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Sample records for accident analysis structural

  1. Structural dynamics in fast reactor accident analysis

    Analyses and codes are under development combining the hydrodynamics and solid mechanics (and more recently the bubble dynamics) phenomena to gage the stresses, strains, and deformations of important primary components, as well as the overall adequacy of primary and secondary containments. An arbitrary partition of the structural components treated evolves into (1) a core mechanics effort; and (2) a primary system and containment program. The primary system and containment program treats the structural response of components beyond the core, starting with the core barrel. Combined hydrodynamics-solid mechanics codes provide transient stresses and strains and final deformations for components such as the reactor vessel, reactor cover, cover holddown bolts, as well as the pulses for which the primary piping system is to be analyzed. Both, Lagrangian and Eulerian two-dimensional codes are under development, which provide greater accuracy and longer durations for the treatment of HCDA. The codes are being augmented with bubble migration capability pertaining to the latter stages of the HCDA, after slug impact. Recent developments involve the adaptation of the 2-D Eulerian primary system code to the 2-D elastic-plastic treatment of primary piping. Pulses are provided at the vessel-primary piping interfaces of the inlet and outlet nozzles, calculation includes the elbows and pressure drops along the components of the primary piping system. Recent improvements to the primary containment codes include introduction of bending strength in materials, Langrangian mesh regularization techniques, and treatment of energy absorbing materials for the slug impact. Another development involves the combination of a 2-D finite element code for the reactor cover with the hydrodynamic containment code

  2. Hydrodynamic and elastoplastic structural analysis of fast breeder reactor core accident

    This paper describes the principles and examples of applications of an explicit Lagrangian coupled finite difference-finite element code HEMP-ESI developed in order to calculate the structural consequences of hypothetical core disruptive accidents (HCDA) in nuclear reactors. The explicit solution algorithm of the finite difference scheme used to discretize the hydrodynamic fluid domains is shown to be very similar to that used for the solution of the finite element discretized shell structures, hence permitting an easy and efficient coupling. Two examples of simulation show the applicability of the method to nuclear reactor core safety analysis (test problem). Core explosion in a loop-type reactor including a shell containment: the calculation shows the energy absorbing function of the shell and enables the evaluation of the forces acting on the reactor containment. Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident in a fast breeder reactor: the calculation shows the main features of this accident: lifting of the liquid sodium above the explosion and impact on the cover head inducing upward deformations; radial outflow of the sodium which induces large deformations of the inner and outer shell; zones of compressive circumferential stresses in the main shell at the junction of the spherical head and the cylindrical part

  3. Two Application Examples of Concrete Containment Structures under Accident Load Conditions Using Finite Element Analysis

    Oskarshamn 1 is the oldest nuclear plant in operation in Sweden. It was designed and erected at the end of the 1960's. During the last five years an extensive upgrading process of the power plant has been carried out. Within the frame of one of these upgrading projects the outer and inner Main Steam Isolation Valves (MSN) have been replaced. As a consequence of these replacements it was necessary to make an overhaul investigation of the basic general concept regarding pipe rupture descriptions and rupture locations, in order to attain a design of the pipe whip restraints in accordance with requirements of modern standards. In this paper two application examples regarding finite element analysis of concrete containment structures under accident loading conditions are presented. Each example includes a brief introduction of the problem and the object of the commission. The finite element model and the structural response analysis are described and the results are discussed. The application examples are: 1. Non-linear structural analysis of a reinforced concrete culvert affected by internal over-pressurization and impulse load effects of pipe rupture reactions. 2. Non-linear thermal stress analysis around a steel penetration of a reactor containment

  4. Analysis 320 coal mine accidents using structural equation modeling with unsafe conditions of the rules and regulations as exogenous variables.

    Zhang, Yingyu; Shao, Wei; Zhang, Mengjia; Li, Hejun; Yin, Shijiu; Xu, Yingjun

    2016-07-01

    Mining has been historically considered as a naturally high-risk industry worldwide. Deaths caused by coal mine accidents are more than the sum of all other accidents in China. Statistics of 320 coal mine accidents in Shandong province show that all accidents contain indicators of "unsafe conditions of the rules and regulations" with a frequency of 1590, accounting for 74.3% of the total frequency of 2140. "Unsafe behaviors of the operator" is another important contributory factor, which mainly includes "operator error" and "venturing into dangerous places." A systems analysis approach was applied by using structural equation modeling (SEM) to examine the interactions between the contributory factors of coal mine accidents. The analysis of results leads to three conclusions. (i) "Unsafe conditions of the rules and regulations," affect the "unsafe behaviors of the operator," "unsafe conditions of the equipment," and "unsafe conditions of the environment." (ii) The three influencing factors of coal mine accidents (with the frequency of effect relation in descending order) are "lack of safety education and training," "rules and regulations of safety production responsibility," and "rules and regulations of supervision and inspection." (iii) The three influenced factors (with the frequency in descending order) of coal mine accidents are "venturing into dangerous places," "poor workplace environment," and "operator error." PMID:27085591

  5. Testing and analysis of structural integrity of electrosleeved tubes under severe accident transients

    The structural integrity of flawed steam generator tubing with Electrosleeves trademark under simulated severe accident transients was analyzed by analytical models that used available material properties data and results from high-temperature tests conducted on Electrosleeved tubes. The Electrosleeve material is almost pure Ni and derives its strength and other useful properties from its nanocrystalline microstructure, which is stable at reactor operating temperatures. However, it undergoes rapid grain growth, at the high temperatures expected during severe accidents, resulting in a loss of strength and a corresponding decrease in flow stress. The magnitude of this decrease depends on the time-temperature history during the accident. Failure tests were conducted at ANL and FTI on internally pressurized Electrosleeved tubes with 80% and 100% throughwall machined axial notches in tie parent tubes that were subjected to simulated severe accident temperature transients. The test results, together with the analytical model, were used to estimate the unaged flow stress curve of the Electrosleeved material at high temperatures. Failure temperatures for Electrosleeved tubes with throughwall and part-throughwall axial cracks of various lengths in the parent tubes were calculated for a postulated severe accident transient

  6. Structural and containment response to LMFBR accidents

    The adequacy of the containment of fast reactors has been traditionally evaluated by analyzing the response of the containment to a spectrum of core disruptive accidents. The current approach in the U.S. is to consider fast reactor response to accidents in terms of four lines of assurance (LOAs). Thus, LOA-1 is to prevent accidents, LOA-2 is to limit core damage, LOA-3 is to control accident progression and LOA-4 is to attenuate radiological consequences. Thus, the programs on the adequacy of containment response fall into LOA-3. Significant programs to evaluate the response of the containment to core disruptive accidents and, thereby, to assure control of accident progression are in progress. These include evaluating the mechanical response of the primary system to core disruptive accidents and evaluating the thermal response of the reactor structures to core melting, including the effects this causes on the secondary containment. The analysis of structural response employs calculated pressure-volume-time loading functions. The results of the analyses establish the response of the containment to the prescribed loadings. The analysis of thermal response requires an assessment of the distribution and state of the fuel, fission products and activated materials from accident initiation to final disposition in a stable configuration

  7. An Analysis of Reactor Structural Response to Fuel Sodium Interaction in a Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident

    This study shows the effect of constraints around FSI zone on FSI phenomena and deformations of reactor structures. SUGAR-PISCES code system has been developed to evaluate the phenomena of FSI and the response of reactor structure. SUGAR calculates the phenomena of FSI. PISCES, developed by Physics International Company in U.S.A, calculates the dynamic response of reactor structure in two-dimensional, time-dependent finite-difference Lagrangian model. The results show that the peak pressure and energy by FSI and the deformation of reactor structures are about twice in case of FSI zone surrounding by blanket than by coolant. The FSI phenomena highly depend on the reactor structure and the realistic configuration around core must be considered for analyzing hypothetical core disruptive accident. In conclusion: FSI phenomena depend highly on constraints around FSI zone, so that the constraints must be dealt with realistically in analytical models. Although a two-dimensional model is superior to a quasi-two-dimensional model. The former needs long calculation time, so it is very expensive using in parametric study. Therefore, it is desirable that the two-dimensional model is used in the final study of reactor design and the quasi-two-dimensional model is used in parametric study. The blanket affects on the acoustic pressure and the deformations of radial structures, but affects scarcely on the upper vessel deformation. The blanket also affects on the mechanical work largely. The core barrel gives scarcely the effects on pressure in single phase but gives highly the effects on pressure in two-phase and deformation of reactor structures in this study. For studying the more realistic phenomena of FSI in the reactor design, the following works should be needed. (i) Spatial Distribution of FSI Region Spatial and time-dependent distribution of fuel temperature and molten fuel fraction must be taken in realistic simulation of accident condition. To this purpose, the code will

  8. Application of probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) approach to structuring accident mitigation systems of a PWR

    The safety evaluation technology of PWRs has already been improved substantially because of large-scale safety verification tests and improvement of accuracy in analyses. However, for structuring accident mitigation systems (AMS), the selection of appropriate systems from various AMS candidates mainly depends on engineering judgements by design engineers. So systematic designing process should be established. Reliability of each AMS forms the basis for reliability of safety plant design as a whole. Therefore, explicitly understanding characteristics of each AMS's reliability is very important for safety design. Based on these facts as a background, the limitation of improving reliability by strengthening redundancy of AMS mainly consisting of active components was clarified by applying PSA. At the same time, reliability and other characteristics of AMS mainly consisting of passive components were also clarified with PSA. Through these studies, it is proved that the application of PSA for structuring AMS is effective. (author)

  9. Accident Tolerant Fuel Analysis

    Curtis Smith; Heather Chichester; Jesse Johns; Melissa Teague; Michael Tonks; Robert Youngblood

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional “accident-tolerant” (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and

  10. Accident tolerant fuel analysis

    Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Laboratory; Chichester, Heather [Idaho National Laboratory; Johns, Jesse [Texas A& M University; Teague, Melissa [Idaho National Laboratory; Tonks, Michael Idaho National Laboratory; Youngblood, Robert [Idaho National Laboratory

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced ''RISMC toolkit'' that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional ''accident-tolerant'' (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant

  11. Severe accident analysis methodology in support of accident management

    The author addresses the implementation at BELGATOM of a generic severe accident analysis methodology, which is intended to support strategic decisions and to provide quantitative information in support of severe accident management. The analysis methodology is based on a combination of severe accident code calculations, generic phenomenological information (experimental evidence from various test facilities regarding issues beyond present code capabilities) and detailed plant-specific technical information

  12. Radioactive materials transport accident analysis

    Over the last 25 years, one of the major issues raised regarding radioactive material transportation has been the risk of severe accidents. While numerous studies have shown that traffic fatalities dominate the risk, modeling the risk of severe accidents has remained one of the most difficult analysis problems. This paper will show how models that were developed for nuclear spent fuel transport accident analysis can be adopted to obtain estimates of release fractions for other types of radioactive material such as vitrified highlevel radioactive waste. The paper will also show how some experimental results from fire experiments involving low level waste packaging can be used in modeling transport accident analysis with this waste form. The results of the analysis enable an analyst to clearly show the differences in the release fractions as a function of accident severity. The paper will also show that by placing the data in a database such as ACCESS trademark, it is possible to obtain risk measures for transporting the waste forms along proposed routes from the generator site to potential final disposal sites

  13. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH

  14. Accident analysis and DOE criteria

    In analyzing the radiological consequences of major accidents at DOE facilities one finds that many facilities fall so far below the limits of DOE Order 6430 that compliance is easily demonstrated by simple analysis. For those cases where the amount of radioactive material and the dispersive energy available are enough for accident consequences to approach the limits, the models and assumptions used become critical. In some cases the models themselves are the difference between meeting the criteria or not meeting them. Further, in one case, we found that not only did the selection of models determine compliance but the selection of applicable criteria from different chapters of Order 6430 also made the difference. DOE has recognized the problem of different criteria in different chapters applying to one facility, and has proceeded to make changes for the sake of consistency. We have proposed to outline the specific steps needed in an accident analysis and suggest appropriate models, parameters, and assumptions. As a result we feed DOE siting and design criteria will be more fairly and consistently applied

  15. Probabilistic accident sequence recovery analysis

    Recovery analysis is a method that considers alternative strategies for preventing accidents in nuclear power plants during probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Consideration of possible recovery actions in PRAs has been controversial, and there seems to be a widely held belief among PRA practitioners, utility staff, plant operators, and regulators that the results of recovery analysis should be skeptically viewed. This paper provides a framework for discussing recovery strategies, thus lending credibility to the process and enhancing regulatory acceptance of PRA results and conclusions. (author)

  16. Severe accident analysis using dynamic accident progression event trees

    Hakobyan, Aram P.

    In present, the development and analysis of Accident Progression Event Trees (APETs) are performed in a manner that is computationally time consuming, difficult to reproduce and also can be phenomenologically inconsistent. One of the principal deficiencies lies in the static nature of conventional APETs. In the conventional event tree techniques, the sequence of events is pre-determined in a fixed order based on the expert judgments. The main objective of this PhD dissertation was to develop a software tool (ADAPT) for automated APET generation using the concept of dynamic event trees. As implied by the name, in dynamic event trees the order and timing of events are determined by the progression of the accident. The tool determines the branching times from a severe accident analysis code based on user specified criteria for branching. It assigns user specified probabilities to every branch, tracks the total branch probability, and truncates branches based on the given pruning/truncation rules to avoid an unmanageable number of scenarios. The function of a dynamic APET developed includes prediction of the conditions, timing, and location of containment failure or bypass leading to the release of radioactive material, and calculation of probabilities of those failures. Thus, scenarios that can potentially lead to early containment failure or bypass, such as through accident induced failure of steam generator tubes, are of particular interest. Also, the work is focused on treatment of uncertainties in severe accident phenomena such as creep rupture of major RCS components, hydrogen burn, containment failure, timing of power recovery, etc. Although the ADAPT methodology (Analysis of Dynamic Accident Progression Trees) could be applied to any severe accident analysis code, in this dissertation the approach is demonstrated by applying it to the MELCOR code [1]. A case study is presented involving station blackout with the loss of auxiliary feedwater system for a

  17. Accident analysis in research reactors

    With the sustained development in computer technology, the possibilities of code capabilities have been enlarged substantially. Consequently, advanced safety evaluations and design optimizations that were not possible few years ago can now be performed. The challenge today is to revisit the safety features of the existing nuclear plants and particularly research reactors in order to verify that the safety requirements are still met and - when necessary - to introduce some amendments not only to meet the new requirements but also to introduce new equipment from recent development of new technologies. The purpose of the present paper is to provide an overview of the accident analysis technology applied to the research reactor, with emphasis given to the capabilities of computational tools. (author)

  18. Aircraft Loss-of-Control Accident Analysis

    Belcastro, Christine M.; Foster, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of control remains one of the largest contributors to fatal aircraft accidents worldwide. Aircraft loss-of-control accidents are complex in that they can result from numerous causal and contributing factors acting alone or (more often) in combination. Hence, there is no single intervention strategy to prevent these accidents. To gain a better understanding into aircraft loss-of-control events and possible intervention strategies, this paper presents a detailed analysis of loss-of-control accident data (predominantly from Part 121), including worst case combinations of causal and contributing factors and their sequencing. Future potential risks are also considered.

  19. Analysis of the TMI-2 accident using ATHLET-CD

    One analyzed the simulation of the TMI-2 NPP accident making use of the ATHLET-CD code. One describes the accident sequence, the code structure and performs the comparative analysis of the calculated and the measured data. Simulation of thermohydraulic characteristics was a special success. Application of the codes promotes the NPP optimization, the reactor safety improvement and the risk reduction. The ATHLET-CD system ( the thermohydraulic analysis of leaks and transient processes at the reactor core disruption) will allow to evaluate the adequacy of the models included in the available codes to calculate severe accidents

  20. Safety criteria and guidelines for MSR accident analysis

    Accident analysis for Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) has been investigated at ORNL for MSRE in 1960s. Since then, safety criteria or guidelines have not been defined for MSR accident analysis. Regarding the safety criteria, the authors showed one proposal in this paper. In order to establish guidelines for MSR accident analysis, we have to investigate all possible accidents. In this paper, the authors describe the philosophy for accident analysis, and show 40 possible accidents. They are at first classified as external cause accidents and internal cause accidents. Since the former ones are generic accidents, we investigate only the latter ones, and categorize them to 4 types, such as power excursion accident, flow decrease accident, fuel-salt leak accident, and other accidents mostly specific to MSR. Each accident is described briefly, with some numerical results by the authors. (author)

  1. Analysis of water hammer-structure interaction in piping system for a loss of coolant accident in primary loop of pressurized water reactor

    The conventional analysis of water hammer and dynamics response of structure in piping system is divided into two parts, and the interaction between them is neglected. The mechanism of fluid-structure interaction under the double-end break pipe in piping system is analyzed. Using the characteristics method, the numerical simulation of water hammer-structure interaction in piping system is completed based on 14 parameters and 14 partial differential equations of fluid-piping cell. The calculated results for a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in primary loop of pressurized water reactor show that the waveform and values of pressure and force with time in piping system are different from that of non-interaction between water hammer and structure in piping system, and the former is less than the later

  2. Accident analysis for the NCSC foil experiment

    An accident analysis has been performed for the nuclear criticality safety class (NCSC) foil experiment. The Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) performs this experiment regularly during its 2-, 3-, and 5-day nuclear criticality safety classes. This accident analysis is part of an effort to modify the NCSC foil experiment plan so that the experiment may be operated at delayed critical. Currently, the NCSC foil experiment may only be operated up to a neutron multiplication of 100. The purpose of the accident analysis is to ensure that any accidental nuclear excursion does not exceed the boundary of the safety envelope described in the LACEF safety analysis report (SAR). The experiment consists of very thin, highly enriched (93% 235U) uranium metal foils (23 X 23 X 0.008 cm) interleaved between Lucite plates (36 X 36 X 1.27 cm). The fuel foils and Lucite plates are stacked vertically to form a critical assembly. Extra Lucite plates placed at the top and bottom of the assembly act as vertical reflectors. The assembly is operated remotely with the use of a general-purpose vertical-lift platform machine. The accident scenario consists of one additional fuel foil being added to an existing critical or nearly critical stack. The reactivity insertion rate is 0.05 $/s, based on the speed of the vertical-lift platform. It is assumed that none of the safety systems will function properly during the accident and that the operating crew is unable to mitigate the accident

  3. Accident analysis in nuclear power plants

    The way the philosophy of Safety in Depth can be verified through the analysis of simulated accidents is shown. This can be achieved by verifying that the integrity of the protection barriers against the release of radioactivity to the environment is preserved even during accident conditions. The simulation of LOCA is focalized as an example, including a study about the associated environmental radiological consequences. (Author)

  4. Safety analysis of surface haulage accidents

    Randolph, R.F.; Boldt, C.M.K.

    1996-12-31

    Research on improving haulage truck safety, started by the U.S. Bureau of Mines, is being continued by its successors. This paper reports the orientation of the renewed research efforts, beginning with an update on accident data analysis, the role of multiple causes in these accidents, and the search for practical methods for addressing the most important causes. Fatal haulage accidents most often involve loss of control or collisions caused by a variety of factors. Lost-time injuries most often involve sprains or strains to the back or multiple body areas, which can often be attributed to rough roads and the shocks of loading and unloading. Research to reduce these accidents includes improved warning systems, shock isolation for drivers, encouraging seatbelt usage, and general improvements to system and task design.

  5. Incorporation of advanced accident analysis methodology into safety analysis reports

    as structural analysis codes and computational fluid dynamics codes (CFD) are applied. The initial code development took place in the sixties and seventies and resulted in a set of quite conservative codes for the reactor dynamics, thermal-hydraulics and containment analysis. The most important limitations of these codes came from insufficient knowledge of the physical phenomena and of the limited computer memory and speed. Very significant advances have been made in the development of the code systems during the last twenty years in all of the above areas. If the data for the physical models of the code are sufficiently well established and allow quite a realistic analysis, these newer versions are called advanced codes. The assumptions used in the deterministic safety analysis vary from very pessimistic to realistic assumptions. In the accident analysis terminology, it is customary to call the pessimistic assumptions 'conservative' and the realistic assumptions 'best estimate'. The assumptions can refer to the selection of physical models, the introduction of these models into the code, and the initial and boundary conditions including the performance and failures of the equipment and human action. The advanced methodology in the present report means application of advanced codes (or best estimate codes), which sometimes represent a combination of various advanced codes for separate stages of the analysis, and in some cases in combination with experiments. The Safety Analysis Reports are required to be available before and during the operation of the plant in most countries. The contents, scope and stages of the SAR vary among the countries. The guide applied in the USA, i.e. the Regulatory Guide 1.70 is representative for the way in which the SARs are made in many countries. During the design phase, a preliminary safety analysis report (PSAR) is requested in many countries and the final safety analysis report (FSAR) is required for the operating licence. There is

  6. OFFSITE RADIOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS FOR THE BOUNDING FLAMMABLE GAS ACCIDENT

    This document quantifies the offsite radiological consequences of the bounding flammable gas accident for comparison with the 25 rem Evaluation Guideline established in DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A. The bounding flammable gas accident is a detonation in a SST. The calculation applies reasonably conservative input parameters in accordance with guidance in DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A. The purpose of this analysis is to calculate the offsite radiological consequence of the bounding flammable gas accident. DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', requires the formal quantification of a limited subset of accidents representing a complete set of bounding conditions. The results of these analyses are then evaluated to determine if they challenge the DOE-STD-3009-94, Appendix A, ''Evaluation Guideline,'' of 25 rem total effective dose equivalent in order to identify and evaluate safety-class structures, systems, and components. The bounding flammable gas accident is a detonation in a single-shell tank (SST). A detonation versus a deflagration was selected for analysis because the faster flame speed of a detonation can potentially result in a larger release of respirable material. A detonation in an SST versus a double-shell tank (DST) was selected as the bounding accident because the estimated respirable release masses are the same and because the doses per unit quantity of waste inhaled are greater for SSTs than for DSTs. Appendix A contains a DST analysis for comparison purposes

  7. The development of severe accident analysis technology

    The objective of the development of severe accident analysis technology is to understand the severe accident phenomena such as core melt progression and to provide a reliable analytical tool to assess severe accidents in a nuclear power plant. Furthermore, establishment of the accident management strategies for the prevention/mitigation of severe accidents is also the purpose of this research. The study may be categorized into three areas. For the first area, two specific issues were reviewed to identify the further research direction, that is the natural circulation in the reactor coolant system and the fuel-coolant interaction as an in-vessel and an ex-vessel phenomenological study. For the second area, the MELCOR and the CONTAIN codes have been upgraded, and a validation calculation of the MELCOR has been performed for the PHEBUS-B9+ experiment. Finally, the experimental program has been established for the in-vessel and the ex-vessel severe accident phenomena with the in-pile test loop in KMRR and the integral containment test facilities, respectively. (Author)

  8. The development of severe accident analysis technology

    Kim, Heuy Dong; Cho, Sung Won; Kim, Sang Baek; Park, Jong Hwa; Lee, Kyu Jung; Park, Lae Joon; Hu, Hoh; Hong, Sung Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the development of severe accident analysis technology is to understand the severe accident phenomena such as core melt progression and to provide a reliable analytical tool to assess severe accidents in a nuclear power plant. Furthermore, establishment of the accident management strategies for the prevention/mitigation of severe accidents is also the purpose of this research. The study may be categorized into three areas. For the first area, two specific issues were reviewed to identify the further research direction, that is the natural circulation in the reactor coolant system and the fuel-coolant interaction as an in-vessel and an ex-vessel phenomenological study. For the second area, the MELCOR and the CONTAIN codes have been upgraded, and a validation calculation of the MELCOR has been performed for the PHEBUS-B9+ experiment. Finally, the experimental program has been established for the in-vessel and the ex-vessel severe accident phenomena with the in-pile test loop in KMRR and the integral containment test facilities, respectively. (Author).

