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Sample records for accessory olfactory bulb

  1. Accessory Olfactory Bulb Function is Modulated by Input from the Main Olfactory Epithelium

    Slotnick, Burton; Restrepo, Diego; Schellinck, Heather; Archbold, Georgina; Price, Stephen; Lin, Weihong

    2010-01-01

    While it is now established that sensory neurons in both the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ may be activated by both general and pheromonal odorants, it remains unclear what initiates sampling by the VNO. Anterograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase was used to determine that adequate intranasal syringing with zinc sulfate interrupted all inputs to the main olfactory bulb but left intact those to the accessory olfactory bulb. Adult male treated mi...

  2. Reliable Sex and Strain Discrimination in the Mouse Vomeronasal Organ and Accessory Olfactory Bulb

    Tolokh, Illya I.; Fu, Xiaoyan; Holy, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Animals modulate their courtship and territorial behaviors in response to olfactory cues produced by other animals. In rodents, detecting these cues is the primary role of the accessory olfactory system (AOS). We sought to systematically investigate the natural stimulus coding logic and robustness in neurons of the first two stages of accessory olfactory processing, the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and accessory olfactory bulb (AOB). We show that firing rate responses of just a few well-chosen mou...

  3. Ex Vivo Preparations of the Intact Vomeronasal Organ and Accessory Olfactory Bulb

    Doyle, Wayne I.; Hammen, Gary F.; Meeks, Julian P.

    2014-01-01

    The mouse accessory olfactory system (AOS) is a specialized sensory pathway for detecting nonvolatile social odors, pheromones, and kairomones. The first neural circuit in the AOS pathway, called the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), plays an important role in establishing sex-typical behaviors such as territorial aggression and mating. This small (

  4. Sexual activity increases the number of newborn cells in the accessory olfactory bulb of male rats

    Portillo, Wendy; Unda, Nancy; Camacho, Francisco J.; Sánchez, María; Corona, Rebeca; Arzate, Dulce Ma.; Díaz, Néstor F.; Paredes, Raúl G.

    2012-01-01

    In rodents, sexual behavior depends on the adequate detection of sexually relevant stimuli. The olfactory bulb (OB) is a region of the adult mammalian brain undergoing constant cell renewal by continuous integration of new granular and periglomerular neurons in the accessory (AOB) and main (MOB) olfactory bulbs. The proliferation, migration, survival, maturation, and integration of these new cells to the OB depend on the stimulus that the subjects received. We have previously shown that 15 da...

  5. Sexual activity increases the number of newborn cells in the accessory olfactory bulb of male rats.

    Wendy Portillo; Díaz, Néstor F.

    2012-01-01

    In rodents, sexual behavior depends on the adequate detection of sexually relevant stimuli. The olfactory bulb (OB) is a region of the adult mammalian brain undergoing constant cell renewal by continuous integration of new granular and periglomerular neurons in the accessory (AOB) and main (MOB) olfactory bulbs. The proliferation, migration, survival, maturation, and integration of these new cells to the OB depend on the stimulus that the subjects received. We have previously shown that 15 da...

  6. Activity Regulates Functional Connectivity from the Vomeronasal Organ to the Accessory Olfactory Bulb

    Hovis, Kenneth R.; Ramnath, Rohit; Dahlen, Jeffrey E.; Romanova, Anna L.; LaRocca, Greg; Bier, Mark E.; Urban, Nathaniel N.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian accessory olfactory system is specialized for the detection of chemicals that identify kin and conspecifics. Vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs), residing in the vomeronasal organ, project axons to the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) where they form synapses with principle neurons, known as mitral cells. The organization of this projection is quite precise and is believed to be essential for appropriate function of this system. However, how this precise connectivity is established...

  7. Histological and lectin histochemical studies on the main and accessory olfactory bulbs in the Japanese striped snake, Elaphe quadrivirgata.

    Kondoh, Daisuke; Wada, Akimi; Endo, Daisuke; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    The main and accessory olfactory bulbs were examined by histological methods and lectin histochemistry in the Japanese striped snake. As the results, the histological properties are similar between the main olfactory bulb and the accessory olfactory bulb. In lectin histochemistry, 21 lectins used in this study showed similar binding patterns in the main olfactory bulb and the accessory olfactory bulb. In detail, 15 lectins stained these olfactory bulbs with similar manner, and 6 lectins did not stain them at all. Two lectins, Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL) and Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL), stained the nerve and glomerular layers and did not stain any other layers in both olfactory bulbs. Four lectins, Soybean agglutinin (SBA), Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA), Peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L) stained the nerve and glomerular layers more intensely than other layers in both olfactory bulbs. In addition, VVA showed the dot-like stainings in the glomeruli of both olfactory bulbs. These findings suggest that the degree of development and the properties of glycoconjugates are similar between the main olfactory bulb and the accessory olfactory bulb in the Japanese striped snake. PMID:23257605

  8. Newborn Interneurons in the Accessory Olfactory Bulb Promote Mate Recognition in Female Mice

    Livio eOboti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the olfactory bulb of adult rodents, local interneurons are constantly replaced by immature precursors derived from the subventricular zone. Whether any olfactory sensory process specifically relies on this cell renewal remains largely unclear. By using the well-known model of mating-induced imprinting, we demonstrate that this olfactory memory formation critically depends on the presence of newborn granule neurons in the accessory olfactory bulb. Accordingly, we show that, in adult female mice, exposure to male pheromones increases the number of new granule cells surviving in the accessory olfactory bulb. This neuronal addition depends on the detection of sensory cues by the vomeronasal organ and requires centrifugal feedback activity from the amygdala. The stimuli affecting neuronal survival are contained in the low molecular weight fraction of urine and are implied in pheromonal recognition during mating. By chemical depletion of newly generated bulbar interneurons, we show a direct role of renewed granule cells in the accessory olfactory bulb in preventing pregnancy block by mating male odours. Taken together, our results indicate that adult neurogenesis is essential for specific brain functions such as persistent odour learning and mate recognition.

  9. Postnatal characterization of cells in the accessory olfactory bulb of wild type and reeler mice

    Eduardo eMartín-López

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Olfaction is the most relevant chemosensory sense of the rodents. General odors are primarily detected by the main olfactory system while most pheromonal signals are received by the accessory olfactory system. The first relay in the brain occurs in the olfactory bulb, which is subdivided in the main and accessory olfactory bulb (MOB/AOB. Given that the cell generation time is different between AOB and MOB, and the cell characterization of AOB remains limited, the goal of this work was first, the definition of the layering of AOB/MOB and second, the establishment of cellular phenotypes in the AOB in a time window corresponding to the early postnatal development. Moreover, since reelin deficiency has been related to layering and olfactory learning deficits, those data were compared with reeler mice. Firstly, we compared the layering between AOB and MOB at early embryonic stages. Then, cell phenotypes were established using specific neuronal and glial markers as well as the reelin adaptor protein Dab1 to analyze differences in both genetic backgrounds. There was no apparent difference in the cell phenotypes among AOB and MOB or between wild type and reeler animals. However, it was outstanding a disruption in the granular cell layer of reeler with respect to wild type mice. In conclusion, the AOB in reelin deficient mice showed similar neuronal and glial cell types being only affected the layering of granular cells.

  10. Convergence of FPR-rs3-expressing neurons in the mouse accessory olfactory bulb.

    Dietschi, Quentin; Assens, Alexis; Challet, Ludivine; Carleton, Alan; Rodriguez, Ivan

    2013-09-01

    In the mouse, most members of the FPR receptor family are expressed by vomeronasal sensory neurons. The neural circuitry corresponding to this class of chemical sensors is unknown. Taking advantage of the presence of FPR-rs3 on both vomeronasal dendrites and axonal fibers, we visualized the distribution of sensory cells expressing this member of the FPR family, and their corresponding axonal projections in the olfactory bulb. We found a rostrocaudal gradient of receptor choice frequency in the vomeronasal sensory neuroepithelium, and observed a convergence of FPR-rs3 axons into multiple, linked and deeply located glomeruli. These were homogenously innervated, and spatially restricted to the basal portion of the rostral accessory olfactory bulb. This organization, reminiscent of the one that characterizes axonal projections of V1R-expressing neurons, supports a role played by these receptors in the perception of semiochemicals. PMID:23664818

  11. Reliable sex and strain discrimination in the mouse vomeronasal organ and accessory olfactory bulb.

    Tolokh, Illya I; Fu, Xiaoyan; Holy, Timothy E

    2013-08-21

    Animals modulate their courtship and territorial behaviors in response to olfactory cues produced by other animals. In rodents, detecting these cues is the primary role of the accessory olfactory system (AOS). We sought to systematically investigate the natural stimulus coding logic and robustness in neurons of the first two stages of accessory olfactory processing, the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and accessory olfactory bulb (AOB). We show that firing rate responses of just a few well-chosen mouse VNO or AOB neurons can be used to reliably encode both sex and strain of other mice from cues contained in urine. Additionally, we show that this population code can generalize to new concentrations of stimuli and appears to represent stimulus identity in terms of diverging paths in coding space. Together, the results indicate that firing rate code on the temporal order of seconds is sufficient for accurate classification of pheromonal patterns at different concentrations and may be used by AOS neural circuitry to discriminate among naturally occurring urine stimuli. PMID:23966710

  12. Ex vivo preparations of the intact vomeronasal organ and accessory olfactory bulb.

    Doyle, Wayne I; Hammen, Gary F; Meeks, Julian P

    2014-01-01

    The mouse accessory olfactory system (AOS) is a specialized sensory pathway for detecting nonvolatile social odors, pheromones, and kairomones. The first neural circuit in the AOS pathway, called the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), plays an important role in establishing sex-typical behaviors such as territorial aggression and mating. This small (organization of this system presents unique opportunities for recording from large portions of the circuit simultaneously, investigation of sensory processing in the AOB remains challenging, largely due to its experimentally disadvantageous location in the brain. Here, we demonstrate a multi-stage dissection that removes the intact AOB inside a single hemisphere of the anterior mouse skull, leaving connections to both the peripheral vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) and local neuronal circuitry intact. The procedure exposes the AOB surface to direct visual inspection, facilitating electrophysiological and optical recordings from AOB circuit elements in the absence of anesthetics. Upon inserting a thin cannula into the vomeronasal organ (VNO), which houses the VSNs, one can directly expose the periphery to social odors and pheromones while recording downstream activity in the AOB. This procedure enables controlled inquiries into AOS information processing, which can shed light on mechanisms linking pheromone exposure to changes in behavior. PMID:25145699

  13. Sexual activity increases the number of newborn cells in the accessory olfactory bulb of male rats.

    Wendy ePortillo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In rodents, sexual behavior depends on the adequate detection of sexually relevant stimuli. The olfactory bulb (OB is a region of the adult mammalian brain undergoing constant cell renewal by continuous integration of new granular and periglomerular neurons in the accessory (AOB and main (MOB olfactory bulbs. The proliferation, migration, survival, maturation, and integration of these new cells to the OB depend on the stimulus that the subjects received. We have previously shown that 15 days after females control (paced the sexual interaction an increase in the number of cells is observed in the AOB. No changes are observed in the number of cells when females are not allowed to control the sexual interaction. In the present study we investigated if in male rats sexual behavior increases the number of new cells in the OB. Male rats were divided in five groups: 1 males that did not receive any sexual stimulation, 2 males that were exposed to female odors, 3 males that mated for 1 h and could not pace their sexual interaction, 4 males that paced their sexual interaction and ejaculated 1 time and 5 males that paced their sexual interaction and ejaculated 3 times. All males received three injections of the DNA synthesis marker bromodeoxyuridine at 1h intervals, starting 1h before the beginning of the behavioral test. Fifteen days later, males were sacrificed and the brains were processed to identify new cells and to evaluate if they differentiated into neurons. The number of newborn cells increased in the granular cell layer (also known as the internal cell layer of the AOB in males that ejaculated one or three times controlling (paced the rate of the sexual interaction. Some of these new cells were identified as neurons. In contrast, no significant differences were found in the mitral cell layer (also known as the external cell layer and glomerular cell layer of the AOB. In addition, no significant differences were found between groups in the MOB in

  14. In-vivo Vomeronasal Stimulation Reveals Sensory Encoding of Conspecific and Allospecific Cues by the Mouse Accessory Olfactory Bulb

    Dulac, Catherine; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Katz, Lawrence C.; Mooney, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The rodent vomeronasal system plays a critical role in mediating pheromone-evoked social and sexual behaviors. Recent studies of the anatomical and molecular architecture of the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and of its synaptic target, the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), have suggested that unique features underlie vomeronasal sensory processing. However, the neuronal representation of pheromonal information leading to specific behavioral and endocrine responses has remained largely unexplored due ...

  15. Prolonged Intracellular Na+ Dynamics Govern Electrical Activity in Accessory Olfactory Bulb Mitral Cells.

    Asaph Zylbertal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Persistent activity has been reported in many brain areas and is hypothesized to mediate working memory and emotional brain states and to rely upon network or biophysical feedback. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which persistent neuronal activity can be generated without feedback, relying instead on the slow removal of Na+ from neurons following bursts of activity. We show that mitral cells in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB, which plays a major role in mammalian social behavior, may respond to a brief sensory stimulation with persistent firing. By combining electrical recordings, Ca2+ and Na+ imaging, and realistic computational modeling, we explored the mechanisms underlying the persistent activity in AOB mitral cells. We found that the exceptionally slow inward current that underlies this activity is governed by prolonged dynamics of intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i, which affects neuronal electrical activity via several pathways. Specifically, elevated dendritic [Na+]i reverses the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger activity, thus modifying the [Ca2+]i set-point. This process, which relies on ubiquitous membrane mechanisms, is likely to play a role in other neuronal types in various brain regions.

  16. Oxytocin facilitates the induction of long-term potentiation in the accessory olfactory bulb.

    Fang, Long-Yun; Quan, Rong-Dan; Kaba, Hideto

    2008-06-20

    When female mice are mated, they form a memory to the pheromonal signal of their male partner. Several lines of evidence indicate that the neural changes underlying this memory occur in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) at the first stage of the vomeronasal system. The formation of this memory depends on the mating-induced release of noradrenaline in the AOB. In addition to noradrenaline, the neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) is also released within the central nervous system during mating. Because OT has been implicated in social memory and its receptors are expressed in the AOB, we hypothesized that OT might promote the strength of synaptic transmission from mitral to granule cells in the AOB. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the lateral olfactory tract-evoked field potential that represents the granule cell response to mitral cell activation and its plasticity in parasagittal slices of the AOB. Of the 10-, 20-, 50-, and 100-Hz stimulations tested, the 100-Hz stimulation was optimal for inducing long-term potentiation (LTP). OT paired with 100-Hz stimulation that only produced short-term potentiation enhanced LTP induction in a dose-dependent manner. OT-paired LTP was blocked by both the selective OT antagonist desGly-NH(2),d(CH(2))(5)[Tyr(Me)(2),Thr(4)]-ornithine vasotocin and the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist dl-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid. These results indicate that OT can function as a gate to modulate the establishment of NMDA receptor-dependent LTP at the mitral-to-granule cell synapse in the AOB. PMID:18468792

  17. Paced-mating increases the number of adult new born cells in the internal cellular (granular layer of the accessory olfactory bulb.

    Rebeca Corona

    Full Text Available The continuous production and addition of new neurons during life in the olfactory bulb is well accepted and has been extensively studied in rodents. This process could allow the animals to adapt to a changing environment. Olfactory neurogenesis begins in the subventricular zone where stem cells proliferate and give rise to young undifferentiated neuroblasts that migrate along the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb (OB. Olfaction is crucial for the expression of sexual behavior in rodents. In female rats, the ability to control the rate of sexual interactions (pacing has important physiological and behavioral consequences. In the present experiment we evaluated if pacing behavior modifies the rate of new cells that reach the main and accessory olfactory bulb. The BrdU marker was injected before and after different behavioral tests which included: females placed in a mating cage (control, females allowed to pace the sexual interaction, females that mated but were not able to control the rate of the sexual interaction and females exposed to a sexually active male. Subjects were sacrificed fifteen days after the behavioral test. We observed a significant increase in the density of BrdU positive cells in the internal cellular layer of the accessory olfactory bulb when females paced the sexual interaction in comparison to the other 3 groups. No differences in the cell density in the main olfactory bulb were found. These results suggest that pacing behavior promotes an increase in density of the new cells in the accessory olfactory bulb.

  18. Extracting Behaviorally Relevant Traits from Natural Stimuli: Benefits of Combinatorial Representations at the Accessory Olfactory Bulb.

    Kahan, Anat; Ben-Shaul, Yoram

    2016-03-01

    For many animals, chemosensation is essential for guiding social behavior. However, because multiple factors can modulate levels of individual chemical cues, deriving information about other individuals via natural chemical stimuli involves considerable challenges. How social information is extracted despite these sources of variability is poorly understood. The vomeronasal system provides an excellent opportunity to study this topic due to its role in detecting socially relevant traits. Here, we focus on two such traits: a female mouse's strain and reproductive state. In particular, we measure stimulus-induced neuronal activity in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) in response to various dilutions of urine, vaginal secretions, and saliva, from estrus and non-estrus female mice from two different strains. We first show that all tested secretions provide information about a female's receptivity and genotype. Next, we investigate how these traits can be decoded from neuronal activity despite multiple sources of variability. We show that individual neurons are limited in their capacity to allow trait classification across multiple sources of variability. However, simple linear classifiers sampling neuronal activity from small neuronal ensembles can provide a substantial improvement over that attained with individual units. Furthermore, we show that some traits are more efficiently detected than others, and that particular secretions may be optimized for conveying information about specific traits. Across all tested stimulus sources, discrimination between strains is more accurate than discrimination of receptivity, and detection of receptivity is more accurate with vaginal secretions than with urine. Our findings highlight the challenges of chemosensory processing of natural stimuli, and suggest that downstream readout stages decode multiple behaviorally relevant traits by sampling information from distinct but overlapping populations of AOB neurons. PMID:26938460

  19. Extracting Behaviorally Relevant Traits from Natural Stimuli: Benefits of Combinatorial Representations at the Accessory Olfactory Bulb.

    Anat Kahan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available For many animals, chemosensation is essential for guiding social behavior. However, because multiple factors can modulate levels of individual chemical cues, deriving information about other individuals via natural chemical stimuli involves considerable challenges. How social information is extracted despite these sources of variability is poorly understood. The vomeronasal system provides an excellent opportunity to study this topic due to its role in detecting socially relevant traits. Here, we focus on two such traits: a female mouse's strain and reproductive state. In particular, we measure stimulus-induced neuronal activity in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB in response to various dilutions of urine, vaginal secretions, and saliva, from estrus and non-estrus female mice from two different strains. We first show that all tested secretions provide information about a female's receptivity and genotype. Next, we investigate how these traits can be decoded from neuronal activity despite multiple sources of variability. We show that individual neurons are limited in their capacity to allow trait classification across multiple sources of variability. However, simple linear classifiers sampling neuronal activity from small neuronal ensembles can provide a substantial improvement over that attained with individual units. Furthermore, we show that some traits are more efficiently detected than others, and that particular secretions may be optimized for conveying information about specific traits. Across all tested stimulus sources, discrimination between strains is more accurate than discrimination of receptivity, and detection of receptivity is more accurate with vaginal secretions than with urine. Our findings highlight the challenges of chemosensory processing of natural stimuli, and suggest that downstream readout stages decode multiple behaviorally relevant traits by sampling information from distinct but overlapping populations of AOB neurons.

  20. Electrophysiological evidence for a direct link between the main and accessory olfactory bulbs in the adult rat

    Victor eVargas-Barroso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is accepted that the main- and accessory- olfactory systems exhibit overlapping responses to pheromones and odorants. We performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in adult rat olfactory bulb slices to define a possible interaction between the first central relay of these systems: the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB and the main olfactory bulb (MOB. This was tested by applying electrical field stimulation in the dorsal part of the MOB while recording large principal cells (LPCs of the anterior AOB (aAOB. Additional recordings of LPCs were performed at either side of the plane of intersection between the aAOB and posterior-AOB (pAOB halves, or linea alba, while applying field stimulation to the opposite half. A total of 92 recorded neurons were filled during whole-cell recordings with biocytin and studied at the light microscope. Neurons located in the aAOB (n = 6, 8% send axon collaterals to the MOB since they were antidromically activated in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists (APV and CNQX. Recorded LPCs evoked orthodromic excitatory post-synaptic responses (n = 6, aAOB; n = 1, pAOB or antidromic action potentials (n = 8, aAOB; n = 7, pAOB when applying field stimulation to the opposite half of the recording site (e.g. recording in aAOB; stimulating in pAOB and vice-versa. Observation of the filled neurons revealed that indeed, LPCs send axon branches that cross the linea alba to resolve in the internal cellular layer. Additionally, LPCs of the aAOB send axon collaterals to dorsal-MOB territory. Notably, while performing AOB recordings we found a sub-population of neurons (24 % of the total that exhibited voltage-dependent bursts of action potentials. Our findings support the existence of: 1. a direct projection from aAOB LPCs to dorsal-MOB, 2. physiologically active synapses linking aAOB and pAOB, and 3. pacemaker-like neurons in both AOB halves. This work was presented in the form of an Abstract on SfN 2014 (719.14/EE17.

  1. Sexual stimulation increases the survival of new cells in the accessory olfactory bulb of the male rat.

    Nancy M Unda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sexual behavior in rodents is modulated by the olfactory system. The olfactory bulb (OB is a structure that undergoes continues neurogenesis in adulthood. We have previously shown that 15 days after males rats pace the sexual interaction and ejaculate 1 or 3 times, there is an increase in the density of new cells that reach the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if sexual behavior in male rats increases the density of new neurons that survive 45 days after sexual behavior in the AOB and in the main OB (MOB. Male rats were randomly divided in four groups: 1 Control (Ctr, males without sexual interaction; 2 Exposed (Exp, males only exposed to a sexually receptive female; 3 No pacing (NP, males that mated in conditions in which the female paced the sexual interaction; 4 One ejaculation (1E, males that paced the sexual interaction with a receptive female and ejaculated once; and 5 Three ejaculations (3E, males that paced the sexual interaction and were allowed to ejaculate three times. All males were injected with the DNA synthesis marker 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU, and were tested in one of the above conditions. 45 days later they were sacrificed, and the OBs were processed to identify new cells and evaluate if they had differentiated into neurons. Our data indicate that males that ejaculated 3 times showed an increase in the density of new cells that survive in the posterior part of the granular cell layer of the AOB and have more new neurons that the control group. However, no significant differences were found in the percentage of new cells that differentiate into neurons. No significant increase in the density of new cells was observed in the MOB. Our data show that pacing the sexual interaction until 3 ejaculations increases the density of new cells and neurons in the granular layer of the AOB, confirming that sexual behavior induces long-lasting plastic changes in the OB.

  2. A morphological study of the vomeronasal organ and the accessory olfactory bulb in the Korean roe deer, Capreolus pygargus.

    Park, Changnam; Ahn, Meejung; Lee, Jae-Yuk; Lee, Sang; Yun, Youngmin; Lim, Yoon-Kyu; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Shin, Taekyun

    2014-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) and accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) of the Korean roe deer (Capreolus pygargus) were studied histologically to evaluate their morphological characteristics. Grossly, the VNO, encased by cartilage, has a paired tubular structure with a caudal blind end and a rostral connection through incisive ducts on the hard palate. In the VNO, the vomeronasal sensory epithelium (VSE) consists of galectin-3-positive supporting cells, protein gene product (PGP) 9.5-positive receptor cells, and basal cells. The vomeronasal respiratory epithelium (VRE) consists of a pseudostratified epithelium. The AOB strata included a vomeronasal nerve layer (VNL), a glomerular layer (GL), a mitral/tufted cell layer, and a granular cell layer. All lectins used in this study, including Bandeiraea simplicifolia agglutinin isolectin B4 (BSI-B4), soybean agglutinin (SBA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), and Triticum vulgaris wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), labeled the VSE with varying intensity. In the AOB, both the VNL and the GL reacted with BSI-B4, SBA, and WGA with varying intensity, but not with UEA-I. This is the first morphological study of the VNO and AOB of the Korean roe deer, which are similar to those of goats. PMID:24055195

  3. Three-dimensional reconstruction of electron micrographs reveals intrabulbar circuit differences between accessory and main olfactory bulbs.

    Moriya-Ito, Keiko; Endoh, Kentaroh; Fujiwara-Tsukamoto, Yoko; Ichikawa, Masumi

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of synaptic arrangement on a particular dendrite provides essential information regarding neuronal properties and neural microcircuits. Unconventional synapses are particularly good candidates for such steric attribution. In main and accessory olfactory bulbs (MOBs and AOBs), there are dendrodendritic reciprocal synapses (RSs) between excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory interneurons. Although the fine structure and configuration of these synapses have been investigated in MOB, their characteristics in AOB were unknown. In this study, we performed 3D AOB reconstruction using serial section transmission electron microscopy. We found numerous RSs on primary dendrites from glomeruli to mitral/tufted (MT) cell somas. These synapses formed between dendritic shafts of MT cells and large dendritic spines, or so-called gemmules, of granule (Gr) cells. This indicates that chemical signals received by a glomerulus are regulated in the primary dendrite of an MT cell before reaching its soma. In MOB, RSs are located on secondary dendrites and act as lateral and self-inhibiting following mitral cell depolarization. Our results indicate that AOB intrabulbar microcircuitry is quite different from that in the MOB. PMID:23626525

  4. Three-dimensional reconstruction of electron micrographs reveals intrabulbar circuit differences between accessory and main olfactory bulbs

    Keiko Moriya-Ito

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D reconstruction of synaptic arrangement on a particular dendrite provides essential information regarding neuronal properties and neural microcircuits. Unconventional synapses are particularly good candidates for such steric attribution. In main and accessory olfactory bulbs (MOBs and AOBs, there are dendrodendritic reciprocal synapses (RSs between excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory interneurons. Although the fine structure and configuration of these synapses have been investigated in MOB, their characteristics in AOB were unknown. In this study, we performed 3D AOB reconstruction using serial section transmission electron microscopy. We found numerous RSs on primary dendrites from glomeruli to mitral/tufted (MT cell somas. These synapses formed between dendritic shafts of MT cells and large dendritic spines, or so-called gemmules, of granule (Gr cells. This indicates that chemical signals received by a glomerulus are regulated in the primary dendrite of an MT cell before reaching the AOB. In MOB, RSs are located on secondary dendrites and act as lateral and self-inhibiting following mitral cell depolarization. Our results indicate that AOB intrabulbar microcircuitry is quite different from that in the MOB.

  5. Pheromones from males of different familiarity exert divergent effects on adult neurogenesis in the female accessory olfactory bulb.

    Wu, Jyun-Han; Han, Yueh-Ting; Yu, Jenn-Yah; Wang, Tsu-Wei

    2013-08-01

    Pheromones from urine of unfamiliar conspecific male animals can reinitiate a female's estrus cycle to cause pregnancy block through the vomeronasal organ (VNO)-accessory olfactory bulb (AOB)-hypothalamic pathway. This phenomenon is called the Bruce effect. Pheromones from the mate of the female, however, do not trigger re-entrance of the estrus cycle because an olfactory memory toward its mate is formed. The activity of the VNO-AOB-hypothalamic pathway is negatively modulated by GABAergic granule cells in the AOB. Since these cells are constantly replenished by neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle throughout adulthood and adult neurogenesis is required for mate recognition and fertility, we tested the hypothesis that pheromones from familiar and unfamiliar males may have different effects on adult AOB neurogenesis in female mice. When female mice were exposed to bedding used by a male or lived with one, cell proliferation and neuroblast production in the SVZ were increased. Furthermore, survival of newly generated cells in the AOB was enhanced. This survival effect was transient and mediated by norepinephrine. Interestingly, male bedding-induced newborn cell survival in the AOB but not cell proliferation in the SVZ was attenuated when females were subjected to bedding from an unfamiliar male. Our results indicate that male pheromones from familiar and unfamiliar males exert different effects on neurogenesis in the adult female AOB. Given that adult neurogenesis is required for reproductive behaviors, these divergent pheromonal effects may provide a mechanism for the Bruce effect. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 73: 632-645, 2013. PMID:23696538

  6. Adult Olfactory Bulb Neurogenesis.

    Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Valley, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Most organisms use their olfactory system to detect and analyze chemical cues from the external world to guide essential behaviors. From worms to vertebrates, chemicals are detected by odorant receptors expressed by olfactory sensory neurons, which in vertebrates send an axon to the primary processing center called the olfactory bulb (OB). Within the OB, sensory neurons form excitatory synapses with projection neurons and with inhibitory interneurons. Thus, because of complex synaptic interactions, the output of a given projection neuron is determined not only by the sensory input, but also by the activity of local inhibitory interneurons that are regenerated throughout life in the process of adult neurogenesis. Herein, we discuss how it is optimized and why. PMID:27235474

  7. Transient and sustained afterdepolarizations in accessory olfactory bulb mitral cells are mediated by distinct mechanisms that are differentially regulated by neuromodulators

    Guy eShpak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Social interactions between mammalian conspecifics rely heavily on molecular communication via the main and accessory olfactory systems. These two chemosensory systems show high similarity in the organization of information flow along their early stages: social chemical cues are detected by the sensory neurons of the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ. These neurons then convey sensory information to the main (MOB and accessory (AOB olfactory bulbs, respectively, where they synapse upon mitral cells that project to higher brain areas. Yet, the functional difference between these two chemosensory systems remains unclear. We have previously shown that MOB and AOB mitral cells exhibit very distinct intrinsic biophysical properties leading to different types of information processing. Specifically, we found that unlike MOB mitral cells, AOB neurons display persistent firing responses to strong stimuli. These prolonged responses are mediated by long-lasting calcium-activated non-selective cationic current (Ican. In the current study we further examined the firing characteristics of these cells and their modulation by several neuromodulators. We found that AOB mitral cells display transient depolarizing afterpotentials (DAPs following moderate firing. These DAPs are not found in MOB mitral cells that show instead robust hyperpolarizing afterpotentials. Unlike Ican, the DAPs of AOB mitral cells are activated by low levels of intracellular calcium and are relatively insensitive to flufenamic acid. Moreover, the cholinergic agonist carbachol exerts opposite effects on the persistent firing and DAPs of AOB mitral cells. We conclude that these phenomena are mediated by distinct biophysical mechanisms that may serve to mediate different types of information processing in the AOB at distinct brain states.

  8. Transient and sustained afterdepolarizations in accessory olfactory bulb mitral cells are mediated by distinct mechanisms that are differentially regulated by neuromodulators.

    Shpak, Guy; Zylbertal, Asaph; Wagner, Shlomo

    2014-01-01

    Social interactions between mammalian conspecifics rely heavily on molecular communication via the main and accessory olfactory systems. These two chemosensory systems show high similarity in the organization of information flow along their early stages: social chemical cues are detected by the sensory neurons of the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ. These neurons then convey sensory information to the main (MOB) and accessory (AOB) olfactory bulbs, respectively, where they synapse upon mitral cells that project to higher brain areas. Yet, the functional difference between these two chemosensory systems remains unclear. We have previously shown that MOB and AOB mitral cells exhibit very distinct intrinsic biophysical properties leading to different types of information processing. Specifically, we found that unlike MOB mitral cells, AOB neurons display persistent firing responses to strong stimuli. These prolonged responses are mediated by long-lasting calcium-activated non-selective cationic current (Ican). In the current study we further examined the firing characteristics of these cells and their modulation by several neuromodulators. We found that AOB mitral cells display transient depolarizing afterpotentials (DAPs) following moderate firing. These DAPs are not found in MOB mitral cells that show instead robust hyperpolarizing afterpotentials. Unlike Ican, the DAPs of AOB mitral cells are activated by low levels of intracellular calcium and are relatively insensitive to flufenamic acid. Moreover, the cholinergic agonist carbachol exerts opposite effects on the persistent firing and DAPs of AOB mitral cells. We conclude that these phenomena are mediated by distinct biophysical mechanisms that may serve to mediate different types of information processing in the AOB at distinct brain states. PMID:25642164

  9. Histological Structure of the Vomeronasal Organ and Accessory Olfactory Bulb of Myospalax Cansus and Microtus oeconomus%甘肃鼢鼠与根田鼠的犁鼻器和副嗅球结构研究

    王茁; 张淑慧

    2012-01-01

    为了探讨地下鼠犁鼻系统与地面鼠的差异及其与地面鼠嗅觉功能相适应的特点,用组织学方法对甘肃鼢鼠(Myospalax cansus)与根田鼠(Microtus oeconomus)的副嗅球和犁鼻器结构并进行了差异性研究.结果表明,2种鼠的犁鼻器均位于鼻腔前端鼻中隔基部两侧,呈管状;甘肃鼢鼠犁鼻上皮厚度、副嗅球颗粒细胞和僧帽细胞带宽比根田鼠发达;甘肃鼢鼠犁鼻器、副嗅球的性二型分化比根田鼠显著.2种鼠各自犁鼻器和副嗅球的形态有一定的对应关系,甘肃鼢鼠犁鼻上皮、副嗅球厚而短;根田鼠犁鼻上皮、副嗅球薄而长.这种对应关系可能与犁鼻器和副嗅球之间存在着神经投射有关.%In order to explore the difference in the vomeronasal organs and olfactory functions of subterranean rats and ground rats, the histological and immunohistochemistrical methods were used to study the structure of the accessory olfactory bulb and vomeronasal organ in M. cansus and M. oeconomus. The vomeronasal organs of both rats are in the inboard wall of vomeronasal tube, while outside wall protrudes to the central cave slightly, which is pseudostratified epithelium, and its base is bone marrow of a triangle. The vomeronasal epidermis thickness and Ihe band width of accessory olfactory bulb granular cells and mitral cells in M. cansus are well developed than that of M. oeconomus. Compared with the M. oeconomus, the sexually dimorphic of accessory olfactory bulb and vomeronasal organ in M. cansus are significant. There is a certain corresponding relationship between the morphology of accessory olfactory bulb and vomeronasal organ. The vomeronasal epidermis and accessory olfactory bulb of M. cansus are thick and short, while that of M. oecoiwmus are thin and long. The possible reason of this corresponding relationship is related to the nerve projection between these two structures.

  10. Neuronal organization of olfactory bulb circuits

    Shin eNagayama; Ryota eHomma; Fumiaki eImamura

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons extend their axons solely to the olfactory bulb, which is dedicated to odor information processing. The olfactory bulb is divided into multiple layers, with different types of neurons found in each of the layers. Therefore, neurons in the olfactory bulb have conventionally been categorized based on the layers in which their cell bodies are found; namely, juxtaglomerular cells in the glomerular layer, tufted cells in the external plexiform layer, mitral cells in the...

  11. Olfactory dysfunction, olfactory bulb pathology and urban air pollution

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Osnaya, Norma; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Villarreal-Calderon, Rafael; Herritt, Lou; Brooks, Diane; Keefe, Sheyla; Palacios-Moreno, Juan; Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Mexico City (MC) residents are exposed to severe air pollution and exhibit olfactory bulb inflammation. We compared the olfactory function of individuals living under conditions of extreme air pollution to that of controls from a relatively clean environment and explore associations between olfaction scores, apolipoprotein E (APOE) status, and pollution exposure. The olfactory bulbs (OBs) of 35 MC and 9 controls 20.8 ± 8.5 y were assessed by light and electron microscopy. The University of Pe...

  12. 电生理法对豚鼠副嗅球功能分区的显示%Functional subdivisions of the guinea pig accessory olfactory bulb revealed by electrophysiology

    余青松; 须贝外喜夫

    2001-01-01

    目的:探讨豚鼠副嗅球(AOB)是否存在多个功能分区。方法:在豚鼠副嗅球矢状位切片上,将双钨电极插入副嗅球前部或后部的犁鼻神经纤维层(VNL),以单个方波刺激传入神经纤维,用玻璃微电极记录AOB前部或后部外橄状层(EPL)细胞外场电位。结果:电刺激VNL,可在EPL记录到典型的衰减性场电位,且后EPL记录到的场电位的持续时间较前部分明显延长。刺激前VNL仅在前EPL记录到场电位,而刺激后VNL只在后EPL记录到场电位。结论:豚鼠副嗅球可分为前后两个亚区,两区存在解剖学上的差异,说明在犁鼻系统中至少存在两个不同的传入-传出通路。%Objective:To elucidate possible functional subdivisions in the guinea pig accessory olfactory bulb.Method:The guinea pig accessory olfactory bulbs were cut in sagittal slice.Bipolar tungsten electrodes were inserted into anterior or posterior vomeronasal nerve layers and single square-pulses were delivered through the eletrodes to activate afferent fibres.Glass microelectrodes were used to record extracellular field potentials of anterior or posterior external plexiform layers.Result:A single shook of the VNL provoked a characteristic damped oscillatory field potential and the oscillation in the pAOB was more distinct in wave form and longer in duration than those in the aAOB.The stimulation of anterior VNL elicited field potentials exelusively in the anterior region of EPL,whereas shocks to the posterior VNL provoked oscillatory responses only within the posterior EPL.Conclusion:The accessory olfactory bulb in the guinea-pig is distinctly segregated into the anterior and posterior subdivisions and an anatomical boundary exists in both regions.The results suggested that there are at least two different input-output pathways in vomeronasal systems.

