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Sample records for accidents dosimetrie biologique

  1. Radio-analysis. Applications: biological dosimetry; Radioanalyse. Applications: dosage biologique

    Bourrel, F. [CEA Saclay, INSTN, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Courriere, Ph. [UFR de Pharmacie, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2003-06-01

    Radioisotopes have revolutionized the medical biology. Radio-immunology remains the reference measurement of the infinitely small in biology. Constant efforts have been performed to improve the simpleness, detectability and fastness of the method thanks to an increasing automation. This paper presents: 1 - the advantages of compounds labelling and the isotopic dilution; 2 - the antigen-antibody system: properties, determination of the affinity constant using the Scatchard method; 3 - radio-immunologic dosimetry: competitive dosimetry (radioimmunoassay), calibration curve and mathematical data processing, application to the free thyroxine dosimetry, immunoradiometric dosimetry (immunoradiometric assay), evaluation of the analytical efficiency of a radioimmunoassay; 4 - detection of the radioactive signal (solid and liquid scintillation). (J.S.)

  2. Nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies.

    Sims, C S

    1989-09-01

    Twenty-two nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies utilizing the fast-pulse Health Physics Research Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducted since 1965. These studies have provided a total of 62 different organizations a forum for discussion of criticality accident dosimetry, an opportunity to test their neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry systems under a variety of simulated criticality accident conditions, and the experience of comparing results with reference dose values as well as with the measured results obtained by others making measurements under identical conditions. Sixty-nine nuclear accidents (27 with unmoderated neutron energy spectra and 42 with eight different shielded spectra) have been simulated in the studies. Neutron doses were in the 0.2-8.5 Gy range and gamma doses in the 0.1-2.0 Gy range. A total of 2,289 dose measurements (1,311 neutron, 978 gamma) were made during the intercomparisons. The primary methods of neutron dosimetry were activation foils, thermoluminescent dosimeters, and blood sodium activation. The main methods of gamma dose measurement were thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiophotoluminescent glass, and film. About 68% of the neutron measurements met the accuracy guidelines (+/- 25%) and about 52% of the gamma measurements met the accuracy criterion (+/- 20%) for accident dosimetry. PMID:2777549

  3. Radiation accidents and dosimetry

    On September 2nd 1982 one of the employees of the gamma-irradiation facility at Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller, Norway entered the irradiation cell with a 65.7 kCi *sp60*Co- source in unshielded position. The victim received an unknown radiation dose and died after 13 days. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy, the radiation dose in this accident was subsequently determined based on the production of longlived free radicals in nitroglycerol tablets borne by the operator during the accident. He used nitroglycerol for heart problems and free radical are easily formed and trapped in sugar which is the main component of the tablets. Calibration experiments were carried out and the dose given to the tablets during the accident was determined to 37.2 +- 0.5 Gy. The general use of free radicals for dose determinations is discussed. (Auth.)

  4. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304... Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to... nuclear accident is possible, shall provide nuclear accident dosimetry for those individuals. (b)...

  5. The Why and How of Nuclear Accident Dosimetry

    The objective of an effective nuclear accident dosimetry programme is to ensure that a means is provided for estimating the gamma neutron dose from a nuclear accident. In this connection, the limitation of the film badge is discussed, in addition to certain accident experiences which demonstrate the need for an effective accident dosimetry programme at facilities having a potential for nuclear accidents. Certain basic parameters should be considered in the development of an effective nuclear accident dosimetry programme. These are (a) a method for screening personnel involved in nuclear accidents, (b) a fixed system (primary unit) capable of determining first collision dose within some established degree of accuracy at its point of location, (c) the need for ''secondary units'', and (d) the need for a device worn by personnel which would afford spectrum and flux information to assist in dose extrapolation from the fixed unit to the location of man. The neutron component of the system should permit flux and spectral information in order to arrive at appropriate quality factors in the dose estimation. Accuracies should be established based upon the current state of the art. The gamma -ray component of the system should permit measuring gamma radiation within the biological area of interest, i. e. from 10 to 103r. Consideration for the number, placement and ease of recovery of accident units are indeed an integral part of an effective system of accident dosimetry. These considerations should enable reasonable data collection across the entire fission spectrum. (author)

  6. The use of a portable electronic device in accident dosimetry.

    Beerten, Koen; Vanhavere, Filip

    2008-01-01

    The use of a portable electronic device in accident dosimetry has been investigated. The thermoluminescence properties of a surface-mount alumina-rich ceramic resonator from a USB flash drive were investigated. The following characteristics were verified: the absence of a zero-dose signal, gamma dose response, dose recycling behaviour, fading and optical bleaching. Finally, this component has been successfully used to determine a simulated accident dose (1 d following the irradiation event). It is concluded that it should be possible to perform rapid and reliable accident dose assessments with such components using conventional thermoluminescence dosimetry equipment. PMID:18703583

  7. The use of a portable electronic device in accident dosimetry

    The use of a portable electronic device in accident dosimetry has been investigated. The thermoluminescence properties of a surface-mount alumina-rich ceramic resonator from a USB flash drive were investigated. The following characteristics were verified: the absence of a zero-dose signal, gamma dose response, dose recycling behaviour, fading and optical bleaching. Finally, this component has been successfully used to determine a simulated accident dose (1 d following the irradiation event). It is concluded that it should be possible to perform rapid and reliable accident dose assessments with such components using conventional thermoluminescence dosimetry equipment. (authors)

  8. Dosimetry

    Eight articles treat the dosimetry. Two articles evaluate the radiation doses in specific cases, dosimetry of patients in radiodiagnosis, three articles are devoted to detectors (neutrons and x and gamma radiations) and a computer code to build up the dosimetry of an accident due to an external exposure. (N.C.)

  9. Dosimetry studies for an industrial radiography accident

    On 5 June 1979, an industrial worker who was not involved with radiography found an 192Ir source that had accidently become detached and lost from its shielded camera. He placed the source in the hip pocket of his coveralls and returned to work, keeping the 192Ir source for some time before taking it to the plant manager. The biophysical calculations for the determination of exposure and depth-dose calculations are the basis for this paper

  10. Performance of the CEDS Accident Dosimetry System at the 1995 Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison

    In July 1995, LANL hosted an accident dosimetry intercomparison. When all reactors on the Oak Ridge Reservation were idled in 1988, the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR), which had been used for 22 previous intercomparisons dating from 1965, was shut down for an indefinite period. The LANL group began characterization of two critical assemblies for dosimetry purposes. As a result, NAD-23 was conceived and 10 DOE facilities accepted invitations to participate in the intercomparison. This report is a summary of the performance of one of the participants, the Centralized External Dosimetry System (CEDS). The CEDS is a cooperative personnel dosimetry arrangement between three DOE sites in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Many successes and failures are reported herein. Generally, the TL dosimeters performed poorly and always over-reported the delivered dose. The TLD processing procedures contain efforts that would lead to large biases in the reported absorbed dose, and omit several key steps in the TLD reading process. The supralinear behavior of lithium fluoride (LiF) has not been characterized for this particular dosimeter and application (i.e., in high-dose mixed neutron/gamma fields). The use of TLD materials may also be precluded given the limitations of the LiF material itself, the TLD reading system, and the upper dose level to which accident dosimetry systems are required to perform as set forth in DOE regulations. The indium foil results confirm the expected inability of that material to predict the magnitude of the wearer's dose reliably, although it is quite suitable as a quick-sort material. Biological sample (hair) results were above the minimum detectable activity (MDA) for only one of the tests. Several questions as to the best methods for sample handling and processing remain

  11. The principles of radioiodine dosimetry following a nuclear accident

    Based upon the experience of radioiodine dosimetry after the Chernobyl accident main principals of radioiodine measurements and dosimetry in thyroid glands of population in case of a radiation accident are discussed in the report. For the correct dose estimation following the radioiodine measurement in the thyroid one should know the ''history'' of radionuclide intake into the body of a contaminated person. So a measurement of radioiodine thyroid content should be accompanied by asking questions of investigated persons about, their life style and feeding after a nuclear incident. These data coincidently with data of radionuclides dynamic in the air and food (especially in milk products) are used for the development of radioiodine intake model and then for thyroid dose estimation. The influence of stable iodine prophylaxis and other countermeasures on values are discussed in dependence on the time of its using. Some methods of thyroid dose reconstruction used after the Chernobyl accident in Russia for a situation of thyroid radioiodine measurements lacking in a contaminated settlement are presented in the report. (author). 16 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  12. Nuclear accident dosimetry studies at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Two critical assemblies have been characterized at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) for use in testing nuclear accident dosimeters and related devices. These device, Godiva IV and SHEBA II, have very different characteristics in both operation and emitted neutron energy spectra. The Godiva assembly is a bare metal fast burst device with a hard spectrum. This spectrum can be modified by use of several shields including steel, concrete, and plexiglas. The modified spectra vary in both average neutron energy and in the specific distribution of the neutron energies in the intermediate energy range. This makes for a very favorable test arrangement as the response ratios between different activation foils used in accident dosimeters are significantly altered such as the ratio between gold, copper, and sulfur elements. The SHEBA device is a solution assembly which has both a slow ramp and decay period and a much softer spectrum. The uncertainly introduced in the response of fast decay foils such as indium can therefore be evaluated into the test results. The neutron energy spectrum for each configuration was measured during low power operations with a multisphere system. These measurements were extended to high dose pulsed operation by use of TLDs moderated TLDs, and special activation techniques. The assemblies were used in the testing of several accident dosimetry devices in studies modeled after the Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Studies that were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for about 25 years using the Health Physics Research Reactor. It is our intention to conduct these studies approximately annually for the evaluation of the nuclear accident dosimeter systems currently in use within the DOE, alternative systems used internationally, and new dosimeter designs being developed or considered for field application. Participation in selected studies will be open to all participants

  13. International intercomparison of criticality accident dosimetry system. SILENE 2002

    Sixty laboratories issued from 29 countries participated in an international intercomparison of criticality accident dosimetry systems, which took place in France in June 2002, at the SILENE reactor and at a pure gamma source. This intercomparison was jointly organised by the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) and the Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) with the help of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and was partly supported by the European Communities. This paper describes the different aspects of this intercomparison. The dosimetric quantities measured and reported by the participants are summarised, analysed and compared to the reference values. (author)

  14. Proceedings of the III international workshop 'Actual problems of dosimetry (15 years after the Chernobyl accident)'

    Materials grouped to three main issues: normative, metrological and technical support of dosimetric and radiometric control; biological dosimetry and markers of radiation effects; monitoring and reconstruction of radiation doses at radiation accidents

  15. Radiation accident dosimetry: TL properties of mobile phone screen glass

    Mobile phones are carried by a large part of the population and previous studies have shown that they may be able to function as individual fortuitous dosimeters in case of radiological accident. This study deals with thermoluminescence (TL) properties of mobile phone screen glass. The presence of a significant background signal which partially overlaps with the radiation-induced signal is a serious issue for dose reconstruction. A mechanical method to reduce this signal using a diamond grinding bit is presented. An over-response at low energy (∼50 keV) is observed for two investigated glasses. The results of a dose recovery test using a single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) procedure are discussed. - Highlights: • Mobile phone screen glass is a promising material for retrospective dosimetry. • The TL non-radiation induced background signal can be significantly reduced by a mechanical method. • A dose recovery test using an SAR procedure was successfully carried out for the investigated glass

  16. Development of a retrospective/fortuitous accident dosimetry service based on OSL of mobile phones

    Work is presented on the development of a retrospective/fortuitous accident dosimetry service using optically stimulated luminescence of resistors found in mobile phones to determine the doses of radiation to members of the public following a radiological accident or terrorist incident. The system is described and discussed in terms of its likely accuracy in a real incident. (authors)

  17. The Hanford Criticality Accident: Dosimetry Techniques, Interpretations and Problems

    The number and integrity of dosimetry techniques used for dose interpretations for the twenty-two personnel involved in the 1962 criticality accident occurring at the Hanford Project were unusually complete. Personnel who received excessive exposures were immediately detected and segregated by monitoring personnel using portable instrumentation for ''quick-sort'' procedures which rely on in vivo measurements of Na24 activation. The close correlation between this rapid method of dose interpretation and subsequent sophisticated laboratory procedures was noted. Primary reliance, however, was placed upon film-badge interpretations, as all persons involved were wearing film badges. An area threshold detector, located within twenty-six feet of the critical vessel, furnished data upon which the neutron spectrum and the gamma to neutron ratios were established. Even with sophisticated and complete dosimetry techniques which were available and which are discussed, including blood and whole-body Na24 activity, excreta and P32 analyses and gold activation, many practical problems became evident. Described are methods or alternatives used to cope with or minimize actual problems including those which could have but did not arise. The ''quick-sort'' in vivo procedures successfully used could have become worthless if interfering external contamination were encountered. Alternatively, blood samples taken at first aid may substitute; however, in the haste of the emergency, anticoagulants may be omitted and subsequent coagulation can produce concern as to the accuracy of the dose interpretations. The film badge can include material of high neutron cross-sections introducing sufficient activity to interfere with film interpretations. The activation of the silver in the film presents a correction factor which can delay and confuse personnel who, under stress, are attempting rapid evaluations. The support provided by fixed detectors still presents the problems that scattering

  18. Eighteenth nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison study: August 10-14, 1981

    The Eighteenth Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted August 10-14, 1981, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Nuclear criticality accidents with three different neutron and gamma ray energy spectra were simulated by operating the Health Physics Research Reactor in the pulse mode. Participants from 13 organizations exposed dosimeters set up as area monitors and mounted on phantoms for personnel monitoring. Analysis of experimental results showed that about 56% of the reported neutron doses measured using foil activation, thermoluminescent, or sodium activation methods and about 53% of the gamma doses measured using thermoluminescent methods met nuclear accident dosimetry guidelines which suggest accuracies of +- 25% for neutron dose and +- 20% for gamma dose. The greatest difficulties in measuring accident doses occurred in radiation fields with large fractions of low energy neutrons and a high gamma component (> 40%). Results of this study indicate that continued accident dosimetry intercomparisons are necessary to test dosimetry systems and training programs are needed to improve the technical competence of evaluating personnel

  19. The program of international intercomparison of accident dosimetry; Le programme d'intercomparaison internationale de dosimetrie d'accident 10-12 juin 2002

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    The French institute of radioprotection and nuclear safety (IRSN) has carried out in June 2002 an international intercomparison program for the testing of the physical and biological accident dosimetry techniques. The intercomparison is jointly organized by the IRSN and the OECD-NEA with the sustain of the European commission and the collaboration of the CEA centre of Valduc (France). About 30 countries have participated to this program. Each country has supplied its own dosimeters and biological samples which have been irradiated using the Silene reactor of CEA-Valduc or a {sup 60}Co source. These experiments allow to test the new dosimetric techniques that have been developed since the previous intercomparison program (1993) and to confirm or improve the performances of older techniques. Aside from the intercomparison exercise, this report makes a status of the known radiological accidents and of the effects of high doses of ionizing radiations on human health (symptoms, therapeutics). It explains the phenomenology of criticality accidents, the prevention means, and the history of such accidents up to the Tokai-Mura one in 1999. Finally, the dosimetry of criticality is presented with its physical and biological techniques. (J.S.)

  20. Nuclear accident dosimetry: Los Alamos measurements at the seventeenth nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison study at the Oak Ridge National Lab., DOSAR Facility, August 1980

    Teams from various US and foreign organizations participated in the Seventeenth Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Study held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) facility August 11 to 15, 1980. Criticality dosimeters were simultaneously exposed to pulses of mixed neutron and gamma radiation from the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR). This report summarizes the experimental work conducted by the Los Alamos team. In-air and phantom measurements were conducted by the Los Alamos team using area and personnel dosimeters. Combined blood sodium and sulfur fluence measurements of absorbed dose were also made. In addition, indium foils placed on phantoms were evaluated for the purpose of screening personnel for radiation exposure. All measurements were conducted for unshielded, 5-cm steel and 20-cm concrete shielding configurations. All participant dosimeters were exposed at 3 m from the center of the HPRR core

  1. OSL and TL of Resistors of Mobile Phones for Retrospective Accident Dosimetry

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (TL) of ubiquitous materials continue to draw wider attention for individual dosimetry in nuclear and radiation accidents. Use of ubiquitous objects for radiation dosimetry is preferred because the affected persons in such unexpected events are usually not covered by personal dosimetry services and do not carry personal dosimeters. Often accident sites do not have area monitoring system in place. As the main concern of the dosimetry is health effects, a quick distinction of level of exposures of the affected persons for the required medical care becomes important in all accidents involving radiation. Both in large scale nuclear accidents such Fukushima, Chernobyl or Hiroshima and Nagasaki where large population around the accident site get exposed to radiation (evacuation is based on doses) and in smaller but panicky events, such as misuse of radiological exposure device (RED), radiological dispersive device (RDD: 'Dirty Bomb'), improvised nuclear device (IND) and deliberate dispersal of radioactive contaminants, a need for an ubiquitous personal dosimeter is well recognized. As biological dosimetry systems are yet to become viable for measurements of doses with required accuracy and speed, use of physical dosimeters is often explored. Among the various types of physical dosimetry systems, use of TL and OSL by processing common material such as bricks or tiles and measuring the doses cumulated for long periods of time has already become an accepted tool for large scale nuclear accidents such as Hiroshima and Nagasaki or Chernobyl involving higher doses. In the other potential cases of unexpected situations where the doses encountered could be much lower (even to escape the range of remotely installed area monitors), the need to measure even the low doses in shortest possible time becomes important. It is often realized that in such situations, the main problem could become the panic at the work place

  2. Using soils for accident dosimetry: a preliminary study using optically stimulated luminescence from quartz

    Fujita, Hiroki; Jain, Mayank; Murray, Andrew S.

    2011-01-01

    . The objective was to assess the potential of SAROSL dosimetry using soils for retrospective assessment of a radiation accident. Variation in dose with depth was also measured. The SAR data showed good reproducibility and dose recovery, and there was no evidence of fading of the quartz signal based on...... “delayed” dose recovery experiments. The minimum detection limit (MDL) dose was about 0.1Gy. The dose dependence was measured using both the above SAR OSL protocol as well as a SAR thermoluminescence (TL, violet emission) protocol. The background doses were generally in the range of the MDL to several Gy......, and no clear trend in dose depth profile was observed. From these results, we conclude that SAR OSL dosimetry using natural quartz extracted from soil could be used to evaluate the dose of an accident....

  3. EPR response characterization of drugs excipients for applying in accident dosimetry

    Some drugs are widely used by the population and can be employed to dose retrospective. The carbohydrates (saccharides), commonly used as excipients in the pharmaceutical industry, produce a quantity of free radicals after gamma irradiation, making them useful for dosimetry in emergency or accident situations that imply in dose evaluation from the materials found nearly or in contact with victims. In general, EPR signal from pulverized pills of some drugs are very complex due to the variety of components in the formulation. Because of this fact, some pharmaceutical excipients identified in the pill composition were also analysed by EPR spectrometry. On the counter drugs were studied: Cebion glucose, AAS, Aspirina, Conmel, Lacto-Purga and sugar substitutive ZeroCal. The excipients were: lactose, amide, anhydrous glucose and magnesium stearate. In some samples the number of radicals produced increased with the dose, showing a linear response for a dose range of interest and an adequate sensibility for dosimetry in accident cases

  4. On the use of new generation mobile phone (smart phone) for retrospective accident dosimetry

    Lee, J. I.; Chang, I.; Pradhan, A. S.; Kim, J. L.; Kim, B. H.; Chung, K. S.

    2015-11-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) characteristics of resistors, inductors and integrated-circuit (IC) chips, extracted from new generation smart phones, were investigated for the purpose of retrospective accident dosimetry. Inductor samples were found to exhibit OSL sensitivity about 5 times and 40 times higher than that of the resistors and the IC chips, respectively. On post-irradiation storage, the resistors exhibited a much higher OSL fading (about 80 % in 36 h as compared to the value 3 min after irradiation) than IC chips (about 20 % after 36 h) and inductors (about 50 % in 36 h). Higher OSL sensitivity, linear dose response (from 8.7 mGy up to 8.9 Gy) and acceptable fading make inductors more attractive for accident dosimetry than widely studied resistors.

  5. Dosimetry of accidents using thermoluminescence of dental restorative porcelains

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of dental restorative porcelain were investigated with the aim of using this material as a TL dosemeter to estimate high doses in radiological accidents. The irradiations were carried out with a 60Co gamma source and X rays with effective energies from 29 to 95 KeV. The samples have a limit of detection at about 50R and their reproducibility is better than 15%. Linearity was observed from 50 to 5000R. (Author)

  6. Nineteenth nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison study, August 9-13, 1982

    The Nineteenth Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was held August 9 to 13, 1982, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the Health Physics Research Reactor operated in the pulse mode to simulate nuclear criticality accidents. Participants from eight organizations measured neutron and gamma doses at air stations and on phantoms for three different shielding conditions. Measured results were compared to nuclear industry guidelines for criticality accident dosimeters which suggest accuracies of +-25% for neutron dose and +-20% for gamma dose. Seventy-two percent of the neutron dose measurements using foil activation, sodium activation, hair sulfur activation, and thermoluminescent methods met the guidelines while less than 40% of the gamma dose measurements were within +-20% of reference values. The softest neutron energy spectrum (also lowest neutron/gamma dose ratio) provided the most difficulty in measuring neutron and gamma doses. Results of this study indicate the need for continued intercomparison and testing of nuclear accident dosimetry systems and for training of evaluating personnel. 14 references, 7 figures, 16 tables

  7. Fading corrections to electronic component substrates in retrospective accident dosimetry

    Accurate and rapid assessments of accidentally accrued radiation doses are imperative so that medical authorities may correctly identify exposed individuals and then counsel and triage them appropriately for treatment. Previous investigations have demonstrated very high dose response efficiencies in a wide range of manufactured insulators, including a variety of alumina ceramics, silicon carbides, aluminum nitrides, and others. Many of these serve as circuit and resistor substrates or encapsulants in modern electronic devices and are generally housed in light-tight enclosures; thus, they could in principle serve as accurate and sensitive dosimeters for the general population, should a need for such dosimetry ever arise. The radiation-induced luminescence signal in alumina porcelain resistor substrates has previously been observed to exhibit anomalous fading when a low-temperature preheat is applied. In this study, measurements were carried out using several preheat temperatures in order to determine whether the unstable component of the OSL signal could be eliminated. It was determined that increasing the preheat temperature has a minimal effect on the signal fading rate but results in significantly decreased sensitivity; therefore, a low-temperature preheat (160 oC) may be more appropriate when maximum sensitivity is required.

  8. ESR accident dosimetry using medicine tablets coated with sugar

    Properties of radiation-induced radicals in medicine tablets were investigated using electron spin resonance (ESR). A sharp ESR signal sensitive to gamma ray irradiation was observed in the sugar coating part of the tablets. The signal has anisotropic g values of g1 = 2.0009, g2 = 2.0007 and g3 = 2.0002. The signal grows linearly with dose at least up to about 20 Gy. No fading was observed at room temperature even when exposed to sunlight. The dose to artificially irradiated tablets was estimated using the signal intensity and a previously determined calibration curve. The signal in sugar coated tablets can be utilised for dose measurements. In particular, the wide distribution of sugar coated tablets allows the use of the tablets as accident dosemeters. (author)

  9. Biological dosimetry following exposure to neutrons in a criticality accident

    Lindholm, C. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, STUK (Finland)); Wojcik, A. (Stockholm Univ. (SU), Stockholm (Sweden)); Jaworska, A. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) (Norway))

    2011-01-15

    The aim of the BIONCA project was to implement cytogenetic techniques for biodosimetry purposes in the Nordic countries. The previous NKS-funded biodosimetry activities (BIODOS and BIOPEX) concentrated on experiments using gamma-irradiation and on developing the PCC ring assay for biodosimetry. Experiments conducted during the present BIONCA project has broadened the biodosimetry capacity of the Nordic countries to include dose estimation of exposure to neutrons for both PCC ring and dicentric chromosome techniques. In 2009, experiments were conducted for establishing both PCC ring and dicentric dose calibration curves. Neutron irradiation of human whole blood obtained from two volunteers was conducted in the Netherlands at the Petten reactor. Cell cultures and analysis of whole blood exposed to eight doses between 0 and 10 Gy were performed for both techniques. For the dicentric assay, excellent uniformity in dose calibration for data from both SU and STUK was observed. For PCC rings, the SU and STUK curves were not equally congruent, probably due to the less uniform scoring criteria. However, both curves displayed strong linearity throughout the dose range. In 2010, an exercise was conducted to simulate a criticality accident and to test the validity of the established dose calibration curves. For accident simulation, 16 blood samples were irradiated in Norway at the Kjeller reactor and analysed for dose estimation with both assays. The results showed that, despite a different com-position of the radiation beams in Petten and Kjeller, good dose estimates were obtained. The activity has provided good experience on collaboration required in radiation emergency situations where the biodosimetry capacity and resources of one laboratory may be inadequate. In this respect, the project has strengthened the informal network between the Nordic countries: STUK, the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, NRPA, the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and SU

  10. Development of New Neutron Detectors for Accident Dosimetry

    New detectors and measuring techniques are proposed to improve the assessment of individual dose received from persons involved in a criticality accident. The aim was to reduce the number of detectors in the conventional detector combinations, to use sensitive activation reactions and to measure the dose of intermediate and fast neutrons directly. The proposed neutron detectors for the dosimeter combination are: (a) Arsenic, to detect slow and intermediate neutrons up to 1 MeV by the 75As(n, y) 76As reaction (half-life of 76As is 26.4 h); (b) Phosphorus, to detect fast neutrons above a threshold of 2 MeV by the 31P (n, γ) 31Si reaction (half-life of 31Si is 2.6 h), and slow neutrons by the 31P(n, γ) 32P reaction (half-life of 32P is 14 d); (d) A polycarbonate detector (Makrofol E) as a nuclear track detector to detect fast neutrons above a threshold of 0.5 MeV by elastic scattering and (n,a) reactions in carbon and oxygen. The S-activity of 76As, 31Si and 32P can be measured directly in As2S3 glass and in phosphate glass by means of the β-induced Cerenkov effect. It uses a liquid scintillation counter set up as for tritium measurements. The calibration of the detectors was performed by calculations of the detector sensitivity for different neutron spectra and by irradiation with different neutron sources at different ctiticality installations. After an accident a first estimation of the neutron dose is obtained by a β-counting of the arsenic phosphate glass, which indicates the surface adsorbed dose or the total neutron fluence directly. It is energy independent over the range of intermediate and fast neutrons. (author)

  11. Accident dosimetry using the TL from dental restoration porcelains

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of dental restorative porcelain were investigated with the aim of using this material as a TL dosemeter to estimate high doses in radiological accidents. The irradiations were carried out with a 60Co gamma source and X rays with effective energies from 29 to 95 keV. The porcelain glow curve presents three peaks at about 393,463 and 543K. The samples have a limit of detection at about 1.29x10-2 C.kg-1(50 R) and their reproducibility is better than 15%. Linearity was observed from 1.29 x 10-2 to 12.9 C.kg-1(50 to 50,000 R). Over this exposure range, the dental porcelain TL response presents a maximum pre-dose sensitisation factor of 2.33. The porcelain TL sensitivity, normalised to 60Co, has a maximum of 4.8 at 29 keV due to its energy dependence. (author)

  12. Preliminary study of ESR dosimetry for nuclear accidents

    Electron spin resonance (RSE) technique was used to detect the ESR signal feature and the relations between signal intensity and irradiation dose of 0-50 Gy of 60Co γ ray for human bone, fingernail, hair and more than ten kinds of people carried materials such as materials from watch, clothes, plastic ball pen, cigarette and so on. The results showed that both bone and watch glass have a good linear relation between signal intensity and irradiation dose. The linear correlation factor γ is 0.995 for bone and 0.999 for watch glass. At room temperature, signal from human bone has excellent stability while watch glass has a decay of about 20% during 24 hours at 24 degree C. The decay rate of watch glass will fall down at lower temperature. The lower limit of detectable dose for these two materials is below 2 Gy. The results suggest that both human bone and watch glass can be applicable as ESR dosimeter materials for nuclear accidents. Other materials investigated in this work still have some problems to be solved for accidental dosimetric use

  13. Biological dosimetry: benefit of a serial biological profile in major radiation accidents; Dosimetrie biologique: interet de l`analyse d`un bilan biologique multiparametrique lors d`une surexposition accidentelle

    Martin, S.; Denis, J.; Agay, D.; Abadie, B.; Serbat, A.; Fatome, M.

    1995-12-31

    Supposing there is, for each irradiated individual, a specific biological profile, the kinetics and multi-parametric statistical analysis of which allows to sort irradiated. The parameters of this serial biological profile were researched using a primate experimental model. A biological profile bas been defined which allows as soon as the 6. hour and during 72 hours, to point out doses > 4 Gy and/or prognosis. (author). 2 refs.

  14. EPR dosimetry of teeth in past and future accidents. A prospective look at a retrospective method

    Accurate assessments of doses received by individuals exposed to radiation from nuclear accidents and incidents such as those at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Nevada test site, Chelyabinsk and Mayak are required for epidemiological studies seeking to establish relationships between radiation dose and health effects. One method of retrospective dosimetry which allows for measurement of cumulative gamma ray doses received by exposed individuals is electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) of tooth enamel. Tooth enamel stores and retains, indefinitely, information on absorbed radiation dose; and teeth are available in every population as a result of dental extraction for medical reasons including periodontal disease and impacted wisdom teeth. In the case of children, deciduous teeth, which are shed between the ages of 7 and 13, can be a very important dosimetric source if documented collection is implemented shortly following an accident. (author)

  15. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Uncertainty assessment for internal dosimetry. Volume 2: Appendices

    Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Harrison, J.D. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA internal dosimetry models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the panel on internal dosimetry, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

  16. Using soils for accident dosimetry. A preliminary study using optically stimulated luminescence from quartz

    Fujita, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Labs.; Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical Univ. of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark). Radiation Research Div.; Jain, M. [Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical Univ. of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark). Radiation Research Div.; Murray, A.S. [Aarhus Univ., Risoe DTU, Roskilde (Denmark). Nordic Lab. for Luminescence Dating

    2011-07-01

    The optimum conditions of preheat temperature, stimulation temperature, etc. in the single-aliquot regenerative optically stimulated luminescence (SAR OSL) method were examined specifically for measuring background dose in natural quartz extracted from soils collected around Tokai-mura in Japan. The objective was to assess the potential of SAROSL dosimetry using soils for retrospective assessment of a radiation accident. Variation in dose with depth was also measured. The SAR data showed good reproducibility and dose recovery, and there was no evidence of fading of the quartz signal based on ''delayed'' dose recovery experiments. The minimum detection limit (MDL) dose was about 0.1 Gy. The dose dependence was measured using both the above SAR OSL protocol as well as a SAR thermoluminescence (TL, violet emission) protocol. The background doses were generally in the range of the MDL to several Gy, and no clear trend in dose depth profile was observed. From these results, we conclude that SAR OSL dosimetry using natural quartz extracted from soil could be used to evaluate the dose of an accident. (orig.)

  17. Personnel Dosimetry for Radiation Accidents. Proceedings of a Symposium on Personnel Dosimetry for Accidental High-Level Exposure to External and Internal Radiation

    Accidents involving the exposure of persons to high levels of radiation have been few in number and meticulous precautions are taken in an effort to maintain this good record. When, however, such an accident does occur, a timely estimate of the dose received can be of considerable help to the physician in deciding whether a particular person requires medical treatment, and in selecting the most appropriate treatment. Individual dosimetry provides the physical basis for relating the observed effects to those in other accident cases, to other human data, and to data from animal experiments, thus providing an important aid to rational treatment and to the accumulation of a meaningful body of knowledge on the subject. It is most important therefore that, where there is a possibility of receiving high-level exposure, methods of personnel dosimetry should be available that would provide the dosimetric information most useful to the physician. Provision of good personnel dosimetry for accidental high-level exposure is in many cases an essential part of emergency planning because the information provided may influence emergency and rescue operations, and can lead to improved accident preparedness. Accordingly, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization jointly organized the Symposium on Personnel Dosimetry for Accidental High-Level Exposure to External and Internal Radiation for the discussion of such methods and for a critical review of the procedures adopted in some of the radiation accidents that have already occurred. The meeting was attended by 179 participants from 34 countries and from five other international organizations. The papers presented and the ensuing discussions are published in these Proceedings. It is hoped that the Proceedings will be of help to those concerned with the organization and development of wide-range personnel monitoring systems, and with the interpretation of the results provided

  18. TL (thermoluminescence) accident dosimetry measurements on samples from the town of Pripyat

    In July 1990, several different types of ceramic samples were collected from the town of Pripyat, situated 3 km NW of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. The samples were distributed among several laboratories for thermoluminescence (TL) measurement to determine the total absorbed gamma dose at different points within a small area in the most polluted region and to assess the shielding given by the walls of buildings to the people inside apartment blocks. This paper discusses the types of samples and their suitability for accident dosimetry, the TL measurements, minimum limits of detection for various types of samples and the strengths and limitations of the method in this type of situation. The implication of the results are discussed. (author)

  19. Thermoluminescence of chip inductors from mobile phones for retrospective and accident dosimetry

    Electronic components in portable electronic devices such as mobile phones and portable media player have previously been shown to be useful tools for retrospective and accident dosimetry. In this study the properties of alumina rich inductors removed from mobile phones are investigated using thermoluminescence (TL). The typical glow curve of this component has two main peaks at 170 and 270 °C. With a suitable measurement protocol sensitivity changes of both peaks could be corrected so that the TL signal shows a linear increase in the investigated dose range from 100 mGy to 5 Gy. All inductors studied showed essentially no signal for zero dose. We investigated the fading of the TL signals and the detection limit of inductors extracted from different mobile phones.

  20. Improvement of dose determination using glass display of mobile phones for accident dosimetry

    Previous studies have demonstrated that mobile phones can be used as suitable emergency dosimeters in case of an accidental radiation overexposure. Glass samples extracted from displays of mobile phones are sensitive to ionizing radiation and can be measured using the thermoluminescence (TL) method. A non-radiation induced background signal (so-called zero dose signal) was observed which overlaps with the radiation induced signal and consequently limits the minimum detectable dose. Investigations of several glasses from different displays showed that it is possible to reduce the zero dose signal up to 90% by etching the glass surface with concentrated hydrofluoric acid. With this approach a reduction of the detection limit of a factor of four, corresponding to approximately 80 mGy, was achieved. Dosimetric properties of etched samples are presented and developed protocols validated by dose recovery tests under realistic conditions. With the improvements in sample preparation the proposed method of dose determination is a competitive alternative to OSL/TL measurements of electronic components and chip cards and provides a useful option for retrospective accident dosimetry. -- Highlights: ► Glass displays from mobile phones have good potential for emergency dosimetry. ► The background signal can be reduced by etching glass samples with hydrofluoric acid. ► The minimum detectable dose can be lowered to approximately 80 mGy

  1. Use of epr-dosimetry of dental enamel for persons exposed to radiation due to the Chernobyl accident

    Technique of epr-dosimetry of dental enamel enabling to measure the accumulated dose equivalents of the external irradiation with the accuracy equal to several sGr limits is studied. The PC code enabling to standardize the spectra processing is elaborated. The code is rather reliable and may be used when elaborating the methodical provision of the activity of the dosimetric services directed to determine the accumulated dose equivalents of the external irradiation using the dental enamel epr-dosimetry technique, in particular, in cases of people affected by the Chernobyl accident

  2. Dosimetry

    The fundamental units of dosimetry are defined, such as exposure rate, absorbed dose and equivalent dose. A table is given of relative biological effectiveness values for the different types of radiation. The relation between the roentgen and rad units is calculated and the concepts of physical half-life, biological half-life and effective half-life are discussed. Referring to internal dosimetry, a mathematical treatment is given to β particle-and γ radiation dosimetry. The absorbed dose is calculated and a practical example is given of the calculation of the exposure and of the dose rate for a gama source

  3. Sandia National Laboratories results for the 2010 criticality accident dosimetry exercise, at the CALIBAN reactor, CEA Valduc France.

    Ward, Dann C.

    2011-09-01

    This document describes the personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) used by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and presents PNAD dosimetry results obtained during the Nuclear Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Study held 20-23 September, 2010, at CEA Valduc, France. SNL PNADs were exposed in two separate irradiations from the CALIBAN reactor. Biases for reported neutron doses ranged from -15% to +0.4% with an average bias of -7.7%. PNADs were also exposed on the back side of phantoms to assess orientation effects.

  4. Contribution of new cytogenetic techniques in the estimations of old irradiations in retrospective biological dosimetry; Apport des nouvelles techniques de cytogenetiques dans l'estimation des irradiations anciennes en dosimetrie biologique retrospective

    Pouzoulet, F

    2007-10-15

    The objective of this study was to answer three questions: if the translocations are steady: the results have shown that the translocations even if they are not obligatory steady can be used in retrospective dosimetry. Furthermore, it appeared important to consider the complex translocations in view of their relative stability and complementary information they bring ( quality of radiation, received dose). The second question is what contribution of the M-F.I.S.H. in the translocations analysis in comparison with the F.I.S.H.-3: we have shown that the M-F.I.S.H. would allow to raise the whole of doubt due to a partial genome observation. that has for effect to increase the precision of the analysis and that what ever be the received dose. The third question is if there are differences between the chromosomal aberrations generated by x radiation of 50 keV and by gamma radiation from cobalt-60: yes, the low energy photons generate more translocations than the photons coming from cobalt-60. But they generate less dicentrics. this difference comes from the way the energy is deposited that leads to a more important formation of complex and multiple translocations with the low energy photons. this could constitute a problem in the use of low energy photons in radiotherapy. it would seem that the simple translocations rate is not influenced by the photons energy. (N.C.)

  5. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge. Air-filled ionisation chamber with very small gap is a simple dosemeter, which fulfills the most desired properties of criticality accident dosemeters. Short ion collection time is achieved by combination of small gap and relatively high polarising voltage. For the same reason, parasitic recombination of ions in the chamber is negligibly small even at high dose rates. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity is small for tissue-equivalent chamber and is expected to become practically negligible when the chamber electrodes are made of polypropylene. Additional capacitor provides a broad measuring range from ∼0.1 Gy up to ∼25 Gy; however, leakage of electrical charge from polarising capacitor has to be observed and taken into account. Periodical re-charging of the device is necessary. Obviously, final test of the device in conditions simulating criticality accident is needed and will be performed as soon as available. (authors)

  6. Photon energy dependence and angular response of glass display used in mobile phones for accident dosimetry

    Previous studies have shown that glass displays extracted from mobile phones are suitable as emergency dosimeters in case of an accidental radiation overexposure using the thermoluminescence (TL) method. So far these studies have focused only on recovering the absorbed dose to the material. However, dose in air or dose to the victim carrying the device might be significantly different. Therefore the aim of this work was to investigate photon energy dependence and angular response of glass display used in modern mobile phones. An over-response of about a factor of five is observed for low photon energies compared to the response to Cs-137 (662 keV) which is in reasonable agreement with calculated values mass energy-absorption coefficients of glass and air. Little variation in the energy dependence can be seen for glass displays coming from three different mobile phone models. The angular response for display glass is flat with regard to air kerma within the incident angle of ±60°, independent of the irradiation setup used (with a water phantom or with air kerma reference conditions). For incident angles of 90° the shielding effect of the mobile phones becomes important. With the dosimetric characterization of the photon energy and angular dependencies the absorbed dose in a glass display can be transferred to a reference air kerma dose and provides a useful option for retrospective accident dosimetry. - Highlights: • Determination of the photon energy dependence and angular response for display glass used as an accident dosimeter. • Over-response of about a factor of five for low photon energies. • Flat angular response within incident angles between ±60°

  7. Thermoluminescence of glass display from mobile phones for retrospective and accident dosimetry

    This paper deals with the thermoluminescence (TL) study of glass displays from mobile phones with the aim to use them as emergency dosimeters after an accident involving ionizing radiation. Dosimetric properties are analysed in order to examine and to critically evaluate the usability. Tests are carried out regarding the characterization of the radiation induced TL signal and the zero dose signal (intrinsic background) on a variety of display samples. Investigations on the thermal and optical stability of TL signals are carried out. The detection limit is mainly determined by the variability of the zero dose signal and lies in the range of 300–400 mGy. A linear relationship between the measured TL signal and the applied dose is observed for doses between 10 mGy and 20 Gy. A measurement protocol for the detection of absorbed radiation dose is developed, considering the experimental dosimetric properties. A reconstruction of the absorbed dose is possible using glass samples from mobile phones, if the signal loss due to storage and optical bleaching of the TL signal is adequately corrected for. This was confirmed by realistic tests. - Highlights: • Glass displays of mobile phones have potential for retrospective dosimetry. • Signal fading can be corrected with an universally fading curve. • Irradiation trials on intact mobile phones demonstrated a reasonable agreement between given and measured dose

  8. An EPR dosimetry method for rapid scanning of children following a radiation accident using deciduous teeth

    Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry may be applied to whole deciduous teeth of children. This makes it feasible to make direct measurement of absorbed gamma ray dose in the days and weeks following a nuclear accident, particularly if used in conjunction with a public awareness program. The technique reported here requires little sample preparation and has resulted in precision of approximately 30 mGy (1 σ) for a deciduous incisor. Under conditions for rapid screening procedures, the methodology is estimated to provide 0.5 Gy accuracy. The largest error in the process is the determination of an appropriate background native signal for subtraction from the whole tooth spectrum. The native signal is superimposed on the radiation-induced signal, and the subtraction requires knowledge of a sample's relative content of enamel and dentin along with their relative native signal intensities. Using a composite background standard, an equivalent absorbed dose of 70 ± 38 mGy (1 σ) was determined. The lower detection limit of the technique was achieved by the elimination of anisotropic effects through rotation of the sample during measurement, together with subtraction of the standard native background signal and empty tube background spectra from the sample spectra

  9. Iodine-129 in soils from Northern Ukraine and the retrospective dosimetry of the iodine-131 exposure after the Chernobyl accident

    Forty-eight soil profiles down to a depth of 40 cm were taken in Russia and Ukraine in 1995 and 1997, respectively, in order to investigate the feasibility of retrospective dosimetry of the 131I exposure after the Chernobyl accident via the long-lived 129I. The sampling sites covered areas almost not affected by fallout from the Chernobyl accident such as Moscow/Russia and the Zhitomir district in Ukraine as well as the highly contaminated Korosten and Narodici districts in Ukraine. 129I was analyzed by radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). 127I was measured for some profiles by RNAA or ion chromatography (IC). The results for 127I demonstrated large differences in the capabilities of the soils to store iodine over long time spans. The depth profiles of 129I and of 137Cs showed large differences in the migration behavior between the two nuclides but also for each nuclide among the different sampling sites. Though it cannot be quantified how much 129I and 137Cs was lost out of the soil columns into deeper depths, the inventories in the columns were taken as proxies for the total inventories. For 129I, these inventories were at least three orders of magnitude higher than a pre-nuclear value of 0.084±0.017 mBq m-2 derived from a soil profile taken in 1939 in Lutovinovo/Russia. From the samples from Moscow and Zhitomir, a pre-Chernobyl 129I inventory of (44±24) mBq m-2 was determined, limiting the feasibility of 129I retrospective dosimetry to areas where the 129I inventories exceed 100 mBq m-2. Higher average 129I inventories in the Korosten and Narodici districts of 130 and 848 mBq m-2, respectively, allowed determination of the 129I fallout due to the Chernobyl accident. Based on the total 129I inventories and on literature data for the atomic ratio of 129I/131I=13.6±2.8 for the Chernobyl emissions and on aggregated dose coefficients for 131I, the thyroid exposure due to 131I after the Chernobyl accident was

  10. ESR Dosimetry

    ESR dosimetry is widely used for several applications such as dose assessment in accidents, medical applications and sterilization of food and other materials. In this work the dosimetric properties of natural and synthetic Hydroxyapatite, Alanine, and 2-Methylalanine are presented. Recent results on the use of a K-Band (24 GHz) ESR spectrometer in dosimetry are also presented

  11. EPR dosimetry of teeth in past and future accidents: a prospective look at a retrospective method

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) of tooth enamel is a relatively new technique for retrospective dosimetry that in the past two years has seen increasing effort towards its development and evaluation. Efforts have centered on determining the accuracy which may be achieved with current measurement techniques as well as the minimum doses detectable. The study was focused on evaluating some factors which influence the accuracy of EPR dosimetry of enamel. Reported are studies on sample intercomparisions, instrumental considerations, and effects of dental x-rays, environmental sunlight and ultraviolet radiation

  12. Application of Radiothermoluminescence to Area Dosimetry in the Event of a Nuclear Accident Covering a Wide Area

    Although numerous systems have been studied and developed for providing γ-ray dosimetry at nuclear facilities in the event of an accident, very few of them are really satisfactory as regards their physical characteristics or the practical conditions under which they are applied. Most of them are not completely insensitive to neutrons and the response has to be corrected if the dose is to be evaluated with accuracy. This presupposes, inter alia, that the incident neutron spectrum is known, since the corrections that have to be made vary with the neutron energy. In most cases the systems require fairly large financial investment and some of them have to be regularly renewed (photographic dosimeters). We considered the possibility of using thermoluminescent materials to make an inexpensive dosimeter possessing low neutron sensitivity. Our choice fell on corundum, which is manufactured industrially and is available on the market at low cost. We analysed the radiothermoluminescent characteristics of the corundum selected by us and compared them to those of commercial lithium fluoride. We determined the practical conditions under which this material can be used. We advocate its use both for area dosimetry at nuclear facilities where there is potential risk of strong irradiation and for problems involving civil defence. (author)

  13. Researches and Applications of ESR Dosimetry for Radiation Accident Dose Assessment

    The aim of this work was to establish methods suitable for practical dose assessment of people involved in ionising radiation accidents. Some biological materials of the human body and materials possibly carried or worn by people were taken as detection samples. By using electron spin resonance (ESR) techniques, the basic dosimetric properties of selected materials were investigated in the range above the threshold dose of human acute haemopoietic radiation syndrome. The dosimetric properties involved included dose response properties of ESR signals, signal stabilities, distribution of background signals, the lowest detectable dose value, radiation conditions, environmental effects on the detecting process, etc. Several practical dose analytical indexes and detecting methods were set up. Some of them (bone, watch glass and tooth enamel) had also been successfully used in the dose assessment of people involved in three radiation accidents, including the Chernobyl reactor accident. This work further proves the important role of ESR techniques in radiation accident dose estimation. (author)

  14. Dosimetry of an accident in mixed field (neutrons, photons) using the spectrometry by electronic paramagnetic resonance(EPR); Dosimetrie d'accident en champ mixte (neutrons, photons) utilisant la spectrometrie par resonance paramagnetique electronique (RPE)

    Herve, M.L

    2006-03-15

    In a radiological accident, the assessment of the dose received by the victim is relevant information for the therapeutic strategy. Two complementary dosimetric techniques based on physical means are used in routine practice in the laboratory: EPR spectroscopy performed on materials removed from the victim or gathered from the vicinity of the victim and Monte Carlo calculations. EPR dosimetry, has been used successfully several times in cases of photon or electron overexposures. Accidental exposure may also occur with a neutron component. The aim of this work is to investigate the potentiality of EPR dosimetry for mixed photon and neutron field exposure with different organic materials (ascorbic acid, sorbitol, glucose, galactose, fructose, mannose, lactose and sucrose). The influence of irradiation parameters (dose, dose rate, photon energy) and of environmental parameters (temperature of heating, light exposure) on the EPR signal amplitude was studied. To assess the neutron sensitivity, the materials were exposed to a mixed radiation field of experimental reactors with different neutron to photon ratios. The relative neutron sensitivity was found to range from 10% to 43% according to the materials. Prior knowledge of the ratio between the dose in samples measured by EPR spectrometry and organ or whole body dose obtained by calculations previously performed for these different configurations, makes it possible to give a first estimation of the dose received by the victim in a short delay. The second aim of this work is to provide data relevant for a quick assessment of the dose distribution in case of accidental overexposure based on EPR measurements performed on one or several points of the body. The study consists in determining by calculation the relation between the dose to the organs and whole body and the dose to specific points of the body, like teeth, bones or samples located in the pockets of victim clothes, for different external exposures corresponding

  15. Dosimetry of an accident in mixed field (neutrons, photons) using the spectrometry by electronic paramagnetic resonance(EPR)

    In a radiological accident, the assessment of the dose received by the victim is relevant information for the therapeutic strategy. Two complementary dosimetric techniques based on physical means are used in routine practice in the laboratory: EPR spectroscopy performed on materials removed from the victim or gathered from the vicinity of the victim and Monte Carlo calculations. EPR dosimetry, has been used successfully several times in cases of photon or electron overexposures. Accidental exposure may also occur with a neutron component. The aim of this work is to investigate the potentiality of EPR dosimetry for mixed photon and neutron field exposure with different organic materials (ascorbic acid, sorbitol, glucose, galactose, fructose, mannose, lactose and sucrose). The influence of irradiation parameters (dose, dose rate, photon energy) and of environmental parameters (temperature of heating, light exposure) on the EPR signal amplitude was studied. To assess the neutron sensitivity, the materials were exposed to a mixed radiation field of experimental reactors with different neutron to photon ratios. The relative neutron sensitivity was found to range from 10% to 43% according to the materials. Prior knowledge of the ratio between the dose in samples measured by EPR spectrometry and organ or whole body dose obtained by calculations previously performed for these different configurations, makes it possible to give a first estimation of the dose received by the victim in a short delay. The second aim of this work is to provide data relevant for a quick assessment of the dose distribution in case of accidental overexposure based on EPR measurements performed on one or several points of the body. The study consists in determining by calculation the relation between the dose to the organs and whole body and the dose to specific points of the body, like teeth, bones or samples located in the pockets of victim clothes, for different external exposures corresponding

  16. Risk communication practice after the Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident. Awareness of Fukushima residents in internal dosimetry

    This paper describes an analysis result of the opinion surveys that was carried out in internal dosimetry using whole body counters (WBC) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) Tokai Research and Development Center. At the request of Fukushima prefecture, JAEA has conducted the internal dosimetry for residents of Fukushima prefecture since July 2011. As of March 2013, JAEA screened approximately 22,000 residents. JAEA staffs do not only explained the examination results of WBC to the residents in private booths, but also provided necessary advice for them. We carried out the opinion surveys before the internal dosimetry and after personal dialogue. The purpose of these surveys was grasp of the views of residents on the nuclear accidents before the internal dosimetry and investigation of attitude change of the examinee after the personal dialogue. The survey before the internal dosimetry showed that residents' anxiety about radioactive exposure, hereditary influence on next generation, damage for primary industries by harmful rumor, and so on. In the survey after the personal dialogue, more than 90% examinee express reduction of uneasiness for the radiation damage by the dialogue with JAEA staffs. This analysis result elucidates validity of the direct dialogue with professional stuffs on the decrease of anxiety about radioactive problem. (author)

  17. On the use of OSL of wire-bond chip card modules for retrospective and accident dosimetry

    The potential of optically stimulated luminescence of wire-bond chip card modules, used in health insurance, ID, cash and credit cards for retrospective and accident dosimetry is investigated. Chip card modules obtained directly from the producer, using a widely spread UV-cured epoxy product for encapsulation, are used as basis for the study. The radiation sensitivity is due to silica grains added to the epoxy for controlling the thixotropic properties. Luminescence properties are complex due to the presumed thermo-optical release of electrons from the epoxy and transfer into the silica. Best results and highest sensitivity are obtained by using no or only low preheat treatments. A high degree of fading of the OSL signal during storage at room temperature is observed, which is tentatively explained by the superposition of thermal decay of shallow OSL traps and athermal (anomalous) decay of deeper OSL traps. The dose response of the OSL signal shows exponentially saturating behaviour, with saturation doses of 77 Gy or 9.6 Gy, depending on pretreatment. Dose recovery tests show that given doses can be recovered within a deviation of ±14%, if measured signals are corrected for fading. The minimum detectable dose is estimated at ∼3 mGy, ∼10 mGy and ∼20 mGy for readouts immediately, 1 day and 10 days after exposure, respectively.

