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Sample records for accident management

  1. SEVERE ACCIDENT MANAGEMENT TRAINING

    The purpose of this paper is (a) to define the International Atomic Energy Agency's role in the area of severe accident management training, (b) to briefly describe the status of representative severe accident analysis tools designed to support development and validation of accident management guidelines, and more recently, simulate the accident with sufficient accuracy to support the training of technical support and reactor operator staff, and (c) provide an overview of representative design-specific accident management guidelines and training. Since accident management and the development of accident management validation and training software is a rapidly evolving area, this paper is also intended to evolve as accident management guidelines and training programs are developed to meet different reactor design requirements and individual national requirements

  2. Framework for accident management

    Accident management is an essential element of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Integration Plan for the closure of severe accident issues. This element will consolidate the results from other key elements; such as the Individual Plant Examination (IPE), the Containment Performance Improvement, and the Severe Accident Research Programs, in a form that can be used to enhance the safety programs for nuclear power plants. The NRC is currently conducting an Accident Management Program that is intended to aid in defining the scope and attributes of an accident management program for nuclear power plants. The accident management plan will ensure that a plant specific program is developed and implemented to promote the most effective use of available utility resources (people and hardware) to prevent and mitigate severe accidents. Hardware changes or other plant modifications to reduce the frequency of severe accidents are not a central aim of this program. To accomplish the outlined objectives, the NRC has developed an accident management framework that is comprised of five elements: (1) accident management strategies, (2) training, (3) guidance and computational aids, (4) instrumentation, and (5) delineation of decision making responsibilities. A process for the development of an accident management program has been identified using these NRC framework elements

  3. Framework for accident management

    A program is being conducted to establish those attributes of a severe accident management plan which are necessary to assure effective response to all credible severe accidents and to develop guidance for their incorporation in a plant's Accident Management Plan. This program is one part of the Accident Management Research Program being conducted by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The approach used in establishing attributes and developing guidance includes three steps. In the first step the general attributes of an accident management plan were identified based on: (1) the objectives established for the NRC accident management program, (2) the elements of an accident management framework identified by the NRC, and (3) a review of the processes used in developing the currently used approach for classifying and analyzing accidents. For the second step, a process was defined that uses the general attributes identified from the first step to develop an accident management plan. The third step applied the process defined in the second step at a nuclear power plant to refine and develop it into a benchmark accident management plan. Step one is completed, step two is underway and step three has not yet begun

  4. Management of severe accidents

    The definition and the multidimensionality aspects of accident management have been reviewed. The suggested elements in the development of a programme for severe accident management have been identified and discussed. The strategies concentrate on the two tiered approaches. Operative management utilizes the plant's equipment and operators capabilities. The recovery managment concevtrates on preserving the containment, or delaying its failure, inhibiting the release, and on strategies once there has been a release. The inspiration for this paper was an excellent overview report on perspectives on managing severe accidents in commercial nuclear power plants and extending plant operating procedures into the severe accident regime; and by the most recent publication of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) considering the question of risk reduction and source term reduction through accident prevention, management and mitigation. The latter document concludes that 'active development of accident management measures by plant personnel can lead to very large reductions in source terms and risk', and goes further in considering and formulating the key issue: 'The most fruitful path to follow in reducing risk even further is through the planning of accident management.' (author)

  5. The management of accidents

    R. B. Ward

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This author’s experiences in investigating well over a hundred accident occurrences has led to questioning how such events can be managed - - - while immediately recognising that the idea of managing accidents is an oxymoron, we don’t want to manage them, we don’t want not to manage them, what we desire is not to have to manage not-them, that is, manage matters so they don’t happen and then we don’t have to manage the consequences.Design/methodology/approach: The research will begin by defining some common classes of accidents in manufacturing industry, with examples taken from cases investigated, and by working backwards (too late, of course show how those involved could have managed these sample events so they didn’t happen, finishing with the question whether any of that can be applied to other situations.Findings: As shown that the management actions needed to prevent accidents are control of design and application of technology, and control and integration of people.Research limitations/implications: This paper has shown in some of the examples provided, management actions have been know to lead to accidents being committed by others, lower in the organization.Originality/value: Today’s management activities involve, generally, the use of technology in many forms, varying from simple tools (such as knives to the use of heavy equipment, electric power, and explosives. Against these we commit, in control of those items, the comparatively frail human mind and body, which, again generally, does succeed in controlling these resources, with (another generality by appropriate management. However, sometimes the control slips and an accident occurs.

  6. Accident and emergency management

    There is an increasing potential for severe accidents as the industrial development tends towards large, centralised production units. In several industries this has led to the formation of large organisations which are prepared for accidents fighting and for emergency management. The functioning of these organisations critically depends upon efficient decision making and exchange of information. This project is aimed at securing and possibly improving the functionality and efficiency of the accident and emergency management by verifying, demonstrating, and validating the possible use of advanced information technology in the organisations mentioned above. With the nuclear industry in focus the project consists of five main activities: 1) The study and detailed analysis of accident and emergency scenarios based on records from incidents and rills in nuclear installations. 2) Development of a conceptual understanding of accident and emergency management with emphasis on distributed decision making, information flow, and control structure sthat are involved. 3) Development of a general experimental methodology for evaluating the effects of different kinds of decision aids and forms of organisation for emergency management systems with distributed decision making. 4) Development and test of a prototype system for a limited part of an accident and emergency organisation to demonstrate the potential use of computer and communication systems, data-base and knowledge base technology, and applications of expert systems and methods used in artificial intelligence. 5) Production of guidelines for the introduction of advanced information technology in the organisations based on evaluation and validation of the prototype system. (author)

  7. Accident management information needs

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Accident Management Research Program, a methodology has been developed for identifying the plant information needs necessary for personnel involved in the management of an accident to diagnose that an accident is in progress, select and implement strategies to prevent or mitigate the accident, and monitor the effectiveness of these strategies. This report describes the methodology and presents an application of this methodology to a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) with a large dry containment. A risk-important severe accident sequence for a PWR is used to examine the capability of the existing measurements to supply the necessary information. The method includes an assessment of the effects of the sequence on the measurement availability including the effects of environmental conditions. The information needs and capabilities identified using this approach are also intended to form the basis for more comprehensive information needs assessment performed during the analyses and development of specific strategies for use in accident management prevention and mitigation. 3 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  8. Accident management approach in Armenia

    In this lecture the accident management approach in Armenian NPP (ANPP) Unit 2 is described. List of BDBAs had been developed by OKB Gydropress in 1994. 13 accident sequences were included in this list. The relevant analyses had been performed in VNIIAES and the 'Guidelines on operator actions for beyond design basis accident (BDBA) management at ANPP Unit 2' had been prepared. These instructions are discussed

  9. Accident management insights from IPE's

    In response to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Generic Letter 88-20, each utility in the U.S.A. has undertaken a probabilistic severe accident study of each plant. This paper provides a high level summary of the generic PWR accident management insights that have been obtained from the IPE reports. More importantly, the paper details some of the limitations of the IPE studies with respect to accident management. The IPE studies and the methodology used was designed to provide a best estimate of the potential for a severe accident and/or for severe consequences from a core damage accident. The accepted methodology employs a number of assumptions to make the objective attainable with a reasonable expenditure of resources. However, some of the assumptions represent limitations with respect to developing an accident management program based solely on the IPE and its results. (author)

  10. CAMS: Computerized Accident Management Support

    The OECD Halden Reactor Project has initiated a new research programme on computerised accident management support, the so-called CAMS project (CAMS = Computerized Accident Management Support). This work will investigate the possibilities for developing systems which provide more extensive support to the control room staff and technical support centre than the existing SPDS (Safety Parameter Display System) type of systems. The CAMS project will utilize available simulator codes and the capabilities of computerized tools to assist the plant staff during the various accident stages including: identification of the accident state, assessment of the future development of the accident, and planning accident mitigation strategies. This research programme aims at establishing a prototype system which can be used for experimental testing of the concept and serve as a tool for training and education in accident management. The CAMS prototype should provide support to the staff when the plant is in a normal state, in a disturbance sate, and in an accident state. Even though better support in an accident state is the main goal of the project, it is felt to be important that the staff is familiar with the use of the system during normal operation, when they utilize the system during transients

  11. Severe accident management. Prevention and Mitigation

    Effective planning for the management of severe accidents at nuclear power plants can produce both a reduction in the frequency of such accidents as well as the ability to mitigate their consequences if and when they should occur. This report provides an overview of accident management activities in OECD countries. It also presents the conclusions of a group of international experts regarding the development of accident management methods, the integration of accident management planning into reactor operations, and the benefits of accident management

  12. The vver severe accident management

    The basic approach to the VVER safety management is based on the defence-in-depth principle the main idea of which is the multiplicity of physical barriers on the way of dangerous propagation on the one hand and the diversity of measures to protect each of them on the other hand. The main events of severe accident with loss of core cooling at NPP with WWER can be represented as a sequence of NPP states, in which each subsequent state is more severe than the previous one. The following sequence of states of the accident progression is supposed to be realistic and the most probable: -) loss of efficient core cooling; -) core melting, relocation of the molten core to the lower head and molten pool formation, -) reactor vessel damage, and -) containment damage and fission products release. The objectives of accident management at the design basis stage, the determining factors and appropriate determining parameters of processes are formulated in this paper. The same approach is used for the estimation of processes parameters at beyond design basis accident progression. The accident management goals and the determining factors and parameters are also listed in that case which is characterized by the loss of integrity of the fuel cladding. The accident management goal at the stage of core melt relocation implies the need for an efficient core-catcher

  13. Severe accident management guidelines tool

    Severe Accident is addressed by means of a great number of documents such as guidelines, calculation aids and diagnostic trees. The response methodology often requires the use of several documents at the same time while Technical Support Centre members need to assess the appropriate set of equipment within the adequate mitigation strategies. In order to facilitate the response, TECNATOM has developed SAMG TOOL, initially named GGAS TOOL, which is an easy to use computer program that clearly improves and accelerates the severe accident management. The software is designed with powerful features that allow the users to focus on the decision-making process. Consequently, SAMG TOOL significantly improves the severe accident training, ensuring a better response under a real situation. The software is already installed in several Spanish Nuclear Power Plants and trainees claim that the methodology can be followed easier with it, especially because guidelines, calculation aids, equipment information and strategies availability can be accessed immediately (authors)

  14. The management of radioactive waste from accidents

    Two accident case histories are reviewed - the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) reactor accident in 1979 and the Seveso accident in 1976. The status of the decontamination and radioactive waste management operations at TMI-2 as at 1986 is presented. 1986 estimates of reactor accident and recovery costs are given. 12 refs., 8 tabs

  15. Computerised severe accident management aids

    The OECD Halden Reactor Project in Norway is running two development projects in the area of computerised accident management in cooperation with the Swedish nuclear plant Forsmark unit 2. Also other nuclear organisations in the Nordic countries take part in the projects. The SAS II system is installed at Forsmark and is now being validated against the plant compact simulator and is later to be installed in the plant control room. It is designed to follow all defined critical safety functions in the same manner as is done in the functionally oriented Emergency Operating Procedures. The shift supervisor thus uses SAS II as a complementary information system after a plant disturbance . The plant operators still use the ordinary instrumentation and the event oriented procedures. This gives to a high extent both redundancy and diversity in information channels and in procedures. Further, a new system is under discussion which goes a step further in accident management than SAS II. It is called the Computerised Accident Management Support (CAMS) system. The objective is to make a computerised tool that can assist both the control room crew and the technical support centre in accident mitigation, especially in the early stages of an accident where the integrity of the core still can be maintained if proper counteractions to the accident sequence are taken. In CAMS another approach is taken than in SAS II by putting the process parameters in focus. A more elaborate signal validation is proposed. The validated signals are input to models that calculates mass and energy balances of the primary system. Among parameters calculated are residual heat. Experiences from these two approaches to computerised accident management support are presented and discussed. In summary: The original project proposal aimed particularly for operator and TSC support during severe accidents. In the CAMS design proposal we have, however, promoted the SMABRE code which is not designed for such

  16. Severe accident analysis methodology in support of accident management

    The author addresses the implementation at BELGATOM of a generic severe accident analysis methodology, which is intended to support strategic decisions and to provide quantitative information in support of severe accident management. The analysis methodology is based on a combination of severe accident code calculations, generic phenomenological information (experimental evidence from various test facilities regarding issues beyond present code capabilities) and detailed plant-specific technical information

  17. Accident management insights after the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) accident, that took place on 11 March 2011, initiated a significant number of activities at the national and international levels to reassess the safety of existing NPPs, evaluate the sufficiency of technical means and administrative measures available for emergency response, and develop recommendations for increasing the robustness of NPPs to withstand extreme external events and beyond design basis accidents. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is working closely with its member and partner countries to examine the causes of the accident and to identify lessons learnt with a view to the appropriate follow-up actions to be taken by the nuclear safety community. Accident management is a priority area of work for the NEA to address lessons being learnt from the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP following the recommendations of Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA), Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), and Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH). Considering the importance of these issues, the CNRA authorised the formation of a task group on accident management (TGAM) in June 2012 to review the regulatory framework for accident management following the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. The task group was requested to assess the NEA member countries needs and challenges in light of the accident from a regulatory point of view. The general objectives of the TGAM review were to consider: - enhancements of on-site accident management procedures and guidelines based on lessons learnt from the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident; - decision-making and guiding principles in emergency situations; - guidance for instrumentation, equipment and supplies for addressing long-term aspects of accident management; - guidance and implementation when taking extreme measures for accident management. The report is built on the existing bases for capabilities to respond to design basis

  18. Stress in accident and post-accident management at Chernobyl

    The effects of the Chernobyl nuclear accident on the psychology of the affected population have been much discussed. The psychological dimension has been advanced as a factor explaining the emergence, from 1990 onwards, of a post-accident crisis in the main CIS countries affected. This article presents the conclusions of a series of European studies, which focused on the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. These studies show that the psychological and social effects associated with the post-accident situation arise from the interdependency of a number of complex factors exerting a deleterious effect on the population. We shall first attempt to characterise the stress phenomena observed among the population affected by the accident. Secondly, we will be presenting an anlysis of the various factors that have contributed to the emerging psychological and social features of population reaction to the accident and in post-accident phases, while not neglecting the effects of the pre-accident situation on the target population. Thirdly, we shall devote some initial consideration to the conditions that might be conducive to better management of post-accident stress. In conclusion, we shall emphasise the need to restore confidence among the population generally. (Author)

  19. Development of TRAIN for accident management

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and alternative resources, systems, and actions to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident in nuclear power plants. TRAIN (Training pRogram for AMP In NPP), developed for training control room staff and the technical group, is introduced in this paper. The TRAIN composes of phenomenological knowledge base (KB), accident sequence KB and accident management procedures with AM strategy control diagrams and information needs. This TRAIN might contribute to training them by obtaining phenomenological knowledge of severe accidents, understanding plant vulnerabilities, and solving problems under high stress. (author)

  20. The screening approach for review of accident management programmes

    In this lecture the screening approach for review of accident management programmes are presented. It contains objective trees for accident management: logic structure of the approach; objectives and safety functions for accident management; safety principles

  1. Containment severe accident management - selected strategies

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) organized in June 1994, in collaboration with the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI), a Specialist Meeting on Selected Containment Severe Accident Management Strategies, to discuss their feasibility, effectiveness, benefits and drawbacks, and long-term impact. The meeting focused on water reactors, mainly on existing systems. The technical content covered topics such as general aspects of accident management strategies in OECD Member countries, hydrogen management techniques and other containment accident management strategies, surveillance and protection of the containment function. The main conclusions of the meeting are summarized in the paper. (author)

  2. Strategy generation in accident management support

    An increased interest for research in the field of Accident Management can be noted. Several international programmes have been started in order to be able to understand the basic physical and chemical phenomena in accident conditions. A feasibility study has shown that it would be possible to design and develop a computerized support system for plant staff in accident situations. To achieve this goal the Halden Project has initiated a research programme on Computerized Accident Management Support (CAMS project). The aim is to utilize the capabilities of computerized tools to support the plant staff during the various accident stages. The system will include identification of the accident state, assessment of the future development of the accident and planning of accident mitigation strategies. A prototype is developed to support operators and the Technical Support Centre in decision making during serious accident in nuclear power plants. A rule based system has been built to take care of the strategy generation. This system assists plant personnel in planning control proposals and mitigation strategies from normal operation to severe accident conditions. The ideal of a safety objective tree and knowledge from the emergency procedures have been used. Future prediction requires good state identification of the plant status and some knowledge about the history of some critical variables. The information needs to be validated as well. Accurate calculations in simulators and a large database including all important information form the plant will help the strategy planning. (author). 12 refs, 2 figs

  3. SAMSON: Severe Accident Management System Online Network

    SAMSON, Severe Accident Management System Online Network, is a computational tool used in the event of a nuclear power plant accident by accident managers in the Technical Support Centers (TSC) and Emergency Offsite Facilities (EOF). SAMSON examines over 150 status points monitored by nuclear power plant process computers during a severe accident and makes predictions about when core damage, support plate failure, and reactor vessel failure will occur. These predictions are based on the current state of the plant assuming that all safety equipment not already operating will fail. The status points analyzed include radiation levels, flow rates, pressure levels, temperatures and water levels. SAMSON uses an expert system as well as neural networks trained with the back propagation learning algorithm to make predictions. Previous training on data from accident analysis code allows SAMSON to associate different states in the plant with different times to critical failures. The accidents currently recognized by SAMSON include steam generator tube ruptures (SGTR), with breaks ranging from one tube to eights tubes, and loss of coolant accidents (LOCA), with breaks ranging from 0.001 square feet in size to breaks 3.0 square feet. SAMSON contains several neural networks for each accident type and break size, and chooses the correct network after accident classification by in expert system. SAMSON also provides information concerning the status of plant sensors and recovery strategies

  4. Development of integrated accident management assessment technology

    This project aims to develop critical technologies for accident management through securing evaluation frameworks and supporting tools, in order to enhance capabilities coping with severe accidents. For the research goal, firstly under the viewpoint of accident prevention, on-line risk monitoring system and the analysis framework for human error have been developed. Secondly, the training/supporting systems including the training simulator and the off-site risk evaluation system have been developed to enhance capabilities coping with severe accidents. Four kinds of research results have been obtained from this project. Firstly, the framework and taxonomy for human error analysis has been developed for accident management. As the second, the supporting system for accident managements has been developed. Using data that are obtained through the evaluation of off-site risk for Younggwang site, the risk database as well as the methodology for optimizing emergency responses has been constructed. As the third, a training support system, SAMAT, has been developed, which can be used as a training simulator for severe accident management. Finally, on-line risk monitoring system, DynaRM, has been developed for Ulchin 3 and 4 unit

  5. Accident knowledge and emergency management

    The report contains an overall frame for transformation of knowledge and experience from risk analysis to emergency education. An accident model has been developed to describe the emergency situation. A key concept of this model is uncontrolled flow of energy (UFOE), essential elements are the state, location and movement of the energy (and mass). A UFOE can be considered as the driving force of an accident, e.g., an explosion, a fire, a release of heavy gases. As long as the energy is confined, i.e. the location and movement of the energy are under control, the situation is safe, but loss of confinement will create a hazardous situation that may develop into an accident. A domain model has been developed for representing accident and emergency scenarios occurring in society. The domain model uses three main categories: status, context and objectives. A domain is a group of activities with allied goals and elements and ten specific domains have been investigated: process plant, storage, nuclear power plant, energy distribution, marine transport of goods, marine transport of people, aviation, transport by road, transport by rail and natural disasters. Totally 25 accident cases were consulted and information was extracted for filling into the schematic representations with two to four cases pr. specific domain. (au) 41 tabs., 8 ills.; 79 refs

  6. Accident knowledge and emergency management

    Rasmussen, B.; Groenberg, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    The report contains an overall frame for transformation of knowledge and experience from risk analysis to emergency education. An accident model has been developed to describe the emergency situation. A key concept of this model is uncontrolled flow of energy (UFOE), essential elements are the state, location and movement of the energy (and mass). A UFOE can be considered as the driving force of an accident, e.g., an explosion, a fire, a release of heavy gases. As long as the energy is confined, i.e. the location and movement of the energy are under control, the situation is safe, but loss of confinement will create a hazardous situation that may develop into an accident. A domain model has been developed for representing accident and emergency scenarios occurring in society. The domain model uses three main categories: status, context and objectives. A domain is a group of activities with allied goals and elements and ten specific domains have been investigated: process plant, storage, nuclear power plant, energy distribution, marine transport of goods, marine transport of people, aviation, transport by road, transport by rail and natural disasters. Totally 25 accident cases were consulted and information was extracted for filling into the schematic representations with two to four cases pr. specific domain. (au) 41 tabs., 8 ills.; 79 refs.

  7. Use of PSA and severe accident assessment results for the accident management

    The objectives for this study are to investigate the basic principle or methodology which is applicable to accident management, by using the results of PSA and severe accident research, and also facilitate the preparation of accidents management program in the future. This study was performed as follows: derivation of measures for core damage prevention, derivation of measures for accident mitigation, application of computerized tool to assess severe accident management

  8. Medical response and management of radiation accidents

    An overview is provided of educational programs and principles essential to the appropriate medical management of radiation accident victims. Such an education program will provide details of the physical properties of radiation, of the sources of radiation exposure, of radiation protection standards and of biological radiation effects. The medical management of individuals involved in radiation accidents is discussed. Such management includes emergency medical stabilization, locating and quantitating the level and degree of internal and/or external contamination, wound decontamination, medical surveillance and the evaluation and treatment of local radiation injuries

  9. Severe accident management concept for LWRS

    Although the advanced built-in engineered safety features and the highly trained personnel have led to extremely low probabilities of core melt accidents, there is a common understanding that even for such very unlikely accidents the plant operators must have the ability and means to mitigate the consequences of such events. This paper outlines a concept for the management of severe accidents based on 1) Computer simulations. 2) Various strategies based on core and containment damage states. 3) Calculational Aids. 4) Procedures. 5) Technical basis report. 6) Training. 7) Drills. The major benefit of this concept is the fact that there is no dedicated operating manual for severe accidents; rather the required mitigative strategies and measures are incorporated into existing accident management manuals leading to truly integrated accident management at the plant. At present this concept is going to be implemented in the NPP Geogen. Although this approach is primarily developed for existing PWRs it is also applicable to other LWRs including new NPP designs. Specific features of the plant can be taken into account by an adaptation of the concept. (authors)

  10. US nuclear industry perspective on accident management

    The Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC) serves as the United States nuclear power industry's principal mechanism for conveying industry views, concerns, and policies regarding industry wide regulatory issues to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other government agencies as appropriate. NUMARC and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in support of the NUMARC Severe Accident Working Group's (SAWG's) efforts with regard to accident management, has developed a framework for evaluation of plant-specific accident management capabilities. These capabilities fall into one of three main categories: (1) personnel resources (organization, training, communications); (2) systems and equipment (restoration and repair, instrumentation, use of alternatives); and (3) information resources (procedures and guidance, technical information, process information). The purpose of this paper is to describe this framework, its objectives, the five major steps involved and areas to consider further

  11. Effectiveness of selected accident management measures

    The spectrum of application of accident management measures and the boundary conditions for their performance are discussed. An assessment is made of the feasibility and effectiveness of selected possibilities of intervention for both types of light water reactors. Detailed descriptions are given of accident management measures (bleed and feed) on the secondary and on the primary side. Investigations have revealed that West German light water reactors have a great safety potential by flexible applicaton of the existing systems for controlling events which exceed the design basis. (orig./HP)

  12. Severe accident management. Optimized guidelines and strategies

    The highest priority for mitigating the consequences of a severe accident with core melt lies in securing containment integrity, as this represents the last barrier against fission product release to the environment. Containment integrity is endangered by several physical phenomena, especially highly transient phenomena following high-pressure reactor pressure vessel failure (like direct containment heating or steam explosions which can lead to early containment failure), hydrogen combustion, quasi-static over-pressure, temperature failure of penetrations, and basemat penetration by core melt. Each of these challenges can be counteracted by dedicated severe accident mitigation hardware, like dedicated primary circuit depressurization valves, hydrogen recombiners or igniters, filtered containment venting, containment cooling systems, and core melt stabilization systems (if available). However, besides their main safety function these systems often have also secondary effects that need to be considered. Filtered containment venting causes (though limited) fission product release into the environment, primary circuit depressurization leads to loss of coolant, and an ex-vessel core melt stabilization system as well as hydrogen igniters can generate high pressure and temperature loads on the containment. To ensure that during a severe accident any available systems are used to their full beneficial extent while minimizing their potential negative impact, AREVA has implemented a severe accident management for German nuclear power plants. This concept makes use of extensive numerical simulations of the entire plant, quantifying the impact of system activations (operational systems, safety systems, as well as dedicated severe accident systems) on the accident progression for various scenarios. Based on the knowledge gained, a handbook has been developed, allowing the plant operators to understand the current state of the plant (supported by computational aids), to predict

  13. Management of foodstuffs after nuclear accidents

    A model for the management of foodstuffs after nuclear accidents is presented. The model is a synthesis of traditions and principles taken from both radioactive protection and management of food. It is based on cooperation between the Nordic countries and on practical experience gained from the Chernobyl accident. The aim of the model is to produce a basis for common plans for critical situations based on criteria for decision making. In the case of radioactive accidents it is important that the protection of the public and of the society is handled in a positive way. The model concerns production, marketing and consumption of food and beverage. The overall aim is that the radiation doses should be as low and harmless to health for individual members of the public. (CLS) 35 refs

  14. Development of severe accident management advisory and training simulator (SAMAT)

    The most operator support systems including the training simulator have been developed to assist the operator and they cover from normal operation to emergency operation. For the severe accident, the overall architecture for severe accident management is being developed in some developed countries according to the development of severe accident management guidelines which are the skeleton of severe accident management architecture. In Korea, the severe accident management guideline for KSNP was recently developed and it is expected to be a central axis of logical flow for severe accident management. There are a lot of uncertainties in the severe accident phenomena and scenarios and one of the major issues for developing a operator support system for a severe accident is the reduction of these uncertainties. In this paper, the severe accident management advisory system with training simulator, SAMAT, is developed as all available information for a severe accident are re-organized and provided to the management staff in order to reduce the uncertainties. The developed system includes the graphical display for plant and equipment status, the previous research results by knowledge-base technique, and the expected plant behavior using the severe accident training simulator. The plant model used in this paper is oriented to severe accident phenomena and thus can simulate the plant behavior for a severe accident. Therefore, the developed system may make a central role of the information source for decision-making for a severe accident management, and will be used as the training simulator for severe accident management

  15. Chernobyl reactor accident: medical management

    Chernobyl reactor accident on 26th April, 1986 is by far the worst radiation accident in the history of the nuclear industry. Nearly 500 plant personnel and rescue workers received doses varying from 1-16 Gy. Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) was seen only in the plant personnel. 499 individuals were screened for ARS symptoms like nausea, vomitting, diarrhoea and fever. Complete blood examination was done which showed initial granulocytosis followed by granulocytopenia and lymphocytopenia. Cytogenetic examinations were confirmatory in classifying the patients on the basis of the doses received. Two hundred and thirty seven cases of ARS were hospitalised in the first 24-36 hrs. No member of general public suffered from ARS. There were two immediate deaths and subsequently 28 died in hospital and one of the cases died due to myocardial infarction, making a total of 31 deaths. The majority of fatal cases had whole body doses of about 6 Gy, besides extensive skin burns. Two cases of radiation burns had thermal burns also. Treatment of ARS consisted of isolation, barrier nursing, replacement therapy with fluid electrolytes, platelets and RBC transfusions and antibiotic therapy for bacterial, fungal and viral infections. Bone marrow transplantations were given to 13 cases out of which 11 died due to various causes. Radiation burns due to beta, gamma radiations were seen in 56 cases and treated with dressings, surgical excision, skin grafting and amputation. Oropharangeal syndrome, producing extensive mucous in the oropharynx, was first seen in Chernobyl. The patients were treated with saline wash of the mouth. The patients who had radioactive contamination due to radioactive iodine were given stable iodine, following wash with soap, water and monitored. Fourteen survivors died subsequently due to other causes. Late health effects seen so far include excess of thyroid cancer in the children and psychological disorders due to stress. No excess leukemia has been reported so