  13. Neuronal organization of olfactory bulb circuits

    Shin eNagayama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory sensory neurons extend their axons solely to the olfactory bulb, which is dedicated to odor information processing. The olfactory bulb is divided into multiple layers, with different types of neurons found in each of the layers. Therefore, neurons in the olfactory bulb have conventionally been categorized based on the layers in which their cell bodies are found; namely, juxtaglomerular cells in the glomerular layer, tufted cells in the external plexiform layer, mitral cells in the mitral cell layer, and granule cells in the granule cell layer. More recently, numerous studies have revealed the heterogeneous nature of each of these cell types, allowing them to be further divided into subclasses based on differences in morphological, molecular, and electrophysiological properties. In addition, technical developments and advances have resulted in an increasing number of studies regarding cell types other than the conventionally categorized ones described above, including short-axon cells and adult-generated interneurons. Thus, the expanding diversity of cells in the olfactory bulb is now being acknowledged. However, our current understanding of olfactory bulb neuronal circuits is mostly based on the conventional and simplest classification of cell types. Few studies have taken neuronal diversity into account for understanding the function of the neuronal circuits in this region of the brain. This oversight may contribute to the roadblocks in developing more precise and accurate models of olfactory neuronal networks. The purpose of this review is therefore to discuss the expanse of existing work on neuronal diversity in the olfactory bulb up to this point, so as to provide an overall picture of the olfactory bulb circuit.

  14. Cortical feedback control of olfactory bulb circuits.

    Boyd, Alison M; Sturgill, James F; Poo, Cindy; Isaacson, Jeffry S

    2012-12-20

    Olfactory cortex pyramidal cells integrate sensory input from olfactory bulb mitral and tufted (M/T) cells and project axons back to the bulb. However, the impact of cortical feedback projections on olfactory bulb circuits is unclear. Here, we selectively express channelrhodopsin-2 in olfactory cortex pyramidal cells and show that cortical feedback projections excite diverse populations of bulb interneurons. Activation of cortical fibers directly excites GABAergic granule cells, which in turn inhibit M/T cells. However, we show that cortical inputs preferentially target short axon cells that drive feedforward inhibition of granule cells. In vivo, activation of olfactory cortex that only weakly affects spontaneous M/T cell firing strongly gates odor-evoked M/T cell responses: cortical activity suppresses odor-evoked excitation and enhances odor-evoked inhibition. Together, these results indicate that although cortical projections have diverse actions on olfactory bulb microcircuits, the net effect of cortical feedback on M/T cells is an amplification of odor-evoked inhibition. PMID:23259951

  15. Modeling the Olfactory Bulb - Coupled Nonlinear Oscillators

    Li, Zhaoping; Hopfield, J J

    1989-01-01

    The olfactory bulb of mammals aids in the discrimination of odors. A mathematical model based on the bulbar anatomy and electrophysiology is described. Simulations produce a 35-60 Hz modulated activity coherent across the bulb, mimicing the observed field potentials. The decision states (for the odor information) here can be thought of as stable cycles, rather than point stable states typical of simpler neuro-computing models. Analysis and simulations show that a group of...

  16. Olfactory bulb encoding during learning under anaesthesia

    Alister U Nicol

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neural plasticity changes within the olfactory bulb are important for olfactory learning, although how neural encoding changes support new associations with specific odours and whether they can be investigated under anaesthesia, remain unclear. Using the social transmission of food preference olfactory learning paradigm in mice in conjunction with in vivo microdialysis sampling we have shown firstly that a learned preference for a scented food odour smelled on the breath of a demonstrator animal occurs under isofluorane anaesthesia. Furthermore, subsequent exposure to this cued odour under anaesthesia promotes the same pattern of increased release of glutamate and GABA in the olfactory bulb as previously found in conscious animals following olfactory learning, and evoked GABA release was positively correlated with the amount of scented food eaten. In a second experiment, multiarray (24 electrodes electrophysiological recordings were made from olfactory bulb mitral cells under isofluorane anaesthesia before, during and after a novel scented food odour was paired with carbon disulfide. Results showed significant increases in overall firing frequency to the cued-odour during and after learning and decreases in response to an uncued odour. Analysis of patterns of changes in individual neurons revealed that a substantial proportion (>50% of them significantly changed their response profiles during and after learning with most of those previously inhibited becoming excited. A large number of cells exhibiting no response to the odours prior to learning were either excited or inhibited afterwards. With the uncued odour many previously responsive cells became unresponsive or inhibited. Learning associated changes only occurred in the posterior part of the olfactory bulb. Thus olfactory learning under anaesthesia promotes extensive, but spatially distinct, changes in mitral cell networks to both cued and uncued odours as well as in evoked glutamate and

  17. A circadian clock in the olfactory bulb anticipates feeding during food anticipatory activity.

    Nahum Nolasco

    Full Text Available Rabbit pups ingest food, in this case milk, once a day with circadian periodicity and are a natural model of food anticipatory activity. During nursing, several sensory systems receive information about properties of the food, one of them being the olfactory system, which has received little attention in relation to synchronization by food. In addition, the olfactory bulb has a circadian pacemaker that exhibits rhythms independently of the suprachiasmatic nucleus, but the biological functions of these rhythms are largely unknown. In the present contribution, we hypothesized that circadian suckling of milk synchronizes rhythms in the olfactory bulb. To this aim we explored by immunohistochemistry, rhythms of FOS and PER1 proteins, as indicators of activation and reporter of oscillations, respectively, through a complete 24-h cycle in periglomerular, mitral and granular cell layers of both the main and the accessory olfactory bulb. Subjects were 7-day-old rabbit pups scheduled to nurse during the night (02:00 h or day (10:00 h, and also fasted subjects, to explore the possible persistence of oscillations. In the three layers of the main olfactory bulb, FOS was high at time of nursing, then further increased 1.5 h afterward, and then decreased to increase again in advance of the next nursing bout. This pattern persisted, without the postprandial increase, in fasted subjects with a shift in subjects nursed at 02:00. PER1 was increased 2-8 h after nursing and this increase persisted in most cell layers, with a shift, in fasted subjects. In the accessory olfactory bulb we only observed a consistent pattern of FOS expression in the mitral cell layer of nursed subjects, similar to that of the main olfactory bulb. We conclude that the main olfactory bulb is synchronized during milk ingestion, but during fasting its oscillations perhaps are modulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, as proposed for rodents.

  18. Neurogenesis in the adult olfactory bulb

    Angela Pignatelli; Cristina Gambardella; Ottorino Belluzzi

    2011-01-01

    Neurogenesis is the process by which cells divide, migrate, and subsequently differentiate into a neuronal phenotype. Significant rates of neurogenesis persist into adulthood in two brain regions, the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Cells of the subventricular zone divide and migrate via the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb where they differentiate into granule and periglomerular cells. With the discovery of large-scale neurogenesis in the adult brain, there have been significant efforts to identify the mechanisms that control this process as well as the role of these cells in neuronal functioning. Although many questions remain unanswered, new insights appear daily about adult neurogenesis, regulatory mechanisms, and the fates of the progeny. In this review we highlight the main studies investigating factors that regulate neurogenesis in the subventricular zone, neuronal migration to the olfactory bulb, neuronal integration into the existing bulbar network and shortly discuss the functional meaning of this process.

  19. Olfactory dysfunction, olfactory bulb pathology and urban air pollution

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Osnaya, Norma; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Villarreal-Calderon, Rafael; Herritt, Lou; Brooks, Diane; Keefe, Sheyla; Palacios-Moreno, Juan; Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Aiello-Mora, Mario; Maronpot, Robert R.; Doty, Richard L

    2010-01-01

    Mexico City (MC) residents are exposed to severe air pollution and exhibit olfactory bulb inflammation. We compared the olfactory function of individuals living under conditions of extreme air pollution to that of controls from a relatively clean environment and explore associations between olfaction scores, apolipoprotein E (APOE) status, and pollution exposure. The olfactory bulbs (OBs) of 35 MC and 9 controls 20.8 ± 8.5 y were assessed by light and electron microscopy. The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) was administered to 62 MC / 25 controls 21.2 ±2.7 y. MC subjects had significantly lower UPSIT scores: 34.24 ± 0.42 versus controls 35.76 ± 0.40, p=0.03. Olfaction deficits were present in 35.5% MC and 12% of controls. MC APOE ε 4 carriers failed 2.4 ± 0.54 items in the 10-item smell identification scale from the UPSIT related to Alzheimer's disease, while APOE 2/3 and 3/3 subjects failed 1.36 ± 0.16 items, p = 0.01. MC residents exhibited OB endothelial hyperplasia, neuronal accumulation of particles (2/35), and immunoreactivity to beta amyloid βA42 (29/35) and/or α-synuclein (4/35) in neurons, glial cells and/or blood vessels. Ultrafine particles were present in OBs endothelial cytoplasm and basement membranes. Control OBs were unremarkable. Air pollution exposure is associated with olfactory dysfunction and OB pathology, APOE 4 may confer greater susceptibility to such abnormalities, and ultrafine particles could play a key role in the OB pathology. This study contributes to our understanding of the influences of air pollution on olfaction and its potential contribution to neurodegeneration. PMID:19297138

  20. Olfactory consciousness and gamma oscillation couplings across the olfactory bulb, olfactory cortex and orbitofrontal cortex

    KensakuMori

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The orbitofrontal cortex receives multi-modality sensory inputs, including olfactory input, and is thought to be involved in conscious perception of the olfactory image of objects. Generation of olfactory consciousness requires neuronal circuit mechanisms for the ‘binding’ of distributed neuronal activities, with each constituent neuron representing a specific component of an olfactory percept. The shortest neuronal pathway for odor signals to reach the orbitofrontal cortex is olfactory sensory neuron – olfactory bulbolfactory cortex – orbitofrontal cortex, but other pathways exist, including transthalamic pathways. Here, we review studies on the structural organization and functional properties of the shortest pathway, and propose a model of neuronal circuit mechanisms underlying the temporal bindings of distributed neuronal activities in the olfactory cortex. We describe a hypothesis that suggests functional roles of gamma oscillations in the bindings. This hypothesis proposes that two types of projection neurons in the olfactory bulb, tufted cells and mitral cells, play distinct functional roles in bindings at neuronal circuits in the olfactory cortex: tufted cells provide specificity-projecting circuits which send odor information with early-onset fast gamma synchronization, while mitral cells give rise to dispersedly-projecting feed-forward binding circuits which transmit the response synchronization timing with later-onset slow gamma synchronization. This hypothesis also suggests a sequence of bindings in the olfactory cortex: a small-scale binding by the early-phase fast gamma synchrony of tufted cell inputs followed by a larger-scale binding due to the later-onset slow gamma synchrony of mitral cell inputs. We discuss that behavioral state, including wakefulness and sleep, regulates gamma oscillation couplings across the olfactory bulb, olfactory cortex, and orbitofrontal cortex.

  1. A direct main olfactory bulb projection to the ‘vomeronasal’ amygdala in female mice selectively responds to volatile pheromones from males

    Kang, Ningdong; Baum, Michael J.; Cherry, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The main olfactory system, like the accessory olfactory system, responds to pheromones involved in social communication. Whereas pheromones detected by the accessory system are transmitted to the hypothalamus via the medial (‘vomeronasal’) amygdala, the pathway by which pheromones are detected and transmitted by the main system is not well understood. We examined in female mice whether a direct projection from mitral/tufted (M/T) cells in the main olfactory bulb (MOB) to the medial amygdala e...

  2. Voltage-Dependent Intrinsic Bursting in Olfactory Bulb Golgi Cells

    Pressler, R. Todd; Rozman, Peter A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2013-01-01

    In the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB), local synaptic circuits modulate the evolving pattern of activity in mitral and tufted cells following olfactory sensory stimulation. GABAergic granule cells, the most numerous interneuron subtype in this brain region, have been extensively studied. However, classic studies using Golgi staining methods…

  3. Olfactory dysfunction: Correlation of olfactory bulb volume on MRI and objective olfactometry

    Purpose: To define the role of olfactory bulb volume measurement by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting olfactory dysfunction in comparison with objective olfactometry. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with suspected olfactory dysfunction (16 women, 14 men; mean age 52 years, range 20-79 years) were examined by MRI and objective olfactometry between January 2006 and January 2009. Olfactory bulb volumes were measured by two neuroradiologists using 3D MR data sets. The olfactory function was categorized as normosmia, hyposmia, and anosmia on the basis of objective olfactometry. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated for objective olfactometry and olfactory bulb volumes on MRI. ROC analysis was performed to determine whether MRI bulb volumes can serve to predict anosmia or hyposmia. Results: The bulb volumes measured by MRI ranged from 0 to 135.9 mm3. Based on olfactometry, anosmia was present in 11 patients (total bulb volume of 15.7 ± 23.3 mm3), hyposmia in 9 patients (total bulb volume of 50.0 ± 25.5 mm3), and normosmia in 10 patients (total bulb volume of 110.7 ± 21.5 mm3). There was good correlation (r>0.9) between objective olfactometry and olfactory bulb volume on MRI. ROC analysis yielded a cut-off value of 32 mm3 for anosmia, which had a sensitivity of 0.91 and specificity of 0.947. The cut-off value for olfactory dysfunction was 80.7 mm3 (sensitivity 0.95; specificity of 0.9). Conclusion: The olfactory bulb volume determined by MRI is a suitable parameter for diagnosing complete or partial loss of the sense of smell. (orig.)

  4. Broadcasting of cortical activity to the olfactory bulb.

    Boyd, Alison M; Kato, Hiroyuki K; Komiyama, Takaki; Isaacson, Jeffry S

    2015-02-24

    Odor representations are initially formed in the olfactory bulb, which contains a topographic glomerular map of odor molecular features. The bulb transmits sensory information directly to piriform cortex, where it is encoded by distributed ensembles of pyramidal cells without spatial order. Intriguingly, piriform cortex pyramidal cells project back to the bulb, but the information contained in this feedback projection is unknown. Here, we use imaging in awake mice to directly monitor activity in the presynaptic boutons of cortical feedback fibers. We show that the cortex provides the bulb with a rich array of information for any individual odor and that cortical feedback is dependent on brain state. In contrast to the stereotyped, spatial arrangement of olfactory bulb glomeruli, cortical inputs tuned to different odors commingle and indiscriminately target individual glomerular channels. Thus, the cortex modulates early odor representations by broadcasting sensory information diffusely onto spatially ordered bulbar circuits. PMID:25704808

  5. Maturation and Dysgenesis of the Human Olfactory Bulb.

    Sarnat, Harvey B; Yu, Weiming

    2016-05-01

    The olfactory bulb with its unique architecture was studied for neuronal maturation in human fetuses. Neuroblasts stream into the olfactory bulb from the rostral telencephalon and secondarily migrate radially. The transitory olfactory ventricular recess regresses postnatally. Olfactory is the only sensory system without thalamic projections but incorporates intrinsic thalamic equivalents. The bulb is a repository of progenitor cells. Maturation of the bulb and tract was studied in 18 normal human fetuses of 16-41 weeks gestation; mid-gestational twins with hydrocephalus; 7 arrhinencephaly/holoprosencephaly; 2 olfactory dysgeneses. Multiple immunoreactivities were performed. Synaptophysin around mitral neurons, in a few synaptic glomeruli and concentric lamination of the outer granular layer, was seen at 16 weeks. Outer granular neurons exhibited NeuN at 16 weeks, only 2/3 were reactive at term. Concentric alternating sheets of granular neurons and their dendrodendritic synapses are seen during maturation. Calretinin reactivity is seen in neurons and neurites, primary olfactory nerve axons, periglomerular cells and neuroepithelial cells surrounding the ventricular recess; reactivity occurs later in synaptic glomeruli than with synaptophysin; not all glomeruli are strongly reactive even at term. Nestin- and vimentin-reactive bipolar progenitor cells were demonstrated at all ages and extend into the olfactory tract. Myelin is demonstrated by Luxol fast blue (LFB) only postnatally. In hydrocephalus, the olfactory recess is dilated. Mitral cell dispersion, disrupted glomeruli, heterotopia and maturational delay are seen in some dysgeneses. Malformations exhibit unique findings. Fusion of hypoplastic bulbs can occur. Abnormal architecture is seen in hemimegalencephaly. More documentation of olfactory dysgenesis is needed in other major brain malformations. PMID:26096058

  6. Human Adult Olfactory Bulb Neurogenesis? Novelty Is the Best Policy

    Macklis, Jeffrey Daniel

    2012-01-01

    There is ongoing controversy as to whether the understanding of adult mammalian neurogenesis gained from rodent studies is applicable to humans. In this issue of Neuron, Bergmann et al. (2012) propose that adult human olfactory bulb neurogenesis with long-term neuronal survival is extremely limited.

  7. Olfactory bulb habituation to odor stimuli

    Chaudhury, Dipesh; Manella, Laura; Arellanos, Adolfo; Escanilla, Olga; Cleland, Thomas A.; Linster, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    Habituation is a simple form of memory, yet its neurobiological mechanisms are only beginning to be understood in mammals. In the olfactory system, the neural correlates of habituation at a fast experimental timescale involving very short intertrial intervals (tens of seconds) have been shown to depend on synaptic adaptation in olfactory cortex. In contrast, behavioral habituation to odorants on a longer timescale with intertrial intervals of several minutes depends on processes in the olfact...

  8. Cytological organization of the alpha component of the anterior olfactory nucleus and olfactory limbus

    Jorge A Larriva-Sahd

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the microscopic organization of a wedge-shaped area at the intersection of the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, or olfactory limbus , and an additional component of the anterior olfactory nucleus or alpha accessory olfactory bulb that lies underneath of the accessory olfactory bulb. The olfactory limbus consists of a modified bulbar cortex bounded anteriorly by the main olfactory bulb and posteriorly by the accessory olfactory bulb. In Nissl-stained specimens the olfactory limbus differs from the main olfactory bulb by a progressive, antero-posterior decrease in thickness or absence of the external plexiform, mitral/tufted cell, and granule cell layers. On cytoarchitectual grounds the olfactory limbus is divided from rostral to caudal into three distinct components: a stripe of glomerular-free cortex or preolfactory area, a second or necklace glomerular area, and a wedge-shaped or interstitial area crowned by the so-called modified glomeruli that appear to belong to the anterior accessory olfactory bulb. The strategic location and interactions with the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, together with the previously noted functional and connectional evidence, suggest that the olfactory limbus may be related to both sensory modalities. The alpha component of the anterior olfactory nucleus, a slender cellular cluster (i.e., 650 x 150 µm paralleling the base of the accessory olfactory bulb, contains two neuron types: a pyramidal-like neuron and an interneuron. Dendrites of pyramidal-like cells organize into a single bundle that ascends avoiding the accessory olfactory bulb to resolve in a trigone bounded by the edge of the olfactory limbus, the accessory olfactory bulb and the dorsal part of the anterior olfactory nucleus. Utrastructurally, the neuropil of the alpha component contains three types of synaptic terminals; one of them immunoreactive to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase, isoform 67.

  9. Function of attention in learning process in the olfactory bulb

    马宝生; 王顺鹏; 李岩; 冯春华; 郭爱克

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that in the olfactory bulb, odor information is processed through parallel channels and learning depends on the cognitive environment. The synapse's spike effective time is defined as the effective time for a spike from pre-synapse to post-synapse, which varies with the type of synapse. A learning model of the olfactory bulb was constructed for synapses with varying spike effective times. The simulation results showed that such a model can realize the multi-channel processing of information in the bulb. Furthermore, the effect of the cognitive environment on the learning process was also studied. Different feedback frequencies were used to express different attention states. Considering the information's multi-channel processing requirement for learning, a learning rule considering both spike timing and average spike frequency is proposed. Simulation results showed that habituation and anti-habituation of an odor in the olfactory bulb might be the result of learning guided by a common local learning rule but at different attention states.

  10. Comprehensive connectivity of the mouse main olfactory bulb: analysis and online digital atlas

    Houri eHintiryan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the first open resource for mouse olfactory connectivity data produced as part of the Mouse Connectome Project (MCP at UCLA. The MCP aims to assemble a whole-brain connectivity atlas for the C57Bl/6J mouse using a double coinjection tracing method. Each coinjection consists of one anterograde and one retrograde tracer, which affords the advantage of simultaneously identifying efferent and afferent pathways and directly identifying reciprocal connectivity of injection sites. The systematic application of double coinjections potentially reveals interaction stations between injections and allows for the study of connectivity at the network level. To facilitate use of the data, raw images are made publicly accessible through our online interactive visualization tool, the iConnectome, where users can view and annotate the high-resolution, multi-fluorescent connectivity data (www.MouseConnectome.org. Systematic double coinjections were made into different regions of the main olfactory bulb (MOB and data from 18 MOB cases (~72 pathways; 36 efferent/36 afferent currently are available to view in iConnectome within their corresponding atlas level and their own bright-field cytoarchitectural background. Additional MOB injections and injections of the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB, anterior olfactory nucleus (AON, and other cortical olfactory areas gradually will be made available. Analysis of connections from different regions of the MOB revealed a novel, topographically arranged MOB projection roadmap, demonstrated disparate MOB connectivity with anterior versus posterior piriform cortical area, and exposed some novel aspects of well-established cortical olfactory projections.

  11. Accumulation of [35S]taurine in peripheral layers of the olfactory bulb

    Accumulation of [35S]taurine in the laminae of the olfactory bulb of the adult cat, rat, mouse and rabbit was examined autoradiographically. [35S]Taurine was administered either i.p. or i.v. and olfactory bulbs were excised 24 h post-injection. High concentrations of [35S]taurine were restricted to the olfactory nerve and glomerular layers of the olfactory bulb in all species examined. Olfactory neurons are continuously renewed and the results obtained suggest that taurine may have an important role in olfactory receptor axons. (Auth.)

  12. Map Formation in the Olfactory Bulb by Axon Guidance of Olfactory Neurons

    Benjamin Auffarth; Anders Lansner

    2011-01-01

    The organization of representations in the brain has been observed to locally reflect subspaces of inputs that are relevant to behavioral or perceptual feature combinations, such as in areas receptive to lower and higher-order features in the visual system. The early olfactory system developed highly plastic mechanisms and convergent evidence indicates that projections from primary neurons converge onto the glomerular level of the olfactory bulb (OB) to form a code composed of continuous spat...

  13. The main but not the accessory olfactory system is involved in the processing of socially relevant chemosignals in ungulates.

    Matthieu eKELLER

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ungulates like sheep and goats have, like many other mammalian species, two complementary olfactory systems. The relative role played by these two systems has long been of interest regarding the sensory control of social behavior. The study of ungulate social behavior could represent a complimentary alternative to rodent studies because they live in a more natural environment and their social behaviors depend heavily on olfaction. In addition, the relative size of the main olfactory bulb (in comparison to the accessory olfactory bulb is more developped than in many other lissencephalic species like rodents. In this review, we present data showing a clear involvement of the main olfactory system in two well-characterized social situations under olfactory control in ungulates, namely maternal behavior and offspring recognition at birth and the reactivation of the gonadotropic axis of females exposed to males during the anestrous season. In conclusion, we discuss the apparent discrepancy between the absence of evidence for a role of the vomeronasal system in ungulate social behavior and the existence of a developed accessory olfactory system in these species.

  14. A dendrodendritic reciprocal synapse provides a recurrent excitatory connection in the olfactory bulb

    Didier, Anne; Carleton, Alan; Jan G Bjaalie; Vincent, Jean-Didier; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2001-01-01

    Neuronal synchronization in the olfactory bulb has been proposed to arise from a diffuse action of glutamate released from mitral cells (MC, olfactory bulb relay neurons). According to this hypothesis, glutamate spills over from dendrodendritic synapses formed between MC and granule cells (GC, olfactory bulb interneurons) to activate neighboring MC. The excitation of MC is balanced by a strong inhibition from GC. Here we show that MC excitation is caused by glutama...

  15. Dilation of the olfactory bulb cavity concurrent with hydrocephalus in four small breed dogs

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Jeon, Hyo-Won; Woo, Eung-Je; Park, Hee-Myung

    2009-01-01

    Four small breed dogs were admitted with seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed dilation of the olfactory bulb cavity as well as enlargement of the lateral ventricles. These findings demonstrate that dilation of the olfactory bulb cavity can occur concurrent with hydrocephalus. This is the first description of the clinical and MRI features of dilation of the olfactory bulb cavity concurrent with hydrocephalus in dogs.

  16. Volumetric study of the olfactory bulb in patients with chronic rhinonasal sinusitis using MRI

    Reda A. Alarabawy

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: MRI with volumetric analysis is a useful tool in assessment of the olfactory bulb volume in patients with olfactory loss and appears to be of help in assessment of the degree of recovery in patients after sinus surgery.

  17. Either main or accessory olfactory system signaling can mediate the rewarding effects of estrous female chemosignals in sexually naive male mice.

    Korzan, Wayne J; Freamat, Mihael; Johnson, Adam G; Cherry, James A; Baum, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    A long-held view has been that interest of male mice in female body odors reflects an activation of reward circuits in the male brain following their detection by the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and processing via the accessory olfactory system. We found that adult, sexually naive male mice acquired a conditioned place preference (CPP) after repeatedly receiving estrous female urine on the nose and being placed in an initially nonpreferred chamber with soiled estrous bedding on the floor. CPP was not acquired in control mice that received saline on the nose before being placed in a nonpreferred chamber with clean bedding. Robust acquisition of a CPP using estrous female odors as the reward persisted in separate groups of mice in which VNO-accessory olfactory function was disrupted by bilateral lesioning of the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) or in which main olfactory function was disrupted by zinc sulfate lesions of the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). By contrast, no CPP was acquired for estrous odors in males that received combined AOB and MOE lesions. Either the main or the accessory olfactory system suffices to mediate the rewarding effects of estrous female odors in the male mouse, even in the absence of prior mating experience. The main olfactory system is part of the circuitry that responds to chemosignals involved in motivated behavior, a role that may be particularly important for humans who lack a functional accessory olfactory system. PMID:23978150

  18. Organization and distribution of glomeruli in the bowhead whale olfactory bulb

    Takushi Kishida

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although modern baleen whales (Mysticeti retain a functional olfactory system that includes olfactory bulbs, cranial nerve I and olfactory receptor genes, their olfactory capabilities have been reduced to a great degree. This reduction likely occurred as a selective response to their fully aquatic lifestyle. The glomeruli that occur in the olfactory bulb can be divided into two non-overlapping domains, a dorsal domain and a ventral domain. Recent molecular studies revealed that all modern whales have lost olfactory receptor genes and marker genes that are specific to the dorsal domain. Here we show that olfactory bulbs of bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus lack glomeruli on the dorsal side, consistent with the molecular data. In addition, we estimate that there are more than 4,000 glomeruli elsewhere in the bowhead whale olfactory bulb, which is surprising given that bowhead whales possess only 80 intact olfactory receptor genes. Olfactory sensory neurons that express the same olfactory receptors in rodents generally project to two specific glomeruli in an olfactory bulb, implying an approximate 1:2 ratio of the number of olfactory receptors to the number of glomeruli. Here we show that this ratio does not apply to bowhead whales, reiterating the conceptual limits of using rodents as model organisms for understanding the initial coding of odor information among mammals.

  19. Olfactory aversive conditioning alters olfactory bulb mitral/tufted cell glomerular odor responses

    Max L Fletcher

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical organization of receptor neuron input into the olfactory bulb (OB allows odor information to be transformed into an odorant-specific spatial map of mitral/tufted cell glomerular activity at the upper level of the olfactory bulb. In other sensory systems, neuronal representations of stimuli can be reorganized or enhanced following learning. While the mammalian OB has been shown to undergo experience-dependent plasticity at the glomerular level, it is still unclear if similar representational change occurs within mitral/tufted cell glomerular odor representations following learning. To address this, odorant-evoked glomerular activity patterns were imaged in mice expressing a GFP-based calcium indicator (GCaMP2 in OB mitral/tufted cells. Glomerular odor responses were imaged before and after olfactory associative conditioning to aversive foot shock. Following conditioning, we found no overall reorganization of the glomerular representation. Training, however, did significantly alter the amplitudes of individual glomeruli within the representation in mice in which the odor was presented together with foot shock. Further, the specific pairing of foot shock with odor presentations lead to increased responses primarily in initially weakly activated glomeruli. Overall, these results suggest that associative conditioning can enhance the initial representation of odors within the olfactory bulb by enhancing responses to the learned odor in some glomeruli.

  20. Serotonin increases synaptic activity in olfactory bulb glomeruli.

    Brill, Julia; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam C; Wachowiak, Matt; Shipley, Michael T

    2016-03-01

    Serotoninergic fibers densely innervate olfactory bulb glomeruli, the first sites of synaptic integration in the olfactory system. Acting through 5HT2A receptors, serotonin (5HT) directly excites external tufted cells (ETCs), key excitatory glomerular neurons, and depolarizes some mitral cells (MCs), the olfactory bulb's main output neurons. We further investigated 5HT action on MCs and determined its effects on the two major classes of glomerular interneurons: GABAergic/dopaminergic short axon cells (SACs) and GABAergic periglomerular cells (PGCs). In SACs, 5HT evoked a depolarizing current mediated by 5HT2C receptors but did not significantly impact spike rate. 5HT had no measurable direct effect in PGCs. Serotonin increased spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) in PGCs and SACs. Increased sEPSCs were mediated by 5HT2A receptors, suggesting that they are primarily due to enhanced excitatory drive from ETCs. Increased sIPSCs resulted from elevated excitatory drive onto GABAergic interneurons and augmented GABA release from SACs. Serotonin-mediated GABA release from SACs was action potential independent and significantly increased miniature IPSC frequency in glomerular neurons. When focally applied to a glomerulus, 5HT increased MC spontaneous firing greater than twofold but did not increase olfactory nerve-evoked responses. Taken together, 5HT modulates glomerular network activity in several ways: 1) it increases ETC-mediated feed-forward excitation onto MCs, SACs, and PGCs; 2) it increases inhibition of glomerular interneurons; 3) it directly triggers action potential-independent GABA release from SACs; and 4) these network actions increase spontaneous MC firing without enhancing responses to suprathreshold sensory input. This may enhance MC sensitivity while maintaining dynamic range. PMID:26655822

  1. Photoperiod mediated changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus.

    James C Walton

    Full Text Available Brain plasticity, in relation to new adult mammalian neurons generated in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus, has been well described. However, the functional outcome of new adult olfactory neurons born in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles is not clearly defined, as manipulating neurogenesis through various methods has given inconsistent and conflicting results in lab mice. Several small rodent species, including Peromyscus leucopus, display seasonal (photoperiodic brain plasticity in brain volume, hippocampal function, and hippocampus-dependent behaviors; plasticity in the olfactory system of photoperiodic rodents remains largely uninvestigated. We exposed adult male P. leucopus to long day lengths (LD and short day lengths (SD for 10 to 15 weeks and then examined olfactory bulb cell proliferation and survival using the thymidine analog BrdU, olfactory bulb granule cell morphology using Golgi-Cox staining, and behavioral investigation of same-sex conspecific urine. SD mice did not differ from LD counterparts in granular cell morphology of the dendrites or in dendritic spine density. Although there were no differences due to photoperiod in habituation to water odor, SD mice rapidly habituated to male urine, whereas LD mice did not. In addition, short day induced changes in olfactory behavior were associated with increased neurogenesis in the caudal plexiform and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb, an area known to preferentially respond to water-soluble odorants. Taken together, these data demonstrate that photoperiod, without altering olfactory bulb neuronal morphology, alters olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in Peromyscus leucopus.

  2. Transplant connectivity in the rat olfactory bulb traced with DiI

    Tritiated thymidine pre-labelled presumptive olfactory bulbs (E15-17) were homo-topically transplanted in unilaterally bulbectomized neonatal rats (P3-5). At the time of transplantation a crystal of carbocyanine dye (DiI) was inserted into the center of the donor tissue. The results of in vivo DiI application demonstrated reestablished connections between the transplanted olfactory bulb and the higher olfactory centers of the host.. (authors)

  3. Olfactory bulb volume predicts therapeutic outcome in major depression disorder.

    Negoias, Simona; Hummel, Thomas; Symmank, Anja; Schellong, Julia; Joraschky, Peter; Croy, Ilona

    2016-06-01

    The volume of the olfactory bulb (OB) is strongly reduced in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and this group exhibits markedly decreased olfactory function. It has been suggested that olfactory input is important for maintaining balance in limbic neurocircuits. The aim of our study was to investigate whether reduced OB volume is associated with response to therapy in MDD. Twenty-four inpatients (all women, age 21-49 years, mean 38 ± 10 years SD) with MDD and 36 healthy controls (all women, age 20-52 years, mean 36 ± 10 years SD) underwent structural MRI. OB volume was compared between responders (N = 13) and non-responders (N = 11) to psychotherapy. Retest of OB volume was performed about 6 months after the end of therapy in nine of the patients. Therapy responders exhibited no significant difference in OB volume compared to healthy controls. However, average OB volume of non-responders was 23 % smaller compared to responders (p = .0011). Furthermore, OB volume was correlated with the change of depression severity (r = .46, p = .024). Volume of the OB did not change in the course of therapy. OB volume may be a biological vulnerability factor for the occurrence and/or maintenance of depression, at least in women. PMID:25977168

  4. Biophysical constraints on lateral inhibition in the olfactory bulb.

    McIntyre, Alexa B R; Cleland, Thomas A

    2016-06-01

    The mitral cells (MCs) of the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB) constitute one of two populations of principal neurons (along with middle/deep tufted cells) that integrate afferent olfactory information with top-down inputs and intrinsic learning and deliver output to downstream olfactory areas. MC activity is regulated in part by inhibition from granule cells, which form reciprocal synapses with MCs along the extents of their lateral dendrites. However, with MC lateral dendrites reaching over 1.5 mm in length in rats, the roles of distal inhibitory synapses pose a quandary. Here, we systematically vary the properties of a MC model to assess the capacity of inhibitory synaptic inputs on lateral dendrites to influence afferent information flow through MCs. Simulations using passivized models with varying dendritic morphologies and synaptic properties demonstrated that, even with unrealistically favorable parameters, passive propagation fails to convey effective inhibitory signals to the soma from distal sources. Additional simulations using an active model exhibiting action potentials, subthreshold oscillations, and a dendritic morphology closely matched to experimental values further confirmed that distal synaptic inputs along the lateral dendrite could not exert physiologically relevant effects on MC spike timing at the soma. Larger synaptic conductances representative of multiple simultaneous inputs were not sufficient to compensate for the decline in signal with distance. Reciprocal synapses on distal MC lateral dendrites may instead serve to maintain a common fast oscillatory clock across the OB by delaying spike propagation within the lateral dendrites themselves. PMID:27009162

  5. Neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactive neurons in the human olfactory bulb.

    Ohm, T G; Braak, E; Probst, A; Weindl, A

    1988-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y-like (NPY) immunoreactivity was localized in the adult human olfactory bulb by the unlabeled antibody enzyme (peroxidase anti-peroxidase; PAP) technique in vibratome sections. The majority of NPY-immunoreactive somata was localized in the white matter surrounding the anterior olfactory nucleus. Immunoreactive neurons were less numerous within the anterior olfactory nucleus and within the olfactory bulb layers. NPY-immunoreactive fibres were present in the white matter, the anterior olfactory nucleus, and in the olfactory bulb layers. Fibres within the white matter were generally aligned in a straight path parallel to the long axis of the olfactory bulb and tract. Fibres within the anterior olfactory nucleus showed no clear orientation and displayed numerous branching points. Coiled plexus of NPY-immunoreactive fibres were present in the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb. Additional characteristics of the NPY-immunoreactive neurons were studied after decolouring the chromogen and restaining the sections with aldehydefuchsin to demonstrate the presence of lipofuscin granules and also with gallocyanin chrome alum to stain the Nissl substance. This analysis showed that the neurons belong to the class of non-pigmented nerve cells. PMID:3251589

  6. Wnt5a controls neurite development in olfactory bulb interneurons

    Youngshik Choe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurons born in the postnatal SVZ (subventricular zone must migrate a great distance before becoming mature interneurons of the OB (olfactory bulb. During migration immature OB neurons maintain an immature morphology until they reach their destination. While the morphological development of these cells must be tightly regulated, the cellular pathways responsible are still largely unknown. Our results show that the non-canonical Wnt pathway induced by Wnt5a is important for the morphological development of OB interneurons both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, we demonstrate that non-canonical Wnt signalling works in opposition to canonical Wnt signalling in neural precursors from the SVZ in vitro. This represents a novel role for Wnt5a in the development of OB interneurons and suggests that canonical and non-canonical Wnt pathways dynamically oppose each other in the regulation of dendrite maturation.