  9. Human factors review for Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA)

    The paper will discuss work being conducted during this human factors review including: (1) support of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program based on an assessment of operator actions, and (2) development of a descriptive model of operator severe accident management. Research by SASA analysts on the Browns Ferry Unit One (BF1) anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) was supported through a concurrent assessment of operator performance to demonstrate contributions to SASA analyses from human factors data and methods. A descriptive model was developed called the Function Oriented Accident Management (FOAM) model, which serves as a structure for bridging human factors, operations, and engineering expertise and which is useful for identifying needs/deficiencies in the area of accident management. The assessment of human factors issues related to ATWS required extensive coordination with SASA analysts. The analysis was consolidated primarily to six operator actions identified in the Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs) as being the most critical to the accident sequence. These actions were assessed through simulator exercises, qualitative reviews, and quantitative human reliability analyses. The FOAM descriptive model assumes as a starting point that multiple operator/system failures exceed the scope of procedures and necessitates a knowledge-based emergency response by the operators. The FOAM model provides a functionally-oriented structure for assembling human factors, operations, and engineering data and expertise into operator guidance for unconventional emergency responses to mitigate severe accident progression and avoid/minimize core degradation. Operators must also respond to potential radiological release beyond plant protective barriers. Research needs in accident management and potential uses of the FOAM model are described. 11 references, 1 figure

  10. Structural assessment of TAPS core shroud under accident loads

    Over the last few years, the Core Shroud of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) operating in foreign countries, have developed cracks at weld locations. As a first step for assessment of structural safety of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) core shroud, its detailed stress analysis was done for postulated accident loads. This report is concerned with structural assessment of core shroud, of BWR at TAPS, subjected to loads resulting from main steam line break (MSLB), recirculation line break (RLB) and safe shut down earthquake. The stress analysis was done for core shroud in healthy condition and without any crack since, visual examination conducted till now, do not indicate presence of any flaw. Dynamic structural analysis for MSLB and RLB events was done using dynamic load factor (DLF) method. The complete core shroud and its associated components were modelled and analysed using 3D plate/shell elements. Since, the components of core shroud are submerged in water, hence, hydrodynamic added mass was also considered for evaluation of natural frequencies. It was concluded that from structural point of view, adequate safety margin is available under all the accident loads. Nonlinear analysis was done to evaluate buckling/collapse load. The collapse/buckling load have sufficient margin against the allowable limits. The displacements are low hence, the insertion of control rod may not be affected. (author)

  11. On the application of near accident data to risk analysis of major accidents

    Major accidents are low frequency high consequence events which are not well supported by conventional statistical methods due to data scarcity. In the absence or shortage of major accident direct data, the use of partially related data of near accidentsaccident precursor data – has drawn much attention. In the present work, a methodology has been proposed based on hierarchical Bayesian analysis and accident precursor data to risk analysis of major accidents. While hierarchical Bayesian analysis facilitates incorporation of generic data into the analysis, the dependency and interaction between accident and near accident data can be encoded via a multinomial likelihood function. We applied the proposed methodology to risk analysis of offshore blowouts and demonstrated its outperformance compared to conventional approaches. - Highlights: • Probabilistic risk analysis is applied to model major accidents. • Two-stage Bayesian updating is used to generate informative distributions. • Accident precursor data are used to develop likelihood function. • A multinomial likelihood function is introduced to model dependencies among data

  12. Long term cooling analysis after Fukushima Daiichi accident

    The objective of this study is to analyze of the long term cooling after Fukushima Daiichi accident by RELAP5mode3.3 code and to check the validity of the cooling method. In order to simulate the cooling conditions in Fukushima plants after accident, the model is nodalized on the assumption of the existence of steam/liquid leak position from RPV/PCV and the variety of debris distribution in RPV/PCV. As a result, we estimated the debris distribution in RPV by referring plant parameter such as reactor pressure and temperature. In addition, we performed the analysis of the loss of injection water accident for the current cooling system installed in Fukushima Daiichi cite after the earthquake. In this case, we develop simplified nodalization of RPV to analyze temperature behavior of reactor structural materials by using the radiation heat transfer model. (author)

  13. Severe accident analysis code SAMPSON improvement for IMPACT project

    SAMPSON is the integral code for severe accident analysis in detail with modular structure, developed in the IMPACT project. Each module can run independently and communications with multiple analysis modules supervised by the analysis control module makes an integral analysis possible. At the end of Phase 1 (1994-1997), demonstration simulation by combinations of up to 11 analysis modules had been performed and physical models in the code had been verified by separate-effect tests and validated by integral tests. Multi-dimensional mechanistic models and theoretical-based conservation equations have been applied, during Phase 2 (1998 - 2000). New models for Accident Management evaluation have been also developed. Verification and validation have been performed by analysing separate-effect tests and integral tests, while actual plant analyses are also being in progress. (author)

  14. Reactor accident analysis and evaluation

    Reactor Management Division of Korea Advanced Energy Research Institute has, so far, adopted, modified and developed quite a number of large programs for nuclear core analysis. During the course of this work, it was found necessary to employ some standard subroutines for handling data, input procedures, core memory management and search files. Many programs share lots of common subroutines and/or functions with other programs. Above all, some of them are in lack of transmittal. During the installation of big codes for CYBER computer, it has drawn our keen attention that many elementary subroutines are heavily machine-dependent and that their conversion is extremely difficult. After having collected and modified the subroutines to fit in different codes, it was finally named KINEP (KAERI Improved Nuclear Environmental Package). KINEP has been proved to be convenient even for smaller programs for general purpose. The KINEP includes about one hundred subroutines to facilitate data handling, operator communications, storage allocation, decimal input, file maintence and scratch I/O. (Author)

  15. PWR Core 2 Project accident analysis

    The various operations required for receipt, handling, defueling and storage of spent Shippingport PWR Core 2 fuel assemblies have been evaluated to determine the potential accidents and their consequences. These operations will introduce approximately 16,500 kilograms of depleted natural uranium (as UO2), 139 kilograms of plutonium, 2.8 megacuries of mixed fission products, and 14 kilograms of Zircaloy-4 (cladding and hardware) into the 221-T Canyon Building. Event sequences for potential accidents that were considered included (1) leaking fuel assemblies, (2) fire and explosion, (3) loss of coolant or cooling capability, (4) dropped and/or damaged fuel assemblies, and extrinsic occurrences such as loss of services, missile impact, and natural occurrences (e.g., earthquake, tornado). Accident frequencies were determined by formal analysis to be very low. Accident consequences are greatly mitigated by the safety and containment features designed into the fuel modules and shipping cask, the long cooling time since reactor discharge, and the redundant safety features designed into the facilities, equipment, and operating procedures for the PWR Core 2 Project. Possible hazards associated with the handling of these fuels have been considered and adequate safeguards and storage constraints identified. The operations of M-160 cask unloading and module storage will not involve identifiable risks as great or significantly greater than those for comparable licensed nuclear facilities, nor will hazards or risks be significantly different from comparable past 221-T Plant programs. Therefore, it is concluded that the operations required for receipt, handling, and defueling of the M-160 cask and for the storage and surveillance of the PWR Core 2 fuel assemblies at the 221-T Canyon Building can be performed without undue risk to the safety of the involved personnel, the public, the environment or the facility

  16. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support ''HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety, Analysis Report, Annex A,'' ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report

  17. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    CROWE, R.D.; PIEPHO, M.G.

    2000-03-23

    This document provided the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report''. All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

  18. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    This document provided the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report''. All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report

  19. Canister storage building design basis accident analysis documentation

    KOPELIC, S.D.

    1999-02-25

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

  20. Canister storage building design basis accident analysis documentation

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report

  1. Hindsight Bias in Cause Analysis of Accident

    Atsuo Murata; Yasunari Matsushita

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that hindsight becomes an obstacle to the objective investigation of an accident, and that the proper countermeasures for the prevention of such an accident is impossible if we view the accident with hindsight. Therefore, it is important for organizational managers to prevent hindsight from occurring so that hindsight does not hinder objective and proper measures to be taken and this does not lead to a serious accident. In this study, a basic phenomenon potentially related to accidents, that is, hindsight was taken up, and an attempt was made to explore the phenomenon in order to get basically insights into the prevention of accidents caused by such a cognitive bias.

  2. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    PIEPHO, M.G.

    1999-10-20

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Annex B, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).'' All assumptions, parameters and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the FSAR.

  3. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Annex B, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).'' All assumptions, parameters and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the FSAR

  4. Neutronic static analysis of Chernobyl accident

    In the present analysis, estimates were made of the positive reactivity introduced through the growth of the coolant void fraction in a Graphite-water steam-generating reactor both at the average value of burnup given by the Soviets and at the maximum value. Using Monte Carlo models, various possible axial distribution of burnup, displacer models, conditions in the control channels and positions of the control rods were considered in calculating the insertion of positive reactivity with the fall of the manual and emergency control rods; that is the positive scram. The possibility of positive reactivity insertion due to the creation of a mixture of fuel, water and cladding in a number of central fuel channels has been examined. This situation corresponds to the explosion of these channels, and is considered in the present work as the cause of the second reactivity peak. At the level of the data presented in this study, vaporization of cooling water in the fuel channels can be considered as the cause of the Chernobyl accident. The accident began in the region of the channels close to the axis of the reactor and spread to its periphery. The positive reactivity due to insertion of the manual and emergency control rods - positive scram -played a marginal role in the development of the accident. Fracture of the fuel followed by bursting of the channels around the axis of the reactor, due to contact between the hot UO2 particles and the cooling water at th end of the first peak, could have started a mechanism capable of producing a second peak in reactivity, in the case of fuel damage extended to a sufficiently large portion of the core

  5. An analysis of the Three Mile Island accident

    Starting with a systematic analysis of the chain of events that took place during the Three Mile Island accident, the authors assess the significance of the four distinct phases of the accident. Inferences that can be drawn with respect to the safety of CANDU reactors are discussed. A rational reaction to the accident is suggested, and several factors are shown not to have played an important part, contrary to public impressions. The authors point out that over-reaction to the accident could detract from public safety. The Canadian response to the accident is discussed. (auth)

  6. Analysis of Aircraft Crash Accident for WETF

    This report applies the methodology of DOE-STD-3014-96, ''Accident Analysis for Aircraft Crash into Hazardous Facilities'', to the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) at LANL. Straightforward application of that methodology shows that including local helicopter flights with those of all other aircraft with potential to impact the facility poses a facility impact risk slightly in excess of the DOE standard's threshold--10-6 impacts per year. It is also shown that helicopters can penetrate the facility if their engines impact that facility's roof. However, a refinement of the helicopter impact analysis shows that penetration risk of the facility for all aircraft lies below the DOE standard's threshold. By that standard, therefore, the potential for release of hazardous material from the facility as a result of an aircraft crashing into the facility is negligible and need not be analyzed further

  7. Preliminary safety analysis of the PWR with accident-tolerant fuels during severe accident conditions

    Highlights: • Analysis of severe accident scenarios for a PWR fueled with ATF system is performed. • A large-break LOCA without ECCS is analyzed for the PWR fueled with ATF system. • Extended SBO cases are discussed for the PWR fueled with ATF system. • The accident-tolerance of ATF system for application in PWR is illustrated. - Abstract: Experience gained in decades of nuclear safety research and previous nuclear accidents direct to the investigation of passive safety system design and accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) system which is now becoming a hot research point in the nuclear energy field. The ATF system is aimed at upgrading safety characteristics of the nuclear fuel and cladding in a reactor core where active cooling has been lost, and is preferable or comparable to the current UO2–Zr system when the reactor is in normal operation. By virtue of advanced materials with improved properties, the ATF system will obviously slow down the progression of accidents, allowing wider margin of time for the mitigation measures to work. Specifically, the simulation and analysis of a large break loss of coolant accident (LBLOCA) without ECCS and extended station blackout (SBO) severe accident are performed for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) loaded with ATF candidates, to reflect the accident-tolerance of ATF

  8. Offsite radiological consequence analysis for the bounding flammable gas accident

    The purpose of this analysis is to calculate the offsite radiological consequence of the bounding flammable gas accident. DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', requires the formal quantification of a limited subset of accidents representing a complete set of bounding conditions. The results of these analyses are then evaluated to determine if they challenge the DOE-STD-3009-94, Appendix A, ''Evaluation Guideline,'' of 25 rem total effective dose equivalent in order to identify and evaluate safety class structures, systems, and components. The bounding flammable gas accident is a detonation in a single-shell tank (SST). A detonation versus a deflagration was selected for analysis because the faster flame speed of a detonation can potentially result in a larger release of respirable material. As will be shown, the consequences of a detonation in either an SST or a double-shell tank (DST) are approximately equal. A detonation in an SST was selected as the bounding condition because the estimated respirable release masses are the same and because the doses per unit quantity of waste inhaled are generally greater for SSTs than for DSTs. Appendix A contains a DST analysis for comparison purposes

  9. Analysis of severe accidents in pressurized heavy water reactors

    Certain very low probability plant states that are beyond design basis accident conditions and which may arise owing to multiple failures of safety systems leading to significant core degradation may jeopardize the integrity of many or all the barriers to the release of radioactive material. Such event sequences are called severe accidents. It is required in the IAEA Safety Requirements publication on Safety of the Nuclear Power Plants: Design, that consideration be given to severe accident sequences, using a combination of engineering judgement and probabilistic methods, to determine those sequences for which reasonably practicable preventive or mitigatory measures can be identified. Acceptable measures need not involve the application of conservative engineering practices used in setting and evaluating design basis accidents, but rather should be based on realistic or best estimate assumptions, methods and analytical criteria. Recently, the IAEA developed a Safety Report on Approaches and Tools for Severe Accident Analysis. This publication provides a description of factors important to severe accident analysis, an overview of severe accident phenomena and the current status in their modelling, categorization of available computer codes, and differences in approaches for various applications of severe accident analysis. The report covers both the in- and ex-vessel phases of severe accidents. The publication is consistent with the IAEA Safety Report on Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants and can be considered as a complementary report specifically devoted to the analysis of severe accidents. Although the report does not explicitly differentiate among various reactor types, it has been written essentially on the basis of available knowledge and databases developed for light water reactors. Therefore its application is mostly oriented towards PWRs and BWRs and, to a more limited extent, they can be only used as preliminary guidance for other types of reactors

  10. Predictions of structural integrity of steam generator tubes under normal operating, accident, and severe accident conditions

    Available models for predicting failure of flawed and unflawed steam generator tubes under normal operating, accident, and severe accident conditions are reviewed. Tests conducted in the past, though limited, tended to show that the earlier flow-stress model for part-through-wall axial cracks overestimated the damaging influence of deep cracks. This observation is confirmed by further tests at high temperatures as well as by finite element analysis. A modified correlation for deep cracks can correct this shortcoming of the model. Recent tests have shown that lateral restraint can significantly increase the failure pressure of tubes with unsymmetrical circumferential cracks. This observation is confirmed by finite element analysis. The rate-independent flow stress models that are successful at low temperatures cannot predict the rate sensitive failure behavior of steam generator tubes at high temperatures. Therefore, a creep rupture model for predicting failure is developed and validated by tests under varying temperature and pressure loading expected during severe accidents

  11. Reactor Safety Gap Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Components and Severe Accident Analysis

    The overall objective of this study was to conduct a technology gap evaluation on accident tolerant components and severe accident analysis methodologies with the goal of identifying any data and/or knowledge gaps that may exist, given the current state of light water reactor (LWR) severe accident research, and additionally augmented by insights obtained from the Fukushima accident. The ultimate benefit of this activity is that the results can be used to refine the Department of Energy's (DOE) Reactor Safety Technology (RST) research and development (R&D) program plan to address key knowledge gaps in severe accident phenomena and analyses that affect reactor safety and that are not currently being addressed by the industry or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  12. Reactor Safety Gap Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Components and Severe Accident Analysis

    Farmer, Mitchell T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bunt, R. [Southern Nuclear, Atlanta, GA (United States); Corradini, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ellison, Paul B. [GE Power and Water, Duluth, GA (United States); Francis, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gabor, John D. [Erin Engineering, Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Gauntt, R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Henry, C. [Fauske and Associates, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Linthicum, R. [Exelon Corp., Chicago, IL (United States); Luangdilok, W. [Fauske and Associates, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Lutz, R. [PWR Owners Group (PWROG); Paik, C. [Fauske and Associates, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Plys, M. [Fauske and Associates, Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rempe, J. [Rempe and Associates LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Robb, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wachowiak, R. [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knovville, TN (United States)

    2015-01-31

    The overall objective of this study was to conduct a technology gap evaluation on accident tolerant components and severe accident analysis methodologies with the goal of identifying any data and/or knowledge gaps that may exist, given the current state of light water reactor (LWR) severe accident research, and additionally augmented by insights obtained from the Fukushima accident. The ultimate benefit of this activity is that the results can be used to refine the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Reactor Safety Technology (RST) research and development (R&D) program plan to address key knowledge gaps in severe accident phenomena and analyses that affect reactor safety and that are not currently being addressed by the industry or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  13. Analysis and research status of severe core damage accidents

    The Severe Core Damage Research and Analysis Task Force was established in Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, JAERI, in May, 1982 to make a quantitative analysis on the issues related with the severe core damage accident and also to survey the present status of the research and provide the required research subjects on the severe core damage accident. This report summarizes the results of the works performed by the Task Force during last one and half years. The main subjects investigated are as follows; (1) Discussion on the purposes and necessities of severe core damage accident research, (2) proposal of phenomenological research subjects required in Japan, (3) analysis of severe core damage accidents and identification of risk dominant accident sequences, (4) investigation of significant physical phenomena in severe core damage accidents, and (5) survey of the research status. (author)

  14. Accident progression event tree analysis for postulated severe accidents at N Reactor

    A Level II/III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford reservation in Washington. The accident progression analysis documented in this report determines how core damage accidents identified in the Level I PRA progress from fuel damage to confinement response and potential releases the environment. The objectives of the study are to generate accident progression data for the Level II/III PRA source term model and to identify changes that could improve plant response under accident conditions. The scope of the analysis is comprehensive, excluding only sabotage and operator errors of commission. State-of-the-art methodology is employed based largely on the methods developed by Sandia for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the NUREG-1150 study. The accident progression model allows complex interactions and dependencies between systems to be explicitly considered. Latin Hypecube sampling was used to assess the phenomenological and systemic uncertainties associated with the primary and confinement system responses to the core damage accident. The results of the analysis show that the N Reactor confinement concept provides significant radiological protection for most of the accident progression pathways studied

  15. Analysis of progression of severe accident in Indian PHWRs

    In India a wide variety of nuclear reactors are in operation and in different stages of construction. The main stay of Indian nuclear power programme today is 'Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs)'. There are 13 operating PHWRs and several others in different stages of construction. These reactors are either of 220 MWe or 540 MWe capacity. Atomic Energy Regulatory Board for authorization needs safety analysis reports, which consists of a detailed analyses of all design basis accidents. However, there is a more to carry out severe accident analysis for accident management programme. This paper describes an analysis of a severe accident caused by Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), co-incident with loss of emergency core cooling system and loss of moderator heat sink in 220 MWe Indian PHWR. Initially in a matter of about 60 seconds most of the coolant from primary heat transport system blows out, the reactor gets tripped, but in the absence of emergency core cooling system, the heat removal from the fuel bundles is very poor. Consequently, the fuel bundle starts getting heated up. The only mode of heat transfer is radiative heat transfer from fuel bundle to pressure tube, from pressure tube to calandria tube and them convective heat transfer from calandria tube to the relatively cold moderator in which the reactor channels are immersed. In the absence of availability of moderator heat sink the moderator gets heated up and eventually boils. And slowly the moderator level in the calandria starts falling. Soon the channel gets uncovered and the temperatures of the channel components shoot up as the temperature of the pressure tube and calandria tube rise. Mechanical properties deteriorate rapidly with temperature as structural elements of reactor channel are made of zircaloy. Under the weight of the fuel, the reactor channel gives in and falls into the remaining moderator. This process continues till all the moderator is evaporated, leading to damage to the entire

  16. TMI-2 accident: core heat-up analysis

    This report summarizes NSAC study of reactor core thermal conditions during the accident at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. The study focuses primarily on the time period from core uncovery (approximately 113 minutes after turbine trip) through the initiation of sustained high pressure injection (after 202 minutes). The transient analysis is based upon established sequences of events; plant data; post-accident measurements; interpretation or indirect use of instrument responses to accident conditions

  17. Analysis of local subassembly accident in KALIMER

    Kwon, Young Min; Jeong, Kwan Seong; Hahn, Do Hee

    2000-10-01

    Subassembly Accidents (S-A) in the Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) may cause extensive clad and fuel melting and are thus regarded as a potential whole core accident initiator. The possibility of S-A occurrence must be very low frequency by the design features, and reactor must have specific instrumentation to interrupt the S-A sequences by causing a reactor shutdown. The evaluation of the relevant initiators, the event sequences which follow them, and their detection are the essence of the safety issue. Particularly, the phenomena of flow blockage caused by foreign materials and/or the debris from the failed fuel pin have been researched world-widely. The foreign strategies for dealing with the S-A and the associated safety issues with experimental and theoretical R and D results are reviewed. This report aims at obtaining information to reasonably evaluate the thermal-hydraulic effect of S-A for a wire-wrapped LMR fuel pin bundle. The mechanism of blockage formation and growth within a pin bundle and at the subassembly entrance is reviewed in the phenomenological aspect. Knowledge about the recent LMR subassembly design and operation procedure to prevent flow blockage will be reflected for KALIMER design later. The blockage analysis method including computer codes and related analytical models are reviewed. Especially SABRE4 code is discussed in detail. Preliminary analyses of flow blockage within a 271-pin driver subassembly have been performed using the SABRE4 computer code. As a result no sodium boiling occurred for the central 24-subchannel blockage as well as 6-subchannel blockage.

  18. Analysis of local subassembly accident in KALIMER

    Subassembly Accidents (S-A) in the Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) may cause extensive clad and fuel melting and are thus regarded as a potential whole core accident initiator. The possibility of S-A occurrence must be very low frequency by the design features, and reactor must have specific instrumentation to interrupt the S-A sequences by causing a reactor shutdown. The evaluation of the relevant initiators, the event sequences which follow them, and their detection are the essence of the safety issue. Particularly, the phenomena of flow blockage caused by foreign materials and/or the debris from the failed fuel pin have been researched world-widely. The foreign strategies for dealing with the S-A and the associated safety issues with experimental and theoretical R and D results are reviewed. This report aims at obtaining information to reasonably evaluate the thermal-hydraulic effect of S-A for a wire-wrapped LMR fuel pin bundle. The mechanism of blockage formation and growth within a pin bundle and at the subassembly entrance is reviewed in the phenomenological aspect. Knowledge about the recent LMR subassembly design and operation procedure to prevent flow blockage will be reflected for KALIMER design later. The blockage analysis method including computer codes and related analytical models are reviewed. Especially SABRE4 code is discussed in detail. Preliminary analyses of flow blockage within a 271-pin driver subassembly have been performed using the SABRE4 computer code. As a result no sodium boiling occurred for the central 24-subchannel blockage as well as 6-subchannel blockage

  19. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    CROWE, R.D.

    1999-09-09

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support ''HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety, Analysis Report, Annex A,'' ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

  20. Cause Analysis of Wuhan Tianheng Building Pile Accident

    2001-01-01

    The geological condition and the original structure feature and foundation design of Wuhan Tianheng building are described. The accident appearance of pile foundation in the construction execution of work is illustrated. The generating source of this pile foundation accident is analyzed in great details.``

  1. Comparison of Commonly Used Accident Analysis Techniques for Manufacturing Industries

    IRAJ MOHAMMADFAM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The adverse consequences of major accident events have led to development of accident analysis techniques to investigate thoroughly the accidents. However, each technique has its own advantages and shortcomings,which make it very difficult to find a single technique being capable of analyzing all types of accidents. Therefore, the comparison of accident analysis techniques would help finding out their capabilities in different circumstances to choose the most one. In this research, the techniques CBA and AABF were compared with Tripod β in order to determine the superior technique for analysis of major accidents in manufacturing industries. At first step, the comparison criteria were developed using Delphi Method. Afterwards, the relative importance of each criterion was qualitatively determined and the qualitative values were then converted to the quantitative values  applying  Fuzzy  triangular  numbers.  Finally,  the  TOPSIS  was  used  to  prioritize  the techniques in terms of the preset criteria. The results of the study showed that Tripod β is superior to the CBA and AABF. It is highly recommended to compare all available accident analysis techniques based on proper criteria in order to select the best one whereas improper choice of accident analysis techniques may lead to misguided results.

  2. Development of Database for Accident Analysis in Indian Mines

    Tripathy, Debi Prasad; Guru Raghavendra Reddy, K.

    2015-08-01

    Mining is a hazardous industry and high accident rates associated with underground mining is a cause of deep concern. Technological developments notwithstanding, rate of fatal accidents and reportable incidents have not shown corresponding levels of decline. This paper argues that adoption of appropriate safety standards by both mine management and the government may result in appreciable reduction in accident frequency. This can be achieved by using the technology in improving the working conditions, sensitising workers and managers about causes and prevention of accidents. Inputs required for a detailed analysis of an accident include information on location, time, type, cost of accident, victim, nature of injury, personal and environmental factors etc. Such information can be generated from data available in the standard coded accident report form. This paper presents a web based application for accident analysis in Indian mines during 2001-2013. An accident database (SafeStat) prototype based on Intranet of the TCP/IP agreement, as developed by the authors, is also discussed.

  3. NASA's Accident Precursor Analysis Process and the International Space Station

    Groen, Frank; Lutomski, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the implementation of Accident Precursor Analysis (APA), as well as the evaluation of In-Flight Investigations (IFI) and Problem Reporting and Corrective Action (PRACA) data for the identification of unrecognized accident potentials on the International Space Station.

  4. Development of criticality accident analysis code AGNES

    A one-point kinetics code, AGNES2, has been developed for the evaluation of the criticality accident of nuclear solution fuel system. The code has been evaluated through the simulation of TRACY experiments and used for the study of the condition of the JCO criticality accident. A code, AGNES-P, for the criticality accident of nuclear powder system has been developed based on AGNES2. It is expected that these codes be useful for the evaluation of criticality safety for fuel reprocessing and fabrication plants. (author)

  5. Fire-accident analysis code (FIRAC) verification

    The FIRAC computer code predicts fire-induced transients in nuclear fuel cycle facility ventilation systems. FIRAC calculates simultaneously the gas-dynamic, material transport, and heat transport transients that occur in any arbitrarily connected network system subjected to a fire. The network system may include ventilation components such as filters, dampers, ducts, and blowers. These components are connected to rooms and corridors to complete the network for moving air through the facility. An experimental ventilation system has been constructed to verify FIRAC and other accident analysis codes. The design emphasizes network system characteristics and includes multiple chambers, ducts, blowers, dampers, and filters. A large industrial heater and a commercial dust feeder are used to inject thermal energy and aerosol mass. The facility is instrumented to measure volumetric flow rate, temperature, pressure, and aerosol concentration throughout the system. Aerosol release rates and mass accumulation on filters also are measured. This paper compares and discusses the gas-dynamic and heat transport data obtained from the ventilation system experiments with those predicted by the FIRAC code. The numerically predicted data generally are within 10% of the experimental data

  6. Fire-accident analysis code (FIRAC) verification

    The FIRAC computer code predicts fire-induced transients in nuclear fuel cycle facility ventilation systems. FIRAC calculates simultaneously the gas-dynamic, material transport, and heat transport transients that occur in any arbitrarily connected network system subjected to a fire. The network system may include ventilation components such as filters, dampers, ducts, and blowers. These components are connected to rooms and corridors to complete the network for moving air through the facility. An experimental ventilation system has been constructed to verify FIRAC and other accident analysis codes. The design emphasizes network system characteristics and includes multiple chambers, ducts, blowers, dampers, and filters. A larger industrial heater and a commercial dust feeder are used to inject thermal energy and aerosol mass. The facility is instrumented to measure volumetric flow rate, temperature, pressure, and aerosol concentration throughout the system. Aerosol release rates and mass accumulation on filters also are measured. We have performed a series of experiments in which a known rate of thermal energy is injected into the system. We then simulated this experiment with the FIRAC code. This paper compares and discusses the gas-dynamic and heat transport data obtained from the ventilation system experiments with those predicted by the FIRAC code. The numerically predicted data generally are within 10% of the experimental data

  7. Analysis of reactivity accidents in PWR'S

    This note describes the French strategy which has consisted, firstly, in examining all the accidents presented in the PWR unit safety reports in order to determine for each parameter the impact on accident consequences of varying the parameter considered, secondly in analyzing the provisions taken into account to restrict variation of this parameter to within an acceptable range and thirdly, in checking that the reliability of these provisions is compatible with the potential consequences of transgression of the authorized limits. Taking into consideration violations of technical operating specifications and/or non-observance of operating procedures, equipment failures, and partial or total unavailability of safety systems, these studies have shown that fuel mechanical strength limits can be reached but that the probability of occurrence of the corresponding events places them in the residual risk field and that it must, in fact, be remembered that there is a wide margin between the design basis accidents and accidents resulting in fuel destruction. However, during the coming year, we still have to analyze scenarios dealing with cumulated events or incidents leading to a reactivity accident. This program will be mainly concerned with the impact of the cases examined relating to dilution incidents under normal operating conditions or accident operating conditions

  8. A Hybrid Algorithm of Traffic Accident Data Mining on Cause Analysis

    Jianfeng Xi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic accident databases provide the basis for road traffic accident analysis, the data inside which usually has a radial, multidimensional, and multilayered structure. Traditional data mining algorithms such as association rules, when applied alone, often yield uncertain and unreliable results. An improved association rule algorithm based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO put forward by this paper can be used to analyze the correlation between accident attributes and causes. The new algorithm focuses on characteristics of the hyperstereo structure of road traffic accident data, and the association rules of accident causes can be calculated more accurately and in higher rates. A new concept of Association Entropy is also defined to help compare the importance between different accident attributes. T-test model and Delphi method were deployed to test and verify the accuracy of the improved algorithm, the result of which was a ten times faster speed for random traffic accident data sampling analyses on average. In the paper, the algorithms were tested on a sample database of more than twenty thousand items, each with 56 accident attributes. And the final result proves that the improved algorithm was accurate and stable.

