WorldWideScience

Sample records for accident and emergency services

  1. Accidents in nuclear power engineering. Emergency-engineering service and its purposes

    The review of severe accidents in the world practice of NPP operation is given. The problems met when eliminating the Chernobyl' NPP accident effects are discussed. The main purposes of the emergency-engineering service in nuclear power engineering are considered. These are: possible accident forecasting and preparation of the equipment for its effect elimination; prevention of accidents and abnormal situations at nuclear power objects; accident effect liquidation, NPP unit decommissioning. Some directions which development takes the priority, are formulated. 21 refs

  2. Accident and emergency management

    There is an increasing potential for severe accidents as the industrial development tends towards large, centralised production units. In several industries this has led to the formation of large organisations which are prepared for accidents fighting and for emergency management. The functioning of these organisations critically depends upon efficient decision making and exchange of information. This project is aimed at securing and possibly improving the functionality and efficiency of the accident and emergency management by verifying, demonstrating, and validating the possible use of advanced information technology in the organisations mentioned above. With the nuclear industry in focus the project consists of five main activities: 1) The study and detailed analysis of accident and emergency scenarios based on records from incidents and rills in nuclear installations. 2) Development of a conceptual understanding of accident and emergency management with emphasis on distributed decision making, information flow, and control structure sthat are involved. 3) Development of a general experimental methodology for evaluating the effects of different kinds of decision aids and forms of organisation for emergency management systems with distributed decision making. 4) Development and test of a prototype system for a limited part of an accident and emergency organisation to demonstrate the potential use of computer and communication systems, data-base and knowledge base technology, and applications of expert systems and methods used in artificial intelligence. 5) Production of guidelines for the introduction of advanced information technology in the organisations based on evaluation and validation of the prototype system. (author)

  3. The Sheffield experiment: the effects of centralising accident and emergency services in a large urban setting

    Simpson, A; Wardrope, J.; Burke, D

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To assess the effects of centralisation of accident and emergency (A&E) services in a large urban setting. The end points were the quality of patient care judged by time to see a doctor or nurse practitioner, time to admission and the cost of the A&E service as a whole.

  4. Relation of out of hours activity by general practice and accident and emergency services with deprivation in Nottingham: longitudinal survey.

    Carlisle, R; Groom, L. M.; Avery, A J; Boot, D; Earwicker, S.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relation between out of hours activity of general practice and accident and emergency services with deprivation and distance from accident and emergency department. DESIGN: Six month longitudinal study. SETTING: Six general practices and the sole accident and emergency department in Nottingham. SUBJECTS: 4745 out of hours contacts generated by 45,182 patients from 23 electoral wards registered with six practices. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rates of out of hours cont...

  5. Elderly patients attended in emergency health services in Brazil: a study for victims of falls and traffic accidents

    Mariana Gonçalves de Freitas; Palmira de Fátima Bonolo; Edgar Nunes de Moraes; Carla Jorge Machado

    2015-01-01

    The article aims to describe the profile of elderly victims of falls and traffic accidents from the data of the Surveillance Survey of Violence and Accidents (VIVA). The VIVA Survey was conducted in the emergency health-services of the Unified Health System in the capitals of Brazil in 2011. The sample of elderly by type of accident was subjected to the two-step cluster procedure. Of the 2463 elderly persons in question, 79.8% suffered falls and 20.2% were the victims of traffic accidents. Th...

  6. Use of the emergency ambulance service to an inner city accident and emergency department--a comparison of general practitioner and '999' calls.

    Pennycook, A. G.; Makower, R M; Morrison, W G

    1991-01-01

    Over a 2-week period a prospective study was undertaken of patients brought to an inner city accident and emergency department by the emergency ambulance service. Criteria for assessing the appropriateness of use of the emergency ambulance service are not well defined and at worst entirely subjective. The author's finding that, of patients attending after a '999' call, 49.8% were discharged with no follow-up suggests that many of these journeys represented inappropriate use of the emergency a...

  7. Socioeconomic deprivation and accident and emergency attendances

    Scantlebury, Rachel; Rowlands, Gillian; Durbaba, Stevo;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Demand for England's accident and emergency (A&E) services is increasing and is particularly concentrated in areas of high deprivation. The extent to which primary care services, relative to population characteristics, can impact on A&E is not fully understood. AIM: To conduct...

  8. Accident knowledge and emergency management

    The report contains an overall frame for transformation of knowledge and experience from risk analysis to emergency education. An accident model has been developed to describe the emergency situation. A key concept of this model is uncontrolled flow of energy (UFOE), essential elements are the state, location and movement of the energy (and mass). A UFOE can be considered as the driving force of an accident, e.g., an explosion, a fire, a release of heavy gases. As long as the energy is confined, i.e. the location and movement of the energy are under control, the situation is safe, but loss of confinement will create a hazardous situation that may develop into an accident. A domain model has been developed for representing accident and emergency scenarios occurring in society. The domain model uses three main categories: status, context and objectives. A domain is a group of activities with allied goals and elements and ten specific domains have been investigated: process plant, storage, nuclear power plant, energy distribution, marine transport of goods, marine transport of people, aviation, transport by road, transport by rail and natural disasters. Totally 25 accident cases were consulted and information was extracted for filling into the schematic representations with two to four cases pr. specific domain. (au) 41 tabs., 8 ills.; 79 refs

  9. Accident knowledge and emergency management

    Rasmussen, B.; Groenberg, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    The report contains an overall frame for transformation of knowledge and experience from risk analysis to emergency education. An accident model has been developed to describe the emergency situation. A key concept of this model is uncontrolled flow of energy (UFOE), essential elements are the state, location and movement of the energy (and mass). A UFOE can be considered as the driving force of an accident, e.g., an explosion, a fire, a release of heavy gases. As long as the energy is confined, i.e. the location and movement of the energy are under control, the situation is safe, but loss of confinement will create a hazardous situation that may develop into an accident. A domain model has been developed for representing accident and emergency scenarios occurring in society. The domain model uses three main categories: status, context and objectives. A domain is a group of activities with allied goals and elements and ten specific domains have been investigated: process plant, storage, nuclear power plant, energy distribution, marine transport of goods, marine transport of people, aviation, transport by road, transport by rail and natural disasters. Totally 25 accident cases were consulted and information was extracted for filling into the schematic representations with two to four cases pr. specific domain. (au) 41 tabs., 8 ills.; 79 refs.

  10. Elderly patients attended in emergency health services in Brazil: a study for victims of falls and traffic accidents.

    de Freitas, Mariana Gonçalves; Bonolo, Palmira de Fátima; de Moraes, Edgar Nunes; Machado, Carla Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The article aims to describe the profile of elderly victims of falls and traffic accidents from the data of the Surveillance Survey of Violence and Accidents (VIVA). The VIVA Survey was conducted in the emergency health-services of the Unified Health System in the capitals of Brazil in 2011. The sample of elderly by type of accident was subjected to the two-step cluster procedure. Of the 2463 elderly persons in question, 79.8% suffered falls and 20.2% were the victims of traffic accidents. The 1812 elderly who fell were grouped together into 4 clusters: Cluster 1, in which all had disabilities; Cluster 2, all were non-white and falls took place in the home; Cluster 3, younger and active seniors; and Cluster 4, with a higher proportion of seniors 80 years old or above who were white. Among cases of traffic accidents, 446 seniors were grouped into two clusters: Cluster 1 of younger elderly, drivers or passengers; Cluster 2, with higher age seniors, mostly pedestrians. The main victims of falls were women with low schooling and unemployed; traffic accident victims were mostly younger and male. Complications were similar in victims of falls and traffic accidents. Clusters allow adoption of targeted measures of care, prevention and health promotion. PMID:25760111

  11. Elderly patients attended in emergency health services in Brazil: a study for victims of falls and traffic accidents

    Mariana Gonçalves de Freitas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to describe the profile of elderly victims of falls and traffic accidents from the data of the Surveillance Survey of Violence and Accidents (VIVA. The VIVA Survey was conducted in the emergency health-services of the Unified Health System in the capitals of Brazil in 2011. The sample of elderly by type of accident was subjected to the two-step cluster procedure. Of the 2463 elderly persons in question, 79.8% suffered falls and 20.2% were the victims of traffic accidents. The 1812 elderly who fell were grouped together into 4 clusters: Cluster 1, in which all had disabilities; Cluster 2, all were non-white and falls took place in the home; Cluster 3, younger and active seniors; and Cluster 4, with a higher proportion of seniors 80 years old or above who were white. Among cases of traffic accidents, 446 seniors were grouped into two clusters: Cluster 1 of younger elderly, drivers or passengers; Cluster 2, with higher age seniors, mostly pedestrians. The main victims of falls were women with low schooling and unemployed; traffic accident victims were mostly younger and male. Complications were similar in victims of falls and traffic accidents. Clusters allow adoption of targeted measures of care, prevention and health promotion.

  12. Attitudes of Dublin accident and emergency department doctors and nurses towards the services offered by local general practitioners.

    Gibney, D; Murphy, A W; Smith, M.; Bury, G; Plunkett, P K

    1995-01-01

    Good communication at the accident and emergency (A&E)-general practice interface is important. Such communication will be affected by the attitudes of A&E staff towards local general practitioners (GPs). The objectives of this study were to establish and compare, using a questionnaire, the attitudes of Dublin A&E doctors and nurses towards the services offered by local GPs. A questionnaire was sent to all nurses and non-consultant doctors working in four of the six Dublin A&E departments. Co...

  13. Emergency thoracotomy for thoracic trauma in the accident and emergency department: indications and outcome

    Jahangiri, Marjan; Youhana, Aprim; Hyde, Jonathan; Lewis, Terence; Griffin, Steven; Wood, Alan; Magee, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of emergency thoracotomy performed for thoracic trauma in the accident and emergency department, a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent this procedure and were brought to hospital by the Helicopter Emergency Medical Service was carried out. Between 1991 and 1994, 16 patients had emergency thoracotomy performed in the accident department. Twelve patients had sustained blunt trauma and four patients had sustained penetrating injuries. Three patients first asse...

  14. The nuclear accident emergency and preparation activities of Zhejiang Province emergency committee for nuclear power station accident

    The offsite accident emergency preparation for coordinating operation of Qinshan Nuclear Power Station by Zhijiang province people government since 1989 has carried out. The emergency and preparation consist of the following activities: 1. Setting up the organization; 2. Drawing the offsite emergency plan and establishing the emergency system; 3. Enforcing the nuclear accident offsite emergency exercise before operation of the nuclear power station; 4. Holding the nuclear accident emergency staff training course and conducting safety education for the public around the nuclear power station

  15. Organization of accident medical service in emergency situations in the system of Federal administration board for medical-biological and emergency problems at the Ministry of public health and medical industry of Russia

    Federal Administration Board for medical-biological problems at the Ministry of Public Health and Medical Industry of Russia, in accordance with the entrusted functions, provides medical-sanitary service for the workers of the branches of industry with especially dangerous labour conditions. For these purpose, there is functioning in its system a network of therapeutic-prophylactic, sanitary, scientific-research, educational and other establishments. A high degree of accident danger of the attended industrial plants determines the state policy of organizations and administrations as well as scientific-practical establishments of the Federal Administration Board in respect of elaboration and introduction of a complex of measures which would enable to guarantee the safe functioning of the plants. All sub-administration establishments have the necessary structures, settle the questions of liquidation of medical-sanitary after-effects of accidents at the attended plants, and are regarded to be the organizations of specialized emergency medical aid of the Federal Administration Board

  16. Acidentes e violências entre mulheres atendidas em Serviços de Emergência Sentinela - Brasil, 2009 Accidents and violence among women attended in Sentinel Emergency Services - Brazil, 2009

    Celeste de Souza Rodrigues

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available As causas externas afetam de maneira desigual as populações humanas. O presente artigo tem como objetivo analisar os atendimentos de emergência em mulheres vítimas de acidentes e violências. Foram analisados dados do inquérito de Vigilância de Violências e Acidentes em 74 Unidades de Emergência de 23 capitais e no Distrito Federal em 2009. Analisaram-se 6.965 atendimentos de mulheres adultas comparando-se as faixas de 20-39 e 40-59 anos, em relação a ocorrência de acidentes e violências. Os acidentes foram mais frequentes em mulheres jovens (20 a 39 anos, de cor negra e com escolaridade maior que 9 anos de estudo. A ocorrência de violência também foi predominante em mulheres jovens e negras, porém com menor escolaridade. Entre os acidentes predominaram as quedas (38,6%, seguidas de acidentes de transporte. As violências foram mais frequentes no domicílio (p Accidents from external causes affect the human population in different ways. This article seeks to analyze emergency care for women who are victims of accidents and violence. Data from the Surveillance System for Violence and Accidents were analyzed. This study was carried out in 74 emergency units of 23 state capitals and the Federal District in 2009 and included 6,965 women aged from 20-59 years. The age groups of 20-39 and 40-59 years were compared for the occurrence of accidents and violence. Accidents were more frequent among young black women (20-39 years with more than nine years of schooling. The occurrence of violence was also prevalent in young black women but with less schooling. Falls were the most frequent accidents (38.6%, followed by traffic accidents. The occurrence of violence was more frequent in the home (p <0.000 and the mention of alcohol abuse among victims of violence was predominant. The most frequent type of violence was aggression (84.6%, in which the aggressor was male (79.1% and identified as an intimate partner (44.1%. It is increasingly

  17. Helicopter emergency medical services accident rates in different international air rescue systems

    J Hinkelbein

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available J Hinkelbein1,2, M Schwalbe2, H V Genzwuerker2,31Department for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Cologne, Germany; 2Working Group “Emergency Medicine and Air Rescue”, German Society of Aviation and Space Medicine (DGRLM eV; 3Clinic of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Neckar-Odenwald-Kliniken gGmbH, Hospitals Buchen and Mosbach, Buchen, GermanyAim: Each year approximately two to four helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS crashes occur in Germany. The aim of the present study was to compare crash rates and fatal crash rates in Germany to rates in other countries.Materials and methods: A MEDLINE search from 1970 to 2009 was performed using combinations of the keywords “HEMS”, “rescue helicopter”, “accident”, “accident rate”, “crash”, and “crash rate”. The search was supplemented by additional published data. Data were compared on the basis of 10,000 missions and 100,000 helicopter flying hours. These data were allocated to specific time frames for analyis.Results: Eleven relevant studies were identified. Five studies (three from Germany, one from the US, one from Australia analyzing HEMS accidents on the basis of 10,000 missions were identified. Crash rates per 10,000 missions ranged between 0.4 and 3.05 and fatal crash rates between 0.04 and 2.12. In addition, nine studies (six from the US, two from Germany, one from Australia used 100,000 flying hours as a denominator. Here, crash rates ranged between 1.7 and 13.4 and fatal crash rates between 0.91 and 4.7.Conclusions: Data and accident rates were inhomogeneous and differed significantly. Data analysis was impeded by publication of mean data, use of different time frames, and differences in HEMS systems.Keywords: fatal accident rate, rescue helicopter, fatal crash rate, helicopter emergency medical system, accident analysis

  18. Pain in young children attending an accident and emergency department

    McCarthy, C.; Hewitt, S; Choonara, I.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To assess pain in young children presenting to an accident and emergency (A&E) department. To evaluate the use of the toddler-preschooler postoperative pain scale (TPPPS) and the use of analgesia in these children.

  19. Unusual presentation of tuberculosis to the accident and emergency department.

    Jones, K E; McLauchlan, C A

    1995-01-01

    A patient with localized, reactive tendinitis secondary to tuberculosis presented to the accident and emergency (A&E) department. Tendinitis is a relatively common complaint, and it is important to consider uncommon systemic causes, including tuberculosis.

  20. Diphtheria presenting in the accident and emergency department.

    Walters, R F

    1987-01-01

    A case of diphtheria encountered in the accident and emergency department is described. In addition, 38 cases of diphtheria have been analysed, and demonstrate that, although now rare in this country, the disease still exists and its clinical features remain unchanged. It presents almost as often in the accident and emergency department as it does to the general practitioner and remains overwhelmingly a disease of children. Diphtheria is still a notifiable disease. The diagnosis must be made ...

  1. The impact of nationally distributed guidelines on the management of paracetamol poisoning in accident and emergency departments. National Poison Information Service.

    Bialas, M. C.; Evans, R J; Hutchings, A D; Alldridge, G; Routledge, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of the treatment guidelines on the management of paracetamol self poisoning in accident and emergency (A&E) departments. METHODS: 24 A&E departments in Wales and England provided details of their management of paracetamol poisoning before and after the distribution of national treatment guidelines to all A&E departments in the United Kingdom. RESULTS: Significant increases were seen in the availability of formal written policies, the display of treatment nomogr...

  2. Accident and emergency nursing – clinical audit

    Kitching, Holly

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this audit is to measure current practice in minor head injury management in an emergency department against the recommendations stated in the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) (2007) guidelines for Head injury: Triage, assessment, investigation and early management of head injury in infants, children and adults. Objectives Is to determine the impact on workload in the emergency department in-relation to the implementation of the NICE head injur...

  3. Reconstruction of the Chernobyl emergency and accident management

    Full text of publication follows: on April 26, 1986 the most serious civil technological accident in the history of mankind occurred of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) in the former Soviet Union. As a direct result of the accident, the reactor was severely destroyed and large quantities of radionuclides were released. Some 800000 persons, also called 'liquidators' - including plant operators, fire-fighters, scientists, technicians, construction workers, emergency managers, volunteers, as well as medical and military personnel - were part of emergency measurements and accident management efforts. Activities included measures to prevent the escalation of the accident, mitigation actions, help for victims as well as activities in order to provide a basic infrastructure for this unprecedented and overwhelming task. The overall goal of the 'Project Chernobyl' of the Institute of Risk Research of the University of Vienna was to preserve for mankind the experience and knowledge of the experts among the 'liquidators' before it is lost forever. One method used to reconstruct the emergency measures of Chernobyl was the direct cooperation with liquidators. Simple questionnaires were distributed among liquidators and a database of leading accident managers, engineers, medical experts etc. was established. During an initial struggle with a number of difficulties, the response was sparse. However, after an official permit had been issued, the questionnaires delivered a wealth of data. Furthermore a documentary archive was established, which provided additional information. The multidimensional problem in connection with the severe accident of Chernobyl, the clarification of the causes of the accident, as well as failures and successes and lessons to be learned from the Chernobyl emergency measures and accident management are discussed. (authors)

  4. Oral and maxillofacial surgery in accident and emergency departments.

    Wood, G D; Leeming, K A

    1995-01-01

    Patients with oral and facial injuries presenting as emergencies to the accident and emergency (A&E) unit at Arrowe Park Hospital have been used to compare the treatment method of direct referral to oral and maxillofacial surgery with that of the routine A&E procedure. A quicker and more effective treatment was administered by direct referral of patients to oral and maxillofacial surgery and an argument for such specialist staff to be based in A&E departments is advanced.

  5. Emergency planning and preparedness for a nuclear accident

    Based on current regulations, FEMA approves each site-specific plan of state and local governments for each power reactor site after 1) formal review offsite preparedness, 2) holding a public meeting at which the preparedness status has been reviewed, and 3) a satisfactory joint exercise has been conducted with both utility and local participation. Annually, each state, within any position of the 10-mile emergency planning zone, must conduct a joint exercise with the utility to demonstrate its preparedness for a nuclear accident. While it is unlikely that these extreme measures will be needed as a result of an accident at a nuclear power station, the fact that these plans have been well thought out and implemented have already proven their benefit to society. The preparedness for a nuclear accident can be of great advantage in other types of emergencies. For example, on December 11, 1982, a non-nuclear chemical storage tank exploded at a Union Carbide plant in Louisiana shortly after midnight. More than 20,000 people were evacuated from their homes. They were evacuated under the emergency response plan formulated for use in the event of a nuclear accident at the nearby Waterford Nuclear plants. Clearly, this illustrates how a plan conceived for one purpose is appropriate to handle other types of accidents that occur in a modern industrial society

  6. PWR auxiliary systems, safety and emergency systems, accident analysis, operation

    The author presents a description of PWR auxiliary systems like volume control, boric acid control, coolant purification, -degassing, -storage and -treatment system and waste processing systems. Residual heat removal systems, emergency systems and containment designs are discussed. As an accident analysis the author gives a survey over malfunctions and disturbances in the field of reactor operations. (TK)

  7. Measuring patients' experiences in the Accident and Emergency department

    Bos, N.

    2013-01-01

    Two questionnaires were used to measure patients’ experiences in the Accident and Emergency department (A&E). First, the English A&E department questionnaire used in the English National Survey Programme, and after translation in Dutch used in the Netherlands. The second questionnaire concerned the

  8. Hepatitis B vaccination in United Kingdom accident and emergency departments.

    Heyworth, J

    1988-01-01

    Hepatitis B vaccination is not widespread amongst staff in accident and emergency departments in the United Kingdom. The results of a survey of departments training senior registrars reveal that unfounded fears concerning the safety of the vaccine are responsible for the low uptake. The need for vaccination, cost, medicolegal aspects and future developments are discussed.

  9. Process criticality accident likelihoods, magnitudes and emergency planning. A focus on solution accidents

    This paper presents analyses and applications of data from reactor and critical experiment research on the dynamics of nuclear excursions in solution media. Available criticality accident information is also discussed and shown to provide strong evidence of the overwhelming likelihood of accidents in liquid media over other forms and to support the measured data. These analyses are shown to provide valuable insights into key parameters important to understanding solution excursion dynamics in general and in evaluating practical upper bounds on criticality accident magnitudes. This understanding and these upper bounds are directly applicable to the evaluation of the consequences of postulated criticality accidents. These bounds are also essential in order to comply with national and international consensus standards and regulatory requirements for emergency planning. (author)

  10. ANS-8.23: Criticality accident emergency planning and response

    A study group has been formed under the auspices of ANS-8 to examine the need for a standard on nuclear criticality accident emergency planning and response. This standard would be ANS-8.23. ANSI/ANS-8.19-1984, Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety, provides some guidance on the subject in Section 10 titled -- Planned Response to Nuclear Criticality Accidents. However, the study group has formed a consensus that Section 10 is inadequate in that technical guidance in addition to administrative guidance is needed. The group believes that a new standard which specifically addresses emergency planning and response to a perceived criticality accident is needed. Plans for underway to request the study group be designated a writing group to create a draft of such a new standard. The proposed standard will divide responsibility between management and technical staff. Generally, management will be charged with providing the necessary elements of emergency planning such as a criticality detection and alarm system, training, safe evacuation routes and assembly areas, a system for timely accountability of personnel, and an effective emergency response organization. The technical staff, on the other hand, will be made responsible for establishing specific items such as safe and clearly posted evacuation evacuation routes and dose criteria for personnel assembly areas. The key to the question of responsibilities is that management must provide the resources for the technical staff to establish the elements of an emergency response effort

  11. Experience and lessons learned from emergency disposal of Fukushima nuclear power station accident

    After Fukushima nuclear accident, we visited the related medical aid agencies for nuclear accidents and conducted investigations in disaster-affected areas in Japan. This article summarizes the problems with emergency disposal of Fukushima nuclear accident while disclosing problems should be solved during the emergency force construction for nuclear accidents. (authors)

  12. A systemic analysis of patterns of organizational breakdowns in accidents: A case from Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) operations

    In recent years, many accident models and techniques have shifted their focus from shortfalls in the actions of practitioners to systemic causes in the organization. Accident investigation techniques (e.g., STAMP) have been developed that looked into the flaws of control processes in the organization. Organizational models have looked into general patterns of breakdown related to structural vulnerabilities and gradual degradation of performance. Although some degree of cross-fertilization has been developed between these two trends, safety analysts are left on their own to integrate this gap between control flaws and patterns of organizational breakdown in accident investigation. This article attempts to elaborate the control dynamics of the Systems Theoretic Accident Model and Process (STAMP) technique on the basis of a theoretical model of organizational viability (i.e., the Viable Systems Model). The joint STAMP–VSM framework is applied to an accident from a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) organization to help analysts progress from the analysis of control flaws to the underlying patterns of breakdown. The joint framework may help analysts to rethink the safety organization, model new information loops and constraints, look at the adaptation and steering functions of the organization and finally, develop high leverage interventions. - Highlights: ► This article bridges the gap between two parallel trends in systemic accident models. ► Investigation techniques (i.e., STAMP) have looked into the flaws of safety management processes. ► The literature has highlighted many patterns (or archetypes) of organizational breakdowns. ► The Viable System Model is used with STAMP to link control flaws and organizational breakdowns.

