WorldWideScience

Sample records for accessing human knowledge

  1. Accessible Knowledge - Knowledge on Accessibility

    Kirkeby, Inge Mette

    2015-01-01

    Although serious efforts are made internationally and nationally, it is a slow process to make our physical environment accessible. In the actual design process, architects play a major role. But what kinds of knowledge, including research-based knowledge, do practicing architects make use of when...... designing accessible environments? The answer to the question is crucially important since it affects how knowledge is distributed and how accessibility can be ensured. In order to get first-hand knowledge about the design process and the sources from which they gain knowledge, 11 qualitative interviews...... were conducted with architects with experience of designing for accessibility. The analysis draws on two theoretical distinctions. The first is research-based knowledge versus knowledge used by architects. The second is context-independent knowledge versus context-dependent knowledge. The practitioners...

  2. Accessing vs Sourcing Knowledge

    Awate, Snehal; Larsen, Marcus M.; Mudambi, Ram

    2015-01-01

    to get on par with industry leaders. An in-depth comparison of knowledge flows reveals that within AMNEs, headquarters often serves the primary source of knowledge for R&D subsidiaries. In contrast, within EMNEs, headquarters accesses knowledge from R&D subsidiaries in advanced economies for...

  3. Accessing Remote Knowledge

    Maskell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Work on clusters during the last few decades convincingly demonstrates enhanced opportunities for local growth and entrepreneurship, but external upstream knowledge linkages are often overlooked or taken for granted. This article is an attempt to remedy this situation by investigating why and how...

  4. Open Access to Knowledge: Initiatives in India

    Bandi, Anand; Bandi, Shekappa

    2011-01-01

    Study traces major Open Access Initiatives in a digital environment. Major National Open Access initiatives briefly enumerated to give an overview of the movement. Study strives to illustrate initiatives on open access to information and knowledge. Some of the common open access channels found are digital libraries, open access journals, institutional repositories, national-level repositories, open courseware, metadata harvesting services, etc. Most of the open access initiatives are supporte...

  5. Online Access to Knowledge: System Design.

    Meadow, Charles T.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reports on design and rationale of Online Access to Knowledge, a computer intermediary developed by Online Access to Knowledge Project to enable users with little or no training or experience in bibliographic searching to conduct their own searches. Topics covered include software design, tutorials and assistance programs, and conclusions based on…

  6. Learning Task Knowledge from Dialog and Web Access

    Vittorio Perera

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present KnoWDiaL, an approach for Learning and using task-relevant Knowledge from human-robot Dialog and access to the Web. KnoWDiaL assumes that there is an autonomous agent that performs tasks, as requested by humans through speech. The agent needs to “understand” the request, (i.e., to fully ground the task until it can proceed to plan for and execute it. KnoWDiaL contributes such understanding by using and updating a Knowledge Base, by dialoguing with the user, and by accessing the web. We believe that KnoWDiaL, as we present it, can be applied to general autonomous agents. However, we focus on our work with our autonomous collaborative robot, CoBot, which executes service tasks in a building, moving around and transporting objects between locations. Hence, the knowledge acquired and accessed consists of groundings of language to robot actions, and building locations, persons, and objects. KnoWDiaL handles the interpretation of voice commands, is robust regarding speech recognition errors, and is able to learn commands involving referring expressions in an open domain, (i.e., without requiring a lexicon. We present in detail the multiple components of KnoWDiaL, namely a frame-semantic parser, a probabilistic grounding model, a web-based predicate evaluator, a dialog manager, and the weighted predicate-based Knowledge Base. We illustrate the knowledge access and updates from the dialog and Web access, through detailed and complete examples. We further evaluate the correctness of the predicate instances learned into the Knowledge Base, and show the increase in dialog efficiency as a function of the number of interactions. We have extensively and successfully used KnoWDiaL in CoBot dialoguing and accessing the Web, and extract a few corresponding example sequences from captured videos.

  7. Open Access to Scientific Knowledge: Policy Perspectives and National Initiatives

    Das, Anup-Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Various initiatives are taken globally to make knowledge repositories more accessible to researchers by exploiting the internet platform and developing a model that allows free access. India is also actively participating in this new initiative. Open access to scientific knowledge is an integral part of India’s S&T policy intervention. Some of the major international and Indian national initiatives are highlighted. Further efforts that would be required to make Indian participation more fruit...

  8. SW Architecture for Access to Medical Information for Knowledge Execution

    Kim, Suntae; Shim, Bingu; Kim, Jeong Ah; Cho, Insook

    Recently, many approaches have been studied to author medical knowledge and verify doctor's diagnosis based on the specified knowledge. During the verification, intensive access to medical information is unavoidable. Also, the access approach should consider modifiability in order to cover diverse medical information from the variety of hospitals. This paper presents an approach to generating query language from medical knowledge, and shows software architecture for accessing medical information from hospitals by executing generated query languages. Implementation of this architecture has been deployed in a hospital of South Korea so that it shows the feasibility of the architecture.

  9. UPCommons: Global Access to UPC Knowledge

    Prats-Prat, Jordi; Torn, Pep; López-Vivancos, Marta; Gómez-Enrich, Roser

    2007-01-01

    Institutional Repositories give the opportunity to faculties and researchers from universities and research institutes to freely publish and facilitate open access to their publicly funded research activities results. Publishing Sci Tech Information into Institutional Repositories is also a good chance for Scholars and Research Communities to highly increase their visibility in the world and their impact factor and for university libraries is the opportunity to document, organize and pr...

  10. Knowledge Access Based on the Rough Set Theory

    HAN Yan-ling; YANG Bing-ru; CAO Shou-qi

    2005-01-01

    During the procedure of fault diagnosis for large-scale complicated equipment, the existence of redundant and fuzzy information results in the difficulty of knowledge access. Aiming at this characteristic, this paper brought forth the Rough Set (RS) theory to the field of fault diagnosis. By means of the RS theory which is predominant in the way of dealing with fuzzy and uncertain information,knowledge access about fault diagnosis was realized. The foundation ideology of the RS theory was exhausted in detail, an amended RS algorithm was proposed, and the process model of knowledge access based on the amended RS algorithm was researched. Finally, we verified the correctness and the practicability of this method during the procedure of knowledge access.

  11. Open Access Journals: Knowledge and Attitudes among Cuban Health Researchers

    Sánchez Tarragó, Nancy; Fernández Molina, Juan Carlos

    2007-01-01

    A descriptive, cross-sectional study is presented whose objective was to determine the level of knowledge about and the attitudes toward open access journals among Cuban health researchers. To this end, a printed questionnaire was distributed between March and June 2007 to a group of researchers from Cuban national health institutes, who were chosen through stratified random sampling (160 researchers from 11 institutes). Variables included level of information about Open Access Movement terms...

  12. Regional Productivity and Accessibility to Knowledge and Dense Markets

    KARLSSON Charlie; Pettersson, Lars

    2005-01-01

    Accessibility to knowledge and local service markets can be assumed to explain regional growth performance. The role of regional supply of services and educated labour with respect to regional development are stressed by many researchers. In this paper we make an empirical analysis using panel data for Swedish municipalities. The purpose is to analyse the relationship between regional productivity measures as gross regional product per square kilometre and accessibility to educated labour. We...

  13. Open access to scientific knowledge and feudalism knowledge: Is there a connection?

    Vladimir M. Moskovkin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of universities and transnational corporations in the circulation of scientific knowledge is considered. If institutions generate, mostly scientific knowledge, trying to facilitate its free circulation, then transnational companies, contrarily, try to remove most significant and cutting-edge scientific knowledge from free circulation and its commercialization and reintroduction into an open, but now commercial, circulation in the TRIPS. However, paradoxical, the open access movement to scientific knowledge, eventually, facilitates feudalism of knowledge. We call this phenomenon the "open access - paradox". Based on the experiments done with Google Scholar and Google Patents, it is shown that universities generates, mostly scientific knowledge (scientific articles, and transnational companies generates, mostly technological knowledge (patents.

  14. Ontology-Based Federated Data Access to Human Studies Information

    Sim, Ida; Carini, Simona; Tu, Samson W.; Detwiler, Landon T; Brinkley, James; Mollah, Shamim A.; Burke, Karl; Lehmann, Harold P.; Chakraborty, Swati; Wittkowski, Knut M.; Pollock, Brad H.; Johnson, Thomas M.; Huser, Vojtech

    2012-01-01

    Human studies are one of the most valuable sources of knowledge in biomedical research, but data about their design and results are currently widely dispersed in siloed systems. Federation of these data is needed to facilitate large-scale data analysis to realize the goals of evidence-based medicine. The Human Studies Database project has developed an informatics infrastructure for federated query of human studies databases, using a generalizable approach to ontology-based data access. Our ap...

  15. Access to Knowledge and High School Vocational Education.

    Lotto, Linda S.; Murphy, Joseph F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors examine access to knowledge in public secondary education to determine if students who concentrate in vocational education programs are being systematically denied valuable instructional resources and outcomes. Emphasis is placed on the possibility that vocational education is being used to perpetuate social class distinctions. (CH)

  16. Open access to scientific knowledge and feudalism knowledge: Is there a connection?

    Vladimir M. Moskovkin

    2011-01-01

    The role of universities and transnational corporations in the circulation of scientific knowledge is considered. If institutions generate, mostly scientific knowledge, trying to facilitate its free circulation, then transnational companies, contrarily, try to remove most significant and cutting-edge scientific knowledge from free circulation and its commercialization and reintroduction into an open, but now commercial, circulation in the TRIPS. However, paradoxical, the open access movement ...

  17. Human Knowledge Resources and Interorganizational Systems

    Ibrahim, Mohammed; Ribbers, Piet; Bettonvil, B.W.M.

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analyses how human knowledge resources affect capabilities and subsequently attainment of operational and strategic benefits. We test a conceptual model using data from two qualitative case studies and a quantitative field study. The findings indicate that human knowledge positively influences IOS capabilities related to cross-organizational business processes and transfer of knowledge. The data show that strategic benefits are the consequence of knowledge transfer, whe...

  18. Traditional Knowledge and Human Rights

    Haugen, Hans Morten

    2005-01-01

    In the realm of intellectual property protection, traditional knowledge has been receiving increasing attention in the past few years. Presently, however, there is no international treaty regulating traditional knowledge.’ Nonetheless, the efforts of the Intergovernmental Committee on Intellectual Property and Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge and Folklore (GRTKFw) ithin the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) might just result in the creation of such an inte...

  19. Human Knowledge Resources and Interorganizational Systems

    M.K.M. Ibrahim (Mohammed); P.M.A. Ribbers (Piet); B.W.M. Bettonvil

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analyses how human knowledge resources affect capabilities and subsequently attainment of operational and strategic benefits. We test a conceptual model using data from two qualitative case studies and a quantitative field study. The findings indicate that human knowledge posi

  20. What Type of Knowledge Provides Valid Housing Standards Addressing Accessibility?

    Helle, Tina; Brandt, Åse; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    with a potential to inform housing standards addressing accessibility that accommodate adult people with physical functional limitations using/not using mobility devices (Helle et al., 2011), it was found that the existing knowledge: • Derived from the field of anthropometry and ergonomics • Focused on isolated...... component of the Nordic version of the Housing Enabler instrument (Iwarsson and Slaug, 2008). Participants 60 years of age or older; living in ordinary dwellings; used to preparing lunch and coffee and cleaning up afterwards; having physical functional limitations were included. Thirty participants were...... on the rollator or in the lap of those using a wheelchair. Forcing a threshold with a cup of coffee differs substantially from forcing it without, because the coffee will likely topple, which will decrease accessibility. In addition, half of those using a rollator sat on it during parts of the activity...

  1. Towards universal access to all knowledge-Internet Archive

    KAHLE Brewster

    2005-01-01

    Advances in computing and communications mean that we can cost-effectively store every book, sound recording,movie, software package, and public Web page ever created, and provide access to these collections via the Internet to students and adults all over the world. By mostly using existing institutions and funding sources, we can build this as well as compensate authors within the current worldwide library budget. We should take advantage of our new technologies and our open societies to make a Universal Library again, and go the next step and make all knowledge easily available to every man, woman and child around the world.

  2. Feminist knowledge and human security

    Truong, T-D.

    2009-01-01

    The essay proposes to re-orient feminist debates on epistemology towards the care-security nexus as a pathway that can plausibly provide an integral understanding of a human-centred and eco-minded security. Seeing "gender" in binary terms tends to produce an understanding of "care" as "female" and "security" as "male". Care, when free from the constraints of gender as a binary construct, can play an important role in revealing the depth of ethical-political concerns and help expand the unders...

  3. VIALACTEA knowledge base homogenizing access to Milky Way data

    Molinaro, Marco; Bandieramonte, Marilena; Becciani, Ugo; Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano; Costa, Alessandro; Di Giorgio, Anna M; Elia, Davide; Hajnal, Akos; Gabor, Hermann; Kacsuk, Peter; Liu, Scige J; Molinari, Sergio; Riccio, Giuseppe; Schisano, Eugenio; Sciacca, Eva; Smareglia, Riccardo; Vitello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The VIALACTEA project has a work package dedicated to Tools and Infrastructure and, inside it, a task for the Database and Virtual Observatory Infrastructure. This task aims at providing an infrastructure to store all the resources needed by the, more purposely, scientific work packages of the project itself. This infrastructure includes a combination of: storage facilities, relational databases and web services on top of them, and has taken, as a whole, the name of VIALACTEA Knowledge Base (VLKB). This contribution illustrates the current status of this VLKB. It details the set of data resources put together; describes the database that allows data discovery through VO inspired metadata maintenance; illustrates the discovery, cutout and access services built on top of the former two for the users to exploit the data content.

  4. Human Capital in the Knowledge Based Management

    Ion PETRESCU

    2010-01-01

    All over the world, the problem of human capital acknowledge, it’s ways and means of shaping in order to improve it’s creative potential, tends to occupy a suitable place in the ensemble of all the organization’s management science and practice concerns. This study aims that, according to the theoretical ang pragmatical aquisitions, to present conceptual boundries about the human capital involvement in the knowledge based management. It starts with presenting the relations ballance and philos...

  5. "The architecture of access to scientific knowledge: just how badly we have messed this up"

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    In this talk, Professor Lessig will review the evolution of access to scientific scholarship, and evaluate the success of this system of access against a background norm of universal access.While copyright battles involving artists has gotten most of the public's attention, the real battle should be over access to knowledge, not culture. That battle we are losing.

  6. Human Resource Development in the Knowledge Economy

    Jørgensen, Sanne Lehmann

    . In this line of thinking, the aim is to propose a model for analysing the progress of knowledge improvements in developing countries as an outcome of the management of human, social and organisational capital. In this regard, the paper considers relevant practices and strategies in the context of developing...

  7. Ontology-based federated data access to human studies information.

    Sim, Ida; Carini, Simona; Tu, Samson W; Detwiler, Landon T; Brinkley, James; Mollah, Shamim A; Burke, Karl; Lehmann, Harold P; Chakraborty, Swati; Wittkowski, Knut M; Pollock, Brad H; Johnson, Thomas M; Huser, Vojtech

    2012-01-01

    Human studies are one of the most valuable sources of knowledge in biomedical research, but data about their design and results are currently widely dispersed in siloed systems. Federation of these data is needed to facilitate large-scale data analysis to realize the goals of evidence-based medicine. The Human Studies Database project has developed an informatics infrastructure for federated query of human studies databases, using a generalizable approach to ontology-based data access. Our approach has three main components. First, the Ontology of Clinical Research (OCRe) provides the reference semantics. Second, a data model, automatically derived from OCRe into XSD, maintains semantic synchrony of the underlying representations while facilitating data acquisition using common XML technologies. Finally, the Query Integrator issues queries distributed over the data, OCRe, and other ontologies such as SNOMED in BioPortal. We report on a demonstration of this infrastructure on data acquired from institutional systems and from ClinicalTrials.gov. PMID:23304360

  8. Importance of Knowledge Management in Human Resource Development

    Human resource management and knowledge management: • In human resource management - important to identify crucial knowledge base on which competitiveness of company depends → according this ensure appropriate development of human resources. • Era of so-called knowledge economy - only individual and organizational knowledge could give competitive advantage. • From operational perspective, knowledge management - systematic processes by which an organization identifies, creates, captures, acquires, shares and increase knowledge

  9. Employees and Creativity: Social Ties and Access to Heterogeneous Knowledge

    Huang, Chiung-En; Liu, Chih-Hsing Sam

    2015-01-01

    This study dealt with employee social ties, knowledge heterogeneity contacts, and the generation of creativity. Although prior studies demonstrated a relationship between network position and creativity, inadequate attention has been paid to network ties and heterogeneity knowledge contacts. This study considered the social interaction processes…

  10. Knowledge unbound selected writings on Open Access, 2002-2011

    Suber, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Peter Suber has been a leading advocate for open access since 2001 and has worked full time on issues of open access since 2003. As a professor of philosophy during the early days of the internet, he realized its power and potential as a medium for scholarship. As he writes now, "it was like an asteroid crash, fundamentally changing the environment, challenging dinosaurs to adapt, and challenging all of us to figure out whether we were dinosaurs." When Suber began putting his writings and course materials online for anyone to use for any purpose, he soon experienced the benefits of that wider exposure. In 2001, he started a newsletter -- the Free Online Scholarship Newsletter, which later became the SPARC Open Access Newsletter -- in which he explored the implications of open access for research and scholarship. This book offers a selection of some of Suber's most significant and influential writings on open access from 2002 to 2010. In these texts, Suber makes the case for open access to research; answers c...

  11. Some Thoughts on the Solutions to Public Knowledge Access: Symposium to Celebrate 50 Anniversary of Shih-Hsin University

    Mei-Mei Wu; Chien-San Feng; Ting-Ming Lai

    2006-01-01

    In this report, we record the issues on the solutions to public knowledge access discussed in the symposium celebrating 50 anniversary of Shih Hsin University. Through the dialogue, those issues and concepts which involves with public access, free access, public knowledge, efforts towards public knowledge, and barriers to public knowledge accessibility are reviewed; moreover, topics on legal aspects of intellectual property and policy for public knowledge are discussed. The report also conclu...

  12. Geography matters: Mapping human development and digital access

    Birdsall, Stephanie; Birdsall, William

    2005-01-01

    Policy circles have long made the assumption that information and communications technologies promote human development. In mapping the Human Development Index (HDI) against the Digital Access Index (DAI) we explore the statistical and spatial relationship between human development and digital access. The results suggest information and communications technologies may not play as strong a role in promoting human development as is usually asserted and that public policies might need to be cent...

  13. Knowledge-Based Multiple Access Protocol in Broadband Wireless ATM Networks

    Liu, Hong; Gliese, Ulrik Bo; Dittmann, Lars

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a knowledge-based multiple access protocol for the extension of wireline ATM to wireless networks. The objective is to enable effecient transmission of all kinds of ATM traffic in the wireless channel with guaranteed QoS.The proposed protocol utilixes knowledge of the main...... guaranteed QoS requirements to a variety of ATM applications....

  14. Liberal Education Reconsidered: Cultivating Humanity in the Knowledge Society

    Hong, Eunsook

    2014-01-01

    In the knowledge society, there is a conflict between "education for profit" and "education for humanity." Education for profit is needed for students' economic survival and success in the knowledge economy. Education for humanity is needed for their existential lives worthy of human beings. This paper deals with the…

  15. Human Knowledge and a Commonsensical Measure of Human Capital: A Proposal

    Amavilah, Voxi Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Existing literature demonstrates clearly that knowledge is the sum of common knowledge and uncommon knowledge. Common knowledge is mostly inherited and it may or may not have scientific bases. Uncommon knowledge is mainly a product of the motions of science and technology. Scientific and technological motions depend on human capital, so that world knowledge is human capital by implication. From here analysis is not so unusual as the concept of human capital is not new. Through out history pe...

  16. Open Access and its impact on the Knowledge Society: Latin American Case Studies Insights

    María Soledad RAMÍREZ MONTOYA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In a changing society, open access may represent an alternative growth and resources to the educational community, from the opportunities given to students, to teachers, researchers and administrators of educational institutions. The aim of this paper is to analyze the opportunities and challenges that gives open access to the educational community, through the presentation of a conceptual vision and practical cases in Latin America, on the issue of open educational resources, repositories, journals and open access policies –from universities and government agencies or financing– and its link to a knowledge society. The findings are presented on three key elements: opportunities, challenges and opportunities open to access the knowledge society.

  17. Towards a Reference Model for Open Access and Knowledge Sharing, Lessons from Systems Research

    Paola Di Maio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Open Access Movement has been striving to grant universal unrestricted access to the knowledge and data outputs of publicly funded research. leveraging the real time, virtually cost free publishing opportunities offered by the internet and the web. However, evidence suggests that in the systems engineering domain open access policies are largely ignored. This paper presents the rationale, methodology and results of an evidence based inquiry that investigates the dichotomy between policy and practice in Open Access (OA of systems engineering research in the UK, explores entangled dimensions of the problem space from a socio-technical perspective, and issues a set of recommendations, including a reference model outline for knowledge sharing in systems research.

  18. Towards a Reference Model for Open Access and Knowledge Sharing, Lessons from Systems Research

    Di Maio, Paola

    2011-01-01

    The Open Access Movement has been striving to grant universal unrestricted access to the knowledge and data outputs of publicly funded research. leveraging the real time, virtually cost free publishing opportunities offered by the internet and the web. However, evidence suggests that in the systems engineering domain open access policies are not widely adopted. This paper presents the rationale, methodology and results of an evidence based inquiry that investigates the dichotomy between policy and practice in Open Access (OA) of systems engineering research in the UK, explores entangled dimensions of the problem space from a socio-technical perspective, and issues a set of recommendations, including a reference model outline for knowledge sharing in systems research

  19. From Information to Knowledge Online Access to Legal Information Methodologies, Trends and Perspectives

    Biasiotti, MA

    2011-01-01

    Access to accurate legal information is of great importance. Certainty of the law, creating the conditions necessary to equality and fairness in a legal system and improving the functioning of democratic institutions, depends upon it. Citizens have a right to information about the laws which govern their conduct and governments have an obligation to enable access to the law by means of all available and practicable tools. This book presents papers delivered at the workshop 'From Information to Knowledge - Online Access to Legal Information', held in Florence, Italy, in May 2011. This workshop

  20. Ontology management in a service-oriented architecture: Architecture of an knowledge base access service

    Moßgraber, Jürgen; Rospocher, M.

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of information systems integrate semantic data stores for managing ontologies. To access these knowledge bases most of the available implementations provide application programming interfaces (APIs). The implementations of these APIs normally do not support any kind of network protocol or service interface. This works fine as long as a monolithic system is developed. If the need arises to integrate such a knowledge base into a service-oriented architecture a different app...