  18. On the use of OSL of wire-bond chip card modules for retrospective and accident dosimetry

    Woda, Clemens [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)], E-mail: clemens.woda@helmholtz-muenchen.de; Spoettl, Thomas [Infineon Technologies AG, Wernerwerkstrasse 1, D-93049 Regensburg (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    The potential of optically stimulated luminescence of wire-bond chip card modules, used in health insurance, ID, cash and credit cards for retrospective and accident dosimetry is investigated. Chip card modules obtained directly from the producer, using a widely spread UV-cured epoxy product for encapsulation, are used as basis for the study. The radiation sensitivity is due to silica grains added to the epoxy for controlling the thixotropic properties. Luminescence properties are complex due to the presumed thermo-optical release of electrons from the epoxy and transfer into the silica. Best results and highest sensitivity are obtained by using no or only low preheat treatments. A high degree of fading of the OSL signal during storage at room temperature is observed, which is tentatively explained by the superposition of thermal decay of shallow OSL traps and athermal (anomalous) decay of deeper OSL traps. The dose response of the OSL signal shows exponentially saturating behaviour, with saturation doses of 77 Gy or 9.6 Gy, depending on pretreatment. Dose recovery tests show that given doses can be recovered within a deviation of {+-}14%, if measured signals are corrected for fading. The minimum detectable dose is estimated at {approx}3 mGy, {approx}10 mGy and {approx}20 mGy for readouts immediately, 1 day and 10 days after exposure, respectively.

  19. Planned Procedures for Fast Determination of Radiation Levels and Personnel Dosimetry in Connection with Radiological Accidents

    AB Atomenergi, Sweden, has an emergency organization which starts to function as soon as an alarm indicates that an extraordinary situation with considerable radiation hazards has occurred. This organization is operating from a headquarters where equipment is stored and different types of internal and external communications are available. As to determination of exposures, it is desirable both to obtain rough preliminary values for external and internal exposure rates as soon as possible and to get fairly accurate values for the exposure of each individual involved in the accident within reasonable time. Dose reconnaissance patrols make rapid surveys of the site to get a general estimate of the risks. These patrols start out immediately after the alarm equipped with portable instruments and go by car along fixed routes on the site. Practical tests have shown that results from these patrols reach the headquarters within 10 to 15 minutes after the alarm and make it possible to get a good picture of radiation levels inside and outside different buildings. The portable equipment includes air sampling equipment with very short sampling time working on the principle of the air ejector. Individual external doses are evaluated on the basis of film exposures, criticality dosimeter activation and analyses of hair and blood activity. Internal contamination is determined by whole-body counting and radiometric analyses of excreta. In order to determine the radiation fields created by an accident a number of fixed control points are equipped with different types of dosimeters which also are evaluated as soon as possible after the hypothetical accident. (author)

  20. Electron spin resonance dosimetry of teeth of Goiania radiation accident victims

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to assess absorbed doses of six teeth belonging to victims of the highly irradiated group of Goiania accident. The influence of the broad background signal at g=2.0040 as well as of the unstable fraction of CO-2 radicals was taken into account in dose estimates. Three victims teeth showed absorbed doses comparable to those estimated by chromosomal analysis. For the other three teeth, the doses were higher by a factor of 1.3, 1.8 and 2.2

  1. LLNL Results from CALIBAN-PROSPERO Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Experiments in September 2014

    Lobaugh, M. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hickman, D. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wong, C. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wysong, A. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Merritt, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heinrichs, D. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Topper, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-21

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses thin neutron activation foils, sulfur, and threshold energy shielding to determine neutron component doses and the total dose from neutrons in the event of a nuclear criticality accident. The dosimeter also uses a DOELAP accredited Panasonic UD-810 (Panasonic Industrial Devices Sales Company of America, 2 Riverfront Plaza, Newark, NJ 07102, U.S.A.) thermoluminescent dosimetery system (TLD) for determining the gamma component of the total dose. LLNL has participated in three international intercomparisons of nuclear accident dosimeters. In October 2009, LLNL participated in an exercise at the French Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission- CEA) Research Center at Valduc utilizing the SILENE reactor (Hickman, et.al. 2010). In September 2010, LLNL participated in a second intercomparison at CEA Valduc, this time with exposures at the CALIBAN reactor (Hickman et al. 2011). This paper discusses LLNL’s results of a third intercomparison hosted by the French Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety- IRSN) with exposures at two CEA Valduc reactors (CALIBAN and PROSPERO) in September 2014. Comparison results between the three participating facilities is presented elsewhere (Chevallier 2015; Duluc 2015).

  2. The new approach of the radiological emergency response team at the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission's Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry after the Goiania accident

    The evaluation of the emergency actions taken during the Goiania accident caused a complete revision of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission's Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry Emergency Response Team. The changes were in both the scope of the emergency responsibilities and in the organization of the emergency team. This new organization permits an emergency response to accidents in nuclear installations such as nuclear reactors or fuel cycle facilities, or accidents involving radiation sources in hospitals, industry, etc. The organization takes into account all the emergency phases, with emphasis on a quick response in the initial phase. Of a total emergency team of one hundred and four people, there are twenty-six members on call twenty-four hours a day. (author). 1 fig

  3. Subsidies to cytogenetic dosimetry technique generated from analysis of results of Goiania radiological accident

    Following the Goiania radiation accident, which occurred in September of 1987, peripheral lymphocytes from 129 exposed or potentially exposed individuals were analyzed for the frequency of unstable chromosomal aberrations (dicentrics and centric rings) to estimate absorbed radiation dose. During the emergency period, the doses were assessed to help immediate medical treatment. After this initial estimation, doses were reassessed using in vitro calibration curves produced after the accident, more suitable for the conditions prevailing in Goiania. Dose estimates for 24 subjects exceeded 0,5 Gy. Among those, 15 individuals exceeded 1,0 Gy and 5 exceeded 3,0 Gy. None of the estimates exceeded 6,0 Gy. Four of the subjects died. During the emergency period, a cytogenetic follow-up of 14 of the exposed patients was started, aiming to observe the mean lifetime of lymphocytes containing dicentric and ring aberrations. The results suggest that for the highly exposed individuals the disappearance rate of unstable aberrations follows a two- term exponential function. Up to 470 days after the exposure, there is a rapid fall in the aberration frequency. After 470 days, the disappearance rate is very slow, almost constant. The estimated average half-time of elimination of dicentrics and rings among the highly exposed group (> 1 Gy) was 140 days for the initial period after the exposure (up to 470 days). This value is significantly shorter than the usually accepted value of 3 years reported in the literature. Mean disappearance functions of unstable chromosome aberrations were inferred, to be applied in accident situations in which there is a blood sampling delay. Statistical analysis of possible correlations between the individual half-times and biological parameters, such as sex, age, leukopenia level shown during the critical period, absorbed dose (initial frequency of chromosomal aberrations) and the administration of the bone marrow stimulating factor (rHuGM-CSF) was

  4. Optically stimulated luminescence of electronic components for forensic, retrospective, and accident dosimetry

    This study investigated the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) response of electronic components found within portable electronic devices such as cell phones and pagers, portable computers, music and video players, global positioning system receivers, cameras, and digital watches. The analysis of components extracted from these ubiquitous devices was proposed for applications ranging from rapid accident dose reconstruction to the tracking and attribution of gamma-emitting radiological materials. Surface-mount resistors with alumina porcelain substrates consistently produced OSL following irradiation, with minimum detectable doses on the order of 10 mGy for a typical sample. Since the resistor ceramics were found to exhibit anomalous fading, dose reconstruction procedures were developed to correct for this using laboratory measurements of fading rates carried out over approximately 3 months. Two trials were conducted in which cellular phones were affixed to an anthropomorphic phantom and irradiated using gamma-ray sources; ultimately, analysis of the devices used in these trials succeeded in reconstructing doses in the range of 0.1-0.6Gy

  5. Dosimetry of criticality accidents using activations of the blood and hair

    The radiation dose received by a person in a criticality accident can be determined with reasonable accuracy from the activity induced in the blood or in the hair. However, both of these methods require a knowledge of the neutron spectra and the exposure conditions. In this report we have compiled results from numerous criticality studies to serve as a guide for neutron dose evaluations based on blood and hair activation. A technique is described in which a combination of these blood and hair activations can be used to determine the neutron dose. This evaluation technique is independent of the person's orientation, shielding provided by walls, equipment, etc. (except for massive shielding by metals), and the neutron leakage spectra. The technique will improve the accuracy of the dose determination, especially if there is little information available on the exposure conditions. This estimate is normally accurate to within +-20 to 30%. This paper also discusses the gamma-to-neutron ratio and its use in establishing the gamma dose (if no gamma exposure data is available) or the neutron dose (if the gamma exposure is known). The use of a G-M instrument at the abdomen is discussed and curves are given to convert the G-M readings to neutron dose. A simplified counting procedure for hair activation is recommended. (author)

  6. La Chimie Biologique Industrielle à Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech

    Berchem, Thomas; Istasse, Thibaut; Schmetz, Quentin; Jacquet, Nicolas; Richel, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Présentation du laboratoire de Chimie Biologique Industrielle et illustration de nos principales activités; point sur les recherches de trois jeunes doctorants. Leur travail consiste en la valorisation de matrices biologiques (déchets agricoles, industriels et forestiers,...) pour produire une gamme de nouveaux produits, biocarburants ou molécules chimiques.

  7. Guerre Biologique: mythe et réalité

    2002-01-01

    Olivier Lepick, docteur en histoire et politique internationales, est chercheur associé à la Fondation pour la recherche stratégique. Il est l'Auteur du livre Les armes biologiques P.U.F, avril 2001

  8. Qualité des produits biologiques d’origine animale

    Kouba, Marilyne

    2002-01-01

    L’appellation biologique pour un produit garantit un mode de production selon la réglementation spécifique à l’agriculture biologique. Il existe en effet un Règlement Européen pour les Productions Animales Biologiques, appelé REPAB, dont l’application dans le droit français (en date du 24 août 2000) a fait l’objet de contraintes supplémentaires : c’est le CC REPAB F. Il existe une forte demande en produits biologiques dans les pays industrialisés. Il est par conséquent important de considérer...

  9. BiodosEPR-2006 Meeting: Acute dosimetry consensus committee recommendations on biodosimetry applications in events involving uses of radiation by terrorists and radiation accidents

    In the aftermath of a radiological terrorism incident or mass-casualty radiation accident, first responders and receivers require prior guidance and pre-positioned resources for assessment, triage and medical management of affected individuals [NCRP, 2005. Key elements of preparing emergency responders for nuclear and radiological terrorism. NCRP Commentary No. 19, Bethesda, Maryland, USA]. Several recent articles [Dainiak, N., Waselenko, J.K., Armitage, J.O., MacVittie, T.J., Farese, A.M., 2003. The hematologist and radiation casualties. Hematology (Am. Soc. Hematol. Educ. Program) 473-496; Waselenko, J.K., MacVittie, T.J., Blakely, W.F., Pesik, N., Wiley, A.L., Dickerson, W.E., Tsu, H., Confer, D.L., Coleman, C.N., Seed, T., Lowry, P., Armitage, J.O., Dainiak, N., Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group, 2004. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome: recommendations of the Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group. Ann. Intern. Med. 140(12), 1037-1051; Blakely, W.F., Salter, C.A., Prasanna, P.G., 2005. Early-response biological dosimetry-recommended countermeasure enhancements for mass-casualty radiological incidents and terrorism. Health Phys. 89(5), 494-504; Goans, R.E., Waselenko, J.K., 2005. Medical management of radiation casualties. Health Phys. 89(5), 505-512; Swartz, H.M., Iwasaki, A., Walczak, T., Demidenko, E., Salikhov, I., Lesniewski, P., Starewicz, P., Schauer, D., Romanyukha, A., 2005. Measurements of clinically significant doses of ionizing radiation using non-invasive in vivo EPR spectroscopy of teeth in situ. Appl. Radiat. Isot. 62, 293-299; . Acute radiation injury: contingency planning for triage, supportive care, and transplantation. Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant. 12(6), 672-682], national [. Management of persons accidentally contaminated with radionuclides. NCRP Report No. 65, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; . Management of terrorist events involving radioactive material. NCRP Report No. 138, Bethesda, Maryland

  10. BiodosEPR-2006 Meeting: Acute dosimetry consensus committee recommendations on biodosimetry applications in events involving uses of radiation by terrorists and radiation accidents

    Alexander, George A. [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Preparedness and Emergency Operations, 200 Independence Avenue, SW, Room 403B-1, Washington, DC 20201 (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Dept. of Radiology and Physiology Dept., Dartmouth Medical School, HB 7785, Vail 702, Rubin 601, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Amundson, Sally A. [Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 W. 168th Street, VC11-215, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Blakely, William F. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)], E-mail: blakely@afrri.usuhs.mil; Buddemeier, Brooke [Science and Technology, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DC 20528 (United States); Gallez, Bernard [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit and Lab. of Medicinal Chemistry and Radiopharmacy, Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Dainiak, Nicholas [Dept. of Medicine, Bridgeport Hospital, 267 Grant Street, Bridgeport, CT 06610 (United States); Goans, Ronald E. [MJW Corporation, 1422 Eagle Bend Drive, Clinton, TN 37716-4029 (United States); Hayes, Robert B. [Remote Sensing Lab., MS RSL-47, P.O. Box 98421, Las Vegas, NV 89193 (United States); Lowry, Patrick C. [Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), Oak Ridge Associated Universities, P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 (United States); Noska, Michael A. [Food and Drug Administration, FDA/CDRH, 1350 Piccard Drive, HFZ-240, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Okunieff, Paul [Dept. of Radiation Oncology (Box 647), Univ. of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Salner, Andrew L. [Helen and Harry Gray Cancer Center, Hartford Hospital, 80 Seymour Street, Hartford, CT 06102 (United States); Schauer, David A. [National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 400, Bethesda, MD 20814-3095 (United States)] (and others)

    2007-07-15

    In the aftermath of a radiological terrorism incident or mass-casualty radiation accident, first responders and receivers require prior guidance and pre-positioned resources for assessment, triage and medical management of affected individuals [NCRP, 2005. Key elements of preparing emergency responders for nuclear and radiological terrorism. NCRP Commentary No. 19, Bethesda, Maryland, USA]. Several recent articles [Dainiak, N., Waselenko, J.K., Armitage, J.O., MacVittie, T.J., Farese, A.M., 2003. The hematologist and radiation casualties. Hematology (Am. Soc. Hematol. Educ. Program) 473-496; Waselenko, J.K., MacVittie, T.J., Blakely, W.F., Pesik, N., Wiley, A.L., Dickerson, W.E., Tsu, H., Confer, D.L., Coleman, C.N., Seed, T., Lowry, P., Armitage, J.O., Dainiak, N., Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group, 2004. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome: recommendations of the Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group. Ann. Intern. Med. 140(12), 1037-1051; Blakely, W.F., Salter, C.A., Prasanna, P.G., 2005. Early-response biological dosimetry-recommended countermeasure enhancements for mass-casualty radiological incidents and terrorism. Health Phys. 89(5), 494-504; Goans, R.E., Waselenko, J.K., 2005. Medical management of radiation casualties. Health Phys. 89(5), 505-512; Swartz, H.M., Iwasaki, A., Walczak, T., Demidenko, E., Salikhov, I., Lesniewski, P., Starewicz, P., Schauer, D., Romanyukha, A., 2005. Measurements of clinically significant doses of ionizing radiation using non-invasive in vivo EPR spectroscopy of teeth in situ. Appl. Radiat. Isot. 62, 293-299; . Acute radiation injury: contingency planning for triage, supportive care, and transplantation. Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant. 12(6), 672-682], national [. Management of persons accidentally contaminated with radionuclides. NCRP Report No. 65, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; . Management of terrorist events involving radioactive material. NCRP Report No. 138, Bethesda, Maryland

  11. Modern methods of personnel dosimetry

    The physical properties of radiation detectors for personnel dosimetry are described and compared. The suitability of different types of dosimeters for operational and central monitoring of normal occupational exposure, for accident and catastrophe dosimetry and for background and space-flight dosimetry is discussed. The difficulties in interpreting the dosimeter reading with respect to the dose in individual body organs are discussed briefly. 430 literature citations (up to Spring 1966) are given

  12. Retrospective Dosimetry and Clinical Follow-up Programme of Chernobyl Accident Clean-up Workers in Latvia

    Full text: About 6500 Latvian inhabitants were recruited for clean-up works at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant during 1986-1991. Absorbed doses for them are usually unknown, because only less then half of the clean-up workers cohort had officially documented external exposure. Clinical investigations show high morbidity rate of clean-up workers compared with general population. The results of Electronic Spin Resonance (ESR) dose reconstruction (doses absorbed in the tooth enamel) for the clean-up workers were always higher as documented of exposure doses of physical measurements. In many cases more than half of total absorbed dose is due to 90Sr accumulated in teeth. Most of the clean-up workers have poli-symptomatic sicknesses that exhibit tendency to progress, and their morbidity exceeds that observed in general population. ESR dosimetry programs and clinical follow-up improved existing knowledge in the field of radiation medicine. These data will help to develop and apply the proper treatment and rehabilitation procedures for clean-up workers. (author)

  13. Alpha alumina exoemissive and thermoluminescent properties. Application to the dosimetry of ionizing radiations in case of accident

    This work consists of two parts. In the first part, a phenomenon of phototransfer in Thermostimulated Exoelectronic Emission (T.S.E.E.) is pointed out. Study of intrinsic T.S.E.E. of alpha alumina exposed to ultraviolet (U.V.) excitation of energy superior to 4 eV shows three T.S.E.E. peaks situated at 240, 325, 5350C (heating rate of 20C.s-1). The phototransfer phenomenon is then characterized notably by the lowering of the U.V. excitation threshold to 3.5 eV and the increasing of T.S.E.E. response for U.V. energies between 3.5 and 6 eV. Discussion and interpretation of the results obtained are based on the perfect analogy with the phototransfer of Thermoluminescence (T.L.) observed on a similar type of alpha alumina. The second part describes the application of alpha alumina dosimetric properties to accidental irradiation dosimetry and cartography. The material is bound to a textile support to be used for clothes manufacturing for irradiation risking workers. T.S.E.E. and T.L. properties of the selected fabric have been studied. - T.S.E.E. response to a beta irradiation of strontium 90 covers the region [0.01 - 10 Gy], with a dispersion of ± 20%, a non significant thermic fading beyond 72 hours after irradiation and a very important optical fading; - the region in T.L. extends from 0.25 to 10 Gy with X irradiation (45 kV) and from 0.5 to 10 Gy with gamma irradiation of cobalt 60 and caesium 137; the dispersion is ± 20%, the thermic fading is weak and the optical fading is negligible in artificial light or does not vary any more after 5 days of sunlight exposition

  14. Proceedings of the international workshop 'Actual problems of dosimetry'

    Materials grouped to six main issues: dosimetry and radiometry equipment, dosimetry of the medical irradiation, standard and metrology support of dosimetric and radiometric control, biological dosimetry and markers of radiation effects, monitoring and reconstruction of radiation doses at radiation accidents and dosimetry of unionizing radiations

  15. Thermoluminescence Dosimetry Applied to Radiation Protection

    Christensen, Poul; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars; Majborn, Benny

    1982-01-01

    This is a general review of the present state of the development and application of thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) for radiation protection purposes. A description is given of commonly used thermoluminescent dosimeters and their main dosimetric properties, e.g. energy response, dose range......, fading, and LET dependence. The applications of thermoluminescence dosimetry in routine personnel monitoring, accident dosimetry, u.v. radiation dosimetry, and environmental monitoring are discussed with particular emphasis on current problems in routine personnel monitoring. Finally, the present state...

  16. Internal dosimetry for continuous chronic intake of caesium-137 in cedar pollen after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident

    Internal exposures of members of the public were assessed for chronic intake of caesium-137 in cedar pollen after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. Committed effective doses were evaluated using the DSYS-chronic code, which was developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter (AMAD) and particle density for cedar pollen were assumed to be 32 μm and 0.7 g·cm-3, respectively. The observation period was from early February to the end of May, 2012. It was found that the committed effective doses for adults in Fukushima, Ibaraki, and Tokyo were 1.6-1.8×10-3 μSv, 4.5×10-4 μSv, and 3.0×10-4 μSv, respectively. Hence, it can be stated that internal doses from chronic intake of caesium-137 in cedar pollen were insignificant in 2012. In addition, retention and excretion functions for caesium-137 in the whole body were found to be dependent on the times of intake and the fractional activity related to chronic intake. (author)

  17. Radioiodine dosimetry and prediction of consequences of thyroid exposure of the Russian population following the Chernobyl accident

    In the early period after the Chernobyl accident, analysis of patterns of 131I exposure of the human thyroid showed that contaminated milk was the basic source of 131I intake among the inhabitants of Russia. The equipment and techniques used for measurement of the 131I content in the thyroids of these individuals are described in this work. A model of the 131I intake, taking into account protective actions, and a method of thyroid dose calculation are discussed. The mean thyroid dose and frequency distributions of the thyroid doses to inhabitants of towns and villages of the Bryansk, Tula and Orel regions of Russia are presented. The mean dose to the thyroids of children living in the villages was 2 to 5 times higher than the dose to adult thyroids; for children living in the towns, the mean dose was 1.5 to 12 times higher. The mean thyroid mass in adult inhabitants of the Bryansk region was 27 g, which exceeded the value for a standard man (20 g) and was taken into account in the dosimetric calculations. The technique for reconstructing the mean and individual thyroid doses was based on the correlation between thyroid dose and several parameters: Surface 137Cs activity in soil, dose rate in air in May of 1986, 131I content in local milk, milk consumption rate, and 134Cs + 137Cs content in the body. The collective thyroid dose to inhabitants of the most contaminated regions of Russia is estimated and a thyroid cancer rate prognosis is derived. The need for intensified medical care for the critical group - children of preschool age during 1986 - is based on a significant increase in the number of projected thyroid cancers and adenomas. 32 refs., 10 figs., 15 tabs

  18. Results from 2010 Caliban Criticality Dosimetry Intercomparison

    The external dosimetry program participated in a criticality dosimetry intercomparison conducted at the Caliban facility in Valduc, France in 2010. Representatives from the dosimetry and instrumentation groups were present during testing which included irradiations of whole-body beta/gamma (HBGT) and neutron thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD), electronic alarming dosimeters, and a humanoid phantom filled with reference man concentrations of sodium. This report reviews the testing procedures, preparations, irradiations, and presents results of the tests.

  19. Radiation dosimetry

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  20. Dosimetry Service

    2004-01-01

    We wish to remind the people who are invited to the dosimetry service to exchange the new CERN dosimeter that the hours are from Monday to Friday 8.30 to 11.00 and 14.00 to 16.00. http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/

  1. Methods and procedures for internal radiation dosimetry at ORNL

    Procedures, methods, materials, records, and reports used for accomplishing the personnel, internal radiation monitoring program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described for the purpose of documenting what is done now for future reference. This document does not include procedures for nuclear accident dosimetry except insofar as routine techniques may apply also to nuclear accident dosimetry capability

  2. Dosimetry Service

    2006-01-01

    Cern Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page: http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 - 12.00. Closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after the use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel. 7 2155 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  3. Agriculture biologique et génie génétique

    Nowack Heimgartner, Karin; Bickel, Regula; Wyss, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Ce dossier explique pourquoi l'agriculture biologique renonce aux organismes génétiquement modifiés (OGM). Il décrit dans quelles circonstances les produits biologiques peuvent être contaminés par des OGM et les mesures à prendre pour éviter de tels incidents. Ces conseils sont complétés par une analyse de la situation actuelle. Un glossaire définit les principaux termes utilisés.

  4. Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once a month. Regular read-outs are vital to ensure that your personal dose is periodically monitored. Dosimeters should be read even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Dosimetry Service - Tel. 72155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  5. Dosimetry Service

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once a month. Regular read-outs are vital to ensure that your personal dose is periodically monitored. Dosimeters should be read even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Dosimetry Service Tel. 7 2155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  6. Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once a month. Regular read-outs are vital to ensure that your personal dose is periodically monitored. Dosimeters should be read even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Dosimetry Service - Tel. 7 2155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  7. Arboriculture biologique : 11 années d'expérimentation en vergers de pêchers et pommiers

    Simon, Sylvaine; BUSSI, Claude; Girard, Thierry; Corroyer, Nathalie; Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique UE 0695 Unité Expérimentale Recherches Intégrées - Gotheron; Agribiodrôme; Groupe de Recherche en Agriculture Biologique

    2006-01-01

    Un programme de recherche a été conduit en arboriculture biologique pendant 11 ans (1994-2004) à l'unité expérimentale INRA (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique) de Gotheron dans le Sud-Est de la France, en partenariat avec Agribiodrôme (F-26150 Die), association de développement de l'Agriculture Biologique (AB) en Drôme et le GRAB (Groupe de Recherche en Agriculture Biologique, F-84911 Avignon). Les objectifs étaient : (i) acquérir des références en arboriculture biologique ; (ii) ...

  8. Electron paramagnetic resonance technique for radiation dosimetry: emerging trends for laboratory and accidental dosimetry

    The applications of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) for radiation dosimetry are briefly reviewed. In particular, EPR-alanine dosimetry and accidental dosimetry using EPR signals from human tooth enamel have been discussed. The alanine dosimetry was found to be useful from low doses such as 1 Gy to high doses such as 100 kGy. The signals from tooth enamel are found to be invaluable in assessing the absorbed dose of people exposed to radiation accidents and also survivors of atomic bomb explosions. New emerging trends using EPR signals from bones exposed to radiation have also been briefly reviewed. (author)

  9. Retrospective reconstruction of emergency dose exposed to the population of belarus affected by the Chernobyl accident by the method of tooth enamel epr dosimetry

    An approach to the retrospective reconstruction of emergency doses for EPR of tooth enamel was developed, which allows to take into account the contribution to the dose load of side electromagnetic radiation (background radiation, medical X-rays, ultraviolet light) and the mechanical effect of dental borers on enamel during dental treatment. It was found that the highest emergency doses of radiation were received by the liquidators in 1986 accident involvement, then in a descending order by the citizens of areas with soil contamination of 137Cs 15-40, 5-15 and 1-5 Ci/km2 (authors)

  10. Dosimetry Service

    Dosimetry Service

    2004-01-01

    We wish to remind the people who are invited to the dosimetry service to exchange the new CERN dosimeter that the hours are from Monday to Friday 8:30 to 11:00 and 14:00 to 16:00. For all other services we are at your disposition from 8:30 to 12:00 and 14:00 to 17:00. Do not forget to read your dosimeter. A regular read-out is indispensable in order to ensure a periodic monitoring of personal dose. This read-out should be done during the first week of every month. Thank you for your cooperation. The personnel of the Dosimetry Service wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Dosimetry Service Tel. 767 21 55 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  11. Dosimetry methods

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, A.; Kovacs, A.; Mehta, K. K.

    Chemical and physical radiation dosimetry methods, used for the measurement of absorbed dose mainly during the practical use of ionizing radiation, are discussed with respect to their characteristics and fields of application.......Chemical and physical radiation dosimetry methods, used for the measurement of absorbed dose mainly during the practical use of ionizing radiation, are discussed with respect to their characteristics and fields of application....

  12. Dosimetry Service

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once every month. A regular read-out is indispensable to ensure periodic monitoring of your personal dose. You must read your dosimeter even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Film badges are no longer valid at CERN and holders of film badges are no longer allowed to enter the controlled radiation areas or work with a source. Dosimetry Service Tel. 72155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  13. Accidents - Chernobyl accident; Accidents - accident de Tchernobyl

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This file is devoted to the Chernobyl accident. It is divided in four parts. The first part concerns the accident itself and its technical management. The second part is relative to the radiation doses and the different contaminations. The third part reports the sanitary effects, the determinists ones and the stochastic ones. The fourth and last part relates the consequences for the other European countries with the case of France. Through the different parts a point is tackled with the measures taken after the accident by the other countries to manage an accident, the cooperation between the different countries and the groups of research and studies about the reactors safety, and also with the international medical cooperation, specially for the children, everything in relation with the Chernobyl accident. (N.C.)

  14. Report on external occupational dosimetry in Canada

    In light of the new recommendations of the ICRP in Report 60 on dose quantities and dose limits, this working group was set up to examine the implications for external dosimetry in Canada. The operational quantities proposed by the ICRU are discussed in detail with regard to their applicability in Canada. The current occupational dosimetry services available in Canada are described as well as the several performance intercomparisons that have been carried out within the country as well as internationally. Recommendations are given with respect to standards for dosimetry, including accuracy and precision. More practical advice is given on the choice of dosimeter to use for external dosimetry, frequency of monitoring, and who should be monitored. Specific advice is given on the monitoring of pregnant workers and problem of non-uniform irradiation. Accident and emergency dosimetry are dealt with briefly. Suggestions are given regarding record keeping both for employers and for the national dose registry. 48 refs., 6 tabs., 1 fig

  15. Retrospective dosimetry of Iodine-131 exposures using Iodine-129 and Caesium-137 inventories in soils--A critical evaluation of the consequences of the Chernobyl accident in parts of Northern Ukraine.

    Michel, R; Daraoui, A; Gorny, M; Jakob, D; Sachse, R; Romantschuk, L D; Alfimov, V; Synal, H-A

    2015-12-01

    The radiation exposure of thyroid glands due to (131)I as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident was investigated retrospectively based on (129)I and (137)Cs inventories in soils in Northern Ukraine. To this end, soil samples from 60 settlements were investigated for (129)I, (127)I, and (137)Cs by AMS, ICP-MS and gamma-spectrometry, respectively. Sampling was performed between 2004 und 2007. In those parts of Northern Ukraine investigated here the (129)I and (137)Cs inventories are well correlated, the variability of the individual (129)I/(137)Cs ratios being, however, high. Both the (129)I and (137)Cs inventories in the individual 5 samples for each settlement allowed estimating the uncertainties of the inventories due to the variability of the radionuclide deposition and consequently of the retrospective dosimetry. Thyroid equivalent doses were calculated from the (129)I and the (137)Cs inventories using aggregated dose coefficients for 5-year old and 10-year-old children as well as for adults. The highest thyroid equivalent doses (calculated from (129)I inventories) were calculated for Wladimirowka with 30 Gy for 5-years-old children and 7 Gy for adults. In 35 settlements of contamination zone II the geometric mean of the thyroid equivalent doses was 2.0 Gy for 5-years-old children with a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 3.0. For adults the geometric mean was 0.47 Gy also with a GSD of 3.0. In more than 25 settlements of contamination zone III the geometric means were 0.82 Gy for 5-years old children with a GSD of 1.8 and 0.21 Gy for adults (GSD 1.8). For 45 settlements, the results of the retrospective dosimetry could be compared with thyroid equivalent doses calculated using time-integrated (131)I activities of thyroids which were measured in 1986. Thus, a critical evaluation of the results was possible which demonstrated the general feasibility of the method, but also the associated uncertainties and limitations. PMID:26254721

  16. Proceedings of the V. international symposium 'Actual problems of dosimetry'

    The main topics of the workshop were: monitoring and reconstruction of radiation doses at radiation accidents, biological dosimetry and markers of radiation effects as well as normative, metrological and technical aspects of dosimetric and radiometric monitoring

  17. Proceedings of the IV International Symposium 'Actual Problems of Dosimetry'

    The main topic of the workshop were: monitoring and reconstruction of radiation doses at radiation accidents, biological dosimetry and markers of radiation effects as well as normative, metrological and technical aspects of dosimetric and radiometric monitoring

  18. Four decades of thermoluminescence dosimetry research in India

    Last four decades have witnessed tremendous progress in the field of thermo-luminescence dosimetry. During this period development of new and sensitive TL phosphors was reported. Application of these phosphors was exploited in different fields, such as personnel and environmental monitoring, accident and retrospective dosimetry, high dose dosimetry, archaeological and geological dating. Commensurate with these developments, progress in TL instrumentation also took place. This paper reviews some of these developments in the last four decades in India. (author)

  19. Optically stimulated luminescence in retrospective dosimetry

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s the exploration of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in retrospective accident dosimetry has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Riso into measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes of this progr......Since the beginning of the 1990s the exploration of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in retrospective accident dosimetry has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Riso into measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes...

  20. 134Cs and 137Cs whole-body measurements and internal dosimetry of the population living in areas contaminated by radioactivity after the Chernobyl accident

    Six western districts of the Bryansk region, Russia, were heavily contaminated with radioactive fallout after the Chernobyl NPP accident. Annually, between 1991 and 1994, inhabitants of four settlements were studied. Whole-body 134+137Cs contents were measured in about 500 inhabitants. No correlation between Cs whole-body content and Cs soil contamination was found; Cs accumulation in a body depends greatly on natural factors such as type of soil, on social factors such as food habits including consumption of forest products, and on countermeasures to reduce internal exposure. During 1991-1994 average whole-body content of 134+137Cs in adult inhabitants was about 3-60 kBq, corresponding to an effective dose of 0.1-2.4 mSv.y-1. Cs whole-body content increases equally for girls and boys up to adult age. Cs content in adults does not depend significantly on age and is usually 1.2-2 times higher in men than in women. The average annual internal effective dose varies with age significantly less than 134+137Cs whole-body content. In children (0-5 years) the mean absorbed dose is usually 1.2-1.5 times less than in adults. (author)

  1. Lutte biologique augmentative : modélisation mathématique et recommandations

    Nundloll, Sapna

    2010-01-01

    Les travaux présentés dans cette thèse portent sur des problématiques de modélisation mathématique de lutte biologique augmentative et des recommandations pratiques qui en sont dérivées. La lutte biologique est une méthode de phytoprotection visant à combattre les ravageurs des cultures à l'aide de leurs ennemis naturels ; son développement est crucial en vue de diminuer l'utilisation de pesticides dont les conséquences néfastes sont reconnues, notamment sur la santé des agriculteurs et des c...

  2. Dosimetry standards

    The following leaflets are contained in this folder concerning the National Physical Laboratory's measurement services available in relation to dosimetry standards: Primary standards of X-ray exposure and X-ray irradiation facilities, X-ray dosimetry at therapy levels, Protection-level X-ray calibrations, Therapy-level gamma-ray facility, Fricke dosemeter reference service, Low-dose-rate gamma-ray facility, Penetrameter and kV meter calibration, Measurement services for radiation processing, Dichromate dosemeter reference service, Electron linear accelerator. (U.K.)

  3. Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    The Dosimetry Service will be closed every afternoon the week of 21st to 25th February 2005. The opening hours will be from 8.30 am to 12.00 midday. Don't forget to read your dosimeter, as regular read-outs are indispensable to ensure periodic monitoring of personal doses. Thank you for you cooperation.

  4. Methods and procedures for external radiation dosimetry at ORNL

    Procedures, methods, materials, records, and reports used for accomplishing the personnel, external radiation monitoring program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described for the purpose of documenting what is done now for future reference. This document provides a description of the methods and procedures for external radiation metering, monitoring, dosimetry, and records which are in effect at ORNL July 1, 1981. This document does not include procedures for nuclear accident dosimetry except insofar as routine techniques may apply also to nuclear accident dosimetry capability

  5. Accident consequence assessment code development

    This paper describes the new computer code system, OSCAAR developed for off-site consequence assessment of a potential nuclear accident. OSCAAR consists of several modules which have modeling capabilities in atmospheric transport, foodchain transport, dosimetry, emergency response and radiological health effects. The major modules of the consequence assessment code are described, highlighting the validation and verification of the models. (author)

  6. Hot-particle dosimetry recommendations and associated problems

    Hot-particle issues have been in current focus since the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident dosimetry highlighted the basic problems. The 1979 Report to the President's Commission on the Accident at TMI discussed beta dosimetry problems in the health physics sections. Both the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Rogovin Report on TMI as well as the health physics blue ribbon committee report discussed beta dosimetry problems. Participants in a U.S. Department of Energy/Environmental Measurements Laboratory (DOE-EML) Beta Dosimetry Workshop recommended an International Beta Dosimetry Symposium, which was held in 1983, sponsored by DOE, NRC, and the Health Physics Society. The conclusions drawn from this symposium are discussed. History and present status of related regulations are presented

  7. Dosimetry on the radiological risks prevention in radiotherapy

    Dosimetry in its various forms plays a determining role on the radiological risks prevention in radiotherapy. To prove this in this paper is shown an analysis based on the risk matrix method, how the dosimetry can influence in each stages of a radiotherapy service; installation and acceptance, operation, maintenance and calibration. For each one of these stages the role that can play is analyzed as either the initiating event of a radiological accident or limiting barrier of these events of the dosimetric processes used for the individual dosimetry, the area monitoring, fixed or portable, for radiation beam dosimetry and of the patients for a radiotherapy service with cobalt-therapy equipment. The result of the study shows that the application of a prospective approach in the role evaluation of dosimetry in the prevention and mitigation of the consequences of a radiological accident in radiotherapy is crucial and should be subject to permanent evaluation at each development stage of these services. (author)

  8. Optically stimulated luminescence in retrospective dosimetry

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    Since the beginning of the 1990s the exploration of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in retrospective accident dosimetry has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Riso into measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes of this...

  9. Optically stimulated luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence signals from natural quartz and feldspar are now used routinely in dating geological and archaeological materials. More recently they have also been employed in accident dosimetry, i.e. the retrospective assessment of doses received as a result of a nuclear...