  16. Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management

    As an early response to the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident, the Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) Bureau decided to focus on the following issues as an initial response of the joint program after having direct communications with the Japanese official participants in April 2011: - Management of high radiation area worker doses: It has been decided to make available the experience and information from the Chernobyl accident in terms of how emergency worker / responder doses were legally and practically managed, - Personal protective equipment for highly-contaminated areas: It was agreed to collect information about the types of personnel protective equipment and other equipment (e.g. air bottles, respirators, air-hoods or plastic suits, etc.), as well as high-radiation area worker dosimetry use (e.g. type, number and placement of dosimetry) for different types of emergency and high-radiation work situations. Detailed information was collected on dose criteria which are used for emergency workers /responders and their basis, dose management criteria for high dose/dose rate areas, protective equipment which is recommended for emergency workers / responders, recommended individual monitoring procedures, and any special requirement for assessment from the ISOE participating nuclear utilities and regulatory authorities and made available for Japanese utilities. With this positive response of the ISOE official participants and interest in the situation in Fukushima, the Expert Group on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management (EG-SAM) was established by the ISOE Management Board in May 2011. The overall objective of the EG-SAM is to contribute to occupational exposure management (providing a view on management of high radiation area worker doses) within the Fukushima plant boundary with the ISOE participants and to develop a state-of-the-art ISOE report on best radiation protection management practices for proper radiation

  17. Severe accidents at nuclear power plants. Their risk assessment and accident management

    This document is to explain the severe accident issues. Severe Accidents are defined as accidents which are far beyond the design basis and result in severe damage of the core. Accidents at Three Mild Island in USA and at Chernobyl in former Soviet Union are examples of severe accidents. The causes and progressions of the accidents as well as the actions taken are described. Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is a method to estimate the risk of severe accidents at nuclear reactors. The methodology for PSA is briefly described and current status on its application to safety related issues is introduced. The acceptability of the risks which inherently accompany every technology is then discussed. Finally, provision of accident management in Japan is introduced, including the description of accident management measures proposed for BWRs and PWRs. (author)

  18. Artificial intelligence applications in accident management

    For nuclear power plant accident management, there are some addition concerns: linking AI systems to live data streams must be mastered; techniques for processing sensor inputs with varying data quality need to be provided; systems responsiveness to changing plant conditions and multiple user requests should, in general, be improved; there is a need for porting applications from specialized AI machines onto conventional computer hardware without incurring unacceptable performance penalties; human factors guidelines are required for new user interfaces in AI applications; methods for verification and validation of AI-based systems must be developed; and, finally, there is a need for proven methods to evaluate use effectiveness and firmly establish the benefits of AI-based accident management systems. (orig./GL)

  19. The expert assistant in accident management

    In the event of a nuclear accident in proximity to an urban area, the consequences resulting from the complex processes of environmental transport of radioactivity would require complex countermeasures. Emphasis has been placed on either modelling the potential effects of such an event on the population, or on attempting to predict the geographical evolution of the release. Less emphasis has been placed on the development of accident management aids with a in-built data acquisition capability. Given the problems of predicting the evolution of an accidental release of activity, more emphasis should be placed on the development of small regional systems specifically engineered to acquire and display environmental data in the most efficaceous form possible. A wealth of information can be obtained from appropriately-sited outstations which can aid those responsible for countermeasures in their decision making processes. The substantial volume of data which would arrive within the duration and during the aftermath of an accident requires skilled interpretation under conditions of considerable stress. It is necessary that a management aid notonly presents these data in a rapidly assimilable form, but is capable of making intelligent decisions of its own, on such matters as information display priority and the polling frequency of outstations. The requirement is for an expert assistant. The XERSES accident management aid has been designed with the foregoing features in mind. Intended for covering regions up to approximately 100 kms square, it links with between 1 and 64 outstations supplying a variety of environmental data. Under quiescent conditions the system will operate unattended, raising alarms remotely only when detecting abnormal conditions. Under emergency conditions, the system automatically adjusts such operating parameters as data acquisition rate

  20. Simulation of severe accident in reactor core for training and accident management

    An Advanced Real-time Severe Accident Simulation (ARTSAS) train reactor operators and accident management teams for scenarios simulating severe accidents in nuclear reactors. The code has been integrated with the real-time tools and the RAINBO graphic package to provide training and analysis tools on workstations as well as on full-scope simulators. (orig.) (4 refs., 1 fig.)

  1. Severe accident management program at Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant

    Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant (GE BWR/6) has implemented its specific Severe Accident Management Program within this year 2000. New organization and guides have been developed to successfully undertake the management of a severe accident. In particular, the Technical Support Center will count on a new ''Severe Accident Management Team'' (SAMT) which will be in charge of the Severe Accident Guides (SAG) when Control Room Crew reaches the Emergency Operation Procedures (EOP) step that requires containment flooding. Specific tools and training have also been developed to help the SAMT to mitigate the accident. (author)

  2. A Methodology for Probabilistic Accident Management

    While techniques have been developed to tackle different tasks in accident management, there have been very few attempts to develop an on-line operator assistance tool for accident management and none that can be found in the literature that uses probabilistic arguments, which are important in today's licensing climate. The state/parameter estimation capability of the dynamic system doctor (DSD) approach is combined with the dynamic event-tree generation capability of the integrated safety assessment (ISA) methodology to address this issue. The DSD uses the cell-to-cell mapping technique for system representation that models the system evolution in terms of probability of transitions in time between sets of user-defined parameter/state variable magnitude intervals (cells) within a user-specified time interval (e.g., data sampling interval). The cell-to-cell transition probabilities are obtained from the given system model. The ISA follows the system dynamics in tree form and braches every time a setpoint for system/operator intervention is exceeded. The combined approach (a) can automatically account for uncertainties in the monitored system state, inputs, and modeling uncertainties through the appropriate choice of the cells, as well as providing a probabilistic measure to rank the likelihood of possible system states in view of these uncertainties; (b) allows flexibility in system representation; (c) yields the lower and upper bounds on the estimated values of state variables/parameters as well as their expected values; and (d) leads to fewer branchings in the dynamic event-tree generation. Using a simple but realistic pressurizer model, the potential use of the DSD-ISA methodology for on-line probabilistic accident management is illustrated

  3. Assessment of candidate accident management strategies

    A set of candidate accident management strategies, whose purpose is to prevent or mitigate in-vessel core damage, were identified from various Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and industry reports. These strategies have been grouped in this report by the challenges they are intended to meet, and assessed to provide information which may be useful to individual licensees for consideration when they perform their Individual Plant Examinations. Each assessment focused on describing and explaining the strategy, considering its relationship to existing requirements and practices as well as identifying possible associated adverse effects. 10 refs

  4. Accident management strategy focusing on the software area

    Tokyo Electric Power Company has already conducted individual plant examination (IPE) and worked out specific accident management strategies. In addition to hardware projects which will be carried out in due order from now on, we have studied the software aspects of accident management, including personnel education and training in relevant subjects. Based on the results of these studies, a decision has been made on the work sharing between the main control room (MCR) and technical support center (TSC) in implementing accident management. We have also decided on a improvement of guidelines and manuals, such as emergency operation procedures (EOP) and accident management guidelines (AMG), and on a basic policy on personnel education and training in accident management. Following this decision, our future efforts will be focused on improving software measures in combination with hardware measures to work out a well-balanced accident management program. (author)

  5. Use of probabilistic safety analyses in severe accident management

    An important consideration in the development and assessment of severe accident management strategies is that while the strategies are often built on the knowledge base of Probabilistic Safety Analyses (PSA), they must be interpretable and meaningful in terms of the control room indicators. In the following, the relationships between PSA and severe accident management are explored using ex-vessel accident management at a PWR ice-condenser plant as an example. 2 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  6. Emergency room management of radiation accidents

    Emergency room management of radioactively contaminated patients who have an associated medical injury requiring immediate attention must be handled with care. Radioactive contamination of the skin of a worker is not a medical emergency and is usually dealt with at the plant. Effective preplanning and on-the-scene triage will allow the seriously injured and contaminated patients to get the medical care they need with a minimum of confusion and interference. Immediate medical and surgical priorities always take precedence over radiation injuries and radioactive contamination. Probably the most difficult aspect of emergency management is the rarity of such accidents and hence the unfamiliarity of the medical staff with the appropriate procedures. The authors discuss how the answer to these problems is preplanning, having a simple and workable procedure and finally having 24-h access to experts

  7. ATHLET validation using accident management experiments

    The computer code ATHLET is being developed as an advanced best-estimate code for the simulation of leaks and transients in PWRs and BWRs including beyond design basis accidents. The code has features that are of special interest for applications to small leaks and transients with accident management, e.g. initialisation by a steady-state calculation, full-range drift-flux model, and dynamic mixture level tracking. The General Control Simulation Module of ATHLET is a flexible tool for the simulation of the balance-of-plant and control systems including the various operator actions in the course of accident sequences with AM measures. The systematic validation of ATHLET is based on a well balanced set of integral and separate effect tests derived from the CSNI proposal emphasising, however, the German combined ECC injection system which was investigated in the UPTF, PKL and LOBI test facilities. PKL-III test B 2.1 simulates a cool-down procedure during an emergency power case with three steam generators isolated. Natural circulation under these conditions was investigated in detail in a pressure range of 4 to 2 MPa. The transient was calculated over 22000 s with complicated boundary conditions including manual control actions. The calculations demonstrations the capability to model the following processes successfully: (1) variation of the natural circulation caused by steam generator isolation, (2) vapour formation in the U-tubes of the isolated steam generators, (3) break-down of circulation in the loop containing the isolated steam generator following controlled cool-down of the secondary side, (4) accumulation of vapour in the pressure vessel dome. One conclusion with respect to the suitability of experiments simulating AM procedures for code validation purposes is that complete documentation of control actions during the experiment must be available. Special attention should be given to the documentation of operator actions in the course of the experiment

  8. Assessment of light water reactor accident management programs and experience

    The objective of this report is to provide an assessment of the current light water reactor experience regarding accident management programs and associated technology developments. This assessment for light water reactor (LWR) designs is provided as a resource and reference for the development of accident management capabilities for the production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The specific objectives of this assessment are as follows: 1. Perform a review of the NRC, utility, and industry (NUMARC, EPRI) accident management programs and implementation experience. 2. Provide an assessment of the problems and opportunities in developing an accident management program in conjunction or following the Individual Plant Examination process. 3. Review current NRC, utility, and industry technological developments in the areas of computational tools, severe accident predictive tools, diagnostic aids, and severe accident training and simulation

  9. Assessment of light water reactor accident management programs and experience

    Hammersley, R.J. [Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (United States)

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an assessment of the current light water reactor experience regarding accident management programs and associated technology developments. This assessment for light water reactor (LWR) designs is provided as a resource and reference for the development of accident management capabilities for the production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The specific objectives of this assessment are as follows: 1. Perform a review of the NRC, utility, and industry (NUMARC, EPRI) accident management programs and implementation experience. 2. Provide an assessment of the problems and opportunities in developing an accident management program in conjunction or following the Individual Plant Examination process. 3. Review current NRC, utility, and industry technological developments in the areas of computational tools, severe accident predictive tools, diagnostic aids, and severe accident training and simulation.

  10. Verification of accident management strategies at the Forsmark plant

    Due to government requirements severe accident mitigating measures were implemented at the Swedish State Power Board nuclear power plants in 1988. These measures included protection against early containment impairment, highly redundant containment spray and filtered venting of the containment. We also developed accident management strategies and corresponding documents to counteract a severe accident situation. This paper describes the accident management strategies and documents at the Forsmark nuclear power plant, the verification process of the basic approach, and our ongoing program for further development and verification of the accident management program. In summary: From the beginning it was emphasized that it was not only mitigating measures implemented, it was an accident mitigation program, including new EOP's and education and training. This program was implemented, as required by the Swedish government in the end of 1988. Since that time the accident management strategy has been validated, verified and further developed. As a general conclusion, the implemented accident management program has reached a fair degree of completeness at the Forsmark plant. It is expected that in the case a hypothetical accident would occur the envisaged strategy would handle the accident in such a way that the radiological consequences would be insignificant and radiation exposure to the personnel would be within ICRP recommendations. To reach and keep this goal it is imperative that a mental preparedness is always present. This is achieved with a continuous education, training and analyses

  11. A Methodology for Evaluating Severe Accident Management Strategies

    Severe accidents are defined as those which entail at least an initial core damage, in many cases specified as the overcoming of the regulatory fuel. After Fukushima accident, the effectiveness of the severe accident management strategy has been attracted worldwide. There is a typical example of severe accident management strategy like Severe Accident Management and Guideline (SAMG). Unfortunately, suitable method for evaluating the accident management strategy is absence until now. In this study, the evaluation methodology which utilizes the decision tree is developed to evaluate the severe accident management strategies. In addition, we applied the developed methodology to ShinKori nuclear power plant Unit 3, 4 and modeled decision tree for evaluation. In this study, we developed a methodology to evaluate the severe accident management strategy by using decision tree. In addition, the evaluation was carried out by selecting the cavity flooding strategy. Shinkori unit 3, 4 which is APR1400 is selected and analyzed for reference plant. In order to evaluation, decision tree for cavity flooding is modeled. With reliability data, quantification will be conducted. The utility of other severe accident management strategies can be evaluated with proposed methodology in this study. Finally, it is expected that this methodology improves the safety of nuclear power plant

  12. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    Candidate mitigative strategies for the management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after-core degradation has occurred) of postulated boiling water reactor (BWR) severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities, and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for further assessment. The first was a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertained to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose was to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies were performed during 1991 and this paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies, and the potential for their success. ((orig.))

  13. Using MARS to assist in managing a severe accident

    During an accident, information about the current and possible future states of the plant provides guidance for accident managers in evaluating which actions should be taken. However, depending upon the nature of the accident and the stress levels imposed on the plant staff responding to the accident the current and future plant assessments may be very difficult or nearly impossible to perform without supplemental training and/or appropriate tools. The MAAP Accident Response System (MARS) has been developed as a calculational aid to assist the responsible accident management individuals. Specifically MARS provides additional insights on the current and possible future states of the plant during an accident including the influence of operator actions. In addition to serving as a calculational aid, the MARS software can be an effective means for providing supplemental training. The MARS software uses engineering calculations to perform an integral assessment of the plant status including a consistency assessment of the available instrumentation. In addition, it uses the Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) to provide near term predictions of the plant response if corrective actions are taken. This paper will discuss the types of information that are beneficial to the accident manager and how MARS addresses each. The MARS calculational functions include: instrumentation, validation and simulation, projected operator response based on the EOPs, as well as estimated timing and magnitude of in-plant and off-site radiation dose releases. Each of these items is influential in the management of a severe accident. (author)

  14. A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed

  15. A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies

    Kastenberg, W.E. [ed.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering] [and others

    1993-09-01

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed.

  16. Application of PCTRAN-3/U to studying accident management during PWR severe accident

    In order to improve the safety of nuclear power plant, operator action should be taken into account during a severe accident. While it takes a long time to simulate the plant transient behavior under a severe accident in comparison with the design based accident, a transient simulator should have both high speed calculation capability and interactive functions to model the operating procedures. PCTRAN has been developing to be a simple simulator by using a personal computer to simulate plant behavior under an accident condition. While currently available means usually take relatively long time to simulate plant behavior, using a current high-powered personal computer (PC), PCTRAN-3/U code is designed to operate at a speed significantly faster than real-time. The author describes some results of PCTRAN application in studying the efficiency of accident management for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) during an severe accident

  17. Emergency medical management of radiation accident. Lessons learned from the JCO criticality accident

    A criticality accident occurred at the JCO nuclear fuel processing plant in Tokai-mura, Japan at 10:35 am on September 30, 1999. Three workers while working nearby were exposed to high doses of radiation, especially rich in neutron. They suffered from the acute radiation syndrome and two of them were still under medical treatment. This criticality accident taught us significant lessons of radiation protection for the personnels, e.g. physicians, nurses and firemen who are expected to rescue radiation-exposed patients in radiation accidents. In this article, medical management of radiation accident, e.g. treatment of patient, with high-dosed radiation-exposure and with internal contamination of radioactive nuclides and estimation of individual radiation dose, were briefly explained. The Japanese Association for Medical Management of Radiation Accident was founded on August 29, 1997, in order to promote the mutual communication of physicians who have to be engaged in treatment of radiation-exposed patients. (author)

  18. Strategy generator in computerized accident management support system

    An increased interest for research in the field of accident management of nuclear power plants can be noted. Several international programmes have been started in order to be able to understand the basic physical and chemical phenomena in accident conditions. A feasibility study has shown that it would be possible to design and develop a computerized support system for plant staff in accident situations. To achieve this goal the Halden Project has initiated a research programme on Computerized Accident Management Support (CAMS project). The aim is to utilize the capabilities of computerized tools to support the plant staff during the various accident stages. The system will include identification of the accident state, assessment of the future development of the accident and planning of accident mitigation strategies. A prototype is developed to support operators and the Technical Support Centre in decision making during serious accidents in nuclear power plants. A rule based system has been built to take care of the strategy generation. This system assists plant personnel in planning control proposals and mitigation strategies from normal operation to severe accident conditions. The idea of a safety objective tree and knowledge from the emergency procedures have been used. Future prediction requires good state identification of the plant status and some knowledge about the history of some critical variables. The information needs to be validated as well. Accurate calculations in simulators and a large database including all important information from the plant will help the strategy planning. (orig.). (40 refs., 20 figs.)

  19. The management of individuals involved in radiation accidents

    The author defines the objectives and the coverage of two radiation accident courses presented in 1990 by the US Radiation Emergency Assistance Centre and Training Site of the Oak Ridge Associated Universities together with some Australian Medical institutions. It is estimated that the courses, directed towards physicians, radiotherapists and nurses gave plenty practical advices and details on how to go about radiation accident managements. A manual on handling radiation accidents is also to be prepared after the courses

  20. Systematic Review of Accident Management Programs - Principles, Experiences

    Although all plants have some form of accident management, there is not always a proper review of the accident management program neither of its products, i.e. the various procedures and guidelines. Moreover, such reviews are often limited to Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) and Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMG). More complex events, which include large damage on the site, require additional tools and procedures / guidelines. The present paper describes a new review method that covers this larger area and is capable to identify problems and shortcomings, and offers solutions for those. It basically exists of a three-tier approach: 1. interviews with the national regulator and/or the plant to evaluate the scope of the accident management as required by the national regulation and in comparison with international regulation; 2. interviews with the plant staff to discuss the technical basis of the accident management program and its implementation; and 3. observation of an exercise to test the capability of the plant staff to execute the accident management procedures and guidelines, as well as the value of the exercise for such test. The method is an extension of the IAEA 'Review of Accident Management Program which is limited to review of EOPs and SAMG. It is based on extensive experience with plant reviews. (authors)

  1. Preliminary severe accident management strategies for Wolsong nuclear power plants

    Severe accident management strategies for Wolsong 2,3,4 Nuclear Power Plants are presented. The defense in depth concept, which limits release of radioactive materials out of containment building, is applied to develop these strategies. These strategies are actions to prevent or to mitigate core damage, rupture of calandria vessel, rupture of calandria vault, rupture of containment building, and release of radioactive materials. These strategies are deduced from the results of level 2 PSA for Wolsong NPPs. These preliminary results will be assessed further and proved to be effective to Wolsong Plants. Then these severe accident management strategies can be used to develop severe accident management program for Wolsong NPPs

  2. On preparation for accident management in LWR power stations

    Nuclear Safety Commission received the report from Reactor Safety General Examination Committee which investigated the policy of executing the preparation for accident management. The basic policy on the preparation for accident management was decided by Nuclear Safety Commission in May, 1992. This Examination Committee investigated the policy of executing the preparation for accident management, which had been reported from the administrative office, and as the result, it judged the policy as adequate, therefore, the report is made. The course to the foundation of subcommittee is reported. The basic policy of the examination on accident management by the subcommittee conforming to the decision by Nuclear Safety Commission, the measures of accident management which were extracted for BWR and PWR facilities, the examination of the technical adequacy of selecting accident sequences in BWR and PWR facilities and the countermeasures to them, the adequacy of the evaluation of the possibility of executing accident management measures and their effectiveness and the adequacy of the evaluation of effect to existing safety functions, the preparation of operation procedure manual, and education and training plan are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Summary of a workshop on severe accident management for BWRs

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or alternative resources, systems and actions to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of strategies there may be several options available to the operator; and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrument behavior during an accident. During the period September 26--28, 1990, a workshop was held at the University of California, Los Angeles, to address these uncertainties for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). This report contains a summary of the workshop proceedings

  4. Investigation of accident management strategies for VVER-1000-Type reactors

    The goal of this work is the search for an optimal accident management strategy to prevent containment failure and to stop the core/concrete interaction from hindering cavity bottom melt-through on the one hand and from ending the ex-vessel source term increase on the other hand, i.e., to terminate the accident. The work is based on the results of previous studies of physical and chemical phenomena during different accident scenarios for VVER-1000-type reactors. For a TMLB' sequence (an accident caused by a transient in which core melt occurs because the electric power cannot be restored before the pressure vessel melts through), a number of calculations were performed using the source term code package (STCP) to investigate the influence of several accident management measures on the core/concrete interaction and the containment integrity

  5. Applying Functional Modeling for Accident Management of Nuclear Power Plant

    Lind, Morten; Zhang, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    The paper investigate applications of functional modeling for accident management in complex industrial plant with special reference to nuclear power production. Main applications for information sharing among decision makers and decision support are identified. An overview of Multilevel Flow...

  6. Applying Functional Modeling for Accident Management of Nucler Power Plant

    Lind, Morten; Zhang, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    The paper investigates applications of functional modeling for accident management in complex industrial plant with special reference to nuclear power production. Main applications for information sharing among decision makers and decision support are identified. An overview of Multilevel Flow...

  7. Development of Krsko Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG)

    In this lecture development of severe accident management guidances for Krsko NPP are described. Author deals with the history of severe accident management and implementation of issues (validation, review of E-plan and other aspects SAMG implementation guidance). Methods of Westinghouse owners group, of Combustion Engineering owners group, of Babcock and Wilcox owners group, of the BWR owners group, as well as application of US SAMG methodology in Europe and elsewhere are reviewed

  8. Traffic Accident Prediction Model Implementation in Traffic Safety Management

    Wen, Keyao

    2009-01-01

    As one of the highest fatalities causes, traffic accidents and collisions always requires a large amounteffort to be reduced or prevented from occur. Traffic safety management routines therefore always needefficient and effective implementation due to the variations of traffic, especially from trafficengineering point of view apart from driver education.Traffic Accident Prediction Model, considered as one of the handy tool of traffic safety management,has become of well followed with interest...

  9. Severe Accident Management Strategy for EU-APR1400

    In EU-APR1400, the dedicated instrumentation and mitigation features for SAM are being developed to keep the integrity of containment and to prevent the uncontrolled release of fission products. In this paper, SAM strategy for EU-APR1400 was introduced in stages. It is still under development and finally the Severe Accident Management Guidance will be completed based on this SAM Strategy. Severe accidents in a nuclear power plant are defined as certain unlikely event sequences involving significant core damage with the potential to lead to significant releases according to EUR 2.1.4.4. Even though the probability of severe accidents is extremely low, the radiation release may cause serious effect on people as well as environment. Severe Accident Management (SAM) encompasses those actions which could be considered in recovering from a severe accident and preventing or mitigating the release of fission products to the environment. Whether those actions are successful or not, depending on a progression status of a severe accident to mitigate the consequences of severe accident phenomena to limit the release of radioactive materials keeping the leak tightness of the Primary Containment, and finally to restore transient severe accident progression into a controlled and safe states

  10. Regulatory perspective on accident management issues

    Effective response to reactor accidents requires a combination of emergency operations, technical support and emergency response. The NRC and industry have actively pursued programs to assure the adequacy of emergency operations and emergency response. These programs will continue to receive high priority. By contrast, the technical support function has received relatively little attention from NRC and the industry. The results from numerous PRA studies and the severe accident programs of NRC and the industry have yielded a wealth of insights on prevention and mitigation of severe accidents. The NRC intends to work with the industry to make these insights available to the technical support staffs through a combination of guidance, training and periodic drills

  11. Accident Management Issues within the ARTIST Project

    An experimental project to be performed in the ARTIST (AeRosol Trapping In a Steam generaTor ) facility is planned at the Paul Scherrer Institut to address aerosol retention in the various parts of the steam generator (SG) following a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) event. The project will study phenomena at the separate effect and integral levels, and also address accident management (AM) issues. Seven distinct phases are foreseen: 1) Aerosol retention in the tube under dry secondary side conditions, 2) Aerosol retention in the near field close to break under dry conditions, 3) Aerosol retention in the bundle far field under dry conditions, 4) Aerosol retention in the separator and dryer under dry conditions, 5) Aerosol retention in the bundle section under wet conditions, 6) Droplet retention in separator and dryer sections and 7) Integral tests to examine overall retention. The prescribed values of the controlling parameters (aerosol size, aerosol type, gas flow velocity, residence time, etc) cover the range expected in severe accident scenarios. The ARTIST facility is well suited to study phenomena relating to AM. Refilling of the SG might be adopted as an AM measure during an accident in which the SG has dried out. For instance, water injection will establish a pool where the incoming aerosols can be scrubbed to various degrees depending on the aerosol characteristics, water depth and subcooling and steam content in the carrier gas flow. Aerosols are expected to be removed mainly through inertial impaction and diffusiophoresis (condensation) in the vicinity of the break. Away from the break, the remaining gas breaks up in smaller bubbles which rise in the pool, and periodically squirt out through the narrow constrictions of the support plates. In this latter phase, aerosol removal is mainly due to inertial mechanisms. There are many questions that need to be resolved before deciding on the efficacy of flooding the secondary side of a dry SG. These include

  12. Passive depressurization accident management strategy for boiling water reactors

    Highlights: • We proposed two passive depressurization systems for BWR severe accident management. • Sensitivity analysis of the passive depressurization systems with different leakage area. • Passive depressurization strategies can prevent direct containment heating. - Abstract: According to the current severe accident management guidance, operators are required to depressurize the reactor coolant system to prevent or mitigate the effects of direct containment heating using the safety/relief valves. During the course of a severe accident, the pressure boundary might fail prematurely, resulting in a rapid depressurization of the reactor cooling system before the startup of SRV operation. In this study, we demonstrated that a passive depressurization system could be used as a severe accident management tool under the severe accident conditions to depressurize the reactor coolant system and to prevent an additional devastating sequence of events and direct containment heating. The sensitivity analysis performed with SAMPSON code also demonstrated that the passive depressurization system with an optimized leakage area and failure condition is more efficient in managing a severe accident