  13. Use of an accident and emergency department by hospital staff.

    Mann, C J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the number of attendances by hospital staff at an accident and emergency (A&E) department, and reasons for their attendance. METHODS: A&E attendances by hospital staff were studied for a 12 month period. Comparison was made with attendances by non-hospital staff in full or part time employment. Differences between the observed and expected numbers of attendances were analysed using chi 2 analysis. RESULTS: 560 staff attendances were recorded out of 78,103 total attendance...

  14. Rural Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and Trauma

    ... View more Rural Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and Trauma Emergency medical services (EMS) providers care for individuals ... hospital be part of the regional and statewide trauma system? Yes. According to Safety in Numbers: Are ...

  15. Administration of medicines by emergency nurse practitioners according to protocols in an accident and emergency department.

    Marshall, J.; Edwards, C.; Lambert, M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present the legal and professional issues related to nurse administration of drugs according to protocols, and describe the implementation and initial audit findings of such a scheme. SETTING: Accident and emergency (A&E) department of a district general hospital. METHODS: Analysis of legal and professional opinion. Protocols acceptable to the medical, nursing, and pharmacy professions were developed across a wide range of drugs appropriate for administration by accident and eme...

  16. Accident Emergency Response And Routing Software (AERARS using Genetic Algorithm

    Naveen Ramachandran,

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available AERARS is a response and routing software for accident emergency requirement. A method has been proposed in this project for using a genetic algorithm to find the shortest route between a source and adestination. It make use of genetic algorithms ability to search the opt solution from the population helping to solve spatially addressed problem. The numbers of accident spots are plotted in ArcGISenvironment and ten major accident spots are identified. The software package is designed with closest facility estimation and shortest route generation along with other basic software facilities in Visual Basic environment. Genetic algorithm provided a great optimality to the solutions. The closest facility tool helps to estimate the nearest hospital, ambulance, police station and fire station. The shortest route estimation tool generates shortest path between a locations to the hospital or ambulance spot. The various risk zonesare assessed and more safety measures can be taken to reduce the frequency of accident. The software efficiency can be further increased by incorporating GPS and satellite technology.

  17. Emergency plans for nuclear power accidents

    The report presents an evaluation of an exercise of emergency services during a simulated accident at the nuclear power plant of Barsebaeck, Sweden. The aim of the exercise was to test Swedish and Danish organizations and various collaborative co-ordinations. Recommendations for future exercises are given. (G.B.)

  18. Process criticality accident likelihoods, consequences, and emergency planning

    Evaluation of criticality accident risks in the processing of significant quantities of fissile materials is both complex and subjective, largely due to the lack of accident statistics. Thus, complying with standards such as ISO 7753 which mandates that the need for an alarm system be evaluated, is also subjective. A review of guidance found in the literature on potential accident magnitudes is presented for different material forms and arrangements. Reasoned arguments are also presented concerning accident prevention and accident likelihoods for these material forms and arrangements. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  19. Emergency response planning and preparedness for transport accidents involving radioactive material

    The purpose of this Guide is to provide assistance to public authorities and others (including consignors and carriers of radioactive materials) who are responsible for ensuring safety in establishing and developing emergency response arrangements for responding effectively to transport accidents involving radioactive materials. This Guide is concerned mainly with the preparation of emergency response plans. It provides information which will assist those countries whose involvement with radioactive materials is just beginning and those which have already developed their industries involving radioactive materials and attendant emergency plans, but may need to review and improve these plans. The need for emergency response plans and the ways in which they are implemented vary from country to country. In each country, the responsible authorities must decide how best to apply this Guide, taking into account the actual shipments and associated hazards. In this Guide the emergency response planning and response philosophy are outlined, including identification of emergency response organizations and emergency services that would be required during a transport accident. General consequences which could prevail during an accident are described taking into account the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 43 refs, figs and tabs

  20. Nuclear accident/radiological emergency assistance plan. NAREAP - edition 2000. Emergency preparedness and response

    The purpose of the Nuclear Accident/Radiological Emergency Assistance Plan (NAREAP) is to describe the framework for systematic, integrated, co-ordinated, and effective preparedness and response for a nuclear accident or radiological emergency involving facilities or practices that may give rise to a threat to health, the environment or property. The purpose of the NAREAP is: to define the emergency response objectives of the Agency's staff in a nuclear accident or a radiological emergency; to assign responsibilities for performing the tasks and authorities for making the decisions that comprise the Agency staff's response to a nuclear accident or radiological emergency; to guide the Agency managers who must ensure that all necessary tasks are given the necessary support in discharging the Agency staff responsibilities and fulfilling its obligations in response to an emergency; to ensure that the development and maintenance of detailed and coherent response procedures are well founded; to act as a point of reference for individual Agency staff members on their responsibilities (as an individual or a team member) throughout a response; to identify interrelationships with other international intergovernmental Organizations; and to serve as a training aid to maintain readiness of personnel. The NAREAP refers to the arrangements of the International Atomic Energy Agency and of the United Nations Security and Safety Section at the Vienna International Centre (UNSSS-VIC) that may be necessary for the IAEA to respond to a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, as defined in the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions. It covers response arrangements for any situation that may have actual, potential or perceived radiological consequences and that could require a response from the IAEA, as well as the arrangements for developing, maintaining and exercising preparedness. The implementing procedures themselves are not included in the NAREAP, but they are required

  1. Transport accident emergency response plan

    To comply with the IAEA recommendations for the implementation of an Emergency Response Plan as described in Safety Series 87, Transnucleaire, a company deeply involved in the road and rail transports of the fuel cycle, masters means of Emergency Response in the event of a transport accident. This paper aims at analyzing the solutions adopted for the implementation of an Emergency Response Plan and the development of a technical support and adapted means for the recovery of heavy packagings. (authors)

  2. Patterns of presentation of abused children to the accident and emergency department.

    Olney, D B

    1988-01-01

    A search of accident and emergency department records showed that 61% of 85 children registered as being physically or sexually abused by the Department of Community Paediatrics at St James's University Hospital, Leeds, England, were found to have visited the accident and emergency department an average of 2.9 times before the diagnosis was made. Fifty-two per cent of the attendances were because of problems other than injuries. Staff of accident and emergency departments should be aware that...

  3. What do we really know about infants who attend Accident and Emergency departments?

    Heys, M; Kwong, H-M; Reed, J.; Blair, M

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Accident and Emergency attendances continue to rise. Infants are disproportionately represented. This study examines the clinical reasons infants attend UK Accident and Emergency departments. Methods: A retrospective review of 6,667 infants aged less than one year attending Accident and Emergency at two district general hospitals in London from 1st April 2009 to 30th March 2010. All infants had been assigned to a diagnostic category by the medical coding department according to Natio...

  4. Emergency department radiation accident protocol.

    Leonard, R B; Ricks, R C

    1980-09-01

    Every emergency department faces the potential problem of handling one or more victims of a radiation accident. While emergency departments near nuclear power plants or isotope production laboratories probably have a detailed protocol for such emergencies, a similar protocol is needed for the emergency department that may have to handle an isolated event, such as a vehicular accident that spills radioactive material and contaminates passengers or bystanders. This communication attempts to answer that need, presenting a step-by-step protocol for decontamination of a radiation victim, the rationale on which each step is based, a list of needed supplies, and a short summary of decorporation procedures that should be started in the emergency department. PMID:7425419

  5. Intracardiac therapy following emergency thoracotomy in the accident and emergency department: an experimental model.

    Moulton, C; Pennycook, A; Crawford, R

    1992-01-01

    For a select group of patients with penetrating chest trauma, immediate thoracotomy in the accident and emergency department offers the only chance of survival. Foley catheters have been used to achieve haemostasis in cardiac wounds but are not widely used for intracardiac fluid and drug administration during resuscitation. In an anatomical model designed to assess this procedure an average flow rate of 275 ml min-1 was achieved. The equipment required is readily available and easily assembled.

  6. Emergency Responses and Health Consequences after the Fukushima Accident; Evacuation and Relocation.

    Hasegawa, A; Ohira, T; Maeda, M; Yasumura, S; Tanigawa, K

    2016-04-01

    The Fukushima accident was a compounding disaster following the strong earthquake and huge tsunami. The direct health effects of radiation were relatively well controlled considering the severity of the accident, not only among emergency workers but also residents. Other serious health issues include deaths during evacuation, collapse of the radiation emergency medical system, increased mortality among displaced elderly people and public healthcare issues in Fukushima residents. The Fukushima mental health and lifestyle survey disclosed that the Fukushima accident caused severe psychological distress in the residents from evacuation zones. In addition to psychiatric and mental health problems, there are lifestyle-related problems such as an increase proportion of those overweight, an increased prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidaemia and changes in health-related behaviours among evacuees; all of which may lead to an increased cardiovascular disease risk in the future. The effects of a major nuclear accident on societies are diverse and enduring. The countermeasures should include disaster management, long-term general public health services, mental and psychological care, behavioural and societal support, in addition to efforts to mitigate the health effects attributable to radiation. PMID:26876459

  7. Scoping accident(s) for emergency planning

    At the request of the Conference of State Radiation Control Program Director's (CRCPD), in November 1976 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission formed a joint Task Force with representatives of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to answer a number of questions posed by the States regarding emergency planning. This Task Force held monthly meetings through November 1977. In December 1977 a draft report was prepared for limited distribution for review and comment by selected State and local organizations. The NRC/EPA Task Force deliberations centered on the CRCPD request for '... a determination of the most severe accident basis for which radiological emergency response plans should be developed by offsite agencies...' in the vicinity of nuclear power plants. Federal Interagency guidance to the States in this regard has been that the scoping accident should be the most serious conservatively analyzed accident considered for siting purposes, as exemplified in the Commission's Regulations at 10 CFR Part 100 and the NRC staffs Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4, and as presented in license applicant's Safety Analysis Reports and the USNRC Staffs Safety Evaluation Reports. The draft report of the Task Force amplifies on this recommendation: to present a clearer picture of its import and introduces the concept of protective action zones (PAZs) within which detailed emergency plans should be developed; one zone for the plume exposure pathway and a second, larger zone for contamination pathways. The time dependence of potential releases and atmospheric transport, and important radionuclide groups of possible import are also discussed in the draft Task Force report. A status report regarding this effort, as of June 1978, will be presented. (author)

  8. Preventing radiological accidents and emergencies by legislative and regulatory means

    The Goiania radiation accident triggered a reassessment of radiation safety systems. From a legal point of view, the course of events indicates that there were deficiencies either in the existing legal framework or in the implementation of that framework. Proposals to avoid similar accidents in the future are discussed, stressing the need for a sound legal regime and a close co-operation between state authorities and users of radioactive sources. In particular, the importance is underscored of the human factor in achieving a high level of radiation safety. (author)

  9. Planning and Preparing for Emergency Response to Transport Accidents Involving Radioactive Material. Safety Guide

    This Safety Guide provides guidance on various aspects of emergency planning and preparedness for dealing effectively and safely with transport accidents involving radioactive material, including the assignment of responsibilities. It reflects the requirements specified in Safety Standards Series No. TS-R-1, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, and those of Safety Series No. 115, International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Framework for planning and preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 3. Responsibilities for planning and preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 4. Planning for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 5. Preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; Appendix I: Features of the transport regulations influencing emergency response to transport accidents; Appendix II: Preliminary emergency response reference matrix; Appendix III: Guide to suitable instrumentation; Appendix IV: Overview of emergency management for a transport accident involving radioactive material; Appendix V: Examples of response to transport accidents; Appendix VI: Example equipment kit for a radiation protection team; Annex I: Example of guidance on emergency response to carriers; Annex II: Emergency response guide.

  10. Carbon monoxide poisoning: correlation of neurological findings between accident and emergency departments and a hyperbaric unit

    Lynch, R.; Laden, G; Grout, P

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To investigate and quantify the differences in neurological examination findings in patients acutely poisoned with carbon monoxide, between initial assessment at accident and emergency (A&E) departments and subsequently at a hyperbaric unit.

  11. A radioactive waste transportation package monitoring system for normal transport and accident emergency response conditions

    This paper addresses spent fuel and high level waste transportation history and prospects, discusses accident histories of radioactive material transport, discusses emergency responder needs and provides a general description of the Transportation Intelligent Monitoring System (TRANSIMS) design. The key objectives of the monitoring system are twofold: (1) to facilitate effective emergency response to accidents involving a radioactive waste transportation package, while minimizing risk to the public and emergency first-response personnel, and (2) to allow remote monitoring of transportation vehicle and payload conditions to enable research into radioactive material transportation for normal and accident conditions. (J.P.N.)

  12. Emergency care of the elderly in the short-stay ward of the accident and emergency department.

    Harrop, S.N.; Morgan, W J

    1985-01-01

    Review of a consecutive series of the elderly patients who presented unheralded to the Accident and Emergency Department of the Royal Gwent Hospital showed that a relative minority (11%) were difficult to manage because they had no obvious acute medical condition or injury which qualified them for admission by the firms to whom they were first referred. The difficulty was compounded by the shortage of geriatric beds. Judicious use of short-stay ward beds in the accident and emergency departme...

  13. EMERGENCY RESPONSE OF THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE FEDERAL SERVICE FOR SURVEILLANCE ON CONSUMER RIGHTS PROTECTION AND HUMAN WELL-BEING IN SAKHALIN REGION TO THE FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT

    B. B. Darizhapov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the experience of the Administration of the Federal Service for Surveillance on Consumer Rights Protection and Human Well-being in Sakhalin Region in organizing prevention of conditions that endanger the public radiation safety related to the nuclear accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. The authors present results of the measurements of the radiation situation in the Sakhalin region and propose ways to improve organizational and sanitary-hygienic measures aimed on ensuring public protectiony in events of radiation accidents.

  14. Emergency drinking water treatment during source water pollution accidents in China: origin analysis, framework and technologies.

    Zhang, Xiao-Jian; Chen, Chao; Lin, Peng-Fei; Hou, Ai-Xin; Niu, Zhang-Bin; Wang, Jun

    2011-01-01

    China has suffered frequent source water contamination accidents in the past decade, which has resulted in severe consequences to the water supply of millions of residents. The origins of typical cases of contamination are discussed in this paper as well as the emergency response to these accidents. In general, excessive pursuit of rapid industrialization and the unreasonable location of factories are responsible for the increasing frequency of accidental pollution events. Moreover, insufficient attention to environmental protection and rudimentary emergency response capability has exacerbated the consequences of such accidents. These environmental accidents triggered or accelerated the promulgation of stricter environmental protection policy and the shift from economic development mode to a more sustainable direction, which should be regarded as the turning point of environmental protection in China. To guarantee water security, China is trying to establish a rapid and effective emergency response framework, build up the capability of early accident detection, and develop efficient technologies to remove contaminants from water. PMID:21133359

  15. Survey of the use of rapid sequence induction in the accident and emergency department

    Walker, A.; Brenchley, J

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To determine the current position regarding the use of rapid sequence induction (RSI) by accident and emergency (A&E) medical staff and the attitudes of consultants in A&E and anaesthetics towards this.

  16. Biological tissue adhesive for multiple use in the accident and emergency department

    Gerrard, C.; S. Moore; Ryan, B

    2000-01-01

    Objective—To assess the strength of the glue and microbial contamination over 28 days from opening a vial of tissue adhesive in the accident and emergency setting, and to quantify cost savings of repeated use of the vials.

  17. Head injuries in accident and emergency departments. How different are children from adults?

    Brookes, M; MacMillan, R.; Cully, S; E. Anderson; S. Murray; Mendelow, A D; Jennett, B

    1990-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim of the study was to examine the differences between child and adult patients attending accident and emergency departments after recent head injuries. DESIGN AND SETTING--A retrospective survey based on existing case records from 23 Scottish accident and emergency departments for 1985 was compared with prospective data from one hospital over 9 months in 1984. PATIENTS--3838 children under 15 and 4775 adults attended hospital with head injuries during the period analyse...

  18. Referral to the accident and emergency department following the use of community alarms

    Youssef, G.; Underhill, T; Tovey, C

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To assess the degree of appropriate referral to the accident and emergency (A&E) department following the use of a community alarm where a mobile warden works in conjunction with the community alarm control centre.

  19. Emergency Medical Services

    ... and need help right away, you should use emergency medical services. These services use specially trained people ... facilities. You may need care in the hospital emergency room (ER). Doctors and nurses there treat emergencies, ...

  20. Emergency Medical Services

    ... need help right away, you should use emergency medical services. These services use specially trained people and ... emergencies, you need help where you are. Emergency medical technicians, or EMTs, do specific rescue jobs. They ...

  1. Integrating four-dimensional geographical information and mobile techniques into radiological accident emergency response training

    When radiological accidents occur, radioactive material may spread into the atmosphere, causing large-scale and long-term contamination. To diminish the effects of such accidents, researchers from many countries have investigated training programs in emergency response to radiological accidents, especially in the wake of several serious radiological accidents. Although many training programs have been proposed, this study identifies two problems: the lack of effective data representation and the lack of complete training records. Therefore, by considering various requirements for relief and evacuation work at radiological accident sites, it integrates four-dimensional geographical information and mobile techniques to construct a training platform for radiological accident emergency response. During training, groups of participants learn to respond to simulated radiological accident scenarios. Moreover, participants can use the training platform to review and discuss training details. Judging by the results, the training platform has not only increased the effectiveness of training programs, but also complied with standard operating procedures for radiological accident emergency response in Taiwan. In conclusion, this study could serve as a useful reference for similar studies and applications. (author)

  2. Review of emergency thoracotomy for chest injuries in patients attending a UK Accident and Emergency department.

    Bleetman, A; Kasem, H; Crawford, R

    1996-03-01

    Over a two and a half year period, 25 patients presenting to the Glasgow Royal Infirmary underwent emergency thoracotomy for suspected severe chest injuries. Eighteen (72 per cent) were performed in the Accident and Emergency (A&E) department and seven (28 per cent) in a fully equipped operating theatre after resuscitation. There were 23 men and 2 women. Twenty-three (92 per cent) had been stabbed, one (4 per cent) had been shot and one (4 per cent) had sustained a blunt injury in a road traffic accident. Eight (32 per cent) patients survived. All survivors had been stabbed and seven were well enough to undergo thoracotomy in theatre. Only one (5.6 per cent) of the patients operated upon in the A&E department survived to discharge, although three (16.8 per cent) survived the initial procedure. Three of four patients survived, in whom the diagnosis of cardiac tamponade was initially missed. Thirteen (76.5 per cent) of the 17 who did not survive had no vital signs on admission. Outcomes may be improved if appropriately trained hospital staff are immediately available and prehospital delays are minimized so that patients arrive sooner with signs of life still present. Ambulance paramedic interventions have little to offer these patients and may worsen the prognosis if they result in delayed transport to hospital. The emphasis placed on diagnosis and treatment of cardiac tamponade in Advanced Trauma Life Support programmes is appropriate and all staff involved in these cases should undergo this type of training. PMID:8730388

  3. Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography

    The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant's operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ''onsite'' response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world's collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously

  4. Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography

    Youngen, G.

    1988-10-01

    The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant`s operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ``onsite`` response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world`s collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously.

  5. ANS [American Nuclear Society] topical meeting on radiological accidents: Perspectives and emergency planning: Proceedings

    The increasing use of radioactive materials and the increasing public concern about possible accidents involving these materials has led to greater emphasis on preparing for such emergencies. The ANS Topical Meeting on Radiological Accidents - Perspectives and Emergency Planning provided a review of experiences with radiological accidents. The meeting covered some of the most important aspects of radiological accidents. Papers were presented which dealt with radiological accident experience. Technical response to accidents is of primary interest to many in the nuclear community; most of the papers submitted fell into this area. So many of these papers dealt with the use of computers in response that a session on that topic was arranged. A very significant impact of most radiological accidents is the cost, especially the cost of cleanup. There were papers on what is known about costs and associated current topics, such as modification and extension of the Price-Anderson Act. At least as important as the technical response to accidents is how society attempts to deal with them. A session on institutional issues was included to discuss how governments and other organizations respond to and deal with accidents. Medical effects of accidents are of great concern to the public. Invited papers to review the effects of high doses of radiation as well as very low doses were included in that session. Although the nuclear industry has an excellent safety record, this fact often does not agree with the public perception of the industry. The final session explored the public response to and perception of radiological emergencies and accidents. This subject will ultimately determine the future use of radioactive materials in this country

  6. Characterization of motorcycle accident victims attended by the mobile emergency service (SAMU-192, Recife, Pernambuco State, Brazil - 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v34ispec.11524

    Betise Mery Alencar Sousa Macau Furtado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study described the epidemiological characteristics of victims of accidents involving motorcycles, attended by the Mobile Emergency Service (SAMU-192 in the city of Recife (PE in 2006. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study that analyzed a sample of 703 cases. The results showed that 81.8% were male, aged 20 to 29 years. It was noted that 406 of them were wearing a helmet at the time of the accident. The accidents occurred most frequently on Sundays (19.3% between 18:00 and 24:00 hours (0.28%. The extremities were the most affected body segment, with 341 occurrences. Regarding the severity of injuries, it was found that 37.6% were superficial or mild (scrapes, cuts and bruises. These results demonstrate the need for educational campaigns to encourage the use of personal protective equipment among motorcyclists. The best way to reduce the risks and damages from motorcycle accidents is through primary prevention. For this, are needed integrated intersectoral actions aimed at reducing the incidence and severity of injuries.  

  7. Review and assessment of package requirements (yellowcake) and emergency response to transportation accidents

    As a consequence of an accident involving a truck shipment of yellowcake, a joint NRC--DOT study was undertaken to review and assess the regulations and practices related to package integrity and to emergency response to transportation accidents involving low specific activity radioactive materials. Recommendations are made regarding the responsibilities of state and local agencies, carriers, and shippers, and the DOT and NRC regulations

  8. Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management

    The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies

  9. Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies.

  10. Pediatric emergency medical services and their drawbacks

    Abdullah Foraih Al-Anazi

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To survey the literature on Pediatric Emergency Medical Services (PEMS) with an aim to focus its drawbacks and emphasize the means of improvement. Materials and Methods: Published articles selected for inclusion were based on the significance and understanding of literature search on different aspects of PEMS. To meet this criterion, PubMed, PubMed Central, Science Direct, Uptodate, Med Line, comprehensive databases, Cochrane library and the Internet (Google, Yahoo) were thoroughly searc...

  11. Emergency preparedness and measures to prevent severe accidents in the Republic of Korea

    The paper reviews the national programme for prevention and mitigation of severe nuclear plant accidents and emergency preparedness in case of nuclear accidents in the Republic of Korea. The programme has implemented most post-Three Mile Island measures for safety improvements and set up a national system of emergency response to handle any nuclear related accident. The programme has also thoroughly examined safety related equipment and operating procedures of operating reactors in the Republic of Korea. As a result of the safety enhancing activities, Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) is establishing an emergency response facility, a post-accident sampling system and full scope probablistic risk analysis work. After the Chernobyl accident, the Government of the Republic of Korea went through a safety check-up of the operating plants once again and KEPCO installed a retraining programme for reactor operators and an upgraded safety check-up procedure and schedule. Improvements were made on a number of safety systems including an emergency core cooling system, a fire monitoring system and a quality assurance programme for fire prevention. In addition, the national programme has been setting up an international co-operative system in order to respond quickly to any unexpected accident through rapid mobilization of international experts, equipment and materials. (author). 1 fig., 1 tab

  12. Effect of guidelines on management of head injury on record keeping and decision making in accident and emergency departments.

    Thomson, R.; Gray, J; Madhok, R; Mordue, A.; Mendelow, A D

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare record keeping and decision making in accident and emergency departments before and after distribution of guidelines on head injury management as indices of implementation. DESIGN--Before (1987) and after (1990) study of accident and emergency medical records. SETTING--Two accident and emergency departments in England. PATIENTS--1144 adult patients with head injury in department 1 (533 in 1987, 613 in 1990) and 734 in department 2 (370, 364 respectively). MAIN MEASURES--...