  10. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments

  11. Biological dosimetry - Dose estimation method using biomakers

    The individual radiation dose estimation is an important step in the radiation risk assessment. In case of radiation incident or radiation accident, sometime, physical dosimetry method can not be used for calculating the individual radiation dose, the other complement method such as biological dosimetry is very necessary. This method is based on the quantitative specific biomarkers induced by ionizing radiation, such as dicentric chromosomes, translocations, micronuclei... in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The basis of the biological dosimetry method is the close relationship between the biomarkers and absorbed dose or dose rate; the effects of in vitro and in vivo are similar, so it is able to generate the calibration dose-effect curve in vitro for in vivo assessment. Possibilities and perspectives for performing biological dosimetry method in radiation protection area are presented in this report. (author)

  12. Emerging technological bases for retrospective dosimetry.

    Straume, T; Anspaugh, L R; Haskell, E H; Lucas, J N; Marchetti, A A; Likhtarev, I A; Chumak, V V; Romanyukha, A A; Khrouch, V T; Gavrilin YuI; Minenko, V F

    1997-01-01

    In this article we discuss examples of challenging problems in retrospective dosimetry and describe some promising solutions. The ability to make measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry and luminescence techniques promises to provide improved dosimetry for regions of Belarus, Ukraine and Russian Federation contaminated by radionuclides from the Chernobyl accident. In addition, it may soon be possible to resolve the large neutron discrepancy in the dosimetry system for Hiroshima through novel measurement techniques that can be used to reconstruct the fast-neutron fluence emitted by the bomb some 51 years ago. Important advances in molecular cytogenetics and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements have produced biodosimeters that show potential in retrospective dosimetry. The most promising of these are the frequency of reciprocal translocations measured in chromosomes of blood lymphocytes using fluorescence in situ hybridization and the electron paramagnetic resonance signal in tooth enamel. PMID:9368303

  13. Dosimetry Service

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter every month at least once and preferably during the first week. A regular read-out is indispensable in order to ensure a periodic monitoring of the personal dose. You should read your dosimeter even if you have not visited the controlled areas. If you still have the old dosimeter (film badge), please send it immediately for evaluation to us (Bdg 24 E-011). After January 2005 there will be no developing process for the old film system. Information for Contractors: Please remember also to bring the form ‘Confirm Reception of a CERN Dosimeter' signed with ‘Feuille d'enregistrement du CERN'. Without these forms the dosimeter cannot be assigned. Thank you for your cooperation. Dosimetry Service Tel 767 2155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  14. Hematological dosimetry

    The principles of hematological dosimetry after acute or protracted whole-body irradiation are reviewed. In both cases, over-exposure is never homogeneous and the clinical consequences, viz medullary aplasia, are directly associated with the mean absorbed dose and the seriousness and location of the overexposure. The main hematological data required to assess the seriousness of exposure are the following: repeated blood analysis, blood precursor cultures, as indicators of whole-body exposure; bone marrow puncture, medullary precursor cultures and medullary scintigraphy as indicators of the importance of a local over-exposure and capacity for spontaneous repair. These paraclinical investigations, which are essential for diagnosis and dosimetry, are also used for surveillance and for the main therapeutic issues

  15. Radiation dosimetry.

    Cameron, J.

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists.

  16. Dosimetry Service

    2004-01-01

    We wish to remind the people who are invited to the Dosimetry Service to exchange the new CERN dosimeter that the hours are from Monday to Friday 8.30 to 11.00 and 14.00 to 16.00. Do not forget to read your dosimeter. The reading should be done during the first week of every month. Thank you for your cooperation.

  17. The Vinca dosimetry experiment

    On 15 October 1958 there occurred a very brief uncontrolled run of the zero-power reactor at the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Science, Vinca, near Belgrade, Yugoslavia. During this run six persons received various doses of radiation. They were subsequently given medical treatment of a novel kind at the Curie Hospital, Paris. In atomic energy operations to date, very few accidents involving excessive radiation exposure to human beings have occurred. In fact, the cases of acute radiation injury are limited to about 30 known high exposures, few of which were in the lethal or near-lethal range. Since direct experiment to determine the effects of ionizing radiation on man is unacceptable, information on these effects has to be based on a consideration of data relating to accidental exposures, viewed in the light of the much more extensive data obtained from experiments on animals. Therefore, any direct information on the effects of radiation on humans is very valuable. The international dosimetry project described in this report was carried out at Vinca, Yugoslavia, under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency to determine the precise amount of radiation to which the persons had been exposed during the accident. These dosimetry data, together with the record of the carefully observed clinical effects, are of importance both for the scientific study of radiation effects on man and for the development of methods of therapy. The experiment and measurements were carried out at the end of April 1960. The project formed part of the Agency's research programme in the field of health and safety. The results of the experiment are made available through this report to all Member States

  18. Accidents - Chernobyl accident

    This file is devoted to the Chernobyl accident. It is divided in four parts. The first part concerns the accident itself and its technical management. The second part is relative to the radiation doses and the different contaminations. The third part reports the sanitary effects, the determinists ones and the stochastic ones. The fourth and last part relates the consequences for the other European countries with the case of France. Through the different parts a point is tackled with the measures taken after the accident by the other countries to manage an accident, the cooperation between the different countries and the groups of research and studies about the reactors safety, and also with the international medical cooperation, specially for the children, everything in relation with the Chernobyl accident. (N.C.)

  19. Nuclear Accident Dosimetry at Argonne National Laboratory

    This report summarizes current planning at Argonne National Laboratory with respect to dose determination following a criticality incident. The discussion relates chiefly to two types of commercially obtained dosimeter packages, and includes the results of independent calibrations performed at the Laboratory. The primary dosimeter system incorporates threshold detectors developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for neutron spectrum measurement. Fission foil decay calibration curves have been determined experimentally for scintillation counting equipment routinely used at Argonne. This equipment also has been calibrated for determination of sodium-24 activity in blood. Dosimeter units of the type designed at Savannah River Laboratory are deployed as secondary stations. Data from the neutron activation components of these units will be used to make corrections to, the neutron spectrum for intermediate as well as thermal energies. The epicadmium copper foil activation, for a given fluence of intermediate energy neutrons, has been shown relatively insensitive to neutron spectrum variations within the region, and a meaningful average of copper cross-section has been determined. Counter calibration factors determined at Argonne are presented for the copper, indium, and sulphur components. The total neutron fluence is computed using the corrected spectrum in conjunction with a capture probability function and the blood sodium result. One or more specifications of neutron dose then may be calculated by applying the spectral information to the appropriate conversion function. The gamma portion of the primary dosimeter package contains fluorescent rods and a thermoluminescent dosimeter in addition to a two-phase chemical dosimeter. The gamma dosimeter in the secondary package is a polyacrylamide solution which is degraded by exposure to gamma radiation. The absorbed dose is derived from a measured change insolution viscosity. Difficulties in evaluation, placement, and storage stability are discussed. Plans have been formulated to determine phosphorus-32 in biological materials in order to obtain a fast- neutron dose, to analyse environmental materials for neutron activation products, and to determine the total number of fissions. Administrative control of dose determination will be facilitated with a manual which lists dosimeter locations and handling and counting procedures as well as formulae for dose calculations. (author)

  20. A second simulated criticality accident dosimetry experiment

    Adams, N

    1973-01-01

    This experiment was undertaken to facilitate training in criticality dose assessment by UKAEA and BNFL establishments with potential criticality hazards. Personal dosemeters, coins, samples of hair, etc. supplied by the seven participating establishments were attached to a man-phantom filled with a solution of sodium nitrate (simulating 'body-sodium'), and exposed to a burst of radiation from the AWRE pulsed reactor VIPER. The neutron and photon doses were each several hundred rads. Participants made two sets of dose assessments. The first, made solely from the evidence of their routine dosemeters the activation of body-sodium and standard monitoring data, simulated the initial dose assessment that would be made before the circumstances of a real incident were established. The second was made when the position and orientation of the phantom relative to the reactor and the shielding (20 cm of copper) between the reactor core and the phantom were disclosed. Neutron and photon dose assessments for comparison wit...

  1. Topics in radiation dosimetry radiation dosimetry

    1972-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry, Supplement 1: Topics in Radiation Dosimetry covers instruments and techniques in dealing with special dosimetry problems. The book discusses thermoluminescence dosimetry in archeological dating; dosimetric applications of track etching; vacuum chambers of radiation measurement. The text also describes wall-less detectors in microdosimetry; dosimetry of low-energy X-rays; and the theory and general applicability of the gamma-ray theory of track effects to various systems. Dose equivalent determinations in neutron fields by means of moderator techniques; as well as developm

  2. ESR dosimetry: achievements and challenges

    Baffa, O., E-mail: baffa@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), also known as Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and more recently as Electron Magnetic Resonance (Emr), is a spectroscopy technique able to detect unpaired electrons such as those created by the interaction ionizing radiation with matter. When the unpaired electrons created by ionizing radiation are stable over some reasonable time, ESR can be used to measure the radiation dose deposited in the material under study. In principle, any insulating material that satisfies this requisite can be used as a dosimeter. ESR has been used in retrospective dosimetry in case of radiological accidents using natural constituents of human body such as teeth, bones and nails as well as fortuitous materials as sugar, sweeteners and plastics. When using teeth the typical detected dose is 0.5 Gy for, for X-Band spectrometers (9 GHz) and even lower doses if higher frequency spectrometers are used. Clinical dosimetry is another area of potential use of this dosimetric modality. In this application the amino acid alanine has been proposed and being used. Alanine dosimeters are very easy to prepare and require no complicated treatments for use. Alanine/ESR dosimetry satisfies many of the required properties for clinical applications such as water equivalent composition, independence of response for the energy range used in therapy and high precision. Other organic materials such as ammonium tartrate are being investigated to increase the sensitivity of ESR for clinical applications. Finally, industrial applications can also benefit from this dosimetry. The challenges to expand applications, the number of users and research groups of ESR dosimetry will be discussed. (Author)

  3. ESR dosimetry: achievements and challenges

    Full text: Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), also known as Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and more recently as Electron Magnetic Resonance (Emr), is a spectroscopy technique able to detect unpaired electrons such as those created by the interaction ionizing radiation with matter. When the unpaired electrons created by ionizing radiation are stable over some reasonable time, ESR can be used to measure the radiation dose deposited in the material under study. In principle, any insulating material that satisfies this requisite can be used as a dosimeter. ESR has been used in retrospective dosimetry in case of radiological accidents using natural constituents of human body such as teeth, bones and nails as well as fortuitous materials as sugar, sweeteners and plastics. When using teeth the typical detected dose is 0.5 Gy for, for X-Band spectrometers (9 GHz) and even lower doses if higher frequency spectrometers are used. Clinical dosimetry is another area of potential use of this dosimetric modality. In this application the amino acid alanine has been proposed and being used. Alanine dosimeters are very easy to prepare and require no complicated treatments for use. Alanine/ESR dosimetry satisfies many of the required properties for clinical applications such as water equivalent composition, independence of response for the energy range used in therapy and high precision. Other organic materials such as ammonium tartrate are being investigated to increase the sensitivity of ESR for clinical applications. Finally, industrial applications can also benefit from this dosimetry. The challenges to expand applications, the number of users and research groups of ESR dosimetry will be discussed. (Author)

  4. ESR dosimetry using eggshells and tooth enamel for accidental dosimetry

    The CO2- signal of eggshells showed a good dose linearity and was appropriate in the wide dose range from 1 to 10 kGy, while ESR signal of CO2- in sea and fresh water shells were saturated at a dose od below 10 kGy. The minimum detectable dose and G-value of CO2- in eggshells were estimated 0.3 Gy and 0.28, respectively. The lifetime of CO2- in eggshells could not be determined exactly because of overlapping organic signals, however it is still sufficiently long for practical use as ESR dosimeter materials. Various bird's or reptile's eggshells would be available as natural retrospective ESR dosimeter materials after nuclear accidents. Eggshells will be useful for the food irradiation dosimetry in the dose range of about a few kGy. Tooth enamel is one of the most useful dosimeter materials in public at a accident because of its high sensitivity. ESR dosimetry will replace TLD in near future if the cost of an ESR reader is further reduced . (author)

  5. EPR Dosimetry - Present and Future

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as in coordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as bio markers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (Astm), and by the International Organisation of Standards (ISO). The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) is considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (Author)

  6. EPR Dosimetry - Present and Future

    Regulla, D.F. [GSF - National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as in coordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as bio markers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (Astm), and by the International Organisation of Standards (ISO). The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) is considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (Author)

  7. Dosimetry studies in Zaborie village

    Takada, J. E-mail: jtakada@ipc.hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Hoshi, M.; Endo, S.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Kondrashov, A.E.; Petin, D.; Skvortsov, V.; Ivannikov, A.; Tikounov, D.; Gavrilin, Y.; Snykov, V.P

    2000-05-15

    Dosimetry studies in Zaborie, a territory in Russia highly contaminated by the Chernobyl accident, were carried out in July, 1997. Studies on dosimetry for people are important not only for epidemiology but also for recovery of local social activity. The local contamination of the soil was measured to be 1.5-6.3 MBq/m{sup 2} of Cs-137 with 0.7-4 {mu}Sv/h of dose rate. A case study for a villager presently 40 years old indicates estimations of 72 and 269 mSv as the expected internal and external doses during 50 years starting in 1997 based on data of a whole-body measurement of Cs-137 and environmental dose rates. Mean values of accumulated external and internal doses for the period from the year 1986 till 1996 are also estimated to be 130 mSv and 16 mSv for Zaborie. The estimation of the 1986-1996 accumulated dose on the basis of large scale ESR teeth enamel dosimetry provides for this village, the value of 180 mSv. For a short term visitor from Japan to this area, external and internal dose are estimated to be 0.13 mSv/9d (during visit in 1997) and 0.024 mSv/50y (during 50 years starting from 1997), respectively.

  8. EPR dosimetry - present and future

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as co-ordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as biomarkers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (ASTM), and the International Organisation of Standards (ISO) as well as those of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (author)

  9. Bayesian Methods for Radiation Detection and Dosimetry

    Groer, Peter G

    2002-01-01

    We performed work in three areas: radiation detection, external and internal radiation dosimetry. In radiation detection we developed Bayesian techniques to estimate the net activity of high and low activity radioactive samples. These techniques have the advantage that the remaining uncertainty about the net activity is described by probability densities. Graphs of the densities show the uncertainty in pictorial form. Figure 1 below demonstrates this point. We applied stochastic processes for a method to obtain Bayesian estimates of 222Rn-daughter products from observed counting rates. In external radiation dosimetry we studied and developed Bayesian methods to estimate radiation doses to an individual with radiation induced chromosome aberrations. We analyzed chromosome aberrations after exposure to gammas and neutrons and developed a method for dose-estimation after criticality accidents. The research in internal radiation dosimetry focused on parameter estimation for compartmental models from observed comp...

  10. Local overexposure: the role of physical dosimetry

    The role of physical dosimetry in cases of local overexposure is limited. However, if dosimetry, which is usually of no use for diagnosis, is combined with clinical and biological data, it can be useful for therapy and prognosis. This paper, based on cases treated at the Hopital Curie, proposes a method which may be used. It consists of: determination of isodose curves at the surface (skin) by an experimental reconstruction of the accident or by calculation; comparison of these isodoses with the skin pathology: area of erythema (3-8 Gy), area of dry desquamation (> 5 Gy), area of exudative desquamation (12-20 Gy) and area of necrosis (> 25 Gy); calibration of the depth-dose curves after this comparison and the determination of the dose to essential organs or tissues. Examples illustrating this approach are given for accidents involving X rays and 192Ir and 60Co sources. (author)

  11. HSE performance tests for dosimetry services

    In the United Kingdom a dosimetry service that measures and assesses whole-body or part-body doses arising from external radiation must successfully complete a performance test. Results of the performance tests for routine whole-body, routine extremity/skin and special accident dosimetry, carried out over the past six years by the AEA Technology Calibration Service at Winfrith, and DRaStaC, the AWE Calibration Service at Aldermaston, are presented. The test involves irradiating groups of dosemeters to known doses of gamma radiation and determining the bias and relative standard deviations for each dose group. The results are compared with the pass criteria specified by the UK Health and Safety Executive. For routine whole-body dosimetry, both the film badge and thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) perform adequately for irradiations between 0.6 and 30 mSv. For higher doses up to 250 mSv, where the slow emulsion of the film is used, the film badge shows poorer performance with a tendency to overestimate the dose. For routine extremity/skin dosimetry there is a wider spread of relative standard deviation results than is seen for routine whole-body dosimetry. This is to be expected since the results will include dosemeters that are based on 'disposable' TLDs and ones based on lithium fluoride powder in sachets. For special accident dosimetry the dosemeters are tested between 0.26 and 6 Gy. For the highest dose group the film badge invariably underestimates the true dose, whereas the TLD has a tendency to overestimate it. (author)

  12. EPR TOOTH DOSIMETRY OF SNTS AREA INHABITANTS

    Sholom, Sergey; Desrosiers, Marc; Bouville, André; Luckyanov, Nicholas; Chumak, Vadim; Simon, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    The determination of external dose to teeth of inhabitants of settlements near the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) was conducted using the EPR dosimetry technique to assess radiation doses associated with exposure to radioactive fallout from the test site. In this study, tooth doses have been reconstructed for 103 persons with all studied teeth having been formed before the first nuclear test in 1949. Doses above those received from natural background radiation, termed “accident doses”...

  13. Developments in optically stimulated luminescence techniques for dating and retrospective dosimetry

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    Optically stimulated luminescence signals from natural quartz and feldspar are now used routinely in dating geological and archaeological materials. More recently they have also been employed in accident dosimetry, i.e. the retrospective assessment of doses received as a result of a nuclear......-precision single-aliquot measurement protocols. These offer exciting possibilities in dating and accident dosimetry, and are already leading to new demands on measurement techniques and facilities....

  14. Breast dosimetry

    The estimation of the absorbed dose to the breast is an important part of the quality control of the mammographic examination. Knowledge of breast dose is essential for the design and performance assessment of mammographic imaging systems. This review gives a historical introduction to the measurement of breast dose. The mean glandular dose (MGD) is introduced as an appropriate measure of breast dose. MGD can be estimated from measurements of the incident air kerma at the surface of the breast and the application of an appropriate conversion factor. Methods of calculating and measuring this conversion factor are described and the results discussed. The incident air kerma itself may be measured for patients or for a test phantom simulating the breast. In each case the dose may be determined using TLD measurements, or known exposure parameters and measurements of tube output. The methodology appropriate to each case is considered and the results from sample surveys of breast dose are presented. Finally the various national protocols for breast dosimetry are compared

  15. Tomate en agriculture biologique : essai variétal sous tunnel froid : compte-rendu d'essai 2005

    Mazollier, Catherine; Picaut, Luc

    2006-01-01

    La production de tomate biologique tient une place importante sous abri froid en Provence. Le choix variétal est limité aux variétés disponibles en semences biologiques ou non traitées. En circuit long, la filière impose des caractéristiques similaires à celles du marché conventionnel : bonne fermeté, forme et coloration régulières, absence de défaut visuel; le choix variétal s'oriente donc vers des variétés "classiques", de type mid-life : Brenda et Paola (semences biologiques), Pétula (...

  16. Epinard en agriculture biologique : essai variétal sous tunnel froid : compte-rendu d'essai 2005

    Mazollier, Catherine; Taulet, Annick; Lambion, Jérôme; Védie, Hélène

    2006-01-01

    En maraîchage biologique, la culture de l’épinard d’hiver sous abris impose notamment le choix de variétés adaptées, tolérantes au mildiou (Peronospora farinosa) et disponibles en semences biologiques ou non traitées. En 2003-2004, le GRAB avait testé des variétés en culture d’hiver sous abris pour une récolte unique de fin janvier. Ce nouvel essai a pour objectif de tester des variétés disponibles en semences biologiques ou non traitées, pour un calendrier de production différent : plantatio...

  17. Relation entre l’agressivité des souches de B. cinerea et l’efficacité de la protection biologique conférée par deux agents de lutte biologique

    Comby, Morgane

    2011-01-01

    Les méthodes de lutte actuelles contre l’agent responsable de la pourriture grise, Botrytis cinerea, ne suffisent pas à garantir une protection totale contre ce champignon pathogène, capable de développer des résistances à de nombreux fongicides. Dans ce contexte, la protection biologique semble prometteuse mais la durabilité de cette méthode de lutte a été très peu étudiée. La perte d’efficacité des agents de lutte biologique pourrait résulter de la préexistence d’isolats moins sensibles de ...

  18. Neutron dosimetry - A review

    This review summarizes information on the following subjects: (1) physical processes of importance in neutron dosimetry; (2) biological effects of neutrons; (3) neutron sources; and (4) instruments and methods used in neutron dosimetry. Also, possible improvements in dosimetry instrumentation are outlined and discussed. (author)

  19. Reconstructive dosimetry for cutaneous radiation syndrome

    Lima, C.M.A.; Lima, A.R.; Degenhardt, Ä.L.; Da Silva, F.C.A., E-mail: dasilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Valverde, N.J. [Fundacao Eletronuclear de Assistencia Medica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a relatively significant number of radiological accidents have occurred in recent years mainly because of the practices referred to as potentially high-risk activities, such as radiotherapy, large irradiators and industrial radiography, especially in gammagraphy assays. In some instances, severe injuries have occurred in exposed persons due to high radiation doses. In industrial radiography, 80 cases involving a total of 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public including 12 deaths have been recorded up to 2014. Radiological accidents in industrial practices in Brazil have mainly resulted in development of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) in hands and fingers. Brazilian data include 5 serious cases related to industrial gammagraphy, affecting 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public; however, none of them were fatal. Some methods of reconstructive dosimetry have been used to estimate the radiation dose to assist in prescribing medical treatment. The type and development of cutaneous manifestations in the exposed areas of a person is the first achievable gross dose estimation. This review article presents the state-of-the-art reconstructive dosimetry methods enabling estimation of local radiation doses and provides guidelines for medical handling of the exposed individuals. The review also presents the Chilean and Brazilian radiological accident cases to highlight the importance of reconstructive dosimetry. (author)

  20. Effet des pratiques biologiques et conventionnelles sur les communautés d’insectes auxiliaires dans les paysages agricoles

    Puech, Camille; Baudry, Jacques; Aviron, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    La sécurité alimentaire ainsi que la conservation de la biodiversité font partie des principaux enjeux de l’agriculture moderne. En raison de ses pratiques alternatives, l’Agriculture Biologique (AB) constitue un mode de production prometteur pour répondre à ces problématiques. En particulier, le contrôle biologique des ravageurs par leurs ennemis naturels semble être une alternative possible aux insecticides utilisés en Agriculture Conventionnelle (AC). L’objectif de cette étude est de décri...

  1. Neutron dosimetry

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq 241 Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s-1 and 0,5 μSv s-1. A calibrated 50 nSv s-1 thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the 241 Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold 241 Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,α) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kVpp cm-1, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46± 0,09) 104 tracks cm-2 mSv-1 for thermal neutrons, (9±3) 102 tracks cm-2 mSV-1 for intermediate neutrons and (26±4) tracks cm-2 mSv-1 for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990's ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is sufficiently sensitive to thermal and intermediate neutrons but fast neutron monitoring ar radiological protection level

  2. Etude des déterminants de conversion à l'agriculture biologique et production de références économiques

    Sainte-Beuve, Jasmin

    2010-01-01

    Parmi les agricultures alternatives, l’agriculture biologique s’est imposée depuis peu comme une modèle crédible. L’Etat a fixé en 2007 lors du Grenelle de l’environnement des objectifs ambitieux en terme de surface converties à l’agriculture biologique. Pourtant, l’évolution actuelle des surfaces ne semble pas suffisante pour atteindre ces objectifs. La question des déterminants à la conversion à l’agriculture biologique et des leviers susceptibles de favoriser les conversions se pose donc e...

  3. Radiation-induced damage analysed by luminescence methods in retrospective dosimetry and emergency response

    The increasing risk of a mass casualty scenario following a large scale radiological accident or attack necessitates the development of appropriate dosimetric tools for emergency response. Luminescence dosimetry has been reliably applied for dose reconstruction in contaminated settlements for several decades and recent research into new materials carried close to the human body opens the possibility of estimating individual doses for accident and emergency dosimetry using the same technique. This paper reviews the luminescence research into materials useful for accident dosimetry and applications in retrospective dosimetry. The properties of the materials are critically discussed with regard to the requirements for population triage. It is concluded that electronic components found within portable electronic devices, such as e.g. mobile phones, are at present the most promising material to function as a fortuitous dosimeter in an emergency response.

  4. Review of retrospective dosimetry techniques for external ionising radiation exposures

    The current focus on networking and mutual assistance in the management of radiation accidents or incidents has demonstrated the importance of a joined-up approach in physical and biological dosimetry. To this end, the European Radiation Dosimetry Working Group 10 on 'Retrospective Dosimetry' has been set up by individuals from a wide range of disciplines across Europe. Here, established and emerging dosimetry methods are reviewed, which can be used immediately and retrospectively following external ionising radiation exposure. Endpoints and assays include dicentrics, translocations, premature chromosome condensation, micronuclei, somatic mutations, gene expression, electron paramagnetic resonance, thermoluminescence, optically stimulated luminescence, neutron activation, haematology, protein biomarkers and analytical dose reconstruction. Individual characteristics of these techniques, their limitations and potential for further development are reviewed, and their usefulness in specific exposure scenarios is discussed. Whilst no single technique fulfils the criteria of an ideal dosemeter, an integrated approach using multiple techniques tailored to the exposure scenario can cover most requirements. (authors)

  5. Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database

  6. Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H. [eds.

    1991-10-01

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database.

  7. Development of radiation biological dosimetry

    Up until now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline (triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the premature chromosome condensation assay and apoptotic fragment assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiation dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with conventional chromosome aberration assay and micronuclei assay

  8. Development of radiation biological dosimetry

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil; Son, Young Sook; Kim, Soo Kwan; Jang, Won Suk; Le, Sun Joo; Jee, Young Heun; Jung, Woo Jung

    1999-04-01

    Up until now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline (triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the premature chromosome condensation assay and apoptotic fragment assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiation dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with conventional chromosome aberration assay and micronuclei assay.

  9. Silicon diode dosimetry

    The theory of silicon dosimetry is briefly reviewed with respect to operation of these diodes without reverse bias in the short-circuit current mode. The problems of temperature dependence, radiation damage, and the dependence on photon energy are discussed. Various applications of the diodes to practical radiation dosimetry are then described with a view toward pointing out the pitfalls as well as the advantages of using these diodes for dosimetry. (author)

  10. Silicon diode dosimetry

    Dixon, R.L.; Ekstrand, K.E. (Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (USA). Bowman Gray School of Medicine)

    1982-11-01

    The theory of silicon dosimetry is briefly reviewed with respect to operation of these diodes without reverse bias in the short-circuit current mode. The problems of temperature dependence, radiation damage, and the dependence on photon energy are discussed. Various applications of the diodes to practical radiation dosimetry are then described with a view toward pointing out the pitfalls as well as the advantages of using these diodes for dosimetry.

  11. Advances in biomedical dosimetry

    The symposium was organized in order to focus on the problems, developments and areas of further research in the life sciences. Forty-nine papers were presented dealing with instrumentation, techniques, experimental and theoretical studies. They included neutron sources and mixed-field dosimetry; developments (e.g. thermocurrent dosimetry) in dosimetry; physical aspects of radiation therapy, and treatment planning; international, national and regional radiation metrology programmes; diagnostic medical x-ray sources, imaging systems and patient doses; high-energy electron and γ-ray dosimetry; and doses determination for ingested or administered radionuclides

  12. Measurement assurance in dosimetry

    The uses of radiation in medicine and industry are today wide in scope and diversity and there is a need for reliable dosimetry in most applications. In particular, high accuracy in dosimetry is required in the therapeutic use of radiation. Consequently, calibration procedures for radiotherapy generally meet also the accuracy requirements for applications in other fields, such as diagnostic radiology, radiation protection and industrial radiation processing. The emphasis at this symposium was therefore mainly or radiotherapy dosimetry, but the meeting also included one session devoted to dosimetry in diagnostic radiology. Refs, fig and tabs

  13. Internal sources dosimetry

    The absorbed dose, need of estimation in risk evaluation in the application of radiopharmaceuticals in Nuclear Medicine practice,internal dosimetry,internal and external sources. Calculation methodology,Marinelli model,MIRD system for absorbed dose calculation based on biological parameters of radiopharmaceutical in human body or individual,energy of emitted radiations by administered radionuclide, fraction of emitted energy that is absorbed by target body.Limitation of the MIRD calculation model. A explanation of Marinelli method of dosimetry calculation,β dosimetry. Y dosimetry, effective dose, calculation in organs and tissues, examples. Bibliography .

  14. Dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    The publication deals with a major field of ionizing radiation dosimetry, viz., integrating dosimetric methods, which are the basic means of operative dose determination. It is divided into the following sections: physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation; integrating dosimetric methods for low radiation doses (film dosimetry, nuclear emulsions, thermoluminescence, radiophotoluminescence, solid-state track detectors, integrating ionization dosemeters); dosimetry of high ionizing radiation doses (chemical dosimetric methods, dosemeters based on the coloring effect, activation detectors); additional methods applicable to integrating dosimetry (exoelectron emission, electron spin resonance, lyoluminescence, etc.); and calibration techniques for dosimetric instrumentation. (Z.S.). 422 refs

  15. Thermoluminescence, optically stimulated luminescence and radiophotoluminescence dosimetry: an overall perspective

    Radiation dosimetric methods are used for the estimation of dose absorbed by radiation in a detector material. These methods are required for estimation of absorbed dose in various applications of radiation, such as personnel and environmental dosimetry, retrospective/accident dosimetry and medical applications of radiation. The use of thermoluminescence (TL) as a method for radiation dosimetry of ionizing radiation has been established for many decades and has found many useful applications in various fields, such as personnel and environmental monitoring, medical dosimetry, archaeological and geological dating, space dosimetry. Several high sensitivity TL phosphor materials and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are now commercially available in different physical forms. There are many commercial TLD systems which are being used for various dosimetric applications and even presently, TL is a major player in the field of radiation dosimetry, particularly in personnel dosimetry. In the last two decades an alternative technique, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), has been developed, as the optical nature of the readout process does not involve problems of blackbody radiation and thermal quenching. Due to this and some other advantages OSL is also being used for various applications in radiation dosimetry, such as personnel and environmental dosimetry, retrospective/accident dosimetry and medical dosimetry. The development of Al2O3:C TL/OSL phosphor by Akselrod et al. and later investigation of its suitability for personnel dosimetry using pulsed OSL (POSL) technique of stimulation by Akselrod and McKeever, resulted in the development of a personnel dosimetry system based on Al2O3:C OSL phosphor. Therefore, thrust of modern luminescence dosimetry development is more towards OSL. The main advantages of the small size optic fiber based OSL dosimeter over the currently available radiation detectors, such as TLD, used in clinical applications, are the capabilities

  16. Nuclear accidents

    On 27 May 1986 the Norwegian government appointed an inter-ministerial committee of senior officials to prepare a report on experiences in connection with the Chernobyl accident. The present second part of the committee's report describes proposals for measures to prevent and deal with similar accidents in the future. The committee's evaluations and proposals are grouped into four main sections: Safety and risk at nuclear power plants; the Norwegian contingency organization for dealing with nuclear accidents; compensation issues; and international cooperation

  17. Radiation accidents

    Radiation accidents may be viewed as unusual exposure event which provide possible high exposure to a few people and, in the case of nuclear plants events, low exposure to large population. A number of radiation accidents have occurred over the past 50 years, involving radiation machines, radioactive materials and uncontrolled nuclear reactors. These accidents have resulted in number of people have been exposed to a range of internal and external radiation doses and those involving radioactive materials have involved multiple routs of exposure. Some of the more important accidents involving significant radiation doses or releases of radioactive materials, including any known health effects involves in it. An analysis of the common characteristics of accidents is useful resolving overarching issues, as has been done following nuclear power, industrial radiography and medical accidents. Success in avoiding accidents and responding when they do occur requires planning in order to have adequately trained and prepared health physics organization; well defined and developed instrument program; close cooperation among radiation protection experts, local and state authorities. Focus is given to the successful avoidance of accidents and response in the events they do occur. Palomares, spain in late 1960, Goiania, Brazil in 1987, Thule, Greenland in 1968, Rocky flats, Colorado in 1957 and 1969, Three mile island, Pennsylvania in 1979, Chernobyl Ukraine in april 1986, Kyshtym, former Soviet Union in 1957, Windscale, UK in Oct. 1957 Tomsk, Russian Federation in 1993, and many others are the important examples of major radiation accidents. (author)

  18. Dosimetry service removal

    Safety Commission

    2010-01-01

    Dear personal dosimeter user, Please note that the Dosimetry service has moved in building 55, the service is now located in the main floor: 55-R-004. Main floor instead of second floor. On your right hand when accessing in the building. Thank you Dosimetry Service

  19. Radiation therapy dosimetry system

    New therapeutic treatments generally aim to increase therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity. Many aspects of radiation dosimetry have been studied and developed particularly in the field of external radiation. The success of radiotherapy relies on monitoring the dose of radiation to which the tumor and the adjacent tissues are exposed. Radiotherapy techniques have evolved through a rapid transition from conventional three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments or radiosurgery and robotic radiation therapy. These advances push the frontiers in our effort to provide better patient care by improving the precision of the absorbed dose delivered. This paper presents state-of-the art radiation therapy dosimetry techniques as well as the value of integral dosimetry (INDOS), which shows promise in the fulfillment of radiation therapy dosimetry requirements. - highlights: • Pre-treatment delivery and phantom dosimetry in brachytherapy treatments were analyzed. • Dose distribution in the head and neck was estimated by physical and mathematical dosimetry. • Electron beam flattening was acquired by means of mathematical, physical and “in vivo” dosimetry. • Integral dosimetry (INDOS) has been suggested as a routine dosimetric method in all radiation therapy treatments

  20. Dosimetry in process control

    Measurement of absorbed dose and dose distribution in irradiated medical products relies on the use of quality dosimetry systems, trained personnel and a thorough understanding of the energy deposition process. The interrelationship of these factors will be discussed with emphasis on the current and future practices of process control dosimetry. (author)

  1. Usage of JENDL dosimetry file for material dosimetry in JOYO

    A cross section set with covariance error matrix for neutron spectrum unfolding has been newly prepared from JENDL-3 dosimetry file and was applied to the dosimetry test in the MK-II core (the irradiation core) of Experimental Fast Reactor 'JOYO'. The dosimetry results by the new cross section set were compared with the previous ones by ENDF/B-V dosimetry file to evaluate the applicability and accuracy for the fast reactor dosimetry. In this work, it has been concluded that more improvement can be expected for the JOYO dosimetry test by employing JENDL-3 dosimetry file. (author)

  2. Projets et découplages dans l'agriculture biologique en France et en Allemagne

    Pernin, M Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    Cette communication a pour objectif de rendre compte des dynamiques méso-socio-économiques dans l’agriculture biologique en France et en Allemagne depuis leur création. Nous utilisons le concept de projet en tant qu’action collective régulée et finalisée en vue a) de découper le réel méso-socio-économique en concepts de formes organisationnelles, b) de produire un schéma interprétatif des dynamiques de ces formes. Les trois dimensions d’un projet sont les piliers de cette approche théorique. ...

  3. Biodiversité et lutte biologique : le cas de la cochenille du manioc en Afrique

    FABRES, Gérard; Nénon, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Au début des années 1970, l'ensemble de la zone de culture du manioc en Afrique, a été envahie par deux ravageurs en provenance du nouveau monde. L'un d'entre eux, la cochenille du manioc (#Phenacoccus manihoti$ Matile-Ferrero,#Homoptera$, #Pseudococcidae$), a fait l'objet d'une intense activité de recherche et une vaste opération de lutte biologique a été lancée. Vingt ans après les premiers travaux, l'idée prévaut que le problème est entièrement résolu grâce à l'introduction d'une seule esp...

  4. Qualité chimique et biologique du bassin de la Semois (partie Belge)

    Leclercq, L.; ROSILLON F.; VANDER BORGHT P.; LONCIN A.; EL MOSSAOUI M.

    1996-01-01

    Les eaux du bassin de la Semois belge ont été étudiées, en 25 stations, sous différents aspects complémentaires : chimie, diatomées et invertébrés benthiques. Les méthodes utilisées sont l'indice de pollution organique (IPO, LECLERCQ et VANDEVENNE, 1987), un indice diatomique (ID, LECLERCQ, non publié) et l'indice biologique global normalisé (IBGN, AFNOR, 1992). Grâce aux analyses chimiques et diatomiques, nous décrivons différents types d'eaux naturelles, à minéralisation croissante, et diff...

  5. Realites et perspectives de la lutte biologique contre les maladies des plantes

    Ponchet, J

    1982-01-01

    Le concept de lutte biologique diffère selon que l’on est phytopathologiste ou entomologiste. Dans ce dernier cas, il se limite à l’exploitation des relations d’exclusion entre organismes, dont la prospection en phytopathologie est restée limitée. La lutte contre les maladies d’origine tellurique utilisant les mécanismes de la résistance naturelle des sols a fait de réels progrès. Que l’antagonisme soit apporté par un peu de terre ou par l’incorporation d’agents très actifs comme les Tric...

  6. Lutte biologique contre la fusariose vasculaire de la tomate. Resultats en serre de production

    COUTEAUDIER, Yvonne; Letard, M. (collab.); Alabouvette, Claude; Louvet, J.

    1985-01-01

    Les connaissances acquises au cours de l’étude de la résistance des sols de Châteaurenard ont permis d’élaborer en conditions expérimentales 2 méthodes de lutte biologique contre les fusarioses vasculaires. Après avoir obtenu de bons résultats en conditions expérimentales, l’efficacité de ces procédés a été testée dans une serre dont le sol est très infesté par Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. La première méthode consiste à mélanger à un sol préalablement traité à la chaleur une ter...

  7. Lutte biologique contre le papillon palmivore (Paysandisia archon) à l'aide de parasitoïdes oophages

    Cabrol, Bastien; Colombel, Etty; Buradino, Maurane; GAGLIO, Jean Claude; Martin, Jean Claude,; Tabone, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Originaire d’Argentine, le papillon palmivore Paysandisia archon (Burmeister) poursuit sa progression en région méditerranéenne en entrainant des dégâts considérables sur les palmiers et des pertes économiques importantes. Il est donc urgent de trouver une solution biologique pour contrôler ce ravageur, en respectant l’environnement et la santé humaine. Les trichogrammes, dont l’efficacité a déjà été prouvée en lutte biologique sur différentes cultures, ont été testés au laboratoire et sur le...

  8. Accident Statistics

    Department of Homeland Security — Accident statistics available on the Coast Guard’s website by state, year, and one variable to obtain tables and/or graphs. Data from reports has been loaded for...

  9. Internal dose assessment in radiation accidents

    Although numerous models have been developed for occupational and medical internal dosimetry, they may not be applicable to an accident situation. Published dose coefficients relate effective dose to intake, but if acute deterministic effects are possible, effective dose is not a useful parameter. Consequently, dose rates to the organs of interest need to be computed from first principles. Standard bioassay methods may be used to assess body contents, but, again, the standard models for bioassay interpretation may not be applicable because of the circumstances of the accident and the prompt initiation of decorporation therapy. Examples of modifications to the standard methodologies include adjustment of biological half-times under therapy, such as in the Goiania accident, and the same effect, complicated by continued input from contaminated wounds, in the Hanford 241Am accident. (author)

  10. Third IAEA nuclear accident intercomparison experiment

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of the International Atomic Energy Agency intercomparison experiments held at the 'Boris Kidric' Institute, Vinca, in May 1973. The experiments are parts of a multilaboratory intercomparison programme sponsored by the IAEA for the evaluation of nuclear accident dosimetry systems and eventually recommendation of dosimetry systems that will provide adequate informations in the event of a criticality accident. The previous two studies were held at the Valduc Centre near Dijon (France) in June 1970 and at the ORNL in Oak Ridge (USA), in May 1971. Parts of the intercomparison studies were coordination meetings. The topics and conclusions of the Third coordination meeting are given in the Chairman's Report of F.F. Haywood. This paper will deal, therefore, only with data concerning the Third intercomparison experiments in which the RB reactor at Vinca was used as a source of mixed radiation. (author)

  11. Improvement of dosimetry for I-131 therapy of lung metastases with special regard to children with thyroid cancer from Belarus following the Chernobyl accident. Final report 1997-1999

    The main problem in treating disseminated pulmonary metastases in children with papillary thyroid cancer is to find a balance between an insufficient dose for the ablation of metastatic tissue and unnecessary high radiation exposure to the lungs and the bone marrow. This can hardly be achieved without quantitative dosimetry for the more or less inhomogeneously distributed 1-131 in high dosed radioiodine therapy. The major goal of this project is to improve the concept for treating patients with lung metastases induced by thyroid carcinoma. Almost all of the patients with lung metastases are treated in more than one therapy course. After each course the knowledge of the doses to the tumor tissue, the lung, and the bone marrow is of crucial importance for a well funded decision about further treatment. In the cases of either the tumor doses being inefficient for ablation or substantial impairment of residuing pulmonary metastases or the cumulated doses to lung and bone marrow exceeds empirically defined ''critical'' limits the fractionated radioiodine treatment has to be stopped to avoid side effects such as lung fibrosis or leukemia in patients with papillary thyroid cancer. The decision which has to be taken must consider that prognosis with respect to mortality and quality of life even in the case of persisting lung metastases may be better than after the induction of progressive pulmonary fibrosis. Up to now, patients are treated more or less empirically until complete remission is achieved and no tumor uptake is visible in post-therapeutic scans with a gamma camera or the cumulative activity of 1-131 taken up by the lungs exceeds 3 GBq (80 mCi) according to recommendations given by Benua and Leaper in 1962. This project combines empirical approaches with theoretical research at cellular level to optimize the dose to the tumor cells with protection of healthy lung tissue. (orig.)

  12. The micronucleus assay in radiation accidents

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in peripheral blood lymphocytes is a standardised and validated technique for bio dosimetry. Automated scoring of micronuclei allows large scale applications as in population triage in case of radiation accidents or malevolent use of radioactive sources. The dose detection limit (95% confidence) of the micronucleus assay for individual dose assessment is restricted to 0.2 Gy but can be decreased to 0.1 Gy by scoring centromeres in micronuclei using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In the past the micronucleus assay was applied for a number of large scale bio monitoring studies of nuclear power plant workers and hospital workers. Baseline micronucleus frequencies depend strongly on age and gender. The assay was also already used for bio dosimetry of radiation accidents. In a multiple endpoint bio dosimetry study for dose assessment of a worker exposed accidentally in 2003 to X-rays, a good agreement was obtained between dose estimates resulting from the micronucleus assay, the scoring of dicentrics and translocations. Automated scoring of micronuclei in combination with centromere signals, allowing systematic bio dosimetry of exposed populations, remains a challenge for the future.

  13. Dosimetry on the radiological risks prevention in radiotherapy; La dosimetria en la prevencion de riesgos radiologicos en radioterapia

    Fornet R, O. M.; Perez G, F., E-mail: nuclear2@citmahlg.holguin.inf.cu [Delegacion Territorial del CITMA, Peralta 16 esq. P. Feria, Rpto. Peralta, 80400 Holguin (Cuba)

    2014-08-15

    Dosimetry in its various forms plays a determining role on the radiological risks prevention in radiotherapy. To prove this in this paper is shown an analysis based on the risk matrix method, how the dosimetry can influence in each stages of a radiotherapy service; installation and acceptance, operation, maintenance and calibration. For each one of these stages the role that can play is analyzed as either the initiating event of a radiological accident or limiting barrier of these events of the dosimetric processes used for the individual dosimetry, the area monitoring, fixed or portable, for radiation beam dosimetry and of the patients for a radiotherapy service with cobalt-therapy equipment. The result of the study shows that the application of a prospective approach in the role evaluation of dosimetry in the prevention and mitigation of the consequences of a radiological accident in radiotherapy is crucial and should be subject to permanent evaluation at each development stage of these services. (author)

  14. INFORMATION: INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    2004-01-01

    We inform you that the Individual Dosimetry Service will be exceptionally closed on April 13 and 14 (Tuesday and Wednesday). Only the very urgent cases will be handled during the days mentioned above.

  15. Dosimetry for radiation processing

    Miller, Arne

    1986-01-01

    During the past few years significant advances have taken place in the different areas of dosimetry for radiation processing, mainly stimulated by the increased interest in radiation for food preservation, plastic processing and sterilization of medical products. Reference services both by...... and sterilization dosimetry, optichromic dosimeters in the shape of small tubes for food processing, and ESR spectroscopy of alanine for reference dosimetry. In this paper the special features of radiation processing dosimetry are discussed, several commonly used dosimeters are reviewed, and factors...... international organizations (IAEA) and national laboratories have helped to improve the reliability of dose measurements. Several dosimeter systems like calorimetry, perspex, and radiochromic dye films are being improved and new systems have emerged, e.g. spectrophotometry of dichromate solution for reference...

  16. Individual Dosimetry Service

    2004-01-01

    Individual Dosimetry Service will be closed on Thursday 9 September (Jeûne genevois) and on Friday 10 September. We inform all staffs and users under regular dosimetry control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2004 are available from their usual dispatchers. Please have your films changed before the 13 SEPTEMBER 2004. The color of the dosimeter valid in SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2004 is RED.

  17. News on personal dosimetry

    What is going on in personal monitoring? The DIS-1 dosimeter (Rados/Mirion Technologies), on the market since 2000, is being introduced in the 4th dosimetry service in Switzerland. In Germany, dosimetry services are looking for alternatives to the film dosimeter. They have recently taken the decision for two technical solutions. IEC has published a standard which shall regulate technical requirements for dosimeters world-wide. (orig.)