  1. Accessing world knowledge: Evidence from N400 and reaction time priming

    Chwilla, D.J.; Kolk, H.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    How fast are we in accessing world knowledge? In two experiments, we tested for priming for word triplets that described a conceptual script (e.g., DIRECTOR-BRIBE-DISMISSAL) but were not associatively related and did not share a category relationship. Event-Related Brain Potentials were used to trac

  2. Conscious knowledge of learning: accessing learning strategies in a final year high school biology class

    Conner, Lindsey; Gunstone, Richard

    2004-12-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative case study investigation of the knowledge and use of learning strategies by 16 students in a final year high school biology class to expand their conscious knowledge of learning. Students were provided with opportunities to engage in purposeful inquiry into the biological, social and ethical aspects of cancer. A constructivist approach was implemented to access prior content and procedural knowledge in various ways. Students were encouraged to develop evaluation of their learning skills independently through activities that promoted metacognition. Those students who planned and monitored their work produced essays of higher quality. The value and difficulties of promoting metacognitive approaches in this context are discussed, as well as the idea that metacognitive processes are difficult to research, because they have to be conscious in order to be identified by the learner, thereby making them accessible to the researcher.

  3. Nursing knowledge and human science: ontological and epistemological considerations.

    Mitchell, G J; Cody, W K

    1992-01-01

    This article examines the meaning of human science in relation to extant nursing knowledge. The origins of the human science tradition are traced to the philosopher Wilhelm Dilthey, who challenged the dominance of the positivist perspective for generating knowledge of the human lifeworld. Specific ontological and epistemological criteria for human science are proposed. Four nursing frameworks, Paterson and Zderad's humanistic nursing, Newman's model of health as expanding consciousness, Watson's human science and human care, and Parse's theory of human becoming, are found to have consistencies and inconsistencies with the human science tradition. It is proposed that the human science perspective is present in and will continue to be reflected in the evolution of nursing science. PMID:1584506

  4. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine: Expanding the open-access conversation on health care

    Huddle Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Natural philosophy once spanned the fields of philosophy, science, and medicine. Scientific disciplines and medical specialties have rapidly achieved independence, and the availability of the internet and open-access publishing promises a further expansion of knowledge. Nevertheless, a consideration of the grounding concepts and ethical principles that underlie health care remains paramount. It is timely, therefore, to contribute to the global conversation on health care with an open-access journal that focuses on addressing the conceptual basis of medicine and related disciplines, considering the ethical aspects of clinical practice, and exploring its intersection with the humanities (including history of medicine.

  5. EVALUATING HUMAN CAPITAL IN A KNOWLEDGE – BASED APPROACH

    Emanoil MUSCALU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The widespread enthusiasm for a knowledge-based approach to understanding the nature of a business and the possible basis for sustained competitive advantage have renewed interest in human capital evaluation or measurement. While many attempts have been made to develop methods for measuring intellectual capital, none have been widely adopted in the business world. In the knowledge-based organizations, and generally, in the information society, human capital is recognized as the fundamental factor of overall progress, and experts agree that long-term investment in human capital has strong drive-propagation effects at the individual, organizational, national and global level. In this paper, we consider that a knowledge-based approach can offer new possibilities and answers to illustrate the importance of evaluation the human capital and knowledge assets by consistently generating added value in the business world.

  6. MANAGEMENT APPROACH TO BUILD A COMPETITIVE HUMAN CAPITAL KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY

    N. V. Nikolaychuk

    2012-01-01

    ???????? ?????? ??????????? ???????????? ????????? ?????????? ??????????????????????????????????? ???????? ? ???????? ?????????? ? ???????? ????????? ??????. ?????????? ?????????????????? ??????????????? ???????? ? ??????? ?????????? ???????????? ?????????. The analysis of the directions of the formation mechanism of competitiveness management of humancapital in the origin and development of the knowledge economy. The conditions for effective public policy inthe field of human capital managem...

  7. Public access to community documents: a fundamental human right?

    Roy W. Davis

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a marked difference between the culture of open government in some Member States, particularly Sweden, and the culture of secrecy in Britain. Recent calls for a uniform interpretation of the law regarding public access to documents held by the Community Institutions seem to suggest that a Swedish-style right of access should be adopted at EU level, on the grounds that public access to government-held information is a fundamental human right. To date, however, it seems that insufficient arguments have been advanced in order to justify this particular claim. Notable constitutional lawyers remain sceptical, as do some Member State governments. Furthermore, in the absence of a convincing philosophical justification for the claim, a situation may be created in which certain people are said to enjoy a fundamental human right, not because they are human beings, but by virtue of their status as citizens or residents of an EU Member State. This appears to be counter-intuitive, if it is accepted that fundamental human rights should be enjoyed by all and should therefore be justified on the basis of universally-shared fundamental values. It therefore seems that further explanation of the importance of public access to documents is required, and further justification of the claim that this is, or should be regarded as, a fundamental human right.

  8. Development of Human Factors Ontology for Business Knowledge Management

    Monica Philippart; Waldemar Karwowski

    2011-01-01

    Employee knowledge and cognitive skills are key assets to achieving business success, yet are often mismanaged. By promoting the human-centered design approach, the discipline of human factors and ergonomics (HF/E) can significantly contribute to optimizing business processes through effective management of employee knowledge. However, a comprehensive methodology is needed to help organizations integrate the HF/E principles across various business processes. This paper introduces a novel meth...

  9. Factors influencing access to agricultural knowledge: The case of smallholder rice farmers in the Kilombero district of Tanzania

    Wulystan P. Mtega

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Access to agricultural knowledge is important in transforming livelihoods of those relying on agriculture for a living and in enhancing food security. This access to agricultural knowledge is influenced by infrastructure needed for information dissemination. However, information infrastructure is not uniformly distributed within and between countries. It is because of this that some of the farming communities are information rich while others are information poor. In Tanzania, the agricultural sector is characterised by poor research-extension-farmers linkage and inaccessibility of agricultural knowledge at farm levelObjective: The study investigated the factors influencing access to agricultural knowledge among smallholder rice farmers in the Kilombero district of Tanzania. Specifically, the study identified categories of agricultural knowledge needed by farmers, determined how farmers access agricultural knowledge, and assessed the factors limiting the accessibility of agricultural knowledge among rice farmers in the Kilombero district.Method: Quantitative data were collected via semi-structured questionnaires administered face-to-face with rice farmers, community leaders, and agricultural agents in four villages at the Kilombero district of the Morogoro region in Tanzania.Results: The key finding indicates that farmers accessed and used agricultural knowledge in undertaking agricultural activities. It was further revealed that the level of acquisition of agricultural knowledge increased with an increase in age. Farmers needed agricultural knowledge on land preparation, seed selection, and rice planting, while few acquired knowledge on agricultural markets. Among the agricultural knowledge sources used, demonstration plots and agricultural extension agents were found to be used by the majority of the farmers. It was also found that a limited number of demonstration plots, late delivery of information services, a limited number of

  10. Retrospective of Open Access Repositories and Trends in the Socialization of Knowledge

    Silvia Irene Adame Rodríguez; Luis Lloréns Baez; Michel Schorr Wiener

    2013-01-01

    While searching for information on the Web is an everyday activity, finding free, reliable and quality information is a challenge, hence the interest in sharing part of a research project about repositories. The aim of this documentary research study is to present an overview of open access digital repositories and some trends in the socialization of knowledge produced by institutions of higher education, which in some way already mark a path toward a culture of sharing and reusing scientific...

  11. HealthNet: Improving Access to Knowledge Resources in a Community-Based Integrated Delivery System

    Pine, Donald; Bissen, Joan; Abelson, David; Roller, Scott

    1998-01-01

    HealthNet is a browser-based environment that connects HealthSystem Minnesota (HSM) health care providers to multiple information components needed in the process of providing care to patients. Its goal is to provide context-based access to professional knowledge at or near the point of care. HSM is a large integrated health care system including a hospital and 30 community clinic sites that provide health care to about sixteen percent of the Twin Cities residents.

  12. Developing accessible cyberinfrastructure-enabled knowledge communities in the national disability community: theory, practice, and policy.

    Myhill, William N; Cogburn, Derrick L; Samant, Deepti; Addom, Benjamin Kwasi; Blanck, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Since publication of the Atkins Commission report in 2003, the national scientific community has placed significant emphasis on developing cyberinfrastructure-enabled knowledge communities, which are designed to facilitate enhanced efficiency and collaboration in geographically distributed networks of researchers. This article suggests that the new cyberinfrastructure movement may not fully benefit those participants with disabilities, unless closer attention is paid to legal mandates and universal design principles. Many technology-enhanced learning communities provide geographically distributed collaboration opportunities that expand the inclusion of diverse peoples and help close the digital divide. However, to date, most collaboratory efforts have not emphasized the need for access among people with disabilities nor meeting minimum standards for technological accessibility. To address these concerns, this article reports on two pilot collaboratory studies that explore the role advanced information, communication, and collaboration technologies play in enhancing geographically distributed collaboration among specific research and applied networks within the national disability community. Universal design principles inform the design of the collaboratory and its use and our efforts to ensure access for all. Data for this article come from Web-based surveys, interviews, observations, computer logs, and detailed, mixed-methods accessibility testing. Emerging results suggest that with deliberate and systematic efforts, cyberinfrastructure can be more accessible and generate benefits among persons with disabilities. The authors provide lessons learned and recommendations for future research, policy, law, and practice. PMID:18939656

  13. Parametric Grid Information in the DOE Knowledge Base: Data Preparation, Storage, and Access

    HIPP,JAMES R.; MOORE,SUSAN G.; MYERS,STEPHEN C.; SCHULTZ,CRAIG A.; SHEPHERD,ELLEN; YOUNG,CHRISTOPHER J.

    1999-10-01

    The parametric grid capability of the Knowledge Base provides an efficient, robust way to store and access interpolatable information which is needed to monitor the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. To meet both the accuracy and performance requirements of operational monitoring systems, we use a new approach which combines the error estimation of kriging with the speed and robustness of Natural Neighbor Interpolation (NNI). The method involves three basic steps: data preparation (DP), data storage (DS), and data access (DA). The goal of data preparation is to process a set of raw data points to produce a sufficient basis for accurate NNI of value and error estimates in the Data Access step. This basis includes a set of nodes and their connectedness, collectively known as a tessellation, and the corresponding values and errors that map to each node, which we call surfaces. In many cases, the raw data point distribution is not sufficiently dense to guarantee accurate error estimates from the NNI, so the original data set must be densified using a newly developed interpolation technique known as Modified Bayesian Kriging. Once appropriate kriging parameters have been determined by variogram analysis, the optimum basis for NNI is determined in a process they call mesh refinement, which involves iterative kriging, new node insertion, and Delauny triangle smoothing. The process terminates when an NNI basis has been calculated which will fir the kriged values within a specified tolerance. In the data storage step, the tessellations and surfaces are stored in the Knowledge Base, currently in a binary flatfile format but perhaps in the future in a spatially-indexed database. Finally, in the data access step, a client application makes a request for an interpolated value, which triggers a data fetch from the Knowledge Base through the libKBI interface, a walking triangle search for the containing triangle, and finally the NNI interpolation.

  14. Parametric Grid Information in the DOE Knowledge Base: Data Preparation, Storage and Access.

    Hipp, J. R.; Young, C. J.; Moore, S. G.; Shepherd, E. R.; Schultz, C. A.; Myers, S. C.

    1999-10-01

    The parametric grid capability of the Knowledge Base provides an efficient, robust way to store and access interpolatable information which is needed to monitor the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. To meet both the accuracy and performance requirements of operational monitoring systems, we use a new approach which combines the error estimation of kriging with the speed and robustness of Natural Neighbor Interpolation (NNI). The method involves three basic steps: data preparation (DP), data storage (DS), and data access (DA). The goal of data preparation is to process a set of raw data points to produce a sufficient basis for accurate NNI of value and error estimates in the Data Access step. This basis includes a set of nodes and their connectedness, collectively known as a tessellation, and the corresponding values and errors that map to each node, which we call surfaces. In many cases, the raw data point distribution is not sufficiently dense to guarantee accurate error estimates from the NNI, so the original data set must be densified using a newly developed interpolation technique known as Modified Bayesian Kriging. Once appropriate kriging parameters have been determined by variogram analysis, the optimum basis for NNI is determined in a process we call mesh refinement, which involves iterative kriging, new node insertion, and Delauny triangle smoothing. The process terminates when an NNI basis has been calculated which will fit the kriged values within a specified tolerance. In the data storage step, the tessellations and surfaces are stored in the Knowledge Base, currently in a binary flatfile format but perhaps in the future in a spatially-indexed database. Finally, in the data access step, a client application makes a request for an interpolated value, which triggers a data fetch from the Knowledge Base through the libKBI interface, a walking triangle search for the containing triangle, and finally the NNI interpolation.

  15. Integrating across episodes: Investigating the long-term accessibility of self-derived knowledge in 4-year-old children.

    Varga, Nicole L; Stewart, Rebekah A; Bauer, Patricia J

    2016-05-01

    Semantic memory, defined as our store of knowledge about the world, provides representational support for all of our higher order cognitive functions. As such, it is crucial that the contents of semantic memory remain accessible over time. Although memory for knowledge learned through direct observation has been investigated previously, we know very little about the retention of knowledge derived through integration of information acquired across separate learning episodes. The current research investigated cross-episode integration in 4-year-old children. Participants were presented with novel facts via distinct story episodes and tested for knowledge extension through cross-episode integration as well as for retention of the information over a 1-week delay. In Experiment 1, children retained the self-derived knowledge over the delay, although performance was primarily evidenced in a forced-choice format. In Experiment 2, we sought to facilitate the accessibility and robustness of self-derived knowledge by providing a verbal reminder after the delay. The accessibility of self-derived knowledge increased irrespective of whether participants successfully demonstrated knowledge of the integration facts during the first visit. The results suggest that knowledge extended through integration remains accessible after delays even in a population where this learning process is less robust. The findings also demonstrate the facilitative effect of reminders on the accessibility and further extension of knowledge over extended time periods. PMID:26774259

  16. Knowledge machines digital transformations of the sciences and humanities

    Meyer, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    In Knowledge Machines, Eric Meyer and Ralph Schroeder argue that digital technologies have fundamentally changed research practices in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Meyer and Schroeder show that digital tools and data, used collectively and in distributed mode -- which they term e-research -- have transformed not just the consumption of knowledge but also the production of knowledge. Digital technologies for research are reshaping how knowledge advances in disciplines that range from physics to literary analysis. Meyer and Schroeder map the rise of digital research and offer case studies from many fields, including biomedicine, social science uses of the Web, astronomy, and large-scale textual analysis in the humanities. They consider such topics as the challenges of sharing research data and of big data approaches, disciplinary differences and new forms of interdisciplinary collaboration, the shifting boundaries between researchers and their publics, and the ways that digital tools promote o...

  17. Overcoming Human Barrier as a Measure towards Improved Knowledge Management

    Siti Alida John Abdullah; Hjh. Sabitha Marican

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge management involves delivering of information to a person or a set of people, which necessitates two or more people communicating directly face to face, indirectly or in a virtual environment. Human barrier in this paper refers to sexual harassment behaviors that are unwanted and unwelcome that occurs in the form of verbal, non verbal, physical and visual actions among workers at workplace. It acts a as communication barrier to knowledge sharing, which works best when the people who...

  18. The challenges for human factors in knowledge work

    Ipsen, Christine; Møller, Niels; Jensen, Per Langaa

    2011-01-01

    The development towards a service and knowledge intensive economy arise new challenges for ergonomics and human factors. Knowledge on work within mass service production exists, but the challenges within knowledge work have still to be addressed. The focus of this paper is on some of the challeng...... with the demands of the knowledge intensive work when KPI’s are central management tools. Especially handling the balance between high motivation and enthusiasm and burn out will be addressed....... in knowledge intensive work to establish productive and satisfying jobs by a case study of our own place of work: a university department. Testimonials from a young associate professor, a first line manager and the department manager lead us to identify some of the major challenges for ergonomics to comply...

  19. Towards a humane school in modern knowledge society: Antique guidelines

    Đukić Mara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the concept of humane schools in the context of contemporary knowledge society, from pedagogical aspect. The authors specifically indicate that the knowledge society achieves its true meaning and proper importance as well as full pedagogical potential, only when the values on which it is based are defined, and what kind of knowledge it implies. The basic features of humane school are discussed, their interdependence explained and major paradoxes that may occur in this regard perceived. Listening to the voices of some ancient thinkers that can be clearly heard, the authors discover deep roots and distant traces of important arguments in favor of the implementation of a school of thought in a new way, that is authentic humane school. Accordingly, it is concluded that on the uncertain and laden with contradictions road towards European knowledge society for the 21st century and the humane school in it, we need solid guidelines. By all accounts, these guidelines may be sought and found in the creatively transformed and newly assumed ideas of ancient Greek philosophers and in their global application on lifelong education for all people, i.e. for each man as a conscious and self-responsible human being.

  20. Retrospective of Open Access Repositories and Trends in the Socialization of Knowledge

    Silvia Irene Adame Rodríguez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available While searching for information on the Web is an everyday activity, finding free, reliable and quality information is a challenge, hence the interest in sharing part of a research project about repositories. The aim of this documentary research study is to present an overview of open access digital repositories and some trends in the socialization of knowledge produced by institutions of higher education, which in some way already mark a path toward a culture of sharing and reusing scientific, academic and cultural information for the benefit of the academic community and the general public.

  1. neXtProt: a knowledge platform for human proteins.

    Lane, Lydie; Argoud-Puy, Ghislaine; Britan, Aurore; Cusin, Isabelle; Duek, Paula D; Evalet, Olivier; Gateau, Alain; Gaudet, Pascale; Gleizes, Anne; Masselot, Alexandre; Zwahlen, Catherine; Bairoch, Amos

    2012-01-01

    neXtProt (http://www.nextprot.org/) is a new human protein-centric knowledge platform. Developed at the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), it aims to help researchers answer questions relevant to human proteins. To achieve this goal, neXtProt is built on a corpus containing both curated knowledge originating from the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot knowledgebase and carefully selected and filtered high-throughput data pertinent to human proteins. This article presents an overview of the database and the data integration process. We also lay out the key future directions of neXtProt that we consider the necessary steps to make neXtProt the one-stop-shop for all research projects focusing on human proteins. PMID:22139911

  2. Measuring Athletic Facility Managers’ Knowledge Of Access And The Americans With Disabilities Act: A Pilot Study

    Joshua R. Pate

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this exploratory research was measuring facility managers’ knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA, and it may assist in decreasing the gap in knowledge between facility managers and the needs of people with physical disabilities. An existing survey examining ADA knowledge was slightly modified and used for this study. Four athletic facility managers from universities in a large Bowl Championship Series conference participated in the study. Results provided a preliminary sketch of who athletic facility manages may be, and how athletic facility managers may be educating themselves and others about accessibility. This exploratory study shows that facility managers may be knowledgeable of specific ADA requirements but may not have a firm grasp on more general issues patrons with physical disabilities face and that have often been the point of contention in the courts such as parking, entranceways, seating, and sightlines. Additionally, athletic facility managers may not be seeking to expand their education on ADA-related matters or educate others on the topics, which could be a missed opportunity to position themselves as a topic expert in the field of ADA compliance for athletic facilities.

  3. Open access to large scale datasets is needed to translate knowledge of cancer heterogeneity into better patient outcomes.

    Andrew H Beck

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this guest editorial, Andrew Beck discusses the importance of open access to big data for translating knowledge of cancer heterogeneity into better outcomes for cancer patients.

  4. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Records: Maintaining Access to the Knowledge - 13122

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is an integral part of DOE's strategy to ensure that legacy liabilities of former nuclear weapons production sites are properly managed following the completion of environmental cleanup activities. In the area of environmental legacy management, records management is crucial to the protection of health, environmental, and legal interests of the Department and the public. LM is responsible for maintaining long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) records in performance of its mission. Maintaining access to the knowledge contained in these record collections is one of LM's primary responsibilities. To fulfill this responsibility, LM established a consolidated records management facility, the LM Business Center (LMBC), to house physical media records and electronic records. A new electronic record keeping system (ERKS) was needed to replace an obsolete system while helping to ensure LM is able to meet ongoing responsibilities to maintain access to knowledge and control the life cycle management of records. (authors)

  5. The impact of mobile phones on knowledge access and transfer of small-scale horticultural farmers in Tanzania

    Krone, Madlen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture is the main economic activity in Tanzania and the country´s largest employer, providing livelihood for at least 80 % of the economically active population. Many studies have identified key challenges facing the sector for Africa in general – among these lack of access to knowledge. For agricultural producers, access to knowledge is important for an improved productivity and competitiveness. The fast diffusion of information and communication technologies (ICT such as mobile phones across Africa in the last years has resulted in an improved access and transfer of agricultural knowledge. Studies have shown that rural actors like farmers in remote areas even use mobile phones for their farming business. Based on qualitative interviews in the Mwanza Region in northwestern Tanzania, this study aims to identify and categorise the different types of knowledge which are transferred via mobile phones. Our results show that mobile phones enlarge the ability of farmers to access business-relevant knowledge at an increasing spatial scale. However, the effects of the use depend on the type of knowledge and other factors. The results add to existing studies by deepening the understanding of the benefits of ICT on knowledge access and transfer for the context of rural small-scale framers in Tanzania.

