WorldWideScience

Sample records for accident analysis

  1. Accident Tolerant Fuel Analysis

    Curtis Smith; Heather Chichester; Jesse Johns; Melissa Teague; Michael Tonks; Robert Youngblood

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional “accident-tolerant” (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and

  2. Accident tolerant fuel analysis

    Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Laboratory; Chichester, Heather [Idaho National Laboratory; Johns, Jesse [Texas A& M University; Teague, Melissa [Idaho National Laboratory; Tonks, Michael Idaho National Laboratory; Youngblood, Robert [Idaho National Laboratory

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced ''RISMC toolkit'' that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional ''accident-tolerant'' (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant

  3. Severe accident analysis methodology in support of accident management

    The author addresses the implementation at BELGATOM of a generic severe accident analysis methodology, which is intended to support strategic decisions and to provide quantitative information in support of severe accident management. The analysis methodology is based on a combination of severe accident code calculations, generic phenomenological information (experimental evidence from various test facilities regarding issues beyond present code capabilities) and detailed plant-specific technical information

  4. Radioactive materials transport accident analysis

    Over the last 25 years, one of the major issues raised regarding radioactive material transportation has been the risk of severe accidents. While numerous studies have shown that traffic fatalities dominate the risk, modeling the risk of severe accidents has remained one of the most difficult analysis problems. This paper will show how models that were developed for nuclear spent fuel transport accident analysis can be adopted to obtain estimates of release fractions for other types of radioactive material such as vitrified highlevel radioactive waste. The paper will also show how some experimental results from fire experiments involving low level waste packaging can be used in modeling transport accident analysis with this waste form. The results of the analysis enable an analyst to clearly show the differences in the release fractions as a function of accident severity. The paper will also show that by placing the data in a database such as ACCESS trademark, it is possible to obtain risk measures for transporting the waste forms along proposed routes from the generator site to potential final disposal sites

  5. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH

  6. Accident analysis and DOE criteria

    In analyzing the radiological consequences of major accidents at DOE facilities one finds that many facilities fall so far below the limits of DOE Order 6430 that compliance is easily demonstrated by simple analysis. For those cases where the amount of radioactive material and the dispersive energy available are enough for accident consequences to approach the limits, the models and assumptions used become critical. In some cases the models themselves are the difference between meeting the criteria or not meeting them. Further, in one case, we found that not only did the selection of models determine compliance but the selection of applicable criteria from different chapters of Order 6430 also made the difference. DOE has recognized the problem of different criteria in different chapters applying to one facility, and has proceeded to make changes for the sake of consistency. We have proposed to outline the specific steps needed in an accident analysis and suggest appropriate models, parameters, and assumptions. As a result we feed DOE siting and design criteria will be more fairly and consistently applied

  7. Probabilistic accident sequence recovery analysis

    Recovery analysis is a method that considers alternative strategies for preventing accidents in nuclear power plants during probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Consideration of possible recovery actions in PRAs has been controversial, and there seems to be a widely held belief among PRA practitioners, utility staff, plant operators, and regulators that the results of recovery analysis should be skeptically viewed. This paper provides a framework for discussing recovery strategies, thus lending credibility to the process and enhancing regulatory acceptance of PRA results and conclusions. (author)

  8. Severe accident analysis using dynamic accident progression event trees

    Hakobyan, Aram P.

    In present, the development and analysis of Accident Progression Event Trees (APETs) are performed in a manner that is computationally time consuming, difficult to reproduce and also can be phenomenologically inconsistent. One of the principal deficiencies lies in the static nature of conventional APETs. In the conventional event tree techniques, the sequence of events is pre-determined in a fixed order based on the expert judgments. The main objective of this PhD dissertation was to develop a software tool (ADAPT) for automated APET generation using the concept of dynamic event trees. As implied by the name, in dynamic event trees the order and timing of events are determined by the progression of the accident. The tool determines the branching times from a severe accident analysis code based on user specified criteria for branching. It assigns user specified probabilities to every branch, tracks the total branch probability, and truncates branches based on the given pruning/truncation rules to avoid an unmanageable number of scenarios. The function of a dynamic APET developed includes prediction of the conditions, timing, and location of containment failure or bypass leading to the release of radioactive material, and calculation of probabilities of those failures. Thus, scenarios that can potentially lead to early containment failure or bypass, such as through accident induced failure of steam generator tubes, are of particular interest. Also, the work is focused on treatment of uncertainties in severe accident phenomena such as creep rupture of major RCS components, hydrogen burn, containment failure, timing of power recovery, etc. Although the ADAPT methodology (Analysis of Dynamic Accident Progression Trees) could be applied to any severe accident analysis code, in this dissertation the approach is demonstrated by applying it to the MELCOR code [1]. A case study is presented involving station blackout with the loss of auxiliary feedwater system for a

  9. Accident analysis in research reactors

    With the sustained development in computer technology, the possibilities of code capabilities have been enlarged substantially. Consequently, advanced safety evaluations and design optimizations that were not possible few years ago can now be performed. The challenge today is to revisit the safety features of the existing nuclear plants and particularly research reactors in order to verify that the safety requirements are still met and - when necessary - to introduce some amendments not only to meet the new requirements but also to introduce new equipment from recent development of new technologies. The purpose of the present paper is to provide an overview of the accident analysis technology applied to the research reactor, with emphasis given to the capabilities of computational tools. (author)

  10. Aircraft Loss-of-Control Accident Analysis

    Belcastro, Christine M.; Foster, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of control remains one of the largest contributors to fatal aircraft accidents worldwide. Aircraft loss-of-control accidents are complex in that they can result from numerous causal and contributing factors acting alone or (more often) in combination. Hence, there is no single intervention strategy to prevent these accidents. To gain a better understanding into aircraft loss-of-control events and possible intervention strategies, this paper presents a detailed analysis of loss-of-control accident data (predominantly from Part 121), including worst case combinations of causal and contributing factors and their sequencing. Future potential risks are also considered.

  11. Safety criteria and guidelines for MSR accident analysis

    Accident analysis for Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) has been investigated at ORNL for MSRE in 1960s. Since then, safety criteria or guidelines have not been defined for MSR accident analysis. Regarding the safety criteria, the authors showed one proposal in this paper. In order to establish guidelines for MSR accident analysis, we have to investigate all possible accidents. In this paper, the authors describe the philosophy for accident analysis, and show 40 possible accidents. They are at first classified as external cause accidents and internal cause accidents. Since the former ones are generic accidents, we investigate only the latter ones, and categorize them to 4 types, such as power excursion accident, flow decrease accident, fuel-salt leak accident, and other accidents mostly specific to MSR. Each accident is described briefly, with some numerical results by the authors. (author)

  12. Accident analysis for the NCSC foil experiment

    An accident analysis has been performed for the nuclear criticality safety class (NCSC) foil experiment. The Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) performs this experiment regularly during its 2-, 3-, and 5-day nuclear criticality safety classes. This accident analysis is part of an effort to modify the NCSC foil experiment plan so that the experiment may be operated at delayed critical. Currently, the NCSC foil experiment may only be operated up to a neutron multiplication of 100. The purpose of the accident analysis is to ensure that any accidental nuclear excursion does not exceed the boundary of the safety envelope described in the LACEF safety analysis report (SAR). The experiment consists of very thin, highly enriched (93% 235U) uranium metal foils (23 X 23 X 0.008 cm) interleaved between Lucite plates (36 X 36 X 1.27 cm). The fuel foils and Lucite plates are stacked vertically to form a critical assembly. Extra Lucite plates placed at the top and bottom of the assembly act as vertical reflectors. The assembly is operated remotely with the use of a general-purpose vertical-lift platform machine. The accident scenario consists of one additional fuel foil being added to an existing critical or nearly critical stack. The reactivity insertion rate is 0.05 $/s, based on the speed of the vertical-lift platform. It is assumed that none of the safety systems will function properly during the accident and that the operating crew is unable to mitigate the accident

  13. Accident analysis in nuclear power plants

    The way the philosophy of Safety in Depth can be verified through the analysis of simulated accidents is shown. This can be achieved by verifying that the integrity of the protection barriers against the release of radioactivity to the environment is preserved even during accident conditions. The simulation of LOCA is focalized as an example, including a study about the associated environmental radiological consequences. (Author)

  14. Safety analysis of surface haulage accidents

    Randolph, R.F.; Boldt, C.M.K.

    1996-12-31

    Research on improving haulage truck safety, started by the U.S. Bureau of Mines, is being continued by its successors. This paper reports the orientation of the renewed research efforts, beginning with an update on accident data analysis, the role of multiple causes in these accidents, and the search for practical methods for addressing the most important causes. Fatal haulage accidents most often involve loss of control or collisions caused by a variety of factors. Lost-time injuries most often involve sprains or strains to the back or multiple body areas, which can often be attributed to rough roads and the shocks of loading and unloading. Research to reduce these accidents includes improved warning systems, shock isolation for drivers, encouraging seatbelt usage, and general improvements to system and task design.

  15. The development of severe accident analysis technology

    Kim, Heuy Dong; Cho, Sung Won; Kim, Sang Baek; Park, Jong Hwa; Lee, Kyu Jung; Park, Lae Joon; Hu, Hoh; Hong, Sung Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the development of severe accident analysis technology is to understand the severe accident phenomena such as core melt progression and to provide a reliable analytical tool to assess severe accidents in a nuclear power plant. Furthermore, establishment of the accident management strategies for the prevention/mitigation of severe accidents is also the purpose of this research. The study may be categorized into three areas. For the first area, two specific issues were reviewed to identify the further research direction, that is the natural circulation in the reactor coolant system and the fuel-coolant interaction as an in-vessel and an ex-vessel phenomenological study. For the second area, the MELCOR and the CONTAIN codes have been upgraded, and a validation calculation of the MELCOR has been performed for the PHEBUS-B9+ experiment. Finally, the experimental program has been established for the in-vessel and the ex-vessel severe accident phenomena with the in-pile test loop in KMRR and the integral containment test facilities, respectively. (Author).

  16. The development of severe accident analysis technology

    The objective of the development of severe accident analysis technology is to understand the severe accident phenomena such as core melt progression and to provide a reliable analytical tool to assess severe accidents in a nuclear power plant. Furthermore, establishment of the accident management strategies for the prevention/mitigation of severe accidents is also the purpose of this research. The study may be categorized into three areas. For the first area, two specific issues were reviewed to identify the further research direction, that is the natural circulation in the reactor coolant system and the fuel-coolant interaction as an in-vessel and an ex-vessel phenomenological study. For the second area, the MELCOR and the CONTAIN codes have been upgraded, and a validation calculation of the MELCOR has been performed for the PHEBUS-B9+ experiment. Finally, the experimental program has been established for the in-vessel and the ex-vessel severe accident phenomena with the in-pile test loop in KMRR and the integral containment test facilities, respectively. (Author)

  17. On the application of near accident data to risk analysis of major accidents

    Major accidents are low frequency high consequence events which are not well supported by conventional statistical methods due to data scarcity. In the absence or shortage of major accident direct data, the use of partially related data of near accidentsaccident precursor data – has drawn much attention. In the present work, a methodology has been proposed based on hierarchical Bayesian analysis and accident precursor data to risk analysis of major accidents. While hierarchical Bayesian analysis facilitates incorporation of generic data into the analysis, the dependency and interaction between accident and near accident data can be encoded via a multinomial likelihood function. We applied the proposed methodology to risk analysis of offshore blowouts and demonstrated its outperformance compared to conventional approaches. - Highlights: • Probabilistic risk analysis is applied to model major accidents. • Two-stage Bayesian updating is used to generate informative distributions. • Accident precursor data are used to develop likelihood function. • A multinomial likelihood function is introduced to model dependencies among data

  18. Reactor accident analysis and evaluation

    Reactor Management Division of Korea Advanced Energy Research Institute has, so far, adopted, modified and developed quite a number of large programs for nuclear core analysis. During the course of this work, it was found necessary to employ some standard subroutines for handling data, input procedures, core memory management and search files. Many programs share lots of common subroutines and/or functions with other programs. Above all, some of them are in lack of transmittal. During the installation of big codes for CYBER computer, it has drawn our keen attention that many elementary subroutines are heavily machine-dependent and that their conversion is extremely difficult. After having collected and modified the subroutines to fit in different codes, it was finally named KINEP (KAERI Improved Nuclear Environmental Package). KINEP has been proved to be convenient even for smaller programs for general purpose. The KINEP includes about one hundred subroutines to facilitate data handling, operator communications, storage allocation, decimal input, file maintence and scratch I/O. (Author)

  19. PWR Core 2 Project accident analysis

    The various operations required for receipt, handling, defueling and storage of spent Shippingport PWR Core 2 fuel assemblies have been evaluated to determine the potential accidents and their consequences. These operations will introduce approximately 16,500 kilograms of depleted natural uranium (as UO2), 139 kilograms of plutonium, 2.8 megacuries of mixed fission products, and 14 kilograms of Zircaloy-4 (cladding and hardware) into the 221-T Canyon Building. Event sequences for potential accidents that were considered included (1) leaking fuel assemblies, (2) fire and explosion, (3) loss of coolant or cooling capability, (4) dropped and/or damaged fuel assemblies, and extrinsic occurrences such as loss of services, missile impact, and natural occurrences (e.g., earthquake, tornado). Accident frequencies were determined by formal analysis to be very low. Accident consequences are greatly mitigated by the safety and containment features designed into the fuel modules and shipping cask, the long cooling time since reactor discharge, and the redundant safety features designed into the facilities, equipment, and operating procedures for the PWR Core 2 Project. Possible hazards associated with the handling of these fuels have been considered and adequate safeguards and storage constraints identified. The operations of M-160 cask unloading and module storage will not involve identifiable risks as great or significantly greater than those for comparable licensed nuclear facilities, nor will hazards or risks be significantly different from comparable past 221-T Plant programs. Therefore, it is concluded that the operations required for receipt, handling, and defueling of the M-160 cask and for the storage and surveillance of the PWR Core 2 fuel assemblies at the 221-T Canyon Building can be performed without undue risk to the safety of the involved personnel, the public, the environment or the facility

  20. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support ''HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety, Analysis Report, Annex A,'' ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report

  1. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    CROWE, R.D.; PIEPHO, M.G.

    2000-03-23

    This document provided the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report''. All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

  2. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    This document provided the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report''. All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report

  3. Canister storage building design basis accident analysis documentation

    KOPELIC, S.D.

    1999-02-25

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

  4. Canister storage building design basis accident analysis documentation

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report

  5. Hindsight Bias in Cause Analysis of Accident

    Atsuo Murata; Yasunari Matsushita

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that hindsight becomes an obstacle to the objective investigation of an accident, and that the proper countermeasures for the prevention of such an accident is impossible if we view the accident with hindsight. Therefore, it is important for organizational managers to prevent hindsight from occurring so that hindsight does not hinder objective and proper measures to be taken and this does not lead to a serious accident. In this study, a basic phenomenon potentially related to accidents, that is, hindsight was taken up, and an attempt was made to explore the phenomenon in order to get basically insights into the prevention of accidents caused by such a cognitive bias.

  6. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Annex B, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).'' All assumptions, parameters and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the FSAR

  7. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    PIEPHO, M.G.

    1999-10-20

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Annex B, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).'' All assumptions, parameters and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the FSAR.

  8. Neutronic static analysis of Chernobyl accident

    In the present analysis, estimates were made of the positive reactivity introduced through the growth of the coolant void fraction in a Graphite-water steam-generating reactor both at the average value of burnup given by the Soviets and at the maximum value. Using Monte Carlo models, various possible axial distribution of burnup, displacer models, conditions in the control channels and positions of the control rods were considered in calculating the insertion of positive reactivity with the fall of the manual and emergency control rods; that is the positive scram. The possibility of positive reactivity insertion due to the creation of a mixture of fuel, water and cladding in a number of central fuel channels has been examined. This situation corresponds to the explosion of these channels, and is considered in the present work as the cause of the second reactivity peak. At the level of the data presented in this study, vaporization of cooling water in the fuel channels can be considered as the cause of the Chernobyl accident. The accident began in the region of the channels close to the axis of the reactor and spread to its periphery. The positive reactivity due to insertion of the manual and emergency control rods - positive scram -played a marginal role in the development of the accident. Fracture of the fuel followed by bursting of the channels around the axis of the reactor, due to contact between the hot UO2 particles and the cooling water at th end of the first peak, could have started a mechanism capable of producing a second peak in reactivity, in the case of fuel damage extended to a sufficiently large portion of the core

  9. An analysis of the Three Mile Island accident

    Starting with a systematic analysis of the chain of events that took place during the Three Mile Island accident, the authors assess the significance of the four distinct phases of the accident. Inferences that can be drawn with respect to the safety of CANDU reactors are discussed. A rational reaction to the accident is suggested, and several factors are shown not to have played an important part, contrary to public impressions. The authors point out that over-reaction to the accident could detract from public safety. The Canadian response to the accident is discussed. (auth)

  10. Analysis of Aircraft Crash Accident for WETF

    This report applies the methodology of DOE-STD-3014-96, ''Accident Analysis for Aircraft Crash into Hazardous Facilities'', to the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) at LANL. Straightforward application of that methodology shows that including local helicopter flights with those of all other aircraft with potential to impact the facility poses a facility impact risk slightly in excess of the DOE standard's threshold--10-6 impacts per year. It is also shown that helicopters can penetrate the facility if their engines impact that facility's roof. However, a refinement of the helicopter impact analysis shows that penetration risk of the facility for all aircraft lies below the DOE standard's threshold. By that standard, therefore, the potential for release of hazardous material from the facility as a result of an aircraft crashing into the facility is negligible and need not be analyzed further

  11. Preliminary safety analysis of the PWR with accident-tolerant fuels during severe accident conditions

    Highlights: • Analysis of severe accident scenarios for a PWR fueled with ATF system is performed. • A large-break LOCA without ECCS is analyzed for the PWR fueled with ATF system. • Extended SBO cases are discussed for the PWR fueled with ATF system. • The accident-tolerance of ATF system for application in PWR is illustrated. - Abstract: Experience gained in decades of nuclear safety research and previous nuclear accidents direct to the investigation of passive safety system design and accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) system which is now becoming a hot research point in the nuclear energy field. The ATF system is aimed at upgrading safety characteristics of the nuclear fuel and cladding in a reactor core where active cooling has been lost, and is preferable or comparable to the current UO2–Zr system when the reactor is in normal operation. By virtue of advanced materials with improved properties, the ATF system will obviously slow down the progression of accidents, allowing wider margin of time for the mitigation measures to work. Specifically, the simulation and analysis of a large break loss of coolant accident (LBLOCA) without ECCS and extended station blackout (SBO) severe accident are performed for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) loaded with ATF candidates, to reflect the accident-tolerance of ATF

  12. Analysis of severe accidents in pressurized heavy water reactors

    Certain very low probability plant states that are beyond design basis accident conditions and which may arise owing to multiple failures of safety systems leading to significant core degradation may jeopardize the integrity of many or all the barriers to the release of radioactive material. Such event sequences are called severe accidents. It is required in the IAEA Safety Requirements publication on Safety of the Nuclear Power Plants: Design, that consideration be given to severe accident sequences, using a combination of engineering judgement and probabilistic methods, to determine those sequences for which reasonably practicable preventive or mitigatory measures can be identified. Acceptable measures need not involve the application of conservative engineering practices used in setting and evaluating design basis accidents, but rather should be based on realistic or best estimate assumptions, methods and analytical criteria. Recently, the IAEA developed a Safety Report on Approaches and Tools for Severe Accident Analysis. This publication provides a description of factors important to severe accident analysis, an overview of severe accident phenomena and the current status in their modelling, categorization of available computer codes, and differences in approaches for various applications of severe accident analysis. The report covers both the in- and ex-vessel phases of severe accidents. The publication is consistent with the IAEA Safety Report on Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants and can be considered as a complementary report specifically devoted to the analysis of severe accidents. Although the report does not explicitly differentiate among various reactor types, it has been written essentially on the basis of available knowledge and databases developed for light water reactors. Therefore its application is mostly oriented towards PWRs and BWRs and, to a more limited extent, they can be only used as preliminary guidance for other types of reactors

  13. Reactor Safety Gap Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Components and Severe Accident Analysis

    Farmer, Mitchell T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bunt, R. [Southern Nuclear, Atlanta, GA (United States); Corradini, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ellison, Paul B. [GE Power and Water, Duluth, GA (United States); Francis, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gabor, John D. [Erin Engineering, Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Gauntt, R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Henry, C. [Fauske and Associates, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Linthicum, R. [Exelon Corp., Chicago, IL (United States); Luangdilok, W. [Fauske and Associates, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Lutz, R. [PWR Owners Group (PWROG); Paik, C. [Fauske and Associates, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Plys, M. [Fauske and Associates, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rempe, J. [Rempe and Associates LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Robb, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wachowiak, R. [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knovville, TN (United States)

    2015-01-31

    The overall objective of this study was to conduct a technology gap evaluation on accident tolerant components and severe accident analysis methodologies with the goal of identifying any data and/or knowledge gaps that may exist, given the current state of light water reactor (LWR) severe accident research, and additionally augmented by insights obtained from the Fukushima accident. The ultimate benefit of this activity is that the results can be used to refine the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Reactor Safety Technology (RST) research and development (R&D) program plan to address key knowledge gaps in severe accident phenomena and analyses that affect reactor safety and that are not currently being addressed by the industry or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  14. Reactor Safety Gap Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Components and Severe Accident Analysis

    The overall objective of this study was to conduct a technology gap evaluation on accident tolerant components and severe accident analysis methodologies with the goal of identifying any data and/or knowledge gaps that may exist, given the current state of light water reactor (LWR) severe accident research, and additionally augmented by insights obtained from the Fukushima accident. The ultimate benefit of this activity is that the results can be used to refine the Department of Energy's (DOE) Reactor Safety Technology (RST) research and development (R&D) program plan to address key knowledge gaps in severe accident phenomena and analyses that affect reactor safety and that are not currently being addressed by the industry or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  15. Analysis and research status of severe core damage accidents

    The Severe Core Damage Research and Analysis Task Force was established in Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, JAERI, in May, 1982 to make a quantitative analysis on the issues related with the severe core damage accident and also to survey the present status of the research and provide the required research subjects on the severe core damage accident. This report summarizes the results of the works performed by the Task Force during last one and half years. The main subjects investigated are as follows; (1) Discussion on the purposes and necessities of severe core damage accident research, (2) proposal of phenomenological research subjects required in Japan, (3) analysis of severe core damage accidents and identification of risk dominant accident sequences, (4) investigation of significant physical phenomena in severe core damage accidents, and (5) survey of the research status. (author)

  16. Accident progression event tree analysis for postulated severe accidents at N Reactor

    A Level II/III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford reservation in Washington. The accident progression analysis documented in this report determines how core damage accidents identified in the Level I PRA progress from fuel damage to confinement response and potential releases the environment. The objectives of the study are to generate accident progression data for the Level II/III PRA source term model and to identify changes that could improve plant response under accident conditions. The scope of the analysis is comprehensive, excluding only sabotage and operator errors of commission. State-of-the-art methodology is employed based largely on the methods developed by Sandia for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the NUREG-1150 study. The accident progression model allows complex interactions and dependencies between systems to be explicitly considered. Latin Hypecube sampling was used to assess the phenomenological and systemic uncertainties associated with the primary and confinement system responses to the core damage accident. The results of the analysis show that the N Reactor confinement concept provides significant radiological protection for most of the accident progression pathways studied

  17. TMI-2 accident: core heat-up analysis

    This report summarizes NSAC study of reactor core thermal conditions during the accident at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. The study focuses primarily on the time period from core uncovery (approximately 113 minutes after turbine trip) through the initiation of sustained high pressure injection (after 202 minutes). The transient analysis is based upon established sequences of events; plant data; post-accident measurements; interpretation or indirect use of instrument responses to accident conditions

  18. Analysis of local subassembly accident in KALIMER

    Kwon, Young Min; Jeong, Kwan Seong; Hahn, Do Hee

    2000-10-01

    Subassembly Accidents (S-A) in the Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) may cause extensive clad and fuel melting and are thus regarded as a potential whole core accident initiator. The possibility of S-A occurrence must be very low frequency by the design features, and reactor must have specific instrumentation to interrupt the S-A sequences by causing a reactor shutdown. The evaluation of the relevant initiators, the event sequences which follow them, and their detection are the essence of the safety issue. Particularly, the phenomena of flow blockage caused by foreign materials and/or the debris from the failed fuel pin have been researched world-widely. The foreign strategies for dealing with the S-A and the associated safety issues with experimental and theoretical R and D results are reviewed. This report aims at obtaining information to reasonably evaluate the thermal-hydraulic effect of S-A for a wire-wrapped LMR fuel pin bundle. The mechanism of blockage formation and growth within a pin bundle and at the subassembly entrance is reviewed in the phenomenological aspect. Knowledge about the recent LMR subassembly design and operation procedure to prevent flow blockage will be reflected for KALIMER design later. The blockage analysis method including computer codes and related analytical models are reviewed. Especially SABRE4 code is discussed in detail. Preliminary analyses of flow blockage within a 271-pin driver subassembly have been performed using the SABRE4 computer code. As a result no sodium boiling occurred for the central 24-subchannel blockage as well as 6-subchannel blockage.

  19. Analysis of local subassembly accident in KALIMER

    Subassembly Accidents (S-A) in the Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) may cause extensive clad and fuel melting and are thus regarded as a potential whole core accident initiator. The possibility of S-A occurrence must be very low frequency by the design features, and reactor must have specific instrumentation to interrupt the S-A sequences by causing a reactor shutdown. The evaluation of the relevant initiators, the event sequences which follow them, and their detection are the essence of the safety issue. Particularly, the phenomena of flow blockage caused by foreign materials and/or the debris from the failed fuel pin have been researched world-widely. The foreign strategies for dealing with the S-A and the associated safety issues with experimental and theoretical R and D results are reviewed. This report aims at obtaining information to reasonably evaluate the thermal-hydraulic effect of S-A for a wire-wrapped LMR fuel pin bundle. The mechanism of blockage formation and growth within a pin bundle and at the subassembly entrance is reviewed in the phenomenological aspect. Knowledge about the recent LMR subassembly design and operation procedure to prevent flow blockage will be reflected for KALIMER design later. The blockage analysis method including computer codes and related analytical models are reviewed. Especially SABRE4 code is discussed in detail. Preliminary analyses of flow blockage within a 271-pin driver subassembly have been performed using the SABRE4 computer code. As a result no sodium boiling occurred for the central 24-subchannel blockage as well as 6-subchannel blockage

  20. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    CROWE, R.D.

    1999-09-09

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support ''HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety, Analysis Report, Annex A,'' ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

  1. Incorporation of advanced accident analysis methodology into safety analysis reports

    The IAEA Safety Guide on Safety Assessment and Verification defines that the aim of the safety analysis should be by means of appropriate analytical tools to establish and confirm the design basis for the items important to safety, and to ensure that the overall plant design is capable of meeting the prescribed and acceptable limits for radiation doses and releases for each plant condition category. Practical guidance on how to perform accident analyses of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is provided by the IAEA Safety Report on Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants. The safety analyses are performed both in the form of deterministic and probabilistic analyses for NPPs. It is customary to refer to deterministic safety analyses as accident analyses. This report discusses the aspects of using the advanced accident analysis methods to carry out accident analyses in order to introduce them into the Safety Analysis Reports (SARs). In relation to the SAR, purposes of deterministic safety analysis can be further specified as (1) to demonstrate compliance with specific regulatory acceptance criteria; (2) to complement other analyses and evaluations in defining a complete set of design and operating requirements; (3) to identify and quantify limiting safety system set points and limiting conditions for operation to be used in the NPP limits and conditions; (4) to justify appropriateness of the technical solutions employed in the fulfillment of predetermined safety requirements. The essential parts of accident analyses are performed by applying sophisticated computer code packages, which have been specifically developed for this purpose. These code packages include mainly thermal-hydraulic system codes and reactor dynamics codes meant for the transient and accident analyses. There are also specific codes such as those for the containment thermal-hydraulics, for the radiological consequences and for severe accident analyses. In some cases, codes of a more general nature such

  2. Comparison of Commonly Used Accident Analysis Techniques for Manufacturing Industries

    IRAJ MOHAMMADFAM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The adverse consequences of major accident events have led to development of accident analysis techniques to investigate thoroughly the accidents. However, each technique has its own advantages and shortcomings,which make it very difficult to find a single technique being capable of analyzing all types of accidents. Therefore, the comparison of accident analysis techniques would help finding out their capabilities in different circumstances to choose the most one. In this research, the techniques CBA and AABF were compared with Tripod β in order to determine the superior technique for analysis of major accidents in manufacturing industries. At first step, the comparison criteria were developed using Delphi Method. Afterwards, the relative importance of each criterion was qualitatively determined and the qualitative values were then converted to the quantitative values  applying  Fuzzy  triangular  numbers.  Finally,  the  TOPSIS  was  used  to  prioritize  the techniques in terms of the preset criteria. The results of the study showed that Tripod β is superior to the CBA and AABF. It is highly recommended to compare all available accident analysis techniques based on proper criteria in order to select the best one whereas improper choice of accident analysis techniques may lead to misguided results.

  3. Development of Database for Accident Analysis in Indian Mines

    Tripathy, Debi Prasad; Guru Raghavendra Reddy, K.

    2015-08-01

    Mining is a hazardous industry and high accident rates associated with underground mining is a cause of deep concern. Technological developments notwithstanding, rate of fatal accidents and reportable incidents have not shown corresponding levels of decline. This paper argues that adoption of appropriate safety standards by both mine management and the government may result in appreciable reduction in accident frequency. This can be achieved by using the technology in improving the working conditions, sensitising workers and managers about causes and prevention of accidents. Inputs required for a detailed analysis of an accident include information on location, time, type, cost of accident, victim, nature of injury, personal and environmental factors etc. Such information can be generated from data available in the standard coded accident report form. This paper presents a web based application for accident analysis in Indian mines during 2001-2013. An accident database (SafeStat) prototype based on Intranet of the TCP/IP agreement, as developed by the authors, is also discussed.

  4. NASA's Accident Precursor Analysis Process and the International Space Station

    Groen, Frank; Lutomski, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the implementation of Accident Precursor Analysis (APA), as well as the evaluation of In-Flight Investigations (IFI) and Problem Reporting and Corrective Action (PRACA) data for the identification of unrecognized accident potentials on the International Space Station.

  5. Development of criticality accident analysis code AGNES

    A one-point kinetics code, AGNES2, has been developed for the evaluation of the criticality accident of nuclear solution fuel system. The code has been evaluated through the simulation of TRACY experiments and used for the study of the condition of the JCO criticality accident. A code, AGNES-P, for the criticality accident of nuclear powder system has been developed based on AGNES2. It is expected that these codes be useful for the evaluation of criticality safety for fuel reprocessing and fabrication plants. (author)

  6. Fire-accident analysis code (FIRAC) verification

    The FIRAC computer code predicts fire-induced transients in nuclear fuel cycle facility ventilation systems. FIRAC calculates simultaneously the gas-dynamic, material transport, and heat transport transients that occur in any arbitrarily connected network system subjected to a fire. The network system may include ventilation components such as filters, dampers, ducts, and blowers. These components are connected to rooms and corridors to complete the network for moving air through the facility. An experimental ventilation system has been constructed to verify FIRAC and other accident analysis codes. The design emphasizes network system characteristics and includes multiple chambers, ducts, blowers, dampers, and filters. A large industrial heater and a commercial dust feeder are used to inject thermal energy and aerosol mass. The facility is instrumented to measure volumetric flow rate, temperature, pressure, and aerosol concentration throughout the system. Aerosol release rates and mass accumulation on filters also are measured. This paper compares and discusses the gas-dynamic and heat transport data obtained from the ventilation system experiments with those predicted by the FIRAC code. The numerically predicted data generally are within 10% of the experimental data

  7. Fire-accident analysis code (FIRAC) verification

    The FIRAC computer code predicts fire-induced transients in nuclear fuel cycle facility ventilation systems. FIRAC calculates simultaneously the gas-dynamic, material transport, and heat transport transients that occur in any arbitrarily connected network system subjected to a fire. The network system may include ventilation components such as filters, dampers, ducts, and blowers. These components are connected to rooms and corridors to complete the network for moving air through the facility. An experimental ventilation system has been constructed to verify FIRAC and other accident analysis codes. The design emphasizes network system characteristics and includes multiple chambers, ducts, blowers, dampers, and filters. A larger industrial heater and a commercial dust feeder are used to inject thermal energy and aerosol mass. The facility is instrumented to measure volumetric flow rate, temperature, pressure, and aerosol concentration throughout the system. Aerosol release rates and mass accumulation on filters also are measured. We have performed a series of experiments in which a known rate of thermal energy is injected into the system. We then simulated this experiment with the FIRAC code. This paper compares and discusses the gas-dynamic and heat transport data obtained from the ventilation system experiments with those predicted by the FIRAC code. The numerically predicted data generally are within 10% of the experimental data

  8. Analysis of reactivity accidents in PWR'S

    This note describes the French strategy which has consisted, firstly, in examining all the accidents presented in the PWR unit safety reports in order to determine for each parameter the impact on accident consequences of varying the parameter considered, secondly in analyzing the provisions taken into account to restrict variation of this parameter to within an acceptable range and thirdly, in checking that the reliability of these provisions is compatible with the potential consequences of transgression of the authorized limits. Taking into consideration violations of technical operating specifications and/or non-observance of operating procedures, equipment failures, and partial or total unavailability of safety systems, these studies have shown that fuel mechanical strength limits can be reached but that the probability of occurrence of the corresponding events places them in the residual risk field and that it must, in fact, be remembered that there is a wide margin between the design basis accidents and accidents resulting in fuel destruction. However, during the coming year, we still have to analyze scenarios dealing with cumulated events or incidents leading to a reactivity accident. This program will be mainly concerned with the impact of the cases examined relating to dilution incidents under normal operating conditions or accident operating conditions

  9. Analysis of the TMI-2 accident using ATHLET-CD

    One analyzed the simulation of the TMI-2 NPP accident making use of the ATHLET-CD code. One describes the accident sequence, the code structure and performs the comparative analysis of the calculated and the measured data. Simulation of thermohydraulic characteristics was a special success. Application of the codes promotes the NPP optimization, the reactor safety improvement and the risk reduction. The ATHLET-CD system ( the thermohydraulic analysis of leaks and transient processes at the reactor core disruption) will allow to evaluate the adequacy of the models included in the available codes to calculate severe accidents

  10. Traffic Accident, System Model and Cluster Analysis in GIS

    Veronika Vlčková

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the many often frequented topics as normal journalism, so the professional public, is the problem of traffic accidents. This article illustrates the orientation of considerations to a less known context of accidents, with the help of constructive systems theory and its methods, cluster analysis and geoinformation engineering. Traffic accident is reframing the space-time, and therefore it can be to study with tools of technology of geographic information systems. The application of system approach enabling the formulation of the system model, grabbed by tools of geoinformation engineering and multicriterial and cluster analysis.

  11. Analysis of freight train accident statistics for 1972-1974

    Both train speed and dollar damage have been used in transportation studies as measures of accident severity. Analysis of freight train accident data for the three year period, 1972-74 showed that, in general, as speed increases dollar damage to railroad property also increases. A greater percentage of high speed than low speed accidents result in high dollar damage. Factors, in addition to speed, that can have an important effect on accident severity include the type of accident, the kinds of railcars and other equipment involved, and the geographical environmental of the accident. Threshold levels of accident stresses (e.g., impact and puncture forces and fire temperature and duration) are required to compromise the integrity of shipping containers used for the transport of radioactive materials. Analyses of accident severity using either speed or dollar damage as a basis can provide some insights into the possible risks involved in transport of radioactive materials. however, care must be taken in the strict use of results since there is no direct correlation between either speed or dollar damage and cask failure threshold levels

  12. Sensitivity analysis in severe accidents semi-mechanistic modeling

    A sensitivity analysis to determine the most influent phenomena in the core melt progression to be considered in a semi-mechanistic modeling have been performed in the present work. The semi-mechanistic program MARCH3 and the TMI-2 plant parameters were used in the TMI-2 severe accident. The sensitivity analysis was performed with the comparison of the results obtained by the program with the plant data recorded during the accident. The results enabled us to verify that although many phenomena are present in the accident, the modelling of the most important ones was enough to reproduce, at least in a qualitative way, the accident progression. This fact reflects the importance of the sensitivity analysis to select the most influent phenomena in a core melting process. (author). 48 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs

  13. A methodology for radiological accidents analysis in industrial gamma radiography

    A critical review of 34 published severe radiological accidents in industrial gamma radiography, that happened in 15 countries, from 1960 to 1988, was performed. The most frequent causes, consequences and dose estimation methods were analysed, aiming to stablish better procedures of radiation safety and accidents analysis. The objective of this work is to elaborate a radiological accidents analysis methodology in industrial gamma radiography. The suggested methodology will enable professionals to determine the true causes of the event and to estimate the dose with a good certainty. The technical analytical tree, recommended by International Atomic Energy Agency to perform radiation protection and nuclear safety programs, was adopted in the elaboration of the suggested methodology. The viability of the use of the Electron Gamma Shower 4 Computer Code System to calculate the absorbed dose in radiological accidents in industrial gamma radiography, mainly at sup(192)Ir radioactive source handling situations was also studied. (author)

  14. Severe accident analysis to verify the effectiveness of severe accident management guidelines for large pressurized heavy water reactor

    Gokhale, O.S., E-mail: onkarsg@barc.gov.in; Mukhopadhyay, D., E-mail: dmukho@barc.gov.in; Lele, H.G., E-mail: hglele@barc.gov.in; Singh, R.K., E-mail: rksingh@barc.gov.in

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The progression of severe accident initiated from high pressure scenario of station black out has been analyzed using RELAP5/SCDAP. • The effectiveness of SAMG actions prescribed has been established through analysis. • The time margin available to invoke the SAMG action has been specified. - Abstract: The pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) contains both inherent and engineered safety features that help the reactor become resistant to severe accident and its consequences. However in case of a low frequency severe accident, despite the safety features, procedural action should be in place to mitigate the accident progression. Severe accident analysis of such low frequency event provides insight into the accident progression and basis to develop the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG). Since the order of uncertainty in the progression path of severe accident is very high, it is necessary to study the consequences of the SAMG actions prescribed. The paper discusses severe accident analysis for large PHWRs for multiple failure transients involving a high pressure scenario (initiation event like SBO with loss of emergency core cooling system and loss of moderator cooling). SAMG actions prescribed for such a scenario include water injection into steam generator, calandria vessel or calandria vault at different stages of accident. The effectiveness of SAMG actions prescribed has been investigated. It is found that there is sufficient time margin available to the operator to execute these SAMG actions and the progression of severe accident is arrested in all the three cases.

  15. Severe accident analysis to verify the effectiveness of severe accident management guidelines for large pressurized heavy water reactor

    Highlights: • The progression of severe accident initiated from high pressure scenario of station black out has been analyzed using RELAP5/SCDAP. • The effectiveness of SAMG actions prescribed has been established through analysis. • The time margin available to invoke the SAMG action has been specified. - Abstract: The pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) contains both inherent and engineered safety features that help the reactor become resistant to severe accident and its consequences. However in case of a low frequency severe accident, despite the safety features, procedural action should be in place to mitigate the accident progression. Severe accident analysis of such low frequency event provides insight into the accident progression and basis to develop the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG). Since the order of uncertainty in the progression path of severe accident is very high, it is necessary to study the consequences of the SAMG actions prescribed. The paper discusses severe accident analysis for large PHWRs for multiple failure transients involving a high pressure scenario (initiation event like SBO with loss of emergency core cooling system and loss of moderator cooling). SAMG actions prescribed for such a scenario include water injection into steam generator, calandria vessel or calandria vault at different stages of accident. The effectiveness of SAMG actions prescribed has been investigated. It is found that there is sufficient time margin available to the operator to execute these SAMG actions and the progression of severe accident is arrested in all the three cases

  16. ANALYSIS OF ACCIDENTS RATE OF AGRICULTURAL OFF-ROAD VEHICLES

    Veronika Váliková

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, we deal with the analysis of the accident rate of agricultural off-road vehicles and fatality figure of service personnel. We analyse reasons of accidents of agricultural mechanisms, however mostly tractors,as well as their consequences. The research was oriented mainly to machine overturn (rollover). We also analyse injuries of service personnel that occurred following the vehicle rollover as well as following the disregard of occupational safety regulations. In the con...

  17. OFFSITE RADIOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS FOR THE BOUNDING FLAMMABLE GAS ACCIDENT

    This document quantifies the offsite radiological consequences of the bounding flammable gas accident for comparison with the 25 rem Evaluation Guideline established in DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A. The bounding flammable gas accident is a detonation in a SST. The calculation applies reasonably conservative input parameters in accordance with guidance in DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A. The purpose of this analysis is to calculate the offsite radiological consequence of the bounding flammable gas accident. DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', requires the formal quantification of a limited subset of accidents representing a complete set of bounding conditions. The results of these analyses are then evaluated to determine if they challenge the DOE-STD-3009-94, Appendix A, ''Evaluation Guideline,'' of 25 rem total effective dose equivalent in order to identify and evaluate safety-class structures, systems, and components. The bounding flammable gas accident is a detonation in a single-shell tank (SST). A detonation versus a deflagration was selected for analysis because the faster flame speed of a detonation can potentially result in a larger release of respirable material. A detonation in an SST versus a double-shell tank (DST) was selected as the bounding accident because the estimated respirable release masses are the same and because the doses per unit quantity of waste inhaled are greater for SSTs than for DSTs. Appendix A contains a DST analysis for comparison purposes

  18. Analysis of tritium mission FMEF/FAA fuel handling accidents

    The Fuels Material Examination Facility/Fuel Assembly Area is proposed to be used for fabrication of mixed oxide fuel to support the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) tritium/medical isotope mission. The plutonium isotope mix for the new mission is different than that analyzed in the FMEF safety analysis report. A reanalysis was performed of three representative accidents for the revised plutonium mix to determine the impact on the safety analysis. Current versions computer codes and meterology data files were used for the analysis. The revised accidents were a criticality, an explosion in a glovebox, and a tornado. The analysis concluded that risk guidelines were met with the revised plutonium mix

  19. MAAP4.0.7 severe accident source term analysis

    The Severe Accident Source Term Analysis performed in support of U.S. EPR design certification was conducted using MAAP4.07. The analysis had three distinct goals: to determine the most limiting scenario from a severe accident stand point and incorporate the annulus, fuel and safeguards buildings into the MAAP4.0.7 base model; to develop and document the Level 2 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Source Term Analysis; and to develop the input from the PRA Level 2 output to PRA Level 3. The methods of this analysis will be presented in this paper. (authors)

  20. Analysis of tritium mission FMEF/FAA fuel handling accidents

    Van Keuren, J.C.

    1997-11-18

    The Fuels Material Examination Facility/Fuel Assembly Area is proposed to be used for fabrication of mixed oxide fuel to support the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) tritium/medical isotope mission. The plutonium isotope mix for the new mission is different than that analyzed in the FMEF safety analysis report. A reanalysis was performed of three representative accidents for the revised plutonium mix to determine the impact on the safety analysis. Current versions computer codes and meterology data files were used for the analysis. The revised accidents were a criticality, an explosion in a glovebox, and a tornado. The analysis concluded that risk guidelines were met with the revised plutonium mix.

  1. Loss of Coolant Accident Analysis for Israel Research Reactor

    One of the main objectives of reactor safety systems is to keep the reactor core in condition that does not permit any release of radioactivity into the environment. In order to ensure this, the reactor must have sufficient safety margins during all possible operational and accident conditions. This paper focuses on the analysis of loss of coolant accident (LOCA), which is one of the most severe scenarios among other hypothetical events such as reactivity induced accidents, loss of flow accident, etc. The analysis was carried out for the Israel Research Reactor 1 (IRR-1), which is a 5MW swimming pool type research reactor. The IRR-1 core consists of MTR highlyenriched uranium (HEU) fuel type, and is reflected by Graphite elements. During normal operation, the reactor core is cooled by downward forced flow of light water circulated by a primary cooling circuit pump. But during shutdown stage, the reactor core is cooled by upward natural convection flow through a safety flapper valve. There could be several primary causes to initiate a LOCA in research reactors, such as breaks in the piping system, ruptures of the beam tubes, and concrete wall failures of the reactor pool. Although probability of large break accident in research reactors is very low, once the accident occurs, it may cause major core damages, so it must be considered

  2. Overview of SAMPSON code development for LWR severe accident analysis

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has developed a severe accident analysis code 'SAMPSON'. SAMPSON's distinguishing features include inter-connected hierarchical modules and mechanistic models covering a wide spectrum of scenarios ranging from normal operation to hypothetical severe accident events. Each module included in the SAMPSON also runs independently for analysis of specific phenomena assigned. The OECD International Standard Problems (ISP-45 and 46) were solved by the SAMPSON for code verifications. The analysis results showed fairly good agreement with the test results. Then, severe accident phenomena in typical PWR and BWR plants were analyzed. The PWR analysis result showed 56 hours as the containment vessel failure timing, which was 9 hours later than one calculated by MELCOR code. The BWR analysis result showed no containment vessel failure during whole accident events, whereas the MELCOR result showed 10.8 hours. These differences were mainly due to consideration of heat release from the containment vessel wall to atmosphere in the SAMPSON code. Another PWR analysis with water injection as an accident management was performed. The analysis result showed that earlier water injection before the time when the fuel surface temperature reached 1,750 K was effective to prevent further core melt. Since fuel surface and fluid temperatures had spatial distribution, a careful consideration shall be required to determine the suitable location for temperature measurement as an index for the pump restart for water injection. The SAMPSON code was applied to the accident analysis of the Hamaoka-1 BWR plant, where the pipe ruptured due to hydrogen detonation. The SAMPSON had initially been developed to run on a parallel computer. Considering remarkable progress of computer hardware performance, as another version of the SAMPSON code, it has recently been modified so as to run on a single processor. The improvements of physical models, numerical

  3. Role of accident analysis in development of severe accident management guidance for multi-unit CANDU nuclear power plants

    This paper discusses the role of accident analysis in support of the development of Severe Accident Management Guidance for domestic CANDU reactors. In general, analysis can identify what types of challenges can be expected during accident progression but it cannot specify when and to what degree accident phenomena will occur. SAMG overcomes these limitations by monitoring the actual values of key plant indicators that can be used directly or indirectly to infer the condition of the plant and by establishing setpoints beyond which corrective action is required. Analysis can provide a means to correlate observed post-accident plant behavior against predicted behaviour to improve the confidence in and quality of accident mitigation decisions. (author)

  4. Chemistry of fission products for accident analysis

    Current knowledge concerning the chemical state of the fission product elements during the development of accidents in water reactor systems is reviewed in this paper. The fission product elements which have been considered are Cs, I, Te, Sr and Ba but aspects of the behavior of Mo, Ru and the lanthanides are also discussed. Some features of the reactions of the various species of these elements with other components of the reactor systems are described. The importance of having an adequate knowledge of thermodynamic data and phase equilibria of relatively simple systems in order to interpret experimental observations on complex multi-component systems is stressed

  5. Risk analysis considering accident in nuclear reactors and oil refineries

    Risk analysis is an important tool to help decision-making, especially related to energy choices and their environmental consequences. This paper sets out to analyze the risk associated with deploying and operating a nuclear installation for later comparison with the risk of other energy sources such as oil. We have conducted a risk analysis based on the number of reactors-year and the number of worldwide accidents that have occurred in nuclear power plants. The same was done based on the number of refineries-year and the number of accidents that have occurred worldwide in oil refineries. Our results showed that the risk of accidents in nuclear power plants is smaller than the risk in oil production. We believe the proposed analysis might affect the decision-making process in the environmental area and contribute to a more sustainable energy future. (author)

  6. The RA reactor loss-of-flow accident analysis

    This paper is dealing with the Vinca RA research reactor thermo hydraulics safety analysis of the hypothetic loss-of-flow accident, caused by the reactor pumps loss of power. The methodology review is exposed. The results of the analysis indicate the primary reactor system high level accuracy. (author)

  7. Hanford Waste Tank Bump Accident and Consequence Analysis

    BRATZEL, D.R.

    2000-06-20

    This report provides a new evaluation of the Hanford tank bump accident analysis and consequences for incorporation into the Authorization Basis. The analysis scope is for the safe storage of waste in its current configuration in single-shell and double-shell tanks.

  8. Hanford Waste Tank Bump Accident and Consequence Analysis

    This report provides a new evaluation of the Hanford tank bump accident analysis and consequences for incorporation into the Authorization Basis. The analysis scope is for the safe storage of waste in its current configuration in single-shell and double-shell tanks

  9. Accident Sequence Evaluation Program: Human reliability analysis procedure

    This document presents a shortened version of the procedure, models, and data for human reliability analysis (HRA) which are presented in the Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis With emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications (NUREG/CR-1278, August 1983). This shortened version was prepared and tried out as part of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and managed by Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this new HRA procedure, called the ''ASEP HRA Procedure,'' is to enable systems analysts, with minimal support from experts in human reliability analysis, to make estimates of human error probabilities and other human performance characteristics which are sufficiently accurate for many probabilistic risk assessments. The ASEP HRA Procedure consists of a Pre-Accident Screening HRA, a Pre-Accident Nominal HRA, a Post-Accident Screening HRA, and a Post-Accident Nominal HRA. The procedure in this document includes changes made after tryout and evaluation of the procedure in four nuclear power plants by four different systems analysts and related personnel, including human reliability specialists. The changes consist of some additional explanatory material (including examples), and more detailed definitions of some of the terms. 42 refs

  10. Accident Sequence Evaluation Program: Human reliability analysis procedure

    Swain, A.D.

    1987-02-01

    This document presents a shortened version of the procedure, models, and data for human reliability analysis (HRA) which are presented in the Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis With emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications (NUREG/CR-1278, August 1983). This shortened version was prepared and tried out as part of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and managed by Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this new HRA procedure, called the ''ASEP HRA Procedure,'' is to enable systems analysts, with minimal support from experts in human reliability analysis, to make estimates of human error probabilities and other human performance characteristics which are sufficiently accurate for many probabilistic risk assessments. The ASEP HRA Procedure consists of a Pre-Accident Screening HRA, a Pre-Accident Nominal HRA, a Post-Accident Screening HRA, and a Post-Accident Nominal HRA. The procedure in this document includes changes made after tryout and evaluation of the procedure in four nuclear power plants by four different systems analysts and related personnel, including human reliability specialists. The changes consist of some additional explanatory material (including examples), and more detailed definitions of some of the terms. 42 refs.

  11. Waste form characterization and its relationship to transportation accident analysis

    The response of potential waste forms should be determined for extreme transportation environments that must be postulated for environmental impact analysis and also for hypothetical accident conditions to which packagings and contents must be subjected for licensing purposes. The best approach may be to test materials up to and beyond their failure point; such an approach would establish failure thresholds. Specification of what denotes failure would be defined by existing or proposed regulations or dictated by requirements developed from accident analysis. Responses to physical and thermal insults are the most important for licensing or analysis and need to be thoroughly characterized. Others in need of characterization might be responses to extreme chemical environments and to intense and prolonged radiation exposure. A complete characterization of waste-form responses would be desirable for environments that are considered extreme for transportation accidents but which may be typical for processing or disposal environments. In addition, the characterizations that are performed must be completed in laboratory environments which can be readily correlated to accident environments and must be meaningfully conveyed to a transportation impact analyst. As an example, leaching data as commonly presented are not usable to the analyst and are obtained under conditions that are not directly applicable to conditions of most transportation accidents. Transportation analysts are in need of data useful for calculating environmental impacts and for licensing of packagings. Future waste form development programs and associated decisions should consider the needs of transportation analysts

  12. Severe accident analysis code Sampson for impact project

    Hiroshi, Ujita; Takashi, Ikeda; Masanori, Naitoh [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation, Advanced Simulation Systems Dept., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Four years of the IMPACT project Phase 1 (1994-1997) had been completed with financial sponsorship from the Japanese government's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. At the end of the phase, demonstration simulations by combinations of up to 11 analysis modules developed for severe accident analysis in the SAMPSON Code were performed and physical models in the code were verified. The SAMPSON prototype was validated by TMI-2 and Phebus-FP test analyses. Many of empirical correlation and conventional models have been replaced by mechanistic models during Phase 2 (1998-2000). New models for Accident Management evaluation have been also developed. (author)

  13. Severe accident analysis code Sampson for impact project

    Four years of the IMPACT project Phase 1 (1994-1997) had been completed with financial sponsorship from the Japanese government's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. At the end of the phase, demonstration simulations by combinations of up to 11 analysis modules developed for severe accident analysis in the SAMPSON Code were performed and physical models in the code were verified. The SAMPSON prototype was validated by TMI-2 and Phebus-FP test analyses. Many of empirical correlation and conventional models have been replaced by mechanistic models during Phase 2 (1998-2000). New models for Accident Management evaluation have been also developed. (author)

  14. Nuclear ship accidents, description and analysis

    In this report available information on 44 reported nuclear ship events is considered. Of these 6 deals with U.S. ships and 38 with USSR ships. The ships are in almost all cases nuclear submarines. Only events that involve the sinking of vessels, the nuclear propulsion plants, radiation exposures, fires/ explosions, sea-water leaks into the submarines and sinking of vessels are considered. Comments are made on each of the events, and at the end of the report an attempt is made to point out the weaknesses of the submarine designs which have resulted in the accidents. It is emphasized that some of the information of which this report is based, may be of dubious nature. Consequently some of the results of the assessments made may not be correct. (au)

  15. Human factors review for Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA)

    The paper will discuss work being conducted during this human factors review including: (1) support of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program based on an assessment of operator actions, and (2) development of a descriptive model of operator severe accident management. Research by SASA analysts on the Browns Ferry Unit One (BF1) anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) was supported through a concurrent assessment of operator performance to demonstrate contributions to SASA analyses from human factors data and methods. A descriptive model was developed called the Function Oriented Accident Management (FOAM) model, which serves as a structure for bridging human factors, operations, and engineering expertise and which is useful for identifying needs/deficiencies in the area of accident management. The assessment of human factors issues related to ATWS required extensive coordination with SASA analysts. The analysis was consolidated primarily to six operator actions identified in the Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs) as being the most critical to the accident sequence. These actions were assessed through simulator exercises, qualitative reviews, and quantitative human reliability analyses. The FOAM descriptive model assumes as a starting point that multiple operator/system failures exceed the scope of procedures and necessitates a knowledge-based emergency response by the operators. The FOAM model provides a functionally-oriented structure for assembling human factors, operations, and engineering data and expertise into operator guidance for unconventional emergency responses to mitigate severe accident progression and avoid/minimize core degradation. Operators must also respond to potential radiological release beyond plant protective barriers. Research needs in accident management and potential uses of the FOAM model are described. 11 references, 1 figure

  16. Cognitive systems engineering analysis of the JCO criticality accident

    The JCO Criticality Accident is analyzed with a framework based on cognitive systems engineering. With the framework, analysis is conducted integrally both from the system viewpoint and actors viewpoint. The occupational chemical risk was important as safety constraint for the actors as well as the nuclear risk, which is due to criticality accident, to the public and to actors. The inappropriate actor's mental model of the work system played a critical role and several factors (e.g. poor training and education, lack of information on criticality safety control in the procedures and instructions, and lack of warning signs at workplace) contributed to form and shape the mental model. Based on the analysis, several countermeasures, such as warning signs, information system for supporting actors and improved training and education, are derived to prevent such an accident. (author)

  17. Detection and analysis of accident black spots with even small accident figures.

    Oppe, S.