  9. Traffic Accident, System Model and Cluster Analysis in GIS

    Veronika Vlčková

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the many often frequented topics as normal journalism, so the professional public, is the problem of traffic accidents. This article illustrates the orientation of considerations to a less known context of accidents, with the help of constructive systems theory and its methods, cluster analysis and geoinformation engineering. Traffic accident is reframing the space-time, and therefore it can be to study with tools of technology of geographic information systems. The application of system approach enabling the formulation of the system model, grabbed by tools of geoinformation engineering and multicriterial and cluster analysis.

  10. Structural evaluation of Siemens advanced fuel channel under accident loadings

    As a part of an effort to develop an advanced BWR fuel channel design, Siemens Power Corporation (SPC) and the Siemens AG Power Generation Group (KWU) performed structural analyses to verify the acceptability of the fuel channel design under combined seismic/LOCA (Loss Of. Coolant Accident) loadings. The results of the analyses give some interesting insights into the problem: 1) fluid-structure interaction (FSI) effects are significant and should be considered, 2) the problem may simplified by using a linear analysis despite non-linear features (gaps) between interfacing components, and 3) sufficient accuracy may be obtained by using only the first mode of vibration. The channeled fuel assembly can be considered to be a beam where the flexural stiffness is primarily determined by the fuel channel and the mass is given by the fuel assembly. The results from the analyses show the advanced fuel channel design meets applicable design criteria with adequate margins while at the same time exhibiting superior nuclear performance compared to a conventional BWR fuel channel. (author)

  11. Predictions of structural integrity of steam generator tubes under normal operating, accident, an severe accident conditions

    Majumdar, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Available models for predicting failure of flawed and unflawed steam generator tubes under normal operating, accident, and severe accident conditions are reviewed. Tests conducted in the past, though limited, tended to show that the earlier flow-stress model for part-through-wall axial cracks overestimated the damaging influence of deep cracks. This observation was confirmed by further tests at high temperatures, as well as by finite-element analysis. A modified correlation for deep cracks can correct this shortcoming of the model. Recent tests have shown that lateral restraint can significantly increase the failure pressure of tubes with unsymmetrical circumferential cracks. This observation was confirmed by finite-element analysis. The rate-independent flow stress models that are successful at low temperatures cannot predict the rate-sensitive failure behavior of steam generator tubes at high temperatures. Therefore, a creep rupture model for predicting failure was developed and validated by tests under various temperature and pressure loadings that can occur during postulated severe accidents.

  12. Analysis of freight train accident statistics for 1972-1974

    Both train speed and dollar damage have been used in transportation studies as measures of accident severity. Analysis of freight train accident data for the three year period, 1972-74 showed that, in general, as speed increases dollar damage to railroad property also increases. A greater percentage of high speed than low speed accidents result in high dollar damage. Factors, in addition to speed, that can have an important effect on accident severity include the type of accident, the kinds of railcars and other equipment involved, and the geographical environmental of the accident. Threshold levels of accident stresses (e.g., impact and puncture forces and fire temperature and duration) are required to compromise the integrity of shipping containers used for the transport of radioactive materials. Analyses of accident severity using either speed or dollar damage as a basis can provide some insights into the possible risks involved in transport of radioactive materials. however, care must be taken in the strict use of results since there is no direct correlation between either speed or dollar damage and cask failure threshold levels

  13. Procedures Guide for Structural Expert Judgement in Accident Consequence Modelling (invited paper)

    A protocol is outlined for using structured expert judgement to generate uncertainty data for uncertainty analyses. The use of performance based weighting as an instrument to enable optimisation of the aggregated experts' assessments is emphasised. Examples are shown from the EC/USNRC joint study on Probabilistic Accident Consequence Uncertainty Analysis. (author)

  14. Sensitivity analysis in severe accidents semi-mechanistic modeling

    A sensitivity analysis to determine the most influent phenomena in the core melt progression to be considered in a semi-mechanistic modeling have been performed in the present work. The semi-mechanistic program MARCH3 and the TMI-2 plant parameters were used in the TMI-2 severe accident. The sensitivity analysis was performed with the comparison of the results obtained by the program with the plant data recorded during the accident. The results enabled us to verify that although many phenomena are present in the accident, the modelling of the most important ones was enough to reproduce, at least in a qualitative way, the accident progression. This fact reflects the importance of the sensitivity analysis to select the most influent phenomena in a core melting process. (author). 48 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs

  15. Analyses to demonstrate the structural performance of the CASTOR KN12 in hypothetical accident drop accident scenarios

    CASTORcircledR KN-12 is a new cask design by GNB for KHNP-NETEC for dry and wet transportation of up to twelve spent PWR fuel assemblies in Korea. It received its transport license from the Korean Competent Authority KINS in July 2002 and is now in use in South Korea. It has been designed to satisfy the regulatory requirements of the 10 CFR 71 and the IAEA ST-1 for Type B(U)F packages. Its structural performance was demonstrated against the load cases and boundary conditions as defined in 10 CFR 71 and NRC's Regulatory Guide 7.8, and further explained in NUREG 1617. This included normal conditions of transport load cases - including Hot Environment, Cold Environment, Increased External Pressure (140MPa), Minimum External Pressure (24.5kPa), Vibration and shock, and 0.3m free drop - and the hypothetical accident conditions load cases - including the 9m Free Drop, Puncture, Thermal Fire Accident, 200m Water Immersion and 1.5 x MNOP Internal Pressure. Structural performance were demonstrated by analysis, including state-of-the-art finite element (FE) simulation, and confirmed by tests using a 1/3-scale model. Test results were also used to verify the numerical tool and the methods used in the analyses. All the structural analyses including validation against drop tests were carried out by Arup, and testing were carried out by KAERI. This paper concentrates on the analysis carried out to demonstrate performance in the hypothetical accident 9m free drop scenarios, and results from a small selection of them

  16. A methodology for radiological accidents analysis in industrial gamma radiography

    A critical review of 34 published severe radiological accidents in industrial gamma radiography, that happened in 15 countries, from 1960 to 1988, was performed. The most frequent causes, consequences and dose estimation methods were analysed, aiming to stablish better procedures of radiation safety and accidents analysis. The objective of this work is to elaborate a radiological accidents analysis methodology in industrial gamma radiography. The suggested methodology will enable professionals to determine the true causes of the event and to estimate the dose with a good certainty. The technical analytical tree, recommended by International Atomic Energy Agency to perform radiation protection and nuclear safety programs, was adopted in the elaboration of the suggested methodology. The viability of the use of the Electron Gamma Shower 4 Computer Code System to calculate the absorbed dose in radiological accidents in industrial gamma radiography, mainly at sup(192)Ir radioactive source handling situations was also studied. (author)

  17. Severe accident analysis to verify the effectiveness of severe accident management guidelines for large pressurized heavy water reactor

    Highlights: • The progression of severe accident initiated from high pressure scenario of station black out has been analyzed using RELAP5/SCDAP. • The effectiveness of SAMG actions prescribed has been established through analysis. • The time margin available to invoke the SAMG action has been specified. - Abstract: The pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) contains both inherent and engineered safety features that help the reactor become resistant to severe accident and its consequences. However in case of a low frequency severe accident, despite the safety features, procedural action should be in place to mitigate the accident progression. Severe accident analysis of such low frequency event provides insight into the accident progression and basis to develop the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG). Since the order of uncertainty in the progression path of severe accident is very high, it is necessary to study the consequences of the SAMG actions prescribed. The paper discusses severe accident analysis for large PHWRs for multiple failure transients involving a high pressure scenario (initiation event like SBO with loss of emergency core cooling system and loss of moderator cooling). SAMG actions prescribed for such a scenario include water injection into steam generator, calandria vessel or calandria vault at different stages of accident. The effectiveness of SAMG actions prescribed has been investigated. It is found that there is sufficient time margin available to the operator to execute these SAMG actions and the progression of severe accident is arrested in all the three cases

  18. Severe accident analysis to verify the effectiveness of severe accident management guidelines for large pressurized heavy water reactor

    Gokhale, O.S., E-mail: onkarsg@barc.gov.in; Mukhopadhyay, D., E-mail: dmukho@barc.gov.in; Lele, H.G., E-mail: hglele@barc.gov.in; Singh, R.K., E-mail: rksingh@barc.gov.in

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The progression of severe accident initiated from high pressure scenario of station black out has been analyzed using RELAP5/SCDAP. • The effectiveness of SAMG actions prescribed has been established through analysis. • The time margin available to invoke the SAMG action has been specified. - Abstract: The pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) contains both inherent and engineered safety features that help the reactor become resistant to severe accident and its consequences. However in case of a low frequency severe accident, despite the safety features, procedural action should be in place to mitigate the accident progression. Severe accident analysis of such low frequency event provides insight into the accident progression and basis to develop the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG). Since the order of uncertainty in the progression path of severe accident is very high, it is necessary to study the consequences of the SAMG actions prescribed. The paper discusses severe accident analysis for large PHWRs for multiple failure transients involving a high pressure scenario (initiation event like SBO with loss of emergency core cooling system and loss of moderator cooling). SAMG actions prescribed for such a scenario include water injection into steam generator, calandria vessel or calandria vault at different stages of accident. The effectiveness of SAMG actions prescribed has been investigated. It is found that there is sufficient time margin available to the operator to execute these SAMG actions and the progression of severe accident is arrested in all the three cases.

  19. ANALYSIS OF ACCIDENTS RATE OF AGRICULTURAL OFF-ROAD VEHICLES

    Veronika Váliková

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, we deal with the analysis of the accident rate of agricultural off-road vehicles and fatality figure of service personnel. We analyse reasons of accidents of agricultural mechanisms, however mostly tractors,as well as their consequences. The research was oriented mainly to machine overturn (rollover). We also analyse injuries of service personnel that occurred following the vehicle rollover as well as following the disregard of occupational safety regulations. In the con...

  20. Effect of Candu Fuel Bundle Modeling on Sever Accident Analysis

    Dupleac, D.; Prisecaru, I. [Power Plant Engineering Faculty, Politehnica University, 313 Splaiul Independentei, 060042, sect. 6, Bucharest (Romania); Mladin, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti-Mioveni, 115400 (Romania)

    2009-06-15

    In a Candu 6 nuclear power reactor fuel bundles are located in horizontal Zircaloy pressure tubes through which the heavy-water coolant flows. Each pressure tube is surrounded by a concentric calandria tube. Outside the calandria tubes is the heavy-water moderator contained in the calandria itself. The moderator is maintained at a temperature of 70 deg. C by a separate cooling circuit. The moderator surrounding the calandria tubes provides a potential heat sink following a loss of core heat removal. The calandria vessel is in turn contained within a shield tank (or reactor vault), which provides biological shielding during normal operation and maintenance. It is a large concrete tank filled with ordinary water. During normal operation, about 0.4% of the core's thermal output is deposited in the shield tank and end shields, through heat transfer from the calandria structure and fission heating. In a severe accident scenario, the shield tank could provide an external calandria vessel cooling which can be maintained until the shield tank water level drops below the debris level. The Candu system design has specific features which are important to severe accidents progression and requires selective consideration of models, methods and techniques of severe accident evaluation. Moreover, it should be noted that the mechanistic models for severe accident in Candu system are largely less well validated and as the result the level of uncertainty remains high in many instances. Unlike the light water reactors, for which are several developed computer codes to analyze severe accidents, for Candu severe accidents analysis two codes were developed: MAAP4-Candu and ISAAC. However, both codes started by using MAAP4/PWR as reference code and implemented Candu 6 specific models. Thus, these two codes had many common features. Recently, a joint project involving Romanian nuclear organizations and coordinated by Politehnica University of Bucharest has been started. The purpose

  1. Analysis of tritium mission FMEF/FAA fuel handling accidents

    The Fuels Material Examination Facility/Fuel Assembly Area is proposed to be used for fabrication of mixed oxide fuel to support the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) tritium/medical isotope mission. The plutonium isotope mix for the new mission is different than that analyzed in the FMEF safety analysis report. A reanalysis was performed of three representative accidents for the revised plutonium mix to determine the impact on the safety analysis. Current versions computer codes and meterology data files were used for the analysis. The revised accidents were a criticality, an explosion in a glovebox, and a tornado. The analysis concluded that risk guidelines were met with the revised plutonium mix

  2. Analysis of tritium mission FMEF/FAA fuel handling accidents

    Van Keuren, J.C.

    1997-11-18

    The Fuels Material Examination Facility/Fuel Assembly Area is proposed to be used for fabrication of mixed oxide fuel to support the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) tritium/medical isotope mission. The plutonium isotope mix for the new mission is different than that analyzed in the FMEF safety analysis report. A reanalysis was performed of three representative accidents for the revised plutonium mix to determine the impact on the safety analysis. Current versions computer codes and meterology data files were used for the analysis. The revised accidents were a criticality, an explosion in a glovebox, and a tornado. The analysis concluded that risk guidelines were met with the revised plutonium mix.

  3. MAAP4.0.7 severe accident source term analysis

    The Severe Accident Source Term Analysis performed in support of U.S. EPR design certification was conducted using MAAP4.07. The analysis had three distinct goals: to determine the most limiting scenario from a severe accident stand point and incorporate the annulus, fuel and safeguards buildings into the MAAP4.0.7 base model; to develop and document the Level 2 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Source Term Analysis; and to develop the input from the PRA Level 2 output to PRA Level 3. The methods of this analysis will be presented in this paper. (authors)

  4. Loss of Coolant Accident Analysis for Israel Research Reactor

    One of the main objectives of reactor safety systems is to keep the reactor core in condition that does not permit any release of radioactivity into the environment. In order to ensure this, the reactor must have sufficient safety margins during all possible operational and accident conditions. This paper focuses on the analysis of loss of coolant accident (LOCA), which is one of the most severe scenarios among other hypothetical events such as reactivity induced accidents, loss of flow accident, etc. The analysis was carried out for the Israel Research Reactor 1 (IRR-1), which is a 5MW swimming pool type research reactor. The IRR-1 core consists of MTR highlyenriched uranium (HEU) fuel type, and is reflected by Graphite elements. During normal operation, the reactor core is cooled by downward forced flow of light water circulated by a primary cooling circuit pump. But during shutdown stage, the reactor core is cooled by upward natural convection flow through a safety flapper valve. There could be several primary causes to initiate a LOCA in research reactors, such as breaks in the piping system, ruptures of the beam tubes, and concrete wall failures of the reactor pool. Although probability of large break accident in research reactors is very low, once the accident occurs, it may cause major core damages, so it must be considered

  5. Overview of SAMPSON code development for LWR severe accident analysis

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has developed a severe accident analysis code 'SAMPSON'. SAMPSON's distinguishing features include inter-connected hierarchical modules and mechanistic models covering a wide spectrum of scenarios ranging from normal operation to hypothetical severe accident events. Each module included in the SAMPSON also runs independently for analysis of specific phenomena assigned. The OECD International Standard Problems (ISP-45 and 46) were solved by the SAMPSON for code verifications. The analysis results showed fairly good agreement with the test results. Then, severe accident phenomena in typical PWR and BWR plants were analyzed. The PWR analysis result showed 56 hours as the containment vessel failure timing, which was 9 hours later than one calculated by MELCOR code. The BWR analysis result showed no containment vessel failure during whole accident events, whereas the MELCOR result showed 10.8 hours. These differences were mainly due to consideration of heat release from the containment vessel wall to atmosphere in the SAMPSON code. Another PWR analysis with water injection as an accident management was performed. The analysis result showed that earlier water injection before the time when the fuel surface temperature reached 1,750 K was effective to prevent further core melt. Since fuel surface and fluid temperatures had spatial distribution, a careful consideration shall be required to determine the suitable location for temperature measurement as an index for the pump restart for water injection. The SAMPSON code was applied to the accident analysis of the Hamaoka-1 BWR plant, where the pipe ruptured due to hydrogen detonation. The SAMPSON had initially been developed to run on a parallel computer. Considering remarkable progress of computer hardware performance, as another version of the SAMPSON code, it has recently been modified so as to run on a single processor. The improvements of physical models, numerical

  6. Role of accident analysis in development of severe accident management guidance for multi-unit CANDU nuclear power plants

    This paper discusses the role of accident analysis in support of the development of Severe Accident Management Guidance for domestic CANDU reactors. In general, analysis can identify what types of challenges can be expected during accident progression but it cannot specify when and to what degree accident phenomena will occur. SAMG overcomes these limitations by monitoring the actual values of key plant indicators that can be used directly or indirectly to infer the condition of the plant and by establishing setpoints beyond which corrective action is required. Analysis can provide a means to correlate observed post-accident plant behavior against predicted behaviour to improve the confidence in and quality of accident mitigation decisions. (author)

  7. Enhancement of organizational resilience in light of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident (1). Analysis of responding structure

    Through the critical situations experienced at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, it became evident that plant personnel are the essential driving force toward resilience for mitigating the severe nuclear accident. In such situation, the key factors are skill and attitude of human operators who struggled sincerely against the accident. It is also evident that future nuclear safety needs to aim at Safety- which is a newly introduced notion of safety proposed in conjunction with resilience engineering. Safety-I was defined as a condition where as little as possible went wrong;. Safety-II is defined as a condition where as much as possible goes wright. Among the four core capabilities (i.e. Learning, Responding, Monitoring, Anticipating) proposed in the framework of resilience engineering, the constituents of 'Responding' is mainly studied in this paper. Four constituents such as Skill Attitude, Health and Environment have been identified through in-depth reviewing of accident reports and reflection of one of the authors who served as a unit director of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. (author)

  8. Chemistry of fission products for accident analysis

    Current knowledge concerning the chemical state of the fission product elements during the development of accidents in water reactor systems is reviewed in this paper. The fission product elements which have been considered are Cs, I, Te, Sr and Ba but aspects of the behavior of Mo, Ru and the lanthanides are also discussed. Some features of the reactions of the various species of these elements with other components of the reactor systems are described. The importance of having an adequate knowledge of thermodynamic data and phase equilibria of relatively simple systems in order to interpret experimental observations on complex multi-component systems is stressed

  9. Waste management facility accident analysis (WASTE ACC) system: software for analysis of waste management alternatives

    This paper describes the Waste Management Facility Accident Analysis (WASTEunderscoreACC) software, which was developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to support the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). WASTEunderscoreACC is a decision support and database system that is compatible with Microsoft reg-sign Windows trademark. It assesses potential atmospheric releases from accidents at waste management facilities. The software provides the user with an easy-to-use tool to determine the risk-dominant accident sequences for the many possible combinations of process technologies, waste and facility types, and alternative cases described in the WM PEIS. In addition, its structure will allow additional alternative cases and assumptions to be tested as part of the future DOE programmatic decision-making process. The WASTEunderscoreACC system demonstrates one approach to performing a generic, systemwide evaluation of accident risks at waste management facilities. The advantages of WASTEunderscoreACC are threefold. First, the software gets waste volume and radiological profile data that were used to perform other WM PEIS-related analyses directly from the WASTEunderscoreMGMT system. Second, the system allows for a consistent analysis across all sites and waste streams, which enables decision makers to understand more fully the trade-offs among various policy options and scenarios. Third, the system is easy to operate; even complex scenario runs are completed within minutes

  10. Risk analysis considering accident in nuclear reactors and oil refineries

    Risk analysis is an important tool to help decision-making, especially related to energy choices and their environmental consequences. This paper sets out to analyze the risk associated with deploying and operating a nuclear installation for later comparison with the risk of other energy sources such as oil. We have conducted a risk analysis based on the number of reactors-year and the number of worldwide accidents that have occurred in nuclear power plants. The same was done based on the number of refineries-year and the number of accidents that have occurred worldwide in oil refineries. Our results showed that the risk of accidents in nuclear power plants is smaller than the risk in oil production. We believe the proposed analysis might affect the decision-making process in the environmental area and contribute to a more sustainable energy future. (author)

  11. The RA reactor loss-of-flow accident analysis

    This paper is dealing with the Vinca RA research reactor thermo hydraulics safety analysis of the hypothetic loss-of-flow accident, caused by the reactor pumps loss of power. The methodology review is exposed. The results of the analysis indicate the primary reactor system high level accuracy. (author)

  12. Hanford Waste Tank Bump Accident and Consequence Analysis

    BRATZEL, D.R.

    2000-06-20

    This report provides a new evaluation of the Hanford tank bump accident analysis and consequences for incorporation into the Authorization Basis. The analysis scope is for the safe storage of waste in its current configuration in single-shell and double-shell tanks.

  13. Hanford Waste Tank Bump Accident and Consequence Analysis

    This report provides a new evaluation of the Hanford tank bump accident analysis and consequences for incorporation into the Authorization Basis. The analysis scope is for the safe storage of waste in its current configuration in single-shell and double-shell tanks

  14. Waste form characterization and its relationship to transportation accident analysis

    The response of potential waste forms should be determined for extreme transportation environments that must be postulated for environmental impact analysis and also for hypothetical accident conditions to which packagings and contents must be subjected for licensing purposes. The best approach may be to test materials up to and beyond their failure point; such an approach would establish failure thresholds. Specification of what denotes failure would be defined by existing or proposed regulations or dictated by requirements developed from accident analysis. Responses to physical and thermal insults are the most important for licensing or analysis and need to be thoroughly characterized. Others in need of characterization might be responses to extreme chemical environments and to intense and prolonged radiation exposure. A complete characterization of waste-form responses would be desirable for environments that are considered extreme for transportation accidents but which may be typical for processing or disposal environments. In addition, the characterizations that are performed must be completed in laboratory environments which can be readily correlated to accident environments and must be meaningfully conveyed to a transportation impact analyst. As an example, leaching data as commonly presented are not usable to the analyst and are obtained under conditions that are not directly applicable to conditions of most transportation accidents. Transportation analysts are in need of data useful for calculating environmental impacts and for licensing of packagings. Future waste form development programs and associated decisions should consider the needs of transportation analysts

  15. Accident Sequence Evaluation Program: Human reliability analysis procedure

    Swain, A.D.

    1987-02-01

    This document presents a shortened version of the procedure, models, and data for human reliability analysis (HRA) which are presented in the Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis With emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications (NUREG/CR-1278, August 1983). This shortened version was prepared and tried out as part of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and managed by Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this new HRA procedure, called the ''ASEP HRA Procedure,'' is to enable systems analysts, with minimal support from experts in human reliability analysis, to make estimates of human error probabilities and other human performance characteristics which are sufficiently accurate for many probabilistic risk assessments. The ASEP HRA Procedure consists of a Pre-Accident Screening HRA, a Pre-Accident Nominal HRA, a Post-Accident Screening HRA, and a Post-Accident Nominal HRA. The procedure in this document includes changes made after tryout and evaluation of the procedure in four nuclear power plants by four different systems analysts and related personnel, including human reliability specialists. The changes consist of some additional explanatory material (including examples), and more detailed definitions of some of the terms. 42 refs.