  18. Dosimetry and Calibration Section

    The Dosimetry and Calibration Section fulfils two tasks within CERN's Radiation Protection Group: the Individual Dosimetry Service monitors more than 5000 persons potentially exposed to ionizing radiation on the CERN sites, and the Calibration Laboratory verifies throughout the year, at regular intervals, over 1000 instruments, monitors, and electronic dosimeters used by RP Group. The establishment of a Quality Assurance System for the Individual Dosimetry Service, a requirement of the new Swiss Ordinance for personal dosimetry, put a considerable workload on the section. Together with an external consultant it was decided to identify and then describe the different 'processes' of the routine work performed in the dosimetry service. The resulting Quality Manual was submitted to the Federal Office for Public Health in Bern in autumn. The CERN Individual Dosimetry Service will eventually be officially endorsed after a successful technical test in March 1999. On the technical side, the introduction of an automatic development machine for gamma films was very successful. It processes the dosimetric films without an operator being present, and its built-in regeneration mechanism keeps the concentration of the processing chemicals at a constant level

  19. Factors influencing EPR dosimetry in fingernails

    The technique based on the detection of ionizing radiation induced radicals by EPR in tooth enamel is an established method for the dosimetry of exposed persons in radiological emergencies. Dosimetry based on EPR spectral analysis of fingernail clippings, currently under development, has the practical advantage of the easier sample collection. A limiting factor is that overlapping the radiation induced signal (RIS), fingernails have shown the presence of two mechanically induced signals, called MIS1 and MIS2, due to elastic and plastic deformation respectively, at the time of fingernails cutting. With a water treatment, MIS1 is eliminated while MIS2 is considerably reduced. The calibration curves needed for radiation accident dosimetry should have 'universal' characteristics, ie. Represent the variability that can be found in different individuals. Early studies were directed to the analysis of factors affecting the development of such universal calibration curves. The peak to peak amplitude of the signal before and after the water treatment as well as the effect of size and number of clippings were studied. Furthermore, the interpersonal and intrapersonal variability were analyzed. Taking into account these previous studies, the optimal conditions for measurement were determined and EPR spectra of samples irradiated at different doses were used for the developing of dose-response curves. This paper presents the analysis of the results.(authors)

  20. Bayesian Methods for Radiation Detection and Dosimetry

    We performed work in three areas: radiation detection, external and internal radiation dosimetry. In radiation detection we developed Bayesian techniques to estimate the net activity of high and low activity radioactive samples. These techniques have the advantage that the remaining uncertainty about the net activity is described by probability densities. Graphs of the densities show the uncertainty in pictorial form. Figure 1 below demonstrates this point. We applied stochastic processes for a method to obtain Bayesian estimates of 222Rn-daughter products from observed counting rates. In external radiation dosimetry we studied and developed Bayesian methods to estimate radiation doses to an individual with radiation induced chromosome aberrations. We analyzed chromosome aberrations after exposure to gammas and neutrons and developed a method for dose-estimation after criticality accidents. The research in internal radiation dosimetry focused on parameter estimation for compartmental models from observed compartmental activities. From the estimated probability densities of the model parameters we were able to derive the densities for compartmental activities for a two compartment catenary model at different times. We also calculated the average activities and their standard deviation for a simple two compartment model

  1. Usability of VTL from natural quartz grains for retrospective dosimetry.

    Fujita, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Tetsuo

    2007-01-01

    To develop retrospective dosimetry of unexpected radiation accident, basic studies on violet thermoluminescence (VTL) phenomena were conducted using natural quartz grains. All VTL glowcurves of as-received samples did not exhibit peaks VTL peaks in the temperature region VTL measurements from natural quartz. The mean lives of VTL were evaluated by the various heating rates method and the range of values was found to be between some days and ten thousands of years depending on each peak. Especially, the mean life of VTL peak at 200 degrees C was years order. Furthermore, the lower detection limit was calculated to be tens of mGy from the response curve. This value was lower than that of other methods such as ESR dosimetry. From these results, we conclude that VTL dosimetry can be preferred for accidental evaluation. PMID:16936290

  2. Dosimetry of x-ray beams: The measure of the problem

    This document contains the text of an oral presentation on dosimetry of analytical x-ray equipment presented at the Denver X-Ray Conference. Included are discussions of sources of background radiation, exposure limits from occupational sources, and the relationship of these sources to the high dose source of x-rays found in analytical machines. The mathematical basis of x-ray dosimetry is reviewed in preparation for more detailed notes on personnel dosimetry and the selection of the most appropriate dosimeter for a specific application. The presentation concludes with a discussion common to previous x-ray equipment accidents. 2 refs

  3. Criticality dosimetry using a sulfur disk and a priori neutron spectral knowledge

    This paper proposes the design of a new approach to criticality accident dosimetry, which uses a priori knowledge of the neutron spectra for criticality accident conditions, and depends upon accurate detector spectral response characterization and environmental modeling. The sulfur disk was selected as a potential neutron detector, for neutrons of higher energies. Several sulfur disks were exposed to a critical Godiva experiment, the spectral response function determined using Monte Carlo methods, and the activity determined using knowledge of the known criticality spectrum. The new method, possibly with two or more different detectors to measure other energy ranges, holds promise as a practical approach to neutron criticality dosimetry

  4. Diagnostic et perspectives de développement de la filière fruits et légumes biologiques des Pays de la Loire

    Morel-Thareau, Bertille; Le Guen, Roger; Schieb-Bienfait, Nathalie; Lambert, Annie; Euzen, Rebecca

    2003-01-01

    Sur les 1700 producteurs de fruits et légumes en Pays de la Loire, 150 (seulement) sont concernés par la production de fruits et de légumes biologiques, dispersés sur les cinq départements. La production de fruits et légumes biologiques est donc une production de niche dont l’importance sur le plan national est faible (6ème région productrice de légumes biologiques). La filière se caractérise par la présence de nombreux acteurs, souvent indépendants, voire isolés. Ce secteur est structuré en ...

  5. Diagnostic et perspectives de développement de la filière céréales biologiques des Pays de la Loire

    Thareau, Bertille; Le Guen, Roger; Lambert, Annie; Schieb-Bienfait, Nathalie

    2004-01-01

    Plus encore qu’en conventionnel, la production de céréales est très dispersée dans le paysage agrobiologique régional. Ce sont avant tout les éleveurs bovins, nombreux en Pays de la Loire, qui produisent des céréales et oléoprotéagineux biologiques. Les exploitants spécialisés en grandes cultures ne produisent que 20% des céréales biologiques régionales (source RGA 2001). Ainsi, notre enquête auprès des producteurs de céréales biologiques concerne des agriculteurs aux parcours et aux exploita...

  6. Secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL)

    A secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory has been established in the Tun Ismail Research Centre, Malaysia as a national laboratory for reference and standardization purposes in the field of radiation dosimetry. This article gives brief accounts on the general information, development of the facility, programmes to be carried out as well as other information on the relevant aspects of the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory. (author)

  7. Topics in radiation dosimetry radiation dosimetry, v.1

    Attix, Frank H

    2013-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry, Supplement 1: Topics in Radiation Dosimetry covers instruments and techniques in dealing with special dosimetry problems. The book discusses thermoluminescence dosimetry in archeological dating; dosimetric applications of track etching; vacuum chambers of radiation measurement. The text also describes wall-less detectors in microdosimetry; dosimetry of low-energy X-rays; and the theory and general applicability of the gamma-ray theory of track effects to various systems. Dose equivalent determinations in neutron fields by means of moderator techniques; as well as developm

  8. Qualité chimique et biologique du bassin de la Semois (partie Belge

    LECLERCQ L.

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Les eaux du bassin de la Semois belge ont été étudiées, en 25 stations, sous différents aspects complémentaires : chimie, diatomées et invertébrés benthiques. Les méthodes utilisées sont l'indice de pollution organique (IPO, LECLERCQ et VANDEVENNE, 1987, un indice diatomique (ID, LECLERCQ, non publié et l'indice biologique global normalisé (IBGN, AFNOR, 1992. Grâce aux analyses chimiques et diatomiques, nous décrivons différents types d'eaux naturelles, à minéralisation croissante, et différents niveaux de pollution et d'eutrophication. Nous présentons une carte d e qualité détaillée, à l'usage des gestionnaires. Les diatomées apparaissent comme les bioindicateurs les plus fiables pour ces paramètres. Les invertébrés sont moins intéressants à utiliser. Ils sont pratiquement insensibles au type de minéralisation de l'eau (tout au moins au niveau de la famille, qui est le seul niveau d'identification possible en routine, mais ces organismes peuvent être plus sensibles au facteur substrat qu'à la pollution organique, conduisant alors à des estimations erronées.

  9. Dosimetry of neutron irradiations

    Biological dosimetry of neutron irradiation appears to be of great difficulty due to the multiparametric aspect of the relative biological effectiveness and the heterogeneity of the neutron dose distribution. Dosimetry by sodium 24 activation which can be performed by means of portable radiameters appears to be very useful for early triage within the 3 h following neutron irradiation, whereas hematological dosimetry by slope and level analysis of the lymphocyte drop cannot be used in this case. Chromosomic aberration analysis allows to evaluate the neutron dose heterogeneity by the frequency measurement of acentric fragments not originating from the formation of dicentrics or rings. Finally, recent experimental data on large primate models (baboons) have shown that some plasma hemostasia factors appear to be reliable biological indicators and noticeable markers of the prognosis of neutron irradiation

  10. Interstitial brachytherapy dosimetry update

    In March 2004, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) published an update to the AAPM Task Group No. 43 Report (TG-43) which was initially published in 1995. This update was pursued primarily due to the marked increase in permanent implantation of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources in the United States over the past decade, and clinical rationale for the need of accurate dosimetry in the implementation of interstitial brachytherapy. Additionally, there were substantial improvements in the brachytherapy dosimetry formalism, accuracy of related parameters and methods for determining these parameters. With salient background, these improvements are discussed in the context of radiation dosimetry. As an example, the impact of this update on the administered dose is assessed for the model 200 103Pd brachytherapy source. (authors)

  11. Secondary standards dosimetry laboratories

    The Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) is part of an international network of dosimetry laboratories established by the IAEA and WHO. The network services maintain the consistency and accuracy of the therapeutic dose by exercising a national and international intercomparison program as well as providing calibration services to the end users, mainly radiotherapy departments in hospitals. The SSDL's are designated by national laboratories (such as Primary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories, PSDL's) to provide national and international absorbed dose traceability for users in that country. The advantage of the SSDL is that the absorbed dose measurements are consistent among the stakeholder countries.The Physics and Safety divisions have recently re-established an SSDL at ANSTO. The SSDL utilises a collimated cobalt-60 source of activity 170 TBq and dose rate of SmGy/sec at 1 metre (within ±2%), and provides a service to calibrate therapy level thimble ionisation chambers and electrometers

  12. Computational methods in several fields of radiation dosimetry

    Full text: Radiation dosimetry has to cope with a wide spectrum of applications and requirements in time and size. The ubiquitous presence of various radiation fields or radionuclides in the human home, working, urban or agricultural environment can lead to various dosimetric tasks starting from radioecology, retrospective and predictive dosimetry, personal dosimetry, up to measurements of radionuclide concentrations in environmental and food product and, finally in persons and their excreta. In all these fields measurements and computational models for the interpretation or understanding of observations are employed explicitly or implicitly. In this lecture some examples of own computational models will be given from the various dosimetric fields, including a) Radioecology (e.g. with the code systems based on ECOSYS, which was developed far before the Chernobyl reactor accident, and tested thoroughly afterwards), b) Internal dosimetry (improved metabolism models based on our own data), c) External dosimetry (with the new ICRU-ICRP-Voxelphantom developed by our lab), d) Radiation therapy (with GEANT IV as applied to mixed reactor radiation incident on individualized voxel phantoms), e) Some aspects of nanodosimetric track structure computations (not dealt with in the other presentation of this author). Finally, some general remarks will be made on the high explicit or implicit importance of computational models in radiation protection and other research field dealing with large systems, as well as on good scientific practices which should generally be followed when developing and applying such computational models

  13. ADAPTATION ET VALIDATION D’UN INDICE POISSON (FBI) POUR L’ÉVALUATION DE LA QUALITÉ BIOLOGIQUE DES COURS D’EAU FRANÇAIS.

    Oberdorff, T.; Pont, D.; Hugueny, B.; BELLIARD J.; BERREBI R.; PORCHER J. P.

    2002-01-01

    La récente Directive Cadre sur l’Eau (DCE) demande aux états membres de la communauté européenne la préservation et la restauration de l’état écologique des écosystèmes aquatiques au travers de leurs composantes chimiques et biologiques. Satisfaire cette demande nécessite de disposer d’indicateurs biologiques capables d’apporter une information pertinente sur l’état de santé de ces écosystèmes. Ces indicateurs doivent être scientifiquement valides, efficaces, rapides à mettre en œuvre et appl...

  14. Nuclear medicine radiation dosimetry

    McParland, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    Complexities of the requirements for accurate radiation dosimetry evaluation in both diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine (including PET) have grown over the past decade. This is due primarily to four factors: growing consideration of accurate patient-specific treatment planning for radionuclide therapy as a means of improving the therapeutic benefit, development of more realistic anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in estimating radiation transport and dosimetry in patients, design and use of advanced Monte Carlo algorithms in calculating the above-mentioned radiation transport and

  15. Status of radiation processing dosimetry

    Miller, A.

    Several milestones have marked the field of radiation processing dosimetry since IMRP 7. Among them are the IAEA symposium on High Dose Dosimetry for Radiation Processing and the international Workshops on Dosimetry for Radiation Processing organized by the ASTM. Several standards have been or are...... being published by the ASTM in this field, both on dosimetry procedures and on the proper use of specific dosimeter systems. Several individuals are involved in this international cooperation which contribute significantly to the broader understanding of the role of dosimetry in radiation processing....... The importance of dosimetry is emphasized in the standards on radiation sterilization which are currently drafted by the European standards organization CEN and by the international standards organization ISO. In both standards, dosimetry plays key roles in characterization of the facility, in...

  16. Tchernobyl accident

    First, R.M.B.K type reactors are described. Then, safety problems are dealt with reactor control, behavior during transients, normal loss of power and behavior of the reactor in case of leak. A possible scenario of the accident of Tchernobyl is proposed: events before the explosion, possible initiators, possible scenario and events subsequent to the core meltdown (corium-concrete interaction, interaction with the groundwater table). An estimation of the source term is proposed first from the installation characteristics and the supposed scenario of the accident, and from the measurements in Europe; radiological consequences are also estimated. Radioactivity measurements (Europe, Scandinavia, Western Europe, France) are given in tables (meteorological maps and fallouts in Europe). Finally, a description of the site is given

  17. Accident: Reminder

    2003-01-01

    There is no left turn to Point 1 from the customs, direction CERN. A terrible accident happened last week on the Route de Meyrin just outside Entrance B because traffic regulations were not respected. You are reminded that when travelling from the customs, direction CERN, turning left to Point 1 is forbidden. Access to Point 1 from the customs is only via entering CERN, going down to the roundabout and coming back up to the traffic lights at Entrance B

  18. Conduite de productions animales dans des couverts complexes. Production de volailles biologiques en parcours prairiaux et arborés

    2014-01-01

    L’accès à un parcours extérieur est une obligation réglementaire dans le cadre de l’élevage avicole biologique. Il est possible de valoriser son utilisation par les animaux car il peut rendre des services aux animaux. Les parcours peuvent agir à différents niveaux : santé, alimentation, performance zootechnique, environnement, comportement. Le dispositif AlterAvi a permis d’étudier les services rendus par les parcours. Ainsi, des aménagements comme l’implantation d’arbres ont permis d’augment...

  19. Composition corporelle et caractéristiques biologiques des muscles chez les bovins en croissance et à l'engrais

    Micol, Didier; Robelin, Jacques; Geay, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Cet article présente de façon synthétique les connaissances acquises par différentes équipes de recherches sur les lois biologiques de variations de la composition corporelle des bovins et les effets des facteurs zootechniques qui permettent de la modifier (génotype, sexe, stade d’abattage, niveau d’alimentation, nature de la ration et facteurs de croissance). Les caractéristiques du tissu musculaire, déterminantes pour la qualité de la viande, et leurs variations sous l’influence des mêmes f...

  20. Limitation des populations de ravageurs de l’olivier par le recours à la lutte biologique par conservation

    Warlop, Francois

    2006-01-01

    L’olivier est une culture relativement rustique, mais qui peut être fortement attaquée par la mouche Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin), son principal ravageur. Les parasitoïdes de cette mouche sont connus, mais leur impact sur les populations de Diptères demeure faible, faute d’aménagement adéquat du paysage et suite à une intensification abusive des pratiques culturales. Le programme d’installation de bandes florales mené par le Groupe de recherches en agriculture biologique qui a débuté en 2004 vis...

  1. Une exploration des liens entre dynamiques identitaires et développement territorial. Le cas des agriculteurs biologiques

    Van Dam, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Cet article propose une analyse des liens entre la dynamique identitaire et l’engagement dans un projet de développement territorial, chez les agriculteurs biologiques. Adoptant une posture constructiviste, nous posons comme hypothèse que la dynamique identitaire, entendue comme une configuration particulière entre tensions identitaires et histoire de vie, influence le type de projet initié par l’agriculteur. Nous abordons le développement territorial dans sa double dimension de coordination ...

  2. Verger de kiwi (Actinidia) conduit en Agriculture Biologique : résoudre le problème de la fertilisation

    Romet, Lionel

    2006-01-01

    Compte-tenu des besoins de la plante, la fertilisation est le problème majeur de la production de kiwi en Agriculture Biologique. Pour avoir de l’azote assimilable par le kiwi après son débourrement il est possible de fertiliser avec du guano d’oiseaux. La date de l'apport apparaît comme primordiale. Le tourteau de ricin qu 'il soit sous forme de bouchon ou en semoule ne convient pas pour des épandages hivernaux, car sa minéralisation est beaucoup plus lente et est partielle sur une année....

  3. Ion storage dosimetry

    Mathur, V. K.

    2001-09-01

    The availability of a reliable, accurate and cost-effective real-time personnel dosimetry system is fascinating to radiation workers. Electronic dosimeters are contemplated to meet this demand of active dosimetry. The development of direct ion storage (DIS) dosimeters, a member of the electronic dosimeter family, for personnel dosimetry is also an attempt in this direction. DIS dosimeter is a hybrid of the well-established technology of ion chambers and the latest advances in data storage using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) analog memory device. This dosimeter is capable of monitoring legal occupational radiation doses of gamma, X-rays, beta and neutron radiation. Similar to an ion chamber, the performance of the dosimeter for a particular application can be optimized through the selection of appropriate wall materials. The use of the floating gate of a MOSFET as one of the electrodes of the ion chamber allows the miniaturization of the device to the size of a dosimetry badge and avoids the use of power supplies during dose accumulation. The concept of the device, underlying physics and the design of the DIS dosimeter are discussed. The results of preliminary testing of the device are also provided.

  4. Individual Dosimetry Service

    2004-01-01

    We inform all staffs and users under regular dosimetry control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period MAY-JUNE 2004 are available from their usual dispatchers. Please have your films changed before the 11th MAY 2004. The color of the dosimeter valid in MAY-JUNE 2004 is YELLOW.

  5. Individual dosimetry service

    2004-01-01

    We inform all staffs and users under regular dosimetry control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period MARCH/APRIL 2004 are available from their usual dispatchers. Please have your films changed before the 11th MARCH 2004. The color of the dosimeter valid in MARCH/APRIL 2004 is BLUE.

  6. Individual dosimetry service

    2004-01-01

    We inform all staff and users under regular dosimetry control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period JULY-AUGUST 2004 are available from their usual dispatchers. Please have your films changed before the 15 JULY 2004. The color of the dosimeter valid in July-August 2004 is PINK.

  7. Dosimetry and Calibration Section

    The two tasks of the Dosimetry and Calibration Section at CERN are the Individual Dosimetry Service which assures the personal monitoring of about 5000 persons potentially exposed to ionizing radiation at CERN, and the Calibration Laboratory which verifies all the instruments and monitors. This equipment is used by the sections of the RP Group for assuring radiation protection around CERN's accelerators, and by the Environmental Section of TISTE. In addition, nearly 250 electronic and 300 quartz fibre dosimeters, employed in operational dosimetry, are calibrated at least once a year. The Individual Dosimetry Service uses an extended database (INDOS) which contains information about all the individual doses ever received at CERN. For most of 1997 it was operated without the support of a database administrator as the technician who had assured this work retired. The Software Support Section of TIS-TE took over the technical responsibility of the database, but in view of the many other tasks of this Section and the lack of personnel, only a few interventions for solving immediate problems were possible

  8. Dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    Dosimetry is an area of increasing importance in diagnostic radiology. There is a realisation amongst health professionals that the radiation dose received by patients from modern X-ray examinations and procedures can be at a level of significance for the induction of cancer across a population, and in some unfortunate instances, in the acute damage to particular body organs such as skin and eyes. The formulation and measurement procedures for diagnostic radiology dosimetry have recently been standardised through an international code of practice which describes the methodologies necessary to address the diverging imaging modalities used in diagnostic radiology. Common to all dosimetry methodologies is the measurement of the air kerma from the X-ray device under defined conditions. To ensure the accuracy of the dosimetric determination, such measurements need to be made with appropriate instrumentation that has a calibration that is traceable to a standards laboratory. Dosimetric methods are used in radiology departments for a variety of purposes including the determination of patient dose levels to allow examinations to be optimized and to assist in decisions on the justification of examination choices. Patient dosimetry is important for special cases such as for X-ray examinations of children and pregnant patients. It is also a key component of the quality control of X-ray equipment and procedures.

  9. Ion-kill dosimetry

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  10. High frequency electromagnetic dosimetry

    Sánchez-Hernández, David A

    2009-01-01

    Along with the growth of RF and microwave technology applications, there is a mounting concern about the possible adverse effects over human health from electromagnetic radiation. Addressing this issue and putting it into perspective, this groundbreaking resource provides critical details on the latest advances in high frequency electromagnetic dosimetry.

  11. Dosimetry of pion beams

    Negative pion beams are probably the most esoteric and most complicated type of radiation which has been suggested for use in clinical radiotherapy. Because of the limited availability of pion beams in the past, even to nuclear physicists, there exist relatively fewer basic data for this modality. Pion dosimetry is discussed

  12. The ARN critical dosimetry system

    Accident Dosimetry Systems at Silene Reactor in 2002, showing a good performance. (author)

  13. Immediate medical consequences of nuclear accidents: lessons from Chernobyl

    The immediate medical response to the nuclear accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station involved containment of the radioactivity and evacuation of the nearby population. The next step consisted of assessment of the radiation dose received by individuals, based on biological dosimetry, and treatment of those exposed. Medical care involved treatment of skin burns; measures to support bone marrow failure, gastrointestinal tract injury, and other organ damage (i.e., infection prophylaxis and transfusions) for those with lower radiation dose exposure; and bone marrow transplantation for those exposed to a high dose of radiation. At Chernobyl, two victims died immediately and 29 died of radiation or thermal injuries in the next three months. The remaining victims of the accident are currently well. A nuclear accident anywhere is a nuclear accident everywhere. Prevention and cooperation in response to these accidents are essential goals

  14. Transportation accidents

    Predicting the possible consequences of transportation accidents provides a severe challenge to an analyst who must make a judgment of the likely consequences of a release event at an unpredictable time and place. Since it is impractical to try to obtain detailed knowledge of the meteorology and terrain for every potential accident location on a route or to obtain accurate descriptions of population distributions or sensitive property to be protected (data which are more likely to be more readily available when one deals with fixed-site problems), he is constrained to make conservative assumptions in response to a demanding public audience. These conservative assumptions are frequently offset by very small source terms (relative to a fixed site) created when a transport vehicle is involved in an accident. For radioactive materials, which are the principal interest of the authors, only the most elementary models have been used for assessing the consequences of release of these materials in the transportation setting. Risk analysis and environmental impact statements frequently have used the Pasquill-Gifford/gaussian techniques for releases of short duration, which are both simple and easy to apply and require a minimum amount of detailed information. However, after deciding to use such a model, the problem of selecting what specific parameters to use in specific transportation situations still presents itself. Additional complications arise because source terms are not well characterized, release rates can be variable over short and long time periods, and mechanisms by which source aerosols become entrained in air are not always obvious. Some approaches that have been used to address these problems will be reviewed with emphasis on guidelines to avoid the Worst-Case Scenario Syndrome

  15. Review of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) instrumental developments for retrospective dosimetry

    Bøtter-Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Jain, Mayank

    2010-01-01

    This review describes 40 years of experience gained at Risø National Laboratory in the development of facilities for irradiation, thermal/optical stimulation and luminescence signal detection. These facilities have mainly been used in luminescence dating and nuclear accident dosimetry. We focus...

  16. Retrospective dosimetry: Dose evaluation using unheated and heated quartz from a radioactive waste storage building

    Jain, M.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.; Jungner, H.

    In the assessment of dose received from a nuclear accident, considerable attention has been paid to retrospective dosimetry using heated materials such as household ceramics and bricks. However, unheated materials such as mortar and concrete are more commonly found in industrial sites and...

  17. Dosimetry for food irradiation

    A Manual of Food Irradiation Dosimetry was published in 1977 under the auspices of the IAEA as Technical Reports Series No. 178. It was the first monograph of its kind and served as a reference in the field of radiation processing and in the development of standards. While the essential information about radiation dosimetry in this publication has not become obsolete, other publications on radiation dosimetry have become available which have provided useful information for incorporation in this updated version. There is already a Codex General Standard for Irradiated Foods and an associated Code of Practice for Operation of Irradiation Facilities used for Treatment of Food, issued in 1984 by the Codex Alimentarius Commission of the FAO/WHO Food Standard Programme. The Codex Standard contains provisions on irradiation facilities and process control which include, among other requirements, that control of the processes within facilities shall include the keeping of adequate records including quantitative dosimetry. Appendix A of the Standard provides an explanation of process control and dosimetric requirements in compliance with the Codex Standard. By 1999, over 40 countries had implemented national regulations or issued specific approval for certain irradiated food items/classes of food based on the principles of the Codex Standard and its Code of Practice. Food irradiation is thus expanding, as over 30 countries are now actually applying this process for the treatment of one or more food products for commercial purposes. Irradiated foods are being marketed at retail level in several countries. With the increasing recognition and application of irradiation as a sanitary and phytosanitary treatment of food based on the provisions of the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures of the World Trade Organization, international trade in irradiated food is expected to expand during the next decade. It is therefore essential that proper dosimetry

  18. Guidance on approval of dosimetry services under the ionising radiations regulations 1985

    Regulation 15 of the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 gives the Health and Safety Executive the power to approve suitable dosimetry services for the purpose of Regulations 13 (dose assessment), 14 (accident dosimetry) and 27 (contingency plans). Part 3 of notes for guidance for dosimetry services wishing to apply to the HSE for approval is presented. This describes those aspects which are relevant to co-ordination of inputs from contributing approved dosimetry services (ADS's) and record keeping of assessed doses. It sets out the functions of the co-ordinating ADS's, gives guidance on interpretation of dose quantities, specifies the minimum content of dose records and describes suitable types of dose record storage. Finally the basis on which HSE will assess a service for approval is outlined. (U.K.)

  19. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    1990-01-01

    A continuation of the treatise The Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation, Volume III builds upon the foundations of Volumes I and II and the tradition of the preceeding treatise Radiation Dosimetry. Volume III contains three comprehensive chapters on the applications of radiation dosimetry in particular research and medical settings, a chapter on unique and useful detectors, and two chapters on Monte Carlo techniques and their applications.

  20. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR

  1. Ambiguities in thermoluminescence dosimetry

    On one hand, thermoluminescence dosimetry is one of most reliable, rugged and economical system of passive dosimetry but on the other hand there are several ambiguities, which need attention. The PTTL is a complex phenomenon and it is difficult to identify the source for the transfer of the charge carrier to repopulate the traps related to the glow peaks. For the photon energy dependence it is difficult to explain the change in the response for 662 keV gamma rays of 137Cs as compared to the response for 1.25 MeV gamma rays of 60Co. The increase in the response of a TLD with increasing heating rate poses another ambiguity and so is the case with the observations of the supra linearity of different glow peaks. To over come the ambiguities, efforts have to continue to enhance the understanding and to harmonize the protocol for reliable experimental data

  2. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    Amaro, C.R. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR.

  3. Accidental neutron dosimetry with human hair

    Human hair contains sulfur, which can be activated by fast neutrons. The 32S(n,p)32P reaction with a threshold of 2.5 MeV was used for fast neutron dose estimation. It is a very important parameter for individual dose reconstruction with regards to the heterogeneity of the neutron transfer to the human body. Samples of human hair were irradiated in a radial channel of a training reactor VR-1. 32P activity in hair was measured both, directly by means of a proportional counter, and as ash dispersed in a liquid scintillator. Based on neutron spectrum estimation, a relationship between the neutron dose and induced activity was derived. The experiment verified the practical feasibility of this dosimetry method in cases of criticality accidents or malevolent acts with nuclear materials. - Highlights: • Human hair contains sulfur. • Reaction 32S(n,p)32P can be used for dosimetry of fast neutrons. • Relation between 32P activity and neutron dose can be derived for a specific neutron spectrum

  4. Sixth symposium on neutron dosimetry

    This booklet contains all abstracts of papers presented in 13 sessions. Main topics: Cross sections and Kerma factors; analytical radiobiology; detectors for personnel monitoring; secondary charged particles and microdosimetric basis of q-value for neutrons; personnel dosimetry; concepts for radiation protection; ambient monitoring; TEPC and ion chambers in radiation protection; beam dosimetry; track detectors (CR-39); dosimetry at biomedical irradiation facilities; health physics at therapy facilities; calibration for radiation protection; devices for beam dosimetry (TLD and miscellaneous); therapy and biomedical irradiation facilities; treatment planning. (HP)

  5. Personal radon daughter dosimetry

    The conventional means of radon daughter exposure estimatikn for uranium miners in Canada is by grab sampling and time weighting. Personal dosimetry is a possible alternative method with its own advantages and limitations. The author poses basic questions with regard to two methods of radon daughter detection, thermoluminescent chips and track-etch film. An historical review of previous and current research and development programs in Canada and in other countries is presented, as are brief results and conclusions of each dosimeter evaluation

  6. Personnel radiation dosimetry

    The book contains the 21 technical papers presented at the Technical Committee Meeting to Elaborate Procedures and Data for the Intercomparison of Personnel Dosimeters organizaed by the IAEA on 22-26 April 1985. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. A list of areas in which additional research and development work is needed and recommendations for an IAEA-sponsored intercomparison program on personnel dosimetry is also included

  7. Utilisation of OSL from table salt in retrospective dosimetry

    Common salt (NaCl) has previously been suggested for use in dose estimation in accident dosimetry. In this study, we investigated the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and violet thermoluminescence (VTL) characteristics of 'Aji-Shio' (Ajinomoto), a Japanese commercial salt. A comparison of OSL and TL signals allowed identification of common source traps. The initial OSL signal contained a dominant thermally unstable component, which necessitated prior heat treatment. Based on these luminescence characteristics, a single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) OSL protocol was modified and tested. The protocol worked very well for six types of salt, but not for four other types of salt. A minimum detection limit of ∼15 mGy was estimated using the OSL protocol; this is lower than the value obtained from other forms of OSL retrospective dosimetry and lower than that obtained using electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry. It was concluded that the OSL from Japanese commercial salt could be used successfully to derive precise estimates of accident dose. (author)

  8. Usability of VTL from natural quartz grains for retrospective dosimetry

    To develop retrospective dosimetry of unexpected radiation accident, basic studies on violet thermoluminescence (VTL) phenomena were conducted using natural quartz grains. All VTL glow curves of as-received samples did not exhibit peaks <250 deg. C, although for artificially irradiated quartz samples there were VTL peaks in the temperature region <250 deg. C. Therefore, accident doses could be estimated without the interference of naturally accumulated doses by VTL measurements from natural quartz. The mean lives of VTL were evaluated by the various heating rates method and the range of values was found to be between some days and ten thousands of years depending on each peak. Especially, the mean life of VTL peak at 200 deg. C was years order. Furthermore, the lower detection limit was calculated to be tens of mGy from the response curve. This value was lower than that of other methods such as ESR dosimetry. From these results, we conclude that VTL dosimetry can be preferred for accidental evaluation. (authors)

  9. Dosimetry: an ARDENT topic

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The first annual ARDENT workshop took place in Vienna from 20 to 23 November. The workshop gathered together the Early-Stage Researchers (ESR) and their supervisors, plus other people involved from all the participating institutions.   “The meeting, which was organised with the local support of the Austrian Institute of Technology, was a nice opportunity for the ESRs to get together, meet each other, and present their research plans and some preliminary results of their work,” says Marco Silari, a member of CERN Radiation Protection Group and the scientist in charge of the programme. Two full days were devoted to a training course on radiation dosimetry, delivered by renowned experts. The workshop closed with a half-day visit to the MedAustron facility in Wiener Neustadt. ARDENT (Advanced Radiation Dosimetry European Network Training) is a Marie Curie ITN project funded under EU FP7 with €4 million. The project focuses on radiation dosimetry exploiting se...

  10. Advances in biomedical dosimetry

    Full text: Radiation dosimetry, the accurate determination of the absorbed dose within an irradiated body or a piece of material, is a prerequisite for all applications of ionizing radiation. This has been known since the very first radiation applications in medicine and biology, and increasing efforts are being made by radiation researchers to develop more reliable, effective and safe instruments, and to further improve dosimetric accuracy for all types of radiation used. Development of new techniques and instrumentation was particularly fast in the field of both medical diagnostic and therapeutic radiology. Thus, in Paris in October the IAEA held the latest symposium in its continuing series on dosimetry in medicine and biology. The last one was held in Vienna in 1975. High-quality dosimetry is obviously of great importance for human health, whether the objectives lie in the prevention and control of risks associated with the nuclear industry, in medical uses of radioactive substances or X-ray beams for diagnostic purposes, or in the application of photon, electron or neutron beams in radiotherapy. The symposium dealt with the following subjects: General aspects of dosimetry; Special physical and biomedical aspects; Determination of absorbed dose; Standardization and calibration of dosimetric systems; and Development of dosimetric systems. The forty or so papers presented and the discussions that followed them brought out a certain number of dominant themes, among which three deserve particular mention. - The recent generalization of the International System of Units having prompted a fundamental reassessment of the dosimetric quantities to be considered in calibrating measuring instruments, various proposals were advanced by the representatives of national metrology laboratories to replace the quantity 'exposure' (SI unit = coulomb/kg) by 'Kerma' or 'absorbed dose' (unit joule/kg, the special name of which is 'gray'), this latter being closer to the practical

  11. The Chernobyl accident: EPR dosimetry on dental enamel of children

    The radiation dose on tooth enamel of children living close to Chernobyl has been evaluated by EPR. The sample preparation was reduced to a minimum of mechanical steps to remove a piece of enamel. A standard X-ray tube at low energy was used for additive irradiation. The filtration effect of facial soft tissue was taken into account. The radiation dose for a group of teeth slightly exceeds the annual dose, whereas for another group the dose very much exceeds the annual dose. Since the higher dose is found in teeth whose enamel have much lower EPR sensitivity to the radiation, it can be suggested that for these teeth the native signal could alter the evaluation of the smaller radiation signal

  12. Compendium on neutron spectra in criticality accident dosimetry

    Graphical and tabulated neutron spectra are presented: from selected critical assemblies; from critical solutions; of fission neutrons through shielding; of H2O-moderated fission neutrons through shielding; of D2O-moderated fission neutrons through shielding; of fission neutrons reflected from various materials; from the D(T,4He)n reaction (''14 MeV'' neutrons) through shielding and of ''14 MeV'' neutrons reflected from various materials

  13. Problems of dosimetric evaluation of radiation accident situations with external irradiation in neutron and gamma field

    The problems are discussed of the dosimetric evaluation of radiation accident situations in a mixed gamma and neutron field. The methods and means of accident dosimetry should allow evaluation basically in three stages: (1) within 6 hours following an accident to classify persons according to radiation exposure; (2) to obtain data on the maximum absorbed dose with accuracy better than +-50% within 48 hours; (3) to establish depth dose values with accuracy better than +-20 to 25% within 3 to 6 days. Recommendations are shown related to safeguarding dosimetric systems for radiation accident situations in nuclear facilities. (B.S.)

  14. Alternative statistical methods for cytogenetic radiation biological dosimetry

    Fornalski, Krzysztof Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents alternative statistical methods for biological dosimetry, such as the Bayesian and Monte Carlo method. The classical Gaussian and robust Bayesian fit algorithms for the linear, linear-quadratic as well as saturated and critical calibration curves are described. The Bayesian model selection algorithm for those curves is also presented. In addition, five methods of dose estimation for a mixed neutron and gamma irradiation field were described: two classical methods, two Bayesian methods and one Monte Carlo method. Bayesian methods were also enhanced and generalized for situations with many types of mixed radiation. All algorithms were presented in easy-to-use form, which can be applied to any computational programming language. The presented algorithm is universal, although it was originally dedicated to cytogenetic biological dosimetry of victims of a nuclear reactor accident.

  15. Criticality Accident

    At a meeting of electric utility presidents in October, 1999, the Federation Power Companies (FEPCO) officially decided to establish a Japanese version of WANO, following the JCO criticality accident. The Japanese WANO is expected to be launched by the end of the year: initially, with some 30 private sector companies concerned with nuclear fuel. It is said that the private sector had to make efforts to ensure that safety was the most important value in management policy throughout the industry, and that comprehensive inspections would be implemented. In anything related to nuclear energy, sufficient safety checks are required even for the most seemingly trivial matters. Therefore, the All-Japan Council of Local Governments with Atomic Power Stations has already proposed to the Japanese government that it should enact the special law for nuclear emergency, providing that the unified responsibility for nuclear disaster prevention should be shifted to the national government, since the nuclear disaster was quite special from the viewpoint of its safety regulation and technical aspects. (G.K.)

  16. Characterization of a nuclear accident dosimeter

    The 23rd nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison was held during the week of June 12--16, 1995 at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This report presents the results of this event, referred to as NAD 23, as related to the performance of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD). Two separate critical assemblies, SHEBA and Godiva, were used to generate seven separate neutron spectra for use in dose comparisons. SNL's PNAD measured absorbed doses that were within +16 to +26% of the reference doses. In addition, a preliminary investigation was undertaken to determine the feasibility of using the data obtained from an irradiated PNAD to correct for body orientation. This portion of the experiment was performed with a TRIGA reactor at the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A and M University

  17. Spanish National Dosimetry Bank

    The National Dosimetry Bank (BDN) was designed to be a useful instrument for the protection of exposed workers. On the basis of individual doses, in conjunction with the type of facility where they were received and the type of work involved, it is possible to monitor and control the individual conditions of an exposed worker. In addition to this primary objective, the BDN's structure and utilities are such that it can be used for applications such as determining the suitability of the working conditions in various areas of ionizing radiation applications, evaluating exposure trends and the most affected areas, and supplying statistical data that can be used for legal studies

  18. Relocation of Dosimetry Service

    2007-01-01

    The Dosimetry Service is moving from Building 24 to Building 55 and will therefore be closed on Friday, March 30. From Monday, April 2 onwards you will find us in building 55/1-001. Please note that during that day we might still have some problems with the internet connections and cannot fully guarantee normal service procedures. The service's opening hours and telephone number will not change as a result of the move 8.30 - 12.00, afternoons closed Tel. 72155

  19. Individual dosimetry and calibration

    In 1995 both the Individual Dosimetry and Calibration Sections worked under the condition of a status quo and concentrated fully on the routine part of their work. Nevertheless, the machine for printing the bar code which will be glued onto the film holder and hence identify the people when entering into high radiation areas was put into operation and most of the holders were equipped with the new identification. As far as the Calibration Section is concerned the project of the new source control system that is realized by the Technical Support Section was somewhat accelerated

  20. Dosimetry in Radiology

    The steady growth in the use of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging requires to maintain a proper management of patient’s dose. Dosimetry in Radiology is a difficult topic to address, but vital for proper estimation of the dose the patient is receiving. The awareness that every day is perceived in our country on these issues is the appropriate response to this problem. This article describes the main dosimetric units used and easily exemplifies doses in radiology through internationally known reference values. (authors)

  1. Fast neutron dosimetry

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period.

  2. Persistence on airline accidents.

    L. A. GIL-ALANA; Barros, C.P. (Carlos P.); J.R. Faria

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses airline accidents data from 1927-2006. The fractional integration methodology is adopted. It is shown that airline accidents are persistent and (fractionally) cointegrated with airline traffic. Thus, there exists an equilibrium relation between air accidents and airline traffic, with the effect of the shocks to that relationship disappearing in the long run. Policy implications are derived for countering accidents events.

  3. Persistence in Airline Accidents

    Carlos Pestana Barros; João Ricardo Faria; Luis A. Gil-Alana

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses airline accident data from 1927-2006, through fractional integration. It is shown that airline accidents are persistent and (fractionally) cointegrated with airline traffic. There exists a negative relation between air accidents and airline traffic, with the effect of the shocks to that relationship disappearing in the long run. Policy implications are derived for countering accident events.

  4. Elevage de la Crevette Bleue en Nouvelle-Calédonie. Litopenaeus Stylirostris. Bases biologiques et zootechnie

    Della Patrona, Luc; Brun, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    L’ouvrage « Elevage de la Crevette Bleue en Nouvelle-Calédonie – Bases biologiques et zootechnie » est sans aucun doute le document de référence dont la crevetticulture de Nouvelle-Calédonie avait besoin. L’élaboration de cette synthèse des connaissances a été initiée lors du déroulement du projet de recherche Ifremer DESANS (DEfi SANté Stylirostris) construit sur la période 2003-2006 et a été finalisée sous le projet DEDUCTION (DEveloppement DUrable de la Crevetticulture, Traitement de l’Inf...

  5. Production de références pour optimiser la fertilisation organique en riziculture biologique camarguaise (France)

    Mouret, Jean-Claude; Hammond, Roy; Bayot, Mathieu; Fabre, Denis; Thomas, C

    2009-01-01

    La vitesse de minéralisation d’un engrais organique commercial a été évaluée durant trois années dans une rizière biologique en Camargue (France). L’effet de différentes doses d’engrais apportées à différentes périodes a été testé. En conditions inondées, l’engrais organique minéralise rapidement. Sur la base de ce résultat, nous montrons qu’une adaptation des pratiques de fertilisation organique, inspirée de celles appliquées pour des engrais minéraux, permet une meilleure valorisation des e...

  6. Radiation protection experience in Yugoslavia from the Vinca accident to nowadays

    This Paper is the expression of the author opinion about development of radiation protection in Yugoslavia from its beginning forty years ago, which might affect its status in the foreseeable future at the first decades of the 21st century. It focuses on key events in this field starting from the Vinca Accident, which happened in the October 1958, to nowadays. Shortly reviewed some of key events are: Vinca Accident; Foundation of the Radiation Protection Laboratory in the Vinca Institute; International Vinca Dosimetry Experiment; First National Symposium and foundation of the Yugoslav Radiation Protection Association; International Intercomparison Experiment on Nuclear Accident Dosimetry and, International Summer Schools and Symposium on Radiation Protection organized in Yugoslavia. Finally, some specific experimental data obtained during and after Chernobyl Accident up to nowadays in radiation protection action in Yugoslavia are presented also. (author)

  7. Severe accident phenomena

    Severe accidents are nuclear reactor accidents in which the reactor core is substantially damaged. The report describes severe reactor accident phenomena and their significance for the safety of nuclear power plants. A comprehensive set of phenomena ranging from accident initiation to containment behaviour and containment integrity questions are covered. The report is based on expertise gained in the severe accident assessment projects conducted at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). (49 refs., 32 figs., 12 tabs.)

  8. Assessment of off-site consequences of nuclear accidents (MARIA)

    A brief report is given of a workshop held in Luxembourg in 1985 on methods for assessing the off-site radiological consequences of nuclear accidents (MARIA). The sessions included topics such as atmospheric dispersion; foodchain transfer; urban contamination; demographic and land use data; dosimetry, health effects, economic and countermeasures models; uncertainty analysis; and application of probabilistic risk assessment results as input to decision aids. (U.K.)

  9. University of Tennessee Comparative Animal Research Laboratory accident in 1971

    On 4 February 1971, a 32-year-old research technologist performing seed irradiated experiments at the University of Tennessee Comparative Animal Research Laboratory was exposed to a Cobalt 60 source of 7700 curies for 40 seconds. Details of the accident, dose estimates from dosimetry studies, and acute biological clinical findings are discussed. Follow-up clinical data on the hematopoietic system, biochemistry, fingers, and blood counts are discussed

  10. Dosimetry of industrial sources

    The gamma rays are produced during the disintegration of the atomic nuclei, its high energy allows them to cross thick materials. The capacity to attenuate a photons beam allows to determine the density, in line, of industrial interest materials as the mining. By means of two active dosemeters and a TLDs group (passive dosimetry) the dose rates of two sources of Cs-137 used for determining in line the density of mining materials were determined. With the dosemeters the dose levels in diverse points inside the grave that it harbors the sources and by means of calculations the isodoses curves were determined. In the phase of calculations was supposed that both sources were punctual and the isodose curves were calculated for two situations: naked sources and in their Pb packings. The dosimetry was carried out around two sources of 137Cs. The measured values allowed to develop a calculation procedure to obtain the isodoses curves in the grave where the sources are installed. (Author)

  11. Internal Dosimetry. Chapter 18

    The Committee on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) is a committee within the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The MIRD Committee was formed in 1965 with the mission to standardize internal dosimetry calculations, improve the published emission data for radionuclides and enhance the data on pharmacokinetics for radiopharmaceuticals [18.1]. A unified approach to internal dosimetry was published by the MIRD Committee in 1968, MIRD Pamphlet No. 1 [18.2], which was updated several times thereafter. Currently, the most well known version is the MIRD Primer from 1991 [18.3]. The latest publication on the formalism was published in 2009 in MIRD Pamphlet No. 21 [18.4], which provides a notation meant to bridge the differences in the formalism used by the MIRD Committee and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) [18.5]. The formalism presented in MIRD Pamphlet No. 21 [18.4] will be used here, although some references to the quantities and parameters used in the MIRD primer [18.3] will be made. All symbols, quantities and units are presented

  12. Thermo-luminescent dosimetry

    The development of paediatric radiology which began in the late 195O's has been characterised by the need to limit the dose of ionising radiation to which the child is subjected. The aim has been to keep radiation exposure as low as possible by the introduction of suitable techniques and by the development of new methods. It is therefore surprising that studies in dosimetry in the paediaytric age range have only been carried out in recent years. One reason for this may have been the fact that a suitable technique of measurement was not available at the time. The introduction of solid state dosimetry based on thermo-luminescence, first into radiotherapy (1968) and subsequently into radiodiagnosis, has made it possible to abandon the previously widely used ionisation chamber (1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, 14, and 14). The purpose of the present paper is to indicate the suitability of this form of dose measurement for paediatric radiological purposes and to stimulate its application in this field. (orig.)

