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  1. Cost-effectiveness of voluntary HIV-1 counseling and testing in reducing sexual transmission of HIV-1 in Kenya and Tanzania.

    Sweat, M.; Gregorich , S; Sangiwa , G; Furlonge , C; Balmer, D; Kamenga, C.; Grinstead, O; Coates, T.

    2000-01-01

    Background Access to HIV-1 voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) is severely limited in less-developed countries. We undertook a multisite trial of HIV-1 VCT to assess its impact, cost, and cost-effectiveness in less-developed country settings. Methods The cost-effectiveness of HIV-1 VCT was estimated for a hypothetical cohort of 10 000 people seeking VCT in urban east Africa. Outcomes were modelled based on results from a randomised controlled trial of HIV-1 VCT in Tanzania and Kenya....

  2. Efficient Quantification of HIV-1 in Heparin Plasma Spiked with Cultured HIV-1 by the Roche Cobas TaqMan and Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Tests

    Jagodzinski, Linda L; Weston, Holly R.; Liu, Ying; O'Connell, Robert J.; Peel, Sheila A

    2012-01-01

    The current automated real-time HIV-1 viral load assays, the Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan test and the Abbott RealTime test, are FDA cleared for use with EDTA plasma. We show that both real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) tests reliably quantify HIV-1 RNA in heparin plasma specimens spiked with HIV-1 isolate MN.

  3. HIV-1 viral diversity and its implications for viral load testing: review of current platforms.

    Luft, LeeAnne M; Gill, M John; Church, Deirdre L

    2011-10-01

    The 2008 Recommendations for care of the International AIDS Society reaffirmed the importance of both accurate and sensitive viral load assessment, and by necessity, access to viral load assays. HIV-1 viral load testing is considered essential when initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART), when monitoring ART response, and when considering switching ART regimens. The demand for accurate, reproducible, and cost-effective viral load assays is therefore a global issue. Although the North American and Western European experience has historically been with HIV-1 group M subtype B virus, this paradigm is changing rapidly as migrants and refugees from developing countries with non-B subtype infections often now present for care in the developed world, and travelers to developing countries acquire non-B subtype infection abroad and present for care at home. Awareness of any clinical or laboratory differences between the common HIV-1 group M subtype B and the newer HIV-1 strains being seen in practice is therefore increasingly important. This review of current HIV-1 viral load testing is focused on the potential value of a standardized genotype assignment for HIV-1 viral subtypes, regular monitoring of the performance of available commercial HIV viral load assays on emerging non-B HIV subtypes, circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and unique recombinant forms (URFs), and a discussion of the implications for resource-limited settings. PMID:21767972

  4. Validation, Performance under Field Conditions, and Cost-Effectiveness of Capillus HIV-1/HIV-2 and Determine HIV-1/2 Rapid Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody Assays Using Sequential and Parallel Testing Algorithms in Tanzania▿

    Mayhood, Meghan K.; Afwamba, Isaac A.; Odhiambo, Christopher O.; Ndanu, Epimack; Thielman, Nathan M.; Morrissey, Anne B.; Shao, John F; Wells Pence, Brian; Crump, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody tests support the effort to expand access to HIV testing and counseling services in remote, rural, and poor parts of the world. We validated the Capillus HIV-1/HIV-2 (Trinity Biotech PLC, Bray, County Wicklow, Ireland) and Determine HIV-1/2 (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL) rapid tests in a reference laboratory using patient samples from Tanzania and evaluated the performance of the tests under field conditions in northern Tanzania. We us...

  5. Readily Accessible Multiplane Microscopy: 3D Tracking the HIV-1 Genome in Living Cells.

    Itano, Michelle S; Bleck, Marina; Johnson, Daniel S; Simon, Sanford M

    2016-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection and the associated disease AIDS are a major cause of human death worldwide with no vaccine or cure available. The trafficking of HIV-1 RNAs from sites of synthesis in the nucleus, through the cytoplasm, to sites of assembly at the plasma membrane are critical steps in HIV-1 viral replication, but are not well characterized. Here we present a broadly accessible microscopy method that captures multiple focal planes simultaneously, which allows us to image the trafficking of HIV-1 genomic RNAs with high precision. This method utilizes a customization of a commercial multichannel emission splitter that enables high-resolution 3D imaging with single-macromolecule sensitivity. We show with high temporal and spatial resolution that HIV-1 genomic RNAs are most mobile in the cytosol, and undergo confined mobility at sites along the nuclear envelope and in the nucleus and nucleolus. These provide important insights regarding the mechanism by which the HIV-1 RNA genome is transported to the sites of assembly of nascent virions. PMID:26567131

  6. Microfluidic Chip-based Nucleic Acid Testing using Gingival Crevicular Fluid as a New Technique for Detecting HIV-1 Infection

    Alex Willyandre

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of HIV-1 infection by individuals in window period who are tested negative in conventional HIV-1 detection would pose the community with serious problems. Several diagnostic tools require specific labora-tory equipment, perfect timing of diagnosis, antibody to HIV-1, and invasive technique to get sample for examination, until high amount of time to process the sample as well as accessibility of remote areas. Many attempts have been made to solve those problems to come to a new detection technique. This review aims to give information about the current development technique for detection of HIV infection. Microfluidic Chip-based Nucleic Acid Testing is currently introduced for detection of HIV-1 infection. This review also cover the possible usage of gingival crevicular fluid as sample specimen that could be taken noninvasively from the individual.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v18i2.63

  7. Accessibility of nuclear DNA to triplex-forming oligonucleotides: The integrated HIV-1 provirus as a target

    Giovannangeli, Carine; Diviacco, Silvia; Labrousse, Valérie; Gryaznov, Sergei; Charneau, Pierre; Helene, Claude

    1997-01-01

    The control of gene transcription by antigene oligonucleotides rests upon the specific recognition of double-helical DNA by triplex-forming oligonucleotides. The development of the antigene strategy requires access to the targeted DNA sequence within the chromatin structure of the cell nucleus. In this sudy we have used HIV-1 chronically infected cells containing the HIV provirus as endogenous genes to demonstrate that the integrated HIV-1 proviral genome is accessible to triplex-forming olig...

  8. An international multicenter study on HIV-1 drug resistance testing by 454 ultra-deep pyrosequencing.

    Simen, Birgitte B; Braverman, Michael S; Abbate, Isabella; Aerssens, Jeroen; Bidet, Yannick; Bouchez, Olivier; Gabriel, Christian; Izopet, Jacques; Kessler, Harald H; Stelzl, Evelyn; Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Schlapbach, Ralph; Radonic, Aleksander; Paredes, Roger; Recordon-Pinson, Patricia; Sakwa, James; St John, Elizabeth P; Schmitz-Agheguian, Gudrun G; Metzner, Karin J; Däumer, Martin P

    2014-08-01

    The detection of mutant spectra within the viral quasispecies is critical for therapeutic management of HIV-1 infections. Routine clinical application of ultrasensitive genotyping requires reproducibility and concordance within and between laboratories. The goal of the study was to evaluate a new protocol on HIV-1 drug resistance testing by 454 ultra-deep pyrosequencing (454-UDS) in an international multicenter study. Sixteen blinded HIV-1 subtype B samples were provided for 454-UDS as both RNA and cDNA with viral titers of 88,600-573,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml. Eight overlapping amplicons spanning protease (PR) codons 10-99 and reverse transcriptase (RT) codons 1-251 were generated using molecular barcoded primers. 454-UDS was performed using the 454 Life Sciences/Roche GS FLX platform. PR and RT sequences were analyzed using 454 Life Sciences Amplicon Variant Analyzer (AVA) software. Quantified variation data were analyzed for intra-laboratory reproducibility and inter-laboratory concordance. Routine population sequencing was performed using the ViroSeq HIV-1 genotyping system. Eleven laboratories and the reference laboratory 454 Life Sciences sequenced the HIV-1 sample set. Data presented are derived from seven laboratories and the reference laboratory since severe study protocol execution errors occurred in four laboratories leading to exclusion. The median sequencing depth across all sites was 1364 reads per position (IQR=809-2065). 100% of the ViroSeq-reported mutations were also detected by 454-UDS. Minority HIV-1 drug resistance mutations, defined as HIV-1 drug resistance mutations identified at frequencies of 1-25%, were only detected by 454-UDS. Analysis of 10 preselected majority and minority mutations were consistently found across sites. The analysis of drug-resistance mutations detected between 1 and 10% demonstrated high intra- and inter-laboratory consistency in frequency estimates for both RNA and prepared cDNA samples, indicating robustness of the

  9. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    2010-04-30

    ... (70 FR 43439), FDA announced the availability of the draft guidance of the same title. FDA received...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV): Testing, Product Disposition, and Donor...

  10. Evaluation of four rapid tests for diagnosis and differentiation of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections in Guinea-Conakry, West Africa.

    Chaillet, Pascale; Tayler-Smith, Katie; Zachariah, Rony; Duclos, Nanfack; Moctar, Diallo; Beelaert, Greet; Fransen, Katrien

    2010-01-01

    With both HIV-1 and HV-2 prevalent in Guinea-Conakry, accurate diagnosis and differentiation is crucial for treatment purposes. Thus, four rapid HIV tests were evaluated for their HIV-1 and HIV-2 diagnostic and discriminative capacity for use in Guinea-Conakry. These included SD Bioline HIV 1/2 3.0 (Standard Diagnostics Inc.), Genie II HIV1/HIV2 (Bio-Rad), First Response HIV Card Test 1-2.0 (PMC Medical) and Immunoflow HIV1-HIV2 (Core Diagnostics). Results were compared with gold standard tes...

  11. Study of HIV-1 subtypes in serodiscordant couples attending an integrated counselling and testing centre in Mumbai using heteroduplex mobility analysis and DNA sequencing

    Mehta P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine the prevalent subtypes of HIV-1 in serodiscordant couples. Setting: Integrated Counselling and Testing Centre (ICTC, Department of Microbiology. Study Design: Prospective pilot study. Participants: Thirty HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. Inclusion Criteria: a Documentation of HIV-1 infection in one partner and seronegative status in the other, current history of continued unprotected sexual activity within the partnership, demonstration that they have been in a partnership for at least 1 year and are not currently on highly active antiretroviral therapy HAART; b willingness of both partners to provide written informed consent including consent to continued couple counselling for 3 months. Materials and Methods: HIV-1 subtyping was carried out by heteroduplex mobility analysis (HMA by amplifying env region; and DNA sequencing by amplifying gag region. Results: HIV-1 env gene was amplified successfully in 10/30 samples; gag gene, in 25/30 samples; and both env and gag gene were amplified successfully in 5/30 samples. HIV-1 subtype C was detected from 21 samples; subtype B, from 7; and subtype A, from 2. Sample from 1 positive partner was detected as subtype C by env HMA and subtype B by gag sequencing. Conclusion: HIV-1 subtype C was found to be the predominant subtype of HIV-1 in serodiscordant couples attending our ICTC, followed by HIV-1 subtype B and HIV-1 subtype A, respectively. DNA sequencing was found to be the most reliable method for determining the subtypes of HIV-1.

  12. Measuring enzymatic HIV-1 susceptibility to two reverse transcriptase inhibitors as a rapid and simple approach to HIV-1 drug-resistance testing.

    Dieter Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Simple and cost-effective approaches for HIV drug-resistance testing are highly desirable for managing increasingly expanding HIV-1 infected populations who initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART, particularly in resource-limited settings. Non-nucleoside reverse trancriptase inhibitor (NNRTI-based regimens with an NRTI backbone containing lamivudine (3TC or emtricitabine (FTC are preferred first ART regimens. Failure with these drug combinations typically involves the selection of NNRTI- and/or 3TC/FTC-resistant viruses. Therefore, the availability of simple assays to measure both types of drug resistance is critical. We have developed a high throughput screening test for assessing enzymatic resistance of the HIV-1 RT in plasma to 3TC/FTC and NNRTIs. The test uses the sensitive "Amp-RT" assay with a newly-developed real-time PCR format to screen biochemically for drug resistance in single reactions containing either 3TC-triphosphate (3TC-TP or nevirapine (NVP. Assay cut-offs were defined based on testing a large panel of subtype B and non-subtype B clinical samples with known genotypic profiles. Enzymatic 3TC resistance correlated well with the presence of M184I/V, and reduced NVP susceptibility was strongly associated with the presence of K103N, Y181C/I, Y188L, and G190A/Q. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting resistance were 97.0% and 96.0% in samples with M184V, and 97.4% and 96.2% for samples with NNRTI mutations, respectively. We further demonstrate the utility of an HIV capture method in plasma by using magnetic beads coated with CD44 antibody that eliminates the need for ultracentifugation. Thus our results support the use of this simple approach for distinguishing WT from NNRTI- or 3TC/FTC-resistant viruses in clinical samples. This enzymatic testing is subtype-independent and can assist in the clinical management of diverse populations particularly in resource-limited settings.

  13. Antiretroviral drug resistance testing in adult HIV-1 infection: 2008 recommendations of an International AIDS Society-USA panel

    Hirsch, M S; Günthard, H F; Schapiro, J. M.; Brun-Vézinet, F.; Clotet, B; Hammer, S M; Johnson, V A; Kuritzkes, D.R.; Mellors, J W; Pillay, D; Yeni, P G; Jacobsen, D M; Richman, D. D.

    2008-01-01

    Resistance to antiretroviral drugs remains an important limitation to successful human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) therapy. Resistance testing can improve treatment outcomes for infected individuals. The availability of new drugs from various classes, standardization of resistance assays, and the development of viral tropism tests necessitate new guidelines for resistance testing. The International AIDS Society-USA convened a panel of physicians and scientists with expertise in drug...

  14. Changes in the accessibility of the HIV-1 Integrase C-terminus in the presence of cellular proteins

    Zanta-Boussif Maria-Antonietta; Bucher Stéphanie; Benkhelifa-Ziyyat Sofia; Pasquet Julie; Danos Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Following entry, uncoating, and reverse transcription, a number of cellular proteins become associated with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) pre-integration complex (PIC). With the goal of obtaining reagents for the analysis of the HIV-1 PIC composition and localisation, we have constructed functional integrase (IN) and matrix (MA) proteins that can be biotinylated during virus production and captured using streptavidin-coated beads. Results Although the lab...

  15. Re-testing and misclassification of HIV-2 and HIV-1&2 dually reactive patients among the HIV-2 cohort of The West African Database to evaluate AIDS collaboration

    Boris K Tchounga

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: West Africa is characterized by the circulation of HIV-1 and HIV-2. The laboratory diagnosis of these two infections as well as the choice of a first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART is challenging, considering the limited access to second-line regimens. This study aimed at confirming the classification of HIV-2 and HIV-1&2 dually reactive patients followed up in the HIV-2 cohort of the West African Database to evaluate AIDS collaboration. Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted from March to December 2012 in Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire and Mali among patients classified as HIV-2 or HIV-1&2 dually reactive according to the national HIV testing algorithms. A 5-ml blood sample was collected from each patient and tested in a single reference laboratory in Côte d’Ivoire (CeDReS, Abidjan with two immuno-enzymatic tests: ImmunoCombII® (HIV-1&2 ImmunoComb BiSpot – Alere and an in-house ELISA test, approved by the French National AIDS and hepatitis Research Agency (ANRS. Results: A total of 547 patients were included; 57% of them were initially classified as HIV-2 and 43% as HIV-1&2 dually reactive. Half of the patients had CD4≥500 cells/mm3 and 68.6% were on ART. Of the 312 patients initially classified as HIV-2, 267 (85.7% were confirmed as HIV-2 with ImmunoCombII® and in-house ELISA while 16 (5.1% and 9 (2.9% were reclassified as HIV-1 and HIV-1&2, respectively (Kappa=0.69; p<0.001. Among the 235 patients initially classified as HIV-1&2 dually reactive, only 54 (23.0% were confirmed as dually reactive with ImmunoCombII® and in-house ELISA, while 103 (43.8% and 33 (14.0% were reclassified as HIV-1 and HIV-2 mono-infected, respectively (kappa= 0.70; p<0.001. Overall, 300 samples (54.8% were concordantly classified as HIV-2, 63 (11.5% as HIV-1&2 dually reactive and 119 (21.8% as HIV-1 (kappa=0.79; p<0.001. The two tests gave discordant results for 65 samples (11.9%. Conclusions: Patients with HIV-2 mono-infection are

  16. HIV-1 diversity and drug resistance mutations among people seeking HIV diagnosis in voluntary counseling and testing sites in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Carlos A Velasco-de-Castro

    Full Text Available The remarkable viral diversity remains a big challenge to the development of HIV vaccines and optimal therapy worldwide. In the latest years, as a consequence of the large expansion of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART availability worldwide, an increase in transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM has been observed, varying according the region. This study assessed HIV-1 diversity and TDRM profile over time among newly HIV-1 diagnosed individuals from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Blood samples were collected from individuals seeking HIV diagnosis in four voluntary counseling and testing (VCTs sites located in the Rio de Janeiro Metropolitan Area, in 2005-2007. Recent (RS and long-term (LTS HIV-1 seroconverters were distinguished using BED-CEIA. Pol viral sequences were obtained for 102 LTS identified in 2005 and 144 RS from 2005-2007. HIV-1 subtype and pol recombinant genomes were determined using Rega HIV-1 Subtyping Tool and by phylogenetic inferences and bootscanning analyses. Surveillance of HIV-1 TDRM to protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors were performed according to the Calibrated Population Resistance (CPR Tool 6.0. Overall, subtype B remains the most prevalent in Rio de Janeiro in both LTS and RS HIV-1 infected individuals. An increased proportion of recombinant samples was detected over time, especially in RS heterosexual men, due to the emergence of CRF02_AG and URF samples bearing a subtype K fragment. The prevalence of HIV-1 samples carrying TDRM was high and similar between LTS and RS (15.7% vs 14.6% or age (25yo 16.6% along the study period. The high resistance levels detected in both populations are of concern, especially considering the dynamics of HIV-1 diversity over time. Our results suggest that the incorporation of resistance testing prior to HAART initiation should be highly considered, as well as permanent surveillance, aiming to carefully monitoring HIV-1 diversity, with focus on CRF/URF emergence and

  17. Assessment of topical microbicides to prevent HIV-1 transmission: concepts, testing, lessons learned.

    Friend, David R; Kiser, Patrick F

    2013-09-01

    The development of topically applied products capable of preventing vaginal and rectal transmission of HIV-1 has been on-going for nearly 20 years. Despite this, only one clinical trial has demonstrated protection against sexual transmission of HIV-1 in women. This review covers the development of microbicides, also referred to as topical pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), through three stages. The first stage focused on nonspecific agents, including surfactants such as nonoxynol-9 (N-9), to prevent HIV-1 transmission. Unfortunately, N-9 enhanced susceptibility to sexual transmission of HIV-1 when evaluated for efficacy. Soon thereafter, other nonspecific agents (polyanions) were quickly moved into large efficacy trials. Due to a lack of coordination among investigators and funders, a large investment was made in a class of compounds shown ultimately to be ineffective, although poor adherence may have contributed to these findings. The second stage involved the assessment of the antiretroviral drug tenofovir, formulated as a vaginal gel, which was found to be modestly effective in a Phase IIb trial (CAPRISA-004) when dosed in a coitally-dependent manner. In another Phase IIb trial, VOICE (MTN-003), tenofovir gel was found to be ineffective when dosed once-daily in a coitally-independent manner. Based on pharmacokinetic data, it was concluded the participants were poorly adherent to this dosing regimen, leading to a lack of efficacy. Tenofovir gel is currently in a Phase III safety and efficacy trial in South Africa (FACTS-001), using the coitally-dependent dosing regimen employed in CAPRISA-004. We are now in the third stage of microbicide research. The antiretroviral drug dapivirine is currently in two Phase III safety and efficacy studies formulated as a vaginal ring. It is hoped that the once-monthly dosing regimen will lead to higher adherence than found in the VOICE study. It is now clear that product adherence could be the greatest challenge to demonstrating

  18. Validation of Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 Test on dried blood spots

    N Ruiz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The plasma specimen is the gold standard for viral load monitoring, the key method to assess the effect of antiviral chemotherapy and to monitor progression of the disease toward AIDS. Nevertheless, several works endorse the use of dried blood spots (DBS on filter paper for the reliable quantification of the levels needed to take therapeutic decisions, detect of treatment failure and monitor the occurrence of drug resistance. The purpose of this study was to validate the use of Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 test version 2.0, with DBS. To evaluate the performance of the above mentioned kit, three stages were involved: 1- Standardization of DBS working conditions, 2- Stability studies at three temperature conditions and 3- Performance evaluation of the kit using this alternative specimen. Additionally, the viral load was quantified in parallel (plasma and DBS to 43 genetically characterized samples, with different levels of viral load. The Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated and the prediction of the value of RNA in plasma starting from the obtained value in DBS was made. Linear regression analysis was performed and coefficients of variation in precision assays were calculated. The best conditions pickups to the work with DBS were: 100 µL of blood (2 spots/50 µl, dried time between 16 and 18 hours at room temperature and, elution of the blood, 2 hours, between 2 and 8°C; in TRIS-EDTA buffer. The samples on DBS proved to be stable during the study periods. A strong correlation was attained between the measurements of viral load in plasma and DBS samples (r=0.96. The detection rate was 90.7 and the coefficient of variation between the values obtained in plasma-DBS sample pairs averaged 3.42%. The CAP/CTM HIV-1 test provided a linear response in DBS, from 330 copies/mL to 420 000 copies/mL. Overall, coefficients of variation in precision tests were below 10%. Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 test version 2.0 had a good

  19. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  20. Changes in the accessibility of the HIV-1 Integrase C-terminus in the presence of cellular proteins

    Zanta-Boussif Maria-Antonietta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following entry, uncoating, and reverse transcription, a number of cellular proteins become associated with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 pre-integration complex (PIC. With the goal of obtaining reagents for the analysis of the HIV-1 PIC composition and localisation, we have constructed functional integrase (IN and matrix (MA proteins that can be biotinylated during virus production and captured using streptavidin-coated beads. Results Although the labelled C-terminus allows for the sensitive detection of virion-associated IN, it becomes inaccessible in the presence of cellular proteins. This masking is not dependent on the nature of the tag and does not occur with the tagged MA. It was not observed either with an IN mutant unable to interact with LEDGF/p75, or when LEDGF/p75 was depleted from cells. Conclusion Our observation suggests that a structural rearrangement or oligomerization of the IN protein occurs during the early steps of infection and that this process is related to the presence of LEDGF/p75.

  1. Veterinary field test as screening tool for mastitis and HIV-1 viral load in breastmilk from HIV-infected Zambian women.

    Dorosko, Stephanie M; Thea, Donald M; Saperstein, George; Russell, Robert M; Paape, Max J; Hinckley, Lynn S; Decker, William D; Semrau, Katherine; Sinkala, Moses; Kasonde, Prisca; Kankasa, Chipepo; Aldrovandi, Grace M; Hamer, Davidson H

    2007-09-01

    Clinical and subclinical mastitis increase the risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1 through breastfeeding. We hypothesized that a field test for mastitis used for bovine milk, the California Mastitis Test, would detect high cell counts in milk of HIV-infected women. We also investigated whether total milk cell count would positively correlate with viral HIV-1 RNA in the milk of 128 HIV-positive Zambian women. Mean cell counts in each California Mastitis Test scoring category were significantly different (p tested for HIV-1 RNA, viral RNA levels did not significantly correlate with total cell count (r = 0.166, p = .244). The CMT may serve as a screening tool for mastitis in breastmilk, but total cell count does not correlate with HIV-1 RNA levels. Since both cell-free and cell-associated virus are associated with increased risk of MTCT, investigation of the relationship between total milk cell count and HIV-1 proviral DNA is warranted before a conclusive determination is made regarding use of the CMT as a clinical screening tool to detect cases at high risk for breastmilk transmission. PMID:17903106

  2. Efficiency of indirect immunofluorescence assay as a confirmatory test for the diagnosis of human retrovirus infection (HIV-1 and HTLV-I/II in different at risk populations

    GASTALDELLO René

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared the indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA with Western blot (Wb as a confirmatory method to detect antibodies anti retrovirus (HIV-1 and HTLV-I/II. Positive and negative HIV-1 and HTLV-I/II serum samples from different risk populations were studied. Sensitivity, specificity, positive, negative predictive and kappa index values were assayed, to assess the IFA efficiency versus Wb. The following cell lines were used as a source of viral antigens: H9 ( HTLV-III b; MT-2 and MT-4 (persistently infected with HTLV-I and MO-T (persistently infected with HTLV-II. Sensitivity and specificity rates for HIV-1 were 96.80% and 98.60% respectively, while predictive positive and negative values were 99.50% and 92.00% respectively. No differences were found in HIV IFA performance between the various populations studied. As for IFA HTLV system, the sensitivity and specificity values were 97.91% and 100% respectively with positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 97.92%. Moreover, the sensitivity of the IFA for HTLV-I/II proved to be higher when the samples were tested simultaneously against both antigens (HTLV-I-MT-2 and HTLV-II-MO-T. The overall IFA efficiency for HIV-1 and HTLV-I/II-MT-2 antibody detection probed to be very satisfactory with an excellent correlation with Wb (Kappa indexes 0.93 and 0.98 respectively. These results confirmed that the IFA is a sensitive and specific alternative method for the confirmatory diagnosis of HIV-1 and HTLV-I/II infection in populations at different levels of risk to acquire the infection and suggest that IFA could be included in the serologic diagnostic algorithm.

  3. Reduced HIV symptoms and improved health-related quality of life correlate with better access to care for HIV-1 infected women: the ELLA study

    Robert Baran

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Global HIV-1 prevalence is 35.3 million [1]; women comprise >50% of those infected. The majority of women may lack regular care and only one-fourth are virologically suppressed [2]. ELLA is a cross-sectional, non-interventional study conducted across Europe, Latin America, Canada and Asia that describes barriers to care for HIV-infected women and associations with disease stage, symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Methods: HIV-infected women eligible for ELLA (≥18 years completed: Barrier to Care Scale (BACS comprising 12 items in four domains (Index range 0–12, Overall range 1–4, greater=more barriers, Overall score ≥2 considered severe; AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG Health Status Assessment comprising 21 items assessing 9 HRQoL domains (range 0–100, greater=better; and ACTG Symptom Distress Module comprising 20 symptoms rated on bother (range 0–4, greater=more bother. Healthcare providers documented medical history and HIV clinical data. Correlations of BACS response and last reported VL/CD4 count with HIV symptoms and HRQoL were analyzed. Spearman rank order was used to test correlations with statistical significance set at p50 years; 47.7% education <12 years; 36% unemployed; 82.9% urban residence. HIV was acquired heterosexually in 83.0%; 88.2% of subjects were on ART; 57.5% had VL<50 c/ml; mean CD4 was 540.5 c/µL. Mean [SD] BACS Index and Overall scores were 6.19 [3.47] (N=1818 and 2.09 [0.71] (N=1922, respectively. Stigma was a prominent barrier. Lower (better BACS Index and Overall scores correlated with better HRQoL on all nine domains (p<0.0001. Lower VL and greater CD4 count were both correlated with better HRQoL for eight of nine domains (p<0.04, p≤0.0002, respectively excepting pain. Lower BACS Index and Overall scores correlated with fewer symptom count and less symptom bother (p<0.0001. Fewer symptom count and less symptom bother correlated with better HRQoL on all nine domains (p<0

  4. Performance of 3 Rapid Tests for Discrimination Between HIV-1 and HIV-2 in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa

    Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Bjarnason Obinah, Magnús Pétur; Jespersen, Sanne;

    2014-01-01

    As HIV-2 is intrinsically resistant to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, it is mandatory to discriminate between HIV types before initiating antiretroviral treatment. Guinea-Bissau has the world's highest prevalence of HIV-2 and HIV-1/HIV-2 dually infected individuals. We evaluated 3...

  5. An HIV1/2 point of care test on sputum for screening TB/HIV co-infection in central India - Will it work?

    Prabha Desikan; Sajal De; Nitika Pant Pai; Pradyumna K Mishra; Kaushal Kumar; Nikita Panwalkar; Mayanka Verma; Zia Ul Hasan; Kewal K Maudar

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To determine whether theOraQuick®HIV-1/2Assay(OraSureTechnologies, Inc.,Bethlehem,PA,USA) in sputum is a valid tool forHIV surveillance amongTB patients. Methods:A cross sectional study was carried out on sputa of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis.Sputa were tested for antibodies toHIV usingOraQuick®HIV-1/2Assay(OraSure Technologies,Inc.,Bethlehem,PA,USA).The results were compared with results of serum ELISA.Results:Compared to serumELISA, theOraQuick®HIV-1/2Assay in sputum specimens reported90% sensitivity(9/10) and100% specificity(307/307), with a positive predictive value of 100%(95%CI:66.37%-100.00%) and a negative predictive value of99.68%(95%CI:98.20%-99.99%). Conclusions:This testing method may provide a useful strategy for conductingHIV surveillance in possible co-infectedTB patients at peripheral centres.Since there is no investment on infrastructure, it may be possible for paramedical health professionals to carry out the test, particularly in areas with lowHIV endemicity.