  16. Accident Sequence Evaluation Program: Human reliability analysis procedure

    This document presents a shortened version of the procedure, models, and data for human reliability analysis (HRA) which are presented in the Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis With emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications (NUREG/CR-1278, August 1983). This shortened version was prepared and tried out as part of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and managed by Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this new HRA procedure, called the ''ASEP HRA Procedure,'' is to enable systems analysts, with minimal support from experts in human reliability analysis, to make estimates of human error probabilities and other human performance characteristics which are sufficiently accurate for many probabilistic risk assessments. The ASEP HRA Procedure consists of a Pre-Accident Screening HRA, a Pre-Accident Nominal HRA, a Post-Accident Screening HRA, and a Post-Accident Nominal HRA. The procedure in this document includes changes made after tryout and evaluation of the procedure in four nuclear power plants by four different systems analysts and related personnel, including human reliability specialists. The changes consist of some additional explanatory material (including examples), and more detailed definitions of some of the terms. 42 refs

  17. Severe accident analysis code Sampson for impact project

    Hiroshi, Ujita; Takashi, Ikeda; Masanori, Naitoh [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation, Advanced Simulation Systems Dept., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Four years of the IMPACT project Phase 1 (1994-1997) had been completed with financial sponsorship from the Japanese government's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. At the end of the phase, demonstration simulations by combinations of up to 11 analysis modules developed for severe accident analysis in the SAMPSON Code were performed and physical models in the code were verified. The SAMPSON prototype was validated by TMI-2 and Phebus-FP test analyses. Many of empirical correlation and conventional models have been replaced by mechanistic models during Phase 2 (1998-2000). New models for Accident Management evaluation have been also developed. (author)

  18. Severe accident analysis code Sampson for impact project

    Four years of the IMPACT project Phase 1 (1994-1997) had been completed with financial sponsorship from the Japanese government's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. At the end of the phase, demonstration simulations by combinations of up to 11 analysis modules developed for severe accident analysis in the SAMPSON Code were performed and physical models in the code were verified. The SAMPSON prototype was validated by TMI-2 and Phebus-FP test analyses. Many of empirical correlation and conventional models have been replaced by mechanistic models during Phase 2 (1998-2000). New models for Accident Management evaluation have been also developed. (author)

  19. Nuclear ship accidents, description and analysis

    In this report available information on 44 reported nuclear ship events is considered. Of these 6 deals with U.S. ships and 38 with USSR ships. The ships are in almost all cases nuclear submarines. Only events that involve the sinking of vessels, the nuclear propulsion plants, radiation exposures, fires/ explosions, sea-water leaks into the submarines and sinking of vessels are considered. Comments are made on each of the events, and at the end of the report an attempt is made to point out the weaknesses of the submarine designs which have resulted in the accidents. It is emphasized that some of the information of which this report is based, may be of dubious nature. Consequently some of the results of the assessments made may not be correct. (au)

  20. Analysis of severe hypothetical accidents for the SNR-300 MARK 1A core

    Two types of hypothetical accidents have been analysed for the fresh and irradiated SNR-300 MARK 1A cores: 1) Loss of flow accidents caused by a coast down of all primary pumps and simultaneous failure of both independent shutdown systems. 2) Transient overpower accidents caused by a reactivity input ramp and simultaneous failure of both independent shutdown systems. The analysis was done by using the CAPRI-2/KADIS computer-program-system which was developed at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe. Detailed parametric variations were performed for both accident types in case of the fresh core to determine the most important and influential parameters. These parameter studies were also used to allow a conservative parameter choice for the reference cases within a reasonable parameter band. In addition the parametric variations gave some insight under which circumstances the accident would lead into energetic disassembly, early shutdown with in-place cooling possibility, or a transition phase with extended fuel motion. The thermal energy in the molten fuel at the end of the nuclear excursion is one important quantity for the severity of the accident. In case of the loss of flow accidents these energies were 3,239 MWs and 3,605 MWs for the reference cases of the fresh and irradiated cores, respectively. The corresponding energies for the reference transient overpower accidents caused by a 15 cent/sec reactivity input ramp were 1,182 MWs and 2,940 MWs for the fresh and irradiated cores respectively. Besides the thermal energy release the analysis provides much more information, for example, about the core conditions at the end of the nuclear excursion. More important the analysis automatically gives the input data for the computer programs which analyse the mechanical response of the reactor tank and the tankinternal mechanical structures. (orig./HP)

  1. Cognitive systems engineering analysis of the JCO criticality accident

    The JCO Criticality Accident is analyzed with a framework based on cognitive systems engineering. With the framework, analysis is conducted integrally both from the system viewpoint and actors viewpoint. The occupational chemical risk was important as safety constraint for the actors as well as the nuclear risk, which is due to criticality accident, to the public and to actors. The inappropriate actor's mental model of the work system played a critical role and several factors (e.g. poor training and education, lack of information on criticality safety control in the procedures and instructions, and lack of warning signs at workplace) contributed to form and shape the mental model. Based on the analysis, several countermeasures, such as warning signs, information system for supporting actors and improved training and education, are derived to prevent such an accident. (author)

  2. Modelling and analysis of severe accidents for VVER-1000 reactors

    Tusheva, Polina

    2012-03-09

    Accident conditions involving significant core degradation are termed severe accidents /IAEA: NS-G-2.15/. Despite the low probability of occurrence of such events, the investigation of severe accident scenarios is an important part of the nuclear safety research. Considering a hypothetical core melt down scenario in a VVER-1000 light water reactor, the early in-vessel phase focusing on the thermal-hydraulic phenomena, and the late in-vessel phase focusing on the melt relocation into the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head, are investigated. The objective of this work is the assessment of severe accident management procedures for VVER-1000 reactors, i.e. the estimation of the maximum period of time available for taking appropriate measures and particular decisions by the plant personnel. During high pressure severe accident sequences it is of prime importance to depressurize the primary circuit in order to allow for effective injection from the emergency core cooling systems and to avoid reactor pressure vessel failure at high pressure that could cause direct containment heating and subsequent challenge to the containment structure. Therefore different accident management measures were investigated for the in-vessel phase of a hypothetical station blackout accident using the severe accident code ASTEC, the mechanistic code ATHLET and the multi-purpose code system ANSYS. The analyses performed on the PHEBUS ISP-46 experiment, as well as simulations of small break loss of coolant accident and station blackout scenarios were used to contribute to the validation and improvement of the integral severe accident code ASTEC. Investigations on the applicability and the effectiveness of accident management procedures in the preventive domain, as well as detailed analyses on the thermal-hydraulic phenomena during the early in-vessel phase of a station blackout accident have been performed with the mechanistic code ATHLET. The results of the simulations show, that the

  3. Modelling and analysis of severe accidents for VVER-1000 reactors

    Accident conditions involving significant core degradation are termed severe accidents /IAEA: NS-G-2.15/. Despite the low probability of occurrence of such events, the investigation of severe accident scenarios is an important part of the nuclear safety research. Considering a hypothetical core melt down scenario in a VVER-1000 light water reactor, the early in-vessel phase focusing on the thermal-hydraulic phenomena, and the late in-vessel phase focusing on the melt relocation into the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head, are investigated. The objective of this work is the assessment of severe accident management procedures for VVER-1000 reactors, i.e. the estimation of the maximum period of time available for taking appropriate measures and particular decisions by the plant personnel. During high pressure severe accident sequences it is of prime importance to depressurize the primary circuit in order to allow for effective injection from the emergency core cooling systems and to avoid reactor pressure vessel failure at high pressure that could cause direct containment heating and subsequent challenge to the containment structure. Therefore different accident management measures were investigated for the in-vessel phase of a hypothetical station blackout accident using the severe accident code ASTEC, the mechanistic code ATHLET and the multi-purpose code system ANSYS. The analyses performed on the PHEBUS ISP-46 experiment, as well as simulations of small break loss of coolant accident and station blackout scenarios were used to contribute to the validation and improvement of the integral severe accident code ASTEC. Investigations on the applicability and the effectiveness of accident management procedures in the preventive domain, as well as detailed analyses on the thermal-hydraulic phenomena during the early in-vessel phase of a station blackout accident have been performed with the mechanistic code ATHLET. The results of the simulations show, that the

  4. Channel blockage accident analysis for research reactors with MTR- type fuel elements

    It is the purpose of this study to investigate the feasibility of removing the residual decay heat from core of TR-2 ,which is a pool-type research reactor, after a channel blockage accident event and to identify the principal factors involved in cooling process. To analyze this accident scenery, THEAP-I computer code, which is a single phase transient 3-D structure/1-D flow thermal hydraulics code developed with the aim to contribute mainly to the safety analysis of the open pool research reactors, was modified and used. All of the analysis results figured out the fact that the core melting was inevitable in case of an uninterrupted operation (continuous operation) preceding a channel blockage accident of the TR-2 Reactor. Such a result will even be met if the blockage occurs only in a single fuel element. The results of analysis are expressed in terms of temperature field distribution as a function of time

  5. Studies on melt-water-structure interaction during severe accidents

    Results of a series of studies, on melt-water-structure interactions which occur during the progression of a core melt-down accident, are described. The emphasis is on the in-vessel interactions and the studies are both experimental and analytical. Since, the studies performed resulted in papers published in proceedings of the technical meetings, and in journals, copies of a set of selected papers are attached to provide details. A summary of the results obtained is provided for the reader who does not, or cannot, venture into the perusal of the attached papers. (au)

  6. Detection and analysis of accident black spots with even small accident figures.

    Oppe, S.

    1982-01-01

    Accident black spots are usually defined as road locations with high accident potentials. In order to detect such hazardous locations we have to know the probability of an accident for a traffic situation of some kind, or the mean number of accidents for some unit of time. In almost all procedures

  7. ANALYSIS OF ACCIDENTS RATE OF AGRICULTURAL OFF-ROAD VEHICLES

    Veronika Váliková

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we deal with the analysis of the accident rate of agricultural off-road vehicles and fatality figure of service personnel. We analyse reasons of accidents of agricultural mechanisms, however mostly tractors,as well as their consequences. The research was oriented mainly to machine overturn (rollover. We also analyse injuries of service personnel that occurred following the vehicle rollover as well as following the disregard of occupational safety regulations. In the contribution, we present results of the research in Slovakia, which were registered by National Labour Inspectorate in years 2000 – 2012 as well as the unregistered one.

  8. Accident consequence calculations for project W-058 safety analysis

    This document describes the calculations performed to determine the accident consequences for the W-058 safety analysis. Project W-058 is the replacement cross site transfer system (RCSTS), which is designed to transort liquid waste between the 200 W and 200 E areas. Calculations for RCSTS safety analyses used the same methods as the calculations for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) and its supporting calculation notes. Revised analyses were performed for the spray and pool leak accidents since the RCSTS flows and pressures differ from those assumed in the TWRS BIO. Revision 1 of the document incorporates review comments

  9. PWR auxiliary systems, safety and emergency systems, accident analysis, operation

    The author presents a description of PWR auxiliary systems like volume control, boric acid control, coolant purification, -degassing, -storage and -treatment system and waste processing systems. Residual heat removal systems, emergency systems and containment designs are discussed. As an accident analysis the author gives a survey over malfunctions and disturbances in the field of reactor operations. (TK)

  10. The development of a severe accident analysis code

    For prevention and mitigation of the containment failure during severe accident, the study is focused on the severe accident phenomena, especially, the ones occurring inside the cavity in an effect to improve existing models and develop analytical tools for the assessment of severe accidents. For hydrogen control, the analysis of hydrogen concentration in the containment and visualization for the concentration in the cell were performed. The computer code to predict combustion flame characteristic was also developed. the analytical model for the expansion phase of vapor explosion was developed and verified with the experimental results. The corium release fraction model from the cavity with the capture volume was developed and applied to the power plants. Pre-test calculation was performed for molten corium concrete interaction study and the crust formation process, heat transfer characteristics of the crust, and the sensitivity study using MELCOR code was carried out. A stress analysis code using finite element method for the reactor vessel lower head failure analysis was developed and the effect by gap formation between molten corium and vessel was analyzed. Through the international program of PHEBUS-FP and participation in the software development, the study on fission products release and transportation in the software development, the study on fission products release and transportation and aerosol deposition were performed. The system for severe accident analysis codes, CONTAIN and MELCOR codes etc., under the cooperation with USNRC were also established by installing in workstation and applying to experimental results and real plants. (author). 116 refs., 31 tabs., 59 figs

  11. Analysis of Hydrogen Control Strategy Using Igniter during Severe Accident

    The Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs) for the operating pressurized water reactor (PWR) have been completed within 2006. Among the SAMG strategies, mitigation-07 is the most important strategy for managing a severe accident of a PWR in order to reduce containment hydrogen. The fastest way to reduce the containment hydrogen concentration is to intentionally ignite the hydrogen. For this strategy, igniters exist in Optimized Power Reactor 1000 (OPR 1000) to burn hydrogen for a severe accident. For using the igniters during a severe accident, the adverse effects such as the explosion of the hydrogen mixture should be considered for containment integrity. However, an applicable discrimination method to activate the igniters does not exist, so that the hydrogen control strategy using the igniters cannot be chosen during a severe accident. Thus, this study focused on suggesting an applicable discrimination method to carry out the strategy of using the igniters. In this study, the specific plant used for this analysis is Ulchin Unit 5 and 6, OPR 1000 plant, in Korea

  12. Analysis on food safety accident affecting factors base on interpretative structural modelling method%基于ISM的食品安全事故影响因素分析

    梁德沛; 刘辉; 熊波; 彭述辉

    2013-01-01

      目的将食品安全事故影响因素之间的复杂关系层次化。方法采用解释结构模型法(ISM),构建食品安全事故影响因素的解释结构模型,并对导致我国食品安全事故的因素进行层次性分析。结果导致我国食品安全事故的直接原因是食品标准体系不合理、食源性疾病监测与预警系统存在缺陷、食品污染物监测系统不完善和食品安全监管体制存在漏洞;而导致我国食品安全事故频发的根本原因是食品安全信息网络不健全,信息传递不畅、食品安全法律体系不完善和食品安全教育培训制度缺乏。结论针对导致我国食品安全事故的直接原因和根本原因,有针对性的提出了相关的政策建议。%Objective To stratify the complex relationship among food safety accident affect factors. Methods Interpretative structural modelling (ISM) structural model was constructed by ISM method. Then, hierarchy analysis was taken on the factors of China’s food safety incidents. Results The results showed that unreasonable food standard system, defect foodborne disease surveillance and early warning system, imperfect food contamination monitoring systems, and loopholes food safety regulatory system were those of the direct influence factors which caused frequent food safety accidents. Imperfect food safety information network, im-perfect food safety legal system and lack food safety education and training system were those of the funda-mental influence factors which also caused frequent food safety accidents. Conclusion Target direct factors and fundamental factors, relevant policy recommendations were put forward.

  13. Analysis on the severe accidents in KSTAR tokamak

    Lee, Myoung Jae; Cheong, Y. H.; Choi, Y. S.; Cheon, E. J. [PlaGen, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-11-15

    The establishment of regulatory and approval systems for KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) has been demanded as the facility is targeted to be completed in the year of 2005. Such establishment can be achieved by performing adequate and in-depth analyses on safety issues covering radiological and chemical hazard materials, radiation protection, high vacuum, very low temperature, etc. The loss of coolant accidents and the loss of vacuum accident in fusion facilities have been introduced with summary of simulation results that were previously reported for ITER and JET. Computer codes that are actively used for accident simulation research are examined and their main features are briefly described. It can be stated that the safety analysis is indispensable to secure the safety of workers and individual members of the public as well as to establish the regulatory and approval systems for KSTAR tokamak.

  14. Fault Tree Analysis of an Accident Probability for Pyroprocessing Facility

    The pyroprocessing technology is one of the spent fuel recycling technologies. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI) started the R and D about the pyroprocessing technology in 1997. The physical protection system requirements based on the VAI should be prepared for applying the pyroprocessing facility in Korea. In this study, we have arranged the accidents which can be happened in pyroprocessing facility. Then, we have obtained the accident path according to the hazards. We can expect that this study will be taken to the VAI as a basic data. The fault tree is not complete yet. The fault tree for an accident probability of pyroprocessing facility is being made according to the hot cell area and each process. Conclusions will be handled after finishing the fault tree analysis

  15. Detection and analysis of accident black spots with even small accident figures.

    Oppe, S.

    1982-01-01

    Accident black spots are usually defined as road locations with high accident potentials. In order to detect such hazardous locations we have to know the probability of an accident for a traffic situation of some kind, or the mean number of accidents for some unit of time. In almost all procedures known to us, the various road locations are treated as isolated spots. With small accident figures it is difficult to detect such places in the known procedures. An alternative procedure starts from...

  16. Sizewell 'B' accident analysis. An overview

    The main topics for initial discussion are origins of the safety case, faults to be analysed defined, independent of plant design. In case of UK licensing have different requirements, so needed new safety case structure and defining the faults to be analysed dependant on plant design and mode of operation. Sizewell 'B' is investigated in main four stages. The first one is grouping the events, according to specific characteristics. Defines of the safeguard requirements in PSA analyzing is the next stage, and is carried according to covering the main safety functions and determining the requirements for each safety function and for each fault. To corresponded stage three are splitting the safety functions into fault and event tree sets, faults grouping with similar requirements, as and the defining of event and fault tree super groups with characteristic faults. And a last stage is the producing of event and fault trees for super groups. On the basis of event tree results the event cutoff is modeled and the list of design basis faults is defined. The modeling assumptions are determined take into account the initial condition, safeguards availability, operator action, single failure criteria and such elements as consequential failures and control system operation. The initiating events analysed are based on design and world operating history, and are investigated sequences for analysis identified from a full PSA assessment. The result of analyses are the complex sequences of low frequency with implementing of systematic approach to initial conditions and systematic approach to fault modelling as well as the internationally recognised acceptance criteria

  17. Risk-based Analysis of Construction Accidents in Iran During 2007-2011-Meta Analyze Study

    AMIRI, Mehran; ARDESHIR, Abdollah; FAZEL ZARANDI, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The present study aimed to investigate the characteristics of occupational accidents and frequency and severity of work related accidents in the construction industry among Iranian insured workers during the years 20072011. Methods The Iranian Social Security Organization (ISSO) accident database containing 21,864 cases between the years 2007-2011 was applied in this study. In the next step, Total Accident Rate (TRA), Total Severity Index (TSI), and Risk Factor (RF) were defined. The core of this work is devoted to analyzing the data from different perspectives such as age of workers, occupation and construction phase, day of the week, time of the day, seasonal analysis, regional considerations, type of accident, and body parts affected. Results Workers between 15-19 years old (TAR=13.4%) are almost six times more exposed to risk of accident than the average of all ages (TAR=2.51%). Laborers and structural workers (TAR=66.6%) and those working at heights (TAR=47.2%) experience more accidents than other groups of workers. Moreover, older workers over 65 years old (TSI=1.97%> average TSI=1.60%), work supervisors (TSI=12.20% >average TSI=9.09%), and night shift workers (TSI=1.89% >average TSI=1.47%) are more prone to severe accidents. Conclusion It is recommended that laborers, young workers, weekend and night shift workers be supervised more carefully in the workplace. Use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) should be compulsory in working environments, and special attention should be undertaken to people working outdoors and at heights. It is also suggested that policymakers pay more attention to the improvement of safety conditions in deprived and cold western regions. PMID:26005662

  18. INDUSTRIAL/MILITARY ACTIVITY-INITIATED ACCIDENT SCREENING ANALYSIS

    D.A. Kalinich

    1999-09-27

    Impacts due to nearby installations and operations were determined in the Preliminary MGDS Hazards Analysis (CRWMS M&O 1996) to be potentially applicable to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. This determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of the potential activities ongoing on or off the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is intended that the Industrial/Military Activity-Initiated Accident Screening Analysis provided herein will meet the requirements of the ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987) in establishing whether this external event can be screened from further consideration or must be included as a design basis event (DBE) in the development of accident scenarios for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). This analysis only considers issues related to preclosure radiological safety. Issues important to waste isolation as related to impact from nearby installations will be covered in the MGR performance assessment.

  19. Human reliability analysis for accident sequences in NPP

    The purpose of this paper is to perform a human performance analysis in accident conditions for the operating NPP. This analysis is realized using Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) methods. HRA methods have necessary tools to analyze the human actions, to estimate the human error probabilities and to identify the major factors which could have a negative influence on the mitigating of the consequences of the abnormal events in NPP. The analyzed events are from CANDU 600 NPP. In order to achieve the analysis of these events the THEP and SPAR-H methods were used. After analyzing the results the actuated equipment, the negative influence factors on the human performance and the dependence levels between the human actions and between the human actions and diagnosis were established. In addition, some recommendations were formulated which could influence positive the human performance on the mitigating of the consequences of the accident sequences in NPP. (authors)

  20. Cold Vacuum Drying facility design basis accident analysis documentation

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Annex B, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the FSAR. The calculations in this document address the design basis accidents (DBAs) selected for analysis in HNF-3553, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report'', Annex B, ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report.'' The objective is to determine the quantity of radioactive particulate available for release at any point during processing at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and to use that quantity to determine the amount of radioactive material released during the DBAs. The radioactive material released is used to determine dose consequences to receptors at four locations, and the dose consequences are compared with the appropriate evaluation guidelines and release limits to ascertain the need for preventive and mitigative controls

  1. Cold Vacuum Drying facility design basis accident analysis documentation

    CROWE, R.D.

    2000-08-08

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Annex B, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the FSAR. The calculations in this document address the design basis accidents (DBAs) selected for analysis in HNF-3553, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report'', Annex B, ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report.'' The objective is to determine the quantity of radioactive particulate available for release at any point during processing at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and to use that quantity to determine the amount of radioactive material released during the DBAs. The radioactive material released is used to determine dose consequences to receptors at four locations, and the dose consequences are compared with the appropriate evaluation guidelines and release limits to ascertain the need for preventive and mitigative controls.

  2. Theories of radiation effects and reactor accident analysis

    Muckerheide's paper was a public breakthrough on how one might assess the public health effects of low-level radiation. By the organization of a wealth of data, including the consequences of Hiroshima and Nagasaki but not including Chernobyl, he was able to conclude that present radioactive waste disposal and cleanup efforts need to be much less arduous than forecast by the U.S. Department of Energy, which, together with regulators, uses the linear hypothesis of radiation damage to humans. While the linear hypothesis is strongly defended and even recommended for extension to noncarcinogenic pollutants, exploration of a conservative threshold for very low level exposures could save billions of dollars in disposing of radioactive waste, enhance the understanding of reactor accident consequences, and assist in the development of design and operating criteria pertaining to severe accidents. In this context, the authors discuss the major differences between design-basis and severe accidents. The authors propose that what should ultimately be done is to develop a regulatory formula for severe-accident analysis that relates the public health effects to the amount and type of radionuclides released and distributed by the Chernobyl accident. Answers to the following important questions should provide the basis of this study: (1) What should be the criteria for distinguishing between design-basis and severe accidents, and what should be the basis for these criteria? (2) How do, and should, these criteria differ for older plants, newer operating plants, type of plant (i.e., gas cooled, water cooled, and liquid metal), advanced designs, and plants of the former Soviet Union? (3) How safe is safe enough?

  3. An analysis of station blackout sequences for the severe accident analysis database (II)

    Park, Soo Yong; Kim, Dong Ha

    2006-08-15

    This report contains analysis methodologies and calculation results of station blackout sequences for the severe accident analysis database system. The Korean standard nuclear power plant has been selected as a reference plant. Based on the probabilistic safety analysis of the corresponding plant. Eight accident scenarios, which was predicted to have more than 10{sup -10}/ry occurrence frequency have been analyzed as base cases for the station blackout sequence database. Furthermore, the sensitivity studies for operational plant systems and for phenomenological models of the analysis computer code have been performed. The functions of the severe accident analysis database system will be to make a diagnosis of the accident by some input information from the plant symptoms, to search a corresponding scenario, and finally to provide the user phenomenological information based on the pre-analyzed results. The MAAP 4.06 calculation results of station blackout sequence in this report will be utilized as input data of the severe accident analysis database system.

  4. An analysis of station blackout sequences for the severe accident analysis database (II)

    This report contains analysis methodologies and calculation results of station blackout sequences for the severe accident analysis database system. The Korean standard nuclear power plant has been selected as a reference plant. Based on the probabilistic safety analysis of the corresponding plant. Eight accident scenarios, which was predicted to have more than 10-10/ry occurrence frequency have been analyzed as base cases for the station blackout sequence database. Furthermore, the sensitivity studies for operational plant systems and for phenomenological models of the analysis computer code have been performed. The functions of the severe accident analysis database system will be to make a diagnosis of the accident by some input information from the plant symptoms, to search a corresponding scenario, and finally to provide the user phenomenological information based on the pre-analyzed results. The MAAP 4.06 calculation results of station blackout sequence in this report will be utilized as input data of the severe accident analysis database system

  5. Evaluation of reactor structural function during core drop accident

    Background: A core drop accident causes the core barrel and supporting structure to drop and impact on the bottom of the reactor vessel. Purpose: To ensure the scram functionality is maintained. Methods: The stress-strain curves applicable to the material are approximated by Ludwik's expression. Considering the core deadweight, buoyancy force and heat expansion, material train ratios for both cold and hot conditions are calculated. Results: Vessel impact load (8294482N in cold condition and 6064537N in hot condition) is determined, which remains within the vessel design specification limits. The calculated drop length (47.44 mm in cold condition and 27.63 mm in hot condition) is less than the fuel pin full-diameter engagement length, so the fuel assembly top nozzle will remain engaged during a core drop. Finally the compressive assemblies are evaluated, which would not buckle due to the core drop accident loads. Conclusions: A core drop will not affect the scram function. (authors)

  6. Accident analysis in the nuclear licensing procedure

    Taking a fracture in a reactor coolant pipe of a containment as an example, those problems are dealt with which in the course of the safety analysis present themselves in particular on account of the term 'realistic, but sufficiently assured assumption' (under point 2.3.2. of the RSK guidelines for PWRs). (HP/LN)

  7. Analysis of reactivity induced accidents at Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    Analysis of reactivity induced accidents in Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) utilizing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, has been carried out using standard computer code PARET. The present core comprises of 29 standard and five control fuel elements. Various modes of reactivity insertions have been considered. The events studied include: start-up accident; accidental drop of a fuel element on the core; flooding of a beam tube with water; removal of an in-pile experiment during reactor operation etc. For each of these transients, time histories of reactor power, energy released and clad surface temperature etc. were calculated. The results reveal that the peak clad temperatures remain well below the clad melting temperature during these accidents. It is concluded that the reactor, which is operated safely at a steady-state power level of 10 MW, with coolant flow rate of 950 m3/h, will also be safe against any possible reactivity induced accident and will not result in a fuel failure

  8. Analysis of reactivity induced accidents at Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    Bokhari, I.H. E-mail: ishtiaq@pinstech.org.pk; Israr, M.; Pervez, S

    2002-12-01

    Analysis of reactivity induced accidents in Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) utilizing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, has been carried out using standard computer code PARET. The present core comprises of 29 standard and five control fuel elements. Various modes of reactivity insertions have been considered. The events studied include: start-up accident; accidental drop of a fuel element on the core; flooding of a beam tube with water; removal of an in-pile experiment during reactor operation etc. For each of these transients, time histories of reactor power, energy released and clad surface temperature etc. were calculated. The results reveal that the peak clad temperatures remain well below the clad melting temperature during these accidents. It is concluded that the reactor, which is operated safely at a steady-state power level of 10 MW, with coolant flow rate of 950 m{sup 3}/h, will also be safe against any possible reactivity induced accident and will not result in a fuel failure.

  9. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for Ignalina NPP confinement in case of loss of coolant accident

    At present the best-estimate approach in the safety analysis of nuclear power plants is widely used around the world. The application of such approach requires to estimate the uncertainty of the calculated results. Various methodologies are applied in order to determine the uncertainty with the required accuracy. One of them is the statistical methodology developed at GRS mbH in Germany and integrated into the SUSA tool, which was applied for the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the thermal-hydraulic parameters inside the confinement (Accident Localisation System) of Ignalina NPP with RBMK-1500 reactor in case of Maximum Design Basis Accident (break of 900 mm diameter pipe). Several parameters that could potentially influence the calculated results were selected for the analysis. A set of input data with different initial values of the selected parameters was generated. In order to receive the results with 95 % probability and 95 % accuracy, 100 runs were performed with COCOSYS code developed at GRS mbH. The calculated results were processed with SUSA tool. The performed analysis showed a rather low dispersion of the results and only in the initial period of the accident. Besides, the analysis showed that there is no threat to the building structures of Ignalina NPP confinement in case of the considered accident scenario. (author)

  10. Gas-cooled reactor safety and accident analysis

    The Specialists' Meeting on Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety and Accident Analysis was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Oak Ridge on the invitation of the Department of Energy in Washington, USA. The meeting was hosted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an opportunity to compare and discuss results of safety and accident analysis of gas-cooled reactors under development, construction or in operation, to review their lay-out, design, and their operational performance, and to identify areas in which additional research and development are needed. The meeting emphasized the high safety margins of gas-cooled reactors and gave particular attention to the inherent safety features of small reactor units. The meeting was subdivided into four technical sessions: Safety and Related Experience with Operating Gas-Cooled Reactors (4 papers); Risk and Safety Analysis (11 papers); Accident Analysis (9 papers); Miscellaneous Related Topics (5 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  11. Spent nuclear fuel structural response when subject to an end impact accident

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) is responsible for licensing spent fuel storage and transportation systems. A subset of this responsibility is to investigate and understand the structural performance of these systems. Studies have shown that the fuel rods of intact spent fuel assemblies with burn-ups up to 45 gigawatt days per metric ton of uranium (Gwd/MTU) are capable of resisting the normally expected impact loads subjected during drop accident conditions. However, effective cladding thickness for intact spent fuel assemblies with burn ups greater than 45 Gwd/MTU can be reduced due to corrosion. The capability of the fuel rod to withstand the expected loads encountered under normal and accident conditions may also be reduced, given degradation of the material properties under extended use, such as decrease in ductility. The USNRC and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNNL) performed computational studies to predict the structural response of spent nuclear fuel in a transport system that is subjected to a hypothetical regulatory impact accident, as defined in 10 CFR71.73. This study performs a structural analysis of a typical high burn up Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assembly using the ANSYS registered ANSYS registered /LS- DYNA registered finite element analysis (FEA) code. The material properties used in the analyses were based on expert judgment and included uncertainties. Ongoing experimental programs will reduce the uncertainties. The current evaluations include the pins, spacer grids, and tie plates to assess possible cladding failure/rupture under hypothetical impact accident loading. This paper describes the USNRC and PNNL staff's analytical approach, provides details on the single pin model developed for this assessment, and presents the results

  12. Improvement of Severe Accident Analysis Computer Code and Development of Accident Management Guidance for Heavy Water Reactor

    Park, Soo Yong; Kim, Ko Ryu; Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, See Darl; Song, Yong Mann; Choi, Young; Jin, Young Ho

    2005-03-15

    The objective of the project is to develop a generic severe accident management guidance(SAMG) applicable to Korean PHWR and the objective of this 3 year continued phase is to construct a base of the generic SAMG. Another objective is to improve a domestic computer code, ISAAC (Integrated Severe Accident Analysis code for CANDU), which still has many deficiencies to be improved in order to apply for the SAMG development. The scope and contents performed in this Phase-2 are as follows: The characteristics of major design and operation for the domestic Wolsong NPP are analyzed from the severe accident aspects. On the basis, preliminary strategies for SAM of PHWR are selected. The information needed for SAM and the methods to get that information are analyzed. Both the individual strategies applicable for accident mitigation under PHWR severe accident conditions and the technical background for those strategies are developed. A new version of ISAAC 2.0 has been developed after analyzing and modifying the existing models of ISAAC 1.0. The general SAMG applicable for PHWRs confirms severe accident management techniques for emergencies, provides the base technique to develop the plant specific SAMG by utility company and finally contributes to the public safety enhancement as a NPP safety assuring step. The ISAAC code will be used inevitably for the PSA, living PSA, severe accident analysis, SAM program development and operator training in PHWR.