  6. Access to Awareness for Faces during Continuous Flash Suppression Is Not Modulated by Affective Knowledge

    Rabovsky, Milena; Stein, Timo; Abdel Rahman, Rasha

    2016-01-01

    It is a controversially debated topic whether stimuli can be analyzed up to the semantic level when they are suppressed from visual awareness during continuous flash suppression (CFS). Here, we investigated whether affective knowledge, i.e., affective biographical information about faces, influences the time it takes for initially invisible faces with neutral expressions to overcome suppression and break into consciousness. To test this, we used negative, positive, and neutral famous faces as well as initially unfamiliar faces, which were associated with negative, positive or neutral biographical information. Affective knowledge influenced ratings of facial expressions, corroborating recent evidence and indicating the success of our affective learning paradigm. Furthermore, we replicated shorter suppression durations for upright than for inverted faces, demonstrating the suitability of our CFS paradigm. However, affective biographical information did not modulate suppression durations for newly learned faces, and even though suppression durations for famous faces were influenced by affective knowledge, these effects did not differ between upright and inverted faces, indicating that they might have been due to low-level visual differences. Thus, we did not obtain unequivocal evidence for genuine influences of affective biographical information on access to visual awareness for faces during CFS. PMID:27119743

  7. Human Disease Insight: An integrated knowledge-based platform for disease-gene-drug information.

    Tasleem, Munazzah; Ishrat, Romana; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-01-01

    The scope of the Human Disease Insight (HDI) database is not limited to researchers or physicians as it also provides basic information to non-professionals and creates disease awareness, thereby reducing the chances of patient suffering due to ignorance. HDI is a knowledge-based resource providing information on human diseases to both scientists and the general public. Here, our mission is to provide a comprehensive human disease database containing most of the available useful information, with extensive cross-referencing. HDI is a knowledge management system that acts as a central hub to access information about human diseases and associated drugs and genes. In addition, HDI contains well-classified bioinformatics tools with helpful descriptions. These integrated bioinformatics tools enable researchers to annotate disease-specific genes and perform protein analysis, search for biomarkers and identify potential vaccine candidates. Eventually, these tools will facilitate the analysis of disease-associated data. The HDI provides two types of search capabilities and includes provisions for downloading, uploading and searching disease/gene/drug-related information. The logistical design of the HDI allows for regular updating. The database is designed to work best with Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome and is freely accessible at http://humandiseaseinsight.com. PMID:26631432

  8. Human-centered design of a distributed knowledge management system.

    Rinkus, Susan; Walji, Muhammad; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A; Malin, Jane T; Turley, James P; Smith, Jack W; Zhang, Jiajie

    2005-02-01

    Many healthcare technology projects fail due to the lack of consideration of human issues, such as workflow, organizational change, and usability, during the design and implementation stages of a project's development process. Even when human issues are considered, the consideration is typically on designing better user interfaces. We argue that human-centered computing goes beyond a better user interface: it should include considerations of users, functions and tasks that are fundamental to human-centered computing. From this perspective, we integrated a previously developed human-centered methodology with a Project Design Lifecycle, and we applied this integration in the design of a complex distributed knowledge management system for the Biomedical Engineer (BME) domain in the Mission Control Center at NASA Johnson Space Center. We analyzed this complex system, identified its problems, generated systems requirements, and provided specifications of a replacement prototype for effective organizational memory and knowledge management. We demonstrated the value provided by our human-centered approach and described the unique properties, structures, and processes discovered using this methodology and how they contributed in the design of the prototype. PMID:15694881

  9. Open Access to scientific knowledge: a methodological model for scientific information and knowledge management at the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa)

    Leite, Fernando César Lima; Bertin, Patrícia Rocha Bello; Pereira, Fernando do Amaral

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a methodological model for the establishment of Open Access to scientific information at Embrapa, as a strategy for scientific information and knowledge management. The model consists of elements that speed up scientific communication processes and allow for the research output management. The aim is to provide the necessary mechanisms to capture, store, organize, preserve and widely disseminate the scientific knowledge produced by Embrapa and by the scientific community i...

  10. The focal account: Indirect lie detection need not access unconscious, implicit knowledge.

    Street, Chris N H; Richardson, Daniel C

    2015-12-01

    People are poor lie detectors, but accuracy can be improved by making the judgment indirectly. In a typical demonstration, participants are not told that the experiment is about deception at all. Instead, they judge whether the speaker appears, say, tense or not. Surprisingly, these indirect judgments better reflect the speaker's veracity. A common explanation is that participants have an implicit awareness of deceptive behavior, even when they cannot explicitly identify it. We propose an alternative explanation. Attending to a range of behaviors, as explicit raters do, can lead to conflict: A speaker may be thinking hard (indicating deception) but not tense (indicating honesty). In 2 experiments, we show that the judgment (and in turn the correct classification rate) is the result of attending to a single behavior, as indirect raters are instructed to do. Indirect lie detection does not access implicit knowledge, but simply focuses the perceiver on more useful cues. PMID:26301728

  11. Network Based Educational Environment How Libraries and Librarians Become Organizers of Knowledge Access and Resources

    Pettenati, M C; Pettenati, Corrado

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we will highlight some important issues which will influence the redefinition of roles and duties of libraries and librarians in a networked based educational environment. Although librarians will also keep their traditional roles of faculty support services as well as reference service and research assistance, we identify the participation in the instructional design process, the support in the evaluation, development and use of a proper authoring system and the customization of information access, as being the domains where libraries and librarians should mainly involve themselves in the next future and make profit of their expertise in information and knowledge organization in order to properly and effectively support the institutions in the use of Information Technology in education.

  12. Access to pain treatment as a human right

    Amon Joseph J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Almost five decades ago, governments around the world adopted the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs which, in addition to addressing the control of illicit narcotics, obligated countries to work towards universal access to the narcotic drugs necessary to alleviate pain and suffering. Yet, despite the existence of inexpensive and effective pain relief medicines, tens of millions of people around the world continue to suffer from moderate to severe pain each year without treatment. Discussion Significant barriers to effective pain treatment include: the failure of many governments to put in place functioning drug supply systems; the failure to enact policies on pain treatment and palliative care; poor training of healthcare workers; the existence of unnecessarily restrictive drug control regulations and practices; fear among healthcare workers of legal sanctions for legitimate medical practice; and the inflated cost of pain treatment. These barriers can be understood not only as a failure to provide essential medicines and relieve suffering but also as human rights abuses. Summary According to international human rights law, countries have to provide pain treatment medications as part of their core obligations under the right to health; failure to take reasonable steps to ensure that people who suffer pain have access to adequate pain treatment may result in the violation of the obligation to protect against cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment.

  13. Semi-automated knowledge discovery: identifying and profiling human trafficking

    Poelmans, Jonas; Elzinga, Paul; Ignatov, Dmitry I.; Kuznetsov, Sergei O.

    2012-11-01

    We propose an iterative and human-centred knowledge discovery methodology based on formal concept analysis. The proposed approach recognizes the important role of the domain expert in mining real-world enterprise applications and makes use of specific domain knowledge, including human intelligence and domain-specific constraints. Our approach was empirically validated at the Amsterdam-Amstelland police to identify suspects and victims of human trafficking in 266,157 suspicious activity reports. Based on guidelines of the Attorney Generals of the Netherlands, we first defined multiple early warning indicators that were used to index the police reports. Using concept lattices, we revealed numerous unknown human trafficking and loverboy suspects. In-depth investigation by the police resulted in a confirmation of their involvement in illegal activities resulting in actual arrestments been made. Our human-centred approach was embedded into operational policing practice and is now successfully used on a daily basis to cope with the vastly growing amount of unstructured information.

  14. HUMAN CAPITAL THEORY AND HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT. IMPLICATIONS IN DEVELEOPMENT OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

    Simona Buta

    2015-01-01

    In terms of the organization, the human capital theory and human resource management raises a number of issues, namely: human capital issues (they relate to attracting, maintaining, developing and rewarding human resources in order to create and maintain a skilled, dedicated and motivated personnel); issues related to the structural capital (with reference to the size and development of organizational structures that stimulate the processes of creating, capturing and sizing of knowledge); iss...

  15. Access to human, animal, and environmental journals is still limited for the One Health community*

    Vreeland, Carol E.; Alpi, Kristine M.; Pike, Caitlin A.; Whitman, Elisabeth E.; Kennedy-Stoskopf, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Objective “One Health” is an interdisciplinary approach to evaluating and managing the health and well-being of humans, animals, and the environments they share that relies on knowledge from the domains of human health, animal health, and the environmental sciences. The authors' objective was to evaluate the extent of open access (OA) to journal articles in a sample of literature from these domains. We hypothesized that OA to articles in human health or environmental journals was greater than access to animal health literature. Methods A One Health seminar series provided fifteen topics. One librarian translated each topic into a search strategy and searched four databases for articles from 2011 to 2012. Two independent investigators assigned each article to human health, the environment, animal health, all, other, or combined categories. Article and journal-level OA were determined. Each journal was also assigned a subject category and its indexing evaluated. Results Searches retrieved 2,651 unique articles from 1,138 journals; 1,919 (72%) articles came from 406 journals that contributed more than 1 article. Seventy-seven (7%) journals dealt with all 3 One Health domains; the remaining journals represented human health 487 (43%), environment 172 (15%), animal health 141 (12%), and other/combined categories 261 (23%). The proportion of OA journals in animal health (40%) differed significantly from journals categorized as human (28%), environment (28%), and more than 1 category (29%). The proportion of OA for articles by subject categories ranged from 25%–34%; only the difference between human (34%) and environment (25%) was significant. Conclusions OA to human health literature is more comparable to animal health than hypothesized. Environmental journals had less OA than anticipated. PMID:27076796

  16. Deconstructing Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Knowledge: Objective and Perceived Knowledge in Males' Intentions to Receive the HPV Vaccine

    Krawczyk, Andrea; Stephenson, Ellen; Perez, Samara; Lau, Elsa; Rosberger, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    Background: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was recently approved for men. To effectively tailor HPV education efforts toward men, it is important to understand what men know about HPV and how this knowledge relates to their decision to receive the vaccine. This study examines how objective HPV knowledge, objective HPV vaccine knowledge,…

  17. A Matter of Discipline: Open Access, the Humanities, and Art History

    Tomlin, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Recent events suggest that open access has gained new momentum in the humanities, but the slow and uneven development of open-access initiatives in humanist fields continues to hinder the consolidation of efforts across the university. Although various studies have traced the general origins of the humanities' reticence to embrace open access, few…

  18. Advocacy for Open Access

    Das, Anup-Kumar

    2015-01-01

    In the scholarly communications world, the concept of open access publishing has proliferated at faster pace since the global open access declarations such as the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI) in February 2002 and the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities in October 2003. After one decade of these two epoch-making declarations, we see growing instances of open access resources due to collective efforts put by the advocacy organizations, advocac...

  19. Cancer's Margins: Trans* and Gender Nonconforming People's Access to Knowledge, Experiences of Cancer Health, and Decision-Making

    Bryson, Mary K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Research in Canada and the United States indicates that minority gender and sexuality status are consistently associated with health disparities and poor health outcomes, including cancer health. This article investigates experiences of cancer health and care, and access to knowledge for trans* and gender nonconforming people diagnosed with and treated for breast and/or gynecologic cancer. Our study contributes new understandings about gender minority populations that will advance knowledge concerning the provision of culturally appropriate care. This is the first study we are aware of that focuses on trans* and gender nonconforming peoples' experiences of cancer care and treatment, support networks, and access to and mobilization of knowledge. Methods: This article analyzes trans* and gender nonconforming patient interviews from the Cancer's Margins project (www.lgbtcancer.ca): Canada's first nationally-funded project that investigates the complex intersections of sexual and/or gender marginality, cancer knowledge, treatment experiences, and modes of the organization of support networks. Results: Our analysis documents how different bodies of knowledge relative to cancer treatment and gendered embodiment are understood, accessed, and mobilized by trans* and gender nonconforming patients. Findings reported here suggest that one's knowledge of a felt sense of gender is closely interwoven with knowledge concerning cancer treatment practices; a dynamic which organizes knowledge mobilities in cancer treatment. Conclusions: The findings support the assertion that cisgender models concerning changes to the body that occur as a result of biomedical treatment for breast and/or gynecologic cancer are wholly inadequate in order to account for trans* and gender nonconforming peoples' experiences of cancer treatments, and access to and mobilization of related knowledge. PMID:26789402

  20. Organizing conceptual knowledge in humans with a gridlike code.

    Constantinescu, Alexandra O; O'Reilly, Jill X; Behrens, Timothy E J

    2016-06-17

    It has been hypothesized that the brain organizes concepts into a mental map, allowing conceptual relationships to be navigated in a manner similar to that of space. Grid cells use a hexagonally symmetric code to organize spatial representations and are the likely source of a precise hexagonal symmetry in the functional magnetic resonance imaging signal. Humans navigating conceptual two-dimensional knowledge showed the same hexagonal signal in a set of brain regions markedly similar to those activated during spatial navigation. This gridlike signal is consistent across sessions acquired within an hour and more than a week apart. Our findings suggest that global relational codes may be used to organize nonspatial conceptual representations and that these codes may have a hexagonal gridlike pattern when conceptual knowledge is laid out in two continuous dimensions. PMID:27313047

  1. Human Capital and Knowledge Emergence. Induced Effects of the Global Crisis on Human capital and Innovation

    Simona Buta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the global crisis context crossed by organizations and countries in the past six years we assist also at conflicting measures in which regards knowledge, innovation and human capital; for example, countries such as England and France have reduced their costs for education, while Germany and other countries (Australia, Austria, Canada and Norway maintained the same allocations for education. What will be the effects of such measures on human capital in the near future? What are the best human resources policies in companies in the crisis context? Given that the subject of the research is "knowledge and human capital", in this paper we refer to the induced effects of the crisis on human capital and innovation. We will also identify the key steps that can be taken during crisis, and not only, to stimulate human capital.

  2. Intellectual Property Rights, Legislated Protection, Sui Generis Models and Ethical Access in the Transformation of Indigenous Traditional Knowledge

    Young-Ing, Greg

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation arises out of deep concerns over how Indigenous Intellectual Property and Traditional Knowledge should be ethically accessed and used and reviews existing mechanisms of protection. It focuses on how Indigenous Intellectual Property and Traditional Knowledge should best be ethically, legislatively and legally treated in the public domain and in other public usage - and what mechanisms are required to protect it - particularly regarding Indigenous cultural expression. The di...

  3. Open Access to Knowledge Resources in Science and Technology : The Role of Digital Reference Service to Facilitate Accessing Scholarly Information

    Chandra, Harish

    2005-01-01

    The present paper discusses the importance, objectives and major developments in open access initiatives. It further examines the specific use of digital information services including the digital reference service. The paper also highlights the various steps taken in this direction at the Central Library of IIT Madras.

  4. HINT-KB: The human interactome knowledge base

    Theofilatos, Konstantinos A.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins and their interactions are considered to play a significant role in many cellular processes. The identification of Protein-Protein interactions (PPIs) in human is an open research area. Many Databases, which contain information about experimentally and computationally detected human PPIs as well as their corresponding annotation data, have been developed. However, these databases contain many false positive interactions, are partial and only a few of them incorporate data from various sources. To overcome these limitations, we have developed HINT-KB (http://150.140.142.24:84/Default.aspx) which is a knowledge base that integrates data from various sources, provides a user-friendly interface for their retrieval, estimates a set of features of interest and computes a confidence score for every candidate protein interaction using a modern computational hybrid methodology. © 2012 IFIP International Federation for Information Processing.

  5. The Challenges of Human Resources Management Practice in a Knowledge Based Organization

    Antohi Ionut

    2013-01-01

    Human resources represent an important asset for modern organizations especially in the context of knowledge based economy. The main competitive advantage is represented by knowledge possessed by the employee of an organization. Human resources management practice needs a different approach meant to attract develop and fully use such knowledge. This paper aims to analyse the growing impact of knowledge over human resources management practice. Mainly we discuss the manner in which the human r...

  6. Access to justice: evaluating law, health and human rights programmes in Kenya

    Sofia Gruskin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Kenya, human rights violations have a marked impact on the health of people living with HIV. Integrating legal literacy and legal services into healthcare appears to be an effective strategy to empower vulnerable groups and address underlying determinants of health. Methods: We carried out an evaluation to collect evidence about the impact of legal empowerment programmes on health and human rights. The evaluation focused on Open Society Foundation-supported legal integration activities at four sites: the Academic Model of Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH facility, where the Legal Aid Centre of Eldoret (LACE operates, in Eldoret; Kenyatta National Hospital's Gender-based Violence Recovery Centre, which hosts the COVAW legal integration program; and Christian Health Association of Kenya (CHAK facilities in Mombasa and Naivasha. In consultation with the organizations implementing the programs, we designed a conceptual logic model grounded in human rights principles, identified relevant indicators and then coded structure, process and outcome indicators for the rights-related principles they reflect. The evaluation included a resource assessment questionnaire, a review of program records and routine data, and semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions with clients and service providers. Data were collected in May–August 2010 and April–June 2011. Results: Clients showed a notable increase in practical knowledge and awareness about how to access legal aid and claim their rights, as well as an enhanced ability to communicate with healthcare providers and to improve their access to healthcare and justice. In turn, providers became more adept at identifying human rights violations and other legal difficulties, which enabled them to give clients basic information about their rights, refer them to legal aid and assist them in accessing needed support. Methodological challenges in evaluating such activities point to

  7. Digital Humanities: Challenges of the Transformation of Tools and Objects of Knowledge in Contemporary Humanities

    Camus, Alexandre; Paneva-Marinova, Dessislava; Luchev, Detelin

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to sketch some bases for the problematization of digital tools as objects of knowledge for Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH). Our purpose is to raise some relevant questions about the Digital Humanities (DH) and how SSH and Computer Sciences (CS) can work together to face new challenges. We discuss some tension points and propose a model for SSH and CS collaboration for joint projects in cultural digitization.

  8. Human Capital and Knowledge Emergence. Induced Effects of the Global Crisis on Human capital and Innovation

    Simona Buta

    2014-01-01

    In the global crisis context crossed by organizations and countries in the past six years we assist also at conflicting measures in which regards knowledge, innovation and human capital; for example, countries such as England and France have reduced their costs for education, while Germany and other countries (Australia, Austria, Canada and Norway) maintained the same allocations for education. What will be the effects of such measures on human capital in the near future? What are the best hu...

  9. Human Resource Management & Knowledge-Based Management -- A study of HR practices in performance-related knowledge management

    Huang, Keke

    2007-01-01

    Human resource management has increasingly become to a significant part of organizational management. The existing literatures related to Strategic HRM currently are closely referred to the resource-based view of the firm to explain and analyze the correlation between human capital and the sustention of competitive advantage. In view of resource-based development under the competitive dynamic environment, the economy has changed from the product-based to mainly knowledge-based. Knowledge-rela...

  10. Offenheit und wissenschaftliche Werke: Open Access, Open Review, Open Metrics, Open Science & Open Knowledge

    Herb, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Open Access - so die wohl weithin akzeptierte Definition - bezeichnet die Forderung nach freiem Zugang zu wissenschaftlicher Literatur. Der Grad der Offenheit, den er verlangt, ist nur vage definiert und gemessen an anderen Open Initiatives eher gering: Die meisten Wissenschaftler dürften nicht mehr als entgeltfreie Nutzung wissenschaftlicher Texte darunter verstehen. Dennoch hielten mit Open Access Offenheit und Transparenz Einzug in der Wissenschaft. Vor allem Open-Access-Befürworter plädie...

  11. Critiquing Human Judgment Using Knowledge-Acquisition Systems

    Silverman, Barry G.

    1990-01-01

    Automated knowledge-acquisition systems have focused on embedding a cognitive model of a key knowledge worker in their software that allows the system to acquire a knowledge base by interviewing domain experts just as the knowledge worker would. Two sets of research questions arise: (1) What theories, strategies, and approaches will let the modeling process be facilitated; accelerated; and, possibly, automated? If automated knowledge-acquisition systems reduce the bottleneck associated with a...

  12. Web Accessibility Knowledge and Skills for Non-Web Library Staff

    McHale, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Why do librarians and library staff other than Web librarians and developers need to know about accessibility? Web services staff do not--or should not--operate in isolation from the rest of the library staff. It is important to consider what areas of online accessibility are applicable to other areas of library work and to colleagues' regular job…

  13. Knowledge Management, Human Resource Management, and Higher Education: A Theoretical Model

    Brewer, Peggy D.; Brewer, Kristen L.

    2010-01-01

    Much has been written on the importance of knowledge management, the challenges facing organizations, and the important human resource management activities involved in assuring the acquisition and transfer of knowledge. Higher business education plays an important role in preparing students to assume the knowledge management and human resource…

  14. On the Design of an Architecture for Partitioned Knowledge Management in Autonomic Multimedia Access and Aggregation Networks

    Latré, Steven; Verstichel, Stijn; de Vleeschauwer, Bart; de Turck, Filip; Demeester, Piet

    The recent emergence of multimedia services, such as Network Based Personal Video Recording and Broadcast TV over traditional DSL based access networks, has introduced stringent Quality of Experience (QoE) requirements. It is generally assumed that the wide variety of services and user profiles introduces the need for a per-user or per-subscriber QoE management. Such a complex QoE management requires real-time knowledge about the managed services, which is available amongst the different nodes in the network. However, even for managing a few services, a relatively large amount of, constantly updated, knowledge is needed. Propagating all the knowledge to all nodes is therefore not feasible. As not all knowledge is relevant to all nodes, it is important to perform an intelligent knowledge distribution and management. In this position paper, we introduce the concept of a cognitive model that describes the knowledge requirements of each node. Based on the information stated in this cognitive model, we discuss how filter queries, that typically describe what needs to be queried from other nodes, can be automatically generated leading to an efficient partitioning of the knowledge through the distributed nodes.

  15. Cancer's Margins: Trans* and Gender Nonconforming People's Access to Knowledge, Experiences of Cancer Health, and Decision-Making

    Taylor, Evan T.; Bryson, Mary K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Research in Canada and the United States indicates that minority gender and sexuality status are consistently associated with health disparities and poor health outcomes, including cancer health. This article investigates experiences of cancer health and care, and access to knowledge for trans* and gender nonconforming people diagnosed with and treated for breast and/or gynecologic cancer. Our study contributes new understandings about gender minority populations that will a...

  16. 77 FR 18247 - Request for Comments on Issues of Privacy and Access With Regard to Human Genome Sequence Data

    2012-03-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Request for Comments on Issues of Privacy and Access With Regard to Human Genome Sequence... availability of large-scale human genome sequence data, with regard to privacy and data access and the... is examining issues of privacy and access as pertains to large-scale human genome sequence...

  17. Rethinking Development as Knowledge: Implications for Human Development

    Mukherjee Reed, Ananya

    2000-01-01

    The idea that knowledge is critical for development is neither new nor controversial, yet its full implications cannot be assessed unless we clarify at least two sets of issues: (a) how exactly knowledge is conceptualised or, what constitutes knowledge; and (b) the conditions under which such knowledge is produced, evaluated and ‘exchanged' or ‘transferred'. This paper will attempt to provide some tentative answers to these two questions, with the ultimate objective of identifying the conditi...

  18. Open-Access Textbooks and Financial Sustainability: A Case Study on Flat World Knowledge

    Hilton, John, III; Wiley, David

    2011-01-01

    Many college students and their families are concerned about the high costs of textbooks. A company called Flat World Knowledge both gives away and sells open-source textbooks in a way it believes to be financially sustainable. This article reports on the financial sustainability of the Flat World Knowledge open-source textbook model after one…

  19. Open Access von A bis Z

    Stieg, Kerstin; Pavlovic, Karlo

    2012-01-01

    The glossary „Open Access from A to Z“ comprises essential key terms on Open Access such as arXiv, The Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities, the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI), Creative Commons (CC), the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB), the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), the Directory of Open Access Repositories (OpenDOAR), the EU project Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER), the Finch Report,...