  13. The computer aided education and training system for accident management

    Under severe accident conditions of a nuclear power plant, plant operators and technical support center (TSC) staffs will be under a amount of stress. Therefore, those individuals responsible for managing the plant should promote their understanding about the accident management and operations. Moreover, it is also important to train in ordinary times, so that they can carry out accident management operations effectively on severe accidents. Therefore, the education and training system which works on personal computers was developed by Japanese BWR group (Tokyo Electric Power Co.,Inc., Tohoku Electric Power Co. ,Inc., Chubu Electric Power Co. ,Inc., Hokuriku Electric Power Co.,Inc., Chugoku Electric Power Co.,Inc., Japan Atomic Power Co.,Inc.), and Hitachi, Ltd. The education and training system is composed of two systems. One is computer aided instruction (CAI) education system and the other is education and training system with a computer simulation. Both systems are designed to execute on MS-Windows(R) platform of personal computers. These systems provide plant operators and technical support center staffs with an effective education and training tool for accident management. TEPCO used the simulation system for the emergency exercise assuming the occurrence of hypothetical severe accident, and have performed an effective exercise in March, 2000. (author)

  14. The DOE technology development programme on severe accident management

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a programme in technology development aimed at resolving the technical issues in severe accident management strategies for advanced and evolutionary light water reactors (LWRs). The key objective of this effort is to achieve a robust defense-in-depth at the interface between prevention and mitigation of severe accidents. The approach taken towards this goal is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM). Applications of ROAAM to the severe accident management strategy for the US AP600 advanced LWR have been effective both in enhancing the design and in achieving acceptance of the conclusions and base technology developed in the course of the work. This paper presents an overview of that effort and its key technical elements

  15. Fundamentals for reviewing accident managements of reprocessing facilities

    The accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station insisted a necessity of reconsideration of the defence in depth concept against events exceeding design basis. The insistence suggested a need of practical guidance for reviewing accident management measures for such events. Soon after the accident, Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) started a preliminary study on the points to be considered in reviewing comprehensiveness and consistency of accident management measures for reprocessing facilities. The results of PSA studies which have been pursued at JNES contributed significantly to the preliminary study, because the contents of the PSA studies have a close relation with subjects to be considered in the review. Based on the insight the paper focuses on such relation and discusses fundamentals for the review in terms of the knowledge derived from the PSA and specific features of reprocessing facilities. The result of the study is also described with touching relations to the fundamentals. (author)

  16. Reconstruction of the Chernobyl emergency and accident management

    Full text of publication follows: on April 26, 1986 the most serious civil technological accident in the history of mankind occurred of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) in the former Soviet Union. As a direct result of the accident, the reactor was severely destroyed and large quantities of radionuclides were released. Some 800000 persons, also called 'liquidators' - including plant operators, fire-fighters, scientists, technicians, construction workers, emergency managers, volunteers, as well as medical and military personnel - were part of emergency measurements and accident management efforts. Activities included measures to prevent the escalation of the accident, mitigation actions, help for victims as well as activities in order to provide a basic infrastructure for this unprecedented and overwhelming task. The overall goal of the 'Project Chernobyl' of the Institute of Risk Research of the University of Vienna was to preserve for mankind the experience and knowledge of the experts among the 'liquidators' before it is lost forever. One method used to reconstruct the emergency measures of Chernobyl was the direct cooperation with liquidators. Simple questionnaires were distributed among liquidators and a database of leading accident managers, engineers, medical experts etc. was established. During an initial struggle with a number of difficulties, the response was sparse. However, after an official permit had been issued, the questionnaires delivered a wealth of data. Furthermore a documentary archive was established, which provided additional information. The multidimensional problem in connection with the severe accident of Chernobyl, the clarification of the causes of the accident, as well as failures and successes and lessons to be learned from the Chernobyl emergency measures and accident management are discussed. (authors)

  17. Validation of severe accident management guidance for the wolsong plants

    Full text: Full text: The severe accident management(SAM) guidance has been developed for the Wolsong nuclear power plants in Korea. The Wolsong plants are 700MWe CANDU-type reactors with heavy water as the primary coolant, natural uranium-fueled pressurized, horizontal tubes, surrounded by heavy water moderator inside a horizontal calandria vessel. The guidance includes six individual accident management strategies: (1) injection into primary heat transport system (2) injection into calandria vessel (3) injection into calandria vault (4) reduction of fission product release (5) control of reactor building condition (6) reduction of reactor building hydrogen. The paper provides the approaches to validate the SAM guidance. The validation includes the evaluation of:(l) effectiveness of accident management strategies, (2) performance of mitigation systems or components, (3) calculation aids, (4) strategy control diagram, and (5) interface with emergency operation procedure and with radiation emergency plan. Several severe accident sequences with high probability is selected from the plant specific level 2 probabilistic safety analysis results for the validation of SAM guidance. Afterward, thermal hydraulic and severe accident phenomenological analyses is performed using ISAAC(Integrated Severe Accident Analysis Code for CANDU Plant) computer program. Furthermore, the experiences obtained from a table-top-drill is also discussed

  18. Severe Accident Management Measures Introduced in Belgian NPP's

    In response to the Belgian Safety Authorities' request to address the severe accident issue within a decennial safety review, Tractebel, on behalf of the Belgian Utility, Electrabel, examined in detail specific severe accident topics and provided the Utility with several measures that could be implemented to reduce the risk associated with beyond-design accidents. The present paper summarizes the key elements of the approach applied in Belgium: - Presentation of plant-specific studies related to severe accident issues; - Use of PSA results; - Inputs of international R and D projects; - Selection and justification of severe accident measures; - Comparative study between possible mitigative measures; - Definition and justification of implemented severe accident management strategies. The vulnerability to severe accidents as well as the potential causes of containment failures have been identified leading to the study of possible countermeasures taking into account the combination of conservative design and post-TMI measures already implemented . A section of the paper will also be devoted to the specific study made for the selection, the sizing and the implementation of hydrogen control means. After the description of the selected measures implemented, the paper also describes the content of the 'Severe Accident Management Guidelines' developed by Tractebel for the Tihange NPPs and for the Doel NPPs. This project aimed at providing the operators with procedures or guidelines enabling to deal with complex situations not formally considered in the standard Emergency Response Guidelines, including accidents in which a significant portion of the core melts. The objective of these SAMG's programs is to indicate actions that must bring the plant to a controlled stable state and, above all, mitigate any challenges to the fission product barriers. The plant personnel must use the available plant information to determine the best severe accident management measures. Obviously

  19. Recent Developments in Level 2 PSA and Severe Accident Management

    In 1997, CSNI WGRISK produced a report on the state of the art in Level 2 PSA and severe accident management - NEA/CSNI/R(1997)11. Since then, there have been significant developments in that more Level 2 PSAs have been carried out worldwide for a variety of nuclear power plant designs including some that were not addressed in the original report. In addition, there is now a better understanding of the severe accident phenomena that can occur following core damage and the way that they should be modelled in the PSA. As requested by CSNI in December 2005, the objective of this study was to produce a report that updates the original report and gives an account of the developments that have taken place since 1997. The aim has been to capture the most significant new developments that have occurred rather than to provide a full update of the original report, most of which is still valid. This report is organised using the same structure as the original report as follows: Chapter 2: Summary on state of application, results and insights from recent Level 2 PSAs. Chapter 3: Discussion on key severe accident phenomena and modelling issues, identification of severe accident issues that should be treated in Level 2 PSAs for accident management applications, review of severe accident computer codes and the use of these codes in Level 2 PSAs. Chapter 4: Review of approaches and practices for accident management and SAM, evaluation of actions in Level 2 PSAs. Chapter 5: Review of available Level 2 PSA methodologies, including accident progression event tree / containment event tree development. Chapter 6: Aspects important to quantification, including the use of expert judgement and treatment of uncertainties. Chapter 7: Examples of the use of the results and insights from the Level 2 PSA in the context of an integrated (risk informed) decision making process

  20. Severe Accident Management System On-line Network SAMSON

    SAMSON is a computational tool used by accident managers in the Technical Support Centers (TSC) and Emergency Operations Facilities (EOF) in the event of a nuclear power plant accident. SAMSON examines over 150 status points monitored by nuclear power plant process computers during a severe accident and makes predictions about when core damage, support plate failure, and reactor vessel failure will occur. These predictions are based on the current state of the plant assuming that all safety equipment not already operating will fail. SAMSON uses expert systems, as well as neural networks trained with the back propagation learning algorithms to make predictions. Training on data from an accident analysis code (MAAP - Modular Accident Analysis Program) allows SAMSON to associate different states in the plant with different times to critical failures. The accidents currently recognized by SAMSON include steam generator tube ruptures (SGTRs), with breaks ranging from one tube to eight tubes, and loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs), with breaks ranging from 0.0014 square feet (1.30 cm2) in size to breaks 3.0 square feet in size (2800 cm2). (author)

  1. Development of Parameter Network for Accident Management Applications

    When a severe accident happens, it is hard to obtain the necessary information to understand of internal status because of the failure or damage of instrumentation and control systems. We learned the lessons from Fukushima accident that internal instrumentation system should be secured and must have ability to react in serious conditions. While there might be a number of methods to reinforce the integrity of instrumentation systems, we focused on the use of redundant behavior of plant parameters without additional hardware installation. Specifically, the objective of this study is to estimate the replaced value which is able to identify internal status by using set of available signals when it is impossible to use instrumentation information in a severe accident, which is the continuation of the paper which was submitted at the last KNS meeting. The concept of the VPN was suggested to improve the quality of parameters particularly to be logged during severe accidents in NPPs using a software based approach, and quantize the importance of each parameter for further maintenance. In the future, we will continue to perform the same analysis to other accident scenarios and extend the spectrum of initial conditions so that we are able to get more sets of VPNs and ANN models to predict the behavior of accident scenarios. The suggested method has the uncertainty underlain in the analysis code for severe accidents. However, In case of failure to the safety critical instrumentation, the information from the VPN would be available to carry out safety management operation

  2. Development of Parameter Network for Accident Management Applications

    Pak, Sukyoung; Ahemd, Rizwan; Heo, Gyunyoung [Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Taek; Park, Soo Yong; Ahn, Kwang Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    When a severe accident happens, it is hard to obtain the necessary information to understand of internal status because of the failure or damage of instrumentation and control systems. We learned the lessons from Fukushima accident that internal instrumentation system should be secured and must have ability to react in serious conditions. While there might be a number of methods to reinforce the integrity of instrumentation systems, we focused on the use of redundant behavior of plant parameters without additional hardware installation. Specifically, the objective of this study is to estimate the replaced value which is able to identify internal status by using set of available signals when it is impossible to use instrumentation information in a severe accident, which is the continuation of the paper which was submitted at the last KNS meeting. The concept of the VPN was suggested to improve the quality of parameters particularly to be logged during severe accidents in NPPs using a software based approach, and quantize the importance of each parameter for further maintenance. In the future, we will continue to perform the same analysis to other accident scenarios and extend the spectrum of initial conditions so that we are able to get more sets of VPNs and ANN models to predict the behavior of accident scenarios. The suggested method has the uncertainty underlain in the analysis code for severe accidents. However, In case of failure to the safety critical instrumentation, the information from the VPN would be available to carry out safety management operation.

  3. Unconventional sources of plant information for accident management

    Oehlberg, R.; Machiels, A.; Chao, J.; Weiss, J. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)); True, D.; James, R. (ERIN Engineering and Research, Walnut Creek, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    One phase of accident management covers the actions taken during the course of an accident by the plant operating and technical staff to prevent or minimize off-site radiation releases, gain control, and return the plant to a safe state. Inherent in accomplishing these goals is obtaining a clear picture of the nature of the accident and plant status. Development of a consistent and coherent understanding of the accident and plant status requires plant staff to evaluate and interpret data from a wide range of sources. Plant information during an accident can be obtained from the following sources: (1) plant instrumentation, including Regulatory Guide 1.97 instrumentation; and (2) information sources identified in abnormal operations or emergency operations procedures. Probabilistic risk analyses have shown that events involving the loss of key electrical support systems can be significant contributors to core damage. Such events could jeopardize or degrade instrument availability. Plant-specific accident procedures and interpretation of instruments intended for design-basis events may not be applicable in severe accidents. Information sources such as other nuclear steam supply systems (NSSSs) and balance-of-plant (BOP) instrumentation may be available.

  4. A Survey of Implementation of Severe Accident Management in Sweden

    A comprehensive program for severe accident mitigation was completed for all Swedish reactors by the end of 1988. This work included development of new accident management procedures and also training programmes for operators . As a complement to the EOP's, knowledge based handbooks have been written for the reactors in Forsmark and Ringhals. They are intended for the emergency control centre in a late stage of a severe accident, when the procedures in the control room no longer are applicable. In a separate project, the impact from certain actions in a short perspective on the long term scenario has been investigated. Results from that work have been used in the development of knowledge based handbooks as decision support for the emergency control centre. For the PWR's in Ringhals the earlier procedures have been replaced by SAMG from WOG (Westinghouse Owners Group) in a project run by a team in Ringhals with support from Westinghouse. In the ongoing APRI-project (a cooperative effort between the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, the Swedish power utilities and TVO in Finland), accident management has been addressed in a sub-project with focus on validation of SAM strategies and use of results from the research on severe accidents to improve the SAM strategies. An important part of the program for severe accident mitigation was the development of accident management strategies. This work was documented in EOP's and other documentation to be used by the emergency organisation in case of an accident. Personnel at the utilities took an active part in the work mentioned above and also in later improvements such as the FR1PP project and in the development of handbooks for the emergency control centres in Forsmark and Ringhals. Generally, active participation of the end users in the development of documentation for severe accident management has clear advantages. One is that the staff at the plant will have a better insight in the work. To a certain extent the

  5. Seabrook Station Level 2 PRA Update to Include Accident Management

    A ground-breaking study was recently completed as part of the Seabrook Level 2 PRA update. This study updates the post-core damage phenomena to be consistent with the most recent information and includes accident management activities that should be modeled in the Level 2 PRA. Overall, the result is a Level 2 PRA that fully meets the requirements of the ASME PRA Standard with respect to modeling accident management in the LERF assessment and NRC requirements in Regulatory Guide 1.174 for considering late containment failures. This technical paper deals only with the incorporation of operator actions into the Level 2 PRA based on a comprehensive study of the Seabrook Station accident response procedures and guidance. The paper describes the process used to identify the key operator actions that can influence the Level 2 PRA results and the development of success criteria for these key operator actions. This addresses a key requirement of the ASME PRA Standard for considering SAMG. An important benefit of this assessment was the identification of Seabrook specific accident management insights that can be fed back into the Seabrook Station accident management procedures and guidance or the training provided to plant personnel for these procedures and guidance. (authors)

  6. A framework for assessing severe accident management strategies

    Accident management can be defined as the innovative use of existing and or alternative resources, systems and actions to prevent or mitigate a severe accident. Together with risk management (changes in plant operation and/or addition of equipment) and emergency planning (off-site actions), accident management provides an extension of the defense-in-depth safety philosophy for severe accidents. A significant number of probabilistic safety assessments (PSA) have been completed which yield the principal plant vulnerabilities. For each sequence/threat and each combination of strategy there may be several options available to the operator. Each strategy/option involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. These considerations include uncertainty in key phenomena, uncertainty in operator behavior, uncertainty in system availability and behavior, and uncertainty in available information (i.e., instrumentation). The objective of this project is to develop a methodology for assessing severe accident management strategies given the key uncertainties mentioned above. Based on Decision Trees and Influence Diagrams, the methodology is currently being applied to two case studies: cavity flooding in a PWR to prevent vessel penetration or failure, and drywell flooding in a BWR to prevent containment failure

  7. Managing major chemical accidents in China: Towards effective risk information

    Chemical industries, from their very inception, have been controversial due to the high risks they impose on safety of human beings and the environment. Recent decades have witnessed increasing impacts of the accelerating expansion of chemical industries and chemical accidents have become a major contributor to environmental and health risks in China. This calls for the establishment of an effective chemical risk management system, which requires reliable, accurate and comprehensive data in the first place. However, the current chemical accident-related data system is highly fragmented and incomplete, as different responsible authorities adopt different data collection standards and procedures for different purposes. In building a more comprehensive, integrated and effective information system, this article: (i) reviews and assesses the existing data sources and data management, (ii) analyzes data on 976 recorded major hazardous chemical accidents in China over the last 40 years, and (iii) identifies the improvements required for developing integrated risk management in China.

  8. U.S. nuclear industry perspective on accident management

    The Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC) serves as the United States nuclear power industry's principal mechanism for conveying industry views, concerns, and policies regarding industry wide regulatory issues to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other government agencies as appropriate. NUMARC and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in support of the NUMARC Severe Accident Working Group's (SAWG's) efforts with regard to accident management, has developed a framework for evaluation of plant-specific accident management capabilities. These capabilities fall into one of three main categories: (1) personnel resources (organization, training, communications); (2) systems and equipment (restoration and repair, instrumentation, use of alternatives); and (3) information resources (procedures and guidance, technical information, process information). The purpose of this paper is to describe this framework, its objectives, the five major steps involved and areas to consider further. (orig.)

  9. Applying Functional Modeling for Accident Management of Nuclear Power Plant

    The paper investigate applications of functional modeling for accident management in complex industrial plant with special reference to nuclear power production. Main applications for information sharing among decision makers and decision support are identified. An overview of Multilevel Flow Modeling is given and a detailed presentation of the foundational means-end concepts is presented and the conditions for proper use in modelling accidents are identified. It is shown that Multilevel Flow Modeling can be used for modelling and reasoning about design basis accidents. Its possible role for information sharing and decision support in accidents beyond design basis is also indicated. A modelling example demonstrating the application of Multilevel Flow Modelling and reasoning for a PWR LOCA is presented

  10. Concern on accident management for the Korea next generation reactor

    The Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) is under development to be built after year 2000 in Korea. To enhance its capability of preventing and/or mitigating severe accidents, various safety features are incorporated in its design. Some of them are designed against severe accidents and can be operated based on accident management program (AMP) for the KNGR. In this study, the potential capability of the Safety Depressurization System (SDS) and the Shutdown Cooling System (SCS) to mitigate the consequence of severe accidents was examined by using the MAAP 4.02 code as a preliminary step of the AMP development for the KNGR. The concerned accident sequences are small break loss of coolant accidents (SB LOCAs) with a failure of high pressure safety injection system (HPSIS) and a total loss of feedwater (TLOFW). In the level 1 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of the KNGR, the operation of the SDS and SCS was not considered because the failures of the HPSIS and the aggressive secondary side cooling result in core damage based on the success criteria of the level 1 PSA. The analysis results show that the SDS can depressurize the RCS below the shutoff head of the shutdown cooling system (SCS) prior to reactor vessel failure. Although core uncovery and core damage occur early due to the opening of the SDS valves, the MAAP calculation results show that the SCS can reflood the damaged core and that core damage and reactor vessel failure can be mitigated or prevented by the feed-and-bleed operation with those systems. From the analysis results, therefore, it seems that the operation of the SDS and SCS can provide a means of mitigating accident consequences and can be employed as an effective accident management strategy for the KNGR. 5 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  11. The evolution of computerized displays in accident management

    Key regulations implemented by the NRC in 1982, which included requirements such as upgraded emergency operating procedures, detailed control room design reviews, the addition of a safety parameter display system, and the inclusion of a degreed shift technical advisor as part of the operating staff, have enabled the use of computerized displays to evolve as an integral part of accident management within each of the four main vendor groups. Problems, however, remain to be resolved in the area of technical content, information reliability, and rules for use in order to achieve the goal of more reliable accident management in nuclear power plants

  12. The computer aided education and training system for accident management

    The education and training system for Accident Management was developed by the Japanese BWR group and Hitachi Ltd. The education and training system is composed of two systems. One is computer aided instruction (CAI) education system and the education and training system with computer simulations. Both systems are designed to be executed on personal computers. The outlines of the CAI education system and the education and training system with simulator are reported below. These systems provides plant operators and technical support center staff with the effective education and training for accident management. (author)

  13. A systematic process for developing and assessing accident management plans

    This document describes a four-phase approach for developing criteria recommended for use in assessing the adequacy of nuclear power plant accident management plans. Two phases of the approach have been completed and provide a prototype process that could be used to develop an accident management plan. Based on this process, a preliminary set of assessment criteria are derived. These preliminary criteria will be refined and improved when the remaining steps of the approach are completed, that is, after the prototype process is validated through application. 9 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs

  14. Development of emergency response support system for accident management

    Specific measures for the accident management (AM) are proposed to prevent the severe accident and to mitigate their effects in order to upgrade the safety of nuclear power plants even further. To ensure accident management effective, it is essential to grasp the plant status accurately. In consideration of the above mentioned background, the Emergency Response Support System (ERSS) was developed as a computer assisted prototype system by a joint study of Japanese BWR group. This system judges and predicts the plant status at the emergency condition in a nuclear power plant. This system displays the results of judgment and prediction. The effectiveness of the system was verified through the test and good prospects for applying the system to a plant was obtained. 7 refs., 10 figs

  15. PSA use in accident management studies in Japan

    The safety of NPPs in Japan is secured by stringent safety regulations based on the deterministic method, minimizing the possibility a severe accident to a technologically negligible level. PSA is not required in the current regulatory procedures. Accident management based on PSA is a 'knowledge-based' action dependent on utilities' technical knowledge aimed at further reduction of the risk which is kept small enough by existing measures. The paper discusses the following three kinds of PSAs that have been conducted practically and efficiently on NPPs to provide supplemental information about their safety characteristics in addition to the deterministic evaluation used in the regulatory safety review: PSAs on typical NPPs, PSAs on all NPPs to examine candidates for accident management, and PSAs as part of periodic safety review (PSR). 1 fig., 5 tabs

  16. Plant specific severe accident management - the implementation phase

    Many plants are in the process of developing on-site guidance for technical staff to respond to a severe accident situation severe accident management guidance (SAMG). Once the guidance is developed, the SAMG must be implemented at the plant site, and this involves addressing a number of additional aspects. In this paper, approaches to this implementation phase are reviewed, including review and verification of plant specific SAMG, organizational aspects and integration with the emergency plan, training of SAMG users, validation and self-assessment and SAMG maintenance. Examples draw on experience from assisting numerous plants to implement symptom based severe accident management guidelines based on the Westinghouse Owners Group approach, in Westinghouse, non-Westinghouse and VVER plant types. It is hoped that it will be of use to those plant operators about to perform these activities.(author)

  17. Proceedings of the specialist meeting on selected containment severe accident management strategies

    Twenty papers were presented at the first specialist meeting on Selected Containment Severe Accident management Strategies, held in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1994, half of them dealing with accident management strategies implementation status, half of them with research aspects. The four sessions were: general aspects of containment accident management strategies, hydrogen management techniques, other containment accident management strategies (spray cooling, core catcher...), surveillance and protection of containment function

  18. Investigation on accident management measures for VVER-1000 reactors

    A consequence of a total loss of AC power supply (station blackout) leading to unavailability of major active safety systems which could not perform their safety functions is that the safety criteria ensuring a secure operation of the nuclear power plant would be violated and a consequent core heat-up with possible core degradation would occur. Currently, a study which examines the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of the plant during the early phase of the scenario is being performed. This paper focuses on the possibilities for delay or mitigation of the accident sequence to progress into a severe one by applying Accident Management Measures (AMM). The strategy 'Primary circuit depressurization' as a basic strategy, which is realized in the management of severe accidents is being investigated. By reducing the load over the vessel under severe accident conditions, prerequisites for maintaining the integrity of the primary circuit are being created. The time-margins for operators' intervention as key issues are being also assessed. The task is accomplished by applying the GRS thermal-hydraulic system code ATHLET. In addition, a comparative analysis of the accident progression for a station blackout event for both a reference German PWR and a reference VVER-1000, taking into account the plant specifics, is being performed. (authors)

  19. Development of Integrated Evaluation System for Severe Accident Management

    Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, K. R.; Park, S. H.; Park, S. Y.; Park, J. H.; Song, Y. M.; Ahn, K. I.; Choi, Y

    2007-06-15

    The objective of the project is twofold. One is to develop a severe accident database (DB) for the Korean Standard Nuclear Power plant (OPR-1000) and a DB management system, and the other to develop a localized computer code, MIDAS (Multi-purpose IntegrateD Assessment code for Severe accidents). The MELCOR DB has been constructed for the typical representative sequences to support the previous MAAP DB in the previous phase. The MAAP DB has been updated using the recent version of MAAP 4.0.6. The DB management system, SARD, has been upgraded to manage the MELCOR DB in addition to the MAAP DB and the network environment has been constructed for many users to access the SARD simultaneously. The integrated MIDAS 1.0 has been validated after completion of package-wise validation. As the current version of MIDAS cannot simulate the anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) sequence, point-kinetics model has been implemented. Also the gap cooling phenomena after corium relocation into the RPV can be modeled by the user as an input parameter. In addition, the subsystems of the severe accident graphic simulator are complemented for the efficient severe accident management and the engine of the graphic simulator was replaced by the MIDAS instead of the MELCOR code. For the user's convenience, MIDAS input and output processors are upgraded by enhancing the interfacial programs.

  20. Development of Integrated Evaluation System for Severe Accident Management

    The objective of the project is twofold. One is to develop a severe accident database (DB) for the Korean Standard Nuclear Power plant (OPR-1000) and a DB management system, and the other to develop a localized computer code, MIDAS (Multi-purpose IntegrateD Assessment code for Severe accidents). The MELCOR DB has been constructed for the typical representative sequences to support the previous MAAP DB in the previous phase. The MAAP DB has been updated using the recent version of MAAP 4.0.6. The DB management system, SARD, has been upgraded to manage the MELCOR DB in addition to the MAAP DB and the network environment has been constructed for many users to access the SARD simultaneously. The integrated MIDAS 1.0 has been validated after completion of package-wise validation. As the current version of MIDAS cannot simulate the anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) sequence, point-kinetics model has been implemented. Also the gap cooling phenomena after corium relocation into the RPV can be modeled by the user as an input parameter. In addition, the subsystems of the severe accident graphic simulator are complemented for the efficient severe accident management and the engine of the graphic simulator was replaced by the MIDAS instead of the MELCOR code. For the user's convenience, MIDAS input and output processors are upgraded by enhancing the interfacial programs

  1. OSSA - An optimized approach to severe accident management: EPR application

    There is a recognized need to provide nuclear power plant technical staff with structured guidance for response to a potential severe accident condition involving core damage and potential release of fission products to the environment. Over the past ten years, many plants worldwide have implemented such guidance for their emergency technical support center teams either by following one of the generic approaches, or by developing fully independent approaches. There are many lessons to be learned from the experience of the past decade, in developing, implementing, and validating severe accident management guidance. Also, though numerous basic approaches exist which share common principles, there are differences in the methodology and application of the guidelines. AREVA/Framatome-ANP is developing an optimized approach to severe accident management guidance in a project called OSSA ('Operating Strategies for Severe Accidents'). There are still numerous operating power plants which have yet to implement severe accident management programs. For these, the option to use an updated approach which makes full use of lessons learned and experience, is seen as a major advantage. Very few of the current approaches covers all operating plant states, including shutdown states with the primary system closed and open. Although it is not necessary to develop an entirely new approach in order to add this capability, the opportunity has been taken to develop revised full scope guidance covering all plant states in addition to the fuel in the fuel building. The EPR includes at the design phase systems and measures to minimize the risk of severe accident and to mitigate such potential scenarios. This presents a difference in comparison with existing plant, for which severe accidents where not considered in the design. Thought developed for all type of plants, OSSA will also be applied on the EPR, with adaptations designed to take into account its favourable situation in that field

  2. Handbook for medical management of persons exposed in radiation accidents

    The document is intended as a rapid reference handbook for the use of physicians who may be called upon to handle the cases of radiation emergency. It deals mainly with the diagnosis and treatment procedures which should be followed by medical officers. The handbook has following sections : basic radiobiology, classification of radiation accidents and preparedness for medical intervention, management of external radiation exposure, management of radioactive contamination, and action plan for handling radiation facilities. It is advisable to have a separate medical unit for proper management of persons exposed in radiation accidents. Infrastructure and facilities required in such a set-up are described. Names and addresses of : (1) physicians in India who have specialized in medical management of radiation injuries, and (2)medical doctors trained in radiation protection and occupational health in different states of India are listed in an appendix. (M.G.B.). 10 refs., figs., tabs

  3. Recommendations on accident management for NPP with WWER

    The work deals with the analysis of practices in the field of beyond design basis accidents (BDBA) management in countries operating WWER type reactors. The recommendations of the working group are presented. The aim is to cooperate the actions of the regulatory bodies for the development of an unified concept for recommendations and to speed up the DBDA management realization for the decreasing of the risk from the nuclear power plant operation

  4. Precept from the management for the accident of Fukushima daiichi

    At 17 hours after the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, National Institute of Radiological Sciences sent the first REMAT (Radiation Emergency Medical Assistance Team) in the 20 km range from the Plant. The team members were confronted by two issues: (1) Medical activities under the infrastructures destructed by a multiple disaster caused by earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident, which was not presumed. (2) Radiation protection management for dispatched staff. Measures for this situation worked out by activities on the site are presented. (K.Y.)