  7. Map formation in the olfactory bulb by axon guidance of olfactory neurons

    Benjamin Auffarth

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The organization of representations in the brain has been observed to locally reflect subspaces of inputsthat are relevant to behavioral or perceptual feature combinations, such as in areas receptiveto lower and higher-order features in the visual system. The early olfactory system developedhighly plastic mechanisms and convergent evidence indicates that projections from primaryneurons converge onto the glomerular level of the olfactory bulb (OB to form a code composed ofcontinuous spatial zones that are differentially active for particular physico–-chemical featurecombinations, some of which are known to trigger behavioral responses. In a model study of theearly human olfactory system, we derive a glomerular organization based on a set of real-world,biologically-relevant stimuli, a distribution of receptors that respond each to a set ofodorants of similar ranges of molecular properties, and a mechanism of axon guidance basedon activity. Apart from demonstrating activity-dependent glomeruli formation and reproducing therelationship of glomerular recruitment with concentration, it is shown that glomerular responsesreflect similarities of human odor category perceptions and that further, a spatial code providesa better correlation than a distributed population code. These results are consistent with evidenceof functional compartmentalization in the OB and could suggest a function for the bulb inencoding of perceptual dimensions.

  8. Expression of polysialyltransferases (STX and PST) in adult rat olfactory bulb after an olfactory associative discrimination task.

    Mione, J; Manrique, C; Duhoo, Y; Roman, F S; Guiraudie-Capraz, G

    2016-04-01

    Neuronal plasticity and neurogenesis occur in the adult hippocampus and in other brain structures such as the olfactory bulb and often involve the neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM. During an olfactory associative discrimination learning task, NCAM polysialylation triggers neuronal plasticity in the adult hippocampus. The PST enzyme likely modulates this polysialylation, but not STX, a second sialyltransferase. How the two polysialyltransferases are involved in the adult olfactory bulb remains unknown. We addressed this question by investigating the effect of olfactory associative learning on plasticity and neurogenesis. After a hippocampo-dependent olfactory associative task learning, we measured the expression of both PST and STX polysialyltransferases in the olfactory bulbs of adult rats using quantitative PCR. In parallel, immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate both NCAM polysialylation level and newly-born cells, with or without learning. After learning, no changes were observed neither in the expression level of PST and NCAM polysialylation, nor in STX gene expression level and newly-born cells number in the olfactory bulb. PMID:26844880

  9. One nose, one brain: contribution of the main and accessory olfactory system to chemosensation

    Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Redaelli, Marco; Caretta, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The accessory olfactory system is present in most tetrapods. It is involved in the perception of chemical stimuli, being implicated also in the detection of pheromones. However, it is sensitive also to some common odorant molecules, which have no clear implication in intraspecific chemical communication. The accessory olfactory system may complement the main olfactory system and may contribute different perceptual features to the construction of a unitary representation, which merges the diff...

  10. Continuous Spatial Representations in the Olfactory Bulb may Reflect Perceptual Categories

    Benjamin Auffarth; Agustín Gutierrez-Galvez; Santiago Marco

    2011-01-01

    In sensory processing of odors, the olfactory bulb is an important relay station, where odor representations are noise-filtered, sharpened, and possibly re-organized. An organization by perceptual qualities has been found previously in the piriform cortex, however several recent studies indicate that the olfactory bulb code reflects behaviorally relevant dimensions spatially as well as at the population level. We apply a statistical analysis on 2-deoxyglucose images, taken over the entire bul...

  11. Osterix is dispensable for the development of the mouse olfactory bulb.

    Park, Ji-Soo; Park, Geon-Il; Kim, Jung-Eun

    2016-09-01

    Osterix (Osx) has been shown to be an osteoblast-specific transcription factor for bone formation. Recently, it has been reported that Osx is significantly expressed in the mouse olfactory bulb, proving that Osx may play a role in olfactory bulb development, as well as bone development. Here, we studied morphological differences and neuronal cell alterations in the olfactory bulb using an Osx gene-modified mouse model. Although Osx expression was reduced, morphological differences were not observed in the olfactory bulb of Osx heterozygous mice compared with that of wild-type mice. Immunofluorescence using the neuronal marker genes DCX, MAP2, NeuN, and GFAP showed neuronal cell alterations caused by Osx deficiency in the mitral cell layer (MCL) and granule cell layer (GCL) of the olfactory bulb at postnatal stage. The number, morphology, and expression patterns of immature neurons, mature neurons, and astrocytes were identical in both wild-type and Osx heterozygous mice. At the post-embryonic stage, the expression of neuronal markers DCX, Nestin, MAP2, and NeuN were examined in the MCL and GCL of the olfactory bulb in wild-type, Osx heterozygous, and Osx knockout embryos. Both DCX- and Nestin-positive immature neurons, and MAP2- and NeuN-positive mature neurons, revealed a similar expression pattern in all mouse types. These results indicated that olfactory bulb development was not significantly impaired in the absence of Osx. Further study may be necessary to explain the functional properties of the olfactory bulb caused by Osx deficiency. PMID:27449610

  12. Expression of G proteins in the olfactory receptor neurons of the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster: their unique projection into the olfactory bulbs.

    Nakada, Tomoaki; Hagino-Yamagishi, Kimiko; Nakanishi, Koki; Yokosuka, Makoto; Saito, Toru R; Toyoda, Fumiyo; Hasunuma, Itaru; Nakakura, Takashi; Kikuyama, Sakae

    2014-10-15

    We analyzed the expression of G protein α subunits and the axonal projection into the brain in the olfactory system of the semiaquatic newt Cynops pyrrhogaster by immunostaining with antibodies against Gαolf and Gαo , by in situ hybridization using probes for Gαolf , Gαo , and Gαi2 , and by neuronal tracing with DiI and DiA. The main olfactory epithelium (OE) consists of two parts, the ventral OE and dorsal OE. In the ventral OE, the Gαolf - and Gαo -expressing neurons are located in the apical and basal zone of the OE, respectively. This zonal expression was similar to that of the OE in the middle cavity of the fully aquatic toad Xenopus laevis. However, the Gαolf - and Gαo -expressing neurons in the newt ventral OE project their axons toward the main olfactory bulb (MOB) and the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), respectively, whereas in Xenopus, the axons of both neurons project solely toward the MOB. In the dorsal OE of the newt, as in the principal cavity of Xenopus, the majority of the neurons express Gαolf and extend their axons into the MOB. In the vomeronasal organ (VNO), the neurons mostly express Gαo . These neurons and quite a few Gαolf -expressing neurons project their axons toward the AOB. This feature is similar to that in the terrestrial toad Bufo japonicus and is different from that in Xenopus, in which VNO neurons express solely Gαo , although their axons invariably project toward the AOB. We discuss the findings in the light of diversification and evolution of the vertebrate olfactory system. PMID:24771457

  13. Topological reorganization of odor representations in the olfactory bulb.

    Emre Yaksi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Odors are initially represented in the olfactory bulb (OB by patterns of sensory input across the array of glomeruli. Although activated glomeruli are often widely distributed, glomeruli responding to stimuli sharing molecular features tend to be loosely clustered and thus establish a fractured chemotopic map. Neuronal circuits in the OB transform glomerular patterns of sensory input into spatiotemporal patterns of output activity and thereby extract information about a stimulus. It is, however, unknown whether the chemotopic spatial organization of glomerular inputs is maintained during these computations. To explore this issue, we measured spatiotemporal patterns of odor-evoked activity across thousands of individual neurons in the zebrafish OB by temporally deconvolved two-photon Ca(2+ imaging. Mitral cells and interneurons were distinguished by transgenic markers and exhibited different response selectivities. Shortly after response onset, activity patterns exhibited foci of activity associated with certain chemical features throughout all layers. During the subsequent few hundred milliseconds, however, MC activity was locally sparsened within the initial foci in an odor-specific manner. As a consequence, chemotopic maps disappeared and activity patterns became more informative about precise odor identity. Hence, chemotopic maps of glomerular input activity are initially transmitted to OB outputs, but not maintained during pattern processing. Nevertheless, transient chemotopic maps may support neuronal computations by establishing important synaptic interactions within the circuit. These results provide insights into the functional topology of neural activity patterns and its potential role in circuit function.

  14. Paying attention to smell: Cholinergic signaling in the olfactory bulb.

    Rinaldo David D'Souza

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The tractable, layered architecture of the olfactory bulb (OB, and its function as a relay between odor input and higher cortical processing, makes it an attractive model to study how sensory information is processed at a synaptic and circuit level. The OB is also the recipient of strong neuromodulatory inputs, chief among them being the central cholinergic system. Cholinergic axons from the basal forebrain modulate the activity of various cells and synapses within the OB, particularly the numerous dendrodendritic synapses, resulting in highly variable responses of OB neurons to odor input that is dependent upon the behavioral state of the animal. Behavioral, electrophysiological, anatomical, and computational studies examining the function of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors expressed in the OB have provided valuable insights into the role of acetylcholine (ACh in regulating its function. We here review various studies examining the modulation of OB function by cholinergic fibers and their target receptors, and provide putative models describing the role that cholinergic receptor activation might play in the encoding of odor information.

  15. Culture and purification of human fetal olfactory bulb ensheathing cells

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To obtain high purity of human fetal olfactory bulb ensheathing cells (OB-hOECs) in vitro and to develop a simple and effective method for primary culture of OB-hOECs. Methods: OB-hOECs were cultured based on the differential rates of attachment of the various harvested cell types. Then the method was combined with arabinoside cytosine (Ara-C)inhibition, serum-free starvation or intermittent neurotrophin 3 (NT3) nutrition method to observe cell states in different cultural environments. The purity of OB-hOECs was assessed with immunocytochemical analysis. Results: OB-hOECs appeared bipolar and tripolar shape, with slender processes forming network. The purity of OECs reached 88% with the selective attachment method on day 6, and then fibroblast proliferated quickly and reduced the purity. When combined with the starvation method, the purity of OECs was 91% on day 6 and 86% on day 9, however, OECs were in a poor state. While combined with the NT3 method, the purity reached 95% on day 9 and 83% on day 12, respectively. The cells still remained in a good state. Conclusion: A combination of selective attachment and intermittent NT3 nutrition is an effective method to obtain OECs with higher purity and quality.

  16. Learning mechanism for column formation in the olfactory bulb

    M. Migliore

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensory discrimination requires distributed arrays of processing units. In the olfactory bulb, the processing units for odor discrimination are believed to involve dendrodendritic synaptic interactions between mitral and granule cells. There is increasing anatomical evidence that these cells are organized in columns, and that the columns processing a given odor are arranged in widely distributed arrays. Experimental evidence is lacking on the underlying learning mechanisms for how these columns and arrays are formed. To gain insight into these mechanisms, we have used a simplified realistic circuit model to test the hypothesis that distributed connectivity can self-organize through an activity-dependent dendrodendritic synaptic mechanism. The results point to action potentials propagating in the mitral cell lateral dendrites as playing a critical role in this mechanism. The model predicts that columns emerge from the interaction between the local temporal dynamics of the action potentials and the synapses that they activate during dendritic propagation. The results suggest a novel and robust learning mechanism for the development of distributed processing units in a cortical structure.

  17. Secreted factors from olfactory mucosa cells expanded as free-floating spheres increase neurogenesis in olfactory bulb neurosphere cultures

    Caldwell Maeve A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The olfactory epithelium is a neurogenic tissue comprising a population of olfactory receptor neurons that are renewed throughout adulthood by a population of stem and progenitor cells. Because of their relative accessibility compared to intra-cranially located neural stem/progenitor cells, olfactory epithelium stem and progenitor cells make attractive candidates for autologous cell-based therapy. However, olfactory stem and progenitor cells expand very slowly when grown as free-floating spheres (olfactory-spheres under growth factor stimulation in a neurosphere assay. Results In order to address whether olfactory mucosa cells extrinsically regulate proliferation and/or differentiation of immature neural cells, we cultured neural progenitor cells derived from mouse neonatal olfactory bulb or subventricular zone (SVZ in the presence of medium conditioned by olfactory mucosa-derived spheres (olfactory-spheres. Our data demonstrated that olfactory mucosa cells produced soluble factors that affect bulbar neural progenitor cell differentiation but not their proliferation when compared to control media. In addition, olfactory mucosa derived soluble factors increased neurogenesis, especially favouring the generation of non-GABAergic neurons. Olfactory mucosa conditioned medium also contained several factors with neurotrophic/neuroprotective properties. Olfactory-sphere conditioned medium did not affect proliferation or differentiation of SVZ-derived neural progenitors. Conclusion These data suggest that the olfactory mucosa does not contain factors that are inhibitory to neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation but does contain factors that steer differentiation toward neuronal phenotypes. Moreover, they suggest that the poor expansion of olfactory-spheres may be in part due to intrinsic properties of the olfactory epithelial stem/progenitor cell population.

  18. One nose, one brain: contribution of the main and accessory olfactory system to chemosensation

    Carla eMucignat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The accessory olfactory system is present in most tetrapods. It is involved in the perception of chemical stimuli, being implicated also in the detection of pheromone. However, it is sensitive also to some common odorant molecules, which have no clear implication in intraspecific chemical communication. The accessory olfactory system may complement the main olfactory system, and may contribute different perceptual features to the construction of a unitary representation, which merges the different chemosensory qualities. Crosstalk between the main and accessory olfactory systems occurs at different levels of central processing, in brain areas where the inputs from the two systems converge. Interestingly, centrifugal projections from more caudal brain areas are deeply involved in modulating both main and accessory sensory processing. A high degree of interaction between the two systems may be conceived, and partial overlapping appears to occur in many functions. Therefore, the central chemosensory projections merge inputs from different organs to obtain a complex chemosensory picture.

  19. Ablation of mouse adult neurogenesis alters olfactory bulb structure and olfactory fear conditioning

    Matthew Valley

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis replenishes olfactory bulb (OB interneurons throughout the life of most mammals, yet during this constant fl ux it remains unclear how the OB maintains a constant structure and function. In the mouse OB, we investigated the dynamics of turnover and its impact on olfactory function by ablating adult neurogenesis with an x-ray lesion to the subventricular zone (SVZ. Regardless of the magnitude of the lesion to the SVZ, we found no change in the survival of young adult born granule cells (GCs born after the lesion, and a gradual decrease in the population of GCs born before the lesion. After a lesion producing a 96% reduction of incoming adult born GCs to the OB, we found a diminished behavioral fear response to conditioned odor cues but not to audio cues. Interestingly, despite this behavioral defi cit and gradual anatomical changes, we found no electrophysiological changes in the GC population assayed in vivo through dendro-dendritic synaptic plasticity and odor-evoked local fi eld potential oscillations. These data indicate that turnover in the granule cell layer is generally decoupled from the rate of adult neurogenesis, and that OB adult neurogenesis plays a role in a wide behavioral system extending beyond the OB.

  20. Somatostatin-14-like immunoreactive neurons and fibres in the human olfactory bulb.

    Ohm, T G; Braak, E; Probst, A

    1988-01-01

    This study describes the morphological features and the distribution pattern of neurons in the human olfactory bulb which are immunoreactive for an antiserum against the neuropeptide somatostatin-14. Immunoreactive nerve cell bodies were mainly found in the white matter surrounding the cell clusters of the anterior olfactory nucleus. Some immunoreactive neurons were also found scattered throughout the anterior olfactory nucleus and the deeper parts of the inner granule cell layer. Only a few immunoreactive neurons were localized in the glomerular layer and the outer granule cell layer. Immunoreactive fibres were found in all layers of the olfactory bulb. In addition, an impressive number of coiled and kinked immunoreactive fibres were localized within the anterior olfactory nucleus forming a dense plexus. Accumulations of twisted and coiled branches of immunoreactive fibres were rarely found either surrounding or within the olfactory glomerula. The characteristics of somatostatin-14 immunoreactive neurons as seen in the combined pigment-Nissl preparation were studied after decolourizing the chromogen and restaining the preparations with aldehydefuchsin in order to demonstrate the lipofuscin pigment and gallocyanin chrome alum for Nissl material. About 90% of the immunoreactive neurons studied in this manner turned out to be devoid of lipofuscin granules. The remaining 10% displayed different patterns of pigmentation. These findings suggest the presence of different types of somatostatin-14-like immunoreactive neurons in the olfactory bulb of the human adult. PMID:2906788

  1. Activity-induced remodeling of olfactory bulb microcircuits revealed by monosynaptic tracing.

    Benjamin R Arenkiel

    Full Text Available The continued addition of new neurons to mature olfactory circuits represents a remarkable mode of cellular and structural brain plasticity. However, the anatomical configuration of newly established circuits, the types and numbers of neurons that form new synaptic connections, and the effect of sensory experience on synaptic connectivity in the olfactory bulb remain poorly understood. Using in vivo electroporation and monosynaptic tracing, we show that postnatal-born granule cells form synaptic connections with centrifugal inputs and mitral/tufted cells in the mouse olfactory bulb. In addition, newly born granule cells receive extensive input from local inhibitory short axon cells, a poorly understood cell population. The connectivity of short axon cells shows clustered organization, and their synaptic input onto newborn granule cells dramatically and selectively expands with odor stimulation. Our findings suggest that sensory experience promotes the synaptic integration of new neurons into cell type-specific olfactory circuits.

  2. Olfactory dysfunction: Correlation of olfactory bulb volume on MRI and objective olfactometry; Riechstoerungen. Korrelation von objektiver Olfaktometrie und volumetrischer Messungen des Bulbus olfactorius in der MRT

    Bauknecht, H.C.; Jach, C. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Fleiner, F.; Sedlmaier, B.; Goektas, Oe. [Hals-Nasen-Ohrenklinik, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: To define the role of olfactory bulb volume measurement by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting olfactory dysfunction in comparison with objective olfactometry. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with suspected olfactory dysfunction (16 women, 14 men; mean age 52 years, range 20-79 years) were examined by MRI and objective olfactometry between January 2006 and January 2009. Olfactory bulb volumes were measured by two neuroradiologists using 3D MR data sets. The olfactory function was categorized as normosmia, hyposmia, and anosmia on the basis of objective olfactometry. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated for objective olfactometry and olfactory bulb volumes on MRI. ROC analysis was performed to determine whether MRI bulb volumes can serve to predict anosmia or hyposmia. Results: The bulb volumes measured by MRI ranged from 0 to 135.9 mm{sup 3}. Based on olfactometry, anosmia was present in 11 patients (total bulb volume of 15.7 {+-} 23.3 mm{sup 3}), hyposmia in 9 patients (total bulb volume of 50.0 {+-} 25.5 mm{sup 3}), and normosmia in 10 patients (total bulb volume of 110.7 {+-} 21.5 mm{sup 3}). There was good correlation (r>0.9) between objective olfactometry and olfactory bulb volume on MRI. ROC analysis yielded a cut-off value of 32 mm{sup 3} for anosmia, which had a sensitivity of 0.91 and specificity of 0.947. The cut-off value for olfactory dysfunction was 80.7 mm{sup 3} (sensitivity 0.95; specificity of 0.9). Conclusion: The olfactory bulb volume determined by MRI is a suitable parameter for diagnosing complete or partial loss of the sense of smell. (orig.)

  3. The functional significance of newly born neurons integrated into olfactory bulb circuits

    Sakamoto, Masayuki; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Imayoshi, Itaru

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is the first central processing center for olfactory information connecting with higher areas in the brain, and this neuronal circuitry mediates a variety of odor-evoked behavioral responses. In the adult mammalian brain, continuous neurogenesis occurs in two restricted regions, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. New neurons born in the SVZ migrate through the rostral migratory stream and are integrated into the ne...

  4. A population of glomerular glutamatergic neurons controls sensory information transfer in the mouse olfactory bulb

    Tatti, Roberta; Bhaukaurally, Khaleel; Gschwend, Olivier; Seal, Rebecca P.; Edwards, Robert H.; Rodriguez, Ivan; Carleton, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In sensory systems, peripheral organs convey sensory inputs to relay networks where information is shaped by local microcircuits before being transmitted to cortical areas. In the olfactory system, odorants evoke specific patterns of sensory neuron activity which are transmitted to output neurons in olfactory bulb glomeruli. How sensory information is transferred and shaped at this level remains still unclear. Here we employ mouse genetics, 2-photon microscopy, electrophysiology and optogenet...

  5. Neuronal pattern separation in the olfactory bulb improves odor discrimination learning

    Gschwend, Olivier; Abraham, Nixon; Lagier, Samuel; Begnaud, Frédéric; Rodriguez, Ivan; Carleton, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal pattern separation is thought to enable the brain to disambiguate sensory stimuli with overlapping features thereby extracting valuable information. In the olfactory system, it remains unknown whether pattern separation acts as a driving force for sensory discrimination and the learning thereof. Here we show that overlapping odor-evoked input patterns to the mouse olfactory bulb (OB) are dynamically reformatted in the network at the timescale of a single breath, giving rise to separa...

  6. The Olfactory Bulb: An Immunosensory Effector Organ during Neurotropic Viral Infections.

    Durrant, Douglas M; Ghosh, Soumitra; Klein, Robyn S

    2016-04-20

    In 1935, the olfactory route was hypothesized to be a portal for virus entry into the central nervous system (CNS). This hypothesis was based on experiments in which nasophayngeal infection with poliovirus in monkeys was prevented from spreading to their CNS via transection of olfactory tracts between the olfactory neuroepithelium (ONE) of the nasal cavity and the olfactory bulb (OB). Since then, numerous neurotropic viruses have been observed to enter the CNS via retrograde transport along axons of olfactory sensory neurons whose cell bodies reside in the ONE. Importantly, this route of infection can occur even after subcutaneous inoculation of arboviruses that can cause encephalitis in humans. While the olfactory route is now accepted as an important pathway for viral entry into the CNS, it is unclear whether it provides a way for infection to spread to other brain regions. More recently, studies of antiviral innate and adaptive immune responses within the olfactory bulb suggest it provides early virologic control. Here we will review the data demonstrating that neurotropic viruses gain access to the CNS initially via the olfactory route with emphasis on findings that suggest the OB is a critical immunosensory effector organ that effectively clears virus. PMID:27058872

  7. Disruption of adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb affects social interaction but not maternal behavior

    Claudia E Feierstein

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Adult-born neurons arrive to the olfactory bulb and integrate into the existing circuit throughout life. Despite the prevalence of this phenomenon, its functional impact is still poorly understood. Recent studies point to the importance of newly generated neurons to olfactory learning and memory. Adult neurogenesis is regulated by a variety of factors, notably by instances related to reproductive behavior, such as exposure to mating partners, pregnancy and lactation, and exposure to offspring. To study the contribution of olfactory neurogenesis to maternal behavior and social recognition, here we selectively disrupted olfactory bulb neurogenesis using focal irradiation of the subventricular zone in adult female mice. We show that reduction of olfactory neurogenesis results in an abnormal social interaction pattern with male, but not female, conspecifics; we suggest that this effect could result from inability to detect or discriminate male odors and could therefore have implications for the recognition of potential mating partners. Disruption of olfactory bulb neurogenesis, however, neither impaired maternal-related behaviors, nor did it affect the ability of mothers to discriminate their own progeny from others.

  8. Odor recognition and segmentation by coupled olfactory bulb and cortical networks

    Li, Z; Li, Zhaoping; Hertz, John

    1999-01-01

    We present a model of a coupled system of the olfactory bulb and cortex. Odor inputs to the epithelium are transformed to oscillatory bulbar activities. The cortex recognizes the odor by resonating to the bulbar oscillating pattern when the amplitude and phase patterns from the bulb match an odor memory stored in the intracortical synapses. We assume a cortical structure which transforms the odor information in the oscillatory pattern to a slow DC feedback signal to the bulb. This feedback suppresses the bulbar response to the pre-existing odor, allowing subsequent odor objects to be segmented out for recognition.

  9. Adult Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Phenotypes Identified by Targeting Embryonic and Postnatal Neural Progenitors.

    Figueres-Oñate, Maria; López-Mascaraque, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are generated during embryonic development and in adulthood, although adult neurogenesis is restricted to two main brain regions, the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. The subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles generates neural stem/progenitor cells that continually provide the olfactory bulb (OB) with new granule or periglomerular neurons, cells that arrive from the SVZ via the rostral migratory stream. The continued neurogenesis and the adequate integration of these newly generated interneurons is essential to maintain homeostasis in the olfactory bulb, where the differentiation of these cells into specific neural cell types is strongly influenced by temporal cues. Therefore, identifying the critical features that control the generation of adult OB interneurons at either pre- or post-natal stages is important to understand the dynamic contribution of neural stem cells. Here, we used in utero and neonatal SVZ electroporation along with a transposase-mediated stable integration plasmid, in order to track interneurons and glial lineages in the OB. These plasmids are valuable tools to study the development of OB interneurons from embryonic and post-natal SVZ progenitors. Accordingly, we examined the location and identity of the adult progeny of embryonic and post-natally transfected progenitors by examining neurochemical markers in the adult OB. These data reveal the different cell types in the olfactory bulb that are generated in function of age and different electroporation conditions. PMID:27242400

  10. α-Synuclein aggregation in the olfactory bulb of middle-aged common marmoset.

    Kobayashi, Reona; Takahashi-Fujigasaki, Junko; Shiozawa, Seiji; Hara-Miyauchi, Chikako; Inoue, Takashi; Okano, Hirotaka James; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-05-01

    The synaptic protein α-synuclein has been identified as a major component of Lewy bodies, a pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). Prior to the formation of Lewy bodies, mislocalization and aggregation of the α-synuclein in brain tissue is frequently observed in various neurodegenerative diseases. Aberrant accumulation and localization of α-synuclein are also observed in the aging human brain, for which reason aging is regarded as a risk factor for neurodegenerative disease. To investigate changes in α-synuclein properties in the aging brain, we compared α-synuclein immunoreactivity in brain tissue of young (2-years-old) and middle-aged (6-years-old) common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). Our analyses revealed marked changes in α-synuclein immunoreactivity in the olfactory bulb of common marmosets of these age cohorts. Perikaryal α-synuclein aggregations were formed in the olfactory bulb in middle-aged animals. We also observed signals of α-synuclein accumulation in hippocampus in this cohort; however, unlike in the olfactory bulb, hippocampal α-synuclein signals were localized in the synaptic terminals. We did not observe either of these features in younger marmosets, which suggest that aging may play a role in these phenomena. Our results using common marmoset brain corresponded with the observation that the α-synuclein aggregations were first occurred from olfactory bulb in human normal aged and PD brain. Therefore, common marmoset is expected as useful model for α-synuclein pathology. PMID:26643383

  11. Regulation of granule cell excitability by a low-threshold calcium spike in turtle olfactory bulb

    Pinato, Giulietta; Midtgaard, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Granule cells excitability in the turtle olfactory bulb was analyzed using whole cell recordings in current- and voltage-clamp mode. Low-threshold spikes (LTSs) were evoked at potentials that are subthreshold for Na spikes in normal medium. The LTSs were evoked from rest, but hyperpolarization of...

  12. Value of MRI olfactory bulb evaluation in the assessment of olfactory dysfunction in Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    Braun, J J; Noblet, V; Kremer, S; Molière, S; Dollfus, H; Marion, V; Goetz, N; Muller, J; Riehm, S

    2016-07-01

    Olfactory bulb (OB) volume evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been demonstrated to be related to olfactory dysfunction in many different diseases. Olfactory dysfunction is often overlooked in Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) patients and is rarely objectively evaluated by MRI. We present a series of 20 BBS patients with olfactory dysfunction. The OB was evaluated separately and blindly by two radiologists (SR and SM) with 3 Tesla MRI imaging comparatively to 12 normal control subjects by global visual evaluation and by quantitative measurement of OB volume. In the 12 control cases OB visual evaluation was considered as normal in all cases for radiologist (SR) and in 10 cases for radiologist (SM). In the 20 BBS patients, OB visual evaluation was considered as abnormal in 18 cases for SR and in all cases for SM. OB volumetric evaluation for SR and SM in BBS patients was able to provide significant correlation between BBS and olfactory dysfunction. This study indicates that OB volume evaluation by MRI imaging like structural MRI scan for gray matter modifications demonstrates that olfactory dysfunction in BBS patients is a constant and cardinal symptom integrated in a genetical syndrome with peripheral and central olfactory structure alterations. PMID:26586152

  13. [3H]GABA uptake as a marker for cell type in primary cultures of cerebellum and olfactory bulb

    Uptake of [3H]GABA into cell cultures of rat cerebellum and olfactory bulb was studied by autoradiography, using β-alanine and aminocyclohexane carboxylic acid to distinguish neuronal-specific and glial-specific uptake. Neurons and astrocytes were also labelled by tetanus toxin and anti-GFAP respectively. This combination of markers allowed identification and quantification of several cell types. Cerebellar cultures were found to contain 77% granule neurons, 7.5% inhibitory neurons (probably stellate and basket cells) and 15% astrocytes. Olfactory bulb cultures were over 50% in small neurons which accumulated GABA, the olfactory bulb granule neuron being GABAergic in vivo. (Auth.)

  14. Regulation of spike timing-dependent plasticity of olfactory inputs in mitral cells in the rat olfactory bulb.

    Teng-Fei Ma

    Full Text Available The recent history of activity input onto granule cells (GCs in the main olfactory bulb can affect the strength of lateral inhibition, which functions to generate contrast enhancement. However, at the plasticity level, it is unknown whether and how the prior modification of lateral inhibition modulates the subsequent induction of long-lasting changes of the excitatory olfactory nerve (ON inputs to mitral cells (MCs. Here we found that the repetitive stimulation of two distinct excitatory inputs to the GCs induced a persistent modification of lateral inhibition in MCs in opposing directions. This bidirectional modification of inhibitory inputs differentially regulated the subsequent synaptic plasticity of the excitatory ON inputs to the MCs, which was induced by the repetitive pairing of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs with postsynaptic bursts. The regulation of spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP was achieved by the regulation of the inter-spike-interval (ISI of the postsynaptic bursts. This novel form of inhibition-dependent regulation of plasticity may contribute to the encoding or processing of olfactory information in the olfactory bulb.

  15. Olfactory dysfunction and neurotransmitter disturbance in olfactory bulb of transgenic mice expressing human A53T mutant α-synuclein.

    Sufang Zhang

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease is a multi-system neurodegenerative disease characterized by both motor and non-motor symptoms. Hyposmia is one of the early non-motor symptoms occurring in more than 90% of Parkinson disease cases, which can precede motor symptoms even several years. Up to now, the relationship between hyposmia and Parkinson disease remains elusive. Lack of proper animal models of hyposmia restricts the investigation. In this study we assessed olfactory function in Prp-A53T-α-synuclein transgenic (αSynA53T mice which had been reported to show age-dependent motor impairments and intracytoplasmic inclusions. We also examined cholinergic and dopaminergic systems in olfactory bulb of αSynA53T mice by immunofluorescent staining, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and western blot. We found that compared to wild type littermates, αSynA53T mice at 6 months or older displayed a deficit of odor discrimination and odor detection. No significant changes were found in olfactory memory and odor habituation. Furthermore compared to wildtype littermates, in olfactory bulb of αSynA53T mice at 10 months old we detected a marked decrease of cholinergic neurons in mitral cell layer and a decrease of acetylcholinesterase activity, while dopaminergic neurons were found increased in glomerular layer, accompanied with an increase of tyrosine hydroxylase protein. Our studies indicate that αSynA53T mice have olfactory dysfunction before motor deficits occur, and the cholinergic and dopaminergic disturbance might be responsible for the Parkinson disease-related olfactory dysfunction.

  16. Continuous spatial representations in the olfactory bulb may reflect perceptual categories

    Benjamin Auffarth

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In sensory processing of odors, the olfactory bulb is an important relay station, where odor representations are noise-filtered, sharpened, and possibly re-organized. An organization by perceptual qualities has been found previously in the piriform cortex, however several recent studies indicate that the olfactory bulb code reflects behaviorally relevant dimensions spatially as well as at the population level. We apply a statistical analysis on 2-deoxyglucose images, taken over the entire bulb of glomerular layer of the rat, in order to see how the recognition of odors in the nose is translated into a map of odor quality in the brain. We first confirm previous studies that the first principal component could be related to pleasantness, however the next higher principal components are not directly clear. We then find mostly continuous spatial representations for perceptual categories. We compare the space spanned by spatial and population codes to human reports of perceptual similarity between odors and our results suggest that perceptual categories could be already embedded in glomerular activations and that spatial representations give a better match than population codes. This suggests that human and rat perceptual dimensions of odorant coding are related and indicates that perceptual qualities could be represented as continuous spatial codes of the olfactory bulb glomerulus population.

  17. Mechanisms and benefits of granule cell latency coding in the mouse olfactory bulb

    Sonya Giridhar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory circuits are critical for shaping odor representations in the olfactory bulb. Individual olfactory bulb granule cells can respond to brief stimulation with extremely long (up to 1000 ms, input-specific latencies that are highly reliable. However, the mechanism and function of this long timescale activity remain unknown. We sought to elucidate the mechanism responsible for long-latency activity, and to understand the impact of widely distributed interneuron latencies on olfactory coding. We used a combination of electrophysiological, optical, and pharmacological techniques to show that long-latency inhibition is driven by late onset synaptic excitation to granule cells. We also provide evidence that tufted cells, which have intrinsic properties that favor longer latency spiking than mitral cells are the major source of this excitation. Using computational modeling, we show that widely distributed interneuron latency can increase the discriminability of similar stimuli. Thus, long-latency inhibition in the olfactory bulb requires a combination of circuit- and cellular-level mechanisms that function to improve stimulus representations.

  18. Participation of the Olfactory Bulb in Circadian Organization during Early Postnatal Life in Rabbits.

    Navarrete, Erika; Ortega-Bernal, Juan Roberto; Trejo-Muñoz, Lucero; Díaz, Georgina; Montúfar-Chaveznava, Rodrigo; Caldelas, Ivette

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that during pre-visual stages of development in mammals, circadian regulation is still not under the control of the light-entrainable hypothalamic pacemaker, raising the possibility that the circadian rhythmicity that occurs during postnatal development is under the control of peripheral oscillators, such as the main olfactory bulb (MOB). We evaluated the outcome of olfactory bulbectomy on the temporal pattern of core body temperature and gross locomotor activity in newborn rabbits. From postnatal day 1 (P1), pups were randomly assigned to one of the following conditions: intact pups (INT), intact pups fed by enteral gavage (INT+ENT), sham operated pups (SHAM), pups with unilateral lesions of the olfactory bulb (OBx-UNI), and pups with bilateral lesions of the olfactory bulb (OBx-BI). At the beginning of the experiment, from P1-8, the animals in all groups were fed at 11:00, from P9-13 the feeding schedule was delayed 6 h (17:00), and finally, from P14-15 the animals were subjected to fasting conditions. The rabbit pups of the INT, INT+ENT, SHAM and OBx-UNI groups exhibited a clear circadian rhythmicity in body temperature and locomotor activity, with a conspicuous anticipatory rise hours prior to the nursing or feeding schedule, which persisted even during fasting conditions. In addition, phase delays in the nursing or feeding schedule induced a clear phase shift in both parameters. In contrast, the OBx-BI group exhibited atypical rhythmicity in both parameters under entrained conditions that altered the anticipatory component, as well as deficient phase control of both rhythms. The present results demonstrate that the expression of circadian rhythmicity at behavioral and physiological levels during early stages of rabbit development largely depends on the integrity of the main olfactory bulb. PMID:27305041

  19. Participation of the Olfactory Bulb in Circadian Organization during Early Postnatal Life in Rabbits.

    Erika Navarrete

    Full Text Available Experimental evidence indicates that during pre-visual stages of development in mammals, circadian regulation is still not under the control of the light-entrainable hypothalamic pacemaker, raising the possibility that the circadian rhythmicity that occurs during postnatal development is under the control of peripheral oscillators, such as the main olfactory bulb (MOB. We evaluated the outcome of olfactory bulbectomy on the temporal pattern of core body temperature and gross locomotor activity in newborn rabbits. From postnatal day 1 (P1, pups were randomly assigned to one of the following conditions: intact pups (INT, intact pups fed by enteral gavage (INT+ENT, sham operated pups (SHAM, pups with unilateral lesions of the olfactory bulb (OBx-UNI, and pups with bilateral lesions of the olfactory bulb (OBx-BI. At the beginning of the experiment, from P1-8, the animals in all groups were fed at 11:00, from P9-13 the feeding schedule was delayed 6 h (17:00, and finally, from P14-15 the animals were subjected to fasting conditions. The rabbit pups of the INT, INT+ENT, SHAM and OBx-UNI groups exhibited a clear circadian rhythmicity in body temperature and locomotor activity, with a conspicuous anticipatory rise hours prior to the nursing or feeding schedule, which persisted even during fasting conditions. In addition, phase delays in the nursing or feeding schedule induced a clear phase shift in both parameters. In contrast, the OBx-BI group exhibited atypical rhythmicity in both parameters under entrained conditions that altered the anticipatory component, as well as deficient phase control of both rhythms. The present results demonstrate that the expression of circadian rhythmicity at behavioral and physiological levels during early stages of rabbit development largely depends on the integrity of the main olfactory bulb.