  13. Help guides for post-accident consequence management: farm activities and exiting the emergency phase

    After having recalled the main actions foreseen in the PPIs (plans particuliers d'intervention, intervention specific plans) in case of radionuclide release in the environment after a nuclear accident, i.e. sheltering and ingestion of steady iodine, and also indicated the different phases of consequence management (preparation, emergency and post-accident phases), this report describes and comments the contents of two guides published by the IRSN (the French Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety Institute) and dealing with the management of post-accident consequences. The first one is a guide to aid to decision-making for the management of the agricultural sector in case of nuclear accident, and the second one is a guide for the preparation of the end of the emergency phase in which actions to be performed during the first week after the end of accidental releases are described

  14. ETH-CHEMRISK: A pilot decision support system for industrial accidents emergency planning and preparedness

    ETH-CHEMRISK is designed in accordance with the principles and methods of emergency planning and preparedness as applied to the case of industrial (chemical) accidents. The outline of this decision support system design follows from both the features that nuclear and chemical accident consequence analysis share, and those that make the two different from each other. It uses and integrates concepts such as: data base, geographical information system, risk assessment, graphic driven software environment

  15. Emergency Response to Radioactive Material Transport Accidents

    Although transport regulations issued by IAEA is providing a high degree of safety during transport opertions,transport accidents involving packages containing radioactive material have occurred and will occur at any time. Whenever a transport accident involving radioactive material accurs, and many will pose no radiation safety problems, emergency respnose actioms are meeded to ensure that radiation safety is maintained. In case of transport accident that result in a significant relesae of radioactive material , loss of shielding or loss of criticality control , that consequences should be controlled or mitigated by proper emergency response actions safety guide, Emergency Response Plamming and Prepardness for transport accidents involving radioactive material, was published by IAEA. This guide reflected all requirememts of IAEA, regulations for safe transport of radioactive material this guide provide guidance to the publicauthorites and other interested organziation who are responsible for establishing such emergency arrangements

  16. Chemical and nuclear emergencies: Interchanging lessons learned from planning and accident experience

    Because the goal of emergency preparedness for both chemical and nuclear hazards is to reduce human exposure to hazardous materials, this paper examines the interchange of lessons learned from emergency planning and accident experience in both industries. While the concerns are slightly different, sufficient similarity is found for each to draw implications from the others experience. Principally the chemical industry can learn from the dominant planning experience associated with nuclear power plants, while the nuclear industry can chiefly learn from the chemical industry's accident experience. 23 refs

  17. Populations protection and territories management in nuclear emergency and post-accident situation

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during these conference days. Twenty seven presentations out of 29 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - radiological and dosimetric consequences in nuclear accident situation: impact on the safety approach and protection stakes (E. Cogez); 2 - organisation of public authorities in case of emergency and in post-event situation (in case of nuclear accident or radiological terror attack in France and abroad), (O. Kayser); 3 - ORSEC plan and 'nuclear' particular intervention plan (PPI), (C. Guenon); 4 - thyroid protection by stable iodine ingestion: European perspective (J.R. Jourdain); 5 - preventive distribution of stable iodine: presentation of the 2009/2010 public information campaign (E. Bouchot); 6 - 2009/2010 iodine campaign: presentation and status (O. Godino); 7 - populations protection in emergency and post-accident situation in Switzerland (C. Murith); 8 - CIPR's recommendations on the management of emergency and post-accident situations (J. Lochard); 9 - nuclear exercises in France - status and perspectives (B. Verhaeghe); 10 - the accidental rejection of uranium at the Socatri plant: lessons learnt from crisis management (D. Champion); 11 - IRE's radiological accident of August 22, 2008 (C. Vandecasteele); 12 - presentation of the CEA's crisis national organisation: coordination centre in case of crisis, technical teams, intervention means (X. Pectorin); 13 - coordination and realisation of environmental radioactivity measurement programs, exploitation and presentation of results: status of IRSN's actions and perspectives (P. Dubiau); 14 - M2IRAGE - measurements management in the framework of geographically-assisted radiological interventions in the environment (O. Gerphagnon and H. Roche); 15 - post-accident management of a nuclear accident - the CODIRPA works (I. Mehl-Auget); 16 - nuclear post-accident: new challenges of crisis expertise (D. Champion); 17 - aid guidebooks

  18. Consistency in accident analyses in DOE safety, environmental, and emergency planning documents

    A consistency review of accident analyses in US Department of Energy (DOE) safety, environmental, and emergency planning documents is presented. The range of and key differences in driving assumptions used in accident definition and frequency assessment, radiological source term generation, and atmospheric transport and fate modeling across recent environmental impact statements (EISs) and emergency planning documents and the effects of these differences on results are summarized. Considerable variation in both the assumptions and the underlying level of conservatism is shown to exist. Recommendations are made for source term generation and assumed meteorological conditions to reduce inconsistencies without being overly prescriptive. Recommendations also are made to improve consistency in assessing the frequencies of various generic accident sequences traditionally analyzed in EIS and emergency planning documents. All recommendations are shown to be consistent with currently applicable DOE guidance

  19. Guidelines for attendance and registration for radiological emergencies of nuclear accidents

    Today in Brazil the use of nuclear energy is becoming an usual practice in various activities. Thus, must be a matter of great weight, directions for attendance and registration for radiological emergencies or nuclear accidents. This work shows the planning elaborated by the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (Brazilian CNEN) for nuclear plants, aiming avoid the injurious effects from the ionizing radiation exposure, radionuclides release or the direct or indirect exposure of ionizing radiation, that proceeding from a radiological emergencies or a nuclear accidents. (J.A.M.M.)

  20. Management of a radiological emergency. Experience feedback and post-accident management

    In France, the organization of crisis situations and the management of radiological emergency situations are regularly tested through simulation exercises for a continuous improvement. Past severe accidents represent experience feedback resources of prime importance which have led to deep changes in crisis organizations. However, the management of the post-accident phase is still the object of considerations and reflections between the public authorities and the intervening parties. This document presents, first, the nuclear crisis exercises organized in France, then, the experience feedback of past accidents and exercises, and finally, the main aspects to consider for the post-accident management of such events: 1 - Crisis exercises: objectives, types (local, national and international exercises), principles and progress, limits; 2 - Experience feedback: real crises (major accidents, other recent accidental situations or incidents), crisis exercises (experience feedback organization, improvements); 3 - post-accident management: environmental contamination and people exposure, management of contaminated territories, management of populations (additional protection, living conditions, medical-psychological follow up), indemnification, organization during the post-accident phase; 4 - conclusion and perspectives. (J.S.)

  1. Pediatric emergency medical services and their drawbacks

    Abdullah Foraih Al-Anazi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To survey the literature on Pediatric Emergency Medical Services (PEMS with an aim to focus its drawbacks and emphasize the means of improvement. Materials and Methods: Published articles selected for inclusion were based on the significance and understanding of literature search on different aspects of PEMS. To meet this criterion, PubMed, PubMed Central, Science Direct, Uptodate, Med Line, comprehensive databases, Cochrane library and the Internet (Google, Yahoo were thoroughly searched. Results: PEMS provide out-of-hospital medical care and/or transport the patients to definitive care. The task force represents specialties of ambulance transport, first aid, emergency medical care, life saving, trauma, emergency medicine, water rescue, and extrication. Preliminary care is undertaken to save the patients from different medical exigencies. The techniques and procedures of basic and advanced life-support are employed. A large number of weaknesses are recorded in PEMS system, such as ambulance transport irregularities, deficit equipment, lack of expertise, and ignorance of the pre-hospital care providers. These are discussed with special reference to a few examples of medical exigencies. Conclusions: The appointments in PEMS should be regularized with specific qualifications, experience, and expertise in different areas. Responsibility of PEMS should not be left to pre-hospital care providers, who are non clinicians and lack proper education and training. Pediatricians should be adequately trained to play an active role in PEMS. Meetings should be convened to discuss the lapses and means of improvement. Networks of co-operation between pre-hospital providers and experts in the emergency department should be established.

  2. Emergency reception of accidents and incidents in working with ionizing radiation

    This manual is intended to be a general manual for the responsible expert regarding radiation hygienics in order to assist him in establishing an organization for combat of accidents and incidents. First attention is paid considerations underlying emergency measures and aid, subsequently the demands and desirabilities in the practical organization are discussed. (author). 3 figs

  3. Development and application of random walk model of atmospheric diffusion in emergency response of nuclear accidents

    Plume concentration prediction is one of the main contents of radioactive consequence assessment for early emergency to nuclear accidents. This paper describes random characteristics of atmospheric diffusion itself, introduces random walk model of atmospheric diffusion (Random Walk), and compare with Lagrangian puff model (RIMPUFF) in the nuclear emergency decision support system (RODOS) developed by European Community for verification. The results show the concentrations calculated by the two models are quite close except that plume area calculated by Random Walk is a little smaller than that by RIMPUFF. The random walk model for atmospheric diffusion can simulate the atmospheric diffusion in case of nuclear accidents and provide more actual information for early emergency and consequence assessment as one atmospheric diffusion module of the nuclear emergency decision support system. (authors)

  4. Experience of domestic violence by women attending an inner city accident and emergency department

    Sethi, D; Watts, S.; Zwi, A.; Watson, J; McCarthy, C.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the prevalence of domestic violence (DV) (defined as physical abuse perpetrated by intimate partners) in women attending an inner city accident and emergency department and to elicit women's response about being asked routinely about domestic violence in this setting.

  5. Dermatobia hominis in the accident and emergency department: "I've got you under my skin".

    MacNamara, A; Durham, S

    1997-05-01

    An unusual form of larval infestation from South America is presented which, in view of increasing tourism to South america's tropical areas, may present to any accident and emergency department. Infestation with Dermatobia hominis is reviewed in terms of clinical recognition and life cycle. Techniques of removal are described. PMID:9193989

  6. The assistance and recording of radiological emergencies and nuclear accidents of Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission

    The Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission with the aim of obtain the prompt notification and of assisting in potential or real radiological emergency situations and nuclear accidents, has organized an integrated system, in prevention regimen, working 24 hours a day. All notifications related to events that could result in an emergency situation, coming from any part of the national territory, are immediately sent to the system. This system was implemented in July 1990 and has received 107 notifications of which 10% were classified as potential emergency situations. The system organization is described. (B.C.A.). 08 refs, 04 figs

  7. The Fukushima Daiichi Accident. Technical Volume 3/5. Emergency Preparedness and Response

    This volume describes the key events and response actions from the onset of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP), operated by the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), on 11 March 2011. It also describes the national emergency preparedness and response (EPR) system in place in Japan and the international EPR framework prior to the accident. It is divided into five sections. Section 3.1 describes the initial actions taken by Japan in response to the accident, involving: identification of the accident, notification of off-site authorities and activation of the response; mitigatory actions taken on-site; and initial off-site response. Section 3.2 describes the protective measures taken for personnel in response to the natural disaster, protection of emergency workers, medical management of emergency workers and the voluntary involvement of members of the public in the emergency response. Section 3.3 describes the protective actions and other response actions taken by Japan to protect the public. It addresses urgent and early protective actions; the use of a dose projection model, the System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information (SPEEDI), as a basis for decisions on protective actions during the accident; environmental monitoring; provision of information to the public and international community; and issues related to international trade and waste management. Section 3.4 describes the transition from the emergency phase to the recovery phase. It also addresses the national analysis of the accident and the emergency response. Section 3.5 describes the response by the IAEA, other international organizations within the Inter- Agency Committee on Radiological and Nuclear Emergencies (IACRNE), the actions of IAEA Member States with regard to protective actions recommended to their nationals in Japan and the provision of international assistance. A summary, observations and lessons conclude each section. There are three

  8. National emergency plan for nuclear accidents

    The national emergency plan for nuclear accidents is a plan of action designed to provide a response to accidents involving the release or potential release of radioactive substances into the environment, which could give rise to radiation exposure to the public. The plan outlines the measures which are in place to assess and mitigate the effects of nuclear accidents which might pose a radiological hazard in ireland. It shows how accident management will operate, how technical information and monitoring data will be collected, how public information will be provided and what measures may be taken for the protection of the public in the short and long term. The plan can be integrated with the Department of Defence arrangements for wartime emergencies

  9. Emergency planning and preparedness for accidents involving radioactive materials used in medicine, industry, research and teaching

    This Safety Series book should be considered as a technical guide aimed at the users of radioactive materials and the appropriate local and national authorities. It does not represent a single solution to the problems involved but rather draws the outlines of the plans and procedures that have to be developed in order to mitigate the consequences of an accident, should one occur. The preparation of local and national plans should follow the technical recommendations provided in this publication, with due consideration given to local factors which might vary from country to country (e.g. governmental systems, local legislation, quantities of radioactive materials involved). Several types of accidents are described, together with their possible radiological consequences. The basic principles of the protective measures that should be applied are discussed, and the principles of emergency planning and the measures needed to maintain preparedness for an operational response to an accident are outlined

  10. Severe accident modeling and offsite dose consequence evaluations for nuclear power plant emergency planning

    We have investigated the roles of Firewater Addition System and Passive Flooder in ABWR severe accidents, such as LOCA and SBO. The results are apparent that Firewater System is vital in the highly unlikely situation where all AC are lost. Also in this paper, we present EPZDose, an effective and faster-than-real time code for offsite dose consequences predictions and evaluations. Illustrations with the release from our severe accident scenario show friendly and informative user's interface for supporting decision makings in nuclear emergency situations. (author)

  11. The study on development of emergency operating procedures based on symptom and risk for accident management

    The Advanced EOP(AEOP) has been developed by focusing on the importance of the operators role in emergency conditions. In the AEOP, to overcome the complexity of current EOPs and maintain the consistency of operators action according to plant emergency conditions, operator's task were allocated according to their duties. As an alternative, the Computerized Operator Aid System (COAS) has been developed to reduce operator's burden and provide detailed instructions of procedure. Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) results were synthesized in the AEOP using the event tree to give the awareness and the prediction of accident progression in advance. In conclusion, the existing EOP with its inherent complexity should be simplified and consolidated using computerized operator support system and task allocation to prevent more severe accidents and to reduce operator cognitive overload in emergency conditions

  12. Emergency response and nuclear risk governance. Nuclear safety at nuclear power plant accidents

    The present study entitled ''Emergency Response and Nuclear Risk Governance: nuclear safety at nuclear power plant accidents'' deals with issues of the protection of the population and the environment against hazardous radiation (the hazards of nuclear energy) and the harmful effects of radioactivity during nuclear power plant accidents. The aim of this study is to contribute to both the identification and remediation of shortcomings and deficits in the management of severe nuclear accidents like those that occurred at Chernobyl in 1986 and at Fukushima in 2011 as well as to the improvement and harmonization of plans and measures taken on an international level in nuclear emergency management. This thesis is divided into a theoretical part and an empirical part. The theoretical part focuses on embedding the subject in a specifically global governance concept, which includes, as far as Nuclear Risk Governance is concerned, the global governance of nuclear risks. Due to their characteristic features the following governance concepts can be assigned to these risks: Nuclear Safety Governance is related to safety, Nuclear Security Governance to security and NonProliferation Governance to safeguards. The subject of investigation of the present study is as a special case of the Nuclear Safety Governance, the Nuclear Emergency governance, which refers to off-site emergency response. The global impact of nuclear accidents and the concepts of security, safety culture and residual risk are contemplated in this context. The findings (accident sequences, their consequences and implications) from the analyses of two reactor accidents prior to Fukushima (Three Mile Iceland in 1979, Chernobyl in 1986) are examined from a historical analytical perspective and the state of the Nuclear Emergency governance and international cooperation aimed at improving nuclear safety after Chernobyl is portrayed by discussing, among other topics, examples of &apos

  13. Evaluating emergency services activity at the health district level.

    Milner, P

    2001-01-01

    We do not have good information on the incidence and prevalence of emergency conditions nor is there good research evidence on the best ways of meeting these. There are, however, some indicators for evaluating emergency services activities and we have a good framework from Donabedian for evaluation, and the important dimensions of quality specified by Maxwell. The range of emergency services covers primary care, community crisis care, ambulance services, hospital services (accident and emerge...

  14. Outline of emergency care in a radiation accident and topics for further discussion

    Medical management in a criticality accident is described based on the authors' experiences, and some suggestions are made. The JCO criticality accident occurred in Tokai-mura on September 30, 1999, and the Ministry of Health and Welfare dispatched the authors to the site. They consulted with other experts and carried out medical examinations on people living within 350 m of the JCO site. They explained the gamma-radiation survey and about health hazards. Then they framed a public health plan of action before leaving Tokai-mura. At the time, there was no adequate system for interpreting the situation of for preparing for accidents. Based on these experiences, the authors concluded that good training, a care manual, and a system for the emergency phase and the follow-up phase are necessary. (K.H.)

  15. Idling Reduction for Emergency and Other Service Vehicles

    None

    2015-05-07

    This is a fact sheet about reducing idling for emergency and service vehicles. Emergency vehicles, such as police cars, ambulances, and fire trucks, along with other service vehicles such as armored cars, are often exempt from laws that limit engine idling. However, these vehicles can save fuel and reduce emissions with technologies that allow them to perform vital services without idling.

  16. Emergency planning practices and criteria in the OECD countries after the Chernobyl accident

    This critical review has been prepared at the request of the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH), on the basis of information collected from Member countries on their emergency planning practices and criteria, and on changes being considered as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident. This information was officially provided to the Secretariat in response to a questionnaire. Other material has also been used, such as official papers describing national practices and reports presented at meetings organised by the NEA. In these cases the sources are given in the list of references. The information in this report reflects the situation in the Member countries at the end of 1987 and it might well be that additional changes were introduced in the emergency planning practices and criteria of several countries after the answers were sent to the Secretariat. It should also be noted that several of the questions were mainly relevant to nuclear power reactor operations. However, the basic philosophy for emergency planning is general, i.e. radiological criteria, emergency organisation, medical assistance, information to the public, etc., and applies in similar ways to different emergencies. Therefore, the information in the report should be valid for different types of radiological emergencies, although emphasis is placed in the report is on nuclear power reactor emergencies. For non-nuclear power Member countries the information refers mainly to plans to cope with other types of radiation emergencies, and to emergencies of a transboundary origin. Finally, the information covers only the off-site part of emergency planning, apart from some reflections in Chapter 1 on on-site emergency planning and the measures taken at nuclear facilities to prevent an accident or mitigate its consequences

  17. The Fukushima Daiichi Accident. Technical Volume 3/5. Emergency Preparedness and Response. Annexes

    The Fukushima Daiichi Accident consists of a Report by the IAEA Director General and five technical volumes. It is the result of an extensive international collaborative effort involving five working groups with about 180 experts from 42 Member States with and without nuclear power programmes and several international bodies. It provides a description of the accident and its causes, evolution and consequences, based on the evaluation of data and information from a large number of sources available at the time of writing. The Fukushima Daiichi Accident will be of use to national authorities, international organizations, nuclear regulatory bodies, nuclear power plant operating organizations, designers of nuclear facilities and other experts in matters relating to nuclear power, as well as the wider public. The set contains six printed parts and five supplementary CD-ROMs. Contents: Report by the Director General; Technical Volume 1/5, Description and Context of the Accident; Technical Volume 2/5, Safety Assessment; Technical Volume 3/5, Emergency Preparedness and Response; Technical Volume 4/5, Radiological Consequences; Technical Volume 5/5, Post-accident Recovery; Annexes. The Report by the Director General is available separately in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, Spanish and Japanese

  18. Medical assistance in the management of nuclear power plant accidents. Guide for: medical personnel of emergency preparedness services, doctors of emergency departments, doctors for out-patient or in-patient treatment. 2. rev. ed.

    The guide explains the medical tasks and activities in the context of the emergency preparedness programmes and provisions established by the Laender. The medical expert for radiation injuries is a particularly important function in the radiologial accident management services. The provisions for medical care have been determined on the basis of knowledge drawn among other sources from the German Nuclear Power Plant Risk Study, Phase B. In addition, the guide's provisions are based on international knowledge about the consequences of enhanced radiation exposure, and the medical tasks and the required organisational infrastructure have been determined accordingly. A further source of reference for planning the activities are the data accumulated during emergency preparedness training activities in the various Laender. (orig./MG). 3 figs., 5 tabs

  19. ANSI/ANS-8.23-1997: nuclear criticality accident emergency planning and response

    American National Standard ANSUANS-8.23 was developed to expand upon the basic emergency response guidance given in American National Standard, 'Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety' ANSI/ANS-8.19-1996 (Ref. 1). This standard provides guidance for minimizing risks to personnel during emergency response to a nuclear criticality accident outside reactors. This standard is intended to apply to those facilities for which a criticality accident alarm system, as specified in American National Standard, 'Criticality Accident Alarm System', ANSI/ANS-8.3-1997 (Ref. 2) is in use. The Working Group was established in 1990, with Norman L. Pruvost as chairman. The Working Group had up to twenty-three members representing a broad range of the nuclear industry, and has included members from Canada, Japan and the United Kingdom. The initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23 was approved by the American National Standards Institute on December 30, 1997. It provides guidance for the following topics: (1) Management and technical staff responsibilities; (2) Evaluation of a potential criticality accident; (3) Emergency plan provisions; (4) Evacuation; (5) Re-entry, rescue and stabilization; and (6) Classroom training, exercises and evacuation drills. This guidance is not for generic emergency planning issues, but is specific to nuclear criticality accidents. For example, it assumes that an Emergency Plan is already established at facilities that implement the standard. During the development of the initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23, each Working Group member evaluated potential use of the standard at a facility with which the member was familiar. This revealed areas where a facility could have difficulty complying with the standard. These reviews helped identify and eliminate many potential problems and ambiguities with the guidance. The Working Group has received very limited feedback from the user community since the first edition of the standard was published. Suggestions

  20. ANSI/ANS-8.23-1997: nuclear criticality accident emergency planning and response.

    Baker, J. S. (James S.)

    2004-01-01

    American National Standard ANSUANS-8.23 was developed to expand upon the basic emergency response guidance given in American National Standard, 'Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety' ANSI/ANS-8.19-1996 (Ref. 1). This standard provides guidance for minimizing risks to personnel during emergency response to a nuclear criticality accident outside reactors. This standard is intended to apply to those facilities for which a criticality accident alarm system, as specified in American National Standard, 'Criticality Accident Alarm System', ANSI/ANS-8.3-1997 (Ref. 2) is in use. The Working Group was established in 1990, with Norman L. Pruvost as chairman. The Working Group had up to twenty-three members representing a broad range of the nuclear industry, and has included members from Canada, Japan and the United Kingdom. The initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23 was approved by the American National Standards Institute on December 30, 1997. It provides guidance for the following topics: (1) Management and technical staff responsibilities; (2) Evaluation of a potential criticality accident; (3) Emergency plan provisions; (4) Evacuation; (5) Re-entry, rescue and stabilization; and (6) Classroom training, exercises and evacuation drills. This guidance is not for generic emergency planning issues, but is specific to nuclear criticality accidents. For example, it assumes that an Emergency Plan is already established at facilities that implement the standard. During the development of the initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23, each Working Group member evaluated potential use of the standard at a facility with which the member was familiar. This revealed areas where a facility could have difficulty complying with the standard. These reviews helped identify and eliminate many potential problems and ambiguities with the guidance. The Working Group has received very limited feedback from the user community since the first edition of the standard was

  1. Ecological safety during radiological accidents. Analysis and evaluation of emergency situations at radiologically dangerous objects

    The risk of radiological accidents at dangerous objects is minimal when with the help of technical and organizational means it is guaranteed that indoor and outdoor radiation doses are not exceeded. Also, it is necessary to ensure that the quantity of radiological products in the environment doesn't exceed allowed levels both at a normal exploitation of an object and during an accident. In regions with high radiological loads it is necessary to pay enough attention to the safety of dangerous objects in the situations of accidents. An example given in the paper on how to deal with accidents is based on a situation in the Archangelsk region. Analysis was implemented at 23 radiologically dangerous objects. The results of the analysis allowed to determine objects that are dangerous in an ecological sense. Relying on that, methodology of evaluating the situation in the region was created. The main thing is that evaluation of an ecological situation is judged relying on an emergency situation at a radiologically dangerous object. The first step of the methodology preparation is identification of particularly dangerous objects, and modeling of radiological load on an investigated area. The second step of the work is to review the second stage of the methodology which would be dedicated to the analysis and evaluation of emergency situations at radiologically dangerous objects. (author)

  2. The first aid management of epistaxis by accident and emergency department staff.

    McGarry, G W; Moulton, C

    1993-01-01

    Most nose bleeds can be controlled by compressing the ala nasi, thus applying direct pressure over Little's area. The ability to demonstrate the correct position for this manoeuvre was assessed in 115 members of the staff of the accident and emergency (A&E) department of a major teaching hospital. Overall, the correct response rate was only 33% and even trained medical and nursing staff achieved less than a 50% success rate. Increased awareness of this simple and effective technique is recomm...

  3. The diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy in an accident and emergency department.

    Clancy, M J; Illingworth, R N

    1989-01-01

    The correct diagnosis was initially suspected in 32 (53%) of 60 patients with ectopic pregnancy who attended an accident and emergency department. Incorrect diagnoses were made because ectopic pregnancy was not considered or because relevant symptoms and signs were missed or misinterpreted. Three patients had been 'sterilized'. Twenty-four patients (40%) had abdominal pain or vaginal bleeding for more than 1 week before attending. Fever and leucocytosis were wrongly attributed to pelvic infec...