  6. HIV-1 Eradication: Early Trials (and Tribulations).

    Spivak, Adam M; Planelles, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has rendered HIV-1 infection a manageable illness for those with access to treatment. However, ART does not lead to viral eradication owing to the persistence of replication-competent, unexpressed proviruses in long-lived cellular reservoirs. The potential for long-term drug toxicities and the lack of access to ART for most people living with HIV-1 infection have fueled scientific interest in understanding the nature of this latent reservoir. Exploration of HIV-1 persistence at the cellular and molecular level in resting memory CD4(+) T cells, the predominant viral reservoir in patients on ART, has uncovered potential strategies to reverse latency. We review recent advances in pharmacologically based 'shock and kill' HIV-1 eradication strategies, including comparative analysis of early clinical trials. PMID:26691297

  7. HIV-1 RNA quantification in CRF02_AG HIV-1 infection: too easy to make mistakes.

    Tatarelli, Paola; Taramasso, Lucia; Di Biagio, Antonio; Sticchi, Laura; Nigro, Nicola; Barresi, Renata; Viscoli, Claudio; Bruzzone, Bianca

    2016-04-01

    The number of patients newly infected by HIV-1 non-B subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) is increasing worldwide, including in the western countries. We report on a primary HIV-1 infection in a Caucasian patient. A routine quantitative assay (Nuclisens EasyQ HIV-1 2.0, BioMérieux SA) showed 6,700 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml. A combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) consistent with low baseline HIV-1 RNA was started. Few days later, the analysis performed with REGA HIV-1 Subtyping Tool - Version 3.0 attributed the HIV-1 sequence to the CRF02_AG recombinant form. Therefore, a second real-time PCR assay was performed, using the Versant HIV-1 RNA 1.0 Assay (kPCR) (Siemens HealthCare Diagnostics) which revealed a HIV-1 RNA of 230,000 copies/ml. Consequently, the ongoing cART was potentiated. This case suggests that the wide genetic variability of HIV-1 subtypes may affect the capability of the commonly used assays to detect and accurately quantify HIV-1 RNA in non-B subtypes and CRFs. In presence of CRFs different commercial HIV-1 RNA tests should be performed to find the most reliable for viral load quantification at the diagnosis, because it influences the choice of cART, and during the follow-up. Indeed, international guidelines for HIV-1 infection management suggest to monitor patient' HIV-RNA with the same assay over the course of treatment. As different commercial tests can be performed in the same laboratory with considerable difficulty, the laboratory should select an assay that is suitable not only for the more prevalent strain, but also for less frequent ones that, nevertheless, can occur. Then, knowing and investigating the spread of non-B strains has essential clinical and laboratory implications. PMID:27196556

  8. Revisiting HIV-1 uncoating

    Arhel Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Abstract HIV uncoating is defined as the loss of viral capsid that occurs within the cytoplasm of infected cells before entry of the viral genome into the nucleus. It is an obligatory step of HIV-1 early infection and accompanies the transition between reverse transcription complexes (RTCs), in which reverse transcription occurs, and pre-integration complexes (PICs), which are competent to integrate into the host genome. The study of the nature and timing of HIV-1 uncoating has been paved wit...

  9. Diagnostik af HIV-1 infektionen

    Christiansen, C B; Dickmeiss, E; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    1991-01-01

    Different methods have been developed for the diagnosis of HIV infection, i.e. detection of antibodies, antigen and proviral DNA. ELISA methods for detecting HIV-1 antibodies are widely used as screening assays. A sample which is repeatedly positive with ELISA is re-tested with a confirmatory test......, e.g. western blot. Antibodies to HIV-1 are not detectable until 2-3 months after infection, but antigens may be detectable during the last weeks of this initial period, though they disappear with the appearance of the antibodies. In the later stages of HIV infection, HIV antigen is again detectable...... in a proportion of patients. Detection and quantitation of HIV antigen are used as indicators of disease progression and for monitoring the antiviral efficacy of therapeutic interventions. When no antibodies or antigens can be detected in persons suspected of having HIV infection, culture of HIV can...

  10. Challenges of Diagnosing Acute HIV-1 Subtype C Infection in African Women: Performance of a Clinical Algorithm and the Need for Point-of-Care Nucleic-Acid Based Testing

    Mlisana, Koleka; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena; Werner, Lise; Feinstein, Addi; van Loggerenberg, Francois; NAICKER, Nivashnee; Williamson, Carolyn; Garrett, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    Background Prompt diagnosis of acute HIV infection (AHI) benefits the individual and provides opportunities for public health intervention. The aim of this study was to describe most common signs and symptoms of AHI, correlate these with early disease progression and develop a clinical algorithm to identify acute HIV cases in resource limited setting. Methods 245 South African women at high-risk of HIV-1 were assessed for AHI and received monthly HIV-1 antibody and RNA testing. Signs and symp...

  11. Evaluation of the consistency of three methods for testing HIV-1 genotype drug resistance%三种HIV-1基因型耐药检测方法的一致性评价

    李晶; 蒋岩; 吕超; 汪静; 姚均

    2013-01-01

    药检测上具有较好的一致性.%Objective To compare the concordance in predicting genotype HIV-1 drug resistance between In-house method and TRUGENETM or ViroSeqTM method.Methods 25 international proficiency testing(PT) samples received from 2009 to 2013 were detected by three methods,then pairwise comparison results was analyzed to validate their concordance on drug resistance mutation and drug resistance report.To further confirm the results,another 15 serum specimens were detected by In-house and TRUGENETM methods,then compared their results concordance.Results The evaluation of the consistency of resistanceassociated mutations showed that for 25 PT samples,the consistency was 99.42% (2933/2950) in testing drug resistance mutation sites among the three methods; all pairwise comparison Kappa values > 0.81(P < 0.01).The evaluation of the consistency of drug resistance test showed that inconsistent comparison results mainly concentrated in the four nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors zidovudine (AZT),didanosine (ddI),stavudine (d4T),abacavir (ABC),and the inconsistencies were mainly minor.Where the minor inconsistencies between In-house and ViroSeqTM methods were 28% (7/25),28% (7/25),16% (4/25) and 20% (5/25),respectively.And the inconsistencies between In-house and TRUGENETM method were separately 44% (11/25),28% (7/25),36% (9/25) and 28% (7/25) ; while the inconsistencies between TRUGENETM and ViroSeqTM method were separately 24% (6/25),8% (2/25),28% (7/25) and 8% (2/25).AZT in the comparison between In-house and ViroSeqTM methods,ddl,d4T,ABC and TDF in the comparison]between In-house and TRUGENETM methods were moderately consistent (weighted Kappa values were separately 0.54,0.44,0.52,0.42,0.59,all the P value < 0.01).The other compared results were all highly-consistent (weighted Kappa values were 0.61-0.80) or extremely high-consistent (weighted Kappa values were > 0.80).For 15 serum specimens,99.55% (1762

  12. Nup153 and Nup98 bind the HIV-1 core and contribute to the early steps of HIV-1 replication

    The early steps of HIV-1 replication involve the entry of HIV-1 into the nucleus, which is characterized by viral interactions with nuclear pore components. HIV-1 developed an evolutionary strategy to usurp the nuclear pore machinery and chromatin in order to integrate and efficiently express viral genes. In the current work, we studied the role of nucleoporins 153 and 98 (Nup153 and Nup98) in infection of human Jurkat lymphocytes by HIV-1. We showed that Nup153-depleted cells exhibited a defect in nuclear import, while depletion of Nup 98 caused a slight defect in HIV integration. To explore the biochemical viral determinants for the requirement of Nup153 and Nup98 during HIV-1 infection, we tested the ability of these nucleoporins to interact with HIV-1 cores. Our findings showed that both nucleoporins bind HIV-1 cores suggesting that this interaction is important for HIV-1 nuclear import and/or integration. Distribution analysis of integration sites in Nup153-depleted cells revealed a reduced tendency of HIV-1 to integrate in intragenic sites, which in part could account for the large infectivity defect observed in Nup153-depleted cells. Our work strongly supports a role for Nup153 in HIV-1 nuclear import and integration. - Highlights: ► We studied the role of Nup98 and Nup153 in HIV-1 infection. ► Nup98 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 integration. ► Nup153 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 nuclear import. ► Depletion of Nup153 decreased the integration of HIV-1 in transcriptionally active sites

  13. Nup153 and Nup98 bind the HIV-1 core and contribute to the early steps of HIV-1 replication

    Di Nunzio, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.di-nunzio@pasteur.fr [Molecular Virology and Vaccinology unit, CNRS URA 3015, Department of Virology, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Dr. Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Fricke, Thomas [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Miccio, Annarita [University of Modena e Reggio Emilia, Centro di Medicina Rigenerativa, Modena (Italy); Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Perez, Patricio [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Souque, Philippe [Molecular Virology and Vaccinology unit, CNRS URA 3015, Department of Virology, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Dr. Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Rizzi, Ermanno; Severgnini, Marco [Institute of Biomedical Technologies, CNR, Milano (Italy); Mavilio, Fulvio [University of Modena e Reggio Emilia, Centro di Medicina Rigenerativa, Modena (Italy); Genethon, Evry (France); Charneau, Pierre [Molecular Virology and Vaccinology unit, CNRS URA 3015, Department of Virology, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Dr. Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Diaz-Griffero, Felipe, E-mail: felipe.diaz-griffero@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2013-05-25

    The early steps of HIV-1 replication involve the entry of HIV-1 into the nucleus, which is characterized by viral interactions with nuclear pore components. HIV-1 developed an evolutionary strategy to usurp the nuclear pore machinery and chromatin in order to integrate and efficiently express viral genes. In the current work, we studied the role of nucleoporins 153 and 98 (Nup153 and Nup98) in infection of human Jurkat lymphocytes by HIV-1. We showed that Nup153-depleted cells exhibited a defect in nuclear import, while depletion of Nup 98 caused a slight defect in HIV integration. To explore the biochemical viral determinants for the requirement of Nup153 and Nup98 during HIV-1 infection, we tested the ability of these nucleoporins to interact with HIV-1 cores. Our findings showed that both nucleoporins bind HIV-1 cores suggesting that this interaction is important for HIV-1 nuclear import and/or integration. Distribution analysis of integration sites in Nup153-depleted cells revealed a reduced tendency of HIV-1 to integrate in intragenic sites, which in part could account for the large infectivity defect observed in Nup153-depleted cells. Our work strongly supports a role for Nup153 in HIV-1 nuclear import and integration. - Highlights: ► We studied the role of Nup98 and Nup153 in HIV-1 infection. ► Nup98 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 integration. ► Nup153 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 nuclear import. ► Depletion of Nup153 decreased the integration of HIV-1 in transcriptionally active sites.

  14. Aggressive HIV-1?

    van der Hoek Lia; de Ronde Anthony; Berkhout Ben

    2005-01-01

    Abstract New York City health officials announced on February 11, 2005 that a patient rapidly developed full-blown AIDS shortly after being diagnosed with a rare, drug-resistant strain of HIV-1. The New York City Department of Health issued an alert to all hospitals and doctors and a press conference was held to announce the emergence of an aggressive HIV-1 strain that may be difficult to treat and that appears to trigger rapid progression to AIDS. Is the panic justified?

  15. The HIV-1 V3 domain on field isolates: participation in generation of escape virus in vivo and accessibility to neutralizing antibodies

    Arendrup, M; Akerblom, L; Heegaard, P M; Nielsen, Jens Ole; Hansen, J E

    1995-01-01

    The V3 domain is highly variable and induces HIV neutralizing antibodies (NA). Here we addressed the issues of 1) the participation of mutations in V3 in generation of neutralization resistant escape virus in vivo and 2) the applicability of synthetic V3 peptides corresponding to field isolates to...... induce neutralizing immune sera. Seven peptides corresponding to the V3 region of primary and escape virus from 3 HIV-1 infected patients were synthesized and used for antibody (Abs) studies and immunizations. The anti-V3 Abs titre in patient serum was generally low against peptides corresponding to...... autologous virus isolated later than the serum sample in contrast to the titre against peptides corresponding to virus isolated earlier than the serum sample. Furthermore, neutralizing anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against V3 peptides from laboratory strains of HIV-1 showed distinct binding...

  16. Allele-specific real-time PCR testing for minor HIV-1 drug resistance mutations: assay preparation and application to reveal dynamic of mutations in vivo

    GUO Dong-xing; LI Jing-yun; LI Han-ping; LI Lin; ZHUANG Dao-min; JIAO Li-yan; WANG Zheng; BAO Zuo-yi; LIU Si-yang; LIU Yong-jian

    2010-01-01

    Background It is very important for the clinical management to test for minor HIV-1 resistance mutations accurately and sensitively. The conventional genotypic assays of HIV drug resistance detection based on sequencing can only discriminate the mutations which present in more than 20%-30%. The aim of this study was to evaluate allele-specific real-time PCR (ASPCR) to detect the resistance-related mutations located at positions 103, 184 and 215.Methods We developed the allele-specific PCR assay, using the most common drug resistance mutations in Chinese AIDS patients, K103N, M184V/I, T215F/Y as a model system. The standards were constructed by cloning the wild-type and mutant DNA fragments into the T-vector. We designed specific primers to discriminate mutant templates in the real-time PCR using SYBR green as a fluorescence reporter. And then we evaluated the ASPCR assay and tested 140clinical samples using this method.Results The sensitivities of ASPCR assay were 0.04% for K103N, 0.30% for M1841, 0.40% for M184V, 0.03% for T215F and 0.02% for T215Y. The intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation were less than 0.42. One hundred and forty plasma samples were tested by ASPCR and dynamic resistance curves of ten patients were obtained.Conclusions Drug resistance emerged half a year after the start of antiretroviral therapy. The mutation of T215Yemerged 1 to 1.5 years after starting treatment and then increased rapidly. The ASPCR assay we developed was a sensitive, accurate and rapid method to detect the minor HIV-1 variants and it can provide earlier and more drug-resistance information for HIV research and AIDS antiretroviral therapy.

  17. Role of endolysosomes in HIV-1 Tat-induced neurotoxicity

    Liang Hui

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Combined anti-retroviral therapeutic drugs effectively increase the lifespan of HIV-1-infected individuals who then have a higher prevalence of HAND (HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorder. Soluble factors including HIV-1 proteins released from HIV-1-infected cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of HAND, and particular attention has been paid to the HIV-1 Tat (transactivator of transcription protein because of its ability to directly excite neurons and cause neuronal cell death. Since HIV-1 Tat enters cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and since endolysosomes play an important role in neuronal cell life and death, we tested here the hypothesis that HIV-1 Tat neurotoxicity is associated with changes in the endolysosome structure and function and also autophagy. Following the treatment of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons with HIV-1 Tat or as controls mutant-Tat or PBS, neuronal viability was determined using a triple staining method. Preceding observations of HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal cell death, we observed statistically significant changes in the structure and membrane integrity of endolysosomes, endolysosome pH and autophagy. As early as 24 h after HIV-1 Tat was applied to neurons, HIV-1 Tat accumulated in endolysosomes, endolysosome morphology was affected and their size increased, endolysosome membrane integrity was disrupted, endolysosome pH increased, specific activities of endolysosome enzymes decreased and autophagy was inhibited, as indicated by the significant changes in three markers for autophagy. In contrast, statistically significant levels of HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal cell death were observed only after 48 h of HIV-1 Tat treatment. Our findings suggest that endolysosomes are involved in HIV-1 Tat-induced neurotoxicity and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention against HAND.

  18. TNPO3 is required for HIV-1 replication after nuclear import but prior to integration and binds the HIV-1 core.

    Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Di Nunzio, Francesca; Yang, Yang; Reszka, Natalia; Lienlaf, Maritza; Arhel, Nathalie; Perez, Patricio; Brass, Abraham L.; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    International audience TNPO3 is a nuclear importer required for HIV-1 infection. Here, we show that depletion of TNPO3 leads to an HIV-1 block after nuclear import but prior to integration. To investigate the mechanistic requirement of TNPO3 in HIV-1 infection, we tested the binding of TNPO3 to the HIV-1 core and found that TNPO3 binds to the HIV-1 core. Overall, this work suggests that TNPO3 interacts with the incoming HIV-1 core in the cytoplasm to assist a process that is important for ...

  19. Punica granatum (Pomegranate juice provides an HIV-1 entry inhibitor and candidate topical microbicide

    Li Yun-Yao

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For ≈ 24 years the AIDS pandemic has claimed ≈ 30 million lives, causing ≈ 14,000 new HIV-1 infections daily worldwide in 2003. About 80% of infections occur by heterosexual transmission. In the absence of vaccines, topical microbicides, expected to block virus transmission, offer hope for controlling the pandemic. Antiretroviral chemotherapeutics have decreased AIDS mortality in industrialized countries, but only minimally in developing countries. To prevent an analogous dichotomy, microbicides should be: acceptable; accessible; affordable; and accelerative in transition from development to marketing. Already marketed pharmaceutical excipients or foods, with established safety records and adequate anti-HIV-1 activity, may provide this option. Methods Fruit juices were screened for inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IIIB using CD4 and CXCR4 as cell receptors. The best juice was tested for inhibition of: (1 infection by HIV-1 BaL, utilizing CCR5 as the cellular coreceptor; and (2 binding of gp120 IIIB and gp120 BaL, respectively, to CXCR4 and CCR5. To remove most colored juice components, the adsorption of the effective ingredient(s to dispersible excipients and other foods was investigated. A selected complex was assayed for inhibition of infection by primary HIV-1 isolates. Results HIV-1 entry inhibitors from pomegranate juice adsorb onto corn starch. The resulting complex blocks virus binding to CD4 and CXCR4/CCR5 and inhibits infection by primary virus clades A to G and group O. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of producing an anti-HIV-1 microbicide from inexpensive, widely available sources, whose safety has been established throughout centuries, provided that its quality is adequately standardized and monitored.

  20. Abbott RealTime HIV-1 m2000rt viral load testing: Manual extraction versus the automated m2000sp extraction

    Scott, Lesley E.; Crump, John A.; Msuya, Emma; Morrissey, Anne B.; Venter, Willem F.; Stevens, Wendy S.

    2010-01-01

    The Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay is a real-time nucleic acid amplification assay available for HIV-1 viral load quantitation. The assay has a platform for automated extraction of viral RNA from plasma or dried blood spot samples, and an amplification platform with real time fluorescent detection. Overall, this study found no clinically relevant differences in viral load, if samples were extracted manually.

  1. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Therapy

    Arts, Eric J.; Hazuda, Daria J.

    2012-01-01

    The most significant advance in the medical management of HIV-1 infection has been the treatment of patients with antiviral drugs, which can suppress HIV-1 replication to undetectable levels. The discovery of HIV-1 as the causative agent of AIDS together with an ever-increasing understanding of the virus replication cycle have been instrumental in this effort by providing researchers with the knowledge and tools required to prosecute drug discovery efforts focused on targeted inhibition with ...

  2. Field evaluation of five rapid diagnostic tests for screening of HIV-1 infections in rural Rakai, Uganda

    Kagulire, S. C.; Opendi, P; Stamper, P. D.; Nakavuma, J L; Mills, L. A.; Makumbi, F.; Gray, R H; Shott, J P; Serwadda, D; Reynolds, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    The performance characteristics of HIV rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) vary by test and by population. We assessed five commercial RDTs in Uganda where all but one RDT (Determine; Abbott Laboratories, Germany) performed close to manufacturer’s expectations. Determine had low specificity (85.2%, positive predictive value 67.3%) due to false-positive results with weak-positive bands. Properly trained staff, good quality control programmes and validation of RDTs with laboratories having confirmato...

  3. Evaluation of the NucliSens EasyQ v2.0 assay in comparison with the Roche Amplicor v1.5 and the Roche CAP/CTM HIV-1 Test v2.0 in quantification of C-clade HIV-1 in plasma.

    Maximilian Muenchhoff

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 genetic diversity poses a challenge to reliable viral load monitoring. Discrepancies between different testing platforms have been observed, especially for non-clade-B virus. Therefore we compare, in antiretroviral therapy (ART-naïve South African subjects predominantly infected with HIV-1 clade-C, three commercially available assays: the COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 Test version 2.0 by Roche (CAP/CTM v2.0, the BioMérieux NucliSens Version 2.0 Easy Q/Easy Mag (NucliSens v2.0 and the Roche COBAS Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor Test Version 1.5 (Amplicor v1.5. Strong linear correlation was observed and Bland-Altman analyses showed overall good agreement between the assays with mean viral load differences of 0.078 log cp/ml (NucliSens v2.0 - Amplicor v1.5, 0.260 log cp/ml (CAP/CTM v2.0 - Amplicor v1.5 and 0.164 log cp/ml (CAP/CTM v2.0 - NucliSens v2.0, indicating lower mean viral load results for the Amplicor v1.5 and higher mean readings for the CAP/CTM v2.0. Consistent with observations following previous comparisons of CAP/CTM v2.0 versus Amplicor v1.5, the CAP/CTM v2.0 assay detected low-level viremia (median 65 cp/ml in more than one-third of those in whom viremia had been undetectable (<20 cp/ml in assays using the NucliSens platform. These levels of viremia are of uncertain clinical significance but may be of importance in early detection of ART resistance in those on treatment. Overall the three assays showed good comparability of results but with consistent, albeit relatively small, discrepancies for HIV-1 clade-C samples, especially in the low-viremic range that should be taken into account when interpreting viral load data.

  4. Revisiting HIV-1 uncoating

    Arhel Nathalie

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV uncoating is defined as the loss of viral capsid that occurs within the cytoplasm of infected cells before entry of the viral genome into the nucleus. It is an obligatory step of HIV-1 early infection and accompanies the transition between reverse transcription complexes (RTCs, in which reverse transcription occurs, and pre-integration complexes (PICs, which are competent to integrate into the host genome. The study of the nature and timing of HIV-1 uncoating has been paved with difficulties, particularly as a result of the vulnerability of the capsid assembly to experimental manipulation. Nevertheless, recent studies of capsid structure, retroviral restriction and mechanisms of nuclear import, as well as the recent expansion of technical advances in genome-wide studies and cell imagery approaches, have substantially changed our understanding of HIV uncoating. Although early work suggested that uncoating occurs immediately following viral entry in the cell, thus attributing a trivial role for the capsid in infected cells, recent data suggest that uncoating occurs several hours later and that capsid has an all-important role in the cell that it infects: for transport towards the nucleus, reverse transcription and nuclear import. Knowing that uncoating occurs at a later stage suggests that the viral capsid interacts extensively with the cytoskeleton and other cytoplasmic components during its transport to the nucleus, which leads to a considerable reassessment of our efforts to identify potential therapeutic targets for HIV therapy. This review discusses our current understanding of HIV uncoating, the functional interplay between infectivity and timely uncoating, as well as exposing the appropriate methods to study uncoating and addressing the many questions that remain unanswered.

  5. Revisiting HIV-1 uncoating.

    Arhel, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    HIV uncoating is defined as the loss of viral capsid that occurs within the cytoplasm of infected cells before entry of the viral genome into the nucleus. It is an obligatory step of HIV-1 early infection and accompanies the transition between reverse transcription complexes (RTCs), in which reverse transcription occurs, and pre-integration complexes (PICs), which are competent to integrate into the host genome. The study of the nature and timing of HIV-1 uncoating has been paved with difficulties, particularly as a result of the vulnerability of the capsid assembly to experimental manipulation. Nevertheless, recent studies of capsid structure, retroviral restriction and mechanisms of nuclear import, as well as the recent expansion of technical advances in genome-wide studies and cell imagery approaches, have substantially changed our understanding of HIV uncoating. Although early work suggested that uncoating occurs immediately following viral entry in the cell, thus attributing a trivial role for the capsid in infected cells, recent data suggest that uncoating occurs several hours later and that capsid has an all-important role in the cell that it infects: for transport towards the nucleus, reverse transcription and nuclear import. Knowing that uncoating occurs at a later stage suggests that the viral capsid interacts extensively with the cytoskeleton and other cytoplasmic components during its transport to the nucleus, which leads to a considerable reassessment of our efforts to identify potential therapeutic targets for HIV therapy. This review discusses our current understanding of HIV uncoating, the functional interplay between infectivity and timely uncoating, as well as exposing the appropriate methods to study uncoating and addressing the many questions that remain unanswered. PMID:21083892

  6. Developing strategies for HIV-1 eradication

    Durand, Christine M.; Blankson, Joel N.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses HIV-1 replication, transforming the outlook for infected patients. However, reservoirs of replication-competent forms of the virus persist during HAART, and when treatment is stopped, high rates of HIV-1 replication return. Recent insights into HIV-1 latency, as well as a report that HIV-1 infection was eradicated in one individual, have renewed interest in finding a cure for HIV-1 infection. Strategies for HIV-1 eradication include gene...

  7. HIV-1 integrase inhibitors are substrates for the multidrug transporter MDR1-P-glycoprotein

    Cara Andrea

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of diketoacid-containing derivatives as inhibitors of HIV-1 Integrase (IN (IN inhibitors, IINs has played a major role in validating this enzyme as an important target for antiretroviral therapy. Since the in vivo efficacy depends on access of these drugs to intracellular sites where HIV-1 replicates, we determined whether the IINs are recognized by the multidrug transporter MDR1-P-glycoprotein (P-gp thereby reducing their intracellular accumulation. To address the effect of IINs on drug transport, nine quinolonyl diketo acid (DKA derivatives active on the HIV-1 IN strand transfer (ST step and with EC50 ranging from 1.83 to >50 μm in cell-based assays were tested for their in vitro interaction with P-gp in the CEM-MDR cell system. IINs were investigated for the inhibition and induction of the P-gp function and expression as well as for multidrug resistance (MDR reversing ability. Results The HIV-1 IINs act as genuine P-gp substrates by inhibiting doxorubicin efflux and inducing P-gp functional conformation changes as evaluated by the modulation of UIC2 mAb epitope. Further, IINs chemosensitize MDR cells to vinblastine and induce P-gp expression in drug sensitive revertants of CEM-MDR cells. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that HIV-1 IINs are P-gp substrates. This biological property may influence the absorption, distribution and elimination of these novels anti HIV-1 compounds.

  8. Sexually transmitted infections among HIV-1-discordant couples.

    Brandon L Guthrie

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: More new HIV-1 infections occur within stable HIV-1-discordant couples than in any other group in Africa, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs may increase transmission risk among discordant couples, accounting for a large proportion of new HIV-1 infections. Understanding correlates of STIs among discordant couples will aid in optimizing interventions to prevent HIV-1 transmission in these couples. METHODS: HIV-1-discordant couples in which HIV-1-infected partners were HSV-2-seropositive were tested for syphilis, chlamydia, gonorrhea, and trichomoniasis, and HIV-1-uninfected partners were tested for HSV-2. We assessed sociodemographic, behavioral, and biological correlates of a current STI. RESULTS: Of 416 couples enrolled, 16% were affected by a treatable STI, and among these both partners were infected in 17% of couples. A treatable STI was found in 46 (11% females and 30 (7% males. The most prevalent infections were trichomoniasis (5.9% and syphilis (2.6%. Participants were 5.9-fold more likely to have an STI if their partner had an STI (P<0.01, and STIs were more common among those reporting any unprotected sex (OR = 2.43; P<0.01 and those with low education (OR = 3.00; P<0.01. Among HIV-1-uninfected participants with an HSV-2-seropositive partner, females were significantly more likely to be HSV-2-seropositive than males (78% versus 50%, P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Treatable STIs were common among HIV-1-discordant couples and the majority of couples affected by an STI were discordant for the STI, with relatively high HSV-2 discordance. Awareness of STI correlates and treatment of both partners may reduce HIV-1 transmission. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00194519.

  9. Anti-HIV-1 activity of flavonoid myricetin on HIV-1 infection in a dual-chamber in vitro model.

    Silvana Pasetto

    Full Text Available HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01-100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic, H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic, and the dual tropic (X4R5 HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research.

  10. Regional Differences in Prevalence of HIV-1 Discordance in Africa and Enrollment of HIV-1 Discordant Couples into an HIV-1 Prevention Trial

    Jairam R Lingappa; Lambdin, Barrot; Bukusi, Elizabeth Ann; Ngure, Kenneth; Kavuma, Linda; Inambao, Mubiana; Kanweka, William; Allen, Susan; Kiarie, James N.; Were, Edwin; Manongi, Rachel; Coetzee, David; de Bruyn, Guy; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; MAGARET, Amalia

    2008-01-01

    Background: Most HIV-1 transmission in Africa occurs among HIV-1-discordant couples (one partner HIV-1 infected and one uninfected) who are unaware of their discordant HIV-1 serostatus. Given the high HIV-1 incidence among HIV-1 discordant couples and to assess efficacy of interventions for reducing HIV-1 transmission, HIV-1 discordant couples represent a critical target population for HIV-1 prevention interventions and prevention trials. Substantial regional differences exist in HIV-1 preval...

  11. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    Ferdinand Roesch; Oussama Meziane; Anna Kula; Sébastien Nisole; Françoise Porrot; Ian Anderson; Fabrizio Mammano; Ariberto Fassati; Alessandro Marcello; Monsef Benkirane; Olivier Schwartz

    2012-01-01

    International audience HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively inve...

  12. Correlates of HIV-1 genital shedding in Tanzanian women.

    Clare Tanton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the correlates of HIV shedding is important to inform strategies to reduce HIV infectiousness. We examined correlates of genital HIV-1 RNA in women who were seropositive for both herpes simplex virus (HSV-2 and HIV-1 and who were enrolled in a randomised controlled trial of HSV suppressive therapy (aciclovir 400 mg b.i.d vs. placebo in Tanzania. METHODOLOGY: Samples, including a cervico-vaginal lavage, were collected and tested for genital HIV-1 and HSV and reproductive tract infections (RTIs at randomisation and 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up. Data from all women at randomisation and women in the placebo arm during follow-up were analysed using generalised estimating equations to determine the correlates of cervico-vaginal HIV-1 RNA detection and load. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cervico-vaginal HIV-1 RNA was detected at 52.0% of 971 visits among 482 women, and was independently associated with plasma viral load, presence of genital ulcers, pregnancy, bloody cervical or vaginal discharge, abnormal vaginal discharge, cervical ectopy, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, an intermediate bacterial vaginosis score and HSV DNA detection. Similar factors were associated with genital HIV-1 RNA load. CONCLUSIONS: RTIs were associated with increased presence and quantity of genital HIV-1 RNA in this population. These results highlight the importance of integrating effective RTI treatment into HIV care services.