  20. Patterns of olfactory bulb neurogenesis in the adult zebrafish are altered following reversible deafferentation.

    Trimpe, Darcy M; Byrd-Jacobs, Christine A

    2016-09-01

    Adult brain plasticity can be investigated using reversible methods that remove afferent innervation but allow return of sensory input. Repeated intranasal irrigation with Triton X-100 in adult zebrafish diminishes innervation to the olfactory bulb, resulting in a number of alterations in bulb structure and function, and cessation of the treatment allows for reinnervation and recovery. Using bromodeoxyuridine, Hu, and caspase-3 immunoreactivity we examined cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival under conditions of acute and chronic deafferentation and reafferentation. Cell proliferation within the olfactory bulb was not influenced by acute or chronic deafferentation or reafferentation, but cell fate (including differentiation, migration, and/or survival of newly formed cells) was affected. We found that chronic deafferentation caused a bilateral increase in the number of newly formed cells that migrated into the bulb, although the amount of cell death of these new cells was significantly increased compared to untreated fish. Reafferentation also increased the number of newly formed cells migrating into both bulbs, suggesting that the deafferentation effect on cell fate was maintained. Reafferentation resulted in a decrease in newly formed cells that became neurons and, although death of newly formed cells was not altered from control levels, survival was reduced in relation to that seen in chronically deafferented fish. The potential effect of age on cell genesis was also examined. While the amount of cell migration into the olfactory bulbs was not affected by fish age, more of the newly formed cells became neurons in older fish. Younger fish displayed more cell death under conditions of chronic deafferentation. In sum, our results show that reversible deafferentation affects several aspects of cell fate, including cell differentiation, migration, and survival, and age of the fish influences the response to deafferentation. PMID:27343831

  1. Olfactory bulb proteome dynamics during the progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease: identification of common and distinct olfactory targets across Alzheimer-related co-pathologies

    Zelaya, María Victoria; Pérez-Valderrama, Estela; de Morentin, Xabier Martínez; Tuñon, Teresa; Ferrer, Isidro; Luquin, María Rosario; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Santamaría, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is present in up to 90% of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Although deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau and β-amyloid substrates are present in olfactory areas, the molecular mechanisms associated with decreased smell function are not completely understood. We have applied mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics to probe additional molecular disturbances in postmortem olfactory bulbs (OB) dissected from AD cases respect to neurologically intact controls (n=2...

  2. Olfactory bulb units - Activity correlated with inhalation cycles and odor quality.

    Macrides, F.; Chorover, S. L.

    1972-01-01

    Single olfactory bulb units were studied in two macrosmatic species of rodents under conditions intended to preserve the cyclical stimulation which normally accompanies nasal breathing. Patterns of unit activity related to the inhalation cycle were observed in all animals, often in the absence of specific stimuli, and could not be explained in simple mechanical terms. Distinctive changes in these patterns occurred in response to certain odors, and were generally independent of changes in the overall firing frequency. These findings indicate that a change in the overall firing frequency of unit discharges is neither a necessary nor sufficient measure of responsiveness to odors in the rodent olfactory bulb, and that stimulus-specific temporal distributions of unit firing may be involved in olfacto-endocrine activities.

  3. The impact of adult neurogenesis on olfactory bulb circuits and computations.

    Lepousez, Gabriel; Valley, Matthew T; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Modern neuroscience has demonstrated how the adult brain has the ability to profoundly remodel its neurons in response to changes in external stimuli or internal states. However, adult brain plasticity, although possible throughout life, remains restricted mostly to subcellular levels rather than affecting the entire cell. New neurons are continuously generated in only a few areas of the adult brain-the olfactory bulb and the dentate gyrus-where they integrate into already functioning circuitry. In these regions, adult neurogenesis adds another dimension of plasticity that either complements or is redundant to the classical molecular and cellular mechanisms of plasticity. This review extracts clues regarding the contribution of adult-born neurons to the different circuits of the olfactory bulb and specifically how new neurons participate in existing computations and enable new computational functions. PMID:23190074

  4. Sexual dimorphism in the human olfactory bulb: females have more neurons and glial cells than males.

    Ana V Oliveira-Pinto

    Full Text Available Sex differences in the human olfactory function reportedly exist for olfactory sensitivity, odorant identification and memory, and tasks in which odors are rated based on psychological features such as familiarity, intensity, pleasantness, and others. Which might be the neural bases for these behavioral differences? The number of cells in olfactory regions, and especially the number of neurons, may represent a more accurate indicator of the neural machinery than volume or weight, but besides gross volume measures of the human olfactory bulb, no systematic study of sex differences in the absolute number of cells has yet been undertaken. In this work, we investigate a possible sexual dimorphism in the olfactory bulb, by quantifying postmortem material from 7 men and 11 women (ages 55-94 years with the isotropic fractionator, an unbiased and accurate method to estimate absolute cell numbers in brain regions. Female bulbs weighed 0.132 g in average, while male bulbs weighed 0.137 g, a non-significant difference; however, the total number of cells was 16.2 million in females, and 9.2 million in males, a significant difference of 43.2%. The number of neurons in females reached 6.9 million, being no more than 3.5 million in males, a difference of 49.3%. The number of non-neuronal cells also proved higher in women than in men: 9.3 million and 5.7 million, respectively, a significant difference of 38.7%. The same differences remained when corrected for mass. Results demonstrate a sex-related difference in the absolute number of total, neuronal and non-neuronal cells, favoring women by 40-50%. It is conceivable that these differences in quantitative cellularity may have functional impact, albeit difficult to infer how exactly this would be, without knowing the specific circuits cells make. However, the reported advantage of women as compared to men may stimulate future work on sex dimorphism of synaptic microcircuitry in the olfactory bulb.

  5. Sensory-Evoked Intrinsic Imaging Signals in the Olfactory Bulb Are Independent of Neurovascular Coupling

    Roberto Vincis; Samuel Lagier; Dimitri Van De Ville; Ivan Rodriguez; Alan Carleton

    2015-01-01

    Functional brain-imaging techniques used in humans and animals, such as functional MRI and intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging, are thought to largely rely on neurovascular coupling and hemodynamic responses. Here, taking advantage of the well-described micro-architecture of the mouse olfactory bulb, we dissected the nature of odor-evoked IOSs. Using in vivo pharmacology in transgenic mouse lines reporting activity in different cell types, we show that parenchymal IOSs are largely independ...

  6. Optophysiological analysis of pattern classification strategies in the zebrafish olfactory bulb

    Niessing, Jörn

    2012-01-01

    Classification of overlapping activity patterns is a common problem for sensory systems. For a robust representation of sensory stimuli, neuronal circuits should generalize over input patterns reflecting variations of the same stimulus but separate patterns representing different stimuli, even if they are highly overlapping. In the olfactory bulb (OB), input patterns evoked by related, yet distinct, odors are often highly overlapping but perceived as a different stimulus. Consistent with this...

  7. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 and -2 Expression in the Olfactory Bulb Following Methyl Bromide Gas Exposure

    Bakos, Stephen R.; Schwob, James E.; Costanzo, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and MMP-2 are important for recovery following direct traumatic injury within the central nervous system (CNS). However, most CNS injury models include both direct trauma and neuronal deafferentation. This limits the ability to determine if these MMPs are important to one or both components of injury. To establish if MMPs play a role in the deafferentation processes, we investigated MMP-9 and MMP-2 in the olfactory bulb following methyl bromide gas exposure....

  8. Cholecystokinin: an excitatory modulator of mitral/tufted cells in the mouse olfactory bulb.

    Jie Ma

    Full Text Available Cholecystokinin (CCK is widely distributed in the brain as a sulfated octapeptide (CCK-8S. In the olfactory bulb, CCK-8S is concentrated in two laminae: an infraglomerular band in the external plexiform layer, and an inframitral band in the internal plexiform layer (IPL, corresponding to somata and terminals of superficial tufted cells with intrabulbar projections linking duplicate glomerular maps of olfactory receptors. The physiological role of CCK in this circuit is unknown. We made patch clamp recordings of CCK effects on mitral cell spike activity in mouse olfactory bulb slices, and applied immunohistochemistry to localize CCKB receptors. In cell-attached recordings, mitral cells responded to 300 nM-1 µM CCK-8S by spike excitation, suppression, or mixed excitation-suppression. Antagonists of GABAA and ionotropic glutamate receptors blocked suppression, but excitation persisted. Whole-cell recordings revealed that excitation was mediated by a slow inward current, and suppression by spike inactivation or inhibitory synaptic input. Similar responses were elicited by the CCKB receptor-selective agonist CCK-4 (1 µM. Excitation was less frequent but still occurred when CCKB receptors were blocked by LY225910, or disrupted in CCKB knockout mice, and was also observed in CCKA knockouts. CCKB receptor immunoreactivity was detected on mitral and superficial tufted cells, colocalized with Tbx21, and was absent from granule cells and the IPL. Our data indicate that CCK excites mitral cells postsynaptically, via both CCKA and CCKB receptors. We hypothesize that extrasynaptic CCK released from tufted cell terminals in the IPL may diffuse to and directly excite mitral cell bodies, creating a positive feedback loop that can amplify output from pairs of glomeruli receiving sensory inputs encoded by the same olfactory receptor. Dynamic plasticity of intrabulbar projections suggests that this could be an experience-dependent amplification mechanism for

  9. Improved spatial accuracy of functional maps in the rat olfactory bulb using supervised machine learning approach.

    Murphy, Matthew C; Poplawsky, Alexander J; Vazquez, Alberto L; Chan, Kevin C; Kim, Seong-Gi; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2016-08-15

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is a popular and important tool for noninvasive mapping of neural activity. As fMRI measures the hemodynamic response, the resulting activation maps do not perfectly reflect the underlying neural activity. The purpose of this work was to design a data-driven model to improve the spatial accuracy of fMRI maps in the rat olfactory bulb. This system is an ideal choice for this investigation since the bulb circuit is well characterized, allowing for an accurate definition of activity patterns in order to train the model. We generated models for both cerebral blood volume weighted (CBVw) and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI data. The results indicate that the spatial accuracy of the activation maps is either significantly improved or at worst not significantly different when using the learned models compared to a conventional general linear model approach, particularly for BOLD images and activity patterns involving deep layers of the bulb. Furthermore, the activation maps computed by CBVw and BOLD data show increased agreement when using the learned models, lending more confidence to their accuracy. The models presented here could have an immediate impact on studies of the olfactory bulb, but perhaps more importantly, demonstrate the potential for similar flexible, data-driven models to improve the quality of activation maps calculated using fMRI data. PMID:27236085

  10. BDNF over-expression increases olfactory bulb granule cell dendritic spine density in vivo.

    McDole, B; Isgor, C; Pare, C; Guthrie, K

    2015-09-24

    Olfactory bulb granule cells (GCs) are axon-less, inhibitory interneurons that regulate the activity of the excitatory output neurons, the mitral and tufted cells, through reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses located on GC spines. These contacts are established in the distal apical dendritic compartment, while GC basal dendrites and more proximal apical segments bear spines that receive glutamatergic inputs from the olfactory cortices. This synaptic connectivity is vital to olfactory circuit function and is remodeled during development, and in response to changes in sensory activity and lifelong GC neurogenesis. Manipulations that alter levels of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in vivo have significant effects on dendritic spine morphology, maintenance and activity-dependent plasticity for a variety of CNS neurons, yet little is known regarding BDNF effects on bulb GC spine maturation or maintenance. Here we show that, in vivo, sustained bulbar over-expression of BDNF in transgenic mice produces a marked increase in GC spine density that includes an increase in mature spines on their apical dendrites. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that changes in spine density were most notable in the distal and proximal apical domains, indicating that multiple excitatory inputs are potentially modified by BDNF. Our results indicate that increased levels of endogenous BDNF can promote the maturation and/or maintenance of dendritic spines on GCs, suggesting a role for this factor in modulating GC functional connectivity within adult olfactory circuitry. PMID:26211445

  11. Stressors impair odor recognition memory via an olfactory bulb-dependent noradrenergic mechanism

    Laura C Manella

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-associative habituation and odor recognition tasks have been widely used to probe questions social recognition, odor memory duration, and odor memory specificity. Among others, these paradigms have provided valuable insight into how neuromodulation, and specifically norepinephrine/noradrenaline (NE influences odor memory. In general, NE levels are modulated by arousal, stress, and behavioral state, and there is sparse evidence of a direct relationship between NE and odor memory in adult rodents. The present study uses simple mild psychological stressors (bright light and sound, to modulate NE levels physiologically in order to probe its effect on olfactory memory. In rats with bilateral bulbar cannulations, we show that these stressors modulate olfactory memory and that this effect is at least partially mediated by olfactory bulb. Specifically, we show that the presence of stressors during the acquisition of odor memory suppresses memory for an odor when tested 30 minutes after the acquisition. This suppression is blocked by infusing NE antagonists into the olfactory bulb prior to odor acquisition. Additionally, we find that infusion of bulbar NE is sufficient to suppress odor memory in a manner mimicking that of our stressors. These effects are unlikely to be solely mediated by locomotor/exploratory changes produced by stressors, although these stressors influence certain behaviors not directly related to odor investigation. This study provides important information about how behaviorally relevant changes in NE can influence top-down sensory processing and odor memory.

  12. Neuronal pattern separation in the olfactory bulb improves odor discrimination learning

    Lagier, Samuel; Begnaud, Frédéric; Rodriguez, Ivan; Carleton, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal pattern separation is thought to enable the brain to disambiguate sensory stimuli with overlapping features thereby extracting valuable information. In the olfactory system, it remains unknown whether pattern separation acts as a driving force for sensory discrimination and the learning thereof. Here we show that overlapping odor-evoked input patterns to the mouse olfactory bulb (OB) are dynamically reformatted in the network at the timescale of a single breath, giving rise to separated patterns of activity in ensemble of output neurons (mitral/tufted cells; M/T). Strikingly, the extent of pattern separation in M/T assemblies predicts behavioral discrimination performance during the learning phase. Furthermore, exciting or inhibiting GABAergic OB interneurons, using optogenetics or pharmacogenetics, altered pattern separation and thereby odor discrimination learning in a bidirectional way. In conclusion, we propose that the OB network can act as a pattern separator facilitating olfactory stimuli distinction, a process that is sculpted by synaptic inhibition. PMID:26301325

  13. Slow potentials of the turtle olfactory bulb in response to odor stimulation of the nose.

    Beuerman, R W

    1975-10-24

    Odor stimulation of the nose in the box turtle and the gopher tortoise produced a characteristic series of slow potentials in the olfactory bulb which were referred to as the odor evoked response. When recorded with direct coupling, the odor evoked response had 3 components: wave I, a short duration monophasic event; wave II, a long duration variation in the DC potential; and wave III, an oscillatory potential superimposed on wave II. Waves I and II were negative at bulbar surfaces receiving olfactory input and positive deep within the bulb. This series of potentials could be evoked by 3 methods of odor stimulation: (1) large puffs delivered from odorant test bottles, (2) small puffs delivered from a syringe and (3) continuous flow with concentration and nasal flow rate parameters controlled by an olfactometer. When the odor evoked response was recorded at a bulbar locus, these potentials were seen in response to each stimulation and the amplitudes of each wave were reproducible with the same stimulus. The amplitudes of the 3 waves were compared in the gopher tortoise and differed with the 3 odorants tested--high purity geraniol, technical grade geraniol and amyl acetate. Odorant concentration also directly affected the response amplitudes of all 3 wave components. The amplitudes of waves I and III markedly decreased with closely spaced stimulations recovering to near the initial values when the interstimulus interval was increased severalfold. This series of sensory evoked potentials is considered to reflect the processing of odor information from the olfactory receptors by the olfactory bulb. PMID:1175040

  14. Direction of Head Trauma and its Effect on Olfactory Bulb Volume in Post-Traumatic Anosmia

    S Farshchi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anosmia is a physical sign in post-traumatic patients, which significantly reduces the quality of life. Anosmia occurs in up to 30% of cases with head trauma. In this study we aimed to compare the Olfactory Bulb Volume (OBV in patients with posttraumatic anosmia in different impact positions and also with healthy individuals to find the relation between the two variables. Methods: Thirty-eight patients with posttraumatic anosmia and 27 healthy individuals with normal olfactory function were recruited in this case-control study performed in Amir Alam Hospital in Tehran, Iran. Variables of age, sex, time of trauma, site of trauma (frontoparietal/occipital, side of trauma, OBV, the results of olfactory identification tests and olfactory threshold were extracted and evaluated. We used non-contrasted 1.5-Tesla coronal brain MRI for the measurement of OBV.Results: There were no significant differences between cases and controls regarding sex and age. Olfactory bulb volume was significantly smaller in cases compared to the controls (P=0.004. Among the case group, OBV was smaller in anterior versus posterior head traumas (P=0.02. OBV was also smaller in ipsilateral rather than the contralateral side of trauma (P=0.01.Conclusion: The direction of trauma had a significant effect on OBV and it was smaller in traumas to the anterior and also ipsilateral sides of the head. It seems that changes in OBV differ due to the direction of head trauma and it can be helpful in predicting the prognosis of posttraumatic anosmia. Further studies are required for more conclusive statements.

  15. Olfactory Bulb Field Potentials and Respiration in Sleep-Wake States of Mice.

    Jessberger, Jakob; Zhong, Weiwei; Brankačk, Jurij; Draguhn, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that local field potentials (LFP) in the rodent olfactory bulb (OB) follow respiration. This respiration-related rhythm (RR) in OB depends on nasal air flow, indicating that it is conveyed by sensory inputs from the nasal epithelium. Recently RR was found outside the olfactory system, suggesting that it plays a role in organizing distributed network activity. It is therefore important to measure RR and to delineate it from endogenous electrical rhythms like theta which cover similar frequency bands in small rodents. In order to validate such measurements in freely behaving mice, we compared rhythmic LFP in the OB with two respiration-related biophysical parameters: whole-body plethysmography (PG) and nasal temperature (thermocouple; TC). During waking, all three signals reflected respiration with similar reliability. Peak power of RR in OB decreased with increasing respiration rate whereas power of PG increased. During NREM sleep, respiration-related TC signals disappeared and large amplitude slow waves frequently concealed RR in OB. In this situation, PG provided a reliable signal while breathing-related rhythms in TC and OB returned only during microarousals. In summary, local field potentials in the olfactory bulb do reliably reflect respiratory rhythm during wakefulness and REM sleep but not during NREM sleep. PMID:27247803

  16. Olfactory Bulb Field Potentials and Respiration in Sleep-Wake States of Mice

    Jakob Jessberger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that local field potentials (LFP in the rodent olfactory bulb (OB follow respiration. This respiration-related rhythm (RR in OB depends on nasal air flow, indicating that it is conveyed by sensory inputs from the nasal epithelium. Recently RR was found outside the olfactory system, suggesting that it plays a role in organizing distributed network activity. It is therefore important to measure RR and to delineate it from endogenous electrical rhythms like theta which cover similar frequency bands in small rodents. In order to validate such measurements in freely behaving mice, we compared rhythmic LFP in the OB with two respiration-related biophysical parameters: whole-body plethysmography (PG and nasal temperature (thermocouple; TC. During waking, all three signals reflected respiration with similar reliability. Peak power of RR in OB decreased with increasing respiration rate whereas power of PG increased. During NREM sleep, respiration-related TC signals disappeared and large amplitude slow waves frequently concealed RR in OB. In this situation, PG provided a reliable signal while breathing-related rhythms in TC and OB returned only during microarousals. In summary, local field potentials in the olfactory bulb do reliably reflect respiratory rhythm during wakefulness and REM sleep but not during NREM sleep.

  17. Neurogenesis drives stimulus decorrelation in a model of the olfactory bulb.

    Chow, Siu-Fai; Wick, Stuart D; Riecke, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    The reshaping and decorrelation of similar activity patterns by neuronal networks can enhance their discriminability, storage, and retrieval. How can such networks learn to decorrelate new complex patterns, as they arise in the olfactory system? Using a computational network model for the dominant neural populations of the olfactory bulb we show that fundamental aspects of the adult neurogenesis observed in the olfactory bulb--the persistent addition of new inhibitory granule cells to the network, their activity-dependent survival, and the reciprocal character of their synapses with the principal mitral cells--are sufficient to restructure the network and to alter its encoding of odor stimuli adaptively so as to reduce the correlations between the bulbar representations of similar stimuli. The decorrelation is quite robust with respect to various types of perturbations of the reciprocity. The model parsimoniously captures the experimentally observed role of neurogenesis in perceptual learning and the enhanced response of young granule cells to novel stimuli. Moreover, it makes specific predictions for the type of odor enrichment that should be effective in enhancing the ability of animals to discriminate similar odor mixtures. PMID:22442645

  18. Neurogenesis drives stimulus decorrelation in a model of the olfactory bulb.

    Siu-Fai Chow

    Full Text Available The reshaping and decorrelation of similar activity patterns by neuronal networks can enhance their discriminability, storage, and retrieval. How can such networks learn to decorrelate new complex patterns, as they arise in the olfactory system? Using a computational network model for the dominant neural populations of the olfactory bulb we show that fundamental aspects of the adult neurogenesis observed in the olfactory bulb--the persistent addition of new inhibitory granule cells to the network, their activity-dependent survival, and the reciprocal character of their synapses with the principal mitral cells--are sufficient to restructure the network and to alter its encoding of odor stimuli adaptively so as to reduce the correlations between the bulbar representations of similar stimuli. The decorrelation is quite robust with respect to various types of perturbations of the reciprocity. The model parsimoniously captures the experimentally observed role of neurogenesis in perceptual learning and the enhanced response of young granule cells to novel stimuli. Moreover, it makes specific predictions for the type of odor enrichment that should be effective in enhancing the ability of animals to discriminate similar odor mixtures.

  19. [Activity of glial cells in the olfactory bulb of Niemann-Pick disease type C1 mice].

    Yan, Xin; Qiao, Liang; Yang, En-Hui; Lin, Jun-Tang

    2016-04-25

    To study the pathological mechanisms of Niemann-Pick disease type C1, we observed the changes of activation of glial cells in the olfactory bulb of Npc1 mutant (Npc1(-/-)) mice. The genomic DNA was extracted from mouse tails for genotyping by PCR. Immunofluorescent histochemistry was performed to examine the activation of microglia and astrocytes in the olfactory bulb of Npc1(-/-) mice on postnatal day 30. NeuN, phosphorylated neurofilament (NF), Doublecortin (DCX), CD68 and GFAP were detected by Western blot. The results showed that Npc1 gene mutation strongly increased the activation of astrocytes and microglia in olfactory bulb associated with increased protein levels of CD68 and GFAP. Furthermore, the expression of phosphorylated NF was also significantly increased in the olfactory bulb of Npc1(-/-) mice compared with that in Npc1(+/+) mice. However, DCX expression was significantly reduced. The above results suggest that there are some early changes in the olfactory bulb of Npc1(-/-) mice. PMID:27108900

  20. Adult Born Olfactory Bulb Dopaminergic Interneurons: Molecular Determinants and Experience-Dependent Plasticity

    Bonzano, Sara; Bovetti, Serena; Gendusa, Claudio; Peretto, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is a highly plastic brain region involved in the early processing of olfactory information. A remarkably feature of the OB circuits in rodents is the constitutive integration of new neurons that takes place during adulthood. Newborn cells in the adult OB are mostly inhibitory interneurons belonging to chemically, morphologically and functionally heterogeneous types. Although there is general agreement that adult neurogenesis in the OB plays a key role in sensory information processing and olfaction-related plasticity, the contribution of each interneuron subtype to such functions is far to be elucidated. Here, we focus on the dopaminergic (DA) interneurons: we highlight recent findings about their morphological features and then describe the molecular factors required for the specification/differentiation and maintenance of the DA phenotype in adult born neurons. We also discuss dynamic changes of the DA interneuron population related to age, environmental stimuli and lesions, and their possible functional implications. PMID:27199651

  1. Sensory-Evoked Intrinsic Imaging Signals in the Olfactory Bulb Are Independent of Neurovascular Coupling.

    Vincis, Roberto; Lagier, Samuel; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Rodriguez, Ivan; Carleton, Alan

    2015-07-14

    Functional brain-imaging techniques used in humans and animals, such as functional MRI and intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging, are thought to largely rely on neurovascular coupling and hemodynamic responses. Here, taking advantage of the well-described micro-architecture of the mouse olfactory bulb, we dissected the nature of odor-evoked IOSs. Using in vivo pharmacology in transgenic mouse lines reporting activity in different cell types, we show that parenchymal IOSs are largely independent of neurotransmitter release and neurovascular coupling. Furthermore, our results suggest that odor-evoked parenchymal IOSs originate from changes in light scattering of olfactory sensory neuron axons, mostly due to water movement following action potential propagation. Our study sheds light on a direct correlate of neuronal activity, which may be used for large-scale functional brain imaging. PMID:26146075

  2. Sensory-Evoked Intrinsic Imaging Signals in the Olfactory Bulb Are Independent of Neurovascular Coupling

    Roberto Vincis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Functional brain-imaging techniques used in humans and animals, such as functional MRI and intrinsic optical signal (IOS imaging, are thought to largely rely on neurovascular coupling and hemodynamic responses. Here, taking advantage of the well-described micro-architecture of the mouse olfactory bulb, we dissected the nature of odor-evoked IOSs. Using in vivo pharmacology in transgenic mouse lines reporting activity in different cell types, we show that parenchymal IOSs are largely independent of neurotransmitter release and neurovascular coupling. Furthermore, our results suggest that odor-evoked parenchymal IOSs originate from changes in light scattering of olfactory sensory neuron axons, mostly due to water movement following action potential propagation. Our study sheds light on a direct correlate of neuronal activity, which may be used for large-scale functional brain imaging.

  3. Activation of raphe nuclei triggers rapid and distinct effects on parallel olfactory bulb output channels.

    Kapoor, Vikrant; Provost, Allison C; Agarwal, Prateek; Murthy, Venkatesh N

    2016-02-01

    The serotonergic raphe nuclei are involved in regulating brain states over timescales of minutes and hours. We examined more rapid effects of raphe activation on two classes of principal neurons in the mouse olfactory bulb, mitral and tufted cells, which send olfactory information to distinct targets. Brief stimulation of the raphe nuclei led to excitation of tufted cells at rest and potentiation of their odor responses. While mitral cells at rest were also excited by raphe activation, their odor responses were bidirectionally modulated, leading to improved pattern separation of odors. In vitro whole-cell recordings revealed that specific optogenetic activation of raphe axons affected bulbar neurons through dual release of serotonin and glutamate. Therefore, the raphe nuclei, in addition to their role in neuromodulation of brain states, are also involved in fast, sub-second top-down modulation similar to cortical feedback. This modulation can selectively and differentially sensitize or decorrelate distinct output channels. PMID:26752161

  4. Neurodegenerative changes in the brainstem and olfactory bulb in people older than 50 years old: a descriptive study

    Francine Hehn de Oliveira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available With the increase in life expectancy in Brazil, concerns have grown about the most prevalent diseases in elderly people. Among these diseases are neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Protein deposits related to the development of these diseases can pre-date the symptomatic phases by years. The tau protein is particularly interesting: it might be found in the brainstem and olfactory bulb long before it reaches the limbic cortex, at which point symptoms occur. Of the 14 brains collected in this study, the tau protein was found in the brainstems of 10 (71.42% and in olfactory bulbs of 3 out 11. Of the 7 individuals who had a final diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, 6 presented tau deposits in some region of the brainstem. Our data support the idea of the presence of tau protein in the brainstem and olfactory bulb in the earliest stages of AD.

  5. Not all sharks are "swimming noses": variation in olfactory bulb size in cartilaginous fishes.

    Yopak, Kara E; Lisney, Thomas J; Collin, Shaun P

    2015-03-01

    Olfaction is a universal modality by which all animals sample chemical stimuli from their environment. In cartilaginous fishes, olfaction is critical for various survival tasks including localizing prey, avoiding predators, and chemosensory communication with conspecifics. Little is known, however, about interspecific variation in olfactory capability in these fishes, or whether the relative importance of olfaction in relation to other sensory systems varies with regard to ecological factors, such as habitat and lifestyle. In this study, we have addressed these questions by directly examining interspecific variation in the size of the olfactory bulbs (OB), the region of the brain that receives the primary sensory projections from the olfactory nerve, in 58 species of cartilaginous fishes. Relative OB size was compared among species occupying different ecological niches. Our results show that the OBs maintain a substantial level of allometric independence from the rest of the brain across cartilaginous fishes and that OB size is highly variable among species. These findings are supported by phylogenetic generalized least-squares models, which show that this variability is correlated with ecological niche, particularly habitat. The relatively largest OBs were found in pelagic-coastal/oceanic sharks, especially migratory species such as Carcharodon carcharias and Galeocerdo cuvier. Deep-sea species also possess large OBs, suggesting a greater reliance on olfaction in habitats where vision may be compromised. In contrast, the smallest OBs were found in the majority of reef-associated species, including sharks from the families Carcharhinidae and Hemiscyllidae and dasyatid batoids. These results suggest that there is great variability in the degree to which these fishes rely on olfactory cues. The OBs have been widely used as a neuroanatomical proxy for olfactory capability in vertebrates, and we speculate that differences in olfactory capabilities may be the result of

  6. Spontaneous firing in olfactory bulb neurons of Bufo bufo gargarizans in and after hibernation

    Chuancheng Liang; Shaokang Bian; Xia Peng; Liwen Wang

    2011-01-01

    Microelectrode technique was used to record the spontaneous electrical activities of the neurons in olfactory bulb of the Bufo bufo gargarizans, both in hibernation and after hibernation. This study investigated the electrophysiological characteristics of amphibian olfactory bulb in the period of hibernation and after hibernation and its effects on the start of hibernation and spontaneous awakening. The research showed four forms of spontaneous firings: single spontaneous firing, burst spontaneous firing, irregular spontaneous firing and consecutive single spontaneous firing. The single spontaneous firing includes slow depolarized spontaneous firing and fast depolarized spontaneous firing, and the slow depolarized spontaneous firing occurs only during the hibernation period. In hibernation, the low amplitude and low frequency firing with a longer duration may be relevant to maintaining the tonicity of the central nervous system in toads that are in hibernation, and this kind of firing may also provide an excited basis for their arousal from hibernation. After hibernation, the amplitude and frequency of firing increase, but the firing duration gets shorter. This form of short-term firing, which may be a phenomenon of sensory neurons fast adapting, is one of the neuronal mechanisms for the arousal of hibernating animals.

  7. Understanding odor information segregation in the olfactory bulb by means of mitral and tufted cells.

    Davide Polese

    Full Text Available Odor identification is one of the main tasks of the olfactory system. It is performed almost independently from the concentration of the odor providing a robust recognition. This capacity to ignore concentration information does not preclude the olfactory system from estimating concentration itself. Significant experimental evidence has indicated that the olfactory system is able to infer simultaneously odor identity and intensity. However, it is still unclear at what level or levels of the olfactory pathway this segregation of information occurs. In this work, we study whether this odor information segregation is performed at the input stage of the olfactory bulb: the glomerular layer. To this end, we built a detailed neural model of the glomerular layer based on its known anatomical connections and conducted two simulated odor experiments. In the first experiment, the model was exposed to an odor stimulus dataset composed of six different odorants, each one dosed at six different concentrations. In the second experiment, we conducted an odor morphing experiment where a sequence of binary mixtures going from one odor to another through intermediate mixtures was presented to the model. The results of the experiments were visualized using principal components analysis and analyzed with hierarchical clustering to unveil the structure of the high-dimensional output space. Additionally, Fisher's discriminant ratio and Pearson's correlation coefficient were used to quantify odor identity and odor concentration information respectively. Our results showed that the architecture of the glomerular layer was able to mediate the segregation of odor information obtaining output spiking sequences of the principal neurons, namely the mitral and external tufted cells, strongly correlated with odor identity and concentration, respectively. An important conclusion is also that the morphological difference between the principal neurons is not key to achieve odor

  8. Imaging of olfactory bulb and gray matter volumes in brain areas associated with olfactory function in patients with Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy

    We explored if magnetic resonance imaging sequences might aid in the clinical differential diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). We measured the volumes of the olfactory bulb, the olfactory tract, and olfaction-associated cortical gray matter in 20 IPD patients, 14 MSA patients, and 12 normal subjects, using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging sequences in combination with voxel-based statistical analysis. We found that, compared to normal subjects and MSA patients, the volumes of the olfactory bulb and tract were significantly reduced in IPD patients. The gray matter volume of IPD patients decreased in the following order: the olfactory area to the right of the piriform cortex, the right amygdala, the left entorhinal cortex, and the left occipital lobe. Further, the total olfactory bulb volume of IPD patients was associated with the duration of disease. The entorhinal cortical gray matter volume was negatively associated with the UPDRS III score. Conclusion: Structural volumes measured by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging may potentially be used for differential diagnosis of IPD from MSA

  9. Imaging of olfactory bulb and gray matter volumes in brain areas associated with olfactory function in patients with Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy

    Chen, Shun, E-mail: shchen_2013@163.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); Tan, Hong-yu, E-mail: honhyutan@21cn.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); Wu, Zhuo-hua, E-mail: zhh88@126.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); Sun, Chong-peng, E-mail: Suncp2002@gmail.com [Imaging Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); He, Jian-xun, E-mail: xundog@163.com [Imaging Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); Li, Xin-chun, E-mail: xinchunli@163.com [Imaging Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); Shao, Ming, E-mail: yimshao@126.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China)

    2014-03-15

    We explored if magnetic resonance imaging sequences might aid in the clinical differential diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). We measured the volumes of the olfactory bulb, the olfactory tract, and olfaction-associated cortical gray matter in 20 IPD patients, 14 MSA patients, and 12 normal subjects, using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging sequences in combination with voxel-based statistical analysis. We found that, compared to normal subjects and MSA patients, the volumes of the olfactory bulb and tract were significantly reduced in IPD patients. The gray matter volume of IPD patients decreased in the following order: the olfactory area to the right of the piriform cortex, the right amygdala, the left entorhinal cortex, and the left occipital lobe. Further, the total olfactory bulb volume of IPD patients was associated with the duration of disease. The entorhinal cortical gray matter volume was negatively associated with the UPDRS III score. Conclusion: Structural volumes measured by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging may potentially be used for differential diagnosis of IPD from MSA.

  10. The functional significance of newly born neurons integrated into olfactory bulb circuits

    Masayuki eSakamoto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The olfactory bulb (OB is the first central processing center for olfactory information connecting with higher areas in the brain, and this neuronal circuitry mediates a variety of odor-evoked behavioral responses. In the adult mammalian brain, continuous neurogenesis occurs in two restricted regions, the subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricle and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. New neurons born in the SVZ migrate through the rostral migratory stream and are integrated into the neuronal circuits of the OB throughout life. The significance of this continuous supply of new neurons in the OB has been implicated in plasticity and memory regulation. Two decades of huge investigation in adult neurogenesis revealed the biological importance of integration of new neurons into the olfactory circuits. In this review, we highlight the recent findings about the physiological functions of newly generated neurons in rodent OB circuits and then discuss the contribution of neurogenesis in the brain function. Finally, we introduce cutting edge technologies to monitor and manipulate the activity of new neurons.