  13. Clinical dosimetry using mosfets

    Purpose: The use of metal oxide-silicon field effect transistors (MOSFETs) as clinical dosimeters is demonstrated for a number of patients with targets at different clinical sites. Methods and Materials: Commercially available MOSFETs were characterized for energy response, angular dependency of response, and effect of accumulated dose on sensitivity and some inherent properties of MOSFETs. The doses determined both by thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) and MOSFETs in clinical situation were evaluated and compared to expected doses determined by calculation. Results: It was observed that a standard calibration of 0.01 Gy/mV gave MOSFET determined doses which agreed with expected doses to within 5% at the 95% confidence limit for photon beams from 6 to 25 MV and electron beams from 5 to 14 MeV. An energy-dependent variation in response of up to 28% was observed between two orientations of a MOSFET. The MOSFET doses compared very well with the doses estimated by TLDs, and the patients tolerated MOSFETs very well. A standard deviation of 3.9% between expected dose and MOSFET determined dose was observed, while for TLDs the standard deviation was 5.1%. The advantages and disadvantages of using MOSFETs for clinical dosimetry are discussed in detail. Conclusion: It was concluded that MOSFETs can be used as clinical dosimeters and can be a good alternative to TLDs. However, they have limitations under certain clinical situations

  14. Radiation dosimetry in Cyprus

    Cyprus is a small island in the eastern part of the mediterranean sea with a population of 700,000. A small Physics Department in the Nicosia General Hospital is responsible for all matters related to ionising radiation. The main applications of ionising radiation are in medicine, some applications of radioisotopes in agriculture and hydrology research and very few applications in industry with sealed radiation sources. The same problems in radiation dosimetry are encountered as in any other countries but on a smaller scale. These have to be solved locally, because of the island's geographic isolation. All the infrastructure including Secondary Standard Dosemeters, field instruments and calibration sources is needed in order to achieve this, but the financial resources available are very limited. For this reason improvisation is often necessary. The Co-60 and other X-ray units intended for radiotherapy or other clinical use, are used as radiation sources for dosimetry and calibration of the instruments. Simple, locally made phantoms are designed in order to decrease costs whenever possible. (author). 7 refs, 1 fig

  15. Développement d'un programme de lutte biologique contre le ravageur du palmier Paysandisia archon à l'aide de parasitoïdes oophages

    Cabrol, Bastien; Colombel, Etty; Buradino, Maurane; GAGLIO, Jean Claude; Martin, Jean Claude,; Tabone, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Originaire d'Argentine, le papillon palmivore Paysandisia archon (Burmeister) poursuit sa progression en région méditerranéenne en entrainant des dégâts considérables sur les palmiers et des pertes économiques importantes. Il est donc urgent de trouver une solution biologique pour contrôler ce ravageur, en respectant l'environnement et la santé humaine. Les Trichogrammes, dont l'efficacité a déjà été prouvée en lutte biologique sur différentes cultures, ont été testés au laboratoire et sur le...

  16. Etude multi-site d’une nouvelle approche du travail du sol en maraîchage biologique : les planches permanentes

    Berry, D.(University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), Chicago, USA); LECLERC, B; Grébert, D.; Lhôte, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    La pratique des planches permanentes a été évaluée en France sur quatre parcelles cultivées en maraîchage biologique en conditions pédo-climatiques contrastées. Après 3 à 7 ans de pratique, les résultats sont assez différenciés selon le type de sol (plus ou moins sensible à la compaction), le matériel utilisé, le type de légume (planté ou semé, racine ou non) et la pression des adventices. La suppression du labour sur cet itinéraire a permis d'augmenter l'activité biologique et de...

  17. Radiation dosimetry instrumentation and methods

    Shani, Gad

    2000-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry has made great progress in the last decade, mainly because radiation therapy is much more widely used. Since the first edition, many new developments have been made in the basic methods for dosimetry, i.e. ionization chambers, TLD, chemical dosimeters, and photographic films. Radiation Dosimetry: Instrumentation and Methods, Second Edition brings to the reader these latest developments. Written at a high level for medical physicists, engineers, and advanced dosimetrists, it concentrates only on evolvement during the last decade, relying on the first edition to provide the basics.

  18. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    2006-01-01

    Please note the following opening hours of the Service: From 31st July onwards: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 The Service is closed in the afternoons. We should like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCTs) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel 72155 Bldg. 24 E 011 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  19. Rare earth doped radio-photo luminescent phosphor for gamma dosimetry

    Solid state luminescence dosimetry has been used for personnel monitoring and retrospective dosimetry for last 50 years. The exposed material gives characteristic luminescence. If the intensity of luminescence can be co-related with the amount of exposure, this can be used for measurement of the exposure. Conventional RPL dosimetry uses silver activated meta-phosphate glass as dosimeter. The dosimeter is most popular for military applications for personnel accident dosimetry. But due to inherent build-up phenomenon, it can not be used as a real time dosimeter for cumulative dose measurement. The researchers have observed that the radiation induced valency changes in the rare earth element of phosphor and related RPL signal can be used for gamma dose measurement. Rare earth doped phosphor has a potential to replace RPL glass dosimeter without any build-up phenomenon. To the date no such type of dosimeter is commercially available in international market. Strong radiation induced fluorescence has been reported in some solids such as CaF2:Eu and CaSO4:Eu. The present paper highlights the dosimetric properties of synthesized phosphor samples for its application in gamma dosimetry and retrospective dosimetry

  20. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs

  1. Results of the dosimetry intercomparison

    The appropriate way to verify the accuracy of the results of dose reported by the laboratories that offer lend personal dosimetry service is in the periodic participation of round of intercomparison dosimetry, undertaken by laboratories whose standards are trace (Secondary Laboratory). The Laboratory of External Personal Dosimetry of the CNEA-PY has participated in three rounds of intercomparison. The first two were organized in the framework of the Model Project RLA/9/030 RADIOLOGICAL WASTE SECURITY, and the irradiations were carried out in the Laboratory of Regional Calibration of the Center of Nuclear Technology Development, Belo Horizonte-Brazil (1998) and in the National Laboratory of Metrology of the ionizing radiations of the Institute of Radioprotection and Dosimetry, Rio de Janeiro-Brazil (1999). The third was organized by the IAEA and the irradiations were made in the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt PTB, Braunschweig - Federal Republic of Germany (1999-2000)

  2. Radioembolization Dosimetry: The Road Ahead

    Smits, Maarten L. J., E-mail: m.l.j.smits-3@umcutrecht.nl; Elschot, Mattijs [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Sze, Daniel Y. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Kao, Yung H. [Austin Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Australia); Nijsen, Johannes F. W. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Iagaru, Andre H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (United States); Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Lam, Marnix G. E. H. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands)

    2015-04-15

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the optimization of the results of RE. The heterogeneous and often clustered intrahepatic biodistribution of millions of point-source radioactive particles poses a challenge for dosimetry. Several studies found a relationship between absorbed doses and treatment outcome, with regard to both toxicity and efficacy. This should ultimately lead to improved patient selection and individualized treatment planning. New calculation methods and imaging techniques and a new generation of microspheres for image-guided RE will all contribute to these improvements. The aim of this review is to give insight into the latest and most important developments in RE dosimetry and to suggest future directions on patient selection, individualized treatment planning, and study designs.

  3. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    1990-12-20

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs.

  4. Application of the micronucleus assay performed by different scorers in case of large-scale radiation accidents

    Rawojć Kamila; Tarnawska Dorota M.; Miszczyk Justyna U.; Swakoń Jan; Stolarczyk Liliana; Rydygier Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Mass casualty scenarios of radiation exposure require high throughput biological dosimetry techniques for population triage, in order to rapidly identify individuals, who require clinical treatment. Accurate dose estimates can be made by biological dosimetry, to predict the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) within days after a radiation accident or a malicious act involving radiation. Timely information on dose is important for the medical management of acutely irradiated persons [1]. The aim of...

  5. Medical dosimetry in Hungary

    Turák, O.; Osvay, M.; Ballay, L.

    2012-09-01

    Radiation exposure of medical staff during cardiological and radiological procedures was investigated. The exposure of medical staff is directly connected to patient exposure. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of doses on uncovered part of body of medical staff using LiF thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters in seven locations. Individual Kodak film dosimeters (as authorized dosimetry system) were used for the assessment of medical staff's effective dose. Results achieved on dose distribution measurements confirm that wearing only one film badge under the lead apron does not provide enough information on the personal dose. The value of estimated annual doses on eye lens and extremities (fingers) were in good correlation with international publications.

  6. Dosimetry of breast cancer

    The systemic therapy of breast cancer has also changed profoundly during the last 60 years, and in this time the integration of treatment modalities involve a major area of investigation. The dosimetry of breast cancer presents different complications which can range from the Physician's handling of the neoplasia up to the simple aspects of physical simulation, contour design, radiation fields, irregular surfaces and computer programs containing mathematical equations which differ little or largely with the reality of the radiation distribution into the volume to be irradiated. We have studied the problem using two types of measurements to determine how the radiation distribution is in irregular surfaces, and designing an easier skill to be used with each patient, in order to optimize the treatment with respect to the simulation and verification process. (author). 7 refs

  7. Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine

    Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine labeled with radioactive iodine was determined by measuring the biodistribution of 131I-iodoantipyrine in 41 female rabbits. Following administration of the radiopharmaceutical, subjects were killed at 0.5, 6, 12, 17, 24, 36, and 48 h. Organs and samples of tissues and body fluids were assayed. Results were corrected for physical decay. Exponential functions were employed to describe the time-concentration curves; representative value would be the biological half life of 9.96±0.55 h for blood. Cumulated activity estimates for 123I, 125I and 131I were then computed. Extrapolation to absorbed dose in humans followed the formulation of the Medical International Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The whole body absorbed doses are 0.7 μGray, 0.5 μGray and 2.9 μGray per MBq of 123I, 123I, and 131I administered respectively. (orig.)

  8. Strahlungsmessung und Dosimetrie

    Krieger, Hanno

    2013-01-01

    „Strahlungsquellen und Dosimetrie“ ist Teil einer Lehrbuchreihe zur Strahlungsphysik und zum Strahlenschutz. Der erste Teil befasst sich mit den physikalischen Grundlagen der Strahlungsdetektoren und der Strahlungsmessung. Im zweiten Teil werden die Konzepte und Verfahren der klinischen Dosimetrie dargestellt. Der dritte Abschnitt erläutert ausführlich die Dosisverteilungen der klinisch angewendeten Strahlungsarten. Im vierten Teil werden weitere Messaufgaben der Strahlungsphysik einschließlich der Messsysteme für die Bildgebung mit Röntgenstrahlung dargestellt. Neben den grundlegenden Ausführungen enthält dieser Band im laufenden Text zahlreiche Tabellen und Grafiken zur technischen und medizinischen Radiologie, die bei der praktischen Arbeit sehr hilfreich sein können und 199 Übungsaufgaben mit Lösungen zur Vertiefung der Inhalte. Für die zweite Auflage wurden die Darstellungen der Elektronen- und der Protonendosimetrie sowie der bildgebenden Verfahren mit Computertomografen deutlich erweit...

  9. Radioiodotherapy: dosimetry planning

    The results of treatment of 142 case histories of 125 patients who had been treated with radioactive iodine at the Medical Radiological Research Center of Russian Academy of Medicine Sciences from 1983 to 1999 are given in the presentation. Among the patients, 35 cases of diffuse toxic goiter with signs of thyrotoxicosis of a mild degree, 25 cases of Diffuse toxic goiter with severe thyrotoxicosis, 6 cases of differentiated thyroid cancer with metastases to lymph-nodes of the neck, 30 cases of thyroid cancer with metastases to lymph-nodes of the neck and lung and 1 case of thyroid cancer with metastases to bones were diagnosed. This paper gives recommendations for individual dosimetry planning for radioiodine-therapy. (authors)

  10. Dosimetry in radionuclide therapy

    While it is known that therapeutic effects of radionuclides are due to absorbed radiation dose and to radiosensitivity, individual dosimetry in 'Gy' is practiced rarely in clinical Nuclear Medicine but 'doses' are described in 'mCi' or 'MBq', which is only indirectly related to 'Gy' in the target. To estimate 'Gy', the volume of the target, maximum concentration of the radiopharmaceutical in it and residence time should be assessed individually. These parameters can be obtained usually only with difficulty, involving possibly also quantitative SPET or PET, modern imaging techniques (sonography, CT, MRT), substitution of y- or positron emitting radiotracers for β-emitting radiopharmaceuticals as well as whole-body distribution studies. Residence time can be estimated by obtaining data on biological half-life of a comparable tracer and transfer of these data in the physical characteristics of the therapeutic agent. With all these possibilities for gross dosimetry the establishment of a dose-response-relation should be possible. As distribution of the radiopharmaceutical in lesions is frequently inhomogenous and microdosimetric conditions are difficult to assess in vivo as yet, it could be observed since decades that empirically set, sometimes 'fixed' doses (mCi or MBq) can also be successful in many diseases. Detailed dosimetric studies, however, are work- and cost-intensive. Nevertheless, one should be aware at a time when more sophisticated therapeutic possibilities in Nuclear Medicine arise, that we should try to estimate radiation dose (Gy) in our new methods even as differences in individual radiosensitivity cannot be assessed yet and studies to define individual radiosensitivity in lesions should be encouraged. (author)

  11. Dosimetry in intravascular brachytherapy

    Among the cardiovascular diseases responsible for deaths in the adult population in almost all countries of the world, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which generally occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Several diagnostic techniques and therapies are being tested for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than traditional surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment).Recently, the idea of delivering high radiation doses to coronary arteries to avoid or delay restenosis has been suggested. Known as intravascular brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis in some patient populations. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for the attending staff for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, o,30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several candidate radionuclides as well. Two s tent sources (metallic prosthesis that put inside of patient's artery through angioplasty) employing 32 P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the various radionuclides and source geometries are discussed. The dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients for this promising new technology. (author)

  12. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1989-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

  13. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs

  14. Fifth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    This meeting was held to exchange information on how to get better estimates of the radiation absorbed dose. There seems to be a high interest of late in patient dosimetry; discussions were held in the light of revised risk estimates for radiation. Topics included: Strategies of Dose Assessment; Dose Estimation for Radioimmunotherapy; Dose Calculation Techniques and Models; Dose Estimation for Positron Emission Tomography (PET); Kinetics for Dose Estimation; and Small Scale Dosimetry and Microdosimetry. (VC)

  15. Internal dosimetry, past and future

    This paper is a review of the progress in the dosimetry of internally deposited radionuclides (internal dosimetry) since World War II. Previous to that, only naturally occurring radionuclides were available and only a limited number of studies of biokinetics and dosimetry were done. The main radionuclides studied were 226Ra, 228Ra, and 224Ra but natural uranium was also studied mainly because of its toxic effect as a heavy metal, and not because it was radioactive. The effects of 226Ra in bone, mainly from the radium dial painters, also formed the only bases for the radiotoxicity of radionuclides in bone for many years, and it is still, along with 224Ra, the main source of information on the effects of alpha emitters in bone. The publications of the International Commission on Radiological Protection that have an impact on internal dosimetry are used as mileposts for this review. These series of publications, more than any other, represent a broad consensus of opinion within the radiation protection community at the time of their publication, and have formed the bases for radiation protection practice throughout the world. This review is not meant to be exhaustive; it is meant to be a personnel view of the evolution of internal dosimetry, and to present the author's opinion of what the future directions in internal dosimetry will be. 39 refs., 2 tabs

  16. Health physics evaluation of an accident involving acute overexposure to a radiography source

    An accident, involving the loss of an iridium-192 radiographic source and the subsequent serious overexposure of a third party, is described. Health physics aspects, particularly dosimetrical aspects are addressed and compared with results obtained by means of chromosome aberration dosimetry. Details are provided on the medical observations and treatment of the patient

  17. SEVERE ACCIDENT MANAGEMENT TRAINING

    The purpose of this paper is (a) to define the International Atomic Energy Agency's role in the area of severe accident management training, (b) to briefly describe the status of representative severe accident analysis tools designed to support development and validation of accident management guidelines, and more recently, simulate the accident with sufficient accuracy to support the training of technical support and reactor operator staff, and (c) provide an overview of representative design-specific accident management guidelines and training. Since accident management and the development of accident management validation and training software is a rapidly evolving area, this paper is also intended to evolve as accident management guidelines and training programs are developed to meet different reactor design requirements and individual national requirements

  18. Traffic Congestion and Accidents

    Schrage, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Obstructions caused by accidents can trigger or exacerbate traffic congestion. This paper derives the efficient traffic pattern for a rush hour with congestion and accidents and the corresponding road toll. Compared to the model without accidents, where the toll equals external costs imposed on drivers using the road at the same time, a new insight arises: An optimal toll also internalizes the expected increase in future congestion costs. Since accidents affect more drivers if traffic volumes...

  19. Radiotherapy gel dosimetry

    shapes and sizes while sparing normal tissue. The situation is further complicated if the normal tissues are critical organs or are particularly sensitive to radiation. Radiotherapy techniques employed to obtain a closer conformation of the dose distribution to the tumour volume are referred to as conformal radiotherapy techniques. The clinical implementation of conformal therapy has been delayed by limitations in the verification of conformal dose distributions calculated by treatment planning systems prior to the irradiation of the patient and the verification of complex treatments during its delivery to the patient. There are several aspects of conformal therapy that complicate dose verification. To achieve the dose distributions conforming to complex 3D volumes, high dose gradients arise in the treatment volume. Further, overdose or underdose regions can exist when separate radiation fields are used to deliver additional radiation. These aspects require that practical dose measurement (dosimetry) techniques be able to integrate dose over time and easily measure dose distributions in 3D with high spatial resolution. Traditional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, thermoluminescent dosimeters and radiographic film do not fulfil these requirements. Novel gel dosimetry techniques are being developed in which dose distributions can potentially be determined in vitro in 3D using anthropomorphic phantoms to simulate a clinically irradiated situation. As long ago as the 1950's, radiation-induced colour change in dyes was used to investigate radiation doses in gels. It was subsequently shown that radiation induced changes in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation properties of gels infused with conventional Fricke dosimetry solutions could be measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In Fricke gels, Fe2+ ions in ferrous sulphate solutions are usually dispersed throughout a gelatin, agarose or PVA matrix. Radiation-induced changes in the dosimeters are considered to

  20. Psychology of nuclear accidents

    Tysoe, M.

    1983-03-31

    Incidents involving nuclear weapons are described, as well as the accident to the Three Mile Island-2 reactor. Methods of assessment of risks are discussed, with particular reference to subjective judgements and the possible role of human error in civil nuclear accidents. Accidents or misunderstandings in communication or human actions which might lead to nuclear war are also discussed.

  1. Current status of internal dosimetry service laboratories in Brazil

    Dantas, B.M.; Acar, M.E.D.; Dantas, A.L.A. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). In Vivo Monitoring Lab.], e-mail: bmdantas@ird.gov.br; Cardoso, J.C.S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). In Vivo Monitoring Lab.], e-mail: jcardoso@ipen.br; Tadei, M.H.T. [Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas, (LAPOC/CNEN-MG), MG (Brazil). Radiochemistry Lab.], e-mail: mhtaddei@cnen.gov.br; Juliao, L.Q.C. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). In Vitro Bioassay Lab.], e-mail: ligia@ird.gov.br; Lima, M.F. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Radiochemistry Lab.], e-mail: mflima@ipen.br; Arine, D.R. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP) , SP (Brazil). Radioecology Lab.], e-mail: djair@ctmsp.mar.mil.br; Ramos, M.A. [Central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto (CNAAA), Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil). In Vivo Monitoring Lab.], e-mail: mramos@eletronuclear.gov.br; Alonso, T.C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). In Vivo Monitoring Lab.], e-mail: alonso@cdtn.br; Lima, F.F. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil). In Vivo Monitoring Lab.], e-mail: fflima@cnen.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    Several technical documents related to internal dosimetry have been released by the IAEA and ICRP after nuclear and radiological accidents, such as the Chernobyl and Goiania. However, standard bioassay procedures and methodologies for bioassay data interpretation are still under discussion and, in some cases, not well understood by the professionals involved in this specific field of radiation protection. Therefore, both in routine and emergency monitoring, responses may differ markedly among Dosimetry Laboratories and it may be difficult to interpret and use the bioassay data generated. The resulting misunderstanding can impair countermeasures and remediation operations and enhance significant socio-economic and political consequences. Currently it is recognized worldwide the need to have a realistic evaluation of the reliability of the services provided by specific laboratory as well as a clear compliance with best practices and a permanent effort to improve data interpretation. The objective of this work is to ensure regular and systematic quality monitoring of the Accredited Laboratory Network composed by the Brazilian governmental Institutes which will comprise expert teams able to provide, upon request, reliable services in case of a radiological accidents and follow-up operations, as well as internal dose evaluation of occupationally exposed workers. (author)

  2. Current status of internal dosimetry service laboratories in Brazil

    Several technical documents related to internal dosimetry have been released by the IAEA and ICRP after nuclear and radiological accidents, such as the Chernobyl and Goiania. However, standard bioassay procedures and methodologies for bioassay data interpretation are still under discussion and, in some cases, not well understood by the professionals involved in this specific field of radiation protection. Therefore, both in routine and emergency monitoring, responses may differ markedly among Dosimetry Laboratories and it may be difficult to interpret and use the bioassay data generated. The resulting misunderstanding can impair countermeasures and remediation operations and enhance significant socio-economic and political consequences. Currently it is recognized worldwide the need to have a realistic evaluation of the reliability of the services provided by specific laboratory as well as a clear compliance with best practices and a permanent effort to improve data interpretation. The objective of this work is to ensure regular and systematic quality monitoring of the Accredited Laboratory Network composed by the Brazilian governmental Institutes which will comprise expert teams able to provide, upon request, reliable services in case of a radiological accidents and follow-up operations, as well as internal dose evaluation of occupationally exposed workers. (author)

  3. Current research and service activities of AFRRI's biological dosimetry program

    Full text: The long-range goal of the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute's (AFRRI) Biological Dosimetry Team is to develop validated radiation bio dosimeters. Our objectives are (1) to establish definitive clinical bioassays for rapid, high-throughput radiation exposure analyses and (2) to develop complimentary triage-type radiation exposure assessment bioassays to support medical treatment decisions. The experimental approach involves two steps. The first is to establish a reference laboratory that uses conventional bioassays for definitive analyses of biological samples. The second step is to develop a validated and forward deployable biological dosimetry capability for rapid radiation dose assessment with an emphasis on the use of molecular biology-based diagnostic platforms. The conventional lymphocyte metaphase-spread dicentric assay was established at AFRRI in accordance with international harmonized protocols and applied to estimate radiation exposure doses in several overexposure accidents. Currently, novel interphase cell-based cytological bioassay that detects cells with chromosomal type aberrations and radiation responsive molecular bio markers (i.e., gene expression, protein) are being validated and optimized for rapid radiation exposure assessment applications. In addition the Biological Assessment Tool (BAT), a radiation casualty management software application, was developed. Available at AFRRI's website (www.afrri.usuhs.mil), BAT permits the recording and communication of relevant radiological and medical information for radiation accidents. These research and service efforts contribute to an improved diagnostic response for accidental overexposures and also have applications in other research fields including radiation therapy and toxicology

  4. EPR dosimetry for actual and suspected overexposures during radiotherapy treatments in Poland

    EPR dosimetry on bone samples was recently used for actual and suspected overexposures during radiotherapy treatments performed in Poland. In 2001 five breast-cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy in the Bialystok Oncology Center, Poland, were overexposed. The overexposure was due to a defective safety interlock and an obsolete safety system of the linear accelerator. For the three most exposed patients, pieces of rib bones removed during surgical reconstruction of the chest wall and skin transplantation allowed an estimation of the accident doses by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. The doses delivered during the accident were as high as 60-80 Gy. In 2005, a patient treated in Kielce Holy Cross Cancer Center exhibited similar deep necroses of the chest wall but 6 years following a 'standard upper mantel fields' radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. In order to investigate the possible late effect of an overexposure as necrosis origin, the delivered dose was afterward estimated by EPR dosimetry performed on a rib sample

  5. Electron paramagnetic resonance biophysical radiation dosimetry with tooth enamel

    This thesis deals with the advancements made in the field of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) for biophysical dosimetry with tooth enamel for accident, emergency, and retrospective radiation dose reconstruction. A methodology has been developed to measure retrospective radiation exposures in human tooth enamel. This entails novel sample preparation procedures with minimum mechanical treatment to reduce the preparation induced uncertainties, establish optimum measurement conditions inside the EPR cavity, post-process the measured spectrum with functional simulation of dosimetric and other interfering signals, and reconstruct dose. By using this technique, retrospective gamma exposures as low as 80±30 mGy have been successfully deciphered. The notion of dose modifier was introduced in EPR biodosimetry for low dose measurements. It has been demonstrated that by using the modified zero added dose (MZAD) technique for low radiation exposures, doses in 100 mGy ranges can be easily reconstructed in teeth that were previously thought useless for EPR dosimetry. Also, the use of a dose modifier makes robust dose reconstruction possible for higher radiation exposures. The EPR dosimetry technique was also developed for tooth samples extracted from rodents, which represent small tooth sizing. EPR doses in the molars, extracted from the mice irradiated with whole body exposures, were reassessed and shown to be correct within the experimental uncertainty. The sensitivity of human tooth enamel for neutron irradiation, obtained from the 3 MV McMaster K.N. Van de Graaff accelerator, was also studied. For the first time this work has shown that the neutron sensitivity of the tooth enamel is approximately 1/10th of the equivalent gamma sensitivity. Parametric studies for neutron dose rate and neutron energy within the available range of the accelerator, showed no impact on the sensitivity of the tooth enamel. Therefore, tooth enamel can be used as a dosimeter for both neutrons

  6. Supervisor's accident investigation handbook

    This pamphlet was prepared by the Environmental Health and Safety Department (EH and S) of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to provide LBL supervisors with a handy reference to LBL's accident investigation program. The publication supplements the Accident and Emergencies section of LBL's Regulations and Procedures Manual, Pub. 201. The present guide discusses only accidents that are to be investigated by the supervisor. These accidents are classified as Type C by the Department of Energy (DOE) and include most occupational injuries and illnesses, government motor-vehicle accidents, and property damages of less than $50,000

  7. State of art: Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry – Frontiers of future research

    Since the commercial adoption of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique in dosimetry, almost 20 years ago, we have seen major advances in the deployment of OSL dosimeters in different areas, including personal, medical, and space dosimetry. The objective of this paper is to provide a critical overlook at the OSL technique from three different points of view: strengths, challenges and opportunities. We discuss factors that made the OSL technique successful: its simplicity, accuracy, wide dynamic range of measured dose, ease for automation, re-read capability, ability to perform imaging, and the availability of diverse instruments and materials. We look into problems that were overcome and others that remain in several areas of new applications into which OSL has expanded in the past 10 years, such as medical, space, neutron and accident dosimetry. Finally, we discuss unexplored possibilities, new driving forces, and open questions. We hope the broad overview presented here will encourage more discussion and stimulate the research that will advance our fundamental understanding of the OSL process. - Highlights: • Critical overlook of the OSL technique is presented. • Factors that made the OSL technique successful are discussed. • New applications in medical, space and accident dosimetry are discussed. • Unexplored possibilities, new driving forces, and open questions are presented

  8. Upgrading the dosimetry at Ontario Hydro

    Ontario Hydro has embarked upon a major programme to replace and upgrade its external dosimetry systems. In two year's time, the utility expects to have two state-of-the-art dosimetry systems in place: a new TLD dosimetry of legal record that was designed nearly 30 years ago; and an electronic dosimetry system which could eventually replace the TLD as the primary system. (Author)

  9. Problems of clinical dosimetry in Russian radiotherapy centers

    Due to the general catastrophic situation of radiation oncology in Russia, its outdated equipment and shortage of medical physicists, the clinical dosimetry is also in a very poor state and doesn't meet the modern requirements of the quality assurance in radiotherapy. In Russia there are 140 radiotherapy departments, 100 medical accelerators and 250 gamma apparatus but only 150 clinical dosimeters and 75 dose field analyzers, 90% of which are morally and physically obsolete and do not meet the requirements of the quality assurance. Ten percent of the radiotherapy departments are not equipped with clinical dosimeters at all. There is no national program of quality assurance in radiotherapy. Service for dosimetry equipment calibration is lacking. The national standards and protocols of clinical dosimetry haven't been elaborated. Two-hundred-and-sixty medical physicists work in radiotherapy, 90% of whom have insufficient experience and qualification. Ten percent of radiotherapy departments do not have medical physicists in its staff at all and the rest of the departments face a shortage of medical physicists. The number of medical physicists is not enough to provide the full medical physics service. Qualified medical physicists do not stay long in clinics because of the small salary. As a result of these drawbacks the accuracy of the therapeutic dose delivery to the tumour often achieves 30% instead of the 5% admissible error. This situation leads to high radiation risks, particularly for radiation overdosage or underdosage during the patient's treatment. However, there are no radiation accident statistics in Russia; therefore it's impossible to evaluate them in terms of quantity. Unfortunately, this is the outcome of the lack of the state policy in this field. Neither the Health Ministry nor the Rosatom is concerned about this problem. The only thing that the Health Ministry is undertaking now is the purchase of the new equipment, dosimetry equipment included, for

  10. Review of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) instrumental developments for retrospective dosimetry

    Botter-Jensen, L., E-mail: boetter@youmail.d [Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Thomsen, K.J.; Jain, M. [Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2010-03-15

    This review describes 40 years of experience gained at Riso National Laboratory in the development of facilities for irradiation, thermal/optical stimulation and luminescence signal detection. These facilities have mainly been used in luminescence dating and nuclear accident dosimetry. We focus especially on methods for light stimulation and irradiation, and developments of new portable TL/OSL readers for determining doses directly in the field on both Earth and the planet Mars.

  11. Framework for accident management

    Accident management is an essential element of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Integration Plan for the closure of severe accident issues. This element will consolidate the results from other key elements; such as the Individual Plant Examination (IPE), the Containment Performance Improvement, and the Severe Accident Research Programs, in a form that can be used to enhance the safety programs for nuclear power plants. The NRC is currently conducting an Accident Management Program that is intended to aid in defining the scope and attributes of an accident management program for nuclear power plants. The accident management plan will ensure that a plant specific program is developed and implemented to promote the most effective use of available utility resources (people and hardware) to prevent and mitigate severe accidents. Hardware changes or other plant modifications to reduce the frequency of severe accidents are not a central aim of this program. To accomplish the outlined objectives, the NRC has developed an accident management framework that is comprised of five elements: (1) accident management strategies, (2) training, (3) guidance and computational aids, (4) instrumentation, and (5) delineation of decision making responsibilities. A process for the development of an accident management program has been identified using these NRC framework elements

  12. Biological dosimetry; Dosimetria biologica

    Guerrero C, C.; Arceo M, C., E-mail: citlali.guerrero@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Biologia, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    In the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) the works to establish a laboratory of biological dosimetry were initiated in 1998, with the purpose that could assist any situation with respect to the exposition to radiation, so much of the occupational exposed personnel as of individuals not related with the handling of radio-active material. The first activity that was realized was to develop the corresponding curves in vitro of dose response for different qualities and radiation types. In the year 2000 the curve corresponding to the gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co was published and up to 2002 the curve corresponding to the X rays of 58 KeV, 120 and 250 kVp. In all the cases, the curves contain the requirements to be used in the determination of the exposition dose. At the present time the curves dose-response are developing for neutrons take place in the reactor Triga Mark III of ININ. Additionally to these activities, cases of suspicion of accidental exposition to radiation have been assisted, using in a beginning the curves published by the IAEA and, from the year 2000, the curves developed in the ININ. (Author)

  13. Fast neutron dosimetry

    During 1988--1990 the magnetic resonance dosimetry project was completed, as were the 250 MeV proton shielding measurements. The first cellular experiment using human cells in vitro at the 1 GeV electron storage ring was also accomplished. More detail may be found in DOE Report number-sign DOE/EV/60417-002 and the open literature cited in the individual progress subsections. We report Kinetic Energy Released in Matter (KERMA), factor measurements in several elements of critical importance to neutron radiation therapy and radiation protection for space habitation and exploration for neutron energies below 30 MeV. The results of this effort provide the only direct measurements of the oxygen and magnesium kerma factors above 20 MeV neutron energy, and the only measurements of the iron kerma factor above 15 MeV. They provide data of immediate relevance to neutron radiotherapy and impose strict criteria for normalizing and testing nuclear models used to calculate kerma factors at higher neutron energies

  14. Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine

    Chu, R.Y.L.; Ekeh, S. (Oklahoma Univ., Oklahoma City, OK (USA). Dept. of Radiological Sciences; Veterans Administration Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (USA)); Basmadjian, G. (Oklahoma Univ., Oklahoma City, OK (USA). Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences)

    1989-12-01

    Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine labeled with radioactive iodine was determined by measuring the biodistribution of {sup 131}I-iodoantipyrine in 41 female rabbits. Following administration of the radiopharmaceutical, subjects were killed at 0.5, 6, 12, 17, 24, 36, and 48 h. Organs and samples of tissues and body fluids were assayed. Results were corrected for physical decay. Exponential functions were employed to describe the time-concentration curves; representative value would be the biological half life of 9.96+-0.55 h for blood. Cumulated activity estimates for {sup 123}I, {sup 125}I and {sup 131}I were then computed. Extrapolation to absorbed dose in humans followed the formulation of the Medical International Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The whole body absorbed doses are 0.7 {mu}Gray, 0.5 {mu}Gray and 2.9 {mu}Gray per MBq of {sup 123}I, {sup 123}I, and {sup 131}I administered respectively. (orig.).

  15. Dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    The book informs of the whole range of the physical foundations of dosimetry. In the chapter dealing with the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter the processes are described of the interaction between the individual types of ionizing radiation and matter and the effects of ionizing radiation on matter. The chapter dealing with dosimetric quantities and units gives a survey and definitions of quantities and their inter-relations. The chapters relating to the determination of basic dosimetric quantities and to integral dosimetric methods give a detailed description of the individual methods. The chapter relating to radionuclides in the environment concerns the occurrence of natural radionuclides in the environment and in the human organism, cosmic radiation and artificial sources of radioactivity connected with the development of civilisation and technology. The chapter related to radiation protection gives guidelines for the calculation of shielding for individual types of radiation. The supplement contains a list of the properties of certain radionuclides widespread in the environment, their basic physico-chemical and biological characteristics, parameters of metabolism and values of maximum permissible concentrations. (M.D.)

  16. Standardization of dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    Three objectives of dosimetry in diagnostic radiology can be identified: (1) Measurement of patient doses for comparison with diagnostic reference levels; (2) Assessment of equipment performance; (3) Patient dose measurements for risk assessment. In this paper author deals with problems of standardization of dosimetry in diagnostic radiology. Recommended application specific quantities for dosimetry in diagnostic radiology are presented

  17. 4.2 Methods for Internal Dosimetry

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.2 Methods for Internal Dosimetry' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy' with the contents:

  18. Initial radiation dosimetry at Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    The dosimetry of A-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki is discussed in light of the new dosimetry developed in 1980 by the author. The important changes resulting from the new dosimetry are the ratios of neutron to gamma doses, particularly at Hiroshima. The implications of these changes in terms of epidemiology and radiation protection standards are discussed

  19. Miniature semiconductor detectors for in vivo dosimetry

    Silicon mini-semiconductor detectors are found in wide applications for in vivo personal dosimetry and dosimetry and Micro-dosimetry of different radiation oncology modalities. These applications are based on integral and spectroscopy modes of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor and silicon p-n junction detectors. The advantages and limitations of each are discussed. (authors)

  20. Dosimetry Termoluminiscent a new personal dosimetry concept in Nicaragua

    The present work is based on to study carried out along one year April 1996 until April 1997 at a hospital that located in Managua, here to control of personal dosimetric has been taken in 20 of people that work in the same one, this has been using jointly so much pocket dosemeters (ionization chambers) and thermoluminiscent dosemeters (TLD). To comparison was made among the two systems of personal dosimetry and the varying b was shown among the same ones, considering the fact that the pocket dosemeters to be able to carry out such to delicate company ace it is it the personal dosimetry inside the radiological protection

  1. Calibration facility for environment dosimetry instruments

    Bercea, Sorin; Celarel, Aurelia; Cenusa, Constantin [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 30 Reactorului St, Magurele, Jud Ilfov, P.O.B. MG-6, RO-077125 (Romania)

    2013-12-16

    In the last ten years, the nuclear activities, as well as the major nuclear events (see Fukushima accident) had an increasing impact on the environment, merely by contamination with radioactive materials. The most conferment way to quickly identify the presence of some radioactive elements in the environment, is to measure the dose-equivalent rate H. In this situation, information concerning the values of H due only to the natural radiation background must exist. Usually, the values of H due to the natural radiation background, are very low (∼10{sup −9} - 10{sup −8} Sv/h). A correct measurement of H in this range involve a performing calibration of the measuring instruments in the measuring range corresponding to the natural radiation background lead to important problems due to the presence of the natural background itself the best way to overlap this difficulty is to set up the calibration stand in an area with very low natural radiation background. In Romania, we identified an area with such special conditions at 200 m dept, in a salt mine. This paper deals with the necessary requirements for such a calibration facility, as well as with the calibration stand itself. The paper includes also, a description of the calibration stand (and images) as well as the radiological and metrological parameters. This calibration facilities for environment dosimetry is one of the few laboratories in this field in Europe.

  2. Calibration facility for environment dosimetry instruments

    In the last ten years, the nuclear activities, as well as the major nuclear events (see Fukushima accident) had an increasing impact on the environment, merely by contamination with radioactive materials. The most conferment way to quickly identify the presence of some radioactive elements in the environment, is to measure the dose-equivalent rate H. In this situation, information concerning the values of H due only to the natural radiation background must exist. Usually, the values of H due to the natural radiation background, are very low (∼10−9 - 10−8 Sv/h). A correct measurement of H in this range involve a performing calibration of the measuring instruments in the measuring range corresponding to the natural radiation background lead to important problems due to the presence of the natural background itself the best way to overlap this difficulty is to set up the calibration stand in an area with very low natural radiation background. In Romania, we identified an area with such special conditions at 200 m dept, in a salt mine. This paper deals with the necessary requirements for such a calibration facility, as well as with the calibration stand itself. The paper includes also, a description of the calibration stand (and images) as well as the radiological and metrological parameters. This calibration facilities for environment dosimetry is one of the few laboratories in this field in Europe

  3. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    2006-01-01

    Please note the following opening hours of the Service: In June: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 In July: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 8:30 to 11:30 Closed all day on Tuesdays and Thursdays From 31st July onwards: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 The Service is closed in the afternoons. We should like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCTs) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel 72155 Bldg. 24 E 011 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  4. External audit in radiotherapy dosimetry

    Quality audit forms an essential part of any comprehensive quality assurance programme. This is true in radiotherapy generally and in specific areas such as radiotherapy dosimetry. Quality audit can independently test the effectiveness of the quality system and in so doing can identify problem areas and minimize their possible consequences. Some general points concerning quality audit applied to radiotherapy are followed by specific discussion of its practical role in radiotherapy dosimetry, following its evolution from dosimetric intercomparison exercises to routine measurement-based on-going audit in the various developing audit networks both in the UK and internationally. Specific examples of methods and results are given from some of these, including the Scottish+ audit group. Quality audit in radiotherapy dosimetry is now well proven and participation by individual centres is strongly recommended. Similar audit approaches are to be encouraged in other areas of the radiotherapy process. (author)

  5. For information: Individual dosimetry service

    2004-01-01

    The service has noticed that there are dosimeter holders who have changed their activities and thus have no longer need of dosimeter as a permanent basis in their work (persons who go rarely to the controlled areas). The reduction of persons in the regular distribution list of dosimeters will lighten the work of the service (distribution, evaluation and consolidation of doses) as well as the work of the distributors, needless to say the economical input this would have for CERN. For the persons who only need a dosimeter temporarily we would like to remind that there is a quick and simple procedure to have one immediately from the Individual Dosimetry Service. Please contact the service (dosimetry.service@cern.ch) if you do not need a dosimeter regularly. Thank you for your cooperation. http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  6. Radiotherapy quality insurance by individualized in vivo dosimetry: state of the art

    The quality insurance in radiotherapy in the frame of highly complex technical process as Intensity modulated radiotherapy (I.M.R.T.) needs independent control of the delivered dose to the patient. Actually, up to now, most of the radiotherapy treatments rely only on computed dosimetry through a rather complicated series of linked simulation tool. This dosimetry approach requires also qualified treatment means based on cautious quality insurance procedures. However, erroneous parameters could be difficult to detect and systematical errors could happen leading to radiotherapy accidents. In this context, in vivo dosimetry has a critical role of final control of the delivered dose. As many beam incidences and ports are used for any photon therapy treatment, external control could be very tedious and time consuming. Therefore, innovations are needed for in vivo dosimetry to provide ergonomic and efficient tools for these controls. This paper presents a review of technologies and products that can be used for in vivo dosimetry. It proposes also a reflection on the concepts to develop future devices suitable for this purpose. The technical means with their physical principles are reviewed, the clinical experiences demonstrating the feasibility of new techniques are then summarized and finally, the early clinical use and its impact on clinical practice is review. (authors)

  7. Fundamentals of materials, techniques and instrumentation for OSL and FNTD dosimetry

    Akselrod, M. S.

    2013-02-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique has already become a successful commercial tool in personal radiation dosimetry, medical dosimetry, diagnostic imaging, geological and archeological dating. This review briefly describes the history and fundamental principles of OSL materials, methods and instrumentation. The advantages of OSL technology and instrumentation in comparison with thermoluminescent technique are analyzed. Progress in material and detector engineering has allowed new and promising developments regarding OSL applications in the medical field. Special attention is dedicated to Al2O3:C as a material of choice for many dosimetric applications including fiberoptic OSL/RL sensors with diameters as small as 300 μm. A new RL/OSL fiberoptic system has a high potential for in vivo and in vitro dosimetry in both radiation therapy and diagnostic mammography. Different aspects of instrumentation, data processing algorithms, post-irradiation and real-time measurements are described. The next technological breakthrough was done with Fluorescent Nuclear Track detectors (FNTD) that has some important advantages in measuring fast neutron and high energy heavy charge particles that became the latest tool in radiation therapy. New Mg-doped aluminum oxide crystals and novel type of imaging instrumentation for FNTD technology were engineered and successfully demonstrated for occupational and accident dosimetry, for medical dosimetry and radiobiological research.

  8. Dosimetry at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility: Past, present, and future

    Although the primary reason for the existence of the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility is to provide basic data on the physics of systems of fissile material, the physical arrangements and ability to provide sources of radiation have led to applications for all types of radiation dosimetry. In the broad definition of radiation phenomena, the facility has provided sources to evaluate biological effects, radiation shielding and transport, and measurements of basic parameters such as the evaluation of delayed neutron parameters. Within the last 15 years, many of the radiation measurements have been directed to calibration and intercomparison of dosimetry related to nuclear criticality safety. Future plans include (1) the new applications of Godiva IV, a bare-metal pulse assembly, for dosimetry (including an evaluation of neutron and gamma-ray room return); (2) a proposal to relocate the Health Physics Research Reactor from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to Los Alamos, which will provide the opportunity to continue the application of a primary benchmark source to radiation dosimetry; and (3) a proposal to employ SHEBA, a low-enrichment solution assembly, for accident dosimetry and evaluation

  9. An upgraded personnel dosimetry system for TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2

    Following the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident, it was identified that due to the unusual radiological conditions created, an improved thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) system was needed to support the cleanup and recovery. The deficiencies of the existing system were identified as an unsuitable dosimeter design and limited system automation available to support the ∼6000 dosimeters being processed monthly for record dose. As a result, a Panasonic-based TLD personnel dosimetry system was developed and installed by GPU Nuclear at the TMI facility. The components of this dosimetry system include a dosimeter design and associated interpretation algorithm, an extensive quality assurance program, and a computer-based dosimeter processing system. This dosimeter/algorithm design provides for the use of a changing beta correction factor (BCF), which is derived from beta spectral data collected by the dosimeter. The system computer-based processing equipment is driven using software developed to be user friendly, totally menu driven, and geared toward the implementation of an extensive quality assurance program for a production dosimetry system. In total, this software consists of over 95 programs that specifically support written dosimetry procedures

  10. Framework for accident management

    A program is being conducted to establish those attributes of a severe accident management plan which are necessary to assure effective response to all credible severe accidents and to develop guidance for their incorporation in a plant's Accident Management Plan. This program is one part of the Accident Management Research Program being conducted by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The approach used in establishing attributes and developing guidance includes three steps. In the first step the general attributes of an accident management plan were identified based on: (1) the objectives established for the NRC accident management program, (2) the elements of an accident management framework identified by the NRC, and (3) a review of the processes used in developing the currently used approach for classifying and analyzing accidents. For the second step, a process was defined that uses the general attributes identified from the first step to develop an accident management plan. The third step applied the process defined in the second step at a nuclear power plant to refine and develop it into a benchmark accident management plan. Step one is completed, step two is underway and step three has not yet begun

  11. Visualization of Traffic Accidents

    Wang, Jie; Shen, Yuzhong; Khattak, Asad

    2010-01-01

    Traffic accidents have tremendous impact on society. Annually approximately 6.4 million vehicle accidents are reported by police in the US and nearly half of them result in catastrophic injuries. Visualizations of traffic accidents using geographic information systems (GIS) greatly facilitate handling and analysis of traffic accidents in many aspects. Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), Inc. is the world leader in GIS research and development. ArcGIS, a software package developed by ESRI, has the capabilities to display events associated with a road network, such as accident locations, and pavement quality. But when event locations related to a road network are processed, the existing algorithm used by ArcGIS does not utilize all the information related to the routes of the road network and produces erroneous visualization results of event locations. This software bug causes serious problems for applications in which accurate location information is critical for emergency responses, such as traffic accidents. This paper aims to address this problem and proposes an improved method that utilizes all relevant information of traffic accidents, namely, route number, direction, and mile post, and extracts correct event locations for accurate traffic accident visualization and analysis. The proposed method generates a new shape file for traffic accidents and displays them on top of the existing road network in ArcGIS. Visualization of traffic accidents along Hampton Roads Bridge Tunnel is included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Colloque final du programme de recherche ECHIBIOTEB : Outils innovants d’échantillonnage, d’analyses chimiques et biologiques pour le suivi de traitements avancés des eaux usées et des boues

    Miege, C.; Choubert, J.M.; Geffard, O.; Coquery, M.; Bruchet, A.; Besnault, S.; H. Budzinski; Cachot, J.; Parlanti, E; Ait Aissa, S.; Pandard, P.; Levi, Y; Dudal, Y.