  5. Neural network-based expert system for severe accident management

    This paper presents the results of the second phase of a three-phase Severe Accident Management expert system program underway. The primary objectives of the second phase were to develop and demonstrate four capabilities of neural networks with respect to nuclear power plant severe accident monitoring and prediction. A second objective of the program was to develop an interactive graphical user interface which presented the system's information in an easily accessible and straightforward manner to the user. This paper describes the technical and regulatory foundation upon which the expert system is based and provides a background on the development of a new severe accident management tool. This tool provides data to assist in; (1) planning and developing priorities for recovery actions, (2) evaluating recovery action feasibility, (3) identifying recovery action options, and (4) assessing the timing and possible effects of potential recovery strategies. These performance characteristics represent the goals identified for the Severe Accident Management Strategies Online Network (SAMSON) which is currently under development. 4 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  6. Severe accident analysis to verify the effectiveness of severe accident management guidelines for large pressurized heavy water reactor

    Highlights: • The progression of severe accident initiated from high pressure scenario of station black out has been analyzed using RELAP5/SCDAP. • The effectiveness of SAMG actions prescribed has been established through analysis. • The time margin available to invoke the SAMG action has been specified. - Abstract: The pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) contains both inherent and engineered safety features that help the reactor become resistant to severe accident and its consequences. However in case of a low frequency severe accident, despite the safety features, procedural action should be in place to mitigate the accident progression. Severe accident analysis of such low frequency event provides insight into the accident progression and basis to develop the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG). Since the order of uncertainty in the progression path of severe accident is very high, it is necessary to study the consequences of the SAMG actions prescribed. The paper discusses severe accident analysis for large PHWRs for multiple failure transients involving a high pressure scenario (initiation event like SBO with loss of emergency core cooling system and loss of moderator cooling). SAMG actions prescribed for such a scenario include water injection into steam generator, calandria vessel or calandria vault at different stages of accident. The effectiveness of SAMG actions prescribed has been investigated. It is found that there is sufficient time margin available to the operator to execute these SAMG actions and the progression of severe accident is arrested in all the three cases

  7. Severe accident analysis to verify the effectiveness of severe accident management guidelines for large pressurized heavy water reactor

    Gokhale, O.S., E-mail: onkarsg@barc.gov.in; Mukhopadhyay, D., E-mail: dmukho@barc.gov.in; Lele, H.G., E-mail: hglele@barc.gov.in; Singh, R.K., E-mail: rksingh@barc.gov.in

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The progression of severe accident initiated from high pressure scenario of station black out has been analyzed using RELAP5/SCDAP. • The effectiveness of SAMG actions prescribed has been established through analysis. • The time margin available to invoke the SAMG action has been specified. - Abstract: The pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) contains both inherent and engineered safety features that help the reactor become resistant to severe accident and its consequences. However in case of a low frequency severe accident, despite the safety features, procedural action should be in place to mitigate the accident progression. Severe accident analysis of such low frequency event provides insight into the accident progression and basis to develop the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG). Since the order of uncertainty in the progression path of severe accident is very high, it is necessary to study the consequences of the SAMG actions prescribed. The paper discusses severe accident analysis for large PHWRs for multiple failure transients involving a high pressure scenario (initiation event like SBO with loss of emergency core cooling system and loss of moderator cooling). SAMG actions prescribed for such a scenario include water injection into steam generator, calandria vessel or calandria vault at different stages of accident. The effectiveness of SAMG actions prescribed has been investigated. It is found that there is sufficient time margin available to the operator to execute these SAMG actions and the progression of severe accident is arrested in all the three cases.

  8. Management of a radiological emergency. Experience feedback and post-accident management

    In France, the organization of crisis situations and the management of radiological emergency situations are regularly tested through simulation exercises for a continuous improvement. Past severe accidents represent experience feedback resources of prime importance which have led to deep changes in crisis organizations. However, the management of the post-accident phase is still the object of considerations and reflections between the public authorities and the intervening parties. This document presents, first, the nuclear crisis exercises organized in France, then, the experience feedback of past accidents and exercises, and finally, the main aspects to consider for the post-accident management of such events: 1 - Crisis exercises: objectives, types (local, national and international exercises), principles and progress, limits; 2 - Experience feedback: real crises (major accidents, other recent accidental situations or incidents), crisis exercises (experience feedback organization, improvements); 3 - post-accident management: environmental contamination and people exposure, management of contaminated territories, management of populations (additional protection, living conditions, medical-psychological follow up), indemnification, organization during the post-accident phase; 4 - conclusion and perspectives. (J.S.)

  9. Accident management advisor system (AMAS): A Decision Aid for Interpreting Instrument Information and Managing Accident Conditions in Nuclear Power Plants

    Accident management can be characterized as the optimized use of all available plant resources to stop or mitigate the progression of a nuclear power plant accident sequence which may otherwise result i n reactor vessel and containment failure. It becomes important under conditions that have low probability of occurring. However, given that these conditions may lead to extremely severe financial consequences and public health effects, it is now recognized that it is important for the plant owners to develop realistic strategies and guidelines. Recent studies have classified accident management strategies as: - the use of alternative resources (i.e., air, water, power), - the use of alternative equipment (i.e., pumps, water lines, generators), the use of alternative actions (i.e., manual depressurization and injection, 'feed and bleed', etc.) The matching of these alternative actions and resources to an actual plant condition represents a decision process affected by a high degree of uncertainty in several of its fundamental inputs. This uncertainty includes the expected accident progression phenomenology (e.g., the issue of high pressure core ejection from the vessel in a PWR plant with possible 'direct containment heating'), as well as the expected availability and behavior of plant systems and of plant instrumentation. To support the accident management decision process with computer-based decision aids, one needs to develop accident progression models that can be stored in a computer knowledge based and retrieved at will for comparison with actual plant conditions, so that these conditions can be recognized and dealt with accordingly. Recent Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs) [1] show the progression of a severe accident through and beyond the core melt stages via multi-branch accident progression trees. Although these 'accident tree models' were originally intended for accident probability assessment purposes, they do provide a basis of initial information

  10. Accident Precursor Analysis and Management: Reducing Technological Risk Through Diligence

    Phimister, James R. (Editor); Bier, Vicki M. (Editor); Kunreuther, Howard C. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    Almost every year there is at least one technological disaster that highlights the challenge of managing technological risk. On February 1, 2003, the space shuttle Columbia and her crew were lost during reentry into the atmosphere. In the summer of 2003, there was a blackout that left millions of people in the northeast United States without electricity. Forensic analyses, congressional hearings, investigations by scientific boards and panels, and journalistic and academic research have yielded a wealth of information about the events that led up to each disaster, and questions have arisen. Why were the events that led to the accident not recognized as harbingers? Why were risk-reducing steps not taken? This line of questioning is based on the assumption that signals before an accident can and should be recognized. To examine the validity of this assumption, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) undertook the Accident Precursors Project in February 2003. The project was overseen by a committee of experts from the safety and risk-sciences communities. Rather than examining a single accident or incident, the committee decided to investigate how different organizations anticipate and assess the likelihood of accidents from accident precursors. The project culminated in a workshop held in Washington, D.C., in July 2003. This report includes the papers presented at the workshop, as well as findings and recommendations based on the workshop results and committee discussions. The papers describe precursor strategies in aviation, the chemical industry, health care, nuclear power and security operations. In addition to current practices, they also address some areas for future research.

  11. The Assesment Of Radioactive Accident Management On The RSG-GAS

    In the operational reactor facilities include RSG-GAS, safety factor for radioactive accident very important to be prioritized. Till now the anticipate happening radioactive accident on the RSG-GAS threat only by the RSG-GAS Operation Manual. For increasing the working function need to create radioactive accident management by facility level. From studying result which source IAEA guidebook, can be composed the assessment accident management of radioactive the RSG-GAS.The sketching this accident management of radioactive to be hoped can helping P2TRR organization by handling radioactive accident if this moment happen on the RSG-GAS

  12. EC-sponsored research activities on accident management measures

    The European Commission (EC) is currently funding, via the 1994-1998 R and D Framework Programme, a number of activities in the field of Nuclear Fission Safety (NFS), and particularly in several areas related to 'Reactor Safety Severe Accidents'. This programme continues the research activities of the previous Community Reactor Safety Programme which was carried out as a Reinforced Concerted Action (RCA) during the period 1992-1995. The group of multi-partners projects selected for financial support from the EC under Area B.5.1 of the current NFS Programme, 'Supporting Activities / Accident Management Measures' (known as the 'AMM' cluster) are basically aiming at implementing the results of severe accident research into practical Accident Management (AM) strategies. The generic objective is to exchange information and to develop a common European approach regarding aspects such as phenomena related uncertainties, possible adverse effects of operator actions on the progression of the accident, interpretation of measurements, equipment performance, instrument survival and human error under stress. This paper briefly discusses the objectives and achievements of a completed project of the 1992-1995 RCA, known as 'Accident Management Support' ('AMS'), and also presents the current status of an on-going project of the 1994-1998 NFS Programme, 'Algorithm support for accident identification and Critical safety Functions signal validation' ('ASIA'). The objectives of the 'AMS' project were (i) to define, investigate and develop means and methods to provide reliable information and diagnostics, as well as support tools for accident management, and (ii) investigate the different signal validation methodologies with emphasis on the existing instrumentation rather than on new instrumentation needs. The work started with the writing of two state-of-the-art reports (SOARs) in these two areas. In parallel to the compilation of the SOARs, and later in a second phase, specific

  13. The Goiania accident waste management - Reconditioning operation

    As a result of an accidental breakage of a 137Cs radiotherapy source, radioactive waste was generated in Goiania-Brazil. It was collected in different types of packaging and removed to a temporary storage site near Abadia de Goias. After four years in open air storage, corrosion was detected in some packages, especially in the 200 1drums. Measures to ensure a safe interim storage were adopted, until a final disposal plan was to be executed. The objective was to make the waste product suitable for the final disposal requests according to Brazilian standards. These measures were concerned mainly with the waste reconditioning. This paper presents the waste management strategy adopted for this operation

  14. Development of the french accident management and procedures - role of operators in accident and incident management

    This paper gives a brief overview of the set of emergency operating procedures for French NPPs and the method used to built and validate these procedures. Particular emphasis is put on the role and organisation of the operating team during an incident or accident. (orig.)

  15. Market-oriented management method of coalmine accident hidden dangers

    LIU Zhao-xia; LI Xing-dong; LU Ying; REN Da-wei

    2007-01-01

    By analyzing the problems which exist currently in the accident hidden dangers management of the coal mine, this paper proposed a new kind of management method-"simulating the market", in which an operation pattern of simulating the market to transact hidden troubles was constructed. This method introduces "Market Mechanism"into safe management, and adopts measurable value to describe the hidden dangers such as" human behavior, technique, environment, equipments etc.". It regards the hidden dangers as "the goods produced by labor" which are found out by the safety managers and the security inspectors, then sells as "commodity". By the process of disposing, counterchecking, re-selling, and redisposing. It forms a set of market-oriented closed-form management pattern of coalmine accident hidden dangers. This kind of management method changes the past traditional methods in which the wageworkers treat safety management passively, but to encourage and restrict them to participate in the check-up and improvement of the hidden dangers.

  16. A structured approach to individual plant evaluation and accident management

    The need for long term development of accident management programs is acknowledged and the key tool for that development is identified as the IPE Program. The Edison commitment to build an integrated program is cited and the effect on the IPE effort is considered. Edison's integrated program is discussed in detail. The key benefits, realism and long term savings, are discussed. Some of the highly visible products such as neural network artificial intelligence systems are cited

  17. Role of accident analysis in development of severe accident management guidance for multi-unit CANDU nuclear power plants

    This paper discusses the role of accident analysis in support of the development of Severe Accident Management Guidance for domestic CANDU reactors. In general, analysis can identify what types of challenges can be expected during accident progression but it cannot specify when and to what degree accident phenomena will occur. SAMG overcomes these limitations by monitoring the actual values of key plant indicators that can be used directly or indirectly to infer the condition of the plant and by establishing setpoints beyond which corrective action is required. Analysis can provide a means to correlate observed post-accident plant behavior against predicted behaviour to improve the confidence in and quality of accident mitigation decisions. (author)

  18. Implementation of severe accident management measures - Summary and conclusions

    The objectives of the meeting were: 1) to exchange information on activities in the area of SAM implementation and on the rationale for such actions, 2) to monitor progress made, 3) to identify cases of agreement or disagreement, 4) to discuss future orientations of work, 5) to make recommendations to the CSNI. Session summaries prepared by the Chairpersons and discussed by the whole writing group are given in Annex. During the first session, 'SAM Programmes Implementation', papers from one regulator and several utilities and national research institutes were presented to outline the status of implementation of SAM programmes in countries like Switzerland, Russia, Spain, Finland, Belgium and Korea. Also, the contribution of SAM to the safety of Japanese plants (in terms of core damage frequency) was quantified in a paper. One paper gave an overview on the situation regarding SAM implementation in Europe. The second session, 'SAM Approach', provided background and bases for Severe Accident Management in countries like Sweden, Japan, Germany and Switzerland, as well as for hardware features in advanced light water reactor designs, such as the European Pressurised Reactor (EPR), regarding Severe Accident Management. The third session, 'SAM Mitigation Measures', was about hardware measures, in particular those oriented towards hydrogen mitigation where fundamentally different approaches have been taken in Scandinavian countries, France, Germany and Korea. Three papers addressed specific contributions from research to provide a broader basis for the assumptions made in certain computer codes used for the assessment of plant risk arising from beyond-design accident sequences. The fourth session, 'Implementation of SAM Measures on VVER-1000 Reactors', was about the status of work on Severe Accident Management implementation in VVER reactors of existing design and in a new plant currently under construction. The overall picture is that Severe Accident Management has been

  19. Modeling and measuring the effects of imprecision in accident management

    This paper presents two approaches for evaluating the uncertainties inherent in accident management strategies. Current PRA methodology uses expert opinion in the assessment of rare event probabilities. The problem is that these probabilities may be difficult to estimate even though reasonable engineering judgement is applied. This occurs because expert opinion under incomplete knowledge and limited data is inherently imprecise. In this case, the concept of uncertainty about a probability value is both intuitively appealing and potentially useful. This analysis considers accident management as a decision problem (i.e. 'applying a strategy' vs. 'do nothing') and uses an influence diagram. Then, the analysis applies two approaches to evaluating imprecise node probabilities in the influence diagram: 'a fuzzy probability' and 'an interval-valued subjective probability'. For the propagation of subjective probabilities, the analysis uses a Monte-Carlo simulation approach. In case of fuzzy probabilities, fuzzy logic is applied to propagate them. We believe that these approaches can allow us to better understand uncertainties associated with severe accident management strategies, because they provide additional information regarding the implications of using imprecise input data

  20. Level 2 PSA methodology and severe accident management

    The objective of the work was to review current Level 2-PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) methodologies and practices and to investigate how Level 2-PSA can support severe accident management programmes, i.e. the development, implementation, training and optimisation of accident management strategies and measures. For the most part, the presented material reflects the state in 1996. Current Level 2 PSA results and methodologies are reviewed and evaluated with respect to plant type specific and generic insights. Approaches and practices for using PSA results in the regulatory context and for supporting severe accident management programmes by input from level 2 PSAs are examined. The work is based on information contained in: PSA procedure guides, PSA review guides and regulatory guides for the use of PSA results in risk informed decision making; plant specific PSAs and PSA related literature exemplifying specific procedures, methods, analytical models, relevant input data and important results, use of computer codes and results of code calculations. The PSAs are evaluated with respect to results and insights. In the conclusion section, the present state of risk informed decision making, in particular in the level 2 domain, is described and substantiated by relevant examples

  1. Lessons learned from Fukushima accident in relation to emergency management

    The latest accident in Fukushima, Japan, which involved concurrent accidents at multiple nuclear facilities due to the earthquakes and tsunami, as well as station blackouts for an extended period of time, demonstrated the need for an overall review of existing prevention measures. These measures include emergency protection measures for residents beyond the emergency planning zone, the application of radiation protection criteria that consider the release of radioactive materials to the environment over an extended period and the disposal of large-scale radioactive wastes and radiation protection criteria to be applied upon recovery. Accordingly, Japan has taken improvement initiatives in the area of prevention by submitting a government report on the Fukushima accident prior to the IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety in June last year, and the US has devised a regulatory system of its own, including directions for improvement through the NRC, which operated a temporary taskforce specifically for this purpose. This study examined how Japan is responding to the Fukushima accident and investigated directions that countries around the world can take to improve the area of nuclear protection in order to enhance Korea's own radiological emergency management system

  2. Development and validation of Maanshan severe accident management guidelines

    Maanshan is a Westinghouse pressurized water reactor Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) located in south Taiwan. The Severe Accident Management Guideline (SAMG) of Maanshan NPP is developed based on the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) SAMG. The Maanshan SAMG is developed at the end of 2002. MAAP4 code is used as tool to validate the SAMG strategies. The development process and characteristics of Maanshan SAMG is described. A Station BlackOut (SBO) accident for Maanshan NPP which occurred in March 2001 is cited as a reference case for SAMG validation. A SBO accident is simulated first. The severe accident progression is simulated and the entry condition of SAMG is described. Mitigation actions are then applied to demonstrate the effect of SAMG. A RCS depressurization, RCS injection, and containment hydrogen reduction strategies are used to restore the system to a stable condition as power is recovered. Hot leg creep rupture is occurs during the mitigation action that is not considered in WOG SAMG. The effect of the RCS depressurization, RCS injection, and containment hydrogen reduction strategies are analyzed with MAAP4 code

  3. Westinghouse severe accident management guidance overview and current status

    The Westinghouse Owners Group has completed a major development program in Severe Accident Management. This program draws on all presently available sources of information in the field, including in the field, including NRC, NUMARC and EPRI programs, plant specific Individual Plant Examinations and Probabilistic Safety Assessments, and other international activities. The program has developed a full set of Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG) applicable to Westinghouse and Westinghouse licensee PWR plant. The SAMG enhances the capabilities of the plant emergency response team for accident sequences that progress to fuel damage, and therefore beyond the range of applicability of present guidance in the form of Emergency Operating Procedures. Since the first draft of SAMG was transmitted officially to the WOG members and the NRC in July 1993, many activities have been carried out by the different organizations involved, and although no significant changes to the SAMG structure have resulted from these activities, several enhancement have been included, mainly from the comments recorded during the generic SAMG validation exercise at the Point Beach plant. With the issue in June 1994 of the revision 0 SAMG, some plants in the U.S. and abroad are already implementing plant specific guidelines. This paper provides an overview of the SAMG package, and also describe the most important comments and feedback from the validation and review efforts. (author)

  4. Unconventional sources of plant information for accident management

    An essential element to accident management is having as clear a picture as is practical of the plant status and thus of the accident and its progress. Effective, appropriate decisions to control and mitigate an accident are dependent on making this assessment of the accident. The objective of this paper is to stimulate consideration of unconventional plant information sources through discussion of specific examples. A plant's condition during an accident can be characterized by plant parameters such as temperatures and pressures and by plant system operational status. For example, core damage is associated with increasing temperatures, pressures, and radiation levels in many different systems and plant areas. Reg. Guide 1.97 instrumentation exists to provide information to allow operators to take specified manual actions (Type A), to indicate whether plant safety functions are being accomplished (Type B), to indicate the potential for breach of barriers to fission product release (Type C), to indicate operability of individual safety systems (Type D), and to indicate the magnitude of radioactive material releases (Type E). Reg. Guide 1.97 instrument range requirements, with the exception of pressure instruments, address conditions up to design basis conditions. Pressure instrument range requirements exceed design basis conditions. During a severe accident, some instruments may not see conditions beyond their design basis. Effective accident management includes the ability to establish a consistent picture of the accident by accumulating information from as many sources as is practical. Operability of systems and components, and non-safety related temperature, radiation, pressure, and water-level indication can be used to directly indicate, measure, or infer plant parameters which confirm, augment or replace those otherwise available. Innovative uses of information sources thus serve to increase the diversity and flexibility of accident data available. Both the

  5. Proceedings of the specialist meeting on severe accident management implementation

    The Niantic Specialist meeting was structured around three main themes, one for each session. During the first session, papers from regulators, research groups, designers/owners groups and some utilities discussed the critical decisions in Severe Accident Management (SAM), how these decisions were addressed and implemented in generic SAM guidelines, what equipment and instrumentation was used, what are the differences in national approaches, etc. During the second session, papers were presented by utility specialists that described approaches chosen to specific implementation of the generic guidelines, the difficulties encountered in the implementation process and the perceived likelihood of success of their SAM program in dealing with severe accidents. The third session was dedicated to discussing what are the remaining uncertainties and open questions in SAM. Experts from several OECD countries presented significant perspectives on remaining open issues

  6. PWR accident management realated tests: some Bethsy results

    The BETHSY integral test facility which is a scaled down model of a 3 loop FRAMATOME PWR and is currently operated at the Nuclear Center of Grenoble, forms an important part of the French strategy for PWR Accident Management. In this paper the features of both the facility and the experimental program are presented. Two accident transients: a total loss of feedwater and a 2'' cold leg break in case of High Pressure Safety Injection System failure, involving either Event Oriented - or State Oriented-Emergency Operating Procedures (EO-EOP or SO-EOP) are described and the system response analyzed. CATHARE calculation results are also presented which illustrate the ability of this code to adequately predict the key phenomena of these transients. (authors). 13 figs., 11 refs., 2 tabs

  7. Summary and conclusions: Specialist Meeting on Severe Accident Management Implementation

    During the first session of this meeting, regulators, research groups, designers/owners' groups and some utilities discussed the critical decisions in SAM (Severe Accident Management), how these decisions were addressed and implemented in generic SAM guidelines, what equipment and instrumentation was used, what are the differences in national approaches, etc. During the second session, papers were presented by utility specialists that described approaches chosen for specific implementation of the generic guidelines, the difficulties encountered in the implementation process and the perceived likelihood of success of their SAM programme in dealing with severe accidents. The third and final sessions was dedicated to discussing what are the remaining uncertainties and open questions in SAM. Experts from several OECD countries presented significant perspectives on remaining open issues

  8. A proposal for accident management optimization based on the study of accident sequence analysis for a BWR

    The paper describes a proposal for accident management optimization based on the study of accident sequence and source term analyses for a BWR. In Japan, accident management measures are to be implemented in all LWRs by the year 2000 in accordance with the recommendation of the regulatory organization and based on the PSAs carried out by the utilities. Source terms were evaluated by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) with the THALES code for all BWR sequences in which loss of decay heat removal resulted in the largest release. Identification of the priority and importance of accident management measures was carried out for the sequences with larger risk contributions. Considerations for optimizing emergency operation guides are believed to be essential for risk reduction. (author)

  9. Implementation of accident management programmes in nuclear power plants

    According to the generally established defence in depth concept in nuclear safety, consideration in plant operation is also given to highly improbable severe plant conditions that were not explicitly addressed in the original design of currently operating nuclear power plants (NPPs). Defence in depth is achieved primarily by means of four successive barriers which prevent the release of radioactive material (fuel matrix, cladding, primary coolant boundary and containment), and these barriers are primarily protected by three levels of design measures: prevention of abnormal operation and failures (level 1), control of abnormal operation and detection of failures (level 2) and control of accidents within the design basis (level 3). If these first three levels fail to ensure the structural integrity of the core, e.g. due to beyond the design basis multiple failures, or due to extremely unlikely initiating events, additional efforts are made at level 4 to further reduce the risks. The objective at the fourth level is to ensure that both the likelihood of an accident entailing significant core damage (severe accident) and the magnitude of radioactive releases following a severe accident are kept as low as reasonably achievable. Finally, level 5 includes off-site emergency response measures, with the objective of mitigating the radiological consequences of significant releases of radioactive material. The implementation of the emergency response is usually dependent upon the type and magnitude of the accident. Good co-ordination between the operator and the responding organizations is needed to ensure the appropriate response. Accident management is one of the key components of effective defence in depth. In accordance with defence in depth, each design level should be protected individually, independently of other levels. This report focuses on the fourth level of defence in depth, including the transitions from the third level and into the fifth level. It describes

  10. RASPLAV, Refine accident management strategies during a reactor core meltdown

    Description: OECD RASPLAV Project. The RASPLAV project aimed to refine accident management strategies during a reactor core meltdown; it was completed in June 2000. Little is known about the complex interactions that take place during a core meltdown, so one of the RASPLAV project's primary goals was to develop an understanding of this process. The information gathered during tests at the Kurchatov Institute have allowed scientists to develop models of a core meltdown. These models can be used in the design of new reactors and in refining the accident procedures for existing ones. Two aspects of the issue were considered. First, for existing reactors, where external cooling may not be practicable, the process and time sequence before melt-through were studied. This was to help develop management strategies for severe accidents. Secondly, for future and some existing reactor designs, the project aimed to determine the heat transfer conditions under which cavity flooding can be a viable accident management option. The project was run in two successive phases. The RASPLAV Phase-2 project investigated the progression of a severe accident and in particular the thermal loading imposed by a corium pool on the lower head of a Light Water Reactor (LWR) vessel. It followed an earlier Phase-1 project dedicated mainly to the build-up of the experimental and analytical infrastructure. The project objectives were to obtain relevant data on the physical and thermal behavior of the corium in large-scale tests, to derive thermal-physical property data for various molten core materials, and to investigate the effects of stratification of molten materials. The programme of work involved the use of the large facilities available at the Kurchatov Institute in Russia. Four large-scale tests were carried out and were complemented by a series of smaller-scale experiments, all involving the use of materials representative of power reactor cores. Experiments with these test materials in

  11. Severe accident research and management in Nordic Countries - A status report

    The report describes the status of severe accident research and accident management development in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark. The emphasis is on severe accident phenomena and issues of special importance for the severe accident management strategies implemented in Sweden and in Finland. The main objective of the research has been to verify the protection provided by the accident mitigation measures and to reduce the uncertainties in risk dominant accident phenomena. Another objective has been to support validation and improvements of accident management strategies and procedures as well as to contribute to the development of level 2 PSA, computerised operator aids for accident management and certain aspects of emergency preparedness. Severe accident research addresses both the in-vessel and the ex-vessel accident progression phenomena and issues. Even though there are differences between Sweden and Finland as to the scope and content of the research programs, the focus of the research in both countries is on in-vessel coolability, integrity of the reactor vessel lower head and core melt behaviour in the containment, in particular the issues of core debris coolability and steam explosions. Notwithstanding that our understanding of these issues has significantly improved, and that experimental data base has been largely expanded, there are still important uncertainties which motivate continued research. Other important areas are thermal-hydraulic phenomena during reflooding of an overheated partially degraded core, fission product chemistry, in particular formation of organic iodine, and hydrogen transport and combustion phenomena. The development of severe accident management has embraced, among other things, improvements of accident mitigating procedures and strategies, further work at IFE Halden on Computerised Accident Management Support (CAMS) system, as well as plant modifications, including new instrumentation. Recent efforts in Sweden in this area

  12. Severe accident research and management in Nordic Countries - A status report

    Frid, W. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SKI (Sweden)] (ed.)