  13. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    Yulianti, Yanti [Department of Physics, University of Lampung Jl. Sumantri Brojonegoro No.1 Bandar Lampung, Indonesia Email: y-yanti@unila.ac.id (Indonesia); Su’ud, Zaki [Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung, Indonesia Email: szaki@fi.itb.ac.id (Indonesia); Takaki, Naoyuki [Department of Nuclear Safety Engineering Cooperative Major in Nuclear Energy (Graduate School) 1-28-1 Tamazutsumi,Setagayaku, Tokyo158-8557, Japan Email: ntakaki@tcu.ac.jp (Japan)

    2015-04-16

    power reactor has a peak value before reactor has new balance condition. The analysis showed that temperatures of fuel and claddings during accident are still below limitations which are in secure condition.

  14. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    Yulianti, Yanti; Su'ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2015-04-01

    before reactor has new balance condition. The analysis showed that temperatures of fuel and claddings during accident are still below limitations which are in secure condition.

  15. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    power reactor has a peak value before reactor has new balance condition. The analysis showed that temperatures of fuel and claddings during accident are still below limitations which are in secure condition

  16. Review of Severe Accident Phenomena in LWR and Related Severe Accident Analysis Codes

    Muhammad Hashim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Firstly, importance of severe accident provision is highlighted in view of Fukushima Daiichi accident. Then, extensive review of the past researches on severe accident phenomena in LWR is presented within this study. Various complexes, physicochemical and radiological phenomena take place during various stages of the severe accidents of Light Water Reactor (LWR plants. The review deals with progression of the severe accidents phenomena by dividing into core degradation phenomena in reactor vessel and post core melt phenomena in the containment. The development of various computer codes to analyze these severe accidents phenomena is also summarized in the review. Lastly, the need of international activity is stressed to assemble various severe accidents related knowledge systematically from research organs and compile them on the open knowledge base via the internet to be available worldwide.

  17. Modelling and analysis of the behavior of LWRs at severe core accidents

    With respect to the assessment of the consequences of severe accidents in light water reactors from the initiation of the accident up to the thermal failure of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), a modular program system has been developed. Experimental results will be considered with respect to the modeling of the fuel rod behavior, e.g. deformation of the fuel rod, metal water reaction and the melting of the fuel rods. The fuel and core models allow to estimate the coolability of fuel rods and core as well as the consequences of core meltdown accidents at various pressure levels. After partial failure of the lower core retention structure, the core material will drop into the lower plenum and heat up the RPV. This strong interaction between the thermal behavior of the remaining core and the partially dropped core material has been modeled because of an accident sequence analysis. The analyses described here show, that not the entire core will fail, but a partial drop of core material into the lower plenum is likely to occur. With respect to the validation of the program system, comparison calculations with the fuel rod behavior and melt models SSYST and EXMEL will be performed. Moreover, the program system will be applied to the bundle behavior in meltdown experiments, the TMI-2 core behavior and the course of a core meltdown accident in risk studies. (orig.)

  18. Shipping container response to severe highway and railway accident conditions: Appendices

    Fischer, L.E.; Chou, C.K.; Gerhard, M.A.; Kimura, C.Y.; Martin, R.W.; Mensing, R.W.; Mount, M.E.; Witte, M.C.

    1987-02-01

    Volume 2 contains the following appendices: Severe accident data; truck accident data; railroad accident data; highway survey data and bridge column properties; structural analysis; thermal analysis; probability estimation techniques; and benchmarking for computer codes used in impact analysis. (LN)

  19. Shipping container response to severe highway and railway accident conditions: Appendices

    Volume 2 contains the following appendices: Severe accident data; truck accident data; railroad accident data; highway survey data and bridge column properties; structural analysis; thermal analysis; probability estimation techniques; and benchmarking for computer codes used in impact analysis. (LN)

  20. NASA Accident Precursor Analysis Handbook, Version 1.0

    Groen, Frank; Everett, Chris; Hall, Anthony; Insley, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Catastrophic accidents are usually preceded by precursory events that, although observable, are not recognized as harbingers of a tragedy until after the fact. In the nuclear industry, the Three Mile Island accident was preceded by at least two events portending the potential for severe consequences from an underappreciated causal mechanism. Anomalies whose failure mechanisms were integral to the losses of Space Transportation Systems (STS) Challenger and Columbia had been occurring within the STS fleet prior to those accidents. Both the Rogers Commission Report and the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report found that processes in place at the time did not respond to the prior anomalies in a way that shed light on their true risk implications. This includes the concern that, in the words of the NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP), "no process addresses the need to update a hazard analysis when anomalies occur" At a broader level, the ASAP noted in 2007 that NASA "could better gauge the likelihood of losses by developing leading indicators, rather than continue to depend on lagging indicators". These observations suggest a need to revalidate prior assumptions and conclusions of existing safety (and reliability) analyses, as well as to consider the potential for previously unrecognized accident scenarios, when unexpected or otherwise undesired behaviors of the system are observed. This need is also discussed in NASA's system safety handbook, which advocates a view of safety assurance as driving a program to take steps that are necessary to establish and maintain a valid and credible argument for the safety of its missions. It is the premise of this handbook that making cases for safety more experience-based allows NASA to be better informed about the safety performance of its systems, and will ultimately help it to manage safety in a more effective manner. The APA process described in this handbook provides a systematic means of analyzing candidate

  1. Analysis of severe accidents in the IIE - Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas

    The international trend on several accident analysis shows an overall emphasis on prevention, mitigation and management of severe accidents in nuclear power plants. Most of the developed countries have established policies and programs to deal with accidents beyond design basis. An encouraged participation in severe accidents analysis of the Latin American Countries operating commercial Nuclear Power Plants is forseen. The experience from probabilistic safety assessment, emergency operating procedures and best estimate codes for transient analysis, in order to develop analysis tools and knowledge that support the severe accident programs of the national nuclear power organizations. (author)

  2. Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRS - A Preliminary Systems Analysis

    Gilles Youinou; R. Sonat Sen

    2013-09-01

    The severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plants illustrates the need for continuous improvements through developing and implementing technologies that contribute to safe, reliable and cost-effective operation of the nuclear fleet. Development of enhanced accident tolerant fuel contributes to this effort. These fuels, in comparison with the standard zircaloy – UO2 system currently used by the LWR industry, should be designed such that they tolerate loss of active cooling in the core for a longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, and design-basis events. This report presents a preliminary systems analysis related to most of these concepts. The potential impacts of these innovative LWR fuels on the front-end of the fuel cycle, on the reactor operation and on the back-end of the fuel cycle are succinctly described without having the pretension of being exhaustive. Since the design of these various concepts is still a work in progress, this analysis can only be preliminary and could be updated as the designs converge on their respective final version.

  3. Accident Analysis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Polycube Stabilization Process

    The Polycube Stabilization Project involves low temperature oxidation, without combustion, of polystyrene cubes using the production muffle furnaces in Glovebox HC-21C located in the Remote Mechanical ''C'' (RMC) Line in Room 230A in the 234-52 Facility. Polycubes are polystyrene cubes containing various concentrations of plutonium and uranium oxides. Hundreds of these cubes were manufactured for criticality experiments, and currently exist as unstabilized storage forms at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). This project is designed to stabilize and prepare the polycube material for stable storage using a process very similar to the earlier processing of sludges in these furnaces. The significant difference is the quantity of hydrogenous material present, and the need to place additional controls on the heating rate of the material. This calculation note documents the analyses of the Representative Accidents identified in Section 2.4.4 of Hazards Analysis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Polycube Stabilization Process, HNF-7278 (HNF 2000). These two accidents, ''Deflagration in Glovebox HC-21C due to Loss of Power'' and ''Seismic Failure of Glovebox HC-21C'', will be further assessed in this accident analysis

  4. Power Excursion Accident Analysis of Research Water Reactor

    A three-dimensional neutronic code POWEX-K has been developed, and it has been coupled with the sub-channel thermal-hydraulic core analysis code SV based on the Single Mass Velocity Model. This forms the integrated neutronic/thermal hydraulics code system POWEX-K/SV for the accident analysis. The Training and Research Reactors at Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME-Reactor) has been taken as a reference reactor. The cross-section generation procedure based on WIMS. The code uses an implicit difference approach for both the diffusion equations and thermal-hydraulics modules, with reactivity feedback effects due to coolant and fuel temperatures. The code system was applied to analyzing power excursion accidents initiated by ramp reactivity insertion of 1.2 $. The results show that the reactor is inherently safe in case of such accidents i.e. no core melt is expected even if the safety rods do not fall into the core

  5. Investigation on Nodalization for Analysis of SFR Channel Blockage Accidents

    Chang, Won Pyo; Kwon, Young Min; Ha, Ki Suk; Lee, Kwi Lim; Jeong, Hae Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The present paper demonstrates nodalization analysis results obtained in application of the MATRA-LMR/FB to channel blockage accidents for a SFR (Sodium cooled Fast Reactor), KALIMER-150. In the earlier study, a uniform node size over the total sub-channel length in a subassembly was used. The study was carried out not only for the radially different positions, i.e. central, medium between the center and the duct wall, and edge sub-channels in the assembly, but also for larger blockage sizes larger than 6 sub-channels, the blockage size of which was classified into a DBE(Design Basis Event) in the KALIMER-150 design. The present investigation focuses mainly on the identification of conservatism as well as consistency in the analyses of the maximum coolant temperature for the 6 sub-channels blockage accidents

  6. Analysis of reactivity insertion accidents in PWR reactors

    A calculation model to analyze reactivity insertion accidents in a PWR reactor was developed. To analyze the nuclear power transient, the AIREK-III code was used, which simulates the conventional point-kinetic equations with six groups of delayed neutron precursors. Some modifications were made to generalize and to adapt the program to solve the proposed problems. A transient thermal analysis model was developed which simulates the heat transfer process in a cross section of a UO2 fuel rod with Zircalloy clad, a gap fullfilled with Helium gas and the correspondent coolant channel, using as input the nulcear power transient calculated by AIREK-III. The behavior of ANGRA-i reactor was analized during two types of accidents: - uncontrolled rod withdrawal from subcritical condition; - uncontrolled rod withdrawal at power. The results and conclusions obtained will be used in the license process of the Unit 1 of the Central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto. (Author)

  7. JCO criticality accident as POST-LOCA: Poor structure induced loss of organizational control accident

    Some problems in operation and business management of JCO (Japan Nuclear Fuel Conversion Co.) have been studied as background factors of the criticality accident. Open information about business conditions of JCO suggests that the cause of the accident is not so simple as to be attributed only to economic pressure, but includes immanent problems in JCO. We investigate the problems from five viewpoints, organization of safety management, system of operation management, activities for business improvement, risk awareness, and restructuring of business, and discuss the effects and causality of background factors as well as remedies for them. (author)

  8. Two serious accidents at the A-1 NPP. Analysis of the accidents the A-1 NPP

    In this presentation author describes the nuclear reactor A-1 in Jaslovske Bohunice (Slovakia). Author analyzes two reactor accidents which took off at this reactor. The first accident proceeded on January 5, 1976 during exchange of fuel elements when coolant - carbon dioxide - escaped. The second serious accident became on February 22, 1977 again during exchange of spent fuel elements. At this accident moderator - heavy water penetrated into the primary circuit of the reactor. Heavy water was subsequently removed from the reservoirs into the reserve tank in order not to leak out into the primary circuit. Inserting fuel element was melted. This accident was evaluated as grade 4 on seven-grade the international INES scale. A crash course and course parameters of the both accidents are analyzed.

  9. Analysis of Three Mile Island-Unit 2 accident

    1980-03-01

    The Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) of the Electric Power Research Institute has analyzed the Three Mile Island-2 accident. Early results of this analysis were a brief narrative summary, issued in mid-May 1979 and an initial version of this report issued later in 1979 as noted in the Foreword. The present report is a revised version of the 1979 report, containing summaries, a highly detailed sequence of events, a comparison of that sequence of events with those from other sources, 25 appendices, references and a list of abbreviations and acronyms. A matrix of equipment and system actions is included as a folded insert.

  10. Analysis of Three Mile Island-Unit 2 accident

    The Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) of the Electric Power Research Institute has analyzed the Three Mile Island-2 accident. Early results of this analysis were a brief narrative summary, issued in mid-May 1979 and an initial version of this report issued later in 1979 as noted in the Foreword. The present report is a revised version of the 1979 report, containing summaries, a highly detailed sequence of events, a comparison of that sequence of events with those from other sources, 25 appendices, references and a list of abbreviations and acronyms. A matrix of equipment and system actions is included as a folded insert

  11. Accident sequence precursor analysis level 2/3 model development

    Lui, C.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Galyean, W.J.; Brownson, D.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program currently uses simple Level 1 models to assess the conditional core damage probability for operational events occurring in commercial nuclear power plants (NPP). Since not all accident sequences leading to core damage will result in the same radiological consequences, it is necessary to develop simple Level 2/3 models that can be used to analyze the response of the NPP containment structure in the context of a core damage accident, estimate the magnitude of the resulting radioactive releases to the environment, and calculate the consequences associated with these releases. The simple Level 2/3 model development work was initiated in 1995, and several prototype models have been completed. Once developed, these simple Level 2/3 models are linked to the simple Level 1 models to provide risk perspectives for operational events. This paper describes the methods implemented for the development of these simple Level 2/3 ASP models, and the linkage process to the existing Level 1 models.

  12. Advanced accident sequence precursor analysis level 2 models

    Galyean, W.J.; Brownson, D.A.; Rempe, J.L. [and others

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Accident Sequence Precursor program pursues the ultimate objective of performing risk significant evaluations on operational events (precursors) occurring in commercial nuclear power plants. To achieve this objective, the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research is supporting the development of simple probabilistic risk assessment models for all commercial nuclear power plants (NPP) in the U.S. Presently, only simple Level 1 plant models have been developed which estimate core damage frequencies. In order to provide a true risk perspective, the consequences associated with postulated core damage accidents also need to be considered. With the objective of performing risk evaluations in an integrated and consistent manner, a linked event tree approach which propagates the front end results to back end was developed. This approach utilizes simple plant models that analyze the response of the NPP containment structure in the context of a core damage accident, estimate the magnitude and timing of a radioactive release to the environment, and calculate the consequences for a given release. Detailed models and results from previous studies, such as the NUREG-1150 study, are used to quantify these simple models. These simple models are then linked to the existing Level 1 models, and are evaluated using the SAPHIRE code. To demonstrate the approach, prototypic models have been developed for a boiling water reactor, Peach Bottom, and a pressurized water reactor, Zion.

  13. Core disruptive accident analysis using ASTERIA-FBR

    Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) is developing a core disruptive accident analysis code, ASTERIA-FBR, which tightly couples the thermal-hydraulics and the neutronics to simulate the core behavior during core disruptive accidents (CDA) of fast breeder reactors (FBRs). ASTERIA-FBR consists of the three-dimensional thermal-hydraulics calculation module: CONCORD, the fuel pin behavior calculation module: FEMAXI-FBR, and the space-time neutronics module: Dynamic-GMVP or PARTISN/RKIN. This paper describes a comparison between characteristics of GMVP and PARTISN and summarizes the challenging issues on applying Dynamic-GMVP to the calculation against unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) event which is a typical initiator of core disruptive accident of FBR. It was found that Dynamic-GMVP is confirmed to be basically applicable to the CDA phenomena. It was found that, however, applying GMVP to the CDA calculation is less reasonable than PARTISN since the calculation load of GMVP is too large to meet the required calculation accuracy, although the Monte-Carlo method is based on the actual neutron behavior without any discretization of space and energy. The statistical error included in the calculation results may affect the super-prompt criticality during ULOF event and thus the amount of released energy

  14. A human factor analysis of a radiotherapy accident

    Since September 2005, I.R.S.N. studies activities of radiotherapy treatment from the angle of the human and organizational factors to improve the reliability of treatment in radiotherapy. Experienced in nuclear industry incidents analysis, I.R.S.N. analysed and diffused in March 2008, for the first time in France, the detailed study of a radiotherapy accident from the angle of the human and organizational factors. The method used for analysis is based on interviews and documents kept by the hospital. This analysis aimed at identifying the causes of the difference recorded between the dose prescribed by the radiotherapist and the dose effectively received by the patient. Neither verbal nor written communication (intra-service meetings and protocols of treatment) allowed information to be transmitted correctly in order to permit radiographers to adjust the irradiation zones correctly. This analysis highlighted the fact that during the preparation and the carrying out of the treatment, various factors led planned controls to not be performed. Finally, this analysis highlighted the fact that unsolved areas persist in the report over this accident. This is due to a lack of traceability of a certain number of key actions. The article concluded that there must be improvement in three areas: cooperation between the practitioners, control of the actions and traceability of the actions. (author)

  15. Loss-of-coolant accident analysis of the Savannah River new production reactor design

    This document contains the loss-of-coolant accident analysis of the representative design for the Savannah River heavy water new production reactor. Included in this document are descriptions of the primary system, reactor vessel, and loss-of-coolant accident computer input models, the results of the cold leg and hot leg loss-of-coolant accident analyses, and the results of sensitivity calculations for the cold leg loss-of-coolant accident. 5 refs., 50 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Critical analysis of accident scenario and consequences modelling applied to light-water reactor power plants for accident categories beyond the design basis accident (DBA)

    A critical analysis and sensitivity study of the modelling of accident scenarios and environmental consequences are presented, for light-water reactor accident categories beyond the standard design-basis-accident category. The first chapter, on ''source term'' deals with the release of fission products from a damaged core inventory and their migration within the primary circuit and the reactor containment. Particular attention is given to the influence of engineering safeguards intervention and of the chemical forms of the released fission products. The second chapter deals with their release to the atmosphere, transport and wet or dry deposition, outlining relevant partial effects and confronting short-duration or prolonged releases. The third chapter presents a variability analysis, for environmental contamination levels, for two extreme hypothetical scenarios, evidencing the importance of plume rise. A numerical plume rise model is outlined

  17. Structural evaluation of electrosleeved tubes under severe accident transients

    A flow stress model was developed for predicting failure of Electrosleeved PWR steam generator tubing under severe accident transients. The Electrosleeve, which is nanocrystalline pure nickel, loses its strength at temperatures greater than 400 C during severe accidents because of grain growth. A grain growth model and the Hall-Petch relationship were used to calculate the loss of flow stress as a function of time and temperature during the accident. Available tensile test data as well as high temperature failure tests on notched Electrosleeved tube specimens were used to derive the basic parameters of the failure model. The model was used to predict the failure temperatures of Electrosleeved tubes with axial cracks in the parent tube during postulated severe accident transients

  18. The accident analysis in the framework of emergency provisions

    The first part of the report describes the demands on and bases of a reactor emergency plan and outlines the technical characteristics of a nuclear power plant with light-water moderated pressurized-water reactor with special regard to reactor safety. In the second part the failure and risk potentials of a pressurized-water plant are described and discussed. The third part is dedicated to a representation of the analytical method in a stricter sense, according to the current state of technology. Finally the current degree of effectiveness of the reactor accident analysis method is critically discussed and perspectives of future development are pointed out. (orig.)

  19. Source term analysis for a nuclear submarine accident

    A source term analysis has been conducted to determine the activity release into the environment as a result of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident aboard a visiting nuclear-powered submarine to a Canadian port. This best-estimate analysis considers the fractional release from the core, and fission product transport in the primary heat transport system, primary containment (i.e. reactor compartment) and submarine hull. Physical removal mechanisms such as vapour and aerosol deposition are treated in the calculation. Since a thermalhydraulic analysis indicated that the integrity of the reactor compartment is maintained, release from the reactor compartment will only occur by leakage; however, it is conservatively assumed that the secondary containment is not isolated for a 24-h period where release occurs through an open hatch in the submarine hull. Consequently, during this period, the activity release into the atmosphere is estimated as 4.6 TBq, leading to a maximum individual dose equivalent of 0.5 mSv at 800 metres from the berthing location. This activity release is comparable to that obtained in the BEREX TSA study (for a similar accident scenario) but is four orders of magnitude less than that reported in the earlier Davis study where, unrealistically, no credit had been taken for the containment system or for any physical removal processes. (author)

  20. Accident consequence calculations for project W-058 safety analysis

    Accident consequence analyses have been performed for Project W-058, the Replacement Cross Site Transfer System. using the assumption and analysis techniques developed for the Tank Remediation Waste system Basis for Interim Operation. most potential accident involving the FISTS are bounded by the TWRS BIO analysis. However, the spray leak and pool leak scenarios require revised analyses since the RCSTS design utilizes larger diameter pipe and higher pressures than those analyzed in the TWRS BIO. Also the volume of diversion box and vent station are larger than that assumed for the valve pits in the TWRS BIO, which effects results of sprays or spills into the pits. the revised analysis for the spray leak is presented in Section 2, for the above ground spill in Section 3, for the presented in Section 2, for the above ground spill in Section 3, for the subsurface spill forming a pool in Section 4, and for the subsurface pool remaining subsurface in Section 5. The conclusion from these sections are summarized below

  1. Extension of ship accident analysis to multiple-package shipments

    Severe ship accidents and the probability of radioactive material release from spent reactor fuel casks were investigated previously (Spring, 1995). Other forms of RAM, e.g., plutonium oxide powder, may be shipped in large numbers of packagings rather than in one to a few casks. These smaller, more numerous packagings are typically placed in ISO containers for ease of handling, and several ISO containers may be placed in one of several holds of a cargo ship. In such cases, the size of a radioactive release resulting from a severe collision with another ship is determined not by the likelihood of compromising a single, robust package but by the probability that a certain fraction of 10's or 100's of individual packagings is compromised. The previous analysis (Spring, 1995) involved a statistical estimation of the frequency of accidents which would result in damage to a cask located in one of seven cargo holds in a collision with another ship. The results were obtained in the form of probabilities (frequencies) of accidents of increasing severity and of release fractions for each level of severity. This paper describes an extension of the same general method in which the multiple packages are assumed to be compacted by an intruding ship's bow until there is no free space in the hold. At such a point, the remaining energy of the colliding ship is assumed to be dissipated by progressively crushing the RAM packagings and the probability of a particular fraction of package failures is estimated by adaptation of the statistical method used previously. The parameters of a common, well-characterized packaging, the 6M with 2R inner containment vessel, were employed as an illustrative example of this analysis method. However, the method is readily applicable to other packagings for which crush strengths have been measured or can be estimated with satisfactory confidence. (authors)

  2. A general approach to critical infrastructure accident consequences analysis

    Bogalecka, Magda; Kołowrocki, Krzysztof; Soszyńska-Budny, Joanna

    2016-06-01

    The probabilistic general model of critical infrastructure accident consequences including the process of the models of initiating events generated by its accident, the process of environment threats and the process of environment degradation is presented.

  3. Thermohydraulic and Safety Analysis for CARR Under Station Blackout Accident

    A thermohydraulic and safety analysis code (TSACC) has been developed using Fortran 90 language to evaluate the transient thermohydraulic behaviors and safety characteristics of the China Advanced Research Reactor(CARR) under Station Blackout Accident(SBA). For the development of TSACC, a series of corresponding mathematical and physical models were considered. Point reactor neutron kinetics model was adopted for solving reactor power. All possible flow and heat transfer conditions under station blackout accident were considered and the optional models were supplied. The usual Finite Difference Method (FDM) was abandoned and a new model was adopted to evaluate the temperature field of core plate type fuel element. A new simple and convenient equation was proposed for the resolution of the transient behaviors of the main pump instead of the complicated four-quadrant model. Gear method and Adams method were adopted alternately for a better solution to the stiff differential equations describing the dynamic behaviors of the CARR. The computational result of TSACC showed the enough safety margin of CARR under SBA. For the purpose of Verification and Validation (V and V), the simulated results of TSACC were compared with those of Relap5/Mdo3. The V and V result indicated a good agreement between the results by the two codes. Because of the adoption of modular programming techniques, this analysis code is expected to be applied to other reactors by easily modifying the corresponding function modules. (authors)

  4. PERSPECTIVES ON A DOE CONSEQUENCE INPUTS FOR ACCIDENT ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS

    (NOEMAIL), K; Jonathan Lowrie, J; David Thoman (NOEMAIL), D; Austin Keller (NOEMAIL), A

    2008-07-30

    Department of Energy (DOE) accident analysis for establishing the required control sets for nuclear facility safety applies a series of simplifying, reasonably conservative assumptions regarding inputs and methodologies for quantifying dose consequences. Most of the analytical practices are conservative, have a technical basis, and are based on regulatory precedent. However, others are judgmental and based on older understanding of phenomenology. The latter type of practices can be found in modeling hypothetical releases into the atmosphere and the subsequent exposure. Often the judgments applied are not based on current technical understanding but on work that has been superseded. The objective of this paper is to review the technical basis for the major inputs and assumptions in the quantification of consequence estimates supporting DOE accident analysis, and to identify those that could be reassessed in light of current understanding of atmospheric dispersion and radiological exposure. Inputs and assumptions of interest include: Meteorological data basis; Breathing rate; and Inhalation dose conversion factor. A simple dose calculation is provided to show the relative difference achieved by improving the technical bases.