    1982-01-01

    Accident black spots are usually defined as road locations with high accident potentials. In order to detect such hazardous locations we have to know the probability of an accident for a traffic situation of some kind, or the mean number of accidents for some unit of time. In almost all procedures

  18. Accident consequence calculations for project W-058 safety analysis

    This document describes the calculations performed to determine the accident consequences for the W-058 safety analysis. Project W-058 is the replacement cross site transfer system (RCSTS), which is designed to transort liquid waste between the 200 W and 200 E areas. Calculations for RCSTS safety analyses used the same methods as the calculations for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) and its supporting calculation notes. Revised analyses were performed for the spray and pool leak accidents since the RCSTS flows and pressures differ from those assumed in the TWRS BIO. Revision 1 of the document incorporates review comments

  19. ANALYSIS OF ACCIDENTS RATE OF AGRICULTURAL OFF-ROAD VEHICLES

    Veronika Váliková

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we deal with the analysis of the accident rate of agricultural off-road vehicles and fatality figure of service personnel. We analyse reasons of accidents of agricultural mechanisms, however mostly tractors,as well as their consequences. The research was oriented mainly to machine overturn (rollover. We also analyse injuries of service personnel that occurred following the vehicle rollover as well as following the disregard of occupational safety regulations. In the contribution, we present results of the research in Slovakia, which were registered by National Labour Inspectorate in years 2000 – 2012 as well as the unregistered one.

  20. PWR auxiliary systems, safety and emergency systems, accident analysis, operation

    The author presents a description of PWR auxiliary systems like volume control, boric acid control, coolant purification, -degassing, -storage and -treatment system and waste processing systems. Residual heat removal systems, emergency systems and containment designs are discussed. As an accident analysis the author gives a survey over malfunctions and disturbances in the field of reactor operations. (TK)

  1. The development of a severe accident analysis code

    For prevention and mitigation of the containment failure during severe accident, the study is focused on the severe accident phenomena, especially, the ones occurring inside the cavity in an effect to improve existing models and develop analytical tools for the assessment of severe accidents. For hydrogen control, the analysis of hydrogen concentration in the containment and visualization for the concentration in the cell were performed. The computer code to predict combustion flame characteristic was also developed. the analytical model for the expansion phase of vapor explosion was developed and verified with the experimental results. The corium release fraction model from the cavity with the capture volume was developed and applied to the power plants. Pre-test calculation was performed for molten corium concrete interaction study and the crust formation process, heat transfer characteristics of the crust, and the sensitivity study using MELCOR code was carried out. A stress analysis code using finite element method for the reactor vessel lower head failure analysis was developed and the effect by gap formation between molten corium and vessel was analyzed. Through the international program of PHEBUS-FP and participation in the software development, the study on fission products release and transportation in the software development, the study on fission products release and transportation and aerosol deposition were performed. The system for severe accident analysis codes, CONTAIN and MELCOR codes etc., under the cooperation with USNRC were also established by installing in workstation and applying to experimental results and real plants. (author). 116 refs., 31 tabs., 59 figs

  2. Analysis of Hydrogen Control Strategy Using Igniter during Severe Accident

    The Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs) for the operating pressurized water reactor (PWR) have been completed within 2006. Among the SAMG strategies, mitigation-07 is the most important strategy for managing a severe accident of a PWR in order to reduce containment hydrogen. The fastest way to reduce the containment hydrogen concentration is to intentionally ignite the hydrogen. For this strategy, igniters exist in Optimized Power Reactor 1000 (OPR 1000) to burn hydrogen for a severe accident. For using the igniters during a severe accident, the adverse effects such as the explosion of the hydrogen mixture should be considered for containment integrity. However, an applicable discrimination method to activate the igniters does not exist, so that the hydrogen control strategy using the igniters cannot be chosen during a severe accident. Thus, this study focused on suggesting an applicable discrimination method to carry out the strategy of using the igniters. In this study, the specific plant used for this analysis is Ulchin Unit 5 and 6, OPR 1000 plant, in Korea

  3. Analysis on the severe accidents in KSTAR tokamak

    Lee, Myoung Jae; Cheong, Y. H.; Choi, Y. S.; Cheon, E. J. [PlaGen, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-11-15

    The establishment of regulatory and approval systems for KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) has been demanded as the facility is targeted to be completed in the year of 2005. Such establishment can be achieved by performing adequate and in-depth analyses on safety issues covering radiological and chemical hazard materials, radiation protection, high vacuum, very low temperature, etc. The loss of coolant accidents and the loss of vacuum accident in fusion facilities have been introduced with summary of simulation results that were previously reported for ITER and JET. Computer codes that are actively used for accident simulation research are examined and their main features are briefly described. It can be stated that the safety analysis is indispensable to secure the safety of workers and individual members of the public as well as to establish the regulatory and approval systems for KSTAR tokamak.

  4. Long term cooling analysis after Fukushima Daiichi accident

    The objective of this study is to analyze of the long term cooling after Fukushima Daiichi accident by RELAP5mode3.3 code and to check the validity of the cooling method. In order to simulate the cooling conditions in Fukushima plants after accident, the model is nodalized on the assumption of the existence of steam/liquid leak position from RPV/PCV and the variety of debris distribution in RPV/PCV. As a result, we estimated the debris distribution in RPV by referring plant parameter such as reactor pressure and temperature. In addition, we performed the analysis of the loss of injection water accident for the current cooling system installed in Fukushima Daiichi cite after the earthquake. In this case, we develop simplified nodalization of RPV to analyze temperature behavior of reactor structural materials by using the radiation heat transfer model. (author)

  5. Fault Tree Analysis of an Accident Probability for Pyroprocessing Facility

    The pyroprocessing technology is one of the spent fuel recycling technologies. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI) started the R and D about the pyroprocessing technology in 1997. The physical protection system requirements based on the VAI should be prepared for applying the pyroprocessing facility in Korea. In this study, we have arranged the accidents which can be happened in pyroprocessing facility. Then, we have obtained the accident path according to the hazards. We can expect that this study will be taken to the VAI as a basic data. The fault tree is not complete yet. The fault tree for an accident probability of pyroprocessing facility is being made according to the hot cell area and each process. Conclusions will be handled after finishing the fault tree analysis

  6. Detection and analysis of accident black spots with even small accident figures.

    Oppe, S.

    1982-01-01

    Accident black spots are usually defined as road locations with high accident potentials. In order to detect such hazardous locations we have to know the probability of an accident for a traffic situation of some kind, or the mean number of accidents for some unit of time. In almost all procedures known to us, the various road locations are treated as isolated spots. With small accident figures it is difficult to detect such places in the known procedures. An alternative procedure starts from...

  7. Severe accident analysis code SAMPSON improvement for IMPACT project

    SAMPSON is the integral code for severe accident analysis in detail with modular structure, developed in the IMPACT project. Each module can run independently and communications with multiple analysis modules supervised by the analysis control module makes an integral analysis possible. At the end of Phase 1 (1994-1997), demonstration simulation by combinations of up to 11 analysis modules had been performed and physical models in the code had been verified by separate-effect tests and validated by integral tests. Multi-dimensional mechanistic models and theoretical-based conservation equations have been applied, during Phase 2 (1998 - 2000). New models for Accident Management evaluation have been also developed. Verification and validation have been performed by analysing separate-effect tests and integral tests, while actual plant analyses are also being in progress. (author)

  8. INDUSTRIAL/MILITARY ACTIVITY-INITIATED ACCIDENT SCREENING ANALYSIS

    D.A. Kalinich

    1999-09-27

    Impacts due to nearby installations and operations were determined in the Preliminary MGDS Hazards Analysis (CRWMS M&O 1996) to be potentially applicable to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. This determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of the potential activities ongoing on or off the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is intended that the Industrial/Military Activity-Initiated Accident Screening Analysis provided herein will meet the requirements of the ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987) in establishing whether this external event can be screened from further consideration or must be included as a design basis event (DBE) in the development of accident scenarios for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). This analysis only considers issues related to preclosure radiological safety. Issues important to waste isolation as related to impact from nearby installations will be covered in the MGR performance assessment.

  9. Human reliability analysis for accident sequences in NPP

    The purpose of this paper is to perform a human performance analysis in accident conditions for the operating NPP. This analysis is realized using Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) methods. HRA methods have necessary tools to analyze the human actions, to estimate the human error probabilities and to identify the major factors which could have a negative influence on the mitigating of the consequences of the abnormal events in NPP. The analyzed events are from CANDU 600 NPP. In order to achieve the analysis of these events the THEP and SPAR-H methods were used. After analyzing the results the actuated equipment, the negative influence factors on the human performance and the dependence levels between the human actions and between the human actions and diagnosis were established. In addition, some recommendations were formulated which could influence positive the human performance on the mitigating of the consequences of the accident sequences in NPP. (authors)

  10. Cold Vacuum Drying facility design basis accident analysis documentation

    CROWE, R.D.

    2000-08-08

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Annex B, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the FSAR. The calculations in this document address the design basis accidents (DBAs) selected for analysis in HNF-3553, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report'', Annex B, ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report.'' The objective is to determine the quantity of radioactive particulate available for release at any point during processing at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and to use that quantity to determine the amount of radioactive material released during the DBAs. The radioactive material released is used to determine dose consequences to receptors at four locations, and the dose consequences are compared with the appropriate evaluation guidelines and release limits to ascertain the need for preventive and mitigative controls.

  11. Cold Vacuum Drying facility design basis accident analysis documentation

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Annex B, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the FSAR. The calculations in this document address the design basis accidents (DBAs) selected for analysis in HNF-3553, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report'', Annex B, ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report.'' The objective is to determine the quantity of radioactive particulate available for release at any point during processing at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and to use that quantity to determine the amount of radioactive material released during the DBAs. The radioactive material released is used to determine dose consequences to receptors at four locations, and the dose consequences are compared with the appropriate evaluation guidelines and release limits to ascertain the need for preventive and mitigative controls

  12. Theories of radiation effects and reactor accident analysis

    Muckerheide's paper was a public breakthrough on how one might assess the public health effects of low-level radiation. By the organization of a wealth of data, including the consequences of Hiroshima and Nagasaki but not including Chernobyl, he was able to conclude that present radioactive waste disposal and cleanup efforts need to be much less arduous than forecast by the U.S. Department of Energy, which, together with regulators, uses the linear hypothesis of radiation damage to humans. While the linear hypothesis is strongly defended and even recommended for extension to noncarcinogenic pollutants, exploration of a conservative threshold for very low level exposures could save billions of dollars in disposing of radioactive waste, enhance the understanding of reactor accident consequences, and assist in the development of design and operating criteria pertaining to severe accidents. In this context, the authors discuss the major differences between design-basis and severe accidents. The authors propose that what should ultimately be done is to develop a regulatory formula for severe-accident analysis that relates the public health effects to the amount and type of radionuclides released and distributed by the Chernobyl accident. Answers to the following important questions should provide the basis of this study: (1) What should be the criteria for distinguishing between design-basis and severe accidents, and what should be the basis for these criteria? (2) How do, and should, these criteria differ for older plants, newer operating plants, type of plant (i.e., gas cooled, water cooled, and liquid metal), advanced designs, and plants of the former Soviet Union? (3) How safe is safe enough?

  13. An analysis of station blackout sequences for the severe accident analysis database (II)

    Park, Soo Yong; Kim, Dong Ha

    2006-08-15

    This report contains analysis methodologies and calculation results of station blackout sequences for the severe accident analysis database system. The Korean standard nuclear power plant has been selected as a reference plant. Based on the probabilistic safety analysis of the corresponding plant. Eight accident scenarios, which was predicted to have more than 10{sup -10}/ry occurrence frequency have been analyzed as base cases for the station blackout sequence database. Furthermore, the sensitivity studies for operational plant systems and for phenomenological models of the analysis computer code have been performed. The functions of the severe accident analysis database system will be to make a diagnosis of the accident by some input information from the plant symptoms, to search a corresponding scenario, and finally to provide the user phenomenological information based on the pre-analyzed results. The MAAP 4.06 calculation results of station blackout sequence in this report will be utilized as input data of the severe accident analysis database system.

  14. An analysis of station blackout sequences for the severe accident analysis database (II)

    This report contains analysis methodologies and calculation results of station blackout sequences for the severe accident analysis database system. The Korean standard nuclear power plant has been selected as a reference plant. Based on the probabilistic safety analysis of the corresponding plant. Eight accident scenarios, which was predicted to have more than 10-10/ry occurrence frequency have been analyzed as base cases for the station blackout sequence database. Furthermore, the sensitivity studies for operational plant systems and for phenomenological models of the analysis computer code have been performed. The functions of the severe accident analysis database system will be to make a diagnosis of the accident by some input information from the plant symptoms, to search a corresponding scenario, and finally to provide the user phenomenological information based on the pre-analyzed results. The MAAP 4.06 calculation results of station blackout sequence in this report will be utilized as input data of the severe accident analysis database system

  15. Accident analysis in the nuclear licensing procedure

    Taking a fracture in a reactor coolant pipe of a containment as an example, those problems are dealt with which in the course of the safety analysis present themselves in particular on account of the term 'realistic, but sufficiently assured assumption' (under point 2.3.2. of the RSK guidelines for PWRs). (HP/LN)

  16. Analysis of reactivity induced accidents at Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    Analysis of reactivity induced accidents in Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) utilizing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, has been carried out using standard computer code PARET. The present core comprises of 29 standard and five control fuel elements. Various modes of reactivity insertions have been considered. The events studied include: start-up accident; accidental drop of a fuel element on the core; flooding of a beam tube with water; removal of an in-pile experiment during reactor operation etc. For each of these transients, time histories of reactor power, energy released and clad surface temperature etc. were calculated. The results reveal that the peak clad temperatures remain well below the clad melting temperature during these accidents. It is concluded that the reactor, which is operated safely at a steady-state power level of 10 MW, with coolant flow rate of 950 m3/h, will also be safe against any possible reactivity induced accident and will not result in a fuel failure

  17. Analysis of reactivity induced accidents at Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    Bokhari, I.H. E-mail: ishtiaq@pinstech.org.pk; Israr, M.; Pervez, S

    2002-12-01

    Analysis of reactivity induced accidents in Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) utilizing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, has been carried out using standard computer code PARET. The present core comprises of 29 standard and five control fuel elements. Various modes of reactivity insertions have been considered. The events studied include: start-up accident; accidental drop of a fuel element on the core; flooding of a beam tube with water; removal of an in-pile experiment during reactor operation etc. For each of these transients, time histories of reactor power, energy released and clad surface temperature etc. were calculated. The results reveal that the peak clad temperatures remain well below the clad melting temperature during these accidents. It is concluded that the reactor, which is operated safely at a steady-state power level of 10 MW, with coolant flow rate of 950 m{sup 3}/h, will also be safe against any possible reactivity induced accident and will not result in a fuel failure.

  18. Gas-cooled reactor safety and accident analysis

    The Specialists' Meeting on Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety and Accident Analysis was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Oak Ridge on the invitation of the Department of Energy in Washington, USA. The meeting was hosted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an opportunity to compare and discuss results of safety and accident analysis of gas-cooled reactors under development, construction or in operation, to review their lay-out, design, and their operational performance, and to identify areas in which additional research and development are needed. The meeting emphasized the high safety margins of gas-cooled reactors and gave particular attention to the inherent safety features of small reactor units. The meeting was subdivided into four technical sessions: Safety and Related Experience with Operating Gas-Cooled Reactors (4 papers); Risk and Safety Analysis (11 papers); Accident Analysis (9 papers); Miscellaneous Related Topics (5 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  19. Improvement of Severe Accident Analysis Computer Code and Development of Accident Management Guidance for Heavy Water Reactor

    Park, Soo Yong; Kim, Ko Ryu; Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, See Darl; Song, Yong Mann; Choi, Young; Jin, Young Ho

    2005-03-15

    The objective of the project is to develop a generic severe accident management guidance(SAMG) applicable to Korean PHWR and the objective of this 3 year continued phase is to construct a base of the generic SAMG. Another objective is to improve a domestic computer code, ISAAC (Integrated Severe Accident Analysis code for CANDU), which still has many deficiencies to be improved in order to apply for the SAMG development. The scope and contents performed in this Phase-2 are as follows: The characteristics of major design and operation for the domestic Wolsong NPP are analyzed from the severe accident aspects. On the basis, preliminary strategies for SAM of PHWR are selected. The information needed for SAM and the methods to get that information are analyzed. Both the individual strategies applicable for accident mitigation under PHWR severe accident conditions and the technical background for those strategies are developed. A new version of ISAAC 2.0 has been developed after analyzing and modifying the existing models of ISAAC 1.0. The general SAMG applicable for PHWRs confirms severe accident management techniques for emergencies, provides the base technique to develop the plant specific SAMG by utility company and finally contributes to the public safety enhancement as a NPP safety assuring step. The ISAAC code will be used inevitably for the PSA, living PSA, severe accident analysis, SAM program development and operator training in PHWR.

  20. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    Yulianti, Yanti [Department of Physics, University of Lampung Jl. Sumantri Brojonegoro No.1 Bandar Lampung, Indonesia Email: y-yanti@unila.ac.id (Indonesia); Su’ud, Zaki [Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung, Indonesia Email: szaki@fi.itb.ac.id (Indonesia); Takaki, Naoyuki [Department of Nuclear Safety Engineering Cooperative Major in Nuclear Energy (Graduate School) 1-28-1 Tamazutsumi,Setagayaku, Tokyo158-8557, Japan Email: ntakaki@tcu.ac.jp (Japan)

    2015-04-16

    power reactor has a peak value before reactor has new balance condition. The analysis showed that temperatures of fuel and claddings during accident are still below limitations which are in secure condition.

  1. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    power reactor has a peak value before reactor has new balance condition. The analysis showed that temperatures of fuel and claddings during accident are still below limitations which are in secure condition

  2. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    Yulianti, Yanti; Su'ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2015-04-01

    before reactor has new balance condition. The analysis showed that temperatures of fuel and claddings during accident are still below limitations which are in secure condition.

  3. Review of Severe Accident Phenomena in LWR and Related Severe Accident Analysis Codes

    Muhammad Hashim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Firstly, importance of severe accident provision is highlighted in view of Fukushima Daiichi accident. Then, extensive review of the past researches on severe accident phenomena in LWR is presented within this study. Various complexes, physicochemical and radiological phenomena take place during various stages of the severe accidents of Light Water Reactor (LWR plants. The review deals with progression of the severe accidents phenomena by dividing into core degradation phenomena in reactor vessel and post core melt phenomena in the containment. The development of various computer codes to analyze these severe accidents phenomena is also summarized in the review. Lastly, the need of international activity is stressed to assemble various severe accidents related knowledge systematically from research organs and compile them on the open knowledge base via the internet to be available worldwide.

  4. Analysis of progression of severe accident in Indian PHWRs

    In India a wide variety of nuclear reactors are in operation and in different stages of construction. The main stay of Indian nuclear power programme today is 'Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs)'. There are 13 operating PHWRs and several others in different stages of construction. These reactors are either of 220 MWe or 540 MWe capacity. Atomic Energy Regulatory Board for authorization needs safety analysis reports, which consists of a detailed analyses of all design basis accidents. However, there is a more to carry out severe accident analysis for accident management programme. This paper describes an analysis of a severe accident caused by Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), co-incident with loss of emergency core cooling system and loss of moderator heat sink in 220 MWe Indian PHWR. Initially in a matter of about 60 seconds most of the coolant from primary heat transport system blows out, the reactor gets tripped, but in the absence of emergency core cooling system, the heat removal from the fuel bundles is very poor. Consequently, the fuel bundle starts getting heated up. The only mode of heat transfer is radiative heat transfer from fuel bundle to pressure tube, from pressure tube to calandria tube and them convective heat transfer from calandria tube to the relatively cold moderator in which the reactor channels are immersed. In the absence of availability of moderator heat sink the moderator gets heated up and eventually boils. And slowly the moderator level in the calandria starts falling. Soon the channel gets uncovered and the temperatures of the channel components shoot up as the temperature of the pressure tube and calandria tube rise. Mechanical properties deteriorate rapidly with temperature as structural elements of reactor channel are made of zircaloy. Under the weight of the fuel, the reactor channel gives in and falls into the remaining moderator. This process continues till all the moderator is evaporated, leading to damage to the entire

  5. Offsite radiological consequence analysis for the bounding flammable gas accident

    The purpose of this analysis is to calculate the offsite radiological consequence of the bounding flammable gas accident. DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', requires the formal quantification of a limited subset of accidents representing a complete set of bounding conditions. The results of these analyses are then evaluated to determine if they challenge the DOE-STD-3009-94, Appendix A, ''Evaluation Guideline,'' of 25 rem total effective dose equivalent in order to identify and evaluate safety class structures, systems, and components. The bounding flammable gas accident is a detonation in a single-shell tank (SST). A detonation versus a deflagration was selected for analysis because the faster flame speed of a detonation can potentially result in a larger release of respirable material. As will be shown, the consequences of a detonation in either an SST or a double-shell tank (DST) are approximately equal. A detonation in an SST was selected as the bounding condition because the estimated respirable release masses are the same and because the doses per unit quantity of waste inhaled are generally greater for SSTs than for DSTs. Appendix A contains a DST analysis for comparison purposes

  6. Sizewell 'B' accident analysis. An overview

    The main topics for initial discussion are origins of the safety case, faults to be analysed defined, independent of plant design. In case of UK licensing have different requirements, so needed new safety case structure and defining the faults to be analysed dependant on plant design and mode of operation. Sizewell 'B' is investigated in main four stages. The first one is grouping the events, according to specific characteristics. Defines of the safeguard requirements in PSA analyzing is the next stage, and is carried according to covering the main safety functions and determining the requirements for each safety function and for each fault. To corresponded stage three are splitting the safety functions into fault and event tree sets, faults grouping with similar requirements, as and the defining of event and fault tree super groups with characteristic faults. And a last stage is the producing of event and fault trees for super groups. On the basis of event tree results the event cutoff is modeled and the list of design basis faults is defined. The modeling assumptions are determined take into account the initial condition, safeguards availability, operator action, single failure criteria and such elements as consequential failures and control system operation. The initiating events analysed are based on design and world operating history, and are investigated sequences for analysis identified from a full PSA assessment. The result of analyses are the complex sequences of low frequency with implementing of systematic approach to initial conditions and systematic approach to fault modelling as well as the internationally recognised acceptance criteria

  7. NASA Accident Precursor Analysis Handbook, Version 1.0

    Groen, Frank; Everett, Chris; Hall, Anthony; Insley, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Catastrophic accidents are usually preceded by precursory events that, although observable, are not recognized as harbingers of a tragedy until after the fact. In the nuclear industry, the Three Mile Island accident was preceded by at least two events portending the potential for severe consequences from an underappreciated causal mechanism. Anomalies whose failure mechanisms were integral to the losses of Space Transportation Systems (STS) Challenger and Columbia had been occurring within the STS fleet prior to those accidents. Both the Rogers Commission Report and the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report found that processes in place at the time did not respond to the prior anomalies in a way that shed light on their true risk implications. This includes the concern that, in the words of the NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP), "no process addresses the need to update a hazard analysis when anomalies occur" At a broader level, the ASAP noted in 2007 that NASA "could better gauge the likelihood of losses by developing leading indicators, rather than continue to depend on lagging indicators". These observations suggest a need to revalidate prior assumptions and conclusions of existing safety (and reliability) analyses, as well as to consider the potential for previously unrecognized accident scenarios, when unexpected or otherwise undesired behaviors of the system are observed. This need is also discussed in NASA's system safety handbook, which advocates a view of safety assurance as driving a program to take steps that are necessary to establish and maintain a valid and credible argument for the safety of its missions. It is the premise of this handbook that making cases for safety more experience-based allows NASA to be better informed about the safety performance of its systems, and will ultimately help it to manage safety in a more effective manner. The APA process described in this handbook provides a systematic means of analyzing candidate

  8. Analysis of severe accidents in the IIE - Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas

    The international trend on several accident analysis shows an overall emphasis on prevention, mitigation and management of severe accidents in nuclear power plants. Most of the developed countries have established policies and programs to deal with accidents beyond design basis. An encouraged participation in severe accidents analysis of the Latin American Countries operating commercial Nuclear Power Plants is forseen. The experience from probabilistic safety assessment, emergency operating procedures and best estimate codes for transient analysis, in order to develop analysis tools and knowledge that support the severe accident programs of the national nuclear power organizations. (author)

  9. Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRS - A Preliminary Systems Analysis

    Gilles Youinou; R. Sonat Sen

    2013-09-01

    The severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plants illustrates the need for continuous improvements through developing and implementing technologies that contribute to safe, reliable and cost-effective operation of the nuclear fleet. Development of enhanced accident tolerant fuel contributes to this effort. These fuels, in comparison with the standard zircaloy – UO2 system currently used by the LWR industry, should be designed such that they tolerate loss of active cooling in the core for a longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, and design-basis events. This report presents a preliminary systems analysis related to most of these concepts. The potential impacts of these innovative LWR fuels on the front-end of the fuel cycle, on the reactor operation and on the back-end of the fuel cycle are succinctly described without having the pretension of being exhaustive. Since the design of these various concepts is still a work in progress, this analysis can only be preliminary and could be updated as the designs converge on their respective final version.

  10. Accident Analysis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Polycube Stabilization Process

    The Polycube Stabilization Project involves low temperature oxidation, without combustion, of polystyrene cubes using the production muffle furnaces in Glovebox HC-21C located in the Remote Mechanical ''C'' (RMC) Line in Room 230A in the 234-52 Facility. Polycubes are polystyrene cubes containing various concentrations of plutonium and uranium oxides. Hundreds of these cubes were manufactured for criticality experiments, and currently exist as unstabilized storage forms at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). This project is designed to stabilize and prepare the polycube material for stable storage using a process very similar to the earlier processing of sludges in these furnaces. The significant difference is the quantity of hydrogenous material present, and the need to place additional controls on the heating rate of the material. This calculation note documents the analyses of the Representative Accidents identified in Section 2.4.4 of Hazards Analysis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Polycube Stabilization Process, HNF-7278 (HNF 2000). These two accidents, ''Deflagration in Glovebox HC-21C due to Loss of Power'' and ''Seismic Failure of Glovebox HC-21C'', will be further assessed in this accident analysis

  11. Power Excursion Accident Analysis of Research Water Reactor

    A three-dimensional neutronic code POWEX-K has been developed, and it has been coupled with the sub-channel thermal-hydraulic core analysis code SV based on the Single Mass Velocity Model. This forms the integrated neutronic/thermal hydraulics code system POWEX-K/SV for the accident analysis. The Training and Research Reactors at Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME-Reactor) has been taken as a reference reactor. The cross-section generation procedure based on WIMS. The code uses an implicit difference approach for both the diffusion equations and thermal-hydraulics modules, with reactivity feedback effects due to coolant and fuel temperatures. The code system was applied to analyzing power excursion accidents initiated by ramp reactivity insertion of 1.2 $. The results show that the reactor is inherently safe in case of such accidents i.e. no core melt is expected even if the safety rods do not fall into the core

  12. Investigation on Nodalization for Analysis of SFR Channel Blockage Accidents

    Chang, Won Pyo; Kwon, Young Min; Ha, Ki Suk; Lee, Kwi Lim; Jeong, Hae Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The present paper demonstrates nodalization analysis results obtained in application of the MATRA-LMR/FB to channel blockage accidents for a SFR (Sodium cooled Fast Reactor), KALIMER-150. In the earlier study, a uniform node size over the total sub-channel length in a subassembly was used. The study was carried out not only for the radially different positions, i.e. central, medium between the center and the duct wall, and edge sub-channels in the assembly, but also for larger blockage sizes larger than 6 sub-channels, the blockage size of which was classified into a DBE(Design Basis Event) in the KALIMER-150 design. The present investigation focuses mainly on the identification of conservatism as well as consistency in the analyses of the maximum coolant temperature for the 6 sub-channels blockage accidents

  13. Analysis of reactivity insertion accidents in PWR reactors

    A calculation model to analyze reactivity insertion accidents in a PWR reactor was developed. To analyze the nuclear power transient, the AIREK-III code was used, which simulates the conventional point-kinetic equations with six groups of delayed neutron precursors. Some modifications were made to generalize and to adapt the program to solve the proposed problems. A transient thermal analysis model was developed which simulates the heat transfer process in a cross section of a UO2 fuel rod with Zircalloy clad, a gap fullfilled with Helium gas and the correspondent coolant channel, using as input the nulcear power transient calculated by AIREK-III. The behavior of ANGRA-i reactor was analized during two types of accidents: - uncontrolled rod withdrawal from subcritical condition; - uncontrolled rod withdrawal at power. The results and conclusions obtained will be used in the license process of the Unit 1 of the Central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto. (Author)

  14. Two serious accidents at the A-1 NPP. Analysis of the accidents the A-1 NPP

    In this presentation author describes the nuclear reactor A-1 in Jaslovske Bohunice (Slovakia). Author analyzes two reactor accidents which took off at this reactor. The first accident proceeded on January 5, 1976 during exchange of fuel elements when coolant - carbon dioxide - escaped. The second serious accident became on February 22, 1977 again during exchange of spent fuel elements. At this accident moderator - heavy water penetrated into the primary circuit of the reactor. Heavy water was subsequently removed from the reservoirs into the reserve tank in order not to leak out into the primary circuit. Inserting fuel element was melted. This accident was evaluated as grade 4 on seven-grade the international INES scale. A crash course and course parameters of the both accidents are analyzed.

  15. Analysis of Three Mile Island-Unit 2 accident

    1980-03-01

    The Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) of the Electric Power Research Institute has analyzed the Three Mile Island-2 accident. Early results of this analysis were a brief narrative summary, issued in mid-May 1979 and an initial version of this report issued later in 1979 as noted in the Foreword. The present report is a revised version of the 1979 report, containing summaries, a highly detailed sequence of events, a comparison of that sequence of events with those from other sources, 25 appendices, references and a list of abbreviations and acronyms. A matrix of equipment and system actions is included as a folded insert.

  16. Analysis of Three Mile Island-Unit 2 accident

    The Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) of the Electric Power Research Institute has analyzed the Three Mile Island-2 accident. Early results of this analysis were a brief narrative summary, issued in mid-May 1979 and an initial version of this report issued later in 1979 as noted in the Foreword. The present report is a revised version of the 1979 report, containing summaries, a highly detailed sequence of events, a comparison of that sequence of events with those from other sources, 25 appendices, references and a list of abbreviations and acronyms. A matrix of equipment and system actions is included as a folded insert

  17. Core disruptive accident analysis using ASTERIA-FBR

    Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) is developing a core disruptive accident analysis code, ASTERIA-FBR, which tightly couples the thermal-hydraulics and the neutronics to simulate the core behavior during core disruptive accidents (CDA) of fast breeder reactors (FBRs). ASTERIA-FBR consists of the three-dimensional thermal-hydraulics calculation module: CONCORD, the fuel pin behavior calculation module: FEMAXI-FBR, and the space-time neutronics module: Dynamic-GMVP or PARTISN/RKIN. This paper describes a comparison between characteristics of GMVP and PARTISN and summarizes the challenging issues on applying Dynamic-GMVP to the calculation against unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) event which is a typical initiator of core disruptive accident of FBR. It was found that Dynamic-GMVP is confirmed to be basically applicable to the CDA phenomena. It was found that, however, applying GMVP to the CDA calculation is less reasonable than PARTISN since the calculation load of GMVP is too large to meet the required calculation accuracy, although the Monte-Carlo method is based on the actual neutron behavior without any discretization of space and energy. The statistical error included in the calculation results may affect the super-prompt criticality during ULOF event and thus the amount of released energy

  18. A human factor analysis of a radiotherapy accident

    Since September 2005, I.R.S.N. studies activities of radiotherapy treatment from the angle of the human and organizational factors to improve the reliability of treatment in radiotherapy. Experienced in nuclear industry incidents analysis, I.R.S.N. analysed and diffused in March 2008, for the first time in France, the detailed study of a radiotherapy accident from the angle of the human and organizational factors. The method used for analysis is based on interviews and documents kept by the hospital. This analysis aimed at identifying the causes of the difference recorded between the dose prescribed by the radiotherapist and the dose effectively received by the patient. Neither verbal nor written communication (intra-service meetings and protocols of treatment) allowed information to be transmitted correctly in order to permit radiographers to adjust the irradiation zones correctly. This analysis highlighted the fact that during the preparation and the carrying out of the treatment, various factors led planned controls to not be performed. Finally, this analysis highlighted the fact that unsolved areas persist in the report over this accident. This is due to a lack of traceability of a certain number of key actions. The article concluded that there must be improvement in three areas: cooperation between the practitioners, control of the actions and traceability of the actions. (author)

  19. Loss-of-coolant accident analysis of the Savannah River new production reactor design

    This document contains the loss-of-coolant accident analysis of the representative design for the Savannah River heavy water new production reactor. Included in this document are descriptions of the primary system, reactor vessel, and loss-of-coolant accident computer input models, the results of the cold leg and hot leg loss-of-coolant accident analyses, and the results of sensitivity calculations for the cold leg loss-of-coolant accident. 5 refs., 50 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Critical analysis of accident scenario and consequences modelling applied to light-water reactor power plants for accident categories beyond the design basis accident (DBA)

    A critical analysis and sensitivity study of the modelling of accident scenarios and environmental consequences are presented, for light-water reactor accident categories beyond the standard design-basis-accident category. The first chapter, on ''source term'' deals with the release of fission products from a damaged core inventory and their migration within the primary circuit and the reactor containment. Particular attention is given to the influence of engineering safeguards intervention and of the chemical forms of the released fission products. The second chapter deals with their release to the atmosphere, transport and wet or dry deposition, outlining relevant partial effects and confronting short-duration or prolonged releases. The third chapter presents a variability analysis, for environmental contamination levels, for two extreme hypothetical scenarios, evidencing the importance of plume rise. A numerical plume rise model is outlined

  1. The accident analysis in the framework of emergency provisions

    The first part of the report describes the demands on and bases of a reactor emergency plan and outlines the technical characteristics of a nuclear power plant with light-water moderated pressurized-water reactor with special regard to reactor safety. In the second part the failure and risk potentials of a pressurized-water plant are described and discussed. The third part is dedicated to a representation of the analytical method in a stricter sense, according to the current state of technology. Finally the current degree of effectiveness of the reactor accident analysis method is critically discussed and perspectives of future development are pointed out. (orig.)

  2. Source term analysis for a nuclear submarine accident

    A source term analysis has been conducted to determine the activity release into the environment as a result of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident aboard a visiting nuclear-powered submarine to a Canadian port. This best-estimate analysis considers the fractional release from the core, and fission product transport in the primary heat transport system, primary containment (i.e. reactor compartment) and submarine hull. Physical removal mechanisms such as vapour and aerosol deposition are treated in the calculation. Since a thermalhydraulic analysis indicated that the integrity of the reactor compartment is maintained, release from the reactor compartment will only occur by leakage; however, it is conservatively assumed that the secondary containment is not isolated for a 24-h period where release occurs through an open hatch in the submarine hull. Consequently, during this period, the activity release into the atmosphere is estimated as 4.6 TBq, leading to a maximum individual dose equivalent of 0.5 mSv at 800 metres from the berthing location. This activity release is comparable to that obtained in the BEREX TSA study (for a similar accident scenario) but is four orders of magnitude less than that reported in the earlier Davis study where, unrealistically, no credit had been taken for the containment system or for any physical removal processes. (author)

  3. Accident consequence calculations for project W-058 safety analysis

    Accident consequence analyses have been performed for Project W-058, the Replacement Cross Site Transfer System. using the assumption and analysis techniques developed for the Tank Remediation Waste system Basis for Interim Operation. most potential accident involving the FISTS are bounded by the TWRS BIO analysis. However, the spray leak and pool leak scenarios require revised analyses since the RCSTS design utilizes larger diameter pipe and higher pressures than those analyzed in the TWRS BIO. Also the volume of diversion box and vent station are larger than that assumed for the valve pits in the TWRS BIO, which effects results of sprays or spills into the pits. the revised analysis for the spray leak is presented in Section 2, for the above ground spill in Section 3, for the presented in Section 2, for the above ground spill in Section 3, for the subsurface spill forming a pool in Section 4, and for the subsurface pool remaining subsurface in Section 5. The conclusion from these sections are summarized below

  4. Extension of ship accident analysis to multiple-package shipments

    Severe ship accidents and the probability of radioactive material release from spent reactor fuel casks were investigated previously (Spring, 1995). Other forms of RAM, e.g., plutonium oxide powder, may be shipped in large numbers of packagings rather than in one to a few casks. These smaller, more numerous packagings are typically placed in ISO containers for ease of handling, and several ISO containers may be placed in one of several holds of a cargo ship. In such cases, the size of a radioactive release resulting from a severe collision with another ship is determined not by the likelihood of compromising a single, robust package but by the probability that a certain fraction of 10's or 100's of individual packagings is compromised. The previous analysis (Spring, 1995) involved a statistical estimation of the frequency of accidents which would result in damage to a cask located in one of seven cargo holds in a collision with another ship. The results were obtained in the form of probabilities (frequencies) of accidents of increasing severity and of release fractions for each level of severity. This paper describes an extension of the same general method in which the multiple packages are assumed to be compacted by an intruding ship's bow until there is no free space in the hold. At such a point, the remaining energy of the colliding ship is assumed to be dissipated by progressively crushing the RAM packagings and the probability of a particular fraction of package failures is estimated by adaptation of the statistical method used previously. The parameters of a common, well-characterized packaging, the 6M with 2R inner containment vessel, were employed as an illustrative example of this analysis method. However, the method is readily applicable to other packagings for which crush strengths have been measured or can be estimated with satisfactory confidence. (authors)

  5. Effect of Candu Fuel Bundle Modeling on Sever Accident Analysis

    Dupleac, D.; Prisecaru, I. [Power Plant Engineering Faculty, Politehnica University, 313 Splaiul Independentei, 060042, sect. 6, Bucharest (Romania); Mladin, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti-Mioveni, 115400 (Romania)

    2009-06-15

    In a Candu 6 nuclear power reactor fuel bundles are located in horizontal Zircaloy pressure tubes through which the heavy-water coolant flows. Each pressure tube is surrounded by a concentric calandria tube. Outside the calandria tubes is the heavy-water moderator contained in the calandria itself. The moderator is maintained at a temperature of 70 deg. C by a separate cooling circuit. The moderator surrounding the calandria tubes provides a potential heat sink following a loss of core heat removal. The calandria vessel is in turn contained within a shield tank (or reactor vault), which provides biological shielding during normal operation and maintenance. It is a large concrete tank filled with ordinary water. During normal operation, about 0.4% of the core's thermal output is deposited in the shield tank and end shields, through heat transfer from the calandria structure and fission heating. In a severe accident scenario, the shield tank could provide an external calandria vessel cooling which can be maintained until the shield tank water level drops below the debris level. The Candu system design has specific features which are important to severe accidents progression and requires selective consideration of models, methods and techniques of severe accident evaluation. Moreover, it should be noted that the mechanistic models for severe accident in Candu system are largely less well validated and as the result the level of uncertainty remains high in many instances. Unlike the light water reactors, for which are several developed computer codes to analyze severe accidents, for Candu severe accidents analysis two codes were developed: MAAP4-Candu and ISAAC. However, both codes started by using MAAP4/PWR as reference code and implemented Candu 6 specific models. Thus, these two codes had many common features. Recently, a joint project involving Romanian nuclear organizations and coordinated by Politehnica University of Bucharest has been started. The purpose

  6. A general approach to critical infrastructure accident consequences analysis

    Bogalecka, Magda; Kołowrocki, Krzysztof; Soszyńska-Budny, Joanna

    2016-06-01

    The probabilistic general model of critical infrastructure accident consequences including the process of the models of initiating events generated by its accident, the process of environment threats and the process of environment degradation is presented.

  7. Thermohydraulic and Safety Analysis for CARR Under Station Blackout Accident

    A thermohydraulic and safety analysis code (TSACC) has been developed using Fortran 90 language to evaluate the transient thermohydraulic behaviors and safety characteristics of the China Advanced Research Reactor(CARR) under Station Blackout Accident(SBA). For the development of TSACC, a series of corresponding mathematical and physical models were considered. Point reactor neutron kinetics model was adopted for solving reactor power. All possible flow and heat transfer conditions under station blackout accident were considered and the optional models were supplied. The usual Finite Difference Method (FDM) was abandoned and a new model was adopted to evaluate the temperature field of core plate type fuel element. A new simple and convenient equation was proposed for the resolution of the transient behaviors of the main pump instead of the complicated four-quadrant model. Gear method and Adams method were adopted alternately for a better solution to the stiff differential equations describing the dynamic behaviors of the CARR. The computational result of TSACC showed the enough safety margin of CARR under SBA. For the purpose of Verification and Validation (V and V), the simulated results of TSACC were compared with those of Relap5/Mdo3. The V and V result indicated a good agreement between the results by the two codes. Because of the adoption of modular programming techniques, this analysis code is expected to be applied to other reactors by easily modifying the corresponding function modules. (authors)

  8. PERSPECTIVES ON A DOE CONSEQUENCE INPUTS FOR ACCIDENT ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS

    (NOEMAIL), K; Jonathan Lowrie, J; David Thoman (NOEMAIL), D; Austin Keller (NOEMAIL), A

    2008-07-30

    Department of Energy (DOE) accident analysis for establishing the required control sets for nuclear facility safety applies a series of simplifying, reasonably conservative assumptions regarding inputs and methodologies for quantifying dose consequences. Most of the analytical practices are conservative, have a technical basis, and are based on regulatory precedent. However, others are judgmental and based on older understanding of phenomenology. The latter type of practices can be found in modeling hypothetical releases into the atmosphere and the subsequent exposure. Often the judgments applied are not based on current technical understanding but on work that has been superseded. The objective of this paper is to review the technical basis for the major inputs and assumptions in the quantification of consequence estimates supporting DOE accident analysis, and to identify those that could be reassessed in light of current understanding of atmospheric dispersion and radiological exposure. Inputs and assumptions of interest include: Meteorological data basis; Breathing rate; and Inhalation dose conversion factor. A simple dose calculation is provided to show the relative difference achieved by improving the technical bases.

  9. Offsite radiological consequence analysis for the bounding aircraft crash accident

    The purpose of this calculation note is to quantitatively analyze a bounding aircraft crash accident for comparison to the DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', Appendix A, Evaluation Guideline of 25 rem. The potential of aircraft impacting a facility was evaluated using the approach given in DOE-STD-3014-96, ''Accident Analysis for Aircraft Crash into Hazardous Facilities''. The following aircraft crash FR-equencies were determined for the Tank Farms in RPP-11736, ''Assessment Of Aircraft Crash FR-equency For The Hanford Site 200 Area Tank Farms'': (1) The total aircraft crash FR-equency is ''extremely unlikely.'' (2) The general aviation crash FR-equency is ''extremely unlikely.'' (3) The helicopter crash FR-equency is ''beyond extremely unlikely.'' (4) For the Hanford Site 200 Areas, other aircraft type, commercial or military, each above ground facility, and any other type of underground facility is ''beyond extremely unlikely.'' As the potential of aircraft crash into the 200 Area tank farms is more FR-equent than ''beyond extremely unlikely,'' consequence analysis of the aircraft crash is required

  10. Accidents in the construction industry in the Netherlands: An analysis of accident reports using Storybuilder

    As part of an ongoing effort by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment of the Netherlands, a research project is being undertaken to construct a causal model for occupational risk. This model should provide quantitative insight into the causes and consequences of occupational accidents. One of the components of the model is a tool to systematically classify and analyse reports of past accidents. This tool 'Storybuilder' was described in earlier papers. In this paper, Storybuilder is used to analyse the causes of accidents reported in the database of the Dutch Labour Inspectorate involving people working in the construction industry. Conclusions are drawn on measures to reduce the accident probability. Some of these conclusions are contrary to common beliefs in the industry

  11. Large LOCA accident analysis for AP1000 under earthquake

    Highlights: • Seismic failure event probability is induced by uncertainties in PGA and in Am. • Uncertainty in PGA is shared by all the components at the same place. • Relativity induced by sharing PGA value can be analyzed explicitly by MC method. • Multi components failures and accident sequences will occur under high PGA value. - Abstract: Seismic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is developed to give the insight of nuclear power plant risk under earthquake and the main contributors to the risk. However, component failure probability including the initial event frequency is the function of peak ground acceleration (PGA), and all the components especially the different kinds of components at same place will share the common ground shaking, which is one of the important factors to influence the result. In this paper, we propose an analysis method based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulation in which the effect of all components sharing the same PGA level can be expressed by explicit pattern. The Large LOCA accident in AP1000 is analyzed as an example, based on the seismic hazard curve used in this paper, the core damage frequency is almost equal to the initial event frequency, moreover the frequency of each accident sequence is close to and even equal to the initial event frequency, while the main contributors are seismic events since multi components and systems failures will happen simultaneously when a high value of PGA is sampled. The component failure probability is determined by uncertainties in PGA and in component seismic capacity, and the former is the crucial element to influence the result

  12. Application of probabilistic safety assessment in CPR1000 severe accident prevention and mitigation analysis

    The relationship between probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) and severe accident study was discussed. Also how to apply PSA in severe accident prevention and mitigation was elaborated. PSA can find the plant vulnerabilities of severe accidents prevention and mitigation. Some modifications or improvements focusing on these vulnerabilities can be put forward. PSA also can assess the efficient of these actions for decision-making. According to CPR1000 unit severe accident analysis, an example for the process and method on how to use PSA to enhance the ability to deal with severe accident prevention and mitigation was set forth. (authors)

  13. An analysis of LOCA sequences in the development of severe accident analysis DB

    Although a Level 2 PSA was performed for the Korean Standard Power Plants (KSNPs), and it considered the necessary sequences for an assessment of the containment integrity and source term analysis. In terms of an accident management, however, more cases causing severe core damage need to be analyzed and arranged systematically for an easy access to the results. At present, KAERI is calculating the severe accident sequences intensively for various initiating events and generating a database for the accident progression including thermal hydraulic and source term behaviours. The developed Database (DB) system includes a graphical display for a plant and equipment status, previous research results by knowledge-base technique, and the expected plant behaviour. The plant model used in this paper is oriented to the case of LOCAs related severe accident phenomena and thus can simulate the plant behaviours for a severe accident. Therefore the developed system may play a central role as an information source for decision-making for a severe accident management, and will be used as a training simulator for a severe accident management. (author)

  14. Analysis of surface powered haulage accidents, January 1990--July 1996

    Fesak, G.M.; Breland, R.M.; Spadaro, J. [Dept. of Labor, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This report addresses surface haulage accidents that occurred between January 1990 and July 1996 involving haulage trucks (including over-the-road trucks), front-end-loaders, scrapers, utility trucks, water trucks, and other mobile haulage equipment. The study includes quarries, open pits and surface coal mines utilizing self-propelled mobile equipment to transport personnel, supplies, rock, overburden material, ore, mine waste, or coal for processing. A total of 4,397 accidents were considered. This report summarizes the major factors that led to the accidents and recommends accident prevention methods to reduce the frequency of these accidents.

  15. Decontamination analysis of the NUWAX-83 accident site using DECON

    Tawil, J.J.

    1983-11-01

    This report presents an analysis of the site restoration options for the NUWAX-83 site, at which an exercise was conducted involving a simulated nuclear weapons accident. This analysis was performed using a computer program deveoped by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The computer program, called DECON, was designed to assist personnel engaged in the planning of decontamination activities. The many features of DECON that are used in this report demonstrate its potential usefulness as a site restoration planning tool. Strategies that are analyzed with DECON include: (1) employing a Quick-Vac option, under which selected surfaces are vacuumed before they can be rained on; (2) protecting surfaces against precipitation; (3) prohibiting specific operations on selected surfaces; (4) requiring specific methods to be used on selected surfaces; (5) evaluating the trade-off between cleanup standards and decontamination costs; and (6) varying of the cleanup standards according to expected exposure to surface.

  16. Decontamination analysis of the NUWAX-83 accident site using DECON

    This report presents an analysis of the site restoration options for the NUWAX-83 site, at which an exercise was conducted involving a simulated nuclear weapons accident. This analysis was performed using a computer program deveoped by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The computer program, called DECON, was designed to assist personnel engaged in the planning of decontamination activities. The many features of DECON that are used in this report demonstrate its potential usefulness as a site restoration planning tool. Strategies that are analyzed with DECON include: (1) employing a Quick-Vac option, under which selected surfaces are vacuumed before they can be rained on; (2) protecting surfaces against precipitation; (3) prohibiting specific operations on selected surfaces; (4) requiring specific methods to be used on selected surfaces; (5) evaluating the trade-off between cleanup standards and decontamination costs; and (6) varying of the cleanup standards according to expected exposure to surface

  17. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis

    This report is a revision of NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990), Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis. This revision has been made to incorporate changes to the Health Effects Models recommended in two addenda to the NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 11, 1989 report. The first of these addenda provided recommended changes to the health effects models for low-LET radiations based on recent reports from UNSCEAR, ICRP and NAS/NRC (BEIR V). The second addendum presented changes needed to incorporate alpha-emitting radionuclides into the accident exposure source term. As in the earlier version of this report, models are provided for early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating the risks of seven types of cancer in adults - leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and ''other''. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Five classes of genetic diseases -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocations, and multifactorial diseases are also considered. Data are provided that should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk

  18. An Accident Precursor Analysis Process Tailored for NASA Space Systems

    Groen, Frank; Stamatelatos, Michael; Dezfuli, Homayoon; Maggio, Gaspare

    2010-01-01

    Accident Precursor Analysis (APA) serves as the bridge between existing risk modeling activities, which are often based on historical or generic failure statistics, and system anomalies, which provide crucial information about the failure mechanisms that are actually operative in the system and which may differ in frequency or type from those in the various models. These discrepancies between the models (perceived risk) and the system (actual risk) provide the leading indication of an underappreciated risk. This paper presents an APA process developed specifically for NASA Earth-to-Orbit space systems. The purpose of the process is to identify and characterize potential sources of system risk as evidenced by anomalous events which, although not necessarily presenting an immediate safety impact, may indicate that an unknown or insufficiently understood risk-significant condition exists in the system. Such anomalous events are considered accident precursors because they signal the potential for severe consequences that may occur in the future, due to causes that are discernible from their occurrence today. Their early identification allows them to be integrated into the overall system risk model used to intbrm decisions relating to safety.

  19. Health effects estimation code development for accident consequence analysis

    As part of a computer code system for nuclear reactor accident consequence analysis, two computer codes have been developed for estimating health effects expected to occur following an accident. Health effects models used in the codes are based on the models of NUREG/CR-4214 and are revised for the Japanese population on the basis of the data from the reassessment of the radiation dosimetry and information derived from epidemiological studies on atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The health effects models include early and continuing effects, late somatic effects and genetic effects. The values of some model parameters are revised for early mortality. The models are modified for predicting late somatic effects such as leukemia and various kinds of cancers. The models for genetic effects are the same as those of NUREG. In order to test the performance of one of these codes, it is applied to the U.S. and Japanese populations. This paper provides descriptions of health effects models used in the two codes and gives comparisons of the mortality risks from each type of cancer for the two populations. (author)

  20. Improvement of severe accident analysis method for KSNP

    Park, Jae Hong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Song Won; Cho, Youn Soo [Korea Radiation Technology Institute Co., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    The objective of this study is preparation of MELCOR 1.8.5 input deck for KSNP and simulation of some major severe accidents. The contents of this project are preparation of MELCOR 1.8.5 base input deck for KSNP to understand severe accident phenomena and to assess severe accident strategy, preparation of 20 cell containment input deck to simulate the distribution of hydrogen and fission products in containment, simulation of some major severe accident scenarios such as TLOFW, SBO, SBLOCA, MBLOCA, and LBLOCA. The method for MELCOR 1.8.5 input deck preparation can be used to prepare the input deck for domestic PWRs and to simulate severe accident experiments such as ISP-46. Information gained from analyses of severe accidents may be helpful to set up the severe accident management strategy and to develop regulatory guidance.