  13. Characteristics, Immunological Response & Treatment Outcomes of HIV-2 Compared with HIV-1 & Dual Infections (HIV 1/2) in Mumbai

    Chiara, Montaldo; Rony, Zachariah; Homa, Mansoor; Bhanumati, Varghese; Ladomirska, Joanna; Manzi, M.; Wilson, N; Alaka, Deshpande; Harries, A. D.

    2010-01-01

    Background & objectives: Information available on HIV-2 and dual infection (HIV-1/2) is limited. This study was carried out among HIV positive individuals in an urban referral clinic in Khar, Mumbai, India, to report on relative proportions of HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 and baseline characteristics, response to and outcomes on antiretroviral treatment (ART). Methods: Retrospective analysis of programme data (May 2006-May 2009) at Khar HIV/AIDS clinic at Mumbai, India was done. Three test algori...

  14. Safety testing for LHC access system

    Valentini, F; Ninin, P; Scibile, S

    2008-01-01

    In the domain of Safety Real-Time Systems the problem of testing represents always a big effort in terms of time, costs and efficiency to guarantee an adequate coverage degree. Exhaustive tests may, in fact, not be practicable for large and distributed systems. This paper describes the testing process followed during the validation of the CERN's LHC Access System [1], responsible for monitoring and preventing physical risks for the personnel accessing the underground areas. In the paper we also present a novel strategy for the testing problem, intended to drastically reduce the time for the test patterns generation and execution. In particular, we propose a methodology for blackbox testing that relies on the application of Model Checking techniques. Model Checking is a formal method from computer science, commonly adopted to prove correctness of system’s models through an automatic system’s state space exploration against some property formulas.

  15. Field Evaluation of Calypte’s AWARE™ Blood Serum Plasma (BSP) and Oral Mucosal Transudate (OMT) Rapid Tests for Detecting Antibodies to HIV-1 and 2 in Plasma and Oral Fluid

    Alemnji, George A.; Ngulefac, Gisele A; Ndumbe, Peter M; Asonganyi, Tazoacha

    2009-01-01

    As programs to prevent and care for HIV-infected persons are scaled-up in Africa, there is the need for continuous evaluation of the performance of test kits that could best support these programs. The present study evaluated the sensitivity, specificity, ease of use, and cost of AWARE ™ Blood Serum Plasma (BSP) and Oral Mucosal Transudate (OMT) Rapid HIV-1/2 test kits using real-time and archived samples of HIV-infected persons from Cameroon. Matched whole blood and OMT specimens were collec...

  16. Contribution of MxB Oligomerization to HIV-1 Capsid Binding and Restriction

    Buffone, Cindy; Schulte, Bianca; OPP, Silvana; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The alpha interferon (IFN-α)-inducible restriction factor myxovirus B (MxB) blocks HIV-1 infection after reverse transcription but prior to integration. MxB binds to the HIV-1 core, which is composed of capsid protein, and this interaction leads to inhibition of the uncoating process of HIV-1. Previous studies suggested that HIV-1 restriction by MxB requires binding to capsid. This work tests the hypothesis that MxB oligomerization is important for the ability of MxB to bind to the HIV-1 core...

  17. Progress in Research on Drug-resistance of HIV-1%HIV-1耐药性的研究进展

    贾峥

    2011-01-01

    The drug-resistance of HIV-1 is one of the important cause for failure in treatment of AIDS in humans.The research on drug-resistance of HIV-1 is of an important significance in controlling the epidemic of drug-resistance HIV-1 strain and clinical therapy of AIDS.This paper reviews the generation, evolution and epidemic of drug-resistant strain, mechanism of drug-resistance, drug-resistant mutation, test for drug-resistance as well as novel methods for drug-resistance test of HIV-1.%HIV-1耐药株的出现是人类艾滋病(AIDS)治疗失败的重要原因之一,HIV-1耐药性的研究对于控制耐药株的流行及临床治疗真有重要意义.本文就HIV-1耐药株的产生、进化和传播,HIV-1的耐药机制及耐药性突变,HIV-1耐药性检测以及新型HIV-1耐药性检测方法等作一综述.

  18. Early detection of HIV infection with Dried Blood Spot testing among infants in Yunnan province%滤纸片干血斑HIV-1DNA检测技术在婴儿HIV早期诊断中的应用

    杨朝军; 陈敏; 陈玲; 苏莹珍; 陈会超; 闫文云; 杨莉

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨滤纸片干血斑技术在婴儿HIV早期诊断中的应用效果.方法 于2010-2011年在云南省昆明、大理、德宏和临沧市(州)的14个妇幼保健院中,对所有感染HIV的孕妇所生的6周至18个月的婴儿进行调查,共计286名.采用滤纸片干血斑采血与罗氏HIV-1 DNA检测技术对HIV感染产妇所生的婴儿进行HIV早期诊断研究,并与18个月时婴儿的HIV抗体结果进行比较.同时阶段性采集并检测滤纸片干血斑的HIV抗体,了解未感染HIV婴儿的抗体阴转时间.并对孕妇抗病毒治疗情况及婴儿母乳喂养情况进行调查.结果 在286名婴儿中,有148名男性、138名女性.对286名婴儿进行了HIV-1 DNA检测,有8名婴儿HIV-1 DNA检测结果为阳性,HIV感染率为2.8%(8/286),与18个月时婴儿的HIV抗体检测结果完全一致;其余278名DNA检测结果为阴性的婴儿,其抗体也均为阴性.对143名HIV-1 DNA阴性的婴儿进行随访,其在出生后6、9、12和18个月时的累计抗体阴转率分别是14.0%(20/143)、61.5%(88/143)、88.1% (126/143)和100.0%( 143/143).286例感染HIV的孕妇中,抗病毒治疗组孕妇所生婴儿的HIV感染率为2.14%(6/280),未抗病毒治疗孕妇组婴儿HIV感染率为33.33% (2/6),差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).人工喂养组婴儿的HIV感染率为2.55% (7/274),纯母乳喂养组婴儿HIV感染率为8.33%(1/12).结论 滤纸片干血斑HIV-1 DNA检测方法可以较好地应用于6周至18个月龄婴儿HIV感染的早期诊断.%Objective To explore the application od Dried Blood Spot (DBS) testing for early detection of HIV infection among infants.Methods All of the infants aged between 6 weeks and 18 months and born by HIV positive mothers from 14 Maternity and Child Health Care Hospitals in Kunming,Dali,Dehong,Lincang of Yunnan province were investigated from 2010 to 2011.By using DBS and Roche HIV-1 DNA test techniques,286 infants were tested for HIV early diagnosis and

  19. Assessment of antiretroviral therapy by plasma viral load testing: standard and ICD HIV-1 p24 antigen and viral RNA (QC-PCR) assays compared.

    Kappes, J C; Saag, M S; Shaw, G M; Hahn, B H; Chopra, P; Chen, S; Emini, E A; McFarland, R; Yang, L C; Piatak, M

    1995-10-01

    To assess the utility of quantitative competitive-polymerase chain reaction (QC-PCR) measurements of plasma human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA and other viral load markers for assessment of antiretroviral therapy, we used archived cryopreserved specimens from a randomized controlled clinical trial of 135 patients (CD4+ T cell count or = 30 pg/ml) in 42% and 56%, respectively. All viral load parameters showed significant decreases from baseline within 1 week of initiation of zidovudine, as measured by standard p24 antigen assay, ICD p24 assay, and QC-PCR. At 1 week, patients treated with either 300 or 1,000 mg/day of L-697,661 showed significant decreases from baseline in plasma standard and ICD p24 antigen and QC-PCR-determined HIV-1 RNA levels. Whereas viral load decreases seen with zidovudine were sustained for the duration of treatment, plasma viral markers often returned to pretreatment levels despite ongoing L-697,661 treatment, with evidence of the emergence of drug-resistant virus. Whereas standard p24, ICD p24, and viral RNA levels changed similarly in response to treatment, the superior sensitivity and available dynamic range of plasma viral RNA assays like QC-PCR analysis provide an advantage for clinical monitoring of plasma viral load, allowing tracking of treatment-related changes even in patients with earlier stage disease and lower levels of viral load. PMID:7552477

  20. VHDL IMPLEMENTATION OF TEST ACCESS PORT CONTROLLER

    MANPREET KAUR

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an implementation of IEEE 1149.7 standard is used for designing Test Access Port (TAP Controller and testing of interconnects is done using boundary scan. By c-JTAG the pin count gets reduced which increases the performance and simplifies the connection between devices. TAP Controller is a synchronous Moore type finite state machine that is changed when the TMS and TCK signals of the test access port gets change. This controls the sequence operation of the circuitry conveyed by JTAG and c-JTAG. JTAGmainly used four pins with TAP and fifth pin is for optional use in Boundary scan. But c-JTAG uses only two pins with TAP. In this approach TDI and TDO gets multiplexed by using class T4 and T5 of c-JTAG. Various instructions are used for testing interconnects using IEEE 1149.7 standard (std.

  1. Immunologic Strategies for HIV-1 Remission and Eradication

    Barouch, Dan H.; Deeks, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is able to suppress HIV-1 replication indefinitely in individuals who have access to these medications, are able to tolerate these drugs, and are motivated to take them daily for life. However, ART is not curative. HIV-1 persists indefinitely during ART as quiescent integrated DNA within memory CD4+ T cells and perhaps other long-lived cellular reservoirs. In this review, we discuss the role of the immune system on the establishment and maintenance of this “latent...

  2. Methylation: a regulator of HIV-1 replication?

    Jeang Kuan-Teh; Yedavalli Venkat RK

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Recent characterizations of methyl transferases as regulators of cellular processes have spurred investigations into how methylation events might influence the HIV-1 life cycle. Emerging evidence suggests that protein-methylation can positively and negatively regulate HIV-1 replication. How DNA- and RNA- methylation might impact HIV-1 is also discussed.

  3. Clinical significance of HIV-1 coreceptor usage

    Lusso Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identification of phenotypically distinct HIV-1 variants with different prevalence during the progression of the disease has been one of the earliest discoveries in HIV-1 biology, but its relevance to AIDS pathogenesis remains only partially understood. The physiological basis for the phenotypic variability of HIV-1 was elucidated with the discovery of distinct coreceptors employed by the virus to infect susceptible cells. The role of the viral phenotype in the variable clinical course and treatment outcome of HIV-1 infection has been extensively investigated over the past two decades. In this review, we summarize the major findings on the clinical significance of the HIV-1 coreceptor usage.

  4. Prediction of exposed domains of envelope glycoprotein in Indian HIV-1 isolates and experimental confirmation of their immunogenicity in humans

    Mohabatkar H.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the impact of subtype differences on the seroreactivity of linear antigenic epitopes in envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 isolates from different geographical locations. By computer analysis, we predicted potential antigenic sites of envelope glycoprotein (gp120 and gp4l of this virus. For this purpose, after fetching sequences of proteins of interest from data banks, values of hydrophilicity, flexibility, accessibility, inverted hydrophobicity, and secondary structure were considered. We identified several potential antigenic epitopes in a B subtype strain of envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 (IIIB. Solid- phase peptide synthesis methods of Merrifield and Fmoc chemistry were used for synthesizing peptides. These synthetic peptides corresponded mainly to the C2, V3 and CD4 binding sites of gp120 and some parts of the ectodomain of gp41. The reactivity of these peptides was tested by ELISA against different HIV-1-positive sera from different locations in India. For two of these predicted epitopes, the corresponding Indian consensus sequences (LAIERYLKQQLLGWG and DIIGDIRQAHCNISEDKWNET (subtype C were also synthesized and their reactivity was tested by ELISA. These peptides also distinguished HIV-1-positive sera of Indians with C subtype infections from sera from HIV-negative subjects.

  5. Sensitive non-radioactive detection of HIV-1

    Teglbjærg, Lars Stubbe; Nielsen, C; Hansen, J E

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the non-radioactive detection of HIV-1 proviral genomic sequences in HIV-1 infected cells. We have developed a sensitive assay, using three different sets of nested primers and our results show that this method is superior to...... standard PCR for the detection of HIV-1 DNA. The assay described features the use of a simple and inexpensive sample preparation technique and a non-radioactive hybridization procedure for confirmation of results. To test the suitability of the assay for clinical purposes, we tested cell samples from 76...... genomic copies often are present at such low numbers that they are otherwise undetectable....

  6. Challenges of diagnosing acute HIV-1 subtype C infection in African women: performance of a clinical algorithm and the need for point-of-care nucleic-acid based testing.

    Koleka Mlisana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prompt diagnosis of acute HIV infection (AHI benefits the individual and provides opportunities for public health intervention. The aim of this study was to describe most common signs and symptoms of AHI, correlate these with early disease progression and develop a clinical algorithm to identify acute HIV cases in resource limited setting. METHODS: 245 South African women at high-risk of HIV-1 were assessed for AHI and received monthly HIV-1 antibody and RNA testing. Signs and symptoms at first HIV-positive visit were compared to HIV-negative visits. Logistic regression identified clinical predictors of AHI. A model-based score was assigned to each predictor to create a risk score for every woman. RESULTS: Twenty-eight women seroconverted after a total of 390 person-years of follow-up with an HIV incidence of 7.2/100 person-years (95%CI 4.5-9.8. Fifty-seven percent reported ≥1 sign or symptom at the AHI visit. Factors predictive of AHI included age <25 years (OR = 3.2; 1.4-7.1, rash (OR = 6.1; 2.4-15.4, sore throat (OR = 2.7; 1.0-7.6, weight loss (OR = 4.4; 1.5-13.4, genital ulcers (OR = 8.0; 1.6-39.5 and vaginal discharge (OR = 5.4; 1.6-18.4. A risk score of 2 correctly predicted AHI in 50.0% of cases. The number of signs and symptoms correlated with higher HIV-1 RNA at diagnosis (r = 0.63; p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Accurate recognition of signs and symptoms of AHI is critical for early diagnosis of HIV infection. Our algorithm may assist in risk-stratifying individuals for AHI, especially in resource-limited settings where there is no routine testing for AHI. Independent validation of the algorithm on another cohort is needed to assess its utility further. Point-of-care antigen or viral load technology is required, however, to detect asymptomatic, antibody negative cases enabling early interventions and prevention of transmission.

  7. No SEVI-mediated enhancement of rectal HIV-1 transmission of HIV-1 in two humanized mouse cohorts.

    Van Dis, Erik S; Moore, Tyler C; Lavender, Kerry J; Messer, Ronald J; Keppler, Oliver T; Verheyen, Jens; Dittmer, Ulf; Hasenkrug, Kim J

    2016-01-15

    Amyloid fibrils from semen-derived peptide (SEVI) enhance HIV-1 infectivity in vitro but the ability of SEVI to mediate enhancement of HIV infection in vivo has not been tested. In this study we used immunodeficient mice reconstituted with human immune systems to test for in vivo enhancement of HIV-1 transmission. This mouse model supports mucosal transmission of HIV-1 via the intrarectal route leading to productive infection. In separate experiments with humanized mouse cohorts reconstituted with two different donor immune systems, high dose HIV-1JR-CSF that had been incubated with SEVI amyloid fibrils at physiologically relevant concentrations did not show an increased incidence of infection compared to controls. In addition, SEVI failed to enhance rectal transmission with a reduced concentration of HIV-1. Although we confirmed potent SEVI-mediated enhancement of HIV infectivity in vitro, this model showed no evidence that it plays a role in the much more complex situation of in vivo transmission. PMID:26609939

  8. Potent Intratype Neutralizing Activity Distinguishes Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) from HIV-1

    Özkaya Şahin, Gülşen; Holmgren, Birgitta; da Silva, Zacarias; Nielsen, Jens; Nowroozalizadeh, Salma; Esbjörnsson, Joakim; Månsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Sören; Norrgren, Hans; Aaby, Peter; Jansson, Marianne; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2012-01-01

    HIV-2 has a lower pathogenicity and transmission rate than HIV-1. Neutralizing antibodies could be contributing to these observations. Here we explored side by side the potency and breadth of intratype and intertype neutralizing activity (NAc) in plasma of 20 HIV-1-, 20 HIV-2-, and 11 dually HIV-1/2 (HIV-D)-seropositive individuals from Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Panels of primary isolates, five HIV-1 and five HIV-2 isolates, were tested in a plaque reduction assay using U87.CD4-CCR5 cells a...

  9. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication by chimeric phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides applied in free solution

    Lund, O S; Hansen, J E

    1998-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing a variable number of 3' and 5' terminal phosphorothioate linkages were applied in free solution to cells infected by HIV-1. ODNs of 28 nt length were applied at up to 5 microM concentration. The ODNs were found to inhibit HIV-1 infection in a dose dependent...... manner, which correlated with the number of modified linkages (4, 8 and 12, respectively). A target sequence in the HIV-1 rev mRNA, previously reported as sensitive to antisense inhibition by full length phosphorothioate ODNs, only revealed non-sequence dependent inhibition of HIV-1, when tested by these...

  10. Absence of Detectable HIV-1 Viremia after Treatment Cessation in an Infant

    Persaud, Deborah; Gay, Hannah; Ziemniak, Carrie; Chen, Ya Hui; Piatak, Michael; Chun, Tae-Wook; Strain, Matthew; Richman, Douglas; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    An infant born to a woman with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection began receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) 30 hours after birth owing to high-risk exposure. ART was continued when detection of HIV-1 DNA and RNA on repeat testing met the standard diagnostic criteria for infection. After therapy was discontinued (when the child was 18 months of age), levels of plasma HIV-1 RNA, proviral DNA in peripheral-blood mononuclear cells, and HIV-1 antibodies, as assessed by means ...

  11. Cytoplasmic Dynein Promotes HIV-1 Uncoating

    Paulina Pawlica; Lionel Berthoux

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral capsid (CA) cores undergo uncoating during their retrograde transport (toward the nucleus), and/or after reaching the nuclear membrane. However, whether HIV-1 CA core uncoating is dependent upon its transport is not understood. There is some evidence that HIV-1 cores retrograde transport involves cytoplasmic dynein complexes translocating on microtubules. Here we investigate the role of dynein-dependent transport in HIV-1 uncoating. To interfere with dynein function, we depleted d...

  12. HIV-1 associated dementia: symptoms and causes

    Khalili Kamel; Amini Shohreh; Ghafouri Mohammad; Sawaya Bassel E

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), neuronal cell death remains a problem that is frequently found in the brains of HIV-1-infected patients. HAART has successfully prevented many of the former end-stage complications of AIDS, however, with increased survival times, the prevalence of minor HIV-1 associated cognitive impairment appears to be rising among AIDS patients. Further, HIV-1 associated dementia (HAD) is still prevalent in treated patients as well a...

  13. Genetic Consequences of Antiviral Therapy on HIV-1

    Miguel Arenas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of enzyme inhibitors have been developed in combating HIV-1, however the fast evolutionary rate of this virus commonly leads to the emergence of resistance mutations that finally allows the mutant virus to survive. This review explores the main genetic consequences of HIV-1 molecular evolution during antiviral therapies, including the viral genetic diversity and molecular adaptation. The role of recombination in the generation of drug resistance is also analyzed. Besides the investigation and discussion of published works, an evolutionary analysis of protease-coding genes collected from patients before and after treatment with different protease inhibitors was included to validate previous studies. Finally, the review discusses the importance of considering genetic consequences of antiviral therapies in models of HIV-1 evolution that could improve current genotypic resistance testing and treatments design.

  14. Cocaine enhances HIV-1-induced CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis: implications in disease progression in cocaine-abusing HIV-1 patients.

    Pandhare, Jui; Addai, Amma B; Mantri, Chinmay K; Hager, Cynthia; Smith, Rita M; Barnett, Louis; Villalta, Fernando; Kalams, Spyros A; Dash, Chandravanu

    2014-04-01

    Substance abuse is a major barrier in eradication of the HIV epidemic because it serves as a powerful cofactor for viral transmission, disease progression, and AIDS-related mortality. Cocaine, one of the commonly abused drugs among HIV-1 patients, has been suggested to accelerate HIV disease progression. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Therefore, we tested whether cocaine augments HIV-1-associated CD4(+) T-cell decline, a predictor of HIV disease progression. We examined apoptosis of resting CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1-negative and HIV-1-positive donors in our study, because decline of uninfected cells plays a major role in HIV-1 disease progression. Treatment of resting CD4(+) T cells with cocaine (up to 100 μmol/L concentrations) did not induce apoptosis, but 200 to 1000 μmol/L cocaine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, treatment of CD4(+) T cells isolated from healthy donors with both HIV-1 virions and cocaine significantly increased apoptosis compared with the apoptosis induced by cocaine or virions alone. Most important, our biochemical data suggest that cocaine induces CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and inducing mitochondrial depolarization. Collectively, our results provide evidence of a synergy between cocaine and HIV-1 on CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis that may, in part, explain the accelerated disease observed in HIV-1-infected drug abusers. PMID:24486327

  15. Generation of HIV-1 and Internal Control Transcripts as Standards for an In-House Quantitative Competitive RT-PCR Assay to Determine HIV-1 Viral Load

    Anny Armas Cayarga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 viral load is useful for monitoring disease progression in HIV-infected individuals. We generated RNA standards of HIV-1 and internal control (IC by in vitro transcription and evaluated its performance in a quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR assay. HIV-1 and IC standards were obtained at high RNA concentrations, without DNA contamination. When these transcripts were included as standards in a qRT-PCR assay, it was obtained a good accuracy (±0.5 log10 unit of the expected results in the quantification of the HIV-1 RNA international standard and controls. The lower limit detection achieved using these standards was 511.0 IU/mL. A high correlation (=0.925 was obtained between the in-house qRT-PCR assay and the NucliSens easyQ HIV-1 test (bioMerieux for HIV-1 RNA quantitation with clinical samples (=14. HIV-1 and IC RNA transcripts, generated in this study, proved to be useful as standards in an in-house qRT-PCR assay for determination of HIV-1 viral load.

  16. Remotely accessible laboratory for MEMS testing

    Sivakumar, Ganapathy; Mulsow, Matthew; Melinger, Aaron; Lacouture, Shelby; Dallas, Tim E.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the construction of a remotely accessible and interactive laboratory for testing microdevices (aka: MicroElectroMechancial Systems - MEMS). Enabling expanded utilization of microdevices for research, commercial, and educational purposes is very important for driving the creation of future MEMS devices and applications. Unfortunately, the relatively high costs associated with MEMS devices and testing infrastructure makes widespread access to the world of MEMS difficult. The creation of a virtual lab to control and actuate MEMS devices over the internet helps spread knowledge to a larger audience. A host laboratory has been established that contains a digital microscope, microdevices, controllers, and computers that can be logged into through the internet. The overall layout of the tele-operated MEMS laboratory system can be divided into two major parts: the server side and the client side. The server-side is present at Texas Tech University, and hosts a server machine that runs the Linux operating system and is used for interfacing the MEMS lab with the outside world via internet. The controls from the clients are transferred to the lab side through the server interface. The server interacts with the electronics required to drive the MEMS devices using a range of National Instruments hardware and LabView Virtual Instruments. An optical microscope (100 ×) with a CCD video camera is used to capture images of the operating MEMS. The server broadcasts the live video stream over the internet to the clients through the website. When the button is pressed on the website, the MEMS device responds and the video stream shows the movement in close to real time.

  17. Testing anti-HIV activity of antiretroviral agents in vitro using flow cytometry analysis of CEM-GFP cells infected with transfection-derived HIV-1 NL4-3.

    Frezza, Caterina; Grelli, Sandro; Federico, Maurizio; Marino-Merlo, Francesca; Mastino, Antonio; Macchi, Beatrice

    2016-06-01

    An assay, specifically optimized to evaluate the anti-HIV activity of antiretrovirals by flow cytometry analysis, is described. As widely used anti-HIV agents, zidovudine (AZT), abacavir (ABC), 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (DDI), lamivudine (3TC), nevirapine (NVP), and efavirenz (EFV), and as drugs of recent approval raltegravir (RAL), etravirine (ETR), and rilpivirine (RPV), were utilized as reference drugs. HIV-1 NL4-3 virus was prepared by transfection of HEK293T cells with purified plasmid DNA and quantified by p24 antigen-capture assay. For infection, CEM-GFP cells were exposed to vehicle or to several concentrations of the drugs for 2 hr at 37 °C before HIV-1 NL4-3 was added to each sample. The adsorption was prolonged for 3 hr at 37 °C. After 72 hr of incubation, HIV-induced GFP expression in infected CEM-GFP cells was assessed by flow cytometry analysis and expressed as % positive cells. For comparison, p24 production in supernatants was assessed by a commercial ELISA kit. On the basis of IC50 values, the anti-HIV activity, as assayed by this method, was EFV > 3TC > AZT > NVP > DDI > ABC and ETR > RPV > RAL. The comparison between the IC50 values calculated through flow cytometry and p24 production revealed overlapping results, showing that the optimized protocol of CEM-GFP infection with HIV NL4-3 is a suitable method to perform quantitative, rapid and low-expensive screening tests to evaluate the in vitro effect of new candidate anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26519867

  18. Gp120 on HIV-1 Virions Lacks O-Linked Carbohydrate.

    Stansell, Elizabeth; Panico, Maria; Canis, Kevin; Pang, Poh-Choo; Bouché, Laura; Binet, Daniel; O'Connor, Michael-John; Chertova, Elena; Bess, Julian; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Haslam, Stuart M; Morris, Howard R; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Dell, Anne

    2015-01-01

    As HIV-1-encoded envelope protein traverses the secretory pathway, it may be modified with N- and O-linked carbohydrate. When the gp120s of HIV-1 NL4-3, HIV-1 YU2, HIV-1 Bal, HIV-1 JRFL, and HIV-1 JRCSF were expressed as secreted proteins, the threonine at consensus position 499 was found to be O-glycosylated. For SIVmac239, the corresponding threonine was also glycosylated when gp120 was recombinantly expressed. Similarly-positioned, highly-conserved threonines in the influenza A virus H1N1 HA1 and H5N1 HA1 envelope proteins were also found to carry O-glycans when expressed as secreted proteins. In all cases, the threonines were modified predominantly with disialylated core 1 glycans, together with related core 1 and core 2 structures. Secreted HIV-1 gp140 was modified to a lesser extent with mainly monosialylated core 1 O-glycans, suggesting that the ectodomain of the gp41 transmembrane component may limit the accessibility of Thr499 to glycosyltransferases. In striking contrast to these findings, gp120 on purified virions of HIV-1 Bal and SIV CP-MAC lacked any detectable O-glycosylation of the C-terminal threonine. Our results indicate the absence of O-linked carbohydrates on Thr499 as it exists on the surface of virions and suggest caution in the interpretation of analyses of post-translational modifications that utilize recombinant forms of envelope protein. PMID:25915761

  19. Effects of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms on HIV-1 susceptibility

    SAMHD1 is a human restriction factor that prevents efficient infection of macrophages, dendritic cells and resting CD4+ T cells by HIV-1. Here we explored the antiviral activity and biochemical properties of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms. Our studies focused on human SAMHD1 polymorphisms that were previously identified as evolving under positive selection for rapid amino acid replacement during primate speciation. The different human SAMHD1 polymorphisms were tested for their ability to block HIV-1, HIV-2 and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). All studied SAMHD1 variants block HIV-1, HIV-2 and EIAV infection when compared to wild type. We found that these variants did not lose their ability to oligomerize or to bind RNA. Furthermore, all tested variants were susceptible to degradation by Vpx, and localized to the nuclear compartment. We tested the ability of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms to decrease the dNTP cellular levels. In agreement, none of the different SAMHD1 variants lost their ability to reduce cellular levels of dNTPs. Finally, we found that none of the tested human SAMHD1 polymorphisms affected the ability of the protein to block LINE-1 retrotransposition. - Highlights: • Human SAMHD1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms block HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection. • SAMHD1 polymorphisms do not affect its ability to block LINE-1 retrotransposition. • SAMHD1 polymorphisms decrease the cellular levels of dNTPs

  20. Effects of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms on HIV-1 susceptibility

    White, Tommy E.; Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, 1301 Morris Park – Price Center 501, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Knowlton, Caitlin; Kim, Baek [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Sawyer, Sara L. [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Diaz-Griffero, Felipe, E-mail: Felipe.Diaz-Griffero@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, 1301 Morris Park – Price Center 501, New York, NY 10461 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    SAMHD1 is a human restriction factor that prevents efficient infection of macrophages, dendritic cells and resting CD4+ T cells by HIV-1. Here we explored the antiviral activity and biochemical properties of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms. Our studies focused on human SAMHD1 polymorphisms that were previously identified as evolving under positive selection for rapid amino acid replacement during primate speciation. The different human SAMHD1 polymorphisms were tested for their ability to block HIV-1, HIV-2 and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). All studied SAMHD1 variants block HIV-1, HIV-2 and EIAV infection when compared to wild type. We found that these variants did not lose their ability to oligomerize or to bind RNA. Furthermore, all tested variants were susceptible to degradation by Vpx, and localized to the nuclear compartment. We tested the ability of human SAMHD1 polymorphisms to decrease the dNTP cellular levels. In agreement, none of the different SAMHD1 variants lost their ability to reduce cellular levels of dNTPs. Finally, we found that none of the tested human SAMHD1 polymorphisms affected the ability of the protein to block LINE-1 retrotransposition. - Highlights: • Human SAMHD1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms block HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection. • SAMHD1 polymorphisms do not affect its ability to block LINE-1 retrotransposition. • SAMHD1 polymorphisms decrease the cellular levels of dNTPs.