  11. Perceptual stability during dramatic changes in olfactory bulb activation maps and dramatic declines in activation amplitudes

    Homma, R.; Cohen, L. B.; Kosmidis, E. K.; Youngentob, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    We compared the concentration dependence of the ability of rats to identify odorants with the calcium signals in the nerve terminals of the olfactory receptor neurons. Although identification performance decreased with concentrations both above and below the training stimuli it remained well above random at all concentrations tested (between 0.0006% and 35% of saturated vapor). In contrast, the calcium signals in the same awake animals were much smaller than their maximum values at odorant concentrations less than 1% of saturated vapor. In addition, maps of activated glomeruli changed dramatically as odorant concentration was reduced. Thus perceptual stability exists in the face of dramatic changes in both the amplitude and the maps of the input to the olfactory bulb. The data for the concentration dependence of the response of the most sensitive glomeruli for each of five odorants was fitted with a Michaelis-Menten (Hill) equation. The fitted curves were extrapolated to odorant concentrations several orders of magnitude lower the smallest observed signals and suggest that the calcium response at low odorant concentrations is more than 1000 times smaller than the response at saturating odorant concentrations. We speculate that only a few spikes in olfactory sensory neurons may be sufficient for correct odorant identification. PMID:19291227

  12. Statistical analysis of coding for molecular properties in the olfactory bulb

    Benjamin eAuffarth

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between molecular properties of odorants and neural activities is arguably one of the most important issues in olfaction and the rules governing this relationship are still not clear. In the olfactory bulb (OB, glomeruli relay olfactory information to second-order neurons which in turn project to cortical areas. We investigate relevance of odorant properties, spatial localization of glomerular coding sites, and size of coding zones in a dataset of 2-deoxyglucose images of glomeruli over the entire OB of the rat. We relate molecular properties to activation of glomeruli in the OB using a nonparametric statistical test and a support-vector machine classification study. Our method permits to systematically map the topographic representation of various classes of odorants in the OB. Our results suggest many localized coding sites for particular molecular properties and some molecular properties that could form the basis for a spatial map of olfactory information. We found that alkynes, alkanes, alkenes, and amines affect activation maps very strongly as compared to other properties and that amines, sulfur-containing compounds, and alkynes have small zones and high relevance to activation changes, while aromatics, alkanes, and carboxylics acid recruit very big zones in the dataset. Results suggest a local spatial encoding for molecular properties.

  13. Recording Temperature-induced Neuronal Activity through Monitoring Calcium Changes in the Olfactory Bulb of Xenopus laevis

    Kludt, Eugen; Schild, Detlev

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory system, specialized in the detection, integration and processing of chemical molecules is likely the most thoroughly studied sensory system. However, there is piling evidence that olfaction is not solely limited to chemical sensitivity, but also includes temperature sensitivity. Premetamorphic Xenopus laevis are translucent animals, with protruding nasal cavities deprived of the cribriform plate separating the nose and the olfactory bulb. These characteristics make them well suited for studying olfaction, and particularly thermosensitivity. The present article describes the complete procedure for measuring temperature responses in the olfactory bulb of X. laevis larvae. Firstly, the electroporation of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) is performed with spectrally distinct dyes loaded into the nasal cavities in order to stain their axon terminals in the bulbar neuropil. The differential staining between left and right receptor neurons serves to identify the γ-glomerulus as the only structure innervated by contralateral presynaptic afferents. Secondly, the electroporation is combined with focal bolus loading in the olfactory bulb in order to stain mitral cells and their dendrites. The 3D brain volume is then scanned under line-illumination microscopy for the acquisition of fast calcium imaging data while small temperature drops are induced at the olfactory epithelium. Lastly, the post-acquisition analysis allows the morphological reconstruction of the thermosensitive network comprising the γ-glomerulus and its innervating mitral cells, based on specific temperature-induced Ca2+ traces. Using chemical odorants as stimuli in addition to temperature jumps enables the comparison between thermosensitive and chemosensitive networks in the olfactory bulb. PMID:27286501

  14. Greater addition of neurons to the olfactory bulb than to the cerebral cortex of eulipotyphlans but not rodents, afrotherians or primates

    Pedro Furtado De Mattos Ribeiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The olfactory bulb is an evolutionarily old structure that antedates the appearance of a six-layered mammalian cerebral cortex. As such, the neuronal scaling rules that apply to scaling the mass of the olfactory bulb as a function of its number of neurons might be shared across mammalian groups, as we have found to be the case for the ensemble of non-cortical, non-cerebellar brain structures. Alternatively, the neuronal scaling rules that apply to the olfactory bulb might be distinct in those mammals that rely heavily on olfaction. The group previously referred to as Insectivora includes small mammals, some of which are now placed in Afrotheria, a base group in mammalian radiation, and others in Eulipotyphla, a group derived later, at the base of Laurasitheria. Here we show that the neuronal scaling rules that apply to building the olfactory bulb differ across eulipotyphlans and other mammals such that eulipotyphlans have more neurons concentrated in an olfactory bulb of similar size than afrotherians, glires and primates. Most strikingly, while the cerebral cortex gains neurons at a faster pace than the olfactory bulb in glires, and afrotherians follow this trend, it is the olfactory bulb that gains neurons at a faster pace than the cerebral cortex in eulipotyphlans, which contradicts the common view that the cerebral cortex is the fastest expanding structure in brain evolution. Our findings emphasize the importance of not using brain structure size as a proxy for numbers of neurons across mammalian orders, and are consistent with the notion that different selective pressures have acted upon the olfactory system of eulipotyphlans, glires and primates, with eulipotyphlans relying more on olfaction for their behavior than glires and primates. Surprisingly, however, the neuronal scaling rules for primates predict that the human olfactory bulb has as many neurons as the larger eulipotyphlan olfactory bulbs, which questions the classification of

  15. Novel subdomains of the mouse olfactory bulb defined by molecular heterogeneity in the nascent external plexiform and glomerular layers

    Yona Golan

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the mouse olfactory system, the role of the olfactory bulb in guiding olfactory sensory neuron (OSN axons to their targets is poorly understood. What cell types within the bulb are necessary for targeting is unknown. What genes are important for this process is also unknown. Although projection neurons are not required, other cell-types within the external plexiform and glomerular layers also form synapses with OSNs. We hypothesized that these cells are important for targeting, and express spatially differentially expressed guidance cues that act to guide OSN axons within the bulb. Results We used laser microdissection and microarray analysis to find genes that are differentially expressed along the dorsal-ventral, medial-lateral, and anterior-posterior axes of the bulb. The expression patterns of these genes divide the bulb into previously unrecognized subdomains. Interestingly, some genes are expressed in both the medial and lateral bulb, showing for the first time the existence of symmetric expression along this axis. We use a regeneration paradigm to show that several of these genes are altered in expression in response to deafferentation, consistent with the interpretation that they are expressed in cells that interact with OSNs. Conclusion We demonstrate that the nascent external plexiform and glomerular layers of the bulb can be divided into multiple domains based on the expression of these genes, several of which are known to function in axon guidance, synaptogenesis, and angiogenesis. These genes represent candidate guidance cues that may act to guide OSN axons within the bulb during targeting.

  16. Localisation of 3H-GABA in the rat olfactory bulb: An in vivo and in vitro autoradiographic study

    In an attempt to further clarify the localisation of GABAergic elements in the olfactory bulb we have performed, in vivo and in vitro, autoradiographic studies with 3H-GABA (#betta#-amino butyric acid) and 3H-DABA (L-2,4 diamino butyric acid). The results have shown a strong labelling with 3H-GABA of the glial cells in all the layers of the olfactory bulb. A high concentration of grains was observed in the periglomerular region. The labelling in the external plexiform layer was uniformly distributed in the neuropile with the strongest activity at the level of the dendritic processes of the granule cells, leaving the mitral cell dendrites and cell bodies almost free of grains. 3H-DABA showed a very similar pattern to 3H-GABA. When olfactory bulb slices were preincubated with #betta#-alanine the labelling of the glial elements almost disappeared especially at the level of the olfactory nerve layer. The labelling pattern of the other layers of the bulb remained mostly unchanged. This supports the view that a population of periglomerular and granule cells are GABAergic and that #betta#-alanine competes with GABA uptake sites only in glial cells. (orig.)

  17. The Role of Astrocytes in the Generation, Migration, and Integration of New Neurons in the Adult Olfactory Bulb.

    Gengatharan, Archana; Bammann, Rodrigo R; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, new neurons in the adult olfactory bulb originate from a pool of neural stem cells in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Adult-born cells play an important role in odor information processing by adjusting the neuronal network to changing environmental conditions. Olfactory bulb neurogenesis is supported by several non-neuronal cells. In this review, we focus on the role of astroglial cells in the generation, migration, integration, and survival of new neurons in the adult forebrain. In the subventricular zone, neural stem cells with astrocytic properties display regional and temporal specificity when generating different neuronal subtypes. Non-neurogenic astrocytes contribute to the establishment and maintenance of the neurogenic niche. Neuroblast chains migrate through the rostral migratory stream ensheathed by astrocytic processes. Astrocytes play an important regulatory role in neuroblast migration and also assist in the development of a vasculature scaffold in the migratory stream that is essential for neuroblast migration in the postnatal brain. In the olfactory bulb, astrocytes help to modulate the network through a complex release of cytokines, regulate blood flow, and provide metabolic support, which may promote the integration and survival of new neurons. Astrocytes thus play a pivotal role in various processes of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis, and it is likely that many other functions of these glial cells will emerge in the near future. PMID:27092050

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae infection regulates expression of neurotrophic factors in the olfactory bulb and cultured olfactory ensheathing cells.

    Ruiz-Mendoza, S; Macedo-Ramos, H; Santos, F A; Quadros-de-Souza, L C; Paiva, M M; Pinto, T C A; Teixeira, L M; Baetas-da-Cruz, W

    2016-03-11

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative agent of numerous diseases including severe invasive infections such as bacteremia and meningitis. It has been previously shown that strains of S. pneumoniae that are unable to survive in the bloodstream may colonize the CNS. However, information on cellular components and pathways involved in the neurotropism of these strains is still scarce. The olfactory system is a specialized tissue in which olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) are interfacing with the external environment through several microvilli. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) which also form the glial limiting membrane at the surface of the olfactory bulb (OB) are the only cells that ensheathe the ORNs axons. Since previous data from our group showed that OECs may harbor S. pneumoniae, we decided to test whether infection of the OB or OEC cultures modulates the expression levels of neurotrophic factor's mRNA and its putative effects on the activation and viability of microglia. We observed that neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) expression was significantly higher in the OB from uninfected mice than in infected mice. A similar result was observed when we infected OEC cultures. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF) expression was significantly lower in the OB from infected mice than in uninfected mice. In contrast, in vitro infection of OECs resulted in a significant increase of BDNF mRNA expression. An upregulation of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) expression was observed in both OB and OEC cultures infected with S. pneumoniae. Moreover, we found that conditioned medium from infected OEC cultures induced the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved-caspase-3 and an apparently continuous nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 activation in the N13 microglia. Altogether, our data suggest the possible existence of an OEC-pathogen molecular interface, through which the OECs could interfere on the activation and

  19. Functional recovery of odor representations in regenerated sensory inputs to the olfactory bulb

    James E Schwob

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The olfactory system has a unique capacity for recovery from peripheral damage. After injury to the olfactory epithelium, olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs regenerate and re-converge on target glomeruli of the olfactory bulb (OB. Thus far, this process has been described anatomically for only a few defined populations of OSNs. Here we characterize this regeneration at a functional level by assessing how odor representations carried by OSN inputs to the OB recover after massive loss and regeneration of the sensory neuron population. We used chronic imaging of mice expressing synaptopHluorin in OSNs to monitor odor representations in the dorsal OB before lesion by the olfactotoxin methyl bromide and after a 12 week recovery period. Methyl bromide eliminated functional inputs to the OB, and these inputs recovered to near-normal levels of response magnitude within 12 weeks. We also found that the functional topography of odor representations recovered after lesion, with odorants evoking OSN input to glomerular foci within the same functional domains as before lesion. At a finer spatial scale, however, we found evidence for mistargeting of regenerated OSN axons onto OB targets, with odorants evoking synaptopHluorin signals in small foci that did not conform to a typical glomerular structure but whose distribution was nonetheless odorant-specific. These results indicate that OSNs have a robust ability to reestablish functional inputs to the OB and that the mechanisms underlying the topography of bulbar reinnervation during development persist in the adult and allow primary sensory representations to be largely restored after massive sensory neuron loss.

  20. Insulin modulates network activity in olfactory bulb slices: impact on odour processing

    Kuczewski, Nicola; Fourcaud-Trocmé, Nicolas; Savigner, Agnès; Thevenet, Marc; Aimé, Pascaline; Garcia, Samuel; Duchamp-Viret, Patricia; Palouzier-Paulignan, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Odour perception depends closely on nutritional status, in animals as in humans. Insulin, the principal anorectic hormone, appears to be one of the major candidates for ensuring the link between olfactory abilities and nutritional status, by modifying processing in the olfactory bulb (OB), one of its main central targets. The present study investigates whether and how insulin can act in OB, by evaluating its action on the main output neurons activities, mitral cells (MCs), in acute rat OB slices. Insulin was found to act at two OB network levels: (1) on MCs, by increasing their excitability, probably by inhibiting two voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels; (2) on interneurons by modifying the GABAergic and on glutamatergic synaptic activity impinging on MCs, mainly reducing them. Insulin also altered the olfactory nerve (ON)-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in 60% of MCs. Insulin decreased or increased the ON-evoked responses in equal proportion and the direction of its effect depended on the initial neuron ON-evoked firing rate. Indeed, insulin tended to decrease the high and to increase the low ON-evoked firing rates, thereby reducing inter-MC response firing variability. Therefore, the effects of insulin on the evoked firing rates were not carried out indiscriminately in the MC population. By constructing a mathematical model, the impact of insulin complex effects on OB was assessed at the population activity level. The model shows that the reduction of variability across cells could affect MC detection and discrimination abilities, mainly by decreasing and, less frequently, increasing them, depending on odour quality. Thus, as previously proposed, this differential action of insulin on MCs across odours would allow this hormone to put the olfactory function under feeding signal control, given the discerning valence of an odour as a function of nutritional status. PMID:24710056

  1. Analgesia induced by repeated exposure to low dose X-rays in mice, and involvement of the accessory olfactory system in modulation of the radiation effects

    The effects of low-dose X-rays on mouse nociceptive behavior were examined using a formalin injected test which rated the amount of time the animals spent licking the injected hind-paw. Male ICR White Swiss mice showed a marked suppression of licking behavior after repeated low-dose X-irradiation (5 cGy/day, 6 consecutive days). The most profound effect was observed on the day 30 after irradiation. The decline of licking behavior, however, was not observed at all following olfactory bulbectomy or vomeronasal tract cut. The analgesic effects could be observed in writhing animals administered acetic-acid intraperitoneally. Moreover, analgesia was totally blocked by the administration of N-nitro-L-arginine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, to accessory olfactory bulbs prior to the exposure. The present results indicate that the olfactory system plays an important role in modulation of radiation-induced analgesia, and a possible involvement of nitric oxide in the formation of recognition memory subjected to repeated X-rays. Relatively higher doses (5 cGy x 9 days, 5 cGy x 12 days), however, did not induce such effects, namely, the decline of nociceptive response was limited to the animals irradiated with the smaller dose. (author)

  2. Control of Mitral/Tufted Cell Output by Selective Inhibition among Olfactory Bulb Glomeruli.

    Economo, Michael N; Hansen, Kyle R; Wachowiak, Matt

    2016-07-20

    Inhibition is fundamental to information processing by neural circuits. In the olfactory bulb (OB), glomeruli are the functional units for odor information coding, but inhibition among glomeruli is poorly characterized. We used two-photon calcium imaging in anesthetized and awake mice to visualize both odorant-evoked excitation and suppression in OB output neurons (mitral and tufted, MT cells). MT cell response polarity mapped uniformly to discrete OB glomeruli, allowing us to analyze how inhibition shapes OB output relative to the glomerular map. Odorants elicited unique patterns of suppression in only a subset of glomeruli in which such suppression could be detected, and excited and suppressed glomeruli were spatially intermingled. Binary mixture experiments revealed that interglomerular inhibition could suppress excitatory mitral cell responses to odorants. These results reveal that inhibitory OB circuits nonlinearly transform odor representations and support a model of selective and nonrandom inhibition among glomerular ensembles. PMID:27346531

  3. Greater addition of neurons to the olfactory bulb than to the cerebral cortex of eulipotyphlans but not rodents, afrotherians or primates

    Ribeiro, Pedro F. M.; Manger, Paul R.; Catania, Kenneth C.; Kaas, Jon H.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory bulb is an evolutionarily old structure that antedates the appearance of a six-layered mammalian cerebral cortex. As such, the neuronal scaling rules that apply to scaling the mass of the olfactory bulb as a function of its number of neurons might be shared across mammalian groups, as we have found to be the case for the ensemble of non-cortical, non-cerebellar brain structures. Alternatively, the neuronal scaling rules that apply to the olfactory bulb might be distinct in those...

  4. Age and gender-related differences in mitral cells of olfactory bulb

    To investigate the age and gender-related differences in mitral cells of the human cadaveric olfactory bulbs. Sixty olfactory bulbs, 30 each from male and female (age 20-76 years) human cadavers divided into six groups of age and gender-wise were collected from the mortuary of the King Edward Medical University, Lahore. Mitral cells were counted and their diameter was calculated from 10 micro m thick cresyl violet stained histological sections. Statistical analysis was done using ANOVA for age-related differences and independent t-test for gender-related differences. There was significant reduction in the number of mitral cells and diameter of their nuclei with age. There was significant decrease in the number of mitral cells in males, between groups I and II (p < 0.001); II and III (p < 0.001); and I and III (p < 0.001); statistically significant decrease also occurred in females, between groups IV and V (p < 0.001); V and VI (p < 0.001); and IV and VI (p < 0.001). In most cases, the distance between individual mitral cells was seen to be much greater than in younger group. In group VI, few mitral cells were observed in the cell layer. There was also significant decrease in the diameter of mitral cell nuclei in males, between groups I and III (p < 0.001); and II and III (p < 0.010); in females, between groups IV and VI (p < 0.001); and V and VI (p < 0.001). No gender-related differences were observed. The number of mitral cells and diameter of their nuclei decreased with advancing age. (author)

  5. Spatio-temporal characteristics of inhibition mapped by optical stimulation in mouse olfactory bulb

    Alexander eLehmann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitral and tufted cells (MTCs of the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB are connected via dendrodendritic synapses with inhibitory interneurons in the external plexiform layer. The range, spatial layout and temporal properties of inhibitory interactions between MTCs mediated by inhibitory interneurons remain unclear. Therefore we tested for inhibitory interactions using an optogenetic approach. We optically stimulated MTCs expressing channelrhodopsin-2 in transgenic mice, while recording from individual MTCs in juxtacellular or whole-cell configuration in vivo. We used a spatial noise stimulus for mapping interactions between MTCs belonging to different glomeruli in the dorsal bulb. Analyzing firing responses of MTCs to the stimulus, we did not find robust lateral inhibitory effects that were spatially specific. However, analysis of sub-threshold changes in the membrane potential revealed evidence for inhibitory interactions between MTCs that belong to different glomerular units. These lateral inhibitory effects were short-lived and spatially specific. MTC response maps showed hyperpolarizing effects radially extending over more than 5 glomerular diameters. The inhibitory maps exhibited non-symmetrical yet distance-dependent characteristics.

  6. Odorant recognition using biological responses recorded in olfactory bulb of rats.

    Vizcay, Marcela A; Duarte-Mermoud, Manuel A; Aylwin, María de la Luz

    2015-01-01

    In this study we applied pattern recognition (PR) techniques to extract odorant information from local field potential (LFP) signals recorded in the olfactory bulb (OB) of rats subjected to different odorant stimuli. We claim that LFP signals registered on the OB, the first stage of olfactory processing, are stimulus specific in animals with normal sensory experience, and that these patterns correspond to the neural substrate likely required for perceptual discrimination. Thus, these signals can be used as input to an artificial odorant classification system with great success. In this paper we have designed and compared the performance of several configurations of artificial olfaction systems (AOS) based on the combination of four feature extraction (FE) methods (Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Fisher Transformation (FT), Sammon NonLinear Map (NLM) and Wavelet Transform (WT)), and three PR techniques (Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) and Support Vector Machine (SVM)), when four different stimuli are presented to rats. The best results were reached when PCA extraction followed by SVM as classifier were used, obtaining a classification accuracy of over 95% for all four stimuli. PMID:25464359

  7. Retronasal odor concentration coding in glomeruli of the rat olfactory bulb

    Justus V Verhagen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian olfactory system processes odorants presented orthonasally (inhalation through the nose and also retronasally (exhalation, enabling identification of both external as well as internal objects during food consumption. There are distinct differences between ortho- and retronasal air flow patterns, psychophysics, multimodal integration and glomerular responses. Recent work indicates that rats can also detect odors retronasally, that rats can associate retronasal odors with tastes, and that their olfactory bulbs (OBs can respond to retronasal odorants but differently than to orthonasal odors. To further characterize retronasal OB input activity patterns, experiments here focus on determining the effects of odorant concentration on glomerular activity by monitoring calcium activity in the dorsal OB of rats using a dextran-conjugated calcium-sensitive dye in vivo. Results showed reliable concentration-response curves that differed between odorants, and recruitment of additional glomeruli, as odorant concentration increases. We found evidence of different concentration-response functions between glomeruli, that in turn depended on odor. Further, the relation between dynamics and concentration differed remarkably among retronasal odorants. These dynamics are suggested to reduce the odor map ambiguity based on response amplitude. Elucidating the coding of retronasal odor intensity is fundamental to the understanding of feeding behavior and the neural basis of flavor. These data further establish and refine the rodent model of flavor neuroscience.

  8. Olfactory bulb ablation in the rat: behavioural changes and their reversal by antidepressant drugs.

    van Riezen, H; Schnieden, H; Wren, A F

    1977-01-01

    1. The effects of bilateral olfactory bulbectomy, sham-operation and inducement of peripheral anosmia were studied on locomotor activity, passive avoidance acquisition and irritability. 2. Bulbectomized rats were hyperactive, deficient at learning a step-down passive avoidance response and hyperirritable. Peripheral anosmia, induced by intranasal infusion of ZnSO4 solution resulted in no behavioural changes. 3. Chronic pretreatment with amitriptyline (3 and 10 mg/kg) and a tetracyclic antidepressant mianserin (Org GB 94, 5 and 15 mg/kg) reversed the hyperactivity and reduced the learning deficit of bulbectomized rats. These drugs had no significant effects on sham-operated animals. 4. Neither amitriptyline nor mianserin reduced the exaggerated responses of bulbectomized rats to external stimuli. 5. (+)-Amphetamine (1 and 3 mg/kg) accelerated the acquisition of the passive avoidance response, greatly enhanced the locomotor activity and slightly increased the irritability score of both sham-operated and bulbectomized rats. 6. Chlorpromazine (1 and 3 mg/kg) and chlordiazepoxide (10 mg/kg) significantly reduced the acquisition, locomotor activity and irritability of experimental and control rats. 7. Lithium sulphate (1 and 3 mg/kg) had no effect on activity or irritability but produced a small impairment in acquistion of bulbectomized rats. 8. It is concluded that the reversal by antidepressant drugs of the behavioural syndrome seen after olfactory bulb ablation could constitute a new model for the detection of this group of centrally acting compounds. PMID:907867

  9. Mapping of odor-related neuronal activity in the olfactory bulb by high-resolution 2-deoxyglucose autoradiography

    The spatial distribution of odor-induced neuronal activity in the olfactory bulb, the first relay station of the olfactory pathway, is believed to reflect important aspects of chemosensory coding. We report here the application of high-resolution 2-deoxyglucose autoradiography to the mapping of spatial patterns of metabolic activity at the level of single neurons in the olfactory bulb. It was found that glomeruli, which are synaptic complexes containing the first synaptic relay, tend to be uniformly active or inactive during odor exposure. Differential 2-deoxyglucose uptake was also observed in the somata of projection neurons (mitral cells) and interneurons (periglomerular and granule cells). This confirms and extends our previous studies in which odor-specific laminar and focal uptake patterns were revealed by the conventional x-ray film 2-deoxyglucose method due to Sokoloff and colleagues [Sokoloff, L., Reivich, M., Kennedy, C., DesRosiers, M. H., Patlak, C. S., Pettigrew, K. D., Sakurada, O. and Shinohara, M. (1977) J. Neurochem. 28, 897-916]. Based on results obtained by the two methods, it is suggested that the glomerulus as a whole serves as a functional unit of activity. The high-resolution results are interpreted in terms of the well-characterized synaptic organization of the olfactory bulb and also serve to illustrate the capability of the 2-deoxyglucose autoradiographic technique to map metabolic activity in single neurons of the vertebrate central nervous system

  10. Dopaminergic modulation of mitral cell activity in the frog olfactory bulb: a combined radioligand binding-electrophysiological study

    Dopamine content in the amphibian olfactory bulb is supplied by interneurons scattered among mitral cells in the external plexiform/mitral cell layer. In mammals, dopamine has been found to be involved in various aspects of bulbar information processing by influencing mitral cell odour responsiveness. Dopamine action in the bulb depends directly on the localization of its receptor targets, found to be mainly of the D2 type in mammals. The present study assessed, in the frog, both the anatomical localization of D2-like, radioligand-labelled receptors of dopamine and the in vivo action of dopamine on unitary mitral cell activity in response to odours delivered over a wide range of concentrations. The [125I]iodosulpride-labelled D2 binding sites were visualized on frozen sagittal sections of frog brains by film radioautography. The sites were found to be restricted to the external plexiform/mitral cell layer; other layers of the olfactory bulb were devoid of specific labelling. Electrophysiological recordings of mitral unit activity revealed that dopamine or its agonist apomorphine induced a drastic reduction of spontaneous firing rate of mitral cells in most cases without altering odour intensity coding properties of these cells. Moreover, pre-treatment with the D2 antagonist eticlopride blocked the dopamine-induced reduction of mitral cell spontaneous activity.In the frog olfactory bulb, both anatomical localization of D2-like receptors and functional data on dopamine involvement in information processing differ from those reported in mammals. This suggests a phylogenetic evolution of dopamine action in the olfactory bulb. In the frog, anatomical data perfectly corroborate electrophysiological results, together strongly suggesting a direct action of dopamine on mitral cells. In a physiologically operating system, such an action would result in a global improvement of signal-to-noise ratio. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  11. Dopaminergic modulation of mitral cell activity in the frog olfactory bulb: a combined radioligand binding-electrophysiological study

    Duchamp, A.; Moyse, E.; Delaleu, J.-C.; Coronas, V.; Duchamp-Viret, P. [Laboratoire de Physiologie Neurosensorielle, Universite Claude Bernard and CNRS, F69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-04-28

    Dopamine content in the amphibian olfactory bulb is supplied by interneurons scattered among mitral cells in the external plexiform/mitral cell layer. In mammals, dopamine has been found to be involved in various aspects of bulbar information processing by influencing mitral cell odour responsiveness. Dopamine action in the bulb depends directly on the localization of its receptor targets, found to be mainly of the D{sub 2} type in mammals. The present study assessed, in the frog, both the anatomical localization of D{sub 2}-like, radioligand-labelled receptors of dopamine and the in vivo action of dopamine on unitary mitral cell activity in response to odours delivered over a wide range of concentrations. The [{sup 125}I]iodosulpride-labelled D{sub 2} binding sites were visualized on frozen sagittal sections of frog brains by film radioautography. The sites were found to be restricted to the external plexiform/mitral cell layer; other layers of the olfactory bulb were devoid of specific labelling. Electrophysiological recordings of mitral unit activity revealed that dopamine or its agonist apomorphine induced a drastic reduction of spontaneous firing rate of mitral cells in most cases without altering odour intensity coding properties of these cells. Moreover, pre-treatment with the D{sub 2} antagonist eticlopride blocked the dopamine-induced reduction of mitral cell spontaneous activity.In the frog olfactory bulb, both anatomical localization of D{sub 2}-like receptors and functional data on dopamine involvement in information processing differ from those reported in mammals. This suggests a phylogenetic evolution of dopamine action in the olfactory bulb. In the frog, anatomical data perfectly corroborate electrophysiological results, together strongly suggesting a direct action of dopamine on mitral cells. In a physiologically operating system, such an action would result in a global improvement of signal-to-noise ratio. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B

  12. Reduction of Glucose Metabolism in Olfactory Bulb is an Earlier Alzheimer's Disease-related Biomarker in 5XFAD Mice

    Nai-An Xiao; Jing Zhang; Meng Zhou; Zhen Wei; Xi-Lin Wu; Xiao-Man Dai; Yuan-Gui Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Early diagnosis assumes a vital role in an effective treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD).Most of the current studies can only make anAD diagnosis after the manifestation of typical clinical symptoms.The present study aimed to investigate typical and other biomarkers of AD to find a possible early biomarker.Methods:A total of 14 5XFAD mice (at 3 and 6 months old),with 14 age-matched wild-type (WT) mice as control,were enrolled in this case-control study.Morris water maze test was performed to evaluate the cognitive function;buried food pellet test and olfactory maze test were employed to investigate the olfactory function;immunofluorescence to detect amyloid deposition and positron emission tomography to examine 2-deoxy-2-(18F) fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) uptake in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex.Results:With the increasing age,cognitive performance (P =0.0262) and olfactory function were significantly deteriorated (day 1 P =0.0012,day 2 P =0.0031,day 3 P =0.0160,respectively) and the (18F)-FDG uptake was markedly decreased in multi-cerebral regions including the olfactory bulb (P < 0.0001),hippocampus (P =0.0121),and cerebral cortex (P < 0.0001).Of note,in 3-month-old 5XFAD mice,a significant decline of (18F)-FDG uptake in the olfactory bulb was found when compared with that of age-matched WT mice (P =0.023) while no significant difference was present when the uptakes in other cerebral regions were compared.Conclusions:The decline of (18F)-FDG uptake in the olfactory bulb occurs earlier than other incidents,serving as an earlier in vivo biological marker of AD in 5XFAD mice and making early diagnosis of AD possibly.

  13. Increased Olfactory Bulb BDNF Expression Does Not Rescue Deficits in Olfactory Neurogenesis in the Huntington's Disease R6/2 Mouse.

    Smail, Shamayra; Bahga, Dalbir; McDole, Brittnee; Guthrie, Kathleen

    2016-03-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the huntingtin gene. Mutant huntingtin protein (mhtt) interferes with the actions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and BDNF signaling is reduced in the diseased striatum. Loss of this trophic support is thought to contribute to loss of striatal medium spiny neurons in HD. Increasing BDNF in the adult striatum or ventricular ependyma slows disease progression in HD mouse models, and diverts subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neuroblasts from their normal destination, the olfactory bulb, to the striatum, where some survive and develop features of mature neurons. Most neuroblasts that migrate to the olfactory bulb differentiate as granule cells, with approximately half surviving whereas others undergo apoptosis. In the R6/2 HD mouse model, survival of adult-born granule cells is reduced. Newly maturing cells express the BDNF receptor TrkB, suggesting that mhtt may interfere with normal BDNF trophic activity, increasing their loss. To determine if augmenting BDNF counteracts this, we examined granule cell survival in R6/2 mice that overexpress BDNF in olfactory bulb. Although we detected a decline in apoptosis, increased BDNF was not sufficient to normalize granule cell survival within their normal target in R6/2 mice. PMID:26783111

  14. Inducible and targeted deletion of the ERK5 MAP kinase in adult neurogenic regions impairs adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb and several forms of olfactory behavior.

    Yung-Wei Pan

    Full Text Available Although adult-born neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ and olfactory bulb (OB have been extensively characterized at the cellular level, their functional impact on olfactory behavior is still highly controversial with many conflicting results reported in the literature. Furthermore, signaling mechanisms regulating adult SVZ/OB neurogenesis are not well defined. Here we report that inducible and targeted deletion of erk5, a MAP kinase selectively expressed in the adult neurogenic regions of the adult brain, impairs adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and OB of transgenic mice. Although erk5 deletion had no effect on olfactory discrimination among discrete odorants in the habituation/dishabituation assay, it reduced short-term olfactory memory as well as detection sensitivity to odorants and pheromones including those evoking aggression and fear. Furthermore, these mice show impaired acquisition of odor-cued associative olfactory learning, a novel phenotype that had not been previously linked to adult neurogenesis. These data suggest that ERK5 MAP kinase is a critical kinase signaling pathway regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB, and provide strong evidence supporting a functional role for adult neurogenesis in several distinct forms of olfactory behavior.

  15. Changes in Olfactory Bulb Volume in Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Li, Jia; Gu, Cheng-zhi; Su, Jian-bin; Zhu, Lian-hai; Zhou, Yong; Huang, Huai-yu; LIU Chun-feng

    2016-01-01

    Objective The changes in olfactory bulb (OB) volume in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients have not yet been comprehensively evaluated. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to explore whether the OB volume was significantly different between PD patients and healthy controls. Methods PubMed and Embase were searched up to March 6, 2015 with no language restrictions. Two independent reviewers screened eligible studies and extracted data on study characteristics and OB volume. Additionally, a syst...

  16. 'When an old rat smells a cat': A decline in defense-related, but not accessory olfactory, Fos expression in aged rats.

    Hunt, Glenn E; Van Nieuwenhuijzen, Petra S; Chan-Ling, Tailoi; McGregor, Iain S

    2011-04-01

    Comparisons were made between young (3-6 months) and aged (20-30 months) Wistar rats on locomotor activity, emergence, social interaction and cat odor avoidance. Aged rats were less active and spent less time in the open field during the emergence test than younger rats. Older rats also showed fewer contacts with a novel conspecific in the social interaction test, although total duration of interaction did not differ. There were very few behavioral differences between male and female rats. Older rats were less reactive than younger rats in a test of cat odor avoidance. However, they expressed similar amounts of cat odor-induced Fos in the posterior accessory olfactory bulb, a critical region for processing the predator odor stimulus. Older rats had reduced Fos expression in several defense-related brain regions that are normally activated by predator odors such as the medial amygdala and dorsal premammillary nucleus. These results indicate that aged rats are less reactive than younger rats to predator odors due to decreased responsiveness in defense-related but not necessarily olfactory circuits. PMID:19394115

  17. Impaired olfactory bulb neurogenesis depends on the presence of human wild-type alpha-synuclein.

    May, V E L; Nuber, S; Marxreiter, F; Riess, O; Winner, B; Winkler, J

    2012-10-11

    Synucleinopathies including Parkinson's disease (PD) are characterized by the accumulation of alpha-synuclein (α-syn) within neural cell bodies and their processes. Transgenic mice overexpressing human wild-type or mutant forms of α-syn under the control of different promoters were developed to analyse the underlying neuropathology of PD. One of the earliest clinical symptoms associated with PD is olfactory impairment. The generation of new neurons persists up to adulthood in mammals, in particular the olfactory bulb (OB). In order to assess this process in relation to α-syn accumulation, we used mice overexpressing human wild-type α-syn under the regulatable control (tet-off) of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα-promoter (CaMKII). We observed a decrease in OB neurogenesis in transgenic animals compared to controls using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label newly generated cells (neuron-specific nuclear protein; NeuN). After cessation of transgene expression we detected an increase in newly generated cells both in granular (GCL) and glomerular (GLOM) layers of the OB. This led to a rescue of newly generated neurons (BrdU(+)/NeuN(+)) within the GLOM with a distinct specificity for the dopaminergic subpopulation. In contrast, we did not detect a cell-specific rescue of neuronal cells in the GCL suggesting diverse effects of alpha-synucleinopathy in both interneuronal layers of the OB. Colabelling of BrdU with glial markers showed that a differentiation into neither astroglia nor microglia attributed to the observed phenotype in the GCL. In particular, BrdU(+) particles located within microglial cells were predominantly associated close to the membrane therefore the resembling phagocytosed nuclear fragments of BrdU(+) cells. Thus, our study further contributes insights into α-syn accumulation as a causative player in the impairment of adult neurogenesis and emphasizes its diverse role in cell renewal of distinct OB cell layers. PMID:22814000

  18. Cellular and molecular cues of glucose sensing in the rat olfactory bulb

    Dolly eAl Koborssy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the brain, glucose homeostasis of extracellular fluid is crucial to the point that systems specifically dedicated to glucose sensing are found in areas involved in energy regulation and feeding behavior. Olfaction is a major sensory modality regulating food consumption. Nutritional status in turn modulates olfactory detection. Recently it has been proposed that some olfactory bulb (OB neurons respond to glucose similarly to hypothalamic neurons. However, the precise molecular cues governing glucose sensing in the OB are largely unknown. To decrypt these molecular mechanisms, we first used immunostaining to demonstrate a strong expression of two neuronal markers of glucose-sensitivity, insulin-dependent glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4, and sodium glucose co-transporter type 1 (SGLT1 in specific OB layers. We showed that expression and mapping of GLUT4 but not SGLT1 were feeding state-dependent. In order to investigate the impact of metabolic status on the delivery of blood-borne glucose to the OB, we measured extracellular fluid glucose concentration using glucose biosensors simultaneously in the OB and cortex of anesthetized rats. We showed that glucose concentration in the OB is higher than in the cortex, that metabolic steady-state glucose concentration is independent of feeding state in the two brain areas, and that acute changes in glycemic conditions affect bulbar glucose concentration alone. These data provide new evidence of a direct relationship between the OB and peripheral metabolism, and emphasize the importance of glucose for the OB network, providing strong arguments toward establishing the OB as a glucose-sensing organ.