  1. Severe accident analysis of a small LOCA accident using MAAP-CANDU support level 2 PSA for the Point Lepreau station refurbishment project

    A Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment was performed for the Point Lepreau Generating Station. The MAAP4-CANDU code was used to calculate the progression of postulated severe core damage accidents and fission product releases. Five representative severe core damage accidents were selected: Station Blackout, Small Loss-of-Coolant Accident, Stagnation Feeder Break, Steam Generator Tube Rupture, and Shutdown State Accident. Analysis results for only the reference Small LOCA Accident scenario (which is a very low probability event) are discussed in this paper. (author)

  2. Summary of the SRS Severe Accident Analysis Program, 1987--1992

    The Severe Accident Analysis Program (SAAP) is a program of experimental and analytical studies aimed at characterizing severe accidents that might occur in the Savannah River Site Production Reactors. The goals of the Severe Accident Analysis Program are: To develop an understanding of severe accidents in SRS reactors that is adequate to support safety documentation for these reactors, including the Safety Analysis Report (SAR), the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and other studies evaluating the safety of reactor operation; To provide tools and bases for the evaluation of existing or proposed safety related equipment in the SRS reactors; To provide bases for the development of accident management procedures for the SRS reactors; To develop and maintain on the site a sufficient body of knowledge, including documents, computer codes, and cognizant engineers and scientists, that can be used to authoritatively resolve questions or issues related to reactor accidents. The Severe Accident Analysis Program was instituted in 1987 and has already produced a substantial amount of information, and specialized calculational tools. Products of the Severe Accident Analysis Program (listed in Section 9 of this report) have been used in the development of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and in the development of technical specifications for the SRS reactors. A staff of about seven people is currently involved directly in the program and in providing input on severe accidents to other SRS activities

  3. Summary of the SRS Severe Accident Analysis Program, 1987--1992

    Long, T.A.; Hyder, M.L.; Britt, T.E.; Allison, D.K.; Chow, S.; Graves, R.D.; DeWald, A.B. Jr.; Monson, P.R. Jr.; Wooten, L.A.

    1992-11-01

    The Severe Accident Analysis Program (SAAP) is a program of experimental and analytical studies aimed at characterizing severe accidents that might occur in the Savannah River Site Production Reactors. The goals of the Severe Accident Analysis Program are: To develop an understanding of severe accidents in SRS reactors that is adequate to support safety documentation for these reactors, including the Safety Analysis Report (SAR), the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and other studies evaluating the safety of reactor operation; To provide tools and bases for the evaluation of existing or proposed safety related equipment in the SRS reactors; To provide bases for the development of accident management procedures for the SRS reactors; To develop and maintain on the site a sufficient body of knowledge, including documents, computer codes, and cognizant engineers and scientists, that can be used to authoritatively resolve questions or issues related to reactor accidents. The Severe Accident Analysis Program was instituted in 1987 and has already produced a substantial amount of information, and specialized calculational tools. Products of the Severe Accident Analysis Program (listed in Section 9 of this report) have been used in the development of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and in the development of technical specifications for the SRS reactors. A staff of about seven people is currently involved directly in the program and in providing input on severe accidents to other SRS activities.

  4. Hypothetical accident conditions thermal analysis of the 5320 package

    An axisymmetric model of the 5320 package was created to perform hypothetical accident conditions (HAC) thermal calculations. The analyses assume the 5320 package contains 359 grams of plutonium-238 (203 Watts) in the form of an oxide powder at a minimum density of 2.4 g/cc or at a maximum density of 11.2 g/cc. The solution from a non-solar 100 F ambient steady-state analysis was used as the initial conditions for the fire transient. A 30 minute 1,475 F fire transient followed by cooling via natural convection and thermal radiation to a 100 F non-solar environment was analyzed to determine peak component temperatures and vessel pressures. The 5320 package was considered to be horizontally suspended within the fire during the entire transient

  5. Radionuclide analysis on bamboos following the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Takumi Higaki

    Full Text Available In response to contamination from the recent Fukushima nuclear accident, we conducted radionuclide analysis on bamboos sampled from six sites within a 25 to 980 km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Maximum activity concentrations of radiocesium (134Cs and (137Cs in samples from Fukushima city, 65 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi plant, were in excess of 71 and 79 kBq/kg, dry weight (DW, respectively. In Kashiwa city, 195 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi, the sample concentrations were in excess of 3.4 and 4.3 kBq/kg DW, respectively. In Toyohashi city, 440 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi, the concentrations were below the measurable limits of up to 4.5 Bq/kg DW. In the radiocesium contaminated samples, the radiocesium activity was higher in mature and fallen leaves than in young leaves, branches and culms.

  6. Aircraft Accident Prevention: Loss-of-Control Analysis

    Kwatny, Harry G.; Dongmo, Jean-Etienne T.; Chang, Bor-Chin; Bajpai, Guarav; Yasar, Murat; Belcastro, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    The majority of fatal aircraft accidents are associated with loss-of-control . Yet the notion of loss-of-control is not well-defined in terms suitable for rigorous control systems analysis. Loss-of-control is generally associated with flight outside of the normal flight envelope, with nonlinear influences, and with an inability of the pilot to control the aircraft. The two primary sources of nonlinearity are the intrinsic nonlinear dynamics of the aircraft and the state and control constraints within which the aircraft must operate. In this paper we examine how these nonlinearities affect the ability to control the aircraft and how they may contribute to loss-of-control. Examples are provided using NASA s Generic Transport Model.

  7. Advanced accident sequence precursor analysis level 1 models

    Sattison, M.B.; Thatcher, T.A.; Knudsen, J.K.; Schroeder, J.A.; Siu, N.O. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-03-01

    INEL has been involved in the development of plant-specific Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) models for the past two years. These models were developed for use with the SAPHIRE suite of PRA computer codes. They contained event tree/linked fault tree Level 1 risk models for the following initiating events: general transient, loss-of-offsite-power, steam generator tube rupture, small loss-of-coolant-accident, and anticipated transient without scram. Early in 1995 the ASP models were revised based on review comments from the NRC and an independent peer review. These models were released as Revision 1. The Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research has sponsored several projects at the INEL this fiscal year to further enhance the capabilities of the ASP models. Revision 2 models incorporates more detailed plant information into the models concerning plant response to station blackout conditions, information on battery life, and other unique features gleaned from an Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation quick review of the Individual Plant Examination submittals. These models are currently being delivered to the NRC as they are completed. A related project is a feasibility study and model development of low power/shutdown (LP/SD) and external event extensions to the ASP models. This project will establish criteria for selection of LP/SD and external initiator operational events for analysis within the ASP program. Prototype models for each pertinent initiating event (loss of shutdown cooling, loss of inventory control, fire, flood, seismic, etc.) will be developed. A third project concerns development of enhancements to SAPHIRE. In relation to the ASP program, a new SAPHIRE module, GEM, was developed as a specific user interface for performing ASP evaluations. This module greatly simplifies the analysis process for determining the conditional core damage probability for a given combination of initiating events and equipment failures or degradations.

  8. Analysis of accidents at the LPR (Radiochemical Processes Laboratory)

    Accidents are defined as not planned events that may result in the emission of significative quantities of radioactive materials to the environment. The pilot plant has been specifically designed to prevent this type of accidents but there still exists the possibility that one or more accidents can be produced during the plant life. In a first phase, the emission of radionuclides to the environment were evaluated for 13 credible accidents. In a second phase, by means of the calculation program SEDA, specially adapted to this purpose, the critical doses of critical group were calculated for each accident. Due to the small capacity of the pilot plant and the long cooling period of treated fuel, it is concluded that the radiological consequences for the external environment are of very small magnitude. In this way, without need of developing complex fault- or event-trees, it is shown that any of the accidents falls into the non acceptable zone of Farmer diagram. (Author)

  9. Accident Analysis and Barrier Function (AEB) Method. Manual for Incident Analysis

    The Accident Analysis and Barrier Function (AEB) Method models an accident or incident as a series of interactions between human and technical systems. In the sequence of human and technical errors leading to an accident there is, in principle, a possibility to arrest the development between each two successive errors. This can be done by a barrier function which, for example, can stop an operator from making an error. A barrier function can be performed by one or several barrier function systems. To illustrate, a mechanical system, a computer system or another operator can all perform a given barrier function to stop an operator from making an error. The barrier function analysis consists of analysis of suggested improvements, the effectiveness of the improvements, the costs of implementation, probability of implementation, the cost of maintaining the barrier function, the probability that maintenance will be kept up to standards and the generalizability of the suggested improvement. The AEB method is similar to the US method called HPES, but differs from that method in different ways. To exemplify, the AEB method has more emphasis on technical errors than HPES. In contrast to HPES that describes a series of events, the AEB method models only errors. This gives a more focused analysis making it well suited for checking other HPES-type accident analyses. However, the AEB method is a generic and stand-alone method that has been applied in other fields than nuclear power, such as, in traffic accident analyses

  10. Modelling and analysis of severe accidents for VVER-1000 reactors

    Tusheva, Polina

    2013-01-01

    Accident conditions involving significant core degradation are termed severe accidents /IAEA: NS-G-2.15/. Despite the low probability of occurrence of such events, the investigation of severe accident scenarios is an important part of the nuclear safety research. Considering a hypothetical core melt down scenario in a VVER-1000 light water reactor, the early in-vessel phase focusing on the thermal-hydraulic phenomena, and the late in-vessel phase focusing on the melt relocation into the re...

  11. Accident sequence precursor analysis of Daya Bay and Ling'ao nuclear power plants

    The accident sequence precursor analysis method was adopted to evaluate the events of Daya Bay and Ling'ao Nuclear Power Plants, and some risk significant events which are called the accident sequence precursor were identified. By the statistics, classification and trend analysis, some useful insight can be obtained to support the nuclear safety management for the nuclear power plant. (authors)

  12. Strategy for the Development of Severe Accident Analysis Technology

    To ensure the safety of people living near the nuclear power plants during the postulated events of severe accidents, a severe accident management strategy is prepared for the operating reactors and dedicated engineered features for the severe accidents are under research and development for the new reactors, such as GEN-III reactors. To accomplish these tasks, not only a proper understanding of fundamental physics of severe accident phenomena but also reliable computer codes for analyzing the severe accident phenomena is very necessary. This report deals with a strategic plan for a development and provision of computer code system for analyzing the severe accidents. This reports includes a summary of major phenomena of severe accidents, an peer review of the computer codes for analyzing the integral behavior of severe accident scenario and computer codes for analyzing the specific phenomena. Finally, a strategic plan for an equipment of severe accident computer codes either by use of already available computer codes or a development of our own computer codes, which could be competitive with world class foreign computer codes

  13. ANALYSIS OF THE ACCIDENTS OF THE CAR MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

    J.Adl ; Z. Mohammad zade

    1993-08-01

    Full Text Available Car manufacturing industry accident’s rates from three major companies are analyzed. Totally 1325 accidents with 4 cases of fatality were recorded. Accident rates per 100 full-time workers have gradually increased from 5.3 to 8.7 during 3 years of study. Most of the accidents occurred during the primary hours of the work, Strains and sprains represented the most frequently occurring type of injury, accounting for 37.9% and the greatest number of injuries occurred by flying particles (3 1.6%, resulting in eye injuries. Other aspects of accidents in this industry are discussed and recommendations are given for their prevention.

  14. Initial event analysis of the Fukushima Daiichi accident

    The objective of this study is to investigate the initial event of the Fukushima Daiichi accident and to check the validity of the counter measures against the accident. We analyzed the initial event of the Fukushima Daiichi accident for Unit-1, 2 and 3 plants by RELAP5 code and compared with the actual plant data. The parametric study about the operation of the isolation condenser (IC), the reactor core isolation cooling system (RCIC) and the high pressure core injection system (HPCI) was also done to understand the accident progression. (author)

  15. Analysis on relation between safety input and accidents

    YAO Qing-guo; ZHANG Xue-mu; LI Chun-hui

    2007-01-01

    The number of safety input directly determines the level of safety, and there exists dialectical and unified relations between safety input and accidents. Based on the field investigation and reliable data, this paper deeply studied the dialectical relationship between safety input and accidents, and acquired the conclusions. The security situation of the coal enterprises was related to the security input rate, being effected little by the security input scale, and build the relationship model between safety input and accidents on this basis, that is the accident model.

  16. Exploring the potential of data mining techniques for the analysis of accident patterns

    Prato, Carlo Giacomo; Bekhor, Shlomo; Galtzur, Ayelet;

    2010-01-01

    Research in road safety faces major challenges: individuation of the most significant determinants of traffic accidents, recognition of the most recurrent accident patterns, and allocation of resources necessary to address the most relevant issues. This paper intends to comprehend which data mining...... association rules) data mining techniques are implemented for the analysis of traffic accidents occurred in Israel between 2001 and 2004. Results show that descriptive techniques are useful to classify the large amount of analyzed accidents, even though introduce problems with respect to the clear...... importance of input and intermediate neurons, and the relative importance of hundreds of association rules. Further research should investigate whether limiting the analysis to fatal accidents would simplify the task of data mining techniques in recognizing accident patterns without the “noise” probably...

  17. Preliminary analysis of loss-of-coolant accident in Fukushima nuclear accident

    Su'ud, Zaki; Anshari, Rio

    2012-06-01

    Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) especially on Fukushima Nuclear Accident will be discussed in this paper. The Tohoku earthquake triggered the shutdown of nuclear power reactors at Fukushima Nuclear Power station. Though shutdown process has been completely performed, cooling process, at much smaller level than in normal operation, is needed to remove decay heat from the reactor core until the reactor reach cold-shutdown condition. If LOCA happen at this condition, it will cause the increase of reactor fuel and other core temperatures and can lead to reactor core meltdown and exposure of radioactive material to the environment such as in the Fukushima Dai Ichi nuclear accident case. In this study numerical simulation has been performed to calculate pressure composition, water level and temperature distribution on reactor during this accident. There are two coolant regulating system that operational on reactor unit 1 at this accident, Isolation Condensers (IC) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV) system. Average mass flow of steam to the IC system in this event is 10 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 3,2 hours and fully uncovered in 4,7 hours later. There are two coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 2, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) System and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of coolant that correspond this event is 20 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 73 hours and fully uncovered in 75 hours later. There are three coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 3, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) system, High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of water that correspond this event is 15 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 37 hours and fully uncovered in 40 hours later.

  18. Development status of Severe Accident Analysis Code SAMPSON

    The Four years of the IMPACT, 'Integrated Modular Plant Analysis and Computing Technology' project Phase 1 have been completed. The verification study of Severe Accident Analysis Code SAMPSON prototype developed in Phase 1 was conducted in two steps. First, each analysis module was run independently and analysis results were compared and verified against separate-effect test data with good results. Test data are as follows: CORA-13 (FZK) for the Core Heat-up Module; VI-3 of HI/VI Test (ORNL) for the FP Release from Fuel Module; KROTOS-37 (JRC-ISPRA) for the Molten Core Relocation Module; Water Spread Test (UCSB) for the Debris Spreading Model and Benard's Melting Test for Natural Convection Model in the Debris Cooling Module; Hydrogen Burning Test (NUPEC) for the Ex-Vessel Thermal Hydraulics Module; PREMIX, PM10 (FZK) for the Steam Explosion Module; and SWISS-2 (SNL) for the Debris-Concrete Interaction Module. Second, with the Simulation Supervisory System, up to 11 analysis modules were executed concurrently in the parallel environment (currently, NUPEC uses IBM-SP2 with 72 process elements), to demonstrate the code capability and integrity. The target plant was Surry as a typical PWR and the initiation events were a 10-inch cold leg failure. The analysis is divided to two cases; one is in-vessel retention analysis when the gap cooling is effective (In-vessel scenario test), the other is analysis of phenomena event is extended to ex-vessel due to the Reactor Pressure Vessel failure when the gap cooling is not sufficient (Ex-vessel scenario test). The system verification test has confirmed that the full scope of the scenarios can be analyzed and phenomena occurred in scenarios can be simulated qualitatively reasonably considering the physical models used for the situation. The Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan sponsors this work. (author)

  19. Development status of Severe Accident Analysis Code SAMPSON

    Iwashita, Tsuyoshi; Ujita, Hiroshi [Advanced Simulation Systems Department, Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    The Four years of the IMPACT, 'Integrated Modular Plant Analysis and Computing Technology' project Phase 1 have been completed. The verification study of Severe Accident Analysis Code SAMPSON prototype developed in Phase 1 was conducted in two steps. First, each analysis module was run independently and analysis results were compared and verified against separate-effect test data with good results. Test data are as follows: CORA-13 (FZK) for the Core Heat-up Module; VI-3 of HI/VI Test (ORNL) for the FP Release from Fuel Module; KROTOS-37 (JRC-ISPRA) for the Molten Core Relocation Module; Water Spread Test (UCSB) for the Debris Spreading Model and Benard's Melting Test for Natural Convection Model in the Debris Cooling Module; Hydrogen Burning Test (NUPEC) for the Ex-Vessel Thermal Hydraulics Module; PREMIX, PM10 (FZK) for the Steam Explosion Module; and SWISS-2 (SNL) for the Debris-Concrete Interaction Module. Second, with the Simulation Supervisory System, up to 11 analysis modules were executed concurrently in the parallel environment (currently, NUPEC uses IBM-SP2 with 72 process elements), to demonstrate the code capability and integrity. The target plant was Surry as a typical PWR and the initiation events were a 10-inch cold leg failure. The analysis is divided to two cases; one is in-vessel retention analysis when the gap cooling is effective (In-vessel scenario test), the other is analysis of phenomena event is extended to ex-vessel due to the Reactor Pressure Vessel failure when the gap cooling is not sufficient (Ex-vessel scenario test). The system verification test has confirmed that the full scope of the scenarios can be analyzed and phenomena occurred in scenarios can be simulated qualitatively reasonably considering the physical models used for the situation. The Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan sponsors this work. (author)

  20. Empirical Risk Analysis of Severe Reactor Accidents in Nuclear Power Plants after Fukushima

    Jan Christian Kaiser

    2012-01-01

    Many countries are reexamining the risks connected with nuclear power generation after the Fukushima accidents. To provide updated information for the corresponding discussion a simple empirical approach is applied for risk quantification of severe reactor accidents with International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES) level ≥5. The analysis is based on worldwide data of commercial nuclear facilities. An empirical hazard of 21 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 4; 62) severe accidents am...

  1. An analysis of evacuation options for nuclear accidents

    The threat of release of a hazardous substance into the atmosphere will sometimes require that the population at risk be evacuated. If the substance is particularly hazardous or the release is exceptionally large, then an extensive area may have to be evacuated at substantial cost. In this report we consider the threat posed by the accidental release of radionuclides from a nuclear power plant. The report's objective is to establish relationships between radiation dose and the cost of evacuation under a wide variety of conditions. The dose can almost always be reduced by evacuating the population from a larger area. However, extending the evacuation zone outward will cause evacuation costs to increase. The purpose of this analysis was to provide the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) a data base for evaluating whether implementation costs and risks averted could be used to justify evacuation at lower doses than would be required based on acceptable risk of health effects alone. The procedures used and results of these analyses are being made available as background information for use by others. In this report we develop cost/dose relationships for 54 scenarios that are based upon the severity of the reactor accident, meteorological conditions during the release of radionuclides into the environment, and the angular width of the evacuation zone. The 54 scenarios are derived from combinations of three accident severity levels, six meteorological conditions and evacuation zone widths of 70 deg, 90 deg, and 180 deg. Appendix tables are provided to allow acceptable evaluation of the cost/dose relationships for a wide variety of scenarios. Guidance and examples are provided in the text to show how these tables can be used

  2. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled open-quotes Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysisclose quotes, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled open-quotes Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,close quotes was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model

  3. 300-Area accident analysis for Emergency Planning Zones

    The Department of Energy has requested SRL assistance in developing offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) for the Savannah River Plant, based on projected dose consequences of atmospheric releases of radioactivity from potential credible accidents in the SRP operating areas. This memorandum presents the assessment of the offsite doses via the plume exposure pathway from the 300-Area potential accidents. 8 refs., 3 tabs

  4. Cause Analysis of Wuhan Tianheng Building Pile Accident

    2001-01-01

    The geological condition and the original structure feature and foundation design of Wuhan Tianheng building are described. The accident appearance of pile foundation in the construction execution of work is illustrated. The generating source of this pile foundation accident is analyzed in great details.``

  5. Storybuilder-A tool for the analysis of accident reports

    As part of an ongoing effort by the ministry of Social Affairs and Employment of The Netherlands a research project is being undertaken to construct a causal model for the most commonly occurring scenarios related to occupational risk. This model should provide quantitative insight in the causes and consequences of occupational accidents. The results should be used to help selecting optimal strategies to reduce these risks taking the costs of accidents and of measures into account. The research is undertaken by an international consortium under the name of Workgroup Occupational Risk Model. One of the components of the model is a tool to systematically classify and analyse past accidents. This tool: 'Storybuilder' and its place in the Occupational Risk Model (ORM) are described in the paper. The paper gives some illustrations of the application of the Storybuilder, drawn from the study of ladder accidents, which forms one of the biggest single accident categories in the Dutch data

  6. GPHS-RTG launch accident analysis for Galileo and Ulysses

    This paper presents the safety program conducted to determine the response of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) to potential launch accidents of the Space Shuttle for the Galileo and Ulysses missions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provided definition of the Shuttle potential accidents and characterized the environments. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program (LASEP) was developed by GE to analyze the RTG response to these accidents. RTG detailed response to Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) fragment impacts, as well as to other types of impact, was obtained from an extensive series of hydrocode analyses. A comprehensive test program was conducted also to determine RTG response to the accident environments. The hydrocode response analyses coupled with the test data base provided the broad range response capability which was implemented in LASEP

  7. Analysis of causes and sequences of the accident on Fukushima NPP as a factor of sever accidents prevention in the vessel reactor

    In this monograph, the provisional analysis of the causes and sequences of the sever accidents on the Fukushima NPP is presented. The analysis of the possibility of the origin of extreme events connected with the flooding of Zaporizhzhia NPP industrial site, emergency of the steam-gas explosions on NPPs with WWER and other phenomena occurred under sever accidents was carried out. It was presented the authors original working-out on symptom-oriented approaches of sever accident initiating event list identification, on criteria substantiation of explosion safety and optimization of processes management at sever accidents, as well as on the methodological support of the accident beyond the design basis management at the WWER for prevention of their transition in the stage of sever accidents.

  8. Statistical analysis of accident data associated with sea transport (invited paper)

    This analysis, based on Lloyd's database, gives an accurate description of the world fleet and the most severe ship accidents, as well as the frequencies of accident per ship type, accident category and age category. Complementary analyses were achieved using fire accident databases from AEA Technology and the French Bureau Veritas. The results should be used in the perspective of safety assessments of maritime shipments of radioactive material. For this purpose the existence of the regulations of the International Maritime Organisation has to be considered, leading to the introduction of correction factors to these statistical data derived from general cargo-carrying ships. (author)

  9. China's coal mine accident statistics analysis and one million tons mortality prediction

    Qiao Tong

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the general rule of coal mine accidents in China in recent years, the data of coal mine accident in 2011-2015 is analyzed. The mathematical statistics method is used to analyze the occurrence year, type, season and area of the accident. The results of analysis shows that the coal mine accident has been reduced year by year, and the frequency of gas explosion is the highest. The frequency and the number of deaths in the second quarter of the year are the highest; Guizhou p...

  10. Analysis of the TMI-2 accident using ATHLET-CD

    On March 28, 1979, the only loss-of-coolant accident so far in a light water reactor exceeding the design basis occurred in unit 2 of the U.S. PWR of Three Mile Island (TMI-2) near Harrisburg. The accident entailed massive core degradation accompanied by the formation of a bed of debris and a molten pool. Approx. 30 t of the core inventory were moved to the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel; the vessel sustained this thermal load. Also because of the worldwide use of light water reactors, this accident constitutes an outstanding event with respect to technical safety which can be used to describe the phenomenology of the early as well as the late phases of core degradation, for modeling and, above all, for validation of codes analyzing very severe accidents and, in this way, can serve to enhance the safety of plants in operation. After a brief introduction, the accident scenario is outlined. On this basis, the ATHLET-CD code is introduced, and the approach used in modeling the plant and the accident is described. Finally, the results of the simulation carried out with ATHLET-CD are summarized and evaluated. It is seen that the code is able, in principle, to describe the accident with good accuracy. However, further development with respect to modeling of the late phase is required. (orig.)

  11. Analysis of the TMI-2 accident using ATHLET-CD

    Drath, T.; Kleinhietpass, I.D.; Koch, M.K. [Lehrstuhl fuer Energiesysteme und Energiewirtschaft (LEE), Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (RUB) (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    On March 28, 1979, the only loss-of-coolant accident so far in a light water reactor exceeding the design basis occurred in unit 2 of the U.S. PWR of Three Mile Island (TMI-2) near Harrisburg. The accident entailed massive core degradation accompanied by the formation of a bed of debris and a molten pool. Approx. 30 t of the core inventory were moved to the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel; the vessel sustained this thermal load. Also because of the worldwide use of light water reactors, this accident constitutes an outstanding event with respect to technical safety which can be used to describe the phenomenology of the early as well as the late phases of core degradation, for modeling and, above all, for validation of codes analyzing very severe accidents and, in this way, can serve to enhance the safety of plants in operation. After a brief introduction, the accident scenario is outlined. On this basis, the ATHLET-CD code is introduced, and the approach used in modeling the plant and the accident is described. Finally, the results of the simulation carried out with ATHLET-CD are summarized and evaluated. It is seen that the code is able, in principle, to describe the accident with good accuracy. However, further development with respect to modeling of the late phase is required. (orig.)

  12. Sodium fast reactor gaps analysis of computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety.

    Carbajo, Juan (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache %3CU%2B2013%3E CEA, France)

    2011-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an expert-opinion elicitation activity designed to qualitatively assess the status and capabilities of currently available computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety calculations of advanced sodium fast reactors, and identify important gaps. The twelve-member panel consisted of representatives from five U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, and BNL), the University of Wisconsin, the KAERI, the JAEA, and the CEA. The major portion of this elicitation activity occurred during a two-day meeting held on Aug. 10-11, 2010 at Argonne National Laboratory. There were two primary objectives of this work: (1) Identify computer codes currently available for SFR accident analysis and reactor safety calculations; and (2) Assess the status and capability of current US computer codes to adequately model the required accident scenarios and associated phenomena, and identify important gaps. During the review, panel members identified over 60 computer codes that are currently available in the international community to perform different aspects of SFR safety analysis for various event scenarios and accident categories. A brief description of each of these codes together with references (when available) is provided. An adaptation of the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) for computational modeling and simulation is described for use in this work. The panel's assessment of the available US codes is presented in the form of nine tables, organized into groups of three for each of three risk categories considered: anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), design basis accidents (DBA), and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). A set of summary conclusions are drawn from the results obtained. At the highest level, the panel judged that current US code capabilities are adequate for licensing given reasonable margins, but expressed concern that US code development activities had stagnated and that the

  13. A study on the core analysis methodology for SMART CEA ejection accident-I

    A methodology to analyze the fuel enthalpy is developed based on MASTER that is a time dependent 3 dimensional core analysis code. Using the proposed methodology, SMART CEA ejection accident is analyzed. Moreover, radiation doses are estimated at the exclusion area boundary and low population zone to confirm the criteria for the accident. (Author). 31 refs., 13 tabs., 18 figs

  14. A method for modeling and analysis of directed weighted accident causation network (DWACN)

    Zhou, Jin; Xu, Weixiang; Guo, Xin; Ding, Jing

    2015-11-01

    Using complex network theory to analyze accidents is effective to understand the causes of accidents in complex systems. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to establish directed weighted accident causation network (DWACN) for the Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB) in the UK, which is based on complex network and using event chains of accidents. DWACN is composed of 109 nodes which denote causal factors and 260 directed weighted edges which represent complex interrelationships among factors. The statistical properties of directed weighted complex network are applied to reveal the critical factors, the key event chains and the important classes in DWACN. Analysis results demonstrate that DWACN has characteristics of small-world networks with short average path length and high weighted clustering coefficient, and display the properties of scale-free networks captured by that the cumulative degree distribution follows an exponential function. This modeling and analysis method can assist us to discover the latent rules of accidents and feature of faults propagation to reduce accidents. This paper is further development on the research of accident analysis methods using complex network.

  15. Analysis of the 1957-58 Soviet nuclear accident

    The occurrence of a Soviet accident in the winter of 1957-58, involving the atmospheric release of reprocessed fission wastes (cooling time approximately 1-2 yrs.), appears to have been confirmed, primarily by an analysis of the USSR radioecology literature. Due to the high population density in the affected region (Cheliabinsk Province in the highly industrialized Urals Region) and the reported level of 90Sr contamination, the event probably resulted in the evacuation and/or resettlement of the human population from a significant area (100-1000 km2). The resulting contamination zone is estimated to have contained approximately 106 Ci of 90Sr (reference radionuclide); a relatively small fraction of the total may have been dispersed as an aerosol. Although a plausible explanation for the incident exists (i.e., use of now-obsolete waste storage-137Cs isotope separation techniques), it is not yet possible, based on the limited information presently available, to completely dismiss this phenomenon as a purely historical event. It seems imperative that we have a complete explanation of the causes and consequences of this incident. Soviet experience gained in application of corrective measures would be invaluable to the rest of the world nuclear community

  16. BNL severe accident sequence experiments and analysis program

    A major source of containment pressurization during severe accidents is the transfer of stored energy from the hot core material to available cooling water. One mode of thermal interaction involves the quench of superheated beds of debris which could be present in the reactor cavity following melt-through or failure of the reactor vessel. This work supports development of models of superheated bed quench phenomena which are to be incorporated into containment analysis computer codes such as MARCH, CONTAIN, and MEDICI. A program directed towards characterization of the behavior of superheated debris beds has been completed. This work addressed the quench of superheated debris which is postulated to exist in the reactor cavity of a PWR following melt ejection from the primary system. The debris is assumed to be cooled by a pool of water overlying the bed of hot debris. This work has led to the development of models to predict rate of steam generation during the quench process and, in addition, the ability to assess the coolability of the debris during the transient quench process. A final report on this work has been completed. This report presents a brief description of some relevant results and conclusions. 15 refs

  17. Analysis of the source term in the Chernobyl-4 accident

    The report presents the analysis of the Chernobyl accident and of the phenomena with major influence on the source term, including the chemical effects of materials dumped over the reactor, carried out by the Chair of Nuclear Technology at Madrid University under a contract with the CEC. It also includes the comparison of the ratio (Cs-137/Cs-134) between measurements performed by Soviet authorities and countries belonging to the Community and OECD area. Chapter II contains a summary of both isotope measurements (Cs-134 and Cs-137), and their ratios, in samples of air, water, soil and agricultural and animal products collected by the Soviets in their report presented in Vienna (1986). Chapter III reports on the inventories of cesium isotopes in the core, while Chapter IV analyses the transient, especially the fuel temperature reached, as a way to deduce the mechanisms which took place in the cesium escape. The cesium source term is analyzed in Chapter V. Normal conditions have been considered, as well as the transient and the post-accidental period, including the effects of deposited materials. The conclusion of this study is that Chernobyl accidental sequence is specific of the RBMK type of reactors, and that in the Western world, basic research on fuel behaviour for reactivity transients has already been carried out

  18. Analysis of Loss-of-Coolant Accidents in the NBSR

    Baek J. S.; Cheng L.; Diamond, D.

    2014-05-23

    This report documents calculations of the fuel cladding temperature during loss-of-coolant accidents in the NBSR. The probability of a pipe failure is small and procedures exist to minimize the loss of water and assure emergency cooling water flows into the reactor core during such an event. Analysis in the past has shown that the emergency cooling water would provide adequate cooling if the water filled the flow channels within the fuel elements. The present analysis is to determine if there is adequate cooling if the water drains from the flow channels. Based on photographs of how the emergency water flows into the fuel elements from the distribution pan, it can be assumed that this water does not distribute uniformly across the flow channels but rather results in a liquid film flowing downward on the inside of one of the side plates in each fuel element and only wets the edges of the fuel plates. An analysis of guillotine breaks shows the cladding temperature remains below the blister temperature in fuel plates in the upper section of the fuel element. In the lower section, the fuel plates are also cooled by water outside the element that is present due to the hold-up pan and temperatures are lower than in the upper section. For small breaks, the simulation results show that the fuel elements are always cooled on the outside even in the upper section and the cladding temperature cannot be higher than the blister temperature. The above results are predicated on assumptions that are examined in the study to see their influence on fuel temperature.

  19. Analysis of the rod drop accident for Angra-1

    The aim of this work is to present a rod drop accident analysis for the third cycle of the Angra-1 nuclear power plant operating in the automatic control mode. In this analysis all possible configurations for dropped rods caused by a single failure in the controller circuits have been considered. The dropped rod worths, power distributions and excore detector tilts were determined by using the Siemens/KWU neutronic code system, in particular the MEDIUM2, PINPOW and DETILT codes. The transient behaviour of the plant during the rod drop event was simulated with the SACI2/MOD0 code, developed at CDTN. Determinations related to the DNBR design limit were conducted by utilizing the CDTN PANTERA-1P subchannel code. The transient analysis indicated that for dropped rod worths greater than about 425 pcm reactor trip from negative neutron flux rate will take place independently of core conditions. In the range from 0 to 425 pcm large power overshoots may occur as a consequence of the automatic control system action. The magnitude of the maximum power peaking during the event increases with the dropped rod worth, as far as the control bank is able to compensate the initial reactivity decrease. Thermal-hydraulic evaluations carried out with the PANTERA-1P code show that for all the relevant dropped rod worths the minimum DNBR will remain above a limit value of 1.365. Even if this conservative limit is met, the calculated nuclear power peaking factors, FNAH, will be at least 6% higher than the allowable FNAH-values. Therefore, the DNBR design margin will be preserved at the event of rod drop. (author)

  20. Offsite Radiological Consequence Analysis for the Bounding Flammable Gas Accident

    Carro, C A

    2003-01-01

    This document quantifies the offsite radiological consequences of the bounding flammable gas accident for comparison with the 25 rem Evaluation Guideline established in DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A. The bounding flammable gas accident is a detonation in a single-shell tank The calculation applies reasonably conservation input parameters in accordance with DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A, guidance. Revision 1 incorporates comments received from Office of River Protection.

  1. Statistical analysis of accident data associated with sea transport (data from 1994-1997). Annex 1

    This analysis is based on Lloyd's database concerning sea transport accidents for the 1994-1997 period and completes the previous analysis based on 1994 data. It gives an accurate description of the world fleet and the most severe ship accidents (total losses), as well as the frequencies of accident (in average on the 1994-1997 period the frequency of accident for cargo carrying ships is 2.57.10-3 loss /ship.year). Furthermore, an analysis has been performed on the ship casualties recorded by the Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) for UK vessels for the 1990-1996 period, this database including all accidents for which a declaration has been made to authorities (for example, the average frequency of fires derived from this analysis is 1.36.10-2 per ship.year, this occurrence corresponding to the occurrence of initiating events of fire). Concerning fire accidents aboard ships supposed to be representative of the radioactive material transporters, a specific analysis was achieved by the French Bureau Veritas, on a selection of the world casualties (total losses) for the 1978-1988 period. This analysis related to the origin of the fire points out that it originates mainly in the machinery room and quarters. In a few cases the fire duration recorded is more than one day. (author)

  2. Fuel safety analysis following feeder break accident for refurbished Wolsong 1

    The objective of the fuel analysis for the postulated accident was to estimate the quantity and timing of a fission product release from fuels when a postulated single channel accident occurs in CANDU 6 reactors. In this study, a fuel safety analysis for the refurbished Wolsong 1 was carried out by using the latest IST (Industrial Standard Toolset) fuel code. The relevant accident scenario focused in this study was a feeder stagnation break accident. The amount of fission product inventory and its distribution during the normal operating conditions were calculated by using the latest ELESTRES-IST code. For a calculation of transient fission product release following the feeder stagnation break, it was assumed that all fuel sheaths in the channel were failed and the entire gap inventory was released instantaneously at the beginning of the accident. The additional releases from the grain boundary and in-grain bound inventories were estimated by applying the Gehl's release model. (author)

  3. Statistical analysis of causes and countermeasures to the accidents in coal mines

    SHI Jian-jun; DUAN Xu-hua

    2007-01-01

    Statistics and analysis was made in causes, places and proportions about all kinds of disasters and accidents in coal mines of China in resent 50 years. The analysis indicates the emphasis reason that result in the accidents in coal mines are artificial cause,explosion of mash gas and coal dust, water flood, fire hazard. The accidents mostly happened on stope which is more often than other places, following by the driving work face.This not only supplies the managers with basic reference about safe administration, but also suggests the countermeasures in reducing accidents: improve the disposition of person, perfect all kinds of rules and regulations, severely investigate, analyze and deal with the accidents.

  4. Human reliability analysis of Three Mile Island II accident considering THERP and ATHEANA methodologies

    The main purpose of this work is to perform a human reliability analysis using THERP (Technique for Human Error Prediction) and ATHEANA (A Technique for Human Error Analysis) methodologies, as well as their application to the development of qualitative and quantitative analysis of a nuclear power plant accident. The accident selected was the one that occurred at the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plan. The accident analysis has revealed a series of unsafe actions that resulted in permanent loss of the unit. This study also aims at enhancing the understanding of THERP and ATHEANA methodologies and their possible interactions with practical applications. The TMI accident analysis has pointed out the possibility of integration of THERP and ATHEANA methodologies. In this work, the integration between both methodologies is developed in a way to allow better understanding of the influence of operational context on human errors. (author)

  5. Human reliability analysis of Three Mile Island II accident considering THERP and ATHEANA methodologies

    Fonseca, Renato Alves; Alvarenga, Marco Antonio Bayout; Gibelli, Sonia Maria Orlando [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: rfonseca@cnen.gov.br; bayout@cnen.gov.br; sonia@cnen.gov.br; Alvim, Antonio Carlos Marques; Frutuoso e Melo, Paulo Fernando Ferreira [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: Alvim@con.ufrj.br; frutuoso@con.ufrj.br

    2008-07-01

    The main purpose of this work is to perform a human reliability analysis using THERP (Technique for Human Error Prediction) and ATHEANA (A Technique for Human Error Analysis) methodologies, as well as their application to the development of qualitative and quantitative analysis of a nuclear power plant accident. The accident selected was the one that occurred at the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plan. The accident analysis has revealed a series of unsafe actions that resulted in permanent loss of the unit. This study also aims at enhancing the understanding of THERP and ATHEANA methodologies and their possible interactions with practical applications. The TMI accident analysis has pointed out the possibility of integration of THERP and ATHEANA methodologies. In this work, the integration between both methodologies is developed in a way to allow better understanding of the influence of operational context on human errors. (author)

  6. Modelling and analysis of severe accidents for VVER-1000 reactors

    Tusheva, Polina

    2012-03-09

    Accident conditions involving significant core degradation are termed severe accidents /IAEA: NS-G-2.15/. Despite the low probability of occurrence of such events, the investigation of severe accident scenarios is an important part of the nuclear safety research. Considering a hypothetical core melt down scenario in a VVER-1000 light water reactor, the early in-vessel phase focusing on the thermal-hydraulic phenomena, and the late in-vessel phase focusing on the melt relocation into the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head, are investigated. The objective of this work is the assessment of severe accident management procedures for VVER-1000 reactors, i.e. the estimation of the maximum period of time available for taking appropriate measures and particular decisions by the plant personnel. During high pressure severe accident sequences it is of prime importance to depressurize the primary circuit in order to allow for effective injection from the emergency core cooling systems and to avoid reactor pressure vessel failure at high pressure that could cause direct containment heating and subsequent challenge to the containment structure. Therefore different accident management measures were investigated for the in-vessel phase of a hypothetical station blackout accident using the severe accident code ASTEC, the mechanistic code ATHLET and the multi-purpose code system ANSYS. The analyses performed on the PHEBUS ISP-46 experiment, as well as simulations of small break loss of coolant accident and station blackout scenarios were used to contribute to the validation and improvement of the integral severe accident code ASTEC. Investigations on the applicability and the effectiveness of accident management procedures in the preventive domain, as well as detailed analyses on the thermal-hydraulic phenomena during the early in-vessel phase of a station blackout accident have been performed with the mechanistic code ATHLET. The results of the simulations show, that the

  7. Modelling and analysis of severe accidents for VVER-1000 reactors

    Accident conditions involving significant core degradation are termed severe accidents /IAEA: NS-G-2.15/. Despite the low probability of occurrence of such events, the investigation of severe accident scenarios is an important part of the nuclear safety research. Considering a hypothetical core melt down scenario in a VVER-1000 light water reactor, the early in-vessel phase focusing on the thermal-hydraulic phenomena, and the late in-vessel phase focusing on the melt relocation into the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head, are investigated. The objective of this work is the assessment of severe accident management procedures for VVER-1000 reactors, i.e. the estimation of the maximum period of time available for taking appropriate measures and particular decisions by the plant personnel. During high pressure severe accident sequences it is of prime importance to depressurize the primary circuit in order to allow for effective injection from the emergency core cooling systems and to avoid reactor pressure vessel failure at high pressure that could cause direct containment heating and subsequent challenge to the containment structure. Therefore different accident management measures were investigated for the in-vessel phase of a hypothetical station blackout accident using the severe accident code ASTEC, the mechanistic code ATHLET and the multi-purpose code system ANSYS. The analyses performed on the PHEBUS ISP-46 experiment, as well as simulations of small break loss of coolant accident and station blackout scenarios were used to contribute to the validation and improvement of the integral severe accident code ASTEC. Investigations on the applicability and the effectiveness of accident management procedures in the preventive domain, as well as detailed analyses on the thermal-hydraulic phenomena during the early in-vessel phase of a station blackout accident have been performed with the mechanistic code ATHLET. The results of the simulations show, that the

  8. Risk analysis of emergent water pollution accidents based on a Bayesian Network.

    Tang, Caihong; Yi, Yujun; Yang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jie

    2016-01-01

    To guarantee the security of water quality in water transfer channels, especially in open channels, analysis of potential emergent pollution sources in the water transfer process is critical. It is also indispensable for forewarnings and protection from emergent pollution accidents. Bridges above open channels with large amounts of truck traffic are the main locations where emergent accidents could occur. A Bayesian Network model, which consists of six root nodes and three middle layer nodes, was developed in this paper, and was employed to identify the possibility of potential pollution risk. Dianbei Bridge is reviewed as a typical bridge on an open channel of the Middle Route of the South to North Water Transfer Project where emergent traffic accidents could occur. Risk of water pollutions caused by leakage of pollutants into water is focused in this study. The risk for potential traffic accidents at the Dianbei Bridge implies a risk for water pollution in the canal. Based on survey data, statistical analysis, and domain specialist knowledge, a Bayesian Network model was established. The human factor of emergent accidents has been considered in this model. Additionally, this model has been employed to describe the probability of accidents and the risk level. The sensitive reasons for pollution accidents have been deduced. The case has also been simulated that sensitive factors are in a state of most likely to lead to accidents. PMID:26433361

  9. Waste management facility accident analysis (WASTE ACC) system: software for analysis of waste management alternatives

    This paper describes the Waste Management Facility Accident Analysis (WASTEunderscoreACC) software, which was developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to support the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). WASTEunderscoreACC is a decision support and database system that is compatible with Microsoft reg-sign Windows trademark. It assesses potential atmospheric releases from accidents at waste management facilities. The software provides the user with an easy-to-use tool to determine the risk-dominant accident sequences for the many possible combinations of process technologies, waste and facility types, and alternative cases described in the WM PEIS. In addition, its structure will allow additional alternative cases and assumptions to be tested as part of the future DOE programmatic decision-making process. The WASTEunderscoreACC system demonstrates one approach to performing a generic, systemwide evaluation of accident risks at waste management facilities. The advantages of WASTEunderscoreACC are threefold. First, the software gets waste volume and radiological profile data that were used to perform other WM PEIS-related analyses directly from the WASTEunderscoreMGMT system. Second, the system allows for a consistent analysis across all sites and waste streams, which enables decision makers to understand more fully the trade-offs among various policy options and scenarios. Third, the system is easy to operate; even complex scenario runs are completed within minutes

  10. Energy Analysis of Road Accidents Based on Close-Range Photogrammetry

    Alejandro Morales

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an efficient and low-cost approach for energy analysis of road accidents using images obtained using consumer-grade digital cameras and smartphones. The developed method could be used by security forces in order to improve the qualitative and quantitative analysis of traffic accidents. This role of the security forces is crucial to settle arguments; consequently, the remote and non-invasive collection of accident related data before the scene is modified proves to be essential. These data, taken in situ, are the basis to perform the necessary calculations, basically the energy analysis of the road accident, for the corresponding expert reports and the reconstruction of the accident itself, especially in those accidents with important damages and consequences. Therefore, the method presented in this paper provides the security forces with an accurate, three-dimensional, and scaled reconstruction of a road accident, so that it may be considered as a support tool for the energy analysis. This method has been validated and tested with a real crash scene simulated by the local police in the Academy of Public Safety of Extremadura, Spain.

  11. Challenges in thermohydraulic analysis of LWR severe accidents: steam explosions

    A severe accident is an accident state beyond design basis events with significant core damage and release of radioactive materials to the environment. Nuclear power plants are designed to endure prescribed accident situations against which safety equipment should be effective enough to assure that environmental release of radioactive materials is avoided. However, three major severe accidents have already experienced in commercial scale power plants so far, namely, Three Mile Island (TMI), Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi. Thus, the severe accident is no more just a hypothesis but a reality that have to be prepared with enough effectivity. A method for assessment of steam explosion load has been established based on presently available phenomenological information and simulation technique. On the 3 other hand, the present model is not sufficient for slow long term FCIs in which the steam and non-condensable gas generation rate for vessel pressurization and the resulting debris bed geometry for its coolability are in question. Also, there are shortcomings from the present analytical method such as influences of the mesh size on the void fraction, lacking radiation heat transfer beyond meshes and so on. If the level of the model is upgraded to CFD type including more flexible particle methods, direct simulation of complicated phenomena involving molten core, may become available. This may be one of the directions of future development

  12. Analysis of the Chernobyl reactor accident. Pt. 2

    Of the six items of improvement measures including a future improvement measure announced by the USSR regarding the accident of Chernobyl nuclear power plant No. 4 reactor, the three items having exercised large influence over the plant behavior at the accident were analyzed by WIMS-ATR, EUREKA-2 and other calculational codes, and technically evaluated. As a result the following have been made clear: (1) If 80 manual control rods are inserted 1.2 m deep from the core upper end, any accident can be prevented by further inserting them at a 0.4 m/s speed, even under such power increase conditions as in this accident. (2) If the additional 80 manual control rods are inserted into the reactor, the coolant void reactivity coefficient can be improved from 2x10-4 Δk/k/% void to 1.4x10-4 Δk/k/% void. Further if the coefficient is less than 1.5x10-4 Δk/k/% void, the power increase speed will slow down much more and similar accidents can fully be prevented by means of the currently designed control rods of the shut-down system. (orig.)

  13. Safety Analysis Results for Cryostat Ingress Accidents in ITER

    Merrill, B. J.; Cadwallader, L. C.; Petti, D. A.

    1997-06-01

    Accidents involving the ingress of air, helium, or water into the cryostat of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak design have been analyzed with a modified version of the MELCOR code for the ITER Non-site Specific Safety Report (NSSR-1). The air ingress accident is the result of a postulated breach of the cryostat boundary into an adjoining room. MELCOR results for this accident demonstrate that the condensed air mass and increased heat loads are not a magnet safety concern, but that the partial vacuum in the adjoining room must be accommodated in the building design. The water ingress accident is the result of a postulated magnet arc that results in melting of a Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) coolant pipe, discharging PHTS water and PHTS water activated corrosion products and HTO into the cryostat. MELCOR results for this accident demonstrate that the condensed water mass and increased heat loads are not a magnet safety concern, that the cryostat pressure remains below design limits, and that the corrosion product and HTO releases are well within the ITER release limits.

  14. Analysis of the radiation accident in El Salvador

    On 5 February 1989 at 2 a.m. local time in a cobalt-60 industrial irradiation facility, a series of events started leading to one of the most serious radiation accidents in this type of installation. It took place in Soyapango, a city situated 5 km from San Salvador, the capital of the Republic of El Salvador. In this accident, three workers were involved in the first event and a further four in the second. When the accident took place, the activity level was approximately 0.66 PBq (18,000 Ci). The source became blocked when being lowered to its safe position, where upon the technician responsible for the irradiator entered the chamber in breach of the few inadequate safety procedures, accompanied by two colleagues from an adjacent department; the three workers suffered acute radiation exposure, with the result that one of them died six-and-a-half months later, the second had both his legs amputated at mid-thigh, while the third recovered completely. This article describes the irradiator, outlines the causes of the accident and analyses the economic and social repercussions, with the aim of helping teams responsible for radiation protection and safety in industrial irradiation facilities to identify potentially hazardous circumstances and avoid accidents. (author)

  15. China's coal mine accident statistics analysis and one million tons mortality prediction

    Qiao Tong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the general rule of coal mine accidents in China in recent years, the data of coal mine accident in 2011-2015 is analyzed. The mathematical statistics method is used to analyze the occurrence year, type, season and area of the accident. The results of analysis shows that the coal mine accident has been reduced year by year, and the frequency of gas explosion is the highest. The frequency and the number of deaths in the second quarter of the year are the highest; Guizhou province, Hunan province, Yunnan province and Heilongjiang province are the accident prone provinces. GM (1, 1 dynamic prediction model is used to model and forecast the future million tons mortality in China. The forecast results show that the coal mine's million tons mortality rate of China showed a decreasing trend. The forecast results are scientific and reliable, and it is of great significance to the safety management of coal mine.

  16. Analysis on the Direct Vessel Injection Line Break Accident at APR+ Standard Design

    Lee, Youngho; Yang, Huichang [TUEV Rheinland Korea Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kap [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    APR+ (Advanced Power Reactor +) is the newest design variation of APR1400. The main characteristics of APR+, compared with APR1400, are passive safety systems and dedicated systems for severe accident mitigation. APR+ is under review for standard design certification. In this study, thermal hydraulic analysis on the Direct Vessel Injection (DVI) line break accident postulated in APR+ design was performed. Comparisons of the major parameters which can represent the overall accident behavior during DVI line break accident, several discrepancies between this study and reference data were found and such discrepancies include actuation timing of SIPs and SITs, and also include parameter behaviors of break flow rate and PCT at the accident initiation. These differences were mainly from the different thermal hydraulic models in simulation codes. The behavioral differences for break flow as well as peak cladding temperatures will be examined further as a next step for this study.

  17. Impact of the TMI accident on the French nuclear program and the safety analysis

    Almost immediately after the TMI accident, Electricite de France (EdF), Framatome and the French safety authorities started a large scale program of actions designed to analyse and understand the causes of the accident, and draw lessons applicable in France. This paper discusses these actions and the main conclusions of TMI accident analysis in France, notably: the fundamental role of plant operators, and the importance of operator training, written instructions and procedures, and diagnostic aids; the importance of feeding back operating experience to design teams, and incorporating the results of accident and post-accident studies in operating procedures; the necessity to improve knowledge of core cooling modes, including during two-phase flow and natural circulation; measures to improve particular systems and components

  18. Accident Precursor Analysis and Management: Reducing Technological Risk Through Diligence

    Phimister, James R. (Editor); Bier, Vicki M. (Editor); Kunreuther, Howard C. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    Almost every year there is at least one technological disaster that highlights the challenge of managing technological risk. On February 1, 2003, the space shuttle Columbia and her crew were lost during reentry into the atmosphere. In the summer of 2003, there was a blackout that left millions of people in the northeast United States without electricity. Forensic analyses, congressional hearings, investigations by scientific boards and panels, and journalistic and academic research have yielded a wealth of information about the events that led up to each disaster, and questions have arisen. Why were the events that led to the accident not recognized as harbingers? Why were risk-reducing steps not taken? This line of questioning is based on the assumption that signals before an accident can and should be recognized. To examine the validity of this assumption, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) undertook the Accident Precursors Project in February 2003. The project was overseen by a committee of experts from the safety and risk-sciences communities. Rather than examining a single accident or incident, the committee decided to investigate how different organizations anticipate and assess the likelihood of accidents from accident precursors. The project culminated in a workshop held in Washington, D.C., in July 2003. This report includes the papers presented at the workshop, as well as findings and recommendations based on the workshop results and committee discussions. The papers describe precursor strategies in aviation, the chemical industry, health care, nuclear power and security operations. In addition to current practices, they also address some areas for future research.

  19. A Hybrid Algorithm of Traffic Accident Data Mining on Cause Analysis

    Jianfeng Xi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic accident databases provide the basis for road traffic accident analysis, the data inside which usually has a radial, multidimensional, and multilayered structure. Traditional data mining algorithms such as association rules, when applied alone, often yield uncertain and unreliable results. An improved association rule algorithm based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO put forward by this paper can be used to analyze the correlation between accident attributes and causes. The new algorithm focuses on characteristics of the hyperstereo structure of road traffic accident data, and the association rules of accident causes can be calculated more accurately and in higher rates. A new concept of Association Entropy is also defined to help compare the importance between different accident attributes. T-test model and Delphi method were deployed to test and verify the accuracy of the improved algorithm, the result of which was a ten times faster speed for random traffic accident data sampling analyses on average. In the paper, the algorithms were tested on a sample database of more than twenty thousand items, each with 56 accident attributes. And the final result proves that the improved algorithm was accurate and stable.