    2015-01-01

    / Résumé du programme ECHIBIOTEB : Bien que les stations de traitement des eaux usées (STEU) ne soient pas construites dans le but d’éliminer les micropolluants organiques et métalliques, ces derniers peuvent néanmoins être éliminés de la phase dissoute des eaux usées par les procédés de traitement biologique conventionnels. L’élimination peut se faire grâce aux mécanismes d’adsorption sur les boues ou de dégradation biologique ou abiotique. Cependant, certains micropolluant...

  13. La fixation biologique de l'azote : quelles potentialités pour le développement ? : conférence-débat de l'ORSTOM présentée le 30 mai 1996

    Roger, Pierre-Armand; Dommergues, Y.; Balandreau, J; Dreyfus, Bernard; Sougoufara, B.

    1996-01-01

    La fixation biologique de N2 est une activité microbienne aussi importante pour le maintien de la vie sur le globe terrestre que la photosynthèse. Environ 175 millions de tonnes d'azote atmosphérique sont réintroduits annuellement dans le cycle de la vie par la fixation biologique. Pour comparaison, les engrais azotés utilisés en agriculture correspondentà environ 40 millions de tonnes d'azote par an. Dans les écosystèmes cultivés,la fixation de N2 et les apports d'engrais azoté constituent l...

  14. Dosimetry standards for radiation processing

    For irradiation treatments to be reproducible in the laboratory and then in the commercial environment, and for products to have certified absorbed doses, standardized dosimetry techniques are needed. This need is being satisfied by standards being developed by experts from around the world under the auspices of Subcommittee E10.01 of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). In the time period since it was formed in 1984, the subcommittee has grown to 150 members from 43 countries, representing a broad cross-section of industry, government and university interests. With cooperation from other international organizations, it has taken the combined part-time effort of all these people more than 13 years to complete 24 dosimetry standards. Four are specifically for food irradiation or agricultural applications, but the majority apply to all forms of gamma, x-ray, Bremsstrahlung and electron beam radiation processing, including dosimetry for sterilization of health care products and the radiation processing of fruits, vegetables, meats, spices, processed foods, plastics, inks, medical wastes and paper. An additional 6 standards are under development. Most of the standards provide exact procedures for using individual dosimetry systems or for characterizing various types of irradiation facilities, but one covers the selection and calibration of dosimetry systems, and another covers the treatment of uncertainties. Together, this set of standards covers essentially all aspects of dosimetry for radiation processing. The first 20 of these standards have been adopted in their present form by the International Organization of Standardization (ISO), and will be published by ISO in 1999. (author)

  15. Calorimetric dosimetry of reactor radiation

    Calorimetric dosimetry of reactor radiation is relatively new reactor dosimetry method and the number of relevant papers is rather small. Some difficulties in applying standard methods (chemical dosemeters, ionization chambers) exist because of the complexity of radiation. In general application of calorimetric dosemeters for measuring absorbed doses is most precise. In addition to adequate choice of calorimetric bodies there is a possibility of determining the yields of each component of the radiation mixture in the total absorbed dose. This paper contains a short review of the basic calorimetry methods and some results of measurements at the RA reactor in Vinca performed by isothermal calorimeter

  16. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with the design and measurement of physical parameters used in theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and uses the theoretical developments for experimental design, and provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  17. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with design and measurement of those physical parameters used in the theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and makes use of the theoretical developments for experimental design. Also, this program provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  18. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    2006-01-01

    CERN Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page: http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry. The Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 to 12.00 and is closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats.

  19. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    2006-01-01

    CERN Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry. The Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 - 12.00, and closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats.

  20. Ideal dosimetry system: dosimetry systems in current use

    In radiation processing - validation and process control (sterilization, food irradiation, etc.) depend on the measurement of absorbed dose. Measurements of absorbed dose shall be performed using a dosimetric system or systems having a known level of accuracy and precision (European standard EN552:1994). Lecture describes application of different dosimetry systems in the radiation processing of different materials

  1. Laser accidents: Being Prepared

    Barat, K

    2003-01-24

    The goal of the Laser Safety Officer and any laser safety program is to prevent a laser accident from occurring, in particular an injury to a person's eyes. Most laser safety courses talk about laser accidents, causes, and types of injury. The purpose of this presentation is to present a plan for safety offices and users to follow in case of accident or injury from laser radiation.

  2. The Chernobyl accident consequences

    Five teen years later, Tchernobyl remains the symbol of the greater industrial nuclear accident. To take stock on this accident, this paper proposes a chronology of the events and presents the opinion of many international and national organizations. It provides also web sites references concerning the environmental and sanitary consequences of the Tchernobyl accident, the economic actions and propositions for the nuclear safety improvement in the East Europe. (A.L.B.)

  3. Communication and industrial accidents

    As, Sicco van

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence of organizational communication on safety. Accidents are actually caused by individual mistakes. However the underlying causes of accidents are often organizational. As a link between these two levels - the organizational failures and mistakes - I suggest the concept of role distance, which emphasizes the organizational characteristics. The general hypothesis is that communication failures are a main cause of role distance and accident-proneness within orga...

  4. Nuclear accidents and epidemiology

    A consultation on epidemiology related to the Chernobyl accident was held in Copenhagen in May 1987 as a basis for concerted action. This was followed by a joint IAEA/WHO workshop in Vienna, which reviewed appropriate methodologies for possible long-term effects of radiation following nuclear accidents. The reports of these two meetings are included in this volume, and cover the subjects: 1) Epidemiology related to the Chernobyl nuclear accident. 2) Appropriate methodologies for studying possible long-term effects of radiation on individuals exposed in a nuclear accident. Figs and tabs

  5. Propriétés biologiques et pharmacologiques de Terminalia superba Engl. et Diels (Combretaceae) : Synthèse bibliographique

    Fifamè KOUGNIMON; Dougnon, Victorien; Eugénie ANAGO; Honoré BANKOLE; Mohamed SOUMANOU; Frédéric LOKO

    2015-01-01

    Terminalia superba Engl. et Diels (Combretaceae) est une plante largement répartie en Afrique. Elle est beaucoup employée en pharmacopée indigène. Le présent travail a pour objectif de réaliser une synthèse bibliographique et une analyse des résultats de recherche portant sur la composition phytochimique ainsi que les propriétés biologiques et pharmacologiques de T. superba. Ce travail a permis de noter que cette plante est riche en tanins, saponosides, coumarines, mucilages, dérivés anthr...

  6. Les effluents vinicoles : problématique du traitement et premier bilan sur la conception et le fonctionnement des procédés biologiques

    Racault, Y.; Stricker, A.E.; Vedrenne, J.

    2002-01-01

    Une large gamme de procédés de traitement est désormais applicable aux effluents vinicoles et une méthodologie propre à ce type d'effluents est nécessaire pour choisir la solution la plus adaptée en fonction des contraintes (caractéristiques des rejets, qualité requise pour les eaux traitées, environnement, capacités de stockage in situ...). Les spécificités de fonctionnement des traitements biologiques appliqués aux effluents vinicoles sont rappelées ainsi que les performances possibles. Une...

  7. Diagnostic et perspectives de développement de la filière viande bovine biologique des Pays de la Loire

    Morel-Thareau, Bertille; Le Guen, Roger; Lambert, Annie; Schieb-Bienfait, Nathalie; De Fontguyon, Guy; Euzeon, Rebecca

    2003-01-01

    La filière viande bovine biologique des Pays de la Loire présente les particularités suivantes : - de nombreux acteurs n’interviennent qu’en prestation de service . C’est le cas des organisations de producteurs pour la collecte, l’estimation, le transport et la facturation des animaux, c’est le cas aussi de certains abattoirs et ateliers de découpe agréés sollicités pour l’approvisionnement des bouchers, des magasins spécialisés ou des producteurs – vendeurs. Dans l’état actuel de l’organ...

  8. Des bandes fleuries pour la lutte biologique : état des lieux, limites et perspectives en Wallonie – Une synthèse bibliographique.

    Hatt, Séverin; Uyttenbroeck, Roel; Bodson, Bernard; Piqueray, Julien; Monty, Arnaud; Francis, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Parmi les Mesures Agri-Environnementales wallonnes soutenues par l’Union Européenne figure l’aménagement des bordures de parcelles. Il existe divers types d’aménagements dont celui d’y semer des mélanges fleuris. Ceux-ci sont connus pour abriter une large diversité d’insectes et parmi eux, des ennemis naturels des ravageurs qui peuvent être mobilisés pour lutter biologiquement contre ces derniers. Néanmoins, semer des bandes fleuries n’implique pas nécessairement un service de lutte biolog...

  9. Agritourisme et productions biologiques dans les Alpes-de-Haute-Provence : indicateurs de la redynamisation des campagnes ?

    Volle, Aurélie

    2008-01-01

    L’étude des localisations des exploitations agricoles concernées ainsi que des évolutions démographiques et de la déprise agricole permettent de nuancer l’impact de l’agritourisme et des productions biologiques dans la redynamisation des campagnes des Alpes-de-Haute-Provence. Les nouvelles installations néorurales marquent surtout une révolution sociologique : l’identité rurale se substitue à celle des paysans, la mobilité professionnelle fait son apparition dans le monde agricole. Dans certa...

  10. Etude de l'Interaction Protéine-Protéine par Modélisation Moléculaire. Application aux Processus Biologiques

    SARI MOHAMED, Souad

    2013-01-01

    Les interactions protéine-protéine ont un aspect essentiel des processus biologiques. Elles sont fortement impliquées dans la formation de structures macromoléculaires, dans la signalisation, dans la régulation et dans les différentes voies métaboliques. La haute spécificité de ces interactions fait d’elles des cibles idéales pour les agents thérapeutiques. Les protéines kinases, plus particulièrement, représentent une des plus grandes familles de protéines, La plupart des canc...

  11. In aqua vivo EPID dosimetry

    Wendling, M.; McDermott, L.N.; Mans, A.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; Pecharroman-Gallego, R.; Sonke, J.J.; Stroom, J.; Herk, M. van; Mijnheer, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: At the Netherlands Cancer Institute--Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in vivo dosimetry using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been implemented for almost all high-energy photon treatments of cancer with curative intent. Lung cancer treatments were initially excluded, because t

  12. Manual of food irradiation dosimetry

    Following items are discussed: Fundamentals of dosimetry; description of irradiators; dose distribution in the product and commissioning the process; plant operation and process control; detailed instructions on using various dose-meter systems; references; glossary of some basic terms and concepts

  13. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy

    Tanderup, Kari; Beddar, Sam; Andersen, Claus Erik; Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Cygler, Joanna E.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the...

  14. Thermoluminescence dosimetry environmental monitoring system

    In this report, characteristics and performances of an environmental monitoring system with thermoluminescence dosimetry are presented. Most of the work deals with the main physical parameters necessary for measurements of ambiental dose. At the end of this report some of level doses in the environment around the site of the ENEA Center of Energy Research Salluggia (Italy) are illustrated

  15. Dosimetry for Electron Beam Applications

    Miller, Arne

    1983-01-01

    This report describes two aspects of electron bean dosimetry, on one hand developaent of thin fil« dosimeters and measurements of their properties, and on the other hand developaent of calorimeters for calibration of routine dosimeters, e.g. thin films. Two types of radiochromic thin film dosimet...

  16. The personal dosimetry in Mexico

    The Personal Dosimetry in Mexico, has an approximately 30 year-old history; and it had been and it is at the moment, one of the more important resources with which the personnel that works with ionizing radiation sources counts for its protection. The Personal Dosimetry begins with the film dosimetry, technique that even continues being used at the present time by some users, and the main reason of its use is for economic reasons. At the moment this technique, it has been surpassed, by the Thermoluminescent dosimetry, which has taken a lot of peak, mainly by the technological development with which it is counted at the present time; what has given as a result that this technique becomes tip technology; that supported in the characteristic of the used materials, as the handling and processing of the information associated with the new PC, digitizer cards, software etc, what has allowed increases it potential. In this work the current necessities of the market are presented as well as an analysis of the future real necessities in Mexico, at national level, the companies that provide this service and that they spread to satisfy this necessity of the market, including the different used technologies are also mentioned. The application ranges, at the same time, of the advantages and disadvantages of the different systems of Personal Dosimetry in the market. The companies that at the moment provide the service of Personal Dosimetry, its use materials and equipment in indistinct form, for the monitoring of gamma radiation, beta particles, different qualities of x-ray radiation, and sometimes neutrons. The monitoring of the exposed personnel at the diverse sources of ionizing radiation mentioned is carried out in many occasions without having with the materials (detectors), neither the appropriate infrastructure and therefore without the quality control that guarantees a correct evaluation of the dose equivalent, as a result of the exposure to the ionizing radiations; it

  17. Dosimetry for radiopharmaceuticals (invited paper)

    Developments in internal dosimetry for radiopharmaceuticals are summarised, with special reference to work carried out within the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Differences and similarities with internal dosimetry for occupationally exposed workers and for members of the public are identified. What is unique for radiopharmaceuticals is their special biokinetics. The products are designed to get high uptake in certain organs and tissues. When a new compound is introduced there are few long-term retention data for humans available. Therefore efforts have continuously to be made to investigate the biokinetics and dosimetry of new products as well as older products, for which the dosimetry is uncertain, e.g. pure β-emitters. Serial, quantitative gamma camera images of patients will continue to be the base for biokinetic information together with analysis of urine samples. The observed time-activity curves are described using exponential functions with specified fractional activities and half-times. The physical calculations are based on the MIRD formalism. For more detailed dosimetry, CT, MR and ultrasound can be used to localise organs and to determine their volumes. Such measurements are also needed for the construction of realistic phantoms (mathematically describable phantoms, 'voxel' phantoms and anthropomorphic phantoms) which are the geometrical base for dose calculations. Variations in anatomy and biokinetics between individuals due to age, gender and disease have to be given greater consideration in the future. Information on the distribution of a radionuclide within organs and tissues is of importance for its therapeutic use as is the intracellular localisation of low energy electron emitters both in therapy and diagnosis. (author)

  18. Biological effects of neutrons, mechanisms and applications; Effets biologiques des neutrons: mecanismes et applications

    Voisin, Ph. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN), 92 (France)

    1999-12-01

    The interest to study the ionizing radiations effects on the biological structures concern not only the fundamental comprehension of the mechanisms leading to the radiation damage but also much more pragmatic problems such as the accidental overexposure or radiotherapy treatment. Among these fundamental or applied studies, the neutrons effects take an important part, because of their particular mode of indirect ionization effect and their applications, as well civil as military ones. The purpose of this review is to point out some specific biological effects of neutrons and to describe biological methods to measure them. It clearly appears that neutrons biological effects are more deleterious than those caused by the radiations of lower TEL(X- and {gamma}-rays) taken as reference, for all the measurement levels used, genes mutations, chromosome aberrations, cellular survival or carcinogenesis. This difference is probably related to the density of the energy deposit in the vital cell targets, and to the absence of significant variations related to oxygenation, dose rate or dose fractionation. Such toxic effects, when considered in the course of a criticality accident, can paradoxically become an advantage in the follow-up of therapeutic treatment. (author)

  19. Retrospective dosimetry using Japanese brick quartz: A way forward despite an unstable fast decaying OSL signal

    Fujita, Hiroki; Jain, Mayank; Murray, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Quartz extracted from heated bricks has been previously suggested for use in dose estimation in accident dosimetry, but this technique has never been applied before to Japanese quartz which often has unusual OSL characteristics. In this study the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) characteri......Quartz extracted from heated bricks has been previously suggested for use in dose estimation in accident dosimetry, but this technique has never been applied before to Japanese quartz which often has unusual OSL characteristics. In this study the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL...... peak, which necessitates a prior heat treatment. A single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) protocol is developed and tested using thermal treatments intended to isolate a stable dosimetric signal. A minimum detection limit of 65 mGy is then estimated using this protocol. Following irradiation using 60Co...... of Japanese brick quartz examined here can be used to derive precise estimates of accident dose, and, possibly to distinguish between sources of gamma radiation in a nuclear accident. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the existence of an unstable fast decaying OSL signal in quartz derived...

  20. Accident of radiation exposure and/or contamination with radionuclide

    The accident of exposure is defined to be an unintentional one leading to deleterious outcome. This paper reviews the historical and recent accidents involving those mainly dealt in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan and reported in foreign countries, and describes Japanese medical system for coping with the exposure. Hazardous events of radiation exposure are reported as early as within 1 year after discovery of X-ray by Roentgen (1895). In Japan, there are accidents of exposure to the crew of fishing boat Daigo Fukuryu Maru by nuclear experiment at Bikini Atoll (1954), of exposure by stolen 192Ir source (1972) and by Tokai Criticality Accident (1999). More recently, accidents dealt in NIRS are 13 incidents in 2000-2011: serious cases are 3 skin injuries of electronic industry workers by soft X-ray at 50-91 Gy (2000), and of a high school student at 9 Gy (2001) in the science lesson. The decontamination, dosimetry, radiological protection and support of temporary entrance of evacuees have been conducted by NIRS at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident (2011). Foreign information of 19 severely exposed accidents from 2000 to 2012 are described partly or thoroughly for 18 countries. In Japan, the medical system for coping with the exposure is now under re-construction on the impact of the Fukushima Accident. Its concept stands on the aspects that the system is essentially built up not only for prefectures having nuclear power plant and their neighboring ones, but also those with facilities dealing with radioisotopes, and that those undertaking subjects are thoroughly responsible for concurrent support of medicare at radiation emergency. The guideline for medical education published in 2011 contains the item concerning the radiation/humans. (T.T.)

  1. Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management

    As an early response to the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident, the Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) Bureau decided to focus on the following issues as an initial response of the joint program after having direct communications with the Japanese official participants in April 2011: - Management of high radiation area worker doses: It has been decided to make available the experience and information from the Chernobyl accident in terms of how emergency worker / responder doses were legally and practically managed, - Personal protective equipment for highly-contaminated areas: It was agreed to collect information about the types of personnel protective equipment and other equipment (e.g. air bottles, respirators, air-hoods or plastic suits, etc.), as well as high-radiation area worker dosimetry use (e.g. type, number and placement of dosimetry) for different types of emergency and high-radiation work situations. Detailed information was collected on dose criteria which are used for emergency workers /responders and their basis, dose management criteria for high dose/dose rate areas, protective equipment which is recommended for emergency workers / responders, recommended individual monitoring procedures, and any special requirement for assessment from the ISOE participating nuclear utilities and regulatory authorities and made available for Japanese utilities. With this positive response of the ISOE official participants and interest in the situation in Fukushima, the Expert Group on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management (EG-SAM) was established by the ISOE Management Board in May 2011. The overall objective of the EG-SAM is to contribute to occupational exposure management (providing a view on management of high radiation area worker doses) within the Fukushima plant boundary with the ISOE participants and to develop a state-of-the-art ISOE report on best radiation protection management practices for proper radiation

  2. Criticality accident in Argentina

    A recent criticality type accident, ocurred in Argetina, is commented. Considerations about the nature of the facility where this accident took place, its genesis, type of operation carried out on the day of the event, and the medical aspects involved are done. (Author)

  3. Chernobyl accident and Danmark

    The report describes the Chernobyl accident and its consequences for Denmark in particular. It was commissioned by the Secretary of State for the Environment. Volume 1 contains copies of original documents issued by Danish authorities during the first accident phase and afterwards. Evaluations, monitoring data, press releases, legislation acts etc. are included. (author)

  4. Radiation accidents in hospitals

    Some of the radiation accidents that have occurred in Indian hospitals and causes that led to them are reviewed. Proper organization of radiation safety minimizes such accidents. It has been pointed out that there must be technical competence and mental preparedness to tackle emergencies when they do infrequently occur. (M.G.B.)

  5. Communication and industrial accidents

    As, Sicco van

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence of organizational communication on safety. Accidents are actually caused by individual mistakes. However the underlying causes of accidents are often organizational. As a link between these two levels - the organizational failures and mistakes - I suggest the conc

  6. Chernobyl accident and Denmark

    The report describes the Chernobyl accident and its consequences for Denmark in particular. It was commissioned by The Secretary of State for the Environment. Volume 2 contains copies of original documents issued by Danish authorities during the first accident phase and afterwards. Evaluations, monitoring data, press releases, legislation acts etc. are included. (author)

  7. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 210 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 208 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Accidents with orphan sources

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has specifically defined statutory functions relating to the development of standards of safety and the provision for their application. It also has responsibilities placed on it by virtue of a number of Conventions, two of which are relevant to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies - the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. An overview of the way in which these functions are being applied to prevent and respond to radiological accidents, particularly those involving orphan sources, is described in this paper. Summaries of a number of such accidents and of the Agency's Action Plan relating to the safety and security of radiation sources are given. (orig.)

  10. Retrospective dosimetry: Preliminary use of the single aliquot regeneration (SAR) protocol for the measurement of quartz dose in young house bricks

    Banerjee, D.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    In retrospective dosimetry, the total dose absorbed by some pre-existing dosemeters, such as house bricks or tiles, is used to derive the dose to the population arising from a nuclear accident. This paper uses the newly developed SAR protocol to determine the total dose in young house bricks from...

  11. Proceedings of the 5. symposium on neutron dosimetry. Beam dosimetry

    Proceedings of the fifth symposium on neutron dosimetry, organized at Neuherberg, 17-21 September 1984, by the Commission of the European Communities and the GSF Neuherberg, with the co-sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Environmental Research. The proceedings deal with research on concepts, instruments and methods in radiological protection for neutrons and mixed neutron-gamma fields, including the generation, collection and evaluation of new dosimetric data, the derivation of relevant radiation protection quantitites, and the harmonization of experimental methods and instrumentation by intercomparison programmes. Besides radiation protection monitoring, the proceedings also report on the improvement of neutron beam dosimetry in the fields of radiobiology and radiation therapy

  12. Program for rapid dose assessment in criticality accident, RADAPAS

    In a criticality accident, a person near fissile material can receive extremely high dose which can cause acute health effect. For such a case, medical treatment should be carried out for the exposed person, according to severity of the exposure. Then, radiation dose should be rapidly assessed soon after an outbreak of an accident. Dose assessment based upon the quantity of induced 24Na in human body through neutron exposure is expected as one of useful dosimetry techniques in a criticality accident. A dose assessment program, called RADAPAS (RApid Dose Assessment Program from Activated Sodium in Criticality Accidents), was therefore developed to assess rapidly radiation dose to exposed persons from activity of induced 24Na. RADAPAS consists of two parts; one is a database part and the other is a part for execution of dose calculation. The database contains data compendiums of energy spectra and dose conversion coefficients from specific activity of 24Na induced in human body, which had been derived in a previous analysis using Monte Carlo calculation code. Information for criticality configuration or characteristics of radiation in the accident field is to be interactively given with interface displays in the dose calculation. RADAPAS can rapidly derive radiation dose to the exposed person from the given information and measured 24Na specific activity by using the conversion coefficient in database. This report describes data for dose conversions and dose calculation in RADAPAS and explains how to use the program. (author)

  13. Radiological accident in Panama - IAEA to send assistance team

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is sending a team of six international experts to assist the authorities of Panama to deal with the aftermath of a radiological accident that occurred at Panama's National Oncology Institute. The Government of Panama informed the IAEA on 22 May about the accident, reported that 28 patients have been affected, and requested IAEA's assistance under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency, to which Panama is a party. The assistance to be provided by the expert mission will include: ensuring that the radiation source(s) involved in the accident is (are) in a safe and secure condition; evaluating the doses incurred by the affected patients, inter alia, by analysing the treatment records and physical measurements; undertaking a medical evaluation of the affected patients' prognosis and treatment, taking into account, inter alia, the autopsy findings for those who died; and identifying issues on which the IAEA could offer to provide and/or co-ordinate assistance to minimize the consequences of the accident. The team, which includes senior experts in radiology, radiotherapy, radiopathology, radiation dosimetry and radiation protection from France, USA and Japan, and the IAEA itself, will leave for Panama tomorrow, 26 May

  14. Protocol for emergency dosimetry based on phaners using EPR spectrometry

    In the case of a radiological accident due to an external overexposure involving a limited number of persons from the public or workers without dosemeters, dosimetry by Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrometry on tooth enamel, among other techniques such as biological dosimetry, can be an efficient tool. However, for an accident involving a large number of victims, most of dosimetric techniques are limited by the necessary short delay of the answer. Indeed, in this specific case, it is very important in a first time and as quick as possible to sort population according to the severity of the exposure and, in a second time, to assess the dose more accurately, especially for the most irradiated victims in order to define the best therapeutic strategy. As a matter of fact, EPR dosimetry on tooth enamel due to the invasive sampling cannot be used for emergency dosimetry. Nevertheless, EPR dosimetry on materials easily sampled on the victims or in their vicinity may be a pertinent tool. In this context, the objective of this work was to study the dosimetric properties of phaners and to provide operational guidelines describing the sampling, the storage conditions, the sample preparation and the EPR signal measurement for fast triage of population and dose assessment.We studied the dosimetric properties of fingernails and different types of hair. After having optimized the recording parameters, the analysis of EPR signal was carried out according to specific criteria, such as anisotropy, temporal fading, influence of external parameters and dose response.The important fading of the radio-induced signal may be diminished with an appropriate storage at low temperature, allowing measurements up to several weeks after irradiation. The signal intensity was found linear with the received dose at least until 50 Gy for studied materials. Detection limits were respectively estimated equal to 2 Gy f or fingernails and about 3 Gy for hairs. Concerning hair, a strong

  15. Propriétés biologiques et pharmacologiques de Terminalia superba Engl. et Diels (Combretaceae : Synthèse bibliographique

    Fifamè KOUGNIMON

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia superba Engl. et Diels (Combretaceae est une plante largement répartie en Afrique. Elle est beaucoup employée en pharmacopée indigène. Le présent travail a pour objectif de réaliser une synthèse bibliographique et une analyse des résultats de recherche portant sur la composition phytochimique ainsi que les propriétés biologiques et pharmacologiques de T. superba. Ce travail a permis de noter que cette plante est riche en tanins, saponosides, coumarines, mucilages, dérivés anthracéniques, anthocyanes, polyterpènes, polyphénols, flavonoïdes, alcaloïdes, quinones, stérols, composés réducteurs ; acide gallique et gallate de méthyle, époxylignanes, triterpènes glucosides, acide ellagique. Ces groupent chimiques peuvent seuls ou dans une possible synergie d’action, être responsables d’activités biologiques et pharmacologiques notamment des activités anti-diabétiques, anti-parasitaires, anti-microbiennes, anti-hypertensives, anti-oxydantes, anti-ulcéreuses, anti-diarrhéiques et analgésiques. En conclusion, par ses vertus, T. superba est une potentielle source de recettes médicinales.

  16. Influence of biological and ecological factors on the radio-sensitivity of laboratory animals; Influence des facteurs biologiques et ecologiques sur la radiosensibilite des animaux de laboratoire

    Guenet, J.L.; Legeay, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    The biological and ecological factors liable to induce a change in the radio-sensitivity of a species are undoubtedly responsible for the large fluctuations observed during radio-biological experiments. It is easy to limit or to suppress the effects of some of them (genetic or nutritional factors). Since the research worker cannot control the others it is necessary to take them into account. In this report the authors analyse the action of two factors chosen as examples: - the first concerns biological rhythms; - the second attempts to define the role of health conditions. Other factors will be dealt with in a later report. (authors) [French] Les facteurs biologiques et ecologiques susceptibles de faire varier la radiosensibilite d'une espece sont sans aucun doute responsables des fluctuations importantes observees lors de l'experimentation radiobiologique. On peut facilement limiter ou supprimer l'action de certains d'entre eux (facteurs genetiques ou nutritionnels...). Il est necessaire de tenir compte des autres puisque l'experimentateur ne peut agir. Dans ce rapport, les auteurs analysent l'action de deux facteurs choisis comme exemple: - le premier concerne les rythmes biologiques; - le deuxieme s'attache a definir le role de l'etat sanitaire. D'autres facteurs seront analyses dans un prochain rapport. (auteurs)

  17. Accident report 1975/76

    The statistics previously published on the development of accidents were completed. It is the purpose of this accident report: 1) to present a survey of the development of the number of accidents (no radiation accidents) for the years 1960 - 1976, 2) to break down the accidents by different characteristics in order to be able to recognize the preventive measures to be taken so as to avoid further accidents, 3) to report about accidents experienced and to indicate activities performed with respect to accident prevention and health protection. (orig.)

  18. Dosimetry Control: Technic and methods. Proceedings of the international workshop 'Actual problems of dosimetry'

    There is a number of unsolved problems of both dosimetric and radiometric control, questions of the biological dosimetry, reconstruction of dozes of irradiation of the population at radiation incidents, which require coordination of efforts of scientists in various areas of a science. The submitted materials are grouped on five units: dosimetry engineering, biological dosimetry and markers of radiation impact, dosimetry of a medical irradiation, normative and measurement assurance of the dosimetric control, monitoring and reconstruction of dozes at radiation incidents

  19. Solid-state dosimetry applications: thermoluminescence dating, thermocurrent dosimetry

    In the new TL method for the testing of authenticity of archaeological findings the fraction between 100-250 μm from the whole substance of the pottery is used. The mass of the sample being about 0.1 g the method entails a negligible destruction of the object. For the determination of absolute age the TL of quartz grains separated from the ceramic object is used. A TLD method for the measurement of internal dose rate was developed an supplemented with elemental analysis to raise accuracy (at present about 20%). The temporary change in the conductivity of the insulating materials under ionizing radiation and heating - the so-called thermocurrent (TC) effect - offer new possibilities for the dosimetry of ionizing radiations. From the practical point of view the TC dosimetry distinguishes itself by the simplicity of read-out and, consequently, by excellent reproducibility. The dose measurable by sapphire crystals ranges from 100 μGy to 10 Gy, so the method is hopeful in personal dosimetry, too. The only drawback is the high scattering of parameters of the samples measured. (author)

  20. Worldwide quality assurance networks for radiotherapy dosimetry

    Several national and international organizations have developed various types and levels of external audit systems for radiotherapy dosimetry, either based on on-site review visits or using mailed dosimetry systems.Three major TLD (thermoluminescence dosimetry) networks make available postal dose audits to a large number of radiotherapy centres on a regular basis. These are the IAEA/WHO (World Health Organization) TLD postal dose audit service, which operates worldwide; the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) network, known as EQUAL, which operates in the European Union; and the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) network in North America. Other external audit programmes are either associated with national and international clinical trial groups or perform national dosimetry comparisons that check radiotherapy dosimetry at various levels. The paper discusses the present status of the worldwide quality assurance networks in radiotherapy dosimetry and reviews the activities of the three main TLD networks: the IAEA/WHO, EQUAL and RPC networks. (author)

  1. A microcomputer controlled thermoluminescence dosimetry system

    Using a microcomputer, an automatic thermoluminescence dosimetry system for personal dosimetry and thermoluminescence detector (TLD) research was developed. Process automation, statistical computation and dose calculation are provided by this microcomputer. Recording of measurement data, as well as dose record keeping for radiological workers is carried out with floppy disk. The microcomputer also provides a human/system interface by means of a video display and a printer. The main features of this dosimetry system are its low cost, high degree of flexibility, high degree of automation and the feasibility for use in routine dosimetry as well as in TLD research. The system is in use for personal dosimetry, environmental dosimetry and for TL-research work. Because of its modular set-up several components of the system are in use for other applications, too. The system seems suited for medium sized health physics groups. (author)

  2. Dosimetry by ESR spectroscopy of alanine

    Dosimetry based on electron spin resonance analysis of radiation-induced free radicals in amino acids (e.g. L-alanine) is relevant to biological dosimetry applications. Typical features are a wide dose range covering more than 5 decades (1-105Gy), energy independent response for photons above 100 keV, long-term stability of the ESR signal, and fast straightforward readout technique. Typical dosimeter samples, consisting of small pellets of microcrystalline amino acids in paraffin, are rugged, non-toxic, and insensitive to surface contaminations. Moreover, they are prepared homogeneously and inexpensively in large batches and can be evaluated repeatedly and supply archival dosimetry data. They have proven to be highly useful in various applications of radiation processing and sterilization dosimetry, food irradiation, quality control, radiation dosimetry, radiation therapy measurements, and as a reference system for dosimetry mailing intercomparisons. (author)

  3. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in veterinary diagnostic radiology

    This paper presents the results of Environmental and Personnel Dosimetry made in a radiology area of a veterinary hospital. Dosimetry was realized using thermoluminescent (TL) materials. Environmental Dosimetry results show that areas closer to the X-ray equipment are safe. Personnel Dosimetry shows important measurements of daily workday in some persons near to the limit established by ICRP. TL results of radiation measurement suggest TLDs are good candidates as a dosimeter to radiation dosimetry in veterinary radiology. - Highlights: ► Personnel dosimetry in laboratory veterinary diagnostic was determined. ► Student workplaces are safe against radiation. ► Efficiency value of apron lead was determined. ► X-ray beams distribution into veterinarian laboratory was measured.

  4. Locations of criticality alarms and nuclear accident dosimeters at Hanford

    1992-08-01

    Hanford facilities that contain fissionable materials capable of achieving critical mass are monitored with nuclear accident dosimeters (NADS) in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.11, Chapter XI, Section 4.c. (DOE 1988). The US Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Field Office (RL) has assigned the responsibility for maintaining and evaluating the Hanford NAD system to the Instrumentation and External Dosimetry (I ED) Section of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL's) Health Physics Department. This manual provides a description of the Hanford NAD, criteria and instructions for proper NAD placement, and the locations of these dosimeters onsite.

  5. Locations of criticality alarms and nuclear accident dosimeters at Hanford

    Hanford facilities that contain fissionable materials capable of achieving critical mass are monitored with nuclear accident dosimeters (NADS) in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.11, Chapter XI, Section 4.c. (DOE 1988). The US Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Field Office (RL) has assigned the responsibility for maintaining and evaluating the Hanford NAD system to the Instrumentation and External Dosimetry (I ampersand ED) Section of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL's) Health Physics Department. This manual provides a description of the Hanford NAD, criteria and instructions for proper NAD placement, and the locations of these dosimeters onsite

  6. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry with gypsum wallboard (drywall)

    Gypsum wallboard (drywall) represents an attractive target for retrospective dosimetry by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in the event of a radiological accident or malicious use of nuclear material. In this study, wallboard is shown to display a radiation-induced luminescence signal (RIS) as well as a natural background signal (NS), which is comparable in intensity to the RIS. Excitation and emission spectra show that maximum luminescence intensity is obtained for stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes (470 nm) and for detection in the ultraviolet region (290-370 nm). It is necessary to decrease the optical stimulation power dramatically in order to adequately separate the RIS from the interfering background signal. The necessary protocols are developed for accurately measuring the absorbed dose as low as 500 mGy and demonstrate that the RIS decays logarithmically with storage time, with complete erasure expected within 1-4 d. (authors)

  7. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry with gypsum wallboard (drywall).

    Thompson, Jeroen W; Burdette, Kevin E; Inrig, Elizabeth L; Dewitt, Regina; Mistry, Rajesh; Rink, W Jack; Boreham, Douglas R

    2010-09-01

    Gypsum wallboard (drywall) represents an attractive target for retrospective dosimetry by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in the event of a radiological accident or malicious use of nuclear material. In this study, wallboard is shown to display a radiation-induced luminescence signal (RIS) as well as a natural background signal (NS), which is comparable in intensity to the RIS. Excitation and emission spectra show that maximum luminescence intensity is obtained for stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes (470 nm) and for detection in the ultraviolet region (290-370 nm). It is necessary to decrease the optical stimulation power dramatically in order to adequately separate the RIS from the interfering background signal. The necessary protocols are developed for accurately measuring the absorbed dose as low as 500 mGy and demonstrate that the RIS decays logarithmically with storage time, with complete erasure expected within 1-4 d. PMID:20447939

  8. Retrospective dosimetry using EPR and TL techniques: a status report

    Methods of retrospective dosimetry, including luminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), rely on measurement of accident dose absorbed by naturally occurring materials - ceramics in the case of both thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and organic materials and bio- minerals in the case of EPR. Each of these methods relies on measurement of radiation defects resulting from accidental exposure. Since defects also result from natural sources of radiation over the lifetime of a sample, analysis is usually restricted to materials for which the natural dose may be determined and subtracted from the measured cumulative dose. Luminescence dating techniques rely heavily on an accurate assessment of cumulative dose from natural radiation sources, and dating research has provided us with the bulk of our knowledge in this area. Virtually all of the work on natural dose determination can be directly applied to retrospective techniques. With EPR techniques the cumulative dose from diagnostic x- rays is also of importance

  9. Database on aircraft accidents

    The Reactor Safety Subcommittee in the Nuclear Safety and Preservation Committee published the report 'The criteria on assessment of probability of aircraft crash into light water reactor facilities' as the standard method for evaluating probability of aircraft crash into nuclear reactor facilities in July 2002. In response to the report, Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization has been collecting open information on aircraft accidents of commercial airplanes, self-defense force (SDF) airplanes and US force airplanes every year since 2003, sorting out them and developing the database of aircraft accidents for latest 20 years to evaluate probability of aircraft crash into nuclear reactor facilities. This year, the database was revised by adding aircraft accidents in 2010 to the existing database and deleting aircraft accidents in 1991 from it, resulting in development of the revised 2011 database for latest 20 years from 1991 to 2010. Furthermore, the flight information on commercial aircrafts was also collected to develop the flight database for latest 20 years from 1991 to 2010 to evaluate probability of aircraft crash into reactor facilities. The method for developing the database of aircraft accidents to evaluate probability of aircraft crash into reactor facilities is based on the report 'The criteria on assessment of probability of aircraft crash into light water reactor facilities' described above. The 2011 revised database for latest 20 years from 1991 to 2010 shows the followings. The trend of the 2011 database changes little as compared to the last year's one. (1) The data of commercial aircraft accidents is based on 'Aircraft accident investigation reports of Japan transport safety board' of Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. 4 large fixed-wing aircraft accidents, 58 small fixed-wing aircraft accidents, 5 large bladed aircraft accidents and 114 small bladed aircraft accidents occurred. The relevant accidents for evaluating

  10. Persistence of airline accidents.

    Barros, Carlos Pestana; Faria, Joao Ricardo; Gil-Alana, Luis Alberiko

    2010-10-01

    This paper expands on air travel accident research by examining the relationship between air travel accidents and airline traffic or volume in the period from 1927-2006. The theoretical model is based on a representative airline company that aims to maximise its profits, and it utilises a fractional integration approach in order to determine whether there is a persistent pattern over time with respect to air accidents and air traffic. Furthermore, the paper analyses how airline accidents are related to traffic using a fractional cointegration approach. It finds that airline accidents are persistent and that a (non-stationary) fractional cointegration relationship exists between total airline accidents and airline passengers, airline miles and airline revenues, with shocks that affect the long-run equilibrium disappearing in the very long term. Moreover, this relation is negative, which might be due to the fact that air travel is becoming safer and there is greater competition in the airline industry. Policy implications are derived for countering accident events, based on competition and regulation. PMID:20618386

  11. Management of severe accidents

    The definition and the multidimensionality aspects of accident management have been reviewed. The suggested elements in the development of a programme for severe accident management have been identified and discussed. The strategies concentrate on the two tiered approaches. Operative management utilizes the plant's equipment and operators capabilities. The recovery managment concevtrates on preserving the containment, or delaying its failure, inhibiting the release, and on strategies once there has been a release. The inspiration for this paper was an excellent overview report on perspectives on managing severe accidents in commercial nuclear power plants and extending plant operating procedures into the severe accident regime; and by the most recent publication of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) considering the question of risk reduction and source term reduction through accident prevention, management and mitigation. The latter document concludes that 'active development of accident management measures by plant personnel can lead to very large reductions in source terms and risk', and goes further in considering and formulating the key issue: 'The most fruitful path to follow in reducing risk even further is through the planning of accident management.' (author)

  12. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eighteen years (from 1988 till the beginning of 2006 are analyzed in this paper. It is very alarming data that, according to all the recorded accidents, over 1.6 million tons of sulfuric acid were exuded. Although water transport is the safest (only 16.38% of the total amount of accidents in that way 98.88% of the total amount of sulfuric acid was exuded into the environment. Human factor was the common factor in all the accidents, whether there was enough control of the production process, of reservoirs or transportation tanks or the transport was done by inadequate (old tanks, or the accidents arose from human factor (inadequate speed, lock of caution etc. The fact is that huge energy, sacrifice and courage were involved in the recovery from accidents where rescue teams and fire brigades showed great courage to prevent real environmental catastrophes and very often they lost their lives during the events. So, the phrase that sulfuric acid is a real "environmental bomb" has become clearer.

  13. Accidents, risks and consequences

    Although the accident at Chernobyl can be considered as the worst accident in the world, it could have been worse. Other far worse situations are considered, such as a nuclear weapon hitting a nuclear reactor. Indeed the accident at Chernobyl is compared to a nuclear weapon. The consequences of Chernobyl in terms of radiation levels are discussed. Although it is believed that a similar accident could not occur in the United Kingdom, that possibility is considered. It is suggested that emergency plans should be made for just such an eventuality. Even if Chernobyl could not happen in the UK, the effects of accidents are international. The way in which nuclear reactor accidents happen is explored, taking the 1957 Windscale fire, Three Mile Island and Chernobyl as examples. Reactor designs and accident scenarios are considered. The different reactor designs are listed. As well as the Chernobyl RBMK design it is suggested that the light water reactors also have undesirable features from the point of view of safety. (U.K.)