  19. Ligand binding studies in the mouse olfactory bulb: identification and characterisation of a L-[3H]carnosine binding site

    Binding sites for the dipeptide L-carnosine (β-alanyl-t-histidine) have been detected in membranes prepared from mouse olfactory bulbs. The binding of L-[3H]- carnosine was saturable, reversible and stereospecific and had a Ksub(d) of about 770 nM. The stereospecific binding of L-carnosine represented about 30% of the totoal binding at pH 6.8, and decreased markedly with increasing pH. Binding was stimulated by calcium, unaffected by zinc, magnesium or manganese and inhibted by sodium and potassium. Carnosine binding was sensitive to trypsin and phospholipases A and C, but not to neuraminidase. Nystatin and filipin, which interact with membrane lipids, also interfered with binding. Some peptide analogues of carnosine were potent inhibitors of binding, but a variety of drugs serving as potent inhibitors in other binding systems had no effect on carnosine binding. Carnosine binding to mouse olfactory bulb membranes was 15-fold higher than that seen in membranes prepared from cerebral hemispheres, 5-fold higher than in cerebellum membranes and 3-fold higher than in membranes from spinal medulla and the olfactory tubercle-lateral olfactory tract area. (Auth.)

  20. Olfactory Associative Conditioning in Infant Rats with Brain Stimulation as Reward: II. Norepinephrine Mediates a Specific Component of the Bulb Response to Reward

    Wilson, Donald A.; Sullivan, Regina M

    1991-01-01

    One of the circuits modified by early olfactory learning is in the olfactory bulb. Specifically, response patterns of mitral-tufted cells are modified by associative conditioning during the early postnatal period. In addition, previous work has demonstrated that mitral-tufted cell single units respond to both olfactory conditioned stimuli and rewarding stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle-lateral hypothalamus (MFB-LH). The present study suggests that norepinephrine β-receptor activation...

  1. Morphological analysis of activity-reduced adult-born neurons in the mouse olfactory bulb

    Jeffrey E Dahlen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Adult born neurons are added to the olfactory bulb (OB throughout life in rodents. While many factors have been identified as regulating the survival and integration of adult-born neurons (ABNs into existing circuitry, the understanding of how these factors affect ABN morphology and connectivity is limited. Here we compare how cell intrinsic (siRNA knock down of voltage gated sodium channels NaV1.1-1.3 and circuit level (naris occlusion reductions in activity affect ABN morphology during integration into the OB. We found that both manipulations reduce the number of dendritic spines (and thus likely the number of reciprocal synaptic connections formed with the surrounding circuitry and inhibited dendritic ramification of ABNs. Further, we identified regions of ABN apical dendrites where the largest and most significant decreases occur following siRNA knock down or naris occlusion. In siRNA knock down cells, reduction of spines is observed in proximal regions of the apical dendrite. This suggests that distal regions of the dendrite may remain active independent of NaV1.1-1.3 channel expression, perhaps facilitated by activation of T-type calcium channels and NMDA receptors. By contrast, circuit level reduction of activity by naris occlusion resulted in a global depression of spine number. Together, these results indicate that ABNs retain the ability to develop their typical overall morphological features regardless of experienced activity, and activity modulates the number and location of formed connections.

  2. The Adult Ventricular-Subventricular Zone (V-SVZ) and Olfactory Bulb (OB) Neurogenesis.

    Lim, Daniel A; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    A large population of neural stem/precursor cells (NSCs) persists in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) located in the walls of the lateral brain ventricles. V-SVZ NSCs produce large numbers of neuroblasts that migrate a long distance into the olfactory bulb (OB) where they differentiate into local circuit interneurons. Here, we review a broad range of discoveries that have emerged from studies of postnatal V-SVZ neurogenesis: the identification of NSCs as a subpopulation of astroglial cells, the neurogenic lineage, new mechanisms of neuronal migration, and molecular regulators of precursor cell proliferation and migration. It has also become evident that V-SVZ NSCs are regionally heterogeneous, with NSCs located in different regions of the ventricle wall generating distinct OB interneuron subtypes. Insights into the developmental origins and molecular mechanisms that underlie the regional specification of V-SVZ NSCs have also begun to emerge. Other recent studies have revealed new cell-intrinsic molecular mechanisms that enable lifelong neurogenesis in the V-SVZ. Finally, we discuss intriguing differences between the rodent V-SVZ and the corresponding human brain region. The rapidly expanding cellular and molecular knowledge of V-SVZ NSC biology provides key insights into postnatal neural development, the origin of brain tumors, and may inform the development regenerative therapies from cultured and endogenous human neural precursors. PMID:27048191

  3. Role of the Retinoblastoma protein, Rb, during adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb.

    Naser, Rayan; Vandenbosch, Renaud; Omais, Saad; Hayek, Dayana; Jaafar, Carine; Al Lafi, Sawsan; Saliba, Afaf; Baghdadi, Maarouf; Skaf, Larissa; Ghanem, Noël

    2016-01-01

    Adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) are relatively quiescent populations that give rise to distinct neuronal subtypes throughout life, yet, at a very low rate and restricted differentiation potential. Thus, identifying the molecular mechanisms that control their cellular expansion is critical for regeneration after brain injury. Loss of the Retinoblastoma protein, Rb, leads to several defects in cell cycle as well as neuronal differentiation and migration during brain development. Here, we investigated the role of Rb during adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb (OB) by inducing its temporal deletion in aNSCs and progenitors. Loss of Rb was associated with increased proliferation of adult progenitors in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the rostral migratory stream (RMS) but did not alter self-renewal of aNSCs or neuroblasts subsequent migration and terminal differentiation. Hence, one month after their birth, Rb-null neuroblasts were able to differentiate into distinct subtypes of GABAergic OB interneurons but were gradually lost after 3 months. Similarly, Rb controlled aNSCs/progenitors proliferation in vitro without affecting their differentiation capacity. This enhanced SVZ/OB neurogenesis associated with loss of Rb was only transient and negatively affected by increased apoptosis indicating a critical requirement for Rb in the long-term survival of adult-born OB interneurons. PMID:26847607

  4. Adult neurogenesis and specific replacement of interneuron subtypes in the mouse main olfactory bulb

    LaRocca Greg

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New neurons are generated in the adult brain from stem cells found in the subventricular zone (SVZ. These cells proliferate in the SVZ, generating neuroblasts which then migrate to the main olfactory bulb (MOB, ending their migration in the glomerular layer (GLL and the granule cell layer (GCL of the MOB. Neuronal populations in these layers undergo turnover throughout life, but whether all neuronal subtypes found in these areas are replaced and when neurons begin to express subtype-specific markers is not known. Results Here we use BrdU injections and immunohistochemistry against (calretinin, calbindin, N-copein, tyrosine hydroxylase and GABA and show that adult-generated neurons express markers of all major subtypes of neurons in the GLL and GCL. Moreover, the fractions of new neurons that express subtype-specific markers at 40 and 75 days post BrdU injection are very similar to the fractions of all neurons expressing these markers. We also show that many neurons in the glomerular layer do not express NeuN, but are readily and specifically labeled by the fluorescent nissl stain Neurotrace. Conclusion The expression of neuronal subtype-specific markers by new neurons in the GLL and GCL changes rapidly during the period from 14–40 days after BrdU injection before reaching adult levels. This period may represent a critical window for cell fate specification similar to that observed for neuronal survival.

  5. New insights into the role of histamine in subventricular zone-olfactory bulb neurogenesis.

    Maria Francisca eEiriz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The subventricular zone (SVZ contains neural stem cells (NSCs that generate new neurons throughout life. Many brain diseases stimulate NSCs proliferation, neuronal differentiation and homing of these newborns cells into damaged regions. However, complete cell replacement has never been fully achieved. Hence, the identification of proneurogenic factors crucial for stem cell-based therapies will have an impact in brain repair. Histamine, a neurotransmitter and immune mediator, has been recently described to modulate proliferation and commitment of NSCs. Histamine levels are increased in the brain parenchyma and at the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF upon inflammation and brain injury, thus being able to modulate neurogenesis. Herein, we add new data showing that in vivo administration of histamine in the lateral ventricles has a potent proneurogenic effect, increasing the production of new neuroblasts in the SVZ that ultimately reach the olfactory bulb (OB. This report emphasizes the multidimensional effects of histamine in the modulation of NSCs dynamics and sheds light into the promising therapeutic role of histamine for brain regenerative medicine.

  6. Functional optical coherence tomography of rat olfactory bulb with periodic odor stimulation.

    Watanabe, Hideyuki; Rajagopalan, Uma Maheswari; Nakamichi, Yu; Igarashi, Kei M; Kadono, Hirofumi; Tanifuji, Manabu

    2016-03-01

    In rodent olfactory bulb (OB), optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI) is commonly used to investigate functional maps to odorant stimulations. However, in such studies, the spatial resolution in depth direction (z-axis) is lost because of the integration of light from different depths. To solve this problem, we propose functional optical coherence tomography (fOCT) with periodic stimulation and continuous recording. In fOCT experiments of in vivo rat OB, propionic acid and m-cresol were used as odor stimulus presentations. Such a periodic stimulation enabled us to detect the specific odor-responses from highly scattering brain tissue. Swept source OCT operating at a wavelength of 1334 nm and a frequency of 20 kHz, was employed with theoretical depth and lateral resolutions of 6.7 μm and 15.4 μm, respectively. We succeeded in visualizing 2D cross sectional fOCT map across the neural layer structure of OCT in vivo. The detected fOCT signals corresponded to a few glomeruli of the medial and lateral parts of dorsal OB. We also obtained 3D fOCT maps, which upon integration across z-axis agreed well with OISI results. We expect such an approach to open a window for investigating and possibly addressing toward inter/intra-layer connections at high resolutions in the future. PMID:27231593

  7. Age-Dependent Neurogenesis and Neuron Numbers within the Olfactory Bulb and Hippocampus of Homing Pigeons

    Meskenaite, Virginia; Krackow, Sven; Lipp, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Many birds are supreme long-distance navigators that develop their navigational ability in the first months after fledgling but update the memorized environmental information needed for navigation also later in life. We studied the extent of juvenile and adult neurogenesis that could provide such age-related plasticity in brain regions known to mediate different mechanisms of pigeon homing: the olfactory bulb (OB), and the triangular area of the hippocampal formation (HP tr). Newly generated neurons (visualized by doublecortin, DCX) and mature neurons were counted stereologically in 35 pigeon brains ranging from 1 to 168 months of age. At the age of 1 month, both areas showed maximal proportions of DCX positive neurons, which rapidly declined during the first year of life. In the OB, the number of DCX-positive periglomerular neurons declined further over time, but the number of mature periglomerular cells appeared unchanged. In the hippocampus, the proportion of DCX-positive neurons showed a similar decline yet to a lesser extent. Remarkably, in the triangular area of the hippocampus, the oldest birds showed nearly twice the number of neurons as compared to young adult pigeons, suggesting that adult born neurons in these regions expanded the local circuitry even in aged birds. This increase might reflect navigational experience and, possibly, expanded spatial memory. On the other hand, the decrease of juvenile neurons in the aging OB without adding new circuitry might be related to the improved attachment to the loft characterizing adult and old pigeons. PMID:27445724

  8. Chronic Spinal Injury Repair by Olfactory Bulb Ensheathing Glia and Feasibility for Autologous Therapy

    Muñoz-Quiles, Cintia; Santos-Benito, Fernando F.; Llamusí, M. Beatriz; Ramón-Cueto, Almudena

    2009-01-01

    Olfactory bulb ensheathing glia (OB-OEG) promote repair of spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats after transplantation at acute or subacute (up to 45 days) stages. The most relevant clinical scenario in humans, however, is chronic SCI, in which no more major cellular or molecular changes occur at the injury site; this occurs after the third month in rodents. Whether adult OB-OEG grafts promote repair of severe chronic SCI has not been previously addressed. Rats with complete SCI that were transplanted with OB-OEG 4 months after injury exhibited progressive improvement in motor function and axonal regeneration from different brainstem nuclei across and beyond the SCI site. A positive correlation between motor outcome and axonal regeneration suggested a role for brainstem neurons in the recovery. Functional and histological outcomes did not differ at subacute or chronic stages. Thus, autologous transplantation is a feasible approach as there is time for patient stabilization and OEG preparation in human chronic SCI; the healing effects of OB-OEG on established injuries may offer new therapeutic opportunities for chronic SCI patients. PMID:19915486

  9. Immunohistochemical localization of GABAergic key molecules in the main olfactory bulb of the Korean roe deer, Capreolus pygargus.

    Kim, Jeongtae; Takayama, Chitoshi; Park, Changnam; Ahn, Meejung; Moon, Changjong; Shin, Taekyun

    2015-09-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) negatively regulates the excitatory activity of neurons and is a predominant neurotransmitter in the nervous system. The olfactory bulb, the main center in the olfactory system, is modulated by inhibitory interneurons that use GABA as their main neurotransmitter. The present study aimed to evaluate GABAergic transmission in the main olfactory bulb (MOB) of the Korean roe deer (Capreolus pygargus) by examining the immunohistochemical localization of GABAergic key molecules, including glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT), GABA transporters (GATs; GAT-1 and GAT-3), and potassium sodium chloride co-transporter 2 (KCC2). GAD, VGAT, and KCC2 were expressed in the glomerular layer (GL), external plexiform layer (ePL), mitral cell layer (ML), and granule cell layer (GrL). Intense GAT-1 expression was observed in the GL; GAT-1 expression was discernible in the ePL, ML, and GrL. However, intense GAT-3 expression was extensively observed in all layers of the MOB. These results suggest that substantial GABAergic synapses are present in the GL, ePL, ML, and GrL. Furthermore, the released GABA may be removed by GAT-1 and GAT-3 in the GL, and the majority of GABA, which is present in the ePL to GrL, may undergo reuptake by GAT-3. This is the first morphological and descriptive study of GABAergic transmission in the MOB of Korean roe deer. PMID:26115600

  10. In Vivo Study of Dynamics and Stability of Dendritic Spines on Olfactory Bulb Interneurons in Xenopus laevis Tadpoles.

    Yu-Bin Huang

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines undergo continuous remodeling during development of the nervous system. Their stability is essential for maintaining a functional neuronal circuit. Spine dynamics and stability of cortical excitatory pyramidal neurons have been explored extensively in mammalian animal models. However, little is known about spiny interneurons in non-mammalian vertebrate models. In the present study, neuronal morphology was visualized by single-cell electroporation. Spiny neurons were surveyed in the Xenopus tadpole brain and observed to be widely distributed in the olfactory bulb and telencephalon. DsRed- or PSD95-GFP-expressing spiny interneurons in the olfactory bulb were selected for in vivo time-lapse imaging. Dendritic protrusions were classified as filopodia, thin, stubby, or mushroom spines based on morphology. Dendritic spines on the interneurons were highly dynamic, especially the filopodia and thin spines. The stubby and mushroom spines were relatively more stable, although their stability significantly decreased with longer observation intervals. The 4 spine types exhibited diverse preferences during morphological transitions from one spine type to others. Sensory deprivation induced by severing the olfactory nerve to block the input of mitral/tufted cells had no significant effects on interneuron spine stability. Hence, a new model was established in Xenopus laevis tadpoles to explore dendritic spine dynamics in vivo.

  11. Calcium buffering in rodent olfactory bulb granule cells and mitral cells.

    Egger, Veronica; Stroh, Olga

    2009-09-15

    In the mammalian olfactory bulb, axonless granule cells (GCs) mediate self- and lateral inhibitory interactions between mitral cells (MCs) via reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses. Calcium signals in the GC dendrites and reciprocal spines appear to decay unusually slowly, hence GC calcium handling might contribute to the known asynchronous release at this synapse. By recording fluorescence transients of different Ca(2+)-sensitive dyes at variable concentrations evoked by backpropagating action potentials (APs) and saturating AP trains we extrapolated Ca(2+) dynamics to conditions of zero added buffer for juvenile rat GC apical dendrites and spines and MC lateral dendrites. Resting [Ca(2+)] was at approximately 50 nM in both GC dendrites and spines. The average endogenous GC buffer capacities (kappa(E)) were within a range of 80-90 in the dendrites and 110-140 in the spines. The extrusion rate (gamma) was estimated as 570 s(-1) for dendrites and 870 s(-1) for spines and the decay time constant as approximately 200 ms for both. Single-current-evoked APs resulted in a [Ca(2+)] elevation of approximately 250 nM. Calcium handling in juvenile and adult mouse GCs appeared mostly similar. In MC lateral dendrites, we found AP-mediated [Ca(2+)] elevations of approximately 130 nM with a similar decay to that in GC dendrites, while kappa(E) and gamma were roughly 4-fold higher. In conclusion, the slow GC Ca(2+) dynamics are due mostly to sluggish Ca(2+) extrusion. Under physiological conditions this slow removal may well contribute to delayed release and also feed into other Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms that foster asynchronous output from the reciprocal spine. PMID:19635818

  12. Partial Conservation between Mice and Humans in Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Transcription Factor Codes.

    Fujiwara, Nana; Cave, John W

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian main olfactory bulb (OB) has a large population of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons that contains several subtypes defined by the co-expression other neurotransmitters and calcium binding proteins. The three most commonly studied OB interneuron subtypes co-express either Calretinin, Calbindin, or Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th). Combinations of transcription factors used to specify the phenotype of progenitors are referred to as transcription factor codes, and the current understanding of transcription factor codes that specify OB inhibitory neuron phenotypes are largely based on studies in mice. The conservation of these transcription factor codes in the human OB, however, has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to establish whether transcription factor codes in OB interneurons are conserved between mice and humans. This study compared the co-expression of Foxp2, Meis2, Pax6, and Sp8 transcription factors with Calretinin, Calbindin, or Th in human and mouse OB interneurons. This analysis found strong conservation of Calretinin co-expression with Sp8 and Meis2 as well as Th co-expression with Pax6 and Meis2. This analysis also showed that selective Foxp2 co-expression with Calbindin was conserved between mice and humans, which suggests Foxp2 is a novel determinant of the OB Calbindin interneuron phenotype. Together, the findings in this study provide insight into the conservation of transcription codes for OB interneuron phenotypes between humans and mice, as well as reveal some important differences between the species. This advance in our understanding of transcription factor codes in OB interneurons provides an important complement to the codes that have been established for other regions within the mammalian central nervous system, such as the cortex and spinal cord. PMID:27489533

  13. Accessory olfactory neural Fos responses to a conditioned environment are blocked in male mice by vomeronasal organ removal

    Pankevich, Diana E.; Cherry, James A.; Baum, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    The ability of an anesthetized estrous female to induce a conditioned place preference (CPP) response was assessed in male mice from which the vomeronasal organ (VNO) had either been removed (VNOx) or left intact (VNOi) in an initial effort to assess the possible contribution of VNO-accessory olfactory inputs to the intrinsically rewarding properties of opposite-sex body odorants. Both VNOi and VNOx male mice acquired a CPP after repeated pairing of an initially non-preferred test chamber wit...

  14. Acute changes in murine hippocampus and olfactory bulb after nasal instillation of varying size cerium dioxide particles.

    Liu, Yang; Li, Yuanyuan; Yang, Tongwang; Yang, Jing; Wang, He; Wu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Cerium (Ce)-containing compounds are now widely applied in medicine, agriculture, and animal breeding. However, the effects of Ce on humans, especially on the central nervous system (CNS), remain to be determined. In order to investigate whether Ce exposure affected the CNS, the aim of this study was to expose female ICR mice to varying nanoparticle sizes of 35 nm and 300 nm, and to a mixture of 1-5 µM cerium dioxide (CeO2) particles through intranasal (i.n.) instillation at daily dose of 40 mg/kg body weight. Immunohistochemical data showed that glial fibrillary acidic protein expression (GFAP) increased significantly in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb in all Ce-administered groups. The ultrastructure of olfactory bulb cells displayed chromatin reduction. In the hippocampus decreased chromatin was associated with ribosome shedding as evidenced from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). No significant differences in immunohistochemistry were noted between varying sizes of CeO2 groups. The results of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis group exposed to 1-5 µM demonstrated that Ce levels were significantly higher in whole brain (0.17 ng/mg) than for the control (0.04 ng/mg). Data thus demonstrated that i.n. instillation of different sized CeO2 particles induced damage in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus and that CeO2 particle size did not appear to play a role in the observed adverse responses. PMID:27599233

  15. Gestational methyl donor deficiency alters key proteins involved in neurosteroidogenesis in the olfactory bulbs of newborn female rats and is associated with impaired olfactory performance.

    El Hajj Chehadeh, Sarah; Pourié, Grégory; Martin, Nicolas; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Daval, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Leininger-Muller, Brigitte

    2014-03-28

    Gestational methyl donor deficiency (MDD) leads to growth retardation as well as to cognitive and motor disorders in 21-d-old rat pups. These disorders are related to impaired neurogenesis in the cerebral neurogenic areas. Olfactory bulbs (OB), the main target of neuronal progenitors originating from the subventricular zone, play a critical role during the postnatal period by allowing the pups to identify maternal odour. We hypothesised that growth retardation could result from impaired suckling due to impaired olfactory discrimination through imbalanced apoptosis/neurogenesis in the OB. Since neurosteroidogenesis modulates neurogenesis in OB, in the present study, we investigated whether altered neurosteroidogenesis could explain some these effects. Pups born to dams fed a normal diet (n 24) and a MDD diet (n 27) were subjected to olfactory tests during the lactation and weaning periods (n 24 and 20, respectively). We studied the markers of apoptosis/neurogenesis and the expression levels of the key neurosteroidogenic enzyme aromatase, the cholesterol-transfer protein StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein) and the ERα oestrogen receptor and the content of oestradiol in OB. The 21-d-old MDD female pups displayed lower body weight and impaired olfactory discrimination when compared with the control pups. MDD led to greater homocysteine accumulation and more pronounced apoptosis, along with impaired cell proliferation in the OB of female pups. The expression levels of aromatase, StAR and ERα as well as the content of oestradiol were lower in the OB of the MDD female pups than in those of the control female pups. In conclusion, gestational MDD may alter olfactory discrimination performances by affecting neurogenesis, apoptosis and neurosteroidogenesis in OB in a sex-dependent manner. It may be involved in growth retardation through impaired suckling. PMID:24229781

  16. Trpc2 gene impacts on maternal aggression, accessory olfactory bulb anatomy, and brain activity

    Hasen, Nina S.; Gammie, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    The trpc2 gene codes for an ion channel found in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). Studies using the trpc2−/− (KO) mouse have exploited the gene's role in signal transduction to explore the VNO's role in pheromonally-mediated behaviors. To date, no study has evaluated the impact of the trpc2 gene on activity within the brain. Here, we examine the gene's effect on brain regions governing maternal aggression. We intruder-tested lactating dams and then quantified Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-IR) in the ...

  17. Reduced proliferation in the adult mouse subventricular zone increases survival of olfactory bulb interneurons.

    Yi Sui

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the adult brain is largely restricted to the subependymal zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricle, olfactory bulb (OB and the dentate subgranular zone, and survival of adult-born cells in the OB is influenced by factors including sensory experience. We examined, in mice, whether survival of adult-born cells is also regulated by the rate of precursor proliferation in the SVZ. Precursor proliferation was decreased by depleting the SVZ of dopamine after lesioning dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra compacta with 6-hydroxydopamine. Subsequently, we examined the effect of reduced SVZ proliferation on the generation, migration and survival of neuroblasts and mature adult-born cells in the SVZ, rostral migratory stream (RMS and OB. Proliferating cells in the SVZ, measured by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU injected 2 hours prior to death or by immunoreactivity against Ki67, were reduced by 47% or 36%, respectively, 7 days after dopamine depletion, and by 29% or 31% 42 days after dopamine depletion, compared to sham-treated animals. Neuroblast generation in the SVZ and their migration along the RMS were not affected, neither 7 nor 42 days after the 6-hydroxydopamine injection, since the number of doublecortin-immunoreactive neuroblasts in the SVZ and RMS, as well as the number of neuronal nuclei-immunoreactive cells in the OB, were stable compared to control. However, survival analysis 15 days after 6-hydroxydopamine and 6 days after BrdU injections showed that the number of BrdU+ cells in the SVZ was 70% higher. Also, 42 days after 6-hydroxydopamine and 30 days after BrdU injections, we found an 82% increase in co-labeled BrdU+/γ-aminobutyric acid-immunoreactive cell bodies in the granular cell layer, while double-labeled BrdU+/tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cell bodies in the glomerular layer increased by 148%. We conclude that the number of OB interneurons following reduced SVZ proliferation is maintained through an increased

  18. Linear correlation between the number of olfactory sensory neurons expressing a given mouse odorant receptor gene and the total volume of the corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb.

    Bressel, Olaf Christian; Khan, Mona; Mombaerts, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Chemosensory specificity in the main olfactory system of the mouse relies on the expression of ∼1,100 odorant receptor (OR) genes across millions of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE), and on the coalescence of OSN axons into ∼3,600 glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. A traditional approach for visualizing OSNs and their axons consists of tagging an OR gene genetically with an axonal marker that is cotranslated with the OR by virtue of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Here we report full cell counts for 15 gene-targeted strains of the OR-IRES-marker design coexpressing a fluorescent protein. These strains represent 11 targeted OR genes, a 1% sample of the OR gene repertoire. We took an empirical, "count every cell" strategy: we counted all fluorescent cell profiles with a nuclear profile within the cytoplasm, on all serial coronal sections under a confocal microscope, a total of 685,673 cells in 56 mice at postnatal day 21. We then applied a strain-specific Abercrombie correction to these OSN counts in order to obtain a closer approximation of the true OSN numbers. We found a 17-fold range in the average (corrected) OSN number across these 11 OR genes. In the same series of coronal sections, we then determined the total volume of the glomeruli (TGV) formed by coalescence of the fluorescent axons. We found a strong linear correlation between OSN number and TGV, suggesting that TGV can be used as a surrogate measurement for estimating OSN numbers in these gene-targeted strains. PMID:26100963

  19. Robust encoding of stimulus identity and concentration in the accessory olfactory system.

    Arnson, Hannah A; Holy, Timothy E

    2013-08-14

    Sensory systems represent stimulus identity and intensity, but in the neural periphery these two variables are typically intertwined. Moreover, stable detection may be complicated by environmental uncertainty; stimulus properties can differ over time and circumstance in ways that are not necessarily biologically relevant. We explored these issues in the context of the mouse accessory olfactory system, which specializes in detection of chemical social cues and infers myriad aspects of the identity and physiological state of conspecifics from complex mixtures, such as urine. Using mixtures of sulfated steroids, key constituents of urine, we found that spiking responses of individual vomeronasal sensory neurons encode both individual compounds and mixtures in a manner consistent with a simple model of receptor-ligand interactions. Although typical neurons did not accurately encode concentration over a large dynamic range, from population activity it was possible to reliably estimate the log-concentration of pure compounds over several orders of magnitude. For binary mixtures, simple models failed to accurately segment the individual components, largely because of the prevalence of neurons responsive to both components. By accounting for such overlaps during model tuning, we show that, from neuronal firing, one can accurately estimate log-concentration of both components, even when tested across widely varying concentrations. With this foundation, the difference of logarithms, log A - log B = log A/B, provides a natural mechanism to accurately estimate concentration ratios. Thus, we show that a biophysically plausible circuit model can reconstruct concentration ratios from observed neuronal firing, representing a powerful mechanism to separate stimulus identity from absolute concentration. PMID:23946396

  20. Neonatal citalopram exposure decreases serotonergic fiber density in the olfactory bulb of male but not female adult rats

    Junlin eZhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Manipulation of serotonin (5HT during early development has been shown to induce long-lasting morphological changes within the raphe nuclear complex and serotonergic circuitry throughout the brain. Recent studies have demonstrated altered raphe-derived 5HT transporter (SERT immunoreactive axonal expression in several cortical target sites after brief perinatal exposure to selective 5HT reuptake inhibitors such as citalopram (CTM. Since the serotonergic raphe nuclear complex projects to the olfactory bulb (OB and perinatal 5HT disruption has been shown to disrupt olfactory behaviors, the goal of this study was to further investigate such developmental effects in the OB of CTM exposed animals. Male and female rat pups were exposed to CTM from postnatal day 8-21. After animals reach adulthood (>90 days, OB tissue sections were processed immunohistochemically for SERT antiserum. Our data revealed that the density of the SERT immunoreactive fibers decreased ~40% in the OB of CTM exposed male rats, but not female rats. Our findings support a broad and long-lasting change throughout most of the 5HT system, including the OB, after early manipulation of 5HT. Because dysfunction of the early 5HT system has been implicated in the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs, these new findings may offer insight into the abnormal olfactory perception often noted in patients with ASD.

  1. 2D-gel based proteomics unravels neurogenesis and energetic metabolism dysfunction of the olfactory bulb in CUMS rat model.

    Cheng, Ke; Li, Juan; Yang, Deyu; Yang, Yongtao; Rao, Chenglong; Zhang, Shuxiao; Wang, Wei; Guo, Hua; Fang, Liang; Zhu, Dan; Han, Yu; Xie, Peng

    2016-10-15

    Major depression is a devastating psychiatric disease worldwide currently. A reduced olfactory sensitivity in MDD patients was well evidenced. We previously interrogated the mechanism of decreasing hippocampus neurogenesis in CUMS rat model of depression. The Olfactory Bulb (OB) is crucial part of the olfactory system which functions in post-developmental neurogenesis. However, the mechanism of the dysfunction of OB induced by CUMS is still largely unknown. Herein, by using the chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rat model of depression, differential protein expression between the OB proteomes of CUMS and control group was interrogated through two-dimensional electrophoresis coupling with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty nine differential protein expression was analyzed by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway over-representation and Ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA). Seven identified differential proteins were selected for Western blotting validation. This study provides insight that neurogenesis and Energy metabolism disorder is involved in OB dysfunction induced by CUMS. PMID:27340088

  2. Olfactory Bulb [alpha][subscript 2]-Adrenoceptor Activation Promotes Rat Pup Odor-Preference Learning via a cAMP-Independent Mechanism

    Shakhawat, Amin MD.; Harley, Carolyn W.; Yuan, Qi

    2012-01-01

    In this study, three lines of evidence suggest a role for [alpha][subscript 2]-adrenoreceptors in rat pup odor-preference learning: olfactory bulb infusions of the [alpha][subscript 2]-antagonist, yohimbine, prevents learning; the [alpha][subscript 2]-agonist, clonidine, paired with odor, induces learning; and subthreshold clonidine paired with…

  3. Gene expression changes in the olfactory bulb of mice induced by exposure to diesel exhaust are dependent on animal rearing environment.

    Satoshi Yokota

    Full Text Available There is an emerging concern that particulate air pollution increases the risk of cranial nerve disease onset. Small nanoparticles, mainly derived from diesel exhaust particles reach the olfactory bulb by their nasal depositions. It has been reported that diesel exhaust inhalation causes inflammation of the olfactory bulb and other brain regions. However, these toxicological studies have not evaluated animal rearing environment. We hypothesized that rearing environment can change mice phenotypes and thus might alter toxicological study results. In this study, we exposed mice to diesel exhaust inhalation at 90 µg/m(3, 8 hours/day, for 28 consecutive days after rearing in a standard cage or environmental enrichment conditions. Microarray analysis found that expression levels of 112 genes were changed by diesel exhaust inhalation. Functional analysis using Gene Ontology revealed that the dysregulated genes were involved in inflammation and immune response. This result was supported by pathway analysis. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed 10 genes. Interestingly, background gene expression of the olfactory bulb of mice reared in a standard cage environment was changed by diesel exhaust inhalation, whereas there was no significant effect of diesel exhaust exposure on gene expression levels of mice reared with environmental enrichment. The results indicate for the first time that the effect of diesel exhaust exposure on gene expression of the olfactory bulb was influenced by rearing environment. Rearing environment, such as environmental enrichment, may be an important contributive factor to causation in evaluating still undefined toxic environmental substances such as diesel exhaust.

  4. Anosmin-1 over-expression increases adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and neuroblast migration to the olfactory bulb.

    García-González, Diego; Murcia-Belmonte, Verónica; Esteban, Pedro F; Ortega, Felipe; Díaz, David; Sánchez-Vera, Irene; Lebrón-Galán, Rafael; Escobar-Castañondo, Laura; Martínez-Millán, Luis; Weruaga, Eduardo; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Berninger, Benedikt; de Castro, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    New subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neuroblasts that migrate via the rostral migratory stream are continuously added to the olfactory bulb (OB) of the adult rodent brain. Anosmin-1 (A1) is an extracellular matrix protein that binds to FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) to exert its biological effects. When mutated as in Kallmann syndrome patients, A1 is associated with severe OB morphogenesis defects leading to anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Here, we show that A1 over-expression in adult mice strongly increases proliferation in the SVZ, mainly with symmetrical divisions, and produces substantial morphological changes in the normal SVZ architecture, where we also report the presence of FGFR1 in almost all SVZ cells. Interestingly, for the first time we show FGFR1 expression in the basal body of primary cilia in neural progenitor cells. Additionally, we have found that A1 over-expression also enhances neuroblast motility, mainly through FGFR1 activity. Together, these changes lead to a selective increase in several GABAergic interneuron populations in different OB layers. These specific alterations in the OB would be sufficient to disrupt the normal processing of sensory information and consequently alter olfactory memory. In summary, this work shows that FGFR1-mediated A1 activity plays a crucial role in the continuous remodelling of the adult OB. PMID:25300351

  5. Altered Morphologies and Functions of the Olfactory Bulb and Hippocampus Induced by miR-30c.

    Sun, Tingting; Li, Tianpeng; Davies, Henry; Li, Weiyun; Yang, Jing; Li, Shanshan; Ling, Shucai

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is considered to contribute to a certain degree of plasticity for the brain. However, the effects of adult-born neurons on the brain are still largely unknown. Here, we specifically altered the expression of miR-30c in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and dentate gyrus (DG) by stereotaxic injection with their respective up- and down-regulated lentiviruses. Results showed an increased level of miR-30c enhanced adult neurogenesis by prompting cell-cycles of stem cells, whereas down-regulated miR-30c led to the opposite results. When these effects of miR-30c lasted for 3 months, we detected significant morphological changes in the olfactory bulb (OB) and lineage alteration in the hippocampus. Tests of olfactory sensitivity and associative and spatial memory showed that a certain amount of adult-born neurons are essential for the normal functions of the OB and hippocampus, but there also exist redundant newborn neurons that do not further improve the functioning of these areas. Our study revealed the interactions between miRNA, adult neurogenesis, brain morphology and function, and this provides a novel insight into understanding the role of newborn neurons in the adult brain. PMID:27242411

  6. Two distinct olfactory bulb sublaminar networks involved in gamma and beta oscillation generation: a CSD study in the anesthetized rat.

    Nicolas eFourcaud-Trocmé

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A prominent feature of olfactory bulb (OB dynamics is the expression of characteristic local field potential (LFP rhythms, including a slow respiration-related rhythm and two fast alternating oscillatory rhythms, beta (15-30 Hz and gamma (40-90 Hz. All of these rhythms are implicated in olfactory coding. Fast oscillatory rhythms are known to involve the mitral-granule cell loops. Although the underlying mechanisms of gamma oscillation have been studied, the origin of beta oscillation remains poorly understood. Whether these two different rhythms share the same underlying mechanism is unknown. This study uses a quantitative and detailed current-source density analysis combined with multi-unit activity recordings to shed light on this question in freely breathing anesthetized rats. In particular, we show that gamma oscillation generation involves mainly upper half of the external plexiform layer (EPL and superficial areas of granule cell layer. In contrast, the generation of beta oscillation involves the lower part of the EPL and deep granule cells. This differential involvement of sublaminar networks is neither dependent on odor quality nor on the precise frequency of the fast oscillation under study. Overall, this study demonstrates a functional sublaminar organization of the rat OB, which is supported by previous anatomical findings.

  7. Altered morphologies and functions of the olfactory bulb and hippocampus induced by miR-30c

    Tingting eSun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis is considered to contribute to a certain degree of plasticity for the brain. However, the effects of adult-born neurons on the brain are still largely unknown. Here, we specifically altered the expression of miR-30c in the subventricular zone (SVZ and dentate gyrus (DG by stereotaxic injection with their respective up-and down-regulated lentiviruses. Results showed an increased level of miR-30c enhanced adult neurogenesis by prompting cell-cycles of stem cells, whereas down-regulated miR-30c led to the opposite results. When these effects of miR-30c lasted for three months, we detected significant morphological changes in the olfactory bulb (OB and lineage alteration in the hippocampus. Tests of olfactory sensitivity and associative and spatial memory showed that a certain amount of adult-born neurons are essential for the normal functions of the OB and hippocampus, but there also exist redundant newborn neurons that do not further improve the functioning of these areas. Our study revealed the interactions between miRNA, adult neurogenesis, brain morphology and function, and this provides a novel insight into understanding the role of newborn neurons in the adult brain.

  8. Neuroanatomical relationships between FMRFamide-immunoreactive components of the nervus terminalis and the topology of olfactory bulbs in teleost fish.