  20. Knowledge, attitudes and practices about human papillomavirus in educated adolescents

    Castro Reyes Elkin Mauricio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: cervical cancer (CC is the second most frequent cancer in women in theworld, South America and Colombia. It represents the fourth cause of death by cancerin the world, the third cause in South America and the first cause in Colombia. The interesanprincipalrisk factor is the persistent infection with the Human Papillomavirus (HPV. TheCC can be prevented and the patient can be treated if it is detected early.Objective: to establish the knowledge, attitudes and practices about HumanPapillomavirus (HPV in adolescent students of secondary.Methods: an analytical, observational and cross sectional study was performed withthe application of a survey of knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP, to studentsof secondary of two schools of the city of Cartagena, Colombia, between July andDecember of 2011.Results: 10.8% of the polled adolescents replied that they knew the condilomatosis,infectious disease of sexual transmission caused by HPV and 20,1% have knowledgeabout the connection between cervical cancer and HPV infection.Conclusion: there is low knowledge about HPV infection and its association with CC,just like good attitudes with respect to the use of prevention methods of HPV infectionand early detection methods of CC and inadequate practices, mainly in the vaccinationprogramming against HPV. Rev.cienc.biomed. 2012;3(2:275-281RESUMEN:frecuente en mujeres en el mundo, América Latina y Colombia. Representa la cuartacausa de muerte por cáncer en el mundo, la tercera en America del Sur y la primera enColombia. El factor de riesgo principal es la infección persistente con el Virus del PapilomaHumano (VPH. El CACU puede prevenirse y curarse si se detecta tempranamente.Objetivo: establecer conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas acerca del VPH enadolescentes estudiantes de secundaria.Metodología: estudio observacional analítico de corte transversal realizado con laaplicación de una encuesta de conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas (CAP, a

  1. Knowledge of human papillomavirus and the human papillomavirus vaccine in European adolescents: a systematic review.

    Patel, H; Jeve, YB; Sherman, SM; Moss, EL

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is recommended for adolescent girls in many European countries, however there is huge variation in vaccine uptake. METHODS: A mixed methods systematic review to ascertain the level of HPV and HPV vaccine knowledge that exists among European adolescents. Two electronic databases, Ovid Medline and PsychInfo, were searched from origin to September 2014. Meta-analysis was performed for the two primary outcome measures ('have you heard of HPV?' an...

  2. Visual categorization: accessing abstraction in non-human primates.

    Fabre-Thorpe, Michèle

    2003-01-01

    Evolution might have set the basic foundations for abstract mental representation long ago. Because of language, mental abilities would have reached different degrees of sophistication in mammals and in humans but would be, essentially, of the same nature. Thus, humans and animals might rely on the same basic mechanisms that could be masked in humans by the use of sophisticated strategies. In this paper, monkey and human abilities are compared in a variety of perceptual tasks including visual...

  3. Human rights responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies in relation to access to medicines.

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hunt, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Although access to medicines is a vital feature of the right to the highest attainable standard of health ("right to health"), almost two billion people lack access to essential medicines, leading to immense avoidable suffering. While the human rights responsibility to provide access to medicines lies mainly with States, pharmaceutical companies also have human rights responsibilities in relation to access to medicines. This article provides an introduction to these responsibilities. It briefly outlines the new UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and places the human rights responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies in this context. The authors draw from the work of the first UN Special Rapporteur on the right to the highest attainable standard of health, in particular the Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies in Relation to Access to Medicines that he presented to the UN General Assembly in 2008, and his UN report on GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). While the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights are general human rights standards applicable to all business entities, the Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies consider the specific human rights responsibilities of one sector (pharmaceutical companies) in relation to one area of activity (access to medicines). The article signals the human rights responsibilities of all pharmaceutical companies, with particular attention to patent-holding pharmaceutical companies. Adopting a right-to-health "lens," the article discusses GSK and accountability. The authors argue that human rights should shape pharmaceutical companies' policies, and provide standards in relation to which pharmaceutical companies could, and should, be held accountable. They conclude that it is now crucial to devise independent, accessible, transparent, and effective mechanisms to monitor pharmaceutical companies and hold them publicly accountable for their human rights responsibilities. PMID:22789042

  4. Mothers' human papilloma virus knowledge and willingness to vaccinate their adolescent daughters in Lagos, Nigeria

    Ezenwa BN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Beatrice N Ezenwa,1 Mobolanle R Balogun,2 Ifeoma P Okafor2 1Department of Pediatrics, 68 Nigerian Army Reference Hospital, Lagos State, Nigeria; 2Department of Community Health and Primary Care, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos State, Nigeria Introduction: Human papillomavirus (HPV is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections in sexually active adolescents and young women and has been implicated as a cause of the majority of cases of cervical cancer, which is the second most common cancer in women in Nigeria. HPV is preventable with the use of HPV vaccines. Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess mothers' HPV knowledge and their willingness to vaccinate their adolescent daughters in Lagos, Nigeria. Materials and methods: This study was a community-based, descriptive cross-sectional study carried out in July, 2012 in Shomolu Local Government Area (LGA of Lagos State, Nigeria. Multistage sampling method was employed to select the 290 respondents who participated in the study. Structured, pretested, interviewer-administered questionnaires were used for data collection. Data was analyzed with Epi-Info™ version 7. Results: The study revealed low awareness of HPV (27.9% and HPV vaccines (19.7% among the mothers that participated. There was a high awareness for cervical cancer but little knowledge of its link to HPV. Awareness and utilization of HPV vaccines increased with increasing educational level (P<0.05. There was a high willingness and intention among the mothers to vaccinate their girls (88.9% and to recommend the vaccine to others (91.0%. Accessibility and affordability of the HPV vaccines were found to be possible barriers to future utilization of the vaccines. Conclusion: Despite low knowledge about HPV and HPV vaccines, mothers were willing to vaccinate their daughters. We recommend improving mothers' knowledge by education and the possible inclusion of the vaccine in the national immunization

  5. Knowledge Representation for Robots through Human-Robot Interaction

    Bastianelli, Emanuele; Bloisi, Domenico; Capobianco, Roberto; Gemignani, Guglielmo; Iocchi, Luca; Nardi, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    The representation of the knowledge needed by a robot to perform complex tasks is restricted by the limitations of perception. One possible way of overcoming this situation and designing "knowledgeable" robots is to rely on the interaction with the user. We propose a multi-modal interaction framework that allows to effectively acquire knowledge about the environment where the robot operates. In particular, in this paper we present a rich representation framework that can be automatically buil...

  6. Initial funding for high-quality open access journals in the humanities and social sciences

    Reckling, Falk; Scherag, Eva

    2012-01-01

    In coordination with the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science and Research (BMWF), the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) launched an initiative to provide initial funding for innovative open access journals in the humanities and social sciences. The initiative targeted media owners operating in Austria and enabled them to submit funding applications for the establishment of new open access journals and for conversion from classic subscription models to open access.

  7. DOCUMENTING OF THE PROCESS OF ACCUMULATION OF KNOWLEDGE AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE INTELLECTUAL HUMAN CAPITAL

    Yermolenko V. V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of documenting of process of accumulation of knowledge and development of the intellectual human capital is considered in this article. The purpose of the article is the research of theoretical approaches of documenting of process of accumulation of knowledge, development of the intellectual human capital and the analysis of domestic public corporations on documenting of process of accumulation of knowledge. The solution of research tasks in article is proposed: the analysis of the contents of theories of development of the human capital in the conditions of economy of knowledge is carried out; domestic practice of public corporations on documenting of process of accumulation of knowledge is studied; features of documenting of knowledge as maintenance of development of the human capital are marked out. The particular emphasis in the article is placed on disclosure of such problems, as: methodological and theoretical aspects of development of the intellectual human capital; formation of mechanisms and ways of documenting of knowledge in the conditions of knowledge economy; formation of corporate institutes of formation and the development of the intellectual human capital, realizing reproduction of the intellectual capital and engineering of knowledge; formation of organizational innovations and dumping of old organizational routines. Documenting of knowledge is presented as maintenance of development of the human capital, the project of introduction of knowledge management and its documentary maintenance in corporations, and also ways of network documenting of knowledge of the human capital in the process of joint design activity is offered. Development of a special control system and its organizational and methodical providing which will allow to increase efficiency of work with documents during projects of development of the intellectual human capital is necessary for management of the documentary massif of knowledge of the

  8. Internationalizing the Right to Know: Conceptualizations of Access to Information in Human Rights Law

    Bishop, Cheryl Ann

    2009-01-01

    Currently there exists a global movement promoting institutional transparency and freedom of information legislation. Conceptualizing access to government-held information as a human right is one of the latest developments in this global trend promoting access to information. The purpose of this dissertation is to identify and analyze the various…

  9. Access to pain treatment as a human right

    Amon Joseph J; Schleifer Rebecca; Lohman Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Almost five decades ago, governments around the world adopted the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs which, in addition to addressing the control of illicit narcotics, obligated countries to work towards universal access to the narcotic drugs necessary to alleviate pain and suffering. Yet, despite the existence of inexpensive and effective pain relief medicines, tens of millions of people around the world continue to suffer from moderate to severe pain each year with...

  10. Knowledge and acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination and cervical cancer screening among women in Karnataka, India.

    Montgomery, Martha P; Dune, Tanaka; Shetty, Prasanna K; Shetty, Avinash K

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in India; however, participation in prevention and screening is low and the reasons for this are not well understood. In a cross-sectional survey in August 2008, 202 healthy women in Karnataka, India completed a questionnaire regarding knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Factors associated with vaccination and Papanicolau (Pap) smear screening acceptance were explored. Thirty-six percent of women had heard of HPV while 15% had heard of cervical cancer. Five percent of women reported ever having a Pap smear, and 4% of women felt at risk of HPV infection. Forty-six percent of women were accepting of vaccination, but fewer (21%) were willing to have a Pap smear. Overall, knowledge related to HPV and cervical cancer topics was low. Women with negative attitudes toward HPV infection were 5.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8-10) times more likely to accept vaccination but were not significantly more likely to accept Pap smear (odds ratio 1.5, 95% CI 0.7-3.0). Cost and a low level of perceived risk were the most frequent factors cited as potential barriers. Improving awareness of HPV and cervical cancer through health care providers in addition to increasing access to vaccination and screening through government-sponsored programs may be feasible and effective methods to reduce cervical cancer burden in India. PMID:25355525

  11. Massive Access Control Aided by Knowledge-Extraction for Co-Existing Periodic and Random Services over Wireless Clinical Networks.

    Du, Qinghe; Zhao, Weidong; Li, Weimin; Zhang, Xuelin; Sun, Bo; Song, Houbing; Ren, Pinyi; Sun, Li; Wang, Yichen

    2016-07-01

    The prosperity of e-health is boosted by fast development of medical devices with wireless communications capability such as wearable devices, tiny sensors, monitoring equipments, etc., which are randomly distributed in clinic environments. The drastically-increasing population of such devices imposes new challenges on the limited wireless resources. To relieve this problem, key knowledge needs to be extracted from massive connection attempts dispersed in the air towards efficient access control. In this paper, a hybrid periodic-random massive access (HPRMA) scheme for wireless clinical networks employing ultra-narrow band (UNB) techniques is proposed. In particular, the proposed scheme towards accommodating a large population of devices include the following new features. On one hand, it can dynamically adjust the resource allocated for coexisting periodic and random services based on the traffic load learned from signal collision status. On the other hand, the resource allocation within periodic services is thoroughly designed to simultaneously align with the timing requests of differentiated services. Abundant simulation results are also presented to demonstrate the superiority of the proposed HPRMA scheme over baseline schemes including time-division multiple access (TDMA) and random access approach, in terms of channel utilization efficiency, packet drop ratio, etc., for the support of massive devices' services. PMID:27240842

  12. Romania's human resources in the European Union accession context

    Alexandra Ionescu

    2006-01-01

    Human resources have always been mobile, and nowadays more than ever, this quality is essential. The migration of Romania’s human resources is, no more at its beginings. But if people want to work outside Romania’s borders, should know how to do it, legaly and professionally

  13. The impact of accuracy motivation on interpretation, comparison, and correction processes: accuracy x knowledge accessibility effects.

    Stapel, D A; Koomen, W; Zeelenberg, M

    1998-04-01

    Four studies provide evidence for the notion that there may be boundaries to the extent to which accuracy motivation may help perceivers to escape the influence of fortuitously activated information. Specifically, although accuracy motivations may eliminate assimilative accessibility effects, they are less likely to eliminate contrastive accessibility effects. It was found that the occurrence of different types of contrast effects (comparison and correction) was not significantly affected by participants' accuracy motivations. Furthermore, it was found that the mechanisms instigated by accuracy motivations differ from those ignited by correction instructions: Accuracy motivations attenuate assimilation effects because perceivers add target interpretations to the one suggested by primed information. Conversely, it was found that correction instructions yield contrast and prompt respondents to remove the priming event's influence from their reaction to the target. PMID:9569650

  14. Intellectual Property and Global Health: From Corporate Social Responsibility to the Access to Knowledge Movement

    Timmermann, C.A.; Belt, van den, H.

    2013-01-01

    Any system for the protection of intellectual property rights (IPRs) has three main kinds of distributive effects. It will determine or influence: (a) the types of objects that will be developed and for which IPRs will be sought; (b) the differential access various people will have to these objects; and (c) the distribution of the IPRs themselves among various actors. What this means to the area of pharmaceutical research is that many urgently needed medicines will not be developed at all, th...

  15. Landscapes of Research: Perceptions of Open Access (OA Publishing in the Arts and Humanities

    Julia Gross

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is widely known now that scholarly communication is in crisis, resting on an academic publishing model that is unsustainable. One response to this crisis has been the emergence of Open Access (OA publishing, bringing scholarly literature out from behind a paywall and making it freely available to anyone online. Many research and academic libraries are facilitating the change to OA by establishing institutional repositories, supporting OA policies, and hosting OA journals. In addition, research funding bodies, such as the Australian Research Council (ARC, are mandating that all published grant research outputs be made available in OA, unless legal and contractual obligations prevent this. Despite these broader changes, not all scholars are aware of the new publishing environment. In particular, the rate of adoption of OA models in the Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS has historically been lower than Science, Technology and Medicine (STM disciplines. Nevertheless, some local and international OA exemplars exist in HSS. At Edith Cowan University in Perth, Western Australia, the faculty-administered environmental humanities journal, Landscapes, was migrated to the institutional open access repository in 2013. Subsequently, researchers in the Faculty of Education and Arts were surveyed regarding their knowledge, understandings, and perceptions of OA publishing. The survey was also designed to elicit the barriers to OA publishing perceived or experienced by HSS researchers. This article will present the findings of our small faculty-based OA survey, with particular attention to HSS academics (and within this subject group, particular attention to the arts and humanities, their perceptions of OA, and the impediments they encounter. We argue that OA publishing will continue to transform scholarship within the arts and humanities, especially through the role of institutional repositories. The “library-as-publisher” role offers the potential to

  16. Each-One-Teach-One Mobile Networks: An Innovative Strategy for Knowledge Access in Asian Countries

    Misra, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    The changing landscape of learning is helping Asian countries to emerge as technology-driven knowledge-based societies. The success of these societies depends on promoting the acquisition of key competences and broadening opportunities for innovative and more flexible forms of learning for every citizen. Considering that in Asia almost everyone…

  17. The Knowledge Management Information Landscape — Awareness, Access, Use and Value of Sources

    Denise A. D. Bedford

    2015-01-01

    Information landscape is a critical component of professional and scholarly disciplines. Established disciplines have a managed information foundation covering primary, secondary and tertiary sources, targeted search capabilities, discipline-specific knowledge organisation tools and services, and quality controlled review processes. The information landscapes of emerging disciplines may be more chaotic and unsettled, and present challenges for professionals. This research considers the inform...

  18. Implications of Human Pattern Processing for the Design of Artificial Knowledge Systems.

    Hayes-Roth, Barbara

    This paper presents evidence that four design principles commonly embodied in artificial knowledge systems are inconsistent with human cognitive capabilities. Because these principles are widely accepted as characteristics of human knowledge processing, common theoretical properties related to cognitive psychology and artificial intelligence which…

  19. Knowledge-base for the new human reliability analysis method, A Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA)

    This paper describes the knowledge base for the application of the new human reliability analysis (HRA) method, a ''A Technique for Human Error Analysis'' (ATHEANA). Since application of ATHEANA requires the identification of previously unmodeled human failure events, especially errors of commission, and associated error-forcing contexts (i.e., combinations of plant conditions and performance shaping factors), this knowledge base is an essential aid for the HRA analyst

  20. Role of marine bioprospecting contracts in developing access and benefit sharing mechanism for marine traditional knowledge holders in the pharmaceutical industry

    Pooja Bhatia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable growth of bio-based industry has led to a rapid increase in the bioprospecting activities. The marine biomes are a rich reservoir of unique life systems making them an attractive target for bioprospecting for identification and development of potential drug molecules for human therapeutics. Many of the drug molecules such as ara-c, trabecetidin and eribulin have been discovered from marine organisms. It is noteworthy that indigenous communities have developed, preserved as well as evolved the marine traditional knowledge from one generation to next. Pharmaceutical companies utilize marine life based traditional knowledge developed by the communities at various stages of drug development, unfortunately, many a times without having a mechanism of access and benefit sharing in place. One such example is the marine bioprospecting Fiji contract that illustrates the role played by Fijian community and the lacuna in access and benefit sharing mechanisms. The present study is an attempt to explore the mechanism of fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from use of marine bioresources with the local communities as marine traditional knowledge holders in marine areas. It briefly describes the various international conventions and protocols that emphasize on the development of fair and equitable benefit sharing mechanisms. The study proposes marine bioprospecting contracts that are based on mutually agreed terms among the key stakeholders (the State with the genetic resources, traditional knowledge holders and marine bioprospectors. Marine bioprospecting contracts eventually will need to be customized as per the legislation of a country because of territorial nature of law. Also, the marine bioprospecting contracts will differ from other bioprospecting contracts due to various unique parameters associated with the activity such as economics of deep sea explorations (expensive processes of exploration and sample extraction

  1. Human transporter database: comprehensive knowledge and discovery tools in the human transporter genes.

    Adam Y Ye

    Full Text Available Transporters are essential in homeostatic exchange of endogenous and exogenous substances at the systematic, organic, cellular, and subcellular levels. Gene mutations of transporters are often related to pharmacogenetics traits. Recent developments in high throughput technologies on genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics allow in depth studies of transporter genes in normal cellular processes and diverse disease conditions. The flood of high throughput data have resulted in urgent need for an updated knowledgebase with curated, organized, and annotated human transporters in an easily accessible way. Using a pipeline with the combination of automated keywords query, sequence similarity search and manual curation on transporters, we collected 1,555 human non-redundant transporter genes to develop the Human Transporter Database (HTD (http://htd.cbi.pku.edu.cn. Based on the extensive annotations, global properties of the transporter genes were illustrated, such as expression patterns and polymorphisms in relationships with their ligands. We noted that the human transporters were enriched in many fundamental biological processes such as oxidative phosphorylation and cardiac muscle contraction, and significantly associated with Mendelian and complex diseases such as epilepsy and sudden infant death syndrome. Overall, HTD provides a well-organized interface to facilitate research communities to search detailed molecular and genetic information of transporters for development of personalized medicine.

  2. Considerations on private human access to space from an institutional point of view

    Hufenbach, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    Private human access to space as discussed in this article addresses two market segments: suborbital flight and crew flights to Low Earth Orbit. The role of entrepreneurs, the technical complexity, the customers, the market conditions as well as the time to market in these two segments differ significantly. Space agencies take currently a very different approach towards private human access to space in both segments. Analysing the outcome of broader inter-agency deliberations on the future of human spaceflight and exploration, performed e.g. in the framework of the International Space Exploration Coordination Group, enables to derive some common general views on this topic. Various documents developed by inter-agency working groups recognise the general strategic importance for enabling private human access to space for ensuring a sustainable future of human spaceflight, although the specific definition of private human access and approaches vary. ESA has performed some reflections on this subject throughout the last 5 years. While it gained through these reflections a good understanding on the opportunities and implications resulting from the development of capabilities and markets for Private Human Access, limited concrete activities have been initiated in relation to this topic as of today.

  3. Multiple choice exams of medical knowledge with open books and web access? A validity study

    O'Neill, Lotte; Simonsen, Eivind Ortind; Knudsen, Ulla Breth;

    2015-01-01

    Background: Open book tests have been suggested to lower test anxiety and promote deeper learning strategies. In the Aarhus University medical program, ¼ of the curriculum assess students’ medical knowledge with ‘open book, open web’ (OBOW) multiple choice examinations. We found little existing e...... pass/fail rates for the groups will be compared. Results: The results will be available for and discussed at the AMEE 2015 conference....

  4. Developing technology intelligence strategy to access knowledge of innovation clusters. : The case of KODAK in Cambridge

    Dang, Rani Jeanne; Mortara, Letizia; Thomson, Ruth; Minshall, Tim

    2010-01-01

    International audience Current times are characterised by a knowledge-based economy and fast technological change. In this difficult environment, companies compete to maintain a relevant position through innovation. In response to these challenges, many companies are currently adopting an open approach to innovation, pursuing innovation by combining internal and external resources. Technology intelligence (TI) activities support the implementation of open innovation with the systematic cap...

  5. Accessing Local Knowledge to Identify Where Species of Conservation Concern Occur in a Tropical Forest Landscape

    Padmanaba, Michael; Sheil, Douglas; Basuki, Imam; Liswanti, Nining

    2013-01-01

    Conventional biodiversity surveys play an important role in ensuring good conservation friendly management in tropical forest regions but are demanding in terms of expertise, time, and budget. Can local people help? Here, we illustrate how local knowledge can support low cost conservation surveys. We worked in the Malinau watershed, East Kalimantan, Indonesia, an area currently at risk of extensive forest loss. We selected eight species of regional conservation interest: rafflesia (Rafflesia ...

  6. Scientific knowledge unchained: verso una policy dell’università italiana sull’Open Access

    Caso, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Lo scopo di questo scritto è mettere in luce quel che il diritto formale può fare a favore dell’Open Access (OA). La tesi di fondo è che il diritto formale - la legge, i regolamenti, i contratti - può rappresentare un formidabile ausilio all’affermazione del principio dell’accesso aperto, ma che il definitivo successo dell’OA risiede in un radicale cambiamento delle norme informali che presidiano le prassi dell’editoria scientifica. Un tale mutamento dipende dalle dinamiche di potere nell...

  7. Study of knowledge, accessibility and utilization of the existing rehabilitation services by disabled in a rural Goan community

    Sagar Borker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the knowledge, accessibility and utilization of the existing Medical rehabilitation services by the PWD (Persons with Disability in a rural Goan community and their reasons for inaccessibility. Methods and Materials: Semi structured questionnaire with the interview technique was used. Systematic random sampling of families was done. This cross sectional study lasted from June 05 - Oct 06. Sample sizes of four thousand eight hundred six subjects were chosen from the 5 subcentres of RHTC (Rural Health and Training Centre Mandur (Rural area in Goa. Results : One ninety PWD were found.77.9% of the disabled or the parent, guardian, family member of the disabled have knowledge, only 44.2% have accessibility, 24.2% utilize the rehabilitative services. In which 49.1% of disabilities are temporary in nature. Cataract is the commonest cause of temporary disability. Mental retardation is the commonest cause of permanent disability. Conclusion : There is a need to make people aware of the rehabilitative measures and distribute the rehabilitative appliances in the community set up at a subsidized rate. A CBR (Community based rehabilitation worker is a must. People should also be made aware of various social welfare measures.