  14. Gel dosimetry for conformal radiotherapy

    With the continuum development of conformal radio therapies, aimed at delivering high dose to tumor tissue and low dose to the healthy tissue around, the necessities has appeared of suitable improvement of dosimetry techniques giving the possibility of obtaining dose images to be compared with diagnostic images. Also if wide software has been developed for calculating dose distributions in the fields of various radiotherapy units, experimental verifications are necessary, in particular in the case of complex geometries in conformal radiotherapy. Gel dosimetry is a promising method for imaging the absorbed dose in tissue-equivalent phantoms, with the possibility of 3D reconstruction of the spatial dose distribution, with milli metric resolution. Optical imaging of gel dosimeters, based on visible light absorbance analysis, has shown to be a reliable technique for achieving dose distributions. (Author)

  15. Dosimetry in radiotherapy. V.1

    A series of symposia on dosimetry in medicine and biology have been held by the IAEA in co-operation with WHO. The present symposium was the first one focusing on ''Dosimetry in Radiotherapy''. The papers presented reflected the different steps in the calibration chain such as the calibration standards established by the National Standards Laboratories and the conversion of the reading of calibrated instruments to the desired quantity, i.e. absorbed dose to water at a reference point in the user's beam at the radiotherapy clinic. The programme further examined the procedures necessary for optimization of the treatment of the patient, such as treatment planning methods, dose distribution studies, new techniques of dose measurement, improvements in the physical dose distributions/conformation therapy and special problems involved in total body treatments. Results of quality assurance in radiotherapy were presented from local hospitals as well as from national and international studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Radiation protection dosimetry and calibrations

    At the SCK-CEN different specialised services are delivered for a whole range of external and internal customers in the radiation protection area. For the expertise group of radiation protection dosimetry and calibrations, these services are organized in four different laboratories: dosimetry, anthropogammametry, nuclear calibrations and non-nuclear calibrations. The services are given by a dedicated technical staff who has experience in the handling of routine and specialised cases. The scientific research that is performed by the expertise group makes sure that state-of-the-art techniques are being used, and that constant improvements and developments are implemented. Quality Assurance is an important aspect for the different services, and accreditation according national and international standards is achieved for all laboratories

  17. Relative dosimetry by Ebt-3

    In the present work relative dosimetry in two linear accelerator for radiation therapy was studied. Both Varian Oncology systems named Varian Clinac 2100-Cd and MLC Varian Clinac i X were used. Gaf Chromic Ebt-3 film was used. Measurements have been performed in a water equivalent phantom, using 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams on both Linacs. Both calibration and Electron irradiations were carried out with the ionization chamber placed at the isocenter, below a stack of solid water slabs, at the depth of dose maximum (D max), with a Source-to-Surface Distance (SSD) of 100 cm and a field size of 10 cm x 10 cm. Calibration and dosimetric measurements photons were carried out under IAEA-TRS 398 protocol. Results of relative dosimetry in the present work are discussed. (Author)

  18. Some aspects on neutron dosimetry

    The American National Council on Radiation Protection and measurements (1) has recently issued a statement regarding dose limitation system for neutrons. The changes proposed in that statement presented substantial problems regarding the personnel exposure to neutrons and had pointed out the need to reassess an adequate current neutron dosimetry practice. Generally, the same types of dosimeters i.e. Nuclear Track (NTA films) and TLD-Albedo, have been used at major nuclear facilities over the past 15 years. here recently, other dosimetry methods such as track etch with polycarbonates such as CR-39 have been developed. However these should be recognized as local systems aiming to the development of better and more applicable dosimeters. 4 tab

  19. Dosimetry in radiotherapy. V.2

    A series of symposia on dosimetry in medicine and biology have been held by the IAEA in co-operation with WHO. The present symposium was the first one focusing on ''Dosimetry in Radiotherapy''. The papers presented reflected the different steps in the calibration chain such as the calibration standards established by the National Standards Laboratories and the conversion of the reading of calibrated instruments to the desired quantity, i.e. absorbed dose to water at a reference point in the user's beam at the radiotherapy clinic. The programme further examined the procedures necessary for optimization of the treatment of the patient, such as treatment planning methods, dose distribution studies, new techniques of dose measurement, improvements in the physical dose distributions/conformation therapy and special problems involved in total body treatments. Results of quality assurance in radiotherapy were presented from local hospitals as well as from national and international studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. NOTE FROM THE DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    2002-01-01

    During March, the Dosimetry Service will be opened from 8h30 to 12h in the morning and closed every afternoon.   We have established that many people, who are provided regularly with a personal dosimeter (film badge), have changed their activity and do not need it anymore, because they do not, or only exceptionally, enter controlled areas. If you are one of these persons, please contact the Personal Dosimeter Service (tel: 72155). There is a simplified procedure for obtaining a dosimeter if you have an immediate need for short-term visits in controlled areas. A reduction of the number of persons on the regular distribution list of dosimeters would decrease our and the distributors workload. It would also contribute to significant savings in the dosimetry, and thus CERN, budget. We thank you in advance for your understanding and for your collaboration.

  1. High-level exposure: Progress in dosimetry

    In the event of people being accidentally exposed to unusually high levels of radiation, it becomes important to obtain as quickly as possible a reasonably accurate indication of the dose which each individual may have received. This serves in the first place to show which, if any, of the persons who may have been involved should receive medical treatment or be kept under observation. In the second place the information supplements clinical observation as a guide to treatment. A symposium in Vienna, held from 8 to 12 March 1965, discussed the assessment of doses received by persons who have been accidentally irradiated, by exposure to external radiation fields, by the intake of radioactive materials, or by radioactive contamination being deposited on the surface of the body. The symposium, organised jointly by IAEA and the World Health Organisation, was entitled Personnel Dosimetry for Accidental High-Level Exposure to External and Internal Radiation. There were 179 participants from 34 countries and five international organisations. This was a specialized conference, fairly narrow in scope, since it formed one in a succession of meetings on kindred subjects. For example, a symposium held in May 1964 dealt with general methods of assessing radioactive body burdens in man; a joint IAEA/WHO meeting in October 1960, and another in October 1962, dealt with medical aspects of radiation injury and of radioactive poisoning. About half the proceedings were devoted to discussion of measurement techniques for external radiation, with detailed discussion of various kinds of warning and recording devices, monitors and personal dosimeters. From these the meeting passed on to consider supplementary methods such as estimation of neutron dosage by analysis of blood or hair, and experiments conducted by means of polyethylene phantoms to establish the dose likely to be received under particular circumstances. Other sessions dealt with the determination of internal contamination, and

  2. Suitability of Israeli Household Salt for Retrospective Dosimetry

    Following a nuclear accident or a terror attack involving the dispersal of radioactive material, radiation dose assessment to first responders and the members of the public is essential. This information may be used by medical personnel to decide whether to refer the exposed individual for medical treatment or not. Few people, if any, will be wearing standard dosimeters at the exposure scene, so the need for a retrospective assessment of the radiation dose is an acute necessity. Previously developed methods for retrospective dosimetry (RD) have suggested various types of materials such as tiles, bricks, CDs, electronic components, mobile phones, electron paramagnetic resonance of tooth enamel, hair, nails, biological dosimetry techniques etc. These techniques involve significant disadvantages such as: the long time required to prepare the samples for measurement the considerable expense of the measuring equipment, invasive procedure and others. The need for an RD technique which will be fast, inexpensive, reliable, non-invasive and, if possible, portable, remains an on-going challenge. The ideal retrospective dosimeter must fulfill the following basic criteria: a) Availability in the contaminated area, b) Adequate dose measurement capability in the relevant range of dose levels, c) Negligible or known fading between exposure and measurement

  3. Computer Aided Dosimetry and Verification of Exposure to Radiation

    Waller, Edward; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Leach, Karen E.; Lalonde, Louise

    2002-06-01

    In the timeframe following the September 11th attacks on the United States, increased emphasis has been placed on Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) preparedness. Of prime importance is rapid field assessment of potential radiation exposure to Canadian Forces field personnel. This work set up a framework for generating an 'expert' computer system for aiding and assisting field personnel in determining the extent of radiation insult to military personnel. Data was gathered by review of the available literature, discussions with medical and health physics personnel having hands-on experience dealing with radiation accident victims, and from experience of the principal investigator. Flow charts and generic data fusion algorithms were developed. Relationships between known exposure parameters, patient interview and history, clinical symptoms, clinical work-ups, physical dosimetry, biological dosimetry, and dose reconstruction as critical data indicators were investigated. The data obtained was examined in terms of information theory. A main goal was to determine how best to generate an adaptive model (i.e. when more data becomes available, how is the prediction improved). Consideration was given to determination of predictive algorithms for health outcome. In addition. the concept of coding an expert medical treatment advisor system was developed (U)

  4. Nonuniform irradiation of the canine intestine. II. Dosimetry

    An experimental model has been developed for quantitative studies of radiobiological damage to the canine small intestine following partial-body nonuniform irradiation. Animals were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays to simulate the nonuniform irradiation which do occur in victims of radiation accidents. The model used a short source-to-surface distance for unilateral irradiations to produce a dose gradient of a factor of two laterally across the canine intestinal region. The remainder of the animal's body was shielded to prevent lethal damage to the bone marrow. In situ dosimetry measurements were made using thermoluminescent dosimeters to determine the radiation dose delivered as a function of position along a segment of the small intestine. This system made it possible to correlate the radiation dose delivered at a specific point along the small intestine with the macroscopic and microscopic appearance of the intestinal mucosa at that point, as determined by direct observation and biopsy using a fiberoptic endoscope. A key feature of this model is that dosimetry data for multiple sites, which receive a graded range of radiation doses, can be correlated with biological measurements to obtain a dose-response curve. This model is being used to evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutic procedures to improve survival following nonuniform irradiation

  5. MISTI Shielding and Dosimetry Experiment Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reliable on-orbit dosimetry is necessary for understanding effects of space radiation environments on spacecraft microelectronics performance and comparison of...

  6. Radio-analysis. Applications: biological dosimetry

    Radioisotopes have revolutionized the medical biology. Radio-immunology remains the reference measurement of the infinitely small in biology. Constant efforts have been performed to improve the simpleness, detectability and fastness of the method thanks to an increasing automation. This paper presents: 1 - the advantages of compounds labelling and the isotopic dilution; 2 - the antigen-antibody system: properties, determination of the affinity constant using the Scatchard method; 3 - radio-immunologic dosimetry: competitive dosimetry (radioimmunoassay), calibration curve and mathematical data processing, application to the free thyroxine dosimetry, immunoradiometric dosimetry (immunoradiometric assay), evaluation of the analytical efficiency of a radioimmunoassay; 4 - detection of the radioactive signal (solid and liquid scintillation). (J.S.)

  7. Dosimetry for electron beam sterilization

    According to ISO 11137-1 (sect 4.3.4) dosimetry used in the development, validation and routine control of the sterilization process shall have measurement traceability to national or international standards and shall have a known level of uncertainty. It can only be obtained through calibration of the dosimeters. In presented lecture different types of dosimeter systems for electron beams (calorimeters, radiochromic film dosimeters, alanine / EPR) and their calibration are described

  8. Dosimetry of β extensive sources

    In this work, we have been studied, making use of the Penelope Monte Carlo simulation code, the dosimetry of β extensive sources in situations of spherical geometry including interfaces. These configurations are of interest in the treatment of the called cranealfaringyomes of some synovia leisure of knee and other problems of interest in medical physics. Therefore, its application can be extended toward problems of another areas with similar geometric situation and beta sources. (Author)

  9. Dosimetry of total body irradiation

    In the treatment of disseminated malignancies an improvement in the curability and reduction of complication rates require high precision total body irradiation (TBI) and correct reporting of relevant treatment parameters. Optimal TBI dosimetry is the basis. Radiooncological and radiobiological requirements as well as the special physical situation have to be considered. To review the efforts of medical physicists, highlights from TBI workshops and publications are summarized. Additionally, dosimetric data from 34 European radiooncological centres contributing to the recent ESTRO inquiry on TBI are analysed. The topics are: absorbed dose and dose monitor calibration, determination of absolute and relative doses, dose ratios, attenuation data and heterogeneity corrections; TBI dose calculation methods regarding patient position, beam incidence, body shape and thickness, lung size and density; methods of TBI treatment planning including calculated dose modification and of TBI quality assurance. In conclusion, the following recommendations can be given: TBI dosimetry shall be performed under TBI conditions, close to the real treatment situation. The absorbed dose to water must be determined. The dose monitor should be calibrated against dose measurements at the centre of a water equivalent phantom of TBI equivalent size and typical thickness. Photon fluence profiles have to be measured with small phantoms. Influences on the local dose must be investigated systematically. A reproducible AP/PA TBI technique should be used. The TBI dose shall be specified to mid-abdomen and reported in units of gray. The single and total dose and the dose rate to the lungs, the number of fractions and the treatment time schedule must be stated. In vivo dosimetry is required if non-reliable TBI techniques are used. An international TBI dosimetry intercomparison could assist these efforts to improve the treatment of acute leukaemia. (author). 89 refs, 3 figs, 13 tabs

  10. Topical Review: Polymer gel dosimetry

    Baldock, C; De Deene, Y; Doran, S.; Ibbott, G; Jirasek, A.; Lepage, M.; McAuley, K B; Oldham, M; Schreiner, L J

    2010-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose ...

  11. Biological dosimetry-knowing what happened

    Effective medical management of a suspected radiation overexposure incident necessitates recording dynamic medical data and measuring appropriate radiation bioassays in order to provide diagnostic information to the treating physician and dose assessment for the personnel radiation protection records. Biological Assessment Tool (BAT), a radiation casualty management software application available at the AFRRI's website (www.afrri.usuhs.mil), was developed to facilitate medical recording and to assist in bioassay dose predictions. Prodromal signs and symptoms as well as the body location and degree of transitory radiation-induced erythema should be recorded. Goans and colleagues have recently published dose prediction models for the prodromal symptom, time until onset of vomiting, following photon and criticality accident exposures. A complete blood cell count (CBC) with white cell differential should be obtained immediately after exposure, three times a day for the next 2-3 days, and then twice a day for the following 3- 6 days. Lymphocyte cell counts and lymphocyte depletion kinetics provide a dose assessment prediction between 1 and 10 Gy photon equivalent dose range. A blood sample should also be taken for dose assessment, following coordination with a qualified radiation cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory, typically 24 hours after exposure using the 'gold standard' lymphocyte-dicentric radiation bioassay. Several of these cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratories use the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) bioassay, which permits dose assessment at higher doses (>5 Gy photon equivalent and acute high-dose rate exposures). Other opportunistic dosimetry approaches should be considered if available. Automated instrumentation to accomplish sample preparation and analysis for the conventional cytogenetic-based bioassays need to be integrated and beta tested in reference cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratories. Complimentary novel interphase-based cytological

  12. Radiation protection, dosimetry and archaeometry

    The activities performed by the radiation protection, dosimetry and archeometry group of the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities during 1999-2001 are briefly described, they include: internal radiation protection (a pilot project based on select x-ray diagnostics investigations where the surface dose was measured and compared against the EU standards), dose rates for patients and personnel during radiological check up, environmental monitoring. In the field of dosimetry, a new dosimeter material (CaF2:Tm was investigated), an active and a passive Bonner-Kugel-spectrometer to measure the neutron spectrum and their dose at high altitudes was built. In the project phantom during 600 days the energy distribution and equivalent dose in a human phantom was measured. Dosimetry and spectrometry (neutrons) on high mountains and airplanes were performed. Earlier cells apoptosis after irradiation with 60Co gamma radiation and neutrons was investigated and age estimation was performed on samples from middle Neolithic period, Bronze age an Roman empire. (nevyjel)

  13. Fourth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    The focus of the Fourth International Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry Symposium was to explore the impact of current developments in nuclear medicine on absorbed dose calculations. This book contains the proceedings of the meeting including the edited discussion that followed the presentations. Topics that were addressed included the dosimetry associated with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and blood elements, ultrashort-lived radionuclides, and positron emitters. Some specific areas of discussion were variations in absorbed dose as a result of alterations in the kinetics, the influence of radioactive contaminants on dose, dose in children and in the fetus, available instrumentation and techniques for collecting the kinetic data needed for dose calculation, dosimetry requirements for the review and approval of new radiopharmaceuticals, and a comparison of the effect on the thyroid of internal versus external irradiation. New models for the urinary blader, skeleton including the active marrow, and the blood were presented. Several papers dealt with the validity of traditional ''average-organ'' dose estimates to express the dose from particulate radiation that has a short range in tissue. These problems are particularly important in the use of monoclonal antibodies and agents used to measure intracellular functions. These proceedings have been published to provide a resource volume for anyone interested in the calculation of absorbed radiation dose

  14. Handling of Radiation Accidents. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Handling of Radiation Accidents

    Many types of radiation accidents can theoretically be foreseen, ranging from minor spills of radioactive materials within a laboratory to serious accidents characterized by the presence of intense radiation fields and the uncontrolled release of large quantities of radioactive contaminants. They could lead to the irradiation and contamination of persons and the contamination of premises and the natural environment. As a result of the great emphasis that has been placed on safety in the development of nuclear energy programmes and in the use of radiation sources, accidents involving the serious overexposure of persons are in fact very rare. Nevertheless such accidents can occur and it is necessary to plan in advance for those that can be,reasonably foreseen. The handling of serious radiation accidents requires the co-operation of experts with diverse qualifications and experience: radiation monitoring and dosimetry specialists; medical doctors experienced in diagnosing and treating radiation injury; nuclear safety, decontamination and waste management specialists; public relations officers; and many others. This symposium, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization as part of a co-ordinated programme, was designed to enable these specialists to discuss their problems on a very broad basis. The meeting was attended by 212 participants from 34 countries and 9 international organizations. In his opening address Professor Zheludev reminded the participants that the good safety record of the nuclear industry must not give rise to complacency and that we must all learn as much as possible from reported accidents in order to be ready to deal promptly and effectively with those that may be encountered in the future. It is noteworthy that some of the most severe injuries reported were suffered by persons who found lost-sources and carried them for long periods without any knowledge of the dangers involved. Organizational

  15. Report of the workshop on biological dosimetry: Increasing capacity for emergency response

    Recent events have brought increased attention to the possibility and dangers of a radiological terrorist threat and its potential implication on the national capacity for radiation accident preparedness. In such an event, there is a pressing need to rapidly identify severely irradiated individuals who require prompt medical attention from those who have not been exposed or have been subject to low doses. Initial dose assessment is a key component in rapid triage and treatment, however, the development of accurate methods for rapid dose assessment remains a challenge. In this report, the authors describe a recent workshop supported by the Chemical, Biological, Radiological-Nuclear and Explosives Research and Technology Initiative regarding the international effort to increase biological dosimetry capacity to effectively mount an emergency response in a mass casualty situation. Specifically, the focus of the workshop was on the current state of biological dosimetry capabilities and capacities in North America, recent developments towards increasing throughput for biological dosimetry and to identify opportunities for developing a North American Biological Dosimetry Network and forming partnerships and collaborations within Canada and the USA. (authors)

  16. Soviet submarine accidents

    Although the Soviet Union has more submarines than the NATO navies combined, and the technological superiority of western submarines is diminishing, there is evidence that there are more accidents with Soviet submarines than with western submarine fleets. Whether this is due to inadequate crews or lower standards of maintenance and overhaul procedures is discussed. In particular, it is suggested that since the introduction of nuclear powered submarines, the Soviet submarine safety record has deteriorated. Information on Soviet submarine accidents is difficult to come by, but a list of some 23 accidents, mostly in nuclear submarines, between 1966 and 1986, has been compiled. The approximate date, class or type of submarine, the nature and location of the accident, the casualties and damage and the source of information are tabulated. (U.K.)

  17. Accident resistant transport container

    Anderson, J.A.; Cole, K.K.

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  18. Boating Accident Statistics

    Department of Homeland Security — Accident statistics available on the Coast Guard’s website by state, year, and one variable to obtain tables and/or graphs. Data from reports has been loaded for...

  19. Talking about accidents

    It is argued that the public's emotional fear of the hypothetical, very unlikely, gigantic nuclear accident is partly caused by the nuclear industry's incorrect use of language within its own professional discussions. Improved terminology is suggested. (U.K.)

  20. FATAL ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (FARS)

    The Fatal Accident Reporting System (FARS) database consist of three relational tables, containing data on automobile accidents on public U.S. roads that resulted in the death of one or more people within 30 days of the accident. Truck and trailer accidents are also included.

  1. The Chernobyl accident

    In connection with the Chernobyl accident the report gives a description of the technical features of importance to the accident, the course of events, and the estimated health hazards in the local environment. Dissimilarities in western and Sovjet reactor safety philosophy are dealt with, as well as conceivable concequences in relation to technology and research in western nuclear power programmes. Results of activity level measurements of air and foodstuff, made in Norway by Institute for Energy Technology, are given

  2. Accident and emergency management

    There is an increasing potential for severe accidents as the industrial development tends towards large, centralised production units. In several industries this has led to the formation of large organisations which are prepared for accidents fighting and for emergency management. The functioning of these organisations critically depends upon efficient decision making and exchange of information. This project is aimed at securing and possibly improving the functionality and efficiency of the accident and emergency management by verifying, demonstrating, and validating the possible use of advanced information technology in the organisations mentioned above. With the nuclear industry in focus the project consists of five main activities: 1) The study and detailed analysis of accident and emergency scenarios based on records from incidents and rills in nuclear installations. 2) Development of a conceptual understanding of accident and emergency management with emphasis on distributed decision making, information flow, and control structure sthat are involved. 3) Development of a general experimental methodology for evaluating the effects of different kinds of decision aids and forms of organisation for emergency management systems with distributed decision making. 4) Development and test of a prototype system for a limited part of an accident and emergency organisation to demonstrate the potential use of computer and communication systems, data-base and knowledge base technology, and applications of expert systems and methods used in artificial intelligence. 5) Production of guidelines for the introduction of advanced information technology in the organisations based on evaluation and validation of the prototype system. (author)

  3. Accident management information needs

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Accident Management Research Program, a methodology has been developed for identifying the plant information needs necessary for personnel involved in the management of an accident to diagnose that an accident is in progress, select and implement strategies to prevent or mitigate the accident, and monitor the effectiveness of these strategies. This report describes the methodology and presents an application of this methodology to a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) with a large dry containment. A risk-important severe accident sequence for a PWR is used to examine the capability of the existing measurements to supply the necessary information. The method includes an assessment of the effects of the sequence on the measurement availability including the effects of environmental conditions. The information needs and capabilities identified using this approach are also intended to form the basis for more comprehensive information needs assessment performed during the analyses and development of specific strategies for use in accident management prevention and mitigation. 3 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  4. Prevention of the causes and consequences of a criticality accident - measures adopted in France

    The question of safety in regard to criticality accident risks has two aspects: prevention of the cause and limitation of the consequences. These two aspects are closely connected. The effort devoted to prevention of the causes depends on the seriousness of the possible human psychologic and economic consequences of the accident. The criticality accidents which have occurred in the nuclear industry, though few in number, do reveal the imperfect nature of the techniques adopted to prevent the causes, and also constitute the only available realistic basis for evaluating the consequences and developing measures to limit them. The authors give a analysis of the known causes and consequences of past criticality accidents and on this basis make a number of comments concerning: the validity of traditional safety criteria, the probability of accidents for different types of operations, characteristic accidents which can serve as models, and the extent of possible radiological consequences. The measures adopted in France to limit the consequences of a possible criticality accident under the headings: location, design and lay-out of the installations, accident detection, and dosimetry for the exposed personnel, are briefly described after a short account of the criteria used in deciding on them. (author)

  5. Historical aspects of radiation accidents

    Radiation accidents are extremely rare events; however, the last two years have witnessed the largest radiation accidents in both the eastern and western hemispheres. It is the purpose of this chapter to review how radiation accidents are categorized, examine the temporal changes in frequency and severity, give illustrative examples of several types of radiation accidents, and finally, to describe the various registries for radiation accidents

  6. Cyclical Fluctuations in Workplace Accidents

    Boone, J.; van Ours, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    This Paper presents a theory and an empirical investigation on cyclical fluctuations in workplace accidents. The theory is based on the idea that reporting an accident dents the reputation of a worker and raises the probability that he is fired. Therefore a country with a high or an increasing unemployment rate has a low (reported) workplace accident rate. The empirical investigation concerns workplace accidents in OECD countries. The analysis confirms that workplace accident rates are invers...

  7. Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.7 Necessity of Patient-Specific Dose Planning in Radionuclide Therapy' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy'.

  8. Dosimetry of Low-Energy Beta Radiation

    Borg, Jette

    Useful techniques and procedures for derermination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy beta radiation were studied and evaluated. The four techniques included were beta spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical...

  9. Patient dosimetry and protection in diagnostic radiology

    The paper discussed the following subjects: x-ray in medicine as they represent by far the largest man-made sources of population exposure to ionizing radiation, methods of patient dosimetry, entrance surface dose per radiograph, dose-area product per examination, dosimetry for assessing risk, potential of dose reduction

  10. Good Practice of Clinical Dosimetry Reporting

    The intention of the guidance of this paper, Good Practice of Clinical Dosimetry Reporting, by the Dosimetry Committee of the European Association for Nuclear Medicine, is to guide the reader through a series of suggestions for reporting dosimetric approaches in nuclear medicine. (author)

  11. High dose dosimetry for radiation processing

    Radiation processing today offers various advantages in the field of sterilization of medical and pharmaceutical products, food preservation, treatment of chemical materials and a variety of other products widely used in modern society, all of which are of direct relevance to health and welfare. The safety and economic importance of radiation processing is clearly recognized. It is understood that reliable dosimetry is a key parameter for quality assurance of radiation processing and irradiated products. Furthermore, the standardization of dosimetry can provide a justification for the regulatory approval of irradiated products and form the basis of international clearance for free trade. After the initiation of the Agency's high dose standardization programme (1977), the first IAEA Symposium on High Dose Dosimetry was organized in 1984. As a result, concern as to the necessity of reliable dosimetry has greatly escalated not only in the scientific community but also in the radiation processing industry. The second International Symposium on High Dose Dosimetry for Radiation Processing was held in Vienna from 5 to 9 November, 1990, with a view to providing an international forum for the exchange of technical information on up to date developments in this particular field. The scientific programme held promises for an authoritative account of the status of high dose dosimetry throughout the world in 1990. Forty-one papers presented at the meeting discussed the development of new techniques, the improvement of reference and routine dosimetry systems, and the quality control and assurance of dosimetry. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Basics of the ionizing radiation dosimetry

    The dosimetry basic physics issues, ionizing irradiation interaction with the substance and the radiation parameter regulation principles were considered. The special attention was paid to the methods of the ionizing radiation measurement. The edition is the manual on the dosimetry principles and is intended, first of all, for the university students of the technical and engineering specialties

  13. Development of radiation biological dosimetry and treatment of radiation-induced damaged tissue

    Util now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline(triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the apoptotic fragment assay, PCC, comet assay, and micronucleus assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiated dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with chromosome dosimetry and micronucleus assay

  14. Development of radiation biological dosimetry and treatment of radiation-induced damaged tissue

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil [and others

    2000-04-01

    Util now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline(triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the apoptotic fragment assay, PCC, comet assay, and micronucleus assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiated dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with chromosome dosimetry and micronucleus assay.

  15. [Psychogenesis of accidents].

    Giannattasio, E; Nencini, R; Nicolosi, N

    1988-01-01

    After having carried out a historical review of industrial psychology with specific attention to the evolution of the concept of causality in accidents, the Authors formulate their work hypothesis from that research which take into highest consideration the executives' attitudes in the genesis of the accidents. As dogmatism appears to be one of the most negative of executives' attitudes, the Authors administered Rockeach's Scale to 130 intermediate executives from 6 industries in Latium and observed the frequency index for accidents and the morbidity index (absenteeism) of the 2149 workhand. The Authors assumed that to high degree of dogmatism on the executives' side should correspond o a higher level of accidents and absenteeism among the staff. The data processing revealed that, due to the type of machinery employed, three of the industries examined should be considered as High Risk Industrie (HRI), while the remaining three could be considered as Low Risk Industries (LRI): in fact, due to the different working conditions, a significant lower number of accidents occurred in last the three. A statistically significant correlation between the executives' dogmatism and the number of accidents among their workhand in the HRI has been noticed, while this has not been observed in the LRI. This confirms, as had already been pointed out by Gemelli in 1944, that some "objective conditions" are requested so that the accident may actually take place. On the other hand the morbidity index has not shown any difference related to the different kind of industries (HRI, LRI): in both cases statistically significant correlations were obtained between the executives' dogmatism and the staff's absenteeism. absenteeism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3154344

  16. Accidents in nuclear ships

    Oelgaard, P.L. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)]|[Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    This report starts with a discussion of the types of nuclear vessels accidents, in particular accidents which involve the nuclear propulsion systems. Next available information on 61 reported nuclear ship events in considered. Of these 6 deals with U.S. ships, 54 with USSR ships and 1 with a French ship. The ships are in almost all cases nuclear submarines. Only events that involve the sinking of vessels, the nuclear propulsion plants, radiation exposures, fires/explosions, sea-water leaks into the submarines and sinking of vessels are considered. For each event a summary of available information is presented, and comments are added. In some cases the available information is not credible, and these events are neglected. This reduces the number of events to 5 U.S. events, 35 USSR/Russian events and 1 French event. A comparison is made between the reported Soviet accidents and information available on dumped and damaged Soviet naval reactors. It seems possible to obtain good correlation between the two types of events. An analysis is made of the accident and estimates are made of the accident probabilities which are found to be of the order of 10{sup -3} per ship reactor years. It if finally pointed out that the consequences of nuclear ship accidents are fairly local and does in no way not approach the magnitude of the Chernobyl accident. It is emphasized that some of the information on which this report is based, may not be correct. Consequently some of the results of the assessments made may not be correct. (au).

  17. Accidents in nuclear ships

    This report starts with a discussion of the types of nuclear vessels accidents, in particular accidents which involve the nuclear propulsion systems. Next available information on 61 reported nuclear ship events in considered. Of these 6 deals with U.S. ships, 54 with USSR ships and 1 with a French ship. The ships are in almost all cases nuclear submarines. Only events that involve the sinking of vessels, the nuclear propulsion plants, radiation exposures, fires/explosions, sea-water leaks into the submarines and sinking of vessels are considered. For each event a summary of available information is presented, and comments are added. In some cases the available information is not credible, and these events are neglected. This reduces the number of events to 5 U.S. events, 35 USSR/Russian events and 1 French event. A comparison is made between the reported Soviet accidents and information available on dumped and damaged Soviet naval reactors. It seems possible to obtain good correlation between the two types of events. An analysis is made of the accident and estimates are made of the accident probabilities which are found to be of the order of 10-3 per ship reactor years. It if finally pointed out that the consequences of nuclear ship accidents are fairly local and does in no way not approach the magnitude of the Chernobyl accident. It is emphasized that some of the information on which this report is based, may not be correct. Consequently some of the results of the assessments made may not be correct. (au)

  18. Optically stimulated luminescence of common plastic materials for accident dose reconstruction

    Optically stimulate luminescence(OSL) has many applications in a variety of radiation dosimetry fields, including personal dosimetry, environmental radiation level monitor, retrospective dosimetry for dating, and reconstruction of radiation doses from radiation accident. In the reconstruction of radiation doses from radiation accident, OSL technique has been used to estimate the doses exposed to public area through analysis of housewares or house construing materials. Recently, many efforts have been carried out for dose reconstruction using personal electronic devices such as mobile phones and USB memory chips. Some of natural minerals such as quartz and feldspar have OSL properties. Quartz is the second most abundant mineral in continental crust of the Earth. In some of common plastics, inorganic fillers (quartz, alumina etc.) are added to make strengthen of their properties depends on applications areas. The aim of this research is to explore a possibility of use of the common plastic materials for dose reconstruction in radiation accident case. In this research the OSL dose response-curve and fading characteristics of the common plastics were tested and evaluated. Finally, we expect this work contribute to elevate the possibility of the dose reconstruction. The general conclusion of this work is that the possibility of dose reconstruction using common plastic materials is showed using the OSL characteristics of the materials. However, the tested common plastic materials have relatively low sensitivities. Further work is required to establish a database of OSL properties of common plastic materials for emergency dose reconstruction by using housewares

  19. radiation dosimetry in cases of normal and emergency situations

    The use of radioactive materials in various fields of medicine, industry, agriculture and researches has been increasing steadily during the last few decades. A lot of radiation sources, radiopharmaceuticals, labeled compounds and other radioactive materials are sold and used throughout the world each year. Historically, accidents have occurred during the production, transport and use of radioactive materials. If an accident does occur, it is necessary to cope with it as soon as possible in order to control radiological human exposures and contamination of the environment and to restore normal conditions. Examination of individuals that deal with radioactive isotopes should be carried out in cases of nuclear medicine units, and in other applications including radiotherapy unit and gamma irradiation facility. Identification of the feasibility and efficiency of the counting detectors of internal and external radiation dosimetry, and preparedness in normal and emergency situations are included in the present work. Furthermore, this study also deals with the use of thermoluminescent dosimeters for radiation dose estimation for applications of gamma irradiation, and cobalt-60 treatment unit. Hence, operator dose can be estimated in case of malfunction or stuck of the radioactive source. Three methods were used to measure the radiation dose: (1) TL dosimeters with Harshaw (TLD- 4000) reader were used for measurement of external exposures. (2) FASTSCAN and (3) ACUUSCAN II whole body counters were used for measurement of internal exposures.

  20. Radiation dosimetry and standards at the austrian dosimetry laboratory

    The Austrian Dosimetry Laboratory, established and operated in cooperation between the Austrian Research Center Seibersdorf and the Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying (Bundesamt and Eich- und Vermessungswesen) maintains the national primary standards for radiation dosimetry. Furthermore its tasks include routine calibration of dosemeters and dosimetric research. The irradiation facilities of the laboratory comprise three X-ray machines covering the voltage range from 5 kV to 420 kV constant potential, a 60Co teletherapy unit, a circular exposure system for routine batch calibration of personnel dosemeters with four gamma ray sources (60Co and 137Cs) and a reference source system with six gamma ray sources (60Co and 137Cs). In addition a set of calibrated beta ray sources are provided (147Pm, 204Tl and 90Sr). The dosimetric equipment consists of three free-air parallelplate ionization chambers serving as primary standards of exposure for the X-ray energy region, graphite cavity chambers with measured volume as primary standards for the gamma radiation of 137Cs and 60Co as well as different secondary standard ionization chambers covering the dose rate range from the natural background level up to the level of modern therapy accelerators. In addition for high energy photon and electron radiation a graphite calorimeter is provided as primary standard of absorbed dose. The principle experimental set-ups for the practical use of the standards are presented and the procedures for the calibration of the different types of dosemeters are described. (Author)

  1. Gamma dosimetry of high doses

    The gamma dosimetry of high doses is problematic in almost all the classic dosemeters either based on the thermoluminescence, electric, chemical properties, etc., because they are saturated to very high dose and they are no longer useful. This work carries out an investigation in the interval of high doses. The solid system of heptahydrate ferrous sulfate, can be used as solid dosemeter of routine for high doses of radiation. The proposed method is simple, cheap and it doesn't require sophisticated spectrophotometers or spectrometers but expensive and not common in some laboratories

  2. Air Force neutron dosimetry program

    Approximately 1000 Air Force personnel are monitored for neutron radiation resulting from various sources at more than thirty worldwide locations. Neutron radiation spanning several orders of magnitude in energy is encountered. The Air Force currently uses albedo thermoluminescent neutron dosimeters for personnel monitoring. The energy dependence of the albedo neutron dosimeter is a current problem and the development of site specific correction factors is ongoing. A summary of data on the energy dependence is presented as well as efforts to develop algorithms for the dosimeter. An overview of current Air Force neutron dosimetry users and needs is also presented

  3. Relocation of the Dosimetry Service

    2007-01-01

    The Dosimetry Service is moving from Building 24 to Building 55 and will therefore be closed on Friday, 30 March. From Monday, 2 April onwards you will find us in Building 55/1-001. Please note that we cannot exclude problems with Internet connections on that day and are therefore unable to guarantee normal service. The Service's opening hours and telephone number will not change as a result of the move: Open from 8.30 - 12.00. Closed in the afternoons. Tel. 7 2155

  4. Quality assurance of BNCT dosimetry

    The Phase I clinical trials for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) started in May 1999 in Otaniemi, Espoo. For BNCT no uniform international guidance for the quality assurance of dosimetry exists, so far. Because of the complex dose distribution with several different dose components, the international recommendations on conventional radiotherapy dosimetry are not applicable in every part. Therefore, special guidance specifically for BNCT is needed. To obtain such guidelines a European collaboration project has been defined. The aim of the project is a generally accepted Code of Practice for use by all European BNCT centres. This code will introduce the traceability of the dosimetric methods to the international measurement system. It will also ensure the comparability of the results in various BNCT beams and form the basis for the comparison of the treatment results with the conventional radiotherapy or other treatment modalities. The quality assurance of the dosimetry in BNCT in Finland covers each step of the BNCT treatment, which include dose planning imaging, dose planning, boron infusion, boron kinetics, patient positioning, monitoring of the treatment beam, characterising the radiation spectrum, calibration of the beam model and the dosimetric measurements both in patients (in viva measurements) and in various phantoms. The dose planning images are obtained using a MR scanner with MRI sensitive markers and the dose distribution is computed with a dose planning software BNCTRtpe. The program and the treatment beam (DORT) model used have been verified with measurements and validated with MCNP calculations in phantom. Dosimetric intercomparison has been done with the Brookhaven BNCT beam (BMRR). Before every patient irradiation the relationship between the beam monitor pulse rate and neutron fluence rate in the beam is checked by activation measurements. Kinetic models used to estimate the time-behavior of the blood boron concentration have been verified

  5. The Future of Medical Dosimetry

    The world of health care delivery is becoming increasingly complex. The purpose of this manuscript is to analyze current metrics and analytically predict future practices and principles of medical dosimetry. The results indicate five potential areas precipitating change factors: a) evolutionary and revolutionary thinking processes, b) social factors, c) economic factors, d) political factors, and e) technological factors. Outcomes indicate that significant changes will occur in the job structure and content of being a practicing medical dosimetrist. Discussion indicates potential variables that can occur within each process and change factor and how the predicted outcomes can deviate from normative values. Finally, based on predicted outcomes, future opportunities for medical dosimetrists are given

  6. Radiation dosimetry by potassium feldspar

    Arun Pandya; S G Vaijapurkar; P K Bhatnagar

    2000-04-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of raw and annealed feldspar have been studied for their use in gamma dosimetry. The raw gamma exposed feldspar shows glow peaks at 120°C and 319°C. Gamma dose beyond 500 cGy can be measured without any significant fading even after 40 days of termination of exposure. The annealed feldspar shows a glow peak at 120°C after gamma exposure. This peak can be used to measure gamma doses beyond 25 cGy when the TL is measured after 24 h from termination of exposure.

  7. The Future of Medical Dosimetry

    Adams, Robert D., E-mail: robert_adams@med.unc.edu

    2015-07-01

    The world of health care delivery is becoming increasingly complex. The purpose of this manuscript is to analyze current metrics and analytically predict future practices and principles of medical dosimetry. The results indicate five potential areas precipitating change factors: a) evolutionary and revolutionary thinking processes, b) social factors, c) economic factors, d) political factors, and e) technological factors. Outcomes indicate that significant changes will occur in the job structure and content of being a practicing medical dosimetrist. Discussion indicates potential variables that can occur within each process and change factor and how the predicted outcomes can deviate from normative values. Finally, based on predicted outcomes, future opportunities for medical dosimetrists are given.

  8. Foibles of internal dosimetry systems

    Any system of internal dosimetry intended for widespread use must provide a series of assumptions, and models of calculation. These models will depend upon the basic limitations of dose, risk, or quantity of material that the system is designed to meet. The quirks in most systems arise at this point, depending upon the desires of the designers to provide a workable system that provides safety and depends on the proper use of the models chosen to implement the system. This paper presents illustrations of some of the quirks, or foibles in the past and the current system and discusses a few of the options open for the future. 16 figs

  9. Solid-State Personal Dosimetry

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2005-01-01

    This document is a web site page, and a data sheet about Personal protection (i.e., space suits) presented to the Radiation and Micrometeoroid Mitigation Technology Focus Group meeting. The website describes the work of the PI to improve solid state personal radiation dosimetry. The data sheet presents work on the active personal radiation detection system that is to provide real-time local radiation exposure information during EVA. Should undue exposure occur, knowledge of the dynamic intensity conditions during the exposure will allow more precise diagnostic assessment of the potential health risk to the exposed individual.

  10. Dosimetry for electron beam application

    This report describes two aspects of electron beam dosimetry, on one hand development of film dosimeters and measurements of their properties, and on the other hand development of calorimeters for calibration of routine dosimeters, e.g. thin films. Two types of radiochromic thin film dosimeters have been developed in this department, and the properties of these and commercially available dosimeters have been measured and found to be comparable. Calorimeters which are in use for routine measurements, are being investigated with reference to their application as standardizing instruments, and new calorimeters are being developed. (author)

  11. Scoping accident(s) for emergency planning

    At the request of the Conference of State Radiation Control Program Director's (CRCPD), in November 1976 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission formed a joint Task Force with representatives of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to answer a number of questions posed by the States regarding emergency planning. This Task Force held monthly meetings through November 1977. In December 1977 a draft report was prepared for limited distribution for review and comment by selected State and local organizations. The NRC/EPA Task Force deliberations centered on the CRCPD request for '... a determination of the most severe accident basis for which radiological emergency response plans should be developed by offsite agencies...' in the vicinity of nuclear power plants. Federal Interagency guidance to the States in this regard has been that the scoping accident should be the most serious conservatively analyzed accident considered for siting purposes, as exemplified in the Commission's Regulations at 10 CFR Part 100 and the NRC staffs Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4, and as presented in license applicant's Safety Analysis Reports and the USNRC Staffs Safety Evaluation Reports. The draft report of the Task Force amplifies on this recommendation: to present a clearer picture of its import and introduces the concept of protective action zones (PAZs) within which detailed emergency plans should be developed; one zone for the plume exposure pathway and a second, larger zone for contamination pathways. The time dependence of potential releases and atmospheric transport, and important radionuclide groups of possible import are also discussed in the draft Task Force report. A status report regarding this effort, as of June 1978, will be presented. (author)

  12. Chapitre 3. Faisabilité technique de l’agriculture biologique en Martinique : aspects généraux

    Cabidoche, Yves-Marie; Benoît, Marc; Blanchart, Éric; FOURNET, Jacques; Lhoste, Philippe; Gautronneau, Yvan; Langlais, Christian; Taupier-Letage, Bruno; Toribio, Armel

    2013-01-01

    La faisabilité technique de l’agriculture biologique (AB) en Martinique repose sur les mêmes champs d’intervention que dans les espaces tempérés : les rotations culturales (3.1), les techniques de travail du sol (3.2), la disponibilité de semences et plants agréés (3.3), le contrôle de la santé des plantes (3.4), la fertilisation et la gestion de la matière organique (3.5), la gestion des « mauvaises herbes » (3.6). Tout en étant des facteurs décisifs pour la production agrobiologique, ils so...

  13. Méthode sémantique pour la classification et l'interrogation de sources de données biologiques

    Messai, Nizar; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Napoli, Amedeo; Smaïl-Tabbone, Malika

    2005-01-01

    Nous présentons une méthode de classification et de recherche de sources biologiques. Elle consiste à construire un treillis de Galois à partir d'un ensemble de méta-données associées aux sources et converties en propriétés booléennes. Un concept construit à partir d'une requête utilisateur est ensuite inséré dans le treillis grâce à un algorithme de construction incrémentale. Le calcul du résultat se ramène à extraire l'ensemble des sources figurant dans les extensions des subsumants du conc...

  14. Projets multi-acteurs et politiques publiques : un moyen de développer les systèmes à bas intrants et l’agriculture biologique

    Cardona, Aurélie; Lamine, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Projets multi-acteurs et politiques publiques : un moyen de développer les systèmes à bas intrants et l’agriculture biologique ? Dans un contexte où l’agriculture et notamment le système de protection des cultures actuel sont fortement critiqués, diverses politiques en faveur de changements de pratiques agricoles ont été mises en oeuvre, mais leur efficacité reste souvent limitée. D’autres formes d’incitations semblent se développer, qui méritent d’être étudiées. Le développement de la multif...

  15. Cognition spatiale et invasion biologique en forêt de Compiègne: analyses à l'aide d'un SIG

    Frédéric Roulier

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Prunus serotina est une espèce invasive qui menace aujourd’hui la biodiversité des forêts françaises, en particulier le massif de Compiègne. L’article présente l’exploitation, dans un SIG, d’une carte cognitive relative à cette invasion biologique. L’approche employée confronte la cartographie de Prunus serotina mesurée selon un protocole botanique avec la représentation spatiale qu’en ont des gestionnaires forestiers du massif. La surestimation et la sous-estimation du phénomène sont cartographiées à partir d’une régression linéaire. L’analyse met en avant le rôle de la visibilité de Prunus serotina et, au-delà, celui de la relation à la plante.

  16. Etude de l'evolution des caracteristiques physico-chimiques et de la stabilite biologique des ordures menageres au cours du compostage

    Morel, Jean-Louis; GUCKERT, Armand; Nicolardot, Bernard; Benistant, D.; Catroux, Gerard; Germon, J Claude

    1986-01-01

    Une étude analytique a été conduite sur un échantillonnage de composts urbains et d’ordures broyées prélevés à des âges différents sur 14 usines ou décharges situées en France. Les analyses ont porté sur des paramètres physiques et chimiques. On a suivi d’autre part certaines fractions organiques impliquées dans le compostage (hydrates de carbone, composés alcalino-solubles). Enfin, des expériences de respirométrie ont été conduites afin de déterminer la stabilité biologique des composts....