    2002-01-01

    The report describes the status of severe accident research and accident management development in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark. The emphasis is on severe accident phenomena and issues of special importance for the severe accident management strategies implemented in Sweden and in Finland. The main objective of the research has been to verify the protection provided by the accident mitigation measures and to reduce the uncertainties in risk dominant accident phenomena. Another objective has been to support validation and improvements of accident management strategies and procedures as well as to contribute to the development of level 2 PSA, computerised operator aids for accident management and certain aspects of emergency preparedness. Severe accident research addresses both the in-vessel and the ex-vessel accident progression phenomena and issues. Even though there are differences between Sweden and Finland as to the scope and content of the research programs, the focus of the research in both countries is on in-vessel coolability, integrity of the reactor vessel lower head and core melt behaviour in the containment, in particular the issues of core debris coolability and steam explosions. Notwithstanding that our understanding of these issues has significantly improved, and that experimental data base has been largely expanded, there are still important uncertainties which motivate continued research. Other important areas are thermal-hydraulic phenomena during reflooding of an overheated partially degraded core, fission product chemistry, in particular formation of organic iodine, and hydrogen transport and combustion phenomena. The development of severe accident management has embraced, among other things, improvements of accident mitigating procedures and strategies, further work at IFE Halden on Computerised Accident Management Support (CAMS) system, as well as plant modifications, including new instrumentation. Recent efforts in Sweden in this area

  13. Specific features of RBMK severe accidents progression and approach to the accident management

    Fundamental construction features of the LWGR facilities (absence of common external containment shell, disintegrated circulation circuit and multichannel reactor core, positive vapor reactivity coefficient, high mass of thermally capacious graphite moderator) predetermining development of assumed heavy non-projected accidents and handling them are treated. Rating the categories of the reactor core damages for non-projected accidents and accident types producing specific grope of damages is given. Passing standard non-projected accidents, possible methods of attack accident consequences, as well as methods of calculated analysis of non-projected accidents are demonstrated

  14. Experimental and analytical verification of accident management measures

    Two complementary test facilities - the Upper Plenum Test Facility and the ''Primaerkreislauf'' test facility were constructed to investigate the thermal hydraulic response of a pressurized water reactor during postulated accidents. The general objective of the experimental programs is to contribute to a better understanding of accident sequences and to provide a detailed data base for the validation of computer codes, i.e. ATHLET and RELAP, the latter being used by Siemens/KWU for reactor safety analyses. A major target of the recent experimental programs has been the verification of accident management procedures, such as secondary and/or primary side bleed-and-feed. The experimental results demonstrate that secondary side bleed-and-feed is a very effective method for removing decay heat without contaminating the containment. Primary side bleed-and-feed was also shown to be a highly effective measure to ensure core cooling under beyond-design-basis conditions. This publication presents results from experiments at the Upper Plenum Test Facility and the ''Primaerkreislauf'' test facility as well as from corresponding RELAP 5/Mod 2 analyses. (orig.)

  15. Specialist meeting on selected containment severe accident management strategies. Summary and conclusions

    The CSNI Specialist Meeting on Selected Containment Severe Accident Management Strategies held in Stockholm, Sweden in June 1994 was organised by the Task Group on Containment Aspects of Severe Accident Management (CAM) of CSNI's Principal Working Group on the Confinement of Accidental Radioactive Releases (PWG4) in collaboration with the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI). Conclusions and recommendations are given for each of the sessions of the workshops: Containment accident management strategies (general aspects); hydrogen management techniques and other containment accident management techniques; surveillance and protection of containment function

  16. Nuclear Malaysia Disaster Management-Japan Nuclear Accident

    Japan worst Nuclear Accident tragedy due to the earthquake and tsunami, were shocking the world. Malaysia also feels the impact from this disaster. Nuclear Malaysia personnel was mobilize to perform the radiation and contamination monitoring at Malaysian Airport (KLIA and KKIA), environmental monitoring and sampling at Kudat, Sabah, contamination screening centre at Block 13 and also at National Radiology Emergency Centre at AELB. This paper will discuss how this disaster management being performs and its challenge and also the number or personnel and man-hours involved within 1st month after the tragedy. (author)

  17. Improvement of Severe Accident Analysis Computer Code and Development of Accident Management Guidance for Heavy Water Reactor

    Park, Soo Yong; Kim, Ko Ryu; Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, See Darl; Song, Yong Mann; Choi, Young; Jin, Young Ho

    2005-03-15

    The objective of the project is to develop a generic severe accident management guidance(SAMG) applicable to Korean PHWR and the objective of this 3 year continued phase is to construct a base of the generic SAMG. Another objective is to improve a domestic computer code, ISAAC (Integrated Severe Accident Analysis code for CANDU), which still has many deficiencies to be improved in order to apply for the SAMG development. The scope and contents performed in this Phase-2 are as follows: The characteristics of major design and operation for the domestic Wolsong NPP are analyzed from the severe accident aspects. On the basis, preliminary strategies for SAM of PHWR are selected. The information needed for SAM and the methods to get that information are analyzed. Both the individual strategies applicable for accident mitigation under PHWR severe accident conditions and the technical background for those strategies are developed. A new version of ISAAC 2.0 has been developed after analyzing and modifying the existing models of ISAAC 1.0. The general SAMG applicable for PHWRs confirms severe accident management techniques for emergencies, provides the base technique to develop the plant specific SAMG by utility company and finally contributes to the public safety enhancement as a NPP safety assuring step. The ISAAC code will be used inevitably for the PSA, living PSA, severe accident analysis, SAM program development and operator training in PHWR.

  18. Generalities on nuclear accidents and their short-dated and middle-dated management

    All the nuclear activities present a radiation risk. The radiation exposure of the employees or the public, may occur during normal activity or during an accident. The IRSN realized a document on this radiation risk and the actions of protection. The sanitary and medical aspects of a radiation accident are detailed. The actions of the population protection during an accident and the post accident management are also discussed. (A.L.B.)

  19. Identification and evaluation of PWR in-vessel severe accident management strategies

    This reports documents work performed the NRC/RES Accident Management Guidance Program to evaluate possible strategies for mitigating the consequences of PWR severe accidents. The selection and evaluation of strategies was limited to the in-vessel phase of the severe accident, i.e., after the initiation of core degradation and prior to RPV failure. A parallel project at BNL has been considering strategies applicable to the ex-vessel phase of PWR severe accidents

  20. Developement of integrated evaluation system for severe accident management

    Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, H. D.; Park, S. Y.; Kim, K. R.; Park, S. H.; Choi, Y.; Song, Y. M.; Ahn, K. I.; Park, J. H

    2005-04-01

    The scope of the project includes four activities such as construction of DB, development of data base management tool, development of severe accident analysis code system and FP studies. In the construction of DB, level-1,2 PSA results and plant damage states event trees were mainly used to select the following target initiators based on frequencies: LLOCA, MLOCA, SLOCA, station black out, LOOP, LOFW and SGTR. These scenarios occupy more than 95% of the total frequencies of the core damage sequences at KSNP. In the development of data base management tool, SARD 2.0 was developed under the PC microsoft windows environment using the visual basic 6.0 language. In the development of severe accident analysis code system, MIDAS 1.0 was developed with new features of FORTRAN-90 which makes it possible to allocate the storage dynamically and to use the user-defined data type, leading to an efficient memory treatment and an easy understanding. Also for user's convenience, the input (IEDIT) and output (IPLOT) processors were developed and implemented into the MIDAS code. For the model development of MIDAS concerning the FP behavior, the one dimensional thermophoresis model was developed and it gave much improvement to predict the amount of FP deposited on the SG U-tube. Also the source term analysis methodology was set up and applied to the KSNP and APR1400.

  1. Development of the severe accident risk information database management system SARD

    The main purpose of this report is to introduce essential features and functions of a severe accident risk information management system, SARD (Severe Accident Risk Database Management System) version 1.0, which has been developed in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, and database management and data retrieval procedures through the system. The present database management system has powerful capabilities that can store automatically and manage systematically the plant-specific severe accident analysis results for core damage sequences leading to severe accidents, and search intelligently the related severe accident risk information. For that purpose, the present database system mainly takes into account the plant-specific severe accident sequences obtained from the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs), base case analysis results for various severe accident sequences (such as code responses and summary for key-event timings), and related sensitivity analysis results for key input parameters/models employed in the severe accident codes. Accordingly, the present database system can be effectively applied in supporting the Level 2 PSA of similar plants, for fast prediction and intelligent retrieval of the required severe accident risk information for the specific plant whose information was previously stored in the database system, and development of plant-specific severe accident management strategies

  2. Development of the severe accident risk information database management system SARD

    Ahn, Kwang Il; Kim, Dong Ha

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of this report is to introduce essential features and functions of a severe accident risk information management system, SARD (Severe Accident Risk Database Management System) version 1.0, which has been developed in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, and database management and data retrieval procedures through the system. The present database management system has powerful capabilities that can store automatically and manage systematically the plant-specific severe accident analysis results for core damage sequences leading to severe accidents, and search intelligently the related severe accident risk information. For that purpose, the present database system mainly takes into account the plant-specific severe accident sequences obtained from the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs), base case analysis results for various severe accident sequences (such as code responses and summary for key-event timings), and related sensitivity analysis results for key input parameters/models employed in the severe accident codes. Accordingly, the present database system can be effectively applied in supporting the Level 2 PSA of similar plants, for fast prediction and intelligent retrieval of the required severe accident risk information for the specific plant whose information was previously stored in the database system, and development of plant-specific severe accident management strategies.

  3. Summary and conclusions of the specialist meeting on severe accident management programme development

    The CSNI Specialist meeting on severe accident management programme development was held in Rome and about seventy experts from thirteen countries attended the meeting. A total of 27 papers were presented in four sessions, covering specific aspects of accident management programme development. It purposely focused on the programmatic aspects of accident management rather than on some of the more complex technical issues associated with accident management strategies. Some of the major observations and conclusions from the meeting are that severe accident management is the ultimate part of the defense in depth concept within the plant. It is function and success oriented, not event oriented, as the aim is to prevent or minimize consequences of severe accidents. There is no guarantee it will always be successful but experts agree that it can reduce the risks significantly. It has to be exercised and the importance of emergency drills has been underlined. The basic structure and major elements of accident management programmes appear to be similar among OECD member countries. Dealing with significant phenomenological uncertainties in establishing accident management programmes continues to be an important issue, especially in confirming the appropriateness of specific accident management strategies

  4. Emerging framework of safety management after Fukushima accident

    Since the Fukushima accident onset, concerned organizations and experts have tried to identify the causes and effects of the incident. Many have formulated new national regulatory measures to strengthen nuclear safety in an effort to protect the general public to the extent of probabilistic cases of the most severe or extreme accidents. The Japanese government is set to install a regulatory authority, comparable to the US NRC, which is completely independent from the promotion of nuclear energy. An official report of the National Diet (or Senate) of Japan in June of 2012 laments a lack of safety culture and insists the accident could have been prevented if due consideration and attention had been provided. Both France and other European countries have performed stress tests to their operating units, and have identified many areas for improvement including that of their regulatory framework. The US NRC also conducted special inspections of all operating reactors. In addition, the NRC established both near and long term specific goals, and issued a policy statement for streamlining patch worked regulatory framework. It is also applying the Risk informed Defense in Depth Design which includes the extended design basis requirements. The IAEA General Conference adopted a Nuclear Safety Action Plan in September 2011 and organized an International Expert Meeting in March 2012 in order to analyze all relevant technical aspects from the Japanese incident in order to prevent a reoccurrence. Korea is not an exception to this trend. She was swift to conduct a special inspection of operating reactors and is now implementing many scheduled measures. Numerous facts and insights are now available, not only those gained from the Japanese incident, but also those gleaned from experts worldwide concerning a wide array of information. Therefore, this is an opportunistic time to summarize the insights that have been identified with respect to nuclear safety management and to overview

  5. Emerging framework of safety management after Fukushima accident

    Lee, Joo Sang [TUV SUD KOCEN, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Rawls, Scott [EXCEL, JP (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Since the Fukushima accident onset, concerned organizations and experts have tried to identify the causes and effects of the incident. Many have formulated new national regulatory measures to strengthen nuclear safety in an effort to protect the general public to the extent of probabilistic cases of the most severe or extreme accidents. The Japanese government is set to install a regulatory authority, comparable to the US NRC, which is completely independent from the promotion of nuclear energy. An official report of the National Diet (or Senate) of Japan in June of 2012 laments a lack of safety culture and insists the accident could have been prevented if due consideration and attention had been provided. Both France and other European countries have performed stress tests to their operating units, and have identified many areas for improvement including that of their regulatory framework. The US NRC also conducted special inspections of all operating reactors. In addition, the NRC established both near and long term specific goals, and issued a policy statement for streamlining patch worked regulatory framework. It is also applying the Risk informed Defense in Depth Design which includes the extended design basis requirements. The IAEA General Conference adopted a Nuclear Safety Action Plan in September 2011 and organized an International Expert Meeting in March 2012 in order to analyze all relevant technical aspects from the Japanese incident in order to prevent a reoccurrence. Korea is not an exception to this trend. She was swift to conduct a special inspection of operating reactors and is now implementing many scheduled measures. Numerous facts and insights are now available, not only those gained from the Japanese incident, but also those gleaned from experts worldwide concerning a wide array of information. Therefore, this is an opportunistic time to summarize the insights that have been identified with respect to nuclear safety management and to overview

  6. Accident evolution and barrier function and accident evolution management modeling of nuclear power plant incidents

    Every analysis of an accident or an incident is founded on a more or less explicit model of what an accident is. On a general level, the current approach models an incident or accident in a nuclear power plant as a failure to maintain a stable state with all variables within their ranges of stability. There are two main sets of subsystems in continuous interaction making up the analyzed system, namely the human-organizational and the technical subsystems. Several different but related approaches can be chosen to model an accident. However, two important difficulties accompany such modeling: the high level of system complexity and the very infrequent occurrence of accidents. The current approach acknowledges these problems and focuses on modeling reported incidents/accidents or scenarios selected in probabilistic risk assessment analyses to be of critical importance for the safety of a plant

  7. Role of the man-machine interface in accident management strategies

    First, this paper gives a short general review on important safety issues in the field of man-machine interaction as expressed by important nuclear safety organisations. Then follows a summary discussion on what constitutes a modern Man-Machine Interface (MMI) and what is normally meant with accident management and accident management strategies. Furthermore, the paper focuses on three major issues in the context of accident management. First, the need for reliable information in accidents and how this can be obtained by additional computer technology. Second, the use of procedures is discussed, and basic MMI aspects of computer support for procedure presentation are identified followed by a presentation of a new approach on how to computerise procedures. Third, typical information needs for characteristic end-users in accidents, such as the control room operators, technical support staff and plant emergency teams, is discussed. Some ideas on how to apply virtual reality technology in accident management is also presented

  8. Development Process of Plant-specific Severe Accident Management Guidelines for Wolsong Nuclear Power Plants

    A severe accident, which occurred at the TMI in 1979 and Chernobyl in 1986, is an accident that exceeds design basis accidents and leads to significant core damage. The severe accident is the low possibility of occurrence but the high severity. To mitigate the consequences of the severe accidents, Korean Nuclear Safety Committee declared the Severe Accident Policy in 2001, which requested the development of Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs) for operating plants. SAMG is a symptom-based guidance that takes a set of actions to alleviate the outcomes of severe accidents and to get into the safe stable plant condition. The purpose of this paper is to presents the strategic development process of the PHWR SAMG. The guidelines consist of 5 categories: an emergency guide for the main control room (MCR) operators, a strategy implementing guide for the technical support center (TSC), six mitigation guides, a monitoring guide, and a termination guide

  9. Main post-accident management stakes: IRSN's point of view

    Full text of publication follows: Off site management of a radiological crisis covers two phases which need to be clearly distinguished even if there are links between them: emergency phase and recovery phase (also called late or post-accident phase). The presentation will deal with the latter, rather neglected up until recently, but conveying special attention from now on in France and at the international level. It is clear now that the long term management of a radiological or nuclear crisis cannot be reduced to merely site decontamination. Actually, environmental decontamination considerations would be only one amongst other essential economical, social, health, psychological, cultural, and symbolical concerns. This is why off site management of a radiological crisis requires innovative governance, in order to challenge such a complexity. This need for challenge led IRSN to have on the go technical developments and new governance modes reflection. 1) Technical developments: they deal with implementing an organisation, a set of methods, a platform of technical tools which would allow the stakeholders to carry out efficiently their mission during the recovery phase. For example, countermeasures for agricultural and urban rehabilitation are developed within the framework of the 6. PCRDT EURANOS programme. Teams from several countries are involved in common elaboration of rehabilitation strategies based on the best available knowledge. Besides this, simple operational decision aiding tools for the stakeholders (local administration, elected representatives, professional agricultural groups, etc.) are currently developed by IRSN within the framework of the nuclear post-accident exercises. IRSN is also involved in doctrinal reflections about the respective roles of radioactive measurements in the environment and radiological consequences calculation during emergency and recovery phases. Criteria for emergency countermeasures withdrawal are also currently under

  10. Program for accident and incident management support, AIMS

    A prototype of an advisory computer program is presented which could be used in monitoring and analyzing an ongoing incident in a nuclear power plant. The advisory computer program, called the Accident and Incident Management Support (AIMS), focuses on processing a set of data that is to be transmitted from a nuclear power plant to a national or regional emergency center during an incident. The AIMS program will assess the reactor conditions by processing the measured plant parameters. The applied model of the power plant contains a level of complexity that is comparable with the simplified plant model that the power plant operator uses. A standardized decay heat function and a steam water property library is used in the integral balance equations for mass and energy. A simulation of the station blackout accident of the Borssele plant is used to test the program. The program predicts successively: (1) the time of dryout of the steam generators, (2) the time of saturation of the primary system, and (3) the onset of core uncovery. The coolant system with the actual water levels will be displayed on the screen. (orig./HP)

  11. Development of the MIDAS GUI environment for severe accident management and analyses

    MIDAS is being developed at KAERI as an integrated severe accident analysis code with existing model modification and new model addition. Also restructuring of the data transfer scheme is going on to improve user's convenience. In this paper, various MIDAS GUI systems which are input management system IEDIT, variable plotting system IPLOT, severe accident training simulator SATS, and online guidance module HyperKAMG, are introduced. In addition, detail functions and usage of these systems for severe accident management and analyses are described

  12. Radiation accidents and their management: emphasis on the role of nuclear medicine professionals

    Bomanji, Jamshed B.; NOVRUZOV, Fuad; Vinjamuri, Sobhan

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale radiation accidents are few in number, but those that have occurred have subsequently led to strict regulation in most countries. Here, different accident scenarios involving exposure to radiation have been reviewed. A triage of injured persons has been summarized and guidance on management has been provided in accordance with the early symptoms. Types of casualty to be expected in atomic blasts have been discussed. Management at the scene of an accident has been described, with e...

  13. Review of current Severe Accident Management (SAM) approaches for Nuclear Power Plants in Europe

    HERMSMEYER Stephan; Iglesias, R.; Herranz, L; REER B.; SONNENKALB M; NOWACK H.; Stefanova, A.; Raimond, E.; CHATELARD P.; FOUCHER Laurent; BARNAK M.; MATEJOVIC P; PASCAL GHISLAIN; VELA GARCIA MONICA; SANGIORGI MARCO

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima accidents highlighted that both the in-depth understanding of such sequences and the development or improvement of adequate Severe Accident Management (SAM) measures are essential in order to further increase the safety of the nuclear power plants operated in Europe. To support this effort, the CESAM (Code for European Severe Accident Management) R&D project, coordinated by GRS, started in April 2013 for 4 years in the 7th EC Framework Programme of research and development of th...

  14. The management of risk to society from potential accidents

    The main report of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) Working Group on Risks to Society from Potential Major Accidents is presented. It is the outcome of a study by AEA Technology, the trading name of the UKAEA, in support of its own decision-making on risk management of the nuclear plants and laboratories it controls. The principles underlying decisions on social risk are of much broader applicability, however. The report is prefaced by an Executive Summary which is intended to be a stand-alone summary of the results of the study. The topics covered include: an examination of the nature of risk; the distinction to be drawn between individual and societal risk; existing risks; risk estimation; goals and targets as defined in terms of acceptance, tolerability and comparison between risks; regulations relating to risk targets; risk management decisions in theory and practice; societal risk management. A final chapter brings together the conclusions and recommendations from the preceding nine with respect to risk estimation, evaluation, management and overall approach. Two appendices deal with cost benefit analysis and provide a glossary and acronyms. (UK)

  15. Influence diagrams and decision trees for severe accident management

    A review of relevant methodologies based on Influence Diagrams (IDs), Decision Trees (DTs), and Containment Event Trees (CETs) was conducted to assess the practicality of these methods for the selection of effective strategies for Severe Accident Management (SAM). The review included an evaluation of some software packages for these methods. The emphasis was on possible pitfalls of using IDs and on practical aspects, the latter by performance of a case study that was based on an existing Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). The study showed that the use of a combined ID/DT model has advantages over CET models, in particular when conservatisms in the Level 2 PSA have been identified and replaced by fair assessments of the uncertainties involved. It is recommended to use ID/DT models complementary to CET models. (orig.)

  16. CATHARE Assessment of PACTEL LOCA Experiments with Accident Management

    Luben Sabotinov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the analysis results of three PACTEL experiments, carried out with the advanced thermal-hydraulic system computer CATHARE 2 code as a part of the second work package WP2 (analytical work of the EC project “Improved Accident Management of VVER nuclear power plants” (IMPAM-VVER. The three LOCA experiments, conducted on the Finnish test facility PACTEL (VVER-440 model, represent 7.4% cold leg breaks with combination of secondary bleed and primary bleed and feed and different actuation modes of the passive safety injection. The code was used for both defining and analyzing the experiments, and to assess its capabilities in predicting the associated complex VVER-related phenomena. The code results are in reasonable agreement with the measurements, and the important physical phenomena are well predicted, although still further improvement and validation might be necessary.

  17. A database system for the management of severe accident risk information, SARD

    Ahn, K. I.; Kim, D. H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce main features and functions of a PC Windows-based database management system, SARD, which has been developed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute for automatic management and search of the severe accident risk information. Main functions of the present database system are implemented by three closely related, but distinctive modules: (1) fixing of an initial environment for data storage and retrieval, (2) automatic loading and management of accident information, and (3) automatic search and retrieval of accident information. For this, the present database system manipulates various form of the plant-specific severe accident risk information, such as dominant severe accident sequences identified from the plant-specific Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) and accident sequence-specific information obtained from the representative severe accident codes (e.g., base case and sensitivity analysis results, and summary for key plant responses). The present database system makes it possible to implement fast prediction and intelligent retrieval of the required severe accident risk information for various accident sequences, and in turn it can be used for the support of the Level 2 PSA of similar plants and for the development of plant-specific severe accident management strategies.

  18. Waste management facility accident analysis (WASTE ACC) system: software for analysis of waste management alternatives

    This paper describes the Waste Management Facility Accident Analysis (WASTEunderscoreACC) software, which was developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to support the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). WASTEunderscoreACC is a decision support and database system that is compatible with Microsoft reg-sign Windows trademark. It assesses potential atmospheric releases from accidents at waste management facilities. The software provides the user with an easy-to-use tool to determine the risk-dominant accident sequences for the many possible combinations of process technologies, waste and facility types, and alternative cases described in the WM PEIS. In addition, its structure will allow additional alternative cases and assumptions to be tested as part of the future DOE programmatic decision-making process. The WASTEunderscoreACC system demonstrates one approach to performing a generic, systemwide evaluation of accident risks at waste management facilities. The advantages of WASTEunderscoreACC are threefold. First, the software gets waste volume and radiological profile data that were used to perform other WM PEIS-related analyses directly from the WASTEunderscoreMGMT system. Second, the system allows for a consistent analysis across all sites and waste streams, which enables decision makers to understand more fully the trade-offs among various policy options and scenarios. Third, the system is easy to operate; even complex scenario runs are completed within minutes

  19. Analytical support for SAMG development as a part of accident management

    The decision to built up and implement a comprehensive Accident Management Program applying best world-wide knowledge made during last year at Temelin. A small group of engineers dedicated to Accident Management was formed at Temelin NPP as a part of the plant organisation scheme. A short summary of these activities performed by this group is presented. (author)

  20. A study on the development of framework and supporting tools for severe accident management

    Through the extensive research on severe accidents, knowledge on severe accident phenomenology has constantly increased. Based upon such advance, probabilistic risk studies have been performed for some domestic plants to identify plant-specific vulnerabilities to severe accidents. Severe accident management is a program devised to cover such vulnerabilities, and leads to possible resolution of severe accident issues. This study aims at establishing severe accident management framework for domestic nuclear power plants where severe accident management program is not yet established. Emphasis is given to in-vessel and ex-vessel accident management strategies and instrumentation availability for severe accident management. Among the various strategies investigated, primary system depressurization is found to be the most effective means to prevent high pressure core melt scenarios. During low pressure core melt sequences, cooling of in-vessel molten corium through reactor cavity flooding is found to be effective. To prevent containment failure, containment filtered venting is found to be an effective measure to cope with long-term and gradual overpressurization, together with appropriate hydrogen control measure. Investigation of the availability of Yonggwang 3 and 4 instruments shows that most of instruments essential to severe accident management lose their desired functions during the early phase of severe accident progression, primarily due to the environmental condition exceeded ranges of instruments. To prevent instrument failure, a wider range of instruments are recommended to be used for some severe accident management strategies such as reactor cavity flooding. Severe accidents are generally known to accompany a number of complex phenomena and, therefore, it is very beneficial when severe accident management personnel is aided by appropriately designed supporting systems. In this study, a support system for severe accident management personnel is developed

  1. A preliminary study for the implementation of general accident management strategies

    Yang, Soo Hyung; Kim, Soo Hyung; Jeong, Young Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    To enhance the safety of nuclear power plants, implementation of accident management has been suggested as one of most important programs. Specially, accident management strategies are suggested as one of key elements considered in development of the accident management program. In this study, generally applicable accident management strategies to domestic nuclear power plants are identified through reviewing several accident management programs for the other countries and considering domestic conditions. Identified strategies are as follows; 1) Injection into the Reactor Coolant System, 2) Depressurize the Reactor Coolant System, 3) Depressurize the Steam Generator, 4) Injection into the Steam Generator, 5) Injection into the Containment, 6) Spray into the Containment, 7) Control Hydrogen in the Containment. In addition, the systems and instrumentation necessary for the implementation of each strategy are also investigated. 11 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  2. Proceedings of the Specialist Meeting on Severe Accident Management Programme Development

    Effective Accident Management planning can produce both a reduction in the frequency of severe accidents at nuclear power plants as well as the ability to mitigate a severe accident. The purpose of an accident management programme is to provide to the responsible plant staff the capability to cope with the complete range of credible severe accidents. This requires that appropriate instrumentation and equipment are available within the plant to enable plant staff to diagnose the faults and to implement appropriate strategies. The programme must also provide the necessary guidance, procedures, and training to assure that appropriate corrective actions will be implemented. One of the key issues to be discussed is the transition from control room operations and the associated emergency operating procedures to a technical support team approach (and the associated severe accident management strategies). Following a proposal made by the Senior Group of Experts on Severe Accident Management (SESAM), the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations decided to sponsor a Specialist Meeting on Severe Accident Management Programme Development. The general objectives of the Specialist Meeting were to exchange experience, views, and information among the participants and to discuss the status of severe accident management programmes. The meeting brought together utilities, accident management programme developers, personnel training programme developers, regulators, and researchers. In general, the tone of the Specialist Meeting - designed to promote progress, as contrasted with conferences or symposia where the state-of-the-art is presented - was to be rather practical, and focus on accident management programme development, applications, results, difficulties and improvements. As shown by the conclusions of the meeting, there is no doubt that this objective was widely attained