  20. Solid waste accident analysis in support of the Savannah River Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement

    The potential for facility accidents and the magnitude of their impacts are important factors in the evaluation of the solid waste management addressed in the Environmental Impact Statement. The purpose of this document is to address the potential solid waste management facility accidents for comparative use in support of the Environmental Impact Statement. This document must not be construed as an Authorization Basis document for any of the SRS waste management facilities. Because of the time constraints placed on preparing this accident impact analysis, all accident information was derived from existing safety documentation that has been prepared for SRS waste management facilities. A list of facilities to include in the accident impact analysis was provided as input by the Savannah River Technology Section. The accident impact analyses include existing SRS waste management facilities as well as proposed facilities. Safety documentation exists for all existing and many of the proposed facilities. Information was extracted from this existing documentation for this impact analysis. There are a few proposed facilities for which safety analyses have not been prepared. However, these facilities have similar processes to existing facilities and will treat, store, or dispose of the same type of material that is in existing facilities; therefore, the accidents can be expected to be similar

  1. Model verification of the debris coolability analysis module in the severe accident analysis code 'SAMPSON'

    The debris coolability analysis module in the severe accident analysis code 'SAMPSON' has been enhanced to predict more mechanistically the safety margin of present reactor pressure vessels in a severe accident. The module calculates debris spreading and cooling through melting and solidification in combination with the temperature distribution of the vessel wall and it evaluates the wall failure. Debris cooling after spreading is solved on the basis of natural convection analysis with melting and solidification on three-dimensional Cartesian co-ordinates. The calculated results for the cooling model are compared with the results from a three-dimensional natural convection experiment. The comparisons show the module capability for predictions of the debris temperature in the cooling process. Furthermore, it is seen that the prediction capability in the thermal load of the vessel wall is improved, since the penetration nozzles melting is modeled and combined with the cooling model. The module provides a good tool for the prediction of the reactor safety margin in a severe accident through the three-dimensional analysis of debris cooling. (author)

  2. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 15, Analysis of significant accidents

    Power excursions of the RA reactor a mathematical model of reactor kinetic behaviour was formulated to describe power and temperature coefficients for both reactor fuel and moderator. Computer code TM-1 was written for analysis of possible reactor accidents. Power excursions caused by uncontrolled control rod removal and heavy water flow into the central vertical experimental channel were analyzed. Accidents caused by fuel elements handling were discussed including possible fuel element damage. Although the probability for uncontrolled radioactive materials release into the environment is very low, this type of accidents are analyzed as well including the impact on the personnel and the environment. A separate chapter describes analysis of the loss of flow accident. Safety analysis covers the possible damage of the outer steel Ra reactor vessel and the water screens which are part of the water biological shield

  3. Analysis of the On the Spot (OTS) Road Accident Database

    Mansfield, H.; Bunting, A.; Martens, M.; Horst, A.R.A. van der

    2008-01-01

    The UK Government is seeking to substantially reduce the number of road traffic accidents (RTAs) leading to injury or loss of life. Specifically, relative to the average figures for 1994–98, the Government would like to meet the following road casualty reduction targets by 2010: • a 40% reduction in

  4. A method for risk analysis of nuclear reactor accidents

    A method is developed for deriving a set of equations relating the public risk in potential nuclear reactor accidents to the basic variables, such as population distributions and radioactive releases, which determine the consequences of the accidents. The equations can be used to determine the risk for different values of the basic variables without the need of complex computer programs and can be used to determine the variable values which are needed to satisfy various risk criteria. The methodology development in the study involves fitting risk distribution of frequency versus consequence to parametric distribution and then relating the distribution parameters to the basic variable of interest using regression techniques. The Weibull distribution was found to be appropriate for the early fatalities distributions for hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, dam failures and nuclear reactor accidents. A set of equations is then derived which relate the population distribution and the parameters of the Weibull distribution for early fatalities from PWR accidents. The derived equations are straightforward and useful in analyses of population and other effects (eg radioactive release) on risk

  5. Analysis of Criticality Accident Transients of Uranium Solution System

    DUAN; Ming-hui; DU; Kai-wen; LIU; Zhen-hua

    2012-01-01

    <正>In the nuclear fuel cycle, fissile materials are often dissolved in water. Criticality accidents are likely to happen in the uranium solution system and release a large amount of energy and radioactive materials. Therefore, the criticality safety of uranium solution system is very important in the nuclear safety technology research.

  6. Method for risk analysis of nuclear reactor accidents

    A method is developed for deriving a set of equations relating the public risk in potential nuclear reactor accidents to the basic variables, such as population distributions and radioactive releases, which determine the consequences of the accidents. The equations can be used to determine the risk for different values of the basic variables without the need of complex computer programs and can be used to determine the variable values which are needed to satisfy various risk criteria. The methodology developed in this study consists of two steps. The first step involves fitting the risk distributions of frequency versus consequence to parametric distributions which contain a small number of parameters. The second step involves deriving the equations which relate the distribution parameters to the basic variables of interest. Regression techniques are used for this second step. The methodology is demonstrated for examples based on the results of the Reactor Safety Study. The calculated distributions of early fatalities in nuclear reactor accidents and the historical records of fatalities in hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes and dam failures are examined to determine an appropriate family of parametric distributions. From these examinations, the Weibull distribution is found to be appropriate for all of the examined events. A set of equations is then derived which relate the population distribution and the parameters of the Weibull distributions for early fatalities from PWR accidents. Regression equations relating the parameters to the characteristics of radioactive releases are also derived

  7. URBAN TRAFFIC ACCIDENT ANALYSIS BY USING GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM

    Meltem SAPLIOĞLU

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, traffic accidents that cause more social and economic losses than that of natural disasters,have become a national problem in Turkey. To solve this problem and to reduce the casualties, road safety programs are tried to be developed. It is necessary to develop the most effective measures with low investment cost due to limited budgets allocated to such road safety programs. The most important program is to determine dangerous locations of traffic accidents and to improve these sections from the road safety view point. New Technologies are driving a cycle of continuous improvement that causes rapid changes in the traffic engineering and any engineering services within it. It is obvious that this developed services will be the potential for forward-thinking engineering studies to take a more influence role. In this study, Geographic Information System (GIS was used to identify the hazardous locations of traffic accidents in Isparta. Isparta city map was digitized by using Arcinfo 7.21. Traffic accident reports occurred between 1998-2002 were obtained from Directory of Isparta Traffic Region and had been used to form the database. Topology was set up by using Crash Diagrams and Geographic Position Reference Systems. Tables are formed according to the obtained results and interpreted.

  8. Analysis of Intra-Urban Traffic Accidents Using Spatiotemporal Visualization Techniques

    Soltani Ali

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic accidents (RTAs rank in the top ten causes of the global burden of disease and injury, and Iran has one of the highest road traffic mortality rates in the world. This paper presents a spatiotemporal analysis of intra-urban traffic accidents data in metropolitan Shiraz, Iran during the period 2011-2012. It is tried to identify the accident prone zones and sensitive hours using Geographic Information Systems (GIS-based spatio-temporal visualization techniques. The analysis aimed at the identification of high-rate accident locations and safety deficient area using Kernel Estimation Density (KED method. The investigation indicates that the majority of occurrences of traffic accidents were on the main roads, which play a meta-region functional role and act as a linkage between main destinations with high trip generation rate. According to the temporal distribution of car crashes, the peak of traffic accidents incident is simultaneous with the traffic congestion peak hours on arterial roads. The accident-prone locations are mostly located in districts with higher speed and traffic volume, therefore, they should be considered as the priority investigation locations to safety promotion programs.

  9. Loss of Off Site Power Accident Analysis Probabilistic and Deterministic Approach

    The accident analysis of a reactor should consider analysis of Design Base Accidents DBA . One of these accident is the Loss of Off Site Power LOSP. For Egypt, the LOSP frequency is abnormally high; 10 times/year, this gives a good cause for initiating the present work. The present work adopted both the probabilistic and the deterministic methods to determine the likelihood of the accident and to establish and assertion of the variation of the reactor safety related parameters e.g. power, flow and temperature over the prescribed accident evolution time. The accident scenario covers the failure sequences of the Reactor Safety systems. Four generated LOSP accident scenarios are analyzed. Two codes are used, the first is the IAEA Probabilistic Safety Assessment Package PSAPACK, the second TR22M21 has been developed by the author to simulate the expected behavior of the reactor thermal-hydraulic parameters. It has been found that the two codes have successfully identify a severe scenario with annual occurrences frequency of 3.8 E-5 which could significantly contribute to the risk of the core damage

  10. The Influence of Seasonal Characteristics on the Accident Consequences Analysis

    In order to examine the influence of seasonal characteristics on accident consequences, we defined a limited number of basic spectra based on the relative importance of source term release parameters and meteorological conditions on offsite health effects and economic impacts. We then investigated the variation in numbers and frequency of early health effects and economic impacts resulting from the severe accidents of the YGN 3 and 4 nuclear power plants from spectrum to spectrum by using MACCS code. These investigations were for meteorological conditions defined as typical on an annual basis. Also, we investigated the variation in numbers and frequency of early health effects and economic impacts for the same standard spectra for meteorological conditions defined as typical on a seasonal basis recognizing that there are four seasons with distinct meteorological characteristics. Results show that there are large differences in consequences from spectrum to spectrum, although an equal amount and mix of radioactive material is released to the atmosphere in each case. Therefore, release parameters and meteorological data have to be well characterized in order to estimate accident consequences resulting from an accident accurately. Also, there are large differences in the estimated number of health effects and economic impacts from season to season due to distinct seasonal variations in meteorological conditions in Korea. In fall, the early fatalities and early fatality risk show minimum values due to enhanced dispersion arising from increased atmospheric instability, and the early fatalities show maximum value in summer due to a large rainfall rate. On the contrast, the economic cost shows maximum value in fall and minimum in summer due to different atmospheric dispersion and rainfall rate. Therefore, it is necessary to consider seasonal characteristics in developing emergency response strategies for reducing offsite early health risks in the event of a severe

  11. Relevant scenarios and uncertainty analysis of severe accidents in the U.S. EPR

    As part of U.S. EPR design certification activities, AREVA has prepared analyses to support the US NRC's regulatory expectation with regard to the resolution of several severe accident safety issues identified in SECY 93-087. To address the large uncertainties associated with severe accident progression, AREVA NP has developed and applied a best-estimate plus uncertainty methodology to the analysis of severe accidents. The uncertainty methodology considers a broad spectrum of phenomenological and process uncertainties. Unique among the uncertainty parameters considered is the sampling of event sequence (i.e., scenario type). (authors)

  12. Study on accident response robot for nuclear power plant and analysis of key technologies

    With the rapid development of nuclear power industry and improving demand for nuclear safety, the demand for developing accident response robot in nuclear power plant is increasingly urgent. Firstly, design analysis for accident response robot is taken with environmental conditions in nuclear power plant. Secondly, development for response robots after Chernobyl, JCO and Fukushima accidents are reviewed, and improvements for commercial mobile robot for use in radioactive environments are summarized. Finally, some key technologies including radiation-tolerance and system reliability are analyzed in details. (authors)

  13. Analysis of nuclear accidents and associated problems relevant to public perception of risk

    The analytical study of nuclear accidents, even if they are limited in number, forms a significant part of the vast discipline of industrial plant risk analysis. The retrospective analysis of the causes and various elements which contributed to the evolution of real accidents, as well as, the evaluation of the consequences and lessons learned, constitute a bank of information which, when suitably elaborated through a process of rational synthesis, can strongly influence the preparation of safety normatives, plant design specifications, environmental impacts assessments, and the perception of risk. This latter aspect is gaining importance today as growing public awareness and sensitivity towards the development and use of new technologies now bear heavily on new plant decision making. This paper examines how the public perception of risk regarding nuclear energy has been influenced by the events surrounding the Chernobyl and Three Mile Island accidents and the way in which information dissemination concerning these accidents was handled by mass media

  14. The grey interrelation analysis and trend prediction on the safety accident in Kailun Coal Mine

    Yang, Z.; Ding, Y.; Zhao, C. [Kailun (Group) Limited Liability Corporation, Tangshan (China)

    2003-02-01

    The man-machine-environment systems in Kailuan Coal Mines is taken as the object of study to make the grey interrelation analysis for coal mine accidents and related factors by integrating the Grey System Theory with actual coal mine production. It also forecasts the accident development trend in coalmine in accordance with the accident statistics of coalmine by means of the grey forecast method. The injury rate per 1000 persons in Jinggezhuang Coal Mine in 2001 and 2002 was forecast and the results were 8.1043 and 7.7033 respectively. The process and the result in the analysis and forecast indicate that the method is simple and easy to use, and the result is reliable. The method and result of the study provide the theoretical reference for the quantitative study in coalmine accidents, as well as the basis for decision-making on safety management of coal enterprise. 3 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. An analysis of accidents involving towboat-barge combination on selected inland waterways of the United States.

    Gamble, William John

    1980-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This study uses a statistical analysis approach on a computerized data base to analyze accidents involving towboat-barge combinations on the inland waterways of the United States. The main areas explored are the factors affecting the severity and the frequency of accidents. In addition, multiple regression models are used to predict the severity of towboat accidents from a set of independent accident variables. Conclusions and recom...

  16. An Analysis of the Cumulative Uncertainty Associated with a Quantitative Consequence Assessment of a Major Accident

    JIRSA PAVEL

    2005-01-01

    The task of the article is to quantify the uncertainty of the possible results of the accident consequence assessment of the chemical production plant and to provide some description of potentional problems with literature references and examples to help to avoid the erroneous use of available formulas. Based on numbers presented in the article we may conclude, that the main source of uncertainty in the consequence analysis of chemical accident assessment is surprisingly not only the dispers...

  17. Of Disasters and Dragon Kings: A Statistical Analysis of Nuclear Power Incidents & Accidents

    Wheatley, Spencer; Sovacool, Benjamin; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01

    We provide, and perform a risk theoretic statistical analysis of, a dataset that is 75 percent larger than the previous best dataset on nuclear incidents and accidents, comparing three measures of severity: INES (International Nuclear Event Scale), radiation released, and damage dollar losses. The annual rate of nuclear accidents, with size above 20 Million US$, per plant, decreased from the 1950s until dropping significantly after Chernobyl (April, 1986). The rate is now roughly stable at 0....

  18. Thermal hydraulic studies of undercooling accidents in LMFBR safety analysis: Codes and validation

    This communication is related to the LMFBR safety analysis of undercooling accidents such as pump run down or total inlet blockage of a subassembly. The authors present the physical models developed for sodium boiling propagation and clad motion and their application to SCARABEE in pile experiments simulating loss of flow accidents in bundle geometry. These studies showed the validity of our description of boiling propagation and improved our understanding of the clad relocation phenomena

  19. Accident Analysis for the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion

    Baek J.; Diamond D.; Cuadra, A.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.R.

    2012-09-30

    Postulated accidents have been analyzed for the 20 MW D2O-moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analysis has been carried out for the present core, which contains high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and for a proposed equilibrium core with low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations were performed with the MCNPX code to determine homogenized fuel compositions in the lower and upper halves of each fuel element and to determine the resulting neutronic properties of the core. The accident analysis employed a model of the primary loop with the RELAP5 code. The model includes the primary pumps, shutdown pumps outlet valves, heat exchanger, fuel elements, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow accident resulting from loss of electrical power with an assumption of failure of shutdown cooling pumps, (4) loss-of-flow accident resulting from a primary pump seizure, and (5) loss-of-flow accident resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve. In addition, natural circulation cooling at low power operation was analyzed. The analysis shows that the conversion will not lead to significant changes in the safety analysis and the calculated minimum critical heat flux ratio and maximum clad temperature assure that there is adequate margin to fuel failure.

  20. Analysis of fission product release behavior during the TMI-2 accident

    An analysis of fission product release during the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident has been initiated to provide an understanding of fission product behavior that is consistent with both the best estimate accident scenario and fission product results from the ongoing sample acquisition and examination efforts. First principles fission product release models are used to describe release from intact, disrupted, and molten fuel. Conclusions relating to fission product release, transport, and chemical form are drawn. 35 references

  1. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis for reactor accident codes

    This paper summarizes a recently completed study that identified and investigated the difficulties and limitations of applying first-order adjoint sensitivity methods to reactor accident codes. The work extends earlier adjoint sensitivity formulations and applications to consider problem/model discontinuities in a general fashion, provide for response (R) formulations required by reactor safety applications, and provide a scheme for accurately handling extremely time-sensitive reactor accident responses. The scheme involves partitioning (dividing) the model into submodels (with spearate defining equations and initial conditions) at the location of discontinuity. Successful partitioning moves the problem dependence on the discontinuity location from the whole model system equations to the initial conditions of the second submodel

  2. Analysis of Fukushima nuclear accident and illustration of radioprotection

    This report based on the tracing of radiation dose variation during the Fukushima Nuclear Accident, systematically analyses the procedures which leaded the radioactive particles releasing into the environment. The essential discussion will be the approaches of production of nuclear radiation and the natural properties of radioactive particles. How to deal with the influence of Fukushima Nuclear Accident for public society is a problem not only for Japan but also for the whole nuclear industry. By comparing different technical methods to handle the radiation domination between China and France, two examples are introduced in detail: the detection of α-particle by CNRS (France) and detection of high energy electron by ESRF. Conclusions will emphasis on the protection for different radioactive particles, therefore the prospective of radioprotection, conjectures of using different protecting materials like shield material, absorbing material, and filtering material. (authors)

  3. Analysis of Traffic Accidents Using Hazard Index Method: Case of Denizli

    Cenk OZAN

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Traffic accidents that occur as a result of a combination of many factors are complex and difficult issue. Although many studies are carried out in order to reduce the number of traffic accidents in urban transportation networks, exactly prevention of traffic accidents which arise from human and environmental factors is impossible. Therefore, especially in the urban transportation networks, determining links which have an accident risk and taking required measures are very important. In this study, the hazard index has been used to determine links which have an accident risk. Transportation network which contains high traffic volume regions in Denizli has been selected as study area. In this network, data were collected to be used in the hazard index, hazard indexes were calculated for links and risk grading was conducted. Morning and evening peak hour speed and traffic volume surveys were carried out in order to be used in analyses. Results showed that hazard index method can be used in traffic accident risk analysis and it is determined that hazard index method can be used to form a basis for future studies about decreasing the number of traffic accidents.

  4. Maximum credible accident analysis for TR-2 reactor conceptual design

    A new reactor, TR-2, of 5 MW, designed in cooperation with CEN/GRENOBLE is under construction in the open pool of TR-1 reactor of 1 MW set up by AMF atomics at the Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center. In this report the fission product inventory and doses released after the maximum credible accident have been studied. The diffusion of the gaseous fission products to the environment and the potential radiation risks to the population have been evaluated

  5. Preliminary accident analysis of Flexblue® underwater reactor

    Haratyk Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexblue® is a subsea-based, transportable, small modular reactor delivering 160 MWe. Immersion provides the reactor with an infinite heat sink – the ocean – around the metallic hull. The reference design includes a loop-type PWR with two horizontal steam generators. The safety systems are designed to operate passively; safety functions are fulfilled without operator action and external electrical input. Residual heat is removed through four natural circulation loops: two primary heat exchangers immersed in safety tanks cooled by seawater and two emergency condensers immersed in seawater. In case of a primary piping break, a two-train safety injection system is actuated. Each train includes a core makeup tank, an accumulator and a safety tank at low pressure. To assess the capability of these features to remove residual heat, the reactor and its safety systems have been modelled using thermal-hydraulics code ATHLET with conservative assumptions. The results of simulated transients for three typical PWR accidents are presented: a turbine trip with station blackout, a large break loss of coolant accident and a small break loss of coolant accident. The analyses show that the safety criteria are respected and that the reactor quickly reaches a safe shutdown state without operator action and external power.

  6. Accident sequence precursor analysis level 2/3 model development

    Lui, C.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Galyean, W.J.; Brownson, D.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program currently uses simple Level 1 models to assess the conditional core damage probability for operational events occurring in commercial nuclear power plants (NPP). Since not all accident sequences leading to core damage will result in the same radiological consequences, it is necessary to develop simple Level 2/3 models that can be used to analyze the response of the NPP containment structure in the context of a core damage accident, estimate the magnitude of the resulting radioactive releases to the environment, and calculate the consequences associated with these releases. The simple Level 2/3 model development work was initiated in 1995, and several prototype models have been completed. Once developed, these simple Level 2/3 models are linked to the simple Level 1 models to provide risk perspectives for operational events. This paper describes the methods implemented for the development of these simple Level 2/3 ASP models, and the linkage process to the existing Level 1 models.

  7. DOE modifications to the MAAP [Modular Accident Analysis Program] code

    This report presents an enhanced model for the MAAP code that addresses fuel-cladding interaction and core mass relocation during core degradation. The main purpose of this work is to assess the potential for in-vessel hydrogen production and to reduce the uncertainty in fission product source term evaluation. The model provides a description of fuel behavior in which the fuel comprises uranium dioxide, zirconium dioxide, and U-Zr-O compounds. The composition of the U-Zr-O compounds and their solidus and liquidus temperatures are calculated throughout the core melt transient. The interaction of control rod materials with fuel and cladding and the relocation of control rod materials are not addressed in this enhanced model. The enhanced core melt progression model has been applied to a hypothetical station blackout accident with a small break via the reactor coolant pump seals. The new model has been benchmarked against both the LOFT experiment LP-FP-2 and the TMI-2 accident prior to the B-loop pump restart. Although some uncertainties and deviations were seen, general agreement was obtained with the experimental data and with the TMI-2 accident. 21 refs., 30 figs

  8. Advanced accident sequence precursor analysis level 2 models

    Galyean, W.J.; Brownson, D.A.; Rempe, J.L. [and others

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Accident Sequence Precursor program pursues the ultimate objective of performing risk significant evaluations on operational events (precursors) occurring in commercial nuclear power plants. To achieve this objective, the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research is supporting the development of simple probabilistic risk assessment models for all commercial nuclear power plants (NPP) in the U.S. Presently, only simple Level 1 plant models have been developed which estimate core damage frequencies. In order to provide a true risk perspective, the consequences associated with postulated core damage accidents also need to be considered. With the objective of performing risk evaluations in an integrated and consistent manner, a linked event tree approach which propagates the front end results to back end was developed. This approach utilizes simple plant models that analyze the response of the NPP containment structure in the context of a core damage accident, estimate the magnitude and timing of a radioactive release to the environment, and calculate the consequences for a given release. Detailed models and results from previous studies, such as the NUREG-1150 study, are used to quantify these simple models. These simple models are then linked to the existing Level 1 models, and are evaluated using the SAPHIRE code. To demonstrate the approach, prototypic models have been developed for a boiling water reactor, Peach Bottom, and a pressurized water reactor, Zion.

  9. Development of accident frequency analysis S/W for chemical processes

    Seo, Jae Min; Ko, Jae wook [College of Chemical Engineering, Kwangwoon University (Korea); Shin, Dong Il [School of Chemical Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    In this study, a computerized prototype program was developed with frequency analysis system as a main system and data base as sub-items to utilize data. Through use of gate-by-gate analysis and minimal cut set using boolean algebra, the frequency analysis program performed the qualitative approach for the accident development path and a quantitative risk analysis. In conclusion, it is thought that the resulting installation will be effective for lessening the probability of accidents through use of this lower cost software. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Analysis of severe hypothetical accidents for the SNR-300 MARK 1A core

    Two types of hypothetical accidents have been analysed for the fresh and irradiated SNR-300 MARK 1A cores: 1) Loss of flow accidents caused by a coast down of all primary pumps and simultaneous failure of both independent shutdown systems. 2) Transient overpower accidents caused by a reactivity input ramp and simultaneous failure of both independent shutdown systems. The analysis was done by using the CAPRI-2/KADIS computer-program-system which was developed at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe. Detailed parametric variations were performed for both accident types in case of the fresh core to determine the most important and influential parameters. These parameter studies were also used to allow a conservative parameter choice for the reference cases within a reasonable parameter band. In addition the parametric variations gave some insight under which circumstances the accident would lead into energetic disassembly, early shutdown with in-place cooling possibility, or a transition phase with extended fuel motion. The thermal energy in the molten fuel at the end of the nuclear excursion is one important quantity for the severity of the accident. In case of the loss of flow accidents these energies were 3,239 MWs and 3,605 MWs for the reference cases of the fresh and irradiated cores, respectively. The corresponding energies for the reference transient overpower accidents caused by a 15 cent/sec reactivity input ramp were 1,182 MWs and 2,940 MWs for the fresh and irradiated cores respectively. Besides the thermal energy release the analysis provides much more information, for example, about the core conditions at the end of the nuclear excursion. More important the analysis automatically gives the input data for the computer programs which analyse the mechanical response of the reactor tank and the tankinternal mechanical structures. (orig./HP)

  11. Computational analysis of the behaviour of nuclear fuel under steady state, transient and accident conditions

    Accident analysis is an important tool for ensuring the adequacy and efficiency of the provision in the defence in depth concept to cope with challenges to plant safety. Accident analysis is the milestone of the demonstration that the plant is capable of meeting any prescribed limits for radioactive releases and any other acceptable limits for the safe operation of the plant. It is used, by designers, utilities and regulators, in a number of applications such as: (a) licensing of new plants, (b) modification of existing plants, (c) analysis of operational events, (d) development, improvement or justification of the plant operational limits and conditions, and (e) safety cases. According to the defence in depth concept, the fuel rod cladding constitutes the first containment barrier of the fission products. Therefore, related safety objectives and associated criteria are defined, in order to ensure, at least for normal operation and anticipated transients, the integrity of the cladding, and for accident conditions, acceptable radiological consequences with regard to the postulated frequency of the accident, as usually identified in the safety analysis reports. Therefore, computational analysis of fuel behaviour under steady state, transient and accident conditions constitutes a major link of the safety case in order to justify the design and the safety of the fuel assemblies, as far as all relevant phenomena are correctly addressed and modelled. This publication complements the IAEA Safety Report on Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants (Safety Report Series No. 23) that provides practical guidance for establishing a set of conceptual and formal methods and practices for performing accident analysis. Computational analysis of the behaviour of nuclear fuel under transient and accident conditions, including normal operation (e.g. power ramp rates) is developed in this publication. For design basis accidents, depending on the type of influence on a fuel element

  12. Environmental decision support system on base of geoinformational technologies for the analysis of nuclear accident consequences

    The report deals with description of the concept and prototype of environmental decision support system (EDSS) for the analysis of late off-site consequences of severe nuclear accidents and analysis, processing and presentation of spatially distributed radioecological data. General description of the available software, use of modem achievements of geostatistics and stochastic simulations for the analysis of spatial data are presented and discussed

  13. The Cost of Company Occupational Accidents: An Activity Based Analysis using the SACA Method

    Rikhardsson, Pall M.; Impgaard, Martin

    - for evaluating the visible and hidden costs of corporate occupational accidents. It also focused on whether the registration, processing and reporting of these costs could be integrated in the corporate accounting information system. The project was based on case studies in 9 Danish companies within 3 different......The Systematic Accident Cost Analysis (SACA) project is a research project carried out during 2001 by The Aarhus School of Business and PricewaterhouseCoopers Denmark with financial support from The Danish National Working Environment Authority. It empirically tested a method - the SACA method...... industry sectors. The main conclusions are that only 2/3 of the costs of occupational accidents are visible in corporate accounting systems while 1/3 is hidden from management view. The highest cost of occupational accidents for a company with 3.600 employees was estimated to approximately $682...

  14. Approaches to accident analysis in recent US Department of Energy environmental impact statements

    A review of accident analyses in recent US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) was conducted to evaluate the consistency among approaches and to compare these approaches with existing DOE guidance. The review considered several components of an accident analysis: the overall scope, which in turn should reflect the scope of the EIS; the spectrum of accidents considered; the methods and assumptions used to determine frequencies or frequency ranges for the accident sequences; and the assumption and technical bases for developing radiological and chemical atmospheric source terms and for calculating the consequences of airborne releases. The review also considered the range of results generated with respect to impacts on various worker and general populations. In this paper, the findings of these reviews are presented and methods recommended for improving consistency among EISs and bringing them more into line with existing DOE guidance

  15. Cognitive workload analysis of Angra II nuclear power plant operators under design basis accidents

    This article presents an application of cognitive modelling for evaluation the workload of nuclear operator crew. The task chosen for modelling was the small break LOCA accident in Angra II nuclear power plant. In this modelling the operation teamwork is composed by a reactor operator, a turbine operator and a shift supervisor. In the simulation the correct identification of the accident type by the team during the period of automatic actions carried through the plant protection systems is considered, i.e., the identification of the accident type is carried out during the first thirty minutes after the accident beginning. The ACT-R (Adaptive Control of Thought - Rules) was used for the simulation. The article also presents the description of the basic features of ACT-R model. We conclude that, despite the approaches made in the cognitive tasks, program ACT-R is a useful instrument for cognitive analysis of operator crew. (author)

  16. Radiation accidents

    Radiation accidents may be viewed as unusual exposure event which provide possible high exposure to a few people and, in the case of nuclear plants events, low exposure to large population. A number of radiation accidents have occurred over the past 50 years, involving radiation machines, radioactive materials and uncontrolled nuclear reactors. These accidents have resulted in number of people have been exposed to a range of internal and external radiation doses and those involving radioactive materials have involved multiple routs of exposure. Some of the more important accidents involving significant radiation doses or releases of radioactive materials, including any known health effects involves in it. An analysis of the common characteristics of accidents is useful resolving overarching issues, as has been done following nuclear power, industrial radiography and medical accidents. Success in avoiding accidents and responding when they do occur requires planning in order to have adequately trained and prepared health physics organization; well defined and developed instrument program; close cooperation among radiation protection experts, local and state authorities. Focus is given to the successful avoidance of accidents and response in the events they do occur. Palomares, spain in late 1960, Goiania, Brazil in 1987, Thule, Greenland in 1968, Rocky flats, Colorado in 1957 and 1969, Three mile island, Pennsylvania in 1979, Chernobyl Ukraine in april 1986, Kyshtym, former Soviet Union in 1957, Windscale, UK in Oct. 1957 Tomsk, Russian Federation in 1993, and many others are the important examples of major radiation accidents. (author)

  17. Evaluation of uncertainties in relation to severe accidents and level-2 probabilistic safety analysis

    Uncertainties of various natures have to be taken into account in severe accident analysis, in particular those related to level-2 probabilistic safety analysis (PSA). However, the extension and application of uncertainty methods to severe accidents is more difficult than for design-basis accidents because of the considerable differences in the availability of experimental data and the level of development and validation of computer codes. Best-estimate approaches used in severe accidents require an assessment of related uncertainties. Besides the evaluation of experimental data scatter, expert judgement is usually needed to assess physical parameter uncertainties, which have to be propagated to results using different techniques. Moreover, the relation between uncertainties and stochastic probabilities (concerning for instance equipment failure and human error), remains an open question, in particular in the framework of level-2 PSAs. The workshop aimed to exchange information about the state of the art in this field and to facilitate the development of a coherent approach to uncertainties in relation to severe accidents. It also provides recommendations for future NEA work in this field. These proceedings gather twenty-four articles shared into four sessions dealing with: 1 - methods for uncertainty assessment, 2 - applications to uncertainty assessment on severe accident physical phenomena, 3 - applications to uncertainty assessment in level 2 PSA, and, 4 - general discussion, conclusions and recommendations

  18. Development of Methodology for Spent Fuel Pool Severe Accident Analysis Using MELCOR Program

    Kim, Won-Tae; Shin, Jae-Uk [RETech. Co. LTD., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Kwang-Il [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The general reason why SFP severe accident analysis has to be considered is that there is a potential great risk due to the huge number of fuel assemblies and no containment in a SFP building. In most cases, the SFP building is vulnerable to external damage or attack. In contrary, low decay heat of fuel assemblies may make the accident processes slow compared to the accident in reactor core because of a great deal of water. In short, its severity of consequence cannot exclude the consideration of SFP risk management. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has performed the consequence studies of postulated spent fuel pool accident. The Fukushima-Daiichi accident has accelerated the needs for the consequence studies of postulated spent fuel pool accidents, causing the nuclear industry and regulatory bodies to reexamine several assumptions concerning beyond-design basis events such as a station blackout. The tsunami brought about the loss of coolant accident, leading to the explosion of hydrogen in the SFP building. Analyses of SFP accident processes in the case of a loss of coolant with no heat removal have studied. Few studies however have focused on a long term process of SFP severe accident under no mitigation action such as a water makeup to SFP. USNRC and OECD have co-worked to examine the behavior of PWR fuel assemblies under severe accident conditions in a spent fuel rack. In support of the investigation, several new features of MELCOR model have been added to simulate both BWR fuel assembly and PWR 17 x 17 assembly in a spent fuel pool rack undergoing severe accident conditions. The purpose of the study in this paper is to develop a methodology of the long-term analysis for the plant level SFP severe accident by using the new-featured MELCOR program in the OPR-1000 Nuclear Power Plant. The study is to investigate the ability of MELCOR in predicting an entire process of SFP severe accident phenomena including the molten corium and concrete reaction. The

  19. The chemistry of fission products for accident analysis

    Current knowledge concerning the chemical state of the fission product elements during the development of accidents in water reactor systems is reviewed in this paper. The fission products elements which have been considered are Cs, I, Te, Sr and Ba but aspects of the behaviour of Mo, Ru and the lanthanides are also discussed. Some features of the reactions of the various species of these elements with other components of the reactor systems are described. The importance of having an adequate knowledge of thermodynamic data and phase equilibria of relatively simple systems in order to interpret experimental observations on complex multi-component systems is stressed

  20. Development of severe accident analysis code - A study on the molten core-concrete interaction under severe accidents

    Jung, Chang Hyun; Lee, Byung Chul; Huh, Chang Wook; Kim, Doh Young; Kim, Ju Yeul [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the phenomena of the molten core/concrete interaction during the hypothetical severe accident, and to develop the model for heat transfer and physical phenomena in MCCIs. The contents of this study are analysis of mechanism in MCCIs and assessment of heat transfer models, evaluation of model in CORCON code and verification in CORCON using SWISS and SURC Experiments, and 1000 MWe PWR reactor cavity coolability, and establishment a model for prediction of the crust formation and temperature of melt-pool. The properties and flow condition of melt pool covering with the conditions of severe accident are used to evaluate the heat transfer coefficients in each reviewed model. Also, the scope and limitation of each model for application is assessed. A phenomenological analysis is performed with MELCOR 1.8.2 and MELCOR 1.8.3 And its results is compared with corresponding experimental reports of SWISS and SURC experiments. And the calculation is performed to assess the 1000 MWe PWR reactor cavity coolability. To improve the heat transfer model between melt-pool and overlying coolant and analyze the phase change of melt-pool, 2 dimensional governing equations are established using the enthalpy method and computational program is accomplished in this study. The benchmarking calculation is performed and its results are compared to the experiment which has not considered effects of the coolant boiling and the gas injection. Ultimately, the model shall be developed for considering the gas injection effect and coolant boiling effect. 66 refs., 10 tabs., 29 refs. (author)

  1. analysis of reactivity accidents in MTR for various protection system parameters and core condition

    Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) core was modified to irradiate LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) plates in two irradiation boxes for fission 99Mo production. The old core comprising 29 fuel elements and one Co Irradiation Device (CID) and the new core comprising 27 fuel elements, CID, and two 99Mo production boxes. The in core irradiation has the advantage of no special cooling or irradiation loop is required. The purpose of the present work is the analysis of reactivity accidents (RIA) for ETRR-2 cores. The analysis was done to evaluate the accidents from different point of view:1- Analysis of the new core for various Reactor Protection System (RPS) parameters 2- Comparison between the two cores. 3- Analysis of the 99Mo production boxes.PARET computer code was employed to compute various parameters. Initiating events in RIA involve various modes of reactivity insertion, namely, prompt critical condition (p=1$), accidental ejection of partial and complete CID uncontrolled withdrawal of a control rod accident, and sudden cooling of the reactor core. The time histories of reactor power, energy released, and the maximum fuel, clad and coolant temperatures of fuel elements and LEU plates were calculated for each of these accidents. The results show that the maximum clad temperatures remain well below the clad melting of both fuel and uranium plates during these accidents. It is concluded that for the new core, the RIA with scram will not result in fuel or uranium plate failure.

  2. Phenomenological uncertainty analysis of containment building pressure load caused by severe accident sequences

    Highlights: • Phenomenological uncertainty analysis has been applied to level 2 PSA. • The methodology provides an alternative to simple deterministic analyses and sensitivity studies. • A realistic evaluation provides a more complete characterization of risks. • Uncertain parameters of MAAP code for the early containment failure were identified. - Abstract: This paper illustrates an application of a severe accident analysis code, MAAP, to the uncertainty evaluation of early containment failure scenarios employed in the containment event tree (CET) model of a reference plant. An uncertainty analysis of containment pressure behavior during severe accidents has been performed for an optimum assessment of an early containment failure model. The present application is mainly focused on determining an estimate of the containment building pressure load caused by severe accident sequences of a nuclear power plant. Key modeling parameters and phenomenological models employed for the present uncertainty analysis are closely related to the in-vessel hydrogen generation, direct containment heating, and gas combustion. The basic approach of this methodology is to (1) develop severe accident scenarios for which containment pressure loads should be performed based on a level 2 PSA, (2) identify severe accident phenomena relevant to an early containment failure, (3) identify the MAAP input parameters, sensitivity coefficients, and modeling options that describe or influence the early containment failure phenomena, (4) prescribe the likelihood descriptions of the potential range of these parameters, and (5) evaluate the code predictions using a number of random combinations of parameter inputs sampled from the likelihood distributions

  3. BNL severe accident sequence experiments and analysis program

    Analyses of LWR degraded core accidents require mathematical characterization of two major sources of pressure and temperature loading on the reactor containment buildings: (1) steam generation from core debris-water thermal interactions and (2) molten core-concrete interactions. Experiments are in progress at BNL in support of analytical model development related to aspects of the above containment loading mechanisms. The work supports development and evaluation of the CORCON, MARCH, CONTAIN and MEDICI computer under development at other NRC-contractor laboratories. The thermal-hydraulic behavior of hot debris located within the reactor core region upon sudden introduction of cooling water is being investigated in a joint experimental and analytical program. This work supports development and evaluation of the SCDAP computer code being developed at EG and G to characterize in-vessel severe core damage accident sequences. Progress is described in the two areas of: 1) core debris thermal-hydraulic phenomenology and 2) heat transfer in core-concrete interactions

  4. A simple accident analysis program for student use

    The discussion of the computer programs used to analyze nuclear power behavior during accidents is generally an integral part of any course on nuclear reactor safety. It would be desirable to have the students run such codes to explore the effect of plant design, operating conditions, and control parameters on accident consequences. The very complicated input and long running times of the commonly used computer programs, however, make this impractical. The PCTRAN program for the simulation of general system response in real time on a personal computer, does meet the simple input and rapid running time needed for student use. However, since the original version of PCTRAN only tracks gross system parameters, such as average pressure, coolant temperature, and void fraction, the student is provided with little information on core behavior. It was concluded that the desired core behavior could be obtained from a revised PCTRAN while retaining rapid running time and simple input. Accordingly, a simple core model was added to the PCTRAN version designed to simulate the response of a pressurized water reactor with U-tube steam generators

  5. Comparing the two techniques Tripod Beta and Mort at a critical accident analysis in power plant construction

    Mohammad SaeidPoursoleiman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Accidents are one of the leading causes of death and disability. Despite great efforts made to prevent accidents, there is still no coherent system to identify the root causes of industrial accidents. Selection of appropriate accident analysis techniques and their comparison can be useful in this regard. This research aimed to analyze a fatal accident in a power plant construction project using the two methods of MORT and Tripod-Beta, and the comparison of the analyses. First, the report of the selected accident was studied, and the accident was analyzed by the two methods of MORT and Tripod-Beta. The next step was followed by the comparison and assessment of the methods of MORT and Tripod-Beta with the measures of time, cost, training needs, the need for technical forces, the number of causes identified, quantifiable, and the need for software to conduct analysis. The TripodBeta accident analysis cost less and requires less time, and less technical experts. Thorough analysis of major accidents needs to identify all the possible causes of the incident, including human error and equipment failure. Therefore, the complimentary use of both techniques of industrial accident analysis is recommended.

  6. Causes and simulation analysis of the accident on Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station

    In order to reproduce pressure, water level and temperature distribution in the reactor during the Fukushima accident by computerized simulation, severe accident analysis code needed to include specific phenomena such as direct vapor leaks into drywell due to over-temperature failures at in-core instrumentation tubes and flange of safety relief valve, leaks from drywell into reactor building at top head flange, incomplete vapor condensation inside pressure suppression chamber, seawater ingress into torus room, partial load operation of RCIC turbine and existence of branch pipes at water injected pipe from fire engines. This article described how dreadfully enlarged the Fukushima accident was, and its causes and sequences leading to meltdown based on the analyzed results obtained by improved code. Calculated amounts of molten core and hydrogen produced were 67% and 572 kg for Unit 1, 38% and 930 kg for Unit 2 and 40% and 880 kg for Unit 3. Causes of accident enlargement might be weak severe accident measures and no in-situ training and emergency manuals against long-term outages. Taking account of simulation results, there could exist accident enlargement (meltdown) preventable measures using available equipment. (T. Tanaka)

  7. Preliminary Analysis of Radiation Shielding for HIC Transport Package Under the Hypothetical Accident Conditions

    A radiation shielding analysis under the hypothetical accident condition has been conducted using a computer program MCNP5 for a B-type HIC (High Integrated Container) Transport Package, which contains HIC with radioactive waste or spent resin, for transportation from nuclear power plat sites to disposal repository. Radiation source term is first carefully determined from the safety analysis reports related to HIC for appropriate calculation. And then MCNP5 is performed to obtain the minimum crevice between package lid and body, which meets the dose rate limit under the hypothetical accident conditions. Standards and codes of radiation shielding analysis related to the hypothetical accident condition are prescribed in Korea Nuclear Law, IAEA Safety Standards Series for Radioactive Material Transport and US 10CFR Part 71

  8. Channel blockage accident analysis for research reactors with MTR- type fuel elements

    It is the purpose of this study to investigate the feasibility of removing the residual decay heat from core of TR-2 ,which is a pool-type research reactor, after a channel blockage accident event and to identify the principal factors involved in cooling process. To analyze this accident scenery, THEAP-I computer code, which is a single phase transient 3-D structure/1-D flow thermal hydraulics code developed with the aim to contribute mainly to the safety analysis of the open pool research reactors, was modified and used. All of the analysis results figured out the fact that the core melting was inevitable in case of an uninterrupted operation (continuous operation) preceding a channel blockage accident of the TR-2 Reactor. Such a result will even be met if the blockage occurs only in a single fuel element. The results of analysis are expressed in terms of temperature field distribution as a function of time

  9. Risk-based Analysis of Construction Accidents in Iran During 2007-2011-Meta Analyze Study

    AMIRI, Mehran; ARDESHIR, Abdollah; FAZEL ZARANDI, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The present study aimed to investigate the characteristics of occupational accidents and frequency and severity of work related accidents in the construction industry among Iranian insured workers during the years 20072011. Methods The Iranian Social Security Organization (ISSO) accident database containing 21,864 cases between the years 2007-2011 was applied in this study. In the next step, Total Accident Rate (TRA), Total Severity Index (TSI), and Risk Factor (RF) were defined. The core of this work is devoted to analyzing the data from different perspectives such as age of workers, occupation and construction phase, day of the week, time of the day, seasonal analysis, regional considerations, type of accident, and body parts affected. Results Workers between 15-19 years old (TAR=13.4%) are almost six times more exposed to risk of accident than the average of all ages (TAR=2.51%). Laborers and structural workers (TAR=66.6%) and those working at heights (TAR=47.2%) experience more accidents than other groups of workers. Moreover, older workers over 65 years old (TSI=1.97%> average TSI=1.60%), work supervisors (TSI=12.20% >average TSI=9.09%), and night shift workers (TSI=1.89% >average TSI=1.47%) are more prone to severe accidents. Conclusion It is recommended that laborers, young workers, weekend and night shift workers be supervised more carefully in the workplace. Use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) should be compulsory in working environments, and special attention should be undertaken to people working outdoors and at heights. It is also suggested that policymakers pay more attention to the improvement of safety conditions in deprived and cold western regions. PMID:26005662

  10. Reactor Core Coolability Analysis during Hypothesized Severe Accidents of OPR1000

    Lee, Yongjae; Seo, Seungwon; Kim, Sung Joong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan-Yeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Assessment of the safety features over the hypothesized severe accidents may be performed experimentally or numerically. Due to the considerable time and expenditures, experimental assessment is implemented only to the limited cases. Therefore numerical assessment has played a major role in revisiting severe accident analysis of the existing or newly designed power plants. Computer codes for the numerical analysis of severe accidents are categorized as the fast running integral code and detailed code. Fast running integral codes are characterized by a well-balanced combination of detailed and simplified models for the simulation of the relevant phenomena within an NPP in the case of a severe accident. MAAP, MELCOR and ASTEC belong to the examples of fast running integral codes. Detailed code is to model as far as possible all relevant phenomena in detail by mechanistic models. The examples of detailed code is SCDAP/RELAP5. Using the MELCOR, Carbajo. investigated sensitivity studies of Station Black Out (SBO) using the MELCOR for Peach Bottom BWR. Park et al. conduct regulatory research of the PWR severe accident. Ahn et al. research sensitivity analysis of the severe accident for APR1400 with MELCOR 1.8.4. Lee et al. investigated RCS depressurization strategy and developed a core coolability map for independent scenarios of Small Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA), SBO, and Total Loss of Feed Water (TLOFW). In this study, three initiating cases were selected, which are SBLOCA without SI, SBO, and TLOFW. The initiating cases exhibit the highest probability of transitioning into core damage according to PSA 1 of OPR 1000. The objective of this study is to investigate the reactor core coolability during hypothesized severe accidents of OPR1000. As a representative indicator, we have employed Jakob number and developed JaCET and JaMCT using the MELCOR simulation. Although the RCS pressures for the respective accident scenarios were different, the JaMCT and Ja

  11. [Comparative analysis of the radionuclide composition in fallout after the Chernobyl and the Fukushima accidents].

    Kotenko, K V; Shinkarev, S M; Abramov, Iu V; Granovskaia, E O; Iatsenko, V N; Gavrilin, Iu I; Margulis, U Ia; Garetskaia, O S; Imanaka, T; Khoshi, M

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear accident occurred at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) (March 11, 2011) similarly to the accident at the Chernobyl NPP (April 26, 1986) is related to the level 7 of the INES. It is of interest to make an analysis of the radionuclide composition of the fallout following the both accidents. The results of the spectrometric measurements were used in that comparative analysis. Two areas following the Chernobyl accident were considered: (1) the near zone of the fallout - the Belarusian part of the central spot extended up to 60 km around the Chernobyl NPS and (2) the far zone of the fallout--the "Gomel-Mogilev" spot centered 200 km to the north-northeast of the damaged reactor. In the case of Fukushima accident the near zone up to about 60 km considered. The comparative analysis has been done with respect to refractory radionuclides (95Zr, 95Nb, 141Ce, 144Ce), as well as to the intermediate and volatile radionuclides 103Ru, 106Ru, 131I, 134Cs, 137Cs, 140La, 140Ba and the results of such a comparison have been discussed. With respect to exposure to the public the most important radionuclides are 131I and 137Cs. For the both accidents the ratios of 131I/137Cs in the considered soil samples are in the similar ranges: (3-50) for the Chernobyl samples and (5-70) for the Fukushima samples. Similarly to the Chernobyl accident a clear tendency that the ratio of 131I/137Cs in the fallout decreases with the increase of the ground deposition density of 137Cs within the trace related to a radioactive cloud has been identified for the Fukushima accident. It looks like this is a universal tendency for the ratio of 131I/137Cs versus the 137Cs ground deposition density in the fallout along the trace of a radioactive cloud as a result of a heavy accident at the NPP with radionuclides releases into the environment. This tendency is important for an objective reconstruction of 131I fallout based on the results of 137Cs measurements of soil samples carried out at

  12. Development of debris coolability analysis module in severe accident analysis code SAMPSON for IMPACT project

    Debris coolability in the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel is an important factor for the evaluation of in-vessel debris retention. The debris coolability analysis module has been developed to predict more mechanistically the safety margin of the present reactor vessels in a severe accident. The module calculates debris spreading and cooling through melting and solidification in combination with the temperature distribution of the vessel wall and it evaluates the wall failure. Debris spreading is solved by the explicit method on a quasi-three-dimensional scheme and debris coolability is solved on the basis of natural convection analysis with melting and solidification. The calculated results for spreading were compared with the results from a water spreading experiment on the floor and the results for coolability were compared with those from an n-octadecane melting experiment in the rectangular vessel. The comparisons showed the capability for predictions of the spearhead transportation in the debris spreading process and of the melting front transportation and time evolution of the fluid temperature in the melting process. The module provides a good tool for the prediction of the reactor pressure vessel safety margin in a severe accident through the analysis of debris spreading and coolability. (author)

  13. Development of debris coolability analysis module in severe accident analysis code SAMPSON for IMPACT project

    Ujita, Hiroshi [Advanced Simulation Systems Department, Nuclear Power Engineering Cooperation, Tokyo (Japan); Hidaka, Masataka; Susuki, Akira; Ishida, Naoyuki

    1999-10-01

    Debris coolability in the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel is an important factor for the evaluation of in-vessel debris retention. The debris coolability analysis module has been developed to predict more mechanistically the safety margin of the present reactor vessels in a severe accident. The module calculates debris spreading and cooling through melting and solidification in combination with the temperature distribution of the vessel wall and it evaluates the wall failure. Debris spreading is solved by the explicit method on a quasi-three-dimensional scheme and debris coolability is solved on the basis of natural convection analysis with melting and solidification. The calculated results for spreading were compared with the results from a water spreading experiment on the floor and the results for coolability were compared with those from an n-octadecane melting experiment in the rectangular vessel. The comparisons showed the capability for predictions of the spearhead transportation in the debris spreading process and of the melting front transportation and time evolution of the fluid temperature in the melting process. The module provides a good tool for the prediction of the reactor pressure vessel safety margin in a severe accident through the analysis of debris spreading and coolability. (author)

  14. Analysis of media coverage and KINS communication activities on Fukushima accident

    The people and mass media of Korea, the closest country to Japan, showed great interest in Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. The Korean government and KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) attempted to provide accurate information to the press through various communication actions. In this study, we conducted an in-depth analysis of the tendencies of the press according to the accident sequence and tracked the diffusion of this issue. The purpose of this study is to determine the properties of the crisis and essence of the issue. We also carry out a general evaluation and draw implications through an analysis of the communication actions of KINS

  15. Fission product transport analysis in a loss of decay heat removal accident at Browns Ferry

    This paper summarizes an analysis of the movement of noble gases, iodine, and cesium fission products within the Mark-I containment BWR reactor system represented by Browns Ferry Unit 1 during a postulated accident sequence initiated by a loss of decay heat removal (DHR) capability following a scram. The event analysis showed that this accident could be brought under control by various means, but the sequence with no operator action ultimately leads to containment (drywell) failure followed by loss of water from the reactor vessel, core degradation due to overheating, and reactor vessel failure with attendant movement of core debris onto the drywell floor

  16. MELCOR code analysis of a severe accident LOCA at Peach Bottom Plant

    A design-basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) concurrent with complete loss of the emergency core cooling systems (ECCSs) has been analyzed for the Peach Bottom atomic station unit 2 using the MELCOR code, version 1.8.1. The purpose of this analysis is to calculate best-estimate times for the important events of this accident sequence and best-estimate source terms. Calculated pressures and temperatures at the beginning of the transient have been compared to results from the Peach Bottom final safety analysis report (FSAR). MELCOR-calculated source terms have been compared to source terms reported in the NUREG-1465 draft

  17. Classification of the railway accident in accordance with the requirement of the safety analysis of transporting spent fuel

    Based on the analysis of the difference between the accident severity categorization used in the Ministry of Railway and that used in the safety analysis of the transporting spent fuel, a method used for the classification of the railway accident in accordance with the requirement of the safety analysis of transporting spent fuel is suggested. The method classifies the railway accidents into 10 scenarios and make it possible to scale the accident through directly using the data documented by the Ministry of Railway without any additional effort

  18. A computer code for analysis of severe accidents in LWRs

    The ICARE2 computer code, developed and validated since 1988 at IPSN (nuclear safety and protection institute), calculates in a mechanistic way the physical and chemical phenomena involved in the core degradation process during possible severe accidents in LWR's. The coupling between ICARE2 and the best-estimate thermal-hydraulics code CATHARE2 was completed at IPSN and led to the release of a first ICARE/CATHARE V1 version in 1999, followed by 2 successive revisions in 2000 and 2001. This documents gathers all the contributions presented at the first international ICARE/CATHARE users'club seminar that took place in November 2001. This seminar was characterized by a high quality and variety of the presentations, showing an increase of reactor applications and user needs in this area (2D/3D aspects, reflooding, corium slumping into the lower head,...). 2 sessions were organized. The first one was dedicated to the applications of ICARE2 V3mod1 against small-scale experiments such as PHEBUS FPT2 and FPT3 tests, PHEBUS AIC, QUENCH experiments, NRU-FLHT-5 test, ACRR-MP1 and DC1 experiments, CORA-PWR tests, and PBF-SFD1.4 test. The second session involved ICARE/CATHARE V1mod1 reactor applications and users'guidelines. Among reactor applications we found: code applicability to high burn-up fuel rods, simulation of the TMI-2 transient, simulation of a PWR-900 high pressure severe accident sequence, and the simulation of a VVER-1000 large break LOCA scenario. (A.C.)

  19. A computer code for analysis of severe accidents in LWRs

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The ICARE2 computer code, developed and validated since 1988 at IPSN (nuclear safety and protection institute), calculates in a mechanistic way the physical and chemical phenomena involved in the core degradation process during possible severe accidents in LWR's. The coupling between ICARE2 and the best-estimate thermal-hydraulics code CATHARE2 was completed at IPSN and led to the release of a first ICARE/CATHARE V1 version in 1999, followed by 2 successive revisions in 2000 and 2001. This documents gathers all the contributions presented at the first international ICARE/CATHARE users'club seminar that took place in November 2001. This seminar was characterized by a high quality and variety of the presentations, showing an increase of reactor applications and user needs in this area (2D/3D aspects, reflooding, corium slumping into the lower head,...). 2 sessions were organized. The first one was dedicated to the applications of ICARE2 V3mod1 against small-scale experiments such as PHEBUS FPT2 and FPT3 tests, PHEBUS AIC, QUENCH experiments, NRU-FLHT-5 test, ACRR-MP1 and DC1 experiments, CORA-PWR tests, and PBF-SFD1.4 test. The second session involved ICARE/CATHARE V1mod1 reactor applications and users'guidelines. Among reactor applications we found: code applicability to high burn-up fuel rods, simulation of the TMI-2 transient, simulation of a PWR-900 high pressure severe accident sequence, and the simulation of a VVER-1000 large break LOCA scenario. (A.C.)

  20. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of TMI-2 accident scenario using simulation based techniques

    The Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident has been studied extensively, as part of both post-accident technical assessment and follow-up computer code calculations. The models used in computer codes for severe accidents have improved significantly over the years due to better understanding. It was decided to reanalyze the severe accident scenario using current state of the art codes and methodologies. This reanalysis was adopted as a part of the joint standard problem exercise for the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) - United States Regulatory Commission (USNRC) bilateral safety meet. The accident scenario was divided into four phases for analysis viz., Phase 1 covers from the accident initiation to the shutdown of the last Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCPs) (0 to 100 min), Phase 2 covers initial fuel heat up and core degradation (100 to 174 min), Phase 3 is the period of recovery of the core water level by operating the reactor coolant pump, and the core reheat that followed (174 to 200 min) and Phase 4 covers refilling of the core by high pressure injection (200 to 300 min). The base case analysis was carried out for all four phases. The majority of the predicted parameters are in good agreement with the observed data. However, some parameters have significant deviations compared to the observed data. These discrepancies have arisen from uncertainties in boundary conditions, such as makeup flow, flow during the RCP 2B transient (Phase 3), models used in the code, the adopted nodalisation schemes, etc. In view of this, uncertainty and sensitivity analyses are carried out using simulation based techniques. The paper deals with uncertainty and sensitivity analyses carried out for the first three phases of the accident scenario.