  8. Cyberscience and the Knowledge-Based Economy. Open Access and Trade Publishing: From Contradiction to Compatibility with Non-Exclusive Copyright Licensing

    Armbruster, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Open source, open content and open access are set to fundamentally alter the conditions of knowledge production and distribution. Open source, open content and open access are also the most tangible result of the shift towards e-science and digital networking. Yet, widespread misperceptions exist about the impact of this shift on knowledge…

  9. Human-centric intelligent systems for exploration and knowledge discovery.

    Parmee, I C

    2005-01-01

    This speculative article discusses research and development relating to computational intelligence (CI) technologies comprising powerful machine-based search and exploration techniques that can generate, extract, process and present high-quality information from complex, poorly understood biotechnology domains. The integration and capture of user experiential knowledge within such CI systems in order to support and stimulate knowledge discovery and increase scientific and technological understanding is of particular interest. The manner in which appropriate user interaction can overcome problems relating to poor problem representation within systems utilising evolutionary computation (EC), machine-learning and software agent technologies is investigated. The objective is the development of user-centric intelligent systems that support an improving knowledge-base founded upon gradual problem re-definition and reformulation. Such an approach can overcome initial lack of understanding and associated uncertainty. PMID:15614348

  10. Human Right and Internet Access : A philosophical investigation

    Wang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    As of December 2014, there are three billion Internet users worldwide, of which 649 million are Chinese. This number will grow in the years to come. This technology, of course, possesses immense significance in our everyday life. What is currently new in international human rights practice is the tr

  11. Knowledge-based support for design and operational use of human-machine interfaces

    The possibilities for knowledge support of different human user classes, namely operators, operational engineers and designers of human-machine interfaces, are discussed. Several human-machine interface functionalities are briefly explained. The paper deals with such questions as which type of knowledge is needed for design and operation, how to represent it, where to get it from, how to process it, and how to consider and use it. The relationships between design and operational use are thereby emphasised. (author)

  12. Semi-Automatically Extracting FAQs to Improve Accessibility of Software Development Knowledge

    Henß, Stefan; Mezini, Mira

    2012-01-01

    Frequently asked questions (FAQs) are a popular way to document software development knowledge. As creating such documents is expensive, this paper presents an approach for automatically extracting FAQs from sources of software development discussion, such as mailing lists and Internet forums, by combining techniques of text mining and natural language processing. We apply the approach to popular mailing lists and carry out a survey among software developers to show that it is able to extract high-quality FAQs that may be further improved by experts.

  13. TRANSFORMING HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY

    ANA-MARIA GRIGORE

    2011-01-01

    Paradoxically, in this era of microprocessors, of top technologies, of equipments “independent” of man’s skills and attention, the human resource regains the hegemony among the economic variables of the organization. Human resources traditionally added value to organizations because of what they did or because of their experience. In the new economy, however, many employees add value because of what they know. The management of the human resources has to be torn apart from its bureaucratic pa...

  14. Knowledge, Capabilities and Human Capital Formation in Economic Growth

    David, Paul A.

    2000-01-01

    This monograph, which has been prepared as a Research Report to the New Zealand (New Zealand) Treasury, undertakes three main tasks: (1) describing the various forms of tangible and intangible human capital, their relationship to "capabilities" affecting human well-being, and the channels through which they may contribute to economic growth; (2) reviewing the major theoretical and empirical findings on the microeconomic determinants, and macroeconomic growth effects of investment in human cap...

  15. Consumers’ perception and knowledge of food safety: results of questionnaires accessible on IZSalimenTO website

    Amaranta Traversa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present survey was undertaken to investigate consumers’ knowledge of the main foodborne agents and dietary regimen during pregnancy. Data were collected using monthly questionnaires available on IZSalimenTO website between March 2013 and January 2014. Hepatitis A virus questionnaire: 20 respondents (77% recognized berries as foodstuff linked to the outbreak of hepatitis A. The majority correctly indicated as precautionary advice to boil berries before consumption. Botulism questionnaire: 29 respondents (62% indicated pesto as food involved in botulism alert in July 2013. The risk of infant botulism in infant less than 1 year old due to honey consumption is known by 24 respondents (51%. Main foodborne disease questionnaire: the risk of infection by Salmonella after the consumption of foods made with raw eggs is known by the majority (94%; N=17 as well as the treatments to be applied in order to make fresh fish safe from parasites (76%. Pregnancy questionnaire: 20 respondents (74% believed that washing vegetables and fruits with sodium bicarbonate or chlorate solution is able to inactivate Toxoplasma; only 4 (15% reported both raw meat and vegetables washed with sodium bicarbonate as food at risk. Results indicate that all consumers should be trained on behaviour and dietary regimen to be adopted in pregnancy and in infant <1 year old. The website may be considered as a useful tool to assess consumers’ knowledge: both the news section and the contents published may be a source of information and education for consumers on food safety.

  16. Accessing Local Knowledge to Identify Where Species of Conservation Concern Occur in a Tropical Forest Landscape

    Padmanaba, Michael; Sheil, Douglas; Basuki, Imam; Liswanti, Nining

    2013-08-01

    Conventional biodiversity surveys play an important role in ensuring good conservation friendly management in tropical forest regions but are demanding in terms of expertise, time, and budget. Can local people help? Here, we illustrate how local knowledge can support low cost conservation surveys. We worked in the Malinau watershed, East Kalimantan, Indonesia, an area currently at risk of extensive forest loss. We selected eight species of regional conservation interest: rafflesia ( Rafflesia spp.), black orchid ( Coelogyne pandurata), sun bear ( Helarctos malayanus), tarsier ( Tarsius bancanus), slow loris ( Nycticebus coucang), proboscis monkey ( Nasalis larvatus), clouded leopard ( Neofelis diardi/N. nebulosa), and orang-utan ( Pongo pygmaeus). We asked 52 informants in seven villages if, where and when they had observed these species. We used maps, based on both geo-referenced and sketched features, to record these observations. Verification concerns and related issues are discussed. Evaluations suggest our local information is reliable. Our study took 6 weeks and cost about USD 5000. Extensive expert based field surveys across the same region would cost one or two orders of magnitude more. The records extend the known distribution for sun bear, tarsier, slow loris, and clouded leopard. Reports of rafflesia, proboscis monkey, and orang-utan are of immediate conservation significance. While quality concerns should never be abandoned, we conclude that local people can help expand our knowledge of large areas in an effective, reliable, and low cost manner and thus contribute to improved management.

  17. Artificial Intelligence, Knowledge Extraction and the Study of Human Intelligence.

    d'Ydewalle, Gery; Delhaye, Patrick

    1988-01-01

    Describes artificial intelligence (AI) as the study of intelligence with the ideas and methods of computation. States that the goal is to make computers more intelligent and thereby uncover the principles that make intelligent behavior possible. Discusses knowledge representations, production (if-then) systems, and expert systems as forms of AI.…

  18. Knowledge Management Integration into Strategic Human Capital Management Systems

    Leadership model philosophies: • Knowledge is fundamental – share it; • We are in the refueling outage business; • Cost effective does not necessarily mean cheap; • Working efficiently and event free; • Make conscious, informed decisions; • Excellence in Operational Focus; • Operations Leads the Station; • End of Licenses and Beyond 60; • Our Leadership Model - Our future

  19. Employing human rights frameworks to realize access to an HIV cure

    Benjamin Mason Meier

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The scale of the HIV pandemic – and the stigma, discrimination and violence that surrounded its sudden emergence – catalyzed a public health response that expanded human rights in principle and practice. In the absence of effective treatment, human rights activists initially sought to protect individuals at high risk of HIV infection. With advances in antiretroviral therapy, activists expanded their efforts under international law, advocating under the human right to health for individual access to treatment. Discussion: As a clinical cure comes within reach, human rights obligations will continue to play a key role in political and programmatic decision-making. Building upon the evolving development and implementation of the human right to health in the global response to HIV, we outline a human rights research agenda to prepare for HIV cure access, investigating the role of human rights law in framing 1 resource allocation, 2 international obligations, 3 intellectual property and 4 freedom from coercion. Conclusions: The right to health is widely recognized as central to governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental responses to the pandemic and critical both to addressing vulnerability to infection and to ensuring universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support. While the advent of an HIV cure will raise new obligations for policymakers in implementing the right to health, the resolution of past debates surrounding HIV prevention and treatment may inform claims for universal access.

  20. Household electricity access, availability and human well-being: Evidence from India

    According to the 2011 Census of India, over 31% of India's 1.2 billion people lived in nearly 8000 towns and cities; the remaining 830 million people lived in over 638,000 villages. About 55% of rural households and 93% of urban households had access to electricity. The 2005 Indian Human Development Survey showed that on average, electricity availability (hours of supply per day) in rural and urban households were 14 and 19 h, respectively (Desai et al., 2007). Using nationally representative data from Indian Human Development Survey, this study estimated the impact of electricity access and availability on two attributes of human well-being, viz. education and health attainment. It found a significant positive relationship between electricity availability and well-being in rural and urban households. Electricity accessibility, revealed a significant positive relationship only for rural households. The paper concludes with implications for electricity policy and infrastructure choices. - Graphical abstract: Impact of electricity security on the attributes of human well-being. - Highlights: • Nexus between well-being, and electricity access and availability is quantified. • Electricity access is positively associated with well-being in rural but not urban. • Electricity availability negatively associates with morbidity and absenteeism. • Electricity security as human well-being enabler seeks nuanced policy attention. • Decentralized rapidly deployable modular technologies and microgrids are advocated

  1. Using a human cognition model in the creation of collaborative knowledge visualizations

    Green, Tera Marie; Ribarsky, William

    2008-04-01

    This paper explores the basis and usefulness of a predictive model for the architecture of data and knowledge visualizations based on human higher-cognition, including human tendencies in reasoning heuristics and cognitive biases. The strengths and weakness of would-be human and computer collaborators are explored, and a model framework is outlined and discussed.

  2. Human Exploration of Near-Earth Objects Accessibility Study

    Abell, Paul; Drake, Bret; Friedensen, Victoria; Mazanek, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Key questions addressed: How short can the trip times be reduced in order to reduce crew exposure to the deep-space radiation and microgravity environment? Are there options to conduct easy, early missions?. What is the affect of infusion of advanced propulsion technologies on target availability When do the departure opportunities open up, how frequent and how long are they? How many launches are required to conduct a round trip human mission to a NEA? And, based on the above, how many Near-Earth Asteroids are available

  3. Knowledges

    Berling, Trine Villumsen

    2012-01-01

    Scientific knowledge in international relations has generally focused on an epistemological distinction between rationalism and reflectivism over the last 25 years. This chapter argues that this distinction has created a double distinction between theory/reality and theory/practice, which works as...... a ghost distinction structuring IR research. While reflectivist studies have emphasised the impossibility of detached, objective knowledge production through a dissolution of the theory/reality distinction, the theory/practice distinction has been left largely untouched by both rationalism and...... reflectivism. Bourdieu, on the contrary, lets the challenge to the theory/reality distinction spill over into a challenge to the theory/practice distinction by thrusting the scientist in the foreground as not just a factor (discourse/genre) but as an actor. In this way, studies of IR need to include a focus on...

  4. Generation of human and structural capital: lessons from knowledge management

    Agndal, Henrik; Nilsson, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    Interorganizational and social relationships can be seen as part of the intellectual capital of a firm. Existing frameworks of intellectual capital, however, fail to address how relationships should be managed to generate more intellectual capital. Drawing on the interaction approach and the fields of intellectual capital and knowledge management, this paper develops a framework for managing relationships. The framework is illustrated with a case study. It is also noted that firms can improve...

  5. Human Mobility Patterns: A Source of Geospatial Knowledge

    Wachowicz, M.; Vazquez, A.H.; Ballari, D.E.; Orellana, D.A.; Rodriguez, A

    2009-01-01

    The study and analysis of human mobility patterns and their relationship with the environment can provide us with a better understanding of certain aspects of human behaviour. New, ubiquitous and non-intrusive devices have made it easier to place sensors in mobile phones, Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or even clothing, providing us with relatively low cost means of gathering highly detailed data on the movement of people and the environments in which they move. However, new spatio-tempor...

  6. Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities?

    Ramirez, Marisa; Dalton, Joan T.; McMillan, Gail; Read, Max; Seamans, Nancy H.

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of higher education institutions worldwide are requiring submission of electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) by graduate students and are subsequently providing open access to these works in online repositories. Faculty advisors and graduate students are concerned that such unfiltered access to their work could diminish future publishing opportunities. This study investigated social sciences, arts and humanities journal editors' and university press direc...

  7. Human embryonic stem cell research, justice, and the problem of unequal biological access

    Moller Mark S

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 2003, Ruth Faden and eighteen other colleagues argued that a "problem of unequal biological access" is likely to arise in access to therapies resulting from human embryonic stem cell research. They showed that unless deliberate steps are taken in the United States to ensure that the human embryonic stem cell lines available to researchers mirrors the genetic diversity of the general population, white Americans will likely receive the benefits of these therapies to the relative exclusion of minority ethnic groups. Over the past five years the problem of unequal biological access has not received much attention from politicians, bioethicists and even many researchers in the United States, in spite of the widely held belief in the country that there is an obligation to prevent and correct ethnic disparities in access to medical care. The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of the problem of unequal biological access and of the need to do more than is currently being done to ensure that ethnic disparities in access to human embryonic stem cell-based therapies do not arise. Specifically, this paper explains why the problem of unequal biological access will likely arise in the United States in such a way that white Americans will disproportionately receive most of the benefits of the therapies resulting from human embryonic stem cell research. It also argues for why there is an obligation to prevent these ethnic disparities in access from happening and outlines four steps that need to be taken towards meeting this obligation.

  8. Capital-centric versus knowledge-centric paradigms of human resource management: A historical perspective

    Chris W. Callaghan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Central to understanding the contemporary state of the human resource management (HRM field is knowledge of its history, and the underlying rationales as to why it has changed over time. This research attempts to identify one such important ‘rationale’.Research purpose: This article relates certain changes in HRM over time to the argument that there has been a shift from an industrial paradigm (on which many human resource [HR] systems, practices and theoretical frameworks are still based to a knowledge paradigm (of knowledge work, in which employee knowledge and skills offer compound advantages that are not substitutable which explains a great deal of the variance in changes of the field over time.Motivation for the study: It is argued that in order for the field to move forward, it may needto bring to the surface certain assumptions and differentiate between theoretical frameworkswhen dealing with knowledge work versus non-knowledge work.Research design, approach and method: This article offers a perspective of HR theory development over time. It is a conceptual/perspectives article and is not qualitative nor quantitative in nature. Further research will be able to test the ideas presented here.Practical/managerial implications: Managers and human resources managers need to differentiate between knowledge and non-knowledge work. The latter is associated with increased heterogeneity and complexity, and differences in power relationships, as knowledge work shifts power away from capital into the hands of skilled knowledge labour.

  9. Using Specification and Description Language (SDL) for capturing and reusing human experts' knowledge

    Conventional knowledge engineering techniques for acquiring experts' knowledge can not produce quality knowledge due to improper knowledge documentation and informal knowledge acquisition method. We propose a new method for knowledge documentation and acquisition using Specification and Description Language (SDL). SDL is used to describe both the target system and the reasoning process. The main idea is to follow deterministic problem solving behavior of human experts and document it. Then knowledge can be extracted by comparing documents of the successive steps. This knowledge is recorded and reused in similar or novel cases. We present an implementation of this method in a tool for software design. The implemented system consists of a SDL CASE tool and an expert system for applying the design knowledge. This system serves as an experimental platform for the study of human design by simulating the design at the lowest level. However, we have found that by acquiring enough domain knowledge, this system can simulate general problem solving of human experts. (author)

  10. The Knowledge Society: A Sustainability Paradigm

    Naim Hamdija Afgan; Maria G. Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    This paper defines the knowledge society as a human structured organisation based on contemporary developed knowledge and representing new quality of life support systems. It implies the need for a full understanding of distribution of knowledge, access to information and the capability to transfer information into a knowledge. The understanding of knowledge is the central challenge when defining a knowledge society. From our present perception of knowledge society, it is of interest to empha...

  11. Addressing the concerns of rural communities about access to plants and knowledge in a sui generis legislation in Cameroon

    Marcelin Tonye Mahop

    2004-12-01

    This article assesses the traditional systems of accessing and using plant genetic resources as well as the benefit sharing and systems of sanctioning infringement in the context of biodiversity related activities in specific areas in the Northwest province of Cameroon. The article also addresses the type research and development activities using plant genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge in the context of Cameroon, the current laws regulating such activities and the extent to which these activities and laws affect and/or protect the customary biodiversity rights of rural communities. The article uses these assessments to suggest the context under which a sui generis legislation for the protection of the biodiversity rights of rural communities can be established in Cameroon.

  12. GIS TECHNIQUES FOR ASSESSING THE LINK BETWEEN HUMAN ACCESSIBILITY AND TERRITORIAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE POPULATION IN HUNEDOARA COUNTY

    R. COSTACHE; Popescu, C; A. ȘTEFAN

    2014-01-01

    GIS Techniques for Assessing the Link between Human Accessibility and Territorial Distribution of the Population in Hunedoara County. The accessibility of an area has a very important role in the territorial distribution of the population in an area. In the present study, in order to determine the human accessibility index, some physical-geographical factors were taken into account. A link between accessibility and population density was established, based on data and maps obtained using GIS ...

  13. Knowledge-Intensive Entrepreneurship and the Impact of Human Capital

    Madsen, Henning; Neergaard, Helle; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address selected aspects of human capital in association with the entrepreneurial process in technology-based new ventures. Until recently, research investigating the founding of new businesses has mainly focused on the personal characteristics of entrepreneurs, but...... success of a newly founded venture. Furthermore, the dimensions of human capital, experience and previous employment, seem to be essential in building the networks that help secure both the early as well as a continuous pool of finance for the ventures....

  14. Knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV vaccination: an international comparison.

    Marlow, L. A.; Zimet, G. D.; McCaffery, K. J.; Ostini, R; Waller, J

    2012-01-01

    Since vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) became available, awareness of HPV has dramatically increased. Implementation of a vaccine program varies internationally yet no studies have explored the influence this has on the public's knowledge of HPV. The present study aimed to explore differences in awareness of HPV and HPV knowledge across three countries: The US, UK and Australia. Participants (n=2409) completed a validated measure of HPV knowledge as part of an online survey. The...

  15. Knowledge of Acute Human Immnuodeficiency Virus Infection among Gay and Bisexual Male College Students

    Grin, Benjamin; Chan, Philip A.; Operario, Don

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors in at-risk college men who have sex with men (MSM), focusing on knowledge about acute HIV infection (AHI). Participants and Methods: A one-time anonymous survey was administered to college students attending a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender,…

  16. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Informational Behaviors of College Students in Regard to the Human Papillomavirus

    Sandfort, Jessica R.; Pleasant, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess students' human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Participants/ Methods: Students (N = 1,282) at a large, public university in the Northeast United States completed a questionnaire during February 2008 assessing HPV knowledge, prevalence, transmission, cervical cancer risk and stigma; sexual behavior,…

  17. Reconstructing Sessions from Data Discovery and Access Logs to Build a Semantic Knowledge Base for Improving Data Discovery

    Yongyao Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Big geospatial data are archived and made available through online web discovery and access. However, finding the right data for scientific research and application development is still a challenge. This paper aims to improve the data discovery by mining the user knowledge from log files. Specifically, user web session reconstruction is focused upon in this paper as a critical step for extracting usage patterns. However, reconstructing user sessions from raw web logs has always been difficult, as a session identifier tends to be missing in most data portals. To address this problem, we propose two session identification methods, including time-clustering-based and time-referrer-based methods. We also present the workflow of session reconstruction and discuss the approach of selecting appropriate thresholds for relevant steps in the workflow. The proposed session identification methods and workflow are proven to be able to extract data access patterns for further pattern analyses of user behavior and improvement of data discovery for more relevancy data ranking, suggestion, and navigation.

  18. LINKING HUMAN RESOURCES STRATEGY WITH KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY TO DRIVE MEASURABLE RESULTS

    Otilia‐Maria BORDEIANU; Simona BUTA

    2015-01-01

    Today the human resources are seen as a very valuable asset to achieve long-term performance. Today we understand that every employee is required to learn throughout life, so to acquire new knowledge, to process such knowledge and possibly disseminate expertise with other members of the organization. The theory on human resources in various organizations has changed over time; recommendations have become more numerous, but there is no consensus on the subject. In other words, the permanent ch...

  19. Human capital in the knowledge-based society: comparative analysis: Romania-Portugal

    Martins, Dora; Laura-Maria DINDIRE

    2013-01-01

    The current economic crisis has rushed even more the economists’ concerns to identify new directions for the sustainable development of the society. In this context, the human capital is crystallised as the key variable of the creative economy and of the knowledge-based society. As such, we have directed the research underlying this paper to identifying the most eloquent indicators of human capital to meet the demands of the knowledge-based society and sustainable development as well as towar...

  20. Perfect match? : Kombinationen av Knowledge Management & Human Resource Management i konsultbolag

    Graner, Nathalie; Madeleine, Gyllström

    2012-01-01

    Background: We have identified the combination of Knowledge Management and Human Resource Management as interesting because of this constellation has been mentioned scarcely in previous studies. There also seem to be some interesting correlations with personnel turnover. Aim: The aim of this study is to describe and understand the theoretically best combination of Human Resource Management and Knowledge Management, by creating a model. The model is also going to be tested empirically through ...

  1. HUMAN CAPITAL'S IMPACT ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ROMANIAN KNOWLEDGE BASED COMPANIES

    Burja Camelia

    2012-01-01

    To meet the desiderata expressed by the implementation of knowledge-based economy, companies must reconsider development strategies and must facilitate the shift from a management largely based on resource consumption to knowledge-based management. In this view, the importance of the human factor increases, becoming a precious resource that creates value and competitiveness. This paper shows the interaction between company performance and human capital, exemplifying this aspect through a case...

  2. HUMAN CAPITAL’S IMPACT ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ROMANIAN KNOWLEDGE BASED COMPANIES

    Burja Camelia

    2012-01-01

    To meet the desiderata expressed by the implementation of knowledge-based economy, companies must reconsider development strategies and must facilitate the shift from a management largely based on resource consumption to knowledge-based management. In this view, the importance of the human factor increases, becoming a precious resource that creates value and competitiveness. This paper shows the interaction between company performance and human capital, exemplifying this aspect through a case...

  3. Further Democratizing Latin America: Broadening Access to Higher Education and Promoting Science Policies Focused on the Advanced Training of Human Resources

    2014-01-01

    We focus this paper on the conditions to build reliable science, technology and higher education systems in Latin America, based on international comparative studies, fieldwork and interviews conducted over the last three years. The analysis shows that science can have a major role in furthering the democratization of society through public policies that foster opportunities to access knowledge and the advanced training of human resources. Broadening the social basis for higher education prom...

  4. Stabilizing knowledge through standards - A perspective for the humanities

    Romary, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    It is usual to consider that standards generate mixed feelings among scientists. They are often seen as not really reflecting the state of the art in a given domain and a hindrance to scientific creativity. Still, scientists should theoretically be at the best place to bring their expertise into standard developments, being even more neutral on issues that may typically be related to competing industrial interests. Even if it could be thought of as even more complex to think about developping standards in the humanities, we will show how this can be made feasible through the experience gained both within the Text Encoding Initiative consortium and the International Organisation for Standardisation. By taking the specific case of lexical resources, we will try to show how this brings about new ideas for designing future research infrastructures in the human and social sciences.