  4. Consent to treatment by minors attending accident and emergency departments: guidelines.

    Williams, L; Harris, A.; Thompson, M.; Brayshaw, A

    1997-01-01

    The absolute right to refuse medical treatment, even if the reasons are irrational, is confined to competent adults. Children under 16 years can give legal consent to treatment in the absence of consent from those with parental responsibility. Children under 18 years do not, however, have an absolute right to consent, or refuse to consent, to treatment. The views of children assume increasing importance with age and maturity. Accident and emergency medical and nursing staff may face difficult...

  5. Deliberate self harm assessment by accident and emergency staff--an intervention study.

    Crawford, M J; Turnbull, G; Wessely, S

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of specific training for accident and emergency (A&E) staff on the quality of psychosocial assessment of deliberate self harm patients. METHODS: A non-randomised intervention study that compared the psychosocial assessment of deliberate self harm patients before and after a one hour teaching session for the A&E departments nursing and junior medical staff. Adequacy of psychosocial assessment was judged by examining A&E case notes. The records of the hospital's...

  6. An examination of the accident and emergency management of deliberate self harm.

    Dennis, M; BEACH, M; Evans, P A; Winston, A.; Friedman, T.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the adequacy of assessment and management of deliberate self harm (DSH) undertaken by accident and emergency (A&E) medical staff. METHODS: The records for attendances to the Leicester Royal Infirmary A&E department with a diagnosis of "self inflicted" injury for the 12 month period April 1994 to March 1995 were scrutinised. If the episode was identified as DSH, then assessment and management were examined, using an instrument based on the Royal College of Psychiatrists' ...

  7. Report of an audit of nurse triage in an accident and emergency department.

    Wong, T W; Tseng, G; Lee, L W

    1994-01-01

    The nurse triage process in an accident and emergency (A&E) department was audited as part of the nursing quality assurance programme. It was found that in most cases documentation was adequate and guidelines had been adhered to. Triage decisions were accurate in most cases using the discharge diagnosis as a bench-mark. Waiting time improvements were also seen. Triage audit was a useful tool in the continuous quality improvement effort.

  8. Organ donation in the accident and emergency department: a study of relatives' views.

    Wellesley, A.; Glucksman, E.; Crouch, R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether recently bereaved people would object to being asked about organ donation immediately after the death of their relative. METHODS: A telephone interview of 78 recently bereaved relatives of people who had died in an inner city accident and emergency (A&E) department; 68 (87%) agreed to participate in the study and were sent a questionnaire. Outcome measures were views on being asked about organ donation in the A&E department immediately after the death of a rela...

  9. A review of 7 years of complaints in an inner-city accident and emergency department.

    Hunt, M T; Glucksman, M E

    1991-01-01

    In 7 years between 1982-88, 122 complaints were lodged against the Accident and Emergency department of King's College Hospital. A high percentage mentioned more than one aspect per complaint. Commonest were those regarding attitude (37.7%), missed diagnosis (36.6%), waiting time (32.8%), cursory examination (14.7%) and poor communication (11.5%). These causes of complaint are amenable to improvement. Training in interpersonal skills may reduce complaints of attitude. A high index of suspicio...

  10. History of aid provision during radiation accidents in the Czech Republic and of radiation emergency reporting

    The history of radiation accidents and reported elevated exposures divided into the 1954-1978, 1979-1994 and 1995-2012 periods is described in detail. The spectrum of reported radiation events has changed during the years, now including e.g. retrieval of orphan sources, illicit traffic, etc. Since 1995 the agenda of radiation protection has been dealt with by the State Office of Nuclear Safety, where an Emergency Coordination Centre was established.

  11. Proposal optimization in nuclear accident emergency decision based on IAHP

    On the basis of establishing the multi-layer structure of nuclear accident emergency decision, several decision objectives are synthetically analyzed, and an optimization model of decision proposals for nuclear accident emergency based on interval analytic hierarchy process is proposed in the paper. The model makes comparisons among several emergency decision proposals quantified, and the optimum proposal is selected out, which solved the uncertain and fuzzy decision problem of judgments by experts' experiences in nuclear accidents emergency decision. Case study shows that the optimization result is much more reasonable, objective and reliable than subjective judgments, and it could be decision references for nuclear accident emergency. (authors)

  12. Tissue donation after death in the accident and emergency department: an opportunity wasted?

    Magrath, H P; Boulstridge, L J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the accident and emergency department (A&E) is a potential source of tissues for donation, from non-heart beating donors (NHBDs). METHODS: A telephone survey of 30 A&E departments was conducted to determine current tissue harvesting practices from NHBDs. The potential number of tissue donors in our own medium sized district general hospital A&E department was estimated. Senior nursing staff were asked to complete a questionnaire to establish their knowledge, ...

  13. The use of music therapy in reducing anxiety on patients attending accident and emergency department

    So, Wing-hong; 蘇永康

    2013-01-01

    In Hong Kong, there has about 70% patients who attend Accident and Emergency Department (AED) is categorized as semi- or non-urgent cases. The medical conditions with the relative longer waiting time provoke the anxiety level. Furthermore the anxiety is worsen by the noisy waiting environment. These phenomena not only affect the psychological but also the physiological changes of patients. Therefore, there is a need to develop an evidence-based intervention that can effectively reduce the anx...

  14. Notification of infectious diseases by junior doctors in accident and emergency departments.

    Spedding, R L; Jenkins, M G; O'Reilly, S A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge about notifiable infectious diseases by accident and emergency (A&E) senior house officers. METHODS: A telephone questionnaire of senior house officers was carried out over a one week period at the end of their six month attachment in A&E departments in Northern Ireland. RESULTS: 81 (91%) of the senior house officers participated in the study; 23 (29%) realised that the doctor diagnosing the notifiable disease had a statutory duty to notify that disease; nin...

  15. Decision making process and emergency management in different phases of a nuclear accident

    EVATECH, Information Requirements and Countermeasure Evaluation Techniques in Nuclear Emergency Management, was a research project in the key action 'Nuclear Fission' of the fifth EURATOM Framework Programme (FP5). The overall objective of the project was to enhance the quality and coherence of response to nuclear emergencies in Europe by improving the decision support methods, models and processes in ways that take into account the expectations and concern of the many different parties involved - stake holders both in managing the emergency response and those who are affected by the consequences of nuclear emergencies. The project had ten partners from seven European countries. The development of the real-time online decision support system RODOS has been one of the major items in the area of radiation protection within the European Commission's Framework Programmes. The main objectives of the RODOS project have been to develop a comprehensive and integrated decision support system that is generally applicable across Europe and to provide a common framework for incorporating the best features of existing decision support systems and future developments. Furthermore the objective has been to provide greater transparency in the decision process to: improve public understanding and acceptance of off-site emergency measures, to facilitate improved communication between countries of monitoring data, predictions of consequences, etc., in the event of any future accident, and to promote, through the development and use of the system, a more coherent, consistent and harmonised response to any future accident that may affect Europe. (authors)

  16. Convention on early notification of a nuclear accident and convention on assistance in the case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

    The document refers to the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (CENNA) (IAEA-INFCIRC-335) and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (CANARE) (IAEA-INFCIRC-336). Part I contains the status list as of 31 December 1996, Part II contains the texts of reservations/declarations made upon or following expressing consent to be bound and objections thereto, and Part III contains the texts of reservations/declarations made upon signature

  17. Convention on early notification of a nuclear accident and convention on assistance in the case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

    The document refers to the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (CENNA) (IAEA-INFCIRC-335) and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (CANARE) (IAEA-INFCIRC-336). Part I contains the status lists as of 10 September 1992, part II contains the texts of reservations/declarations made upon expressing consent to be bound and objections there to, and part III contains the texts of reservations/declarations made upon signature

  18. Emergency preparedness and response to 'not-in-a-facility' radiological accidents

    The paper provides an overview of lessons learned from the past radiological accidents, which have not occurred in an operating facility, i.e. 'not-in-a-facility' radiological emergencies. A method to analyze status of prevention of accidents is proposed taking into account the experiences and findings from the past events. The main emergency planning items are discussed, which would render effective response in case of such emergencies. Although the IAEA has published many documents about establishing an adequate emergency response capability, it is not an easy task to bring these recommendations into life. This paper gives some hints how to overcome the most obvious difficulties while users of these documents trying to adapt the guidance to their own needs. The special cases of alpha emitters and radiological dispersal devices were considered separately. The balanced approach to emergency response is promoted throughout the text, which means that a level of preparedness should be commensurate to the threat and the existing resources should be used to the extent possible. (author)

  19. Emergency preparedness and response to 'Not-in-a-Facility' radiological accidents

    The paper provides an overview of lessons learned from the past radiological accidents, which have not occurred in an operating facility, i.e. 'not-in-a-facility' radiological emergencies. A method to analyze status of prevention of accidents is proposed taking into account the experiences and findings from the past events. The main emergency planning items are discussed, which would render effective response in case of such emergencies. Although the IAEA has published many documents about establishing an adequate emergency response capability, it is not an easy task to bring these recommendations into life. This paper gives some hints how to overcome the most obvious difficulties while users of these documents trying to adapt the guidance to their own needs. The special cases of alpha emitters and radiological dispersal devices were considered separately. The balanced approach to emergency response is promoted throughout the text, which means that a level of preparedness should be commensurate to the threat and the existing resources should be used to the extent possible. (author)

  20. Convention on early notification of a nuclear accident and convention on assistance in the case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

    The document refers to the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (IAEA-INFCIRC-335) and to the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (IAEA-INFCIRC-336). Part I contains the status lists as of August 31, 1991. Part II contains reservations/declarations made upon expressing consent to be bound and objections there to. Part III contains reservations/declarations made upon signature

  1. Medical treatment of radiation damages and medical emergency planning in case of nuclear power plant incidents and accidents

    Medical measures in case of radiation damages are discussed on the basis of five potential categories of radiation incidents and accidents, respectively, viz. contaminations, incorporations, external local and general radiation over-exposures, contaminated wounds, and combinations of radiation damages and conventional injuries. Considerations are made for diagnostic and therapeutic initial measures especially in case of minor and moderate radiation accidents. The medical emergency planning is reviewed by means of definations used in the practical handling of incidents or accidents. The parameters are: extent of the incident or accident, number of persons involved, severity of radiation damage. Based on guiding symptoms the criteria for the classification into minor, moderate or severe radiation accidents are discussed. Reference is made to the Medical Radiation Protection Centers existing in the Federal Republic of Germany and the possibility of getting advices in case of radiation incidents and accidents. (orig.)

  2. Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency

    Part I: Status lists as of 31 December 1996. A. Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (Notification Convention). B. Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention). PART II: Texts of reservations/declarations made upon or following expressing consent to be bound and objections thereto Part III: Texts of reservations/declarations made upon signature

  3. Emergency response to a nuclear facility accident: preplanning and preparedness by off-site organizations

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction ('defence-in-depth' concept); accident assessment (prompt notification of off-site authorities); time factors associated with accidents leading to radiological releases off-site; radiological characteristics of releases; emergency communications; an adequate planning basis; training. (U.K.)

  4. The role of the United States Food Safety and Inspection Service after the Chernobyl accident

    The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) inspects domestic and imported meat and poultry food products to assure the public that they are safe, wholesome, not economically adulterated and properly labeled. The Service also monitors the activities of meat and poultry plants and related activities in allied industries, and establishes standards and approves labels for meat and poultry products. As part of its responsibility, shortly after the Chernobyl accident occurred, FSIS developed a plan to assess this accident's impact on domestically produced and imported meat and poultry

  5. The emergency medical programs of japan and foreign countries for radiation accidents in nuclear power stations

    In our country, the medical emergency programs for the people living near nuclear power stations are well organized, however, preparation of medical staffs who are well trained is considered to be not sufficient. In the USA, on call 24 hours response to a radiological emergency is provided and funded by Department of Energy(DOE) or electric companies. Especially, REAC/TS is a part of DOE response network, in which there are provided well-trained physicians, nurses, health physicists, coordinators and support personnels. In United Kingdom, National Radiological Protection Board(NRPB) is responsible to a radiological emergency program. Each nuclear power station has its own emergency program consisting of a team of physicians, nurses and health physicists. In France, French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) is a responsible agency for a radiological emergency program. On call 24 hours response to a radiological emergency is provided in Fontenay-aux Roses Institute and Curie Institute. Curie Institute also responds to radiological emergencies in other countries at the request of WHO. In Germany(West Germany), compulsory assurance system covers a radiological emergency program and a radiological protection. There are seven centers in West Germany, in which well-trained medical staffs are provided against radiological injuries. In this report, I tried to propose a new concept about emergency medical programs for nuclear power station accidents in Japan. I think it is a very urgent theme to provide on call 24 hours radiological emergency program, in which patients suffered from acute radiation sickness with internal contamination or contaminated radiation burns will be treated without any trouble. We have to make our best efforts to complete basic or clinical research about radiation injuries including bone marrow transplantation, radioprotectors, chelating agents and radiation burns etc. (J.P.N.)

  6. Are mental health problems associated with use of Accident and Emergency and health-related harm?

    Keene, Jan; Rodriguez, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Background: Previous findings indicate that mental health problems are common in Emergency departments; however, there are few studies of the extent of health-related problems and emergency service use in mental health populations as a whole. Methods: Record linkage methods were used to map the association between mental health, age, gender, and health-related harm across total health and mental health care populations in one geographical area, over three years. By examining patterns of healt...

  7. Use of anti-D in an accident and emergency department.

    Huggon, A M; Watson, D P

    1993-01-01

    A retrospective study was made of the use of anti-D in an accident and emergency (A&E) department in 1 month. Patients who are discharged home with a diagnosis of threatened miscarriage should have their blood group determined and anti-D should be given to those who are rhesus negative. We found that only 8/29 patients discharged from the department had their blood group determined and none of the rhesus negative patients was given anti-D. We have introduced a practical method of reminding me...

  8. Telephone advice in the accident and emergency department: a survey of current practice.

    Evans, R J; McCabe, M; Allen, H.; Rainer, T; Richmond, P. W.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the standard of advice given by telephone by accident and emergency (A&E) departments following patients' enquiries. In order to do this patient enquiries were simulated and a telephone questionnaire was carried out. The study was carried out in 18 major and 16 minor A&E departments in Wales. Results achieved were that overall, correct telephone advice was given to 72 of 97 simulated patients (74%). Sixty calls were dealt with by the nursing staff (62...

  9. Child and adolescent mental health emergency services in Macedonia.

    Releva, M; Boskovska, M; Apceva, A; Polazarevska, M; Novotni, A; Bonevski, D; Sargent, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of child and adolescent mental health emergency services in Macedonia since 1993. The evolution of services through the Mental Crisis Centre for Children and Adolescents, funded by the Open Society Institute, and located in six cities is outlined. The paper also defines traditional services, the nature of child mental health emergencies, the evaluation process, follow-up care and training and supervision. It concludes with concern that the mental health emergency system is not sufficient to meet the needs of the child and adolescent population, particularly in the face of the Kosovar refugee crisis. Recommendations for the future are made. PMID:11508566

  10. The cost of overseas visitors to an inner city accident and emergency department.

    Colville, J.; Burgess, A; Kermani, C; Touquet, R; Fothergill, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate, in a metropolitan accident and emergency (A&E) department, the annual cost of treating overseas visitors whose countries of origin do not have reciprocal arrangements with Britain. METHODS: The study was retrospective. A 24 h period (00.01 h to 24.00 h inclusive) on consecutive days in consecutive weeks (that is, Monday in week 1, Tuesday in week 2, etc) was costed over 52 weeks (1.8.92-31.7.93 inclusive) and extrapolated to 365 days. All visitors between those dates w...

  11. An analysis of telephone calls to an inner-city accident and emergency department.

    Crouch, R; Patel, A; Williams, S.; Dale, J

    1996-01-01

    The general public in the UK often telephone accident and emergency (A&E) departments for medical advice. Such calls are usually dealt with by nursing staff in an informal manner (often with no written record of the call being made). The specific questions addressed in this study are who was calling for advice, when did they call, what were their presenting complaints, and what was the outcome of the call? In addition, the study provided an opportunity to test the implementation of a new syst...

  12. Audit of telephone advice in a paediatric accident and emergency department.

    Molyneux, E; Jones, N.; Aldom, G; Molyneux, B

    1994-01-01

    This paper audits the telephone requests for advice to a paediatric accident and emergency (A&E) Department over a 4-week period. All calls were answered by senior nurses. Most calls were received in the early evenings when the A&E department was busy. Parents were the most frequent callers and the majority of calls were for children under 5 years of age. The problems presented were wide ranging but advice over the telephone meant that many unnecessary visits to hospital were prevented. The p...

  13. Regulatory requirements on accident management and emergency preparedness - concept of nuclear and radiation safety during beyond-design-basis accidents

    Actual practice the and proposals for further activities in the field of Accident Management (AM) in the member countries of the Co-operation Forum of WWER regulators and in Western countries have been assessed. Further the results of the last working group on AM , the overview of interactions of severe accident research and the regulatory positions in various countries, IAEA reports, practice in Switzerland and Finland, were taken into consideration. From this information, the working group derived recommendations on Accident Management. The general proposals correspond to the present state of the art on AM. They do not describe the whole spectra of recommendations on AM for NPPs with WWER reactors. A basis for the implementation of an AM program is given, which could be extended in a follow-up working group. The developments and research concerning AM have to be continued. The positions of various countries with regard to the 'Interactions of severe accident research and the regulatory positions' are given. On the basis of the working group proposals, the WWER regulators could set regulatory requirements and support further developments of AM strategies, making use of the benefits of common features of NPPs with WWER reactors. Concerted actions in the field of AM between the WWER regulators would bundle the development of a unified concept of recommendations and speed up the implementation of AM measures in order to minimise the risks involved in nuclear power generation

  14. Process Modeling and Public Value: Performance Measurement for Emergency Assistance Services?

    Claude Rochet; Anaïs Saint; Bruno Tiberghien; Philippe Agopian; Catherine Paris-Laporte; Valéry Soulleihet

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a process modeling of a cerebrovascular accident (CVA) channel, according to the Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) rules, in order to build a balanced scorecard (BSC). The Fire department in the Bouches-du-Rhône (SDIS) and the medical emergency service have coordinated their action and processes with hospitals to set up this kind of specific channel to deal with strokes. According to Hankey and Warlow (1999), each year in a population of 1 million inhabitants of a ...

  15. Mutual emergency assistance for radiation accidents

    A revised document on ''Mutual Emergency Assistance for Radiation Accidents'' jointly prepared by the Agency with the participation of the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Organisation (ILO) and the Office of the United Nations Disaster Relief Co-ordinator (UNDRO) was issued in 1980 as TECDOC-237. The present document lists the additional information received after publication of the 1980 edition and is issued as a Supplement to TECDOC-237 (1980 Edition). Some useful information contained in TECDOC-237 such as the IAEA arrangement and the WHO Collaborating Centres for Radiation Emergency Assistance are reprinted for ready reference

  16. Utilization of the atmospheric release advisory capability (ARAC) services during and after the Three Mile Island accident

    At 0820 PST on 28 March 1979, the Department of Energy's Emergency Operations Center advised the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) that the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, had experienced an accident some four hours earlier, resulting in the atmospheric release of xenon-133 and krypton-88. This report describes ARAC's response to the Three Mile Island accident, including the role ARAC played throughout the 20 days that real-time assessments were made available to the Department of Energy on-scene commander. It also describes the follow-up population-dose calculations performed for the President's Commission on Three Mile Island. At the request of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a questionnaire addressing the usefulness of ARAC products during the accident was sent to ARAC-product users. A summary of the findings from this questionnaire, along with recommendations for improving ARAC service, is also presented. The accident at Mississauga, Ontario, Canada, is discussed in the context of a well-planned emergency response by local and Federal officials

  17. Radioactivity material release mechanism and emergency radiation monitor requirements of personnel in core meltdown accident for submarine nuclear power plants

    Some release mechanism of fission products from core meltdown accident of submarine nuclear power plants is described, which include gas-gap, melting, vaporization, steam and explosion. The further release process of them to cabins and environment is described too. The basic requirements and contents of emergency radiation monitor for personnel are approached. A tentative idea of forming emergency radiation monitor net of submarine nuclear power plants and the issue of neutron monitor and protect in the nuclear accident emergency rescue are put forward

  18. A radioactive waste transportation package monitoring system for normal transport and accident emergency response conditions

    Shipments of radioactive material (RAM) constitute but a small fraction of the total hazardous materials shipped in the United States each year. Public perception, however, of the potential consequences of a release from a transportation package containing RAM has resulted in significant regulation of transport operations, both to ensure the integrity of a package in accident conditions and to place operational constraints on the shipper. Much of this attention has focused on shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high level wastes which, although comprising a very small number of total shipments, constitute a majority of the total curies transported on an annual basis. Shipment of these highly radioactive materials is made in what is described in the regulations as a Type B packaging. Type B transportation packages are designed to withstand a sequence of accident scenarios, including drop, puncture, fire, and immersion with virtually no release of contents. Due to the quantities of spent fuel and high level wastes carried in Type B casks and the public perception and apprehension regarding the potential consequences of a release, involvement of a packaging containing spent fuel or high level wastes in any accident will result in a very cautious emergency response until it can be determined that the integrity of the cask is maintained. Typically this involves closure of the transport link or pathway, evacuation of all unnecessary personnel, diversion of traffic from the area, and subsequent investigative and mitigative procedures from trained specialists. An onboard instrumentation/communications package has been developed that, when affixed to a radioactive materials cask, can monitor key indicators of the integrity of the cask and communicate these parameters to emergency responders through modules on the vehicle. Entitled the Transportation Intelligent Monitoring System (TRANSIMS), this package enables remote monitoring of the status and integrity of the cask

  19. Diagnostic characterization of services providing care to victims of accidents and violence in five Brazilian state capitals

    Suely Ferreira Deslandes

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This article characterizes the services providing care to victims in five Brazilian regions with high violence and accident rates. It analyzes care activities and strategies, the profile of the teams, the conditions of installations, equipment and supplies, integrated care and registration services and the opinion of health managers with respect to the needs and requirements for a better care to the victims. The sample is composed by 103 services: 34 from Recife, 25 from Rio de Janeiro, 18 from Manaus, 18 from Curitiba and 8 from Brasília. The still preliminary results indicate: lower number of services focusing on the elderly; scarce investment in preventive actions; the principal actions carried out are social assistance, ambulatory and hospital care and psychological assistance; patients received from Basic Health Units require attention of the communities and families; need for investment in capacity building programs for professionals; precarious registries, data handled manually. The wording of the National Policy for Reduction of Morbidity and Mortality from Accidents and Violence is not well-known and there is a lack of articulation among and inside sectors and between prehospital and emergency care services. Rehabilitation services are insufficient in all cities.

  20. Adolescents and Dual Diagnosis in a Psychiatric Emergency Service.

    Matali, José Luis; Andión, Oscar; Pardo, Marta; Iniesta, Raquel; Serrano, Eduard; San, Luis

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, both the prevalence of drug use and related child and adolescent psychiatric emergencies have risen sharply. There are few studies about the impact on child and adolescent emergency services. This study has a twofold aim. The first is to describe the prevalence of substance use disorders, mental disorders and dual diagnosis (substance use problems plus mental disorder) in adolescents in psychiatric emergency service. The second is to analyze clinical and healthcare differences between patients with dual diagnosis and patients with a mental disorder without substance use disorder.We retrospectively reviewed 4012 discharge forms for emergencies treated at the psychiatric emergency department during the period 2007-2009. We obtained a sample of 1795 visits. This sample was divided into two groups: the dual diagnosis group (n = 477) and the psychiatric disorder group (n = 1318).The dual diagnosis group accounted for 26.5% of psychiatric emergencies analyzed. Compared to the psychiatric disorder group,the dual diagnosis group had significantly more conduct disorders, social problems, involuntariness in the visit, less hospital admissions and less connection with the healthcare network.Adolescents with a dual diagnosis account for a high percentage of visits at child and adolescent psychiatric emergency services. This patient group requires specialized care both at emergency services and in specific units. Accordingly, these units should play a triple role when handling dual diagnosis: detection, brief treatment and referral to a specialised unit. PMID:26990268

  1. [Structure, organization and capacity problems in emergency medical services, emergency admission and intensive care units].