  1. Pressure Load Analysis during Severe Accidents for the Evaluation of Late Containment Failure in OPR-1000

    The MAAP code is a system level computer code capable of performing integral analyses of potential severe accident progressions in nuclear power plants, whose main purpose is to support a level 2 probabilistic safety assessment or severe accident management strategy developments. The code employs lots of user-options for supporting a sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The present application is mainly focused on determining an estimate of the containment building pressure load caused by severe accident sequences. Key modeling parameters and phenomenological models employed for the present uncertainty analysis are closely related to in-vessel hydrogen generation, gas combustion in the containment, corium distribution in the containment after a reactor vessel failure, corium coolability in the reactor cavity, and molten-corium interaction with concrete. The phenomenology of severe accidents is extremely complex. In this paper, a sampling-based phenomenological uncertainty analysis was performed to statistically quantify uncertainties associated with the pressure load of a containment building for a late containment failure evaluation, based on the key modeling parameters employed in the MAAP code and random samples for those parameters. Phenomenological issues surrounding the late containment failure mode are highly complex. Included are the pressurization owing to steam generation in the cavity, molten corium-concrete interaction, late hydrogen burn in the containment, and the secondary heat removal availability. The methodology and calculation results can be applied for the optimum assessment of a late containment failure model. The accident sequences considered were a loss of coolant accidents and loss of offsite accidents expected in the OPR-1000 plant. As a result, uncertainties addressed in the pressure load of the containment building were quantified as a function of time. A realistic evaluation of the mean and variance estimates provides a more complete

  2. Optimizing severe accident containment filtered vent systems - Severe accident analysis and the dry and scrubber filter technology

    The accident at Fukushima has re-emphasized the importance of the capability to protect containment integrity during severe accidents. In the area of containment filtered vent systems, advances have been made since the original systems were installed in some plants in the late eighties and nineties. The paper describes new work in developing design specific requirements and system design.

  3. Breaking the chain: An empirical analysis of accident causal factors by human factors analysis and classification system

    Li, Wen-Chin; Harris, Don

    2006-01-01

    This research analyzed 523 accidents in the R.O.C. Air Force between 1978 and 2002 using the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) framework described by Wiegmann & Shappell (2003). This study provides an understanding, based upon empirical evidence, of how actions and decisions at higher levels in the organization to result in operational errors and accidents. Suggestions are made about intervention strategies focusing on the categories at higher levels of HFACS. Specific ...

  4. International activities for the analysis of the TMI-2 accident with special consideration of ATHLET calculations

    Several OECD countries still have great interest to analyze the TMI-2 accident. Thermal hydraulic best estimate codes and severe accident codes are used to calculate the TMI-2 analysis exercise defined by a CSNI task group. Fourteen organizations in nine OECD countries are participating in the exercise. Four thermal hydraulic best estimate codes and six severe accident codes are used. The Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) is using the thermal hydraulic code ATHLET developed in the GRS to calculate the TMI-2 analysis exercise. Lessons learned are concentrated on the assessment of ATHLET, show advantages of the two phase thermal hydraulic model used, and identify areas for further development. Results from ATHLET calculations are compared with results from other OECD-codes. (orig.)

  5. Fission product release analysis code during accident conditions of HTGR, RACPAC

    Fission product release analysis code, RACPAC (Fission Product Release Analysis Code from Fuel Particle in Accident Condition), was developed to calculate fractional release from the core during accident conditions of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor. RACPAC code has following features. (1) Fission product release fraction after the reactor scram is calculated based on the analytical solution with reduced diffusion coefficient. (2) The reduced diffusion coefficient for each nuclide is calculated from the (R/B) value, which is defined as release rate to birth rate of fission product. (3) The temperature transient after the accident can be taken into consideration in fractional release calculation with RACPAC. This paper describes calculation model of fission product release from fuel particle, calculation model of the reduced diffusion coefficient, users' manual and calculation examples. (author)

  6. An overview of severe accident modeling and analysis work for the ANS reactor conceptual safety analysis report

    ORNL's Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will be a new user facility for all kinds of neutron research, centered around a research reactor of unprecedented neutron beam flux. A defense-in-depth philosophy has been adopted. In response to this commitment, ANS Project management has initiated severe accident analysis and related technology development efforts early-on in the design phase itself. Early consideration of severe accident issues will aid in designing a sufficiently robust containment for retention and controlled release of radionuclides in the event of such an accident. It will also provide a means for satisfying on- and off-site regulatory requirements and provide containment response and source term analyses for level-2 and -3 Probabilistic Risk Analyses (PRAs) that will be produced. Moreover, it will provide the best possible understanding of the ANS under severe accident conditions, and consequently provide insights for the development of strategies and design philosophies for accident management, mitigation, and emergency preparedness. This paper presents a perspective overview of the severe accident modeling and analysis work for the ANS Conceptual Safety Analysis Report (CSAR)

  7. Preliminary Analysis of a Loss of Condenser Vacuum Accident Using the MARS-KS Code

    In accordance with revision of NUREG-0800 of USNRC, the area of review for loss of condenser vacuum(LOCV) accident has been expanded to analyze both peak pressures of primary and secondary system separately. Currently, the analysis of LOCV accident, which is caused by malfunction of condenser, has been focused to fuel cladding integrity and peak pressure in the primary system. In this paper, accident analysis for LOCV using MARS-KS code were conducted to support the licensing review on transient behavior of secondary system pressure of APR1400 plant. The accident analysis for the loss of condenser vacuum (LOCV) of APR1400 was conducted with the MARS-KS code to support the review on the pressure behavior of primary and secondary system. Total four cases which have different combination of availability of offsite power and the pressurizer spray are considered. The preliminary analysis results shows that the initial conditions or assumptions which concludes the severe consequence are different for each viewpoint, and in some cases, it could be confront with each viewpoint. Therefore, with regard to the each acceptance criteria, figuring out and sensitivity analysis of the initial conditions and assumptions for system pressure would be necessary

  8. Preliminary Analysis of a Loss of Condenser Vacuum Accident Using the MARS-KS Code

    Kim, Jieun Kim; Bang, Young Seok; Oh, Deog Yeon; Kim, Kap; Woo, Sweng-Wong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In accordance with revision of NUREG-0800 of USNRC, the area of review for loss of condenser vacuum(LOCV) accident has been expanded to analyze both peak pressures of primary and secondary system separately. Currently, the analysis of LOCV accident, which is caused by malfunction of condenser, has been focused to fuel cladding integrity and peak pressure in the primary system. In this paper, accident analysis for LOCV using MARS-KS code were conducted to support the licensing review on transient behavior of secondary system pressure of APR1400 plant. The accident analysis for the loss of condenser vacuum (LOCV) of APR1400 was conducted with the MARS-KS code to support the review on the pressure behavior of primary and secondary system. Total four cases which have different combination of availability of offsite power and the pressurizer spray are considered. The preliminary analysis results shows that the initial conditions or assumptions which concludes the severe consequence are different for each viewpoint, and in some cases, it could be confront with each viewpoint. Therefore, with regard to the each acceptance criteria, figuring out and sensitivity analysis of the initial conditions and assumptions for system pressure would be necessary.

  9. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for Ignalina NPP confinement in case of loss of coolant accident

    At present the best-estimate approach in the safety analysis of nuclear power plants is widely used around the world. The application of such approach requires to estimate the uncertainty of the calculated results. Various methodologies are applied in order to determine the uncertainty with the required accuracy. One of them is the statistical methodology developed at GRS mbH in Germany and integrated into the SUSA tool, which was applied for the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the thermal-hydraulic parameters inside the confinement (Accident Localisation System) of Ignalina NPP with RBMK-1500 reactor in case of Maximum Design Basis Accident (break of 900 mm diameter pipe). Several parameters that could potentially influence the calculated results were selected for the analysis. A set of input data with different initial values of the selected parameters was generated. In order to receive the results with 95 % probability and 95 % accuracy, 100 runs were performed with COCOSYS code developed at GRS mbH. The calculated results were processed with SUSA tool. The performed analysis showed a rather low dispersion of the results and only in the initial period of the accident. Besides, the analysis showed that there is no threat to the building structures of Ignalina NPP confinement in case of the considered accident scenario. (author)

  10. The survey analysis of problems of calculated modelling of accidents with loss the heat-carrier on a VVER

    The analysis of known outcomes of accounts of accidents by de pressurizing of outlines of a VVER is carried out. The outcomes of these researches confirm realization of normative conditions of safety. At the same time, the development of direction connected with the calculated analysis additional to the plan of accidents is necessary

  11. Calculation and Analysis of Neutron Time-spatial Kinetics in uncontrolled withdrawal accident of regulating rod in CEFR

    In the accident analysis of China Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR), uncontrolled withdrawal of regulating rod without scram is a severe accident. When it happens, a large positive reactivity will be introduced and the relative space distribution of neutron flux will change significantly. Thus the analytical result of the accident by point kinetics in the safety analysis of CEFR is inaccurate. In this paper, focused on neutronics behavior, the accident is re-evaluated with NAS-K code. The NAS-K code is a CEFR-self-developed three-dimensional space-time-dependent neutron kinetics code for sodium cooled fast reactors, including thermal feedback and various kinds of reactivity feedback effects. The calculation results indicate that the maximum temperatures of fuel and cladding do not exceed the limits specified by acceptance criteria corresponding to design basis accident for CEFR, which means the accident will not cause damage to CEFR core. (author)

  12. Study on coal mines accidents based on the grey relational analysis

    WANG Shuai; ZHANG Jin-long

    2008-01-01

    The subject investigated the system of people-machine-environment in coal mines. The coal mines working process was researched and the theory of grey system was applied to analyze coal mines safety accidents and those relevant factors. This re-search reveals that this analysis method is easy and highly available and the result is of great credibility, which can not only provide theoretical supports to the quantitative study of coal mines safety accident, but offer basis for coal mines companies' safety management.

  13. Application of COREMELT-3D code at analysis of severe fast reactor accidents

    The code COREMELT for calculations of initial and transition stages of severe accident is considered. It is used to conduct connected calculations of nonstationary neutronic and thermohydraulic processes in sodium fast reactor core. The code has some versions depending on dimensions of solving problem and consists of thermohydraulic module COREMELT and neutronic module RADAR. Using the code COREMELT-3D connected calculations of core disassembly accidents of ULOF and UTOP type have been conducted for sodium fast reactors safety analysis. The main problem of code COREMELT-3D use is duration of calculation, speeding of the code is possible when calculating algorithms are parallelized

  14. Loss of coolant accident analysis of supercritical water-cooled reactor fuel qualification test loop

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor fuel qualification test (SCWR-FQT) intends to test a small scale fuel assembly under supercritical water environment in a research reactor. The modified ATHLET code was applied to model the supercritical water-cooled experimental loop containing this fuel assembly and to perform the calculation analysis of the loss of coolant accident induced by the coolant pipe break. The results indicate that the design of existing safety system can practically ensure the effective cooling of the fuel rod experimental section in the accident scenario. The results also show that the modified ATHLET code has good suitability in simulation of supercritical water-cooled system. (authors)

  15. Calculation notes in support of TWRS FSAR spray leak accident analysis

    Hall, B.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-05

    This document includes the calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with unmitigated and mitigated pressurized spray releases from tank farm transfer equipment inside transfer enclosures. The calculations within this document support the spray leak accident analysis reported in the TWRS FSAR.

  16. Results of special radiation measurements resulting from the Chernobyl accident and regional analysis of environmental radioactivity

    This report of the SCPRI exposes an interpretation of the results concerning the monitoring of the environmental radioactivity in France following Chernobyl accident. Atmospheric dusts, milk and milk products, vegetables, water and various beverages are analyzed. More than 1500 additional food samples are presented. Regional analysis of radioactivity and human gamma-spectrometric investigations are included

  17. ACR-1000® end-temperature peaking analysis under postulated accident conditions

    This paper presents a novel and systematic approach to conduct end-temperature peaking analysis under accident conditions for an ACR-1000 reactor, using a two-dimensional (radial and axial) finite-element computer code FEAT. In the past, end-flux peaking effects were overly conservatively assessed by including power increase in the fuel end region without accounting for heat transfer enhancement due to flow disturbance at the bundle end region, especially at the down-stream of a bundle junction. The current analysis determines the end-flux-peaking induced increase in fuel sheath and fuel centreline temperatures while accounting for all relevant key phenomena such as end-flux peaking and heat transfer characteristics including the effects of flow/thermal boundary layer redeveloping at the bundle end region. Using this method significantly reduces the fuel sheath temperature increase caused by end-flux peaking in comparison with the conservative analysis. The postulated accident events considered in this analysis include large break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), small break LOCA, and pressure tube rupture within an intact calandria tube. The determined temperature increases relative to the case without end-flux peaking are required to be quantitatively included in detailed safety analyses for postulated accidents. (author)

  18. An analysis of postulated accident for 49-2 Swimming Pool Reactor

    The thermal hydrodynamic code RETRAN-02 is used for safety analysis of Swimming Pool Reactor. Accident of partial-loss of flow, loss of offsite electric power and unexpected reactivity insertion are analysed and discussed. These results will be helpful for operation safety of the reactor

  19. Modelling and analysis of the behavior of LWRs at severe core accidents

    With respect to the assessment of the consequences of severe accidents in light water reactors from the initiation of the accident up to the thermal failure of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), a modular program system has been developed. Experimental results will be considered with respect to the modeling of the fuel rod behavior, e.g. deformation of the fuel rod, metal water reaction and the melting of the fuel rods. The fuel and core models allow to estimate the coolability of fuel rods and core as well as the consequences of core meltdown accidents at various pressure levels. After partial failure of the lower core retention structure, the core material will drop into the lower plenum and heat up the RPV. This strong interaction between the thermal behavior of the remaining core and the partially dropped core material has been modeled because of an accident sequence analysis. The analyses described here show, that not the entire core will fail, but a partial drop of core material into the lower plenum is likely to occur. With respect to the validation of the program system, comparison calculations with the fuel rod behavior and melt models SSYST and EXMEL will be performed. Moreover, the program system will be applied to the bundle behavior in meltdown experiments, the TMI-2 core behavior and the course of a core meltdown accident in risk studies. (orig.)

  20. A study on accident prevention of liquid metal reactors through operating experience analysis

    A demonstration LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor), called as KALIMER (Korea Advanced LIquid MEtal Reactor), has been being developed as part of the nuclear mid and long-term projects of the government since 1997. To ensure the safety of the KALIMER, the capability to cope with accidents must be enhanced by incorporating means and measures to prevent and mitigate accidents into the design of the KALIMER. The means and measures can be found out through analyzing operating experience in LMRs. Therefore, operating experience reported in published literature was collected and analyzed for the following 9 foreign LMRs: MONJU, Superphenix, Phenix, PFR, JOYO, EBR-II, FFTF, BN-350, BN-600. The analyses results show that accidents can be categorized into the following major groups: sodium leakage, sodium fire, sodium-water reaction, abnormal decrease of core reactivity, components vibrations, sodium aerosol deposits. Based on the results of accident cause analysis for each category, the means and measures to prevent and mitigate the each accident category were obtained

  1. Analysis of accident progression in the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    One of the objectives of this study is to investigate the early stage of the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi accident and to check the validity of the countermeasures against the accident. Last year the early stage of the accident was analyzed with use of RELAP5 code, and the longer term analysis was done by MELCOR code. This year, the simulation of reactor water level instrumentation behavior by MELCOR code was performed. Another objective of this study is to analyze of the long term cooling after the Fukushima Daiichi accident by TRACE5 code. In order to simulate the cooling conditions in Fukushima plants after the accident, the parametric calculations were done on the assumption of the existence of steam/liquid leak in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Pressure Containment Vessel (PCV) and the variety of debris distribution in RPV and PCV. As a result, the debris distribution in RPV and PCV was estimated by referring plant parameter such as reactor pressure and temperature. (author)

  2. Empirical Risk Analysis of Severe Reactor Accidents in Nuclear Power Plants after Fukushima

    Jan Christian Kaiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are reexamining the risks connected with nuclear power generation after the Fukushima accidents. To provide updated information for the corresponding discussion a simple empirical approach is applied for risk quantification of severe reactor accidents with International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES level ≥5. The analysis is based on worldwide data of commercial nuclear facilities. An empirical hazard of 21 (95% confidence intervals (CI 4; 62 severe accidents among the world’s reactors in 100,000 years of operation has been estimated. This result is compatible with the frequency estimate of a probabilistic safety assessment for a typical pressurised power reactor in Germany. It is used in scenario calculations concerning the development in numbers of reactors in the next twenty years. For the base scenario with constant reactor numbers the time to the next accident among the world's 441 reactors, which were connected to the grid in 2010, is estimated to 11 (95% CI 3.7; 52 years. In two other scenarios a moderate increase or decrease in reactor numbers have negligible influence on the results. The time to the next accident can be extended well above the lifetime of reactors by retiring a sizeable number of less secure ones and by safety improvements for the rest.

  3. Accidents - Chernobyl accident; Accidents - accident de Tchernobyl

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This file is devoted to the Chernobyl accident. It is divided in four parts. The first part concerns the accident itself and its technical management. The second part is relative to the radiation doses and the different contaminations. The third part reports the sanitary effects, the determinists ones and the stochastic ones. The fourth and last part relates the consequences for the other European countries with the case of France. Through the different parts a point is tackled with the measures taken after the accident by the other countries to manage an accident, the cooperation between the different countries and the groups of research and studies about the reactors safety, and also with the international medical cooperation, specially for the children, everything in relation with the Chernobyl accident. (N.C.)

  4. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 2, Book 2: Accident model document: Appendices

    1988-12-15

    This section of the Accident Model Document (AMD) presents the appendices which describe the various analyses that have been conducted for use in the Galileo Final Safety Analysis Report II, Volume II. Included in these appendices are the approaches, techniques, conditions and assumptions used in the development of the analytical models plus the detailed results of the analyses. Also included in these appendices are summaries of the accidents and their associated probabilities and environment models taken from the Shuttle Data Book (NSTS-08116), plus summaries of the several segments of the recent GPHS safety test program. The information presented in these appendices is used in Section 3.0 of the AMD to develop the Failure/Abort Sequence Trees (FASTs) and to determine the fuel releases (source terms) resulting from the potential Space Shuttle/IUS accidents throughout the missions.

  5. Fast reactor fuel failures and steam generator leaks: Transient and accident analysis approaches

    This report consists of a survey of activities on transient and accident analysis for the LMFR. It is focused on the following subjects: Fuel transient tests and analyses in hypothetical incident/accident situations; sodium-water interaction in steam generators, and sodium fires: test and analyses. There are also sections dealing with the experimental and analytical studies of: fuel subassembly failures; sodium boiling, molten fuel-coolant interaction; molten material movement and relocation in fuel bundles; heat removal after an accident or incident; sodium-water reaction in steam generator; steam generator protection systems; sodium-water contact in steam generator building; fire-fighting methods and systems to deal with sodium fires. Refs, figs, tabs

  6. EUREKA-2: a computer code for the reactivity accident analysis in a water cooled reactor

    EUREKA-2, a computer code for the reactivity accident analysis, has been developed in order to analyze neutronic, thermal and hydrodynamic transient behaviors in a water cooled reactor. EUREKA-2 can analyze the transient response of the core against the reactivity change caused by control rod withdrawal, coolant flow change and/or coolant temperature change. Especially, it can well simulate fast transient behaviors in serious reactivity accidents. This code calculates coupled neutronic and thermal-hydrodynamic responses for multi-regions in the core. EUREKA-2 has been developed by improving the fluid flow model of EUREKA and can analyze the reactivity accidents in which coolant temperature rises quickly and vapor is produced. (author)

  7. Analysis of Reactivity Induced Accident for Control Rods Ejection with Loss of Cooling

    Saad, Hend Mohammed El Sayed; Wahab, Moustafa Aziz Abd El

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of the time-dependent behavior of the neutron population in nuclear reactor in response to either a planned or unplanned change in the reactor conditions, is a great importance to the safe and reliable operation of the reactor. In the present work, the point kinetics equations are solved numerically using stiffness confinement method (SCM). The solution is applied to the kinetics equations in the presence of different types of reactivities and is compared with different analytical solutions. This method is also used to analyze reactivity induced accidents in two reactors. The first reactor is fueled by uranium and the second is fueled by plutonium. This analysis presents the effect of negative temperature feedback with the addition positive reactivity of control rods to overcome the occurrence of control rod ejection accident and damaging of the reactor. Both power and temperature pulse following the reactivity- initiated accidents are calculated. The results are compared with previous works and...

  8. Uncertainty analysis for fission products transport in CANDU primary heat transport during a severe accident

    Apostol, Mindora; Constantin, Marin [Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania); Leca, Aureliu [Univ. ' Politehnica' of Bucharest (UPB) (Romania)

    2010-08-15

    The work realized under the Severe Accident Research Network of excellence (SARNET) project has shown that the SOPHAEROS module, part of Accident Source Term Evaluation Code (ASTEC) can be fully used to simulate the fission products transport and deposition phenomena in the CANDU Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system. This paper presents an uncertainty analysis for the fission products transport in the CANDU PHT system during a severe accident to obtain the domains of the output parameters, for this study masses of Caesium, Strontium and Iodine deposited in the PHT system and its nodes, taking into account the associated input parameters uncertainties. Five uncertain parameters, the starting time for the releasing process, the duration of the releasing process, the releasing fractions for Cs, Sr and I have been chosen. To generate aleatory values for the uncertain parameters, a method and software have been developed and Monte Carlo simulations to determine uncertainties propagation through the SOPHAEROS module has been carried out. (orig.)

  9. Loss of coolant accident analysis for the IEA-R1 reactor at 5 MW

    The postulated Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) for the IEA-R1 Brazilian Research operating at 5 MW are qualitatively analyzed. Two computer codes, LOSS and TEMPLOCA, were developed. The computer code LOSS determines the time to drain the pool down to the level of the bottom of the core, and the computer code TEMPLOCA calculates the peak fuel element temperature during the transient. Four groups of accidents were analyzed: damaged pool, pump-down of pool, failure of beam tubes or other penetrations, and Primary coolant rupture. The analysis showed the necessity of introducing a new Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), and appropriate modifications in other systems and components of the reactor, such as: Primary Coolant System, Pneumatic Tube System and beam tubes. The effectiveness of the ECCS will ensure that the reactor can be safely operated at 5 MW and that can withstand a loss of coolant accident without sustaining core damage. (author)

  10. A proposal for accident management optimization based on the study of accident sequence analysis for a BWR

    The paper describes a proposal for accident management optimization based on the study of accident sequence and source term analyses for a BWR. In Japan, accident management measures are to be implemented in all LWRs by the year 2000 in accordance with the recommendation of the regulatory organization and based on the PSAs carried out by the utilities. Source terms were evaluated by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) with the THALES code for all BWR sequences in which loss of decay heat removal resulted in the largest release. Identification of the priority and importance of accident management measures was carried out for the sequences with larger risk contributions. Considerations for optimizing emergency operation guides are believed to be essential for risk reduction. (author)

  11. Analysis of dental materials as an aid to identification in aircraft accidents

    Wilson, G.S.; Cruickshanks-Boyd, D.W.

    1982-04-01

    The failure to achieve positive identification of aircrew following an aircraft accident need not prevent a full autopsy and toxicological examination to ascertain possible medical factors involved in the accident. Energy-dispersive electron microprobe analysis provides morphological, qualitative, and accurate quantitative analysis of the composition of dental amalgam. Wet chemical analysis can be used to determine the elemental composition of crowns, bridges and partial dentures. Unfilled resin can be analyzed by infrared spectroscopy. Detailed analysis of filled composite restorative resins has not yet been achieved in the as-set condition to permit discrimination between manufacturers' products. Future work will involve filler studies and pyrolysis of the composite resins by thermogravimetric analysis to determine percentage weight loss when the sample examined is subjected to a controlled heating regime. With these available techniques, corroborative evidence achieved from the scientific study of materials can augment standard forensic dental results to obtain a positive identification.

  12. Preliminary Analysis of Aircraft Loss of Control Accidents: Worst Case Precursor Combinations and Temporal Sequencing

    Belcastro, Christine M.; Groff, Loren; Newman, Richard L.; Foster, John V.; Crider, Dennis H.; Klyde, David H.; Huston, A. McCall

    2014-01-01

    Aircraft loss of control (LOC) is a leading cause of fatal accidents across all transport airplane and operational classes, and can result from a wide spectrum of hazards, often occurring in combination. Technologies developed for LOC prevention and recovery must therefore be effective under a wide variety of conditions and uncertainties, including multiple hazards, and their validation must provide a means of assessing system effectiveness and coverage of these hazards. This requires the definition of a comprehensive set of LOC test scenarios based on accident and incident data as well as future risks. This paper defines a comprehensive set of accidents and incidents over a recent 15 year period, and presents preliminary analysis results to identify worst-case combinations of causal and contributing factors (i.e., accident precursors) and how they sequence in time. Such analyses can provide insight in developing effective solutions for LOC, and form the basis for developing test scenarios that can be used in evaluating them. Preliminary findings based on the results of this paper indicate that system failures or malfunctions, crew actions or inactions, vehicle impairment conditions, and vehicle upsets contributed the most to accidents and fatalities, followed by inclement weather or atmospheric disturbances and poor visibility. Follow-on research will include finalizing the analysis through a team consensus process, defining future risks, and developing a comprehensive set of test scenarios with correlation to the accidents, incidents, and future risks. Since enhanced engineering simulations are required for batch and piloted evaluations under realistic LOC precursor conditions, these test scenarios can also serve as a high-level requirement for defining the engineering simulation enhancements needed for generating them.

  13. Analysis on the nitrogen drilling accident of Well Qionglai 1 (I: Major inducement events of the accident

    Yingfeng Meng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen drilling in poor tight gas sandstone should be safe because of very low gas production. But a serious accident of fire blowout occurred during nitrogen drilling of Well Qionglai 1. This is the first nitrogen drilling accident in China, which was beyond people's knowledge about the safety of nitrogen drilling and brought negative effects on the development of gas drilling technology still in start-up phase and resulted in dramatic reduction in application of gas drilling. In order to form a correct understanding, the accident was systematically analyzed, the major events resulting in this accident were inferred. It is discovered for the first time that violent ejection of rock clasts and natural gas occurred due to the sudden burst of downhole rock when the fractured tight gas zone was penetrated during nitrogen drilling, which has been named as “rock burst and blowout by gas bomb”, short for “rock burst”. Then all the induced events related to the rock burst are as following: upthrust force on drilling string from rock burst, bridging-off formed and destructed repeatedly at bit and centralizer, and so on. However, the most direct important event of the accident turns out to be the blockage in the blooie pipe from rock burst clasts and the resulted high pressure at the wellhead. The high pressure at the wellhead causes the blooie pipe to crack and trigged blowout and deflagration of natural gas, which is the direct presentation of the accident.

  14. ACCIDENT ANALYSES & CONTROL OPTIONS IN SUPPORT OF THE SLUDGE WATER SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    WILLIAMS, J.C.

    2003-11-15

    This report documents the accident analyses and nuclear safety control options for use in Revision 7 of HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, ''K Basins Safety Analysis Report'' and Revision 4 of HNF-SD-SNF-TSR-001, ''Technical Safety Requirements - 100 KE and 100 KW Fuel Storage Basins''. These documents will define the authorization basis for Sludge Water System (SWS) operations. This report follows the guidance of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', for calculating onsite and offsite consequences. The accident analysis summary is shown in Table ES-1 below. While this document describes and discusses potential control options to either mitigate or prevent the accidents discussed herein, it should be made clear that the final control selection for any accident is determined and presented in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062.

  15. Ecological safety during radiological accidents. Analysis and evaluation of emergency situations at radiologically dangerous objects

    The risk of radiological accidents at dangerous objects is minimal when with the help of technical and organizational means it is guaranteed that indoor and outdoor radiation doses are not exceeded. Also, it is necessary to ensure that the quantity of radiological products in the environment doesn't exceed allowed levels both at a normal exploitation of an object and during an accident. In regions with high radiological loads it is necessary to pay enough attention to the safety of dangerous objects in the situations of accidents. An example given in the paper on how to deal with accidents is based on a situation in the Archangelsk region. Analysis was implemented at 23 radiologically dangerous objects. The results of the analysis allowed to determine objects that are dangerous in an ecological sense. Relying on that, methodology of evaluating the situation in the region was created. The main thing is that evaluation of an ecological situation is judged relying on an emergency situation at a radiologically dangerous object. The first step of the methodology preparation is identification of particularly dangerous objects, and modeling of radiological load on an investigated area. The second step of the work is to review the second stage of the methodology which would be dedicated to the analysis and evaluation of emergency situations at radiologically dangerous objects. (author)

  16. Research on the improvement of nuclear safety -The development of a severe accident analysis code-

    For prevention and mitigation of the containment failure during severe accident, the study is focused on the severe accident phenomena, especially, the ones occurring inside the cavity and is intended to improve existing models and develop analytical tools for the assessment of severe accidents. A correlation equation of the flame velocity of pre mixture gas of H2/air/steam has been suggested and combustion flame characteristic was analyzed using a developed computer code. For the analysis of the expansion phase of vapor explosion, the mechanical model has been developed. The development of a debris entrainment model in a reactor cavity with captured volume has been continued to review and examine the limitation and deficiencies of the existing models. Pre-test calculation was performed to support the severe accident experiment for molten corium concrete interaction study and the crust formation process and heat transfer characteristics of the crust have been carried out. A stress analysis code was developed using finite element method for the reactor vessel lower head failure analysis. Through international program of PHEBUS-FP and participation in the software development, the research on the core degradation process and fission products release and transportation are undergoing. CONTAIN and MELCOR codes were continuously updated under the cooperation with USNRC and French developed computer codes such as ICARE2, ESCADRE, SOPHAEROS were also installed into the SUN workstation. 204 figs, 61 tabs, 87 refs. (Author)

  17. Research on the improvement of nuclear safety -The development of a severe accident analysis code-

    Kim, Heui Dong; Cho, Sung Won; Park, Jong Hwa; Hong, Sung Wan; Yoo, Dong Han; Hwang, Moon Kyoo; Noh, Kee Man; Song, Yong Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    For prevention and mitigation of the containment failure during severe accident, the study is focused on the severe accident phenomena, especially, the ones occurring inside the cavity and is intended to improve existing models and develop analytical tools for the assessment of severe accidents. A correlation equation of the flame velocity of pre mixture gas of H{sub 2}/air/steam has been suggested and combustion flame characteristic was analyzed using a developed computer code. For the analysis of the expansion phase of vapor explosion, the mechanical model has been developed. The development of a debris entrainment model in a reactor cavity with captured volume has been continued to review and examine the limitation and deficiencies of the existing models. Pre-test calculation was performed to support the severe accident experiment for molten corium concrete interaction study and the crust formation process and heat transfer characteristics of the crust have been carried out. A stress analysis code was developed using finite element method for the reactor vessel lower head failure analysis. Through international program of PHEBUS-FP and participation in the software development, the research on the core degradation process and fission products release and transportation are undergoing. CONTAIN and MELCOR codes were continuously updated under the cooperation with USNRC and French developed computer codes such as ICARE2, ESCADRE, SOPHAEROS were also installed into the SUN workstation. 204 figs, 61 tabs, 87 refs. (Author).

  18. An analysis of mooring accidents on the Polish Ocean Lines ships in 1975-80. Preventive recommendations.

    Dankiewicz-Sznajder, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the presented research was: 1. to analyse the causes and effects of accidents that occurred on the Polish Ocean Lines ships in 1975-1980 at mooring manoeuvres. 2. Issuing certain prophylactic recommendations. The material of the research was information contained in the 95 accident record cards and in other post-accident documents such as rulings of the Marine Chamber, situational sketches of the place of accident and determination of circumstances and causes of accidents. The obtained data showed, among others, that c. 81 per cent of the mooring accidents occurred at the bow manoeuvre station and 19 per cent--at the stern manoeuvre station. The most frequent cause of injures which appeared in mooring accidents (23.3 per cent) was hitting by the mooring line as result of "bouncing" on the mooring winch head. The most frequent injury was that of lower extremities (32.6 per cent) and upper extremities (30.5 per cent) and the most widespread injuries in those accidents were--contusion (43.16 per cent) and fracture (29.48 per cent of accidents. The analysis of the material allows to state that a smaller risk of accidents occurring at mooring may be achieved through the introduction of some prophylactic recommendations both in the sphere of organisation and technology. PMID:6681361

  19. Internal event analysis for Laguna Verde Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant. Accident sequence quantification and results

    The Level 1 results of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant PRA are presented in the Internal Event Analysis for Laguna Verde Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant, CNSNS-TR 004, in five volumes. The reports are organized as follows: CNSNS-TR 004 Volume 1: Introduction and Methodology. CNSNS-TR4 Volume 2: Initiating Event and Accident Sequences. CNSNS-TR 004 Volume 3: System Analysis. CNSNS-TR 004 Volume 4: Accident Sequence Quantification and Results. CNSNS-TR 005 Volume 5: Appendices A, B and C. This volume presents the development of the dependent failure analysis, the treatment of the support system dependencies, the identification of the shared-components dependencies, and the treatment of the common cause failure. It is also presented the identification of the main human actions considered along with the possible recovery actions included. The development of the data base and the assumptions and limitations in the data base are also described in this volume. The accident sequences quantification process and the resolution of the core vulnerable sequences are presented. In this volume, the source and treatment of uncertainties associated with failure rates, component unavailabilities, initiating event frequencies, and human error probabilities are also presented. Finally, the main results and conclusions for the Internal Event Analysis for Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant are presented. The total core damage frequency calculated is 9.03x 10-5 per year for internal events. The most dominant accident sequences found are the transients involving the loss of offsite power, the station blackout accidents, and the anticipated transients without SCRAM (ATWS). (Author)

  20. Analysis of Adolescent Awareness of Radiation: Marking the First Anniversary of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    Marking the first anniversary of the Fukushima nuclear accident, which took place on March 11th, 2011, the level of adolescent awareness and understanding of radiation was surveyed, and the results were then compared with those for adults with the same questionnaires conducted at similar times. A qualitative survey and frequency analysis were made for the design of the study methodology. Those surveyed were limited to 3rd grade middle school students, 15 years of age, who are the future generation. The questionnaire, which is a survey tool, was directly distributed to the students and 2,217 answers were analysed. The questionnaires were composed of 40 questions, and it was found that Cronbach's coefficient was high with 'self awareness of radiation' at 0.494, 'risk of radiation' at 0.843, 'benefit of radiation' at 0.748, 'radiological safety control' at 0.692, 'information sources of radiation' at 0.819, and 'impacts of Fukushima accident'. The results of the survey analysis showed that the students' knowledge of radiation was not very high with 67.4 points (69.5 points for adults) calculated on a maximum scale of 100 points (converted points). The impacts of the Fukushima nuclear accident were found to be less significant to adolescents than adults, and the rate of answer of 'so' or ' very so' in the following questions demonstrates this well. It was also shown that the impacts of the Fukushima accident to adolescents were comparatively low with 27.0% (38.9% for adults) on the question of 'attitude changed against nuclear power due to the Fukushima accident,' 65.7%(86.6% for adults) on the question of 'the damages from the Fukushima accident was immeasurably huge,' and 65.0% (86.3% for adults) on 'the Fukushima accident contributed to raising awareness on the safety of nuclear power plants'. The adolescents had a high rate of 'average' answers on most of the questions compared with adults, and it can be construed that this resulted from adolescent awareness of

  1. Analysis of Adolescent Awareness of Radiation: Marking the First Anniversary of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    Park, Bang Ju [Korean Science Reporters Association, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Marking the first anniversary of the Fukushima nuclear accident, which took place on March 11th, 2011, the level of adolescent awareness and understanding of radiation was surveyed, and the results were then compared with those for adults with the same questionnaires conducted at similar times. A qualitative survey and frequency analysis were made for the design of the study methodology. Those surveyed were limited to 3rd grade middle school students, 15 years of age, who are the future generation. The questionnaire, which is a survey tool, was directly distributed to the students and 2,217 answers were analysed. The questionnaires were composed of 40 questions, and it was found that Cronbach's coefficient was high with 'self awareness of radiation' at 0.494, 'risk of radiation' at 0.843, 'benefit of radiation' at 0.748, 'radiological safety control' at 0.692, 'information sources of radiation' at 0.819, and 'impacts of Fukushima accident'. The results of the survey analysis showed that the students' knowledge of radiation was not very high with 67.4 points (69.5 points for adults) calculated on a maximum scale of 100 points (converted points). The impacts of the Fukushima nuclear accident were found to be less significant to adolescents than adults, and the rate of answer of 'so' or ' very so' in the following questions demonstrates this well. It was also shown that the impacts of the Fukushima accident to adolescents were comparatively low with 27.0% (38.9% for adults) on the question of 'attitude changed against nuclear power due to the Fukushima accident,' 65.7%(86.6% for adults) on the question of 'the damages from the Fukushima accident was immeasurably huge,' and 65.0% (86.3% for adults) on 'the Fukushima accident contributed to raising awareness on the safety of nuclear power plants'. The adolescents had a high rate of &apos

  2. Analysis of Angra-1 fuel rod during the large break loss-of-coolant accident

    The main objective of this work is to study the fuel element behavior of the Angra 1 Nuclear Reactor, during a large loss of coolant accident caused by as rupture of the cold leg. Only the blowdown phase was considered. For this study the steps discribed below were done: - analysis of the blowdown phase was performed with the computational code RELAP4/MOD5 (option EM); analysis of the hot channel during the blowdown was made using the computational code RELAP/MOD5 (option EM); analysis of the fuel element performance during the accident with the computational code FRAP-T6. The results obtained in the steps above were compared with data presented in the Angra 1 Final Safety Analysis Report. (author)

  3. Source term analysis in severe accident induced by large break loss of coolant accident coincident with ship blackout for ship reactor

    Using MELCOR code, the accident analysis model was established for a ship reactor. The behaviors of radioactive fission products were analyzed in the case of severe accident induced by large break loss of coolant accident coincident with ship blackout. The research mainly focused on the behaviors of release, transport, retention and the final distribution of inert gas and CsI. The results show that 83.12% of inert gas releases from the core, and the most of inert gas exists in the containment. About 83.08% of CsI release from the core, 72.66% of which is detained in the debris and the primary system, and 27.34% releases into the containment. The results can give a reference for the evaluation of cabin dose and nuclear emergency management. (authors)

  4. SAMPSON Parallel Computation for Sensitivity Analysis of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    Pellegrini, M.; Bautista Gomez, L.; Maruyama, N.; Naitoh, M.; Matsuoka, S.; Cappello, F.

    2014-06-01

    On March 11th 2011 a high magnitude earthquake and consequent tsunami struck the east coast of Japan, resulting in a nuclear accident unprecedented in time and extents. After scram started at all power stations affected by the earthquake, diesel generators began operation as designed until tsunami waves reached the power plants located on the east coast. This had a catastrophic impact on the availability of plant safety systems at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi, leading to the condition of station black-out from unit 1 to 3. In this article the accident scenario is studied with the SAMPSON code. SAMPSON is a severe accident computer code composed of hierarchical modules to account for the diverse physics involved in the various phases of the accident evolution. A preliminary parallelization analysis of the code was performed using state-of-the-art tools and we demonstrate how this work can be beneficial to the nuclear safety analysis. This paper shows that inter-module parallelization can reduce the time to solution by more than 20%. Furthermore, the parallel code was applied to a sensitivity study for the alternative water injection into TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi unit 3. Results show that the core melting progression is extremely sensitive to the amount and timing of water injection, resulting in a high probability of partial core melting for unit 3.

  5. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of food pathway results with the MACCS Reactor Accident Consequence Model

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the food pathways associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 87 imprecisely-known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: crop growing season dose, crop long-term dose, milk growing season dose, total food pathways dose, total ingestion pathways dose, total long-term pathways dose, area dependent cost, crop disposal cost, milk disposal cost, condemnation area, crop disposal area and milk disposal area. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: fraction of cesium deposition on grain fields that is retained on plant surfaces and transferred directly to grain, maximum allowable ground concentrations of Cs-137 and Sr-90 for production of crops, ground concentrations of Cs-134, Cs-137 and I-131 at which the disposal of milk will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season, ground concentrations of Cs-134, I-131 and Sr-90 at which the disposal of crops will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season, rate of depletion of Cs-137 and Sr-90 from the root zone, transfer of Sr-90 from soil to legumes, transfer of Cs-137 from soil to pasture, transfer of cesium from animal feed to meat, and the transfer of cesium, iodine and strontium from animal feed to milk

  6. Implementation of numerical simulation techniques in analysis of the accidents in complex technological systems

    Klishin, G.S.; Seleznev, V.E.; Aleoshin, V.V. [RFNC-VNIIEF (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Gas industry enterprises such as main pipelines, compressor gas transfer stations, gas extracting complexes belong to the energy intensive industry. Accidents there can result into the catastrophes and great social, environmental and economic losses. Annually, according to the official data several dozens of large accidents take place at the pipes in the USA and Russia. That is why prevention of the accidents, analysis of the mechanisms of their development and prediction of their possible consequences are acute and important tasks nowadays. The accidents reasons are usually of a complicated character and can be presented as a complex combination of natural, technical and human factors. Mathematical and computer simulations are safe, rather effective and comparatively inexpensive methods of the accident analysis. It makes it possible to analyze different mechanisms of a failure occurrence and development, to assess its consequences and give recommendations to prevent it. Besides investigation of the failure cases, numerical simulation techniques play an important role in the treatment of the diagnostics results of the objects and in further construction of mathematical prognostic simulations of the object behavior in the period of time between two inspections. While solving diagnostics tasks and in the analysis of the failure cases, the techniques of theoretical mechanics, of qualitative theory of different equations, of mechanics of a continuous medium, of chemical macro-kinetics and optimizing techniques are implemented in the Conversion Design Bureau {number_sign}5 (DB{number_sign}5). Both universal and special numerical techniques and software (SW) are being developed in DB{number_sign}5 for solution of such tasks. Almost all of them are calibrated on the calculations of the simulated and full-scale experiments performed at the VNIIEF and MINATOM testing sites. It is worth noting that in the long years of work there has been established a fruitful and effective

  7. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of food pathway results with the MACCS Reactor Accident Consequence Model

    Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Johnson, J.D.; Rollstin, J.A. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the food pathways associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 87 imprecisely-known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: crop growing season dose, crop long-term dose, milk growing season dose, total food pathways dose, total ingestion pathways dose, total long-term pathways dose, area dependent cost, crop disposal cost, milk disposal cost, condemnation area, crop disposal area and milk disposal area. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: fraction of cesium deposition on grain fields that is retained on plant surfaces and transferred directly to grain, maximum allowable ground concentrations of Cs-137 and Sr-90 for production of crops, ground concentrations of Cs-134, Cs-137 and I-131 at which the disposal of milk will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season, ground concentrations of Cs-134, I-131 and Sr-90 at which the disposal of crops will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season, rate of depletion of Cs-137 and Sr-90 from the root zone, transfer of Sr-90 from soil to legumes, transfer of Cs-137 from soil to pasture, transfer of cesium from animal feed to meat, and the transfer of cesium, iodine and strontium from animal feed to milk.

  8. A THERP/ATHEANA Analysis of the Latent Operator Error in Leaving EFW Valves Closed in the TMI-2 Accident

    Fonseca, Renato A.; Alvim, Antonio Carlos M.; Melo, Paulo Fernando F. Frutuoso e; Marco Antonio B. Alvarenga

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at performing a human reliability analysis using THERP (Technique for Human Error Prediction) and ATHEANA (Technique for Human Error Analysis) to develop a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the latent operator error in leaving EFW (emergency feed-water) valves closed in the TMI-2 accident. The accident analysis has revealed a series of unsafe actions that resulted in permanent loss of the unit. The integration between THERP and ATHEANA is developed in a way such as to a...

  9. Calculation of Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) minimum for accident analysis of main steam line break at Angra-1

    The maintenance costs, the operational problems and the failures possibilities of the boron injection system, composed by pumps, valves, heated lines and the boron injection tank, make this tank removal or the boron concentration reduction advisable for Angra 1 Power Plant. The main accident from chapter XV of the final safety analysis report affected by this modification is the main steam line break. It is necessary the interaction of the areas of Accidents and Transients Analysis (RETRAN 02/Mod 5.1 code), Neutronics (APA System) and Thermohydraulics (COBRA IIIC/MIT) to analyse this accident. The present Angra 1 boron concentration is 20000 ppm and it could be reduced to 2000 ppm as a result of the present study. The Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) is the restrictive parameter of this accident, which is calculated from the initials and boundary conditions obtained from the Transients and Accidents Analysis and Neutronics areas. (author)

  10. A Human reliability analysis of post-accident human errors in the PSA of KSNP

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, using the ASME PRA Standard, evaluated the PSA model of the Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP) and identified the items to be improved to enhance its quality. The new risk monitor PSA model for the KSNP of which quality was enhanced is called as PRiME-U3i. The evaluation results of human reliability analysis (HRA) of the post-accident human errors in the PSA model of the KSNP showed that 10 items among 19 items of supporting requirements for those in the ASME PRA Standard were identified as them to be improved. Thus, we newly carried out a HRA for post-accident human errors for the KSNP PSA model as the target of grading its quality above ASME PRA Standard Category I+. Following tasks were additionally major tasks performed in the HRA of post-accident human errors of PRiME-U3i compared with the previous PSA model of the KSNP: interviews with operators in the collection and review of input data need for the HRA, modeling of initial feed and bleed operation as human actions according to 5 initiating event groups, documentation of information of all the input and bases for the detailed quantifications using the quantification sheets The number of the re-estimated human errors of PRiME-U3i according to the Korea Standard HRA method is 92. Among them, the number of individual post-accident human errors is 55. The number of dependent post-accident human errors is 37. Modeling of one event for initial feed and bleed operation increase the CDF of PRiME-U3i by 13.58% compared with baseline CDF. The assessment results for the new HRA results of post-accident human errors of PRiME-U3i using the ASME PRA Standard show that above 80% items of its supporting requirements for post-accident human errors were graded as its Category II. Thus, this study results sufficiently meet the ASME PRA Standard Category I+. It is expected that the HRA results presented in this study will be greatly helpful to improve the PSA quality for the

  11. Uncertainty Analysis of the Potential Hazard of MCCI during Severe Accidents for the CANDU6 Plant

    Sooyong Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates the application of a severe accident analysis computer program to the uncertainty analysis of molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI phenomena in cases of severe accidents in CANDU6 type plant. The potential hazard of MCCI is a failure of the reactor building owing to the possibility of a calandria vault floor melt-through even though the containment filtered vent system is operated. Meanwhile, the MCCI still has large uncertainties in several phenomena such as a melt spreading area and the extent of water ingression into a continuous debris layer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the MCCI in the calandria vault floor via an uncertainty analysis using the ISAAC program for the CANDU6.

  12. Safety analysis of MNSR reactor during reactivity insertion accident using the validated code PARET

    In the framework of the IAEA CRP project (J7.10.10) on 'Safety significance of postulated initiating events for various types of research reactors and assessment of analytical tools' the Syrian team contributed in the assessment of computational codes related to the safety analysis of research reactors. During the project implementation the codes PARET and MERSAT have been tested, modified and verified regarding specific phenomena related to safety analysis of research reactors. In the framework of this contribution the code PARET has been applied to model the core of the Syrian MNSR reactor. The code analysis includes the simulation of steady state operation and a group of selected reactivity insertion accident (RIA) including the design basis accidents dealing with the insertion of total available excess reactivity

  13. Study, analysis and evaluation on the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Computational analysis of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident was carried out. Severe accident analysis code MELCOR, which is developed by U.S. NRC and Sandia National Laboratory, was used. Chronology reported by Tokyo Electric Co. was examined and was used for calculation. Although very limited observed data were available, calculated behavior of RPV pressure and PCV pressure showed good agreement with observed data. We need further investigation to determine status of core, debris, etc. Reactor buildings of Unit 1, 3 and 4 were damaged by explosion of hydrogen, which was generated by metal-water reaction. Flow-field analysis of hydrogen in the reactor was examined by computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT. Hydrogen explosion behavior was also calculated by AUTODYN. (author)

  14. Analysis simulator, a tool for the evaluation of accident management measures

    The analysis simulator is a manifold and variable engineered tool which permits the interactive handling of very comprehensive model codes and offers the wealth of information calculated by the models in a condensed and uncluttered way by means of graphic displays. The first phase of work on the simulator concentrated on the development of interfaces, interactivity and communication. The experience gathered so far and the case study, in which an accident management measure is taken to prevent a severe accident, show both the advantages of the analysis simulator and its limitations as far as the speed of simulation, its sturdiness and the extent of the models are concerned. The continuation of work on the analysis simulator and the test control room will further extend these limits in order to fully comply with the requirements for the simulation of measures oriented towards certain aims of protection. (orig.)

  15. Overview of Sandia National Laboratories and Khlopin Radium Institute collaborative radiological accident consequence analysis efforts

    In January, 1995 a collaborative effort to improve radiological consequence analysis methods and tools was initiated between the V.G. Khlopin Institute (KRI) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of the collaborative effort was to transfer SNL's consequence analysis methods to KRI and identify opportunities for collaborative efforts to solve mutual problems relating to the safety of radiochemical facilities. A second purpose was to improve SNL's consequence analysis methods by incorporating the radiological accident field experience of KRI scientists (e.g. the Chernobyl and Kyshtym accidents). The initial collaborative effort focused on the identification of: safety criteria that radiochemical facilities in Russia must meet; analyses/measures required to demonstrate that safety criteria have been met; and data required to complete the analyses/measures identified to demonstrate the safety basis of a facility

  16. Application of MELCOR code to the MCCI analysis in Severe Accident Sequences

    This paper provides some of the technical aspects that can be applied to an analysis of the MCCI phenomena in a severe accident scenario using the current MELCOR version. An application methodology of the MELCOR current version to the analysis of MCCI, the phenomena of which are very uncertain and lack specific knowledge during severe accidents, was introduced. Assumptions based on the experimental results are used instead of the phenomenological detail modeling because of the modeling limitations. In the technical aspects of MCCI, code modification itself is not a big deal, because the code modification is needed for just the user flexibility. The concern will be whether the assumptions made for this analysis are acceptable or not. This paper illustrates the application of a severe accident analysis code, MELCOR, to the analysis of molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) phenomena in cases of severe accidents in nuclear power plants. In postulated degraded core accidents, followed by the failure of certain engineered safety features of the reactor system, the reactor core may eventually melt owing to the generation of decay heat. If the safety features of the reactor system fail to arrest the accident within the reactor vessel, the corium (molten core debris) will fall into the reactor cavity and attack the concrete walls and floor. Basemat melt-through refers to the process of concrete decomposition and destruction associated with a corium melt interacting with the reactor cavity basemat. The potential hazard of MCCI is the integrity of the containment building owing to the possibility of a basemat melt-through, containment overpressurization by non-condensible gases, or the oxidation of combustible gases. In the meantime, the MCCI still has large uncertainties in several phenomena such as melt spreading area, debris particulation, and heat transfer between the debris and cooling water. In particular, in the case where the water pool exists in the reactor

  17. New Work Environment for Reactor Safety Analysts: Integrated Training and Accident Analysis System

    Safety and risk analyses are complex by nature and require significant effort, extensive skills and experience, analytical tools and supporting information. To reduce the effort and to enhance the analytical capabilities for present and future generation of nuclear systems, an Integrated Training and Accident Analysis System (ITAAS) has been developed. The primary objective of the ITAAS combined software/hardware system is to provide a comprehensive and integrated accident and safety analysis capability for research and technical support organizations and other potential users (such as regulators) having responsibilities related to nuclear power plants (NPPs), research reactors, and other nuclear facilities. More specifically, and in the context of well executed accident and safety analyses, ITAAS provides: Proven Analytical Tools via the Deterministic Analysis Module based on RELAP5 and the Probabilistic Analysis Module based on SAHPIRE, Specialized Skill Development via a Training Module, and a Broad Knowledge Base via a Reference Module. The modular design and connectivity of ITAAS allows for enhancement of existing, and addition of new modules, primarily in the context of future implementation of new analysis tools and their associated training requirements. ITAAS can be configured for specific NPPs or other nuclear installations as may be dictated by facility, organization or country needs. The first ITAAS system has been installed at the Kursk 1 NPP in Russia. (authors)

  18. Boolean Algebra Application in Analysis of Flight Accidents

    Casandra Venera BALAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fault tree analysis is a deductive approach for resolving an undesired event into its causes, identifying the causes of a failure and providing a framework for a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the top event. An alternative approach to fault tree analysis methods calculus goes to logical expressions and it is based on a graphical representation of the data structure for a logic - based binary decision diagram representation. In this analysis, such sites will be reduced to a minimal size and arranged in the sense that the variables appear in the same order in each path. An event can be defined as a statement that can be true or false. Therefore, Boolean algebra rules allow restructuring of a Fault Tree into one equivalent to it, but simpler.