    D'Aniello, Biagio; Polese, Gianluca; Luongo, Luciano; Scandurra, Anna; Magliozzi, Laura; Aria, Massimo; Pinelli, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    The nervus terminalis (NT) is the most anterior of the vertebrate cranial nerves. In teleost fish, the NT runs across all olfactory components and shows high morphological variability within this taxon. We compare the anatomical distribution, average number and size of the FMRFamide-immunoreactive (ir) NT cells of fourteen teleost species with different positions of olfactory bulbs (OBs) with respect to the ventral telencephalic area. Based on the topology of the OBs, three different neuroanatomical organizations of the telencephalon can be defined, viz., fish having sessile (Type I), pseudosessile (short stalked; Type II) or stalked (Type III) OBs. Type III topology of OBs appears to be a feature associated with more basal species, whereas Types I and II occur in derived and in basal species. The displacement of the OBs is positively correlated with the peripheral distribution of the FMRFamide-ir NT cells. The number of cells is negatively correlated with the size of the cells. A dependence analysis related to the type of OB topology revealed a positive relationship with the number of cells and with the size of the cells, with Type I and II topologies of OBs showing significantly fewer cells and larger cells than Type III. A dendrogram based on similarities obtained by taking into account all variables under study, i.e., the number and size of the FMRFamide-ir NT cells and the topology of OBs, does not agree with the phylogenetic relationships amongst species, suggesting that divergent or convergent evolutionary phenomena produced the olfactory components studied. PMID:26453401

  9. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase is required for the survival and maturation of newly generated granule cells in the olfactory bulb.

    Jie Luo

    Full Text Available The type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3 is localized to olfactory cilia in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE and primary cilia in the adult mouse brain. Although AC3 has been strongly implicated in odor perception and olfactory sensory neuron (OSN targeting, its role in granule cells (GCs, the most abundant interneurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB, remains largely unknown. Here, we report that the deletion of AC3 leads to a significant reduction in the size of the MOB as well as the level of adult neurogenesis. The cell proliferation and cell cycle in the subventricular zone (SVZ, however, are not suppressed in AC3-/- mice. Furthermore, AC3 deletion elevates the apoptosis of GCs and disrupts the maturation of newly formed GCs. Collectively, our results identify a fundamental role for AC3 in the development of adult-born GCs in the MOB.

  10. Sex hormone binding globulin in the rat olfactory system.

    Ploss, V; Gebhart, V M; Dölz, W; Jirikowski, G F

    2014-05-01

    Ovarian steroids are known to act on the olfactory system. Their mode of action, however, is mostly unclear to date since nuclear receptors are lacking in sensory neurons. Here we used immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR to study expression and distribution of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in the rat olfactory system. Single sensory cells in the olfactory mucosa and their projections in the olfactory bulb showed specific SHBG immunostaining as determined by double immunofluorescence with olfactory marker protein OMP. Larger groups of SHBG stained sensory cells occurred in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). A portion of the olfactory glomeruli in the accessory olfactory bulb showed large networks of SHBG positive nerve fibres. Some of the mitral cells showed SHBG immune fluorescence. RT-PCR revealed SHBG encoding mRNA in the olfactory mucosa, in the VNO and in the olfactory bulbs indicating intrinsic expression of the binding globulin. The VNO and its related projections within the limbic system are known to be sensitive to gonadal steroid hormones. We conclude that SHBG may be of functional importance for rapid effects of olfactory steroids on limbic functions including the control of reproductive behaviours through pheromones. PMID:24681170

  11. Perceptual stability during dramatic changes in olfactory bulb activation maps and dramatic declines in activation amplitudes

    Homma, R.; Cohen, L. B.; Kosmidis, E. K.; Youngentob, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    We compared the concentration dependence of the ability of rats to identify odorants with the calcium signals in the nerve terminals of the olfactory receptor neurons. Although identification performance decreased with concentrations both above and below the training stimuli it remained well above random at all concentrations tested (between 0.0006% and 35% of saturated vapor). In contrast, the calcium signals in the same awake animals were much smaller than their maximum values at odorant co...

  12. Comprehensive connectivity of the mouse main olfactory bulb: analysis and online digital atlas

    Hong-Wei Dong

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the first open resource for mouse olfactory connectivity data produced as part of the Mouse Connectome Project (MCP) at UCLA. The MCP aims to assemble a whole-brain connectivity atlas for the C57Bl/6J mouse using a double coinjection tracing method. Each coinjection consists of one anterograde and one retrograde tracer, which affords the advantage of simultaneously identifying efferent and afferent pathways and directly identifying reciprocal connectivity of injection sites. T...

  13. The Alzheimer's β-secretase enzyme BACE1 is required for accurate axon guidance of olfactory sensory neurons and normal glomerulus formation in the olfactory bulb

    Rajapaksha Tharinda W

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The β-secretase, β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1, is a prime therapeutic target for lowering cerebral β-amyloid (Aβ levels in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Clinical development of BACE1 inhibitors is being intensely pursued. However, little is known about the physiological functions of BACE1, and the possibility exists that BACE1 inhibition may cause mechanism-based side effects. Indeed, BACE1-/- mice exhibit a complex neurological phenotype. Interestingly, BACE1 co-localizes with presynaptic neuronal markers, indicating a role in axons and/or terminals. Moreover, recent studies suggest axon guidance molecules are potential BACE1 substrates. Here, we used a genetic approach to investigate the function of BACE1 in axon guidance of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs, a well-studied model of axon targeting in vivo. Results We bred BACE1-/- mice with gene-targeted mice in which GFP is expressed from the loci of two odorant-receptors (ORs, MOR23 and M72, and olfactory marker protein (OMP to produce offspring that were heterozygous for MOR23-GFP, M72-GFP, or OMP-GFP and were either BACE1+/+ or BACE1-/-. BACE1-/- mice had olfactory bulbs (OBs that were smaller and weighed less than OBs of BACE1+/+ mice. In wild-type mice, BACE1 was present in OSN axon terminals in OB glomeruli. In whole-mount preparations and tissue sections, many OB glomeruli from OMP-GFP; BACE1-/- mice were malformed compared to wild-type glomeruli. MOR23-GFP; BACE1-/- mice had an irregular MOR23 glomerulus that was innervated by randomly oriented, poorly fasciculated OSN axons compared to BACE1+/+ mice. Most importantly, M72-GFP; BACE1-/- mice exhibited M72 OSN axons that were mis-targeted to ectopic glomeruli, indicating impaired axon guidance in BACE1-/- mice. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that BACE1 is required for the accurate targeting of OSN axons and the proper formation of glomeruli in the OB, suggesting a role for BACE1 in

  14. Effects of total saponins of Panax notoginseng on immature neuroblasts in the adult olfactory bulb following global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Xu He; Feng-jun Deng; Jin-wen Ge; Xiao-xin Yan; Ai-hua Pan; Zhi-yuan Li

    2015-01-01

    The main active components extracted from Panax notoginseng are total saponins. They have been shown to inhibit platelet aggregation, increase cerebral blood flow, improve neurological behavior, decrease infarct volume and promote proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the hippocampus and lateral ventricles. However, there is a lack of studies on whether total saponins of Panax notoginseng have potential benefits on immature neuroblasts in the olfactory bulb following ische...

  15. Anatomy, histochemistry and immunohistochemistry of the olfactory subsystems in mice

    Arthur William Barrios

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The four regions of the murine nasal cavity featuring olfactory neurons were studied anatomically and by labelling with lectins and relevant antibodies with a view to establishing criteria for the identification of olfactory subsystems that are readily applicable to other mammals. In the main olfactory epithelium and the septal organ the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs are embedded in quasi-stratified columnar epithelium; vomeronasal OSNs are embedded in epithelium lining the medial interior wall of the vomeronasal duct and do not make contact with the mucosa of the main nasal cavity; and in Grüneberg’s ganglion a small isolated population of OSNs lies adjacent to, but not within, the epithelium. With the exception of Grüneberg’s ganglion, all the tissues expressing olfactory marker protein (OMP (the above four nasal territories, the vomeronasal and main olfactory nerves, and the main and accessory olfactory bulbs are also labelled by Lycopersicum esculentum agglutinin, while Ulex europaeus agglutinin I labels all and only tissues expressing Gi2 (the apical sensory neurons of the vomeronasal organ, their axons, and their glomerular destinations in the anterior accessory olfactory bulb. These staining patterns of UEA-I and LEA may facilitate the characterization of olfactory anatomy in other species. A 710-section atlas of the anatomy of the murine nasal cavity has been made available on line.

  16. Anatomy, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry of the olfactory subsystems in mice.

    Barrios, Arthur W; Núñez, Gonzalo; Sánchez Quinteiro, Pablo; Salazar, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The four regions of the murine nasal cavity featuring olfactory neurons were studied anatomically and by labeling with lectins and relevant antibodies with a view to establishing criteria for the identification of olfactory subsystems that are readily applicable to other mammals. In the main olfactory epithelium and the septal organ the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are embedded in quasi-stratified columnar epithelium; vomeronasal OSNs are embedded in epithelium lining the medial interior wall of the vomeronasal duct and do not make contact with the mucosa of the main nasal cavity; and in Grüneberg's ganglion a small isolated population of OSNs lies adjacent to, but not within, the epithelium. With the exception of Grüneberg's ganglion, all the tissues expressing olfactory marker protein (OMP) (the above four nasal territories, the vomeronasal and main olfactory nerves, and the main and accessory olfactory bulbs) are also labeled by Lycopersicum esculentum agglutinin, while Ulex europaeus agglutinin I labels all and only tissues expressing Gαi2 (the apical sensory neurons of the vomeronasal organ, their axons, and their glomerular destinations in the anterior accessory olfactory bulb). These staining patterns of UEA-I and LEA may facilitate the characterization of olfactory anatomy in other species. A 710-section atlas of the anatomy of the murine nasal cavity has been made available on line. PMID:25071468

  17. The development of the olfactory organs in newly hatched monotremes and neonate marsupials.

    Schneider, Nanette Yvette

    2011-08-01

    Olfactory cues are thought to play a crucial role in the detection of the milk source at birth in mammals. It has been shown that a marsupial, the tammar wallaby, can detect olfactory cues from its mother's pouch at birth. This study investigates whether the main olfactory and accessory olfactory system are similarly well developed in other marsupials and monotremes at birth/hatching as in the tammar. Sections of the head of various marsupial and two monotreme species were investigated by light microscopy. Both olfactory systems were less well developed in the kowari and Eastern quoll. No olfactory or vomeronasal or terminal nerves could be observed; the main olfactory bulb (MOB) had only two layers while no accessory olfactory bulb or ganglion terminale were visible. All other investigated marsupials and monotremes showed further developed olfactory systems with olfactory, vomeronasal and terminal nerves, a three-layered MOB, and in the marsupials a prominent ganglion terminale. The main olfactory system was further developed than the accessory olfactory system in all species investigated. The olfactory systems were the least developed in species in which the mother's birth position removed most of the difficulty in reaching the teat, placing the neonate directly in the pouch. In monotremes they were the furthest developed as Bowman glands were found underlying the main olfactory epithelium. This may reflect the need to locate the milk field each time they drink as they cannot permanently attach to it, unlike therian mammals. While it still needs to be determined how an odour signal could be further processed in the brain, this study suggests that marsupials and monotremes possess well enough developed olfactory systems to be able to detect an odour cue from the mammary area at birth/hatching. It is therefore likely that neonate marsupials and newly hatched monotremes find their way to the milk source using olfactory cues, as has been previously suggested for the

  18. Effects of total saponins of Panax notoginseng on immature neuroblasts in the adult olfactory bulb following global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Xu He; Feng-jun Deng; Jin-wen Ge; Xiao-xin Yan; Ai-hua Pan; Zhi-yuan Li

    2015-01-01

    The main active components extracted from Panax notoginseng are total saponins. They have been shown to inhibit platelet aggregation, increase cerebral blood lfow, improve neurological behavior, decrease infarct volume and promote proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the hippocampus and lateral ventricles. However, there is a lack of studies on whether total saponins of Panax notoginseng have potential benefits on immature neuroblasts in the olfactory bulb following ischemia and reperfusion. This study established a rat model of global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion using four-vessel occlusion. Rats were administered total sa-ponins of Panax notoginseng at 75 mg/kg intraperitoneally 30 minutes after ischemia then once a day, for either 7 or 14 days. Total saponins of Panax notoginseng enhanced the number of dou-blecortin (DCX)+ neural progenitor cells and increased co-localization of DCX with neuronal nuclei and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding/DCX+ neural progenitor cells in the olfactory bulb at 7 and 14 days post ischemia. These ifndings indicate that following global brain ischemia/reperfusion, total saponins of Panax notoginseng promote differentiation of DCX+ cells expressing immature neuroblasts in the olfactory bulb and the underlying mechanism is related to the activation of the signaling pathway of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein.

  19. Changes in adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis in mice expressing the A30P mutant form of alpha-synuclein.

    Marxreiter, Franz; Nuber, Silke; Kandasamy, Mahesh; Klucken, Jochen; Aigner, Robert; Burgmayer, Ralf; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Riess, Olaf; Winkler, Jürgen; Winner, Beate

    2009-03-01

    In familial and sporadic forms of Parkinson's disease (PD), alpha-synuclein pathology is present in the brain stem nuclei and olfactory bulb (OB) long before Lewy bodies are detected in the substantia nigra. The OB is an active region of adult neurogenesis, where newly generated neurons physiologically integrate. While accumulation of wild-type alpha-synuclein is one of the pathogenic hallmarks of non-genetic forms of PD, the A30P alpha-synuclein mutation results in an earlier disease onset and a severe clinical phenotype. Here, we study the regulation of adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ)/OB system in a tetracycline-suppressive (tet-off) transgenic model of synucleinopathies, expressing human mutant A30P alpha-synuclein under the control of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (CaMK) promoter. In A30P transgenic mice alpha-synuclein was abundant at the site of integration in the glomerular cell layer of the OB. Without changes in proliferation in the SVZ, significantly fewer newly generated neurons were observed in the OB granule cell and glomerular layers of A30P transgenic mice than in controls, most probably due to increased cell death. By tetracycline-dependent abrogation of A30P alpha-synuclein expression, OB neurogenesis and programmed cell death was restored to control levels. Our results indicate that, using A30P conditional (tet-off) mice, A30P alpha-synuclein has a negative impact on olfactory neurogenesis and suppression of A30P alpha-synuclein enhances survival of newly generated neurons. This finding suggests that interfering with alpha-synuclein pathology can rescue newly generated neurons, possibly leading to new targets for therapeutic interventions in synucleinopathies. PMID:19291219

  20. Npas4 Regulates Mdm2 and thus Dcx in Experience-Dependent Dendritic Spine Development of Newborn Olfactory Bulb Interneurons

    Sei-ichi Yoshihara

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sensory experience regulates the development of various brain structures, including the cortex, hippocampus, and olfactory bulb (OB. Little is known about how sensory experience regulates the dendritic spine development of OB interneurons, such as granule cells (GCs, although it is well studied in mitral/tufted cells. Here, we identify a transcription factor, Npas4, which is expressed in OB GCs immediately after sensory input and is required for dendritic spine formation. Npas4 overexpression in OB GCs increases dendritic spine density, even under sensory deprivation, and rescues reduction of dendrite spine density in the Npas4 knockout OB. Furthermore, loss of Npas4 upregulates expression of the E3-ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, which ubiquitinates a microtubule-associated protein Dcx. This leads to reduction in the dendritic spine density of OB GCs. Together, these findings suggest that Npas4 regulates Mdm2 expression to ubiquitinate and degrade Dcx during dendritic spine development in newborn OB GCs after sensory experience.

  1. Aberrant Adult Neurogenesis in the Subventricular Zone-Rostral Migratory Stream-Olfactory Bulb System Following Subchronic Manganese Exposure.

    Fu, Sherleen; Jiang, Wendy; Gao, Xiang; Zeng, Andrew; Cholger, Daniel; Cannon, Jason; Chen, Jinhui; Zheng, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Adult neurogenesis occurs in brain subventricular zone (SVZ). Our recent data reveal an elevated proliferation of BrdU(+) cells in SVZ following subchronic manganese (Mn) exposure in rats. This study was designed to distinguish Mn effect on the critical stage of adult neurogenesis, ie, proliferation, migration, survival and differentiation from the SVZ via the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb (OB). Adult rats received a single ip-dose of BrdU at the end of 4-week Mn exposure to label proliferating cells. Immunostaining and cell-counting showed a 48% increase of BrdU(+) cells in Mn-exposed SVZ than in controls (Padult rats received 3 daily ip-injections of BrdU followed by subchronic Mn exposure. By 4-week post BrdU labeling, most of the surviving BrdU(+) cells in the OB were differentiated into NeuN(+) matured neurons. However, survival rates of BrdU/NeuN/DAPI triple-labeled cells in OB were 33% and 64% in Mn-exposed and control animals, respectively (Padult SVZ. In the OB, however, Mn exposure significantly reduces the surviving adult-born cells and markedly inhibits their differentiation into mature neurons, resulting in an overall decreased adult neurogenesis in the OB. PMID:26794142

  2. A Subpopulation of Olfactory Bulb GABAergic Interneurons Is Derived from Emx1- and Dlx5/6-Expressing Progenitors

    Kohwi, Minoree; Petryniak, Magdalena A.; Long, Jason E.; Ekker, Marc; Obata, Kunihiko; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) of the postnatal brain continuously generates olfactory bulb (OB) interneurons. We show that calretinin+, calbindin+, and dopaminergic (TH+) periglomerular OB interneurons correspond to distinct subtypes of GABAergic cells; all were produced in the postnatal mouse brain, but they matured and were eliminated at different rates. The embryonic lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) is thought to be the site of origin of postnatal SVZ neural progenitors. Consistently, grafts of the embryonic LGE into the adult brain SVZ generated many OB interneurons, including TH+ and calbindin+ periglomerular interneurons. However, calretinin+ cells were not produced from these LGE grafts. Surprisingly, pallial and septal embryonic progenitors transplanted into the adult brain SVZ also resulted in the generation of OB interneurons, including calretinin+ cells. A subset of Dlx2+ OB interneurons was derived from cells expressing Emx1, a transcription factor largely restricted to the pallium during development. Emx1 lineage-derived cells contributed a substantial portion of GABAergic cells in the OB, including calretinin+ interneurons. This is in contrast to cortex, in which Emx1 lineage-derived cells do not differentiate into GABAergic neurons. Our results suggest that some OB interneurons are derived from progenitors outside the LGE and that precursors expressing what has classically been considered a pallial transcription factor generate GABAergic interneurons. PMID:17596436

  3. Distinct lateral inhibitory circuits drive parallel processing of sensory information in the mammalian olfactory bulb

    Geramita, Matthew A; Burton, Shawn D; Urban, Nathan N

    2016-01-01

    Splitting sensory information into parallel pathways is a common strategy in sensory systems. Yet, how circuits in these parallel pathways are composed to maintain or even enhance the encoding of specific stimulus features is poorly understood. Here, we have investigated the parallel pathways formed by mitral and tufted cells of the olfactory system in mice and characterized the emergence of feature selectivity in these cell types via distinct lateral inhibitory circuits. We find differences in activity-dependent lateral inhibition between mitral and tufted cells that likely reflect newly described differences in the activation of deep and superficial granule cells. Simulations show that these circuit-level differences allow mitral and tufted cells to best discriminate odors in separate concentration ranges, indicating that segregating information about different ranges of stimulus intensity may be an important function of these parallel sensory pathways. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16039.001 PMID:27351103

  4. Effect of prenatal androgen receptor antagonist or aromatase inhibitor on the differentiation of neuronal Fos responses to estrous female pheromones in the rat accessory olfactory system

    Dominguez, Emilio; Portillo, Wendy; Baum, Michael J.; Bakker, Julie; Paredes, Raul

    2002-01-01

    Many socially relevant odors are detected in rodent species by the vomeronasal organ and subsequently processed by the accessory olfactory system (AOS). We previously found that gonadectomized male and female rats treated in adulthood with testosterone propionate (TP) showed equivalent Fos responses in the AOS to odors derived from estrous females. Likewise, in contrast with numerous other mammalian species, gonadectomized female rats show surprisingly high levels of male-typical mounting beh...

  5. Global Histone H4 Acetylation in the Olfactory Bulb of Lactating Rats with Different Patterns of Maternal Behavior.

    de Moura, Ana Carolina; da Silva, Ivy Reichert Vital; Reinaldo, Gustavo; Dani, Caroline; Elsner, Viviane Rostirola; Giovenardi, Márcia

    2016-10-01

    In rats, variations in the levels of neuromodulatory molecules and in the expression of their receptors are observed during pregnancy and postpartum. These changes may contribute to the development and management of maternal behavior. The frequency of licking the pups is used to evaluate maternal care, having mothers with low licking (LL) and high licking (HL) frequencies. Previously, we found that HL had increased levels of transcriptional expression of the receptors for serotonin (HTR1a, HTR1b), estrogen (Erα), dopamine (D1a), and prolactin (Prlr) than LL in the olfactory bulb (OB); however, the molecular mechanisms behind this phenomenon are unknown. Since evidences pointed out that epigenetic marks, which may alter gene expression, are modulated by environmental factors such as exercise, diet, maternal care, and xenobiotic exposure, our objective was to verify the acetylation levels of histone-H4 in the OB of LL and HL rats. Maternal behavior was studied for the first 7 postpartum days. LL (n = 4) and HL (n = 5) mothers were selected according to the behavior of licking their pups. Acetylation levels of histone-H4 were determined using the Global Histone-H4 Acetylation Assay Kit and expressed as ng/mg protein (mean ± SD). Analysis revealed that HL (278.36 ± 68.95) had increased H4 acetylation levels than LL (183.24 ± 73.05; p = 0.045). The enhanced expression of the previously studied receptors in the OB could be related, at least in part, to the hyperacetylation status of histone-H4 here observed. Afterward, the modulation of histone acetylation levels could exert a pivotal role through molecular mechanisms involved in the different patterns of maternal behavior. PMID:26620050

  6. Contribution of pheromones processed by the main olfactory system to mate recognition in female mammals

    Micheal J. Baum

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Until recently it was widely believed that the ability of female mammals (with the likely exception of women to identify and seek out a male breeding partner relied on the detection of non-volatile male pheromones by the female’s vomeronasal organ and their subsequent processing by a neural circuit that includes the accessory olfactory bulb, vomeronasal amygdala, and hypothalamus. Emperical data are reviewed in this paper that demonstrate the detection of volatile pheromones by the main olfactory epithelium of female mice which, in turn, leads to the activation of a population of glomeruli and abutting mitral cells in the main olfactory bulb (MOB. Anatomical results along with functional neuroanatomical data demonstrate that some of these MOB mitral cells project to the vomeronasal amygdala. These particular MOB mitral cells were selectively activated (i.e., expressed Fos protein by exposure to male as opposed to female urinary volatiles. A similar selectivity to opposite sex urinary volatiles was also seen in mitral cells of the accessory olfactory bulb of female mice. Behavioral data from female mouse, ferret, and human are reviewed that implicate the main olfactory system, in some cases interacting with the accessory olfactory system, in mate recognition.

  7. Acute Immobilization Stress Modulate GABA Release from Rat Olfactory Bulb: Involvement of Endocannabinoids—Cannabinoids and Acute Stress Modulate GABA Release

    Alejandra Delgado; Erica H. Jaffé

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effects of cannabinoids and acute immobilization stress on the regulation of GABA release in the olfactory bulb. Glutamate-stimulated 3H-GABA release was measured in superfused slices. We report that cannabinoids as WIN55, 212-2, methanandamide, and 2-arachidonoylglycerol were able to inhibit glutamate- and KCl-stimulated 3H-GABA release. This effect was blocked by the CB1 antagonist AM281. On the other hand, acute stress was able per se to increase endocannabinoid activity. Th...

  8. A physiological increase of insulin in the olfactory bulb decreases detection of a learned aversive odor and abolishes food odor-induced sniffing behavior in rats.

    Pascaline Aimé

    Full Text Available Insulin is involved in multiple regulatory mechanisms, including body weight and food intake, and plays a critical role in metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. An increasing body of evidence indicates that insulin is also involved in the modulation of olfactory function. The olfactory bulb (OB contains the highest level of insulin and insulin receptors (IRs in the brain. However, a role for insulin in odor detection and sniffing behavior remains to be elucidated. Using a behavioral paradigm based on conditioned olfactory aversion (COA to isoamyl-acetate odor, we demonstrated that an intracerebroventricular (ICV injection of 14 mU insulin acutely decreased olfactory detection of fasted rats to the level observed in satiated animals. In addition, whereas fasted animals demonstrated an increase in respiratory frequency upon food odor detection, this effect was absent in fasted animals receiving a 14 mU insulin ICV injection as well as in satiated animals. In parallel, we showed that the OB and plasma insulin levels were increased in satiated rats compared to fasted rats, and that a 14 mU insulin ICV injection elevated the OB insulin level of fasted rats to that of satiated rats. We further quantified insulin receptors (IRs distribution and showed that IRs are preferentially expressed in the caudal and lateral parts of the main OB, with the highest labeling found in the mitral cells, the main OB projection neurons. Together, these data suggest that insulin acts on the OB network to modulate olfactory processing and demonstrate that olfactory function is under the control of signals involved in energy homeostasis regulation and feeding behaviors.

  9. Dietary Restriction Mitigates Cocaine-Induced Alterations of Olfactory Bulb Cellular Plasticity and Gene Expression, and Behavior

    Xu, Xiangru; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Hall, F. Scott; Perona, Maria T. G.; Pistell, Paul J.; Lathia, Justin D.; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu; Becker, Kevin G.; Ladenheim, Bruce; Niklason, Laura E.; Uhl, George R; Cadet, Jean Lud; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Because the olfactory system plays a major role in food consumption, and because “food addiction” and associated morbidities have reached epidemic proportions, we tested the hypothesis that dietary energy restriction can modify adverse effects of cocaine on behavior and olfactory cellular and molecular plasticity. Mice maintained on an alternate day fasting (ADF) diet exhibited increased baseline locomotion and increased cocaine-sensitized locomotion during cocaine conditioning, despite no ch...

  10. 成年大鼠嗅球嗅鞘细胞的纯化实验%Purifying olfactory ensheathing cells from the olfactory bulb of adult rats

    朱仲庚; 吴小涛; 蒋赞利

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diversity of purification procedures resulting in various purities of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) used for grafting is considered to be relevant in the effectiveness of OECs transplant. It is important to develop a well-defined method which produces OECs of great purity and is easy to unify for the future standardization of research involving OECs.OBJECTIVE: To establish a method being easy to unify for purifying OECs to acquire highly and uniformly enriched population of OECs for standardized studies on cell transplantation.DESIGN: Randomized and controlled experiment.SETTING: Department of Orthopaedics, Affiliated Zhongda Hospital of Southeast University School of Clinical Medicine;Central Laboratory of Southeast University School of Clinical Medicine; Experimental Animal Center of Southeast University School of Clinical Medicine.MATERIALS: This experiment was carried out in the Central Laboratory of Southeast University School of Clinical Medicine from February to August 2006. Twenty-eight adult female SD rats weighing 200-250 g were selected in this study. The main reagents were detailed as follows: DMEM/F-12 (GIBCO); 2.5 g/L trypsin (GIBCO); poly-L-lysine (SIGMA); bovine pituitary extract (BPE, SIGMA); fetal bovine serum (FBS, Sijiqing Biological Agent Co., Ltd., Hangzhou);rabbit anti-low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (anti-P75, SIGMA); biotinylated goat anti-rabbit IgG (Boster Bioengineering Co., Ltd., Wuhan); methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) kit (SIGMA).METHODS: Primary cultures of OECs were separated from adult SD rats olfactory bulbs. At day 8 in vitro, the primary cultures were divided randomly into 4 groups, namely differential adhesion method group, immunoadsorption method group,the modified method group,and control group.①The cell suspension in the modified method group was seeded into uncoated flasks and incubated at 37 ℃ in 0.05 volume fraction of CO2 for 1 hours. The supematants were seeded into flasks that had

  11. Induction of an Olfactory Memory by the Activation of a Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor

    Kaba, Hideto; Hayashi, Yasunori; Higuchi, Takashi; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    1994-07-01

    Female mice form an olfactory memory of male pheromones at mating; exposure to the pheromones of a strange male after that mating will block pregnancy. The formation of this memory is mediated by the accessory olfactory system, in which an increase in norepinephrine after mating reduces inhibitory transmission of γ-aminobutyric acid from the granule cells to the mitral cells. This study shows that the activation of mGluR2, a metabotropic glutamate receptor that suppresses the γ-aminobutyric acid inhibition of the mitral cells, permits the formation of a specific olfactory memory without the occurrence of mating by infusion of mGluR2 agonists into the female's accessory olfactory bulb. This memory faithfully reflects the memory formed at mating.

  12. Neurobiology of mammalian olfactory learning that occurs during sensitive periods

    Hideto KABA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This review examines the organizational principles underlying olfactory learning in three specialized contexts that occur during sensitive periods of enhanced neural plasticity and emphasizes some of their common features. All three forms of olfactory learning are associated with neural changes in the olfactory bulb (OB at the first stage of sensory processing. These changes require the association of the olfactory and somatosensory signals in the OB. They all depend on somatosensory stimulation-induced release of noradrenaline that induces structural and functional changes at mitral-granule cell reciprocal synapses in the OB, resulting in increases in inhibitory transmission. In the accessory olfactory bulb, this represents the enhanced self-inhibition of mitral cells, which selectively disrupts the transmission of the mating male’s pregnancy-blocking signal at this level. In contrast, an extensive network of secondary dendrites of mitral cells in the main olfactory bulb probably results in a sharpening of the odor-induced pattern of activity, due to increases in lateral inhibition, leading to offspring recognition in sheep and neonatal learning in rats and rabbits. These findings show that inhibitory interneurons play a critical role in olfactory learning. Further work on how these neurons shape olfactory circuit function could provide important clues to understand memory functions of interneurons in other systems. Moreover, recent research has suggested that three forms of olfactory learning are controlled by synergistic, redundant, and distributed neural mechanisms. This has general implications regarding the mechanisms that may contribute to the robustness of memories [Current Zoology 56 (6: 819–833, 2010].

  13. Modulation of Olfactory Bulb Network Activity by Serotonin: Synchronous Inhibition of Mitral Cells Mediated by Spatially Localized GABAergic Microcircuits

    Schmidt, Loren J.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2014-01-01

    Although inhibition has often been proposed as a central mechanism for coordinating activity in the olfactory system, relatively little is known about how activation of different inhibitory local circuit pathways can generate coincident inhibition of principal cells. We used serotonin (5-HT) as a pharmacological tool to induce spiking in ensembles…

  14. Increased doublecortin (DCX expression and incidence of DCX-immunoreactive multipolar cells in the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb system of suicides

    Marissa E Maheu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Postmortem studies have confirmed the occurrence of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in humans and implicated this process in antidepressant response, yet neurogenesis in other regions remains to be examined in the context of depression. Here we assess the extent of subventricular zone-olfactory bulb (SVZ-OB neurogenesis in adult humans having died by suicide. Protein expression of proliferative and neurogenic markers Sox2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and doublecortin (DCX were examined in postmortem SVZ and OB samples from depressed suicides and matched sudden-death controls. In the SVZ, DCX-immunoreactive (IR cells displayed phenotypes typical of progenitors, whereas in the olfactory tract (OT, they were multipolar with variable size and morphologies suggestive of differentiating cells. DCX expression was significantly increased in the OB of suicides, whereas SVZ DCX expression was higher among unmedicated, but not antidepressant-treated, suicides. Although very few DCX-IR cells were present in the control OT, they were considerably more common in suicides and correlated with OB DCX levels. Suicides also displayed higher DCX-IR process volumes. These results support the notion that OB neurogenesis is minimal in adult humans. They further indicate that the differentiation and migration of SVZ-derived neuroblasts may be altered in unmedicated suicides, leading to an accumulation of ectopically-differentiating cells in the OT. Normal SVZ DCX expression among suicides receiving antidepressants suggests a potentially novel mode of action of antidepressant medication. Given the modest group sizes and rarity of DCX-IR cells assessed here, a larger-scale characterization will be required before firm conclusions can be made regarding the identity of these cells.

  15. Contribution of pheromones processed by the main olfactory system to mate recognition in female mammals

    Micheal J. Baum

    2012-01-01

    Until recently it was widely believed that the ability of female mammals (with the likely exception of women) to identify and seek out a male breeding partner relied on the detection of non-volatile male pheromones by the female’s vomeronasal organ and their subsequent processing by a neural circuit that includes the accessory olfactory bulb, vomeronasal amygdala, and hypothalamus. Emperical data are reviewed in this paper that demonstrate the detection of volatile pheromones by the main olf...

  16. Contribution of pheromones processed by the main olfactory system to mate recognition in female mammals

    Baum, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently it was widely believed that the ability of female mammals (with the likely exception of women) to identify and seek out a male breeding partner relied on the detection of non-volatile male pheromones by the female's vomeronasal organ (VNO) and their subsequent processing by a neural circuit that includes the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), vomeronasal amygdala, and hypothalamus. Emperical data are reviewed in this paper that demonstrate the detection of volatile pheromones by t...

  17. The age of olfactory bulb neurons in humans: an application of dating microgram DNA samples with the C14 bomb peak

    Full text: The determination of C14 levels in genomic DNA can be used to retrospectively establish the birth date of cells in the human body which was pioneered at the Karolinska Institute. Aboveground nuclear weapons testing between 1950 and 1963 doubled the atmospheric C14 content. After the Partial Nuclear Test Ban Treaty in 1963 the excess C14 decreased again by exchange of carbon dioxide between atmosphere, biosphere and the ocean. As a consequence all humans who lived in the second half of the 20th century have been labelled with this rapidly changing excess C14. During the last years the amount of carbon required for a C14 Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) measurement at the VERA Laboratory in Vienna was reduced to such an extent (mg to μg) that investigations of neurons of particularly interesting small sections of the human brain became possible. C14 measurements of < 5μg carbon DNA samples with an overall precision of 2.0 to 2.5% were achieved. This allowed to study neurogenesis in the human olfactory bulb, which turned out to take place primarily at birth with <1% of these neurons being exchanged at a later time. This identifies a fundamental difference in the plasticity of the human brain compared to other mammals. (author)

  18. High-Field MRI Reveals a Drastic Increase of Hypoxia-Induced Microhemorrhages upon Tissue Reoxygenation in the Mouse Brain with Strong Predominance in the Olfactory Bulb.

    Hoffmann, Angelika; Kunze, Reiner; Helluy, Xavier; Milford, David; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko; Marti, Hugo H

    2016-01-01

    Human pathophysiology of high altitude hypoxic brain injury is not well understood and research on the underlying mechanisms is hampered by the lack of well-characterized animal models. In this study, we explored the evolution of brain injury by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological methods in mice exposed to normobaric hypoxia at 8% oxygen for 48 hours followed by rapid reoxygenation and incubation for further 24 h under normoxic conditions. T2*-, diffusion-weighted and T2-relaxometry MRI was performed before exposure, immediately after 48 hours of hypoxia and 24 hours after reoxygenation. Cerebral microhemorrhages, previously described in humans suffering from severe high altitude cerebral edema, were also detected in mice upon hypoxia-reoxygenation with a strong region-specific clustering in the olfactory bulb, and to a lesser extent, in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. The number of microhemorrhages determined immediately after hypoxia was low, but strongly increased 24 hours upon onset of reoxygenation. Histologically verified microhemorrhages were exclusively located around cerebral microvessels with disrupted interendothelial tight junction protein ZO-1. In contrast, quantitative T2 and apparent-diffusion-coefficient values immediately after hypoxia and after 24 hours of reoxygenation did not show any region-specific alteration, consistent with subtle multifocal but not with regional or global brain edema. PMID:26863147

  19. Olfactory ensheathing cell tumor

    Ippili Kaushal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs are found in the olfactory bulb and olfactory nasal mucosa. They resemble Schwann cells on light and electron microscopy, however, immunohistochemical staining can distinguish between the two. There are less than 30 cases of olfactory groove schwannomas reported in the literature while there is only one reported case of OEC tumor. We report an OEC tumor in a 42-year-old male and discuss the pathology and origin of this rare tumor.