  3. Policy elements for post-accident management in the event of nuclear accident. Document drawn up by the Steering Committee for the Management of the Post-Accident Phase of a Nuclear Accident (CODIRPA). Final version - 5 October 2012

    Pursuant to the Inter-ministerial Directive on the Action of the Public Authorities, dated 7 April 2005, in the face of an event triggering a radiological emergency, the National directorate on nuclear safety and radiation protection (DGSNR), which became the Nuclear safety authority (ASN) in 2006, was tasked with working the relevant Ministerial offices in order to set out the framework and outline, prepare and implement the provisions needed to address post-accident situations arising from a nuclear accident. In June 2005, the ASN set up a Steering committee for the management of the post-accident phase in the event of nuclear accident or a radiological emergency situation (CODIRPA), put in charge of drafting the related policy elements. To carry out its work, CODIRPA set up a number of thematic working groups from 2005 on, involving in total several hundred experts from different backgrounds (local information commissions, associations, elected officials, health agencies, expertise agencies, authorities, etc.). The working groups reports have been published by the ASN. Experiments on the policy elements under construction were carried out at the local level in 2010 across three nuclear sites and several of the neighbouring municipalities, as well as during national crisis drills conducted since 2008. These works gave rise to two international conferences organised by ASN in 2007 and 2011. The policy elements prepared by CODIRPA were drafted in regard to nuclear accidents of medium scale causing short-term radioactive release (less than 24 hours) that might occur at French nuclear facilities equipped with a special intervention plan (PPI). They also apply to actions to be carried out in the event of accidents during the transport of radioactive materials. Following definitions of each stage of a nuclear accident, this document lists the principles selected by CODIRPA to support management efforts subsequent to a nuclear accident. Then, it presents the main

  4. Knowledge data base for severe accident management of nuclear power plants

    For the reinforcement of the safety of NPPs, the continuous efforts are very important to take in the up-to-date scientific and technical knowledge positively and to reflect them into the safety regulation. The purpose of this present study is to gather effectively the scientific and technical knowledge about the severe accident (SA) phenomena and the accident management (AM) for prevention and mitigation of severe accident, and to take in the experimental data by participating in the international cooperative experiments regarding the important SA phenomena and the effectiveness of accident management. Based on those data and knowledge, JNES is developing and improving severe accident analysis models to maintain the severe accident analysis codes and the accident management knowledge base for assessment of the NPPs in Japan. The activities in fiscal year 2010 are as follows; Experimental study on OECD/NEA projects such as MCCI, SERENA, SFP and international cooperative PSI-ARTIST project, and analytical study on accident management review of new plant and making regulation for severe accident. (author)

  5. Knowledge data base for severe accident management of nuclear power plants

    For the reinforcement of the safety of NPPs, the continuous efforts are very important to take in the up-to-date scientific and technical knowledge positively and to reflect them into the safety regulation. The purpose of this present study is to gather effectively the scientific and technical knowledge about the severe accident (SA) phenomena and the accident management (AM) for prevention and mitigation of severe accident, and to take in the experimental data by participating in the international cooperative experiments regarding the important SA phenomena and the effectiveness of accident management. Based on those data and knowledge, JNES is developing and improving severe accident analysis models to maintain the severe accident analysis codes and the accident management knowledge base for assessment of the NPPs in Japan. The activities in fiscal year 2011 are as follows; Experimental study on OECD/NEA projects such as MCCI, SERENA, SFP and international cooperative PSI-ARTIST project, and analytical study on accident management review of new plant and making regulation for severe accident. (author)

  6. Accident management to ensure containment integrity at Seabrook Station

    This paper reports that PSA results for Seabrook Station have shown capability and strength of the large dry primary containment to withstand early pressure loads that could result from a potential severe core damage event. To build upon a high degree of confidence that containment integrity would be maintained in light of issues such as direct containment heating (DCH) and induced steam generator tube rupture (ISGTR), select accident management strategies have been evaluated for the plant. These strategies include emergency response technical support center procedures and hardware modifications to eliminate the potential for DCH and ISGTR for high pressure core melt scenarios. Operator actions that would result from these strategies include primary system depressurization using the pressurizer power-operated relief valves (PORV) and use of fire water pumps to prevent overheating and thermal creep rupture of the steam generator tubes. The risk management effectiveness of these strategies was quantified with the use of a full-scope Level 3 PSA model of Seabrook Station. A byproduct of this evaluation is a current assessment of the risk significance of DCH and ISGTR for this paper

  7. Developing and validating severe accident management guidelines using SAMPSON-RELAP/SCDAPSIM.MOD3.4

    The development and validation of Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs) must consider complex thermal-hydraulic and severe accident phenomena. Yet, many of the simplified integral Severe Accident codes, that have been used widely to develop SAMGs in Europe, Asia, and the United States, cannot accurately predict many of these complex interactions. By contrast, detailed codes such as SAMPSON-RELAP/SCDAPSIM have shown, through comparison with the TMI-2 accident and experiments, that they can predict such complex behavior. This paper describes the merger of SAMPSON with RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD3.4, reviews the severe accident phenomena important for Severe Accident Management, and then describes the potential impact of using SAMPSON-RELAP/SCDAPSIM on the development and validation of SAMGs. A companion paper, being presented at this conference provides an example of the application of SAMPSON-RELAP/SCDAPSIM for the development and validation of a SAMG for a Nuclear Power Plant. (authors)

  8. Accidents - Chernobyl accident; Accidents - accident de Tchernobyl

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This file is devoted to the Chernobyl accident. It is divided in four parts. The first part concerns the accident itself and its technical management. The second part is relative to the radiation doses and the different contaminations. The third part reports the sanitary effects, the determinists ones and the stochastic ones. The fourth and last part relates the consequences for the other European countries with the case of France. Through the different parts a point is tackled with the measures taken after the accident by the other countries to manage an accident, the cooperation between the different countries and the groups of research and studies about the reactors safety, and also with the international medical cooperation, specially for the children, everything in relation with the Chernobyl accident. (N.C.)

  9. Management of a severe accident on a pressurised water reactor in France

    This brief document defines what a severe accident is on a nuclear reactor, indicates the different failure modes which have been defined (vapour explosion in the reactor vessel, hydrogen explosion, and so on). It describes the management of a core fusion accident for pressurized water reactors, for which a guide has been designed, the GIAG (intervention guide for a severe accident situation). The principles of such an intervention are described, and then the approach for an EPR reactor

  10. Proceedings of the workshop on operator training for severe accident management and instrumentation capabilities during severe accidents

    This Workshop was organised in collaboration with Electricite de France (Service Etudes et Projets Thermiques et Nucleaires). There were 34 participants, representing thirteen OECD Member countries, the Russian Federation and the OECD/NEA. Almost half the participants represented utilities. The second largest group was regulatory authorities and their technical support organisations. Basically, the Workshop was a follow-up to the 1997 Second Specialist Meeting on Operator Aids for Severe Accident Management (SAMOA-2) [Reports NEA/CSNI/R(97)10 and 27] and to the 1992 Specialist Meeting on Instrumentation to Manage Severe Accidents [Reports NEA/CSNI/R(92)11 and (93)3]. It was aimed at sharing and comparing progress made and experience gained from these two meetings, emphasizing practical lessons learnt during training or incidents as well as feedback from instrumentation capability assessment. The objectives of the Workshop were therefore: - to exchange information on recent and current activities in the area of operator training for SAM, and lessons learnt during the management of real incidents ('operator' is defined hear as all personnel involved in SAM); - to compare capabilities and use of instrumentation available during severe accidents; - to monitor progress made; - to identify and discuss differences between approaches relevant to reactor safety; - and to make recommendations to the Working Group on the Analysis and Management of Accidents and the CSNI (GAMA). The meeting confirmed that only limited information is needed for making required decisions for SAM. In most cases existing instrumentation should be able to provide usable information. Additional instrumentation requirements may arise from particular accident management measures implemented in some plants. In any case, depending on the time frame where the instrumentation should be relied upon, it should be assessed whether it is likely to survive the harsh environmental conditions it will be exposed

  11. Implementation of Severe Accident Management Strategy at the Loviisa NPP

    A comprehensive severe accident management (SAM) strategy has been developed by Fortum for the Loviisa NPP in Finland. The strategy ensures reliable prevention and mitigation of containment - threatening phenomena, and it is built around a set of SAM safety functions. This paper focusses on the implementation status of the new SAM approach. We describe how and to what extent the modifications with regards to containment isolation, primary system depressurization, hydrogen mitigation, in-vessel retention of corium, and long-term containment cooling have been carried out. When implementing SAM, it was also necessary to modify the emergency response organisation to include a SAM support team. SAM guidelines, procedures and a SAM Handbook have been written. The automatic containment isolation function has been studied carefully within the SAM project. A successful isolation function is of paramount importance, when radioactive releases from the core can be expected to occur soon. Certain modifications have been carried out so that it is now possible to manually actuate missing isolation signals and to lock isolation status. New local control centres have been built to enable manual closure of certain isolation valves. Several new containment leak-tightness measurements have been installed. New depressurization valves, manually operated relief valves, were installed in 1996 for primary system depressurization purposes. The modifications to the ice condenser doors have been carried out in the years 2000 and 2001. Passive auto-catalytic recombiners have been successfully field-tested in the Loviisa containment atmosphere. We aim for installation in the year 2002. The locations of the glow plugs are being updated in a currently ongoing project. In-vessel retention of molten corium through external cooling of the reactor pressure vessel required certain plant modifications e.g. in order to guarantee access of water to the RPV wall. Most significantly, the support structures

  12. Radiological protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations resulting from a nuclear accident

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Hattori, Takatoshi

    2012-01-01

    In environmental remediation after nuclear accidents, radioactive wastes have to be appropriately managed in existing exposure situations with contamination resulting from the emission of radionuclides by such accidents. In this paper, a framework of radiation protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations for application to the practical and reasonable waste management in contaminated areas, referring to related ICRP recommendations was proposed. In the proposed...

  13. Regulatory requirements on accident management and emergency preparedness - concept of nuclear and radiation safety during beyond-design-basis accidents

    Actual practice the and proposals for further activities in the field of Accident Management (AM) in the member countries of the Co-operation Forum of WWER regulators and in Western countries have been assessed. Further the results of the last working group on AM , the overview of interactions of severe accident research and the regulatory positions in various countries, IAEA reports, practice in Switzerland and Finland, were taken into consideration. From this information, the working group derived recommendations on Accident Management. The general proposals correspond to the present state of the art on AM. They do not describe the whole spectra of recommendations on AM for NPPs with WWER reactors. A basis for the implementation of an AM program is given, which could be extended in a follow-up working group. The developments and research concerning AM have to be continued. The positions of various countries with regard to the 'Interactions of severe accident research and the regulatory positions' are given. On the basis of the working group proposals, the WWER regulators could set regulatory requirements and support further developments of AM strategies, making use of the benefits of common features of NPPs with WWER reactors. Concerted actions in the field of AM between the WWER regulators would bundle the development of a unified concept of recommendations and speed up the implementation of AM measures in order to minimise the risks involved in nuclear power generation

  14. Applicability of Phebus FP results to severe accident safety evaluations and management measures

    The international Phebus FP (Fission Product) programme is the largest research programme in the world investigating core degradation and radioactive product release should a core meltdown accident occur in a light water reactor plant. Three integral experiments have already been performed. The experimental database obtained so far contains a wealth of information to validate the computer codes used for safety and accident management assessment

  15. Opportunities for international cooperation in nuclear accident preparedness and management: Procedural and organizational measures

    In this paper we address a difficult problem: How can we create and maintain preparedness for nuclear accidents? Our research has shown that this can be broken down into two questions: (1) How can we maintain the resources and expertise necessary to manage an accident once it occurs? and (2) How can we develop plans that will help in actually managing an accident once it occurs? It is apparently beyond the means of ordinary human organizations to maintain the capability to respond to a rare event. (A rare event is defined as something like an accident that only happens once every five years or so, somewhere in the world.) Other more immediate pressures tend to capture the resources that should, in a cost/benefit sense, be devoted to maintaining the capability. This paper demonstrates that some of the important factors behind that phenomenon can be mitigated by an international body that promotes and enforces preparedness. Therefore this problem provides a unique opportunity for international cooperation: an international organization promoting and enforcing preparedness could help save us from our own organizational failings. Developing useful accident management plans can be viewed as a human performance problem. It can be restated: how can we support and off-load the accident managers so that their tasks are more feasible? This question reveals the decision analytic perspective of this paper. That is, we look at the problem managing a nuclear accident by focusing on the decision makers, the accident managers: how do we create a decision frame for the accident managers to best help them manage? The decision frame is outlined and discussed. 9 refs

  16. A Study on Reinforcement of the Accident Management System in Korea

    The aim of this study is to present the status of post-Fukushima actions with respect to accident management and also provides the current status of developing EDMGs and applicability of a FLEX strategy in Korea. As part of the post-Fukushima actions in Korea, SAMGs will be revised to improve the effectiveness of accident management. For this purpose, it is recommended to revise the EOPs and SAMGs and establish the EDMGs with consideration of prolonged SBO, spent fuel pool cooling, using mobile equipment for accident control, feedback of the implementation of the action items of the special safety inspection, multiple severe accidents for all reactors at a site. It is considered that the FLEX strategy may be useful to mitigate the accidents like Fukushima. Therefore, it is recommended to adopt this strategy including provision of the equipment with protection from external events. The Fukushima accident revealed that EOPs and SAMGs were not effectively coping with and mitigating the severe accident caused by extreme natural hazards such as earthquake and tsunami. The accident indicated needs for strengthening the existing accident management procedures such as emergency operating procedures (EOPs) and severe accident management guidelines (SAMGs). In particular, these procedures should address the possibility of extreme natural hazards causing a prolonged SBO condition, which affects multiple-units and Spent Fuel Pools (SFPs) (NTTF Recommendation 9). In addition, in order to prevent and mitigate the potential damage in an extensive scale at a multi-unit site due to external events, fire, various kinds of countermeasures are required by the Regulatory Body. These are the follow-up actions to the special safety inspection carried out just after the Fukushima accident and the stress tests for old plants. Especially, the Extensive Damage Mitigation Guidelines (EDMGs) are being provided by the utility in conjunction with adoption of the FLEX strategy (diverse and

  17. Development of a reactor vessel failure diagnosis system for accident management

    Diagnosis of vessel failure provides for operators and TSC personnel very important information to manage the severe accident in nuclear power plant. However, operators can not diagnose the reactor vessel failure by watching the temporal trends of some parameters because they never have experienced the severe accident. Therefore, this study proposes a method on the diagnosis of the PWR vessel failure using a Spatiotemporal Neural Network (STN). STNs can deal directly with both the spatial and the temporal aspects of input signals and can well identify a time-varying problem. The target patterns are generated from MAAP code. Vessel failure diagnosis has been performed for 8 accidents and the developed STNs have been verified for untrained three severe accidents. STNs identifies the vessel failure time and the initiating events. For example, when large break LOCA (break size = 0.16 m2) is used for input accident scenario, only the output value for the target pattern of LBLOCA is activated greater than the threshold value near the real vessel failure. To validate vessel failure diagnosis system and to train severe accident to operators, extensive severe accident simulator is to be an absolute necessity. Therefore, a simplified severe accident simulator, SIMAAP (severe accident Simulator based on MAAP), has been developed. SIMAAP simulates the various severe accident progress through on-line communication with MAAP

  18. A study on the use of neural network for severe accident management

    Based on the consensus that the course and consequence of a severe core damage accident can be greatly influenced by the operators' action, there have been extensive efforts to establish severe accident management program. A severe accident management process is essentially a sequence of decision making with a wide variety of available information under the highly uncertain condition, aimed at successful termination of accident progression or consequence minimization. For operators to take correct and timely accident management actions, they should be informed of the accident progression. Some key events, such as onset of core uncovery, core-melt initiation, reactor vessel lower head failure, containment failure, etc., act as landmarks for operators to make decisions in severe accident management process. Thus it is of critical importance to identify the timing at which such events occur in accident management. Unfortunately, it is difficult task partly due to phenomenological complexity and partly due to the lack of instrumentation reliability in severe accident environment, making the traditional procedural or rule-based approach inappropriate to be adopted to this end. Instead a technique, called artificial neural network, has been successfully applied to the similar problem domain out of various disciplines including nuclear industry. This paper presents a study on the application of a special kind of artificial neural network having the capability of recognizing time-varying patterns, called spatiotemporal network (STN), to the event timing prediction which is an important sub function of integrated computer supporting system for severe accident management. As the first trial, concentration was put on the identification of reactor vessel lower head failure which is considered the most critical events discriminating between so called in-vessel and ex-vessel accident management phases. Several sets of seven parameter signals from MAAP-based severe accident

  19. Solid waste accident analysis in support of the Savannah River Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement

    The potential for facility accidents and the magnitude of their impacts are important factors in the evaluation of the solid waste management addressed in the Environmental Impact Statement. The purpose of this document is to address the potential solid waste management facility accidents for comparative use in support of the Environmental Impact Statement. This document must not be construed as an Authorization Basis document for any of the SRS waste management facilities. Because of the time constraints placed on preparing this accident impact analysis, all accident information was derived from existing safety documentation that has been prepared for SRS waste management facilities. A list of facilities to include in the accident impact analysis was provided as input by the Savannah River Technology Section. The accident impact analyses include existing SRS waste management facilities as well as proposed facilities. Safety documentation exists for all existing and many of the proposed facilities. Information was extracted from this existing documentation for this impact analysis. There are a few proposed facilities for which safety analyses have not been prepared. However, these facilities have similar processes to existing facilities and will treat, store, or dispose of the same type of material that is in existing facilities; therefore, the accidents can be expected to be similar

  20. The philosophy of severe accident management in the US

    The US NRC has put forth the initial steps in what is viewed as the resolution of the severe accident issue. Underlying this process is a fundamental philosophy that if followed will likely lead to an order of magnitude reduction in the risk of severe accidents. Thus far, this philosophy has proven cost effective through improved performance. This paper briefly examines this philosophy and the next step in closure of the severe accident issue, the IPE. An example of the authors experience with determinist. (author)

  1. Medical management of radiological accidents in non-specialized clinics: mistakes and lessons

    In 1996-2002 three radiological accidents were developed in Georgia. There were some people injured in those accidents. During medical management of the injured some mistakes and errors were revealed both in diagnostics and scheme of the treatment. The goal of this article is to summarize medical management of the mentioned radiological accidents, to estimate reasons of mistakes and errors, to present the lessons drawn in result of Georgia radiological accidents. There was no clinic with specialized profile and experience. Accordingly due to having no relevant experience late diagnosis can be considered as the main error. It had direct influence on the patients' health and results of treatment. Lessons to be drawn after analyzing Georgian radiological accidents: 1. informing medical staff about radiological injuries (pathogenesis, types, symptoms, clinical course, principles of treatment and etc.); 2. organization of training and meetings in non-specialized clinics or medical institutions for medical staff; 3. preparation of informational booklets and guidelines.(author)

  2. Marine Accidents in Northern Nigeria: Causes, Prevention and Management

    Lawal Bello Dogarawa

    2012-01-01

    Boat mishaps tend to be increasing in Nigeria in spite of all regulatory measures which have been taken to prevent and control marine accidents. Boat mishaps could occur anywhere water transportation takes place. However, there is a general impression that water transportation takes place only in the riverine areas located in Southern Nigeria but, this paper reports about marine accident cases in Northern Nigeria. It evaluates the safety measures put in place by operators and other institutio...

  3. Development of the MIDAS GUI environment for severe accident management and analyses

    Kim, K. R.; Park, S. H.; Kim, D. H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    MIDAS is being developed at KAERI as an integrated severe accident analysis code with existing model modification and new model addition. Also restructuring of the data transfer scheme is going on to improve user's convenience. In this paper, various MIDAS GUI systems which are input management system IEDIT, variable plotting system IPLOT, severe accident training simulator SATS, and online guidance module HyperKAMG, are introduced. In addition, detail functions and usage of these systems for severe accident management and analyses are described.

  4. Application of simulation techniques for accident management training in nuclear power plants

    Many IAEA Member States operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) are at present developing accident management programmes (AMPs) for the prevention and mitigation of severe accidents. However, the level of implementation varies significantly between NPPs. The exchange of experience and best practices can considerably contribute to the quality, and facilitate the implementation of AMPs at the plants. Various IAEA activities assist countries in the area of accident management. Several publications have been developed which provide guidance and support in establishing accident management at NPPs. The defence in depth concept in nuclear safety requires that, although highly unlikely, beyond design basis and severe accident conditions should also be considered, in spite of the fact that they were not explicitly addressed in the original design of currently operating nuclear power plants (NPPs). Defence in depth is physically achieved by means of four successive barriers (fuel matrix, cladding, primary coolant boundary, and containment) that prevent the release of radioactive material. These barriers are protected by a set of design measures at three levels, including prevention of abnormal operation and failures (level 1), control of abnormal operation and detection of failures (level 2) and control of accidents within the design basis (level 3). Should these first three levels fail to ensure the structural integrity of the core, additional efforts are made at the fourth level of defence in depth in order to further reduce the risks. The objective at level 4 is to ensure that both the likelihood of an accident entailing significant core damage (severe accident) and the magnitude of radioactive releases following a severe accident are kept as low as reasonably achievable. The term 'accident management' refers to the overall range of capabilities of a NPP and its personnel to both prevent and mitigate accident situations that could lead to severe fuel damage in the reactor

  5. Accident analysis for transuranic waste management alternatives in the U.S. Department of Energy waste management program

    Preliminary accident analyses and radiological source term evaluations have been conducted for transuranic waste (TRUW) as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) effort to manage storage, treatment, and disposal of radioactive wastes at its various sites. The approach to assessing radiological releases from facility accidents was developed in support of the Office of Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS). The methodology developed in this work is in accordance with the latest DOE guidelines, which consider the spectrum of possible accident scenarios in the implementation of various actions evaluated in an EIS. The radiological releases from potential risk-dominant accidents in storage and treatment facilities considered in the EM PEIS TRUW alternatives are described in this paper. The results show that significant releases can be predicted for only the most severe and extremely improbable accidents sequences

  6. Initial medical management of criticality accident victim; Conduite a tenir aux victimes d'un accident de criticite

    Miele, A.; Bebaron-Jacobs, L

    2005-07-01

    The extremely severe criticality accidents known to this day, and the subsequent deaths recorded (Sarov 1997 and Tokai Mura 1999), demonstrate the need for sustained surveillance and constant adapted training for the teams in charge of irradiated and/or contaminated victims. The aim of this work group, composed of occupational health services and associated medical biology laboratories, is to present, in leaflet format, the essential data on the documentation and the conduct to be held when facing the victims of a criticality accident. The studies of this work group confirm the difficulties involved in managing this type of accident, both from the dosimetric evaluation point of view and from the therapeutic management point of view. That is why several research themes and perspectives are developed. During the different phases of victim triage, the recommendations given on these leaflets describe the operational conducts to be held. This work will have to be updated according to the evolution in knowledge and means: short and long term effects of exposure to neutrons, multi-competence hospital cooperation, expertise networks related to dosimetric reconstitution. (authors)

  7. Help guides for post-accident consequence management: farm activities and exiting the emergency phase

    After having recalled the main actions foreseen in the PPIs (plans particuliers d'intervention, intervention specific plans) in case of radionuclide release in the environment after a nuclear accident, i.e. sheltering and ingestion of steady iodine, and also indicated the different phases of consequence management (preparation, emergency and post-accident phases), this report describes and comments the contents of two guides published by the IRSN (the French Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety Institute) and dealing with the management of post-accident consequences. The first one is a guide to aid to decision-making for the management of the agricultural sector in case of nuclear accident, and the second one is a guide for the preparation of the end of the emergency phase in which actions to be performed during the first week after the end of accidental releases are described

  8. Second Specialist Meeting on operator aids for severe accident management: summary and conclusions

    The second OECD Specialist Meeting on operator aids for severe accident management (SAMOA-2) was held in Lyon, France (1997), and was attended by 33 specialists representing ten OECD member countries. As for SAMOA-1, the scope of SAMOA-2 was limited to operator aids for accident management which were in operation or could be soon. The meeting concentrated on the management of accidents beyond the design basis, including tools which might be extended from the design basis range into the severe accident area. Relevant simulation tools for operator training were also part of the scope of the meeting. 20 papers were presented; there were two demonstrations of computerized systems (the ATLAS analysis simulator developed by GRS, and EDF's 'Simulateur Post Accidentels' (SIPA). The three sessions dealt with operator aids for control rooms, operator aids for technical support centres, and simulation tools for operator training. The various papers for each session are summarized

  9. Objective provision tree application to the effectiveness evaluation of accident management guidelines

    After the Fukushima accident in 2011, various lessons and safety enhancement action items were announced by national regulatory bodies. Among those items, the enforcement of procedural efficiency verification for accidents management guidelines including emergency operating procedures (EOPs), severe accident management guides (SAMGs) and extensive damage mitigating guidelines (EDMG) if applicable, was raised. The Objective Provision Tree (OPT) method is a top down approach which starts from the level of Defense in Depth (DiD), objectives and barriers, safety functions, challenges, mechanisms and finally ends with provisions. The benefit of OPT application to safety concerns includes that the OPT enables the comprehensive review for the verification of consistency and integrity of safety requirements for a specific safety issue. In this study, the preliminary framework for the application of OPT to the effectiveness evaluation of accident management guideline was introduced

  10. The Management of Beyond Design Basis Accidents with Loss of Cooling at NPPs with WWER

    The analysis of Ukrainian guidance on management of beyond design basis accidents at NPP is carried out. International experience on development regulatory documents in this area is considered. Directions for improvements of regulatory documents for NPPs with WWER are determined. For the analysis PSA results of the Ukrainian NPPs are used. It is shown that the primary circuit LOCAs are the dominant contributors of CDF. The set of symptoms for each LOCA group is developed. To develop the management algorithms for each accident group the approach to grouping of accident sequences on the basis of critical configurations of systems is submitted. Examples of necessary changes for improvement of guidance on management of beyond design basis accidents at NPPs with WWER are presented.(author)

  11. Sisifo-gas a computerised system to support severe accident training and management

    Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) will have to be prepared to face the management of severe accidents, through the development of Severe Accident Guides and sophisticated systems of calculation, as a supporting to the decision-making. SISIFO-GAS is a flexible computerized tool, both for the supporting to accident management and for education and training in severe accident. It is an interactive system, a visual and an easily handle one, and needs no specific knowledge in MAAP code to make complicate simulations in conditions of severe accident. The system is configured and adjusted to work in a BWR/6 technology plant with Mark III Containment, as it is Cofrentes NPP. But it is easily portable to every other kind of reactor, having the level 2 PSA (probabilistic safety analysis) of the plant to be able to establish the categories of the source term and the most important sequences in the progression of the accident. The graphic interface allows following in a very intuitive and formative way the evolution and the most relevant events in the accident, in the both system's way of work, training and management. (authors)

  12. Research on the management of the wastes from plant accidents

    The accident in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant released large amount of radio-nuclides and contaminated wide areas within and out of the site. The decontamination, storage, treatment and disposal of generated wastes are now under planning. Though the regulations for radioactive wastes discharged from normal operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities have been prepared, it is necessary to make amendments of those regulations to deal with wastes from the severe accidents which may have much different features on nuclides contents, or possibility to accompany hazardous chemical materials. Characteristics, treatment and disposal of wastes from accidents were surveyed by literature and the radionuclide migration from the assumed temporally storage yards of the disaster debris was analyzed for consideration of future regulation. (author)

  13. Investigation of the management of the wastes from plant accident

    The accident in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant discharged large amount of radio-nuclides and contaminated wide areas in and out of the site. The decontamination, storage, treatment and disposal of generated wastes are now under planning. Though regulations for the radioactive wastes arisen from normal operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities have been prepared, it is necessary to make amendment of those regulations to deal with wastes from the severe accident which may have much different features on nuclides contents, or possible accompanying hazardous chemical materials. Characteristics of wastes from accidents in foreign nuclear installations, and the treatment and the disposal of those wastes were surveyed by literature and radionuclide migration from the assumed temporally storage yards of the disaster debris was analyzed for consideration of future regulation. (author)

  14. Example of severe accident management guidelines validation and verification using full scope simulator

    The purpose of Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMG) is to provide guidelines to mitigate and control beyond design bases accidents. These guidelines are to be used by the technical support center that is established at the plant within one hour after the beginning of the accident as a technical support for the main control room operators. Since some of the accidents can progress very fast there are also two guidelines provided for the main control room operators. The first one is to be used if the core damage occurs and the TSC is not established yet and the second one after technical support center become operational. After SG replacement and power uprate in year 2000, NPP Krsko developed Rev.1 of these procedures, which have been validated and verified during one-week effort. Plant specific simulator capable of simulating severe accidents was extensively used.(author)

  15. Radioactive waste management after NPP accident: Post-Chernobyl experience

    As a result of the Chernobyl NPP accident a very large amount of so-called 'Chernobyl waste' were generated in the territory of Belarus, which was contaminated much more than all other countries. These wastes relate mainly to two following categories: low-level waste (LLW) and new one 'Conventionally Radioactive Waste' (CRW). Neither regulations nor technology and equipment were sufficiently developed for such an amount and kind of waste before the accident. It required proper decisions in respect of regulations, treatment, transportation, disposal of waste, etc. (author)

  16. Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management

    The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies

  17. Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies.