  1. HIV-1 protease inhibitory substances from the rhizomes of Boesenbergia pandurata Holtt.

    Tassanee Panphadung; Jindaporn Puripattanavong; Sanan Subhadhirasakul; Supinya Tewtrakul

    2003-01-01

    Four flavonoids (pinostrobin, pinocembrin, cardamonin and alpinetin) isolated from the ethanol extract of Boesenbergia pandurata Holtt. (yellow rhizome) were tested for their activities against HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR). The result showed that cardamonin exhibited an appreciable anti-HIV-1 PR activity with an IC50 value of 31 μg/ml.

  2. HIV-1 protease inhibitory substances from the rhizomes of Boesenbergia pandurata Holtt.

    Tassanee Panphadung

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Four flavonoids (pinostrobin, pinocembrin, cardamonin and alpinetin isolated from the ethanol extract of Boesenbergia pandurata Holtt. (yellow rhizome were tested for their activities against HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR. The result showed that cardamonin exhibited an appreciable anti-HIV-1 PR activity with an IC50 value of 31 μg/ml.

  3. Flail arm-like syndrome associated with HIV-1 infection

    Nalini A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last 20 years at least 23 cases of motor neuron disease have been reported in HIV-1 seropositive patients. In this report we describe the clinical picture of a young man with HIV-1 clade C infection and flail arm-like syndrome, who we were able to follow-up for a long period. We investigated and prospectively monitored a 34-year-old man with features of flail arm syndrome, who developed the weakness and wasting 1 year after being diagnosed with HIV-1 infection after a routine blood test. He presented in 2003 with progressive, symmetrical wasting and weakness of the proximal muscles of the upper limb of 2 years′ duration. He had severe wasting and weakness of the shoulder and arm muscles. There were no pyramidal signs. He has been on HAART for the last 4 years and the weakness or wasting has not worsened. At the last follow-up in July 2007, the patient had the same neurological deficit and no other symptoms or signs of HIV-1 infection. MRI of the spinal cord in 2007 showed characteristic T2 hyperintense signals in the central part of the spinal cord, corresponding to the central gray matter. Thus, our patient had HIV-1 clade C infection associated with a ′flail arm-like syndrome.′ The causal relationship between HIV-1 infection and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS-like syndrome is still uncertain. The syndrome usually manifests as a lower motor neuron syndrome, as was seen in our young patient. It is known that treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART stabilizes/improves the condition. In our patient the weakness and atrophy remained stable over a period of 3.5 years after commencing HAART regimen.

  4. Flail arm–like syndrome associated with HIV-1 infection

    Nalini, A.; Desai, Anita; Mahato, Simendra Kumar

    2009-01-01

    During the last 20 years at least 23 cases of motor neuron disease have been reported in HIV-1 seropositive patients. In this report we describe the clinical picture of a young man with HIV-1 clade C infection and flail arm-like syndrome, who we were able to follow-up for a long period. We investigated and prospectively monitored a 34-year-old man with features of flail arm syndrome, who developed the weakness and wasting 1 year after being diagnosed with HIV-1 infection after a routine blood test. He presented in 2003 with progressive, symmetrical wasting and weakness of the proximal muscles of the upper limb of 2 years' duration. He had severe wasting and weakness of the shoulder and arm muscles. There were no pyramidal signs. He has been on HAART for the last 4 years and the weakness or wasting has not worsened. At the last follow-up in July 2007, the patient had the same neurological deficit and no other symptoms or signs of HIV-1 infection. MRI of the spinal cord in 2007 showed characteristic T2 hyperintense signals in the central part of the spinal cord, corresponding to the central gray matter. Thus, our patient had HIV-1 clade C infection associated with a ‘flail arm–like syndrome.’ The causal relationship between HIV-1 infection and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-like syndrome is still uncertain. The syndrome usually manifests as a lower motor neuron syndrome, as was seen in our young patient. It is known that treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART) stabilizes/improves the condition. In our patient the weakness and atrophy remained stable over a period of 3.5 years after commencing HAART regimen. PMID:20142861

  5. HIV-1 western blot assay: What determines an indeterminate status?

    Syed Iqbal

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Western blot assay is the gold standard for the detection of antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type1 (HIV-1. However, indeterminate Western blot reactivity to HIV-1 proteins may occur in individuals, who may not be infected with HIV. Aim: This retrospective study was aimed to determine the diagnostic value of the interpretation criteria in relation to commercial kits for HIV -1 diagnosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 556 serum/plasma specimens collected from high-risk population attending our HIV clinic from 2000 - 2004 were tested by three different western blot kits: NEW LAV BLOT I (n=244, HIV BLOT 2.2; (n=112, Genetic Systems HIV-1 (n=237. And the results of western blot strips were analyzed using the various interpretation criteria: WHO/NACO, CDC/ ASTPHLD, ARC, FDA, CRSS and JHU. Some specimens were run on more than one kit. RT-PCR assay was performed on 5 specimens, which were indeterminate with LAV BLOT I. Results: The discrepancy in LAV BLOT I positive results were between 157(64-176(72, and indeterminate results were between 44(18 to 63(25. No such variations were observed in genetic systems. There are some HIV negative (by PCR specimens were indeterminate in LAV BLOT I revealing the kit more sensitive and less effective for diagnostic purpose. Conclusion: The genetic systems kit is superior to other kits we analyzed and its results are concordant with HIV-1 PCR results. To report, the choice of western blot commercial kit is paramount important than the use of particular interpretation criteria for the diagnosis of HIV -1.

  6. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  7. Mode of inhibition of HIV-1 Integrase by a C-terminal domain-specific monoclonal antibody*

    Merkel George

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To further our understanding of the structure and function of HIV-1 integrase (IN we developed and characterized a library of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs directed against this protein. One of these antibodies, mAb33, which is specific for the C-terminal domain, was found to inhibit HIV-1 IN processing activity in vitro; a corresponding Fv fragment was able to inhibit HIV-1 integration in vivo. Our subsequent studies, using heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, identified six solvent accessible residues on the surface of the C-terminal domain that were immobilized upon binding of the antibody, which were proposed to comprise the epitope. Here we test this hypothesis by measuring the affinity of mAb33 to HIV-1 proteins that contain Ala substitutions in each of these positions. To gain additional insight into the mode of inhibition we also measured the DNA binding capacity and enzymatic activities of the Ala substituted proteins. Results We found that Ala substitution of any one of five of the putative epitope residues, F223, R224, Y226, I267, and I268, caused a decrease in the affinity of the mAb33 for HIV-1 IN, confirming the prediction from NMR data. Although IN derivatives with Ala substitutions in or near the mAb33 epitope exhibited decreased enzymatic activity, none of the epitope substitutions compromised DNA binding to full length HIV-1 IN, as measured by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Two of these derivatives, IN (I276A and IN (I267A/I268A, exhibited both increased DNA binding affinity and uncharacteristic dissociation kinetics; these proteins also exhibited non-specific nuclease activity. Results from these investigations are discussed in the context of current models for how the C-terminal domain interacts with substrate DNA. Conclusion It is unlikely that inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity by mAb33 is caused by direct interaction with residues that are essential for substrate binding. Rather

  8. Assessing the sensitivity and specificity of First Response HIV-1-2 test kit with whole blood and serum samples: a cross-sectional study

    Boadu, Raymond; Darko, George; Nortey, Priscilla; Akweongo, Patricia; Sarfo, Bismark

    2016-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Rapid diagnostic Test (RDT) kits are the preferred assays for HIV testing in many countries. Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission, Know Your Status Campaigns, Blood-Safety, Voluntary Counseling and Testing are major strategies adapted to control transmission of the virus and the pivot of these interventions is either screening or diagnosing individuals through testing. There are reports of inconsistent sensitivity and specificity with whole ...

  9. Primary T-cells from human CD4/CCR5-transgenic rats support all early steps of HIV-1 replication including integration, but display impaired viral gene expression

    Hermann Volker

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo studies on HIV-1 pathogenesis and testing of antiviral strategies have been hampered by the lack of an immunocompetent small animal model that is highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection. Since native rodents are non-permissive, we developed transgenic rats that selectively express the HIV-1 receptor complex, hCD4 and hCCR5, on relevant target cells. These animals display a transient low-level plasma viremia after HIV-1YU-2 infection, demonstrating HIV-1 susceptibility in vivo. However, unlike macrophages, primary CD4 T-cells from double-transgenic animals fail to support viral spread ex vivo. To identify quantitative limitations or absolute blocks in this rodent species, we quantitatively assessed the efficiency of key steps in the early phase of the viral replication cycle in a side-by-side comparison in infected cell lines and primary T-cells from hCD4/hCCR5-transgenic rats and human donors. Results Levels of virus entry, HIV-1 cDNA synthesis, nuclear import, and integration into the host genome were shown to be remarkably similar in cell lines and, where technically accessible, in primary T-cells from both species. In contrast, a profound impairment at the level of early HIV gene expression was disclosed at the single-cell level in primary rat T-cells and most other rat-derived cells. Macrophages were a notable exception, possibly reflecting the unique transcriptional milieu in this evolutionarily conserved target cell of all lentiviruses. Importantly, transient trans-complementation by ex vivo nucleofection with the Tat-interacting protein Cyclin T1 of human origin markedly elevated HIV gene expression in primary rat T-cells. Conclusion This is the first study that has quantitatively determined the efficiency of consecutive steps in the HIV-1 replication cycle in infected primary HIV target cells from a candidate transgenic small animal and compared it to human cells. Unlike cells derived from mice or rabbits, rat

  10. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Are Present in Six Percent of Persons Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Lusaka, Zambia

    R.L. Hamers; M. Siwale; C.L. Wallis; M. Labib; R. van Hasselt; W.S. Stevens; R. Schuurman; A.M.J. Wensing; M. van Vugt; T.F. Rinke de Wit

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the mutational patterns and factors associated with baseline drug-resistant HIV-1 present at initiation of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) at 3 sites in Lusaka, Zambia, in 2007-2008. Methods: Population sequencing of the HIV-1 pol gene was performed in the PharmAccess Af

  11. Efficient Gene Transfer Mediated by HIV-1-based Defective Lentivector and Inhibition of HIV-1 Replication

    2007-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors have drawn considerable attention recently and show great promise to become important delivery vehicles for future gene transfer manipulation. In the present study we have optimized a protocol for preparation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-based defective lentiviral vectors (DLV) and characterized these vectors in terms of their transduction of different cells. Transient co-transfection of 293T packaging cells with DNA plasmids encoding lentiviral vector constituents resulted in production of high-titer DLV (0.5-1.2 × 107IU/mL), which can be further concentrated over 100-fold through a single step ultracentrifugation. These vectors were capable of transducing a variety of cells from both primate and non-primate sources and high transduction efficiency was achieved using concentrated vectors. Assessment of potential generation of RCV revealed no detection of infection by infectious particles in DLV-transduced CEM, SupT-1 and MT-2 cells. Long-term culture of transduced cells showed a stable expression of transgenes without apparent alteration in cellular morphology and growth kinetics. Vector mobilization to untransduced cells mediated by wild-type HIV-1 infection was confirmed in this test. Challenge of transduced human T-lymphocytes with wild-type HIV-1 showed these cells are totally resistant to the viral infection. Considering the effective gene transfer and stable gene expression, safety and anti-HIV activity, these DLV vectors warrant further exploration for their potential use as a gene transfer vehicle in the development of gene therapy protocols.

  12. HIV-1 integrase inhibitors are substrates for the multidrug transporter MDR1-P-glycoprotein

    Cara Andrea; Andreotti Mauro; Galluzzo Clementina; Verdoliva Antonio; Costi Roberta; Molinari Agnese; Dupuis Maria; Cianfriglia Maurizio; Di Santo Roberto; Palmisano Lucia

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The discovery of diketoacid-containing derivatives as inhibitors of HIV-1 Integrase (IN) (IN inhibitors, IINs) has played a major role in validating this enzyme as an important target for antiretroviral therapy. Since the in vivo efficacy depends on access of these drugs to intracellular sites where HIV-1 replicates, we determined whether the IINs are recognized by the multidrug transporter MDR1-P-glycoprotein (P-gp) thereby reducing their intracellular accumulation. To ad...

  13. Application of a case–control study design to investigate genotypic signatures of HIV-1 transmission

    Mota Talia M; Murray John M; Center Rob J; Purcell Damian F J; McCaw James M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The characterization of HIV-1 transmission strains may inform the design of an effective vaccine. Shorter variable loops with fewer predicted glycosites have been suggested as signatures enriched in envelope sequences derived during acute HIV-1 infection. Specifically, a transmission-linked lack of glycosites within the V1 and V2 loops of gp120 provides greater access to an α4β7 binding motif, which promotes the establishment of infection. Also, a histidine at position 12 ...

  14. Cytoplasmic dynein promotes HIV-1 uncoating.

    Pawlica, Paulina; Berthoux, Lionel

    2014-11-01

    Retroviral capsid (CA) cores undergo uncoating during their retrograde transport (toward the nucleus), and/or after reaching the nuclear membrane. However, whether HIV-1 CA core uncoating is dependent upon its transport is not understood. There is some evidence that HIV-1 cores retrograde transport involves cytoplasmic dynein complexes translocating on microtubules. Here we investigate the role of dynein-dependent transport in HIV-1 uncoating. To interfere with dynein function, we depleted dynein heavy chain (DHC) using RNA interference, and we over-expressed p50/dynamitin. In immunofluorescence microscopy experiments, DHC depletion caused an accumulation of CA foci in HIV-1 infected cells. Using a biochemical assay to monitor HIV-1 CA core disassembly in infected cells, we observed an increase in amounts of intact (pelletable) CA cores upon DHC depletion or p50 over-expression. Results from these two complementary assays suggest that inhibiting dynein-mediated transport interferes with HIV-1 uncoating in infected cells, indicating the existence of a functional link between HIV-1 transport and uncoating. PMID:25375884

  15. Cytoplasmic Dynein Promotes HIV-1 Uncoating

    Paulina Pawlica

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Retroviral capsid (CA cores undergo uncoating during their retrograde transport (toward the nucleus, and/or after reaching the nuclear membrane. However, whether HIV-1 CA core uncoating is dependent upon its transport is not understood. There is some evidence that HIV-1 cores retrograde transport involves cytoplasmic dynein complexes translocating on microtubules. Here we investigate the role of dynein-dependent transport in HIV-1 uncoating. To interfere with dynein function, we depleted dynein heavy chain (DHC using RNA interference, and we over-expressed p50/dynamitin. In immunofluorescence microscopy experiments, DHC depletion caused an accumulation of CA foci in HIV-1 infected cells. Using a biochemical assay to monitor HIV-1 CA core disassembly in infected cells, we observed an increase in amounts of intact (pelletable CA cores upon DHC depletion or p50 over-expression. Results from these two complementary assays suggest that inhibiting dynein-mediated transport interferes with HIV-1 uncoating in infected cells, indicating the existence of a functional link between HIV-1 transport and uncoating.

  16. In vitro uncoating of HIV-1 cores.

    Shah, Vaibhav B; Aiken, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The genome of the retroviruses is encased in a capsid surrounded by a lipid envelope. For lentiviruses, such as HIV-1, the conical capsid shell is composed of CA protein arranged as a lattice of hexagon. The capsid is closed by 7 pentamers at the broad end and 5 at the narrow end of the cone(1, 2). Encased in this capsid shell is the viral ribonucleoprotein complex, and together they comprise the core. Following fusion of the viral membrane with the target cell membrane, the HIV-1 is released into the cytoplasm. The capsid then disassembles releasing free CA in the soluble form(3) in a process referred to as uncoating. The intracellular location and timing of HIV-1 uncoating are poorly understood. Single amino-acid substitutions in CA that alter the stability of the capsid also impair the ability of HIV-1 to infect cells(4). This indicates that the stability of the capsid is critical for HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 uncoating has been difficult to study due to lack of availability of sensitive and reliable assays for this process. Here we describe a quantitative method for studying uncoating in vitro using cores isolated from infectious HIV-1 particles. The approach involves isolation of cores by sedimentation of concentrated virions through a layer of detergent and into a linear sucrose gradient, in the cold. To quantify uncoating, the isolated cores are incubated at 37°C for various timed intervals and subsequently pelleted by ultracentrifugation. The extent of uncoating is analyzed by quantifying the fraction of CA in the supernatant. This approach has been employed to analyze effects of viral mutations on HIV-1 capsid stability(4, 5, 6). It should also be useful for studying the role of cellular factors in HIV-1 uncoating. PMID:22105356

  17. In vitro Uncoating of HIV-1 Cores

    Shah, Vaibhav B.; Aiken, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The genome of the retroviruses is encased in a capsid surrounded by a lipid envelope. For lentiviruses, such as HIV-1, the conical capsid shell is composed of CA protein arranged as a lattice of hexagon. The capsid is closed by 7 pentamers at the broad end and 5 at the narrow end of the cone1, 2. Encased in this capsid shell is the viral ribonucleoprotein complex, and together they comprise the core. Following fusion of the viral membrane with the target cell membrane, the HIV-1 is released into the cytoplasm. The capsid then disassembles releasing free CA in the soluble form3 in a process referred to as uncoating. The intracellular location and timing of HIV-1 uncoating are poorly understood. Single amino-acid substitutions in CA that alter the stability of the capsid also impair the ability of HIV-1 to infect cells4. This indicates that the stability of the capsid is critical for HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 uncoating has been difficult to study due to lack of availability of sensitive and reliable assays for this process. Here we describe a quantitative method for studying uncoating in vitro using cores isolated from infectious HIV-1 particles. The approach involves isolation of cores by sedimentation of concentrated virions through a layer of detergent and into a linear sucrose gradient, in the cold. To quantify uncoating, the isolated cores are incubated at 37°C for various timed intervals and subsequently pelleted by ultracentrifugation. The extent of uncoating is analyzed by quantifying the fraction of CA in the supernatant. This approach has been employed to analyze effects of viral mutations on HIV-1 capsid stability4, 5, 6. It should also be useful for studying the role of cellular factors in HIV-1 uncoating. PMID:22105356

  18. DNA Triplex-Based Complexes Display Anti-HIV-1-Cell Fusion Activity.

    Xu, Liang; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Xiaoyu; Chong, Huihui; Lai, Wenqing; Jiang, Xifeng; Wang, Chao; He, Yuxian; Liu, Keliang

    2015-08-01

    DNA triplexes with hydrophobic modifications were designed and evaluated for their activity as inhibitors of the cell fusion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Triplex inhibitors displayed low micromolar activities in the cell-cell fusion assay and nanomolar activities in the anti-HIV-1 pseudovirus test. Helix structure and the presence of sufficient numbers of hydrophobic regions were essential for the antifusion activity. Results from native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a fluorescent resonance energy transfer-based inhibitory assay indicated that these triplexes may interact with the primary pocket at the glycoprotein 41 (gp41) N-heptad repeat, thereby inhibiting formation of the HIV-1 gp41 6-helical bundle. Triplex-based complexes may represent a novel category of HIV-1 inhibitors in anti-HIV-1 drug discovery. PMID:26192705

  19. Seroincidence of HIV and prevalence of transmitted drug resistance of HIV-1 strains among persons seeking voluntary counselling and testing in Taiwan

    Wen-Chun Liu; Lan-Hsin Chang; Pei-Ying Wu; Yu-Zhen Luo; Cheng-Hsin Wu; Yi-Ching Su; Chung-Chi Lai; Sui-Yuan Chang; Chien-Ching Hung

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The total case number of persons who are newly diagnosed with HIV continues to increase in Taiwan and men who have sex with men (MSM) have re-emerged as the leading risk group for HIV transmission. In this study, we aimed to estimate the incidence rate of HIV infection among those individuals who sought voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) service at a university hospital. Methods: Between 1 April, 2006 and 31 December, 2013, 18,246 tests for HIV antibody were performed among...

  20. Access to Papanicolaou Test by the Unified Health System users

    Vanessa Franco de Carvalho; Nalú Pereira da Costa Kerber; Vanessa Andréia Wachholz; Flávia Conceição Pohlmann; Letícia Amico Marques; Fabiane Ferreira Francioni

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to understand how is the access to the public health service users in the Papanicolaou Test. Methods: qualitative study, with 52 women who have changes in the Pap smear exam, questioning the exam achievement frequency and the difficulties of its access and the consultations. It was developed a thematic analysis based on the Fekete accessibility reference. Results: three categories emerged: access to information on the frequency of Pap smears, highlighting the completion of the exam...

  1. Neurobehavioral alterations in HIV-1 transgenic rats: evidence for dopaminergic dysfunction.

    Moran, L M; Booze, R M; Webb, K M; Mactutus, C F

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have provided evidence that the progression of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) involves alterations in dopamine (DA) systems. Drugs of abuse that act on the brain DA system, such as cocaine (Coc), may exacerbate HIV-1 infection and consequent behavioral and neurological manifestations. In the present study, we used the HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rat, which constitutively expresses 7 of the 9 HIV-1 genes, to assess potential DA system alterations in three behavioral assays: prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the auditory startle response (ASR), novelty and habituation/retention, and sensitization to Coc across repeated administration. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were tested in each experiment. The HIV-1 Tg animals were hyperreactive to auditory startle stimuli and displayed a leftward shift in the temporal window for maximal PPI, suggesting an alteration in sensorimotor gating. All animals displayed an initial robust locomotor response to a novel environment which dissipated with repeated testing; however, the HIV-1 Tg rats, relative to controls, consistently showed a weaker novelty response across monthly-spaced assessments. The HIV-1 Tg animals also showed decreased intrasession habituation of motor activity across 3-day periods that emerged across monthly-spaced locomotor activity sessions; a pattern consistent with impaired long-term episodic memory. Furthermore, the HIV-1 Tg group displayed differential cocaine-induced sensitization, observed both in initiation across the 10-day cocaine treatment, and in expression following a cocaine rechallenge after a 7-day abstinence. Collectively, the present data implicate that the non-infectious HIV-1 Tg rat, which resembles the complete suppression of infection in HIV-1 positive individuals under CART, displays sustained, if not permanent, alterations in the brain DA system. PMID:23063600

  2. Cocaine Enhances HIV-1–Induced CD4+ T-Cell Apoptosis: Implications in Disease Progression in Cocaine-Abusing HIV-1 Patients

    Pandhare, Jui; Addai, Amma B.; Mantri, Chinmay K.; Hager, Cynthia; Smith, Rita M.; Barnett, Louis; Villalta, Fernando; Kalams, Spyros A.; Dash, Chandravanu

    2014-01-01

    Substance abuse is a major barrier in eradication of the HIV epidemic because it serves as a powerful cofactor for viral transmission, disease progression, and AIDS-related mortality. Cocaine, one of the commonly abused drugs among HIV-1 patients, has been suggested to accelerate HIV disease progression. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Therefore, we tested whether cocaine augments HIV-1–associated CD4+ T-cell decline, a predictor of HIV disease progression. We exami...

  3. A novel toll-like receptor-9 agonist, MGN1703, enhances HIV-1 transcription and NK cell-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infected autologous CD4+ T cells

    Offersen, Rasmus; Nissen, Sara Konstantin; Rasmussen, Thomas Aagaard; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen; Denton, Paul W; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz; Tolstrup, Martin

    2016-01-01

    currently undergoing phase 3 clinical testing for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer) induces potent antiviral responses in immune effector cells from HIV-1-infected on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. The significant improved safety and tolerability profile of MGN1703 versus TLR9 agonists of......Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists are potent enhancers of innate antiviral immunity and may also reverse HIV-1 latency. Therefore, TLR agonists have a potential role in the context of a 'shock and kill' approach to eradicate HIV-1. Our extensive preclinical evaluation suggests that a novel TLR9...... induced strong antiviral innate immune responses, enhanced HIV-1 transcription and boosted NK cell-mediated suppression of HIV-1 infection in autologous CD4+ T cells. These findings support clinical testing of MGN1703 in HIV-1 eradication trials. IMPORTANCE: We demonstrate, that MGN1703 (a TLR9 agonist...

  4. Prevalence of genotypic HIV-1 drug resistance in Thailand, 2002

    Watitpun Chotip

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prices of reverse transcriptase (RT inhibitors in Thailand have been reduced since December 1, 2001. It is expected that reduction in the price of these inhibitors may influence the drug resistance mutation pattern of HIV-1 among infected people. This study reports the frequency of HIV-1 genetic mutation associated with drug resistance in antiretroviral-treated patients from Thailand. Methods Genotypic resistance testing was performed on samples collected in 2002 from 88 HIV-1 infected individuals. Automated DNA sequencing was used to genotype the HIV-1 polymerase gene isolated from patients' plasma. Results Resistance to protease inhibitors, nucleoside and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were found in 10 (12%, 42 (48% and 19 (21% patients, respectively. The most common drug resistance mutations in the protease gene were at codon 82 (8%, 90 (7% and 54 (6%, whereas resistant mutations at codon 215 (45%, 67 (40%, 41 (38% and 184 (27% were commonly found in the RT gene. This finding indicates that genotypic resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was prevalent in 2002. The frequency of resistant mutations corresponding to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was three times higher-, while resistant mutation corresponding to protease inhibitors was two times lower than those frequencies determined in 2001. Conclusion This study shows that the frequencies of RT inhibitor resistance mutations have been increased after the reduction in the price of RT inhibitors since December 2001. We believe that this was an important factor that influenced the mutation patterns of HIV-1 protease and RT genes in Thailand.

  5. Using Operational Analysis to Improve Access to Pulmonary Function Testing

    Ada Ip; Raymond Asamoah-Barnieh; Diane P. Bischak; Warren J Davidson; W. Ward Flemons; Pendharkar, Sachin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Timely pulmonary function testing is crucial to improving diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary diseases. Perceptions of poor access at an academic pulmonary function laboratory prompted analysis of system demand and capacity to identify factors contributing to poor access. Methods. Surveys and interviews identified stakeholder perspectives on operational processes and access challenges. Retrospective data on testing demand and resource capacity was analyzed to understand utilizati...

  6. Small animal model for HIV-1 Disease

    Yoshio; Koyanagi

    2005-01-01

    Development of a viral infection model of the humanimmune systemusingsmall animalsis animportant goal in biomedi-cal research,especiallyinstudiesof HIV-1infection.Thisis particularlyimportant since susceptibilityto HIV-1islimit-edto humans.The C.B-17-scid/scid-mouselacks mature Tand Bcells dueto a defective rearrangement of the Tcell re-ceptor andimmunoglobulin genes.Twotypes of humanlymphoid chimeras have been establishedin scid-mice.The firstsuccess withthe human mouse chimera was achieved.Human fetal liv...

  7. Efficient in vitro inhibition of HIV-1 gag reverse transcription by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) at minimal ratios of PNA/RNA

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Zachar, Vladimir; Nielsen, P.E.;

    1997-01-01

    We have tested the inhibitory potential of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) on in vitro reverse transcription of the HIV-1 gag gene. PNA was designed to target different regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and the effect on reverse transcription by HIV-1, MMLV and AMV reverse transcriptases (RTs) was...

  8. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    Leitner, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Campbell, Mary S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Mullins, James I [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Hughes, James P [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Wong, Kim G [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Raugi, Dana N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Scrensen, Stefanie [UNIV OF WASHINGTON

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage

  9. Changes in CSF and plasma HIV-1 RNA and cognition after starting potent antiretroviral therapy

    Marra, C.M.; Lockhart, D.; Zunt, J. R.; Perrin, M.; Coombs, R.W.; Collier, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    The authors assessed CSF and plasma HIV-1 RNA and neuropsychological test performance (composite neuropsychological test Z score [NPZ-4]) in 25 HIV-1–infected subjects 4 and 8 weeks after beginning potent antiretroviral therapy that included a protease inhibitor. In the 14 subjects who entered the study on no antiretroviral treatment, NPZ-4 improvement was associated with decline in CSF HIV-1 RNA at both visits (p = 0.001 and p = 0.02), and those treated with zidovudine or indinavir had great...

  10. Oral keratinocytes support non-replicative infection and transfer of harbored HIV-1 to permissive cells

    Giacaman Rodrigo A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral keratinocytes on the mucosal surface are frequently exposed to HIV-1 through contact with infected sexual partners or nursing mothers. To determine the plausibility that oral keratinocytes are primary targets of HIV-1, we tested the hypothesis that HIV-1 infects oral keratinocytes in a restricted manner. Results To study the fate of HIV-1, immortalized oral keratinocytes (OKF6/TERT-2; TERT-2 cells were characterized for the fate of HIV-specific RNA and DNA. At 6 h post inoculation with X4 or R5-tropic HIV-1, HIV-1gag RNA was detected maximally within TERT-2 cells. Reverse transcriptase activity in TERT-2 cells was confirmed by VSV-G-mediated infection with HIV-NL4-3Δenv-EGFP. AZT inhibited EGFP expression in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that viral replication can be supported if receptors are bypassed. Within 3 h post inoculation, integrated HIV-1 DNA was detected in TERT-2 cell nuclei and persisted after subculture. Multiply spliced and unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs were not detectable up to 72 h post inoculation, suggesting that HIV replication may abort and that infection is non-productive. Within 48 h post inoculation, however, virus harbored by CD4 negative TERT-2 cells trans infected co-cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs or MOLT4 cells (CD4+ CCR5+ by direct cell-to-cell transfer or by releasing low levels of infectious virions. Primary tonsil epithelial cells also trans infected HIV-1 to permissive cells in a donor-specific manner. Conclusion Oral keratinocytes appear, therefore, to support stable non-replicative integration, while harboring and transmitting infectious X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 to permissive cells for up to 48 h.