  17. Important severe accident research issues after Fukushima accident

    After the Fukushima accident several investigation committees issued reports with lessons learned from the accident in Japan. Among those lessons, several recommendations have been made on severe accident research. Similar to the EURSAFE efforts under EU Program, review of specific severe accident research items was started before Fukushima accident in working group of Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) in terms of significance of consequences, uncertainties of phenomena and maturity of assessment methodology. Re-investigation has been started since the Fukushima accident. Additional effects of Fukushima accident, such as core degradation behaviors, sea water injection, containment failure/leakage and re-criticality have been covered. The review results are categorized in ten major fields; core degradation behavior, core melt coolability/retention in containment vessel, function of containment vessel, source term, hydrogen behavior, fuel-coolant interaction, molten core concrete interaction, direct containment heating, recriticality and instrumentation in severe accident conditions. Based on these activities and also author's personal view, the present paper describes the perspective of important severe accident research issues after Fukushima accident. Those are specifically investigation of damaged core and components, advanced severe accident analysis capabilities and associated experimental investigations, development of reliable passive cooling system for core/containment, analysis of hydrogen behavior and investigation of hydrogen measures, enhancement of removal function of radioactive materials of containment venting, advanced instrumentation for the diagnosis of severe accident and assessment of advanced containment design which excludes long-term evacuation in any severe accident situations. (author)

  18. Helicopter accident survivability.

    Vyrnwy-Jones, P; Thornton, R

    1984-10-01

    Army Air Corps accident and fatality rates have now reached levels which compare favourably with data from other civilian and military sources. This improvement is the result of enhanced helicopter design and parallel progress in aircrew training. The introduction of new generations of turbine powered rotor craft has largely eliminated mechanical failure as the cause of accident. As a result 75% of Army Air Corps accidents are due to pilot error. This contribution is likely to increase in the future as the pilot's task is made more difficult by the incumberance of personal equipment. Methods whereby occupant protection and aircraft crashworthiness can be improved are reviewed and it is concluded that it would make sound economic sense to implement some of these well proven design features. PMID:6527344

  19. Information at radiation accidents

    This study was undertaken in order to plan an information strategy for possible future accidents involving radioactivity. Six health visitors and six farmers working in the districts of Norway which received the largest amounts of fallout from the Chernobyl accident, were interviewed. The questions were intended to give an indication of their knowledge about radioactivity and radiation, as well as their needs for information in case of a future accident. The results indicate a relatively low educational background in radiation physics and risk estimation. On the other hand the two groups showed a remarkable skill and interest in doing their own evaluation on the background of information that was linked to their daily life. It is suggested that planning of information in this field is done in close cooperation with the potential users of the information

  20. Big nuclear accidents

    Much of the debate on the safety of nuclear power focuses on the large number of fatalities that could, in theory, be caused by extremely unlikely but imaginable reactor accidents. This, along with the nuclear industry's inappropriate use of vocabulary during public debate, has given the general public a distorted impression of the safety of nuclear power. The way in which the probability and consequences of big nuclear accidents have been presented in the past is reviewed and recommendations for the future are made including the presentation of the long-term consequences of such accidents in terms of 'reduction in life expectancy', 'increased chance of fatal cancer' and the equivalent pattern of compulsory cigarette smoking. (author)

  1. Anniversary Paper: Fifty years of AAPM involvement in radiation dosimetry

    This article reviews the involvement of the AAPM in various aspects of radiation dosimetry over its 50 year history, emphasizing the especially important role that external beam dosimetry played in the early formation of the organization. Topics covered include the AAPM's involvement with external beam and x-ray dosimetry protocols, brachytherapy dosimetry, primary standards laboratories, accredited dosimetry chains, and audits for machine calibrations through the Radiological Physics Center

  2. DOSGEN: 'An integrated data and dose estimation system for the cytogenetic dosimetry'

    The biological dosimetry is the only available tool for dose estimation in numerous nuclear and radiological accidents. The cytogenetic dosimetry, which uses the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in the lymphocytes of the peripheral blood as reference indicator is the most precise biological dosimetry method. The Biological Dosimetry Laboratory of the Center for Radiation Protection and Hygiene has more than 20 years of expertise carrying out the Cytogenetic Dosimetric Service; also it has implemented the requirements of ISO 19238:2004 and the ISO 17025:2005 in the laboratory management system establishment, with a complex and voluminous although necessary documentation. Furthermore, the results of mathematical procedures for dose estimations can only be achieved in a accuracy way with an adequate automation. DOSGEN allows the processing of all the information of the cases, from the patient reception up to the final report. DOSGEN has an independent module with the main mathematical operations in the Cytogenetic Dosimetry, among them all the recommended in the IAEA 405 technical report, i.e. calculating the fit coefficients of the dose response curves, checking for the adjustment of Poisson distribution of the aberration by cell, dose estimation in cases of total irradiations and the dose and the irradiated fraction estimation in cases of partial irradiations using Dolphin or Qdr method. The system records the calibration curves that are used by the laboratory. The coefficients of these curves may be calculated using the data obtained by the in vitro irradiation in the laboratory or may be introduced by the user if the coefficients were obtained out of the system. DOSGEN program was developed in Borland Delphis for Windows and Microsoft Access, with different levels of access control according to the type of user. An attractive and comprehensible environment is provided and it allows to work in network. The results can be presented by reports and correlations

  3. The management of accidents

    R. B. Ward

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This author’s experiences in investigating well over a hundred accident occurrences has led to questioning how such events can be managed - - - while immediately recognising that the idea of managing accidents is an oxymoron, we don’t want to manage them, we don’t want not to manage them, what we desire is not to have to manage not-them, that is, manage matters so they don’t happen and then we don’t have to manage the consequences.Design/methodology/approach: The research will begin by defining some common classes of accidents in manufacturing industry, with examples taken from cases investigated, and by working backwards (too late, of course show how those involved could have managed these sample events so they didn’t happen, finishing with the question whether any of that can be applied to other situations.Findings: As shown that the management actions needed to prevent accidents are control of design and application of technology, and control and integration of people.Research limitations/implications: This paper has shown in some of the examples provided, management actions have been know to lead to accidents being committed by others, lower in the organization.Originality/value: Today’s management activities involve, generally, the use of technology in many forms, varying from simple tools (such as knives to the use of heavy equipment, electric power, and explosives. Against these we commit, in control of those items, the comparatively frail human mind and body, which, again generally, does succeed in controlling these resources, with (another generality by appropriate management. However, sometimes the control slips and an accident occurs.

  4. Retrospective dosimetry by chromosomal analysis

    The joint EU/CIS project ECP-6, was set up to examine whether cytogenetic dosimetry is possible for persons irradiated years previously at Chernobyl. The paper describes the possibility of achieving this by the examination of blood lymphocytes for unstable and stable chromosome aberrations; dicentrics and translocations. Emphasis was placed on the relatively new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method for rapid screening for stable translocations. In a collaborative experiment in vitro dose response calibration curves for dicentrics and FISH were produced with gamma radiation over the range 0-1.0 Gy. A pilot study of about 60 liquidators with registered doses ranging from 0-300 mSv was undertaken to determine whether the chromosomal methods may verify the recorded doses. It was concluded that the dicentric is no longer valid as a measured endpoint. Translocations may be used to verify early dosimetry carried out on highly irradiated persons. For the vast majority of lesser exposed subjects FISH is impractical as an individual dosimeter; it may have some value for comparing groups of subjects

  5. Internal dosimetry, past and future

    Progress in the dosimetry of internally deposited radionuclides since World War II is reviewed. The Permissible Doses Conference held at Chalk River in 1949 defined the Standard Man and a biokinetic lung model, setting maximum permissible body burdens (MPBB), maximum permissible concentrations in air (MPCA), and maximum permissible concentrations in water (MPCW) for selected radionuclides. ICRP publications 2, 6 and 9 followed, focusing on setting MPCs. The use of the power function to describe radionuclide retention in the human body was discussed in Publication 2, but not recommended for use until Publication 6. Publication 2 defined the term effective energy. The integration time for internal exposures became 50 years, and the committed dose was defined. ICRP publications 10, 10A and 54 provided guidance for the calculation of doses from measured activity in vivo or in excreta. In 1979 ICRP publication 30 replaced publication 2 as the handbook for internal dosimetry. There will be a major revision of Publication 30 following the release of the new ICRP recommendations. A future publication will give doses to patients who have been administered radiopharmaceuticals. New computer tools will allow the development of more realistic metabolic models, and new dosimetric models that calculate doses to cells will be developed. The availability of high resolution solid state detectors has resulted in improvement in measurements of radionuclides in vivo, and some improvement in radiochemical analyses of excreta. However, poor sensitivity to actinides leaves something to be desired in vitro measurements and air monitoring

  6. Fast neutron dosimetry: Progress summary

    The purpose was to investigate the radiological physics and biology of very low energy photons derived from a 1-GeV electron synchrotron storage ring. An extensive beam line and irradiation apparatus was designed, developed, and constructed. Dosimetry measurements required invention and testing of a miniature absolute calorimeter and a cell irradiation fixture suitable for scanning exposures under computer control. Measurements of the kerma factors of oxygen, aluminum and silicon for 14-20 MeV neutrons. Custom designed miniature proportional counters of cylindrical symmetry were employed in these determinations. The oxygen kerma factor was found significantly lower than values calculated from microscopic cross sections. We also tested Mg and Fe walled conventional spherical counters. The direct neutron-counting gas interaction is significant enough for these counters that a correction is needed. We also investigated the application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to radiation dosimetry. Our purpose was to take advantage of recent development of very high-field magnets, complex RF-pulse techniques for solvent suppression, and improved spectral analysis techniques

  7. Instrumentation for Dosimetry. Chapter 21

    Measurements of absorbed dose (or air kerma) are required in varying situations in diagnostic radiology. The radiation fields vary from plain, slit and even point projection geometry, and may be stationary or moving, including rotational. Owing to the use of low photon energies for these fields, it is important that dosimeters have a satisfactory energy response. In general, the requirements for dosimeter accuracy are less stringent than those in radiation therapy; however, the dose and dose rate measurements cover a large range. Patient dosimetry (see Chapter 22) is a primary responsibility of the medical physicist specializing in diagnostic radiology and is required by legislation in many countries. Dose data are also required in the optimization of examinations for image quality and dose. Radiation measurement is also critical for occupational and public exposure control (see Chapter 24). Dose measurements are essential in acceptance testing and quality control (see Chapter 19). Several types of dosimeter can be used, provided that they have a suitable energy response, but typically, ionization chambers of a few cubic centimetres in volume, or solid state detectors specifically designed for such measurements, are used. If dosimeters are used to make measurements during an examination, they must not interfere with the examination. These devices are also used for determination of the half value layer (HVL). Special types of ionization chamber are employed for computed tomography (CT), mammography and interventional radiology dosimetry

  8. Dosimetry effects of film packing

    Full text: Dosimetric artefacts in film based dosimetry have been addressed by a number of authors. We have investigated the influence on film dose results, of a number of materials that are commonly packed against the film including, solid water, paper, air and plastic. The results indicate that variations in optical density occur due to the character and relative quantity of the packing material as well as the film itself. Kodak X-omat V and GAFChromic film samples were placed in a solid water cassette with packing sheets of various materials placed in contact with the film. Photon and electron exposures were carried out with various film orientation and beam qualities. Results have been obtained for solid water, paper and air. An example of the relative change in film density as a function of depth due to four paper sheets packed adjacent to a film aligned with the central axis of a 6MV photon beam is shown. Other results indicate dose variation can be attributed to Cerenkov radiation. Packing materials in contact or in close proximity with dosimetric film, contribute to optical density variations of the order of several percent. Careful consideration of these effects is necessary when using film in high accuracy dosimetry. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  9. CT dosimetry and risk estimates

    Conventional approaches to CT dosimetry are inadequate because they fail to evaluate the risk to the patient. A risk related approach to CT dosimetry is developed which explicitly takes into account the non-uniform dose distribution in the body and the relative sensitivities of different organs and tissues. The principal radiological risks to patients undergoing CT examinations are the stochastic processes of carcinogenesis and genetic effects. Radiation risk estimates have been obtained for an EMI 5005 CT scanner by measuring the mean organ doses in a Rando phantom for CT studies on the head, chest, abdomen and pelvis. The application of these risk estimates to the population served by this CT scanner indicates that during the lifetime of the CT scanner, approximately 50,000 patients will undergo CT scanning and 60% will result in a positive diagnosis. The radiation detriment is estimated to be about 1 induced cancer and a negligible genetic effect. The radiation detriment is considerably smaller than the total detriment associated with contrast material used in 76% of the CT studies. (author)

  10. Mortal radiological accident

    After defining the concept of 'Radiological accident', statistical data from Radiation Emergency Assistance Center of ORNL (United States of America) are given about the deaths caused by acute irradiation between 1944 and April 24, 1986 -ie, the day before Chernobyl nuclear accident- as well as on the number of deaths caused by the latter. Next the different clinical stages of the Acute Irradiation Syndrome (AIS) as well as its possible treatment are described, and finally the different physical, clinical and biological characteristics linked to the AIS and to its diagnosis and prognosis are discussed. (M.E.L.)

  11. The TMI-2 accident

    A critical study about the technical and man-related facts in order to establish what is considered the worst commercial nuclear power accident until 1986. Radiological consequences and stress to the public are considered in contrast to antinuclear groups. This descriptive and technical study has the purpose to document written and oral opinions obtained abroad and then explain to the public in an easy language terminology. Preliminary study describing safety related systems fails and the accident itself with minute to minute description, conduct to the consequences and then, to learned lessons

  12. Health physics research reactor reference dosimetry

    Reference neutron dosimetry is developed for the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) in the new operational configuration directly above its storage pit. This operational change was physically made early in CY 1985. The new reference dosimetry considered in this document is referred to as the 1986 HPRR reference dosimetry and it replaces any and all HPRR reference documents or papers issued prior to 1986. Reference dosimetry is developed for the unshielded HPRR as well as for the reactor with each of five different shield types and configurations. The reference dosimetry is presented in terms of three different dose and six different dose equivalent reporting conventions. These reporting conventions cover most of those in current use by dosimetrists worldwide. In addition to the reference neutron dosimetry, this document contains other useful dosimetry-related data for the HPRR in its new configuration. These data include dose-distance measurements and calculations, gamma dose measurements, neutron-to-gamma ratios, ''9-to-3 inch'' ratios, threshold detector unit measurements, 56-group neutron energy spectra, sulfur fluence measurements, and details concerning HPRR shields. 26 refs., 11 figs., 31 tabs

  13. Non-conventional personal dosimetry techniques

    Established dosimetry has achieved a high standard in personnel monitoring. This applies particularly to photon dosimetry. Nevertheless, even in photon dosimetry, improvements and changes are being made. The reason may be technological progress, or the introduction of new tasks on the basis of the recommendations of international bodies (e.g. the new ICRU measurement unit) of national legislation. Since we are restricting ourselves here to technical trends the author would like to draw attention to various activities of current interest, e.g. the computation of receptor-related conversion coefficients from personal dose to organ or body doses, taking into account the conditions of exposure with respect to differential energy and angular distribution of the radiation field. Realistic data on exposure geometry are taken from work place analyses. Furthermore, the data banks of central personal dosimetry services are subject to statistical evaluation and radiation protection trend analysis. Technological progress and developments are considered from the point of view of personal dosimetry, partial body or extremity dosimetry and accidental dosimetry

  14. The work of the task group of committee 2 of ICRP on age-dependent dosimetry

    With the accident at Chernobyl and developing concern in regard to the consequences of discharging radionuclides into the environment has come increasing awareness of the need to assess radiation doses to all age groups in the population. In 1987, ICRP set up a Task Group of Committee 2 on Age-dependent Dosimetry with the responsibility for calculating internationally agreed dose coefficients for members of the public. This covered the calculation and ingestion, as well as doses to the embryo and fetus from intakes of radionuclides by the mother. This paper reviews the programme of work.(authors). 17 refs., 6 tabs

  15. Retrospective dosimetry: Dose evaluation using unheated and heated quartz from a radioactive waste storage building

    Jain, M.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.;

    2002-01-01

    particularly in nuclear installations. These materials contain natural dosemeters Such as quartz. which usually is less sensitive than its heated counterpart. The potential of quartz extracted from mortar in a wall of a low-level radioactive-waste storage facility containing distributed sources of Co-60 and Cs......In the assessment of dose received from a nuclear accident, considerable attention has been paid to retrospective dosimetry using heated materials such as household ceramics and bricks. However, unheated materials such as mortar and concrete are more commonly found in industrial sites and...

  16. Present Status and Prospects for Biological Dosimetry using Chromosome Aberration Analysis (invited paper)

    Jin, C.Z.; Liu, X.L.; Zhang, Z.Y.; Luo, Y.S

    1998-07-01

    Biological dosimetry of radiation exposures was performed in 21 persons who received an overexposure to radiation in several radiation accidents during 1980-1996 in China. Based on the frequencies of dicentrics and rings the individual dose was estimated. Long-term follow-up studies have been carried out on five of the moderate and high dose exposed victims. The automated karyotype analysis system and the FISH technique have been established. The application of FISH for a dose-response relationship for translocations after irradiation with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays has been performed. (author)

  17. Standards, Applications and Quality Assurance in Medical Radiation Dosimetry (IDOS). Proceedings of an International Symposium. V. 2

    Ionizing radiation is employed in a wide variety of applications and processes in technologically advanced countries. Dosimetry is the science of measuring ionizing radiation and understanding it is essential for the safe and effective use of nuclear technology. Medical radiation dosimetry deals with those applications in which patients are irradiated. These proceedings embody a selection of refereed papers that were presented at the International Symposium on Standards, Applications and Quality Assurance in Medical Radiation Dosimetry held in Vienna from 9 to 12 November 2010. More than 370 delegates representing 66 Member States, 45 observers and 12 international and professional organizations attended the meeting, at which 75 oral presentations were delivered, 4 round table discussions were held and 187 posters were presented. Owing to its dual role in disseminating radiation measurement standards and verifying the accuracy of dosimetry applied at the hospital level, the IAEA is well positioned to convene international meetings focused on dosimetry. The previous meeting was held in Vienna in November 2002. Since then, three major developments have helped progress medical radiation dosimetry. Firstly, Member States have rapidly adopted new treatment technologies, e.g. intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and they have continued to acquire sophisticated diagnostic capabilities, e.g. computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography scanning. Unfortunately, the adoption of these technologies has not always been trouble-free. News stories in various countries have highlighted radiation accidents during IMRT due to dosimetric errors. In addition, overuse of CT scanning and failure to adopt clinical protocols appropriate to patient size, particularly in paediatric cases, have caused concern. Measurement of radiation dose properly necessitates adoption of new technologies and, consequently, much research has been devoted to improving dosimetry, particularly

  18. Réseaux d'agriculteurs biologiques et développement durable dans la région métropolitaine de Stockholm. Géographies d'un malentendu

    Hochedez, Camille

    2012-01-01

    A travers le cas de la région de Stockholm, cette thèse s'intéresse aux malentendus liés à la territorialisation du développement durable, c'est-à-dire au passage du discours politique à son application dans les territoires locaux. Ce travail remet plus particulièrement en question le postulat de la durabilité de l'agriculture biologique, à travers l'étude de réseaux d'agriculteurs biologiques dans la région métropolitaine de Stockholm. Dans une démarche géographique privilégiant la dimension...

  19. Dosimetry optimization at COGEMA-La Hague

    At the present time, the la Hague site strives to apply international recommendations together with national regulations concerning radiation protection, and especially the respect of limitation and optimization principles. The application of these principles is based on the implementation of a passive dosimetry and an active dosimetry. The monthly passive dosimetry is monitored by means of a photographic dosimetry film, completed with lithium fluorine thermoluminescent film badges. This personal dosimetry common to X, β, γ and neutron radiations is carried out in close relationship between the Radiation Protection Department, the Occupational Medical Department and the staff running the Plant. The application or ALARA's principle as well as that of radiation protection optimization implies to implement a complementary active dosimetry enabling to gain in real time, the personal dosimetry of each intervening person, either they be COGEMA's workers or external companies'. This active dosimetry provides with following information: This preventive dosimetry is based on the knowledge of doses integration in real time and is fitted with alarm thresholds according to the total amount of doses and dose rates. Thresholds on the dose rate are also set relatively to the radiological environment. This knowledge of doses and dose rates allows a stricter management of the works, while analyzing them according to the nature of the work, to the location and to the skills of the intervening people. This dosimetry allows to analyze and optimize doses integration according to the works nature for the whole intervening staff. The la Hague Site has developed an active personal dosimetry system, common to every intervening person, COGEMA or external companies. The DOSICARD was thus elaborated, shaped as an electronic dosimeter fitted with an alarm and a smart card. The access to controlled areas is conditioned to information given by the DOSICARD concerning medical aptitudes and

  20. Basic physical data for neutron dosimetry

    Based on the results of a workshop on basic physical data for neutron dosimetry held in Rijswijk (The Netherlands) on 19-21 May 1976, this monograph reviews the current status in neutron dosimetry and the agreements that were reached on the use of some common basic physical parameters. As appendices are joint tables of kerma factors and a draft of a protocol for neutron dosimetry for radiobiological and medical applications. Main topic treated: source and field characteristics; cross sections and mass energy transfer coefficients; measurements and calculations; detector response, measurements and calculations; dose distributions in phantoms for a limited set of conditions; standardization, calibration and intercomparison

  1. Introduction to radiological physics and radiation dosimetry

    Attix, Frank Herbert

    2004-01-01

    A straightforward presentation of the broad concepts underlying radiological physics and radiation dosimetry for the graduate-level student. Covers photon and neutron attenuation, radiation and charged particle equilibrium, interactions of photons and charged particles with matter, radiotherapy dosimetry, as well as photographic, calorimetric, chemical, and thermoluminescence dosimetry. Includes many new derivations, such as Kramers X-ray spectrum, as well as topics that have not been thoroughly analyzed in other texts, such as broad-beam attenuation and geometrics, and the reciprocity theorem

  2. Préparation et etude de la réactivité de quelques dérivés de naphtoquinones en vue de leurs applications biologiques potentielles.

    Benabdallah, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Les composés ayant un noyau gnomonique constituent une classe très importante dans la chimie organique et la biochimie, grâce à leurs activités biologiques et thérapeutiques élevées. Ce sont des molécules très répandues dans la nature. Elles se divisent en trois grandes familles, les anthraquinones, les anthraquinones et les benzoquinones.

  3. A TLD for whole body dosimetry our experience in neutron personnel dosimetry

    One of the Greek Atomic Energy, Commission's (GAEC) responsibilities is the personnel dosimetry and the record keeping for the workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. The personnel dosimetry laboratory of the GAEC assures the monitoring of almost 7000 workers in the whole country, including about 100 working in areas where neutrons might be present. For this purpose a thermoluminescence dosimetry system (TLD) in neutron dosimetry has been introduced. Scope of the present work is the quality control and the preliminary results on the implementation of the TLD system. The quality control of the system has been completed and the results are presented. (authors)

  4. Description of the accident

    The TMI-2 accident occurred in March 1979. The accident started with a simple and fairly common steam power plant failure--loss of feedwater to the steam generators. Because of a combination of design, training, regulatory policies, mechanical failures and human error, the accident progressed to the point where it eventually produced the worst known core damage in large nuclear power reactors. Core temperatures locally reached UO2 fuel liquefaction (metallic solution with Zr) and even fuel melt (3800-51000F). Extensive fission product release and Zircaloy cladding oxidation and embrittlement occurred. At least the upper 1/2 of the core fractured and crumbled upon quenching. The lower central portion of the core apparently had a delayed heatup and then portions of it collapsed into the reactor vessel lower head. The lower outer portion of the core may be relatively undamaged. Outside of the core boundary, only those steel components directly above and adjacent to the core (≤1 foot) are known to have suffered significant damage (localized oxidation and melting). Other portions of the primary system outside of the reactor vessel apparently had little chance of damage or even notable overheating. The demonstrated coolability of the severely damaged TMI-2 core, once adequate water injection began, was one of the most substantial and important results of the TMI-2 accident

  5. Fifteen years after accident

    This book is devoted to 15th anniversary of the Chernobyl accident. Four problems have been reflected in the book: contamination of territories of Western Europe, Belarus, Ukraine and Russian Federation by cesium-137; plutonium, americium and other actinides on territory of Belarus; problems of radioactive wastes management of Chernobyl origin; influence of various factors on oncology morbidity in the Republic of Belarus

  6. Measures against nuclear accidents

    A select committee appointed by the Norwegian Ministry of Social Affairs put forward proposals concerning measures for the improvement of radiation protection preparedness in Norway. On the basis on an assessment of the potential radiation accident threat, the report examines the process of response, and identifies the organizational and management factors that influence that process

  7. The Chernobyl reactor accident

    The documentation abstracted contains a complete survey of the broadcasts transmitted by the Russian wire service of the Deutsche Welle radio station between April 28 and Mai 15, 1986 on the occasion of the Chernobyl reactor accident. Access is given to extracts of the remarkable eastern and western echoes on the broadcasts of the Deutsche Welle. (HP)

  8. Lessons learned from accident investigations

    Accidents in three main practices - medical applications, industrial radiography and industrial irradiators - are used to illustrate some common causes of accidents and the main lessons to be learned from them. A brief description of some of these accidents is given. Lessons learned from the accidents described are approached bearing in mind: safety culture, quality assurance, human factors, good engineering practice, defence in depth, security of sources, safety assessment and monitoring and verification compliance. (author)

  9. Lessons learned from accidents investigations

    Accidents from three main practices: medical applications, industrial radiography and industrial irradiators are used to illustrate some common causes of accidents and the main lessons to be learned. A brief description of some of these accidents is given. Lessons learned from the described accidents are approached by subjects covering: safety culture, quality assurance, human factors, good engineering practice, defence in depth, security of sources, safety assessment and monitoring and verification compliance. (author)

  10. Road Traffic Accidents in Kazakhstan

    Alma Aubakirova; Alibek Kossumov; Nurbek Igissinov

    2013-01-01

    Background: The article provides the analysis of death rates in road traffic accidents in Kazakhstan from 2004 to 2010 and explores the use of sanitary aviation. Methods: Data of fatalities caused by road traffic accidents were collected and analysed. Descriptive and analytical methods of epidemiology and biomedical statistics were applied. Results: Totaly 27,003 people died as a result of road traffic accidents in this period. The death rate for the total population due to road traffic accid...

  11. The Chernobyl accident

    The accident at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant was the most severe in the nuclear industry. The accident caused the rapid death of 31 power plant employees and firemen, mainly from acute radiation exposures and burns, and brought about the evacuation of 116,000 people within a few weeks. In addition, about half a million workers and four million members of the public have been exposed, to some extent, to radiation doses resulting from the Chernobyl accident. A large number of radiation measurements have been made since the accident in order to reconstruct the doses received by the most exposed populations. On the basis of currently available information, it appears that: (1) average doses received by clean-up workers from external irradiation decreased with time, being about 300 mGy for the persons who worked in the first three months after the accident, about 170 mGy for the remainder of 1986, 130 mGy in 1987, 30 mGy in 1988, and 15 mGy in 1989; (2) the evacuees received, before evacuation, effective doses averaging 11 mSv for the population of Pripyat, and 18 mSv for the remainder of the population of the 30 km zone, with maximum effective doses ranging up to 380 mSv; and (3) among the populations living in contaminated areas, the highest doses were those delivered to the thyroids of children. Thyroid doses derived from thyroid measurements among Belarussian and Ukrainian children indicate median thyroid doses of about 300 mGy, and more than 1% of the children with thyroid doses in excess of 5000 mGy. A description is provided of the epidemiological studies that the National Cancer Institute has, since 1990, at the request of the Department of Energy, endeavoured to undertake, in cooperation with Belarus and Ukraine, on two possible health effects resulting from the Chernobyl accident: (1, thyroid cancer in children living in contaminated areas during the first few weeks following the accident, and (2) leukaemia among workers involved in clean

  12. Need of reactor dosimetry preservation

    Full text: Today's nuclear renaissance in national and European aspect, expressed in building of new NPPs, as well as the development of Gen. IV nuclear reactors, meets new challenges of accuracy of the reactor analysis methods used for reliable operation and nuclear safety assessment. The nuclear safety requirements and philosophy have changed by the development of new nuclear systems and this imposes special research and development activity. Reactor Dosimetry (RD) which is applied for determination of neutron field parameters and neutron flux responses in different regions of the reactor system plays an important role in determining of consecutive effects from the irradiation. That is, for determination of radiation exposure on reactor system elements as reactor vessel, internals, shielding; dose determination for material damage study; determination of radiation field parameters for conditioning of irradiation; dose determination for medicine and industry application; induced activity determination for decommissioning purposes. The management of nuclear knowledge has emerged as a growing challenge in recent years. The need to preserve and transfer nuclear knowledge is compounded by recent trends such as ageing of the nuclear workforce, declining student numbers in nuclear related fields, and the threat of losing accumulated nuclear knowledge. Reinforcement of science and technology potential of many EU institutes is needed so to be able to support the nuclear operators and nuclear regulator in safety assessment as well as to strengthen the utilization of the research reactor for medicine and industry purposes. The ways to preserve and develop the RD knowledge could be asked in the good practice of the near past within the European Working Group for Reactor Dosimetry (EWGRD), members of which are research organizations of the countries in Europe operating VVER, PWR and BWR type reactors. Joint workshops and training, common intercomparisons will maintain the RD

  13. The psychology of nuclear accidents

    Incidents involving nuclear weapons are described, as well as the accident to the Three Mile Island-2 reactor. Methods of assessment of risks are discussed, with particular reference to subjective judgements and the possible role of human error in civil nuclear accidents. Accidents or misunderstandings in communication or human actions which might lead to nuclear war are also discussed. (U.K.)

  14. Developments in optically stimulated luminescence techniques for dating and retrospective dosimetry

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence signals from natural quartz and feldspar are now used routinely in dating geological and archaeological materials. More recently they have also been employed in accident dosimetry, i.e. the retrospective assessment of doses received as a result of a nuclear...... accident. Since 1990, the exploration of this wide variety of applications has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Riso in measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes of this programme, including (i) optimisation of stimulation and emission...... windows, and detection sensitivity, (ii) experience with various stimulation light sources, including filtered incandescent lamps and high intensity light emitting diodes and laser diodes (infrared at 830-850 nm, blue-green at 420-550 nm and blue at 470 nm). Also discussed are recently developed high...

  15. Alanine - ESR dosimetry, feasibility and possible applications

    Alanine ESR dosimetry presents a great interest for quality controls in radiotherapy. This new developed water equivalent alanine dosimeter allows a reproducible dose measurement, by a non-destructive readout technique in a large dose range. In this paper the stability of the dosimeter response has been shown but also its independence with the energy or the dose rate of the absorbed radiation. Through this different studies, one can broaden the application field of alanine / ESR dosimetry especially for in-vivo dosimetry. The results of the experiments and the intra operative treatment, indicate that this kind of dosimetry seems to be a promising technique for in-vivo quality controls in electron beam, γ ray or X ray radiotherapy. (authors)

  16. The International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-85)

    This document describes the contents of the second version of the International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-85), distributed by the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency. This library superseded IRDF-82. (author)

  17. The BNFL legal electronic dosimetry service

    BNFL Magnox Generation started a three year scheme in April 1996 to introduce Siemens Electronic Personal Dosimetry (EPD) systems into its reactor sites as part of an initiative to improve the control of doses and the accuracy of dose statistics and to record personal legal dose. Concurrent with the installation of the EPD systems a successful application was made to the United Kingdom Health and Safety Executive (HSE) for approval of the BNFL dosimetry service to use the Siemens EPD Mk 1.2 for recording legal doses. This paper discusses the experiences of the BNFL dosimetry service in operating the approved dosimetry service since it's approval by the HSE in January 2000. (authors)

  18. Audits for advanced treatment dosimetry

    Radiation therapy has advanced rapidly over the last few decades, progressing from 3D conformal treatment to image-guided intensity modulated therapy of several different flavors, both 3D and 4D and to adaptive radiotherapy. The use of intensity modulation has increased the complexity of quality assurance and essentially eliminated the physicist's ability to judge the validity of a treatment plan, even approximately, on the basis of appearance and experience. Instead, complex QA devices and procedures are required at the institutional level. Similarly, the assessment of treatment quality through remote and on-site audits also requires greater sophistication. The introduction of 3D and 4D dosimetry into external audit systems must follow, to enable quality assurance systems to perform meaningful and thorough audits

  19. Advanced materials in radiation dosimetry

    Bruzzi, M; Nava, F; Pini, S; Russo, S

    2002-01-01

    High band-gap semiconductor materials can represent good alternatives to silicon in relative dosimetry. Schottky diodes made with epitaxial n-type 4 H SiC and Chemical Vapor Deposited diamond films with ohmic contacts have been exposed to a sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma-source, 20 MeV electrons and 6 MV X photons from a linear accelerator to test the current response in on-line configuration in the dose range 0.1-10 Gy. The released charge as a function of the dose and the radiation-induced current as a function of the dose-rate are found to be linear. No priming effects have been observed using epitaxial SiC, due to the low density of lattice defects present in this material.

  20. The future of medical dosimetry.

    Adams, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    The world of health care delivery is becoming increasingly complex. The purpose of this manuscript is to analyze current metrics and analytically predict future practices and principles of medical dosimetry. The results indicate five potential areas precipitating change factors: a) evolutionary and revolutionary thinking processes, b) social factors, c) economic factors, d) political factors, and e) technological factors. Outcomes indicate that significant changes will occur in the job structure and content of being a practicing medical dosimetrist. Discussion indicates potential variables that can occur within each process and change factor and how the predicted outcomes can deviate from normative values. Finally, based on predicted outcomes, future opportunities for medical dosimetrists are given. PMID:25861838

  1. Personal dosimetry in NPP refuelling

    Doses received by people involved in the operation of Nuclear Power Plants may reach high values, sometimes near limits, particularly during the refuelling operation. With the new ICRP recommendations, the doses produced may exceed the limits that have been now established, hence the practice used must be revised and/or exposure times reduced. In this paper, personal dosimetry from the workers of a Service Company involved in the operation of several Nuclear Power Plants, has been analyzed in order to state the implications of the new ICRP recommendations. Doses higher than new limits will imply a revision of the refuelling policies, thus exposure time would be reduced, and perhaps more workers must be involved in the operation, at least in critical stages. Statistics over the collected data have been estimated and major remarks on possible changes in the practice have been summarized. (author)

  2. Critical Reflections on Neutron Dosimetry

    Neutron dosimetry is unsatisfactory at present because the true meaning of the experimental data is not clear. Flux measurements cannot be used to determine the absorbed doses without simultaneous measurement of the spectral distribution of the neutrons, whose QF varies considerably according to the energy. Even with a unit of absorbed dose such as the rad (whose definition is based on physical measuring systems), there is still the problem of how to measure the absorbed energy. Essentially, an instrument for measuring absorbed doses should satisfy at least the following conditions: (1) It should produce no change in the primary flux incident on the subject or should modify it in the same proportions as the subject. (2) It should indicate the absorbed energy accurately. Calorimetric measurements come to mind, but they are insufficiently sensitive (100 rads/min in a substance of unit specific heat produces a temperature rise of 2.5 x 10-4 degC/min). (3) The absorbed energy per unit mass of the dosimeter should be equal or proportional to that absorbed per unit mass of human tissue. Personal dosimetry by means of film badges is inaccurate and insufficiently sensitive. At present, the most reliable dose measurements are those made with tissue-equivalent ionization chambers, but these, too, are unsatisfactory, at least for neutrons of energy between 0.025 eV and 20 keV and above 30 MeV. The authors propose a method for measuring high-energy neutron doses capable of causing nuclear disintegrations in the body. (author)

  3. Chimie des processus biologiques

    Fontecave, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Enseignement Cours : Du CO2 aux carburants, un renversement salutaire Le développement des nouvelles technologies de l’énergie pour l’exploitation des énergies renouvelables, comme l’énergie solaire ou l’énergie éolienne diluées et intermittentes, nécessite celui des procédés de stockage de l’énergie. Une façon de stocker ces énergies est de les transformer en énergie chimique. L’exemple le plus classique est l’électrolyse de l’eau en hydrogène, ce dernier pouvant être en effet ensuite utilis...

  4. Chimie des processus biologiques

    Fontecave, Marc

    2010-01-01

    La chimie du vivant : enzymes et métalloenzymes, des biocatalyseurs fascinants La catalyse enzymatique, ce pouvoir que possèdent certaines protéines d’accélérer de façon extraordinaire et d’orienter avec une précision fascinante les réactions chimiques de la cellule, reste, encore aujourd’hui, l’un des grands mystères des systèmes vivants. Les réactions dont il est question vont de la simple hydrolyse de liaisons peptidiques à des processus poly-électroniques d’une très grande complexité, com...

  5. Neutron excitation function guide for reactor dosimetry

    Neutron Excitation Function Guide for Reactor Dosimetry (NEFGRD) has been prepared in the Ukrainian Nuclear Data Center (UKRNDC) using ZVV 9.2 code for graphical data presentation. The data can be retrieved through Web or obtained on CD-ROM or as hard copy report. NEFGRD contains graphical and text information for 56 nuclides (81 dosimetry reactions). Each reaction is provided by the information part and several graphical function blocks (from one to nine). (author)

  6. Application of radiation damage effects in dosimetry

    some general aspects of radiation dosimetry are outlined. The techniques of radiophotoluminescence, radiothermoluminescence and exo-electron emission are discussed individually. It is thought that the trend in personnel dosimetry is such that thermoluminescence will steadily replace film and photoluminescence techniques over the next decade, and that more unusual techniques, such as exo-electron emission, will make inroads only for special purposes. (B.R.H.)

  7. EPR dosimetry of human dental enamel

    Dental enamel was the object of dosimetry with the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR); the teeth extracted for medical causes in the residents of Kiev, the Kiev and Zhitomir regions were analyzed. New data on radiation defects in dental enamel are presented and problems of EPR dosimetry in humans analyzed, approaches to the development and improvement of the method of retrospective assessment of the dose load with this method are outlined

  8. Developments in Patient Dosimetry for Unsealed Sources

    In molecular radiotherapy, treatment planning essentially is the determination of the activity to administer to optimize safety and efficacy of a treatment. Individualization is possible, for example, by using quantitative imaging modalities, external counting and blood sampling for pre-therapeutic biokinetics measurements. Patient specific dosimetry can be performed as in radiation therapy. Over- or under treatment of patients can be avoided. Here, the standard methods and the expected advances in performing individualized dosimetry are discussed. (author)

  9. Optically stimulated luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry using single grains of quartz extracted from unheated materials

    This work investigates the possibility of applying optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in retrospective dose determinations using unheated materials. It focuses on identifying materials suitable for use in assessment of doses absorbed as a consequence of radiation accidents (i.e. accident dosimetry). Special attention has been paid to quartz extracted from unheated building materials such as concrete and mortar. The single-aliquot regeneration-dose (SAR) protocol has been used to determine absorbed doses in small aliquots as well as single grains of quartz. It is shown that OSL measurements of single grains of quartz extracted from poorly-bleached building materials can provide useful information on radiation accident doses, even when the luminescence sensitivity is low. Sources of variance in well-bleached single grain dose distributions have been investigated in detail and it is concluded that the observed variability in the data is consistent with the sum (in quadrature) of a component, which depends on the number of photons detected from each grain, and a fixed component independent of light level. Dose depth profiles through laboratory irradiated concrete bricks have successfully been measured and minimum detection limits of less than 100 mGy are derived. Measurements of thermal transfer in single grains of poorly-bleached quartz show that thermal transfer is variable on a grain-to-grain basis and that it can be a source of variance in single-grain dose distributions. Furthermore, the potential of using common household and workplace chemicals, such as table salt, washing powder and water softener, in retrospective dosimetry has been investigated. It is concluded that such materials should be considered as retrospective dosimeters in the event of a radiation accident. (au)

  10. Optically stimulated luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry using single grains of quartz extracted from unheated materials

    Joerkov Thomsen, Kristina

    2004-02-01

    This work investigates the possibility of applying optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in retrospective dose determinations using unheated materials. It focuses on identifying materials suitable for use in assessment of doses absorbed as a consequence of radiation accidents (i.e. accident dosimetry). Special attention has been paid to quartz extracted from unheated building materials such as concrete and mortar. The single-aliquot regeneration-dose (SAR) protocol has been used to determine absorbed doses in small aliquots as well as single grains of quartz. It is shown that OSL measurements of single grains of quartz extracted from poorly-bleached building materials can provide useful information on radiation accident doses, even when the luminescence sensitivity is low. Sources of variance in well-bleached single grain dose distributions have been investigated in detail and it is concluded that the observed variability in the data is consistent with the sum (in quadrature) of a component, which depends on the number of photons detected from each grain, and a fixed component independent of light level. Dose depth profiles through laboratory irradiated concrete bricks have successfully been measured and minimum detection limits of less than 100 mGy are derived. Measurements of thermal transfer in single grains of poorly-bleached quartz show that thermal transfer is variable on a grain-to-grain basis and that it can be a source of variance in single-grain dose distributions. Furthermore, the potential of using common household and workplace chemicals, such as table salt, washing powder and water softener, in retrospective dosimetry has been investigated. It is concluded that such materials should be considered as retrospective dosimeters in the event of a radiation accident. (au)

  11. Radiological accidents balance in medicine

    This work deals with the radiological accidents in medicine. In medicine, the radiation accidents on medical personnel and patients can be the result of over dosage and bad focusing of radiotherapy sealed sources. Sometimes, the accidents, if they are unknown during a time enough for the source to be spread and to expose a lot of persons (in the case of source dismantling for instance) can take considerable dimensions. Others accidents can come from bad handling of linear accelerators and from radionuclide kinetics in some therapies. Some examples of accidents are given. (O.L.). 11 refs

  12. Occupational accidents aboard merchant ships

    Hansen, H.L.; Nielsen, D.; Frydenberg, Morten

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the frequency, circumstances, and causes of occupational accidents aboard merchant ships in international trade, and to identify risk factors for the occurrence of occupational accidents as well as dangerous working situations where possible preventive measures may be...... initiated. Methods: The study is a historical follow up on occupational accidents among crew aboard Danish merchant ships in the period 1993–7. Data were extracted from the Danish Maritime Authority and insurance data. Exact data on time at risk were available. Results: A total of 1993 accidents were...... identified during a total of 31 140 years at sea. Among these, 209 accidents resulted in permanent disability of 5% or more, and 27 were fatal. The mean risk of having an occupational accident was 6.4/100 years at sea and the risk of an accident causing a permanent disability of 5% or more was 0.67/100 years...

  13. Chernobyl reactor accident

    On April 26, 1986, an explosion occurred at the newest of four operating nuclear reactors at the Chernobyl site in the USSR. The accident initiated an international technical exchange of almost unprecedented magnitude; this exchange was climaxed with a meeting at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna during the week of August 25, 1986. The meeting was attended by more than 540 official representatives from 51 countries and 20 international organizations. Information gleaned from that technical exchange is presented in this report. A description of the Chernobyl reactor, which differs significantly from commercial US reactors, is presented, the accident scenario advanced by the Russian delegation is discussed, and observations that have been made concerning fission product release are described

  14. The ultimate nuclear accident

    The estimated energy equivalent of Chernobyl explosion was the 1/150 th of the explosive energy equivalent of atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima; while the devastation that could be caused by the world's stock pile of nuclear weapons, could be equivalent to 160 millions of Chernobyl-like incidents. As known, the number of nuclear weapons is over 50,000 and 2000 nuclear weapons are sufficient to destroy the world. The Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents have been blamed on human factors but also the human element, particularly in the form of psychological stresses on those operating the nuclear weapons, could accidentally bring the world to a nuclear catastrophe. This opinion is encouraged by the London's Sunday Times magazine which gave a graphic description of life inside a nuclear submarine. So, to speak of nuclear reactor accidents and not of nuclear weapons is false security. (author)

  15. Nuclear ship accidents

    In this report available information on 28 nuclear ship accident and incidents is considered. Of these 5 deals with U.S. ships and 23 with USSR ships. The ships are in almost all cases nuclear submarines. Only events that involve the nuclear propulsion plants, radiation exposures, fires/explosions and sea water leaks into the submarines are considered. Comments are made on each of the events, and at the end of the report an attempt is made to point out the weaknesses of the submarine designs which have resulted in the accidents. It is emphasized that much of the available information is of a rather dubious nature. consequently some of the assessments made may not be correct. (au)

  16. Reactor accidents in perspective

    In each of the three major reactor accidents which have led to significant releases to the environment, and discussed in outline in this note, the reactor has been essentially destroyed - certainly Windscale and Chernobyl reactors will never operate and the cleanup operation for Three Mile Island is currently estimated to have cost in excess of US Pound 500 000 000. In each of the accidents there has not been any fatality off site in the short term and any long-term health detriment is unlikely to be seen in comparison with the natural cancer incidence rate. At Chernobyl, early fatalities did occur amongst those concerned with fighting the incident on site and late effects are to be expected. The assumption of a linear non-threshold risk, and hence no level of zero risk is the main problem in communication with the public, and the author calls for simplification of the presentation of the concepts of radiological protection. (U.K.)

  17. Environmental dosimetry performance criteria: Pilot test of proposed ANSI draft standard N13.29

    American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards are a source of technical guidance on the application of passive radiation detectors in personnel and environmental monitoring programs. The proposed new ANSI Draft N13.29 describes performance tests for environmental dosimetry providers that are analogous to those now required in personnel dosimetry. The objective of this study was to pilot test the procedural specifications before Draft N13.29 is submitted for final balloting. The results of the performance tests are relevant to environmental surveillance programs, which may be affected if Draft N13.29 is approved. Seven environmental dosimetry providers submitted dosimeters for the pilot test, which included two phases. The first phase involved exposing dosimeters to laboratory gamma, beta, and x-ray sources at routine and accident dose levels. In the second phase, dosimeters were subjected to 90 d of simulated environmental conditions in a chamber that cycled through prescribed temperature and humidity parameters and lighting conditions. Two participants passed all categories of the laboratory test phase, and all seven passed the environmental test phase. The authors report here on the results of the performance tests; additional results relevant to finalizing Draft N13.29 are detailed elsewhere

  18. The Chernobylsk reactor accident

    The construction, the safety philosophy, the major reactor physical parameters of RBMK-1000 type reactor units and the detailed description of the Chernobylsk-4 reactor accident, its causes and conclusions, the efforts to reduce the consequences on the reactor site and in the surroundings are discussed based on different types of Soviet documents including the report presented to the IAEA by the Soviet Atomic Energy Agency in August 1986. (V.N.)

  19. Ship accident studies

    This paper summarizes ship accident studies performed by George G. Sharp, Inc. for the U.S. Maritime Administration in connection with the Nuclear Ship Project. Casualties studied include fires/explosions, groundings and collisions for which a method for calculating probability on a specific route was developed jointly with the Babcock and Wilcox Co. Casualty data source was the Liverpool's Underwriters Association Casualty Returns

  20. 49 CFR 835.11 - Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information.

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident... Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information. It is the responsibility... obtain Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and accompanying accident docket files....