  20. Neurogenesis, Neurodegeneration, Interneuron Vulnerability, and Amyloid-β in the Olfactory Bulb of APP/PS1 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    De la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Ubeda-Banon, Isabel; Flores-Cuadrado, Alicia; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease, mostly idiopathic and with palliative treatment. Neuropathologically, it is characterized by intracellular neurofibrillary tangles of tau protein and extracellular plaques of amyloid β peptides. The relationship between AD and neurogenesis is unknown, but two facts are particularly relevant. First, early aggregation sites of both proteinopathies include the hippocampal formation and the olfactory bulb (OB), which have been correlated to memory and olfactory deficits, respectively. These areas are well-recognized integration zones of newly-born neurons in the adult brain. Second, molecules, such as amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin-1 are common to both AD etiology and neurogenic development. Adult neurogenesis in AD models has been studied in the hippocampus, but only occasionally addressed in the OB and results are contradictory. To gain insight on the relationship between adult neurogenesis and AD, this work analyzes neurogenesis, neurodegeneration, interneuron vulnerability, and amyloid-β involvement in the OB of an AD model. Control and double-transgenic mice carrying the APP and the presenilin-1 genes, which give rise amyloid β plaques have been used. BrdU-treated animals have been studied at 16, 30, 43, and 56 weeks of age. New-born cell survival (BrdU), neuronal loss (using neuronal markers NeuN and PGP9.5), differential interneuron (calbindin-, parvalbumin-, calretinin- and somatostatin-expressing populations) vulnerability, and involvement by amyloid β have been analyzed. Neurogenesis increases with aging in the granule cell layer of control animals from 16 to 43 weeks. No neuronal loss has been observed after quantifying NeuN or PGP9.5. Regarding interneuron population vulnerability: calbindin-expressing neurons remains unchanged; parvalbumin-expressing neurons trend to increase with aging in transgenic animals; calretinin-expressing neurons increase with aging in

  1. Deletion of collapsin response mediator protein 4 results in abnormal layer thickness and elongation of mitral cell apical dendrites in the neonatal olfactory bulb.

    Tsutiya, Atsuhiro; Watanabe, Hikaru; Nakano, Yui; Nishihara, Masugi; Goshima, Yoshio; Ohtani-Kaneko, Ritsuko

    2016-05-01

    Collapsin response mediator protein 4 (CRMP4), a member of the CRMP family, is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Here, we first compared layer thickness of the olfactory bulb between wild-type (WT) and CRMP4-knockout (KO) mice. The mitral cell layer (MCL) was significantly thinner, whereas the external plexiform layer (EPL) was significantly thicker in CRMP4-KO mice at postnatal day 0 (PD0) compared with WTs. However, differences in layer thickness disappeared by PD14. No apoptotic cells were found in the MCL, and the number of mitral cells (MCs) identified with a specific marker (i.e. Tbx21 antibody) did not change in CRMP4-KO neonates. However, DiI-tracing showed that the length of mitral cell apical dendrites was greater in CRMP4-KO neonates than in WTs. In addition, expression of CRMP4 mRNA in WT mice was most abundant in the MCL at PD0 and decreased afterward. These results suggest that CRMP4 contributes to dendritic elongation. Our in vitro studies showed that deletion or knockdown of CRMP4 resulted in enhanced growth of MAP2-positive neurites, whereas overexpression of CRMP4 reduced their growth, suggesting a new role for CRMP4 as a suppressor of dendritic elongation. Overall, our data suggest that disruption of CRMP4 produces a temporary alteration in EPL thickness, which is constituted mainly of mitral cell apical dendrites, through the enhanced growth of these dendrites. PMID:26739921

  2. Polyurethane/polylactide-based biomaterials combined with rat olfactory bulb-derived glial cells and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for neural regenerative medicine applications

    Research concerning the elaboration and application of biomaterial which may support the nerve tissue regeneration is currently one of the most promising directions. Biocompatible polymer devices are noteworthy group among the numerous types of potentially attractive biomaterials for regenerative medicine application. Polylactides and polyurethanes may be utilized for developing devices for supporting the nerve regeneration, like nerve guide conduits or bridges connecting the endings of broken nerve tracts. Moreover, the combination of these biomaterial devices with regenerative cell populations, like stem or precursor cells should significantly improve the final therapeutic effect. Therefore, the composition and structure of final device should support the proper adhesion and growth of cells destined for clinical application. In current research, the three polymer mats elaborated for connecting the broken nerve tracts, made from polylactide, polyurethane and their blend were evaluated both for physical properties and in vitro, using the olfactory-bulb glial cells and mesenchymal stem cells. The evaluation of Young's modulus, wettability and roughness of obtained materials showed the differences between analyzed samples. The analysis of cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology showed that the polyurethane–polylactide blend was the most neutral for cells in culture, while in the pure polymer samples there were significant alterations observed. Our results indicated that polyurethane–polylactide blend is an optimal composition for culturing and delivery of glial and mesenchymal stem cells. - Highlights: • Polyurethane–polylactide blends exhibit different characteristics from pure polymers. • Pure PU and PLA negatively influence on morphology of glial and mesenchymal cells. • PU/PLA blend was neutral for glial and mesenchymal cell proliferation and morphology

  3. Polyurethane/polylactide-based biomaterials combined with rat olfactory bulb-derived glial cells and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for neural regenerative medicine applications

    Grzesiak, Jakub, E-mail: grzesiak.kuba@gmail.com [Electron Microscopy Laboratory, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Kozuchowska 5b, 51-631 Wroclaw (Poland); Marycz, Krzysztof [Electron Microscopy Laboratory, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Kozuchowska 5b, 51-631 Wroclaw (Poland); Szarek, Dariusz [Department of Neurosurgery, Lower Silesia Specialist Hospital of T. Marciniak, Emergency Medicine Center, Traugutta 116, 50-420 Wroclaw (Poland); Bednarz, Paulina [State Higher Vocational School in Tarnów, Mickiewicza 8, 33-100 Tarnów (Poland); Laska, Jadwiga [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    Research concerning the elaboration and application of biomaterial which may support the nerve tissue regeneration is currently one of the most promising directions. Biocompatible polymer devices are noteworthy group among the numerous types of potentially attractive biomaterials for regenerative medicine application. Polylactides and polyurethanes may be utilized for developing devices for supporting the nerve regeneration, like nerve guide conduits or bridges connecting the endings of broken nerve tracts. Moreover, the combination of these biomaterial devices with regenerative cell populations, like stem or precursor cells should significantly improve the final therapeutic effect. Therefore, the composition and structure of final device should support the proper adhesion and growth of cells destined for clinical application. In current research, the three polymer mats elaborated for connecting the broken nerve tracts, made from polylactide, polyurethane and their blend were evaluated both for physical properties and in vitro, using the olfactory-bulb glial cells and mesenchymal stem cells. The evaluation of Young's modulus, wettability and roughness of obtained materials showed the differences between analyzed samples. The analysis of cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology showed that the polyurethane–polylactide blend was the most neutral for cells in culture, while in the pure polymer samples there were significant alterations observed. Our results indicated that polyurethane–polylactide blend is an optimal composition for culturing and delivery of glial and mesenchymal stem cells. - Highlights: • Polyurethane–polylactide blends exhibit different characteristics from pure polymers. • Pure PU and PLA negatively influence on morphology of glial and mesenchymal cells. • PU/PLA blend was neutral for glial and mesenchymal cell proliferation and morphology.

  4. Expression of corticosteroid binding globulin in the rat olfactory system.

    Dölz, Wilfried; Eitner, Annett; Caldwell, Jack D; Jirikowski, Gustav F

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids are known to act on the olfactory system although their mode of action is still unclear since nuclear glucocorticoid receptors are mostly absent in the olfactory mucosa. In this study we used immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridization, and RT-PCR to study the expression and distribution of corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) in the rat olfactory system. Mucosal goblet cells could be immunostained for CBG. Nasal secretion contained measurable amounts of CBG suggesting that CBG is liberated. CBG immunoreactivity was localized in many of the basal cells of the olfactory mucosa, while mature sensory cells contained CBG only in processes as determined by double immunostaining with the olfactory marker protein OMP. This staining was most pronounced in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). The appearance of CBG in the non-sensory and sensory parts of the VNO and in nerve terminals in the accessory bulb indicated axonal transport. Portions of the periglomerular cells, the mitral cells and the tufted cells were also CBG positive. CBG encoding transcripts were confirmed by RT-PCR in homogenates of the olfactory mucosa and VNO. Olfactory CBG may be significant for uptake, accumulation and transport of glucocorticoids, including aerosolic cortisol. PMID:23141917

  5. Cladistic analysis of olfactory and vomeronasal systems

    Alino eMartinez-Marcos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most tetrapods possess two nasal organs for detecting chemicals in their environment, which are the sensory detectors of the olfactory and vomeronasal systems. The seventies’ view that the olfactory system was only devoted to sense volatiles, whereas the vomeronasal system was exclusively specialized for pheromone detection was challenged by accumulating data showing deep anatomical and functional interrelationships between both systems. In addition, the assumption that the vomeronasal system appeared as an adaptation to terrestrial life is being questioned as well. The aim of the present work is to use a comparative strategy to gain insight in our understanding of the evolution of chemical cortex. We have analyzed the organization of the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices of reptiles, marsupials and placental mammals and we have compared our findings with data from other taxa in order to better understand the evolutionary history of the nasal sensory systems in vertebrates. The olfactory and vomeronsasal cortices have been re-investigated in garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis, short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica and rats (Rattus norvegicus by tracing the efferents of the main and accessory olfactory bulbs using injections of neuroanatomical anterograde tracers (dextran-amines. In snakes, the medial olfactory tract is quite evident, whereas the main vomeronasal-recipient structure, the nucleus sphericus is a folded cortical-like structure, located at the caudal edge of the amygdala. In marsupials, which are acallosal mammals, the rhinal fissure is relatively dorsal and the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices relatively expanded. Placental mammals, like marsupials, show partially overlapping olfactory and vomeronasal projections in the rostral basal telencephalon. These data raise the interesting question of how the telencephalon has been re-organized in different groups according to the biological relevance of chemical senses.

  6. Phylogenic studies on the olfactory system in vertebrates.

    Taniguchi, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Kazumi

    2014-06-01

    The olfactory receptor organs and their primary centers are classified into several types. The receptor organs are divided into fish-type olfactory epithelium (OE), mammal-type OE, middle chamber epithelium (MCE), lower chamber epithelium (LCE), recess epithelium, septal olfactory organ of Masera (SO), mammal-type vomeronasal organ (VNO) and snake-type VNO. The fish-type OE is observed in flatfish and lungfish, while the mammal-type OE is observed in amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. The MCE and LCE are unique to Xenopus and turtles, respectively. The recess epithelium is unique to lungfish. The SO is observed only in mammals. The mammal-type VNO is widely observed in amphibians, lizards and mammals, while the snake-type VNO is unique to snakes. The VNO itself is absent in turtles and birds. The mammal-type OE, MCE, LCE and recess epithelium seem to be descendants of the fish-type OE that is derived from the putative primitive OE. The VNO may be derived from the recess epithelium or fish-type OE and differentiate into the mammal-type VNO and snake-type VNO. The primary olfactory centers are divided into mammal-type main olfactory bulbs (MOB), fish-type MOB and mammal-type accessory olfactory bulbs (AOB). The mammal-type MOB first appears in amphibians and succeeds to reptiles, birds and mammals. The fish-type MOB, which is unique to fish, may be the ancestor of the mammal-type MOB. The mammal-type AOB is observed in amphibians, lizards, snakes and mammals and may be the remnant of the fish-type MOB. PMID:24531771

  7. Dopaminergic modulation of bulbofugal projections in the rat olfactory tubercle.

    Inokuchi, A; Mooney, K E; Snow, J B

    1987-01-01

    Neuronal activities following olfactory bulb electrical stimulation were examined before and after administration of dopamine and dopamine antagonist in the rat olfactory tubercle. The inhibitory response to olfactory bulb stimulation was attenuated by systemic haloperidol administration, but the excitatory response to olfactory bulb stimulation rarely was modulated. Topical application of dopamine by iontophoresis extended the duration of inhibition in 56% of the neurons sampled and diminished it in 25%; the excitatory response was modulated in 42% of neurons, most of which were attenuated. These findings suggest that dopamine in the olfactory tubercle could be involved in modulations of neuronal activities related to olfactory transduction. PMID:2820257

  8. Roles of the main olfactory and vomeronasal systems in the detection of androstenone in inbred strains of mice

    Vera V. VOZNESSENSKAYA, Maria A.KLYUCHNIKOVA, Charles J. WYSOCKI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of the main olfactory and accessory olfactory systems (MOS and AOS respectively in the detection of androstenone. We used the following experimental approaches: behavioral, surgical removal of the vomeronasal organ (VNX followed by histochemical verification and Fos immunohistochemistry. Using a Y-maze paradigm we estimated sensitivity of NZB/B1NJ and CBA/J mice to androstenone. CBA mice were 2,000-fold more sensitive to androstenone than NZB mice. VNX caused a 4- to16-fold decrease in sensitivity to androstenone in highly-sensitive CBA mice, but did not affect thresholds in NZB mice. Results indicate the involvement of the MOS and AOS in the detection of androstenone. We observed a specific pattern of Fos-positive cells in the main olfactory bulb of CBA mice but not in NZB mice subsequent to exposure of mice to androstenone; the compound activated cells in the accessory olfactory bulb in both strains of mice, indicating the involvement of the vomeronasal organ. Patterns of Fos-positive cells in the vomeronasal organ were recorded subsequent to exposure to androstenone. Fos-positive receptor cells in the vomeronasal organ of CBA and NZB mice were different, in CBA mice Fos-positive cells were noted in both the basal and apical zones, however, in NZB mice activation was observed only in the apical zone [Current Zoology 56 (6: 813–818, 2010].

  9. Anterior olfactory organ removal produces anxiety-like behavior and increases spontaneous neuronal firing rate in basal amygdala.

    Contreras, Carlos M; Gutiérrez-García, Ana G; Molina-Jiménez, Tania

    2013-09-01

    Some chemical cues may produce signs of anxiety and fear mediated by amygdala nuclei, but unknown is the role of two anterior olfactory epithelial organs, the septal and vomeronasal organs (SO-VNOs). The effects of SO-VNO removal were explored in different groups of Wistar rats using two complementary approaches: (i) the assessment of neuronal firing rate in basal and medial amygdala nuclei and (ii) behavioral testing. Fourteen days after SO-VNO removal, spontaneous activity in basal and medial amygdala nuclei in one group was determined using single-unit extracellular recordings. A separate group of rats was tested in the elevated plus maze, social interaction test, and open field test. Compared with sham-operated and intact control rats, SO-VNO removal produced a higher neuronal firing rate in the basal amygdala but not medial amygdala. In the behavioral tests, SO-VNO removal increased signs of anxiety in the elevated plus maze, did not alter locomotion, and increased self-directed behavior, reflecting anxiety-like behavior. Histological analysis showed neuronal destruction in the accessory olfactory bulb but not anterior olfactory nucleus in the SO-VNO group. The present results suggest the participation of SO-VNO/accessory olfactory bulb/basal amygdala relationships in the regulation of anxiety through a process of disinhibition. PMID:23721965

  10. Bulb Miser

    1978-01-01

    The Bulb-Miser was developed during NASA's Apollo program to protect the Saturn launch vehicle from electrical current surge. It is now being produced for the commercial market by Bulb-Miser, Inc., Houston, Texas. Technically known as a "temperature compensating thermistor," the Bulb-Miser is a simple, inexpensive device which looks like a washer about the size of a quarter. It is slipped between bulb and socket and can be used with any incandescent bulb that screws into a standard socket. In addition to delaying burnout, the Bulb-Miser also offers some reduction of electrical energy. But the economy of the device goes beyond energy use or bulb cost; to big users of bulbs, it makes possible substantially lower maintenance labor costs. One field test involving an apartment complex showed that it took two men 30 man hours monthly to replace light bulbs; after Bulb-Miser installation only nine man hours a month were needed. Bulb-Misers are used not only in private homes but also by hospitals, schools, hotels and motels, restaurants, banks and firms providing contract maintenance for large outdoor electric signs. The broadest use is in industrial facilities; the list of big companies which have purchased the Bulb-Miser reads like a Who's Who of American industry.

  11. the olfactory bulbectomized mouse

    Fink, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    The bilateral ectomy of the olfactory bulb in rats and mice is an accepted animal model of depression. Because of its good predictive validity it is used to develop new antidepressants and to prove their effectiveness. After the olfactory bulbectomy, the animals show a certain pattern of changes in behaviour and in neurochemical, neuroendocrinological and neuroimmunological parameters. The leading parameter for the changes of behaviour in these animals is the locomotoric hyperactivity in the ...

  12. Culture of Mouse Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    Gong, Qizhi

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons, located in the nasal epithelium, detect and transmit odorant information to the central nervous system. This requires that these neurons form specific neuronal connections within the olfactory bulb and express receptors and signaling molecules specific for these functions. This protocol describes a primary olfactory sensory neuron culture technique that allows in vitro investigation of olfactory sensory neuron differentiation, axon outgrowth, odorant receptor expres...

  13. The progress of olfactory transduction and biomimetic olfactory-based biosensors

    WU ChunSheng; WANG LiJiang; ZHOU Jun; ZHAO LuHang; WANG Ping

    2007-01-01

    Olfaction is a very important sensation for all animals. Recently great progress has been made in the research of olfactory transduction. Especially the novel finding of the gene superfamily encoding olfactory receptors has led to rapid advances in olfactory transduction. These advances also promoted the research of biomimetic olfactory-based biosensors and some obvious achievements have been obtained due to their potential commercial prospects and promising industrial applications. This paper briefly introduces the biological basis of olfaction, summarizes the progress of olfactory signal transduction in the olfactory neuron, the olfactory bulb and the olfactory cortex, outlines the latest developments and applications of biomimetic olfactory-based biosensors. Finally, the olfactory biosensor based on light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS) is addressed in detail based on our recent work and the research trends of olfactory biosensors in future are discussed.

  14. Assessment of olfactory nerve by SPECT-MRI image with nasal thallium-201 administration in patients with olfactory impairments in comparison to healthy volunteers.

    Hideaki Shiga

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to assess whether migration of thallium-201 ((201Tl to the olfactory bulb were reduced in patients with olfactory impairments in comparison to healthy volunteers after nasal administration of (201Tl. PROCEDURES: 10 healthy volunteers and 21 patients enrolled in the study (19 males and 12 females; 26-71 years old. The causes of olfactory dysfunction in the patients were head trauma (n = 7, upper respiratory tract infection (n = 7, and chronic rhinosinusitis (n = 7. (201TlCl was administered unilaterally to the olfactory cleft, and SPECT-CT was conducted 24 h later. Separate MRI images were merged with the SPECT images. (201Tl olfactory migration was also correlated with the volume of the olfactory bulb determined from MRI images, as well as with odor recognition thresholds measured by using T&T olfactometry. RESULTS: Nasal (201Tl migration to the olfactory bulb was significantly lower in the olfactory-impaired patients than in healthy volunteers. The migration of (201Tl to the olfactory bulb was significantly correlated with odor recognition thresholds obtained with T&T olfactometry and correlated with the volume of the olfactory bulb determined from MRI images when all subjects were included. CONCLUSIONS: Assessment of the (201Tl migration to the olfactory bulb was the new method for the evaluation of the olfactory nerve connectivity in patients with impaired olfaction.

  15. Olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Hawkes, C H; Shephard, B C; Daniel, S E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate olfactory function in Parkinson's disease. METHODS: A standardised odour identification test was used, together with an evoked potential assessment with hydrogen sulphide. In addition, histological analysis was performed on the olfactory bulbs of cadavers who died from Parkinson's disease. RESULTS: Over 70% of patients studied (71 of 96) were outside the 95% limit of normal on the identification test in an age matched sample and there was an unusual pattern of selective...

  16. Preliminary Modeling and Simulation Study on Olfactory Cell Sensation

    This paper introduced olfactory sensory neuron's whole-cell model with a concrete voltage-gated ionic channels and simulation. Though there are many models in olfactory sensory neuron and olfactory bulb, it remains uncertain how they express the logic of olfactory information processing. In this article, the olfactory neural network model is also introduced. This model specifies the connections among neural ensembles of the olfactory system. The simulation results of the neural network model are consistent with the observed olfactory biological characteristics such as 1/f-type power spectrum and oscillations.

  17. Gap junctions in olfactory neurons modulate olfactory sensitivity

    Zhang Chunbo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the fundamental questions in olfaction is whether olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs behave as independent entities within the olfactory epithelium. On the basis that mature ORNs express multiple connexins, I postulated that gap junctional communication modulates olfactory responses in the periphery and that disruption of gap junctions in ORNs reduces olfactory sensitivity. The data collected from characterizing connexin 43 (Cx43 dominant negative transgenic mice OlfDNCX, and from calcium imaging of wild type mice (WT support my hypothesis. Results I generated OlfDNCX mice that express a dominant negative Cx43 protein, Cx43/β-gal, in mature ORNs to inactivate gap junctions and hemichannels composed of Cx43 or other structurally related connexins. Characterization of OlfDNCX revealed that Cx43/β-gal was exclusively expressed in areas where mature ORNs resided. Real time quantitative PCR indicated that cellular machineries of OlfDNCX were normal in comparison to WT. Electroolfactogram recordings showed decreased olfactory responses to octaldehyde, heptaldehyde and acetyl acetate in OlfDNCX compared to WT. Octaldehyde-elicited glomerular activity in the olfactory bulb, measured according to odor-elicited c-fos mRNA upregulation in juxtaglomerular cells, was confined to smaller areas of the glomerular layer in OlfDNCX compared to WT. In WT mice, octaldehyde sensitive neurons exhibited reduced response magnitudes after application of gap junction uncoupling reagents and the effects were specific to subsets of neurons. Conclusions My study has demonstrated that altered assembly of Cx43 or structurally related connexins in ORNs modulates olfactory responses and changes olfactory activation maps in the olfactory bulb. Furthermore, pharmacologically uncoupling of gap junctions reduces olfactory activity in subsets of ORNs. These data suggest that gap junctional communication or hemichannel activity plays a critical role in

  18. Neurotoxic Effects of Dichlorophenyl Methylsulphones Related to Olfactory Mucosal Lesions

    Carlsson, Carina

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with the highly potent olfactory mucosa toxicant 2,6-dichlorophenyl methylsulphone (2,6-diClPh-MeSO2) and its non-toxic 2,5-chlorinated isomer (2,5-diClPh-MeSO2). In mice, both substances bind firmly in the olfactory mucosa and the olfactory bulb, which are important components of the sensory system. The 2,6-isomer induces olfactory mucosal necrosis with permanent loss of olfactory neuroepithelium and olfactory nerves. A major objective was to clarify the cause of this isome...

  19. A subtype-specific critical period for neurogenesis in the postnatal development of mouse olfactory glomeruli.

    Yasuko Kato

    Full Text Available Sensory input is essential for the normal development of sensory centers in the brain, such as the somatosensory, visual, auditory, and olfactory systems. Visual deprivation during a specific developmental stage, called the critical period, results in severe and irreversible functional impairments in the primary visual cortex. Olfactory deprivation in the early postnatal period also causes significant developmental defects in the olfactory bulb, the primary center for olfaction. Olfactory bulb interneurons are continuously generated from neural stem cells in the ventricular-subventricular zone, suggesting that the olfactory system has plasticity even in adulthood. Here, we investigated the effect of transient neonatal olfactory deprivation on the addition of interneurons to the glomerular layer of the adult mouse olfactory bulb. We found that the addition of one subtype of interneurons was persistently inhibited even after reopening the naris. BrdU pulse-chase experiments revealed that the neonatal olfactory deprivation predominantly affected an early phase in the maturation of this neuronal subtype in the olfactory bulb. Subjecting the mice to odor stimulation for 6 weeks after naris reopening resulted in significant recovery from the histological and functional defects caused by the olfactory deprivation. These results suggest that a subtype-specific critical period exists for olfactory bulb neurogenesis, but that this period is less strict and more plastic compared with the critical periods for other systems. This study provides new insights into the mechanisms of postnatal neurogenesis and a biological basis for the therapeutic effect of olfactory training.

  20. CNPase Expression in Olfactory Ensheathing Cells

    Christine Radtke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A large body of work supports the proposal that transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs into nerve or spinal cord injuries can promote axonal regeneration and remyelination. Yet, some investigators have questioned whether the transplanted OECs associate with axons and form peripheral myelin, or if they recruit endogenous Schwann cells that form myelin. Olfactory bulbs from transgenic mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP under the control of the 2-3-cyclic nucleotide 3-phosphodiesterase (CNPase promoter were studied. CNPase is expressed in myelin-forming cells throughout their lineage. We examined CNPase expression in both in situ in the olfactory bulb and in vitro to determine if OECs express CNPase commensurate with their myelination potential. eGFP was observed in the outer nerve layer of the olfactory bulb. Dissociated OECs maintained in culture had both intense eGFP expression and CNPase immunostaining. Transplantation of OECs into transected peripheral nerve longitudinally associated with the regenerated axons. These data indicate that OECs in the outer nerve layer of the olfactory bulb of CNPase transgenic mice express CNPase. Thus, while OECs do not normally form myelin on olfactory nerve axons, their expression of CNPase is commensurate with their potential to form myelin when transplanted into injured peripheral nerve.

  1. Olfactory dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Li, Li-Min; Yang, Li-Na; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Fu, Ying; Li, Ting; Qi, Yuan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Da-Qi; Zhang, Ningnannan; Liu, Jingchun; Yang, Li

    2016-06-15

    Association of changes in olfactory-related structures with olfactory function in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is not well understood. We used a T&T olfactometer test kit to evaluate olfactory function in 26 patients with MS and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). Then, Brain MRI were performed and olfactory-related structures were analyzed in these subjects. Olfactory detection and recognition threshold were significantly higher in the MS group, interestingly olfactory recognition threshold positively correlated with expanded disability status scale scores in these patients. Olfactory bulb (OB) volume reduced in patients with olfactory dysfunction (ODF). At the same time, reductions in gray matter (GM) volume were observed in the parahippocampal gyrus (PCG), amygdala, piriform cortex, and inferior frontal gyrus in patients with MS compared to HC. Atrophy of the PCG was more obvious in patients with ODF than patients without ODF and the PCG volume correlated with the olfactory recognition threshold, while no difference was found in fractional anisotropy values of tract-based spatial statistics analysis in the two groups. Olfactory function in patients with MS tends to become gradually more impaired with disability aggravation. Decreases in the volume of the OB and olfactory-related GM might provide valuable information about disease status in patients with MS with olfactory impairment. PMID:27206870

  2. Odorant Category Profile Selectivity of Olfactory Cortex

    Yoshida, Ikue; Mori, Kensaku

    2007-01-01

    The olfactory cortex receives converging axonal inputs from many mitral and tufted cells in the olfactory bulb. Recent studies indicate that single cortical neurons integrate signals from diverse odorants. However, there remains a basic question, namely, the signals from which kinds of odorants are integrated by the individual cortical neurons? The present study examined the possibility that some cortical neurons integrate signals from distinct component odorants of natural foods because indi...

  3. Monoallelic expression of olfactory receptors.

    Monahan, Kevin; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    The sense of smell collects vital information about the environment by detecting a multitude of chemical odorants. Breadth and sensitivity are provided by a huge number of chemosensory receptor proteins, including more than 1,400 olfactory receptors (ORs). Organizing the sensory information generated by these receptors so that it can be processed and evaluated by the central nervous system is a major challenge. This challenge is overcome by monogenic and monoallelic expression of OR genes. The single OR expressed by each olfactory sensory neuron determines the neuron's odor sensitivity and the axonal connections it will make to downstream neurons in the olfactory bulb. The expression of a single OR per neuron is accomplished by coupling a slow chromatin-mediated activation process to a fast negative-feedback signal that prevents activation of additional ORs. Singular OR activation is likely orchestrated by a network of interchromosomal enhancer interactions and large-scale changes in nuclear architecture. PMID:26359778

  4. Correlation of olfactory dysfunction of different etiologies in MRI and comparison with subjective and objective olfactometry

    Goektas, Oender [Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Berlin, Charite Campus Mitte, Smell and Taste Consultation Service, Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: oender.goektas@charite.de; Fleiner, Franca; Sedlmaier, Benedikt [Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Berlin, Charite Campus Mitte, Smell and Taste Consultation Service, Berlin (Germany); Bauknecht, Christian [Department of Radiology, University of Berlin, Charite Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    Background: The clinical diagnosis of olfactory dysfunction of different etiologies has been standardized by the German Working Group of Olfactology and Gustology, but there is no agreement about the most suitable imaging modality for diagnosing this disorder. Material and methods: A total of 24 patients (13 women, 11 men; mean age 52 years) with different types of olfactory dysfunction (anosmia, hyposmia) were examined by objective and subjective olfactometry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the olfactory bulb. Results: There was a positive correlation between objective olfactometry and volumetry of the olfactory bulb but no correlation between subjective olfactometry and MRI. Conclusion: MRI allows an evaluation of the olfactory bulb and appears to be superior to other modalities such as computed tomography (CT). Objective olfactometry remains the gold standard for reliable diagnosis of olfactory dysfunction.

  5. Correlation of olfactory dysfunction of different etiologies in MRI and comparison with subjective and objective olfactometry

    Background: The clinical diagnosis of olfactory dysfunction of different etiologies has been standardized by the German Working Group of Olfactology and Gustology, but there is no agreement about the most suitable imaging modality for diagnosing this disorder. Material and methods: A total of 24 patients (13 women, 11 men; mean age 52 years) with different types of olfactory dysfunction (anosmia, hyposmia) were examined by objective and subjective olfactometry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the olfactory bulb. Results: There was a positive correlation between objective olfactometry and volumetry of the olfactory bulb but no correlation between subjective olfactometry and MRI. Conclusion: MRI allows an evaluation of the olfactory bulb and appears to be superior to other modalities such as computed tomography (CT). Objective olfactometry remains the gold standard for reliable diagnosis of olfactory dysfunction.

  6. Physiological and morphological characterization of honeybee olfactory neurons combining electrophysiology, calcium imaging and confocal microscopy

    Galizia, Cosmas Giovanni; Kimmerle, B.

    2004-01-01

    The insect antennal lobe is the first brain structure to process olfactory information. Like the vertebrate olfactory bulb the antennal lobe is substructured in olfactory glomeruli. In insects, glomeruli can be morphologically identified, and have characteristic olfactory response profiles. Local neurons interconnect glomeruli, and output (projection) neurons project to higher-order brain centres. The relationship between their elaborate morphology and their physiology is not understood. We r...

  7. Interactions with the young down-regulate adult olfactory neurogenesis and enhance the maturation of olfactory neuroblasts in sheep mothers.

    Frédéric Levy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available New neurons are continuously added in the dentate gyrus and the olfactory bulb of mammalian brain. While numerous environmental factors controlling survival of newborn neurons have been extensively studied, regulation by social interactions is less documented. We addressed this question by investigating the influence of parturition and interactions with the young on neurogenesis in sheep mothers. Using Bromodeoxyuridine, a marker of cell division, in combination with markers of neuronal maturation, the percentage of neuroblasts and new mature neurons in the olfactory bulb and the dentate gyrus was compared between groups of parturient ewes which could interact or not with their lamb, and virgins. In addition, a morphological analysis was performed by measuring the dendritic arbor of neuroblasts in both structures. We showed that the post-partum period was associated with a decrease in olfactory and hippocampal adult neurogenesis. In the olfactory bulb, the suppressive effect on neuroblasts was dependent on interactions with the young whereas in the dentate gyrus the decrease in new mature neurons was associated with parturition. In addition, dendritic length and number of nodes of neuroblasts were significantly enhanced by interactions with the lamb in the olfactory bulb but not in the dentate gyrus. Because interactions with the young involved learning of the olfactory signature of the lamb, we hypothesize that this learning is associated with a down-regulation in olfactory neurogenesis and an enhancement of olfactory neuroblast maturation. Our assumption is that fewer new neurons decrease cell competition in the olfactory bulb and enhance maturation of those new neurons selected to participate in the learning of the young odor.

  8. Interactions with the young down-regulate adult olfactory neurogenesis and enhance the maturation of olfactory neuroblasts in sheep mothers.

    Brus, Maïna; Meurisse, Maryse; Keller, Matthieu; Lévy, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    New neurons are continuously added in the dentate gyrus (DG) and the olfactory bulb of mammalian brain. While numerous environmental factors controlling survival of newborn neurons have been extensively studied, regulation by social interactions is less documented. We addressed this question by investigating the influence of parturition and interactions with the young on neurogenesis in sheep mothers. Using Bromodeoxyuridine, a marker of cell division, in combination with markers of neuronal maturation, the percentage of neuroblasts and new mature neurons in the olfactory bulb and the DG was compared between groups of parturient ewes which could interact or not with their lamb, and virgins. In addition, a morphological analysis was performed by measuring the dendritic arbor of neuroblasts in both structures. We showed that the postpartum period was associated with a decrease in olfactory and hippocampal adult neurogenesis. In the olfactory bulb, the suppressive effect on neuroblasts was dependent on interactions with the young whereas in the DG the decrease in new mature neurons was associated with parturition. In addition, dendritic length and number of nodes of neuroblasts were significantly enhanced by interactions with the lamb in the olfactory bulb but not in the DG. Because interactions with the young involved learning of the olfactory signature of the lamb, we hypothesize that this learning is associated with a down-regulation in olfactory neurogenesis and an enhancement of olfactory neuroblast maturation. Our assumption is that fewer new neurons decrease cell competition in the olfactory bulb and enhance maturation of those new neurons selected to participate in the learning of the young odor. PMID:24600367

  9. Nasal toxicity, carcinogenicity, and olfactory uptake of metals.

    Sunderman, F W

    2001-01-01

    Occupational exposures to inhalation of certain metal dusts or aerosols can cause loss of olfactory acuity, atrophy of the nasal mucosa, mucosal ulcers, perforated nasal septum, or sinonasal cancer. Anosmia and hyposmia have been observed in workers exposed to Ni- or Cd-containing dusts in alkaline battery factories, nickel refineries, and cadmium industries. Ulcers of the nasal mucosa and perforated nasal septum have been reported in workers exposed to Cr(VI) in chromate production and chrome plating, or to As(III) in arsenic smelters. Atrophy of the olfactory epithelium has been observed in rodents following inhalation of NiSO4 or alphaNi3S2. Cancers of the nose and nasal sinuses have been reported in workers exposed to Ni compounds in nickel refining, cutlery factories, and alkaline battery manufacture, or to Cr(VI) in chromate production and chrome plating. In animals, several metals (eg, Al, Cd, Co, Hg, Mn, Ni, Zn) have been shown to pass via olfactory receptor neurons from the nasal lumen through the cribriform plate to the olfactory bulb. Some metals (eg, Mn, Ni, Zn) can cross synapses in the olfactory bulb and migrate via secondary olfactory neurons to distant nuclei of the brain. After nasal instillation of a metal-containing solution, transport of the metal via olfactory axons can occur rapidly, within hours or a few days (eg, Mn), or slowly over days or weeks (eg, Ni). The olfactory bulb tends to accumulate certain metals (eg, Al, Bi, Cu, Mn, Zn) with greater avidity than other regions of the brain. The molecular mechanisms responsible for metal translocation in olfactory neurons and deposition in the olfactory bulb are unclear, but complexation by metal-binding molecules such as carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) may be involved. PMID:11314863

  10. 菜花原矛头蝮嗅觉系统和犁鼻系统的显微结构%The microstructure of olfactory and vomeronasal systems in snake, Protobothrops jerdonii

    王宏元; 柴丽红; 王晓雯; 李忻怡

    2011-01-01

    采用组织学方法观察了菜花原矛头蝮(Protobothrops jerdonii)的嗅觉系统和犁鼻系统.结果表明,嗅器位于嗅囊的背侧,犁鼻器则位于嗅器的腹内侧.嗅器的上皮分化为嗅上皮和呼吸上皮,嗅上皮的基底层有Bowman's腺,呼吸上皮中具有大量的杯状细胞.犁鼻器基底层未发现犁鼻腺.嗅球和副嗅球呈典型的板层构筑结构.推测菜花原矛头蝮嗅器内嗅上皮和呼吸上皮完全分开有利于背侧嗅上皮俘获气味信号,腹侧呼吸上皮参与呼吸作用.虽然菜花原矛头蝮等蛇类的犁鼻器缺少犁鼻腺,但是其眼眶周围的哈氏腺和口腔内的唾液腺可以代偿犁鼻腺机能.%The olfactory organ and vomeronasal system in snake, Protobothrops jerdonii, were investigated under the microscope. The results showed that the olfactory organ lies in the dorsal and the vomeronasal organ is in the ventral portion of the nose cavity. The epithelium of the olfactory cavity is divided into the two segments: olfactory epithelium and respiratory epithelium.Bowman's gland in the olfactory epithelium is present and goblets cells occur in the respiratory epithelium. Vomeronasal gland is not found in the vomeronasal organ. The olfactory bulb and accessory olfactory bulb are typical laminar pattern. Subdivision of dorsal olfactory epithelium and ventral respiratory epithelium in snake may be beneficial to that the olfactory epithelium capture odour and respiratory epithelium take party into the respiratory. In addition, the vomeronasal organ in snake lacks vomeronasal glands, but the harderian gland and the salivary glands compensate lack of the vomeronasal gland.