    Dick, W

    1994-01-01

    clinical pictures. Cost effectiveness is clearly in favor of emergency medicine. Future developments will be characterized by the consequences of new health care legislation and by effects of financial stringencies on the emergency medical services. PMID:7801705

  2. Emergency room management of radiation accidents

    Emergency room management of radioactively contaminated patients who have an associated medical injury requiring immediate attention must be handled with care. Radioactive contamination of the skin of a worker is not a medical emergency and is usually dealt with at the plant. Effective preplanning and on-the-scene triage will allow the seriously injured and contaminated patients to get the medical care they need with a minimum of confusion and interference. Immediate medical and surgical priorities always take precedence over radiation injuries and radioactive contamination. Probably the most difficult aspect of emergency management is the rarity of such accidents and hence the unfamiliarity of the medical staff with the appropriate procedures. The authors discuss how the answer to these problems is preplanning, having a simple and workable procedure and finally having 24-h access to experts

  3. The use and abuse of the emergency ambulance service: some of the factors affecting the decision whether to call an emergency ambulance.

    Gardner, G J

    1990-01-01

    Over a 1-month period all patients arriving in the accident and emergency department by ambulance following a '999' call were questioned using a standard proforma. They were assessed as to whether their medical condition warranted ambulance transfer. A number of social and practical points were analyzed to see whether they would identify any group of patients who used the emergency service without medical need. Overall 289 patients were questioned. Of these 178 (62%) were considered to have m...

  4. The use of a new design irrigator for the emergency treatment of chemical eye injuries in an accident and emergency department.

    Watts, M T; Mulira, A

    1989-01-01

    The introduction of a hand-held drench hose into a district general hospital accident and emergency department, for the emergency irrigation of chemically injured eyes is reported. The hose is described, together with the technique of irrigation. The advantages that a high-flow, low pressure system affords over conventional irrigation methods are discussed. The system appears to offer a simple, immediately available, effective tool for emergency eye care, which is suitable for use by a variet...

  5. A digest of the nuclear safety division report on the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident seminar (5). Lessons learned on emergency preparedness and response and related issues

    In the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant Accident, the lessons learned on the correspondence to emergency are explained from the view point of the radiation protection. The lessons on the INES evaluation, the cooperation and connection in the accident, and the renewal of accident information are mentioned. (M.H.)

  6. Construction of a technique plan repository and evaluation system based on AHP group decision-making for emergency treatment and disposal in chemical pollution accidents

    Highlights: • Different chemical pollution accidents were simplified using the event tree analysis. • Emergency disposal technique plan repository of chemicals accidents was constructed. • The technique evaluation index system of chemicals accidents disposal was developed. • A combination of group decision and analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was employed. • Group decision introducing similarity and diversity factor was used for data analysis. - Abstract: The environmental pollution resulting from chemical accidents has caused increasingly serious concerns. Therefore, it is very important to be able to determine in advance the appropriate emergency treatment and disposal technology for different types of chemical accidents. However, the formulation of an emergency plan for chemical pollution accidents is considerably difficult due to the substantial uncertainty and complexity of such accidents. This paper explains how the event tree method was used to create 54 different scenarios for chemical pollution accidents, based on the polluted medium, dangerous characteristics and properties of chemicals involved. For each type of chemical accident, feasible emergency treatment and disposal technology schemes were established, considering the areas of pollution source control, pollutant non-proliferation, contaminant elimination and waste disposal. Meanwhile, in order to obtain the optimum emergency disposal technology schemes as soon as the chemical pollution accident occurs from the plan repository, the technique evaluation index system was developed based on group decision-improved analytical hierarchy process (AHP), and has been tested by using a sudden aniline pollution accident that occurred in a river in December 2012

  7. Development of Educational and Training Simulator for Emergency Response to Chinese Nuclear Accidents

    Kim, Juyub; Kim, Juyoul; Kim, Sukhoon; Lee, Seunghee; Yoon, Taebin [FNC Technology Co., Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Cliff, Li-Chi [Micro-Simulation Technology, Montville (United States)

    2015-05-15

    One of the lessons in the emergency response category is that information on the nuclear power plants of neighboring countries should be organized and the consequence can be assessed. In addition, many reactors have been constructed and are under construction on the eastern coast of China recently. Korea might be directly affected by an accident of Chinese nuclear power plant since Korea is located in the westerly belt. performed with the PCTRAN/CPR-1000 module. The result showed that normal operation and DBA conditions were simulated swiftly with the speed of 16 times faster than real time. Thus, it would be a good source term estimation module for the educational and training simulator.

  8. Development of Educational and Training Simulator for Emergency Response to Chinese Nuclear Accidents

    One of the lessons in the emergency response category is that information on the nuclear power plants of neighboring countries should be organized and the consequence can be assessed. In addition, many reactors have been constructed and are under construction on the eastern coast of China recently. Korea might be directly affected by an accident of Chinese nuclear power plant since Korea is located in the westerly belt. performed with the PCTRAN/CPR-1000 module. The result showed that normal operation and DBA conditions were simulated swiftly with the speed of 16 times faster than real time. Thus, it would be a good source term estimation module for the educational and training simulator

  9. Activities, projects and emergency planning etc. at the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene in connection with the Chernobyl reactor accident

    The National Institute of Radiation Hygiene (SIS) is the competent authority for radiation hygiene in Norway according to Act No.1 of 18 June 1938 and regulations given pursuant to the act. Legislation on duties specific to radiological emergencies in general has not been issued in Norway. The report describes how SIS organized the fallout survey and summarizes the different projects implemented by the institute after the Chernobyl accident. Furthermore, the institutes view on an alert system for detection of radiactive contamination and on emergency planning for radiation accidents is expressed

  10. New directions in emergency service operations and planning.

    Zilm, Frank; Crane, Jody; Roche, Kevin T

    2010-01-01

    Emergency services continue to evolve new operational and facility concepts in response to increasing demand for care and pressures for efficient, and safe, patient management. This article describes new models for "intake" of patients and for responding to peak demand that are radically changing the traditional emergency service. Application of Six Sigma and "Lean" analysis techniques are demonstrating dramatic improvements in throughput times and in the utilization of treatment spaces. This article provides an overview of the application of Lean concepts to emergency services. Case studies of Mary Washington Hospital and Banner Health Corporation illustrate the result of application of these tools. Implication for the required patient care areas and design concepts are also discussed. PMID:20838109

  11. Brief interventions for hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption in accident and emergency departments

    Marcin eWojnar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of alcohol abuse among patients treated in accident and emergency departments (A&E is considered substantial. This paper is a narrative review of studies investigating the effectiveness of brief interventions (BI for hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption in A&E. A&E departments in hospitals (and other health care infrastructures are commonly the place where serious consequences of alcohol drinking are seen and need to be tackled, supporting the suggested theoretical usefulness of delivering brief interventions in this environment. Available research shows that brief interventions (BI may be considered a valuable technique for dealing with alcohol-related problems. However, it is suggested that the usefulness of BI may depend significantly on the target population to be dealt with. BI have proved to be beneficial for male individuals and those patients who do not abuse other psychoactive substances. In contrast, evidence indicates that brief interventions in A&E settings are not effective at all when dealing with men admitted as a consequence of a violence-related event. In addition, some studies were unable to confirm the effectiveness of BI in female population, in emergency setting. Studies investigating the association between drinking patterns and the effectiveness of brief interventions also present inconsistent results. Most studies assessing the effectiveness of BI in A&E settings only adopted a short perspective (looking at the impact up to a maximum of twelve months after the BI was delivered. When assessing the effects of BI, both the amount of alcohol consumed as well as expected reductions in alcohol consequences, such as injuries, can be taken into account. Evidence on the implementation of brief intervention in emergency departments remains inconclusive as to whether there are clear benefits. A variety of outcome measures and assessing procedures were used in the different studies, which have investigated this

  12. The Adoption and Impact of Advanced Emergency Response Services

    Susan Athey; Scott Stern

    1998-01-01

    This paper studies the causes and consequences of the adoption of technology by hospitals and public emergency response systems, focusing on Basic and Enhanced 911 services. Basic 911 allows people within a given locality to access specialized call-takers and ambulance dispatchers using the single telephone number 911. Enhanced 911 is characterized by telecommunications equipment and information technology which identifies the location of emergency callers. We begin by exploring the distribut...

  13. Emergency preparedness and response in case of a fire accident with (UF6) packages tracking Suez Canal

    Egypt has a unique problem - the Suez Canal. Radioactive cargo passing regularly through the canal carrying new and spent reactor fuel. Moreover there are also about 1000 metric tons of uranium hexaflouride (UF6) passing through the canal every year. In spite of all precautions taken in the transportation, accidents with packages containing (UF6) and shipped through the Suez Canal, accidents may arise even though the probability is minimal. These accidents, may be accompanied by injuries or death of persons and damage to property. Due to the radiation and criticality hazards of (UF6) and its high risk of chemical toxicity. The probability of a fire accident with a cargo carrying (UF6) during its crossing the Suez Canal can cause serious chemical toxic and radiological hazards, particularly if the accident occurred close or near to one of the three densely populated cities (Port-Said, Ismailia, and Suez), which are located along the Suez Canal, west bank. The government of Egypt has elaborated a national radiological emergency plan inorder to face probable radiological accidents, which may be arised inside the country. Arrangements have been also elaborated for the medical care of any persons who, might be injured or contaminated, or who, have been exposed to severe radiation doses. The motivation of the present paper was undertaken to visualize a fire accident scenario occurring in industrial packages containing UF6 on board of a Cargo crossing the Suez Canal near Port-Said City. The accident scenario and emergency response actions taken during the different phases of the accident are going to be presented and discussed. The proposed emergency response actions taken to face the accident are going to be also presented. The work presented had revealed the importance of public awareness will be needed for populations located in densely populated areas along Suez Canal bank inorder to react timely and effectively to avoid the toxic and radiological hazards araised in

  14. Emergency preparedness and response in case of a fire accident with (UF{sub 6}) packages tracking Suez Canal

    Salama, M. [National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control (NCNSRC), Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2004-07-01

    Egypt has a unique problem - the Suez Canal. Radioactive cargo passing regularly through the canal carrying new and spent reactor fuel. Moreover there are also about 1000 metric tons of uranium hexaflouride (UF6) passing through the canal every year. In spite of all precautions taken in the transportation, accidents with packages containing (UF{sub 6}) and shipped through the Suez Canal, accidents may arise even though the probability is minimal. These accidents, may be accompanied by injuries or death of persons and damage to property. Due to the radiation and criticality hazards of (UF{sub 6}) and its high risk of chemical toxicity. The probability of a fire accident with a cargo carrying (UF{sub 6}) during its crossing the Suez Canal can cause serious chemical toxic and radiological hazards, particularly if the accident occurred close or near to one of the three densely populated cities (Port-Said, Ismailia, and Suez), which are located along the Suez Canal, west bank. The government of Egypt has elaborated a national radiological emergency plan inorder to face probable radiological accidents, which may be arised inside the country. Arrangements have been also elaborated for the medical care of any persons who, might be injured or contaminated, or who, have been exposed to severe radiation doses. The motivation of the present paper was undertaken to visualize a fire accident scenario occurring in industrial packages containing UF6 on board of a Cargo crossing the Suez Canal near Port-Said City. The accident scenario and emergency response actions taken during the different phases of the accident are going to be presented and discussed. The proposed emergency response actions taken to face the accident are going to be also presented. The work presented had revealed the importance of public awareness will be needed for populations located in densely populated areas along Suez Canal bank inorder to react timely and effectively to avoid the toxic and radiological

  15. Emergency preparedness and response in case of a fire accident with UF6 packages traversing the Suez Canal

    Egypt has a unique problem, the Suez Canal. Radioactive cargo passes regularly through the canal carrying new and spent reactor fuel. There are also about 1000 metric tonnes of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) passing through the canal every year. In spite of all the precautions taken in the transport, accidents with packages containing UF6 shipped through the Suez Canal may arise, even though the probability is minimal. Such accidents may be accompanied by injuries to or death of persons and damage to property including radiation and criticality hazards and high chemical toxicity, particularly if the accident occurred close to one of the three densely populated cities (Port Said, Ismailia and Suez), which are located along the west bank of the Suez Canal. The government of Egypt has established a national radiological emergency plan in order to deal with any radiological accidents which may arise inside the country. This paper considers the effect of a fire accident to industrial packages containing UF6 on board a cargo ship passing along the Suez Canal near Port Said City. The accident scenario and emergency response actions taken during the different phases of the accident are presented and discussed. The paper highlights the importance of public awareness for populations located in densely populated areas along the bank of the Suez Canal, in order to react in a timely and effective way to avoid the toxic and radiological hazards resulting from such a type of accident. The possibility of upgrading the capabilities of civil defence and fire-fighting personnel is also discussed (author)

  16. Emergency healthcare process automation using mobile computing and cloud services.

    Poulymenopoulou, M; Malamateniou, F; Vassilacopoulos, G

    2012-10-01

    Emergency care is basically concerned with the provision of pre-hospital and in-hospital medical and/or paramedical services and it typically involves a wide variety of interdependent and distributed activities that can be interconnected to form emergency care processes within and between Emergency Medical Service (EMS) agencies and hospitals. Hence, in developing an information system for emergency care processes, it is essential to support individual process activities and to satisfy collaboration and coordination needs by providing readily access to patient and operational information regardless of location and time. Filling this information gap by enabling the provision of the right information, to the right people, at the right time fosters new challenges, including the specification of a common information format, the interoperability among heterogeneous institutional information systems or the development of new, ubiquitous trans-institutional systems. This paper is concerned with the development of an integrated computer support to emergency care processes by evolving and cross-linking institutional healthcare systems. To this end, an integrated EMS cloud-based architecture has been developed that allows authorized users to access emergency case information in standardized document form, as proposed by the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) profile, uses the Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS) standard Emergency Data Exchange Language (EDXL) Hospital Availability Exchange (HAVE) for exchanging operational data with hospitals and incorporates an intelligent module that supports triaging and selecting the most appropriate ambulances and hospitals for each case. PMID:22205383

  17. Development and application of a random walk model of atmospheric diffusion in the emergency response of nuclear accidents

    CHI Bing; LI Hong; FANG Dong

    2007-01-01

    Plume concentration prediction is one of the main contents of radioactive consequence assessment for early emergency response to nuclear accidents. Random characteristics of atmospheric diffusion itself was described, a random walk model of atmospheric diffusion (Random Walk) was introduced and compared with the Lagrangian puff model (RIMPUFF) in the nuclear emergency decision support system (RODOS) developed by the European Community for verification. The results show the concentrations calculated by the two models are quite close except that the plume area calculated by Random Walk is a little smaller than that by RIMPUFF. The random walk model for atmospheric diffusion can simulate the atmospheric diffusion in case of nuclear accidents, and provide more actual information for early emergency and consequence assessment as one of the atmospheric diffusion module of the nuclear emergency decision support system.

  18. Psychosocial service needs of pediatric transport accident survivors: Using clinical data-mining to establish demographic and service usage characteristics.

    Manguy, Alys-Marie; Joubert, Lynette; Bansemer, Leah

    2016-09-01

    The objectives in this article are the exploration of demographic and service usage data gained through clinical data mining audit and suggesting recommendations for social work service delivery model and future research. The method is clinical data-mining audit of 100 sequentially sampled cases gathering quantitative demographic and service usage data. Descriptive analysis of file audit data raised interesting trends with potential to inform service delivery and usage; the key areas of the results included patient demographics, family involvement and impact, and child safety and risk issues. Transport accidents involving children often include other family members. Care planning must take into account psychosocial issues including patient and family emotional responses, availability of primary carers, and other practical needs that may impact on recovery and discharge planning. This study provides evidence to plan for further research and development of more integrated models of care. PMID:27586428

  19. Radiographers and radiologists reporting plain radiograph requests from accident and emergency and general practice

    AIM: To assess selectively trained radiographers and consultant radiologists reporting plain radiographs for the Accident and Emergency Department (A and E) and general practitioners (GPs) within a typical hospital setting. METHODS: Two radiographers, a group of eight consultant radiologists, and a reference standard radiologist independently reported under controlled conditions a retrospectively selected, random, stratified sample of 400 A and E and 400 GP plain radiographs. An independent consultant radiologist judged whether the radiographer and radiologist reports agreed with the reference standard report. Clinicians then assessed whether radiographer and radiologist incorrect reports affected confidence in their diagnosis and treatment plans, and patient outcome. RESULTS: For A and E and GP plain radiographs, respectively, there was a 1% (95% confidence interval (CI) -2 to 5) and 4% (95% CI -1 to 8) difference in reporting accuracy between the two professional groups. For both A and E and GP cases there was an 8% difference in the clinicians' confidence in their diagnosis based on radiographer or radiologist incorrect reports. For A and E and GP cases, respectively, there was a 2% and 8% difference in the clinicians' confidence in their management plans based on radiographer or radiologist incorrect reports. For A and E and GP cases, respectively, there was a 1% and 11% difference in effect on patient outcome of radiographer or radiologist incorrect reports. CONCLUSION: There is the potential to extend the reporting role of selectively trained radiographers to include plain radiographs for all A and E and GP patients. Further research conducted during clinical practice at a number of sites is recommended

  20. Service experience, structural integrity, severe accidents, and erosion in nuclear and fossil plants. PVP-Volume 303

    Paterson, S.R.; Bamford, W.H; Geraets, L.H.; Okazaki, M.; Cipolla, R.C.; Cowfer, C.D.; Means, K.H. [eds.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this symposium was to disseminate information on service degradation and its prevention. Papers have been divided into the following topical sections: Service experience in nuclear plants; DOE high-level waste tank structural integrity panel--Summary reports; Severe accidents; Service experience in operating fossil power plants; and Erosion. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  1. Helicopter Emergency Medical Services: effects, costs and benefits

    A.N. Ringburg (Akkie)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAdvanced prehospital medical care with air transport was introduced in the Netherlands in May 1995. The fi rst helicopter Mobile Medical Team, also called Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) was a joint venture initiative of the VU Medical Center in Amsterdam and the Algemene Ned

  2. Emergency monitoring strategy and radiation measurements. Working document of the NKS project emergency management and radiation monitoring in nuclear and radiological accidents (EMARAD)

    This report is one of the deliverables of the NKS Project Emergency management and radiation monitoring in nuclear and radiological accidents (EMARAD) (20022005). The project and the overall results are briefly described in the NKS publication 'Emergency Management and Radiation Monitoring in Nuclear and Radiological Accidents. Summary Report on the NKS Project EMARAD' (NKS-137, April 2006). In a nuclear or radiological emergency, all radiation measurements must be performed efficiently and the results interpreted correctly in order to provide the decision-makers with adequate data needed in analysing the situation and carrying out countermeasures. Managing measurements in different situations in a proper way requires the existence of pre-prepared emergency monitoring strategies. Preparing a comprehensive yet versatile strategy is not an easy task to perform because there are lots of different factors that have to be taken into account. The primary objective of this study was to discuss the general problematics concerning emergency monitoring strategies and to describe a few important features of an efficient emergency monitoring system as well as factors affecting measurement activities in practise. Some information concerning the current situation in the Nordic countries has also been included. (au)

  3. Emergency monitoring strategy and radiation measurements document of the NKS project emergency management and radiation monitoring in nuclear and radiological accidents (EMARAD)

    Lahtinen, J. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland)

    2006-04-15

    This report is one of the deliverables of the NKS Project Emergency management and radiation monitoring in nuclear and radiological accidents (EMARAD) (20022005). The project and the overall results are briefly described in the NKS publication 'Emergency Management and Radiation Monitoring in Nuclear and Radiological Accidents. Summary Report on the NKS Project EMARAD' (NKS-137, April 2006). In a nuclear or radiological emergency, all radiation measurements must be performed efficiently and the results interpreted correctly in order to provide the decision-makers with adequate data needed in analysing the situation and carrying out countermeasures. Managing measurements in different situations in a proper way requires the existence of pre-prepared emergency monitoring strategies. Preparing a comprehensive yet versatile strategy is not an easy task to perform because there are lots of different factors that have to be taken into account. The primary objective of this study was to discuss the general problematics concerning emergency monitoring strategies and to describe a few important features of an efficient emergency monitoring system as well as factors affecting measurement activities in practise. Some information concerning the current situation in the Nordic countries has also been included. (au)

  4. Review of off-site emergency preparedness and response plan of Indian NPPs based on experience of Fukushima nuclear accident

    Nuclear power plants in India are designed, constructed and operated based on the principle of the highest priority to nuclear safety. To deal with any unlikely situation of radiological emergency, the emergency preparedness and response plans are ensured to be in place at all NPPs prior to their commissioning. These plans are periodically reviewed and tested by conducting emergency exercise with the participation of various agencies such as Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, NDMA, district authorities, regulatory body and general public. On March 11, 2011 an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 hit the Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni followed by tsunami waves of height 15 meters above reference sea level. This resulted in large scale release of radioactive material from Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS. This led to the evacuation of a large number of people from the areas surrounding the affected nuclear power plants. The event was rated as level 7 event in International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). The event also revealed the challenges in handling radiological emergency situation in adverse environmental conditions, The experience of managing radiological emergency situation during Fukushima nuclear accident provides opportunities to review and improve emergency preparedness and response programme. The present paper presents the chronology of the emergency situation, challenges faced and handled in Fukushima. Even though the possibility of a Fukushima type nuclear accident in India is very remote due to the low probability of a high intensity earthquake followed by tsunami at NPP sites, the efforts needs to be initiated from the regulatory point of view for an effective Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans. The Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans of NPP sites were reviewed in the light of unique challenges of accident at Fukushima. It is realized that multi unit events are the realities that must be addressed as part of Emergency

  5. Needlestick injury among medical personnel in Accident and Emergency Department of two teaching hospitals.

    Ng, Y W; Hassim, I Noor

    2007-03-01

    Needlestick injury has been recognized as one of the occupational hazards which results in transmission of bloodborne pathogens. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 136 health care workers in the Accident and Emergency Department of two teaching hospitals from August to November 2003 to determine the prevalence of cases and episodes of needlestick injury. In addition, this study also assessed the level of knowledge of blood-borne diseases and Universal Precautions, risk perception on the practice of Universal Precautions and to find out factors contributing to needlestick injury. Prevalence of needlestick injury among the health care workers in the two hospitals were found to be 31.6% (N = 43) and 52.9% (N = 87) respectively. Among different job categories, medical assistants appeared to face the highest risk of needlestick injury. Factors associated with needlestick injury included shorter tenure in one's job (p risk of needlestick injury while performing procedures on patients. Therefore, comprehensive infection control strategies should be applied to effectively reduce the risk of needlestick injury. PMID:17682562

  6. An exploration of nurses experience of alcohol related violence and caring for intoxicated patients in Accident and Emergency

    Locker, Emily

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to explore the violence that Accident and Emergency nurses encounter. Current literature and health policies emphasis the seriousness and prevalence of violent attacks on nurses in A&E. There is also a push towards a new Government agenda based on Zero-tolerance. The study adopted a qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews. It contained six participants who were asked about their experiences of violence encountered in the A&E department. They were also asked to lo...

  7. Radiological emergencies arising from accidents in Italy

    The Nuclear Safety and Health Protection Directorate (DISP) of ENEA has organized a structure of officers and technicians on call whenever an accident related to the activity of ENEA-DISP should occur. The most frequent events arise from natural misfortunes, crime, and deficiencies in public services. As regards technical operations such as measurements, removals, decontaminations and transport, DISP requests utilization of the different structures and equipment available to ENEA research centres and, in particular and most frequently, of the Safety and Radioprotection Division of the main ENEA centre: the Casaccia Research Centre. The technicians of this division are always available via telephone or radio, with the firm duty to be present within one hour from the call. The co-operation between these two structures enables timely and efficient intervention in many circumstances so that population and environmental risks can be avoided. Typical accidental situations are earthquakes, adverse atmospheric events, landslides, collapses, railway and road accidents, lost sources discovery, and seizure of illegally detained sources by judicial power. The paper briefly describes some of the situations which have occurred, and the actions carried out to recover sources and to re-establish safe environmental conditions. (author)

  8. HYSPLIT's Capability for Radiological Aerial Monitoring in Nuclear Emergencies: Model Validation and Assessment on the Chernobyl Accident

    Jung, Gunhyo; Kim, Juyoul [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyeongki [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    The Chernobyl accident took place on 25 April 1986 in Ukraine. Consequently large amount of radionuclides were released into the atmosphere. The release was a widespread distribution of radioactivity throughout the northern hemisphere, mainly across Europe. A total of 31 persons died as a consequence of the accident, and about 140 persons suffered various degrees of radiation sickness and health impairment in the acute health impact. The possible increase of cancer incidence has been a real and significant increase of carcinomas of the thyroid among the children living in the contaminated regions as the late health effects. Recently, a variety of atmospheric dispersion models have been developed and used around the world. Among them, HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model developed by NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)/ARL (Air Resources Laboratory) is being widely used. To verify the HYSPLIT model for radiological aerial monitoring in nuclear emergencies, a case study on the Chernobyl accident is performed.