  5. Drawing on student knowledge in human anatomy and physiology

    Slominski, Tara Nicole

    Prior to instruction, students may have developed alternative conceptions about the mechanics behind human physiology. To help students re-shape these ideas into correct reasoning, the faulty characteristics reinforcing the alternative conceptions need to made explicit. This study used student-generated drawings to expose alternative conceptions Human Anatomy and Physiology students had prior to instruction on neuron physiology. Specifically, we investigated how students thought about neuron communication across a synapse (n=355) and how neuron activity can be modified (n=311). When asked to depict basic communication between two neurons, at least 80% of students demonstrated incorrect ideas about synaptic transmission. When targeting spatial and temporal summation, only eleven students (3.5%) were able to accurately depict at least one form of summation. In response to both drawing questions, student drawings revealed multiple alternative conceptions that resulted in a deeper analysis and characterization of the wide variation of student ideas.

  6. Setaria digitata in advancing our knowledge of human lymphatic filariasis.

    Perumal, A N I; Gunawardene, Y I N S; Dassanayake, R S

    2016-03-01

    Setaria digitata is a filarial parasite that causes fatal cerebrospinal nematodiasis in goats, sheep and horses, resulting in substantial economic losses in animal husbandry in the tropics. Due to its close resemblance to Wuchereria bancrofti, this nematode is also frequently used as a model organism to study human lymphatic filariasis. This review highlights numerous insights into the morphological, histological, biochemical, immunological and genetic aspects of S. digitata that have broadened our understanding towards the control and eradication of filarial diseases. PMID:25924635

  7. Human strongyloidiasis: identifying knowledge gaps, with emphasis on environmental control

    Taylor, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Michael J Taylor, Tara A Garrard, Francis J O'Donahoo, Kirstin E Ross Health and Environment, School of the Environment, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia Abstract: Strongyloides is a human parasitic nematode that is poorly understood outside a clinical context. This article identifies gaps within the literature, with particular emphasis on gaps that are hindering environmental control of Strongyloides. The prevalence and distribution of Strongyloides is unclear. An estima...

  8. Human strongyloidiasis: identifying knowledge gaps, with emphasis on environmental control

    Taylor MJ; Garrard TA; O'Donahoo FJ; Ross KE

    2014-01-01

    Michael J Taylor, Tara A Garrard, Francis J O'Donahoo, Kirstin E Ross Health and Environment, School of the Environment, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia Abstract: Strongyloides is a human parasitic nematode that is poorly understood outside a clinical context. This article identifies gaps within the literature, with particular emphasis on gaps that are hindering environmental control of Strongyloides. The prevalence and distribution of Strongyloides is unclear. An estimate o...

  9. Human engineering considerations in designing a computerized controlled access security system

    This paper describes a human engineering effort in the design of a major security system upgrade at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This upgrade was to be accomplished by replacing obsolete and difficult-to-man (i.e., multiple operator task actions required) security equipment and systems with a new, automated, computer-based access control system. The initial task was to assist the electronic and mechanical engineering staff in designing a computerized security access system too functionally and ergonomically accommodate 100% of the Laboratory user population. The new computerized access system was intended to control entry into sensitive exclusion areas by requiring personnel to use an entry booth-based system and/or a remote access control panel system. The primary user interface with the system was through a control panel containing a magnetic card reader, function buttons, LCD display, and push-button keypad

  10. Integrated approach to knowledge acquisition and safety management of complex plants with emphasis on human factors

    In this paper an integrated approach to the knowledge acquisition and safety management of complex industrial plants is proposed and outlined. The plant is considered within a man-technology-environment (MTE) system. The knowledge acquisition is aimed at the consequent reliability evaluation of human factor and probabilistic modeling of the plant. Properly structured initial knowledge is updated in life-time of the plant. The data and knowledge concerning the topology of safety related systems and their functions are created in a graphical CAD system and are object oriented. Safety oriented monitoring of the plant includes abnormal situations due to external and internal disturbances, failures of hard/software components and failures of human factor. The operation and safety related evidence is accumulated in special data bases. Data/knowledge bases are designed in such a way to support effectively the reliability and safety management of the plant. (author)

  11. Cervical Cancer and Human Papilloma Virus Knowledge and Acceptance of Vaccination among Medical Students in Southwest Nigeria.

    Adejuyigbe, Funmilayo F; Balogun, M R; Balogun, Balogun R; Sekoni, Adekemi O; Adegbola, Adebukola A

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the commonest viral sexually transmitted infection in the world and the leading cause of cervical cancer. Medical students as future healthcare providers will play a role in influencing patients' decision to receive HPV vaccination. This study was aimed at determining the knowledge of cervical cancer and HPV as well as the acceptance of HPV vaccination among medical students of the University of Lagos. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among 280 medical students sampled using stratified sampling technique. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect relevant data. Most respondents were aware of cervical cancer (95.4%), HPV (85.4%) and HPV vaccination (69.3%) and the most common source of information was school teaching. Good knowledge of cervical cancer, HPV and HPV vaccination was demonstrated by 51.8%, 67.1% and 21.1% respectively; only 39.6% fully accepted HPV vaccination. Inadequate information and high costs were the obstacles identified to receiving vaccine and recommending it to others. Older age and higher levels of study were significantly associated with good knowledge of HPV. Good knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccination respectively were significantly associated with full acceptance of vaccination. There is need for more education on cervical cancer, HPV infection and HPV vaccination for the medical students via school teaching and other media, and inclusion of the HPV vaccine in the National Program on Immunization to improve access. PMID:26103704

  12. Psychological Basis of the Relationship Between the Rorschach Texture Response and Adult Attachment: The Mediational Role of the Accessibility of Tactile Knowledge.

    Iwasa, Kazunori; Ogawa, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    This study clarifies the psychological basis for the linkage between adult attachment and the texture response on the Rorschach by examining the mediational role of the accessibility of tactile knowledge. Japanese undergraduate students (n = 35) completed the Rorschach Inkblot Method, the Experiences in Close Relationship Scale for General Objects (Nakao & Kato, 2004) and a lexical decision task designed to measure the accessibility of tactile knowledge. A mediation analysis revealed that the accessibility of tactile knowledge partially mediates the association between attachment anxiety and the texture response. These results suggest that our hypothetical model focusing on the response process provides a possible explanation of the relationship between the texture response and adult attachment. PMID:26569020

  13. Guide to open access monograph publishing for arts, humanities and social science researchers

    Collins, Ellen; Milloy, Caren; Stone, Graham

    2015-01-01

    This guide has been produced to assist arts, humanities and social sciences (AHSS) researchers in understanding the state of play with regards to open access in the UK and what it means to them as current and future authors of scholarly monographs.

  14. Web Accessibility and Usability of the Homepages from Academy of Human Resource Development Members' Institutions

    Zeng, Xiaoming; Sligar, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Human resource development programs in various institutions communicate with their constituencies including persons with disabilities through websites. Web sites need to be accessible for legal, economic and ethical reasons. We used an automated web usability evaluation tool, aDesigner, to evaluate 205 home pages from the organizations of AHRD…

  15. Human security and access to water, sanitation, and hygiene: exploring the drivers and nexus

    P. Obani; J. Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Water security challenges are mostly covered in the literature on the food and energy nexus. This chapter however adopts a broader conception of water security in relation to lack of access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH), and argues that the human rights approach could be instrumental in a

  16. Prior implicit knowledge shapes human threshold for orientation noise

    Christensen, Jeppe H; Bex, Peter J; Fiser, József

    2015-01-01

    Although orientation coding in the human visual system has been researched with simple stimuli, little is known about how orientation information is represented while viewing complex images. We show that, similar to findings with simple Gabor textures, the visual system involuntarily discounts...... orientation noise in a wide range of natural images, and that this discounting produces a dipper function in the sensitivity to orientation noise, with best sensitivity at intermediate levels of pedestal noise. However, the level of this discounting depends on the complexity and familiarity of the input image......, resulting in an image-class-specific threshold that changes the shape and position of the dipper function according to image class. These findings do not fit a filter-based feed-forward view of orientation coding, but can be explained by a process that utilizes an experience-based perceptual prior of the...

  17. HUMAN CAPITAL’S IMPACT ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ROMANIAN KNOWLEDGE BASED COMPANIES

    Burja Camelia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available To meet the desiderata expressed by the implementation of knowledge-based economy, companies must reconsider development strategies and must facilitate the shift from a management largely based on resource consumption to knowledge-based management. In this view, the importance of the human factor increases, becoming a precious resource that creates value and competitiveness. This paper shows the interaction between company performance and human capital, exemplifying this aspect through a case study based on a regression model in Romanian software companies. The obtained results show the strong connection between company performance, expressed by net income, and the quality of the human capital, synthesized by labour productivity.

  18. Managing nuclear knowledge: Strategies and human resource development. Summary of an international conference

    The nuclear industry is knowledge based, similar to other highly technical industries, and relies heavily on the accumulation of knowledge. Recent trends such as workforce ageing and declining student enrolment numbers, and the risk of losing accumulated knowledge and experience, have drawn attention to the need for better management of nuclear knowledge. In 2002 the IAEA General Conference adopted a resolution on nuclear knowledge, which was reiterated in 2003; the resolution emphasized the importance of nuclear knowledge and information management and urged both the IAEA and Member States to strengthen their activities and efforts in this regard. Consequently, the International Conference on Nuclear Knowledge Management: Strategies, Information Management and Human Resource Development, which was held on 7-10 September 2004 in Saclay, was organized by the IAEA and the Government of France through the Commissariat a l'energie atomique in cooperation with the European Commission, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, European Atomic Forum, Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, World Council of Nuclear Workers, World Nuclear University and European Association of Information Services. The conference was attended by 250 experts, scientists and officials from 54 Member States and nine international organizations, giving the conference a very broad representation of the nuclear sector. The objective of the conference was to reach a clear and common understanding of the issues related to nuclear knowledge management for sustaining knowledge and expertise in nuclear science and technology and to define a strategic framework for developing IAEA cross-cutting knowledge management activities. The conference provided a forum for professionals and decision makers in the nuclear sector, comprising industry, government and academia, as well as professionals in the knowledge management and information technology sectors. Based on the results of the conference, the key insights, lessons learned

  19. Retaking Responsibility for How We Communicate. A Review of Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future

    James Baker

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the publication of the Budapest Open Access Initiative statement in 2002, Open Access has grown from an ideal to a reality. Open Access and the Humanities explores scholarly practices, communications, and cultures in light of this change and argues that humanists can and should retake responsibility for how they chose to publish.

  20. The lawful uses of knowledge from the Human Genome Project

    Grad, F.P.

    1994-04-15

    Part I of this study deals with the right to know or not to know personal genetic information, and examines available legal protections of the right of privacy and the adverse effect of the disclosure of genetic information both on employment and insurance interests and on self esteem and protection of personal integrity. The study examines the rationale for the legal protection of privacy as the protection of a public interest. It examines the very limited protections currently available for privacy interests, including genetic privacy interests, and concludes that there is a need for broader, more far-reaching legal protections. The second part of the study is based on the assumption that as major a project as the Human Genome Project, spending billions of dollars on science which is health related, will indeed be applied for preventive and therapeutic public health purposes, as it has been in the past. It also addresses the recurring fear that public health initiatives in the genetic area must evolve a new eugenic agenda, that we must not repeat the miserable discriminatory experiences of the past.

  1. Collaborative online knowledge base for human planetary mission simulation stations

    Hargitai, H. I.

    2008-09-01

    Mars Society operates two Mars simulation research stations since 2001/2002: one in Devon Island (FMARS) and one in Utah (MDRS). The goal of these stations is to simulate human mission - work and life - on the Surface of Mars. FMARS receives one crew each year while at MDRS crews change every second week except for the summer season. In the last 7 years 71 crews worked at MDRS. Their results are published in various forums: in peer-reviewed papers, conference abstracts, books, private websites or other publications [3]. The actual work of all crews is documented as specialized daily reports together with images and are avaiable at the MDRS website [4] (Fig. 1, Fig. 2.). An important part of these reports are the "lessons learned" sections where crews describe what they have learned during field trips (EVAs) or other activities. Updated operation manuals and cartographic resources [1] are also available on the website. Some of crew members are visiting MDRS for the first time, others are "veterans".

  2. The Human Genome Project: Information access, management, and regulation. Final report

    McInerney, J.D.; Micikas, L.B.

    1996-08-31

    The Human Genome Project is a large, internationally coordinated effort in biological research directed at creating a detailed map of human DNA. This report describes the access of information, management, and regulation of the project. The project led to the development of an instructional module titled The Human Genome Project: Biology, Computers, and Privacy, designed for use in high school biology classes. The module consists of print materials and both Macintosh and Windows versions of related computer software-Appendix A contains a copy of the print materials and discs containing the two versions of the software.

  3. The Social Uses of the Innovation Concept. A Qualitative Approach to the Discursive Logics for the Access to and Use of Information, Communication and Knowledge in Andalusia.

    Rodríguez Victoriano, José Manuel; Wulff Barreiro, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    In the semantic architecture of the society of the knowledge the innovation concept is the fundamental brick. It is an adobe that allows to construct very different discourses frequently opposed between them, in what the purpose of its social use concerns. In the present communication we introduce the motivations for the access and use of the information and the knowledge on the part of the different social sectors in the Andalusian society. The analysis of the efforts of the Andalusian admin...

  4. Human strongyloidiasis: identifying knowledge gaps, with emphasis on environmental control

    Taylor MJ

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Taylor, Tara A Garrard, Francis J O'Donahoo, Kirstin E Ross Health and Environment, School of the Environment, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia Abstract: Strongyloides is a human parasitic nematode that is poorly understood outside a clinical context. This article identifies gaps within the literature, with particular emphasis on gaps that are hindering environmental control of Strongyloides. The prevalence and distribution of Strongyloides is unclear. An estimate of 100–370 million people infected worldwide has been proposed; however, inaccuracy of diagnosis, unreliability of prevalence mapping, and the fact that strongyloidiasis remains a neglected disease suggest that the higher figure of more than 300 million cases is likely to be a more accurate estimate. The complexity of Strongyloides life cycle means that laboratory cultures cannot be maintained outside of a host. This currently limits the range of laboratory-based research, which is vital to controlling Strongyloides through environmental alteration or treatment. Successful clinical treatment with antihelminthic drugs has meant that controlling Strongyloides through environmental control, rather than clinical intervention, has been largely overlooked. These control measures may encompass alteration of the soil environment through physical means, such as desiccation or removal of nutrients, or through chemical or biological agents. Repeated antihelminthic treatment of individuals with recurrent strongyloidiasis has not been observed to result in the selection of resistant strains; however, this has not been explicitly demonstrated, and relying on such assumptions in the long-term may prove to be shortsighted. It is ultimately naive to assume that continued administration of antihelminthics will be without any negative long-term effects. In Australia, strongyloidiasis primarily affects Indigenous communities, including communities from arid central Australia. This

  5. Social Knowledge and the Web

    Binns, Reuben

    2011-01-01

    Epistemologists have traditionally been concerned with elucidating the conditions under which an agent knows some proposition, focusing on the state of a single individual, and her relation to the world. Whatever its merits, this approach to a theory of knowledge neglects the distinct phenomenon of social knowledge; knowledge that is held collectively by groups. However, we are fast approaching a world in which the sum of human knowledge is primarily stored on and accessed via the web, rather...

  6. The Construction and Globalization of the Knowledge Base in Inter-human Communication Systems

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between the "knowledge base" and the "globalization" of communication systems is discussed from the perspective of communication theory. I argue that inter-human communication takes place at two levels. At the first level information is exchanged and provided with meaning and at the second level meaning can reflexively be communicated. Human language can be considered as the evolutionary achievement which enables us to use these two channels of communication simultaneously. Providing meaning from the perspective of hindsight is a recursive operation: a meaning that makes a difference can be considered as knowledge. If the production of knowledge is socially organized, the perspective of hindsight can further be codified. This adds globalization to the historically stabilized patterns of communications. Globalization can be expected to transform the communications in an evolutionary mode. However, the self-organization of a knowledge-based society remains an expectation with the status of a hy...

  7. Generalization of category knowledge and dimensional categorization in humans (Homo sapiens) and nonhuman primates (Macaca mulatta).

    Smith, J David; Zakrzewski, Alexandria C; Johnston, Jennifer J R; Roeder, Jessica L; Boomer, Joseph; Ashby, F Gregory; Church, Barbara A

    2015-10-01

    A theoretical framework within neuroscience distinguishes humans' implicit and explicit systems for category learning. We used a perceptual-categorization paradigm to ask whether nonhumans share elements of these systems. Participants learned categories that foster implicit or explicit categorization in humans, because they had a multidimensional, information-integration (II) solution or a unidimensional, rule-based (RB) solution. Then humans and macaques generalized their category knowledge to new, untested regions of the stimulus space. II generalization was impaired, suggesting that II category learning is conditioned and constrained by stimulus generalization to its original, trained stimulus contexts. RB generalization was nearly seamless, suggesting that RB category knowledge in humans and monkeys has properties that grant it some independence from the original, trained stimulus contexts. These findings raise the questions of (a) how closely macaques' dimensional categorization verges on humans' explicit/declarative categorization, and (b) how far macaques' dimensional categorization has advanced beyond that in other vertebrate species. PMID:26167774

  8. Linking Human Resource Management and Knowledge Management via Commitment to Safety

    Kuimet Karin; Järvis Marina; Virovere Anu; Hartšenko Jelena

    2015-01-01

    This paper contributes to the development of the human resource management (HRM), organisational (safety) culture and knowledge management literature through developing the linkage and relationship among them. The article suggests that the HRM concepts and frameworks could play an important role in the safety knowledge exchange within the organisation. The research method includes exploratory case studies, interviews and evaluation questionnaires in order to clarify how HRM practices are adop...

  9. The effect of human capital and networks on knowledge and innovation in SMEs

    Salvatore Farace; Fernanda Mazzotta

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework to analyze knowledge creation in traditional sectors and empirically test innovation probability and intensity in small and medium firms (SMEs). The underlying hypothesis is that human capital and networks favour ease of learning and promote absorptive capacity and knowledge, which in turn fosters innovation in SMEs in traditional sectors. The empirical evidence is based on an ad hoc survey of a representative sample of 462 manufacturing firms in a province in ...

  10. Cultivating Humanity or Educating the Human? Two Options for Education in the Knowledge Age

    Biesta, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Ever since the idea of the "knowledge society" came into circulation, there have been discussions about what the term empirically "might" mean and normatively "should" mean. In the literature we can find a rather wide spectrum, ranging from a "utilitarian" interpretation of the knowledge society as a…

  11. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  12. Near-instant automatic access to visually presented words in the human neocortex: neuromagnetic evidence

    Yury Shtyrov; MacGregor, Lucy J

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and efficient processing of external information by the brain is vital to survival in a highly dynamic environment. The key channel humans use to exchange information is language, but the neural underpinnings of its processing are still not fully understood. We investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of neural access to word representations in the brain by scrutinising the brain’s activity elicited in response to psycholinguistically, visually and phonologically matched groups of fami...

  13. Human Lymphoid Translocation Fragile Zones Are Hypomethylated and Have Accessible Chromatin

    Lu, Zhengfei; Lieber, Michael R.; Tsai, Albert G.; Pardo, Carolina E.; Müschen, Markus; Kladde, Michael P.; Hsieh, Chih-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of hematopoietic malignancies. CG motifs within translocation fragile zones (typically 20 to 600 bp in size) are prone to chromosomal translocation in lymphomas. Here we demonstrate that the CG motifs in human translocation fragile zones are hypomethylated relative to the adjacent DNA. Using a methyltransferase footprinting assay on isolated nuclei (in vitro), we find that the chromatin at these fragile zones is accessible. We also examined in vivo ac...

  14. International conference on nuclear knowledge management: Strategies, information management and human resource development. Unedited papers

    The nuclear industry is knowledge based, similar to other highly technical industries, and relies heavily on the accumulation of knowledge. Recent trends such as workforce ageing and declining student enrolment numbers, and the risk of losing accumulated knowledge and experience, have drawn attention to the need for better management of nuclear knowledge. In 2002 the IAEA General Conference adopted a resolution on nuclear knowledge, which was reiterated in 2003; the resolution emphasized the importance of nuclear knowledge and information management and urged both the IAEA and Member States to strengthen their activities and efforts in this regard. Consequently, the International Conference on Nuclear Knowledge Management: Strategies, Information Management and Human Resource Development, which was held on 7-10 September 2004 in Saclay, was organized by the IAEA and the Government of France through the Commissariat a l'energie atomique in cooperation with the European Commission, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, European Atomic Forum, Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, World Council of Nuclear Workers, World Nuclear University and European Association of Information Services. The conference was attended by 250 experts, scientists and officials from 54 Member States and nine international organizations, giving the conference a very broad representation of the nuclear sector. The objective of the conference was to reach a clear and common understanding of the issues related to nuclear knowledge management for sustaining knowledge and expertise in nuclear science and technology and to define a strategic framework for developing IAEA cross-cutting knowledge management activities. The conference provided a forum for professionals and decision makers in the nuclear sector, comprising industry, government and academia, as well as professionals in the knowledge management and information technology sectors. The unedited papers are presented in this report

  15. LINKING HUMAN RESOURCES STRATEGY WITH KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY TO DRIVE MEASURABLE RESULTS

    Otilia‐Maria\tBORDEIANU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Today the human resources are seen as a very valuable asset to achieve long-term performance. Today we understand that every employee is required to learn throughout life, so to acquire new knowledge, to process such knowledge and possibly disseminate expertise with other members of the organization. The theory on human resources in various organizations has changed over time; recommendations have become more numerous, but there is no consensus on the subject. In other words, the permanent change which defines the competitive environment of business remains a type of constant when analysing the efficiency of human resources within companies; inter-individual relations (formal and informal and the values to which each employee relates remains crucial for any theoretical construction in this area. Principles and strategies applied by organizations yesterday could prove their inefficiency today; human resource strategies in organizations today should include a separate subcomponent, we believe, i.e. knowledge management (KM strategy. This is because the competitive advantage obtained or maintained by the company depends today, in large proportion, on the type, quality and value of knowledge possessed by the organization. Therefore, organizational strategy and thus the strategy of acquisition, developing and rewarding of human resources (HR should take into account this reality from the global environment. Moreover, in the current knowledge-driven economy, organizations must know how to develop and implement knowledge-based strategies to drive measurable business results. The goal of this paper is to describe a potential relation between the overall company strategy, HR strategy and KM strategy.