  19. An approach to modelling operator behaviour in integrated dynamic accident sequence analysis

    The paper describes an integrated dynamic methodology for simulating nuclear power plant accidents, with special focus on the operator behaviour model. The overall model consists of accident sequence pre-processor, operator response model, safety and support system model, plant dependence model, thermal hydraulics model, and accident sequence scheduler. The operator model consists of the knowledge base (KB) and the decision making module (DM). KB consists of rules of behaviour. Behaviour is guided by emergency operating procedures (EOPs), thermal hydraulics parameters of the plant, system status, and other factors including stress, training, experience, etc. Possible error mechanisms in following symptom based EOPs are mentioned, and factors which cause some of these errors are identified. Plant parameters are classified as ''diagnostic'' and ''control''. Comparison of operator expectations and plant inputs guides the behaviour. System states affect only control action and not diagnosis. The decision maker simulates the operator behaviour in the way it accesses the KB, assuming that the KB contains all the knowledge that is necessary for managing the accident. This is modelled through a ''filter'' concept where the factors that affect behaviour are filters that affect the access to KB. Actions are categorized in verifying the response of reactor protection systems, and in controlling inventory and heat removal. System modelling is done at system rather than component level since operator actions affect the plant at system level. The methodology is being implemented in PC environment. Possible applications include analysis of causes and consequences of operator actions, particularly errors of commission, EOP validation, analysis of dynamic effects of accident sequences, and performing probabilistic risk assessments. 15 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  20. Depressurization accident analysis for the HTTR by the TAC-NC

    The two-dimensional thermal analysis code TAC-NC is modified from the analytical code TAC-2D in order to calculate temperature transients in the case of loss of forced cooling accidents of the HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor) such as a depressurization accident. In these conditions, temperature transients in the core are affected by natural convection between hotter and colder regions in the pressure vessel. The TAC-NC code includes a special function to calculate heat transfer by natural convection in addition to conduction, radiation and forced convection. Verification of the TAC-NC code was carried out by the comparison of the analytical results with the experimental ones of an air ingress test. Analytical results of simulated core temperature were in good agreement with experimental results. Temperature transients during a depressurization accident were evaluated by the TAC-NC code for the HTTR. The maximum fuel temperature decreases rapidly after the reactor scram and increases slightly after that due to decay heat. The maximum fuel temperature, however, remains below the initial maximum fuel temperature since most of the core decay heat is absorbed in the large thermal capacity of graphite in the core and reflector. The peak vessel temperature occurs at about 30 hours after the beginning of the accident and also remains lower than the allowable temperature, even if one of the reactor pressure vessel cooling systems is failed. (author)

  1. CFD analysis of air ingress distribution during mid-loop accident sequences

    The accident management approach affects nuclear technology and safety with a new formulation of basic hypotheses for the evaluation of the Source Term and radiological impact on the population due to Fission Product release following Severe Accidents. Considering also the wide spectrum of hypothetical and low probability accident scenarios having these kind of consequences, the sequences having potential for air ingress into the reactor coolant system or involving the interaction between fuel and air, which can flow into the reactor coolant system from the containment, have recently gained more and more interest. The research activities summarised in this paper have been carried out at the Department of Mechanical, Nuclear and Production Engineering of Pisa University, in the frame of an international Project of the IV European Community Framework Programme. The activity included a review of the spectrum of accident sequences to be considered for the investigation of the air ingress probability, the behaviour and the effects of air ingress into the reactor core. Two classes of scenarios were identified for a more in-depth analysis: (a) mid-loop sequences, and (b) scenarios including vessel melt-through. In this frame, mid-loop sequences, having more probabilistic interest than vessel melt-through scenarios, have been investigated by using 3D analytical tools (i.e. Fluent V5.0 fluid-dynamic code). (author)

  2. SAMPSON parallel computation for sensitivity analysis of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident

    On March 11. 2011 a high magnitude earthquake and consequent tsunami struck the east coast of Japan, resulting in a nuclear accident unprecedented in time and extents. After SCRAM started at all power stations affected by the earthquake, diesel generators began operation as designed until tsunami waves reached the power plants located on the east coast. This had a catastrophic impact on the availability of plant safety system's at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi, leading to the condition of station black-out from unit 1 to 3. In this article the accident scenario is studied with the SAMPSON code. SAMPSON is a severe accident computer code composed of hierarchical modules to account for the diverse physics involved in the various phases of the accident evolution. A preliminary parallelization analysis of the code was performed using state-of-the-art tools and we demonstrate how this work can be beneficial to more 20%. Furthermore, the parallel code was applied to a sensitivity study for the alternative water injection into TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi unit 3. Results show that the core melting progression is extremely sensitive to the amount and timing of water injection, resulting in a high probability of partial core melting for unit 3. (authors)

  3. Analysis of loss of flow accident at Pakistan research reactor-1

    Bokhari, I.H. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)]. E-mail: ishtiaq@pinstech.org.pk; Mahmood, T. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2005-12-15

    The main objective of the reactor safety is to keep the reactor core in a condition, which does not permit any release of radioactivity into the environment. In order to ensure this, the reactor must have sufficient safety margins during all possible operational conditions (normal as well as accidental). To accomplish this, a study has been carried out, for the analysis of loss of flow accident (LOFA), which is one of the probable scenarios among other possible events such as reactivity-induced-accidents, loss of coolant accident, etc. The study has been carried out for Pakistan research reactor, PARR-1, which was initially converted from HEU to LEU fuel. It is a swimming pool type reactor using MTR type fuel. Presently, a new core is proposed to be assembled containing LEU and some of the used (less burnt) HEU fuel elements. The accident is assumed when the reactor is running at a steady-state power level of 9.8 MW. Computer code PARET and standard correlations were employed to compute various parameters. Results predict nucleate boiling in the core but the temperatures would remain far below the fuel clad melting point.

  4. Analysis of loss of flow accident at Pakistan research reactor-1

    The main objective of the reactor safety is to keep the reactor core in a condition, which does not permit any release of radioactivity into the environment. In order to ensure this, the reactor must have sufficient safety margins during all possible operational conditions (normal as well as accidental). To accomplish this, a study has been carried out, for the analysis of loss of flow accident (LOFA), which is one of the probable scenarios among other possible events such as reactivity-induced-accidents, loss of coolant accident, etc. The study has been carried out for Pakistan research reactor, PARR-1, which was initially converted from HEU to LEU fuel. It is a swimming pool type reactor using MTR type fuel. Presently, a new core is proposed to be assembled containing LEU and some of the used (less burnt) HEU fuel elements. The accident is assumed when the reactor is running at a steady-state power level of 9.8 MW. Computer code PARET and standard correlations were employed to compute various parameters. Results predict nucleate boiling in the core but the temperatures would remain far below the fuel clad melting point

  5. The role of fission gas in the analysis of hypothetical core disruptive accidents

    This paper summarizes recent work at Karlsruhe with the goal of understanding the effects of fission gas in hypothetical core disruptive accidents. The fission gas behavior model is discussed. The computer programs LANGZEIT and KURZZEIT describe the long-term and the transient gas behavior, respectively. Recent improvements in the modeling and a comparison of results with experimental data are reported. A somewhat detailed study of the role of fission gas in transient overpower (TOP) accidents was carried out. If pessimistic assumptions, like pin failure near the axial midplane are made, these accidents end in core disassembly. The codes HOPE and KADIS were used to analyze the initiating and the disassembly phase in these studies. Improvements of the codes are discussed. They include an automatic data transfer from HOPE to KADIS, and a new equation of state in KADIS, with an improved model for fission gas behavior. The analysis of a 15 cents/sec reactivity ramp accident is presented. Different pin failure criteria are used. In the cases selected, the codes predict an energetic disassembly. For the much discussed loss-of-flow driven TOP, detailed models are presently not available at Karlsruhe. Therefore, only a few comments and the results of a few scoping calculations will be presented

  6. Reactor Accident Analysis Methodology for the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility Documented Safety Analysis Upgrade

    The regulatory requirement to develop an upgraded safety basis for a DOE Nuclear Facility was realized in January 2001 by issuance of a revision to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Section 830 (10 CFR 830). Subpart B of 10 CFR 830, ''Safety Basis Requirements,'' requires a contractor responsible for a DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, or 3 nuclear facility to either submit by April 9, 2001 the existing safety basis which already meets the requirements of Subpart B, or to submit by April 10, 2003 an upgraded facility safety basis that meets the revised requirements. 10 CFR 830 identifies Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.70, ''Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' as a safe harbor methodology for preparation of a DOE reactor documented safety analysis (DSA). The regulation also allows for use of a graded approach. This report presents the methodology that was developed for preparing the reactor accident analysis portion of the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC) upgraded DSA. The methodology was approved by DOE for developing the ATRC safety basis as an appropriate application of a graded approach to the requirements of 10 CFR 830

  7. Techniques Applied in the COSYMA Accident Consequence Uncertainty Analysis (invited paper)

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis studies for the program package COSYMA for assessing the radiological consequences of nuclear accidents have been performed to obtain a deeper insight into the propagation of parameter uncertainties through different submodules and to quantify their contribution to uncertainty and sensitivity in a final overall uncertainty analysis of the complete program system COSYMA. Some strategies are given for performing uncertainty analysis runs for submodules and/or the complete complex program system COSYMA and guidelines explain how to post-process and to reduce the bulk of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results. (author)

  8. Study On Safety Analysis Of PWR Reactor Core In Transient And Severe Accident Conditions

    The cooperation research project on the Study on Safety Analysis of PWR Reactor Core in Transient and Severe Accident Conditions between Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology (INST), VINATOM and Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Korea has been setup to strengthen the capability of researches in nuclear safety not only in mastering the methods and computer codes, but also in qualifying of young researchers in the field of nuclear safety analysis. Through the studies on the using of thermal hydraulics computer codes like RELAP5, COBRA, FLUENT and CFX the thermal hydraulics research group has made progress in the research including problems for safety analysis of APR1400 nuclear reactor, PIRT methodologies and sub-channel analysis. The study of severe accidents has been started by using MELCOR in collaboration with KAERI experts and the training on the fundamental phenomena occurred in postulated severe accident. For Vietnam side, VVER-1000 nuclear reactor is also intensively studied. The design of core catcher, reactor containment and severe accident management are the main tasks concerning VVER technology. The research results are presented in the 9th National Conference on Mechanics, Ha Noi, December 8-9, 2012, the 10th National Conference on Nuclear Science and Technology, Vung Tau, August 14-15, 2013, as well as published in the journal of Nuclear Science and Technology, Vietnam Nuclear Society and other journals. The skills and experience from using computer codes like RELAP5, MELCOR, ANSYS and COBRA in nuclear safety analysis are improved with the nuclear reactors APR1400, Westinghouse 4 loop PWR and especially the VVER-1000 chosen for the specific studies. During cooperation research project, man power and capability of Nuclear Safety center of INST have been strengthen. Three masters were graduated, 2 researchers are engaging in Ph.D course at Hanoi University of Science and Technology and University of Science and Technology, Korea

  9. Media content analysis of the Fukushima accident in two Belgian newspapers

    In case of a nuclear accident, the media play a major role in communicating with the public. It is therefore crucial to know what messages are the media delivering in a nuclear emergency and how do they frame the event. Analysing the media reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident can benefit nuclear emergency management in two major aspects. On the one hand, such analysis shows how to deliver risk messages effectively through the media and on the other hand, it brings insights into the information that has to be communicated by the emergency managers to the mass media. The media analysis of the nuclear accident in Fukushima reported here was done by means of discourse and content analysis. The coding method followed explicit rules of coding and enabled large quantities of data to be categorized. The newspapers included in the analysis were the Belgian newspapers Le Soir (French language) and De Standaard (Dutch language). The media news were obtained from press clippings by Media data base at University Antwerp - MEDIARGUS for the period between 11th of March to 11th of May, 2011.

  10. Preclosure radiological safety analysis for accident conditions of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository: Underground facilities

    This preliminary preclosure radiological safety analysis assesses the scenarios, probabilities, and potential radiological consequences associated with postulated accidents in the underground facility of the potential Yucca Mountain repository. The analysis follows a probabilistic-risk-assessment approach. Twenty-one event trees resulting in 129 accident scenarios are developed. Most of the scenarios have estimated annual probabilities ranging from 10-11/yr to 10-5/yr. The study identifies 33 scenarios that could result in offsite doses over 50 mrem and that have annual probabilities greater than 10-9/yr. The largest offsite dose is calculated to be 220 mrem, which is less than the 500 mrem value used to define items important to safety in 10 CFR 60. The study does not address an estimate of uncertainties, therefore conclusions or decisions made as a result of this report should be made with caution

  11. Coupled thermal-hydraulic/aerosol transport analysis capability for severe accidents

    Fission product transport and thermal-hydraulic phenomena, occurring during the in-vessel phase of postulated accident progression, affect each other directly and significantly. It is important to couple the calculation of these processes to obtain accurate estimates of the magnitude and the timing of the release, of initial and revolatilized fission products from the primary system of a PWR, or the vessel of a BWR. The Electric Power Research Institute research efforts to obtain a functional and sophisticated coupled thermal-hydraulic/aerosol transport analysis capability are described. These are based on coupling the codes CORMLT, PSAAC (Primary System Accident Analysis Code) and RAFT (Reactor Aerosol Formation and Transport), which have been under development since 1982. Summary descriptions of these codes are also provided. (author)

  12. ANALYSIS OF MEDIA PUBLICATIONS ON THE FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT

    I. A. Zykova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of informing the public about radiation and radiation risks is made on the basiс of publications on the Fukushima nuclear accident after the earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011, by five newspapers and the official internet sites of the Federal Service for Surveillance on Consumer Rights Protection and Human Well-being and the Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring. The analysis of the data suggests that the population is satisfied with its request in timely, clear, and reliable information on the radiation situation, protective measures and forecast of the situation development in the future. The possibility to learn about different viewpoints positively affects the mood of readers and reduces their anxiety. However, it should be recognized that, if the information have been provided by a single media only, the population would not have adequate understanding of the situation related to the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant.

  13. Analysis of the FeCrAl Accident Tolerant Fuel Concept Benefits during BWR Station Blackout Accidents

    Robb, Kevin R [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are being considered for fuel concepts with enhanced accident tolerance. FeCrAl alloys have very slow oxidation kinetics and good strength at high temperatures. FeCrAl could be used for fuel cladding in light water reactors and/or as channel box material in boiling water reactors (BWRs). To estimate the potential safety gains afforded by the FeCrAl concept, the MELCOR code was used to analyze a range of postulated station blackout severe accident scenarios in a BWR/4 reactor employing FeCrAl. The simulations utilize the most recently known thermophysical properties and oxidation kinetics for FeCrAl. Overall, when compared to the traditional Zircaloy-based cladding and channel box, the FeCrAl concept provides a few extra hours of time for operators to take mitigating actions and/or for evacuations to take place. A coolable core geometry is retained longer, enhancing the ability to stabilize an accident. Finally, due to the slower oxidation kinetics, substantially less hydrogen is generated, and the generation is delayed in time. This decreases the amount of non-condensable gases in containment and the potential for deflagrations to inhibit the accident response.

  14. Aspects of uncertainty analysis in accident consequence modeling

    Mathematical models are frequently used to determine probable dose to man from an accidental release of radionuclides by a nuclear facility. With increased emphasis on the accuracy of these models, the incorporation of uncertainty analysis has become one of the most crucial and sensitive components in evaluating the significance of model predictions. In the present paper, we address three aspects of uncertainty in models used to assess the radiological impact to humans: uncertainties resulting from the natural variability in human biological parameters; the propagation of parameter variability by mathematical models; and comparison of model predictions to observational data

  15. Accident analysis for aircraft crash into hazardous facilities: DOE standard

    This standard provides the user with sufficient information to evaluate and assess the significance of aircraft crash risk on facility safety without expending excessive effort where it is not required. It establishes an approach for performing a conservative analysis of the risk posed by a release of hazardous radioactive or chemical material resulting from an aircraft crash into a facility containing significant quantities of such material. This can establish whether a facility has a significant potential for an aircraft impact and whether this has the potential for producing significant offsite or onsite consequences. General implementation guidance, screening and evaluation guidelines, and methodologies for the evaluations are included

  16. Site-specific meteorology identification for DOE facility accident analysis

    Currently, chemical dispersion calculations performed for safety analysis of DOE facilities assume a Pasquill D-Stability Class with a 4.5 m/s windspeed. These meteorological conditions are assumed to conservatively address the source term generation mechanism as well as the dispersion mechanism thereby resulting in a net conservative downwind consequence. While choosing this Stability Class / Windspeed combination may result in an overall conservative consequence, the level of conservative can not be quantified. The intent of this paper is to document a methodology which incorporates site-specific meteorology to determine a quantifiable consequence of a chemical release. A five-year meteorological database, appropriate for the facility location, is utilized for these chemical consequence calculations, and is consistent with the approach used for radiological releases. The hourly averages of meteorological conditions have been binned into 21 groups for the chemical consequence calculations. These 21 cases each have a probability of occurrence based on the number of times each case has occurred over the five year sampling period. A code has been developed which automates the running of all the cases with a commercially available air modeling code. The 21 cases are sorted by concentration. A concentration may be selected by the user for a quantified level of conservatism. The methodology presented is intended to improve the technical accuracy and defensability of Chemical Source Term / Dispersion Safety Analysis work. The result improves the quality of safety analyses products without significantly increasing the cost

  17. A study on risk analysis for loading and un-loading accident

    Low Level Waste packages are transported from each Japanese nuclear power plants to Rokkasho-Mura by exclusive ship. These packages are contained in half-height 5 ton containers. The handling system for loading and unloading containers is composed of the 25 ton crane, the cell-guide system and transport trucks. These systems are mostly automated and under computer control. By design, the whole handling system should be highly protected from any accident. However unknown causes for accidents might be concealed in this handling system, because of complicated system interaction between computer control and human operation. The representative 25 ton bridge type crane was analyzed in this assessment. As the first step, causes of drop accidents were analyzed using design drawing of the crane and its system operation flow chart as inputs to the analysis. After analysis the protection methods were reviewed, and where necessary, revised in each step accident cause. Those results were rearranged by fault trees for each cause. To provide quantitative details of operational interactions, crane operators and safety supervisors were consulted. Based on their experience, a method to determine probabilities of basic events was tentatively adopted. According to this assessment, each protection method was clarified and some weak points of the loading and un-loading process were able to be identified. Figure 1 shows schematically the sequential steps in the method. As a result of this assessment, the PSA method (including fault trees, etc) was found to be adaptable for the loading and un-loading process (i.e. handling system) and to be effective in understanding the system characteristics. Further, using this PSA analysis method allows transport companies to review protection methods with 'Cost and Benefit' analysis concepts. (authors)

  18. CFD Analysis of Migration Mechanism of Source Term Under Severe Accident

    CHEN; Lin-lin; SUN; Xue-ting; JI; Song-tao

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the migration of source term under severe accident is one of the important aspects of‘Studies on Migration Mechanism of the Source Term under Severe Accident’,which is a significant task of the National Large Advanced PWR Research Program.This research aims at building up a method for analyzing fission product behavior in the containment with CFD code.The effect of PCCS(Passive

  19. Analysis of One Hundred Otters Killed by Accidents in Central Finland

    Skarén U.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of One Hundred Otters Killed by Accidents in Central FinlandThis is a preliminary report of otters brought to Kuopio Museum, 1967 - 1991. The population living in North Savo, Central Finland seems to be relatively healthy. However, there are some reasons for concern. 108 otters were analysed. Cause of death, sex ratio, reproductive status, age, weight, radiation and heavy metal levels, and stomach contents are reviewed.

  20. Doses in radiation accidents investigated by chromosome aberration analysis

    Results from cytogenetic investigations into 55 cases of suspected over-exposure to radiation during 1977 are reviewed. This report is the seventh in an annual series (previous results were published in NRPB-R5, R10, R23, R35, R41 and R57) which together contain data on 327 studies. Results from all investigations have been pooled for general analysis. Brief accounts are given in an appendix of the circumstances behind the past year's investigations and, where possible, physical estimates of dose have been included for comparison. Two cases are described in more detail: the first concerned a non-classified worker who put an iridium-192 source in his pocket and took it home; and the second involved the accidental contamination of two people with tritium gas. In a second appendix, the confidence limits on cytogenetic dosimetry for X- and γ-ray over-exposures are given and the derivation of these limits is discussed. (author)

  1. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of early exposure results with the MACCS Reactor Accident Consequence Model

    Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Johnson, J.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McKay, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the early health effects associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 34 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: number of early fatalities, number of cases of prodromal vomiting, population dose within 10 mi of the reactor, population dose within 1000 mi of the reactor, individual early fatality probability within 1 mi of the reactor, and maximum early fatality distance. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: scaling factor for horizontal dispersion, dry deposition velocity, inhalation protection factor for nonevacuees, groundshine shielding factor for nonevacuees, early fatality hazard function alpha value for bone marrow exposure, and scaling factor for vertical dispersion.

  2. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of early exposure results with the MACCS Reactor Accident Consequence Model

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the early health effects associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 34 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: number of early fatalities, number of cases of prodromal vomiting, population dose within 10 mi of the reactor, population dose within 1000 mi of the reactor, individual early fatality probability within 1 mi of the reactor, and maximum early fatality distance. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: scaling factor for horizontal dispersion, dry deposition velocity, inhalation protection factor for nonevacuees, groundshine shielding factor for nonevacuees, early fatality hazard function alpha value for bone marrow exposure, and scaling factor for vertical dispersion

  3. Accident proneness, does it exist? A review and meta-analysis

    Visser, Ellen; Pijl, Ysbrand J.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Neeleman, Jan; Rosmalen, Judith G M

    2007-01-01

    Accident related health problems have been suggested to cluster within persons. This phenomenon became known as accident proneness and has been a subject of many discussions. This study provides an overview of accident proneness. Therefore, 79 articles with empirical data on accident rates were identified from databases Embase, Medline, and Psychinfo. First, definitions of accidents varied highly, but most studies focused on accidents resulting in injuries requiring medical attention. Second,...

  4. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of chronic exposure results with the MACCS reactor accident consequence model

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the chronic exposure pathways associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 75 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: crop growing season dose, crop long-term dose, water ingestion dose, milk growing season dose, long-term groundshine dose, long-term inhalation dose, total food pathways dose, total ingestion pathways dose, total long-term pathways dose, total latent cancer fatalities, area-dependent cost, crop disposal cost, milk disposal cost, population-dependent cost, total economic cost, condemnation area, condemnation population, crop disposal area and milk disposal area. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: dry deposition velocity, transfer of cesium from animal feed to milk, transfer of cesium from animal feed to meat, ground concentration of Cs-134 at which the disposal of milk products will be initiated, transfer of Sr-90 from soil to legumes, maximum allowable ground concentration of Sr-90 for production of crops, fraction of cesium entering surface water that is consumed in drinking water, groundshine shielding factor, scale factor defining resuspension, dose reduction associated with decontamination, and ground concentration of 1-131 at which disposal of crops will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season

  5. Quantification of a decision-making failure probability of the accident management using cognitive analysis model

    In the nuclear power plant, much knowledge is acquired through probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of a severe accident, and accident management (AM) is prepared. It is necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of AM using the decision-making failure probability of an emergency organization, operation failure probability of operators, success criteria of AM and reliability of AM equipments in PSA. However, there has been no suitable qualification method for PSA so far to obtain the decision-making failure probability, because the decision-making failure of an emergency organization treats the knowledge based error. In this work, we developed a new method for quantification of the decision-making failure probability of an emergency organization using cognitive analysis model, which decided an AM strategy, in a nuclear power plant at the severe accident, and tried to apply it to a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant. As a result: (1) It could quantify the decision-making failure probability adjusted to PSA for general analysts, who do not necessarily possess professional human factors knowledge, by choosing the suitable value of a basic failure probability and an error-factor. (2) The decision-making failure probabilities of six AMs were in the range of 0.23 to 0.41 using the screening evaluation method and in the range of 0.10 to 0.19 using the detailed evaluation method as the result of trial evaluation based on severe accident analysis of a typical PWR plant, and a result of sensitivity analysis of the conservative assumption, failure probability decreased about 50%. (3) The failure probability using the screening evaluation method exceeded that using detailed evaluation method by 99% of probability theoretically, and the failure probability of AM in this study exceeded 100%. From this result, it was shown that the decision-making failure probability was more conservative than the detailed evaluation method, and the screening evaluation method satisfied

  6. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of chronic exposure results with the MACCS reactor accident consequence model

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the chronic exposure pathways associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 75 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: crop growing-season dose, crop long-term dose, water ingestion dose, milk growing-season dose, long-term groundshine dose, long-term inhalation dose, total food pathways dose, total ingestion pathways dose, total long-term pathways dose, total latent cancer fatalities, area-dependent cost, crop disposal cost, milk disposal cost, population-dependent cost, total economic cost, condemnation area, condemnation population, crop disposal area and milk disposal area. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: dry deposition velocity, transfer of cesium from animal feed to milk, transfer of cesium from animal feed to meet, ground concentration of Cs-134 at which the disposal of milk products will be initiated, transfer of Sr-90 from soil to legumes, maximum allowable ground concentration of Sr-90 for production of crops, fraction of cesium entering surface water that is consumed in drinking water, groundshine shielding factor, scale factor defining resuspension, dose reduction associated with decontamination, and ground concentration of I-131 at which disposal of crops will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season. Reducing the uncertainty in the preceding variables was found to substantially reduce the uncertainty in the

  7. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of chronic exposure results with the MACCS reactor accident consequence model

    Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Johnson, J.D.; Rollstin, J.A. [Gram, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the chronic exposure pathways associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 75 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: crop growing season dose, crop long-term dose, water ingestion dose, milk growing season dose, long-term groundshine dose, long-term inhalation dose, total food pathways dose, total ingestion pathways dose, total long-term pathways dose, total latent cancer fatalities, area-dependent cost, crop disposal cost, milk disposal cost, population-dependent cost, total economic cost, condemnation area, condemnation population, crop disposal area and milk disposal area. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: dry deposition velocity, transfer of cesium from animal feed to milk, transfer of cesium from animal feed to meat, ground concentration of Cs-134 at which the disposal of milk products will be initiated, transfer of Sr-90 from soil to legumes, maximum allowable ground concentration of Sr-90 for production of crops, fraction of cesium entering surface water that is consumed in drinking water, groundshine shielding factor, scale factor defining resuspension, dose reduction associated with decontamination, and ground concentration of 1-131 at which disposal of crops will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season.

  8. Analysis of Radiation Accident of Non-destructive Inspection and Rational Preparing Bills

    After 2006, according to enactment of Non-destructive Inspection Promotion Act, the number of non-destructive inspection companies and corresponding accident is increased sharply. In this research, it includes characteristic analysis of field of the non-destructive inspection. And from the result of analysis, the purpose of this research is discovering reason for 'Why there is higher accident ratio in non-destructive inspection field, relatively' and preparing effective bill for reducing radiation accidents. The number of worker for non-destructive inspect is increased steadily and non-destructive inspect worker take highest dose. Corresponding to these, it must be needed to prepare bills to protect non-destructive inspect workers. By analysis of accident case, there are many case of carelessness that tools are too heavy to carry it everywhere workers go. And there are some cases caused by deficiency of education that less understanding of radiation and poor operation by less understanding of structure of tools. Also, there is no data specialized to non-destructive inspect field. So, it has to take information from statistical data. Because of this, it is hard to analyze nondestructive inspect field accurately. So, it is required to; preparing rational bills to protect non-destructive inspect workers nondestructive inspect instrument lightening and easy manual which can understandable for low education background people accurate survey data from real worker. To accomplish these, we needs to do; analyze and comprehend the present law about non-destructive inspect worker understand non-destructive inspect instruments accurately and conduct research for developing material developing rational survey to measuring real condition for non-destructive inspect workers

  9. Discussion about Enterprise Accident Investigation and Analysis Methods%企业事故调查分析方法探讨

    孟凡强

    2011-01-01

    对企业事故调查分析方法进行了探讨,明确了企业事故调查分析程序,提出了具体的事故调查取证方法、事故原因分析方法和事故责任分析方法。%The investigation and analysis methods of enterprise accidents are discussed, the investigation and analysis procedure of enterprise accidents is defined and concrete accident investigating and evidence collecting methods, accident cause analysis methods and accident responsibility analysis methods are presented.

  10. Analysis of the small break loss of coolant accident in the VVER-1000/V446 reactor

    Altaha, S. Mahmoud; Mansouri, Masoud; Jahanfarnia, Gholamreza [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, the analysis of a Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) in the VVER-1000/V446 nuclear power plant is presented. For a conservative analysis of the accident, the loss of power to the NPP and failure of one accumulator, and also of two emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) in loops 2 and 3 of the primary and secondary circuits are considered when SBLOCA has occurred. The RELAP5/MOD3.2 computer code has been used in performing the analyses. Two cases of accident scenarios as 25 mm and 100 mm breaks are analyzed. The results are in good agreement with those reported in the plant's FSAR. The results of liquid velocity show that in both cases, the flow of hot legs after the break is reversed, which provides the potential for reflux condensation phenomena. Furthermore, in the 25 mm break, the flow rate in the broken and intact side downcomer remains in the downward motion while in the 100 mm break, the broken and intact side flow rate changes to the reversed state alternatively.

  11. Analysis of Early Severe Accident Initiated by LBLOCA for Qinshan Phase II Nuclear Power Project

    Shi Xing-Wei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to simulate an early Severe Accident (SA scenario more detail through transferring the thermal-hydraulic status of the plant predicted by RELAP5 computer code to SA Program (SAP. Based on the criterion of date extract time, the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic calculation data is extracted to form a file for SAP input card at 1477K of cladding surface. Relying on the thermal-hydraulic boundary parameters calculated by RELAP5 code, analysis of early SA initiated by the Large Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LBLOCA without mitigation measures for Qinshan Phase II Nuclear Power Plant (QSP-II performed by SAP through finding the key events of accident sequence, estimating the amount of hydrogen generation and oxidation behavior of the cladding and evaluating the relocation order of the materials collapsed in the central region of the core. The results of this study are expected to improve the SA analysis methodology more detail through analyzing early SA scenario.

  12. A Comparative analysis for control rod drop accident in RETRAN DNB and CETOP DNB Model

    In Korea, the nuclear industries such as fuel manufacturer, the architect engineer and the utility, have been using the methodologies and codes of vendors, such as Westinghouse(WH), Combustion Engineering, for the safety analyses of nuclear power plants. Consequently the industries have kept up the many organizations to operate the methodologies and to maintain the codes for each vendor. It may occur difficulty to improve the safety analyses efficiency and technology related. So, the necessity another of methodologies and code systems applicable to Non- LOCA, beyond design basis accident and performance analyses for all types of pressurized water reactor(PWR) has been raised. Due to the above reason, the Korea Electric Power Research Institute(KEPRI) had decided to develop the new safety analysis code system for Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plants in Korea. As the first requirement, the best-estimate codes were required for applicable wider application area and realistic behavior prediction of power plants with various and sophisticated functions. After the investigation for few candidates, RETRAN-3D has been chosen as a system analysis code. As a part of the feasibility estimation for the methodology and code system, CRD(Control Rod Drop) accident which an event of Non-LOCA accidents for Uljin units 3 and 4 and Yonggwang 1 and 2 was selected to verify the feasibility of the methodology using the RETRAN-3D. In this paper, RETRAN DNB Model and CETOP DNB Model were analyzed by using comparative method

  13. Analysis of the small break loss of coolant accident in the VVER-1000/V446 reactor

    In this paper, the analysis of a Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) in the VVER-1000/V446 nuclear power plant is presented. For a conservative analysis of the accident, the loss of power to the NPP and failure of one accumulator, and also of two emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) in loops 2 and 3 of the primary and secondary circuits are considered when SBLOCA has occurred. The RELAP5/MOD3.2 computer code has been used in performing the analyses. Two cases of accident scenarios as 25 mm and 100 mm breaks are analyzed. The results are in good agreement with those reported in the plant's FSAR. The results of liquid velocity show that in both cases, the flow of hot legs after the break is reversed, which provides the potential for reflux condensation phenomena. Furthermore, in the 25 mm break, the flow rate in the broken and intact side downcomer remains in the downward motion while in the 100 mm break, the broken and intact side flow rate changes to the reversed state alternatively.

  14. Analysis of the containment spray effect for severe accident management during Molten Core-Concrete Interaction

    Massive combustible gases generated by MCCI during a severe accident in NPP causes a problem of when we should spray the containment. The increase of hydrogen concentration due to the steam condensation caused by spraying might lead to a hydrogen burning and thus intimidate the containment integrity. In case the containment is designed to be robust enough to sustain the AICC (Adiabatic Isochoric Complete Combustion) load and to prevent DDT (Deflagration to Detonation Transition), it might be effective to spray and thus burn the hydrogen at early phase of MCCI to keep the containment integrity. Spraying the containment at late phase of MCCI might cause the containment to fail because of the increased combustible gases generation. MELCOR analysis for APR1400 shows that spraying the containment at early phase can delay the time to reach containment failure pressure by steam inerting and oxygen depletion. This kind of analysis helps us to better establish a spray actuation time for an accident management procedure against a postulated severe accident

  15. Analysis of medicostatistical data to assess the genetic and teratogenic effects of the Chernobyl accident

    Analysis of the official medicodemographic statistical data (provided by the Ukrainian Ministry of Health) revealed variations in the mean rates of congenital developmental defects (CDD) before 1987 (1985-1986) and in the period of 1987-1989 in all the areas irrespective of a degree of contamination with radionuclides (i.e. variations are determined by the time factor rather than by the irradiation factor). According to the medical statistical data, the rates of CDD and spontaneous abortions varied within a wide range, making it difficult to assess probable mutagenic and teratogenic effects of the Chernobyl accident. Medicostatistical data on spontaneous abortions understated the actual rates 2-3-fold, therefore they were not recommended for assessment of mutagenic effects of the Chernobyl accident

  16. Accident consequence analysis models applied to licensing process of nuclear installations, radioactive and conventional industries

    The industrial accidents happened in the last years, particularly in the eighty's decade, had contributed in a significant way to call the attention to government authorities, industry and society as a whole, demanding mechanisms for preventing episodes that could affect people's safety and environment quality. Techniques and methods already thoroughly used in the nuclear, aeronautic and war industries were then adapted for performing analysis and evaluation of the risks associated to other industrial activities, especially in the petroleum, chemistry and petrochemical areas. Some models for analyzing the consequences of accidents involving fire and explosion, used in the licensing processes of nuclear and radioactive facilities, are presented in this paper. These models have also application in the licensing of conventional industrial facilities. (author)

  17. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Early health effects uncertainty assessment. Volume 1: Main report

    Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Grupa, J.B. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (Netherlands)

    1997-12-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA early health effects models.

  18. Uncertainty analysis for control rod ejection accidents simulated by KIKO3D/TRABCO code system

    Recently, considerable conservatism must be applied in the traditional safety analyses for taking into account the uncertainties originating from the input parameters, approximations in the models, due to the safety reserves, etc. The extreme values for all of the input parameters are supposed in the traditional safety analysis at the same time. Additionally it must be mentioned that the selection of the input parameter values leading to conservative results often is not easy. The main goal of this paper is to present a more realistic methodology for the case of control rod ejection accidents. The applied consistent statistical approach leads to conservative results also, but avoids the unnecessary cumulative conservatism. A method based on a mathematical model ('Two-Sided Statistical Tolerance Intervals', [1-2]) was chosen for the realization of uncertainty analyses of Reactivity Initiated Accidents (RIA). (author)

  19. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Late health effects uncertainty assessment. Volume 1: Main report

    Little, M.P.; Muirhead, C.R. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA late health effects models.

  20. A simulation of steam generator tube rupture accident by safety analysis code RELAP5/MODI

    Steam-generator-tube-rupture accident occurred at Prairie Island unit 1 is simulated using the RELAP5/MOD1 code which has been developed as a best-estimate safety analysis code for light water reactors. The purpose of the simulation is to examine its capacity as a tool of obtaining high-quality and verified data base needed for developing diagnostic techniques of nuclear power plants. The simulation is conducted until 3200 seconds after the tube rupture. The simulation results agrees fairly well with both the plant records and the RETRAN-02 simulation results conducted at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and it is concluded that the RELAP5/MOD1 code is effective to simulate the overall plant behavior during the accident, although several items remain for future improvement. (author)

  1. Expert Judgement for a Probabilistic Accident Consequence Uncertainty Analysis (invited paper)

    The development of two probabilistic accident consequence codes sponsored by the European Commission and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, COSYMA and MACCS respectively, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the risks and other endpoints associated with accidents from hypothesised nuclear installations. In 1991, both Commissions sponsored a joint project for an uncertainty analysis of these two codes. The main objective of this joint project was systematically to derive credible and traceable probability distributions for the respective code input variables. These input distributions will subsequently be used in two uncertainty analyses for each code separately. A formal expert judgement elicitation and evacuation process was used as the best available technique to accomplish that objective. This paper shows the overall process and reports on experiences of elicitors and experts of the eight expert judgement exercises performed under the joint study. (author)

  2. Probabilistic Accident Consequence Uncertainty Analysis of the Whole Program Package COSYMA (invited paper)

    The overall uncertainty analysis of the program package COSYMA for assessing the radiological consequences of nuclear accidents builds on the results of a series of individual uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of its submodules. A set of 186 model parameters was identified which contribute most to the uncertainties of endpoints. Probabilistic accident consequence assessments with 144 weather sequences were performed for each of 300 sample sets derived from the uncertainty distributions of these parameters by Latin hypercube sampling. The evaluation of the results provided confidence bounds for the complementary cumulative frequency distributions of endpoints for three different source terms covering a wide range of release fractions. Concluding sensitivity analyses identified the most important model parameters responsible for the uncertainties of endpoints. (author)

  3. Analysis of containment pressure and temperature changes following loss of coolant accident (LOCA)

    This paper present a preliminary thermal-hydraulics analysis of AP1000 containment following loss of coolant accident events such as double-end cold line break (DECLB) or main steam line break (MSLB) using MELCOR code. A break of this type will produce a rapid depressurization of the reactor pressure vessel (primary system) and release initially high pressure water into the containment followed by a much smaller release of highly superheated steam. The high pressure liquid water will flash and rapidly pressurize the containment building. The performance of passive containment cooling system for steam removal by condensation on large steel containment structure is a major contributing process, controlling the pressure and temperature maximum reached during the accident event. The results are analyzed, discussed and compared with the similar work done by Sandia National Laboratories. (author)

  4. Fuel assembly stress and deflection analysis for loss-of-coolant accident and seismic excitation

    Babcock and Wilcox has evaluated the capability of the fuel assemblies to withstand the effects of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) blowdown, the operational basis earthquake (OBE) and design basis earthquake (DBE), and the simultaneous occurrence of the DBE and LOCA. This method of analysis is applicable to all of B and W's nuclear steam system contracts that specify the skirt-supported pressure vessel. Loads during the saturated and subcooled phases of blowdown following a loss-of-coolant accident were calculated. The maximum loads on the fuel assemblies were found to be below allowable limits, and the maximum deflections of the fuel assemblies were found to be less than those that could prevent the insertion of control rods or the flow of coolant through the core. (U.S.)

  5. Impact of traffic congestion on road accidents: a spatial analysis of the M25 motorway in England.

    Wang, Chao; Quddus, Mohammed A; Ison, Stephen G

    2009-07-01

    Traffic congestion and road accidents are two external costs of transport and the reduction of their impacts is often one of the primary objectives for transport policy makers. The relationship between traffic congestion and road accidents however is not apparent and less studied. It is speculated that there may be an inverse relationship between traffic congestion and road accidents, and as such this poses a potential dilemma for transport policy makers. This study aims to explore the impact of traffic congestion on the frequency of road accidents using a spatial analysis approach, while controlling for other relevant factors that may affect road accidents. The M25 London orbital motorway, divided into 70 segments, was chosen to conduct this study and relevant data on road accidents, traffic and road characteristics were collected. A robust technique has been developed to map M25 accidents onto its segments. Since existing studies have often used a proxy to measure the level of congestion, this study has employed a precise congestion measurement. A series of Poisson based non-spatial (such as Poisson-lognormal and Poisson-gamma) and spatial (Poisson-lognormal with conditional autoregressive priors) models have been used to account for the effects of both heterogeneity and spatial correlation. The results suggest that traffic congestion has little or no impact on the frequency of road accidents on the M25 motorway. All other relevant factors have provided results consistent with existing studies. PMID:19540969

  6. Safety culture and accident analysis-A socio-management approach based on organizational safety social capital

    One of the biggest challenges for organizations in today's competitive business environment is to create and preserve a self-sustaining safety culture. Typically, Key drivers of safety culture in many organizations are regulation, audits, safety training, various types of employee exhortations to comply with safety norms, etc. However, less evident factors like networking relationships and social trust amongst employees, as also extended networking relationships and social trust of organizations with external stakeholders like government, suppliers, regulators, etc., which constitute the safety social capital in the Organization-seem to also influence the sustenance of organizational safety culture. Can erosion in safety social capital cause deterioration in safety culture and contribute to accidents? If so, how does it contribute? As existing accident analysis models do not provide answers to these questions, CAMSoC (Curtailing Accidents by Managing Social Capital), an accident analysis model, is proposed. As an illustration, five accidents: Bhopal (India), Hyatt Regency (USA), Tenerife (Canary Islands), Westray (Canada) and Exxon Valdez (USA) have been analyzed using CAMSoC. This limited cross-industry analysis provides two key socio-management insights: the biggest source of motivation that causes deviant behavior leading to accidents is 'Faulty Value Systems'. The second biggest source is 'Enforceable Trust'. From a management control perspective, deterioration in safety culture and resultant accidents is more due to the 'action controls' rather than explicit 'cultural controls'. Future research directions to enhance the model's utility through layering are addressed briefly

  7. The role of quantitative uncertainty in the safety analysis of flammable gas accidents in Hanford waste tanks

    Following a 1990 investigation into flammable gas generation, retention, and release mechanisms within the Hanford Site high-level waste tanks, personnel concluded that the existing Authorization Basis documentation did not adequately evaluate flammable gas hazards. The US Department of Energy Headquarters subsequently declared the flammable gas hazard as an unresolved safety issue. Although work scope has been focused on resolution of the issue, it has yet to be resolved due to considerable uncertainty regarding essential technical parameters and associated risk. Resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue will include the identification of a set of controls for the Authorization Basis for the tanks which will require a safety analysis of flammable gas accidents. A traditional nuclear facility safety analysis is based primarily on the analysis of a set of bounding accidents to represent the risks of the possible accidents and hazardous conditions at a facility. While this approach may provide some indication of the bounding consequences of accidents for facilities, it does not provide a satisfactory basis for identification of facility risk or safety controls when there is considerable uncertainty associated with accident phenomena and/or data as is the case with potential flammable gas accidents at the Hanford Site. This is due to the difficulties in identifying the bounding case and reaching consensus among safety analysts, facility operations and engineering, and the regulator on the implications of the safety analysis results. In addition, the bounding cases are frequently based on simplifying assumptions that make the analysis results insensitive to variations among facilities or the impact of alternative safety control strategies. The existing safety analysis of flammable gas accidents for the Tank Waste Remediation system (TWRS) at the Hanford Site has these difficulties. However, Hanford Site personnel are developing a refined safety analysis approach

  8. Analysis of radiation accidents/incidents in Japan by the revised INES

    Full text: The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) was originally developed in the 1990's for facilitating rapid communication to the media and the public regarding the safety significance of events mainly at nuclear power stations. It has been considered since the beginning of 2000's to include the use of radiation sources and the transport of radioactive materials under the background of discussion for radiation safety and security. Additional guidance for rating of transport and radiation source events were agreed in 2006. The regulatory authority of Japan (MEXT) made the working group for the evaluation and started to apply the revised INES to the radiation events in Japan in 2007. This paper describes the results of analysis of all the radiation events which were legally reported since 1958 to 2006 in Japan. The analysis was based on the opened materials which were issued by the nuclear safety commission (NSC) and the nuclear safety technology center (NUSTEC). Events are classified on the scale at seven levels: levels 4-7 are termed 'accidents and levels 1-3 incidents'. Events without safety significance are termed 'deviations' and are classified below scale at level 0. Events without relevance to radiological or nuclear safety are termed 'out of scale'. There were 148 radiation events in Japan. The maximum level of accidents was level 4, but no death was observed. Because the number of exposed individuals was about 10, the rating was increased by one level. Three accidents of level 4 were related to the non-destructive test (NDT) and occured in 1971, 1972 and 1979. Based on the lessoned and learned from these accidents, the countermeasures, such as the improvement of machine structure and the effective practice of education, were taken. (author)

  9. Analysis of Public Perception on Radiation: with One Year after Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    A year has passed since the nuclear power plant accident in Fukushima on March 11, 2011, and a survey for public perception on radiation by Korean people has been made. The methodological design was based on a quantitative survey and a frequency analysis was done. The analysis objects were survey papers (n=2,754pcs) answered by random ordinary citizens chosen from all over the country. The questionnaires, and study tool, were directly distributed and collected. A total of 40 questionnaires using a coefficient of Cronbach's α per each area was 'self perception of radiation' (0.620), 'radiation risk' (0.830), 'benefit from radiation' (0.781), 'radiation controlled' (0.685), 'informative source of radiation' (0.831), 'influence degree from Fukushima accident' (0.763), showing rather high score from all areas. As the result of the questionnaires, the knowledge of radiation concept was 69.50 out of 100 points, which shows a rather significant difference from the result of 'know well about radiation' (53.7%) and 'just know about radiation' (37.40%). According to the survey, one of the main reasons why radiation seems risky was that once exposed to radiation, it may not have negative impacts presently but, the next generation could see negative impacts (66.1%). About 41% of our respondents showed a negative position against the government's report on radiation while 39.5% of respondents said that we should stop running nuclear power in light of Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. This study was done for the first time by Korean people's public perception on radiation after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. We expect this might have significant contributions to the establishment of the government's policy on radiation.

  10. A strategy to the development of a human error analysis method for accident management in nuclear power plants using industrial accident dynamics

    This technical report describes the early progress of he establishment of a human error analysis method as a part of a human reliability analysis(HRA) method for the assessment of the human error potential in a given accident management strategy. At first, we review the shortages and limitations of the existing HRA methods through an example application. In order to enhance the bias to the quantitative aspect of the HRA method, we focused to the qualitative aspect, i.e., human error analysis(HEA), during the proposition of a strategy to the new method. For the establishment of a new HEA method, we discuss the basic theories and approaches to the human error in industry, and propose three basic requirements that should be maintained as pre-requisites for HEA method in practice. Finally, we test IAD(Industrial Accident Dynamics) which has been widely utilized in industrial fields, in order to know whether IAD can be so easily modified and extended to the nuclear power plant applications. We try to apply IAD to the same example case and develop new taxonomy of the performance shaping factors in accident management and their influence matrix, which could enhance the IAD method as an HEA method. (author). 33 refs., 17 tabs., 20 figs

  11. Analysis of TRACY experiment and JCO criticality accident by using AGNES code

    A one-point kinetics code, AGNES, has been developed in JAERI for the purpose of the analysis of TRACY experiment. Four of the experiments performed in ramp feed mode were simulated by AGNES code, and the power, temperature and total fission number were evaluated. The calculated values of them were in agreement with the experimental values with ±15% error. In the analysis of JCO criticality accident, three supposed cases were considered, and the total fission number was evaluated at 4 - 6x1017 by insertion of 1.5 - 3.0$ excess reactivity. (author)

  12. Reduction of Accident Rate in Heat Supply Networks by the Analysis of Pipe Rupture Statistical Data

    Adomas Ūselis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of reliable methods to determine the conditions of the pipes buried-in-the-ground, the analysis of the crack history was performed in order to offer an alternative method for planning the pipe condition inspections and the system refurbishment. The results of analysis have shown that the oldest pipes of big diameter, mounted in a non-inspectable channels, loam, silt loam or sandy loam soil fall under the category of pipes with the highest accident rate.Article in Lithuanian

  13. Reduction of Accident Rate in Heat Supply Networks by the Analysis of Pipe Rupture Statistical Data

    Adomas Ūselis; Artur Rogoža

    2011-01-01

    Due to the lack of reliable methods to determine the conditions of the pipes buried-in-the-ground, the analysis of the crack history was performed in order to offer an alternative method for planning the pipe condition inspections and the system refurbishment. The results of analysis have shown that the oldest pipes of big diameter, mounted in a non-inspectable channels, loam, silt loam or sandy loam soil fall under the category of pipes with the highest accident rate.Article in Lithuanian

  14. Heat transfer analysis of experiments simulating a loss-of-coolant accident

    Thermodynamic out-of-pile experiments simulating a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) are performed with electrically heated rods, which are instrumented with internal thermo-couples because surface measurements would influence the coolant flow. The data analysis problem is therefore the solution of the nonlinear problem to determine the surface temperature, the surface heat transfer coefficient, and the surface heat flux from internal temperature measurements. A digital computer code was developed for the analysis of the experimental data. The code has different options. The major application of the code is the numerical solution of the inverse heat conduction problem involving temperature dependent material properties and complex multilayer geometries. (author)

  15. Development of an accident consequence analysis program based on the object oriented programming technique

    The KAERI accident consequence analysis program KAPAC is being developed on the basis of reusable objects in PPAM (platform for the development of plant analysis and management codes). Development of PPAM is being conducted at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) in order to be able to provide portability and reusability of computer codes, and consistent user interface in developing software with the use of object oriented programming (OOP) under a Microsoft Windows environment. By constructing the platform, software development can benefit from a shorter development cycle and an easier validation and verification process. 1 ref., 2 figs

  16. Analysis of National Major Work Safety Accidents in China, 2003-2012

    Yunfeng YE

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study provides a national profile of major work safety accidents in China, which cause more than 10 fatalities per accident, intended to provide scientific basis for prevention measures and strategies to reduce major work safety accidents and deaths.Methods: Data from 2003-2012 Census of major work safety accidents were collected from State Administration of Work Safety System (SAWS. Published literature and statistical yearbook were also included to implement information. We analyzed the frequency of accidents and deaths, trend, geographic distribution and injury types. Additionally, we discussed the severity and urgency of emergency rescue by types of accidents.Results: A total of 877 major work safety accidents were reported, resulting in 16,795 deaths and 9,183 injuries. The numbers of accidents and deaths, mortality rate and incidence of major accidents have declined in recent years. The mortality rate and incidence was 0.71 and 1.20 per 106 populations in 2012, respectively. Transportation and mining contributed to the highest number of major accidents and deaths. Major aviation and railway accidents caused more casualties per incident, while collapse, machinery, electrical shock accidents and tailing dam accidents were the most severe situation that resulted in bigger proportion of death.Conclusion: Ten years’ major work safety accident data indicate that the frequency of accidents and number of deaths was declined and several safety concerns persist in some segments. Keywords: Work safety, Major accident, Prevention

  17. Accident proneness, does it exist? A review and meta-analysis

    Visser, Ellen; Pijl, Ysbrand J.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Neeleman, Jan; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Accident related health problems have been suggested to cluster within persons. This phenomenon became known as accident proneness and has been a subject of many discussions. This study provides an overview of accident proneness. Therefore, 79 articles with empirical data on accident rates were iden

  18. Analysis 320 coal mine accidents using structural equation modeling with unsafe conditions of the rules and regulations as exogenous variables.