  18. Populations protection and territories management in nuclear emergency and post-accident situation

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during these conference days. Twenty seven presentations out of 29 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - radiological and dosimetric consequences in nuclear accident situation: impact on the safety approach and protection stakes (E. Cogez); 2 - organisation of public authorities in case of emergency and in post-event situation (in case of nuclear accident or radiological terror attack in France and abroad), (O. Kayser); 3 - ORSEC plan and 'nuclear' particular intervention plan (PPI), (C. Guenon); 4 - thyroid protection by stable iodine ingestion: European perspective (J.R. Jourdain); 5 - preventive distribution of stable iodine: presentation of the 2009/2010 public information campaign (E. Bouchot); 6 - 2009/2010 iodine campaign: presentation and status (O. Godino); 7 - populations protection in emergency and post-accident situation in Switzerland (C. Murith); 8 - CIPR's recommendations on the management of emergency and post-accident situations (J. Lochard); 9 - nuclear exercises in France - status and perspectives (B. Verhaeghe); 10 - the accidental rejection of uranium at the Socatri plant: lessons learnt from crisis management (D. Champion); 11 - IRE's radiological accident of August 22, 2008 (C. Vandecasteele); 12 - presentation of the CEA's crisis national organisation: coordination centre in case of crisis, technical teams, intervention means (X. Pectorin); 13 - coordination and realisation of environmental radioactivity measurement programs, exploitation and presentation of results: status of IRSN's actions and perspectives (P. Dubiau); 14 - M2IRAGE - measurements management in the framework of geographically-assisted radiological interventions in the environment (O. Gerphagnon and H. Roche); 15 - post-accident management of a nuclear accident - the CODIRPA works (I. Mehl-Auget); 16 - nuclear post-accident: new challenges of crisis expertise (D. Champion); 17 - aid guidebooks

  19. Accidents - Chernobyl accident

    This file is devoted to the Chernobyl accident. It is divided in four parts. The first part concerns the accident itself and its technical management. The second part is relative to the radiation doses and the different contaminations. The third part reports the sanitary effects, the determinists ones and the stochastic ones. The fourth and last part relates the consequences for the other European countries with the case of France. Through the different parts a point is tackled with the measures taken after the accident by the other countries to manage an accident, the cooperation between the different countries and the groups of research and studies about the reactors safety, and also with the international medical cooperation, specially for the children, everything in relation with the Chernobyl accident. (N.C.)

  20. A training simulator to support the Loviisa VVER-440 severe accident management programme

    A simulation tool for training operators and technical support personnel for severe accidents is being developed at VTT. The system will be accomplished by implementing severe accident models into the APROS - Advanced Process Simulator - environment, which already includes a model of the Loviisa VVER-440 plant. The system development is closely coupled with the plant severe accident management programme. The Loviisa severe accident management programme consists of four high level actions: primary system depressurization, retention of molten core within the pressure vessel, hydrogen control and containment external spray cooling. The training system will at the first stage simulate in simple terms the key phenomena associated with these actions and their effect on the plant response. The paper describes the system objectives, outline and modelling philosophy

  1. Influence of accident management strategies on source terms of VVER-1000-type reactors

    The source term can be mitigated by effective accident management. The goal of this work is the investigation of the influence of a number of accident management strategies on the source term of a VVER-1000-type reactor. This work is one of a series of studies investigating the behavior of a VVER-1000-type reactor during severe accidents. In particular, it is based on the study in which the pressure rise in the containment and the melt-through of the cavity bottom was investigated, indicating potential mitigation strategies. To rate the usefulness of these strategies, the source terms of selected scenarios are also calculated in the present work. All the calculations were performed using the Source Term Code Package; hydrogen explosions are not considered. For the first time, the source term behavior of these scenarios was simulated up to the very end of the accident the solidification of the melt

  2. Application of probabilistic methods to accident analysis at waste management facilities

    Probabilistic risk assessment is a technique used to systematically analyze complex technical systems, such as nuclear waste management facilities, in order to identify and measure their public health, environmental, and economic risks. Probabilistic techniques have been utilized at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, to evaluate the probability of a catastrophic waste hoist accident. A probability model was developed to represent the hoisting system, and fault trees were constructed to identify potential sequences of events that could result in a hoist accident. Quantification of the fault trees using statistics compiled by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) indicated that the annual probability of a catastrophic hoist accident at WIPP is less than one in 60 million. This result allowed classification of a catastrophic hoist accident as ''not credible'' at WIPP per DOE definition. Potential uses of probabilistic techniques at other waste management facilities are discussed

  3. Requirement analysis of computerized procedures of AP1000 severe accident management guidelines

    Computerized procedures are drawing increased interest for application in nuclear power plants to enhance operator performance, especially in the accident conditions. AP1000 Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMG) are established to protect the containment fission product boundaries and to mitigate the accident consequences. This paper introduces the AP1000 SAMG, and according to the functional requirements of the Computerized Procedure System (CPS), some requirements are analyzed. These requirements are special to the Computerized AP1000 SAMG, which need to be especially noticed in the design process. (author)

  4. Information processing system and neural network utilization for accident management support

    Tuerkcan, E. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Ciftcioglu, Oe. [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Faculty of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Verhoef, J.P. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Ouden, A.C.B. den [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)

    1996-03-01

    Information processing system with data sensor fusion technology together with potential application of neural network is developed. System is designed for operator in the form of Accident Management Support (AMS) with verification and validation (V and V) for cases of severe accident. To this end, primarily noise analysis techniques are used and their merits are merged for exhaustive information extraction in accident cases where the data from sensors may be obscured by drift, modulation so forth or even incomplete. The information from different methodologies are processed in synergetic form (data sensor fusion) by means of statistical distance measures and neural networks with optimal decisions. (orig.).

  5. Hydrogen management and the metamorphosis of NRC policy on severe nuclear accident risk

    From the early days of light water reactor developments, it was understood that, following a loss-of-coolant accident, hydrogen could accumulate inside the primary reactor containment as a result of: (1) metal-water reaction involving the fuel element cladding; (2) the radiolytic decomposition of the water in the reactor core and the containment sump; (3) the corrosion of certain construction materials by some spray solutions; and (4) possible synergistic effects of chemical, thermal and radiolytic by-products of accidents on containment protective coatings and electric cable insulation. The NRC's policy decisions regarding hydrogen management prior to and in light of the TMI-2 loss of coolant accident are discussed

  6. Information processing system and neural network utilization for accident management support

    Information processing system with data sensor fusion technology together with potential application of neural network is developed. System is designed for operator in the form of Accident Management Support (AMS) with verification and validation (V and V) for cases of severe accident. To this end, primarily noise analysis techniques are used and their merits are merged for exhaustive information extraction in accident cases where the data from sensors may be obscured by drift, modulation so forth or even incomplete. The information from different methodologies are processed in synergetic form (data sensor fusion) by means of statistical distance measures and neural networks with optimal decisions. (orig.)

  7. Facility accident considerations in the US Department of Energy Waste Management Program

    A principal consideration in developing waste management strategies is the relative importance of Potential radiological and hazardous releases to the environment during postulated facility accidents with respect to protection of human health and the environment. The Office of Environmental Management (EM) within the US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently formulating an integrated national program to manage the treatment, storage, and disposal of existing and future wastes at DOE sites. As part of this process, a Programmatic Environmental impact Statement (PEIS) is being prepared to evaluate different waste management alternatives. This paper reviews analyses that have been Performed to characterize, screen, and develop source terms for accidents that may occur in facilities used to store and treat the waste streams considered in these alternatives. Preliminary results of these analyses are discussed with respect to the comparative potential for significant releases due to accidents affecting various treatment processes and facility configurations. Key assumptions and sensitivities are described

  8. Causal Factors and Adverse Events of Aviation Accidents and Incidents Related to Integrated Vehicle Health Management

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Jones, Sharon M.; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Leone, Karen M.; Sandifer, Carl E.

    2011-01-01

    Causal factors in aviation accidents and incidents related to system/component failure/malfunction (SCFM) were examined for Federal Aviation Regulation Parts 121 and 135 operations to establish future requirements for the NASA Aviation Safety Program s Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Project. Data analyzed includes National Transportation Safety Board (NSTB) accident data (1988 to 2003), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) incident data (1988 to 2003), and Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) incident data (1993 to 2008). Failure modes and effects analyses were examined to identify possible modes of SCFM. A table of potential adverse conditions was developed to help evaluate IVHM research technologies. Tables present details of specific SCFM for the incidents and accidents. Of the 370 NTSB accidents affected by SCFM, 48 percent involved the engine or fuel system, and 31 percent involved landing gear or hydraulic failure and malfunctions. A total of 35 percent of all SCFM accidents were caused by improper maintenance. Of the 7732 FAA database incidents affected by SCFM, 33 percent involved landing gear or hydraulics, and 33 percent involved the engine and fuel system. The most frequent SCFM found in ASRS were turbine engine, pressurization system, hydraulic main system, flight management system/flight management computer, and engine. Because the IVHM Project does not address maintenance issues, and landing gear and hydraulic systems accidents are usually not fatal, the focus of research should be those SCFMs that occur in the engine/fuel and flight control/structures systems as well as power systems.

  9. WASTE-ACC: A computer model for analysis of waste management accidents

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Argonne National Laboratory has developed WASTE-ACC, a computational framework and integrated PC-based database system, to assess atmospheric releases from facility accidents. WASTE-ACC facilitates the many calculations for the accident analyses necessitated by the numerous combinations of waste types, waste management process technologies, facility locations, and site consolidation strategies in the waste management alternatives across the DOE complex. WASTE-ACC is a comprehensive tool that can effectively test future DOE waste management alternatives and assumptions. The computational framework can access several relational databases to calculate atmospheric releases. The databases contain throughput volumes, waste profiles, treatment process parameters, and accident data such as frequencies of initiators, conditional probabilities of subsequent events, and source term release parameters of the various waste forms under accident stresses. This report describes the computational framework and supporting databases used to conduct accident analyses and to develop source terms to assess potential health impacts that may affect on-site workers and off-site members of the public under various DOE waste management alternatives

  10. WASTE-ACC: A computer model for analysis of waste management accidents

    Nabelssi, B.K.; Folga, S.; Kohout, E.J.; Mueller, C.J.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    1996-12-01

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Argonne National Laboratory has developed WASTE-ACC, a computational framework and integrated PC-based database system, to assess atmospheric releases from facility accidents. WASTE-ACC facilitates the many calculations for the accident analyses necessitated by the numerous combinations of waste types, waste management process technologies, facility locations, and site consolidation strategies in the waste management alternatives across the DOE complex. WASTE-ACC is a comprehensive tool that can effectively test future DOE waste management alternatives and assumptions. The computational framework can access several relational databases to calculate atmospheric releases. The databases contain throughput volumes, waste profiles, treatment process parameters, and accident data such as frequencies of initiators, conditional probabilities of subsequent events, and source term release parameters of the various waste forms under accident stresses. This report describes the computational framework and supporting databases used to conduct accident analyses and to develop source terms to assess potential health impacts that may affect on-site workers and off-site members of the public under various DOE waste management alternatives.

  11. Support calculations for management of PRISE leakage accidents

    Matejovic, P.; Vranka, L. [Nuclear Power Plants Research Inst. Vuje, Trnava (Slovakia)

    1997-12-31

    Accidents involving primary-to-secondary leakage (PRISE) caused by rupture of one or a few tubes are well known design basis events in both, western and VVER NPPs. Operating experience and in-service inspections of VVER-440 units have demonstrated also the potential for large PRISE leaks in the case of the steam generator (SG) primary collector cover lift-up (Rovno NPP). Without performing any countermeasure for limitation of SG collector cover lift-up, a full opening results in PRISE leak with an equivalent diameter 107 mm. Although this accident was not considered in the original design, this event is usually analysed as DBA too. Different means are available for detection and mitigation of PRISE leakage in NPPs currently in operation (J.Bohunice V-1 and V-2) or under construction (Mochovce) in Slovakia. 8 refs.

  12. Markov Model of Severe Accident Progression and Management

    Bari, R.A.; Cheng, L.; Cuadra,A.; Ginsberg,T.; Lehner,J.; Martinez-Guridi,G.; Mubayi,V.; Pratt,W.T.; Yue, M.

    2012-06-25

    The earthquake and tsunami that hit the nuclear power plants at the Fukushima Daiichi site in March 2011 led to extensive fuel damage, including possible fuel melting, slumping, and relocation at the affected reactors. A so-called feed-and-bleed mode of reactor cooling was initially established to remove decay heat. The plan was to eventually switch over to a recirculation cooling system. Failure of feed and bleed was a possibility during the interim period. Furthermore, even if recirculation was established, there was a possibility of its subsequent failure. Decay heat has to be sufficiently removed to prevent further core degradation. To understand the possible evolution of the accident conditions and to have a tool for potential future hypothetical evaluations of accidents at other nuclear facilities, a Markov model of the state of the reactors was constructed in the immediate aftermath of the accident and was executed under different assumptions of potential future challenges. This work was performed at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy to explore 'what-if' scenarios in the immediate aftermath of the accident. The work began in mid-March and continued until mid-May 2011. The analysis had the following goals: (1) To provide an overall framework for describing possible future states of the damaged reactors; (2) To permit an impact analysis of 'what-if' scenarios that could lead to more severe outcomes; (3) To determine approximate probabilities of alternative end-states under various assumptions about failure and repair times of cooling systems; (4) To infer the reliability requirements of closed loop cooling systems needed to achieve stable core end-states and (5) To establish the importance for the results of the various cooling system and physical phenomenological parameters via sensitivity calculations.

  13. Markov Model of Severe Accident Progression and Management

    The earthquake and tsunami that hit the nuclear power plants at the Fukushima Daiichi site in March 2011 led to extensive fuel damage, including possible fuel melting, slumping, and relocation at the affected reactors. A so-called feed-and-bleed mode of reactor cooling was initially established to remove decay heat. The plan was to eventually switch over to a recirculation cooling system. Failure of feed and bleed was a possibility during the interim period. Furthermore, even if recirculation was established, there was a possibility of its subsequent failure. Decay heat has to be sufficiently removed to prevent further core degradation. To understand the possible evolution of the accident conditions and to have a tool for potential future hypothetical evaluations of accidents at other nuclear facilities, a Markov model of the state of the reactors was constructed in the immediate aftermath of the accident and was executed under different assumptions of potential future challenges. This work was performed at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy to explore 'what-if' scenarios in the immediate aftermath of the accident. The work began in mid-March and continued until mid-May 2011. The analysis had the following goals: (1) To provide an overall framework for describing possible future states of the damaged reactors; (2) To permit an impact analysis of 'what-if' scenarios that could lead to more severe outcomes; (3) To determine approximate probabilities of alternative end-states under various assumptions about failure and repair times of cooling systems; (4) To infer the reliability requirements of closed loop cooling systems needed to achieve stable core end-states and (5) To establish the importance for the results of the various cooling system and physical phenomenological parameters via sensitivity calculations.

  14. Motor vehicle accidents: How should cirrhotic patients be managed?

    2012-01-01

    Motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) are serious social issues worldwide and driver illness is an important cause of MVAs. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is a complex cognitive dysfunction with attention deficit, which frequently occurs in cirrhotic patients independent of severity of liver disease. Although MHE is known as a risk factor for MVAs, the impact of diagnosis and treatment of MHE on MVA-related societal costs is largely unknown. Recently, Bajaj et al demonstrated valuable findings...

  15. The EPR concept for serious accident management, and accompanying research

    An accident, even if the probability of occurrence is so low that it can practically be excluded, must not require any serious external emergency measures, such as evacuation of human populations outside the immediate neighbourhood of the plant. This demand, which in the meantime has also become part of the German article law, creates a new situation for future light water reactors. In addition to the measures which are to reduce the probability of occurrence of serious accidents, a level is introduced which is designed to control the consequences of serious accidents with postulated core meltdown. The introduction of specific measures and design characteristics is a new challenge which cannot be met by industry alone. It is necessary to resort, to a large extent, to present and future research and development work which has been and will be carried out in this area by large-scale research institutions and universities. As regards the EPR, research and development cooperation in this field has been intensified recently. The CEA research centres and the FZKA signed an agreement on information exchange. (orig./HP)

  16. Decision-making guide for management of agriculture in the case of a nuclear accident

    For several years, agricultural and nuclear professionals in France have been working on how to manage the agricultural situation in the event of a nuclear accident. This work resulted in measures at both the national (Aube nuclear safety exercises in 2003, INEX3 in 2005) and international levels (EURATOM Programmes). Following on from the European FARMING (FP5) and EURANOS (FP6) works, ACTA', IRSN and six agricultural technical institutes which are specialized in agricultural production and processing network (arable crop [especially cereals, maize, pulses, potatoes and forage crops], fruits and vegetables, vine and wine, livestock farming [cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry]), created a resource adapted to the French context: the Decision-aiding Tool for the Management of Agriculture in case of a Nuclear Accident. Devised for the Ministry of Agriculture services supporting state officials in a radiation emergency, this manual focuses on the early phase following the accident when the state of emergency would make discussion on countermeasures with a large stakeholder panel impossible. Supported by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries and the French Nuclear Safety Authority, this project increased knowledge of post-accident management strategies and made an important contribution to the national think tank set up within the framework of the French Steering Committee for managing the post-event phase of a nuclear accident (CODIRPA). This article describes how the manual evolved throughout the project and the development of new resources. (authors)

  17. Decision-making guide for management of agriculture in the case of a nuclear accident

    For several years, agricultural and nuclear professionals in France have been working on how to manage the agricultural situation in the event of a nuclear accident. This work resulted in measures at both the national (Aube nuclear safety exercises in 2003, INEX3 in 2005) and international levels (EURATOM Programmes). Following on from the European FARMING (FP5) and EURANOS (FP6) works, ACTA', IRSN and six agricultural technical institutes which are specialized in agricultural production and processing network (arable crop [especially cereals, maize, pulses, potatoes and forage crops], fruits and vegetables, vine and wine, livestock farming [cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry]), created a resource adapted to the French context: the Decision-aiding Tool for the Management of Agriculture in case of a Nuclear Accident. Devised for the Ministry of Agriculture services supporting state officials in a radiation emergency, this manual focuses on the early phase following the accident when the state of emergency would make discussion on countermeasures with a large stakeholder panel impossible. Supported by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries and the French Nuclear Safety Authority, this project increased knowledge of post-accident management strategies and made an important contribution to the national think tank set up within the framework of the French Steering Committee for managing the post-event phase of a nuclear accident (CODIRPA). This article describes how the manual evolved throughout the project and the development of new resources

  18. Applying of Reliability Techniques and Expert Systems in Management of Radioactive Accidents

    Accidents including radioactive exposure have variety of nature and size. This makes such accidents complex situations to be handled by radiation protection agencies or any responsible authority. The situations becomes worse with introducing advanced technology with high complexity that provide operator huge information about system working on. This paper discusses the application of reliability techniques in radioactive risk management. Event tree technique from nuclear field is described as well as two other techniques from nonnuclear fields, Hazard and Operability and Quality Function Deployment. The objective is to show the importance and the applicability of these techniques in radiation risk management. Finally, Expert Systems in the field of accidents management are explored and classified upon their applications

  19. The role of SKI in the severe accident management programme in Sweden

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) has responsibilities in all regulatory aspects of the licensing and operation of nuclear reactors. The twelve Swedish reactors have all implemented technical as well as procedural features for the avoidance and mitigation of the consequences of severe accidents. Work is presently in progress to further develop accident management as well as to further reinforce the basis of knowledge in order to verify measures taken. In the event of an accident, SKI has a specific duty to provide an independent assessment of the potential course of the accident in order to assist regional authorities in making decisions on emergency actions. This paper accounts for SKI's past and present efforts in the severe accident management programme. In all parts of reactor operation human factor aspects are essential, and so indeed in severe accident management. The paper brings forward these aspects in the SKI programme. In conclusion: In war it is common sense that you can only trust proven equipment and trained organizations. The same applies to Severe Accident Management. Technical equipment must be adequate and operable. Tools must be logical, clean cut, easy to find, easy to use and if possible easy to learn. The organization should be clear with regard to distribution of authority and responsibility, have short links of communication, be easy to mobilize and be staffed with competent and dedicated people who are well trained to their tasks. Preparedness against nuclear accidents must always be a consideration in daily operational work. Ensuring that good conditions exist for accident management is one important objective of SKI's assessment. Another is the analysis of organizational behaviour in emergency situations. A frequent conclusion of accident analysis is the major role played by the human factor. It is not hard to find examples where accident management decisions have been taken too soon, on the basis of insufficient information

  20. Triage and medical management of criticality accident victims

    The criticality accident is the result of an uncontrolled chain fission reaction initiated when the quantities of nuclear materials (uranium or plutonium)present accidentally exceed a given limit called the critical mass. As soon as the critical state is exceeded, the chain reaction increases exponentially. The result is a fast increase in the number of fission events which occur within the fissile medium. This phenomenon results in a release of energy mainly in the form of heat, accompanied by the intense emission of neutron and gamma radiation and the release of fission gases (Barby, 1983)

  1. Medical management of two accidents by ionizing radiations

    Two cases of accidents of occupationally exposed personnel are presented, the first one was an accidental sharp exhibition to whole body that a 27 year-old worker suffered when being exposed to a source of Iridium 192 of 94 Curies. For this case it was diagnosed an hematopoiesis syndrome that it was responded to the handling prescribe until him recovery. The second case, a radiologist technical 22 year-old that was irradiated with a source of Iridium 192 of 79 Curies. The treatment consisted on cleaning, antibiotics, analgesic and inert ointment, being achieved recovery after several weeks

  2. Review of current status for designing severe accident management support system

    Jeong, Kwang Sub

    2000-05-01

    The development of operator support system (OSS) is ongoing in many other countries due to the complexity both in design and in operation for nuclear power plant. The computerized operator support system includes monitoring of some critical parameters, early detection of plant transient, monitoring of component status, plant maintenance, and safety parameter display, and the operator support system for these areas are developed and are being used in some plants. Up to now, the most operator support system covers the normal operation, abnormal operation, and emergency operation. Recently, however, the operator support system for severe accident is to be developed in some countries. The study for the phenomena of severe accident is not performed sufficiently, but, based on the result up to now, the operator support system even for severe accident will be developed in this study. To do this, at first, the current status of the operator support system for normal/abnormal/emergency operation is reviewed, and the positive aspects and negative aspects of systems are analyzed by their characteristics. And also, the major items that should be considered in designing the severe accident operator support system are derived from the review. With the survey of domestic and foreign operator support systems, they are reviewed in terms of the safety parameter display system, decision-making support system, and procedure-tracking system. For the severe accident, the severe accident management guideline (SAMG) which is developed by Westinghouse is reviewed; the characteristics, structure, and logical flow of SAMG are studied. In addition, the critical parameters for severe accident, which are the basis for operators decision-making in severe accident management and are supplied to the operators and the technical support center, are reviewed, too.