  11. Infected Cell Killing by HIV-1 Protease Promotes NF-κB Dependent HIV-1 Replication

    Bren, Gary D.; Joe Whitman; Nathan Cummins; Brett Shepard; Rizza, Stacey A; Trushin, Sergey A.; Badley, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    Acute HIV-1 infection of CD4 T cells often results in apoptotic death of infected cells, yet it is unclear what evolutionary advantage this offers to HIV-1. Given the independent observations that acute T cell HIV-1 infection results in (1) NF-kappaB activation, (2) caspase 8 dependent apoptosis, and that (3) caspase 8 directly activates NF-kappaB, we questioned whether these three events might be interrelated. We first show that HIV-1 infected T cell apoptosis, NF-kappaB activation, and casp...

  12. Emergence of minor drug-resistant HIV-1 variants after triple antiretroviral prophylaxis for prevention of vertical HIV-1 transmission.

    Andrea Hauser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: WHO-guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in resource-limited settings recommend complex maternal antiretroviral prophylaxis comprising antenatal zidovudine (AZT, nevirapine single-dose (NVP-SD at labor onset and AZT/lamivudine (3TC during labor and one week postpartum. Data on resistance development selected by this regimen is not available. We therefore analyzed the emergence of minor drug-resistant HIV-1 variants in Tanzanian women following complex prophylaxis. METHOD: 1395 pregnant women were tested for HIV-1 at Kyela District Hospital, Tanzania. 87/202 HIV-positive women started complex prophylaxis. Blood samples were collected before start of prophylaxis, at birth and 1-2, 4-6 and 12-16 weeks postpartum. Allele-specific real-time PCR assays specific for HIV-1 subtypes A, C and D were developed and applied on samples of mothers and their vertically infected infants to quantify key resistance mutations of AZT (K70R/T215Y/T215F, NVP (K103N/Y181C and 3TC (M184V at detection limits of <1%. RESULTS: 50/87 HIV-infected women having started complex prophylaxis were eligible for the study. All women took AZT with a median duration of 53 days (IQR 39-64; all women ingested NVP-SD, 86% took 3TC. HIV-1 resistance mutations were detected in 20/50 (40% women, of which 70% displayed minority species. Variants with AZT-resistance mutations were found in 11/50 (22%, NVP-resistant variants in 9/50 (18% and 3TC-resistant variants in 4/50 women (8%. Three women harbored resistant HIV-1 against more than one drug. 49/50 infants, including the seven vertically HIV-infected were breastfed, 3/7 infants exhibited drug-resistant virus. CONCLUSION: Complex prophylaxis resulted in lower levels of NVP-selected resistance as compared to NVP-SD, but AZT-resistant HIV-1 emerged in a substantial proportion of women. Starting AZT in pregnancy week 14 instead of 28 as recommended by the current WHO-guidelines may further increase

  13. German-austrian recommendations for HIV1-therapy in pregnancy and in HIV1-exposed newborn - update 2008

    Buchholz Bernd

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract German-Austrian recommendations for HIV1-therapy in pregnancy - Update 2008 Bernd Buchholz (University Medical Centre Mannheim, Pediatric Clinic, Matthias Beichert (Mannheim, Gynecology and Obstetrics Practice, Ulrich Marcus (Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Thomas Grubert, Andrea Gingelmaier (Gynecology Clinic of the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Dr. med. Annette Haberl (HIV-Department, J. W. Goethe-University Hospital, Frankfurt, Dr. med. Brigitte Schmied (Otto-Wagner Spital, Wien. In Germany during the last years about 200-250 HIV1-infected pregnant women delivered a baby each year, a number that is currently increasing. To determine the HIV-status early in pregnancy voluntary HIV-testing of all pregnant women is recommended in Germany and Austria as part of prenatal care. In those cases, where HIV1-infection was known during pregnancy, since 1995 the rate of vertical transmission of HIV1 was reduced to 1-2%. This low transmission rate has been achieved by the combination of anti-retroviral therapy of pregnant women, caesarean section scheduled before onset of labour, anti-retroviral post exposition prophylaxis in the newborn and refraining from breast-feeding by the HIV1-infected mother. To keep pace with new results in research, approval of new anti-retroviral drugs and changes in the general treatment recommendations for HIV1-infected adults, in 1998, 2001, 2003 and 2005 an interdisciplinary consensus meeting was held. Gynaecologists, infectious disease specialists, paediatricians, pharmacologists, virologists and members of the German AIDS Hilfe (NGO were participating in this conference to update the prevention strategies. A fifth update became necessary in 2008. The updating process was started in January 2008 and was terminated in September 2008. The guidelines provide new recommendations on the indication and the starting point for HIV-therapy in pregnancies without complications, drugs and drug combinations to be

  14. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8{sup +} T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

    Kamata, Masakazu, E-mail: masa3k@ucla.edu [Division of Hematology-Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kim, Patrick Y. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ng, Hwee L. [Division of Infectious Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ringpis, Gene-Errol E.; Kranz, Emiko; Chan, Joshua; O' Connor, Sean [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yang, Otto O. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Division of Infectious Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States); AIDS Healthcare Foundation, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chen, Irvin S.Y. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8{sup +} T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8{sup +} T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24{sup Gag} in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance. - Highlights: • Ectopic expression of CD4ζ CAR in CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection. • Co-expression of two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection. • Protecting CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection suppresses its cytopathic effect.

  15. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8+ T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8+ T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8+ T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8+ T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24Gag in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8+ T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8+ T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8+ T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance. - Highlights: • Ectopic expression of CD4ζ CAR in CD8+ T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection. • Co-expression of two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8+ T cells from HIV-1 infection. • Protecting CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8+ T cells from HIV-1 infection suppresses its cytopathic effect

  16. Design and Characterization of a Peptide Mimotope of the HIV-1 gp120 Bridging Sheet

    Schiavone, Marco; Fiume, Giuseppe; Caivano, Antonella; de Laurentiis, Annamaria; Falcone, Cristina; Masci, Francesca Fasanella; Iaccino, Enrico; Mimmi, Selena; Palmieri, Camillo; Pisano, Antonio; Pontoriero, Marilena; Rossi, Annalisa; Scialdone, Annarita; Vecchio, Eleonora; Andreozzi, Concetta; Trovato, Maria; Rafay, Jan; Ferko, Boris; Montefiori, David; Lombardi, Angela; Morsica, Giulia; Poli, Guido; Quinto, Ileana; Pavone, Vincenzo; de Berardinis, Piergiuseppe; Scala, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The Bridging Sheet domain of HIV-1 gp120 is highly conserved among the HIV-1 strains and allows HIV-1 binding to host cells via the HIV-1 coreceptors. Further, the bridging sheet domain is a major target to neutralize HIV-1 infection. We rationally designed four linear peptide epitopes that mimic the three-dimensional structure of bridging sheet by using molecular modeling. Chemically synthesized peptides BS3 and BS4 showed a fair degree of antigenicity when tested in ELISA with IgG purified from HIV+ broadly neutralizing sera while the production of synthetic peptides BS1 and BS2 failed due to their high degree of hydrophobicity. To overcome this limitation, we linked all four BS peptides to the COOH-terminus of GST protein to test both their antigenicity and immunogenicity. Only the BS1 peptide showed good antigenicity; however, no envelope specific antibodies were elicited upon mice immunization. Therefore we performed further analyses by linking BS1 peptide to the NH2-terminus of the E2 scaffold from the Geobacillus Stearothermophylus PDH complex. The E2-BS1 fusion peptide showed good antigenic results, however only one immunized rabbit elicited good antibody titers towards both the monomeric and oligomeric viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). In addition, moderate neutralizing antibodies response was elicited against two HIV-1 clade B and one clade C primary isolates. These preliminary data validate the peptide mimotope approach as a promising tool to obtain an effective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:22754323

  17. Isolated HIV-1 core is active for reverse transcription

    Harrich David; Stenzel Deborah; Warrilow David

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Whether purified HIV-1 virion cores are capable of reverse transcription or require uncoating to be activated is currently controversial. To address this question we purified cores from a virus culture and tested for the ability to generate authentic reverse transcription products. A dense fraction (approximately 1.28 g/ml) prepared without detergent, possibly derived from disrupted virions, was found to naturally occur as a minor sub-fraction in our preparations. Core-like particles...

  18. Hydrophobic core flexibility modulates enzyme activity in HIV-1 protease

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.; Bolon, Daniel N. A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Di...

  19. Pursuit eye movement dysfunction in HIV-1 seropositive individuals.

    Sweeney, J A; Brew, B J; Keilp, J G; Sidtis, J J; Price, R W.

    1991-01-01

    Studies of smooth pursuit eye movements were conducted in 30 ambulatory drug-free HIV-1 seropositive patients who did not yet manifest marked clinical signs of the AIDS Dementia Complex. Seropositive patients demonstrated disturbances in pursuit eye movements that were correlated with extent of immunosuppression, with impairments on neuropsychological tests of fine motor control/speed, and with independent clinical staging of the AIDS Dementia Complex. The results provide quantitative evidenc...

  20. Maturation Pathways of Cross-Reactive HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies

    Dimiter S. Dimitrov

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Several human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs and antibody fragments, including the best characterized in terms of structure-function b12 and Fab X5, exhibit relatively potent and broad HIV-1 neutralizing activity. However, the elicitation of b12 or b12-like antibodies in vivo by vaccine immunogens based on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env has not been successful. B12 is highly divergent from the closest corresponding germline antibody while X5 is less divergent. We have hypothesized that the relatively high degree of specific somatic hypermutations may preclude binding of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env to closest germline antibodies, and that identifying antibodies that are intermediates in the pathways to maturation could help design novel vaccine immunogens to guide the immune system for their enhanced elicitation. In support of this hypothesis we have previously found that a germline-like b12 (monovalent and bivalent scFv as an Fc fusion protein or IgG lacks measurable binding to an Env as measured by ELISA with a sensitivity in the μM range [1]; here we present evidence confirming and expanding these findings for a panel of Envs. In contrast, a germline-like scFv X5 bound Env with high (nM affinity. To begin to explore the maturation pathways of these antibodies we identified several possible b12 intermediate antibodies and tested their neutralizing activity. These intermediate antibodies neutralized only some HIV-1 isolates and with relatively weak potency. In contrast, germline-like scFv X5 neutralized a subset of the tested HIV-1 isolates with comparable efficiencies to that of the mature X5. These results could help explain the relatively high immunogenicity of the coreceptor binding site on gp120 and the abundance of CD4-induced (CD4i antibodies in HIV-1-infected patients (X5 is a CD4i antibody as well as the maturation pathway of X5. They also can help identify antigens that can bind specifically to b12 germline and

  1. The CRISPR/Cas9 system inactivates latent HIV-1 proviral DNA

    Zhu, Weijun; Lei, Rongyue; Le Duff, Yann; Li, Jian; Guo, Fei; Wainberg, Mark A.; Liang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has transformed HIV-1 infection from a deadly disease to a manageable chronic illness, albeit does not provide a cure. The recently developed genome editing system called CRISPR/Cas9 offers a new tool to inactivate the integrated latent HIV-1 DNA and may serve as a new avenue toward cure. Findings We tested 10 sites in HIV-1 DNA that can be targeted by CRISPR/Cas9. The engineered CRISPR/Cas9 system was introduced into the JLat10.6 cells ...

  2. N6-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N6-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m6A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1–3) bind to m6A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1–3 proteins recognize m6A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4+ T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1–3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1–3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m6A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m6A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m6A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15528.001 PMID:27371828

  3. μ-opioid modulation of HIV-1 coreceptor expressionand HIV-1 replication

    A substantial proportion of HIV-1-infected individuals are intravenous drug users (IVDUs) who abuse opiates. Opioids induce a number of immunomodulatory effects that may directly influence HIV-1 disease progression. In the present report, we have investigated the effect of opioids on the expression of the major HIV-1 coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5. For these studies we have focused on opiates which are ligands for the μ-opioid receptor. Our results show that DAMGO, a selective μ-opioid agonist, increases CXCR4 and CCR5 expression in both CD3+ lymphoblasts and CD14+ monocytes three- to fivefold. Furthermore, DAMGO-induced elevation of HIV-1 coreceptor expression translates into enhanced replication of both X4 and R5 viral strains of HIV-1. We have confirmed the role of the μ-opioid receptor based on the ability of a μ-opioid receptor-selective antagonist to block the effects of DAMGO. We have also found that morphine enhances CXCR4 and CCR5 expression and subsequently increases both X4 and R5 HIV-1 infection. We suggest that the capacity of μ-opioids to increase HIV-1 coreceptor expression and replication may promote viral binding, trafficking of HIV-1-infected cells, and enhanced disease progression

  4. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  5. Differences in Clinical Manifestations of Acute and Early HIV-1 Infection between HIV-1 Subtypes in African Women

    Lemonovich, Tracy L.; Watkins, Richard R.; Morrison, Charles S.; Kwok, Cynthia; Chipato, Tsungai; Musoke, Robert; Arts, Eric J; Nankya, Immaculate; Salata, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the differences in clinical manifestations between women with various HIV-1 subtypes during acute (AI) and early (EI) HIV infection. In a longitudinal cohort study, clinical signs and symptoms among Uganda and Zimbabwe women with AI and EI were compared with HIV-negative controls; symptoms were assessed quarterly for 15 to 24 months. Early HIV infection was defined as the first visit during which a woman tested HIV antibody positive. Women who were HIV negative serologic...

  6. The hunt for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Lataillade, Max; Kozal, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    Currently, there are three distinct mechanistic classes of antiretrovirals: inhibitors of the HIV- 1 reverse transcriptase and protease enzymes and inhibitors of HIV entry, including receptor and coreceptor binding and cell fusion. A new drug class that inhibits the HIV-1 integrase enzyme (IN) is in development and may soon be available in the clinic. IN is an attractive drug target because it is essential for a stable and productive HIV-1 infection and there is no mammalian homologue of IN. Inhibitors of integrase enzyme (INI) block the integration of viral double-stranded DNA into the host cell's chromosomal DNA. HIV-1 integration has many potential steps that can be inhibited and several new compounds that target specific integration steps have been identified by drug developers. Recently, two INIs, GS-9137 and MK-0518, demonstrated promising early clinical trial results and have been advanced into later stage trials. In this review, we describe how IN facilitates HIV-1 integration, the needed enzyme cofactors, and the resultant byproducts created during integration. Furthermore, we review the different INIs under development, their mechanism of actions, site of IN inhibition, potency, resistance patterns, and discuss the early clinical trial results. PMID:16839248

  7. TopoisomeraseIIβ in HIV-1 transactivation.

    Chekuri, Anil; Bhaskar, C; Bollimpelli, V Satish; Kondapi, Anand K

    2016-03-01

    TopoisomeraseIIβ, an isoform of type II topoisomerase, was found to be functional in various viral infections. Its plausible role in HIV life cycle was also suggested earlier, but not clearly established. In the present study, we have investigated the role of TopoIIβ in HIV-1 infection by its gain and loss of function. Overexpression of TopoIIβ lead to an increase in viral replication, resulting in enhanced virion production. HIV-1 replication was impaired when TopoIIβ was down regulated by siRNA and inhibited by ICRF-193 and merbarone. The role of TopoIIβ in HIV-1 transcription was shown through its interaction with Tat and recruitement to long terminal repeat (LTR) region by co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assays. Involvement of TopoIIβ in transactivation of HIV-1 LTR was confirmed by luciferase assay in reporter cell line, TZM bl and also by transfection of reporter exogenously. It was also observed that LTR transactivation commensurated with the expression of TopoIIβ in the presence of Tat. In addition, a decreased viral gene expression on treatment with merbarone exemplifies the importance of catalytic activity of TopoIIβ in viral replication. These observations indicate that TopoIIβ is involved in the cascade of coactivator complexes that are recruited to LTR for regulation of HIV-1 transcription. PMID:26876283

  8. Hiv-1 Drug Resistance Among Newly Hiv-1 Infected Individuals Attending Tertiary Referral Center in Chennai, India

    Hussain Syed Iqbal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In the era of free HAART, accessibility and availability of ARV has been dramatically increased in India. However, rates of treatment literacy and adherence appear to be sub-optimal. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the extent of primary drug resistance in such settings. Materials and Methods: Between July and October 2006, 18 anti-retroviral-naοve individuals were identified as recent infected by the BED-Capture enzyme immunoassay in a VCTC clinic in Chennai. Specimens from these individuals were subjected to genotypic drug resistance testing. Phylogenetic trees were generated using MEGA for Windows version 4.0 using neighbor-joining method. The significant differences in polymorphic mutation frequencies between the study specimens and established subtype C-specific polymorphisms were examined using the Chi-square test. Results: Amino acid substitution (K103N and V106MV at drug resistance positions occurred in two (11% isolates, conferring high-level resistance to the non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors nevirapine (NVP, efavirenz (EFV, delavirdine (DLV and notably extensive genetic variations were observed. K122E (94.4% and K49R/KR (11.1% polymorphisms identified in this study have not been previously described in established subtype-C specific polymorphisms. The rate of polymorphisms showed marked difference at the locations V60, D121, V35, and D123 (P < 0.0001. All the sequences showed maximum homology with Indian HIV-1 subtype C reference strain C.IN.95IN21068. Conclusions: The finding of resistance to NNRTIs is of public health importance. There is an urgent need to establish surveillance for primary drug resistance in large scale. Further studies are required to determine the phenotype impact of newer polymorphic mutations in relation to drug resistance and viral fitness.

  9. Contrasting roles for TLR ligands in HIV-1 pathogenesis.

    Beda Brichacek

    Full Text Available The first line of a host's response to various pathogens is triggered by their engagement of cellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. Binding of microbial ligands to these receptors leads to the induction of a variety of cellular factors that alter intracellular and extracellular environment and interfere directly or indirectly with the life cycle of the triggering pathogen. Such changes may also affect any coinfecting microbe. Using ligands to Toll-like receptors (TLRs 5 and 9, we examined their effect on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 replication in lymphoid tissue ex vivo. We found marked differences in the outcomes of such treatment. While flagellin (TLR5 agonist treatment enhanced replication of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR 5-tropic and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4-tropic HIV-1, treatment with oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN M362 (TLR9 agonist suppressed both viral variants. The differential effects of these TLR ligands on HIV-1 replication correlated with changes in production of CC chemokines CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, and of CXC chemokines CXCL10, and CXCL12 in the ligand-treated HIV-1-infected tissues. The nature and/or magnitude of these changes were dependent on the ligand as well as on the HIV-1 viral strain. Moreover, the tested ligands differed in their ability to induce cellular activation as evaluated by the expression of the cluster of differentiation markers (CD 25, CD38, CD39, CD69, CD154, and human leukocyte antigen D related (HLA-DR as well as of a cell proliferation marker, Ki67, and of CCR5. No significant effect of the ligand treatment was observed on apoptosis and cell death/loss in the treated lymphoid tissue ex vivo. Our results suggest that binding of microbial ligands to TLRs is one of the mechanisms that mediate interactions between coinfected microbes and HIV-1 in human tissues. Thus, the engagement of appropriate TLRs by microbial molecules or their mimetic might become a new strategy for HIV therapy or prevention.

  10. Significant impact of non-B HIV-1 variants genetic diversity in Gabon on plasma HIV-1 RNA quantitation

    Mouinga-Ondeme, A.; Mabika-Mabika, A.; Alalade, P.; Mongo, A. D.; Sica, J.; Liégeois, Florian; Rouet, F.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluations of HIV-1 RNA viral load assays are lacking in Central Africa. The main objective of our study was to assess the reliability of HIV-1 RNA results obtained with three different assays for samples collected in Gabon. A total of 137 plasma specimens were assessed for HIV-1 RNA using the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (R) and Nuclisens HIV-1 EasyQ (R) version 2.0 assays. It included HIV-1 non-B samples (n = 113) representing six subtypes, 10 CRFs and 18 URFs from patients infected with HIV-1 an...

  11. HIV-1 prevalence and factors associated with infection in the conflict-affected region of North Uganda

    Musinguzi Joshua

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 1986, northern Uganda has been severely affected by civil strife with most of its population currently living internally displaced in protected camps. This study aims at estimating the HIV-1 prevalence among this population and the factors associated with infection. Methods In June-December 2005, a total of 3051 antenatal clinics attendees in Gulu, Kitgum and Pader districts were anonymously tested for HIV-1 infection as part of routine sentinel surveillance. Factors associated with the infection were evaluated using logistic regression models. Results The age-standardised HIV-1 prevalence was 10.3%, 9.1% and 4.3% in the Gulu, Kitgum and Pader district, respectively. The overall prevalence in the area comprised of these districts was 8.2% when data was weighted according to the districts' population size. Data from all sites combined show that, besides older women [20–24 years: adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 1.96, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.29–2.97; 25–29 years: AOR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.30–3.11; ≥ 30 years: AOR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.23–2.97], unmarried women (AOR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.06–2.04, and those with a partner with a non-traditional occupation (AOR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.18–2.21, women living outside of protected camps for internally displaced persons have a higher risk of being HIV-1 infected than internally displaced women (AOR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.15–2.08. Conclusion Although published data from Gulu district show a declining HIV-1 prevalence trend that is consistent with that observed at the national level since 1993, the prevalence in North Uganda is still high. Internally displaced women have a lower risk of being infected probably because of their reduced mobility and accessibility, and increased access to health prevention services.

  12. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 promotes HIV-1 attachment but not fusion to target cells.

    Naoyuki Kondo

    Full Text Available Incorporation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 into HIV-1 particles is known to markedly enhance the virus binding and infection of cells expressing lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1. At the same time, ICAM-1 has been reported to exert a less pronounced effect on HIV-1 fusion with lymphoid cells. Here we examined the role of ICAM-1/LFA-1 interactions in productive HIV-1 entry into lymphoid cells using a direct virus-cell fusion assay. ICAM-1 promoted HIV-1 attachment to cells in a temperature-dependent manner. It exerted a marginal effect on virus binding in the cold, but enhanced binding up to 4-fold at physiological temperature. ICAM-1-independent attachment in the cold was readily reversible upon subsequent incubation at elevated temperature, whereas ICAM-1-bearing particles were largely retained by cells. The better virus retention resulted in a proportional increase in HIV-1 internalization and fusion, suggesting that ICAM-1 did not specifically accelerate endocytosis or fusion steps. We also measured the rates of CD4 engagement, productive endocytosis and HIV-endosome fusion using specific fusion inhibitors. These rates were virtually independent of the presence of ICAM-1 in viral particles. Importantly, irrespective of the presence of ICAM-1, HIV-1 escaped from the low temperature block, which stopped virus endocytosis and fusion, much later than from a membrane-impermeant fusion inhibitor targeting surface-accessible particles. This result, along with the complete inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a small molecule dynamin inhibitor, implies this virus enters lymphoid cells used in this study via endocytosis and that this pathway is not altered by the viral ICAM-1. Our data highlight the role of ICAM-1 in stabilizing the HIV-1 attachment to LFA-1 expressing cells, which leads to a proportional enhancement of the receptor-mediated uptake and fusion with endosomes.

  13. Predicting Pregnancy in HIV-1-Discordant Couples

    Guthrie, Brandon L.; Choi, Robert Y.; Bosire, Rose; Kiarie, James N.; Mackelprang, Romel D.; Gatuguta, Anne; John-Stewart, Grace C.; FARQUHAR, Carey

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the incidence and predictors of pregnancy in HIV-1-discordant couples from Nairobi, Kenya. Women from 454 discordant couples were followed for up to 2 years. One-year cumulative incidence of pregnancy was 9.7%. Pregnancy rates did not differ significantly between HIV-1-infected and uninfected women (HR = 1.46). The majority of pregnancies occurred among women < 30 years old reporting a desire for future children (1-year incidence 22.2%). Pregnancy rates may be high among d...

  14. Lipid domains in HIV-1 assembly

    CyrilFavard

    2014-01-01

    In CD+ 4 T cells, HIV-1 buds from the host cell plasma membrane. The viral Gag polyprotein is mainly responsible for this process. However, the intimate interaction of Gag and lipids at the plasma membrane as well as its consequences, in terms of lipids lateral organization and virus assembly, is still under debate. In this review we propose to revisit the role of plasma membrane lipids in HIV-1 Gag targeting and assembly, at the light of lipid membranes biophysics and literature dealing with...

  15. A SUCCESSION OF MECHANISMS STIMULATE EFFICIENT RECONSTITUTED HIV-1 MINUS STRAND STRONG STOP DNA TRANSFER

    Song, Min; Balakrishnan, Mini; Gorelick, Robert J.; Bambara, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Donor–acceptor template systems in vitro were designed to test mechanisms of minus strand transfer of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1). Donor RNA D199, extending from the 5' end of the HIV-1 genome to the primer binding site (PBS), promoted transfer to only 35% with an acceptor RNA representing the 3' terminal 97 nucleotides. Whereas donor RNA D520, including an additional 321 nucleotides 3' of PBS, exhibited 75% transfer. Both donors transferred through an invasion driven pathway, but ...

  16. Lack of Evidence for Changing Virulence of HIV-1 in North America

    Herbeck, Joshua T.; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.; Xiuhong Li; Zheng Hu; Roger Detels; John Phair; Charles Rinaldo; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Margolick, Joseph B; James I Mullins

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several long-term cohort studies and in-vitro fitness assays have resulted in inconsistent reports on changes in HIV-1 virulence, including reports of decreasing, stable, and increasing virulence over the course of the AIDS pandemic. We tested the hypothesis of changing HIV-1 virulence by examining trends in prognostic clinical markers of disease progression from 1984 to 2005 among nearly 400 antiretroviral-naïve participants in the United States Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MAC...

  17. Selection and Characterization of HIV-1 with a Novel S68 Deletion in Reverse Transcriptase▿

    Schinazi, Raymond F.; Massud, Ivana; Rapp, Kimberly L.; Cristiano, Meta; Detorio, Mervi A.; Stanton, Richard A.; Bennett, Matthew A.; Kierlin-Duncan, Monique; Lennerstrand, Johan; Nettles, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) represents a significant problem in the design of novel therapeutics and the management of treatment regimens in infected persons. Resistance profiles can be elucidated by defining modifications to the viral genome conferred upon exposure to novel nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTI). In vitro testing of HIV-1LAI-infected primary human lymphocytes treated with β-d-2′,3′-dideoxy-2′,3′-didehydro-5-fluorocytidine (DFC; ...

  18. Results of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Assay for Specimens Yielding “Target Not Detected” Results by the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 Test▿

    Babady, N. Esther; Germer, Jeffrey J.; Yao, Joseph D. C.

    2009-01-01

    No significantly discordant results were observed between the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay and the COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 Test (CTM) among 1,190 unique clinical plasma specimens obtained from laboratories located in 40 states representing all nine U.S. geographic regions and previously yielding “target not detected” results by CTM.

  19. Genetic Characteristics, Coreceptor Usage Potential and Evolution of Nigerian HIV-1 Subtype G and CRF02_AG Isolates

    Ajoge, Hannah O.; Gordon, Michelle L.; de Oliveira, Tulio; Green, Taryn N.; Ibrahim, Sani; Shittu, Oladapo S.; Olonitola, Stephen O.; Ahmad, Aliyu A.; Ndung'u, Thumbi

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 CRF02_AG and subtype G (HIV-1G) account for most HIV infections in Nigeria, but their evolutionary trends have not been well documented. To better elucidate the dynamics of the epidemic in Nigeria we characterised the gag and env genes of North-Central Nigerian HIV-1 isolates from pregnant women. Of 28 samples sequenced in both genes, the predominant clades were CRF02_AG (39%) and HIV-1G (32%). Higher predicted proportion of CXCR4-tropic (X4) HIV-1G isolates was noted compared to CRF02_AG (p = 0.007, Fisher's exact test). Phylogenetic and Bayesian analysis conducted on our sequences and all the dated available Nigerian sequences on the Los Alamos data base showed that CRF02_AG and HIV-1G entered into Nigeria through multiple entries, with presence of HIV-1G dating back to early 1980s. This study underlines the genetic complexity of the HIV-1 epidemic in Nigeria, possible subtype-specific differences in co-receptor usage, and the evolutionary trends of the predominant HIV-1 strains in Nigeria, which may have implications for the design of biomedical interventions and better understanding of the epidemic. PMID:21423811

  20. Genetic characteristics, coreceptor usage potential and evolution of Nigerian HIV-1 subtype G and CRF02_AG isolates.

    Hannah O Ajoge

    Full Text Available HIV-1 CRF02_AG and subtype G (HIV-1G account for most HIV infections in Nigeria, but their evolutionary trends have not been well documented. To better elucidate the dynamics of the epidemic in Nigeria we characterised the gag and env genes of North-Central Nigerian HIV-1 isolates from pregnant women. Of 28 samples sequenced in both genes, the predominant clades were CRF02_AG (39% and HIV-1G (32%. Higher predicted proportion of CXCR4-tropic (X4 HIV-1G isolates was noted compared to CRF02_AG (p = 0.007, Fisher's exact test. Phylogenetic and Bayesian analysis conducted on our sequences and all the dated available Nigerian sequences on the Los Alamos data base showed that CRF02_AG and HIV-1G entered into Nigeria through multiple entries, with presence of HIV-1G dating back to early 1980s. This study underlines the genetic complexity of the HIV-1 epidemic in Nigeria, possible subtype-specific differences in co-receptor usage, and the evolutionary trends of the predominant HIV-1 strains in Nigeria, which may have implications for the design of biomedical interventions and better understanding of the epidemic.