  16. Posture-Dependent Human 3He Lung Imaging in an Open Access MRI System: Initial Results

    Tsai, L L; Li, C -H; Rosen, M S; Patz, S; Walsworth, R L

    2007-01-01

    The human lung and its functions are extremely sensitive to orientation and posture, and debate continues as to the role of gravity and the surrounding anatomy in determining lung function and heterogeneity of perfusion and ventilation. However, study of these effects is difficult. The conventional high-field magnets used for most hyperpolarized 3He MRI of the human lung, and most other common radiological imaging modalities including PET and CT, restrict subjects to lying horizontally, minimizing most gravitational effects. In this paper, we briefly review the motivation for posture-dependent studies of human lung function, and present initial imaging results of human lungs in the supine and vertical body orientations using inhaled hyperpolarized 3He gas and an open-access MRI instrument. The open geometry of this MRI system features a "walk-in" capability that permits subjects to be imaged in vertical and horizontal positions, and potentially allows for complete rotation of the orientation of the imaging su...

  17. A Knowledge-Driven Shared Autonomy Human-Robot Interface for Tablet Computers

    Birkenkampf, Peter; Leidner, Daniel; Borst, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Autonomous and teleoperated robots have been proven to be capable of solving complex manipulation tasks. However, autonomous robots can only be deployed in predefined domains and teleoperation requires full attention of a human operator. Therefore, combining autonomous capabilities of the robot with teleoperation is desirable, yet balancing the work load between robot and operator for intuitive human-robot interfaces is still an open issue. In this paper, we present a knowledge-driven tablet ...

  18. Knowledge management: Exploring the relationship between human capital and organisation structure capital

    Al-Halak, A; Al-Karaghouli, W; Ghoneim, A; Koufopoulos, D

    2010-01-01

    Human capital and its impact on the organisation structure capital are of paramount importance in the modern business organisations. This research in progress, which investigates and analyses the role that human capital plays in the determination of the organisation structure capital. The study is based on wide spectrum of current literature, which presents theoretical and practical research on the subject of study. Knowledge Management (KM) is systematic process based on models and technolog...

  19. Problems of formation of human potential on the way to the knowledge economy in Ukraine

    Tiutiunnykova Svitlana V.; Savitska Nataliia L.

    2013-01-01

    The article outlines main problems of formation of the domestic human potential on the way to the knowledge economy. It uses general scientific methods of formal and dialectic logic, modern technique of system analysis, scientific abstraction, synthesis, systematisation and generalisation. It marks out main obstacles of transformation of human potential into the factor of economic development: destruction of macro-economic reproduction proportions, institutional and value motivational grounds...

  20. Academic and Professional Communities of Discourse: Generating Knowledge on Transnational Human Resource Management

    Nancy J Adler; Susan Bartholomew

    1992-01-01

    Increasing global competition is changing the nature of knowledge needed for international human resource management. This article assesses the publishing trends in international organizational behaviour and human resource management (OB/HRM) and interprets their implications for conducting transnational business. A review of over 28,000 articles in seventy-three academic and professional journals identified three important trends in international OB/HRM: first, the focus has shifted from sin...

  1. Knowledge, attitudes, and opinions about human-wildlife conflicts held by community leaders in Virginia

    Elsner, Regina Marie

    2008-01-01

    Using a mail survey, I questioned 490 representatives of local government (i.e., elected officials, administrative officials, animal control officers, and county Cooperative Extension agents) about their understanding of human-wildlife conflicts in their communities, and their receptivity to participating in co-management partnerships with regulatory agencies. Response rates for the mail survey of these four populations ranged from 25.2% to 75.9%. Knowledge of and perceptions about human-wi...

  2. Access to essential maternal health interventions and human rights violations among vulnerable communities in eastern Burma.

    Luke C Mullany

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Health indicators are poor and human rights violations are widespread in eastern Burma. Reproductive and maternal health indicators have not been measured in this setting but are necessary as part of an evaluation of a multi-ethnic pilot project exploring strategies to increase access to essential maternal health interventions. The goal of this study is to estimate coverage of maternal health services prior to this project and associations between exposure to human rights violations and access to such services. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Selected communities in the Shan, Mon, Karen, and Karenni regions of eastern Burma that were accessible to community-based organizations operating from Thailand were surveyed to estimate coverage of reproductive, maternal, and family planning services, and to assess exposure to household-level human rights violations within the pilot-project target population. Two-stage cluster sampling surveys among ever-married women of reproductive age (15-45 y documented access to essential antenatal care interventions, skilled attendance at birth, postnatal care, and family planning services. Mid-upper arm circumference, hemoglobin by color scale, and Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia by rapid diagnostic dipstick were measured. Exposure to human rights violations in the prior 12 mo was recorded. Between September 2006 and January 2007, 2,914 surveys were conducted. Eighty-eight percent of women reported a home delivery for their last pregnancy (within previous 5 y. Skilled attendance at birth (5.1%, any (39.3% or > or = 4 (16.7% antenatal visits, use of an insecticide-treated bed net (21.6%, and receipt of iron supplements (11.8% were low. At the time of the survey, more than 60% of women had hemoglobin level estimates < or = 11.0 g/dl and 7.2% were Pf positive. Unmet need for contraceptives exceeded 60%. Violations of rights were widely reported: 32.1% of Karenni households reported forced labor and 10% of Karen

  3. "Creative Destruction": Knowledge Economy Policy and the Future of the Arts and Humanities in the Academy

    Bullen, Elizabeth; Robb, Simon; Kenway, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Policy conceptualizations of the global knowledge economy have led to the channelling of much Higher Education and Research and Development funding into the priority areas of science and technology. Among other things, this diversion of funding calls into question the future of traditional humanities and creative arts faculties. How these…

  4. Beliefs and Knowledge about the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine among Undergraduate Men

    Hunter, Theresa; Weinstein, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess male undergraduate students' human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge and intentions to receive the HPV vaccination. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: A sample of 116 male undergraduate students from a university in the Midwestern USA completed a survey questionnaire assessing various aspects…

  5. Dichotomous Identification Keys: A Ladder to Higher Order Knowledge about the Human Body

    Sorgo, Andrej

    2006-01-01

    We tried to enrich teaching human anatomy in high school biology lessons. Students construct dichotomous identification keys to the cells, tissues, organs, or body parts. By doing this, students have achieved higher-order cognitive levels of knowledge because construction of such keys is based on analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Students found…

  6. Knowledge, Beliefs, and Behaviors: Examining Human Papillomavirus-Related Gender Differences among African American College Students

    Bynum, Shalanda A.; Brandt, Heather M.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Annang, Lucy; Tanner, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Given recent approval for administration of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to men, it is important to assess the HPV-related perspectives of men and women. The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences in HPV knowledge, beliefs, and vaccine acceptance among college students attending 3 historically black…

  7. Information about Human Sexuality: Sources, Satisfaction, and Perceived Knowledge among College Students

    Rutledge, Scott Edward; Siebert, Darcy Clay; Chonody, Jill; Killian, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This study explored how 333 undergraduate and graduate students attending a large university in the southeastern USA learned about sex, their satisfaction with how they learned about sex, and their self-perceived knowledge before and after taking a human sexuality course. An anonymous, voluntary survey was administered to students in the first and…

  8. Open access

    Dorch, Bertil Fabricius; Demaio, Alessandro; Hersch, Fred

    2012-01-01

    This week, we celebrate open access week – an event aimed at bringing attention to this rapidly emerging form of scientific publication and its ethical imperatives. Traditionally, knowledge breakthroughs and scientific discoveries are shared through publication in academic journals. Peer...... ideas, break down barriers to science and make knowledge accessible to the masses – but this is not actually the case....

  9. Optimizing human-system interface automation design based on a skill-rule-knowledge framework

    This study considers the technological change that has occurred in complex systems within the past 30 years. The role of human operators in controlling and interacting with complex systems following the technological change was also investigated. Modernization of instrumentation and control systems and components leads to a new issue of human-automation interaction, in which human operational performance must be considered in automated systems. The human-automation interaction can differ in its types and levels. A system design issue is usually realized: given these technical capabilities, which system functions should be automated and to what extent? A good automation design can be achieved by making an appropriate human-automation function allocation. To our knowledge, only a few studies have been published on how to achieve appropriate automation design with a systematic procedure. Further, there is a surprising lack of information on examining and validating the influences of levels of automation (LOAs) on instrumentation and control systems in the advanced control room (ACR). The study we present in this paper proposed a systematic framework to help in making an appropriate decision towards types of automation (TOA) and LOAs based on a 'Skill-Rule-Knowledge' (SRK) model. From the evaluating results, it was shown that the use of either automatic mode or semiautomatic mode is insufficient to prevent human errors. For preventing the occurrences of human errors and ensuring the safety in ACR, the proposed framework can be valuable for making decisions in human-automation allocation.

  10. Knowledge of human papillomavirus among high school students can be increased by an educational intervention.

    Gottvall, M; Tydén, T; Höglund, A T; Larsson, M

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an educational intervention concerning human papillomavirus (HPV) directed at Swedish first year high school students. The intervention consisted of a class room lesson, a website and a folder. Outcome variables were knowledge of HPV and attitudes to preventive methods such as HPV vaccination, condom use and Pap smear testing. An intervention group (n = 92) was matched with two comparison groups (n = 184). At baseline, the median score for HPV knowledge was one out of 10 in both groups. At follow-up, the median knowledge score had increased to six in the intervention group, but was still one in the comparison group (P Pap smear testing remained the same (P > 0.05). In conclusion, a short school-based intervention can greatly increase the students' knowledge about HPV, but attitudes and behaviours are less easy to influence. PMID:20975088

  11. The Role of Human Resource Management Practice Mediated by Knowledge Management (Study on companies from ICT sector, Croatia

    Marina Klacmer Calopa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper integrates theories and findings of the role of human resources management (HRM in the process of knowledge management (KM in the information and communication technologies (ICT sector in Croatia.In order to succeed, companies must prevent the loss of knowledge. Therefore, they must recognize the importance of human resources as the main factor of business. Only knowledge management enables knowledge sharing.Furthermore, applications of information technology (IT in the field of HRM can prevent the loss of knowledge and arise the transfer of knowledge among employees.For the purpose of this paper, a survey regarding human resource and knowledge management in IT companies is conducted in order to analyze the structure of HR and the importance of knowledge sharing in an organization.

  12. The Effect of Customization, Price, Geographical Accessibility, Professional Knowledge and Interaction on Intent of Customers for Using Internet Banking Services in Iran

    Kamal Ghalandari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Not all organizations and institutions are equally successful in employing electronic commerce. Thus it is necessary to conduct required studies so that we can create a favorable policy in relation to implementation and employment of electronic commerce and identify factors which facilitate its growth. Thus, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of customization, price, geographical accessibility, professional knowledge and interaction on intent of customers for using internet banking services in Iran. Totally, 400 questionnaires were distributed to university students, that 382 questionnaires were used for the final analysis, which the results from analysis of them based on simple linear regression show that customization, price, professional knowledge and interaction have a positive influence on Customers’ Purchase Intent in Iran, except for geographical accessibility which was not confirmed in the case of our intended population.

  13. Review of Cold war social science: Knowledge production, liberal democracy, and human nature, and Working knowledge: Making the human sciences from Parsons to Kuhn.

    Erickson, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Reviews the books, Cold War Social Science: Knowledge Production, Liberal Democracy, and Human Nature by Mark Solovey and Hamilton Cravens (2012) and Working Knowledge: Making the Human Sciences From Parsons to Kuhn by Joel Isaac (see record 2012-13212-000). Taken together, these two important books make intriguing statements about the way to write the histories of fields like psychology, sociology, anthropology, and economics in the Anglo American world during the 20th century. To date, histories of these fields have drawn on a number of fairly well-established punctuation marks to assist in periodization: the shift from interwar institutionalism in economics to postwar neoclassicism, with its physics-like emphasis on mathematical theory-building; the transition from the regnant prewar behaviorism through a postwar "cognitive revolution" in American psychology; and the move in fields like sociology and anthropology away from positivism and the pursuit of what has sometimes been called "grand theory" in the early postwar era toward a period defined by intellectual and political fragmentation, the reemergence of interpretive approaches and a reaction to the scientistic pretensions of the earlier period. These books, by contrast, provide perspectives orthogonal to such existing narrative frameworks by adopting cross-cutting lenses like the "Cold War" and the working practices of researchers in the social and behavioral sciences. As a result, they do much to indicate the value of casting a historiographical net beyond individual disciplines, or even beyond the "social sciences" or the "human sciences" sensu stricto, in the search for deeper patterns of historical development in these fields. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24245858

  14. OAPEN-UK: an Open Access Business Model for Scholarly Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences

    Milloy, Caren; Stone, Graham; Collins, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the current findings of OAPEN-UK, a UK research project gathering evidence on the social and technological impacts of an open access business model for scholarly monographs in the humanities and social sciences.

  15. LncRNAWiki: harnessing community knowledge in collaborative curation of human long non-coding RNAs

    Ma, L.

    2014-11-15

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) perform a diversity of functions in numerous important biological processes and are implicated in many human diseases. In this report we present lncRNAWiki (http://lncrna.big.ac.cn), a wiki-based platform that is open-content and publicly editable and aimed at community-based curation and collection of information on human lncRNAs. Current related databases are dependent primarily on curation by experts, making it laborious to annotate the exponentially accumulated information on lncRNAs, which inevitably requires collective efforts in community-based curation of lncRNAs. Unlike existing databases, lncRNAWiki features comprehensive integration of information on human lncRNAs obtained from multiple different resources and allows not only existing lncRNAs to be edited, updated and curated by different users but also the addition of newly identified lncRNAs by any user. It harnesses community collective knowledge in collecting, editing and annotating human lncRNAs and rewards community-curated efforts by providing explicit authorship based on quantified contributions. LncRNAWiki relies on the underling knowledge of scientific community for collective and collaborative curation of human lncRNAs and thus has the potential to serve as an up-to-date and comprehensive knowledgebase for human lncRNAs.

  16. neXtProt: organizing protein knowledge in the context of human proteome projects.

    Gaudet, Pascale; Argoud-Puy, Ghislaine; Cusin, Isabelle; Duek, Paula; Evalet, Olivier; Gateau, Alain; Gleizes, Anne; Pereira, Mario; Zahn-Zabal, Monique; Zwahlen, Catherine; Bairoch, Amos; Lane, Lydie

    2013-01-01

    About 5000 (25%) of the ~20400 human protein-coding genes currently lack any experimental evidence at the protein level. For many others, there is only little information relative to their abundance, distribution, subcellular localization, interactions, or cellular functions. The aim of the HUPO Human Proteome Project (HPP, www.thehpp.org ) is to collect this information for every human protein. HPP is based on three major pillars: mass spectrometry (MS), antibody/affinity capture reagents (Ab), and bioinformatics-driven knowledge base (KB). To meet this objective, the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) proposes to build this catalog chromosome-by-chromosome ( www.c-hpp.org ) by focusing primarily on proteins that currently lack MS evidence or Ab detection. These are termed "missing proteins" by the HPP consortium. The lack of observation of a protein can be due to various factors including incorrect and incomplete gene annotation, low or restricted expression, or instability. neXtProt ( www.nextprot.org ) is a new web-based knowledge platform specific for human proteins that aims to complement UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot ( www.uniprot.org ) with detailed information obtained from carefully selected high-throughput experiments on genomic variation, post-translational modifications, as well as protein expression in tissues and cells. This article describes how neXtProt contributes to prioritize C-HPP efforts and integrates C-HPP results with other research efforts to create a complete human proteome catalog. PMID:23205526

  17. A Semantic-Oriented Architecture of a Functional Module for Personalized and Adaptive Access to the Knowledge in a Multimedia Digital Library

    Paneva-Marinova, Desislava

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the principal results of the doctoral thesis “Semantic-oriented Architecture and Models for Personalized and Adaptive Access to the Knowledge in Multimedia Digital Library” by Desislava Ivanova Paneva-Marinova (Institute of Mathematics and Informatics), successfully defended before the Specialised Academic Council for Informatics and Mathematical Modelling on 27 October, 2008. This paper presents dissertation work on semantic-oriented architectures and...

  18. Knowledge about knowledge

    Technology and knowledge make up the knowledge capital that has been so essential to the oil and gas industry's value creation, competitiveness and internationalization. Report prepared for the Norwegian Oil Industry Association (OLF) and The Norwegian Society of Chartered Technical and Scientific Professionals (Tekna), on the Norwegian petroleum cluster as an environment for creating knowledge capital from human capital, how fiscal and other framework conditions may influence the building of knowledge capital, the long-term perspectives for the petroleum cluster, what Norwegian society can learn from the experiences in the petroleum cluster, and the importance of gaining more knowledge about the functionality of knowledge for increased value creation (author) (ml)

  19. Design and analysis of a biometric access control system using an electronic olfactory device to identify human odour characteristics

    McMillan, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The use of an electronic olfactory device, termed an electronic 'nose', was investigated for the detection of unique human odour characteristics. The detection of these unique odours was applied to the field of biometrics for access control, where a human's unique characteristics were used to authenticate a user of an access control system. An electronic odour sensing device was designed and constructed using an array of conducting polymer gas sensors in order to facilitate the regular screen...

  20. Effects of different accessibility of reinforcement schedules on choice in humans

    Stockhorst, Ursula

    1994-01-01

    Based on the delay-reduction hypothesis, a less profitable schedule should be rejected if its duration exceeds the mean delay to reinforcement. It should be accepted if its duration is shorter than the mean delay. This was tested for humans, using a successive-choice schedule. The accessibility of the less profitable (variable-interval 18 s) schedule was varied by changing the duration (in terms of a fixed interval) of the waiting-time component preceding its presentation. Forty-eight student...

  1. Determination of knowledge of Turkish midwifery students about human papilloma virus infection and its vaccines.

    Genc, Rabia Ekti; Sarican, Emine Serap; Turgay, Ayse San; Icke, Sibel; Sari, Dilek; Saydam, Birsen Karaca

    2013-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted agents and its infection is the most established cause of cervical cancer. Midwives play a key position in the implementation of cervical cancer. This descriptive study aimed to determine the level of knowledge concerning HPV and HPV vaccination among 268 midwifery students. Data were collected between November 15 and 30, 2011, through a self-reported questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 20.75 ± 1.60. Among all students, 44.4% had heard of HPV, while 40.4% had heard of HPV vaccinatiob. The relationship between the midwifery student knowledge on HPV and HPV vaccine and their current educational year was significant (p=0.001). In conclusion midwifery students have moderate level of knowledge about HPV and its vaccine and relevant information should be included in their teaching curriculum. PMID:24377604

  2. Accessing key steps of human tumor progression in vivo by using an avian embryo model

    Hagedorn, Martin; Javerzat, Sophie; Gilges, Delphine; Meyre, Aurélie; de Lafarge, Benjamin; Eichmann, Anne; Bikfalvi, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    Experimental in vivo tumor models are essential for comprehending the dynamic process of human cancer progression, identifying therapeutic targets, and evaluating antitumor drugs. However, current rodent models are limited by high costs, long experimental duration, variability, restricted accessibility to the tumor, and major ethical concerns. To avoid these shortcomings, we investigated whether tumor growth on the chick chorio-allantoic membrane after human glioblastoma cell grafting would replicate characteristics of the human disease. Avascular tumors consistently formed within 2 days, then progressed through vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-dependent angiogenesis, associated with hemorrhage, necrosis, and peritumoral edema. Blocking of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor signaling pathways by using small-molecule receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors abrogated tumor development. Gene regulation during the angiogenic switch was analyzed by oligonucleotide microarrays. Defined sample selection for gene profiling permitted identification of regulated genes whose functions are associated mainly with tumor vascularization and growth. Furthermore, expression of known tumor progression genes identified in the screen (IL-6 and cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61) as well as potential regulators (lumican and F-box-only 6) follow similar patterns in patient glioma. The model reliably simulates key features of human glioma growth in a few days and thus could considerably increase the speed and efficacy of research on human tumor progression and preclinical drug screening. angiogenesis | animal model alternatives | glioblastoma

  3. Accessing word meaning: Semantic word knowledge and reading comprehension in Dutch monolingual and bilingual fifth-graders

    M. Cremer

    2013-01-01

    Word knowledge is one of the key elements in reading comprehension and by extension in school success. At the same time, it is not quite clear which components of lexical knowledge play a role in reading. Is it enough to recognize the words we read? Do we need an in-depth understanding of their mean

  4. Innovations in Measuring Peer Conflict Resolution Knowledge in Children with LI: Exploring the Accessibility of a Visual Analogue Rating Scale

    Campbell, Wenonah N.; Skarakis-Doyle, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This preliminary study explored peer conflict resolution knowledge in children with and without language impairment (LI). Specifically, it evaluated the utility of a visual analogue scale (VAS) for measuring nuances in such knowledge. Children aged 9-12 years, 26 with typically developing language (TLD) and 6 with LI, completed a training protocol…

  5. HUMAN RESOURCES STRATEGIC PRACTICES, INNOVATION PERFORMANCE & KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT: PROPOSAL FOR BRAZILIAN ORGANIZATIONS

    Ursula Gomes Rosa Maruyama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Technology andinnovation development presented new challenges for the twenty-first centurymanager. Besides, aspects of organizational culture and knowledge managementare equally important for corporate success. All the above areas have a growingnumber of studies that seek to deepen the reflections providing a greaterunderstanding of their environmental relationship. Brazilian human resourcemanagement has shown years of late progress, especially due to the prevailingmacroeconomic conditions, with no transformation evidences This current studywith a theoretical-descriptive qualitative approach through literatureanalysis, study the integration model proposed by Chen and Huang (2009. Themediating role of knowledge management to strategic human resource practicesand innovation performance presented by these authors are compared withnational and international literature. The integration conceptual modelproposed to apply in the Brazilian context, consider the three pillarspresented by the Eastern authors, enhanced by cross-checks prospects with axes,approaches or intellectual capital directories, representing the Westernauthors’ contributions. Henceforth, we aim to provide a suitable proposal forthis model in the Brazilian organizational context.

  6. Evaluating Effect of Knowledge Management Strategy on Human Resource Management Performance Using BSC Approach

    Hossein Mansoori

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This research provided a model for evaluating the effect of knowledge management strategy on human resource management performance in higher education institutes and academic libraries. This research was a descriptive survey. According to the research literature and expert opinions, in human resource level, 38 indicators were produced for evaluating KM, then these indicators were classified in 10 total factors in terms of balanced scorecard approach. The results of evaluating knowledge management in Yazd academic libraries showed that, this strategy on customer perspectives, internal processes, learning and growth perspective had a good performance. But in terms of financial and Labor productivity indicators and training programs it did not have a good outcome for Yazd academic libraries.

  7. A Novel Method for Intraoral Access to the Superior Head of the Human Lateral Pterygoid Muscle

    Aleli Tôrres Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The uncoordinated activity of the superior and inferior parts of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM has been suggested to be one of the causes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ disc displacement. A therapy for this muscle disorder is the injection of botulinum toxin (BTX, of the LPM. However, there is a potential risk of side effects with the injection guide methods currently available. In addition, they do not permit appropriate differentiation between the two bellies of the muscle. Herein, a novel method is presented to provide intraoral access to the superior head of the human LPM with maximal control and minimal hazards. Methods. Computational tomography along with digital imaging software programs and rapid prototyping techniques were used to create a rapid prototyped guide to orient BTX injections in the superior LPM. Results. The method proved to be feasible and reliable. Furthermore, when tested in one volunteer it allowed precise access to the upper head of LPM, without producing side effects. Conclusions. The prototyped guide presented in this paper is a novel tool that provides intraoral access to the superior head of the LPM. Further studies will be necessary to test the efficacy and validate this method in a larger cohort of subjects.