    Zhang, Yingyu; Shao, Wei; Zhang, Mengjia; Li, Hejun; Yin, Shijiu; Xu, Yingjun

    2016-07-01

    Mining has been historically considered as a naturally high-risk industry worldwide. Deaths caused by coal mine accidents are more than the sum of all other accidents in China. Statistics of 320 coal mine accidents in Shandong province show that all accidents contain indicators of "unsafe conditions of the rules and regulations" with a frequency of 1590, accounting for 74.3% of the total frequency of 2140. "Unsafe behaviors of the operator" is another important contributory factor, which mainly includes "operator error" and "venturing into dangerous places." A systems analysis approach was applied by using structural equation modeling (SEM) to examine the interactions between the contributory factors of coal mine accidents. The analysis of results leads to three conclusions. (i) "Unsafe conditions of the rules and regulations," affect the "unsafe behaviors of the operator," "unsafe conditions of the equipment," and "unsafe conditions of the environment." (ii) The three influencing factors of coal mine accidents (with the frequency of effect relation in descending order) are "lack of safety education and training," "rules and regulations of safety production responsibility," and "rules and regulations of supervision and inspection." (iii) The three influenced factors (with the frequency in descending order) of coal mine accidents are "venturing into dangerous places," "poor workplace environment," and "operator error." PMID:27085591

  19. Hydrodynamic and elastoplastic structural analysis of fast breeder reactor core accident

    This paper describes the principles and examples of applications of an explicit Lagrangian coupled finite difference-finite element code HEMP-ESI developed in order to calculate the structural consequences of hypothetical core disruptive accidents (HCDA) in nuclear reactors. The explicit solution algorithm of the finite difference scheme used to discretize the hydrodynamic fluid domains is shown to be very similar to that used for the solution of the finite element discretized shell structures, hence permitting an easy and efficient coupling. Two examples of simulation show the applicability of the method to nuclear reactor core safety analysis (test problem). Core explosion in a loop-type reactor including a shell containment: the calculation shows the energy absorbing function of the shell and enables the evaluation of the forces acting on the reactor containment. Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident in a fast breeder reactor: the calculation shows the main features of this accident: lifting of the liquid sodium above the explosion and impact on the cover head inducing upward deformations; radial outflow of the sodium which induces large deformations of the inner and outer shell; zones of compressive circumferential stresses in the main shell at the junction of the spherical head and the cylindrical part

  20. Independent assessment of MELCOR as a severe accident thermal-hydraulic/source term analysis tool

    MELCOR is a fully integrated computer code that models all phases of the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants, and is being developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has a program with the NRC called ''MELCOR Verification, Benchmarking, and Applications,'' whose aim is to provide independent assessment of MELCOR as a severe accident thermal-hydraulic/source term analysis tool. The scope of this program is to perform quality control verification on all released versions of MELCOR, to benchmark MELCOR against more mechanistic codes and experimental data from severe fuel damage tests, and to evaluate the ability of MELCOR to simulate long-term severe accident transients in commercial LWRs, by applying the code to model both BWRs and PWRs. Under this program, BNL provided input to the NRC-sponsored MELCOR Peer Review, and is currently contributing to the MELCOR Cooperative Assessment Program (MCAP). This paper presents a summary of MELCOR assessment efforts at BNL and their contribution to NRC goals with respect to MELCOR

  1. Analysis on the Density Driven Air-Ingress Accident in VHTRs

    Air-ingress following the pipe rupture is considered to be the most serious accident in the VHTRs due to its potential problems such as core heat-up, structural integrity and toxic gas release. Previously, it has been believed that the main air-ingress mechanism of this accident is the molecular diffusion process between the reactor core and the cavity. However, according to some recent studies, there is another fast air-ingress process that has not been considered before. It is called density-driven stratified flow. The potential for density-driven stratified air ingress into the VHTR following a large-break LOCA was first described in the NGNP Methods Technical Program based on stratified flow studies performed with liquid. Studies on densitygradient driven stratified flow in advanced reactor systems has been the subject of active research for well over a decade since density-gradient dominated stratified flow is an inherent characteristic of passive systems used in advanced reactors. Recently, Oh et al. performed a CFD analysis on the stratified flow in the VHTR, and showed that this effect can significantly accelerate the air-ingress process in the VHTRs. They also proposed to replace the original air-ingress scenario based on the molecular diffusion with the one based on the stratified flow. This paper is focusing on the effect of stratified flow on the results of the air-ingress accident in VHTR

  2. Loss Of Secondary coolant accident analysis for Pius type reactor using Relap5/MOD2

    Process inherent ultimate safety (Pius) reactor concept is a reactor concept that intrinsically based on passive safety. This reactor refer to Pressurized water reactor (PWR) wherein the primary system is submerged in a pool of poison water. the operating principle is to maintain the pressure balance, so that no inflow from pool to the primary system. On loss of secondary coolant accident, primary coolant temperature increases, it is followed by the increase of primary pump speed. When the upper limit is reached, the pump is tripped due to the pressure balance disturbance, poison water flows from pool to the primary system, then reactor shut down. this accident condition was simulated by experimental and numerical simulation using RELAP5/MOD2. Numerical simulation was done to the experimental apparatus nodalization that was set on the norm of RELAP5/MOD2. This nodalization consist of 119 volumes, 127 junctions, and 106 heat structures. Analysis was carried out using both experimental and numerical simulation results. it can be concluded that PIUS type reactor is able to anticipate loss of secondary coolant accident because its capability of self shut down

  3. Development of a component Monte Carlo program for accident sequence analysis to apply for reprocessing facility

    In consideration of application for reprocessing facility, where a variety of causal events such as equipment failure and human error might occur, and the event progression would take place with relatively substantial time delay before getting to the accident stage, a component Monte Carlo program for accident sequence analysis has been developed to pursue chronologically the probabilistic behavior of each component failure and repair in an exact manner. In comparison with analytical formulation and its calculated results, this Monte Carlo technique is shown to predict a reasonable result. Then, taking an example for a sample problem from a German reprocessing facility model, an accident sequence of red-oil explosion in a plutonium evaporator is analyzed to give a comprehensive interpretation about statistic variation range and computer time elapsed for random walk history calculations. Furthermore, to discuss about its applicability for the practical case of plant system with complex component constitution, a possibility of drastic speed-up of computation is shown by parallelization of the computer program. (author)

  4. Analysis of AP1000 containment passive cooling system during a loss-of-coolant accident

    Highlights: • GOTHIC code is used to model the AP1000 passive cooling system. • The pressure and temperature response compare with DCD. • Predicting the recirculation flow characteristics in secondary containment. • Predicting the nature circulation phenomena in AP1000 containment. - Abstract: A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is one of the design basis accidents (DBAs) in nuclear power plant safety. DBAs may cause containment failure as a result of high temperature or pressure from LOCAs. This study investigates the integrity of the protective mechanism of the AP1000 containment system during a LOCA. The performance of the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) and the ability to perform decay heat removal for long-term cooling are evaluated in this study. The PCCS utilizes gravity-driven natural convection and naturally induced passive safety devices to move the decay heat of fuels to the atmosphere. In this study, two accidents are selected for analysis: a double-ended guillotine of a hot leg and a double-ended break of a main steam line. The analytical results are compared with the corresponding results provided in the AP1000 “Design Control Document” (DCD). The short-term calculations and comparisons with the DCD suggest that GOTHIC 7.2a with a natural convection model may properly represent the phenomenon of passive, safe heat removal. This paper also simulates the long-term calculations of spraying the outer primary containment with a water film and the steam condensation of the inner containment

  5. Knowledge-based modeling of operator response for severe-accident analysis

    Studies of severe accidents in light water reactors have shown that operator response can play a crucial role in the predicted outcomes of dominant accident scenarios. Although computer codes such as MAAP are available to predict the thermal-hydraulic response, substantial knowledge about plant practices and procedures is needed to make reasonable assumptions about operator response. Based on the thermal-hydraulic state of the plant, symptom-oriented procedures provide general guidance to the operators, who then take one of several possible actions. The paper pictures this process as a feedback loop that relies heavily on the judgment of the individual safety analyst. The ability to more explicitly model the procedural guidance and operator response can help close this analytical loop and improve the overall integration and consistency of severe accident analysis. An object-oriented model for operator response characteristics and symptom-oriented procedures was developed using the NEXPERT OBJECT expert system shell. This prototype system reads MAAP transient output files and determines the instructions and operator response characteristics that are implied by the observable plant variables. A limited set of boiling water reactor (BWR6) emergency operating procedures (EOPs) was formulated as a rule set, and pattern-matching techniques were used to generate message queues for display and reports

  6. Analysis of 78 cases of prehospital death due to traffic accident injury

    胡孝菽; 洪勇; 等

    1999-01-01

    Objective The cause and time of prehospital death for the injured patients caused by traffic accidents were studied in order to improve traffic management and clinical treatment,and reduce mortality.Methods The characteristics of the injury,the rescue procedure,the status of the injury leading to death were analyzed based on the retrospective data of 78 cases died before admission.Results The main causes of prehospital death in the traffic accidents included:1.head injury,2.bleeding,3.chest and heart wound,4.spinal cord injury at upper cervix.Death happened immediately after injury was in 17 cases.Death happened from the accident site to our hospital was in 47 cases.Death happened within half an hour after reaching emergency room was in 14 cases.In all of the cases,the death on the transfer took up 62.5%.Conclusions Findings from analysis of the data will be presented on a wide range of traffic safety issues.These include enhancing education of traffic safety and administration of drivers and motor vehicles,establishing a perfect emergency medical service system and a well-trained team of first aid,and popularizing first aid knowledge to all people.

  7. Accident consequences analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    Reyes, S; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-02-23

    Previous studies of the safety and environmental (S and E) aspects of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design have used simplistic assumptions in order to estimate radioactivity releases under accident conditions. Conservatisms associated with these traditional analyses can mask the actual behavior of the plant and have revealed the need for more accurate modeling and analysis of accident conditions and radioactivity mobilization mechanisms. In the present work a set of computer codes traditionally used for magnetic fusion safety analyses (CHEMCON, MELCOR) has been applied for simulating accident conditions in a simple model of the HYLIFE-II IFE design. Here the authors consider a severe lost of coolant accident (LOCA) producing simultaneous failures of the beam tubes (providing a pathway for radioactivity release from the vacuum vessel towards the containment) and of the two barriers surrounding the chamber (inner shielding and containment building it self). Even though containment failure would be a very unlikely event it would be needed in order to produce significant off-site doses. CHEMCON code allows calculation of long-term temperature transients in fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield structures resulting from decay heating. MELCOR is used to simulate a wide range of physical phenomena including thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, aerosol physics and fusion product release and transport. The results of these calculations show that the estimated off-site dose is less than 6 mSv (0.6 rem), which is well below the value of 10 mSv (1 rem) given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for protection of the public from exposure to radiation during off-normal conditions.

  8. Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit final safety analysis report (LWRHU-FSAR): Volume 2: Accident Model Document (AMD)

    Johnson, E.W.

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this volume of the LWRHU SAR, the Accident Model Document (AMD), are to: Identify all malfunctions, both singular and multiple, which can occur during the complete mission profile that could lead to release outside the clad of the radioisotopic material contained therein; Provide estimates of occurrence probabilities associated with these various accidents; Evaluate the response of the LWRHU (or its components) to the resultant accident environments; and Associate the potential event history with test data or analysis to determine the potential interaction of the released radionuclides with the biosphere.

  9. Accidents - Chernobyl accident

    This file is devoted to the Chernobyl accident. It is divided in four parts. The first part concerns the accident itself and its technical management. The second part is relative to the radiation doses and the different contaminations. The third part reports the sanitary effects, the determinists ones and the stochastic ones. The fourth and last part relates the consequences for the other European countries with the case of France. Through the different parts a point is tackled with the measures taken after the accident by the other countries to manage an accident, the cooperation between the different countries and the groups of research and studies about the reactors safety, and also with the international medical cooperation, specially for the children, everything in relation with the Chernobyl accident. (N.C.)

  10. Progress in Addressing DNFSB Recommendation 2002-1 Issues: Improving Accident Analysis Software Applications

    VINCENT, ANDREW

    2005-04-25

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2002-1 (''Quality Assurance for Safety-Related Software'') identified a number of quality assurance issues on the use of software in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for analyzing hazards, and designing and operating controls to prevent or mitigate potential accidents. Over the last year, DOE has begun several processes and programs as part of the Implementation Plan commitments, and in particular, has made significant progress in addressing several sets of issues particularly important in the application of software for performing hazard and accident analysis. The work discussed here demonstrates that through these actions, Software Quality Assurance (SQA) guidance and software tools are available that can be used to improve resulting safety analysis. Specifically, five of the primary actions corresponding to the commitments made in the Implementation Plan to Recommendation 2002-1 are identified and discussed in this paper. Included are the web-based DOE SQA Knowledge Portal and the Central Registry, guidance and gap analysis reports, electronic bulletin board and discussion forum, and a DOE safety software guide. These SQA products can benefit DOE safety contractors in the development of hazard and accident analysis by precluding inappropriate software applications and utilizing best practices when incorporating software results to safety basis documentation. The improvement actions discussed here mark a beginning to establishing stronger, standard-compliant programs, practices, and processes in SQA among safety software users, managers, and reviewers throughout the DOE Complex. Additional effort is needed, however, particularly in: (1) processes to add new software applications to the DOE Safety Software Toolbox; (2) improving the effectiveness of software issue communication; and (3) promoting a safety software quality assurance culture.

  11. Control room dose analysis for Maanshan PWR plant during design basis loss of coolant accident

    To address the issue identified in USNRC's Generic Letter 2003-1 that the unfiltered air in-leakage rate through plant's control room during design basis accident may exceed that assumed in the licensing analysis and thus threat the control room habitability, the control room radiation dose analysis of Maanshan PWR plant has to be re-performed to determine the allowable unfiltered air in-leakage rate. The allowable unfiltered air in-leakage rate is to be determined in such a way that the calculated whole body dose in the control room during the most limiting design basis accident must meet the criteria set forth in 10 CFR 50 Appendix A General Design Criteria (GDC) 19. The determined allowable air in-leakage rate is then employed as an acceptable limit to be met by the control room in-leakage test. In this study, the Maanshan plant control room dose analysis model during loss of coolant accident (LOCA) has been established based on USNRC's RADTRAD computer code. Different release and transport paths have been incorporated in this model, including containment leakage, engineered safety feature (ESF) leakage, and control room filtered and un-filtered air in-leakage. The RADTRAD calculation results are compared with Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) results to assure that overall consistency is reached. Finally, considering the uncertainties and margin to be maintained between RADTRAD calculation results and GDC-19 dose limits, an allowable unfiltered air in-leakage rate for control room habitability application during LOCA has been well defined. (author)

  12. Progress in Addressing DNFSB Recommendation 2002-1 Issues: Improving Accident Analysis Software Applications

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2002-1 (''Quality Assurance for Safety-Related Software'') identified a number of quality assurance issues on the use of software in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for analyzing hazards, and designing and operating controls to prevent or mitigate potential accidents. Over the last year, DOE has begun several processes and programs as part of the Implementation Plan commitments, and in particular, has made significant progress in addressing several sets of issues particularly important in the application of software for performing hazard and accident analysis. The work discussed here demonstrates that through these actions, Software Quality Assurance (SQA) guidance and software tools are available that can be used to improve resulting safety analysis. Specifically, five of the primary actions corresponding to the commitments made in the Implementation Plan to Recommendation 2002-1 are identified and discussed in this paper. Included are the web-based DOE SQA Knowledge Portal and the Central Registry, guidance and gap analysis reports, electronic bulletin board and discussion forum, and a DOE safety software guide. These SQA products can benefit DOE safety contractors in the development of hazard and accident analysis by precluding inappropriate software applications and utilizing best practices when incorporating software results to safety basis documentation. The improvement actions discussed here mark a beginning to establishing stronger, standard-compliant programs, practices, and processes in SQA among safety software users, managers, and reviewers throughout the DOE Complex. Additional effort is needed, however, particularly in: (1) processes to add new software applications to the DOE Safety Software Toolbox; (2) improving the effectiveness of software issue communication; and (3) promoting a safety software quality assurance culture

  13. Analysis of National Major Work Safety Accidents in China, 2003–2012

    YE, Yunfeng; ZHANG, Siheng; RAO, Jiaming; WANG, Haiqing; LI, Yang; WANG, Shengyong; DONG, Xiaomei

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study provides a national profile of major work safety accidents in China, which cause more than 10 fatalities per accident, intended to provide scientific basis for prevention measures and strategies to reduce major work safety accidents and deaths. Methods: Data from 2003–2012 Census of major work safety accidents were collected from State Administration of Work Safety System (SAWS). Published literature and statistical yearbook were also included to implement information. We analyzed the frequency of accidents and deaths, trend, geographic distribution and injury types. Additionally, we discussed the severity and urgency of emergency rescue by types of accidents. Results: A total of 877 major work safety accidents were reported, resulting in 16,795 deaths and 9,183 injuries. The numbers of accidents and deaths, mortality rate and incidence of major accidents have declined in recent years. The mortality rate and incidence was 0.71 and 1.20 per 106 populations in 2012, respectively. Transportation and mining contributed to the highest number of major accidents and deaths. Major aviation and railway accidents caused more casualties per incident, while collapse, machinery, electrical shock accidents and tailing dam accidents were the most severe situation that resulted in bigger proportion of death. Conclusion: Ten years’ major work safety accident data indicate that the frequency of accidents and number of eaths was declined and several safety concerns persist in some segments. PMID:27057515

  14. Severe accident analysis for shutdown state scenarios of CANDU6 plant using ISAAC

    This paper describes the analysis results for the shutdown state accident scenarios with ISAAC (Integrated Severe Accident Analysis code for CANDU plants) in terms of the severe core damage progression from the fuel heat up to the fuel channel failure, fuel material relocation to the calandria vessel, and to calandria/reactor building failure. The analyzed cases include the CANDU6 genetic scenarios. For the base case which represents the most pessimistic assumption for the safety systems, the important phenomena are described at the plant systems following the accident progression including the primary heat transport system, the core (fuel channel and suspended debris bed), the calandria vessel, the reactor vault, and the reactor building. Also the fission product and hydrogen behavior are analyzed. In order to see the effect of the safety systems on severe core damage accident progression, the availability of a moderator cooling system and a shield cooling system are considered for the sensitivity cases. Each scenario is analyzed up to 500,000 seconds (138.9 hours) to see the corium behavior until the reactor vault bottom concrete melt-through. For the ISAAC simulation of the CANDU6 plant, 18 representative fuel channels for 190 actual channels each loop (9 channels between steam generators) are defined for the core configuration. The reactor building is defined with 13 compartments and 22 junctions including reactor building leakage. The result of the most severe case of base case shows that the core uncovers at 2.8 hours, pressure tube ruptures at 3.3 hours due to creep, the reactor building fails at about 32.6 hours and the calandria fails at 49.9 hours after an accident initiation. In the scenarios where the moderator cooling system is available, the pressure tubes experience the creep rupture, but the fuel melt do not occur and the reactor building maintained their integrity. The end shield cooling system can't prevent the core melt and relocation but

  15. Radiation protection: an analysis of thyroid blocking. [Effectiveness of KI in reducing radioactive uptake following potential reactor accident

    Aldrich, D C; Blond, R M

    1980-01-01

    An analysis was performed to provide guidance to policymakers concerning the effectiveness of potassium iodide (KI) as a thyroid blocking agent in potential reactor accident situations, the distance to which (or area within which) it should be distributed, and its relative effectiveness compared to other available protective measures. The analysis was performed using the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) consequence model. Four categories of accidents were addressed: gap activity release accident (GAP), GAP without containment isolation, core melt with a melt-through release, and core melt with an atmospheric release. Cost-benefit ratios (US $/thyroid nodule prevented) are given assuming that no other protective measures are taken. Uncertainties due to health effects parameters, accident probabilities, and costs are assessed. The effects of other potential protective measures, such as evacuation and sheltering, and the impact on children (critical population) are evaluated. Finally, risk-benefit considerations are briefly discussed.

  16. Questions concerning safety and risk after the nuclear accidents in Japan. Deepened accident analysis for the Fukushima Daiichi power plant; Sicherheits- und Risikofragen im Nachgang zu den nuklearen Stoer- und Unfaellen in Japan. Vertiefte Ereignisanalyse zur Anlage Fukushima-Daini

    Pistner, Christoph; Englert, Matthias [Oeko-Institut e.V. - Institut fuer Angewandte Oekologie, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-02-25

    The study questions concerning safety and risk in Japanese power plants following the disastrous nuclear accident covers the following issues: the nuclear facility Fukushima Daiichi, site characterization, important technical equipment, important electro-technical equipment, personal; description of the accident progression in the Fukushima nuclear power plant: impact of the earthquake, impact of the tsunami, short-term measures of the operating personnel, pressure and temperature situation in the containments, restoration of the after-heat cooling system in the units 1/2 and 4, fuel element storage pool, summarized parameters during the accident progress; comparative analysis of the accident progression at the Fukushima Daiichi site.

  17. Accident analysis of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant with the SAMPSON severe accident code. (1) Improvement of debris relocation model

    SAMPSON was designed as a large scale simulation system of inter-connected hierarchical modules covering a wide spectrum of scenarios ranging from normal operation to severe accidents. The code was validated by a wide range of analyses for separate-effect tests, and integral tests mainly through participation in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development projects. In the previous analysis of TEPCO’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (1F) with the SAMPSON code, melt retention at a core plate was assumed based on observations after the Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident. The melt relocation to the core plate occurred when the water level was below the core plate in the SAMPSON analysis of the 1F accident. Therefore debris relocation phenomena were investigated using the Molten Core Relocation Analysis (MCRA) module of SAMPSON. The detailed model of the MCRA module was applied to the XR2-1 BWR metallic relocation experiment first. Molten material in the control rod area accumulated on the velocity limiter in the XR2-1 experiment and this phenomenon was reproduced by the SAMPSON analysis. A part of the molten metal fell directly through the inlet orifice in both the XR2-1 experiment and the SAMPSON analysis. Then the detailed model of the MCRA module was applied to the relocation phenomena of actual fuel bundles. The molten material accumulation on the velocity limiter and direct falling of the molten material through the inlet orifice were also observed in the analysis of actual fuel bundles. Based on the observations described above, MCRA noding for the system calculation was modified as follows. (1) The velocity limiters and control guide tubes were newly taken into account. (2) The flow path of debris was modified so that the molten materials could go to the lower plenum after passing through the inlet orifice without forced accumulation at the core plate. (author)

  18. State-of-the-art report on accident analysis and risk analysis of reprocessing plants in European countries

    This report summarizes informations obtained from America, England, France and FRG concerning methodology, computer code, fundamental data and calculational model on accident/risk analyses of spent fuel reprocessing plants. As a result, the followings are revealed. (1) The system analysis codes developed for reactor plants can be used for reprocessing plants with some code modification. (2) Calculational models and programs have been developed for accidental phenomenological analyses in FRG, but with insufficient data to prove them. (3) The release tree analysis codes developed in FRG are available to estimate radioactivity release amount/probability via off-gas/exhaustair lines in the case of accidents. (4) The computer codes developed in America for reactor-plant environmental transport/safety analyses of released radioactivity can be applied to reprocessing facilities. (author)

  19. Analysis code for large rupture accidents in ATR. SENHOR/FLOOD/HEATUP

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    In the evaluation of thermo-hydraulic transient change, the behavior of core reflooding and the transient change of fuel temperature in the events which are classified in large rupture accidents of reactor coolant loss, that is the safety evaluation event of the ATR, the analysis codes for thermo-hydraulic transient change at the time of large rupture SENHOR, for core reflooding characteristics FLOOD and for fuel temperature HEATUP are used, respectively. The analysis code system for loss of coolant accident comprises the analysis code for thermo-hydraulic transient change at the time of medium and small ruptures LOTRAC in addition to the above three codes. Based on the changes with time lapse of reactor thermal output and steam drum pressure obtained by the SENHOR, average reflooding rate is analyzed by the FLOOD, and the time of starting the turnaround of fuel cladding tube temperature and the heat transfer rate after the turnaround are determined. Based on these data, the detailed temperature change of fuel elements is analyzed by the HEATUP, and the highest temperature and the amount of oxidation of fuel cladding tubes are determined. The SENHOR code, the FLOOD code and the HEATUP code and various models for these codes are explained. The example of evaluation and the sensitivity analysis of the ATR plant are reported in the Appendix. (K.I.)

  20. Status of science and technology with respect of preparation and evaluation of accident analyses and the use of analysis simulators

    The scope of the work was to elaborate the prerequisites for short term accident analyses including recommendations for the application of new methodologies and computational procedures and technical aspects of safety evaluation. The following work packages were performed: Knowledge base for best estimate accident analyses; analytical studies on the PWR plant behavior in case of multiple safety system failures; extension and maintenance of the data base for plant specific analysis simulators.

  1. Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit Safety Analysis Report (LWRHU-SAR). Volume II. Accident model document

    Purposes of this volume (AMD), are to: Identify all malfunctions, both singular and multiple, which can occur during the complete mission profile that could lead to release outside the clad of the radioisotopic material contained therein; provide estimates of occurrence probabilities associated with these various accidents; evaluate the response of the LWRHU (or its components) to the resultant accident environments; and associate the potential event history with test data or analysis to determine the potential interaction of the released radionuclides with the biosphere

  2. A Look at Aircraft Accident Analysis in the Early Days: Do Early 20th Century Accident Investigation Techniques Have Any Lessons for Today?

    Holloway, C. M.; Johnson, C. W.

    2007-01-01

    In the early years of powered flight, the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics in the United States produced three reports describing a method of analysis of aircraft accidents. The first report was published in 1928; the second, which was a revision of the first, was published in 1930; and the third, which was a revision and update of the second, was published in 1936. This paper describes the contents of these reports, and compares the method of analysis proposed therein to the methods used today.

  3. A DOE-STD-3009 hazard and accident analysis methodology for non-reactor nuclear facilities

    This paper demonstrates the use of appropriate consequence evaluation criteria in conjunction with generic likelihood of occurrence data to produce consistent hazard analysis results for nonreactor nuclear facility Safety Analysis Reports (SAR). An additional objective is to demonstrate the use of generic likelihood of occurrence data as a means for deriving defendable accident sequence frequencies, thereby enabling the screening of potentially incredible events (-6 per year) from the design basis accident envelope. Generic likelihood of occurrence data has been used successfully in performing SAR hazard and accident analyses for two nonreactor nuclear facilities at Sandia National Laboratories. DOE-STD-3009-94 addresses and even encourages use of a qualitative binning technique for deriving and ranking nonreactor nuclear facility risks. However, qualitative techniques invariably lead to reviewer requests for more details associated with consequence or likelihood of occurrence bin assignments in the test of the SAR. Hazard analysis data displayed in simple worksheet format generally elicits questions about not only the assumptions behind the data, but also the quantitative bases for the assumptions themselves (engineering judgment may not be considered sufficient by some reviewers). This is especially true where the criteria for qualitative binning of likelihood of occurrence involves numerical ranges. Oftentimes reviewers want to see calculations or at least a discussion of event frequencies or failure probabilities to support likelihood of occurrence bin assignments. This may become a significant point of contention for events that have been binned as incredible. This paper will show how the use of readily available generic data can avoid many of the reviewer questions that will inevitably arise from strictly qualitative analyses, while not significantly increasing the overall burden on the analyst

  4. Coremelt-2D Code for Analysis of Severe Accidents in a Sodium Fast Reactor

    In the paper there is a description of COREMELT-2D code designed for carrying out coupled two-dimensional analysis of neutronic and thermohydraulic transients, which may occur in the core of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR), including severe accidents resulting in damage of SFR core and relocation of its components with the change of their aggregative state, namely: boiling and condensation of coolant, damage and melting of fuel element claddings and fuel, relocation of molten core components, thermal interaction of fuel and coolant and freezing of steel and fuel. So, COREMELT-2D code is capable of analyzing all stages of ULOF accident up to expansion phase characterized by the intensive interaction of molten fuel and sodium. Modular structure of COREMELT-2D code consisting of thermohydraulic module COREMELT and neutronic module RADAR is presented. Preservation equations are solved in COREMELT module in two-dimensional cylindrical R-Z geometry in porous body approximation. RADAR module is used for solving multi-group neutron diffusion equation in R-Z and X-Y geometry. Application of the code for solving dynamics tasks with rather rapid changes of neutron constants requires efficient unit for constants preparation. For this purpose, steady state analysis TRIGEX code (HEX-Z geometry) is used, which includes the program of nuclear data preparation CONSYST connected to the ABBN-93 group constants library. In the paper presented are the results of comparative analytical studies on ULOF beyond design severe accident as applied to the BN-1200 reactor design made by COREMELT-2D code and by its previous version based on neutron kinetics point model. The results of analysis make it possible to evaluate the effect of space-time changes of reactor neutronics caused by sodium removal from the core as a result of sodium boiling. (author)

  5. Analysis of In-Vessel Sever Accident Phenomena in NPP Krsko

    A hypothetical severe accident (SA) with substantial core melt-down can have serious consequences regarding the public safety. Integrity of the containment and the release of fission products in the environment following the containment failure depend strongly on in-vessel core degradation processes. The knowledge of in-vessel melt relocation processes is also important with respect to cooling recovery actions (flooding of the core) and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure analysis. The early in-vessel SA scenario includes cladding oxidation, melting and liquefaction of core materials and formation of a molten pool inside the core. The late in-vessel phase includes molten pool relocation to the lower head, formation of a crust surrounding the molten pool, thermal attack on the vessel wall and, finally, the vessel failure. The accident analyzed in the paper was a station blackout (SBO) with a leakage from the reactor coolant system (RCS) through reactor coolant pump (RCP) seals following their degradation. It was assumed that both off-site and on-site (emergency diesel generators) AC power were unavailable, therefore the primary system coolant inventory was decreasing due to the unavailability of the high head (HHSI) and the low head safety injection (LHSI) flow. Water was only injected from the accumulators because their operation did not depend on the availability of electrical power. RELAP5/SCDAPSIM computer code was used in the analysis. One of the goals of the analysis was to determine the time of the structural failure (creep rupture) of the vessel wall in the lower plenum following the relocation of the molten corium to the lower head. For this purpose COUPLE model of the RPV lower plenum of NPP Krsko was used. Additionally, one more scenario was analyzed with the diesel generators available which would provide power for the HHSI and LHSI pumps. The purpose of that additional case was to evaluate the influence of the on-site power availability on the

  6. Response Analysis on Electrical Pulses under Severe Nuclear Accident Temperature Conditions Using an Abnormal Signal Simulation Analysis Module

    Kil-Mo Koo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike design basis accidents, some inherent uncertainties of the reliability of instrumentations are expected while subjected to harsh environments (e.g., high temperature and pressure, high humidity, and high radioactivity occurring in severe nuclear accident conditions. Even under such conditions, an electrical signal should be within its expected range so that some mitigating actions can be taken based on the signal in the control room. For example, an industrial process control standard requires that the normal signal level for pressure, flow, and resistance temperature detector sensors be in the range of 4~20 mA for most instruments. Whereas, in the case that an abnormal signal is expected from an instrument, such a signal should be refined through a signal validation process so that the refined signal could be available in the control room. For some abnormal signals expected under severe accident conditions, to date, diagnostics and response analysis have been evaluated with an equivalent circuit model of real instruments, which is regarded as the best method. The main objective of this paper is to introduce a program designed to implement a diagnostic and response analysis for equivalent circuit modeling. The program links signal analysis tool code to abnormal signal simulation engine code not only as a one body order system, but also as a part of functions of a PC-based ASSA (abnormal signal simulation analysis module developed to obtain a varying range of the R-C circuit elements in high temperature conditions. As a result, a special function for abnormal pulse signal patterns can be obtained through the program, which in turn makes it possible to analyze the abnormal output pulse signals through a response characteristic of a 4~20 mA circuit model and a range of the elements changing with temperature under an accident condition.

  7. SEVERE ACCIDENT MANAGEMENT TRAINING

    The purpose of this paper is (a) to define the International Atomic Energy Agency's role in the area of severe accident management training, (b) to briefly describe the status of representative severe accident analysis tools designed to support development and validation of accident management guidelines, and more recently, simulate the accident with sufficient accuracy to support the training of technical support and reactor operator staff, and (c) provide an overview of representative design-specific accident management guidelines and training. Since accident management and the development of accident management validation and training software is a rapidly evolving area, this paper is also intended to evolve as accident management guidelines and training programs are developed to meet different reactor design requirements and individual national requirements

  8. Statistical Analysis of Sino-U.S. Coal Mining Industry Accidents

    Guiling Wei

    2011-01-01

    Both China and the United States are large countries in coal production and consumption, however, the safety conditions of coal mining production in China are much worse than that of the U.S.. Although the Chinese Administration of Coal Mine Safety improved safety measures to tighten control on coal mining industry, the number of accidents, death toll and fatality rate per million tons were much higher than those of the U.S. in recent years. Based on the statistical analysis of Sino-U.S. coal...

  9. Application of transient ignition model to multi-canister (MCO) accident analysis

    The potential for ignition of spent nuclear fuel in a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) is examined. A transient model is applied to calculate the highest ambient gas temperature outside an MCO wall tube or shipping cask for which a stable temperature condition exists. This integral analysis couples reaction kinetics with a description of the MCO configuration, heat and mass transfer, and fission product phenomena. It thereby allows ignition theory to be applied to various complex scenarios, including MCO water loss accidents and dry MCO air ingression

  10. A psychological analysis of the rehabilitation of the Goiania accident victims

    This paper brings out a psycho social analysis of the consequences of the radiologic accident of Goiania-Brazil, verified especially among its direct victims. It makes clear the psychological aspects shown by the isolated victims (hospitalized and sheltered) and the psycho therapeutic processes used by the Psychology Department. After all that study, it is clear the need of specific training for health professionals necessary for the regards and multi professional and interdisciplinary attendance to the victims Goiania. It is also important a unity of institutional objectives such as essential conditions for the rehabilitation of the patients in its largest bio psycho social aspect. (author)

  11. Analysis of radioactive contaminations and radiological hazard in Poland after the Chernobyl reactor accident

    It is a report on radiological impact in Poland following the Chernobyl reactor accident prepared in the Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection. The results of measurement and its analysis are presented. Isotopic composition of the contamined air and the concentration of radionuclides are determined. The trajectories of the airborne radioactive material movement from Chernobyl to Poland at the last days of April 1986 are presented. Assessment of the radiological risk of the population is done. 38 refs., 20 figs., 11 tabs. (M.F.W.)

  12. Updating and testing of a PWR model for the Modular Accident Analysis Programe MAAP5

    Marcos Delgado, Elisabet

    2013-01-01

    The present Master’s Thesis is part of the Master’s degree in Nuclear Engineering of the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya and the ENDESA Escuela de Energía, and it was developed during the internship in a Spanish Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The objective of the project is to update and test the nuclear plant model used for the Safety Analysis department which belongs to the Licensing Department mainly for Severe Accidents phenomenology studies to prepare for and respond to emergen...

  13. Quantitative uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of a PWR control rod ejection accident

    Pasichnyk, I.; Perin, Y.; Velkov, K. [Gesellschaft flier Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit - GRS mbH, Boltzmannstasse 14, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The paper describes the results of the quantitative Uncertainty and Sensitivity (U/S) Analysis of a Rod Ejection Accident (REA) which is simulated by the coupled system code ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX applying the GRS tool for U/S analysis SUSA/XSUSA. For the present study, a UOX/MOX mixed core loading based on a generic PWR is modeled. A control rod ejection is calculated for two reactor states: Hot Zero Power (HZP) and 30% of nominal power. The worst cases for the rod ejection are determined by steady-state neutronic simulations taking into account the maximum reactivity insertion in the system and the power peaking factor. For the U/S analysis 378 uncertain parameters are identified and quantified (thermal-hydraulic initial and boundary conditions, input parameters and variations of the two-group cross sections). Results for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are presented for safety important global and local parameters. (authors)

  14. Consequence Analysis of Release from KN-18 Cask during a Severe Transportation Accident

    Lim, Heoksoon; Bhang, Giin; Na, Janghwan; Ban, Jaeha; Kim, Myungsu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) has launched a project entitled 'Development of APR1400 Physical Protection System Design' and conducting a new conceptual physical protection system(PPS) design. One of mayor contents is consequence analysis for spent nuclear fuel cask. Proper design of physical protection system for facilities and storage and transformation involving nuclear and radioactive material requires the quantification of potential consequence from prescribed sabotage and theft scenarios in order to properly understand the level of PPS needed for specific facilities and materials. An important aspect of the regulation of the nuclear industry is assessing the risk to the public and the environment from a release of radioactive material produced by accidental or intentional scenarios. This paper describes the consequence analysis methodology, structural analysis for KN-18 cask and results of release from the cask during a severe transportation accident. Accident during spent fuel cask transportation was numerically calculated for KN-18, and showed the integrity of the fuel assemblies and cask itself was unharmed on a scenario that is comparable to state of art NRC research. Even assumption of leakage as a size of 1 x 10''2 mm''2 does not exceed for a certain criteria at any distance.

  15. TRACE/FRAPTRAN analysis of Kuosheng (BWR/6) Nuclear Power Plant for the similar Fukushima accident

    Kuosheng nuclear power plant (NPP) is a BWR/6 type NPP and located on the northern coast of Taiwan. In order to assess Kuosheng NPP’s safety under the similar Fukushima accident conditions, Kuosheng NPP safety analysis TRACE/SNAP/FRAPTRAN models were established in this research. There were three main steps in this study. The first step was the establishment of Kuosheng NPP TRACE/SNAP model. The next step was the transient analysis of Kuosheng NPP TRACE/SNAP model under the similar Fukushima accident or more severe conditions. Besides, in order to confirm the mechanical property and integrity of fuel rods, the third step was FRAPTRAN analysis. Finally, the animation model of Kuosheng NPP was presented by using animation function of SNAP. TRACE and FRAPTRAN results depicted that zirconium-water reaction generated in SBO or SBO + LOCA transient (no water injected case). It may cause a safety issue in fuel rods. However, if the fire water (39 kg/sec) injected to the vessel at 800 sec in SBO + LOCA transient, TRACE and FRAPTRAN results implied that the integrity of fuel rod was kept. (author)

  16. Consequence Analysis of Release from KN-18 Cask during a Severe Transportation Accident

    Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) has launched a project entitled 'Development of APR1400 Physical Protection System Design' and conducting a new conceptual physical protection system(PPS) design. One of mayor contents is consequence analysis for spent nuclear fuel cask. Proper design of physical protection system for facilities and storage and transformation involving nuclear and radioactive material requires the quantification of potential consequence from prescribed sabotage and theft scenarios in order to properly understand the level of PPS needed for specific facilities and materials. An important aspect of the regulation of the nuclear industry is assessing the risk to the public and the environment from a release of radioactive material produced by accidental or intentional scenarios. This paper describes the consequence analysis methodology, structural analysis for KN-18 cask and results of release from the cask during a severe transportation accident. Accident during spent fuel cask transportation was numerically calculated for KN-18, and showed the integrity of the fuel assemblies and cask itself was unharmed on a scenario that is comparable to state of art NRC research. Even assumption of leakage as a size of 1 x 10''2 mm''2 does not exceed for a certain criteria at any distance

  17. Accident analysis of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant with the SAMPSON severe accident code. (2) Unit 1 analysis with improved debris relocation model

    On March 11, 2011, the Great Eastern Japan earthquake and the subsequent tsunami caused the station black out at TEPCO’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants, and the events that followed led to core meltdowns. For assessment of the present core status, simulations have been performed with the SAMPSON severe accident code. The core debris relocation behaviors are newly investigated in this paper by applying the improved debris relocation model to the analysis of the Fukushima Daiichi unit 1 with SAMPSON code. The improvements to the model are as follows. (1) The velocity limiters and control rod guide tubes are newly taken into account. (2) The flow path of debris is modified so that it goes directly down to the lower plenum through the orifice, while in the old model, the debris had stayed on the core plate until the plate melted. In the plant analysis of unit 1 with the improved model, more than 96 wt% of the core debris is particulate. Much of debris, mainly composed of the fuel and zirconium particle, goes out of the core region through the orifice, while the debris falling on the velocity limiters is mainly composed of steel and control rod material particles. (author)

  18. Advanced surrogate model and sensitivity analysis methods for sodium fast reactor accident assessment

    Within the framework of the generation IV Sodium Fast Reactors, the safety in case of severe accidents is assessed. From this statement, CEA has developed a new physical tool to model the accident initiated by the Total Instantaneous Blockage (TIB) of a sub-assembly. This TIB simulator depends on many uncertain input parameters. This paper aims at proposing a global methodology combining several advanced statistical techniques in order to perform a global sensitivity analysis of this TIB simulator. The objective is to identify the most influential uncertain inputs for the various TIB outputs involved in the safety analysis. The proposed statistical methodology combining several advanced statistical techniques enables to take into account the constraints on the TIB simulator outputs (positivity constraints) and to deal simultaneously with various outputs. To do this, a space-filling design is used and the corresponding TIB model simulations are performed. Based on this learning sample, an efficient constrained Gaussian process metamodel is fitted on each TIB model outputs. Then, using the metamodels, classical sensitivity analyses are made for each TIB output. Multivariate global sensitivity analyses based on aggregated indices are also performed, providing additional valuable information. Main conclusions on the influence of each uncertain input are derived. - Highlights: • Physical-statistical tool for Sodium Fast Reactors TIB accident. • 27 uncertain parameters (core state, lack of physical knowledge) are highlighted. • Constrained Gaussian process efficiently predicts TIB outputs (safety criteria). • Multivariate sensitivity analyses reveal that three inputs are mainly influential. • The type of corium propagation (thermal or hydrodynamic) is the most influential

  19. Application of ITER Safety Analysis for KSTAR : Tritium Leakage from Fusion Power Termination System Failure Accident with MELCOR

    This extreme reactor condition makes serious material limitation and emphasizes the importance of safety analysis. To get permission of construction license, previous researches like preliminary safety research have been analyzed risk assessments of fusion reactors. To simulate the severe accidents in fusion reactor, a number of thermal hydraulic simulation codes were used(ECART, INTRA, ATHENA/RELAP and so on). Before construction, to obtain ITER license about safety issue, MELCOR is chosen as the thermal hydraulic code to be used to simulate radioactive material release from severe accidents. Capability of the simulation code in severe accident analysis is to simulate the cooling system in ITER, the transport of radionuclides during design basis accidents (DBAs) including beyond design basis accidents (BDBAs). MELCOR is fully integrated code that models the accidents in Light Water Reactor (LWR). To analyze the accidents in ITER, MELCOR 1.8.2 version is modified. The amount of release radioactive material is safety acceptance criteria in the nuclear fusion system. There are three kinds of radioactive materials in fusion reactor; tritium (or Tiritiated water: HTO), activation products from divertor or first-wall(AP) and activated corrosion products(ACP). In generic Site Safety Report (GSSR), table I lists the release guidelines for tritium and activation products for normal operation, incidents, and accidents. This small scale facility makes the experimental flexibility to develop fusion technology. Fusion source difference between KSTAR and ITER is D-D(Deuterium- Deuterium reaction) fusion and D-T(Deuterium- Tritium reaction) fusion. This D-D fusion makes Tritium in the 50 percent chance. The radioactivity of tritium is small to consider, but, the accident analysis is indispensable. In the present work, the conservatively estimated tritium inventory in KSTAR is used with one of the most severe accident in ITER; Fusion Power Termination System(FPTS) failure with

  20. Intelligent GIS-Based Road Accident Analysis and Real-Time Monitoring Automated System using WiMAX/GPRS

    Ahmad Rodzi Mahmud

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been a big concern for many people and government to reduce the amount of road accident specially in Malaysia since it could be a big threat to this country. Malaysian government has spent millions of money in order to reduce the number of accident occurrence through several modes of campaign. Unfortunately, from years to years the number keeps increasing. The lack of a comprehensive accident recording and analysis system in Malaysia can be effective in these kinds of problems. By making use of IRAS (Intelligent Road Accident System, the police would be control and manage whole accident events as a real-time monitoring system. This system exploits WiMAX and GPRS communications to connect to the server for transfer the specific data to the data center. This system can be used for a comprehensive intelligent GIS-based solution for accident analysis and management. The system is developed based on object and aspect oriented software design such as .NET technology.

  1. Criticality safety analysis of IRT-200 storage pool under normal and accident conditions

    In the paper some results of nuclear safety analysis of the research reactor IRT-200 storage pool with IRT-4M fuel assemblies, during storage and fuel assembly manipulations are presented. The calculations have been performed by the modular code system SCALE, which is world widely used for criticality safety analysis of facilities for transport and storage of spent nuclear fuel. Conservative evaluation of the effective multiplication factor Keff of the storage pool for both: normal operation and assembly drop accident, is made. The analysis of the obtained results shows that the technological equipment and the storage conditions assure safety during the storage and manipulations of IRT-4M fuel assemblies in accordance with the requirements of the Bulgarian norms and standards, Keff < 0.95. (authors)

  2. Preliminary System Response Analysis of Rod Ejection Accident for APR1000

    Korea Electric Power Co. (KEPCO) has designed the Advanced Power Reactor 1000 (APR1000) plants implementing the advanced safety features to Optimized Power Reactor 1000 (OPR1000) plants. Prior to developing the detail design, the preliminary design project has been launched since the end of 2009 as a feasibility study. In spite of some difference in safety- related design concepts of two plant types, they could be treated as the same plants considering the main features or systems. In this study, the rod ejection accident (REA) event was analyzed using Korea Non-LOCA Analysis Package (KNAP) hot spot model (HSM) for APR1000 to examine the feasibility of the design concepts and the results were compared with those values calculated by the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) conditions of typical OPR1000 plants. Through the study, it was concluded that the design concepts and the analysis package could be applicable on the view point of REA

  3. Large break loss of coolant accident analysis for Kudankulam nuclear power plant

    Full text: This paper describes the thermal hydraulic analysis for large break loss of coolant accident (LOCA) for VVER-1000 reactor. VVER is water moderated water cooled 1000 MWe pressurised water reactor with four primary coolant loops. This analysis has been carried out using thermal hydraulic code RELAPS /MOD 3.2. During break in the primary circuit the coolant inventory in the system comes down, primary pressure starts decreasing, coolant circulation through the core decreases. As a result of decrease in the coolant inventory in the primary circuit there is decrease in heat removal from the core, which can lead to rise in clad surface temperature. There will be significant rise in clad temperature before emergency core cooling system is valved in. The analysis predicts thermal hydraulic conditions following large break LOCA. Thermal hydraulic parameters like pressure, temperature, and flow at different locations in the PHT are estimated during the transient. The results have been discussed and compared with the acceptance criteria

  4. Development of system of computer codes for severe accident analysis and its applications

    Jang, H. S.; Jeon, M. H.; Cho, N. J. and others [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-01-15

    The objectives of this study is to develop a system of computer codes for postulated severe accident analyses in nuclear power plants. This system of codes is necessary to conduct Individual Plant Examination for domestic nuclear power plants. As a result of this study, one can conduct severe accident assessments more easily, and can extract the plant-specific vulnerabilities for severe accidents and at the same time the ideas for enhancing overall accident-resistance. Severe accident can be mitigated by the proper accident management strategies. Some operator action for mitigation can lead to more disastrous result and thus uncertain severe accident phenomena must be well recognized. There must be further research for development of severe accident management strategies utilizing existing plant resources as well as new design concepts.

  5. Analysis of credible accidents for Argonaut reactors. Report for October 1980-April 1981

    Five areas of potential accidents have been evaluated for the Argonaut-UTR reactors. They are: insertion of excess reactivity, catastrophic rearrangement of the core, explosive chemical reaction, graphite fire, and a fuel-handling accident

  6. Analysis of Public Perception on Radiation: with One Year after Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    Park, Bang Ju [Korean Science Reporters Association, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    A year has passed since the nuclear power plant accident in Fukushima on March 11, 2011, and a survey for public perception on radiation by Korean people has been made. The methodological design was based on a quantitative survey and a frequency analysis was done. The analysis objects were survey papers (n=2,754pcs) answered by random ordinary citizens chosen from all over the country. The questionnaires, and study tool, were directly distributed and collected. A total of 40 questionnaires using a coefficient of Cronbach's {alpha} per each area was 'self perception of radiation' (0.620), 'radiation risk' (0.830), 'benefit from radiation' (0.781), 'radiation controlled' (0.685), 'informative source of radiation' (0.831), 'influence degree from Fukushima accident' (0.763), showing rather high score from all areas. As the result of the questionnaires, the knowledge of radiation concept was 69.50 out of 100 points, which shows a rather significant difference from the result of 'know well about radiation' (53.7%) and 'just know about radiation' (37.40%). According to the survey, one of the main reasons why radiation seems risky was that once exposed to radiation, it may not have negative impacts presently but, the next generation could see negative impacts (66.1%). About 41% of our respondents showed a negative position against the government's report on radiation while 39.5% of respondents said that we should stop running nuclear power in light of Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. This study was done for the first time by Korean people's public perception on radiation after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. We expect this might have significant contributions to the establishment of the government's policy on radiation.

  7. Quantification of a decision-making failure probability of the accident management using cognitive analysis model

    In a nuclear power plant, much knowledge on severe accidents has been acquired through PSA, and accident management (AM) guidelines are prepared by incorporating that knowledge. In PSA, it is necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of AM using the decision-making failure probability (DFP) of an emergency organization, operation failure probability of operators, success criteria of AM and reliability of AM equipment. However, to date there has been no suitable quantification method for PSA to obtain DFP. In this study, we developed a new method for DFP quantification of an emergency organization using a cognitive analysis model, and tried to apply it to S2DC and TMLF sequence of a typical plant. As a result: (1) The methods enabled to DFP quantification appropriate to level 1.5PSA by choosing the suitable value of a basic failure probability and an error factor. (2) The DFPs of six AMs appeared to be in the range of 0.23 to 0.41 (screening method) and in the range of 0.10 to 0.19 (detailed method), and the DFP decreased about 50% as a result of sensitivity analysis of the conservative assumption. (3) The screening method was more conservative than the detailed method, and it was shown to satisfy the screening performance required by PSA. (author)

  8. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SOME HEALTH INDICATORS OF VARIOUS RADIATION ACCIDENTS LIQUIDATORS

    V. M. Shubik

    2010-01-01

    The article presents the results of comparative investigation of morbidity and immunity of liquidators of radiation accidents occurred in South Urals (Kyshtym accident), at Chernobyl NPP and nuclear submarines (NS) consequences. The most evident immunity and health changes were revealed for liquidators of Chernobyl NPP accident (ChNPP). Investigations of Kyshtym accident liquidators revealed long-term immunological losses. Comparison of health indicators of Chernobyl and nuclear submarine acc...

  9. Analysis of National Major Work Safety Accidents in China, 2003–2012

    YE, Yunfeng; ZHANG, Siheng; RAO, Jiaming; Wang, Haiqing; LI Yang; Wang, Shengyong; DONG, Xiaomei

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study provides a national profile of major work safety accidents in China, which cause more than 10 fatalities per accident, intended to provide scientific basis for prevention measures and strategies to reduce major work safety accidents and deaths.Methods: Data from 2003-2012 Census of major work safety accidents were collected from State Administration of Work Safety System (SAWS). Published literature and statistical yearbook were also included to implement information. W...

  10. In-depth analysis of accidents : a pilot study and possibilities for further research.

    Oude Egberink, H. Stoop, J. & Poppe, F.

    1988-01-01

    Until recently The Netherlands did not have a tradition in the field of in-depth research of road traffic accidents. Due to the high number and severity of road traffic accidents and in response to a particularly large motorway accident, it was considered to explore the possibility of using the resu

  11. Reactivity accidents analysis during natural core cooling operation of ETRR-2

    One of the main features of Egypt Test and Research Reactor Number 2 (ETRR-2), MTR type, is a continuous steady-state operation at low power level, <=400 kW, with core cooling by natural water circulation. Two flapper valves mounted on the return core cooling pipe lines and long chimney encloses the reactor core and assure natural convection phenomena through the reactor core and reactor pool. Many tests and experiments are carried out during this state of operation. A possible occurrence of reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) may be expected over this operation. The present work studies two types of possible RIA: 1-fast reactivity insertion accident (FRIA) with rate 1.04$/s and 2-slow reactivity insertion accident (SRIA) with rate 0.023$/s which may occur due to fast/slow withdrawal of a control rod or sudden cooling of the core inlet water temperature. Failure or success of the reactor scram system during the transient operation is considered. A computer code TRAP22 is developed for such analysis. It is verified against CONVEC code and commissioning tests for steady state operation. The results of verification show good agreement. The study demonstrates that the reactor can be scrammed safely due to either FRIA or SRIA, whenever the maximum expected hot channel HC clad temperature lies within the range 70.73-71.85 deg. C. While, in case of failure of scram system the maximum (HC) clad temperature reaches the burn out value at time 1.175s for FRIA and at 46.36s for SRIA. At the burn out point the clad surface heat flux exceeds its design critical value which results in partial fuel melt

  12. Effects of improved modeling on best estimate BWR severe accident analysis

    Since 1981, ORNL has completed best estimate studies analyzing several dominant BWR accident scenarios. These scenarios were identified by early Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) studies and detailed ORNL analysis complements such studies. In performing these studies, ORNL has used the MARCH code extensively. ORNL investigators have identified several deficiencies in early versions of MARCH with regard to BWR modeling. Some of these deficiencies appear to have been remedied by the most recent release of the code. It is the purpose of this paper to identify several of these deficiencies. All the information presented concerns the degraded core thermal/hydraulic analysis associated with each of the ORNL studies. This includes calculations of the containment response. The period of interest is from the time of permanent core uncovery to the end of the transient. Specific objectives include the determination of the extent of core damage and timing of major events (i.e., onset of Zr/H2O reaction, initial clad/fuel melting, loss of control blade structure, etc.). As mentioned previously the major analysis tool used thus far was derived from an early version of MARCH. BWRs have unique features which must be modeled for best estimate severe accident analysis. ORNL has developed and incorporated into its version of MARCH several improved models. These include (1) channel boxes and control blades, (2) SRV actuations, (3) vessel water level, (4) multi-node analysis of in-vessel water inventory, (5) comprehensive hydrogen and water properties package, (6) first order correction to the ideal gas law, and (7) separation of fuel and cladding. Ongoing and future modeling efforts are required. These include (1) detailed modeling for the pressure suppression pool, (2) incorporation of B4C/steam reaction models, (3) phenomenological model of corium mass transport, and (4) advanced corium/concrete interaction modeling. 10 references, 17 figures, 1 table

  13. A study on the pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment response analysis methodologies for postulated severe accident

    The present study contains two major parts: one is the treatment of uncertainties involved in the current APET and the other is the importance analysis of the APET uncertainty inputs. A clear disadvantage of the expert opinion polling process approach for uncertainty analysis of the current probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is that the sufficient robustness in the final results may not be attained against the ambiguity of the information upon which the experts base their judgement or the judgmental uncertainty arising under various imprecise and incomplete information. For the treatment of such type of uncertainty, a new approach based on fuzzy set theory is proposed. Then its potential use to the uncertainty analysis of the current PRA is proved through an analysis of accident progression event tree (APET). As a product, a formal procedure with computational algorithms suitable for application of the fuzzy set theory to the APET analysis is provided. Comparing with the uncertainty analysis results obtained by the statistical approach currently used in PRA, the present approach has several major advantages: Firstly, it greatly enhances the robustness in the final results of APET uncertainty analysis by modeling the judgmental uncertainty that arises in the probabilistic quantification of APET top events. Secondly, the modeling of APET uncertainty analysis is far more convenient because of the nonprobabilistic features of fuzzy probabilities used for uncertainty quantification of the APET top events. Thirdly, the APET model can easily be operated by means of a well defined formal propagation logic of fuzzy set theory without going through a tedious sampling procedure. Finally, the fuzzy outcomes provide at least as much information as the existing methods based on the statistical approach. Thus, the present approach can be used as a valuable alternative approach to uncertainty analysis used in the current PRA. Two importance measures for the importance analysis of

  14. Development of Lower Plenum Molten Pool Module of Severe Accident Analysis Code in Korea

    Son, Donggun; Kim, Dong-Ha; Park, Rae-Jun; Bae, Jun-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Suk-Ku; Marigomen, Ralph [Environment and Energy Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To simulate a severe accident progression of nuclear power plant and forecast reactor pressure vessel failure, we develop computational software called COMPASS (COre Meltdown Progression Accident Simulation Software) for whole physical phenomena inside the reactor pressure vessel from a core heat-up to a vessel failure. As a part of COMPASS project, in the first phase of COMPASS development (2011 - 2014), we focused on the molten pool behavior in the lower plenum, heat-up and ablation of reactor vessel wall. Input from the core module of COMPASS is relocated melt composition and mass in time. Molten pool behavior is described based on the lumped parameter model. Heat transfers in between oxidic, metallic molten pools, overlying water, steam and debris bed are considered in the present study. The models and correlations used in this study are appropriately selected by the physical conditions of severe accident progression. Interaction between molten pools and reactor vessel wall is also simulated based on the lumped parameter model. Heat transfers between oxidic pool, thin crust of oxidic pool and reactor vessel wall are considered and we solve simple energy balance equations for the crust thickness of oxidic pool and reactor vessel wall. As a result, we simulate a benchmark calculation for APR1400 nuclear power plant, with assumption of relocated mass from the core is constant in time such that 0.2ton/sec. We discuss about the molten pool behavior and wall ablation, to validate our models and correlations used in the COMPASS. Stand-alone SIMPLE program is developed as the lower plenum molten pool module for the COMPASS in-vessel severe accident analysis code. SIMPLE program formulates the mass and energy balance for water, steam, particulate debris bed, molten corium pools and oxidic crust from the first principle and uses models and correlations as the constitutive relations for the governing equations. Limited steam table and the material properties are provided

  15. Atmospheric dispersion modeling and radiological safety analysis for a hypothetical accident of Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1)

    Highlights: • An atmospheric dispersion model for a hypothetical accident of Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) was developed. • Radiological safety analysis after the postulated accident was also carried out. • The MCNPX and HotSpot codes were used to achieve the objectives of our study. • All the values of effective dose obtained following the accident were far below the regulatory limits. - Abstract: Atmospheric dispersion modeling and radiological safety analysis were performed for a postulated accident scenario of the generic Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) core. The source term was generated from an inventory of peak radioisotope activities released by using the isotope generation code MCNPX. The health physics code, HotSpot, was used to perform the atmospheric transport modeling which was then applied to calculate the total effective dose and how it would be distributed to human organs as a function of distance downwind. All accident scenarios were selected from the GHARR-1 Safety Analysis Report (SAR), assuming that the activities were released to the atmosphere after a design basis accident. The adopted methodology was the use of predominant site-specific meteorological data and dispersion modeling theories to analyze the incident of a hypothetical release to the environment of some selected radionuclides from the site and evaluate to what extent such a release may have radiological effects on the public. The results indicate that all the values of Effective dose obtained, with the maximum of 2.62 × 10−2 mSv at 110 m from the reactor, were far below the regulatory limits, making the use of the reactor safe, even in the event of severe accident scenario

  16. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SOME HEALTH INDICATORS OF VARIOUS RADIATION ACCIDENTS LIQUIDATORS

    V. M. Shubik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of comparative investigation of morbidity and immunity of liquidators of radiation accidents occurred in South Urals (Kyshtym accident, at Chernobyl NPP and nuclear submarines (NS consequences. The most evident immunity and health changes were revealed for liquidators of Chernobyl NPP accident (ChNPP. Investigations of Kyshtym accident liquidators revealed long-term immunological losses. Comparison of health indicators of Chernobyl and nuclear submarine accident liquidators reveals the possibility of combined influence of radiation and stress on the immunity and health.