  1. HIV-1 binding and neutralizing antibodies of injecting drug users

    E.P. Ouverney

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated a stronger seroreactivity against some synthetic peptides responsible for inducing neutralizing antibodies in injecting drug users (IDU compared to that of individuals sexually infected with HIV-1 (S, but the effectiveness in terms of the neutralizing ability of these antibodies has not been evaluated. Our objective was to study the humoral immune response of IDU by determining the specificity of their antibodies and the presence of neutralizing antibodies. The neutralization capacity against the HIV-1 isolate MN (genotype B, the primary HIV-1 isolate 95BRRJ021 (genotype F, and the seroreactivity with peptides known to induce neutralizing antibodies, from the V2 and V3 loops of different HIV-1 subtypes, were analyzed. Seroreactivity indicates that IDU plasma are more likely to recognize a broader range of peptides than S plasma, with significantly higher titers, especially of V3 peptides. Similar neutralization frequencies of the MN isolate were observed in plasma of the IDU (16/47 and S (20/60 groups in the 1:10 dilution. The neutralization of the 95BRRJ021 isolate was more frequently observed for plasma from the S group (15/23 than from the IDU group (15/47, P = 0.0108. No correlation between neutralization and seroreactivity with the peptides tested was observed. These results suggest that an important factor responsible for the extensive and broad humoral immune response observed in IDU is their infection route. There was very little difference in neutralizing antibody response between the IDU and S groups despite their differences in seroreactivity and health status.

  2. Use of amplification refractory mutation system PCR assay as a simple and effective tool to detect HIV-1 drug resistance mutations.

    Nanfack, Aubin J; Agyingi, Lucy; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Ngai, Johnson N; Colizzi, Vittorio; Nyambi, Phillipe N

    2015-05-01

    Access to genotyping assays to determine successful antiretroviral treatment (ART) is limited in resource-constrained settings by high cost, suggesting the need for a cost-effective and simplified method to identify HIV-1 drug resistance (HIVDR) mutations. In this study, an amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)-PCR assay was developed and used to investigate the most frequent HIVDR mutations affecting first-line ART in settings where WHO ART guidelines are applied. Seventy-five HIV-positive (HIV(+)) samples from Cameroon were used to assess the performance of this assay. Sequencing of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase was simultaneously performed for comparison, and discordant samples were tested with a Trugene HIV-1 genotyping kit. The ARMS-PCR assay was able to detect M184V, T215Y/F, K103N, and Y181C mutations with sensitivities of 96.8%, 85.7%, 91.3%, and 70%, respectively, and specificities of 90.6%, 95%, 100%, 96.9%, respectively, compared with data on sequencing. The results indicated the highest positive predictive value for K103N (100%) and the highest negative predictive value for M184V (97.5%). ARMS-PCR's limits of detection for mutations M184V, T215Y/F, K103N, and Y181C were HIV-1 clades (CRF02_AG and non-CRF02_AG). In addition, this approach was more cost-effective than other genotyping assays. The high throughput, the cost-effectiveness, and the simplicity of the ARMS-PCR assay make it a suitable tool to monitor HIVDR patterns in resource-constrained settings with broad HIV-1 genetic diversity. PMID:25788547

  3. HIV-1 therapy with monoclonal antibody 3BNC117 elicits host immune responses against HIV-1

    Schoofs, Till; Klein, Florian; Braunschweig, Malte; Kreider, Edward F.; Feldmann, Anna; Nogueira, Lilian; Oliveira, Thiago; Lorenzi, Julio C. C.; Parrish, Erica H.; Learn, Gerald H.; West, Anthony P.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Schlesinger, Sarah J.; Seaman, Michael S.; Czartoski, Julie

    2016-01-01

    3BNC117 is a broad and potent neutralizing antibody to HIV-1 that targets the CD4 binding site on the viral envelope spike. When administered passively, this antibody can prevent infection in animal models and suppress viremia in HIV-1–infected individuals. Here we report that HIV-1 immunotherapy with a single injection of 3BNC117 affects host antibody responses in viremic individuals. In comparison to untreated controls that showed little change in their neutralizing activity over a 6-month ...

  4. Synthesis and anti-HIV-1 activity of N-hydroxy-N1-aminoguanidines.

    Doubell, P C; Oliver, D W

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis of 13 new Schiff bases of N-hydroxy-N1-aminoguanidines starting from thiosemicarbazide are reported. These new derivatives were for the first time tested against infection by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) using the human T-lymphocyte cell line. Four N-hydroxy-N1-aminoguanidines exhibited HIV-1 inhibition in the micromolar range. The most active compound, [1-(1'-chloro-2'-hydroxy-3'-methoxybenzylidene)amino]-3-hydroxy guanidine inhibited HIV-1 by 96% at 10 micrograms/ml concentration. All the derivatives exhibited substantial cytotoxicity at 320 micrograms/ml concentration. The results indicate that the activity against HIV-1 increases with increasing hydrophobicity and substituents with electron-donating properties. PMID:1586383

  5. Phenyl-1-Pyridin-2yl-Ethanone-Based Iron Chelators Increase IκB-α Expression, Modulate CDK2 and CDK9 Activities, and Inhibit HIV-1 Transcription

    Kumari, Namita; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Breuer, Denitra; Niu, Xiaomei; Lin, Xionghao; Xu, Min; Gavrilenko, Konstantin; Kashanchi, Fatah; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 transcription is activated by the Tat protein, which recruits CDK9/cyclin T1 to the HIV-1 promoter. CDK9 is phosphorylated by CDK2, which facilitates formation of the high-molecular-weight positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex. We previously showed that chelation of intracellular iron inhibits CDK2 and CDK9 activities and suppresses HIV-1 transcription, but the mechanism of the inhibition was not understood. In the present study, we tested a set of novel iron chelators for the ability to inhibit HIV-1 transcription and elucidated their mechanism of action. Novel phenyl-1-pyridin-2yl-ethanone (PPY)-based iron chelators were synthesized and examined for their effects on cellular iron, HIV-1 inhibition, and cytotoxicity. Activities of CDK2 and CDK9, expression of CDK9-dependent and CDK2-inhibitory mRNAs, NF-κB expression, and HIV-1- and NF-κB-dependent transcription were determined. PPY-based iron chelators significantly inhibited HIV-1, with minimal cytotoxicity, in cultured and primary cells chronically or acutely infected with HIV-1 subtype B, but they had less of an effect on HIV-1 subtype C. Iron chelators upregulated the expression of IκB-α, with increased accumulation of cytoplasmic NF-κB. The iron chelators inhibited CDK2 activity and reduced the amount of CDK9/cyclin T1 in the large P-TEFb complex. Iron chelators reduced HIV-1 Gag and Env mRNA synthesis but had no effect on HIV-1 reverse transcription. In addition, iron chelators moderately inhibited basal HIV-1 transcription, equally affecting HIV-1 and Sp1- or NF-κB-driven transcription. By virtue of their involvement in targeting several key steps in HIV-1 transcription, these novel iron chelators have the potential for the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25155598

  6. Immunodeficient Parameters in the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat Model

    Chang, Sulie L.; Frank Ocasio; Joseq A. Beltran

    2007-01-01

    Recently an HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rat model was created that carries a gag-pol-deleted HIV-1 genome under the control of the HIV-1 viral promoter. However, other viral proteins are expressed in most organs and tissues, and are found in the circulating blood. Since HIV-1 targets the immune system in humans, we examined two immunological parameters, leukocyte-endothelial adhesion (LEA) and inflammatory cytokine production, in 5 mo old HIV-1Tg rats to identify immune functions that may be i...

  7. Viral escape in the CNS with multidrug-resistant HIV-1

    Charles Béguelin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV-1 viral escape in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF despite viral suppression in plasma is rare [1,2]. We describe the case of a 50-year-old HIV-1 infected patient who was diagnosed with HIV-1 in 1995. Antiretroviral therapy (ART was started in 1998 with a CD4 T cell count of 71 cells/ìL and HIV-viremia of 46,000 copies/mL. ART with zidovudine (AZT, lamivudine (3TC and efavirenz achieved full viral suppression. After the patient had interrupted ART for two years, treatment was re-introduced with tenofovir (TDF, emtricitabin (FTC and ritonavir boosted atazanavir (ATVr. This regimen suppressed HIV-1 in plasma for nine years and CD4 cells stabilized around 600 cells/ìL. Since July 2013, the patient complained about severe gait ataxia and decreased concentration. Materials and Methods: Additionally to a neurological examination, two lumbar punctures, a cerebral MRI and a neuropsycological test were performed. HIV-1 viral load in plasma and in CSF was quantified using Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 version 2.0 (Cobas Ampliprep, Roche diagnostic, Basel, Switzerland with a detection limit of 20 copies/mL. Drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and protease were evaluated using bulk sequencing. Results: The CSF in January 2014 showed a pleocytosis with 75 cells/ìL (100% mononuclear and 1,184 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL, while HIV-1 in plasma was below 20 copies/mL. The resistance testing of the CSF-HIV-1 RNA showed two NRTI resistance-associated mutations (M184V and K65R and one NNRTI resistance-associated mutation (K103N. The cerebral MRI showed increased signal on T2-weighted images in the subcortical and periventricular white matter, in the basal ganglia and thalamus. Four months after ART intensification with AZT, 3TC, boosted darunavir and raltegravir, the pleocytosis in CSF cell count normalized to 1 cell/ìL and HIV viral load was suppressed. The neurological symptoms improved; however, equilibrium disturbances and impaired memory

  8. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies against HIV-1 p24 Protein and Its Application in Colloidal Gold Immunochromatographic Assay for HIV-1 Detection

    Yi Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 p24 protein is the most abundant viral protein of HIV-1. This protein is secreted in blood serum at high levels during the early stages of HIV-1 infection, making it a biomarker for early diagnosis. In this study, a colloidal gold immunochromatographic assay (GICA was established for detecting p24 protein using mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. The HIV-1 p24 protein was expressed in E. coli strain BL21 and the purified protein was used to immunize mice. Stable hybridoma cell lines secreting anti-p24 monoclonal antibodies were obtained after ELISA screening and subcloning by limiting dilution. 34 different capture and labeling mAb pairs were selected by a novel antibody-capture indirect sandwich ELISA and then applied in GICA to detect p24 protein. The GICA method has a limit of detection (LOD of 25 pg/mL and could detect p24 protein in all 10 positive samples obtained from the National Reference of HIV-1 p24 antigen. Out of 153 negative samples tested, 3 false positives results were obtained. The overall specificity of this test was 98.03%. The good sensitivity and specificity of this method make it a suitable alternative to provide a more convenient and efficient tool for early diagnosis of HIV infection.

  9. Picomolar dichotomous activity of gnidimacrin against HIV-1.

    Li Huang

    Full Text Available Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has offered a promising approach for controlling HIV-1 replication in infected individuals. However, with HARRT, HIV-1 is suppressed rather than eradicated due to persistence of HIV-1 in latent viral reservoirs. Thus, purging the virus from latent reservoirs is an important strategy toward eradicating HIV-1 infection. In this study, we discovered that the daphnane diterpene gnidimacrin, which was previously reported to have potent anti-cancer cell activity, activated HIV-1 replication and killed persistently-infected cells at picomolar concentrations. In addition to its potential to purge HIV-1 from latently infected cells, gnidimacrin potently inhibited a panel of HIV-1 R5 virus infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs at an average concentration lower than 10 pM. In contrast, gnidimacrin only partially inhibited HIV-1 ×4 virus infection of PBMCs. The strong anti-HIV-1 R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was correlated with its effect on down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. The anti-R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was completely abrogated by a selective protein kinase C beta inhibitor enzastaurin, which suggests that protein kinase C beta plays a key role in the potent anti-HIV-1 activity of gnidimacrin in PBMCs. In summary, these results suggest that gnidimacrin could activate latent HIV-1, specifically kill HIV-1 persistently infected cells, and inhibit R5 viruses at picomolar concentrations.

  10. Enhanced clearance of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in vivo.

    Lu, Ching-Lan; Murakowski, Dariusz K; Bournazos, Stylianos; Schoofs, Till; Sarkar, Debolina; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A; Nogueira, Lilian; Golijanin, Jovana; Gazumyan, Anna; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Caskey, Marina; Chakraborty, Arup K; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-05-20

    Antiretroviral drugs and antibodies limit HIV-1 infection by interfering with the viral life cycle. In addition, antibodies also have the potential to guide host immune effector cells to kill HIV-1-infected cells. Examination of the kinetics of HIV-1 suppression in infected individuals by passively administered 3BNC117, a broadly neutralizing antibody, suggested that the effects of the antibody are not limited to free viral clearance and blocking new infection but also include acceleration of infected cell clearance. Consistent with these observations, we find that broadly neutralizing antibodies can target CD4(+) T cells infected with patient viruses and can decrease their in vivo half-lives by a mechanism that requires Fcγ receptor engagement in a humanized mouse model. The results indicate that passive immunotherapy can accelerate elimination of HIV-1-infected cells. PMID:27199430

  11. Using Operational Analysis to Improve Access to Pulmonary Function Testing

    Ada Ip

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Timely pulmonary function testing is crucial to improving diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary diseases. Perceptions of poor access at an academic pulmonary function laboratory prompted analysis of system demand and capacity to identify factors contributing to poor access. Methods. Surveys and interviews identified stakeholder perspectives on operational processes and access challenges. Retrospective data on testing demand and resource capacity was analyzed to understand utilization of testing resources. Results. Qualitative analysis demonstrated that stakeholder groups had discrepant views on access and capacity in the laboratory. Mean daily resource utilization was 0.64 (SD 0.15, with monthly average utilization consistently less than 0.75. Reserved testing slots for subspecialty clinics were poorly utilized, leaving many testing slots unfilled. When subspecialty demand exceeded number of reserved slots, there was sufficient capacity in the pulmonary function schedule to accommodate added demand. Findings were shared with stakeholders and influenced scheduling process improvements. Conclusion. This study highlights the importance of operational data to identify causes of poor access, guide system decision-making, and determine effects of improvement initiatives in a variety of healthcare settings. Importantly, simple operational analysis can help to improve efficiency of health systems with little or no added financial investment.

  12. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of resveratrol derivatives%白藜芦醇衍生物体外抗HIV-1活性的初步研究

    黄宁; 杨柳萌; 王睿睿; 朱海亮; 郑永唐

    2012-01-01

    Objective; To study the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of resveratrol derivatives and the mechanisms. Methods; The cytotoxicities of compounds were tested by MTT assay. The anti-HIV activities of compounds in acute infection were evaluated by cytopathogenic effect (CPE) assay. The inhibition of HIV-lKm018 replication in PBMC was evaluated by p24 antigen expression. The fusion between of HIV-1 infected and uninfected cells was e-valuated by CPE. The inhibition of HIV-1 recombinant reverse transcriptase activity, HIV-1 recombinant protease activity and direct HIV-1 virus killing were used to determine the mechanism. Results; IFB-1 and IFB-9 from resveratrol derivatives markedly inhibited syncytium formation with selective indexes of 16. 16 and 230.27 , respectively. IFB-1 and IFB-9 suppressed HIV-1 p24 antigen production in acutely HIV-111IB-infected C8166 cells with EC50, of 14.57 and 0.23 μg·mL-1 , respectively. They also inhibited HIV-lKM018 replication in PBMC. IFB-1 and IFB-9 blocked the fusion between normal cells and chronically HIV-1-infected cells, but did not inhibit recombinant RT, PR activities and did not directly kill HIV-1. Conclusions; IFB-1 and IFB-9 show potential anti-HIV-1 activities and the mechanism might be associated with inhibition virus entry.%目的:检测白藜芦醇衍生物IFB-1和IFB-9的体外抗HIV-1活性,并对其进行抗HIV-1作用机制的初步研究.方法:采用MTT比色法检测白藜芦醇衍生物IFB-1和IFB-9的细胞毒性;细胞病变法检测化合物对HIV-1急性感染的抑制活性;采用HIV-1 p24抗原ELISA方法检测临床分离株HIV-1KM018在PBMC中复制的抑制实验;采用细胞病变法检测HIV-1感染和未感染细胞之间的融合;采用HIV-1重组逆转录酶活性抑制实验,HIV-1重组蛋白酶活性抑制实验以及直接杀病毒实验来研究化合物体外抗HIV-1机制.结果:白藜芦醇衍生物IFB-1和IFB-9对HIV-1 ⅢB诱导的合胞体形成抑制的选择指数分别为16

  13. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of Qishile, a Chinese medicine effective fraction formula%中药有效部位复方奇士乐体外抗HIV-1活性研究

    杨柳萌; 王睿睿; 张高红; 张兴杰; 陈纪军; 郑永唐

    2011-01-01

    目的 评价有效部位复方奇士乐(QSL)的体外抗HIV-1药效学.方法 通过合胞体抑制、HIV-1感染细胞保护、HIV-1 p24抗原测定等方法检测急性感染中QSL对HIV-1实验株、临床分离株、耐药株的抑制作用和对慢性感染细胞中病毒复制的影响;通过ELISA方法和荧光法分别检测了QSL体外抑制HIV-1逆转录酶和蛋白酶活性作用.结果 有效部位复方制剂QSL能有效地抑制HIV-1ⅢB诱导淋巴细胞病变、保护HIV-1ⅢB感染MT-4细胞死亡、阻断HIV-1ⅢB慢性感染H9细胞与C8166细胞间融合的作用.QSL对HIV-1实验株HIV-1ⅢB、临床分离株HIV-1KM018、耐药株HIV-174V的病毒复制也有较好的抑制作用.QSL抑制HIV活性的作用机制可能为多靶点,主要是抑制HIV逆转录酶、蛋白酶和病毒进入细胞.结论 QSL是具有较好体外抗HIV-1活性的中药有效部位复方.%Aim To evaluate the anti-HIV-1 activities of Qishile ( QSL) in vitro , a Chinese medicine effective fraction formula. Methods The inhibition of syncytia formation induced by HIV -1 was determined under microscopy. The protection of HIV-1 induced MT-4 cell lytic effects was measured by MTT assay . The level of HIV-1 p24 antigen in acute and chronic HIV-1 infection was assayed by ELISA. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and protease activites in vitro were tested by ELISA and FRET, respectively. Results QSL markedly inhibited syncytium formation induced by HIV-1 ⅢB , protected HIV-1 ⅢB induced MT-4 cell lytic effects and blocked cell-to-cell fusion. It also showed obviously inhibitory effect on the clinical strain HIV-1KM018 ancl drug resistant strain HIV-174V replication.QSL maybe inhibited HIV-I replication through multiple targets, including reverse transcriptase , protease and virus entry. Conclusion QSL is a Chinese medicine effective fraction formula with potent anti-HIV-1 activities.

  14. Subtype and sequence analysis of HIV-1 strains in Heilongjiang Province

    WANG Fu-xiang; ZHOU Hui; LING Hong; ZHOU Hai-zhou; LIU Wei-hua; SHAO Yi-ming; ZHOU Jin

    2007-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) is divided into two types, HIV-1 (groups M, N and O) and HIV-2.Heilongjiang Province located in the northeast of China, and the feature of the subtype distribution and sequence characteristics of HIV-1 strains prevalent in Heilongjiang Province is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the subtype distribution and genetic characteristics of HIV-1 strains in one hospital in Heilongjiang Province.Methods HIV-1 env gene was amplified by nested-PCR from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from 19 HIV-1 seropositive individuals in Heilongjiang Province. The C2-V3 region was sequenced. Aligned the nucleotide sequence of 19 samples with CLUSTAL W (BioEdit) software, results were acquired and used for phylogenetic tree analysis after artificial adjustment. Reference sequence, downloaded from Los Alamos HIV Sequence Database,was used to identify the subtype of obtained sequence. Genetic distance between sequences was assessed using the software MEGA 3.1 Kimura 2-parameter, and the Phylogenetic tree was reestablished with Neighbor-Joining method.Results Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that 19 Heilongjiang strains clustered closely to subtype B strain from Thailand and were far from other international subtype reference strains. Statistical test showed no significant discrepancy between the genetic distance of interclass and intra-class (P>0.05). The analysis of V3 loop amino sequence of 19 Heilongjiang B strains revealed that V3 tip motif of 10 samples (52.63%) was GPGQ, and of 4 samples (21.53%) was GPGR.Conclusions The subtype of 19 HIV-1 seropositive individuals in Heilongjiang Province is B', and it is introduced from He'nan Province. V3 tip motifs of the HIV-1 isolates are mainly GPGQ and GPGR.

  15. Modern Molecular Genetic Technologies in the Supervision over HIV-1 Subtypes Circulation

    N.N. Zaitseva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to assess the capabilities of modern technologies in the monitoring of genetic HIV-1 subtypes circulating within some administrative territories (by the example of Privolzhsky Federal District (PFD during the period of 2008–2014. Materials and Methods. We carried out molecular genetic analysis of 647 blood plasma samples of HIV-1 infected patients from 13 regions of PFD (Russia. Genotyping was carried out using a test kit ViroSeqТМ HIV-1 and Genotyping System Software v.2.8 (Celera Diagnostic, USA. Subtyping was performed online using COMET HIV-1/2 and REGA HIV-1 Subtyping Tool, and Phylogenic analysis including reference nucleotide sequences from GenBank of European countries, America, Australia, CIS and Russian regions, was carried out using MEGA 5.2, Maximum Likelihood analysis and Kimura (bootstrap level 1000. Results. The study of HIV-1 subtypes in PFD revealed the tendency for subtype A dominating, both in the period of 2008–2010 (91.3%, and in 2011–2014 (95.6%. Subtype B appeared to be the second most frequent HIV-1 subtype (8.7 and 2%, respectively. We found the increase of subtype diversity of genetic HIV-1 variants in the samples dated 2011–2014, mainly, due to recombinant variants (AB, AG, CRF06_cpx, CRF01_AE and subtype C strain. There was revealed phylogenic affinity and proved molecular epidemiological relationships between nucleotide sequences of viruses isolated in HIV positive patients in PFD, and the sequences taken as reference from international base GenBank. Conclusion. Modern molecular genetic techniques used in epidemiological surveillance over HIV infection, and when studying subtype structure of HIV, can serve as the prime tools to monitor a current situation, as well as for epidemic prognosis. The methods are able to assess, study the subtypes in order to make decisions for developing preventive and anti-epidemic measures to stabilize HIV infection epidemic.

  16. Clade A HIV-1 Gag-Specific T Cell Responses Are Frequent but Do Not Correlate with Viral Loads in a Cohort of Treatment-Naive HIV-Infected Individuals Living in Guinea-Bissau

    Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov; Gómez Román, Victor Raúl; Skov Jensen, Sanne;

    2012-01-01

    In a phase I clinical trial in Guinea-Bissau, we have tested an immunotherapeutic 33 HIV-1 vaccine candidate in HIV-1-infected subjects (Gómez Román et al., under review).…......In a phase I clinical trial in Guinea-Bissau, we have tested an immunotherapeutic 33 HIV-1 vaccine candidate in HIV-1-infected subjects (Gómez Román et al., under review).…...

  17. Novel HIV-1 Therapeutics through Targeting Altered Host Cell Pathways

    Coley, William; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Van Duyne, Rachel; KASHANCHI, FATAH

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) strains presents a challenge for the design of new drugs. Anti-HIV compounds currently in use are the subject of advanced clinical trials using either HIV-1 reverse-transcriptase, viral protease, or integrase inhibitors. Recent studies show an increase in the number of HIV-1 variants resistant to anti-retroviral agents in newly infected individuals. Targeting host cell factors involved in the regulation of HIV-1 repli...

  18. HIV-1 vaccine design: Learning from natural infection

    T.L.G.M. van den Kerkhof

    2016-01-01

    Het humane immuundeficiëntie virus type 1 (hiv-1) is het virus dat aids veroorzaakt. Er is nog steeds geen bescherming tegen een hiv-1 infectie en de beëindiging van de wereldwijde epidemie kan waarschijnlijk alleen worden bereikt met behulp van een vaccin. Een hiv-1 vaccin zal bescherming moeten bi

  19. NKT cells in HIV-1 infection

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique T cell population that have important immunoregulatory functions and have been shown to be involved in host immunity against a range of microorganisms. It also emerges that they might play a role in HIV-1 infection, and therefore be selectively depleted during the early stages of infection. Recent studies are reviewed regarding the dynamics of NKT depletion during HIV-I infection and their recovery under highly active antiretrovirai treatment (HAART). Possible mechanisms for these changes are proposed based on the recent developments in HIV pathogenesis. Further discussions are focused on HIV's disruption of NKT activation by downregulating CDId expression on antigen presentation cells (APC). HIV-1 protein Nefis found to play the major role by interrupting the intraceilular trafficking of nascent and recycling CDId molecules.

  20. Intestinal microbiota and HIV-1 infection

    E. B. S. M. Trindade

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota consists of a qualitatively and quantitatively diverse range of microorganisms dynamically interacting with the host. It is remarkably stable with regard to the presence of microorganisms and their roles which, however, can be altered due to pathological conditions, diet composition, gastrointestinal disturbances and/or drug ingestion. The present review aimed at contributing to the discussion about changes in the intestinal microbiota due to HIV-1 infection, focusing on the triad infection-microbiota-nutrition as factors that promote intestinal bacterial imbalance. Intestinal microbiota alterations can be due to the HIV-1 infection as a primary factor or the pharmacotherapy employed, or they can be one of the consequences of the disease.

  1. Chromatin structure implicated in activation of HIV-1 gene expression by ultraviolet light

    We have investigated the effects of different DNA-damaging agents on HIV-1 gene expression. We find that agents that produce bulky DNA lesions, similar to those induced by ultraviolet light (UV), all dramatically increase HIV-1 gene expression, whereas agents that produce primarily base damage and DNA breakage, such as ionizing radiation, have little or no effect. We show that these effects are independent of DNA synthesis per se and do not require DNA nucleotide excision repair. The drug novobiocin effectively prevents the UV activation process, consistent with the idea that a change in DNA chromatin structure may be required. We suggest that a transient decondensation of chromatin structure, an early step in DNA nucleotide excision repair but not in base excision repair, may be the triggering mechanism. The decondensation may allow the transcriptional machinery better access to the HIV-1 promoter region, thereby increasing gene expression

  2. Novel Approaches to Inhibiting HIV-1 Replication

    Adamson, Catherine S.; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    Considerable success has been achieved in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, and more than two-dozen antiretroviral drugs are available targeting several distinct steps in the viral replication cycle. However, resistance to these compounds emerges readily, even in the context of combination therapy. Drug toxicity, adverse drug-drug interactions, and accompanying poor patient adherence can also lead to treatment failure. These considerations make continued development of novel antiretroviral th...

  3. In vitro Uncoating of HIV-1 Cores

    Shah, Vaibhav B.; Aiken, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The genome of the retroviruses is encased in a capsid surrounded by a lipid envelope. For lentiviruses, such as HIV-1, the conical capsid shell is composed of CA protein arranged as a lattice of hexagon. The capsid is closed by 7 pentamers at the broad end and 5 at the narrow end of the cone1, 2. Encased in this capsid shell is the viral ribonucleoprotein complex, and together they comprise the core.

  4. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on ef...

  5. Methamphetamine Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in CD4+ T Cells by Modulating Anti–HIV-1 miRNA Expression

    Mantri, Chinmay K.; Mantri, Jyoti V.; Pandhare, Jui; Dash, Chandravanu

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine is the second most frequently used illicit drug in the United States. Methamphetamine abuse is associated with increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition, higher viral loads, and enhanced HIV-1 pathogenesis. Although a direct link between methamphetamine abuse and HIV-1 pathogenesis remains to be established in patients, methamphetamine has been shown to increase HIV-1 replication in macrophages, dendritic cells, and cells of HIV transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the effects of methamph...

  6. Morphogenesis of the infectious HIV-1 virion

    Jun-Ichi eSakuragi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The virion of HIV-1 is spherical and viral glycoprotein spikes (gp120, gp41 protrude from its envelope. The characteristic cone-shaped core exists within the virion, caging the ribonucleoprotein (RNP complex, which is comprised of viral RNA, nucleocapsid (NC and viral enzymes. The HIV-1 virion is budded and released from the infected cell as an immature donut-shaped particle. During or immediately after release, viral protease (PR is activated and subsequently processes the viral structural protein Gag. Through this maturation process, virions acquire infectivity, but its mechanism and transition of morphology largely remain unclear. Recent technological advances in experimental devices and techniques have made it possible to closely dissect the viral production site on the cell, the exterior – or even the interior – of an individual virion, and many new aspects on virion morphology and maturation. In this manuscript, I review the morphogenesis of HIV-1 virions. I focus on several studies, including some of our recent findings, which examined virion formation and/or maturation processes. The story of novel compound, which inhibits virion maturation, and the importance of maturation research are also discussed.

  7. A radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease

    A rapid, high-throughput radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease has been developed using ion-exchange chromatography performed in 96-well filtration plates. The assay monitors the activity of the HIV-1 protease on the radiolabeled form of a heptapeptide substrate, [tyrosyl-3,5-3H]Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr-Pro-Val-Val-NH2, which is based on the p17-p24 cleavage site found in the viral polyprotein substrate Pr55gag. Specific cleavage of this uncharged heptapeptide substrate by HIV-1 protease releases the anionic product [tyrosyl-3,5-3H]Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr, which is retained upon minicolumns of the anion-exchange resin AG1-X8. Protease activity is determined from the recovery of this radiolabeled product following elution with formic acid. This facile and highly sensitive assay may be utilized for steady-state kinetic analysis of the protease, for measurements of enzyme activity during its purification, and as a routine assay for the evaluation of protease inhibitors from natural product or synthetic sources

  8. Comparison of the Abbott m2000 HIV-1 Real-Time and Roche AMPLICOR Monitor v1.5 HIV-1 assays on plasma specimens from Rakai, Uganda

    Ssebugenyi, I.; Kizza, A; Mpoza, B; Aluma, G.; Boaz, I.; Newell, K.; Laeyendecker, O; Shott, J P; Serwadda, D; Reynolds, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    The need for viral load (VL) monitoring of HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings (RLS) has become apparent with studies showing the limitations of immunological monitoring. We compared the Abbott m2000 Real-Time (Abbott) HIV-1 assay with the Roche AMPLICOR Monitor v1.5 (Roche) HIV-1 assay over a range of VL concentrations. Three hundred and eleven plasma samples were tested, including 164 samples from patients on ART ≥ six months and 147 from ART-naï...