  9. Comparison of intramuscular glucagon and intravenous dextrose in the treatment of hypoglycaemic coma in an accident and emergency department.

    Patrick, A W; Collier, A.; Hepburn, D A; Steedman, D. J.; Clarke, B F; Robertson, C.

    1990-01-01

    Hypoglycaemia remains a serious and much feared complication of insulin therapy. In this study, patients attending an accident and emergency department in hypoglycaemic coma were randomized to treatment with either intravenous dextrose (25g) or intramuscular glucagon (1mg), administered into the right thigh. Restoration of normal conscious level was slower after glucagon than dextrose (9.0 vs 3.0 min, P less than 0.01), although the average duration of hypoglycaemic coma was 120 min. Two pati...

  10. Accident at Three Mile Island: the contribution of the social sciences to the evaluation of emergency preparedness and response

    At 4:00 A.M. on 28 March 1979, a serious accident occurred in the nuclear-power plant at Three Mile Island near Middletown, Pennsylvania. It was caused by mechanical malfunctions in the plant, and for the next four days the extent and severity of the accident were not clear. Because it raised serious concerns about the safety of nuclear power, on 11 April President Carter established a commission to study and investigate the accident. Several aspects of the formation and evolution of the commission are particularly relevant to the social sciences. One was the way the original problem was defined for the commission by the presidential executive order. A second was the commission's own definition of the problem that evolved as the investigation progressed. As that definition became more inclusive, the body of social science literature relating to emergencies became increasingly relevant

  11. Mutual emergency assistance for radiation accidents

    In 1963 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) issued a document, WP.35, dated 23 November 1963, based on information provided by a number of its Member States on the type of radiological assistance that they might be able to make available in the event of a radiation emergency in another country at the request of that country. The document was subsequently revised in 1968 and 1971 with the participation of the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the International Labour Organisation (ILO). In 1979, an expanded questionnaire to ascertain what could be required by the State in the event of a major radiation accident, was sent jointly by these organizations with the participation of the Office of the United Nations Disaster Relief Co-ordinator (UNDRO), to all their Member States. The text of the expanded questionnaire is reproduced. The present document lists all the information, received up to mid 1980, that contains offers of assistance made by a State. It also lists information on the assistance that might be required by the State. In general, the replies have been reproduced in the form in which they were received, although a few changes in presentation have been introduced in the interest of brevity and clarity. Some countries have pointed out that their replies are necessarily of a general character and that the full extent of the assistance they would be capable of providing could be determined only after a specific request had been received. The information given in this document should therefore be regarded only as a guide to the type of radiological assistance that might be available and/or needed. Other available international assistance includes that provided by the Agency through the IAEA Radiation (Emergency) Assistance Procedures, by WHO through its system of Collaborating Centres on human radiation pathology, and by various States via regional or inter-countries' agreements on

  12. Severe human factor accidents and their management in a in-service nuclear Power plant

    Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) is an important part of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) in a nuclear power plant (NPP). It can be used to evaluate and quantify the behaviors of the operators in a post-accident response. The paper picks up the serious human factor event sequences that contribute more than 5% to the overall Core Damage Frequency (CDF) involved in PSA through a HRA analysis on a domestic PWR. The basic human error probabilities (BHEPs) of these human factor event sequences are resulted, on the basis of which the actions of the operators within the main control room (MCR) after the accidents are analyzed and their criticalities are arranged in order. The paper, from the point of engineering management,puts forward the measures to improve the corresponding emergency operating procedures (EOPs) and the MCR surroundings through analyzing serious human factor event sequence arrangement and the actions of operators in the post-accident interferences. With regard to the operator's interferences of high criticality the NPP should enforce training and improve its ability of interferences. (authors)

  13. Applications of nano-fluids to enhance LWR accidents management in in-vessel retention and emergency core cooling systems

    Water-based nano-fluid, colloidal dispersions of nano-particles in water; have been shown experimentally to increase the critical heat flux and surface wettability at very low concentrations. The use of nano-fluids to enhance accidents management would allow either to increase the safe margins in case of severe accidents or to upgrade the power of an existing power plant with constant margins. Building on the initial work, computational fluid dynamics simulations of the nano-fluid injection system have been performed to evaluate the feasibility of a nano-fluid injection system for in-vessel retention application. A preliminary assessment was also conducted on the emergency core cooling system of the European Pressurized Reactor (EPR) to implement a nano-fluid injection system for improving the management of loss of coolant accidents. Several design options were compared/or their respective merits and disadvantages based on criteria including time to injection, safety impact, and materials compatibility. (authors)

  14. Characterization of cleaners accidents in the Portuguese service sector

    Cabeças, José Miquel

    2008-01-01

    This paper characterizes work accidents at Portuguese industrial cleaning companies, operating in the service sector, through the application of ESAW methodology. Data was codified based on the analysis of 748 accident claims to insurance companies (number of days lost 1 working day) in 3 large industrial cleaning companies for the period 2001-2003. Slipping and falling in the same level was the main deviation from the normal working process in the moment of the accident (in 25% of the accid...

  15. Referral to the Hospital And Emergency Ambulance Service Uses Patterns of the Inmates and Convicts

    Emine Oncu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the reasons for referral to the hospital and 112 emergency ambulance service uses patterns of the inmates and convicts in an E type prison. Material and Method: In this descriptive study, it was evaluated the prison records associated with referral to the hospital and 112 emergency ambulance service uses for one year in 2010- 2011. Of the statistical analysis, descriptive statistics, chi-square test and Fisher%u2019s Exact Test were used. Results: All inmates and convicts were man, the median of age was 30,0 (min 18- max 68 years and substance use was 34,5%. The number of prisoners were referred to the hospital 815, total referrals were 1491; (referrals ranged from one to six and most common in January; and according to frequency, reasons of the referral were eyes problems, musculoskeletal disorders and psychological problems. Emergency medical service was used for in medical causes (78,3%, accident, trauma and injuries (16,4%, suicide (5,3%. Discussion: Findings from the study show that prisoners are more likely to have suffered physical and mental health problems that compared to the rest of society and have significantly high substance use rates.

  16. Emergency preparedness for newborn screening and genetic services.

    Pass, Kenneth A; Thoene, Jess; Watson, Michael S

    2009-06-01

    Patients identified in newborn screening programs can be among the most vulnerable during a disaster due to their need to have prompt diagnosis and medical management. Recent disasters have challenged the ability of newborn screening programs to maintain the needed continuity during emergency situations. This has significant implications for the newborn screening laboratories, the diagnostic confirmation providers, and the patients who either require diagnosis or maintenance of their therapeutic interventions. In 2007, the National Coordinating Center (NCC) for the Regional Genetics and Newborn Screening Collaboratives (RCs) sponsored a meeting involving representatives of the Regional Genetics and Newborn Screening Collaborative Groups, state newborn screening programs, providers of diagnosis and confirmation services, manufacturers of equipment, medical foods, and other treatments used in patients identified in newborn screening programs, and individuals from agencies involved in disaster response including the National Disaster Medical Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Emergency Management Assistance Compact, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and others. In addition to developing contingency plans for newborn screening, we have considered other uses of genetics as it is used in DNA-based kinship identification of mass casualties. The meeting resulted in the description of a wide range of issues facing newborn screening programs, provider groups, and patients for which emergency preparedness development is needed in order that appropriate response is enabled. PMID:19444127

  17. Helicopter Emergency Medical Services: effects, costs and benefits

    Ringburg, Akkie

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAdvanced prehospital medical care with air transport was introduced in the Netherlands in May 1995. The fi rst helicopter Mobile Medical Team, also called Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) was a joint venture initiative of the VU Medical Center in Amsterdam and the Algemene Nederlandse WielrijdersBond (ANWB). The medical team consisted of a trauma surgeon or anaesthesiologist and a specialised trauma nurse, whereas, the ANWB Medical Air Assistance (MAA) helicopter compan...

  18. Cancer patients, emergencies service and provision of palliative care

    Bruno Miranda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To describe the clinical and sociodemographic profile of cancer patients admitted to the Emergency Center for High Complexity Oncologic Assistance, observing the coverage of palliative and home care. Method: Cross sectional study including adult cancer patients admitted to the emergency service (September-December/2011 with a minimum length of hospital stay of two hours. Student’s t-test and Pearson chi-square test were used to compare the means. Results: 191 patients were enrolled, 47.6% elderly, 64.4% women, 75.4% from the city of Recife and greater area. The symptom prevalent at admission was pain (46.6%. 4.2% of patients were linked to palliative care and 2.1% to home care. The most prevalent cancers: cervix (18.3%, breast (13.6% and prostate (10.5%; 70.7% were in advanced stages (IV, 47.1%; 39.4% without any cancer therapy. Conclusion: Patients sought the emergency service on account of pain, probably due to the incipient coverage of palliative and home care. These actions should be included to oncologic therapy as soon as possible to minimize the suffering of the patient/family and integrate the skills of oncologists and emergency professionals.

  19. Radiological review of accident and emergency radiographs: A 1-year audit

    AIM: To assess the impact and cost effectiveness of a system of radiological review of accident and emergency (A and E) plain films. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Review documentation was studied retrospectively over a 1-year period. Six hundred and eighty-four actual or suspected errors in the initial radiological interpretation by A and E staff were highlighted by radiologists in training. These selected 'red reports' were then further reviewed by a musculoskeletal radiologist and a more senior member of the A and E team. RESULTS: Three hundred and fifty-one missed or strongly suspected fractures were detected, with ankle, finger and elbow lesions predominating. Other errors included 11 missed chest radiograph abnormalities and 24 A and E false-positives. Radiologists in training tended to over-report abnormalities with an 18% false-positive rate when compared to the subsequent musculoskeletal radiology opinion. Following review, further action was taken by A and E staff in 286 (42.6%) of cases. No operative intervention was required in those patients with a delayed or missed A and E diagnosis. Consideration is given to the cost of providing this form of review and the impact of medico-legal factors. CONCLUSION: Compared with the large numbers of patients seen and radiographed in a busy A and E department, the number of radiological errors was small. There were even fewer changes in management. Despite this, concern over litigation, clinical governance and future work patterns in A and E make this form of review a useful means of risk reduction in a teaching hospital. Williams, S.M. (2000). Clinical Radiology 55, 861-865

  20. ETH-RISKMONITOR: Linking plant on-line monitoring to rule-based assessment and emergency planning for nuclear accidents

    The ETH-RISKMONITOR is a DSS designed to assist real case on-line remote monitoring of nuclear power plants for abnormal event categorizing based on plant condition, and its evolvement, issuing of recommended alert grades, prompt determination of endangered/exposed sectors in a territory and on dose and health effects mapping. It is an application on linking plant on-line monitoring to rule-based assessment and emergency planning for nuclear accidents

  1. Haematoma block or Bier's block for Colles' fracture reduction in the accident and emergency department--which is best?

    Kendall, J. M.; Allen, P.; Younge, P.; Meek, S M; McCabe, S E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To offer clear guidance on the anaesthetic management of Colles' fractures in the accident and emergency (A&E) department in the light of the conflict between existing reports and current trends, and to address the issue of alkalinisation of haematoma blocks. METHODS: This was a two centre, prospective, randomised clinical trial with consecutive recruitment of adult patients with Colles' fractures requiring manipulation to receive either Bier's block or haematoma block. There was s...

  2. Accident and emergency radiological interpretation using the radiographer opinion form (ROF)

    The red dot system of radiographer opinion giving about the result of an x-ray examination in the accident and emergency (A and E) department has been around for about 15 years in various forms. However, it does not require that the radiographer accurately identify the site and nature of the suspected pathology. In developing a study to measure the ability of radiographers to interpret plain A and E radiographs a new data collection instrument was successfully used, the Radiographer Opinion Form (ROF). The ROF allows radiographers to indicate firstly whether they suspect a pathology or not, and secondly what they the suspected pathology is in their opinion. In a study of 820 A and E cases undertaken at the John Hunter Hospital (JHH) using the ROF radiographers had an overall accuracy of 93 per cent in identifying the presence or absence of pathology compared to the 100 per cent gold standard of the radiologists' reports. Even taking into account a positive selection bias recognised in the study this was comparably with results found in previous studies both in Australia and overseas. The radiographers performed better in less complex anatomical regions, such as the upper extremity (96.3 per cent), compared to other examinations like the chest (90.7 per cent) and the abdomen (87,5 per cent), where the anatomy is more complex and the differential diagnosis is more varied. The ROF proved a useful research tool, however, it may also have valuable clinical applications as a means of conveying the radiographers opinion about suspected abnormalities to referring doctors in the first instance, and ultimately to the reporting radiologists. Copyright (2002) Australian Institute of Radiography

  3. Use of anti-D immunoglobulin in the treatment of threatened miscarriage in the accident and emergency department

    Weinberg, L

    2001-01-01

    Background—The UK guidelines for the use of anti-D immunoglobulin for rhesus prophylaxis have been revised. Anti-D immunoglobulin is no longer recommended for Rh D negative women after a threatened miscarriage less than 12 weeks gestation. These patients are at risk of rhesus immunisation, and there should be a policy for their treatment in the accident and emergency (A&E) department.

  4. Emergency Management and Radiation Monitoring in Nuclear and Radiological Accidents. Summary Report on the NKS Project EMARAD

    In order to manage various nuclear or radiological emergencies the authorities must have pre-prepared plans. The purpose of the NKS project EMARAD (Emergency Management and Radiation Monitoring in Nuclear and Radiological Accidents) was to produce and gather various data and information that could be useful in drawing up emergency plans and radiation monitoring strategies. One of the specific objectives of the project was to establish a www site that would contain various radiation-threat and radiation-monitoring related data and documents and that could be accessed by all Nordic countries. Other important objectives were discussing various factors affecting measurements in an emergency, efficient use of communication technology and disseminating relevant information on such topics as urban dispersion and illicit use of radiation. The web server is hosted by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) of Finland. The data stored include pre-calculated consequence data for nuclear power plant accidents as well as documents and presentations describing e.g. general features of monitoring strategies, the testing of the British urban dispersion model UDM and the scenarios and aspects related to malicious use of radiation sources and radioactive material. As regards the last item mentioned, a special workshop dealing with the subject was arranged in Sweden in 2005 within the framework of the project. (au)

  5. Differences between attendance in emergency care of male and female victims of traffic accidents in Porto alegre, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil

    Raquel Forgiarini Saldanha; Flavio Pechansky; Daniela Benzano; Carlos Alberto Sampaio Martins de Barros; Raquel Brandini De Boni

    2014-01-01

    Driving under the influence of alcohol/ drugs (DUI) is a well-established risk factor for traffic accidents, and men and women have different consumption patterns. The scope of this paper is to analyze differences in alcohol and drug consumption, as well as on behavior associated with traffic accidents among men and women. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 609 sequential traffic accident victims attended in emergency care from Porto Alegre. Subjects gave a structured interview, were ...

  6. Criticality accident in uranium fuel processing plant. Emergency medical care and dose estimation for the severely overexposed patients

    Akashi, Makoto; Ishigure, Nobuhito [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    A criticality accident occurred in JCO, a plant for nuclear fuel production in 1999 and three workers were exposed to extremely high-level radiation (neutron and {gamma}-ray). This report describes outlines of the clinical courses and the medical cares for the patients of this accident and the emergent medical system for radiation accident in Japan. One (A) of the three workers of JCO had vomiting and diarrhea within several minutes after the accident and another one (B) had also vomiting within one hour after. Based on these evidences, the exposure dose of A and B were estimated to be more than 8 and 4 GyEq, respectively. Generally, acute radiation syndrome (ARS) is assigned into three phases; prodromal phase, critical or manifestation phase and recovery phase or death. In the prodromal phase, anorexia, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea often develop, whereas the second phase is asymptotic. In the third phase, various syndromes including infection, hemorrhage, dehydration shock and neurotic syndromes are apt to occur. It is known that radiation exposure at 1 Gy or more might induce such acute radiation syndromes. Based on the clinical findings of Chernobyl accident, it has been thought that exposure at 0.5 Gy or more causes a lowering of lymphocyte level and a decrease in immunological activities within 48 hours. Lymphocyte count is available as an indicator for the evaluation of exposure dose in early phase, but not in later phase The three workers of JCO underwent chemical analysis of blood components, chromosomal analysis and analysis of blood {sup 24}Na immediately after the arrival at National Institute of Radiological Sciences via National Mito Hospital specified as the third and the second facility for the emergency medical care system in Japan, respectively. (M.N.)

  7. Emergency response planning for transport accidents involving radioactive materials

    The document presents a basic discussion of the various aspects and philosophies of emergency planning and preparedness along with a consideration of the problems which might be encountered in a transportation accident involving a release of radioactive materials. Readers who are responsible for preparing emergency plans and procedures will have to decide on how best to apply this guidance to their own organizational structures and will also have to decide on an emergency planning and preparedness philosophy suitable to their own situations

  8. Management options for food production systems affected by a nuclear accident. Task 4: emergency monitoring and processing of milk

    This report evaluates three possible ways in which the quantity of milk designated as waste could be reduced following a nuclear accident. The three approaches considered were: the development of an emergency monitoring programme to release milk with activity concentrations less than the intervention levels back into the foodchain that would otherwise be held up under Government precautionary advice; the direct decontamination of milk for re-introduction into the foodchain; and the processing of contaminated milk into products suitable for consumption or disposal. This work was carried out under the Environmental Assessments Department and Emergency Response Group Quality Management System which is certified to ISO 9001:2000, certificate No. 956546. (author)

  9. Multi-objective evolutionary emergency response optimization for major accidents

    Emergency response planning in case of a major accident (hazardous material event, nuclear accident) is very important for the protection of the public and workers' safety and health. In this context, several protective actions can be performed, such as, evacuation of an area; protection of the population in buildings; and use of personal protective equipment. The best solution is not unique when multiple criteria are taken into consideration (e.g. health consequences, social disruption, economic cost). This paper presents a methodology for multi-objective optimization of emergency response planning in case of a major accident. The emergency policy with regards to protective actions to be implemented is optimized. An evolutionary algorithm has been used as the optimization tool. Case studies demonstrating the methodology and its application in emergency response decision-making in case of accidents related to hazardous materials installations are presented. However, the methodology with appropriate modification is suitable for supporting decisions in assessing emergency response procedures in other cases (nuclear accidents, transportation of hazardous materials) or for land-use planning issues.

  10. Emergency planning and the Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH/Seveso II) Directive: An approach to determine the public safety zone for toxic cloud releases

    The EU Control of Major Accidents Hazards Directive (Seveso II) requires an external emergency plan for each top tier site. This paper sets out a method to build the protection of public health into emergency planning for Seveso sites in the EU. The method involves the review of Seveso site details prescribed under the directive. The site safety report sets out the potential accident scenarios. The safety report's worst-case scenario, and chemical involved, is used as the basis for the external emergency plan. A decision was needed on the appropriate threshold value to use as the level of concern to protect public health. The definitions of the regulatory standards (air quality standards and occupational standards) in use were studied, how they are derived and for what purpose. The 10 min acute exposure guideline level (AEGL) for a chemical is recommended as the threshold value to inform decisions taken to protect public health from toxic cloud releases. The area delimited by AEGL 1 defines the population who may be concerned about being exposed. They need information based on comprehensive risk assessment. The area delimited by AEGL 2 defines the population for long-term surveillance when indicated and may include first responders. The area delimited by AEGL 3 defines the population who may present acutely to the medical services. It ensures that the emergency responders site themselves safely. A standard methodology facilitates discussions with plant operators and concerned public. Examples show how the methodology can be adapted to suit explosive risk and response to fire

  11. Designing of an emergency call system for traffic accidents

    Ziya Ekşi; Murat Çakıroğlu

    2013-01-01

    In our country, many people have been seriously injured or died in traffic accidents. Fatal accidents often occur because of not complying with traffic rules or carelessness. Except these driver mistakes, heavy injuries can result in deaths because of emergency aid teams failing to arrive to accident scene in time. In this study, an accident emergency call system is designed to help injured people's treatment as soon as possible by notifying emercengy team automatically in accidents. The desi...

  12. Review of the emergency response exercise organized during the Erpet training course on off-site emergency planning and response for nuclear accidents

    An international training course on off-site emergency planning and response for nuclear accidents has been organized by the SCK/CEN (Studie Centrum voor Kernenergie - Centre d'Etude de l'Energie Nucleaire) at Mol (Belgium) from 9 to 13 september 1991. One of the major events of this training course was a full-day emergency exercise. An emergency response exercise organized in the frame of a general course has more specific aspects, regarding the role of the participants and the absence of a specific emergency plan or procedures. This paper describes the practical organization, the scenario and the communication with the participants. The decisions proposed by the participants and the results of their radiological evaluations are discussed

  13. A retrospective quality assessment of pre-hospital emergency medical documentation in motor vehicle accidents in south-eastern Norway

    Staff Trine; Søvik Signe

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Few studies have evaluated pre-hospital documentation quality. We retrospectively assessed emergency medical service (EMS) documentation of key logistic, physiologic, and mechanistic variables in motor vehicle accidents (MVAs). Methods Records from police, Emergency Medical Communication Centers (EMCC), ground and air ambulances were retrospectively collected for 189 MVAs involving 392 patients. Documentation of Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), respiratory rate (RR), and systolic...

  14. The new approach of the radiological emergency response team at the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission's Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry after the Goiania accident

    The evaluation of the emergency actions taken during the Goiania accident caused a complete revision of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission's Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry Emergency Response Team. The changes were in both the scope of the emergency responsibilities and in the organization of the emergency team. This new organization permits an emergency response to accidents in nuclear installations such as nuclear reactors or fuel cycle facilities, or accidents involving radiation sources in hospitals, industry, etc. The organization takes into account all the emergency phases, with emphasis on a quick response in the initial phase. Of a total emergency team of one hundred and four people, there are twenty-six members on call twenty-four hours a day. (author). 1 fig

  15. Incident and emergency medical services management from a regional perspective.

    Sisiopiku, Virginia P; Cavusoglu, Ozge

    2012-07-01

    Traffic crashes and other emergencies have impacts on traffic operations in transportation networks, often resulting in non-recurring congestion. Congestion, in turn, may impede the ability of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to provide timely response to those in need of medical attention. The work in this paper investigated the impact of incidents of varying severity and duration on transportation network performance in the Birmingham (AL, USA) area. The intensity and extent of the impact over space and time were assessed on the basis of average speeds. The analysis of incident scenarios was performed using the Visual Interactive System for Transport Algorithms (VISTA) platform. Moreover, first responders' travel times to the scene of the incident were collected to identify best units for responding, in an effort to improve current dispatching practices. Finally, a secondary incident on the EMS to the hospital was considered to further demonstrate the superiority of Dynamic Traffic Assignment (DTA) over traditional static assignment methods in capturing dynamically changing traffic conditions. The study findings are expected to benefit local transportation planners, traffic engineers, emergency responders, and policy makers by allowing them to assess various response strategies to major incidents and emergencies and select the ones that minimize their potential impacts. PMID:22851940

  16. Incident and Emergency Medical Services Management from a Regional Perspective

    Ozge Cavusoglu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Traffic crashes and other emergencies have impacts on traffic operations in transportation networks, often resulting in non-recurring congestion. Congestion, in turn, may impede the ability of Emergency Medical Services (EMS to provide timely response to those in need of medical attention. The work in this paper investigated the impact of incidents of varying severity and duration on transportation network performance in the Birmingham (AL, USA area. The intensity and extent of the impact over space and time were assessed on the basis of average speeds. The analysis of incident scenarios was performed using the Visual Interactive System for Transport Algorithms (VISTA platform. Moreover, first responders’ travel times to the scene of the incident were collected to identify best units for responding, in an effort to improve current dispatching practices. Finally, a secondary incident on the EMS to the hospital was considered to further demonstrate the superiority of Dynamic Traffic Assignment (DTA over traditional static assignment methods in capturing dynamically changing traffic conditions. The study findings are expected to benefit local transportation planners, traffic engineers, emergency responders, and policy makers by allowing them to assess various response strategies to major incidents and emergencies and select the ones that minimize their potential impacts.