  5. Offsite radiological consequence analysis for the bounding aircraft crash accident

    The purpose of this calculation note is to quantitatively analyze a bounding aircraft crash accident for comparison to the DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', Appendix A, Evaluation Guideline of 25 rem. The potential of aircraft impacting a facility was evaluated using the approach given in DOE-STD-3014-96, ''Accident Analysis for Aircraft Crash into Hazardous Facilities''. The following aircraft crash FR-equencies were determined for the Tank Farms in RPP-11736, ''Assessment Of Aircraft Crash FR-equency For The Hanford Site 200 Area Tank Farms'': (1) The total aircraft crash FR-equency is ''extremely unlikely.'' (2) The general aviation crash FR-equency is ''extremely unlikely.'' (3) The helicopter crash FR-equency is ''beyond extremely unlikely.'' (4) For the Hanford Site 200 Areas, other aircraft type, commercial or military, each above ground facility, and any other type of underground facility is ''beyond extremely unlikely.'' As the potential of aircraft crash into the 200 Area tank farms is more FR-equent than ''beyond extremely unlikely,'' consequence analysis of the aircraft crash is required

  6. Accidents in the construction industry in the Netherlands: An analysis of accident reports using Storybuilder

    As part of an ongoing effort by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment of the Netherlands, a research project is being undertaken to construct a causal model for occupational risk. This model should provide quantitative insight into the causes and consequences of occupational accidents. One of the components of the model is a tool to systematically classify and analyse reports of past accidents. This tool 'Storybuilder' was described in earlier papers. In this paper, Storybuilder is used to analyse the causes of accidents reported in the database of the Dutch Labour Inspectorate involving people working in the construction industry. Conclusions are drawn on measures to reduce the accident probability. Some of these conclusions are contrary to common beliefs in the industry

  7. Large LOCA accident analysis for AP1000 under earthquake

    Highlights: • Seismic failure event probability is induced by uncertainties in PGA and in Am. • Uncertainty in PGA is shared by all the components at the same place. • Relativity induced by sharing PGA value can be analyzed explicitly by MC method. • Multi components failures and accident sequences will occur under high PGA value. - Abstract: Seismic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is developed to give the insight of nuclear power plant risk under earthquake and the main contributors to the risk. However, component failure probability including the initial event frequency is the function of peak ground acceleration (PGA), and all the components especially the different kinds of components at same place will share the common ground shaking, which is one of the important factors to influence the result. In this paper, we propose an analysis method based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulation in which the effect of all components sharing the same PGA level can be expressed by explicit pattern. The Large LOCA accident in AP1000 is analyzed as an example, based on the seismic hazard curve used in this paper, the core damage frequency is almost equal to the initial event frequency, moreover the frequency of each accident sequence is close to and even equal to the initial event frequency, while the main contributors are seismic events since multi components and systems failures will happen simultaneously when a high value of PGA is sampled. The component failure probability is determined by uncertainties in PGA and in component seismic capacity, and the former is the crucial element to influence the result

  8. Application of probabilistic safety assessment in CPR1000 severe accident prevention and mitigation analysis

    The relationship between probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) and severe accident study was discussed. Also how to apply PSA in severe accident prevention and mitigation was elaborated. PSA can find the plant vulnerabilities of severe accidents prevention and mitigation. Some modifications or improvements focusing on these vulnerabilities can be put forward. PSA also can assess the efficient of these actions for decision-making. According to CPR1000 unit severe accident analysis, an example for the process and method on how to use PSA to enhance the ability to deal with severe accident prevention and mitigation was set forth. (authors)

  9. An analysis of LOCA sequences in the development of severe accident analysis DB

    Although a Level 2 PSA was performed for the Korean Standard Power Plants (KSNPs), and it considered the necessary sequences for an assessment of the containment integrity and source term analysis. In terms of an accident management, however, more cases causing severe core damage need to be analyzed and arranged systematically for an easy access to the results. At present, KAERI is calculating the severe accident sequences intensively for various initiating events and generating a database for the accident progression including thermal hydraulic and source term behaviours. The developed Database (DB) system includes a graphical display for a plant and equipment status, previous research results by knowledge-base technique, and the expected plant behaviour. The plant model used in this paper is oriented to the case of LOCAs related severe accident phenomena and thus can simulate the plant behaviours for a severe accident. Therefore the developed system may play a central role as an information source for decision-making for a severe accident management, and will be used as a training simulator for a severe accident management. (author)

  10. Decontamination analysis of the NUWAX-83 accident site using DECON

    Tawil, J.J.

    1983-11-01

    This report presents an analysis of the site restoration options for the NUWAX-83 site, at which an exercise was conducted involving a simulated nuclear weapons accident. This analysis was performed using a computer program deveoped by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The computer program, called DECON, was designed to assist personnel engaged in the planning of decontamination activities. The many features of DECON that are used in this report demonstrate its potential usefulness as a site restoration planning tool. Strategies that are analyzed with DECON include: (1) employing a Quick-Vac option, under which selected surfaces are vacuumed before they can be rained on; (2) protecting surfaces against precipitation; (3) prohibiting specific operations on selected surfaces; (4) requiring specific methods to be used on selected surfaces; (5) evaluating the trade-off between cleanup standards and decontamination costs; and (6) varying of the cleanup standards according to expected exposure to surface.

  11. Decontamination analysis of the NUWAX-83 accident site using DECON

    This report presents an analysis of the site restoration options for the NUWAX-83 site, at which an exercise was conducted involving a simulated nuclear weapons accident. This analysis was performed using a computer program deveoped by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The computer program, called DECON, was designed to assist personnel engaged in the planning of decontamination activities. The many features of DECON that are used in this report demonstrate its potential usefulness as a site restoration planning tool. Strategies that are analyzed with DECON include: (1) employing a Quick-Vac option, under which selected surfaces are vacuumed before they can be rained on; (2) protecting surfaces against precipitation; (3) prohibiting specific operations on selected surfaces; (4) requiring specific methods to be used on selected surfaces; (5) evaluating the trade-off between cleanup standards and decontamination costs; and (6) varying of the cleanup standards according to expected exposure to surface

  12. Analysis of surface powered haulage accidents, January 1990--July 1996

    Fesak, G.M.; Breland, R.M.; Spadaro, J. [Dept. of Labor, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This report addresses surface haulage accidents that occurred between January 1990 and July 1996 involving haulage trucks (including over-the-road trucks), front-end-loaders, scrapers, utility trucks, water trucks, and other mobile haulage equipment. The study includes quarries, open pits and surface coal mines utilizing self-propelled mobile equipment to transport personnel, supplies, rock, overburden material, ore, mine waste, or coal for processing. A total of 4,397 accidents were considered. This report summarizes the major factors that led to the accidents and recommends accident prevention methods to reduce the frequency of these accidents.

  13. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis

    This report is a revision of NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990), Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis. This revision has been made to incorporate changes to the Health Effects Models recommended in two addenda to the NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 11, 1989 report. The first of these addenda provided recommended changes to the health effects models for low-LET radiations based on recent reports from UNSCEAR, ICRP and NAS/NRC (BEIR V). The second addendum presented changes needed to incorporate alpha-emitting radionuclides into the accident exposure source term. As in the earlier version of this report, models are provided for early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating the risks of seven types of cancer in adults - leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and ''other''. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Five classes of genetic diseases -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocations, and multifactorial diseases are also considered. Data are provided that should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk

  14. An Accident Precursor Analysis Process Tailored for NASA Space Systems

    Groen, Frank; Stamatelatos, Michael; Dezfuli, Homayoon; Maggio, Gaspare

    2010-01-01

    Accident Precursor Analysis (APA) serves as the bridge between existing risk modeling activities, which are often based on historical or generic failure statistics, and system anomalies, which provide crucial information about the failure mechanisms that are actually operative in the system and which may differ in frequency or type from those in the various models. These discrepancies between the models (perceived risk) and the system (actual risk) provide the leading indication of an underappreciated risk. This paper presents an APA process developed specifically for NASA Earth-to-Orbit space systems. The purpose of the process is to identify and characterize potential sources of system risk as evidenced by anomalous events which, although not necessarily presenting an immediate safety impact, may indicate that an unknown or insufficiently understood risk-significant condition exists in the system. Such anomalous events are considered accident precursors because they signal the potential for severe consequences that may occur in the future, due to causes that are discernible from their occurrence today. Their early identification allows them to be integrated into the overall system risk model used to intbrm decisions relating to safety.

  15. Health effects estimation code development for accident consequence analysis

    As part of a computer code system for nuclear reactor accident consequence analysis, two computer codes have been developed for estimating health effects expected to occur following an accident. Health effects models used in the codes are based on the models of NUREG/CR-4214 and are revised for the Japanese population on the basis of the data from the reassessment of the radiation dosimetry and information derived from epidemiological studies on atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The health effects models include early and continuing effects, late somatic effects and genetic effects. The values of some model parameters are revised for early mortality. The models are modified for predicting late somatic effects such as leukemia and various kinds of cancers. The models for genetic effects are the same as those of NUREG. In order to test the performance of one of these codes, it is applied to the U.S. and Japanese populations. This paper provides descriptions of health effects models used in the two codes and gives comparisons of the mortality risks from each type of cancer for the two populations. (author)

  16. Improvement of severe accident analysis method for KSNP

    Park, Jae Hong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Song Won; Cho, Youn Soo [Korea Radiation Technology Institute Co., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    The objective of this study is preparation of MELCOR 1.8.5 input deck for KSNP and simulation of some major severe accidents. The contents of this project are preparation of MELCOR 1.8.5 base input deck for KSNP to understand severe accident phenomena and to assess severe accident strategy, preparation of 20 cell containment input deck to simulate the distribution of hydrogen and fission products in containment, simulation of some major severe accident scenarios such as TLOFW, SBO, SBLOCA, MBLOCA, and LBLOCA. The method for MELCOR 1.8.5 input deck preparation can be used to prepare the input deck for domestic PWRs and to simulate severe accident experiments such as ISP-46. Information gained from analyses of severe accidents may be helpful to set up the severe accident management strategy and to develop regulatory guidance.

  17. Analysis of containment pressure and temperature changes following loss of coolant accident (LOCA)

    This paper present a preliminary thermal-hydraulics analysis of AP1000 containment following loss of coolant accident events such as double-end cold line break (DECLB) or main steam line break (MSLB) using MELCOR code. A break of this type will produce a rapid depressurization of the reactor pressure vessel (primary system) and release initially high pressure water into the containment followed by a much smaller release of highly superheated steam. The high pressure liquid water will flash and rapidly pressurize the containment building. The performance of passive containment cooling system for steam removal by condensation on large steel containment structure is a major contributing process, controlling the pressure and temperature maximum reached during the accident event. The results are analyzed, discussed and compared with the similar work done by Sandia National Laboratories. (author)

  18. Severe accident analysis of a small LOCA accident using MAAP-CANDU support level 2 PSA for the Point Lepreau station refurbishment project

    A Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment was performed for the Point Lepreau Generating Station. The MAAP4-CANDU code was used to calculate the progression of postulated severe core damage accidents and fission product releases. Five representative severe core damage accidents were selected: Station Blackout, Small Loss-of-Coolant Accident, Stagnation Feeder Break, Steam Generator Tube Rupture, and Shutdown State Accident. Analysis results for only the reference Small LOCA Accident scenario (which is a very low probability event) are discussed in this paper. (author)

  19. Summary of the SRS Severe Accident Analysis Program, 1987--1992

    The Severe Accident Analysis Program (SAAP) is a program of experimental and analytical studies aimed at characterizing severe accidents that might occur in the Savannah River Site Production Reactors. The goals of the Severe Accident Analysis Program are: To develop an understanding of severe accidents in SRS reactors that is adequate to support safety documentation for these reactors, including the Safety Analysis Report (SAR), the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and other studies evaluating the safety of reactor operation; To provide tools and bases for the evaluation of existing or proposed safety related equipment in the SRS reactors; To provide bases for the development of accident management procedures for the SRS reactors; To develop and maintain on the site a sufficient body of knowledge, including documents, computer codes, and cognizant engineers and scientists, that can be used to authoritatively resolve questions or issues related to reactor accidents. The Severe Accident Analysis Program was instituted in 1987 and has already produced a substantial amount of information, and specialized calculational tools. Products of the Severe Accident Analysis Program (listed in Section 9 of this report) have been used in the development of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and in the development of technical specifications for the SRS reactors. A staff of about seven people is currently involved directly in the program and in providing input on severe accidents to other SRS activities

  20. Summary of the SRS Severe Accident Analysis Program, 1987--1992

    Long, T.A.; Hyder, M.L.; Britt, T.E.; Allison, D.K.; Chow, S.; Graves, R.D.; DeWald, A.B. Jr.; Monson, P.R. Jr.; Wooten, L.A.

    1992-11-01

    The Severe Accident Analysis Program (SAAP) is a program of experimental and analytical studies aimed at characterizing severe accidents that might occur in the Savannah River Site Production Reactors. The goals of the Severe Accident Analysis Program are: To develop an understanding of severe accidents in SRS reactors that is adequate to support safety documentation for these reactors, including the Safety Analysis Report (SAR), the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and other studies evaluating the safety of reactor operation; To provide tools and bases for the evaluation of existing or proposed safety related equipment in the SRS reactors; To provide bases for the development of accident management procedures for the SRS reactors; To develop and maintain on the site a sufficient body of knowledge, including documents, computer codes, and cognizant engineers and scientists, that can be used to authoritatively resolve questions or issues related to reactor accidents. The Severe Accident Analysis Program was instituted in 1987 and has already produced a substantial amount of information, and specialized calculational tools. Products of the Severe Accident Analysis Program (listed in Section 9 of this report) have been used in the development of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and in the development of technical specifications for the SRS reactors. A staff of about seven people is currently involved directly in the program and in providing input on severe accidents to other SRS activities.

  1. Main aspects of the design of a support structure of a LMFBR with particular reference to the explosive accident consequences

    The aim of this paper is a review of the main aspects of the design of a support structure of a LMFBR tank, with particular reference to the analysis of the non-linear dynamic behavior of the structure in the plastic range under the effect of an explosive accident within the tank. The structure is composed by a L-shaped flange, which supports the tank, connected by means of nine square beams to a rigid box-type ring, fixed to the concrete. The plug of the tank is connected to the L-shaped flange by means of a group of SS bars. The non-linear dynamic analysis of the explosive accident has been carried out on a lumped mass model, with elastic-plastic elements which simulate main components of the support structure and tank. The impulsive load connected to the explosive accident has been modelled (on the basis of extensive comparative studies carried out) as two triangular pressure impulses has been the object of a parametric evaluation. The dynamic transient on the support structure during and after the explosive accident for each couple of pressure impulses has been analyzed by means of modified version of the NON SAP code running on a CDC 7600 computer. A large amount of results, which describe displacements, velocities and accelerations of the plug, of the tank, and of the support structure, together with the forces and stresses acting on the main structural components are presented and discussed, with particular reference to the influence of the various parameters involved in the analysis

  2. Hypothetical accident conditions thermal analysis of the 5320 package

    An axisymmetric model of the 5320 package was created to perform hypothetical accident conditions (HAC) thermal calculations. The analyses assume the 5320 package contains 359 grams of plutonium-238 (203 Watts) in the form of an oxide powder at a minimum density of 2.4 g/cc or at a maximum density of 11.2 g/cc. The solution from a non-solar 100 F ambient steady-state analysis was used as the initial conditions for the fire transient. A 30 minute 1,475 F fire transient followed by cooling via natural convection and thermal radiation to a 100 F non-solar environment was analyzed to determine peak component temperatures and vessel pressures. The 5320 package was considered to be horizontally suspended within the fire during the entire transient

  3. Aircraft Accident Prevention: Loss-of-Control Analysis

    Kwatny, Harry G.; Dongmo, Jean-Etienne T.; Chang, Bor-Chin; Bajpai, Guarav; Yasar, Murat; Belcastro, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    The majority of fatal aircraft accidents are associated with loss-of-control . Yet the notion of loss-of-control is not well-defined in terms suitable for rigorous control systems analysis. Loss-of-control is generally associated with flight outside of the normal flight envelope, with nonlinear influences, and with an inability of the pilot to control the aircraft. The two primary sources of nonlinearity are the intrinsic nonlinear dynamics of the aircraft and the state and control constraints within which the aircraft must operate. In this paper we examine how these nonlinearities affect the ability to control the aircraft and how they may contribute to loss-of-control. Examples are provided using NASA s Generic Transport Model.

  4. Radionuclide analysis on bamboos following the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Takumi Higaki

    Full Text Available In response to contamination from the recent Fukushima nuclear accident, we conducted radionuclide analysis on bamboos sampled from six sites within a 25 to 980 km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Maximum activity concentrations of radiocesium (134Cs and (137Cs in samples from Fukushima city, 65 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi plant, were in excess of 71 and 79 kBq/kg, dry weight (DW, respectively. In Kashiwa city, 195 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi, the sample concentrations were in excess of 3.4 and 4.3 kBq/kg DW, respectively. In Toyohashi city, 440 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi, the concentrations were below the measurable limits of up to 4.5 Bq/kg DW. In the radiocesium contaminated samples, the radiocesium activity was higher in mature and fallen leaves than in young leaves, branches and culms.

  5. Advanced accident sequence precursor analysis level 1 models

    Sattison, M.B.; Thatcher, T.A.; Knudsen, J.K.; Schroeder, J.A.; Siu, N.O. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-03-01

    INEL has been involved in the development of plant-specific Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) models for the past two years. These models were developed for use with the SAPHIRE suite of PRA computer codes. They contained event tree/linked fault tree Level 1 risk models for the following initiating events: general transient, loss-of-offsite-power, steam generator tube rupture, small loss-of-coolant-accident, and anticipated transient without scram. Early in 1995 the ASP models were revised based on review comments from the NRC and an independent peer review. These models were released as Revision 1. The Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research has sponsored several projects at the INEL this fiscal year to further enhance the capabilities of the ASP models. Revision 2 models incorporates more detailed plant information into the models concerning plant response to station blackout conditions, information on battery life, and other unique features gleaned from an Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation quick review of the Individual Plant Examination submittals. These models are currently being delivered to the NRC as they are completed. A related project is a feasibility study and model development of low power/shutdown (LP/SD) and external event extensions to the ASP models. This project will establish criteria for selection of LP/SD and external initiator operational events for analysis within the ASP program. Prototype models for each pertinent initiating event (loss of shutdown cooling, loss of inventory control, fire, flood, seismic, etc.) will be developed. A third project concerns development of enhancements to SAPHIRE. In relation to the ASP program, a new SAPHIRE module, GEM, was developed as a specific user interface for performing ASP evaluations. This module greatly simplifies the analysis process for determining the conditional core damage probability for a given combination of initiating events and equipment failures or degradations.

  6. Analysis of Radiation Accident of Non-destructive Inspection and Rational Preparing Bills

    After 2006, according to enactment of Non-destructive Inspection Promotion Act, the number of non-destructive inspection companies and corresponding accident is increased sharply. In this research, it includes characteristic analysis of field of the non-destructive inspection. And from the result of analysis, the purpose of this research is discovering reason for 'Why there is higher accident ratio in non-destructive inspection field, relatively' and preparing effective bill for reducing radiation accidents. The number of worker for non-destructive inspect is increased steadily and non-destructive inspect worker take highest dose. Corresponding to these, it must be needed to prepare bills to protect non-destructive inspect workers. By analysis of accident case, there are many case of carelessness that tools are too heavy to carry it everywhere workers go. And there are some cases caused by deficiency of education that less understanding of radiation and poor operation by less understanding of structure of tools. Also, there is no data specialized to non-destructive inspect field. So, it has to take information from statistical data. Because of this, it is hard to analyze nondestructive inspect field accurately. So, it is required to; preparing rational bills to protect non-destructive inspect workers nondestructive inspect instrument lightening and easy manual which can understandable for low education background people accurate survey data from real worker. To accomplish these, we needs to do; analyze and comprehend the present law about non-destructive inspect worker understand non-destructive inspect instruments accurately and conduct research for developing material developing rational survey to measuring real condition for non-destructive inspect workers

  7. Analysis of accidents at the LPR (Radiochemical Processes Laboratory)

    Accidents are defined as not planned events that may result in the emission of significative quantities of radioactive materials to the environment. The pilot plant has been specifically designed to prevent this type of accidents but there still exists the possibility that one or more accidents can be produced during the plant life. In a first phase, the emission of radionuclides to the environment were evaluated for 13 credible accidents. In a second phase, by means of the calculation program SEDA, specially adapted to this purpose, the critical doses of critical group were calculated for each accident. Due to the small capacity of the pilot plant and the long cooling period of treated fuel, it is concluded that the radiological consequences for the external environment are of very small magnitude. In this way, without need of developing complex fault- or event-trees, it is shown that any of the accidents falls into the non acceptable zone of Farmer diagram. (Author)

  8. Accident Analysis and Barrier Function (AEB) Method. Manual for Incident Analysis

    The Accident Analysis and Barrier Function (AEB) Method models an accident or incident as a series of interactions between human and technical systems. In the sequence of human and technical errors leading to an accident there is, in principle, a possibility to arrest the development between each two successive errors. This can be done by a barrier function which, for example, can stop an operator from making an error. A barrier function can be performed by one or several barrier function systems. To illustrate, a mechanical system, a computer system or another operator can all perform a given barrier function to stop an operator from making an error. The barrier function analysis consists of analysis of suggested improvements, the effectiveness of the improvements, the costs of implementation, probability of implementation, the cost of maintaining the barrier function, the probability that maintenance will be kept up to standards and the generalizability of the suggested improvement. The AEB method is similar to the US method called HPES, but differs from that method in different ways. To exemplify, the AEB method has more emphasis on technical errors than HPES. In contrast to HPES that describes a series of events, the AEB method models only errors. This gives a more focused analysis making it well suited for checking other HPES-type accident analyses. However, the AEB method is a generic and stand-alone method that has been applied in other fields than nuclear power, such as, in traffic accident analyses

  9. Modelling and analysis of severe accidents for VVER-1000 reactors

    Tusheva, Polina

    2013-01-01

    Accident conditions involving significant core degradation are termed severe accidents /IAEA: NS-G-2.15/. Despite the low probability of occurrence of such events, the investigation of severe accident scenarios is an important part of the nuclear safety research. Considering a hypothetical core melt down scenario in a VVER-1000 light water reactor, the early in-vessel phase focusing on the thermal-hydraulic phenomena, and the late in-vessel phase focusing on the melt relocation into the re...

  10. Accident sequence precursor analysis of Daya Bay and Ling'ao nuclear power plants

    The accident sequence precursor analysis method was adopted to evaluate the events of Daya Bay and Ling'ao Nuclear Power Plants, and some risk significant events which are called the accident sequence precursor were identified. By the statistics, classification and trend analysis, some useful insight can be obtained to support the nuclear safety management for the nuclear power plant. (authors)

  11. A structured approach to individual plant evaluation and accident management

    The need for long term development of accident management programs is acknowledged and the key tool for that development is identified as the IPE Program. The Edison commitment to build an integrated program is cited and the effect on the IPE effort is considered. Edison's integrated program is discussed in detail. The key benefits, realism and long term savings, are discussed. Some of the highly visible products such as neural network artificial intelligence systems are cited

  12. ANALYSIS OF THE ACCIDENTS OF THE CAR MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

    J.Adl ; Z. Mohammad zade

    1993-08-01

    Full Text Available Car manufacturing industry accident’s rates from three major companies are analyzed. Totally 1325 accidents with 4 cases of fatality were recorded. Accident rates per 100 full-time workers have gradually increased from 5.3 to 8.7 during 3 years of study. Most of the accidents occurred during the primary hours of the work, Strains and sprains represented the most frequently occurring type of injury, accounting for 37.9% and the greatest number of injuries occurred by flying particles (3 1.6%, resulting in eye injuries. Other aspects of accidents in this industry are discussed and recommendations are given for their prevention.

  13. Initial event analysis of the Fukushima Daiichi accident

    The objective of this study is to investigate the initial event of the Fukushima Daiichi accident and to check the validity of the counter measures against the accident. We analyzed the initial event of the Fukushima Daiichi accident for Unit-1, 2 and 3 plants by RELAP5 code and compared with the actual plant data. The parametric study about the operation of the isolation condenser (IC), the reactor core isolation cooling system (RCIC) and the high pressure core injection system (HPCI) was also done to understand the accident progression. (author)

  14. Analysis on relation between safety input and accidents

    YAO Qing-guo; ZHANG Xue-mu; LI Chun-hui

    2007-01-01

    The number of safety input directly determines the level of safety, and there exists dialectical and unified relations between safety input and accidents. Based on the field investigation and reliable data, this paper deeply studied the dialectical relationship between safety input and accidents, and acquired the conclusions. The security situation of the coal enterprises was related to the security input rate, being effected little by the security input scale, and build the relationship model between safety input and accidents on this basis, that is the accident model.

  15. Strategy for the Development of Severe Accident Analysis Technology

    To ensure the safety of people living near the nuclear power plants during the postulated events of severe accidents, a severe accident management strategy is prepared for the operating reactors and dedicated engineered features for the severe accidents are under research and development for the new reactors, such as GEN-III reactors. To accomplish these tasks, not only a proper understanding of fundamental physics of severe accident phenomena but also reliable computer codes for analyzing the severe accident phenomena is very necessary. This report deals with a strategic plan for a development and provision of computer code system for analyzing the severe accidents. This reports includes a summary of major phenomena of severe accidents, an peer review of the computer codes for analyzing the integral behavior of severe accident scenario and computer codes for analyzing the specific phenomena. Finally, a strategic plan for an equipment of severe accident computer codes either by use of already available computer codes or a development of our own computer codes, which could be competitive with world class foreign computer codes

  16. Database structure for the Laser Accident and Incident Registry (LAIR)

    Ness, James W.; Hoxie, Stephen W.; Zwick, Harry; Stuck, Bruce E.; Lund, David J.; Schmeisser, Elmar T.

    1997-05-01

    The ubiquity of laser radiation in military, medical, entertainment, telecommunications and research industries and the significant risk, of eye injury from this radiation are firmly established. While important advances have been made in understanding laser bioeffects using animal analogues and clinical data, the relationships among patient characteristics, exposure conditions, severity of the resulting injury, and visual function are fragmented, complex and varied. Although accident cases are minimized through laser safety regulations and control procedures, accumulated accident case information by the laser eye injury evaluation center warranted the development of a laser accident and incident registry. The registry includes clinical data for validating and refining hypotheses on injury and recovery mechanisms; a means for analyzing mechanisms unique to human injury; and a means for identifying future areas of investigation. The relational database supports three major sections: (1) the physics section defines exposure circumstances, (2) the clinical/ophthalmologic section includes fundus and scanning laser ophthalmoscope images, and (3) the visual functions section contains specialized visual function exam results. Tools are available for subject-matter experts to estimate parameters like total intraocular energy, ophthalmic lesion grade, and exposure probability. The database is research oriented to provide a means for generating empirical relationships to identify symptoms for definitive diagnosis and treatment of laser induced eye injuries.