  9. Immunodeficient Parameters in the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat Model

    Sulie L. Chang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently an HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg rat model was created that carries a gag-pol-deleted HIV-1 genome under the control of the HIV-1 viral promoter. However, other viral proteins are expressed in most organs and tissues, and are found in the circulating blood. Since HIV-1 targets the immune system in humans, we examined two immunological parameters, leukocyte-endothelial adhesion (LEA and inflammatory cytokine production, in 5 mo old HIV-1Tg rats to identify immune functions that may be impaired even before the onset of symptoms of HIV-1 infection. We administered a single injection (i.p. of the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 250 ug/kg, to 5 mo old HIV-1Tg rats, age-matched transgenic control (Tg rats, and F344/NHsd (F344 control background strain rats. LPS induced an LEA response in both the Tg control and F344 control animals. However, in the HIV-1Tg rats, there was no LEA response to LPS. Following LPS administration, there was significantly greater serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β, two pro-inflammatory cytokines, in the HIV-1Tg rats compared to the control animals. In contrast, the serum level of IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, was comparable in the HIV-1Tg, Tg control, and F344 control rats. Our data show that, in the HIV-1Tg rat, there is a negative correlation between the LEA response and the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to bacterial endotoxin. These findings suggest that the persistent presence of viral proteins may be, at least, partially responsible for the immunodeficiency that occurs with HIV-1 infection, and that the HIV-1Tg rat could be a valid rodent model in which to study various aspects of HIV-1 infection.

  10. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo. PMID:26650729

  11. Anti-HIV-1 activity and structure-activity relationship of pyranocoumarin analogs%吡喃香豆素衍生物对HIV-1的抑制作用及其构效关系

    董飚; 马涛; 章天; 周春梅; 刘刚; 王琳; 陶佩珍; 张兴权

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT)/protease (PR) activity and inhibition of virus replication in cell cultures of novel coumarin analogs and determine their structure-activity relationship. Coumarin derivatives have been demonstrated to inhibit the activity of HIV-1 RT/PR in cell free system. It also shows inhibition effects to HIV-1 replication in cell culture. Based on the Chinese traditional pharmacological characteristics and protein three dimension computer aided design, analogs of tetracyclic dipyranocoumarin were synthesized from natural leading compounds. We studied the relationship of antiviral effects and chemical structures via HIV-1 PR/RT enzyme models and cell culture model system. Seven compounds were designed and tested. Several compounds showed anti-HIV-1 activity in varying degrees, especially V0201 showed much higher anti-HIV-1 activity with 3.56 and 0.78 μmol·L-1 of IC50 against HIV-1 PR/RT and 0.036 μmol·L-1 against HIV-1 replication in PBMC cultures. V0201 with a novel structure may be a new leading compound. These new compounds are valuable for development of new anti-HIV drugs in the future.%研究香豆素衍生物对人类免疫缺陷病毒l型逆转录酶(HIV-1 RT)、蛋白酶(HIV-1 PR)和细胞内复制的抑制作用及其构效关系.不同香豆素衍生物具有抑制HIV-1 RT、HIV-1 PR活性,且在细胞内显示出抑制HIV-1复制的作用已见报道.本课题根据国内传统药学的特点,考察以天然产物为先导化合物、结合HIV-1蛋白酶三维结构计算机辅助药物设计、合成的四环双吡喃香豆素及其类似物.以HIV-1 RT及HIV-1 PR以及细胞内病毒复制为靶点,利用酶学模型和细胞培养模型进行药物筛选及其构效关系研究,设计合成的7个化合物的药效学实验结果显示.部分化合物显示了不同程度的抗HIV-1活性.其中V0201作用最强,它对HIV-1 PR和HIV-1 RT的IC50分别为3.56和0.78 μmol·L-1;

  12. Design and Characterization of a Peptide Mimotope of the HIV-1 gp120 Bridging Sheet

    Guido Poli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Bridging Sheet domain of HIV-1 gp120 is highly conserved among the HIV-1 strains and allows HIV-1 binding to host cells via the HIV-1 coreceptors. Further, the bridging sheet domain is a major target to neutralize HIV-1 infection. We rationally designed four linear peptide epitopes that mimic the three-dimensional structure of bridging sheet by using molecular modeling. Chemically synthesized peptides BS3 and BS4 showed a fair degree of antigenicity when tested in ELISA with IgG purified from HIV+ broadly neutralizing sera while the production of synthetic peptides BS1 and BS2 failed due to their high degree of hydrophobicity. To overcome this limitation, we linked all four BS peptides to the COOH-terminus of GST protein to test both their antigenicity and immunogenicity. Only the BS1 peptide showed good antigenicity; however, no envelope specific antibodies were elicited upon mice immunization. Therefore we performed further analyses by linking BS1 peptide to the NH2-terminus of the E2 scaffold from the Geobacillus Stearothermophylus PDH complex. The E2-BS1 fusion peptide showed good antigenic results, however only one immunized rabbit elicited good antibody titers towards both the monomeric and oligomeric viral envelope glycoprotein (Env. In addition, moderate neutralizing antibodies response was elicited against two HIV-1 clade B and one clade C primary isolates. These preliminary data validate the peptide mimotope approach as a promising tool to obtain an effective HIV-1 vaccine.

  13. Tannin inhibits HIV-1 entry by targeting gp41

    Lin L(U); Shu-wen LIU; Shi-bo JIANG; Shu-guang WU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism by which tannin inhibits HIV-1 entry into target cells. METHODS: The inhibitory activity of tannin on HIV-1 replication and entry was detected by p24 production and HIV-1-mediated cell fusion, respectively. The inhibitory activity on the gp41 six-helix bundle formation was determined by an improved sandwich ELISA. RESULTS: Tannins from different sources showed potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 replication,HIV-1-mediated cell fusion, and the gp4 six-helix bundle formation. CONCLUSION: Tannin inhibits HIV-1 entry into target cells by interfering with the gp41 six-helix bundle formation, thus blocking HIV-1 fusion with the target cell.

  14. Predicting Bevirimat resistance of HIV-1 from genotype

    Hoffmann Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maturation inhibitors are a new class of antiretroviral drugs. Bevirimat (BVM was the first substance in this class of inhibitors entering clinical trials. While the inhibitory function of BVM is well established, the molecular mechanisms of action and resistance are not well understood. It is known that mutations in the regions CS p24/p2 and p2 can cause phenotypic resistance to BVM. We have investigated a set of p24/p2 sequences of HIV-1 of known phenotypic resistance to BVM to test whether BVM resistance can be predicted from sequence, and to identify possible molecular mechanisms of BVM resistance in HIV-1. Results We used artificial neural networks and random forests with different descriptors for the prediction of BVM resistance. Random forests with hydrophobicity as descriptor performed best and classified the sequences with an area under the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC curve of 0.93 ± 0.001. For the collected data we find that p2 sequence positions 369 to 376 have the highest impact on resistance, with positions 370 and 372 being particularly important. These findings are in partial agreement with other recent studies. Apart from the complex machine learning models we derived a number of simple rules that predict BVM resistance from sequence with surprising accuracy. According to computational predictions based on the data set used, cleavage sites are usually not shifted by resistance mutations. However, we found that resistance mutations could shorten and weaken the α-helix in p2, which hints at a possible resistance mechanism. Conclusions We found that BVM resistance of HIV-1 can be predicted well from the sequence of the p2 peptide, which may prove useful for personalized therapy if maturation inhibitors reach clinical practice. Results of secondary structure analysis are compatible with a possible route to BVM resistance in which mutations weaken a six-helix bundle discovered in recent experiments

  15. HIV-1 drug resistance among antiretroviral treatment-naïve Ethiopian patients

    A Mulu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In many African countries, access to antiretroviral treatment (ART has been significantly scaled up over the last five years. Nevertheless, data on drug resistance mutation are scarce. The objective of the current study was to determine the predominant subtypes of HIV-1 as well as to identify baseline mutations with potential drug resistance among ART-naïve patients from Ethiopia. Methods: Genotypic drug resistance on the entire protease and partial reverse transcriptase (codons 1–335 regions of the pol gene was determined by an in-house protocol in 160 ART-naïve patients. Genotypic drug resistance was defined as the presence of one or more resistance-related mutations, as specified by the consensus of the Stanford University HIV drug resistance database (HIVDB available at http://hivdb.stanford.edu/ and the 2011 International AIDS Society (IAS mutation list (http://www.iasusa.org/resistance-mutations/. Results: A predominance of HIV-1 subtype C (98.7% was observed. According to the IAS mutation list, antiretroviral drug resistance mutations were detected in 20 patients (13%. However, the level of drug resistance is 5.2% (8/155 when the most conservative method, HIVDB algorithms were applied. In both algorithms, none had major PI mutation and mutation-conferring resistance to NRTI and NNRTI were not overlapping. Conclusions: There is strong evidence for clade homogeneity in Ethiopia and low influx of other subtypes to the country. The level of transmitted drug resistance exceeds that of WHO estimates and indicates that many HIV-infected individuals on ART are practicing risk-related behaviours. The results also show that HIV drug resistance testing should be installed in resource limited settings.

  16. Short Communication: Circulating Plasma HIV-1 Viral Protein R in Dual HIV-1/Tuberculosis Infection

    Toossi, Zahra; Liu, Shigou; Wu, Mianda; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Hirsch, Christina S.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating free HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) is found in up to one third of subjects with HIV-1 infection. Free Vpr presumably shares some of the immunopathogenic effects of cell-associated Vpr. Here we assessed Vpr in plasma and pleural fluid from HIV/tuberculosis (TB) dually infected subjects with pleural TB and from plasma of patients with pulmonary HIV/TB. Vpr was assessed by western blot analysis. In plasma from HIV/TB subjects with pulmonary TB free Vpr could be detected in 47%. Only on...

  17. A conditionally replicating HIV-1 vector interferes with wild-type HIV-1 replication and spread.

    Dropulić, B; Hĕrmánková, M; Pitha, P M

    1996-01-01

    Defective-interfering viruses are known to modulate virus pathogenicity. We describe conditionally replicating HIV-1 (crHIV) vectors that interfere with wild-type HIV-1 (wt-HIV) replication and spread. crHIV vectors are defective-interfering HIV genomes that do not encode viral proteins and replicate only in the presence of wt-HIV helper virus. In cells that contain both wt-HIV and crHIV genomes, the latter are shown to have a selective advantage for packaging into progeny virions because the...

  18. Identification and characterization of HIV-1 latent viral reservoirs in peripheral blood.

    Chargin, Amanda; Yin, Fangfang; Song, Min; Subramaniam, Srividyabhuvaneswari; Knutson, Grace; Patterson, Bruce K

    2015-01-01

    Plasma viral load and CD4 counts are effective for clinical monitoring, but they do not give a full representation of HIV-1 quasispecies in cellular reservoirs, the major repository of replication-competent HIV-1 in infected individuals. We sought to develop a diagnostic system that might stimulate the replication-competent HIV-1 reservoirs for enhanced clinical monitoring, including selection of antiretroviral regimens. Whole-blood samples from 45 HIV-infected individuals were collected into 1 ViraStim HIV-1 activation tube and 1 EDTA tube. Samples were tested for viral load and cell type-specific HIV-1 replication. Further, 7 matched activated/nonactivated samples were sequenced using the Trugene HIV-1 genotyping kit. The percentage of patients with replication-competent virus in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) varied, depending on the baseline plasma viral load in the EDTA tubes. Six out of 24 patients with a starting plasma viral load of 20 and 1,000 all showed increases in viral replication of >5-fold. These increases came from cellular reservoirs in blood as determined by simultaneous ultrasensitive subpopulation staining/hybridization in situ (SUSHI). When resistance genotypes in plasma from activation tubes were compared to those from EDTA tubes for 7 patients, all patients showed additional mutations in the activation tube, while 3 patients demonstrated additional genotypic resistance determinants. We show that HIV-1 viral replication can be stimulated directly from infected whole blood. The sequencing results showed that 3 of 7 cases demonstrated additional drug resistance following stimulation. PMID:25339403

  19. Association of Neutralization Sensitivity of HIV- 1 Primary Isolates With Biological Properties of Isolates From HIV-1 Infected Chinese Individuals

    FA-XIN HEI; HAI-LI TANG; KUN-XUE HONG; JIAN-PING CHEN; HONG PENG; LIN YUAN; JIANG-QING XU; YI-MING SHAO

    2005-01-01

    Objective Although HIV-1 infection is prevalent in many regions in China, it remains largely unknown on the biological characteristics of dominant circulating isolates. This study was designed to isolate the circulating viral strains from different prevalent regions and to characterize their biological properties and neutralization sensitivity. Methods Primary viruses were isolated from fresh PBMCs using the traditional co-culture method and their capacity of inducing syncytium was tested in MT-2 cells. Meanwhile, their coreceptor usage was determined with two cell lines: Magi and GHOST (3) stably expressing CD4 and the chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4. Furthermore, the sensitivity of these viruses to neutralization by HIV-1-infected patients' plasma which were highly active to neutralize SF33 strain, was quantified in GHOST cell-based neutralization assay. Results Six primary viral strains were isolated from 4 separated regions. Isolates LTG0213,LTG0214 and XVS032691 induced syncytia in MT-2 cells, and used CXCR4 as coreceptor. Isolates XJN0021, XJN0091, or SHXDC0041 did not induce syncytia, and used CCR5 as coreceptor. Overall neutralization sensitivity differed among four representative strains: HIV-1 XVS032691>LTG0214>XJN0091≈SHXDC0041. Conclusion The neutralization sensitivity of HIV isolates is linked with the phenotype of isolates, in which syncytium-inducing (SI) or CXCR4-tropic (X4) viruses are more easily neutralized than non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) or CCR5-tropic (R5) viruses. The genetic subtypes based on the phylogeny of env sequences are not classical neutralization serotypes.

  20. Patterns of HIV-1 protein interaction identify perturbed host-cellular subsystems.

    Jamie I MacPherson

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 exploits a diverse array of host cell functions in order to replicate. This is mediated through a network of virus-host interactions. A variety of recent studies have catalogued this information. In particular the HIV-1, Human Protein Interaction Database (HHPID has provided a unique depth of protein interaction detail. However, as a map of HIV-1 infection, the HHPID is problematic, as it contains curation error and redundancy; in addition, it is based on a heterogeneous set of experimental methods. Based on identifying shared patterns of HIV-host interaction, we have developed a novel methodology to delimit the core set of host-cellular functions and their associated perturbation from the HHPID. Initially, using biclustering, we identify 279 significant sets of host proteins that undergo the same types of interaction. The functional cohesiveness of these protein sets was validated using a human protein-protein interaction network, gene ontology annotation and sequence similarity. Next, using a distance measure, we group host protein sets and identify 37 distinct higher-level subsystems. We further demonstrate the biological significance of these subsystems by cross-referencing with global siRNA screens that have been used to detect host factors necessary for HIV-1 replication, and investigate the seemingly small intersect between these data sets. Our results highlight significant host-cell subsystems that are perturbed during the course of HIV-1 infection. Moreover, we characterise the patterns of interaction that contribute to these perturbations. Thus, our work disentangles the complex set of HIV-1-host protein interactions in the HHPID, reconciles these with siRNA screens and provides an accessible and interpretable map of infection.

  1. Evaluation of Performance Characteristics of the Aptima HIV-1 Quant Dx Assay for Detection and Quantitation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Plasma and Cervicovaginal Lavage Samples.

    Sam, Soya S; Kurpewski, Jaclynn R; Cu-Uvin, Susan; Caliendo, Angela M

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of HIV-1 RNA has become the standard of care in the clinical management of HIV-1-infected individuals. The objective of this study was to evaluate performance characteristics and relative workflow of the Aptima HIV-1 Quant Dx assay in comparison with the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay using plasma and cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) specimens. Assay performance was evaluated by using an AcroMetrix HIV-1 panel, AcroMetrix positive controls, Qnostics and SeraCare HIV-1 evaluation panels, 208 clinical plasma samples, and 205 matched CVL specimens on the Panther and m2000 platforms. The Aptima assay demonstrated good linearity over the quantification range tested (2 to 5 log10copies/ml), and there was strong linear correlation between the assays (R(2)= 0.99), with a comparable coefficient of variance of laboratories demanding high-throughput sample processing. PMID:26842702

  2. Developing a Dynamic Pharmacophore Model for HIV-1 Integrase

    We present the first receptor-based pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase. The development of ''dynamic'' pharmacophore models is a new method that accounts for the inherent flexibility of the active site and aims to reduce the entropic penalties associated with binding a ligand. Furthermore, this new drug discovery method overcomes the limitation of an incomplete crystal structure of the target protein. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation describes the flexibility of the uncomplexed protein. Many conformational models of the protein are saved from the MD simulations and used in a series of multi-unit search for interacting conformers (MUSIC) simulations. MUSIC is a multiple-copy minimization method, available in the BOSS program; it is used to determine binding regions for probe molecules containing functional groups that complement the active site. All protein conformations from the MD are overlaid, and conserved binding regions for the probe molecules are identified. Those conserved binding regions define the dynamic pharmacophore model. Here, the dynamic model is compared to known inhibitors of the integrase as well as a three-point, ligand-based pharmacophore model from the literature. Also, a ''static'' pharmacophore model was determined in the standard fashion, using a single crystal structure. Inhibitors thought to bind in the active site of HIV-1 integrase fit the dynamic model but not the static model. Finally, we have identified a set of compounds from the Available Chemicals Directory that fit the dynamic pharmacophore model, and experimental testing of the compounds has confirmed several new inhibitors

  3. Iron status in HIV-1 infection: implications in disease pathology

    Banjoko S Olatunbosun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There had been conflicting reports with levels of markers of iron metabolism in HIV infection. This study was therefore aimed at investigating iron status and its possible mediation of severity of HIV- 1 infection and pathogenesis. Method Eighty (80 anti-retroviral naive HIV-1 positive and 50 sero-negative controls were recruited for the study. Concentrations of serum total iron, transferrin, total iron binding capacity (TIBC, CD4+ T -lymphocytes, vitamin C, zinc, selenium and transferrin saturation were estimated. Results The mean CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell counts, serum iron, TIBC, transferrin saturation for the tests and controls were 319 ± 22, 952 ± 57 cells/μl (P 4+ T-lymphocyte cell count had a positive correlation with levels of vitamin C (r = 0.497, P Conclusion It could be inferred that derangement in iron metabolism, in addition to oxidative stress, might have contributed to the depletion of CD4+ T cell population in our subjects and this may result in poor prognosis of the disease.

  4. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A. (UMASS, MED)

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  5. Intra-spike crosslinking overcomes antibody evasion by HIV-1.

    Galimidi, Rachel P; Klein, Joshua S; Politzer, Maria S; Bai, Shiyu; Seaman, Michael S; Nussenzweig, Michel C; West, Anthony P; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2015-01-29

    Antibodies developed during HIV-1 infection lose efficacy as the viral spike mutates. We postulated that anti-HIV-1 antibodies primarily bind monovalently because HIV's low spike density impedes bivalent binding through inter-spike crosslinking, and the spike structure prohibits bivalent binding through intra-spike crosslinking. Monovalent binding reduces avidity and potency, thus expanding the range of mutations permitting antibody evasion. To test this idea, we engineered antibody-based molecules capable of bivalent binding through intra-spike crosslinking. We used DNA as a "molecular ruler" to measure intra-epitope distances on virion-bound spikes and construct intra-spike crosslinking molecules. Optimal bivalent reagents exhibited up to 2.5 orders of magnitude increased potency (>100-fold average increases across virus panels) and identified conformational states of virion-bound spikes. The demonstration that intra-spike crosslinking lowers the concentration of antibodies required for neutralization supports the hypothesis that low spike densities facilitate antibody evasion and the use of molecules capable of intra-spike crosslinking for therapy or passive protection. PMID:25635457

  6. Effects of HIV-1 on Cognition in Humanized NSG Mice

    Akhter, Sidra Pervez

    Host species specificity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) creates a challenge to study the pathology, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic agents. The closely related simian immunodeficiency virus and studies of neurocognitive impairments on transgenic animals expressing partial viral genome have significant limitations. The humanized mice model provides a small animal system in which a human immune system can be engrafted and immunopathobiology of HIV-1 infection can be studied. However, features of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) were not evaluated in this model. Open field activity test was selected to characterize behavior of original strain NOD/scid-IL-2Rgammac null (NSG) mice, effects of engraftment of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and functional human immune system (huNSG), and finally, investigate the behavior changes induced by chronic HIV-1 infection. Long-term infected HuNSG mice showed the loss of working memory and increased anxiety in the open field. Additionally, these animals were utilized for evaluation of central nervous system metabolic and structural changes. Detected behavioral abnormalities are correlated with obtained neuroimaging and histological abnormalities published.

  7. Developing a dynamic pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase.

    Carlson, H A; Masukawa, K M; Rubins, K; Bushman, F D; Jorgensen, W L; Lins, R D; Briggs, J M; McCammon, J A

    2000-06-01

    We present the first receptor-based pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase. The development of "dynamic" pharmacophore models is a new method that accounts for the inherent flexibility of the active site and aims to reduce the entropic penalties associated with binding a ligand. Furthermore, this new drug discovery method overcomes the limitation of an incomplete crystal structure of the target protein. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation describes the flexibility of the uncomplexed protein. Many conformational models of the protein are saved from the MD simulations and used in a series of multi-unit search for interacting conformers (MUSIC) simulations. MUSIC is a multiple-copy minimization method, available in the BOSS program; it is used to determine binding regions for probe molecules containing functional groups that complement the active site. All protein conformations from the MD are overlaid, and conserved binding regions for the probe molecules are identified. Those conserved binding regions define the dynamic pharmacophore model. Here, the dynamic model is compared to known inhibitors of the integrase as well as a three-point, ligand-based pharmacophore model from the literature. Also, a "static" pharmacophore model was determined in the standard fashion, using a single crystal structure. Inhibitors thought to bind in the active site of HIV-1 integrase fit the dynamic model but not the static model. Finally, we have identified a set of compounds from the Available Chemicals Directory that fit the dynamic pharmacophore model, and experimental testing of the compounds has confirmed several new inhibitors. PMID:10841789

  8. Novel approaches to inhibiting HIV-1 replication.

    Adamson, Catherine S; Freed, Eric O

    2010-01-01

    Considerable success has been achieved in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, and more than two-dozen antiretroviral drugs are available targeting several distinct steps in the viral replication cycle. However, resistance to these compounds emerges readily, even in the context of combination therapy. Drug toxicity, adverse drug-drug interactions, and accompanying poor patient adherence can also lead to treatment failure. These considerations make continued development of novel antiretroviral therapeutics necessary. In this article, we highlight a number of steps in the HIV-1 replication cycle that represent promising targets for drug discovery. These include lipid raft microdomains, the RNase H activity of the viral enzyme reverse transcriptase, uncoating of the viral core, host cell machinery involved in the integration of the viral DNA into host cell chromatin, virus assembly, maturation, and budding, and the functions of several viral accessory proteins. We discuss the relevant molecular and cell biology, and describe progress to date in developing inhibitors against these novel targets. This article forms part of a special issue of Antiviral Research marking the 25th anniversary of antiretroviral drug discovery and development, Vol 85, issue 1, 2010. PMID:19782103

  9. Fucoidans as Potential Inhibitors of HIV-1

    Vladimir S. Prassolov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The antiviral activity of different structure fucoidans (α-l-fucans and galactofucans was studied using two model viral systems based on a lentiviral vectors and a replication competent Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV. It was found that investigated fucoidans have no cytotoxic effects on Jurkat and SC-1cell at the concentration range of 0.001–100 µg/mL. Fucoidans with different efficiency suppressed transduction of Jurkat cell line by pseudo-HIV-1 particles carrying the envelope protein of HIV-1 and infection of SC-1 cells by Mo-MuLV. According to our data, all natural fucoidans can be considered as potential anti-HIV agents regardless of their carbohydrate backbone and degree of sulfating, since their activity is shown at low concentrations (0.001–0.05 µg/mL. High molecular weight fucoidans isolated from Saccharina cichorioides (1.3-α-l-fucan, and S. japonica (galactofucan were the most effective inhibitors.

  10. Rational development of radiopharmaceuticals for HIV-1

    The global battle against HIV-1 would benefit from a sensitive and specific radiopharmaceutical to localize HIV-infected cells. Ideally, this probe would be able to identify latently infected host cells containing replication competent HIV sequences. Clinical and research applications would include assessment of reservoirs, informing clinical management by facilitating assessment of burden of infection in different compartments, monitoring disease progression and monitoring response to therapy. A “rational” development approach could facilitate efficient identification of an appropriate targeted radiopharmaceutical. Rational development starts with understanding characteristics of the disease that can be effectively targeted and then engineering radiopharmaceuticals to hone in on an appropriate target, which in the case of HIV-1 (HIV) might be an HIV-specific product on or in the host cell, a differentially expressed gene product, an integrated DNA sequence specific enzymatic activity, part of the inflammatory response, or a combination of these. This is different from the current approach that starts with a radiopharmaceutical for a target associated with a disease, mostly from autopsy studies, without a strong rationale for the potential to impact patient care. At present, no targeted therapies are available for HIV latency, although a number of approaches are under study. Here we discuss requirements for a radiopharmaceutical useful in strategies targeting persistently infected cells. The radiopharmaceutical for HIV should be developed based on HIV biology, studied in an animal model and then in humans, and ultimately used in clinical and research settings

  11. HIV-1 protease mutations and protease inhibitor cross-resistance.

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Taylor, Jonathan; Fessel, W Jeffrey; Kaufman, David; Towner, William; Troia, Paolo; Ruane, Peter; Hellinger, James; Shirvani, Vivian; Zolopa, Andrew; Shafer, Robert W

    2010-10-01

    The effects of many protease inhibitor (PI)-selected mutations on the susceptibility to individual PIs are unknown. We analyzed in vitro susceptibility test results on 2,725 HIV-1 protease isolates. More than 2,400 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to fosamprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, and saquinavir; 2,130 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to lopinavir; 1,644 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to atazanavir; 1,265 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to tipranavir; and 642 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to darunavir. We applied least-angle regression (LARS) to the 200 most common mutations in the data set and identified a set of 46 mutations associated with decreased PI susceptibility of which 40 were not polymorphic in the eight most common HIV-1 group M subtypes. We then used least-squares regression to ascertain the relative contribution of each of these 46 mutations. The median number of mutations associated with decreased susceptibility to each PI was 28 (range, 19 to 32), and the median number of mutations associated with increased susceptibility to each PI was 2.5 (range, 1 to 8). Of the mutations with the greatest effect on PI susceptibility, I84AV was associated with decreased susceptibility to eight PIs; V32I, G48V, I54ALMSTV, V82F, and L90M were associated with decreased susceptibility to six to seven PIs; I47A, G48M, I50V, L76V, V82ST, and N88S were associated with decreased susceptibility to four to five PIs; and D30N, I50L, and V82AL were associated with decreased susceptibility to fewer than four PIs. This study underscores the greater impact of nonpolymorphic mutations compared with polymorphic mutations on decreased PI susceptibility and provides a comprehensive quantitative assessment of the effects of individual mutations on susceptibility to the eight clinically available PIs. PMID:20660676

  12. Cross-subtype detection of HIV-1 using reverse transcription and recombinase polymerase amplification.

    Lillis, Lorraine; Lehman, Dara A; Siverson, Joshua B; Weis, Julie; Cantera, Jason; Parker, Mathew; Piepenburg, Olaf; Overbaugh, Julie; Boyle, David S

    2016-04-01

    A low complexity diagnostic test that rapidly and reliably detects HIV infection in infants at the point of care could facilitate early treatment, improving outcomes. However, many infant HIV diagnostics can only be performed in laboratory settings. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an isothermal amplification technology that can rapidly amplify proviral DNA from multiple subtypes of HIV-1 in under twenty minutes without complex equipment. In this study we added reverse transcription (RT) to RPA to allow detection of both HIV-1 RNA and DNA. We show that this RT-RPA HIV-1 assay has a limit of detection of 10-30 copies of an exact sequence matched DNA or RNA, respectively. In addition, at 100 copies of RNA or DNA, the assay detected 171 of 175 (97.7%) sequence variants that represent all the major subtypes and recombinant forms of HIV-1 Groups M and O. This data suggests that the application of RT-RPA for the combined detection of HIV-1 viral RNA and proviral DNA may prove a highly sensitive tool for rapid and accurate diagnosis of infant HIV. PMID:26821087

  13. Controlling HIV-1: Non-coding RNA gene therapy approaches to a functional cure

    Chantelle L Ahlenstiel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The current treatment strategy for HIV-1 involves prolonged and intensive combined antiretroviral therapy (cART, which successfully suppresses plasma viremia. It has transformed HIV-1 infection into a chronic disease. However, despite the success of cART, a latent form of HIV-1 infection persists as integrated provirus in resting memory CD4+ T cells. Virus can reactivate from this reservoir upon cessation of treatment and hence HIV requires lifelong therapy. The reservoir represents a major barrier to eradication. Understanding molecular mechanisms regulating HIV-1 transcription and latency are crucial to developing alternate treatment strategies which impact upon the reservoir and provide a path towards a functional cure in which there is no detectable viremia in the absence of cART. Numerous reports have suggested ncRNAs are involved in regulating viral transcription and latency. This review will discuss the latest developments in ncRNAs, specifically short interfering (siRNA and short hairpin (shRNA, targeting molecular mechanisms of HIV-1 transcription, which may represent potential future therapeutics. It will also briefly address animal models available for testing potential therapeutics and current gene therapy clinical trials.