  3. The Fukushima Dai Ichi accident. The narrative of the station manager. Volume 1. The destruction

    While outlining that the Fukushima accident could have been more severe without the courage and action of men who stayed at the controls of the plant under the management of Masao Yoshida, this book proposes a translation of the manager's narrative made for the official inquiry commission. He tells the story of a team of workers facing a disaster foretold. Besides this narrative, the authors propose a discussion on emergency engineering, present the Kan inquiry commission, present the power station and recall the circumstances of the accident and its consequences. Several hearings are reported

  4. Mental health effects from radiological accidents and their social management

    Brenot, J.; Charron, S.; Verger, P. [Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)

    2000-05-01

    Mental health effects resulting from exposure to radiation have been identified principally in the context of large radiological accidents. They cover an extended scope of manifestations in relation with the notion of stress: increase of some hormones, modifications in mental concentration, symptoms of anxiety and depression, psycho-somatic diseases, deviation behaviours, and, on the long term, a possible post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The main results come from the Three Mile Island, Goiania, and Chernobyl accidents and several modifying factors have been identified. Considering those facts, diverse social responses can be brought to reduce the detriment to affected individuals and communities. Medical treatments are necessary for persons who suffer from pathological diseases. In most cases, a structured public health follow-up is required to establish the seriousness of the health problems, to forecast the extent of medical and psychological assistance, and to inform people who express fears and worries. Social assistance is always valuable under various forms: financial compensations, preferential medical care, and particular advantages concerning working and living conditions. If this social assistance is necessary and helpful, it also induces a loss in personal adjustment capability and initiative capacity. To overcome those negative impacts, some guidelines to authorities' action can be set up. But the best approach, not excluding the previous ones, remains problem solving at the local level through community responsibilization; some instructive examples come from the Chernobyl experience. (author)

  5. Mental health effects from radiological accidents and their social management

    Mental health effects resulting from exposure to radiation have been identified principally in the context of large radiological accidents. They cover an extended scope of manifestations in relation with the notion of stress: increase of some hormones, modifications in mental concentration, symptoms of anxiety and depression, psycho-somatic diseases, deviation behaviours, and, on the long term, a possible post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The main results come from the Three Mile Island, Goiania, and Chernobyl accidents and several modifying factors have been identified. Considering those facts, diverse social responses can be brought to reduce the detriment to affected individuals and communities. Medical treatments are necessary for persons who suffer from pathological diseases. In most cases, a structured public health follow-up is required to establish the seriousness of the health problems, to forecast the extent of medical and psychological assistance, and to inform people who express fears and worries. Social assistance is always valuable under various forms: financial compensations, preferential medical care, and particular advantages concerning working and living conditions. If this social assistance is necessary and helpful, it also induces a loss in personal adjustment capability and initiative capacity. To overcome those negative impacts, some guidelines to authorities' action can be set up. But the best approach, not excluding the previous ones, remains problem solving at the local level through community responsibilization; some instructive examples come from the Chernobyl experience. (author)

  6. Proceedings of the first OECD (NEA) CSNI-Specialist Meeting on Instrumentation to Manage Severe Accidents

    OECD member countries have adopted various accident management measures and procedures. To initiate these measures and control their effectiveness, information on the status of the plant and on accident symptoms is necessary. This information includes physical data (pressure, temperatures, hydrogen concentrations, etc.) but also data on the condition of components such as pumps, valves, power supplies, etc. In response to proposals made by the CSNI - PWG 4 Task Group on Containment Aspects of Severe Accident Management (CAM) and endorsed by PWG 4, CSNI has decided to sponsor a Specialist Meeting on Instrumentation to Manage Severe Accidents. The knowledge-basis for the Specialist Meeting was the paper on 'Instrumentation for Accident Management in Containment'. This technical document (NEA/CSNI/R(92)4) was prepared by the CSNI - Principle Working Group Number 4 of experts on January 1992. The Specialist Meeting was structured in the following sessions: I. Information Needs for Managing Severe Accidents, II. Capabilities and Limitations of Existing Instrumentation, III. Unconventional Use and Further Development of Instrumentation, IV. Operational Aids and Artificial Intelligence. The Specialist Meeting concentrated on existing instrumentation and its possible use under severe accident conditions; it also examined developments underway and planed. Desirable new instrumentation was discussed briefly. The interactions and discussions during the sessions were helpful to bring different perspectives to bear, thus sharpening the thinking of all. Questions were raised concerning the long-term viability of current (or added) instrumentation. It must be realized that the subject of instrumentation to manage severe accidents is very new, and that no international meeting on this topic was held previously. One of the objectives was to bring this important issue to the attention of both safety authorities and experts. It could be seen from several of the presentations and from

  7. Beyond Design Basis Severe Accident Management as an Element of DiD Concept Strengthening

    The 4th Level of DiD is ensured by management of beyond design basis accidents which is achieved by implementation of the Beyond Design Basis Accidents Management Guidance (BDBAMG) and, if necessary, by additional technical devices and organizational measures at NPP Unit. BDBAMG is located between Levels 3 and 5 in DiD and is related to them. It is connected with Level 3 by means of conditions generated at this Level and according to which BDBAM should be initiated (Level 4). It is associated with Level 5 by conditions which necessitate implementation of Emergency planning. Both types of conditions should be identified in BDBAMG. BDBAs including the phase of severe damage of fuel and protective barriers (severe accidents) in accordance with Russian regulatory framework are a subset of all BDBAs set. In this connection, such accident scenarios meet the representativeness criterion for further analysis and development of Guidance for their management. BDBAMG availability, as it provides robustness of DiD as a whole, is an obligatory condition for obtaining a NPP operational license. In the process of BDBAMG development and implementation a feedback with technical and organizational measures, comprising Level 1 and, to a less extent, Level 2, comes up. BDBAMG verification is an important final stage of its development. Addressing severe accidents, it is a challenging issue for a full scope simulator and may require its software modernization to make it responsive to severe accident phenomena. The existing BDBAMGs should be updated due to NPP Unit modernizations and in conjunction with the latest knowledge on severe accident phenomenology and lessons learnt from known events (e.g. NPP Fukushima). Thus, improvements incorporated in BDBAMG, enhance the strength of DiD. (author)

  8. Fuel performance under transients, and accident management using Geno-Fuzzy concept for nuclear reactors

    Simulation of Pressurized Water Reactor Power Plant (PWR) has been investigated by simulating all components installed in the power plant namely: the reactor core, steam generator, pressurizer, reactor coolant pumps, and turbine. All plant components have been introduced. This simulator is useful for transient analysis studies, engineering designs, safety analysis, and accident management. Accidents in Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plant (PWR NPP) may be occurred either due to component failures or human error during maintenance or operation. The main target of accident management is to mitigate accidents if it occurs. The Geno-Fuzzy concept is the way to select some important plant state variables as a gene for the overall plant state chromosome. The selected genes are: reactor power, primary coolant pressure, steam generator water level, and onset boiling on clad surface which has direct impact on fuel behavior. Each of these genes has associated fuzzy level. The main objective of Geno-Fuzzy is turning the plant gene from abnormal states to the normal state by associated control variable using the inference wise fuzzy technique. The Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plant simulator has been tested for a typical PWR, for normal transients, Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS), and using the proposed Geno-Fuzzy concept for accident management, which gives very good results in reactor accident mitigation. Some of these tested accidents are; reactor control rod ejection, change in turbine steam load, and loss of coolant flow, which have direct effects on fuel safety and performance. The parameters affecting the behavior of the reactor fuel integrity are analyzed to be considered in future reactor designs. (author)

  9. Is the current management system at Statoil sufficient to prevent potential major accidents from happening at the Snorre A platform?

    Mork, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Only small margins prevented the gas-blow out at one of Statoil's platforms, Snorre A, to develop into a major accident in 2004. The underlying reasons of the accident showed extensive improvement areas, including Statoil's management system. The purpose is to find out whether the current management system at Statoil is sufficient to prevent potential major accidents from happening at the Snorre A platform again. As a guidance, four questions have been deduced. These include if...

  10. Evaluation of RCS injection strategy by normal residual heat removal system in severe accident management

    Highlights: • Integrated severe accident analysis model of ALWR RCS, ESF and containment is built. • Large-break loss of coolant accident and loss of feed water accident are analyzed. • Effectiveness of RNS injection strategy and plant system response are investigated. • Impact of RNS injection on hydrogen generation and distribution is evaluated. • Negative impact induced by different RCS depressurization measures is investigated. - Abstract: Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs) suggests mitigating the consequence of severe accident scenarios by using the non-safety systems if the safety systems are unavailable. For 1000 MWe advanced passive pressurized water reactor (PWR), the normal residual heat removal system (RNS) is proposed to implement the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) injection strategy during severe accidents if safety systems fail. Therefore, evaluation of the effectiveness and negative impact of RNS injection strategy is performed, in which two typical severe accident sequences are selected, which are the typical low-pressure core melt accident sequence induced by Large-break Loss of Coolant Accident (LLOCA) with double-ended guillotine break at cold leg and the typical high-pressure core melt accident induced by Loss of Feed Water (LOFW), to analyze RCS response using the integrated severe accident analysis code. The plant model, including RCS, Engineering Safety Features (ESF), containment and RNS, is built to evaluate the effectiveness of RNS injection by comparing the sequences with and without RCS injection, which shows that RNS injection can terminate core melt progression and maintain core cooling in these accident sequences. However, hydrogen generated during the core reflooding is investigated for the negative impact, which shows that RNS may increase the hydrogen concentration in the containment. For the sequence induced by LOFW, two different RCS depressurization measurements are compared, which shows that opening ADS

  11. Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management. EG-SAM Interim Report

    As an early response to the Fukushima NPP accident, the ISOE Bureau decided to focus on the following issues as an initial response of the joint program after having direct communications with the Japanese official participants in April 2011; - Management of high radiation area worker doses: It has been decided to make available the experience and information from the Chernobyl accident in terms of how emergency worker / responder doses were legally and practically managed, - Personal protective equipment for highly-contaminated areas: It was agreed to collect information about the types of personnel protective equipment and other equipment (e.g. air bottles, respirators, air-hoods or plastic suits, etc.), as well as high-radiation area worker dosimetry use (e.g. type, number and placement of dosimetry) for different types of emergency and high-radiation work situations. Detailed information was collected on dose criteria which are used for emergency workers/responders and their basis, dose management criteria for high dose/dose rate areas, protective equipment which is recommended for emergency workers / responders, recommended individual monitoring procedures, and any special requirement for assessment from the ISOE participating nuclear utilities and regulatory authorities and made available for Japanese utilities. With this positive response of the ISOE actors and interest in the situation in Fukushima, the Expert Group on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management (EG-SAM) was established by the ISOE Management Board in May 2011. The overall objective of the EG-SAM is to contribute to occupational exposure management (providing a view on management of high radiation area worker doses) within the Fukushima plant boundary with the ISOE participants and to develop a state-of-the- art ISOE report on best radiation protection management practices for proper radiation protection job coverage during severe accident initial response and recovery

  12. Nuclear emergency preparedness in Germany - an introduction. Pt. 1. Accident management in NPPs

    For the realization of all safety-relevant requirements of the Atomic Energy Act (Atomgesetz, AtG) and their attached legal and sublegal nuclear regulations the design and operation of nuclear power plants in Germany is based on the 'Multi-Level Defense-in-Depth Safety Concept'. Experiences derived from severe accidents and continuously conducted safety research led to development and implementation of strategies and measures of severe accident management step by step in order to recognize plant states beyond the design basis in good time, to control their course and to limit their on-site and off-site consequences effectively. An overview is provided of the integration of severe accident management into the defense-in-depth concept and the on-site technical, organizational and administrative precautionary measures are described. (orig.)

  13. Severe accident management (SAM), operator training and instrumentation capabilities - Summary and conclusions

    The Workshop on Operator Training for Severe Accident Management (SAM) and Instrumentation Capabilities During Severe Accidents was organised in collaboration with Electricite de France (Service Etudes et Projets Thermiques et Nucleaires). There were 34 participants, representing thirteen OECD Member countries, the Russian Federation and the OECD/NEA. Almost half the participants represented utilities. The second largest group was regulatory authorities and their technical support organisations. Basically, the Workshop was a follow-up to the 1997 Second Specialist Meeting on Operator Aids for Severe Accident Management (SAMOA-2) [Reports NEA/CSNI/R(97)10 and 27] and to the 1992 Specialist Meeting on Instrumentation to Manage Severe Accidents [Reports NEA/CSNI/R(92)11 and (93)3]. It was aimed at sharing and comparing progress made and experience gained from these two meetings, emphasizing practical lessons learnt during training or incidents as well as feedback from instrumentation capability assessment. The objectives of the Workshop were therefore: - to exchange information on recent and current activities in the area of operator training for SAM, and lessons learnt during the management of real incidents ('operator' is defined hear as all personnel involved in SAM); - to compare capabilities and use of instrumentation available during severe accidents; - to monitor progress made; - to identify and discuss differences between approaches relevant to reactor safety; - and to make recommendations to the Working Group on the Analysis and Management of Accidents and the CSNI (GAMA). The Workshop was organised into five sessions: - 1: Introduction; - 2: Tools and Methods; - 3: Training Programmes and Experience; - 4: SAM Organisation Efficiency; - 5: Instrumentation Capabilities. It was concluded by a Panel and General Discussion. This report presents the summary and conclusions: the meeting confirmed that only limited information is needed for making required decisions

  14. Management of accident radioactive waste from Czech nuclear power plants

    A mobile decontamination unit is proposed for the treatment of waste resulting from a LOCA type design accident associated with a compensable or non-compensable primary circuit coolant leakage. The unit comprises a sorption-filtration module for the removal of toxic nuclides, a vitrification module for the solidification of spent inorganic sorbents, and a module for exhaust gases decontamination. The beta-gamma activity of liquid waste is reduced in sorption columns packed with mordenite, to a level enabling its further treatment in the standard decontamination plant of the nuclear power station. The spent inorganic sorbent is mixed with low-melting borosilicate glass and vitrified at 1050 degC, yielding a product suitable for disposal. The result of a long-term cesium leaching rate test of this product, performed according to ISO 6961, is Rn=8.6x10-8 g.cm-2.day-1. (author) 7 tabs., 10 refs

  15. Unconventional sources of plant information for accident management

    Oehlberg, R. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States). Nuclear Power Div.); Machiels, A. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States). Nuclear Power Div.); Chao, J. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States). Nuclear Power Div.); Weiss, J. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States). Nuclear Power Div.); True, D. (ERIN Engineering and Research, Inc., Walnut Creek, CA (United States)); James, R. (ERIN Engineering and Research, Inc., Walnut Creek, CA (United States))

    1992-07-01

    The paper highlighted that other information sources can help to augment and confirm data available from dedicated accident instrumentation such as Reg. Guide 1.97 Instrumentation: inferences of plant status are possible from measurements and measurement trends obtained from instruments not expected to function, observations of system or component operability/inoperability, and observations of locally harsh environmental conditions. Detailed plant-specific examples are given, e.g. regarding the reactor pressure and level indication in BWRs, or the reactor cavity temperature indication on WE-type PWRs which the authors speculate may yield information related to vessel and core temperature. The authors advocate that others look at their information sources in a creative way. (orig.)

  16. Implementation of the severe accident management in Slovenske Elektrarne, subsidiary of ENEL

    Implementation of the Severe Accident Management (SAM) in Slovenske Elektrarne, subsidiary of ENEL, is a process initiated well before the Fukushima Daiichi accident. The main goal was to cover, comprehensively, level 4 of the Defense in Depth (DiD). The process included development of plant specific severe accident management guidelines (SAMGs) and installation of hardware modifications dedicated to mitigation of severe accidents as an upgrade the original VVER-440/V213. The SAM modifications have been developed with the aim to address all main generic vulnerabilities of VVER-440/V213 containments identified during initial analysis supporting the development of plant specific SAMGs. SAM modifications, in addition to their original purpose, improved plant response also at the level 3 of DiD. SAM modifications installed on VVER-440/V213 units in operation or under construction in Slovakia can be considered as an independent and diverse provision for the main safety functions: core subcriticality, core heat removal and confinement integrity. Basic set of SAM modifications includes independent diesel generator (DG), independent external source of borated water and containment vacuum breaker. Major contribution to safety from SAM modifications has been proved to be the implementation of in-vessel retention, hydrogen management in the containment and reliable depressurization of RCS. The complete set of SAM modifications installed incorporates dedicated SAM I and C to allow for determination and monitoring of plant status via dedicated instrumentation and control of SAM equipment installed at plants during a severe accident. SAM project including updating of SAMGs has been successfully completed on both units of Bohunice NPP and respective activities are continuing on operating units no. 1 and 2 in Mochovce with expected deadline in 2015. The basic design of Mochovce units no. 3 and 4 that are under construction has been modified to incorporate hardware changes

  17. Marine Accidents in Northern Nigeria: Causes, Prevention and Management

    Lawal Bello Dogarawa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Boat mishaps tend to be increasing in Nigeria in spite of all regulatory measures which have been taken to prevent and control marine accidents. Boat mishaps could occur anywhere water transportation takes place. However, there is a general impression that water transportation takes place only in the riverine areas located in Southern Nigeria but, this paper reports about marine accident cases in Northern Nigeria. It evaluates the safety measures put in place by operators and other institutional bodies in the areas and assesses the level of infrastructure in terms of quantity, quality and accessibility to boat operators, boat users and institutional staff. Questionnaires were administered through individual and group interviews with boat owners, boat drivers, boat users, boat builders, boat engine mechanics, local government officials, maritime workers union, the marine police, traditional regulators and staff of the federal government agencies for maritime affairs. The paper found that marine transportation is neglected in Northern Nigeria with dilapidated jetties, ill-equipped marine police, non-functional ferries and boast meant to be used by federal officials and wrecks in water channels without removal. Maritime safety is therefore compromised with cases of overloading carrying people, animals, grains and petroleum products in one boat without fire extinguisher and no lifejackets. The paper concludes that there are considerable water transportation activities in Northern Nigeria without a corresponding government attention. It is therefore recommend that government should intervene by providing lifejackets, fire extinguishers, training of surveyors, refurbishing ferries for enforcement as well as creating safety awareness in the region.

  18. Workshop on iodine aspects of severe accident management. Summary and conclusions

    Following a recommendation of the OECD Workshop on the Chemistry of Iodine in Reactor Safety held in Wuerenlingen (Switzerland) in June 1996 [Summary and Conclusions of the Workshop, Report NEA/CSNI/R(96)7], the CSNI decided to sponsor a Workshop on Iodine Aspects of Severe Accident Management, and their planned or effective implementation. The starting point for this conclusion was the realization that the consolidation of the accumulated iodine chemistry knowledge into accident management guidelines and procedures remained, to a large extent, to be done. The purpose of the meeting was therefore to help build a bridge between iodine research and the application of its results in nuclear power plants, with particular emphasis on severe accident management. Specifically, the Workshop was expected to answer the following questions: - what is the role of iodine in severe accident management? - what are the needs of the utilities? - how can research fulfill these needs? The Workshop was organized in Vantaa (Helsinki), Finland, from 18 to 20 May 1999, in collaboration with Fortum Engineering Ltd. It was attended by forty-six specialists representing fifteen Member countries and the European Commission. Twenty-eight papers were presented. These included four utility papers, representing the views of Electricite de France (EDF), Teollisuuden Voima Oy and Fortum Engineering Ltd (Finland), the Nuclear Energy Institute (USA), and Japanese utilities. The papers were presented in five sessions: - iodine speciation; - organic compound control; - iodine control; - modeling; - iodine management; A sixth session was devoted to a general discussion on iodine management under severe accident conditions. This report summarizes the content of the papers and the conclusions of the workshop

  19. The technical requirements concerning severe accident management in nuclear power plants

    The Great East Japan Earthquake with a magnitude of 9.0 (The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake) occurred on March 11, 2011, and the beyond design-basis tsunami descended on the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant by the earthquake. Eventually, the core cooling systems of the units 1, 2 and 3 could not operate stably, they all suffered severe accident, and hydrogen explosions were triggered in the reactor buildings of units 1, 3 and 4. In the light of these circumstances, Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) decided to establish a standard that consolidates the concept of maintaining and improving severe accident management. In the SAM standard, the combination of hardware and software measures based on the risk assessment enables a scientific and rational approach to apply to scenarios of various severe accidents including low-frequency, high-impact events, and assures safety with functionality and flexibility. The SAM standard is already established in March, 2014. After publication of the SAM standard, with regard to effectiveness assessment for accident management and treatment of the uncertainty of severe accident analysis code, for example, the detailed guideline will be prepared as appendices of the standard. (author)

  20. Conclusions of the specialist meeting on operator AIDS for severe accident management and training (SAMOA)

    The scope of the Specialist Meeting was limited to operator aids for accident management which were in operation or could be soon. Moreover, the meeting concentrated on the management of accidents beyond the design basis, including tools which might be extended from the design basis range into the severe accident area. Relevant simulation tools for operator training were also part of the scope of the meeting. The presentations showed that the design and implementation of operator aids were closely related to the organisation adopted by the user, whether it was a utility or a governmental agency. The most common organisation is to share the management of severe accidents among two groups of people: the operating team in the Control Room (CR) and a team of specialists in a Technical Support Centre (TSC). The CR is in charge of the operation of the plant in all conditions using a set of procedures and guidelines, while the experts in the TSC are able to produce in-depth analyses of the plant state and its evolution. The responsibility is shared between the CR and the TSC during accident progression. The TSC acts as a support for the CR for reactor operation and takes charge of the predictions of radioactive releases (source term, accident progression, release and dispersion of radioactive substances, as well as the interaction with public authorities). But this type of organisation is not general and the differences can induce different approaches in the design of operator aids. The first session was dedicated to operator aids for control rooms, the second session to operator aids for technical support centres

  1. Accident management measures. Demand for action as seen by the supervising authority

    The various measures taken for accident management in the plant are to be classified into categories of nuclear law, as there are: prevention of hazards, prevention of risks, or non-preventive measures ( management of remaining risk). Screening the various measures for classification shows that most of them belong to the category of preventive action under the Atomic Energy Act. This means that these measures have to be addressed in KTA safety standards. (orig./HP)

  2. An examination of the accident and emergency management of deliberate self harm.

    Dennis, M; BEACH, M; Evans, P A; Winston, A.; Friedman, T.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the adequacy of assessment and management of deliberate self harm (DSH) undertaken by accident and emergency (A&E) medical staff. METHODS: The records for attendances to the Leicester Royal Infirmary A&E department with a diagnosis of "self inflicted" injury for the 12 month period April 1994 to March 1995 were scrutinised. If the episode was identified as DSH, then assessment and management were examined, using an instrument based on the Royal College of Psychiatrists' ...

  3. Uncertainty quantification for accident management using ACE surrogates

    The alternating conditional expectation (ACE) regression method is used to generate RELAP5 surrogates which are then used to determine the distribution of the peak clad temperature (PCT) during the loss of feedwater accident coupled with a subsequent initiation of the feed and bleed (F and B) operation in the Zion-1 nuclear power plant. The construction of the surrogates assumes conditional independence relations among key reactor parameters. The choice of parameters to model is based on the macroscopic balance statements governing the behavior of the reactor. The peak clad temperature is calculated based on the independent variables that are known to be important in determining the success of the F and B operation. The relationship between these independent variables and the plant parameters such as coolant pressure and temperature is represented by surrogates that are constructed based on 45 RELAP5 cases. The time-dependent PCT for different values of F and B parameters is calculated by sampling the independent variables from their probability distributions and propagating the information through two layers of surrogates. The results of our analysis show that the ACE surrogates are able to satisfactorily reproduce the behavior of the plant parameters even though a quasi-static assumption is primarily used in their construction. The PCT is found to be lower in cases where the F and B operation is initiated, compared to the case without F and B, regardless of the F and B parameters used. (authors)

  4. Motor vehicle accidents: how should cirrhotic patients be managed?

    Kawaguchi, Takumi; Taniguchi, Eitaro; Sata, Michio

    2012-06-01

    Motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) are serious social issues worldwide and driver illness is an important cause of MVAs. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is a complex cognitive dysfunction with attention deficit, which frequently occurs in cirrhotic patients independent of severity of liver disease. Although MHE is known as a risk factor for MVAs, the impact of diagnosis and treatment of MHE on MVA-related societal costs is largely unknown. Recently, Bajaj et al demonstrated valuable findings that the diagnosis of MHE by rapid screening using the inhibitory control test (ICT), and subsequent treatment with lactulose could substantially reduce the societal costs by preventing MVAs. Besides the ICT and lactulose, there are various diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies for MHE. In this commentary, we discussed a current issue of diagnostic tools for MHE, including neuropsychological tests. We also discussed the advantages of the other therapeutic strategies for MHE, such as intake of a regular breakfast and coffee, and supplementation with zinc and branched chain amino acids, on the MVA-related societal costs. PMID:22690067

  5. Motor vehicle accidents: How should cirrhotic patients be managed?

    Takumi Kawaguchi; Eitaro Taniguchi; Michio Sata

    2012-01-01

    Motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) are serious social issues worldwide and driver illness is an important cause of MVAs.Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is a complex cognitive dysfunction with attention deficit,which frequently occurs in cirrhotic patients independent of severity of liver disease.Although MHE is known as a risk factor for MVAs,the impact of diagnosis and treatment of MHE on MVA-related societal costs is largely unknown.Recently,Bajaj et al demonstrated valuable findings that the diagnosis of MHE by rapid screening using the inhibitory control test (ICT),and subsequent treatment with lactulose could substantially reduce the societal costs by preventing MVAs,Besides the ICT and lactulose,there are various diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies for MHE.In this commentary,we discussed a current issue of diagnostic tools for MHE,including neuropsychological tests.We also discussed the advantages of the other therapeutic strategies for MHE,such as intake of a regular breakfast and coffee,and supplementation with zinc and branched chain amino acids,on the MVA-related societal costs.

  6. Advanced evacuation model managed through fuzzy logic during an accident in LNG terminal

    Evacuation of people located inside the enclosed area of an LNG terminal is a complex problem, especially considering that accidents involving LNG are potentially very hazardous. In order to create an evacuation model managed through fuzzy logic, extensive influence must be generated from safety analyses. A very important moment in the optimal functioning of an evacuation model is the creation of a database which incorporates all input indicators. The output result is the creation of a safety evacuation route which is active at the moment of the accident. (Author)

  7. Strategy implemented for a safe management of the waste arising from the Goiania accident

    The management of radioactive waste after the accident is discussed. Several aspects such as properties of the waste, the available infrastructure for its collection, the decontamination logistics, the motivation and commitment of works and the politically sensitive definition of handling different waste as well as the administrative procedure to set up reliable records on the collected waste are studied. Four years after the accident, corrosion was detected in some packages. Waste reconditioning, development and implementation of waste data base and development of a national safety evaluation procedure for the final disposal facility are presented

  8. Development and application of a radioactivity evaluation technique the to obtain radiation exposure dose of radioactivity evaluation technique when a severe accident occurs in the a power station of a severe accident. Accident management guidelines of knowledge-based maintenance

    As a One of the lessons learned from the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Stations of Tokyo Electric Power Company, the was the need for improvement of accident management guidelines is required. In this report study, we developed and applied a dose evaluation technique to evaluated the radiation dose in a nuclear power plant assuming three conditions: employees were evacuation evacuated at the time of a severe accident occurrence; operators carried out the accident management operation; of the operators, and the repair work was carried out for of the trouble damaged apparatuses in a the nuclear power plant using a dose evaluation system. The following knowledge findings were obtained and should to be reflected to in the knowledge base of the guidelines was obtained. (1) By making clearly identifying an areas beforehand becoming the that would receive high radiation doses at the time of a severe accident definitely beforehand, we can employees can be moved to the evacuation places through an areas having of low dose rate and it is also known it how much we long employees can safely stay in the evacuation places. (2) When they circulate CV containment vessel recirculation sump water is recirculated by for the accident management operation and the restoration of safety in the facilities, because the plumbing piping and the apparatuses become radioactive radioactivity sources, the dose evaluation of the shortest access route and detour access routes with should be made for effective the accident management operation is effective. Because the area where a dose rate rises changes which as safety apparatuses are restored, in consideration of a plant state, it is necessary to judge the rightness or wrongness of the work continuation from the spot radioactive dose of the actual apparatus area, with based on precedence of the need to restore with precedence, and to choose a system to be used for accident management. (author)

  9. Regulatory Research of the PWR Severe Accident. Information Needs and Instrumentation for Hydrogen Control and Management

    The current research is concerned with generation of basic engineering data needed in the process of developing hydrogen control guidelines as part of accident management strategies for domestic nuclear power plants and formulating pertinent regulatory requirements. Major focus is placed on identification of information needs and instrumentation methods for hydrogen control and management in the primary system and in the containment, development of decision-making trees for hydrogen management and their quantification, the instrument availability under severe accident conditions, critical review of relevant hydrogen generation model and phenomena In relation to hydrogen behavior, we analyzed the severe accident related hydrogen generation in the UCN 3·4 PWR with modified hydrogen generation model. On the basis of the hydrogen mixing experiment and related GASFLOW calculation, the necessity of 3-dimensional analysis of the hydrogen mixing was investigated. We examined the hydrogen control models related to the PAR(Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner) and performed MAAP4 calculation in relation to the decision tree to estimate the capability and the role of the PAR during a severe accident

  10. Strategy adopted for the safe management of the waste arising from the Goiania accident

    The radiological accident in Goiania brought on an unexpected radioactive decontamination problem which generated a large volume of waste. The key to a straightforward management of this waste was the definition of a successful strategy to deal with it. To achieve this, several fundamental aspects were taken into account. Among the most important, one can mention the properties of the waste, the infrastructure available for its collection, the decontamination logistics, the motivation and commitment of the workers of different organizations involved in the cleanup tasks, the politically sensitive definition of handling a different kind of waste and the administrative procedures to set up reliable records on the waste collected. In the aftermath of the accident, management of the waste became complex because of the delay in agreeing on and setting up a disposal facility. Four years after the accident, corrosion was detected in some packages and measures were taken to ensure safe interim storage until final disposal. These measures focused on waste reconditioning, the development and implementation of a database containing a detailed inventory of the waste and the development of a national safety evaluation procedure for the final disposal facility. An overview is presented of the management of the waste derived from the Goiania accident, as well as the solutions adopted for final disposal. (author)