  17. A model national emergency plan for radiological accidents

    The IAEA has supported several projects for the development of a national response plan for radiological emergencies. As a result, the IAEA has developed a model National Emergency Response Plan for Radiological Accidents (RAD PLAN), particularly for countries that have no nuclear power plants. This plan can be adapted for use by countries interested in developing their own national radiological emergency response plan, and the IAEA will supply the latest version of the RAD PLAN on computer diskette upon request

  18. A model national emergency response plan for radiological accidents

    The IAEA has supported several projects for the development of a national response plan for radiological emergencies. As a results, the IAEA has developed a model National Emergency Response Plan for Radiological Accidents (RAD PLAN), particularly for countries that have no nuclear power plants. This plan can be adapted for use by countries interested in developing their own national radiological emergency response plan, and the IAEA will supply the latest version of the RAD PLAN on computer diskette upon request. 2 tabs

  19. Identification and evaluation of competencies of health professionals in the hospital emergency management of the radiation accident victim

    A preliminary list of ten competency and forty-six sub-competency statements derived from literature and consultation with experts and based on the general areas of clinical performance defined by the National Board of Medical Examiners were the concern of Phase I of this study. Forty-eight experts in nuclear medicine, radiology, radiotherapy, health physics, medical physics, radiation biology, public and occupational health, surgery, and emergency medicine and nursing considered this preliminary list of competencies and sub-competencies to determine which were essential for health professionals who may be caring for radiation accident victims in hospital emergency departments. Eight competencies and thirty-three sub-competencies were rated as Essential competencies. Competencies dealing with establishing priorities in patient care and initiating treatment, assessment, contamination control, and decontamination were highly rated. In the second part of this study, the Essential competencies were utilized in the development of an original evaluation instrument designed to identify deficiencies and continuing education needs during radiation accident drills or exercises. The instrument was designed for use in sixteen possible patient care situations in which the radiation accident victims have varying medical and radiological conditions. Development of the evaluation instrument was described

  20. TRACE - a time-dependent and realistic accident consequence evaluation module for use in emergency response planning

    Following the identification of an off-normal condition at nuclear power plant, the plant operators have one over-riding responsibility: protection of the offsite population. In discharging this responsibility, the operators utilize a set of emergency operating procdedures. A. Immediately following the identification of the off-normal condition, the operators primary actions are focused on establishing a safe, stable shutdown condition for the reactor. B. The plant condition is categorized according to the perceived severity of the event based on a broad overview of the plant conditions, and the information is transmitted to appropriate governmental authorities. C. Estimations of potential environmental releases of radioactivity, based on design basis accident results, are performed and transmitted to the governmental authorities. The TRACE package was developed to provide the operators with the tools to make realistic predictions of the range of possible releases of radioactivity to the environment during all phases of an off-normal condition, including severe accident situations. The TRACE package provides a means to project, during the early stages of an accident, the potential range of possible fission product releases on a realistic and time-dependent basis. The TRACE package also provides a means to update previous evaluations of the potential range of radioactivity releases as plant conditions change or a new information (on accident sequence or plant parameters) becomes available. (orig./HSCH)

  1. Human Mobility and Accident and Emergency (A&E) Department: A contribution to the knowledge of invisible flows

    Bertazzoni, Beatrice; Bertazzoni, Giuliano; Montanari, Armando

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a full report of the results of a feasibility study for a project based on the combination of clinical figures with socio-economic data on human mobility within the metropolitan area of Rome. Acknowledging that Accident and Emergency (A&E) Departments represent privileged observatories of health issues of a given territory, the point of departure of this study is the patient register dataset of the A&E Department of the Policlinico Umberto I for the period 2000-2013. The...

  2. Towards integration of general practitioner posts and accident and emergency departments: a case study of two integrated emergency posts in the Netherlands

    Kamphuis Helen CM

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accident and emergency (A&E departments and general practitioner (GP posts are often used inappropriately, leading to overcrowding. In the Netherlands, increasingly more integrated emergency posts (IEPs are being created, integrating the care provided by GP posts and A&E departments, in order to improve the provision of the emergency care. Methods This explorative study compares the efficiency and patient and employee satisfaction in IEPs with those in two GP posts and two A&E departments. To this end, information was retrieved from hospital and GP patient records for the first quarter of the year before and of the year after the creation of IEPs. Patients and employees were sent a questionnaire to measure their satisfaction. Lastly, groups of hospital doctors, GPs, GP assistants, and nurses were interviewed. Results After the creation of IEPs, there was a shift of more than fifteen percent from secondary care to primary care for emergency consultations and waiting/consultation times were shortened by more than ten percent. Compared with the control settings, patients were more satisfied about telephone contact with an IEP, but professionals working at the IEP were less satisfied with several aspects of their work. Conclusion IEPs could be a promising innovation to organize emergency care more efficiently; however, it might take time to convince professionals of the possible advantages. Studies involving more IEPs and longer follow-up times are needed to determine whether such integration should be stimulated.

  3. Assessment of emergency response planning and implementation in the aftermath of major natural disasters and technological accidents

    Emergency planning around nuclear power plants represents some of the most mature and well developed emergency planning in the United States. Since the implementation of NUREG-0654 / FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, A Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants (NRC, 1980a) the licensees, local, and State agencies have developed detailed Radiological Emergency Response Programs. An important component of these plans is the evacuation of the population in the event of a general emergency condition at the plant. In January 2005, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the landmark report, 'Identification and Analysis of Factors Affecting Emergency Evacuations' (NUREG/CR 6864/), which represented the most comprehensive investigation of public evacuations in the United States in more than 15 years. Since the completion of this research, several high profile evacuations have occurred, including Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Hurricane Rita in Houston, as well as major wildfires across the western U.S. The NRC commissioned an update to its 2005 evacuation case study publication to evaluate the evacuation experience of the selected communities (e.g., timeliness, related injuries, hazard avoidance); the level of preplanning that was in place for the affected areas and extent that the pre planned requirements were implemented during the emergency response; the critical factors contributing to the efficiency of or impediments to the evacuations (e.g., training, drills, preparedness, experience, resources, facilities, and organizational structure); and additional factors that may have contributed to less than satisfactory public response (i.e., availability of personal transportation, use of public transportation, lack of availability of shelters, etc.). The comprehensive report will be published in fall of 2008 as NUREG/CR-6981, Assessment of Emergency Response Planning and

  4. Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Stations

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — EMS Locations in Kansas The EMS stations dataset consists of any location where emergency medical services (EMS) personnel are stationed or based out of, or where...

  5. Development of emergency response support system for accident management

    Specific measures for the accident management (AM) are proposed to prevent the severe accident and to mitigate their effects in order to upgrade the safety of nuclear power plants even further. To ensure accident management effective, it is essential to grasp the plant status accurately. In consideration of the above mentioned background, the Emergency Response Support System (ERSS) was developed as a computer assisted prototype system by a joint study of Japanese BWR group. This system judges and predicts the plant status at the emergency condition in a nuclear power plant. This system displays the results of judgment and prediction. The effectiveness of the system was verified through the test and good prospects for applying the system to a plant was obtained. 7 refs., 10 figs

  6. Mobile Integrated Health Care and Community Paramedicine: An Emerging Emergency Medical Services Concept.

    Choi, Bryan Y; Blumberg, Charles; Williams, Kenneth

    2016-03-01

    Mobile integrated health care and community paramedicine are models of health care delivery that use emergency medical services (EMS) personnel to fill gaps in local health care infrastructure. Community paramedics may perform in an expanded role and require additional training in the management of chronic disease, communication skills, and cultural sensitivity, whereas other models use all levels of EMS personnel without additional training. Currently, there are few studies of the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of mobile integrated health care and community paramedicine programs. Observations from existing program data suggest that these systems may prevent congestive heart failure readmissions, reduce EMS frequent-user transports, and reduce emergency department visits. Additional studies are needed to support the clinical and economic benefit of mobile integrated health care and community paramedicine. PMID:26169927

  7. Pattern of Sexual Offences Attended at Accident and Emergency Department of HUSM from Year 2000 to 2003: A Retrospective Study

    Islam, Mohammed Nasimul; See, Khoo Lay; Ting, Lai Chin; Khan, Jesmine

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the pattern of sexual offence cases attended at the One Stop Crisis Center (OSCC) of the Accident and Emergency Department, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM), Kelantan. A total of 439 reported sexual offence cases were examined over a period of 4 years from 2000 to 2003. Sexual offence constituted by male partner or boyfriend in 18.9%, by relatives in 27.3% and by “others” in 53.8% of cases. Only 0.7% of victims did not attempt to lodge a police report. There i...

  8. Accidents, risks and consequences

    Although the accident at Chernobyl can be considered as the worst accident in the world, it could have been worse. Other far worse situations are considered, such as a nuclear weapon hitting a nuclear reactor. Indeed the accident at Chernobyl is compared to a nuclear weapon. The consequences of Chernobyl in terms of radiation levels are discussed. Although it is believed that a similar accident could not occur in the United Kingdom, that possibility is considered. It is suggested that emergency plans should be made for just such an eventuality. Even if Chernobyl could not happen in the UK, the effects of accidents are international. The way in which nuclear reactor accidents happen is explored, taking the 1957 Windscale fire, Three Mile Island and Chernobyl as examples. Reactor designs and accident scenarios are considered. The different reactor designs are listed. As well as the Chernobyl RBMK design it is suggested that the light water reactors also have undesirable features from the point of view of safety. (U.K.)

  9. 42 CFR 422.113 - Special rules for ambulance services, emergency and urgently needed services, and maintenance and...

    2010-10-01

    ... representative instructs an enrollee to seek emergency services within or outside the plan; and (v) With a limit... pre-approved ends when— (i) A plan physician with privileges at the treating hospital assumes... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules for ambulance services, emergency...

  10. Use of a virtual learning environment for training in maxillofacial emergencies: impact on the knowledge and attitudes of staff in accident and emergency departments.

    Elledge, Ross; McAleer, Sean; Thakar, Meera; Begum, Fathema; Singhota, Sanjeet; Grew, Nicholas

    2016-02-01

    Many graduates will take up junior roles in accident and emergency (A&E) departments to which a large proportion of patients present with facial injuries caused by interpersonal violence. However, it is widely recognised that undergraduates and postgraduates have few opportunities for training in oral and maxillofacial surgery. We aimed to assess the impact of a specifically designed maxillofacial emergencies virtual learning environment (VLE) on the knowledge and confidence of junior doctors in two A&E departments. They were given free access to the VLE for one month, and were asked to complete multiple choice questions and to rate their confidence to deal with 10 common situations on visual analogue scales (VAS) at baseline and one month after training. A total of 29 doctors agreed to pilot the website, 21 (72%) completed both sets of questions, and 18 (62%) completed both VAS assessments. The mean (SD) multiple choice score improved from 10 (2.52) to 13 (3.56) out of a maximum of 20 (p=0.004) and the mean (SD) VAS improved from 29.2 (19.2) mm to 45.7 (16.6) mm out of a maximum of 100 mm (p=0.007). This was a small pilot study with limited numbers, but it showed improvements in the knowledge of maxillofacial emergencies and in confidence, although the latter remained low. Further work is needed to examine how these brief educational interventions affect the attitudes of frontline staff to maxillofacial emergencies. PMID:26725011

  11. GIS-based emergency response system for sudden water pollution accidents

    Rui, Yikang; Shen, Dingtao; Khalid, Shoaib; Yang, Zaigui; Wang, Jiechen

    The frequent occurrence of sudden water pollution accidents brings enormous risks to water environment safety. Therefore, there is great need for the modeling and development of early warning systems and rapid response procedures for current water pollution situation in China. This paper proposes an emergency response system based on the integration of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology and a hydraulic/water-quality model. Using the spatial analysis and three-dimensional visualization capabilities of GIS technology, we calculated pollutant diffusion measures, and visualized and analyzed the simulation results, in order to provide the services of early warning and emergency response for sudden water pollution accidents in the Xiangjia Dam area on the Yangtze River. The results show that the proposed system offers reliable technological support for emergency response to sudden water pollution events, and it shows good potential for wide applications in various aspects of water resources protection.

  12. Development of supporting system for emergency response to maritime transport accidents involving radioactive material

    National Maritime Research Institute has developed a supporting system for emergency response of competent authority to maritime transport accidents involving radioactive material. The supporting system for emergency response has functions of radiation shielding calculation, marine diffusion simulation, air diffusion simulation and radiological impact evaluation to grasp potential hazard of radiation. Loss of shielding performance accident and loss of sealing ability accident were postulated and impact of the accidents was evaluated based on the postulated accident scenario. Procedures for responding to emergency were examined by the present simulation results

  13. Radiation safety for the emergency situation of the power plant accident. Radiation safety in society and its education

    Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunamis, and following Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Accident brought about great impact on society in Japan. Accident analysis of inside reactor was studied by reactor physics or reactor engineering knowledge, while dissipation of a large amount of radioactive materials outside reactor facilities, and radiation and radioactivity effects on people by way of atmosphere, water and soil were dealt with radiation safety or radiation protection. Due to extremely low frequency and experience of an emergency, there occurred a great confusion in the response of electric power company concerned, relevant regulating competent authorities, local government and media, and related scholars and researchers, which caused great anxieties amount affected residents and people. This article described radiation safety in the society and its education. Referring to actual examples, how radiation safety or radiation protection knowledge should be dealt with emergency risk management in the society was discussed as well as problem of education related with nuclear power, radiation and prevention of disaster and fostering of personnel for relevant people. (T. Tanaka)

  14. LIVINGSTON COUNTY EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

    Shields, William H.; Harvey, Lynn R.

    2001-01-01

    Rapid population growth challenges the ability of local government to keep pace with increasing and changing demand for public services. These challenges may be physical or organizational in nature. Physical challenges arise from the need to upgrade public infrastructure such as water and sewer service, roads, schools, and emergency services. Although installation of new infrastructure is always expensive, growth-related increases in the tax base provide new revenue for installation of new se...

  15. Research on problems in nuclear accident emergency rescue for nuclear power submarine

    This paper presents a description of nuclearpowered submarine accident types and an analysis of accident emergency rescue characteristics, including a special number of problems associated with emergencyrescue, such as emergency situation and emergency planning zone, technical rescue resources and task, protection against compound radiation inside and outside port plume zone, on-sea nuclear rescue equipment and technical assurance capacity, and other problesms related to in-accident nuclear submarine disposal. (authors)

  16. Guidelines for mutual emergency assistance arrangements in connection with a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

    The document contains the recommendations of a group of experts from 22 Member States and three international organizations which met in April 1983. These recommendations may serve as guidelines for use by states for the negotiation of bilateral or regional agreements relating to emergency assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

  17. 42 CFR 410.66 - Emergency outpatient services furnished by a nonparticipating hospital and services furnished in...

    2010-10-01

    ... nonparticipating hospital and services furnished in a foreign country. 410.66 Section 410.66 Public Health CENTERS... services furnished by a nonparticipating hospital and services furnished in a foreign country. Conditions for payment of emergency inpatient services furnished by a nonparticipating U.S. hospital and...

  18. Lessons learned from Fukushima accident in relation to emergency management

    The latest accident in Fukushima, Japan, which involved concurrent accidents at multiple nuclear facilities due to the earthquakes and tsunami, as well as station blackouts for an extended period of time, demonstrated the need for an overall review of existing prevention measures. These measures include emergency protection measures for residents beyond the emergency planning zone, the application of radiation protection criteria that consider the release of radioactive materials to the environment over an extended period and the disposal of large-scale radioactive wastes and radiation protection criteria to be applied upon recovery. Accordingly, Japan has taken improvement initiatives in the area of prevention by submitting a government report on the Fukushima accident prior to the IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety in June last year, and the US has devised a regulatory system of its own, including directions for improvement through the NRC, which operated a temporary taskforce specifically for this purpose. This study examined how Japan is responding to the Fukushima accident and investigated directions that countries around the world can take to improve the area of nuclear protection in order to enhance Korea's own radiological emergency management system

  19. Individual feature identification method for nuclear accident emergency decision-making

    According to the individual feature identification method and combining with the characteristics of nuclear accident emergency decision-making, the evaluation index system of the nuclear accident emergency decision-making was determined on the basis of investigation and analysis. The effectiveness of the nuclear accident emergency decision-making was evaluated based on the individual standards by solving the individual features of the individual standard identification decisions. The case study shows that the optimization result is reasonable, objective and reliable, and it can provide an effective analysis method and decision-making support for optimization of nuclear accident emergency protective measures. (authors)

  20. Emergency planning and the Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH/Seveso II) Directive: an approach to determine the public safety zone for toxic cloud releases.

    O'Mahony, Mary T; Doolan, Donal; O'Sullivan, Alice; Hession, Michael

    2008-06-15

    The EU Control of Major Accidents Hazards Directive (Seveso II) requires an external emergency plan for each top tier site. This paper sets out a method to build the protection of public health into emergency planning for Seveso sites in the EU. The method involves the review of Seveso site details prescribed under the directive. The site safety report sets out the potential accident scenarios. The safety report's worst-case scenario, and chemical involved, is used as the basis for the external emergency plan. A decision was needed on the appropriate threshold value to use as the level of concern to protect public health. The definitions of the regulatory standards (air quality standards and occupational standards) in use were studied, how they are derived and for what purpose. The 10 min acute exposure guideline level (AEGL) for a chemical is recommended as the threshold value to inform decisions taken to protect public health from toxic cloud releases. The area delimited by AEGL 1 defines the population who may be concerned about being exposed. They need information based on comprehensive risk assessment. The area delimited by AEGL 2 defines the population for long-term surveillance when indicated and may include first responders. The area delimited by AEGL 3 defines the population who may present acutely to the medical services. It ensures that the emergency responders site themselves safely. A standard methodology facilitates discussions with plant operators and concerned public. Examples show how the methodology can be adapted to suit explosive risk and response to fire. PMID:18078713

  1. Short-term associations between outdoor air pollution and visits to accident and emergency departments in London for respiratory complaints.

    Atkinson, R W; Anderson, H R; Strachan, D P; Bland, J M; Bremner, S A; Ponce de Leon, A

    1999-02-01

    Many epidemiological studies have shown positive short-term associations between health and current levels of outdoor air pollution. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between air pollution and the number of visits to accident and emergency (A&E) departments in London for respiratory complaints. A&E visits include the less severe cases of acute respiratory disease and are unrestricted by bed availability. Daily counts of visits to 12 London A&E departments for asthma, other respiratory complaints, and both combined for a number of age groups were constructed from manual registers of visits for the period 1992-1994. A Poisson regression allowing for seasonal patterns, meteorological conditions and influenza epidemics was used to assess the associations between the number of visits and six pollutants: nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and particles measured as black smoke (BS) and particles with a median aerodynamic diameter of <10 microm (PM10). After making an allowance for the multiplicity of tests, there remained strong associations between visits for all respiratory complaints and increases in SO2: a 2.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-4.9) increase in the number of visits for a 18 microg x (-3) increase (10th-90th percentile range) and a 3.0% (95% CI 0.8-5.2) increase for a 31 microg x m(-3) increase in PM10. There were also significant associations between visits for asthma and SO2, NO2 and PM10. No significant associations between O3 and any of the respiratory complaints investigated were found. Because of the strong correlation between pollutants, it was difficult to identify a single pollutant responsible for the associations found in the analyses. This study suggests that the levels of air pollution currently experienced in London are linked to short-term increases in the number of people visiting accident and emergency departments with respiratory complaints. PMID:10065665

  2. Bulgarian emergency response system in case of nuclear accident: description, performance and verification

    A PC-oriented Emergency Response System (ERS) is developed and works in National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology with Bulgarian Academy of Science. The creation and the development of ERS was highly stimulated by the CEC/IAEA/WMO project ETEX (European Tracer EXperiment). ERS comprises of two main parts - operational and accidental ones, realized for both regions 'Europe' and 'Northern Hemisphere'. The operational part runs automatically. It consists of the following modules: selection of proper meteorological data (analyses and forecast) received via the Global Telecommunication System (GTS) of WMO; preparation of input meteorological files used by both trajectory and dispersion models (so called operational data base); completion of the respective meteorological archives, trajectory calculations for selected NPP in Europe and Northern Hemisphere; visualization of the results and putting the pictures in a specialized Web-site. The operational part runs every 12 hours, after new meteorological information is received. The accidental part is activated manually when a real radioactive releases in occurred or during emergency exercises. Two Bulgarian dispersion models - LED and EMAP are a core of the accidental part, LED (Lagrangean-Eulerian Diffusion) being a typical puff-model, wile EMAP (Eulerian Model for Air Pollution) is a 3-D dispersion model. The source input is specified by the user - Bulgarian emergency authorities, and the visualized output (pollution distribution maps) is sent back via fax and FTP. In the paper, the ERS overall structure and its modules are described and an ERS application in emergency management is shown. (authors)

  3. Emergency response to a nuclear power reactor accident

    The Province of Ontario recently reviewed its plans for an emergency response to a possible nuclear power reactor accident that might contaminate some of the surrounding countryside with radioactivity. The Province requested some comments from a small Panel (the present authors) that was formed for this purpose by the Royal Society of Canada and the Canadian Academy of Engineering. This note is a summary of our findings. It presents, first, a short account of the probabilistic risk assessment of accidents and the probability and severity of accidents for which response training should be undertaken; and second, the mitigation of possible harmful effects of escaped radiation and the radiation level at which action should be taken. (author)

  4. The 2012 derecho: emergency medical services and hospital response.

    Kearns, Randy D; Wigal, Mark S; Fernandez, Antonio; Tucker, March A; Zuidgeest, Ginger R; Mills, Michael R; Cairns, Bruce A; Cairns, Charles B

    2014-10-01

    During the early afternoon of June 29, 2012, a line of destructive thunderstorms producing straight line winds known as a derecho developed near Chicago (Illinois, USA). The storm moved southeast with wind speeds recorded from 100 to 160 kilometers per hour (kph, 60 to 100 miles per hour [mph]). The storm swept across much of West Virginia (USA) later that evening. Power outage was substantial as an estimated 1,300,000 West Virginians (more than half) were without power in the aftermath of the storm and approximately 600,000 citizens were still without power a week later. This was one of the worst storms to strike this area and occurred as residents were enduring a prolonged heat wave. The wind damage left much of the community without electricity and the crippling effect compromised or destroyed critical infrastructure including communications, air conditioning, refrigeration, and water and sewer pumps. This report describes utilization of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and hospital resources in West Virginia in response to the storm. Also reported is a review of the weather phenomena and the findings and discussion of the disaster and implications. PMID:25231139

  5. Conceptual design of emergency communication system to cope with severe accidents in NPPs and its performance evaluation

    Highlights: • The emergency communication system requires the performances of the throughput of 1 Mbps, BER of 10−6 and network configuration of 1:12 communication. • The emergency communication system consists of the terrestrial communication and satellite communication system. • In the terrestrial communication system, at least two wireless repeaters are needed to secure LOS and the throughput and delay time are 16 Mbps and 16 ms, respectively. • In the satellite communication system, DSSS and FDMA are used and the fade margin range is from 1.3 to 16 dB. - Abstract: The Fukushima accident induced by the great earthquake and tsunami reveals the vulnerability of I and C System. In the severe environment, the normal I and C system did not work properly and results in false information about the internal situation in NPP. Eventually the accident was not properly handled at the early stage. Therefore advanced emergency response system using a wireless channel is necessary to cope with the severe accident. In this paper, we introduce the ERS consisting of the HMS and MCS the ECS linking the HMS with MCS and the performance requirement of the ECS is analyzed. The ECS satisfying the requirement is designed conceptually and the performance of the ECS is evaluated through analysis and simulator. To secure a reliable and diverse configuration, the ECS is configured as the dual system which consists of the terrestrial communication and satellite communication. The terrestrial communication system is designed based on the IEEE 802.11. Analyzed performance results prove that the performance requirement can be sufficiently achieved. But if the scalability of data capacity is considered later, use of the advanced 802.11 standard such as 802.11n and multiple signal paths between the HMS and MCS are necessary. In the satellite communication system, the FDMA is used in the status link and the DSSS is used in the control link. The network supporting various data rates is

  6. Fuel and fuel channel behaviour in loss of coolant accident without the availability of the emergency coolant injection system

    Safety Analysis of CANDU reactors assesses fuel and fuel channel behaviour under high temperature transient accident conditions. The basic purpose of the analysis is to establish the channel integrity (a sufficient, but not necessary condition) even when the Emergency Cooling Injection System is presumed to be unavailable. For such severe accident conditions, the channel is heated to temperatures where it deforms and creates a heat removal path from the fuel through the pressure tube and calandria tube to the moderator. The moderator in CANDU reactor is a separate system and can provide heat removal for the heat produced within the channel. This occurs through pressure tube deformation either by circumferential strain or sag whereby the pressure tube contacts the calandria tube and allowing heat to be conducted directly to the moderator. It is found that the heat generated within the channel is transported to the moderator, and that the implied modes of channel (pressure tube) deformation are physically possible, and do not lead to failure of the pressure tube (i.e. of the pressure boundary). This paper considers the fuel and channel thermal and mechanical behaviour at very high temperatures. It discusses modelling of fission product release from fuel, deformation of the pressure tube and calandria tube, and hydrogen production insofar as it affects the fuel analysis and the containment analysis. (author)

  7. Intentional Poisoning as a Cause of Admission to Accident and Emergency in a Tertiary Care Hospital within a Year

    Niveditha

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Poisoning is a common medico social problem nowadays and is often distressing for both family members and medical staff. The present study aims to evaluate the pattern of self poisoning with special preference to psychoactive drugs. Methodology: Study sample comprised of all episodes of self poisoning that had resulted in admission between January to December 2008.Pateints taking any toxic/pharmacological substance by accident or ignorance were excluded. Results: Out of 1206 patients admitted to accident and emergency during the study period, 140 were due to intentional poisoning (11.6% Age of the patients varied from 16-65 years. The maximum incidence was between 21-30 years. The male: female ratio was 1.18:1.Most common substance used was organophosphate compound (OPC (31.7% followed by benzodiazepines (BZD (20.7% and household articles comprised of 18.5%. Multiple drug combinations with alcohol was 30%.Around 13.5% had history of mental illness. Conclusion: At present due to vast development in all fields of life like industries, medicine and agriculture, a significant number of new compounds have appeared as new poisonous substances, which have led to more number of poisoning cases. Although there are restrictions on sale of drugs in India, vulnerability to insecticide cannot be ignored.