  17. Exploring the potential of data mining techniques for the analysis of accident patterns

    Prato, Carlo Giacomo; Bekhor, Shlomo; Galtzur, Ayelet;

    2010-01-01

    Research in road safety faces major challenges: individuation of the most significant determinants of traffic accidents, recognition of the most recurrent accident patterns, and allocation of resources necessary to address the most relevant issues. This paper intends to comprehend which data mining...... association rules) data mining techniques are implemented for the analysis of traffic accidents occurred in Israel between 2001 and 2004. Results show that descriptive techniques are useful to classify the large amount of analyzed accidents, even though introduce problems with respect to the clear...... importance of input and intermediate neurons, and the relative importance of hundreds of association rules. Further research should investigate whether limiting the analysis to fatal accidents would simplify the task of data mining techniques in recognizing accident patterns without the “noise” probably...

  18. Preliminary analysis of loss-of-coolant accident in Fukushima nuclear accident

    Su'ud, Zaki; Anshari, Rio

    2012-06-01

    Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) especially on Fukushima Nuclear Accident will be discussed in this paper. The Tohoku earthquake triggered the shutdown of nuclear power reactors at Fukushima Nuclear Power station. Though shutdown process has been completely performed, cooling process, at much smaller level than in normal operation, is needed to remove decay heat from the reactor core until the reactor reach cold-shutdown condition. If LOCA happen at this condition, it will cause the increase of reactor fuel and other core temperatures and can lead to reactor core meltdown and exposure of radioactive material to the environment such as in the Fukushima Dai Ichi nuclear accident case. In this study numerical simulation has been performed to calculate pressure composition, water level and temperature distribution on reactor during this accident. There are two coolant regulating system that operational on reactor unit 1 at this accident, Isolation Condensers (IC) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV) system. Average mass flow of steam to the IC system in this event is 10 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 3,2 hours and fully uncovered in 4,7 hours later. There are two coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 2, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) System and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of coolant that correspond this event is 20 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 73 hours and fully uncovered in 75 hours later. There are three coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 3, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) system, High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of water that correspond this event is 15 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 37 hours and fully uncovered in 40 hours later.

  19. Development status of Severe Accident Analysis Code SAMPSON

    Iwashita, Tsuyoshi; Ujita, Hiroshi [Advanced Simulation Systems Department, Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    The Four years of the IMPACT, 'Integrated Modular Plant Analysis and Computing Technology' project Phase 1 have been completed. The verification study of Severe Accident Analysis Code SAMPSON prototype developed in Phase 1 was conducted in two steps. First, each analysis module was run independently and analysis results were compared and verified against separate-effect test data with good results. Test data are as follows: CORA-13 (FZK) for the Core Heat-up Module; VI-3 of HI/VI Test (ORNL) for the FP Release from Fuel Module; KROTOS-37 (JRC-ISPRA) for the Molten Core Relocation Module; Water Spread Test (UCSB) for the Debris Spreading Model and Benard's Melting Test for Natural Convection Model in the Debris Cooling Module; Hydrogen Burning Test (NUPEC) for the Ex-Vessel Thermal Hydraulics Module; PREMIX, PM10 (FZK) for the Steam Explosion Module; and SWISS-2 (SNL) for the Debris-Concrete Interaction Module. Second, with the Simulation Supervisory System, up to 11 analysis modules were executed concurrently in the parallel environment (currently, NUPEC uses IBM-SP2 with 72 process elements), to demonstrate the code capability and integrity. The target plant was Surry as a typical PWR and the initiation events were a 10-inch cold leg failure. The analysis is divided to two cases; one is in-vessel retention analysis when the gap cooling is effective (In-vessel scenario test), the other is analysis of phenomena event is extended to ex-vessel due to the Reactor Pressure Vessel failure when the gap cooling is not sufficient (Ex-vessel scenario test). The system verification test has confirmed that the full scope of the scenarios can be analyzed and phenomena occurred in scenarios can be simulated qualitatively reasonably considering the physical models used for the situation. The Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan sponsors this work. (author)

  20. Development status of Severe Accident Analysis Code SAMPSON

    The Four years of the IMPACT, 'Integrated Modular Plant Analysis and Computing Technology' project Phase 1 have been completed. The verification study of Severe Accident Analysis Code SAMPSON prototype developed in Phase 1 was conducted in two steps. First, each analysis module was run independently and analysis results were compared and verified against separate-effect test data with good results. Test data are as follows: CORA-13 (FZK) for the Core Heat-up Module; VI-3 of HI/VI Test (ORNL) for the FP Release from Fuel Module; KROTOS-37 (JRC-ISPRA) for the Molten Core Relocation Module; Water Spread Test (UCSB) for the Debris Spreading Model and Benard's Melting Test for Natural Convection Model in the Debris Cooling Module; Hydrogen Burning Test (NUPEC) for the Ex-Vessel Thermal Hydraulics Module; PREMIX, PM10 (FZK) for the Steam Explosion Module; and SWISS-2 (SNL) for the Debris-Concrete Interaction Module. Second, with the Simulation Supervisory System, up to 11 analysis modules were executed concurrently in the parallel environment (currently, NUPEC uses IBM-SP2 with 72 process elements), to demonstrate the code capability and integrity. The target plant was Surry as a typical PWR and the initiation events were a 10-inch cold leg failure. The analysis is divided to two cases; one is in-vessel retention analysis when the gap cooling is effective (In-vessel scenario test), the other is analysis of phenomena event is extended to ex-vessel due to the Reactor Pressure Vessel failure when the gap cooling is not sufficient (Ex-vessel scenario test). The system verification test has confirmed that the full scope of the scenarios can be analyzed and phenomena occurred in scenarios can be simulated qualitatively reasonably considering the physical models used for the situation. The Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan sponsors this work. (author)

  1. Empirical Risk Analysis of Severe Reactor Accidents in Nuclear Power Plants after Fukushima

    Jan Christian Kaiser

    2012-01-01

    Many countries are reexamining the risks connected with nuclear power generation after the Fukushima accidents. To provide updated information for the corresponding discussion a simple empirical approach is applied for risk quantification of severe reactor accidents with International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES) level ≥5. The analysis is based on worldwide data of commercial nuclear facilities. An empirical hazard of 21 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 4; 62) severe accidents am...

  2. An analysis of evacuation options for nuclear accidents

    The threat of release of a hazardous substance into the atmosphere will sometimes require that the population at risk be evacuated. If the substance is particularly hazardous or the release is exceptionally large, then an extensive area may have to be evacuated at substantial cost. In this report we consider the threat posed by the accidental release of radionuclides from a nuclear power plant. The report's objective is to establish relationships between radiation dose and the cost of evacuation under a wide variety of conditions. The dose can almost always be reduced by evacuating the population from a larger area. However, extending the evacuation zone outward will cause evacuation costs to increase. The purpose of this analysis was to provide the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) a data base for evaluating whether implementation costs and risks averted could be used to justify evacuation at lower doses than would be required based on acceptable risk of health effects alone. The procedures used and results of these analyses are being made available as background information for use by others. In this report we develop cost/dose relationships for 54 scenarios that are based upon the severity of the reactor accident, meteorological conditions during the release of radionuclides into the environment, and the angular width of the evacuation zone. The 54 scenarios are derived from combinations of three accident severity levels, six meteorological conditions and evacuation zone widths of 70 deg, 90 deg, and 180 deg. Appendix tables are provided to allow acceptable evaluation of the cost/dose relationships for a wide variety of scenarios. Guidance and examples are provided in the text to show how these tables can be used

  3. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled open-quotes Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysisclose quotes, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled open-quotes Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,close quotes was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model

  4. Analysis of radiation accidents/incidents in Japan by the revised INES

    Full text: The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) was originally developed in the 1990's for facilitating rapid communication to the media and the public regarding the safety significance of events mainly at nuclear power stations. It has been considered since the beginning of 2000's to include the use of radiation sources and the transport of radioactive materials under the background of discussion for radiation safety and security. Additional guidance for rating of transport and radiation source events were agreed in 2006. The regulatory authority of Japan (MEXT) made the working group for the evaluation and started to apply the revised INES to the radiation events in Japan in 2007. This paper describes the results of analysis of all the radiation events which were legally reported since 1958 to 2006 in Japan. The analysis was based on the opened materials which were issued by the nuclear safety commission (NSC) and the nuclear safety technology center (NUSTEC). Events are classified on the scale at seven levels: levels 4-7 are termed 'accidents and levels 1-3 incidents'. Events without safety significance are termed 'deviations' and are classified below scale at level 0. Events without relevance to radiological or nuclear safety are termed 'out of scale'. There were 148 radiation events in Japan. The maximum level of accidents was level 4, but no death was observed. Because the number of exposed individuals was about 10, the rating was increased by one level. Three accidents of level 4 were related to the non-destructive test (NDT) and occured in 1971, 1972 and 1979. Based on the lessoned and learned from these accidents, the countermeasures, such as the improvement of machine structure and the effective practice of education, were taken. (author)

  5. 300-Area accident analysis for Emergency Planning Zones

    The Department of Energy has requested SRL assistance in developing offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) for the Savannah River Plant, based on projected dose consequences of atmospheric releases of radioactivity from potential credible accidents in the SRP operating areas. This memorandum presents the assessment of the offsite doses via the plume exposure pathway from the 300-Area potential accidents. 8 refs., 3 tabs

  6. Effects of sodium fires on structures and materials. Practical experience with sodium leakage accidents

    A few sodium leakage, incidents happened in SNR 300 nuclear power plant during pre-nuclear operation which were of minor importance with respect to sodium fires. The most important sodium fire accident in the past happened in the Almeria Solar platform in Spain during the attempt to repair a valve while leaving accidentally the circuit under 4 bar overpressure. Considerable damage to pipes, valves, its insulation and its support structures was observed in the influence zone of the fire. Post accident analysis gave a leaked mass of about 14 m3, at a sodium temperature of 225 deg. C, the leakage lasting approximately half an hour, and burning under convective heat exchange with the external air in a section of 40 m2 up to a height of 6 m down to the catch pans. Some local temperatures were determined by metallurgical means, integral support temperatures estimated from mechanical deformation observed. From these temperatures it was concluded that a massive spray type fire must have happened. The results fall in the interpretation range of sodium-spray fire test results. (author)

  7. Storybuilder-A tool for the analysis of accident reports

    As part of an ongoing effort by the ministry of Social Affairs and Employment of The Netherlands a research project is being undertaken to construct a causal model for the most commonly occurring scenarios related to occupational risk. This model should provide quantitative insight in the causes and consequences of occupational accidents. The results should be used to help selecting optimal strategies to reduce these risks taking the costs of accidents and of measures into account. The research is undertaken by an international consortium under the name of Workgroup Occupational Risk Model. One of the components of the model is a tool to systematically classify and analyse past accidents. This tool: 'Storybuilder' and its place in the Occupational Risk Model (ORM) are described in the paper. The paper gives some illustrations of the application of the Storybuilder, drawn from the study of ladder accidents, which forms one of the biggest single accident categories in the Dutch data

  8. GPHS-RTG launch accident analysis for Galileo and Ulysses

    This paper presents the safety program conducted to determine the response of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) to potential launch accidents of the Space Shuttle for the Galileo and Ulysses missions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provided definition of the Shuttle potential accidents and characterized the environments. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program (LASEP) was developed by GE to analyze the RTG response to these accidents. RTG detailed response to Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) fragment impacts, as well as to other types of impact, was obtained from an extensive series of hydrocode analyses. A comprehensive test program was conducted also to determine RTG response to the accident environments. The hydrocode response analyses coupled with the test data base provided the broad range response capability which was implemented in LASEP

  9. Loss Of Secondary coolant accident analysis for Pius type reactor using Relap5/MOD2

    Process inherent ultimate safety (Pius) reactor concept is a reactor concept that intrinsically based on passive safety. This reactor refer to Pressurized water reactor (PWR) wherein the primary system is submerged in a pool of poison water. the operating principle is to maintain the pressure balance, so that no inflow from pool to the primary system. On loss of secondary coolant accident, primary coolant temperature increases, it is followed by the increase of primary pump speed. When the upper limit is reached, the pump is tripped due to the pressure balance disturbance, poison water flows from pool to the primary system, then reactor shut down. this accident condition was simulated by experimental and numerical simulation using RELAP5/MOD2. Numerical simulation was done to the experimental apparatus nodalization that was set on the norm of RELAP5/MOD2. This nodalization consist of 119 volumes, 127 junctions, and 106 heat structures. Analysis was carried out using both experimental and numerical simulation results. it can be concluded that PIUS type reactor is able to anticipate loss of secondary coolant accident because its capability of self shut down

  10. Analysis on the Density Driven Air-Ingress Accident in VHTRs

    Air-ingress following the pipe rupture is considered to be the most serious accident in the VHTRs due to its potential problems such as core heat-up, structural integrity and toxic gas release. Previously, it has been believed that the main air-ingress mechanism of this accident is the molecular diffusion process between the reactor core and the cavity. However, according to some recent studies, there is another fast air-ingress process that has not been considered before. It is called density-driven stratified flow. The potential for density-driven stratified air ingress into the VHTR following a large-break LOCA was first described in the NGNP Methods Technical Program based on stratified flow studies performed with liquid. Studies on densitygradient driven stratified flow in advanced reactor systems has been the subject of active research for well over a decade since density-gradient dominated stratified flow is an inherent characteristic of passive systems used in advanced reactors. Recently, Oh et al. performed a CFD analysis on the stratified flow in the VHTR, and showed that this effect can significantly accelerate the air-ingress process in the VHTRs. They also proposed to replace the original air-ingress scenario based on the molecular diffusion with the one based on the stratified flow. This paper is focusing on the effect of stratified flow on the results of the air-ingress accident in VHTR

  11. Analysis of causes and sequences of the accident on Fukushima NPP as a factor of sever accidents prevention in the vessel reactor

    In this monograph, the provisional analysis of the causes and sequences of the sever accidents on the Fukushima NPP is presented. The analysis of the possibility of the origin of extreme events connected with the flooding of Zaporizhzhia NPP industrial site, emergency of the steam-gas explosions on NPPs with WWER and other phenomena occurred under sever accidents was carried out. It was presented the authors original working-out on symptom-oriented approaches of sever accident initiating event list identification, on criteria substantiation of explosion safety and optimization of processes management at sever accidents, as well as on the methodological support of the accident beyond the design basis management at the WWER for prevention of their transition in the stage of sever accidents.

  12. China's coal mine accident statistics analysis and one million tons mortality prediction

    Qiao Tong

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the general rule of coal mine accidents in China in recent years, the data of coal mine accident in 2011-2015 is analyzed. The mathematical statistics method is used to analyze the occurrence year, type, season and area of the accident. The results of analysis shows that the coal mine accident has been reduced year by year, and the frequency of gas explosion is the highest. The frequency and the number of deaths in the second quarter of the year are the highest; Guizhou p...

  13. Statistical analysis of accident data associated with sea transport (invited paper)

    This analysis, based on Lloyd's database, gives an accurate description of the world fleet and the most severe ship accidents, as well as the frequencies of accident per ship type, accident category and age category. Complementary analyses were achieved using fire accident databases from AEA Technology and the French Bureau Veritas. The results should be used in the perspective of safety assessments of maritime shipments of radioactive material. For this purpose the existence of the regulations of the International Maritime Organisation has to be considered, leading to the introduction of correction factors to these statistical data derived from general cargo-carrying ships. (author)

  14. Analysis of the TMI-2 accident using ATHLET-CD

    On March 28, 1979, the only loss-of-coolant accident so far in a light water reactor exceeding the design basis occurred in unit 2 of the U.S. PWR of Three Mile Island (TMI-2) near Harrisburg. The accident entailed massive core degradation accompanied by the formation of a bed of debris and a molten pool. Approx. 30 t of the core inventory were moved to the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel; the vessel sustained this thermal load. Also because of the worldwide use of light water reactors, this accident constitutes an outstanding event with respect to technical safety which can be used to describe the phenomenology of the early as well as the late phases of core degradation, for modeling and, above all, for validation of codes analyzing very severe accidents and, in this way, can serve to enhance the safety of plants in operation. After a brief introduction, the accident scenario is outlined. On this basis, the ATHLET-CD code is introduced, and the approach used in modeling the plant and the accident is described. Finally, the results of the simulation carried out with ATHLET-CD are summarized and evaluated. It is seen that the code is able, in principle, to describe the accident with good accuracy. However, further development with respect to modeling of the late phase is required. (orig.)

  15. Analysis of the TMI-2 accident using ATHLET-CD

    Drath, T.; Kleinhietpass, I.D.; Koch, M.K. [Lehrstuhl fuer Energiesysteme und Energiewirtschaft (LEE), Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (RUB) (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    On March 28, 1979, the only loss-of-coolant accident so far in a light water reactor exceeding the design basis occurred in unit 2 of the U.S. PWR of Three Mile Island (TMI-2) near Harrisburg. The accident entailed massive core degradation accompanied by the formation of a bed of debris and a molten pool. Approx. 30 t of the core inventory were moved to the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel; the vessel sustained this thermal load. Also because of the worldwide use of light water reactors, this accident constitutes an outstanding event with respect to technical safety which can be used to describe the phenomenology of the early as well as the late phases of core degradation, for modeling and, above all, for validation of codes analyzing very severe accidents and, in this way, can serve to enhance the safety of plants in operation. After a brief introduction, the accident scenario is outlined. On this basis, the ATHLET-CD code is introduced, and the approach used in modeling the plant and the accident is described. Finally, the results of the simulation carried out with ATHLET-CD are summarized and evaluated. It is seen that the code is able, in principle, to describe the accident with good accuracy. However, further development with respect to modeling of the late phase is required. (orig.)

  16. Sodium fast reactor gaps analysis of computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety.

    Carbajo, Juan (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache %3CU%2B2013%3E CEA, France)

    2011-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an expert-opinion elicitation activity designed to qualitatively assess the status and capabilities of currently available computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety calculations of advanced sodium fast reactors, and identify important gaps. The twelve-member panel consisted of representatives from five U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, and BNL), the University of Wisconsin, the KAERI, the JAEA, and the CEA. The major portion of this elicitation activity occurred during a two-day meeting held on Aug. 10-11, 2010 at Argonne National Laboratory. There were two primary objectives of this work: (1) Identify computer codes currently available for SFR accident analysis and reactor safety calculations; and (2) Assess the status and capability of current US computer codes to adequately model the required accident scenarios and associated phenomena, and identify important gaps. During the review, panel members identified over 60 computer codes that are currently available in the international community to perform different aspects of SFR safety analysis for various event scenarios and accident categories. A brief description of each of these codes together with references (when available) is provided. An adaptation of the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) for computational modeling and simulation is described for use in this work. The panel's assessment of the available US codes is presented in the form of nine tables, organized into groups of three for each of three risk categories considered: anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), design basis accidents (DBA), and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). A set of summary conclusions are drawn from the results obtained. At the highest level, the panel judged that current US code capabilities are adequate for licensing given reasonable margins, but expressed concern that US code development activities had stagnated and that the

  17. A study on the core analysis methodology for SMART CEA ejection accident-I

    A methodology to analyze the fuel enthalpy is developed based on MASTER that is a time dependent 3 dimensional core analysis code. Using the proposed methodology, SMART CEA ejection accident is analyzed. Moreover, radiation doses are estimated at the exclusion area boundary and low population zone to confirm the criteria for the accident. (Author). 31 refs., 13 tabs., 18 figs

  18. Accident consequences analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    Reyes, S; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-02-23

    Previous studies of the safety and environmental (S and E) aspects of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design have used simplistic assumptions in order to estimate radioactivity releases under accident conditions. Conservatisms associated with these traditional analyses can mask the actual behavior of the plant and have revealed the need for more accurate modeling and analysis of accident conditions and radioactivity mobilization mechanisms. In the present work a set of computer codes traditionally used for magnetic fusion safety analyses (CHEMCON, MELCOR) has been applied for simulating accident conditions in a simple model of the HYLIFE-II IFE design. Here the authors consider a severe lost of coolant accident (LOCA) producing simultaneous failures of the beam tubes (providing a pathway for radioactivity release from the vacuum vessel towards the containment) and of the two barriers surrounding the chamber (inner shielding and containment building it self). Even though containment failure would be a very unlikely event it would be needed in order to produce significant off-site doses. CHEMCON code allows calculation of long-term temperature transients in fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield structures resulting from decay heating. MELCOR is used to simulate a wide range of physical phenomena including thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, aerosol physics and fusion product release and transport. The results of these calculations show that the estimated off-site dose is less than 6 mSv (0.6 rem), which is well below the value of 10 mSv (1 rem) given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for protection of the public from exposure to radiation during off-normal conditions.

  19. Structural response of large LMFBR head closures to hypothetical core disruptive accidents

    Kulak, R.F.; Marciniak, T.J.; Belytschko, T.B.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary study of the dynamic response of a large (1200 MWe) pool-type deck structure to an energetic core disassembly accident was performed. The analysis proceeded as two independent, decoupled calculations: containment calculations and deck response calculations. The containment calculations were performed mainly to derive a loading pressure history for the deck structure. In part of the study, the deck was considered rigid so the derived loading pressures were conservative. In the second part of the study a set of independent deck response calculations were performed using the derived loading pressure history as input. A finite-element model that incorporated the main structural components of the deck was constructed. A preliminary study of the dynamic response of the deck was performed using this model. Also, the effect that different types of boundary conditions have on the dynamic response of the deck was studied. Based on the above preliminary studies, it is concluded that the deck structure can maintain its structural integrity under the given energy release.

  20. A method for modeling and analysis of directed weighted accident causation network (DWACN)

    Zhou, Jin; Xu, Weixiang; Guo, Xin; Ding, Jing

    2015-11-01

    Using complex network theory to analyze accidents is effective to understand the causes of accidents in complex systems. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to establish directed weighted accident causation network (DWACN) for the Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB) in the UK, which is based on complex network and using event chains of accidents. DWACN is composed of 109 nodes which denote causal factors and 260 directed weighted edges which represent complex interrelationships among factors. The statistical properties of directed weighted complex network are applied to reveal the critical factors, the key event chains and the important classes in DWACN. Analysis results demonstrate that DWACN has characteristics of small-world networks with short average path length and high weighted clustering coefficient, and display the properties of scale-free networks captured by that the cumulative degree distribution follows an exponential function. This modeling and analysis method can assist us to discover the latent rules of accidents and feature of faults propagation to reduce accidents. This paper is further development on the research of accident analysis methods using complex network.

  1. Analysis of the source term in the Chernobyl-4 accident

    The report presents the analysis of the Chernobyl accident and of the phenomena with major influence on the source term, including the chemical effects of materials dumped over the reactor, carried out by the Chair of Nuclear Technology at Madrid University under a contract with the CEC. It also includes the comparison of the ratio (Cs-137/Cs-134) between measurements performed by Soviet authorities and countries belonging to the Community and OECD area. Chapter II contains a summary of both isotope measurements (Cs-134 and Cs-137), and their ratios, in samples of air, water, soil and agricultural and animal products collected by the Soviets in their report presented in Vienna (1986). Chapter III reports on the inventories of cesium isotopes in the core, while Chapter IV analyses the transient, especially the fuel temperature reached, as a way to deduce the mechanisms which took place in the cesium escape. The cesium source term is analyzed in Chapter V. Normal conditions have been considered, as well as the transient and the post-accidental period, including the effects of deposited materials. The conclusion of this study is that Chernobyl accidental sequence is specific of the RBMK type of reactors, and that in the Western world, basic research on fuel behaviour for reactivity transients has already been carried out

  2. Analysis of the 1957-58 Soviet nuclear accident

    The occurrence of a Soviet accident in the winter of 1957-58, involving the atmospheric release of reprocessed fission wastes (cooling time approximately 1-2 yrs.), appears to have been confirmed, primarily by an analysis of the USSR radioecology literature. Due to the high population density in the affected region (Cheliabinsk Province in the highly industrialized Urals Region) and the reported level of 90Sr contamination, the event probably resulted in the evacuation and/or resettlement of the human population from a significant area (100-1000 km2). The resulting contamination zone is estimated to have contained approximately 106 Ci of 90Sr (reference radionuclide); a relatively small fraction of the total may have been dispersed as an aerosol. Although a plausible explanation for the incident exists (i.e., use of now-obsolete waste storage-137Cs isotope separation techniques), it is not yet possible, based on the limited information presently available, to completely dismiss this phenomenon as a purely historical event. It seems imperative that we have a complete explanation of the causes and consequences of this incident. Soviet experience gained in application of corrective measures would be invaluable to the rest of the world nuclear community

  3. BNL severe accident sequence experiments and analysis program

    A major source of containment pressurization during severe accidents is the transfer of stored energy from the hot core material to available cooling water. One mode of thermal interaction involves the quench of superheated beds of debris which could be present in the reactor cavity following melt-through or failure of the reactor vessel. This work supports development of models of superheated bed quench phenomena which are to be incorporated into containment analysis computer codes such as MARCH, CONTAIN, and MEDICI. A program directed towards characterization of the behavior of superheated debris beds has been completed. This work addressed the quench of superheated debris which is postulated to exist in the reactor cavity of a PWR following melt ejection from the primary system. The debris is assumed to be cooled by a pool of water overlying the bed of hot debris. This work has led to the development of models to predict rate of steam generation during the quench process and, in addition, the ability to assess the coolability of the debris during the transient quench process. A final report on this work has been completed. This report presents a brief description of some relevant results and conclusions. 15 refs

  4. Analysis of Loss-of-Coolant Accidents in the NBSR

    Baek J. S.; Cheng L.; Diamond, D.

    2014-05-23

    This report documents calculations of the fuel cladding temperature during loss-of-coolant accidents in the NBSR. The probability of a pipe failure is small and procedures exist to minimize the loss of water and assure emergency cooling water flows into the reactor core during such an event. Analysis in the past has shown that the emergency cooling water would provide adequate cooling if the water filled the flow channels within the fuel elements. The present analysis is to determine if there is adequate cooling if the water drains from the flow channels. Based on photographs of how the emergency water flows into the fuel elements from the distribution pan, it can be assumed that this water does not distribute uniformly across the flow channels but rather results in a liquid film flowing downward on the inside of one of the side plates in each fuel element and only wets the edges of the fuel plates. An analysis of guillotine breaks shows the cladding temperature remains below the blister temperature in fuel plates in the upper section of the fuel element. In the lower section, the fuel plates are also cooled by water outside the element that is present due to the hold-up pan and temperatures are lower than in the upper section. For small breaks, the simulation results show that the fuel elements are always cooled on the outside even in the upper section and the cladding temperature cannot be higher than the blister temperature. The above results are predicated on assumptions that are examined in the study to see their influence on fuel temperature.