  17. Analysis of hot leg natural circulation under station blackout severe accident

    2007-01-01

    Under severe accidents, natural circulation flows are important to influence the accident progression and result in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). In a station blackout accident with no recovery of steam generator (SG) auxiliary feedwater (TMLB' severe accident scenario), the hot leg countercurrent natural circulation flow is analyzed by using a severe-accident code, to better understand its potential impacts on the creep-rupture timing among the surge line, the hot leg, and SG tubes. The results show that the natural circulation may delay the failure time of the hot leg.The recirculation ratio and the hot mixing factor are also calculated and discussed.

  18. Electrical equipment performance under severe accident conditions (BWR/Mark 1 plant analysis): Summary report

    The purpose of the Performance Evaluation of Electrical Equipment during Severe Accident States Program is to determine the performance of electrical equipment, important to safety, under severe accident conditions. In FY85, a method was devised to identify important electrical equipment and the severe accident environments in which the equipment was likely to fail. This method was used to evaluate the equipment and severe accident environments for Browns Ferry Unit 1, a BWR/Mark I. Following this work, a test plan was written in FY86 to experimentally determine the performance of one selected component to two severe accident environments

  19. Analysis of the SL-1 Accident Using RELAPS5-3D

    On January 3, 1961, at the National Reactor Testing Station, in Idaho Falls, Idaho, the Stationary Low Power Reactor No. 1 (SL-1) experienced a major nuclear excursion, killing three people, and destroying the reactor core. The SL-1 reactor, a 3 MWt boiling water reactor, was shut down and undergoing routine maintenance work at the time. This paper presents an analysis of the SL-1 reactor excursion using the RELAP5-3D thermal-hydraulic and nuclear analysis code, with the intent of simulating the accident from the point of reactivity insertion to destruction and vaporization of the fuel. Results are presented, along with a discussion of sensitivity to some reactor and transient parameters (many of the details are only known with a high level of uncertainty)

  20. Analysis of the SL-1 Accident Using RELAPS5-3D

    Francisco, A.D. and Tomlinson, E. T.

    2007-11-08

    On January 3, 1961, at the National Reactor Testing Station, in Idaho Falls, Idaho, the Stationary Low Power Reactor No. 1 (SL-1) experienced a major nuclear excursion, killing three people, and destroying the reactor core. The SL-1 reactor, a 3 MW{sub t} boiling water reactor, was shut down and undergoing routine maintenance work at the time. This paper presents an analysis of the SL-1 reactor excursion using the RELAP5-3D thermal-hydraulic and nuclear analysis code, with the intent of simulating the accident from the point of reactivity insertion to destruction and vaporization of the fuel. Results are presented, along with a discussion of sensitivity to some reactor and transient parameters (many of the details are only known with a high level of uncertainty).

  1. Analysis of station blackout accidents for the Bellefonte pressurized water reactor

    An analysis has been performed for the Bellefonte PWR Unit 1 to determine the containment loading and the radiological releases into the environment from a station blackout accident. A number of issues have been addressed in this analysis which include the effects of direct heating on containment loading, and the effects of fission product heating and natural convection on releases from the primary system. The results indicate that direct heating which involves more than about 50% of the core can fail the Bellefonte containment, but natural convection in the RCS may lead to overheating and failure of the primary system piping before core slump, thus, eliminating or mitigating direct heating. Releases from the primary system are significantly increased before vessel breach due to natural circulation and after vessel breach due to reevolution of retained fission products by fission product heating of RCS structures

  2. Probabilistic Accident Consequence Uncertainty Analysis of the Dose Calculations Module in the COSYMA Package (invited paper)

    Uncertainty analysis of the dose calculation module of the COSYMA accident consequence assessment code has been undertaken, involving the following steps: (1) Expert judgement techniques were applied to assess uncertainties in measurable parameters determining external and internal doses. (2) The data obtained were used to calculate distributions on the dose quantities required as code input parameters. (3) The effect of uncertainties in dose quantities was analysed for a range of COSYMA end points, including the extent of countermeasures and incidences of early and late health effects, and the most important uncertainties were identified for inclusion in an overall uncertainty analysis of COSYMA. Parameters identified as making the largest contributions to uncertainty included external doses and location factors, residence times of materials on skin, breathing rates, and respiratory tract deposition and retention parameters, for the extent of countermeasures and early health effects, and caesium and iodine retention parameters for late effects. (author)

  3. Reactivity analysis of a Savannah River Site reactor under severe accident conditions

    An analysis of the reactivity changes in a Savannah River Site reactor tritium-producing charge during a postulated severe fuel damage accident has been performed. Possible in- and ex-vessel configurations were recriticality could occur have been identified and analyzed using Monte Carlo techniques. The results of the analyses indicate that recriticality is possible if fuel debris collects within the assembly bottom end-fittings (BEFs) in a postulated accident scenario where moderator is retained in the vessel. All other credible debris configurations identified were found to be subcritical. In the BEF, recriticality is possible only if the target melt fraction is less than 70% and moderator is present in the vessel. Given that recriticality in the BEF occurred, the resulting power transient was analyzed using point kinetics coupled with a linear feedback kernel. The calculated final debris temperatures suggest the potential for a fluid coolant interaction following recriticality; however, no aluminum vapor production is predicted to occur. The sensitivity of the final debris temperature to initial debris temperature, target melt fraction, reactivity insertion rate (i.e., fuel melt rate), and initial neutron power were included in the evaluation

  4. Of Disasters and Dragon Kings: A Statistical Analysis of Nuclear Power Incidents & Accidents

    Wheatley, Spencer; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01

    We provide, and perform a risk theoretic statistical analysis of, a dataset that is 75 percent larger than the previous best dataset on nuclear incidents and accidents, comparing three measures of severity: INES (International Nuclear Event Scale), radiation released, and damage dollar losses. The annual rate of nuclear accidents, with size above 20 Million US$, per plant, decreased from the 1950s until dropping significantly after Chernobyl (April, 1986). The rate is now roughly stable at 0.002 to 0.003, i.e., around 1 event per year across the current fleet. The distribution of damage values changed after Three Mile Island (TMI; March, 1979), where moderate damages were suppressed but the tail became very heavy, being described by a Pareto distribution with tail index 0.55. Further, there is a runaway disaster regime, associated with the "dragon-king" phenomenon, amplifying the risk of extreme damage. In fact, the damage of the largest event (Fukushima; March, 2011) is equal to 60 percent of the total damag...

  5. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Late health effects uncertain assessment. Volume 2: Appendices

    Little, M.P.; Muirhead, C.R. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA late health effects models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the expert panel on late health effects, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

  6. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Early health effects uncertainty assessment. Volume 2: Appendices

    Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1997-12-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA early health effects models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the panel on early health effects, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

  7. Performance Analysis Review of Thorium TRISO Coated Particles during Manufacture, Irradiation and Accident Condition Heating Tests

    Thorium, in combination with high enriched uranium, was used in all early high temperature reactors (HTRs). Initially, the fuel was contained in a kernel of coated particles. However, particle quality was low in the 1960s and early 1970s. Modern, high quality, tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles with thorium oxide and uranium dioxide (UO2) had been manufactured since 1978 and were successfully demonstrated in irradiation and accident tests. In 1980, HTR fuels changed to low enriched uranium UO2 TRISO fuels. The wide ranging development and demonstration programme was successful, and it established a worldwide standard that is still valid today. During the process, results of the thorium work with high quality TRISO fuel particles had not been fully evaluated or documented. This publication collects and presents the information and demonstrates the performance of thorium TRISO fuels.This publication is an outcome of the technical contract awarded under the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on Near Term and Promising Long Term Options for Deployment of Thorium Based Nuclear Energy, initiated in 2012. It is based on the compilation and analysis of available results on thorium TRISO coated particle performance in manufacturing and during irradiation and accident condition heating tests

  8. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Uncertainty assessment for deposited material and external doses. Volume 2: Appendices

    Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Boardman, J. [AEA Technology (United Kingdom); Jones, J.A. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA deposited material and external dose models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the panel on deposited material and external doses, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

  9. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Uncertainty assessment for internal dosimetry. Volume 2: Appendices

    Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Harrison, J.D. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA internal dosimetry models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the panel on internal dosimetry, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

  10. Analysis of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant by SAMPSON severe accident code - Unit 3

    On March 11th 2011 an extremely high magnitude earthquake and following tsunami struck the East coast of Japan, resulting in a nuclear accident unprecedented in time and extent. After scram started at all power stations, diesel generators began operation until tsunami waves reached the power plants. Flooding by tsunami had a great impact on the plant safety systems availability, leading to the condition of station black out at Fukushima Daiichi from unit 1 to 3. In the present work the severe accident code SAMPSON is employed for the analysis of the first part of the transient in Fukushima Daiichi Unit 3. In this unit DC batteries remained available for about 40 hours after scram and influenced the time of melting onset, hydrogen release in the reactor building and further explosion. Models of high pressure safety systems were improved in SAMPSON, considering a more realistic pump-turbine unit operation and communication between reactor and containment. Moreover new suppression pool stratification and spray models were developed and implemented in the containment module, showing a great impact in the drywell pressure estimation. It has been shown how the computed results of pressure (in reactor vessel and drywell) and core water level show a fair agreement with the measurement data and notably improvements compared to the previous analyses. (author)

  11. Analysis of the loss of pool cooling accident in a PWR spent fuel pool with MAAP5

    Highlights: • A PWR spent fuel pool was modeled by using MAAP5. • Loss of pool cooling severe accident scenarios were studied. • Loss of pool cooling accidents with two mitigation measures were analyzed. - Abstract: The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident shows that it is necessary to study potential severe accidents and corresponding mitigation measures for the spent fuel pool (SFP) of a nuclear power plant (NPP). This paper presents the analysis of loss of pool cooling accident scenarios and the discussion of mitigation measures for the SFP at a pressurized water reactor (PWR) NPP with the MAAP5 code. Analysis of uncompensated loss of water due to the loss of pool cooling with different initial pool water levels of 12.2 m (designated as a reference case) and 10.7 m have been performed based on a MAAP5 input model. Scenarios of the accident such as overheating of uncovered fuel assemblies, oxidation of claddings and hydrogen generation, loss of intactness of fuel rod claddings, and release of radioactive fission products were predicted with the assumption that mitigation measures were unavailable. The results covered a broad spectrum of severe accident evaluations in the SFP. Furthermore, as important mitigation measures, the effects of recovering the SFP cooling system and makeup water in SFP on the accident progressions have also been investigated respectively based on the events of pool water boiling and spent fuels uncovery. Based upon the reference case, three cases with the recovery of SFP cooling system and three other cases with makeup water in SFP have been studied. The results showed that, severe accident might happen if SFP cooling system was not restored timely before the spent fuels started to become uncovered; spent fuels could be completely submerged and severe accident might be avoided if SFP makeup water system provided water with a mass flow rate larger than the average evaporation rate defined as the division of pool water mass above the

  12. Cyclical Fluctuations in Workplace Accidents

    Boone, J.; van Ours, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    This Paper presents a theory and an empirical investigation on cyclical fluctuations in workplace accidents. The theory is based on the idea that reporting an accident dents the reputation of a worker and raises the probability that he is fired. Therefore a country with a high or an increasing unemployment rate has a low (reported) workplace accident rate. The empirical investigation concerns workplace accidents in OECD countries. The analysis confirms that workplace accident rates are invers...

  13. System Response Analysis of Rod Ejection Accident for OPR1000 Using Korea Non-LOCA Analysis Package

    Korea Electric Power Research Institute (KEPRI) of Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) has been developed the non-loss-of-coolant accident (non-LOCA) analysis methodology, called as the Korea Non-LOCA Analysis Package (KNAP), for the typical Optimized Power Reactor 1000 (OPR1000) plants. The RETRAN hot spot model (HSM) of KNAP has been contrived to replace the functions of STRIKIN-II code of ABB-CE, which is used for the rod ejection accident (REA) analysis. The HSM could be used to estimate the fuel temperature, fuel enthalpy, cladding surface temperature, etc., which are used to confirm the safety limits of REA. In this work, to estimate the feasibility of HSM, the typical cases of REA were analyzed and the results were compared with those calculated by the CESEC-III and STRIKIN-II, which were used to prepared the final safety analysis report (FSAR) of Ul-Chin Units 3 and 4 (UCN-3/4). Through the study, it was concluded that the HSM of KNAP showed the acceptable results

  14. Loss of coolant accident analysis and evolution of emergency core cooling system for an inpile irradiation facility

    This paper deals with the Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis of an inpile facility using RELAP4/MOD6 computer code. The present study is the culmination of a three part LOCA analysis done earlier by the authors. Blowdown analysis had been extended to include reflood part of the transient. Based on the analysis an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) has been evolved. (author). 5 figs., 2 tabs

  15. A human reliability analysis of the Three Mile power plant accident considering the THERP and ATHEANA methodologies

    The main purpose of this work is the study of human reliability using the THERP (Technique for Human Error Prediction) and ATHEANA methods (A Technique for Human Error Analysis), and some tables and also, from case studies presented on the THERP Handbook to develop a qualitative and quantitative study of nuclear power plant accident. This accident occurred in the TMI (Three Mile Island Unit 2) power plant, PWR type plant, on March 28th, 1979. The accident analysis has revealed a series of incorrect actions, which resulted in the Unit 2 shut down and permanent loss of the reactor. This study also aims at enhancing the understanding of the THERP method and ATHEANA, and of its practical applications. In addition, it is possible to understand the influence of plant operational status on human failures and of these on equipment of a system, in this case, a nuclear power plant. (author)

  16. The fuzzy set theory application to the analysis of accident progression event trees with phenomenological uncertainty issues

    Fuzzy set theory provides a formal framework for dealing with the imprecision and vagueness inherent in the expert judgement, and therefore it can be used for more effective analysis of accident progression of PRA where experts opinion is a major means for quantifying some event probabilities and uncertainties. In this paper, an example application of the fuzzy set theory is first made to a simple portion of a given accident progression event tree with typical qualitative fuzzy input data, and thereby computational algorithms suitable for application of the fuzzy set theory to the accident progression event tree analysis are identified and illustrated with example applications. Then the procedure used in the simple example is extended to extremely complex accident progression event trees with a number of phenomenological uncertainty issues, i.e., a typical plant damage state 'SEC' of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant risk assessment. The results show that the fuzzy averages of the fuzzy outcomes are very close to the mean values obtained by current methods. The main purpose of this paper is to provide a formal procedure for application of the fuzzy set theory to accident progression event trees with imprecise and qualitative branch probabilities and/or with a number of phenomenological uncertainty issues. (author)

  17. The Analysis of the Contribution of Human Factors to the In-Flight Loss of Control Accidents

    Ancel, Ersin; Shih, Ann T.

    2012-01-01

    In-flight loss of control (LOC) is currently the leading cause of fatal accidents based on various commercial aircraft accident statistics. As the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) emerges, new contributing factors leading to LOC are anticipated. The NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP), along with other aviation agencies and communities are actively developing safety products to mitigate the LOC risk. This paper discusses the approach used to construct a generic integrated LOC accident framework (LOCAF) model based on a detailed review of LOC accidents over the past two decades. The LOCAF model is comprised of causal factors from the domain of human factors, aircraft system component failures, and atmospheric environment. The multiple interdependent causal factors are expressed in an Object-Oriented Bayesian belief network. In addition to predicting the likelihood of LOC accident occurrence, the system-level integrated LOCAF model is able to evaluate the impact of new safety technology products developed in AvSP. This provides valuable information to decision makers in strategizing NASA's aviation safety technology portfolio. The focus of this paper is on the analysis of human causal factors in the model, including the contributions from flight crew and maintenance workers. The Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) taxonomy was used to develop human related causal factors. The preliminary results from the baseline LOCAF model are also presented.

  18. Accident Analysis and Countermeasures of the Enterprises Involved in Ammonia%涉氨企业事故分析与对策

    卢均臣; 王延平

    2015-01-01

    从事故发生环节、事故类型、事故设备、事故原因等几个方面分析了2005年-2014年全国涉氨企业发生的事故。分析表明:储存和使用环节事故最多;事故主要类型事故泄漏和中毒;主要发生在食品厂、肉类加工厂、冷饮厂、水产公司、果蔬公司、制药厂的制冷车间;主要发生在管道、储罐、阀门、法兰等部位;材料失效事故占比最高。最后,提出了预防此类事故的建议措施。%Accidents occurred in 2005-2014 in our country were analyzed from the aspects of the accident link, accident type, accident equipment, accident cause. Analysis showed that accidents in links of the storage and use were the most, the main types of accidents were leakage and poisoning, accidents mainly occured in food factory, meat processing factory, beverage factory, etc, accidents mainly occured in pipeline, storage tanks, valves, flanges, etc, the amount of accidents caused by material failure was the largest. Suggestions for preventing such accidents were put forward.

  19. Accident safety analysis for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility

    The purpose of the accident safety analysis is to identify and analyze a range of credible events, their cause and consequences, and to provide technical justification for the conclusion that uranium billets, fuel assemblies, uranium scrap, and chips and fines drums can be safely stored in the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility, the contaminated equipment, High-Efficiency Air Particulate filters, ductwork, stacks, sewers and sumps can be cleaned (decontaminated) and/or removed, the new concretion process in the 304 Building will be able to operate, without undue risk to the public, employees, or the environment, and limited fuel handling and packaging associated with removal of stored uranium is acceptable

  20. Health effects models for off-site radiological consequence analysis on nuclear reactor accidents (II)

    Homma, Toshimitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Takahashi, Tomoyuki [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Yonehara, Hidenori [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [eds.

    2000-12-01

    This report is a revision of JAERI-M 91-005, 'Health Effects Models for Off-Site Radiological Consequence Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Accidents'. This revision provides a review of two revisions of NUREG/CR-4214 reports by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission which is the basis of the JAERI health effects models and other several recent reports that may impact the health effects models by international organizations. The major changes to the first version of the JAERI health effects models and the recommended parameters in this report are for late somatic effects. These changes reflect recent changes in cancer risk factors that have come from longer followup and revised dosimetry in major studies on the Japanese A-bomb survivors. This report also provides suggestions about future revisions of computational aspects on health effects models. (author)

  1. Health effects models for off-site radiological consequence analysis on nuclear reactor accidents (II)

    This report is a revision of JAERI-M 91-005, 'Health Effects Models for Off-Site Radiological Consequence Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Accidents'. This revision provides a review of two revisions of NUREG/CR-4214 reports by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission which is the basis of the JAERI health effects models and other several recent reports that may impact the health effects models by international organizations. The major changes to the first version of the JAERI health effects models and the recommended parameters in this report are for late somatic effects. These changes reflect recent changes in cancer risk factors that have come from longer followup and revised dosimetry in major studies on the Japanese A-bomb survivors. This report also provides suggestions about future revisions of computational aspects on health effects models. (author)

  2. Review of core disruptive accident analysis for liquid-metal cooled fast reactors

    Analysis methodologies of core disruptive accidents (CDAs) are reviewed. The role of CDAS in the overall safety evaluation of fast reactors has not always been well defined nor universally agreed upon. However, they have become a traditional issue in LMR safety, design, and licensing. The study is for the understanding of fast reactor behavior under CDA conditions to establish the consequences of such conditions and to provide a basis for evaluating consequence limiting design features for the KALIMER developments. The methods used to analyze CDAs from initiating event to complete core disruption are described. Two examples of CDA analyses for CRBRP and ALMR are given and R and D needed for better understanding of CDA phenomena are proposed. (author). 10 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  3. Accident safety analysis for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility

    Johnson, D.J.; Brehm, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the accident safety analysis is to identify and analyze a range of credible events, their cause and consequences, and to provide technical justification for the conclusion that uranium billets, fuel assemblies, uranium scrap, and chips and fines drums can be safely stored in the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility, the contaminated equipment, High-Efficiency Air Particulate filters, ductwork, stacks, sewers and sumps can be cleaned (decontaminated) and/or removed, the new concretion process in the 304 Building will be able to operate, without undue risk to the public, employees, or the environment, and limited fuel handling and packaging associated with removal of stored uranium is acceptable.

  4. Evaluation of the effect of break nozzle configuration in loss-of-coolant accident analysis

    The Semiscale Mod-1 test program has utilized two different break nozzle configurations in a test facility with identical initial and boundary conditions. An evaluation has been made to determine the effect these break nozzle configurations have on system thermal-hydraulic response during a 200% double-ended cold leg break loss-of-coolant accident simulation. The first nozzle had a convergent-divergent design; the second nozzle had a convergent design with an elongated constant area throat followed by a rapid expansion. Analysis of data from tests conducted with the two nozzles shows that the critical flow characteristics at the break plane were affected by the break nozzle geometry. Differences in break flow caused differences in the core inlet flow which in turn affected core heater rod thermal response. The results of this investigation show that the break flow behavior and the resulting core thermal response in the Semiscale experimental facility can be directly correlated

  5. Containment failure modes preliminary analysis for Atucha-I nuclear power plant during severe accidents

    The present work has the objective to analyze the containment behavior of the Atucha-I nuclear power plant during a severe accident, as part of a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). Initially, a generic description of the containment failure modes considered in other PSAs is performed. Then, the possible containment failure modes for Atucha I are qualitatively analyzed, according to it design peculiarities. These failure modes involve some substantial differences from other PSAs, due to the particular design of Atucha I. Among others, it is studied the influence of: moderator/coolant separation, existence of cooling Zircaloy channels, existence of filling bodies inside the pressure vessel, reactor cavity geometry, on-line refueling mode, and existence of a double shell containment (steel and concrete) with an annular separation room. As a functions of the before mentioning analysis, a series of parameters to be taken into account is defined, on a preliminary basis, for definition of the plant damage states. (author)

  6. Visualization of Traffic Accidents

    Wang, Jie; Shen, Yuzhong; Khattak, Asad

    2010-01-01

    Traffic accidents have tremendous impact on society. Annually approximately 6.4 million vehicle accidents are reported by police in the US and nearly half of them result in catastrophic injuries. Visualizations of traffic accidents using geographic information systems (GIS) greatly facilitate handling and analysis of traffic accidents in many aspects. Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), Inc. is the world leader in GIS research and development. ArcGIS, a software package developed by ESRI, has the capabilities to display events associated with a road network, such as accident locations, and pavement quality. But when event locations related to a road network are processed, the existing algorithm used by ArcGIS does not utilize all the information related to the routes of the road network and produces erroneous visualization results of event locations. This software bug causes serious problems for applications in which accurate location information is critical for emergency responses, such as traffic accidents. This paper aims to address this problem and proposes an improved method that utilizes all relevant information of traffic accidents, namely, route number, direction, and mile post, and extracts correct event locations for accurate traffic accident visualization and analysis. The proposed method generates a new shape file for traffic accidents and displays them on top of the existing road network in ArcGIS. Visualization of traffic accidents along Hampton Roads Bridge Tunnel is included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Best effort analysis of critical large loss-of-coolant accident in Darlington NGS

    A best-effort analysis of Emergency Coolant Injection System (ECIS) effectiveness has been performed for a critical large break loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in Darlington NGS. This analysis, and various sensitivity analyses were performed using the best-effort version of the TUF two-fluid thermal-hydraulics code. The objective of this project is to develop analytical tools and analysis methodology to quantify, within reasonable bounds of certainty, the effectiveness of the ECIS in Ontario Hydro nuclear generating stations to limit activity releases from fuel in the event of a large break LOCA. As part of Best Effort ECIS effectiveness methodology, and the pilot application of this methodology to the analysis of Large LOCA for Darlington NGS, the TUF code has been developed to: quantify the degree of blowdown cooling in a multiple parallel channel reactor core; establish the minimum moderator subcooling required to ensure that fuel channel integrity is maintained, and determine the maximum time that the moderator is required to act as a heat sink; quantify the effectiveness of the ECIS to limit the extent of fuel and fuel channel heatup. The methodology described in this paper, together with enhancements to account for the effects of fuel string relocation, higher void reactivity uncertainty allowance and flux tilt on the initial overpower transient, has been implemented in the Generic Safety Report analysis to update the Large LOCA Safety Report sections for the Bruce and Pickering NGS. (author). 9 refs., 12 figs

  8. Analysis of severe accident on OPR1000 PWR plant at low power and shutdown states with MAAP5 code

    The objective of this paper is to provide a brief description of severe accident analysis using computer codes in Korean OPR1000 Plant at low power and shutdown states. The results of the analysis are utilized in preparing the shutdown severe accident management guidelines (LPSD SAMG). As part of the efforts to prepare LPSD SAMG, analysis of severe accident is performed at low power and shutdown states with MAAP5 code. The Korean OPR1000 plant, a PWR plant with 2 hot legs and 4 cold legs is considered as a reference plant in the analysis. In this study, the scenarios are selected based on the plant operational states (POS) and dominant initiating events (IE) which cause the core damages. Typical scenarios are the loss of shutdown cooling (LSCS) at various primary coolant levels and stuck-opening of valves which prevent the low temperature over pressurization (LTOP) of primary system. As the analysis results, the core uncovery is expected in 2∼6 hours. The maximum temperature of core exit exceeds 649degC (SAMG entry temperature) in 3∼7 hours. The molten corium starts to relocate into lower head in 5∼13 hours and reactor vessel failure is occurred in 11∼14 hours. The above mentioned timings are utilized to choose the possible actions and the timing to implement those actions LPSD SAMG. Also based on the results, the environmental conditions that instruments may encounter in a severe accident are determined. (author)

  9. Analysis of high burnup fuel behavior under rod ejection accident in the Westinghouse-designed 950 MWe PWR

    As there has arisen a concern that failure of the high burnup fuel under the reactivity-insertion accident (RIA) may occur at the energy lower than the expected, duel behavior under the rod ejection accident in a typical Westinghouse-designed 950 MWe PWR was analyzed by using the three dimensional nodal transient neutronics code, PANBOX2 and the transient fuel rod performance analysis code, FRAP-T6. Fuel failure criteria versus the burnup was conservatively derived taking into account available test data and the possible fuel failure mechanisms. The high burnup and longer cycle length fuel loading scheme of a peak rod burnup of 68 MWD/kgU was selected for the analysis. Except three dimensional core neutronics calculation, the analysis used the same core conditions and assumptions as the conventional zero dimensional analysis. Results of three dimensional analysis showed that the peak fuel enthalpy during the rod ejection accident is less than one third of that calculated by the core is less than 4 percent. Therefore, it can be said that the current design limit of less than 10 percent fuel failure and maintaining the core coolable geometry would be adequately satisfied under the rod ejection accident, even though the conservative fuel failure criteria derived from the test data are applied. (author)

  10. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment, appendices A and B

    Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L.; Miller, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States); Lui, C.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Paesler-Sauer, J. [Research Center, Karlsruhe (Germany); Helton, J.C. [and others

    1995-01-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, completed in 1990, estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The objective was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation, developed independently, was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model along with the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the second of a three-volume document describing the project and contains two appendices describing the rationales for the dispersion and deposition data along with short biographies of the 16 experts who participated in the project.

  11. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment, appendices A and B

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, completed in 1990, estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The objective was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation, developed independently, was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model along with the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the second of a three-volume document describing the project and contains two appendices describing the rationales for the dispersion and deposition data along with short biographies of the 16 experts who participated in the project

  12. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment, main report

    Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L.; Miller, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States); Lui, C.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Paesler-Sauer, J. [Research Center, Karlsruhe (Germany); Helton, J.C. [and others

    1995-01-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of the joint effort was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. Experts developed their distributions independently. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. To validate the distributions generated for the dispersion code input variables, samples from the distributions and propagated through the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the first of a three-volume document describing the project.

  13. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment, main report

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of the joint effort was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. Experts developed their distributions independently. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. To validate the distributions generated for the dispersion code input variables, samples from the distributions and propagated through the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the first of a three-volume document describing the project

  14. Development and application of calculational theoretical methods for analysis of the RBMK reactor severe accidents

    One studied high-improbable reactor emergencies that may result in a high consequence accident. To control these accidents and to mitigate their consequences one should study and analyze similar emergencies via detailed computer simulation. Application of foreign and Russian codes for RBMK type reactor should be associated with their supplementary verification. In that context one elaborated the table list of processes for supplementary verification of thermohydraulic models of codes designed to analyze severe accidents

  15. Primary pipe rupture accident analysis for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    In this report, the thermal transient response of the CRBR to a severe primary coolant flow perturbation, initiated by a rupture of the primary heat transport system piping, is analyzed. This hypothetical accident is studied under the further assumption that the plant protection system does function according to current design descriptions for the CRBR. Although a brief discussion of an unprotected (no scram) pipe rupture accident is presented, the major emphasis of the present report is on the protected accident

  16. Primary pipe rupture accident analysis for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    Albright, D.C.; Bari, R.A.

    1976-04-01

    In this report, the thermal transient response of the CRBR to a severe primary coolant flow perturbation, initiated by a rupture of the primary heat transport system piping, is analyzed. This hypothetical accident is studied under the further assumption that the plant protection system does function according to current design descriptions for the CRBR. Although a brief discussion of an unprotected (no scram) pipe rupture accident is presented, the major emphasis of the present report is on the protected accident.

  17. Analysis of primary loop small-break loss-of-coolant accident

    On the basis of a typical model of the primary loop small-break loss-of-coolant accident, the transient variation of the thermo hydraulics parameters at a loss-of-coolant accident are calculated by RETRAN-02 code. The physical process and the relevant measures for protection under the incident condition are analyzed. The calculation result shows that the reactor has a favorable capacity to resist the accident. (authors)

  18. A Human Reliability Analysis of Post- Accident Human Errors in the Low Power and Shutdown PSA of KSNP

    Kang, Daeil; Kim, J. H.; Jang, S. C

    2007-03-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, using the ANS low power and shutdown (LPSD) probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) Standard, evaluated the LPSD PSA model of the KSNP, Yonggwang Units 5 and 6, and identified the items to be improved. The evaluation results of human reliability analysis (HRA) of the post-accident human errors in the LPSD PSA model for the KSNP showed that 10 items among 19 items of supporting requirements for those in the ANS PRA Standard were identified as them to be improved. Thus, we newly carried out a HRA for post-accident human errors in the LPSD PSA model for the KSNP. Following tasks are the improvements in the HRA of post-accident human errors of the LPSD PSA model for the KSNP compared with the previous one: Interviews with operators in the interpretation of the procedure, modeling of operator actions, and the quantification results of human errors, site visit. Applications of limiting value to the combined post-accident human errors. Documentation of information of all the input and bases for the detailed quantifications and the dependency analysis using the quantification sheets The assessment results for the new HRA results of post-accident human errors using the ANS LPSD PRA Standard show that above 80% items of its supporting requirements for post-accident human errors were graded as its Category II. The number of the re-estimated human errors using the LPSD Korea Standard HRA method is 385. Among them, the number of individual post-accident human errors is 253. The number of dependent post-accident human errors is 135. The quantification results of the LPSD PSA model for the KSNP with new HEPs show that core damage frequency (CDF) is increased by 5.1% compared with the previous baseline CDF It is expected that this study results will be greatly helpful to improve the PSA quality for the domestic nuclear power plants because they have sufficient PSA quality to meet the Category II of Supporting Requirements for the post-accident

  19. A comparative analysis of accident risks in fossil, hydro, and nuclear energy chains

    Burgherr, P.; Hirschberg, S. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    This study presents a comparative assessment of severe accident risks in the energy sector, based on the historical experience of fossil (coal, oil, natural gas, and LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas)) and hydro chains contained in the comprehensive Energy-related Severe Accident Database (ENSAD), as well as Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for the nuclear chain. Full energy chains were considered because accidents can take place at every stage of the chain. Comparative analyses for the years 1969-2000 included a total of 1870 severe ({>=} 5 fatalities) accidents, amounting to 81,258 fatalities. Although 79.1% of all accidents and 88.9% of associated fatalities occurred in less developed, non-OECD countries, industrialized OECD countries dominated insured losses (78.0%), reflecting their substantially higher insurance density and stricter safety regulations. Aggregated indicators and frequency-consequence (F-N) curves showed that energy-related accident risks in non-OECD countries are distinctly higher than in OECD countries. Hydropower in non-OECD countries and upstream stages within fossil energy chains are most accident-prone. Expected fatality rates are lowest for Western hydropower and nuclear power plants; however, the maximum credible consequences can be very large. Total economic damages due to severe accidents are substantial, but small when compared with natural disasters. Similarly, external costs associated with severe accidents are generally much smaller than monetized damages caused by air pollution.

  20. An analysis on the severe accident progression with operator recovery actions

    Highlights: • Severe accident progression for the station blackout and SBLOCA accident. • Analyses on APR1400 using MELCOR. • Operator recovery actions for decay heat removal and inventory make up. • Determine the time allowed for the operator to prevent reactor vessel failure. • Insight for the operator recovery actions for the severe accident management. - Abstract: Analyses on the severe accident progressions for the station blackout (SBO) accident and small break LOCA (SBLOCA) initiated severe accident were performed for APR1400 by using MELCOR computer code. Operator recovery actions for decay heat removal and inventory make up using a depressurization system and safety injection pump were simulated in parallel with a simulation of the severe accident progression. Sensitivity studies on the operator actions were performed to investigate the changes in the timing of the reactor vessel failure and to determine the time allowed for the operator to prevent reactor vessel failure. Sensitivity analyses on the effect of major modeling parameters were performed additionally to quantify the uncertainties in timing. It is found that the operator has about 2 h for the recovery actions after the indication of core damage by the signal of core exit thermocouple (CET) for the SBLOCA initiated severe accident, while the operator has to take immediate actions after the indication of core damage by CET for the SBO accident

  1. Two Application Examples of Concrete Containment Structures under Accident Load Conditions Using Finite Element Analysis

    Oskarshamn 1 is the oldest nuclear plant in operation in Sweden. It was designed and erected at the end of the 1960's. During the last five years an extensive upgrading process of the power plant has been carried out. Within the frame of one of these upgrading projects the outer and inner Main Steam Isolation Valves (MSN) have been replaced. As a consequence of these replacements it was necessary to make an overhaul investigation of the basic general concept regarding pipe rupture descriptions and rupture locations, in order to attain a design of the pipe whip restraints in accordance with requirements of modern standards. In this paper two application examples regarding finite element analysis of concrete containment structures under accident loading conditions are presented. Each example includes a brief introduction of the problem and the object of the commission. The finite element model and the structural response analysis are described and the results are discussed. The application examples are: 1. Non-linear structural analysis of a reinforced concrete culvert affected by internal over-pressurization and impulse load effects of pipe rupture reactions. 2. Non-linear thermal stress analysis around a steel penetration of a reactor containment

  2. Analysis of the crush environment for lightweight air-transportable accident-resistant containers

    This report describes the longitudinal dynamic crush environment for a Lightweight Air-Transportable Accident-Resistant Container (LAARC, now called PAT-2) that can be used to transport small quantities of radioactive material. The analysis of the crush environment involves evaluation of the forces imposed upon the LAARC package during the crash of a large, heavily loaded, cargo aircraft. To perform the analysis, a cargo load column was defined which consisted of a longitudinal prism of cargo of cross-sectional area equal to the projected area of the radioactive-material package and length equal to the longitudinal extent of the cargo compartment in a commercial cargo jet aircraft. To bound the problem, two analyses of the cargo load column were performed, a static stability analysis and a dynamic analysis. The results of these analyses can be applied to other packaging designs and suggest that the physical limits or magnitude of the longitudinal crush forces, which are controlled in part by the yield strength of the cargo and the package size, are much smaller than previously estimated

  3. Analysis of the crush environment for lightweight air-transportable accident-resistant containers

    McClure, J.D.; Hartman, W.F.

    1981-12-01

    This report describes the longitudinal dynamic crush environment for a Lightweight Air-Transportable Accident-Resistant Container (LAARC, now called PAT-2) that can be used to transport small quantities of radioactive material. The analysis of the crush environment involves evaluation of the forces imposed upon the LAARC package during the crash of a large, heavily loaded, cargo aircraft. To perform the analysis, a cargo load column was defined which consisted of a longitudinal prism of cargo of cross-sectional area equal to the projected area of the radioactive-material package and length equal to the longitudinal extent of the cargo compartment in a commercial cargo jet aircraft. To bound the problem, two analyses of the cargo load column were performed, a static stability analysis and a dynamic analysis. The results of these analyses can be applied to other packaging designs and suggest that the physical limits or magnitude of the longitudinal crush forces, which are controlled in part by the yield strength of the cargo and the package size, are much smaller than previously estimated.

  4. Analysis of the metallic containment integrity of Angra 2/3 reactor under the effects of the design basis accident

    The application of Condru 4 computer code, developed to determine the maximum values of pressure and temperature that occur inside the metallic containment building of PWR nuclear power plants, in case of a hypothetic accident - LOCA - considered as a Design Basic Accident - DBA. The hypothesis, input and results for the simulation of a loss of coolant in the hot leg of the Angra-2/3 reactors, considered as the most critical case for that Kind of project, are presented. The analysis was made with input provided by the manufacturer. (Author)

  5. Critique of and Limitations on the Use of Expert Judgements in Accident Consequence Uncertainty Analysis (invited paper)

    Accident consequence models are designed primarily to be used in support of siting and licensing decisions. To use these models, the analyst inevitably requires some input from experts. Equally, to understand the implication of the models, the analyst needs to explore their sensitivity to the inputs and uncertainty analysis is a key tool in doing this. In this paper, the interplay between these two aspects of the use of accident consequence models is considered, paying particular attention to issues and limitations that require further research in the coming years. (author)

  6. Monetary evaluation of radiation detriment cost in cost/benefit analysis of protective actions after nuclear accidents

    This paper discusses the monetary evaluation of radiation detriment cost in the cost/benefit analyses of countermeasures after nuclear accidents. The methods used to determine the so-called α factor in cost/benefit analysis are presented. It is pointed out that the approaches found in current literature to the consideration of individual dose in cost-benefit analyses have some limitations. To overcome those deficiencies, we introduced the concept of individual dose evaluation function in this paper. In addition, we developed a modified approach to cost-benefit analyses of protective actions after nuclear accidents. (author)

  7. Numerical Analysis for the Accident at Spent Fuel Bay Cooling and Purification System of Wolsong NPP Unit 1

    Kim, Sook Kwan; Kim, Kyoung Hyun; Kim, Koo Sam; Han, Sang Koo [Hanbat National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The main purpose of SFB(Spent Fuel Bay) cooling and purification system is to remove decay heat of spent fuels and to maintain concentration of radioactivity. Like Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011, loss of heat sink at SFB can lead to a critical situation. However it is also true that there is much more time available for operators to act responses to the accident at SFB compared with design basis accidents related to the reactor core occurring in the nuclear power plant. In this analysis, pipe rupture in the SFB cooling and purification system in Wolsong NPP Unit 1, the most severe accident at SFB, was analyzed to calculate the time of boiling and the time at which fuels are uncovered. The estimated times may be used for HRA (Human Reliability Analysis) of PSA. The accident in the SFB cooling and purification system of Wolsong NPP unit 1, specifically pipe rupture downstream SFB pumps, was analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3.3. The nodalization was developed based on the actual SFB cooling and purification system. The analysis of pipe rupture downstream SFB pumps for normal and abnormal conditions was performed to calculate major times, particularly the time of boiling and fuel uncovery. The predicted overall behaviors are reasonable. Thus the method developed in the analysis can be applied to support Wolsong NPP Unit LPSD PSA activities.

  8. An analysis of the human reliability on Three Mile Island II accident considering THERP and ATHEANA methodologies

    The research on the Analysis of the Human Reliability becomes more important every day, as well as the study of the human factors and the contributions of the same ones to the incidents and accidents, mainly in complex plants or of high technology. The analysis here developed it uses the methodologies THERP (Technique for Human Error Prediction) and ATHEANA (A Technique for Human Error Analysis), as well as, the tables and the cases presented in THERP Handbook and to develop a qualitative and quantitative study of an occurred nuclear accident. The chosen accident was it of Three Mile Island (TMI). The accident analysis has revealed a series of incorrect actions that resulted in the permanent loss of the reactor and shutdown of Unit 2. This study also aims at enhancing the understanding of the THERP and ATHEANA methods and at practical applications. In addition, it is possible to understand the influence of plant operational status on human failures and the influence of human failures on equipment of a system, in this case, a nuclear power plant. (author)

  9. Thermohydrodynamic models adequacy assessment methods within the frameworks of a calculation means verification/validation program for accident processes analysis

    Within the frameworks of the previous developed by authors generalised calculation means (codes) verification / validation methodology in given article considers procedure realisation that related to mathematical thermohydrodynamic models adequacy analysis to real processes of accident / transition modes.For concreteness the last RELAP5 modifications are considered as a calculation code,and VVER reactor equipment is considered as a study object

  10. Importance of LWR best-estimate safety calculations for analysis of Fukushima-like accidents

    The safety assessment of nuclear power plants relies heavily on numerical simulations, which must include the most important physical models that are representative for the reactor type of interest. The current trends in nuclear power generation and regulation are to perform safety studies by 'best-estimate' codes that allow a realistic modeling of nuclear and thermal-hydraulic processes of the reactor core and the entire plant behavior including control and protection functions. Realistic methods are referred to as 'best-estimate' calculations, implying that they use a set of data, correlations, and methods designed to represent the phenomena, using the best available techniques. The application of best-estimate methodologies in the licensing process requires the quantification of the embedded uncertainties of the used codes. In this field many international initiatives are underway under the umbrella of the OECD such as the Light Water Reactor Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling benchmark, Oskarshamn 2 Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Stability benchmark, Kalinin-3 VVER-1000 benchmark, etc. that underlies the importance of these issues. The Fukushima accident has shown the importance of the knowledge of the initial phase of the accident regarding the state of the core, in-vessel structures, and containment as well as the amount of fissile material inventories that potentially can be released if the safety barriers fail. For the development of mitigation and prevention measures modeling of the sequence of the events along with understanding of the key physical phenomena driving the accident progression is important. The paper presents the best-estimate coupled methodologies implemented, validated and applied at the Karlsruhe Institute Technology (KIT) for both types of LWRs - Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) and BWRs. Example are given with a BWR steady state and transient simulations along with corresponding uncertainty quantification. The on-going development of high

  11. Subsidies to cytogenetic dosimetry technique generated from analysis of results of Goiania radiological accident

    Following the Goiania radiation accident, which occurred in September of 1987, peripheral lymphocytes from 129 exposed or potentially exposed individuals were analyzed for the frequency of unstable chromosomal aberrations (dicentrics and centric rings) to estimate absorbed radiation dose. During the emergency period, the doses were assessed to help immediate medical treatment. After this initial estimation, doses were reassessed using in vitro calibration curves produced after the accident, more suitable for the conditions prevailing in Goiania. Dose estimates for 24 subjects exceeded 0,5 Gy. Among those, 15 individuals exceeded 1,0 Gy and 5 exceeded 3,0 Gy. None of the estimates exceeded 6,0 Gy. Four of the subjects died. During the emergency period, a cytogenetic follow-up of 14 of the exposed patients was started, aiming to observe the mean lifetime of lymphocytes containing dicentric and ring aberrations. The results suggest that for the highly exposed individuals the disappearance rate of unstable aberrations follows a two- term exponential function. Up to 470 days after the exposure, there is a rapid fall in the aberration frequency. After 470 days, the disappearance rate is very slow, almost constant. The estimated average half-time of elimination of dicentrics and rings among the highly exposed group (> 1 Gy) was 140 days for the initial period after the exposure (up to 470 days). This value is significantly shorter than the usually accepted value of 3 years reported in the literature. Mean disappearance functions of unstable chromosome aberrations were inferred, to be applied in accident situations in which there is a blood sampling delay. Statistical analysis of possible correlations between the individual half-times and biological parameters, such as sex, age, leukopenia level shown during the critical period, absorbed dose (initial frequency of chromosomal aberrations) and the administration of the bone marrow stimulating factor (rHuGM-CSF) was

  12. Defense In-Depth Accident Analysis Evaluation of Tritium Facility Bldgs. 232-H, 233-H, and 234-H

    'The primary purpose of this report is to document a Defense-in-Depth (DID) accident analysis evaluation for Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Tritium Facility Buildings 232-H, 233-H, and 234-H. The purpose of a DID evaluation is to provide a more realistic view of facility radiological risks to the offsite public than the bounding deterministic analysis documented in the Safety Analysis Report, which credits only Safety Class items in the offsite dose evaluation.'

  13. Analysis of simulation results of damaged nuclear fuel accidents at NPPs with shell-type nuclear reactors

    Lessons from the accident at the Fukushima NPP made it necessary to reevaluate and intensificate the work on modeling and analyzing various scenarios of severe accidents with damage to the nuclear fuel in the reactor, containment and spent nuclear fuel storage pool with the expansion of the primary initiating event causes group listing. Further development of computational tools for modeling the explosion prevention criteria as to steam and gas mixtures, considering the specific thermal-hydrodynamic conditions and mechanisms of explosive situations arrival at different stages of a severe accident development, is substantiated. Based on the analysis of the known shell-type nuclear reactors accidents results the explosion safety thermodynamic criteria are presented, the parameters defining the steam and gas explosions conditions are found, the need to perform the further verification and validation of deterministic codes serving to simulate general accident processes behavior as well as phase-to-phase interaction calculated dependencies is established. The main parameters controlling and defining the criteria explosion safety effective regulation areas and their optimization conditions are found

  14. Integral Test and Engineering Analysis of Coolant Depletion During a Large-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident

    This study concerns the development of an integrated calculation methodology with which to continually and consistently analyze the progression of an accident from the design-basis accident phase via core uncovery to the severe accident phase. The depletion rate of reactor coolant inventory was experimentally investigated after the safety injection failure during a large-break loss-of-coolant accident utilizing the Seoul National University Integral Test Facility (SNUF), which is scaled down to 1/6.4 in length and 1/178 in area from the APR1400 [Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MW(electric)]. The experimental results showed that the core coolant inventory decreased five times faster before than after the extinction of sweepout in the reactor downcomer, which is induced by the incoming steam from the intact cold legs. The sweepout occurred on top of the spillover from the downcomer region and expedited depletion of the core coolant inventory. The test result was simulated with the MAAP4 severe accident analysis code. The calculation results of the original MAAP4 deviated from the test data in terms of coolant inventory distribution in the test vessel. After the calculation algorithm of coolant level distribution was improved by including the subroutine of pseudo pressure buildup, which accounts for the differential pressure between the core and downcomer in MAAP4, the core melt progression was delayed by hundreds of seconds, and the code prediction was in reasonable agreement with the overall behavior of the SNUF experiment

  15. Analysis of simulation results of damaged nuclear fuel accidents at NPPs with shell-type nuclear reactors

    Igor L. Kozlov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lessons from the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP made it necessary to reevaluate and intensificate the work on modeling and analyzing various scenarios of severe accidents with damage to the nuclear fuel in the reactor, containment and spent nuclear fuel storage pool with the expansion of the primary initiating event causes group listing. Further development of computational tools for modeling the explosion prevention criteria as to steam and gas mixtures, considering the specific thermal-hydrodynamic conditions and mechanisms of explosive situations arrival at different stages of a severe accident development, is substantiated. Based on the analysis of the known shell-type nuclear reactors accidents results the explosion safety thermodynamic criteria are presented, the parameters defining the steam and gas explosions conditions are found, the need to perform the further verification and validation of deterministic codes serving to simulate general accident processes behavior as well as phase-to-phase interaction calculated dependencies is established. The main parameters controlling and defining the criteria explosion safety effective regulation areas and their optimization conditions are found.

  16. Probabilistic Accident Consequence Uncertainty Analysis of the Early Health Effects Module in the COSYMA Package (invited paper)

    The accuracy of models that are used to calculate the risk from early health effects due to exposure to a large dose of radiation from radioactive materials has been investigated. Early health effects are radiation diseases that occur within six weeks after the exposure. The present investigation provides data needed for subsequent analysis of the accuracy of estimates of the risks from nuclear power plant accidents (accident consequence assessments). By means of a formal expert elicitation procedure, for a limited number of exposure cases, a set of data has been obtained that quantifies the accuracy of risk estimates for early health effects. These data have been implemented in the generic models for calculating the risk and the accuracy of the calculated risk. These generic models are currently applied in accident consequence assessments. (author)

  17. Modified Bethe-Tait methods for analysis of the Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accidents in Liquid Metal Fast Reactors

    The analytic method used in the evaluation of this type of supper-prompt critical core disruptive accident (CDA) in fast reactor was originally developed by Bethe and Tait in 1956, and had been modified by many authors since then. It is still of value today, because of its simplicity and relative ease to extend for improvements. It is particularly useful tp perform various parametric studies for better understanding of core disassembly process of LMFRs as well as to estimate upper-limit values of the energy release resulting from a power excursion. Moreover, the method would provide an essential experience and Knowledge base on the analysis of the hypothetical core disruptive accidents(HCDAs) in KALIMER. This report describes the concept and mathematical formations of the modified Bethe-Tait methods, and some salient results and insights that had come out of their use for the hypothetical supper-prompt critical accidents in fast reactors. (author)

  18. Analysis of accidents or 'close accidents' with carbon monoxide leaks in dwellings; Analyse af ulykker eller 'naerved haendelser' med kulilteudslip i boliger

    Kilsig, M.; Frederiksen, Hanne

    2005-06-01

    Approx. 6 carbon monoxide accidents and 4 'close accidents' are reported per year in Denmark in connection with use of approx. 800.000 Danish gas appliances. This means that at least 6 people are poisoned by carbon monoxide every year. In several of these cases the consequences are serious. The occurrence of carbon monoxide accidents has many different causes, e.g. poor maintenance, corrosion, negligent handling of gas cookers etc. The objective of this project has been to make a systematic examination of accidents and 'close accidents' in Danish residential buildings as registered with the Danish Safety Technology Authority in the period 1999-2003. The causes for every single accident and 'close accident' have been systematized in order to clarify what leads to a leak of carbon monoxide. Furthermore, it has been examined, whether specific tools of analysis can be used to establish if carbon monoxide poisoning has occurred in cases of doubt. (BA)

  19. A Study for Appropriateness of National Nuclear Policy by using Economic Analysis Methodology after Fukushima accident

    Shim, Jong Myoung; Roh, Myung Sub [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The aim of this paper is to clarify the appropriateness of national nuclear policy in BPE of Korea from an economic perspective. To do this, this paper only focus on the economic analysis methodology without any considering other conditions such as political, cultural, or historical things. In a number of countries, especially Korea, nuclear energy policy is keeping the status quo after Fukushima accident. However the nation's nuclear policy may vary depending on the choice of people. Thus, to make the right decisions, it is important to deliver accurate information and knowledge about nuclear energy to the people. As proven in this paper, the levelized cost of nuclear power is the most inexpensive among the base load units. As the reliance on nuclear power is getting stronger through the economic logic, the nuclear safety and environmental elements will be strengthened. Based on this, national nuclear policy should be promoted. In the aftermath of the Fukushima accident recognized as the world's worst nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl, there are some changes in the nuclear energy policy of various countries. Germany, for example, called a halt to operate Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) which accounts for about 7.5% of the national power generation capacity of 6.3GW. In developing countries such as China and India they conducted the safety check of the nuclear power plants again before preceding their nuclear business. Korea government announced 'The 6th Basic Plan for Long-term Electricity Supply and Demand (BPE)', considering the safety and general public acceptance of the nuclear power plants. According to BPE, they postponed a plan for additional NPP construction, except for constructions that had been already reflected in the 5th BPE. All told, the responses for nuclear energy policy of countries are different depending on their own circumstances.

  20. A Study for Appropriateness of National Nuclear Policy by using Economic Analysis Methodology after Fukushima accident

    The aim of this paper is to clarify the appropriateness of national nuclear policy in BPE of Korea from an economic perspective. To do this, this paper only focus on the economic analysis methodology without any considering other conditions such as political, cultural, or historical things. In a number of countries, especially Korea, nuclear energy policy is keeping the status quo after Fukushima accident. However the nation's nuclear policy may vary depending on the choice of people. Thus, to make the right decisions, it is important to deliver accurate information and knowledge about nuclear energy to the people. As proven in this paper, the levelized cost of nuclear power is the most inexpensive among the base load units. As the reliance on nuclear power is getting stronger through the economic logic, the nuclear safety and environmental elements will be strengthened. Based on this, national nuclear policy should be promoted. In the aftermath of the Fukushima accident recognized as the world's worst nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl, there are some changes in the nuclear energy policy of various countries. Germany, for example, called a halt to operate Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) which accounts for about 7.5% of the national power generation capacity of 6.3GW. In developing countries such as China and India they conducted the safety check of the nuclear power plants again before preceding their nuclear business. Korea government announced 'The 6th Basic Plan for Long-term Electricity Supply and Demand (BPE)', considering the safety and general public acceptance of the nuclear power plants. According to BPE, they postponed a plan for additional NPP construction, except for constructions that had been already reflected in the 5th BPE. All told, the responses for nuclear energy policy of countries are different depending on their own circumstances