  8. First Responders and Criticality Accidents

    Valerie L. Putman; Douglas M. Minnema

    2005-11-01

    Nuclear criticality accident descriptions typically include, but do not focus on, information useful to first responders. We studied these accidents, noting characteristics to help (1) first responders prepare for such an event and (2) emergency drill planners develop appropriate simulations for training. We also provide recommendations to help people prepare for such events in the future.

  9. Explanation of procedure on site medical emergency response for nuclear accident

    National occupational health standard-Procedure on Site Medical Emergency Response for Nuclear Accident has been approved and issued by the Ministry of Health. This standard is formulated according to the Emergency Response Law of the People's Republic of China, Law of the People 's Republic of China on Prevention and Control of Occupational Diseases, Regulations on Emergency Measures for Nuclear Accidents at Nuclear Power Plants, and Health Emergency Plans for Nuclear and Radiological Accidents of Ministry of Health, supporting the use of On-site Medical Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Nuclear Accidents and Off-site Medical Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Nuclear Accidents. Nuclear accident on-site medical response procedure is a part of the on-site emergency plan. The standard specifies the basic content and requirements of the nuclear accident on-site medical emergency response procedures of nuclear facilities operating units to guide and regulate the work of nuclear accident on-site medical emergency response of nuclear facilities operating units. The criteria-related contents were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  10. Novel ecosystems and the emergence of cultural ecosystem services

    Collier, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Many landscapes are severely depleted of ecosystem services, especially industrial ones. Yet, abandoned and, in some cases, regenerating areas are often situated within a wider cultural landscape. With minimal further disturbance these ‘novel ecosystems’ have the potential for recovering some of the ecosystem services that were removed or impeded during and after human management activities, especially cultural services. Novel ecosystems are anthropogenic landscapes that cannot be returned to...

  11. Uncertainties under emergency conditions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 and Bikini accident in 1954

    who were trained at Narashino Chemical School were assigned, at least one, to each unit (brigade and higher) of the Japanese Army. Chemical Weapons Control unit was organised at the headquarters in the centre of Hiroshima. After atomic bombing some vessels of mustard gas stored underground were found cracked and leaked. Judging from these findings it may be possible that some chemical weapons were released to the environment from the military facilities on ground at the time they were destroyed by the atomic bombing and the survivors were exposed to poison gases to a smaller or larger extent. There was no drinking water and they had to drink rain water which fell heavily soon after the atomic bombing. It is highly possible that the rainwater was also contaminated by various toxic substances including chemical weapons. These effects combined with the irradiation by atomic radiation are difficult to quantify accurately at present, many years after atomic bombings. But if all these adverse effects were ascribed solely to the ionizing radiation, the effects of radiation may be overestimated in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In using the Hiroshima and Nagasaki data for establishing radiation safety standard in peaceful uses of atomic energy, we should keep these possibilities of overestimation in mind. At the Bikini accident, where Japanese fishing boat was showered by strongly radioactive ash due to thermonuclear test on March 1, 1954 in the Pacific, some crew tested the ash to see what it is. The amount of intake is uncertain. Depending on the assumption, a widely different result would be obtained. (author)

  12. Uncertainties under emergency conditions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 and Bikini accident in 1954

    Nishiwaki, Y. [Universitaet Wien, Institut fuer Medizinische Physik, Vienna (Austria); Kawai, H. [Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki Univ., Osaka (Japan); Shono, N. [Hiroshima Jogakuin Univ., Hiroshima (Japan); Fujita, S. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Department of Statistics, Hiroshima (Japan); Matsuoka, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Earth Simulator Research and Development Center, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiwara, S. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Ibaraki (Japan); Hosoda, T. [Chiyoda Technol Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    who were trained at Narashino Chemical School were assigned, at least one, to each unit (brigade and higher) of the Japanese Army. Chemical Weapons Control unit was organised at the headquarters in the centre of Hiroshima. After atomic bombing some vessels of mustard gas stored underground were found cracked and leaked. Judging from these findings it may be possible that some chemical weapons were released to the environment from the military facilities on ground at the time they were destroyed by the atomic bombing and the survivors were exposed to poison gases to a smaller or larger extent. There was no drinking water and they had to drink rain water which fell heavily soon after the atomic bombing. It is highly possible that the rainwater was also contaminated by various toxic substances including chemical weapons. These effects combined with the irradiation by atomic radiation are difficult to quantify accurately at present, many years after atomic bombings. But if all these adverse effects were ascribed solely to the ionizing radiation, the effects of radiation may be overestimated in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In using the Hiroshima and Nagasaki data for establishing radiation safety standard in peaceful uses of atomic energy, we should keep these possibilities of overestimation in mind. At the Bikini accident, where Japanese fishing boat was showered by strongly radioactive ash due to thermonuclear test on March 1, 1954 in the Pacific, some crew tested the ash to see what it is. The amount of intake is uncertain. Depending on the assumption, a widely different result would be obtained. (author)

  13. Impact of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident on local community and healthcare services

    The Soso region of Japan, located in the northern part of the Pacific side of Fukushima Prefecture, has suffered tremendously from widespread damage caused by the earthquake, tsunami and the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident. Immediately after the disaster it even seemed that the restoration of this region itself would not be possible. However after six months, the Indoor Restriction Order and evacuation orders within a 20 to 30 km zone from the plant, such as the Evacuation-Prepared Area in Case of Emergency, were lifted and all of those restrictions for the planned evaluation zone has been eased in line with the actual conditions of each region. A year and a month after the earthquake, the Caution Zone, which was declared to prohibit the entry to the zone within the 20 km radius from the plant, was lifted. Thus people can now enter as close as 10 km from the plant. Minami-Soma city is an administrative district which had the largest population (approximately 71,500 residents) within the 20 to 30 km zone prior to the earthquake. It was, also, the only district where the evacuation was not conducted by the municipality. The city is now called the Genpatsu frontline district as it is the closest city to the plant where people have continued to live. Due to the damage caused by the earthquake and Tsunami, the city has suffered both from destruction by the tsunami and radiation, and people are still facing numerous problems despite the fact that the city appears to have been restored on its surface. It is very unfortunate that much of the medical data from the region was lost in the confusion after the Great East Japan Earthquake. In this paper various facts after the disaster based on the data left in the So-so region, Minamisoma city, and Minamisoma municipal general hospital are reported. (author)

  14. Road Accident Prevention with Instant Emergency Warning Message Dissemination in Vehicular Ad-Hoc Network

    P. Gokulakrishnan; Ganeshkumar, P.

    2015-01-01

    A Road Accident Prevention (RAP) scheme based on Vehicular Backbone Network (VBN) structure is proposed in this paper for Vehicular Ad-hoc Network (VANET). The RAP scheme attempts to prevent vehicles from highway road traffic accidents and thereby reduces death and injury rates. Once the possibility of an emergency situation (i.e. an accident) is predicted in advance, instantly RAP initiates a highway road traffic accident prevention scheme. The RAP scheme constitutes the following activities...

  15. Nordic Mutual Emergency Assistance Agreement in Connection with Radiation Accidents

    The text of the Nordic Mutual Emergency Assistance Agreement in Connection with Radiation Accidents, which was signed on 17 October 1963 by the Director General and by representatives of the Governments of Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The entry into force of the Agreement in accordance with Article IX will be notified to Members in an Addendum to this document

  16. Summative service and stakeholder evaluation of an NHS-funded community Pharmacy Emergency Repeat Medication Supply Service (PERMSS)

    Nazar, Hamde; Nazar, Zachariah; Simpson, Jill; Yeung, Andre; Whittlesea, Cate

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Service and stakeholder evaluation of an NHS-funded service providing out-ofhours (OOH) emergency repeat medications to patients self-presenting at community pharmacies. SETTING: Community pharmacies across the North East of England accredited to provide this service. PARTICIPANTS: Patients self-presenting to community pharmacies during OOH periods with emergency repeat medication supply requests. INTERVENTION: Community pharmacists assessed each request for clinical appropriatene...

  17. Key regulatory and safety issues emerging NEA activities. Lessons Learned from Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS Accident - Key Regulatory and Safety Issues

    intervention and performance under extreme conditions; evaluations of metallic components and structures under high-seismic loads; risks assessments for natural external initiating events; and defence-in-depth, including the robustness of electrical systems. A recent joint research project has also been started that will include a benchmarking study of accident codes and the collection of data from the damaged reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi NPS. CRPPH activities in response to the Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident include an update of report on Short-term Countermeasures in Case of a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency that was last updated in 2003; the performance of a survey on emergency management lessons learned; developing lesson learned in the management of occupational exposure in high-radiation areas; and providing support to the Japanese Government by co-ordination and participation in workshops on decontamination and recovery and other technical topics

  18. Process Modeling and Public Value: Performance Measurement for Emergency Assistance Services?

    Claude Rochet

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a process modeling of a cerebrovascular accident (CVA channel, according to the Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN rules, in order to build a balanced scorecard (BSC. The Fire department in the Bouches-du-Rhône (SDIS and the medical emergency service have coordinated their action and processes with hospitals to set up this kind of specific channel to deal with strokes. According to Hankey and Warlow (1999, each year in a population of 1 million inhabitants of a developed country, 2 400 patients use a care institution because of this pathology. As the window of opportunity for treatment is only 4 hours from first symptoms, swiftness is needed in both diagnosis and intervention. This emphasizes the fluidity of the channel, and thus the coordination of actors, as key success factors. This work upon process modeling is a source of lessons on the role of the information system in organizational innovation in the public services and the required capabilities to be mastered. But it mainly allows us to bring out the relevant indicators to build up the monitoring part of the balance scorecard (BSC and to propose a roadmap to implement such a method for equivalent medical channels.

  19. Build-up forces at Military Institute of Medical Radiology and Oncology for emergency medical response to some eventualities of radiological accidents - some suggestions

    Nowadays, the use of various nuclear sources in some fields of the life has brought many practical advantages in general; especially in the next several years, our country will begin construction of the first nuclear plant. However, if there were user carelessness or objective disadvantageous factors (earthquake, tsunami, etc.), that disadvantages could lead to a radiation accident or nuclear accident which causes damages not only for economy but also for public health. Therefore, the emergency response to radiation accident, especially the emergency medical response that has a great important position. To satisfy this real demand, in 1996, Vietnam Ministry of Defence made the decision to establish Center for Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Protecting (now becomes Military Institute of Medical Radiology and Oncology) with the main missions are research, applying radiation protecting methods and organizing treatments to radiation injured victims. To fulfill above main missions, with the help of Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute (VAEI), Vietnam Agency for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (VARANS), the doctors and staffs of our Institute have been participated in the international training courses and workshops that organized in Vietnam or in regional countries about emergency medical response to radiation accidents, they get valuable information, knowledge and documents from these courses and workshops. Depending on the principles of radiation emergency medical response to nuclear/ radiation accidents that International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) guided, and with the experience learned from other countries in Asia region, our Institute have been gradually improving on organization and curing processes for the radiation victims and also setting the preparedness for emergency medical response to radiation accidents if maybe they could occur. (author)

  20. Short-term associations between outdoor air pollution and visits to accident and emergency departments in London for respiratory complaints

    Atkinson, R.W.; Anderson, H.R.; Strachan, D.P.; Bland, J.M.; Bremner, S.A. [St. George`s Hospital Medical School, Dept. of Public Health Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Ponce de Leon, A. [IME/UERJ Rua Sao Francisco Xavier, Dept. de Estatistica, Maracana Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1999-02-01

    Many epidemiological studies have shown positive short-term associations between health and current levels of outdoor air pollution. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between air pollution and the number of visits to accident and emergency (A and E) departments in London for respiratory complaints. A and E visits include the less severe cases of acute respiratory disease and are unrestricted by bed availability. Daily counts of visits to 12 London A and E departments for asthma, other respiratory complaints, and both combined for a number of age groups were constructed from manual registers of visits for the period 1992-1994. A poison regression allowing for seasonal patterns meteorological conditions and influenza epidemics was used to assess the associations between the number of visits and six pollutants: nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and particles measured as black smoke (BS) and particles with a median aerodynamic diameter of <10 {mu}m (PM10). After making an allowance for the multiplicity of tests, there remained strong associations between visits for all respiratory complaints and increases in SO{sub 2}: a 2.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-4.9) increase in the number of visits for a 18 {mu}g{sup .}m{sup -3} increase (10th-90th percentile range) and a 3.0% (95% Cl 0.8-5.2) increase for a 31 {mu}g{sup .}m{sup -3} increase in PM10. There were also significant associations between visits for asthma and SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2} and PM10. No significant associations between O{sub 3} and any of the respiratory complaints investigated were found. Because of the strong correlation between pollutants, it was difficult to identify a single pollutant responsible for the associations found in the analyses. This study suggests that the levels of air pollution currently experienced in London are linked to short-term increases in the number of people visiting accident and emergency departments with respiratory complaints

  1. Short-term associations between outdoor air pollution and visits to accident and emergency departments in London for respiratory complaints

    Atkinson, R.W.; Anderson, H.R.; Strachan, D.P.; Bland, J.M.; Bremner, S.A. [St. George' s Hospital Medical School, Dept. of Public Health Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Ponce de Loen, A. [IME/UERJ Rua Sao Francisco Xavier, Dept. de Estatistica, Maracana Rio de Janeiro , RJ (Brazil)

    1999-07-01

    Many epidemiological studies have shown positive short-term associations between health and current levels of outdoor air pollution. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between air pollution and the number of visits to accident and emergency (A and E) departments in London for respiratory complaints. A and E visits include the less severe cases of acute respiratory disease and are unrestricted by bed availability. Daily counts of visits to 12 London A and E departments for asthma, other respiratory complaints, and both combined for a number of age groups were constructed from manual registers of visits for the period 1992-1994. A Poisson regression allowing for seasonal patterns, meteorological conditions and influenza epidemics was used to assess the associations between the number of visits and six pollutants: nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and particles measured as black smoke (BS) and particles with a median aerodynamic diameter of <10 {mu}m (PM10). After making an allowance for the multiplicity of tests, there remained strong associations between visits for all respiratory complaints and increases in SO{sub 2}: a 2.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-4.9) increase in the number of visits for a 18 {mu}g{sup .}m{sup -3} increase (10th-90th percentile range) and a 3.0% (95% CI 0.8-5.2) increase for a 31 {mu}g{sup .}m{sup -3} increase in PM10. There were also significant associations between visits for asthma and SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2} and PM10. No significant associations between O{sub 3} and any of the respiratory complaints investigated were found. Because of the strong correlation between pollutants, it was difficult to identify a single pollutant responsible for the associations found in the analyses. This study suggests that the levels of air pollution currently experineced in London are linked to short-term increases in the number of people visiting accident and emergency departments with respiratory

  2. Radiation accidents on human in the nuclear installations and their medical emergency procedures, (1)

    Present nuclear installations are one of the safest installations among industrial facilities, being equipped with various safety instruments. Since X-ray was discovered in 1895, however, many radiation injuries of various degrees and kinds occurred. Among dangerous nuclides often observed as radioactivity pollutions in nuclear installations, the exposure to β-ray such as 90Sr, 106Ru, 95Zr, 131I, 144Ce, etc, is considered to be serious problems. When they affect wounds or are inhaled into lungs, only symptomatic treatment is practicable at present, and usually nothing can be depended upon, but spontaneous eliminating ability. As the mass inhalation of α nuclides, especially transuranium nuclides, is quite dangerous, the treatment by lung-irrigation now under development is most effective as the emergency treatment. When trans-uranium nuclides were accidentally observed from wounds, they should be eliminated by the injection of chelating agent. (Kobatake, H.)

  3. Loss-of-coolant accidents with impaired emergency coolant injection

    This report describes work on loss-of-coolant accidents in CANDU reactors in which emergency coolant injection is indefinitely delayed. Two situations are considered, one in which additional heat sinks (moderator, moderator cooling system, etc.) are available and effective and the other in which they are not. For the situation in which additional heat sinks are available, the computer program IMPECC has been used for the analysis. Certain corrections and modifications to IMPECC are described and recommendations on the maximum time steps to use are given. For CANDU reactors in which calandria tubes remain submerged, should local CHF occur when a pressure tube sags onto a calandria tube, which is highly improbable, the dry patch caused would not spread beyond 100 and rewetting would occur rapidly. Calandria tube and pressure tube integrity will almost certainly be maintained. This conclusion is not affected even if the contact strip between pressure and calandria tubes is very wide, which is unlikely. For the situation in which additional heat sinks are not available, a simplified event tree has been developed to examine possible accident sequences. Two accident sequences have been selected for study: loss of moderator cooling system and loss of moderator heat sink. A detailed description of the analytical steps for the loss of moderator cooling system accident sequence is given

  4. Coping with Unanticipated Accidents using Emergency Operating Procedures

    Kim, Yochan; Jung, Wondea [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In, unsafe acts associated with a literal following of a procedure were reported. A report of the Fukushima accident also revealed that a tendency to adhere to procedures and prior practices can impede applying effective countermeasures. To overcome the conflicts between benefit and jeopardy of procedures during unanticipated accidents, we reviewed the literature on the perspectives of cognitive engineering and artificial intelligence. From the insights about human planning of the literatures, we also proposed an approach of how to train operators to effectively use EOPs during unanticipated accidents. There are three key processes required to effectively cope with emergency situations: how correctly the operators are aware of the occurring situations, how properly they develop corresponding plans for the situations, and how accurately they execute the plans. This paper presents a way to develop the plans using EOPs from some literature of human planning. Even if professional operators have implicitly shaped good structures of procedures already, it is expected that this approach will provide a more systematic and concrete training strategy. If the operators are trained with this strategy, a higher level of human reliability would be ensured in unanticipated accidents.

  5. 300-Area accident analysis for Emergency Planning Zones

    The Department of Energy has requested SRL assistance in developing offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) for the Savannah River Plant, based on projected dose consequences of atmospheric releases of radioactivity from potential credible accidents in the SRP operating areas. This memorandum presents the assessment of the offsite doses via the plume exposure pathway from the 300-Area potential accidents. 8 refs., 3 tabs

  6. Loss of coolant accident analysis and evolution of emergency core cooling system for an inpile irradiation facility

    This paper deals with the Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis of an inpile facility using RELAP4/MOD6 computer code. The present study is the culmination of a three part LOCA analysis done earlier by the authors. Blowdown analysis had been extended to include reflood part of the transient. Based on the analysis an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) has been evolved. (author). 5 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Stress in accident and post-accident management at Chernobyl

    The effects of the Chernobyl nuclear accident on the psychology of the affected population have been much discussed. The psychological dimension has been advanced as a factor explaining the emergence, from 1990 onwards, of a post-accident crisis in the main CIS countries affected. This article presents the conclusions of a series of European studies, which focused on the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. These studies show that the psychological and social effects associated with the post-accident situation arise from the interdependency of a number of complex factors exerting a deleterious effect on the population. We shall first attempt to characterise the stress phenomena observed among the population affected by the accident. Secondly, we will be presenting an anlysis of the various factors that have contributed to the emerging psychological and social features of population reaction to the accident and in post-accident phases, while not neglecting the effects of the pre-accident situation on the target population. Thirdly, we shall devote some initial consideration to the conditions that might be conducive to better management of post-accident stress. In conclusion, we shall emphasise the need to restore confidence among the population generally. (Author)

  8. [A guide to successful public relations for hospitals and emergency medical services].

    Ausserer, J; Schwamberger, J; Preloznik, R; Klimek, M; Paal, P; Wenzel, V

    2014-04-01

    Tragic accidents, e.g. involving celebrity patients or severe incidents in hospital occur suddenly without any advance warning, often produce substantial interest by the media and quickly overburden management personnel involved in both hospitals and emergency medical services. While doctors, hospitals and emergency medical services desire objective media reports, the media promote emotionalized and dramatized reports to ensure maximum attention and circulation. When briefing the media, the scales may quickly tilt from professional, well-deliberated information to unfortunate, often unintended disinformation. Such phenomena may result in continuing exaggerated reports in the tabloid press, which in the presence of aggressive lawyers and a competitive hospital environment can turn into image and legal problems. In this article, several aspects are discussed in order to achieve successful public relations.Interviews should be given only after consultation with the responsible press officer and the director of the respective department or hospital director. Requests for information by the media should always be answered as otherwise one-sided, unintentional publications can result that are extremely difficult to correct later. One should be available to be contacted easily by journalists, regular press conferences should be held and critics should be taken seriously and not be brushed off. Questions by journalists should be answered in a timely manner as journalists are continuously under time pressure and do not understand unnecessary delays. Information for the media should always be provided at the same time, no publication should be given preference and an absolutely current list of E-mail contacts is required. When facing big events a press conference is preferred as many questions can be answered at once. Always be well prepared for an interview or even for just a statement. Each interview should be regarded as an opportunity to put a story forward which you

  9. Emergency feature. Great east Japan earthquake disaster Fukushima Daiichi accident

    The Tohoku Pacific Ocean earthquake occurred in March 11, 2011. The disastrous tsunami attacked Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants after automatically shutdown by the earthquake and all motor operated pumps became inoperable due to station black out. Despite the strenuous efforts of operators, if caused serious accident such as loss of cooling function, hydrogen explosion and release of large amount of radioactive materials into the environment, leading to nuclear power emergency that ordered resident to evacuate or remain indoors. This emergency feature consisted of four articles. The first was the interview with the president of JAIF (Japan Atomic Industrial Forum) on how to identify the cause of the accident completely, intensify safety assurance measures and promote discussions on a role of nuclear power in the nation's entire energy policy toward the reconstruction. Others were reactor states and events sequence after the accident with trend data of radiation in the reactor site, statement of president of AESJ (Atomic Energy Society of Japan) on nuclear crisis following Tohoku Pacific Ocean earthquake our response and my experience in evacuation life. (T. Tanaka)

  10. Prehospital Emergency Service for Internal Medicine Problems in Pediatrics; Causes, Time Indices and Outcomes

    Hamid Reza Khoddami Vishteh

    Full Text Available Objective: Although pediatric pre-hospital emergency medical services (EMS are a main challenge of health care systems, few data exists over it. Current study of ambulance calls for medical causes relating to children in Tehran was conducted with the following aims: 1 assessment of the frequency of causes of EMS call, 2 assessment of time indices of service providing by EMS, and 3 to assess the correlation between outcomes and time indices.Material & Methods: In this retrospective study, all calls to Tehran EMS system (Dial 115 for medical causes of children =<15 years old in Tehran between December 2005 and May 2006 were extracted. Demographic variables, accident type, patient outcome before hospital arrival, and ambulance time indices (response time, scene time, total run time, total run time hospital, transport time, round trip time were registered.Findings: 1052 (15.5% calls were for children. From these, 717 (68% were due to problems of medic problems. The most frequent problem was epilepsy (26.8%, unconsciousness (18.1% and respiratory disorders (15.2%. 12 (5. 6% subjects died before ambulance arrival, but no one died between scene and hospital arrival. Mean (SD delay time, response time and scene time were 3.8 ± 1.8, 15.1 ± 6.9, and 23.5 ± 10.9, respectively. The pre-hospital mortality was not correlated with any of the time intervals. Conclusion: One of six ambulance calls in Tehran is related to pediatric patients, most of them with a medical cause. Epilepsy, unconsciousness and respiratory disorders as the most frequent causes for EMS calls for medical problems highlights the need for planning for training of the EMS personnel with these problems. There is still a need for further improvement in time intervals of EMS services, which may be possible by proper management and equipping by more ambulances.