  5. Analysis of the rod drop accident for Angra-1

    The aim of this work is to present a rod drop accident analysis for the third cycle of the Angra-1 nuclear power plant operating in the automatic control mode. In this analysis all possible configurations for dropped rods caused by a single failure in the controller circuits have been considered. The dropped rod worths, power distributions and excore detector tilts were determined by using the Siemens/KWU neutronic code system, in particular the MEDIUM2, PINPOW and DETILT codes. The transient behaviour of the plant during the rod drop event was simulated with the SACI2/MOD0 code, developed at CDTN. Determinations related to the DNBR design limit were conducted by utilizing the CDTN PANTERA-1P subchannel code. The transient analysis indicated that for dropped rod worths greater than about 425 pcm reactor trip from negative neutron flux rate will take place independently of core conditions. In the range from 0 to 425 pcm large power overshoots may occur as a consequence of the automatic control system action. The magnitude of the maximum power peaking during the event increases with the dropped rod worth, as far as the control bank is able to compensate the initial reactivity decrease. Thermal-hydraulic evaluations carried out with the PANTERA-1P code show that for all the relevant dropped rod worths the minimum DNBR will remain above a limit value of 1.365. Even if this conservative limit is met, the calculated nuclear power peaking factors, FNAH, will be at least 6% higher than the allowable FNAH-values. Therefore, the DNBR design margin will be preserved at the event of rod drop. (author)

  6. Offsite Radiological Consequence Analysis for the Bounding Flammable Gas Accident

    Carro, C A

    2003-01-01

    This document quantifies the offsite radiological consequences of the bounding flammable gas accident for comparison with the 25 rem Evaluation Guideline established in DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A. The bounding flammable gas accident is a detonation in a single-shell tank The calculation applies reasonably conservation input parameters in accordance with DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A, guidance. Revision 1 incorporates comments received from Office of River Protection.

  7. Statistical analysis of accident data associated with sea transport (data from 1994-1997). Annex 1

    This analysis is based on Lloyd's database concerning sea transport accidents for the 1994-1997 period and completes the previous analysis based on 1994 data. It gives an accurate description of the world fleet and the most severe ship accidents (total losses), as well as the frequencies of accident (in average on the 1994-1997 period the frequency of accident for cargo carrying ships is 2.57.10-3 loss /ship.year). Furthermore, an analysis has been performed on the ship casualties recorded by the Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) for UK vessels for the 1990-1996 period, this database including all accidents for which a declaration has been made to authorities (for example, the average frequency of fires derived from this analysis is 1.36.10-2 per ship.year, this occurrence corresponding to the occurrence of initiating events of fire). Concerning fire accidents aboard ships supposed to be representative of the radioactive material transporters, a specific analysis was achieved by the French Bureau Veritas, on a selection of the world casualties (total losses) for the 1978-1988 period. This analysis related to the origin of the fire points out that it originates mainly in the machinery room and quarters. In a few cases the fire duration recorded is more than one day. (author)

  8. Statistical analysis of causes and countermeasures to the accidents in coal mines

    SHI Jian-jun; DUAN Xu-hua

    2007-01-01

    Statistics and analysis was made in causes, places and proportions about all kinds of disasters and accidents in coal mines of China in resent 50 years. The analysis indicates the emphasis reason that result in the accidents in coal mines are artificial cause,explosion of mash gas and coal dust, water flood, fire hazard. The accidents mostly happened on stope which is more often than other places, following by the driving work face.This not only supplies the managers with basic reference about safe administration, but also suggests the countermeasures in reducing accidents: improve the disposition of person, perfect all kinds of rules and regulations, severely investigate, analyze and deal with the accidents.

  9. Fuel safety analysis following feeder break accident for refurbished Wolsong 1

    The objective of the fuel analysis for the postulated accident was to estimate the quantity and timing of a fission product release from fuels when a postulated single channel accident occurs in CANDU 6 reactors. In this study, a fuel safety analysis for the refurbished Wolsong 1 was carried out by using the latest IST (Industrial Standard Toolset) fuel code. The relevant accident scenario focused in this study was a feeder stagnation break accident. The amount of fission product inventory and its distribution during the normal operating conditions were calculated by using the latest ELESTRES-IST code. For a calculation of transient fission product release following the feeder stagnation break, it was assumed that all fuel sheaths in the channel were failed and the entire gap inventory was released instantaneously at the beginning of the accident. The additional releases from the grain boundary and in-grain bound inventories were estimated by applying the Gehl's release model. (author)

  10. An integrated structure and scaling methodology for severe accident technical issue resolution: development of methodology

    Scaling has been identified as a particularly important element of the severe accident research program because of its relevance not only to experimentation, but also to analyses based on code calculations or special models. Recognizing the central importance of severe accident scaling issues, the United States Regulatory Commission implemented a severe accident scaling methodology (SASM) development program involving a lead laboratory contractor and a technical program group to guide the development and to demonstrate its practicality via a challenging application. The technical program group recognized that the severe accident scaling methodology was an integral part of a larger structure for technical issue resolution and, therefore, found the need to define and document this larger structure, the integrated structure for technical issue resolution (ISTIR). The larger part of the efforts have been devoted to the development and demonstration of the severe accident scaling methodology, which is component II of the ISTIR. The ISTIR and the SASM have been tested and demonstrated, by their application to a postulated direct containment heating scenario. The ISTIR objectives and process are summarized in this paper, as is its demonstration associated directly with the SASM. The objectives, processes and demonstration for the SASM are also summarized in the paper. The full body of work is referenced. (orig.)

  11. An integrated structure and scaling methodology for severe accident technical issue resolution: development of methodology

    Zuber, N.; Wilson, G.E. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3890 (United States); Ishii, M. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Wulff, W.; Lehner, J.R.; Valente, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Building 475 B, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Boyack, B.E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop K555, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Dukler, A.E. [University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-4791 (United States); Griffith, P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT, 138 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Healzer, J.M.; Levy, S. [South Levy Inc., 3425 S. Bascom Avenue, Campbell, CA 95008 (United States); Henry, R.E. [Fauske and Associate, Inc., 16W070 West 83rd Street, Burr Ridge, IL 60521 (United States); Moody, F.J. [GE Nuclear Energy, 175 Curtner Avenue, MC 747, San Jose, CA 95125 (United States); Pilch, M. [Sandia National Laboratory, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Nuclear Power Safety, 100 44, Stockholm (Sweden); Spencer, B.W. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Case Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Theofanous, T.G. [Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California - Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Scaling has been identified as a particularly important element of the severe accident research program because of its relevance not only to experimentation, but also to analyses based on code calculations or special models. Recognizing the central importance of severe accident scaling issues, the United States Regulatory Commission implemented a severe accident scaling methodology (SASM) development program involving a lead laboratory contractor and a technical program group to guide the development and to demonstrate its practicality via a challenging application. The technical program group recognized that the severe accident scaling methodology was an integral part of a larger structure for technical issue resolution and, therefore, found the need to define and document this larger structure, the integrated structure for technical issue resolution (ISTIR). The larger part of the efforts have been devoted to the development and demonstration of the severe accident scaling methodology, which is component II of the ISTIR. The ISTIR and the SASM have been tested and demonstrated, by their application to a postulated direct containment heating scenario. The ISTIR objectives and process are summarized in this paper, as is its demonstration associated directly with the SASM. The objectives, processes and demonstration for the SASM are also summarized in the paper. The full body of work is referenced. (orig.) 11 refs.

  12. Analysis of In-Vessel Sever Accident Phenomena in NPP Krsko

    A hypothetical severe accident (SA) with substantial core melt-down can have serious consequences regarding the public safety. Integrity of the containment and the release of fission products in the environment following the containment failure depend strongly on in-vessel core degradation processes. The knowledge of in-vessel melt relocation processes is also important with respect to cooling recovery actions (flooding of the core) and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure analysis. The early in-vessel SA scenario includes cladding oxidation, melting and liquefaction of core materials and formation of a molten pool inside the core. The late in-vessel phase includes molten pool relocation to the lower head, formation of a crust surrounding the molten pool, thermal attack on the vessel wall and, finally, the vessel failure. The accident analyzed in the paper was a station blackout (SBO) with a leakage from the reactor coolant system (RCS) through reactor coolant pump (RCP) seals following their degradation. It was assumed that both off-site and on-site (emergency diesel generators) AC power were unavailable, therefore the primary system coolant inventory was decreasing due to the unavailability of the high head (HHSI) and the low head safety injection (LHSI) flow. Water was only injected from the accumulators because their operation did not depend on the availability of electrical power. RELAP5/SCDAPSIM computer code was used in the analysis. One of the goals of the analysis was to determine the time of the structural failure (creep rupture) of the vessel wall in the lower plenum following the relocation of the molten corium to the lower head. For this purpose COUPLE model of the RPV lower plenum of NPP Krsko was used. Additionally, one more scenario was analyzed with the diesel generators available which would provide power for the HHSI and LHSI pumps. The purpose of that additional case was to evaluate the influence of the on-site power availability on the

  13. Coremelt-2D Code for Analysis of Severe Accidents in a Sodium Fast Reactor

    In the paper there is a description of COREMELT-2D code designed for carrying out coupled two-dimensional analysis of neutronic and thermohydraulic transients, which may occur in the core of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR), including severe accidents resulting in damage of SFR core and relocation of its components with the change of their aggregative state, namely: boiling and condensation of coolant, damage and melting of fuel element claddings and fuel, relocation of molten core components, thermal interaction of fuel and coolant and freezing of steel and fuel. So, COREMELT-2D code is capable of analyzing all stages of ULOF accident up to expansion phase characterized by the intensive interaction of molten fuel and sodium. Modular structure of COREMELT-2D code consisting of thermohydraulic module COREMELT and neutronic module RADAR is presented. Preservation equations are solved in COREMELT module in two-dimensional cylindrical R-Z geometry in porous body approximation. RADAR module is used for solving multi-group neutron diffusion equation in R-Z and X-Y geometry. Application of the code for solving dynamics tasks with rather rapid changes of neutron constants requires efficient unit for constants preparation. For this purpose, steady state analysis TRIGEX code (HEX-Z geometry) is used, which includes the program of nuclear data preparation CONSYST connected to the ABBN-93 group constants library. In the paper presented are the results of comparative analytical studies on ULOF beyond design severe accident as applied to the BN-1200 reactor design made by COREMELT-2D code and by its previous version based on neutron kinetics point model. The results of analysis make it possible to evaluate the effect of space-time changes of reactor neutronics caused by sodium removal from the core as a result of sodium boiling. (author)

  14. Human reliability analysis of Three Mile Island II accident considering THERP and ATHEANA methodologies

    The main purpose of this work is to perform a human reliability analysis using THERP (Technique for Human Error Prediction) and ATHEANA (A Technique for Human Error Analysis) methodologies, as well as their application to the development of qualitative and quantitative analysis of a nuclear power plant accident. The accident selected was the one that occurred at the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plan. The accident analysis has revealed a series of unsafe actions that resulted in permanent loss of the unit. This study also aims at enhancing the understanding of THERP and ATHEANA methodologies and their possible interactions with practical applications. The TMI accident analysis has pointed out the possibility of integration of THERP and ATHEANA methodologies. In this work, the integration between both methodologies is developed in a way to allow better understanding of the influence of operational context on human errors. (author)

  15. Human reliability analysis of Three Mile Island II accident considering THERP and ATHEANA methodologies

    Fonseca, Renato Alves; Alvarenga, Marco Antonio Bayout; Gibelli, Sonia Maria Orlando [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: rfonseca@cnen.gov.br; bayout@cnen.gov.br; sonia@cnen.gov.br; Alvim, Antonio Carlos Marques; Frutuoso e Melo, Paulo Fernando Ferreira [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: Alvim@con.ufrj.br; frutuoso@con.ufrj.br

    2008-07-01

    The main purpose of this work is to perform a human reliability analysis using THERP (Technique for Human Error Prediction) and ATHEANA (A Technique for Human Error Analysis) methodologies, as well as their application to the development of qualitative and quantitative analysis of a nuclear power plant accident. The accident selected was the one that occurred at the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plan. The accident analysis has revealed a series of unsafe actions that resulted in permanent loss of the unit. This study also aims at enhancing the understanding of THERP and ATHEANA methodologies and their possible interactions with practical applications. The TMI accident analysis has pointed out the possibility of integration of THERP and ATHEANA methodologies. In this work, the integration between both methodologies is developed in a way to allow better understanding of the influence of operational context on human errors. (author)

  16. Risk analysis of emergent water pollution accidents based on a Bayesian Network.

    Tang, Caihong; Yi, Yujun; Yang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jie

    2016-01-01

    To guarantee the security of water quality in water transfer channels, especially in open channels, analysis of potential emergent pollution sources in the water transfer process is critical. It is also indispensable for forewarnings and protection from emergent pollution accidents. Bridges above open channels with large amounts of truck traffic are the main locations where emergent accidents could occur. A Bayesian Network model, which consists of six root nodes and three middle layer nodes, was developed in this paper, and was employed to identify the possibility of potential pollution risk. Dianbei Bridge is reviewed as a typical bridge on an open channel of the Middle Route of the South to North Water Transfer Project where emergent traffic accidents could occur. Risk of water pollutions caused by leakage of pollutants into water is focused in this study. The risk for potential traffic accidents at the Dianbei Bridge implies a risk for water pollution in the canal. Based on survey data, statistical analysis, and domain specialist knowledge, a Bayesian Network model was established. The human factor of emergent accidents has been considered in this model. Additionally, this model has been employed to describe the probability of accidents and the risk level. The sensitive reasons for pollution accidents have been deduced. The case has also been simulated that sensitive factors are in a state of most likely to lead to accidents. PMID:26433361

  17. Consequence Analysis of Release from KN-18 Cask during a Severe Transportation Accident

    Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) has launched a project entitled 'Development of APR1400 Physical Protection System Design' and conducting a new conceptual physical protection system(PPS) design. One of mayor contents is consequence analysis for spent nuclear fuel cask. Proper design of physical protection system for facilities and storage and transformation involving nuclear and radioactive material requires the quantification of potential consequence from prescribed sabotage and theft scenarios in order to properly understand the level of PPS needed for specific facilities and materials. An important aspect of the regulation of the nuclear industry is assessing the risk to the public and the environment from a release of radioactive material produced by accidental or intentional scenarios. This paper describes the consequence analysis methodology, structural analysis for KN-18 cask and results of release from the cask during a severe transportation accident. Accident during spent fuel cask transportation was numerically calculated for KN-18, and showed the integrity of the fuel assemblies and cask itself was unharmed on a scenario that is comparable to state of art NRC research. Even assumption of leakage as a size of 1 x 10''2 mm''2 does not exceed for a certain criteria at any distance

  18. Consequence Analysis of Release from KN-18 Cask during a Severe Transportation Accident

    Lim, Heoksoon; Bhang, Giin; Na, Janghwan; Ban, Jaeha; Kim, Myungsu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) has launched a project entitled 'Development of APR1400 Physical Protection System Design' and conducting a new conceptual physical protection system(PPS) design. One of mayor contents is consequence analysis for spent nuclear fuel cask. Proper design of physical protection system for facilities and storage and transformation involving nuclear and radioactive material requires the quantification of potential consequence from prescribed sabotage and theft scenarios in order to properly understand the level of PPS needed for specific facilities and materials. An important aspect of the regulation of the nuclear industry is assessing the risk to the public and the environment from a release of radioactive material produced by accidental or intentional scenarios. This paper describes the consequence analysis methodology, structural analysis for KN-18 cask and results of release from the cask during a severe transportation accident. Accident during spent fuel cask transportation was numerically calculated for KN-18, and showed the integrity of the fuel assemblies and cask itself was unharmed on a scenario that is comparable to state of art NRC research. Even assumption of leakage as a size of 1 x 10''2 mm''2 does not exceed for a certain criteria at any distance.

  19. Energy Analysis of Road Accidents Based on Close-Range Photogrammetry

    Alejandro Morales

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an efficient and low-cost approach for energy analysis of road accidents using images obtained using consumer-grade digital cameras and smartphones. The developed method could be used by security forces in order to improve the qualitative and quantitative analysis of traffic accidents. This role of the security forces is crucial to settle arguments; consequently, the remote and non-invasive collection of accident related data before the scene is modified proves to be essential. These data, taken in situ, are the basis to perform the necessary calculations, basically the energy analysis of the road accident, for the corresponding expert reports and the reconstruction of the accident itself, especially in those accidents with important damages and consequences. Therefore, the method presented in this paper provides the security forces with an accurate, three-dimensional, and scaled reconstruction of a road accident, so that it may be considered as a support tool for the energy analysis. This method has been validated and tested with a real crash scene simulated by the local police in the Academy of Public Safety of Extremadura, Spain.

  20. Challenges in thermohydraulic analysis of LWR severe accidents: steam explosions

    A severe accident is an accident state beyond design basis events with significant core damage and release of radioactive materials to the environment. Nuclear power plants are designed to endure prescribed accident situations against which safety equipment should be effective enough to assure that environmental release of radioactive materials is avoided. However, three major severe accidents have already experienced in commercial scale power plants so far, namely, Three Mile Island (TMI), Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi. Thus, the severe accident is no more just a hypothesis but a reality that have to be prepared with enough effectivity. A method for assessment of steam explosion load has been established based on presently available phenomenological information and simulation technique. On the 3 other hand, the present model is not sufficient for slow long term FCIs in which the steam and non-condensable gas generation rate for vessel pressurization and the resulting debris bed geometry for its coolability are in question. Also, there are shortcomings from the present analytical method such as influences of the mesh size on the void fraction, lacking radiation heat transfer beyond meshes and so on. If the level of the model is upgraded to CFD type including more flexible particle methods, direct simulation of complicated phenomena involving molten core, may become available. This may be one of the directions of future development

  1. Analysis of the radiation accident in El Salvador

    On 5 February 1989 at 2 a.m. local time in a cobalt-60 industrial irradiation facility, a series of events started leading to one of the most serious radiation accidents in this type of installation. It took place in Soyapango, a city situated 5 km from San Salvador, the capital of the Republic of El Salvador. In this accident, three workers were involved in the first event and a further four in the second. When the accident took place, the activity level was approximately 0.66 PBq (18,000 Ci). The source became blocked when being lowered to its safe position, where upon the technician responsible for the irradiator entered the chamber in breach of the few inadequate safety procedures, accompanied by two colleagues from an adjacent department; the three workers suffered acute radiation exposure, with the result that one of them died six-and-a-half months later, the second had both his legs amputated at mid-thigh, while the third recovered completely. This article describes the irradiator, outlines the causes of the accident and analyses the economic and social repercussions, with the aim of helping teams responsible for radiation protection and safety in industrial irradiation facilities to identify potentially hazardous circumstances and avoid accidents. (author)

  2. Safety Analysis Results for Cryostat Ingress Accidents in ITER

    Merrill, B. J.; Cadwallader, L. C.; Petti, D. A.

    1997-06-01

    Accidents involving the ingress of air, helium, or water into the cryostat of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak design have been analyzed with a modified version of the MELCOR code for the ITER Non-site Specific Safety Report (NSSR-1). The air ingress accident is the result of a postulated breach of the cryostat boundary into an adjoining room. MELCOR results for this accident demonstrate that the condensed air mass and increased heat loads are not a magnet safety concern, but that the partial vacuum in the adjoining room must be accommodated in the building design. The water ingress accident is the result of a postulated magnet arc that results in melting of a Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) coolant pipe, discharging PHTS water and PHTS water activated corrosion products and HTO into the cryostat. MELCOR results for this accident demonstrate that the condensed water mass and increased heat loads are not a magnet safety concern, that the cryostat pressure remains below design limits, and that the corrosion product and HTO releases are well within the ITER release limits.

  3. Analysis of the Chernobyl reactor accident. Pt. 2

    Of the six items of improvement measures including a future improvement measure announced by the USSR regarding the accident of Chernobyl nuclear power plant No. 4 reactor, the three items having exercised large influence over the plant behavior at the accident were analyzed by WIMS-ATR, EUREKA-2 and other calculational codes, and technically evaluated. As a result the following have been made clear: (1) If 80 manual control rods are inserted 1.2 m deep from the core upper end, any accident can be prevented by further inserting them at a 0.4 m/s speed, even under such power increase conditions as in this accident. (2) If the additional 80 manual control rods are inserted into the reactor, the coolant void reactivity coefficient can be improved from 2x10-4 Δk/k/% void to 1.4x10-4 Δk/k/% void. Further if the coefficient is less than 1.5x10-4 Δk/k/% void, the power increase speed will slow down much more and similar accidents can fully be prevented by means of the currently designed control rods of the shut-down system. (orig.)

  4. China's coal mine accident statistics analysis and one million tons mortality prediction

    Qiao Tong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the general rule of coal mine accidents in China in recent years, the data of coal mine accident in 2011-2015 is analyzed. The mathematical statistics method is used to analyze the occurrence year, type, season and area of the accident. The results of analysis shows that the coal mine accident has been reduced year by year, and the frequency of gas explosion is the highest. The frequency and the number of deaths in the second quarter of the year are the highest; Guizhou province, Hunan province, Yunnan province and Heilongjiang province are the accident prone provinces. GM (1, 1 dynamic prediction model is used to model and forecast the future million tons mortality in China. The forecast results show that the coal mine's million tons mortality rate of China showed a decreasing trend. The forecast results are scientific and reliable, and it is of great significance to the safety management of coal mine.

  5. Impact of the TMI accident on the French nuclear program and the safety analysis

    Almost immediately after the TMI accident, Electricite de France (EdF), Framatome and the French safety authorities started a large scale program of actions designed to analyse and understand the causes of the accident, and draw lessons applicable in France. This paper discusses these actions and the main conclusions of TMI accident analysis in France, notably: the fundamental role of plant operators, and the importance of operator training, written instructions and procedures, and diagnostic aids; the importance of feeding back operating experience to design teams, and incorporating the results of accident and post-accident studies in operating procedures; the necessity to improve knowledge of core cooling modes, including during two-phase flow and natural circulation; measures to improve particular systems and components

  6. Analysis on the Direct Vessel Injection Line Break Accident at APR+ Standard Design

    Lee, Youngho; Yang, Huichang [TUEV Rheinland Korea Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kap [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    APR+ (Advanced Power Reactor +) is the newest design variation of APR1400. The main characteristics of APR+, compared with APR1400, are passive safety systems and dedicated systems for severe accident mitigation. APR+ is under review for standard design certification. In this study, thermal hydraulic analysis on the Direct Vessel Injection (DVI) line break accident postulated in APR+ design was performed. Comparisons of the major parameters which can represent the overall accident behavior during DVI line break accident, several discrepancies between this study and reference data were found and such discrepancies include actuation timing of SIPs and SITs, and also include parameter behaviors of break flow rate and PCT at the accident initiation. These differences were mainly from the different thermal hydraulic models in simulation codes. The behavioral differences for break flow as well as peak cladding temperatures will be examined further as a next step for this study.

  7. Overview of the IMPACT severe accident analysis code SAMPSON - On core degradation and lower plenum debris behavior in the main

    The first version of the IMPACT-SAMPSON code was completed. SAMPSON is the best estimate integral code for severe accident analysis with modular structure. Each module can run independently and communication with multiple analysis modules supervised by the analysis control module makes an integral analysis possible while appearing to users to be a single code. Multi-dimensional mechanistic models and theoretical-base equations were applied. An execution of enormous amount of calculation steps becomes possible with the use of a parallel processing computer. Models in each module were verified by test analyses. Final integral verification by PHEBUS test analyses is in progress and integral analyses of light water nuclear power plants will be performed to demonstrate quantitatively that adequate safety margin exists to cope with severe accidents. (authors)

  8. Accident Precursor Analysis and Management: Reducing Technological Risk Through Diligence

    Phimister, James R. (Editor); Bier, Vicki M. (Editor); Kunreuther, Howard C. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    Almost every year there is at least one technological disaster that highlights the challenge of managing technological risk. On February 1, 2003, the space shuttle Columbia and her crew were lost during reentry into the atmosphere. In the summer of 2003, there was a blackout that left millions of people in the northeast United States without electricity. Forensic analyses, congressional hearings, investigations by scientific boards and panels, and journalistic and academic research have yielded a wealth of information about the events that led up to each disaster, and questions have arisen. Why were the events that led to the accident not recognized as harbingers? Why were risk-reducing steps not taken? This line of questioning is based on the assumption that signals before an accident can and should be recognized. To examine the validity of this assumption, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) undertook the Accident Precursors Project in February 2003. The project was overseen by a committee of experts from the safety and risk-sciences communities. Rather than examining a single accident or incident, the committee decided to investigate how different organizations anticipate and assess the likelihood of accidents from accident precursors. The project culminated in a workshop held in Washington, D.C., in July 2003. This report includes the papers presented at the workshop, as well as findings and recommendations based on the workshop results and committee discussions. The papers describe precursor strategies in aviation, the chemical industry, health care, nuclear power and security operations. In addition to current practices, they also address some areas for future research.

  9. Solid waste accident analysis in support of the Savannah River Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement

    The potential for facility accidents and the magnitude of their impacts are important factors in the evaluation of the solid waste management addressed in the Environmental Impact Statement. The purpose of this document is to address the potential solid waste management facility accidents for comparative use in support of the Environmental Impact Statement. This document must not be construed as an Authorization Basis document for any of the SRS waste management facilities. Because of the time constraints placed on preparing this accident impact analysis, all accident information was derived from existing safety documentation that has been prepared for SRS waste management facilities. A list of facilities to include in the accident impact analysis was provided as input by the Savannah River Technology Section. The accident impact analyses include existing SRS waste management facilities as well as proposed facilities. Safety documentation exists for all existing and many of the proposed facilities. Information was extracted from this existing documentation for this impact analysis. There are a few proposed facilities for which safety analyses have not been prepared. However, these facilities have similar processes to existing facilities and will treat, store, or dispose of the same type of material that is in existing facilities; therefore, the accidents can be expected to be similar

  10. Accident assessment for Chernobyl unit 3 from potential collapse of adjacent structures

    Gore, B.F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Simonov, I.M.; Kritsky, A.B. [Ministry for Environmental Protection and Nuclear Safety, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1998-09-01

    This study assessed the likelihood of a serious, explosive accident to be caused at Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) unit 3 by a collapse that might occur in the nearby shelter (Ukrytie) constructed over the destroyed unit 4 or in the intermediate building block V separating the two units. In order to determine quickly and economically the significance of the hazard to unit 3, the analysis was based on existing information and expert judgment. No new structural analysis calculations were performed. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) managed and directed the methodology of the study. The expert judgment assessments of likely scenarios and event probabilities were carried out by Ukrainian experts. Most of the project team was drawn from the State Scientific and Technical Center of the Ministry of Environmental Protection of Ukraine with support from personnel of the Chernobyl NPP, the Interbranch Agency of the Ukrainian Scientific and Technical Center, and the Ukrainian Nuclear Regulatory Administration. It was truly an international project; the PNNL project manager resided in Ukraine during the study and met regularly with the Ukrainian team to review progress and to discuss approach and methodology. Peer reviews were obtained from Ukrainian, US, and Canadian risk analysis and RBMK systems and operations experts. The full report of the study and its results was published by the Ukrainian team.