  8. Preparing for Humans at Mars, MPPG Updates to Strategic Knowledge Gaps and Collaboration with Science Missions

    Baker, John; Wargo, Michael J.; Beaty, David

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Program Planning Group (MPPG) was an agency wide effort, chartered in March 2012 by the NASA Associate Administrator for Science, in collaboration with NASA's Associate Administrator for Human Exploration and Operations, the Chief Scientist, and the Chief Technologist. NASA tasked the MPPG to develop foundations for a program-level architecture for robotic exploration of Mars that is consistent with the President's challenge of sending humans to the Mars system in the decade of the 2030s and responsive to the primary scientific goals of the 2011 NRC Decadal Survey for Planetary Science. The Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) also sponsored a Precursor measurement Strategy Analysis Group (P-SAG) to revisit prior assessments of required precursor measurements for the human exploration of Mars. This paper will discuss the key results of the MPPG and P-SAG efforts to update and refine our understanding of the Strategic Knowledge Gaps (SKGs) required to successfully conduct human Mars missions.

  9. The arhitecture of the human resources in management based on knowledge and the impact on reduncing unemployment

    Amalia Venera Todoruţ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this working paper I proposed to address/aproach issues of relationship and interdependence of human resources and management based on knowledges. I presented during the paper the new type of human resource management and new challenges which are noted in the current economic conjuncture and their influences on human resource management. We have also shown which is the new type of organizational culture and its impact on management based on knowledge. I focused also on the modalities how influence the management of human resources the management based on knowledge materialized in: the organization employee involvement, strong motivation and retention of employees in the firm based on knowledge, connection of management based on knowledges and the human resource management on the firm strategy, development of employees capacity and the intellectual capital, the creation and maintenance of learning practices widely used in business.

  10. Knowledge about Human Papilloma Virus (HPV and HPV Vaccine at Reproductive Age in Primary Care

    Ozde Onder

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify the knowledge and awareness about human papilloma virus (HPV and human papilloma virus (HPV vaccine of women in reproductive age. Material and Methods: The study covered 294 women aged between 15 and 49. A questionnaire was prepared by the researchers based on the literature review. Results: The mean age of the participants was 30.5+/-8.9 years. Only 24.5% had heard about HPV infection and 28.2% had heard HPV vaccine. Of the participants, 188 (63.9% got zero point from the knowledge questions. Conclusion: This study indicates that the women who apply primary care units have low knowledge levels; it is apperent that personal and social education is needed. Paying importance to patient education on HPV and cervical cancer in primary care health politics will increase knowledge and awareness for HPV infection and HPV vaccination. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 517-524

  11. Changes in Human Immunodeficiency Virusrelated Knowledge and Stigmatizing Attitudes among Korean Adolescents from 2006 to 2011

    Sohn, Aeree; Park, SungBok

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed the prevalence and changes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) knowledge and stigmatizing attitudes in 2006, 2008, and 2011. Methods Three cross-sectional surveys were conducted in 2006, 2008, and 2011. A cross-sectional sample of high school students in Seoul, South Korea was targeted. A self-administered questionnaire measuring general and transmission and discriminatory attitudes was used. Results Misconceptions about casual contact were widespread, even th...

  12. Survey of knowledge and perception on the access to evidence-based practice and clinical practice change among maternal and infant health practitioners in South East Asia

    Crowther Caroline A

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based practice (EBP can provide appropriate care for women and their babies; however implementation of EBP requires health professionals to have access to knowledge, the ability to interpret health care information and then strategies to apply care. The aim of this survey was to assess current knowledge of evidence-based practice, information seeking practices, perceptions and potential enablers and barriers to clinical practice change among maternal and infant health practitioners in South East Asia. Methods Questionnaires about IT access for health information and evidence-based practice were administered during August to December 2005 to health care professionals working at the nine hospitals participating in the South East Asia Optimising Reproductive and Child Health in Developing countries (SEA-ORCHID project in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and The Philippines. Results The survey was completed by 660 staff from six health professional groups. Overall, easy IT access for health care information was available to 46% of participants. However, over a fifth reported no IT access was available and over half of nurses and midwives never used IT health information. Evidence-based practice had been heard of by 58% but the majority did not understand the concept. The most frequent sites accessed were Google and PubMed. The Cochrane Library had been heard of by 47% of whom 51% had access although the majority did not use it or used it less than monthly. Only 27% had heard of the WHO Reproductive Health Library and 35% had been involved in a clinical practice change and were able to identify enablers and barriers to change. Only a third of participants had been actively involved in practice change with wide variation between the countries. Willingness to participate in professional development workshops on evidence-based practice was high. Conclusion This survey has identified the need to improve IT access to health care

  13. ”THE ACCESSION OF EU TO THE EUROPEAN CONVENTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS” - TECHNICAL ASPECTS

    OANA-MARIUCA PETRESCU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available “The continues changing of the European Communities [presently European Union, as resulted from the amendments brought in the last 16 years, and especially via the Treaty of Lisbon] has determinate the changing of the judicial system. The accession of the EU to the Convention will complete the EU system of protecting fundamental rights. The Declaration of Berlin on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the signature of the Treaties of Rome, as it was signed on 25th of March 2007 by all 27 members of European Union, is providing among others the principles and values based on respect of fundamental rights, common traditions of the member states, as well as promoting the variety of languages, cultures and regions within the EU. European Union stresses out again its intention to protect the freedoms of citizens and their civil rights by all possible means, including in front of the courts. The reassessment, via the Treaty of Lisbon, of the role of European Charter of Fundamental Rights and the accession to European Convention of Human Rights highlight the importance that each of them have separately, but as a whole in a complex legal system of the protection of human rights”.

  14. Access to Archived Astronaut Data for Human Research Program Researchers: Update on Progress and Process Improvements

    Lee, L. R.; Montague, K. A.; Charvat, J. M.; Wear, M. L.; Thomas, D. M.; Van Baalen, M.

    2016-01-01

    Since the 2010 NASA directive to make the Life Sciences Data Archive (LSDA) and Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) data archives more accessible by the research and operational communities, demand for astronaut medical data has increased greatly. LSAH and LSDA personnel are working with Human Research Program on many fronts to improve data access and decrease lead time for release of data. Some examples include the following: Feasibility reviews for NASA Research Announcement (NRA) data mining proposals; Improved communication, support for researchers, and process improvements for retrospective Institutional Review Board (IRB) protocols; Supplemental data sharing for flight investigators versus purely retrospective studies; Work with the Multilateral Human Research Panel for Exploration (MHRPE) to develop acceptable data sharing and crew consent processes and to organize inter-agency data coordinators to facilitate requests for international crewmember data. Current metrics on data requests crew consenting will be presented, along with limitations on contacting crew to obtain consent. Categories of medical monitoring data available for request will be presented as well as flow diagrams detailing data request processing and approval steps.

  15. Within but without: human rights and access to HIV prevention and treatment for internal migrants

    Amon Joseph J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Worldwide, far more people migrate within than across borders, and although internal migrants do not risk a loss of citizenship, they frequently confront significant social, financial and health consequences, as well as a loss of rights. The recent global financial crisis has exacerbated the vulnerability internal migrants face in realizing their rights to health care generally and to antiretroviral therapy in particular. For example, in countries such as China and Russia, internal migrants who lack official residence status are often ineligible to receive public health services and may be increasingly unable to afford private care. In India, internal migrants face substantial logistical, cultural and linguistic barriers to HIV prevention and care, and have difficulty accessing treatment when returning to poorly served rural areas. Resulting interruptions in HIV services may lead to a wide range of negative consequences, including: individual vulnerability to infection and risk of death; an undermining of state efforts to curb the HIV epidemic and provide universal access to treatment; and the emergence of drug-resistant disease strains. International human rights law guarantees individuals lawfully within a territory the right to free movement within the borders of that state. This guarantee, combined with the right to the highest attainable standard of health set out in international human rights treaties, and the fundamental principle of non-discrimination, creates a duty on states to provide a core minimum of health care services to internal migrants on a non-discriminatory basis. Targeted HIV prevention programs and the elimination of restrictive residence-based eligibility criteria for access to health services are necessary to ensure that internal migrants are able to realize their equal rights to HIV prevention and treatment.

  16. An Approach to "Knowledge,Thinking,Humanities" Reading Teaching%“知识·思维·人文”教学法初探

    汪文新

    2012-01-01

    知识和思维能力体现的是工具特征,而人文素养体现的是对"人"的关怀。教学不仅要关注知识获得和思维训练,还应关注学生发展与人沟通和合作的能力,树立正确的人生观、世界观和价值观,增强社会责任感等人文素养。以提高人文素养为目标,以知识的输入和输出为基础,以思维能力的训练为核心的阅读教学就是"知识.思维.人文"教学法。%Knowledge and thinking skills are embodied as the teaching tool.Humanities are embodied in the form of "Human" care.Teaching should not only concern the access to knowledge and mental training,but also is concerned about the ability of students to develop communication and cooperation;establish a correct outlook on life,world outlook and values;enhance the sense of social responsibility and other humanities.Aim to enhancing the humanities,base on the input and output of knowledge and thinking skills training is used for the core teaching of reading.

  17. Multicenter Study of Human Papillomavirus and the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: Knowledge and Attitudes among People of African Descent

    Elizabeth Blackman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare knowledge and attitudes of human papillomavirus (HPV and the vaccine between different cultures of African descent. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of 555 African-Americans and Afro-Caribbeans residing in the US and the Bahamas (BHM was conducted. Results. General knowledge about HPV and the HPV vaccine differed between the two countries significantly. Bahamian respondents were less likely to have higher numbers of correct knowledge answers when compared to Americans (Adjusted Odds Ratio [Adj. OR] 0.47, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.30–0.75. Older age, regardless of location, was also associated with answering fewer questions correctly (Adj. OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.40–0.92. Attitudes related to HPV vaccination were similar between the US and BHM, but nearly 80% of BHM respondents felt that children should not be able to receive the vaccine without parental consent compared to 57% of American respondents. Conclusions. Grave lack of knowledge, safety and cost concerns, and influence of parental restrictions may negatively impact vaccine uptake among African-American and Afro-Caribbean persons. Interventions to increase the vaccine uptake in the Caribbean must include medical provider and parental involvement. Effective strategies for education and increasing vaccine uptake in BHM are crucial for decreasing cervical cancer burden in the Caribbean.

  18. The arhitecture of the human resources in management based on knowledge and the impact on reduncing unemployment

    Amalia Venera Todoruţ; George Niculescu; Irina Chirtoc

    2011-01-01

    In this working paper I proposed to address/aproach issues of relationship and interdependence of human resources and management based on knowledges. I presented during the paper the new type of human resource management and new challenges which are noted in the current economic conjuncture and their influences on human resource management. We have also shown which is the new type of organizational culture and its impact on management based on knowledge. I focused a...

  19. United States Human Access to Space, Exploration of the Moon and Preparation for Mars Exploration

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    In the past, men like Leonardo da Vinci and Jules Verne imagined the future and envisioned fantastic inventions such as winged flying machines, submarines, and parachutes, and posited human adventures like transoceanic flight and journeys to the Moon. Today, many of their ideas are reality and form the basis for our modern world. While individual visionaries like da Vinci and Verne are remembered for the accuracy of their predictions, today entire nations are involved in the process of envisioning and defining the future development of mankind, both on and beyond the Earth itself. Recently, Russian, European, and Chinese teams have all announced plans for developing their own next generation human space vehicles. The Chinese have announced their intention to conduct human lunar exploration, and have flown three crewed space missions since 2003, including a flight with three crew members to test their extravehicular (spacewalking) capabilities in September 2008. Very soon, the prestige, economic development, scientific discovery, and strategic security advantage historically associated with leadership in space exploration and exploitation may no longer be the undisputed province of the United States. Much like the sponsors of the seafaring explorers of da Vinci's age, we are motivated by the opportunity to obtain new knowledge and new resources for the growth and development of our own civilization. NASA's new Constellation Program, established in 2005, is tasked with maintaining the United States leadership in space, exploring the Moon, creating a sustained human lunar presence, and eventually extending human operations to Mars and beyond. Through 2008, the Constellation Program developed a full set of detailed program requirements and is now completing the preliminary design phase for the new Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, and the associated infrastructure necessary for humans to explore the Moon. Component testing is well

  20. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HUMAN-UNIVERSE AND THE COMBINATION OF PHILOSOPHY, RELIGION AND SCIENCE IN THE HUMANIZATION OF ABSOLUTE KNOWLEDGE

    Mustafa Said KURŞUNOĞLU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article claim that if our religious, philosophical and scientific knowledge can be read in the plane of human-universe relationship, therefore the varying historical and cultural differences it could be lead to the opportunity to understanding of the ‘other’. In this study, in the point of epistemological view the absolute knowledge is considered as a ‘humanization’ processes that since the beginning of continuous cosmic process of the asset. This study suggest that, the thinking and perception processes of self religious studying and self cultural signifies or philosophical and scientific studies which are stance towards each other, they need for an inclusive perspective that is depending to their common root of all. This study argues that the approaches to increasing line of the differences do not conform to what is natural and universal.

  1. The impact of body worlds on adult visitors' knowledge on human anatomy: A preliminary study.

    Fonseca, Guilherme R B C; Finn, Gabrielle M

    2016-05-01

    Body Worlds is an anatomical exhibition that shows human remains to the public. It has been considered controversial since it raises ethical tensions and issues. However, organizers and supporters of Body Worlds have claimed the exhibition is intended to promote visitors' understanding over the human body. Despite these claims, no studies were found that support or refute the hypothesis that a visit to Body Worlds increases the public's objective knowledge on human anatomy. Consequently, the objective of this study was to determine the impact of Body Worlds on anatomical knowledge. We constructed and delivered a questionnaire to both a previsit random sample and a postvisit random sample of visitors of Body Worlds' event Facets of Life, in Berlin. The questionnaire was available in both English and German languages and contained (a) basic sociodemographic questions and (b) a valid and reliable anatomy quiz. The quiz consisted of 16 multiple-choice questions that assessed the ability to identify the location of major anatomical structures on the human body. Average scores achieved on the quiz by the postvisit sample (X¯= 9.08, s = 2.48, n = 164) were significantly higher (unpaired t = 3.3957, P = 0.0008) than those achieved by the previsit sample (X¯= 8.11, s = 2.69, n = 167). Our results suggest that a visit to Body Worlds' event Facets of Life may have a beneficial effect in anatomical knowledge. However, further studies with better empirical designs and fewer limitations are needed to confirm our results. Clin. Anat. 29:439-445, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26789643

  2. Innovative Knowledge Management At Disney: Human Capital And Queuing Solutions For Services

    Rachelle F. Cope

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that most activities in which a service is provided require customers to wait in a queue during the experience. One thing that is inherent in waiting lines is the universal dislike for the process. In fact, the feelings and opinions developed in waiting lines influence the customer’s perception of the awaited experience. In this paper, Disney is used as a case study for queuing solutions. In particular, we examine their implementation of Knowledge Management (KM solutions to improve the waiting line process. The use of Disney cast members as human capital combined with the knowledge of customer preferences has made the FASTPASS an innovative solution to enhance queuing in the Disney theme parks. In the past, KM has been thought of as the collection of technological assets and managerial policies that compensate for information failures. In fact, the individual’s need for human interaction provides the richest opportunity for knowledge acquisition. Disney’s ability to capture customers in virtual queues while giving them a pleasurable waiting experience has made them a leader in KM initiatives in the service industry.

  3. Knowledge, attitude, and beliefs of young, college student blood donors about Human immunodeficiency virus

    Anju Dubey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Young people, who tend to be healthy, idealistic, and motivated, are an excellent pool of potential voluntary unpaid blood donors. Recruiting and retaining young blood donors improves the long term safety and sufficiency of a country′s blood supply. Knowledge, attitude, and beliefs about Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV should play an important role in prevention of disease transmission. Materials and Methods: This study was a questionnaire based survey, conducted to explore the levels of knowledge, attitude, and beliefs about HIV in young college student blood donors. Results: The results showed that the proportion of participants with comprehensive knowledge of HIV prevention and transmission was lesser than expected. Increase in education level and male gender was found to be significantly associated with high HIV-related knowledge. The responses on the different aspects of HIV-related attitude were also varied and there is still stigma associated with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS even in the educated groups. Discussion: There was a spectrum of myths and misperceptions emphasizing the need of education that recognizes the social context of attitude towards HIV. Results from this study may contribute to the development of appropriate educational and training material for this group of donors which in turn, may assist in achieving the elusive goal of safe blood supply in future.

  4. Universal Access to HIV prevention, treatment and care: assessing the inclusion of human rights in international and national strategic plans

    Gruskin, Sofia; Tarantola, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Rhetorical acknowledgment of the value of human rights for the AIDS response continues, yet practical application of human rights principles to national efforts appears to be increasingly deficient. We assess the ways in which international and national strategic plans and other core documents take into account the commitments made by countries to uphold human rights in their efforts towards achieving Universal Access. Key documents from the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNA...

  5. Assessment of entrepreneurship pedagogy on entrepreneurship knowledge and entrepreneurial human capital asset: A conceptual model

    Chidimma Odira Okeke

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is an effort to propose a conceptual model to measure the impact assessment of entrepreneurship pedagogic. It delineates entrepreneurship education pedagogic into four dimensions and opined specific level for each dimension. Reviewing the entrepreneurship education programme, assessment of entrepreneurship pedagogic evaluates the structure that influence growth mindset development through embedded heuristic strategies, thus, the impact on entrepreneurship knowledge and entrepreneurial capital asset context is proposed. Affirming Fayolle, Gailly, and Lassa-Clerc conceptual affinity that entrepreneurship education share with learning theories and entrepreneurship pedagogical content knowledge were conceptualized to suggest some practical realism guidelines of what insightful philosophy of teaching entrepreneurship need to achieve. With direct synthesis of relevant literature, propositions relating to entrepreneurship pedagogic structure along with the institutional connectedness and associated dimensions of entrepreneurship pedagogic assessment outcome were postulated. Also, the paper proposes the need for further assessment of specific forms of pedagogic impact on entrepreneurial human capital asset.

  6. Near-instant automatic access to visually presented words in the human neocortex: neuromagnetic evidence.

    Shtyrov, Yury; MacGregor, Lucy J

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and efficient processing of external information by the brain is vital to survival in a highly dynamic environment. The key channel humans use to exchange information is language, but the neural underpinnings of its processing are still not fully understood. We investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of neural access to word representations in the brain by scrutinising the brain's activity elicited in response to psycholinguistically, visually and phonologically matched groups of familiar words and meaningless pseudowords. Stimuli were briefly presented on the visual-field periphery to experimental participants whose attention was occupied with a non-linguistic visual feature-detection task. The neural activation elicited by these unattended orthographic stimuli was recorded using multi-channel whole-head magnetoencephalography, and the timecourse of lexically-specific neuromagnetic responses was assessed in sensor space as well as at the level of cortical sources, estimated using individual MR-based distributed source reconstruction. Our results demonstrate a neocortical signature of automatic near-instant access to word representations in the brain: activity in the perisylvian language network characterised by specific activation enhancement for familiar words, starting as early as ~70 ms after the onset of unattended word stimuli and underpinned by temporal and inferior-frontal cortices. PMID:27217080

  7. Achieving human and machine accessibility of cited data in scholarly publications

    Starr, Joan; Castro, Eleni; Crosas, Mercè; Dumontier, Michel; Downs, Robert R.; Duerr, Ruth; Haak, Laurel L.; Haendel, Melissa; Herman, Ivan; Hodson, Simon; Hourclé, Joe; Kratz, John Ernest; Lin, Jennifer; Nielsen, Lars Holm; Nurnberger, Amy; Proell, Stefan; Rauber, Andreas; Sacchi, Simone; Smith, Arthur; Taylor, Mike; Clark, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Reproducibility and reusability of research results is an important concern in scientific communication and science policy. A foundational element of reproducibility and reusability is the open and persistently available presentation of research data. However, many common approaches for primary data publication in use today do not achieve sufficient long-term robustness, openness, accessibility or uniformity. Nor do they permit comprehensive exploitation by modern Web technologies. This has led to several authoritative studies recommending uniform direct citation of data archived in persistent repositories. Data are to be considered as first-class scholarly objects, and treated similarly in many ways to cited and archived scientific and scholarly literature. Here we briefly review the most current and widely agreed set of principle-based recommendations for scholarly data citation, the Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles (JDDCP). We then present a framework for operationalizing the JDDCP; and a set of initial recommendations on identifier schemes, identifier resolution behavior, required metadata elements, and best practices for realizing programmatic machine actionability of cited data. The main target audience for the common implementation guidelines in this article consists of publishers, scholarly organizations, and persistent data repositories, including technical staff members in these organizations. But ordinary researchers can also benefit from these recommendations. The guidance provided here is intended to help achieve widespread, uniform human and machine accessibility of deposited data, in support of significantly improved verification, validation, reproducibility and re-use of scholarly/scientific data. PMID:26167542

  8. Aviation or space policy: New challenges for the insurance sector to private human access to space

    van Oijhuizen Galhego Rosa, Ana Cristina

    2013-12-01

    The phenomenon of private human access to space has introduced a new set of problems in the insurance sector. Orbital and suborbital space transportation will surely be unique commercial services for this new market. Discussions are under way regarding space insurance, in order to establish whether this new market ought to be regulated by aviation or space law. Alongside new definitions, infrastructures, legal frameworks and liability insurances, the insurance sector has also been introducing a new approach. In this paper, I aim to analyse some of the possibilities of new premiums, capacities, and policies (under aviation or space insurance rules), as well as the new insurance products related to vehicles, passengers and third party liability. This paper claims that a change toward new insurance regimes is crucial, due to the current stage in development of space tourism and the urgency to adapt insurance rules to support future development in this area.

  9. Mind the Gap: Privileging Epistemic Access to Knowledge in the Transition from Leaving Certificate Music to Higher Education

    Moore, Gwen

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, music at Leaving Certificate level has come under increasing focus in media and higher education discourse as an easy option. In particular, scant attention has been paid to the musical knowledge and skills needed in the transition to higher music education within the Irish context. This paper addresses the perceived gap in…

  10. Factors Influencing Access to Integrated Soil Fertility Management Information and Knowledge and Its Uptake among Smallholder Farmers in Zimbabwe

    Gwandu, T.; Mtambanengwe, F.; Mapfumo, P.; Mashavave, T. C.; Chikowo, R.; Nezomba, H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The study evaluated how farmer acquisition, sharing and use patterns of information and knowledge interact with different socioeconomic factors to influence integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) technology uptake. Design/methodology/approach: The study was conducted as part of an evaluation of field-based farmer learning approaches…