  14. HIV-1 infected patients with suppressed plasma viremia on treatment have pro-inflammatory HDL

    Navab Kaveh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of pro-inflammatory lipids in systemic immune activation in HIV infection remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that HIV-1-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy would have pro-inflammatory high density lipoprotein (HDL, and that an apoA-1 mimetic peptide might reverse the inflammatory properties of HDL in these persons. Methods Plasma was obtained from 10 HIV-1-infected individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy with suppressed viremia and was incubated with the apoA-I mimetic peptide L-4F or sham-treated prior to isolation of HDL. The HDL that was isolated from each sample was tested for its ability to inhibit LDL-induced MCP-1 production in cultures of human aortic endothelial cells. Results We found in a small pilot study of HIV-1-infected individuals with suppressed viremia on combination antiretroviral therapy that oxidative stress and inflammation in HIV-1 are associated with a marked reduction of HDL antioxidant/anti-inflammatory activities. In vitro, these abnormalities were significantly improved by treatment with the apoA-1 mimetic peptide, 4F. Conclusions These preliminary observations suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of HDL are defective in HIV-1-infected persons despite treatment that is considered to be virologically successful.

  15. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1IIIB infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent

  16. Recent advances in RNAi-based strategies for therapy and prevention of HIV-1/AIDS.

    Swamy, Manjunath N; Wu, Haoquan; Shankar, Premlata

    2016-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) provides a powerful tool to silence specific gene expression and has been widely used to suppress host factors such as CCR5 and/or viral genes involved in HIV-1 replication. Newer nuclease-based gene-editing technologies, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system, also provide powerful tools to ablate specific genes. Because of differences in co-receptor usage and the high mutability of the HIV-1 genome, a combination of host factors and viral genes needs to be suppressed for effective prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. Whereas the continued presence of small interfering/short hairpin RNA (si/shRNA) mediators is needed for RNAi to be effective, the continued expression of nucleases in the gene-editing systems is undesirable. Thus, RNAi provides the only practical way for expression of multiple silencers in infected and uninfected cells, which is needed for effective prevention/treatment of infection. There have been several advances in the RNAi field in terms of si/shRNA design, targeted delivery to HIV-1 susceptible cells, and testing for efficacy in preclinical humanized mouse models. Here, we comprehensively review the latest advances in RNAi technology towards prevention and treatment of HIV-1. PMID:27013255

  17. Baseline characteristics, response to and outcome of antiretroviral therapy among patients with HIV-1, HIV-2 and dual infection in Burkina Faso.

    Harries, Katie; Zachariah, Rony; Manzi, Marcel; Firmenich, Peter; Mathela, Richard; Drabo, Joseph; Onadja, G; Arnould, Line; Harries, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    In an urban district hospital in Burkina Faso we investigated the relative proportions of HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 among those tested, the baseline sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, and the response to and outcome of antiretroviral therapy (ART). A total of 7368 individuals (male=32%; median age=34 years) were included in the analysis over a 6 year period (2002-2008). The proportions of HIV-1, HIV-2 and dual infection were 94%, 2.5% and 3.6%, respectively. HIV-1-infected individu...

  18. Quantification of HIV-1 viral RNA in the blood in needles used for venous puncture in HIV-infected individuals

    Iris Ricardo Rossin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Occupational HIV infection among healthcare workers is an important issue in exposures involving blood and body fluids. There are few data in the literature regarding the potential and the duration of infectivity of HIV type 1 (HIV-1 in contaminated material under adverse conditions. METHODS: We quantified HIV-1 viral RNA in 25×8mm calibre hollow-bore needles, after punctures, in 25 HIV-1-infected patients selected during the sample collection. All of the patients selected were between the ages of 18 and 55. Five samples were collected from 16 patients: one sample for the immediate quantification of HIV-1 RNA in the plasma and blood samples from the interior of 4 needles to be analyzed at 0h, 6h, 24h, and 72h after collection. In nine patients, another test was carried out in the blood from one additional needle, in which HIV-1 RNA was assessed 168h after blood collection. The method used to assess HIV-1 RNA was nucleic acid sequence-based amplification. RESULTS: Up to 7 days after collection, HIV-1 RNA was detected in all of the needles. The viral RNA remained stable up to 168h, and there were no statistically significant differences among the needle samples. CONCLUSIONS: Although the infectivity of the viral material in the needles is unknown, the data indicate the need to re-evaluate the practices in cases of occupational accidents in which the source is not identified.

  19. HIV-1 Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Variation

    Sankaran, Kris; Varghese, Vici; Winters, Mark A.; Hurt, Christopher B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Parkin, Neil; Holmes, Susan P.; Holodniy, Mark; Shafer, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) variability presents a challenge to laboratories performing genotypic resistance testing. This challenge will grow with increased sequencing of samples enriched for proviral DNA such as dried blood spots and increased use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to detect low-abundance HIV-1 variants. We analyzed PR and RT sequences from >100,000 individuals and IN sequences from >10,000 individuals to characterize variation at each amino acid position, identify mutations indicating APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing, and identify mutations resulting from selective drug pressure. Forty-seven percent of PR, 37% of RT, and 34% of IN positions had one or more amino acid variants with a prevalence of ≥1%. Seventy percent of PR, 60% of RT, and 60% of IN positions had one or more variants with a prevalence of ≥0.1%. Overall 201 PR, 636 RT, and 346 IN variants had a prevalence of ≥0.1%. The median intersubtype prevalence ratios were 2.9-, 2.1-, and 1.9-fold for these PR, RT, and IN variants, respectively. Only 5.0% of PR, 3.7% of RT, and 2.0% of IN variants had a median intersubtype prevalence ratio of ≥10-fold. Variants at lower prevalences were more likely to differ biochemically and to be part of an electrophoretic mixture compared to high-prevalence variants. There were 209 mutations indicative of APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing and 326 mutations nonpolymorphic treatment selected. Identification of viruses with a high number of APOBEC-associated mutations will facilitate the quality control of dried blood spot sequencing. Identifying sequences with a high proportion of rare mutations will facilitate the quality control of NGS. IMPORTANCE Most antiretroviral drugs target three HIV-1 proteins: PR, RT, and IN. These proteins are highly variable: many different amino acids can be present at the same position in viruses from different individuals. Some of the amino acid variants cause drug

  20. Optimization of test accesses with a combined BIST and external test scheme

    Sugihara, Makoto; Yasuura, Hiroto

    2001-01-01

    External pins for test are precious hardware resources because the number of them are strongly restricted. In this paper, an optimization method of test accesses with a combined BIST and external test (CBET) scheme is proposed. The method can minimizes test application time and eliminate the wasteful usage of external pins considering the trade-off between test application time and the number of external pins. Our ideas consist of two parts. One is to determine the optimum groups each of whic...

  1. HIV-1 evades innate immune recognition through specific cofactor recruitment

    Jane Rasaiyaah; Choon Ping Tan; Fletcher, Adam J.; Price, Amanda J.; Caroline Blondeau; Laura Hilditch; Jacques, David A.; Selwood, David L.; James, Leo C.; Mahdad Noursadeghi; Towers, Greg J.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is able to replicate in primary human macrophages without stimulating innate immunity despite reverse transcription of genomic RNA into double-stranded DNA, an activity that might be expected to trigger innate pattern recognition receptors. We reasoned that if correctly orchestrated HIV-1 uncoating and nuclear entry is important for evasion of innate sensors then manipulation of specific interactions between HIV-1 capsid and host factors that putatively re...

  2. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 Infection and Inflammation

    Swartz, Talia H.; Dubyak, George R.; Chen, Benjamin K.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 30 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent antiretroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV-1 have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV-1 pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are ...

  3. Dual role of autophagy in HIV-1 replication and pathogenesis

    Killian M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Autophagy, the major mechanism for degrading long-lived intracellular proteins and organelles, is essential for eukaryotic cell homeostasis. Autophagy also defends the cell against invasion by microorganisms and has important roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Increasingly evident is that HIV-1 replication is dependent on select components of autophagy. Fittingly, HIV-1 proteins are able to modulate autophagy to maximize virus production. At the same time, HIV-1 proteins appear t...

  4. Current Perspectives on HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance

    Pinar Iyidogan; Anderson, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    Current advancements in antiretroviral therapy (ART) have turned HIV-1 infection into a chronic and manageable disease. However, treatment is only effective until HIV-1 develops resistance against the administered drugs. The most recent antiretroviral drugs have become superior at delaying the evolution of acquired drug resistance. In this review, the viral fitness and its correlation to HIV-1 mutation rates and drug resistance are discussed while emphasizing the concept of lethal mutagenesis...

  5. Human erythrocytes selectively bind and enrich infectious HIV-1 virions.

    Zoltan Beck

    Full Text Available Although CD4(+ cells represent the major target for HIV infection in blood, claims of complement-independent binding of HIV-1 to erythrocytes and the possible role of Duffy blood group antigen, have generated controversy. To examine the question of binding to erythrocytes, HIV-1 was incubated in vitro with erythrocytes from 30 healthy leukapheresis donors, and binding was determined by p24 analysis and adsorption of HIV-1 with reduction of infectivity for CD4(+ target cells. All of the cells, regardless of blood group type, bound HIV-1 p24. A typical preparation of erythrocytes bound <2.4% of the added p24, but erythrocytes selectively removed essentially all of the viral infectivity as determined by decreased infection of CD4(+ target cells; however, cell-associated HIV-1 was approximately 100-fold more efficient, via trans infection, than unadsorbed virus for infection of CD4(+ cells. All of the bound HIV-1 p24 was released by treatment of the cells with EDTA, and binding was optimized by adding Ca(2+ and Mg(2+ during the washing of erythrocytes containing bound HIV-1. Although the small number of contaminating leukocytes in the erythrocyte preparation also bound HIV-1 p24, there was no significant binding to CD4, and it thus appears that the binding occurred on leukocytes at non-CD4 sites. Furthermore, binding occurred to erythrocyte ghosts from which contaminating leukocytes had been previously removed. The results demonstrate that erythrocytes incubated in vitro with HIV-1 differentially adsorb all of the infectious HIV-1 virions (as opposed to non-infectious or degraded virions in the absence of complement and independent of blood group, and binding is dependent on divalent cations. By analogy with HIV-1 bound to DC-SIGN on dendritic cells, erythrocyte-bound HIV-1 might comprise an important surface reservoir for trans infection of permissive cells.

  6. HIV-1 western blot assay: What determines an indeterminate status?

    Syed Iqbal; Balakrishnan P; Solomon Sunil; Murugavel K; Kumarasamy N; Vidya S; Martin S; Thyagarajan S; Mayer Kenneth; Solomon S

    2005-01-01

    Background: The Western blot assay is the gold standard for the detection of antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type1 (HIV-1). However, indeterminate Western blot reactivity to HIV-1 proteins may occur in individuals, who may not be infected with HIV. Aim: This retrospective study was aimed to determine the diagnostic value of the interpretation criteria in relation to commercial kits for HIV -1 diagnosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 556 serum/plasma specimens collected from h...

  7. Membrane topology analysis of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp41

    Xiao Dan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gp41 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env has been widely regarded as a type I transmembrane protein with a single membrane-spanning domain (MSD. An alternative topology model suggested multiple MSDs. The major discrepancy between the two models is that the cytoplasmic Kennedy sequence in the single MSD model is assigned as the extracellular loop accessible to neutralizing antibodies in the other model. We examined the membrane topology of the gp41 subunit in both prokaryotic and mammalian systems. We attached topological markers to the C-termini of serially truncated gp41. In the prokaryotic system, we utilized a green fluorescent protein (GFP that is only active in the cytoplasm. The tag protein (HaloTag and a membrane-impermeable ligand specific to HaloTag was used in the mammalian system. Results In the absence of membrane fusion, both the prokaryotic and mammalian systems (293FT cells supported the single MSD model. In the presence of membrane fusion in mammalian cells (293CD4 cells, the data obtained seem to support the multiple MSD model. However, the region predicted to be a potential MSD is the highly hydrophilic Kennedy sequence and is least likely to become a MSD based on several algorithms. Further analysis revealed the induction of membrane permeability during membrane fusion, allowing the membrane-impermeable ligand and antibodies to cross the membrane. Therefore, we cannot completely rule out the possible artifacts. Addition of membrane fusion inhibitors or alterations of the MSD sequence decreased the induction of membrane permeability. Conclusions It is likely that a single MSD model for HIV-1 gp41 holds true even in the presence of membrane fusion. The degree of the augmentation of membrane permeability we observed was dependent on the membrane fusion and sequence of the MSD.

  8. Characteristics of HIV-1 Serodiscordant Couples Enrolled in a Clinical Trial of Antiretroviral Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV-1 Prevention

    Mujugira, Andrew; Baeten, Jared M.; Donnell, Deborah; Ndase, Patrick; MUGO, Nelly R.; Barnes, Linda; Campbell, James D.; Wangisi, Jonathan; Tappero, Jordan W.; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Cohen, Craig R.; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Tumwesigye, Elioda; Were, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Stable heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Africa have high HIV-1 transmission rates and are a critical population for evaluation of new HIV-1 prevention strategies. The Partners PrEP Study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of tenofovir and emtricitabine-tenofovir pre-exposure prophylaxis to decrease HIV-1 acquisition within heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. We describe the trial design and characteristics of the study cohort. Methods HIV-1...

  9. Accessibility Theory for Enhancing the Validity of Test Results for Students with Special Needs

    Beddow, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    In the arena of educational testing, accessibility refers to the degree to which students are given the opportunity to participate in and engage a test. Accessibility theory is a model for examining the interactions between the test-taker and the test itself and defining how they may decrease some students' access to the test event, ultimately…

  10. QSAR study of curcumine derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Gupta, Pawan; Sharma, Anju; Garg, Prabha; Roy, Nilanjan

    2013-03-01

    A QSAR study was performed on curcumine derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors using multiple linear regression. The statistically significant model was developed with squared correlation coefficients (r(2)) 0.891 and cross validated r(2) (r(2) cv) 0.825. The developed model revealed that electronic, shape, size, geometry, substitution's information and hydrophilicity were important atomic properties for determining the inhibitory activity of these molecules. The model was also tested successfully for external validation (r(2) pred = 0.849) as well as Tropsha's test for model predictability. Furthermore, the domain analysis was carried out to evaluate the prediction reliability of external set molecules. The model was statistically robust and had good predictive power which can be successfully utilized for screening of new molecules. PMID:23286784

  11. HIV-1 vaccine design: Learning from natural infection

    Kerkhof, van den, T.L.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Het humane immuundeficiëntie virus type 1 (hiv-1) is het virus dat aids veroorzaakt. Er is nog steeds geen bescherming tegen een hiv-1 infectie en de beëindiging van de wereldwijde epidemie kan waarschijnlijk alleen worden bereikt met behulp van een vaccin. Een hiv-1 vaccin zal bescherming moeten bieden tegen de verschillende subtypes die wereldwijd voorkomen. Ongeveer 10-30% van de hiv-1 geïnfecteerde patiënten ontwikkelen zogenoemde "breed-neutraliserende" antistoffen. Alhoewel deze antisto...

  12. HIV-1 vaccine design: Learning from natural infection

    Schuitemaker, J.; Sanders, R W; Kerkhof, van den, T.L.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Het humane immuundeficiëntie virus type 1 (hiv-1) is het virus dat aids veroorzaakt. Er is nog steeds geen bescherming tegen een hiv-1 infectie en de beëindiging van de wereldwijde epidemie kan waarschijnlijk alleen worden bereikt met behulp van een vaccin. Een hiv-1 vaccin zal bescherming moeten bieden tegen de verschillende subtypes die wereldwijd voorkomen. Ongeveer 10-30% van de hiv-1 geïnfecteerde patiënten ontwikkelen zogenoemde “breed-neutraliserende” antistoffen. Alhoewel deze antisto...

  13. Risk Factors for HIV-1 seroconversion among Taiwanese men visiting gay saunas who have sex with men

    Chen Yen-Ju

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Men having sex with men (MSM accounts for 33.6% of all reported cases of HIV-1 infection in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of HIV-1 infection among MSM in gay saunas in Taiwan. Methods Patrons of 5 gay saunas were recruited for a weekly volunteer counseling and testing program from 2001 to 2005. Questionnaires were collected for a risk factor analysis. HIV-1 subtypes were determined using DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Results HIV-1 prevalence rates among MSM in gay saunas in 2001 through 2005 were 3.4%, 5.1%, 8.9%, 8.5%, and 8.3%, respectively. In total, 81 of 1, 093 (7.4% MSM had HIV-1 infection. Fifty-two HIV-1 strains were genotyped, and all of them were subtype B. HIV-seropositive men were significantly younger than the seronegatives. Only 37.1% used condoms every time during sexual intercourse. A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the risk factors for HIV-1 were being uncircumcised (odds ratio (OR = 2.19; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.08~4.45; having sexual intercourse with at least 2 partners during each sauna visit (≥ 2 vs. ≤ 1, OR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.02~2.89; and the role played during anal intercourse (versatile vs. an exclusively insertive role, OR = 2.76; 95% CI, 1.42~5.36. Conclusions Overall, 7.4% Taiwanese MSM participating in this study had HIV-1 subtype B infection. Uncircumcised, being versatile role during anal intercourse, and having sex with more than one person during each sauna visit were main risk factors for HIV-1 infection.

  14. Test Planning and Test Access Mechanism Design for Stacked Chips using ILP

    Sengupta, Breeta; Larsson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose a scheme for test planning and test access mechanism (TAM) design for stacked integrated circuits (SICs) that are designed in a core-based manner. Our scheme minimizes the test cost, which is given as the weighted sum of the test time and the TAM width. The test cost is evaluated for a test flow that consists of a wafer sort test of each individual chip and a package test of the complete stack of chips. We use an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) model to find the opti...

  15. Coamplification of HIV-1 Proviral DNA and Viral RNA in Assays Used for Quantification of HIV-1 RNA▿

    Wan, H; Seth, A; Rainen, L; Fernandes, H.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated HIV-1 viral load (VL) observed in specimens frozen in situ in plasma preparation tubes (PPTs) compared to EDTA plasma specimens may affect therapeutic monitoring of HIV-infected patients. The increase in viral load is cell associated and minimized when plasma from the PPT is aspirated or recentrifuged prior to freezing. This study investigates the contribution of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA to elevated VL in the quantification of HIV-1 RNA in plasma. Fifty paired specimens collecte...

  16. HIV-1 evolution, drug resistance, and host genetics: The Indian scenario

    U Shankarkumar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available U Shankarkumar, A Pawar, K GhoshNational Institute of Immunohaematology (ICMR, KEM Hospital, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra, IndiaAbstract: A regimen with varied side effects and compliance is of paramount importance to prevent viral drug resistance. Most of the drug-resistance studies, as well as interpretation algorithms, are based on sequence data from HIV-1 subtype B viruses. Increased resistance to antiretroviral drugs leads to poor prognosis by restricting treatment options. Due to suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy there is an emergence of drug-resistant HIV-1 strains. The other factors responsible for this viral evolution are antiretroviral drug types and host genetics, especially major histocompatibility complex (MHC. Both primary and secondary drug resistances occur due to mutations in specific epitopes of viral protein regions which may influence the T cell recognition by immune system through MHC Class I and class II alleles. Mutations in viral epitopes enable the virus to escape the immune system. New drugs under clinical trials are being added but their exorbitant costs limit their access in developing countries. Thus the environmental consequences and, the impact of both viral and host genetic variations on the therapy in persons infected with HIV-1 clade C from India need to be determined.Keywords: HIV-1 C drug resistance, virus adaptation, HARRT, India

  17. Novel HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor Development by Virtual Screening Based on QSAR Models.

    Guasch, Laura; Zakharov, Alexey V; Tarasova, Olga A; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Liao, Chenzhong; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) plays an important role in the life cycle of HIV and is responsible for integration of the virus into the human genome. We present computational approaches used to design novel HIV-1 IN inhibitors. We created an IN inhibitor database by collecting experimental data from the literature. We developed quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models of HIV-1 IN strand transfer (ST) inhibitors using this database. The prediction accuracy of these models was estimated by external 5-fold cross-validation as well as with an additional validation set of 308 structurally distinct compounds from the publicly accessible BindingDB database. The validated models were used to screen a small combinatorial library of potential synthetic candidates to identify hits, with a subsequent docking approach applied to further filter out compounds to arrive at a small set of potential HIV-1 IN inhibitors. As result, 236 compounds with good druglikeness properties and with correct docking poses were identified as potential candidates for synthesis. One of the six compounds finally chosen for synthesis was experimentally confirmed to inhibit the ST reaction with an IC50(ST) of 37 µM. The IN inhibitor database is available for download from http://cactus.nci.nih.gov/download/iidb/. PMID:26268340

  18. HIV-1 seroprevalence among women attending sexually transmitted disease clinics in California. California Family of Surveys and Sentinel Surveillance Consortia.

    Wilson, M. J.; Marelich, W. D.; Lemp, G F; Ascher, M S; Kerndt, P; Kizer, K W

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the distribution of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) epidemic among California women, we analyzed HIV-1 seroprevalence and risk factors among women attending sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics in 21 local health jurisdictions. Using standardized protocols developed by the Centers for Disease Control, we tested unlinked serum specimens from women attending participating STD clinics in 1989. We analyzed demographic characteristics, HIV risk exposure groups, an...

  19. Protonation states in HIV-1 proteas

    Molecular dynamics simulations combined with the molecular mechanics-Poisson/Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) are used to study the different protonation states in HIV-1 protease and ABT-538. The results obtained demonstrate that different protonation states have strong influence on the B-factor of protease, the binding free energy between protease and inhibitor and the hydrogen bond. The computation using the MM-PBSA method shows that protonation at the OD1 of Asp25 in B chain has the strongest binding free energy and the B-factor calculated is in agreement with the experiment data. Otherwise, the hydrogen analysis shows the hydrogen bonds between the inhibitor and protease, inhibitor and the bridged-water (W301), and W301 and protease are most stable in the MD. (authors)

  20. MxB binds to the HIV-1 core and prevents the uncoating process of HIV-1

    Fricke, Thomas; White, Tommy E; Schulte, Bianca; de Souza Aranha Vieira, Daniel A.; Dharan, Adarsh; Campbell, Edward M; Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Background The IFN-α-inducible restriction factor MxB blocks HIV-1 infection after reverse transcription but prior to integration. Genetic evidence suggested that capsid is the viral determinant for restriction by MxB. This work explores the ability of MxB to bind to the HIV-1 core, and the role of capsid-binding in restriction. Results We showed that MxB binds to the HIV-1 core and that this interaction leads to inhibition of the uncoating process of HIV-1. These results identify MxB as an e...

  1. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole; Hansen, J E

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera on this...... infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...

  2. Synthesis of Novel Uracil Non-Nucleoside Derivatives as Potential Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors of HIV-1

    El-Brollosy, Nasser R.; Al-Deeb, Omar. A.; El-Emam, Ali A.;

    2009-01-01

    with cyclopropylmethyloxymethyl 9a-d, 2-phenylethyloxymethyl 9e-h, and 3-phenylprop-1-yloxymethyl 9i-l were prepared on treatment of the corresponding uracils with the appropriate acetals 8a-c. Some of the tested compounds showed good activity against HIV-1 wild type. Among them, 1-cyclopropylmethyloxymethyl-5-ethyl-6...

  3. Evidence for a base triple in the free HIV-1 TAR RNA

    Huthoff, H.; Girard, F.C.; Wijmenga, S.S.; Berkhout, B.

    2004-01-01

    We propose the existence of a novel base triple in the HIV-1 TAR hairpin. This triple is supported by covariation of loop residue 31 with residue 22, which is part of an unusual base pair with U40 below the 3-nucleotide bulge. A set of mutants was constructed to test the involvement of bases A22, U3

  4. Association between invasive cancer of the cervix and HIV-1 infection in Tanzania: the need for dual screening

    Ngoma Twalib

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer of the cervix is the second commonest malignancy in females worldwide and is the leading malignancy among women in Tanzania. Cancer of the cervix has been strongly associated with Human Papilloma Virus (HPV which is a sexually transmitted disease. However, the role of HIV-1 in the aetiology of cancer of the cervix is less clear. Studies suggest that HPV and HIV-1 infection are synergistic and therefore their dual occurrence may fuel increased incidence of cancer of the cervix and AIDS. We therefore conducted a study to determine the association between cancer of the cervix and HIV-1. Methods The study was carried out in Ocean Road Cancer Institute, Dar-es-salaam, Tanzania between January and March 2007. A hospital-based case control design was used to study 138 cases and 138 controls. The cases were consenting women 18 years and above with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, while the controls were consenting non-cancer adult women attendants or visitors. The participants were counselled and tested for HIV-1 and interviewed to assess risk factors for cancer of the cervix and HIV-1. Estimation of risk was done by computing odds ratios and confidence intervals. Confounding and interaction between the factors were assessed using logistic regression. Results HIV-1 prevalence was much higher among the cases (21.0% than among the controls (11.6%. In logistic regression, HIV-1 was associated with cancer of the cervix (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.4–5.9. Among the cases the mean age was lower for HIV-1 infected (44.3 years than HIV-1 uninfected women (54 years, p = 0.0001. Conclusion HIV-1 infection is associated with invasive cancer of the cervix. Resource-constrained countries with a high burden of HIV-1 and cervical cancer should adopt a high-risk approach that targets HIV-1 positive women for screening of cervical cancer initially by utilizing HIV/AIDS resources.

  5. CTL Responses to Regulatory Proteins Tat and Rev in HIV-1 B'/C Virus-Infected Individuals

    MING-MING JIA; KUN-XUE HONG; JIAN-PING CHEN; HONG-WEI LIU; SHA LIU; XIAO-QING ZHANG; HONG-JING ZHAO; YI-MING SHAO

    2008-01-01

    To characterize HIV-1 specific CTL responses to regulatory proteins Tat and Rev in HIV-B'/C vires-infected ART-naive individuals. Methods HIV-1-specific CTL responses were analyzed by IFN-γ ELISPOT assay using overlapping peptides spanning the consensus sequences of HIV-1 clade C Tat and Rev proteins. Statistical analysis and graphical presentation were performed using SIGMAPLOT 10.0 and SIGMASTAT 3.5. For samples with a positive response, the magnitude of CTL responses was compared between HIV-1 C proteins by Wilcoxon rank sum test, and the significance threshold was P<0.05. Results Tat and Rev were frequently recognized, with 23% and 52% of the tested individuals having detectable responses to these proteins, respectively. Several immunodominant regions were detected in Rev. No significant correlation was observed between the magnitude and breadth of CTL responses to regulatory proteins and the control of virus replication in this study. Conclusion Tat and Rev can serve as targets for HIV-1-specific CTL, and several immunodominant regions are detectable in Rev. Further characterization of epitopes and their role in virus control may shed light on pathogenesis of HIV-1 natural infection and also be useful for the design and testing of candidate vaccines.

  6. The scaffolding protein Dlg1 is a negative regulator of cell-free virus infectivity but not of cell-to-cell HIV-1 transmission in T cells.

    Patrycja Nzounza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell-to-cell virus transmission of Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 is predominantly mediated by cellular structures such as the virological synapse (VS. The VS formed between an HIV-1-infected T cell and a target T cell shares features with the immunological synapse (IS. We have previously identified the human homologue of the Drosophila Discs Large (Dlg1 protein as a new cellular partner for the HIV-1 Gag protein and a negative regulator of HIV-1 infectivity. Dlg1, a scaffolding protein plays a key role in clustering protein complexes in the plasma membrane at cellular contacts. It is implicated in IS formation and T cell signaling, but its role in HIV-1 cell-to-cell transmission was not studied before. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Kinetics of HIV-1 infection in Dlg1-depleted Jurkat T cells show that Dlg1 modulates the replication of HIV-1. Single-cycle infectivity tests show that this modulation does not take place during early steps of the HIV-1 life cycle. Immunofluorescence studies of Dlg1-depleted Jurkat T cells show that while Dlg1 depletion affects IS formation, it does not affect HIV-1-induced VS formation. Co-culture assays and quantitative cell-to-cell HIV-1 transfer analyses show that Dlg1 depletion does not modify transfer of HIV-1 material from infected to target T cells, or HIV-1 transmission leading to productive infection via cell contact. Dlg1 depletion results in increased virus yield and infectivity of the viral particles produced. Particles with increased infectivity present an increase in their cholesterol content and during the first hours of T cell infection these particles induce higher accumulation of total HIV-1 DNA. CONCLUSION: Despite its role in the IS formation, Dlg1 does not affect the VS and cell-to-cell spread of HIV-1, but plays a role in HIV-1 cell-free virus transmission. We propose that the effect of Dlg1 on HIV-1 infectivity is at the stage of virus entry.

  7. Contribution of immunological and virological factors to extremely severe primary HIV-1 infection

    Dalmau, Judith; Puertas, Maria Carmen; Azuara, Marta; Mariño, Ana; Frahm, Nicole; Mothe, Beatriz; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Buzón, Maria José; Paredes, Roger; Matas, Lourdes; Allen, Todd M.; Brander, Christian; Rodrigo, Carlos; Clotet, Bonaventura; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Background During acute HIV infection, high viral loads and the induction of host immune responses typically coincide with the onset of clinical symptoms. However, clinically severe presentations during acute HIV-1 infection, including AIDS-defining symptoms, are unusual. Methods Virus isolates were tested for clade, drug susceptibility, coreceptor usage, and growth rate for two cases of clinically severe sexual transmission. HLA genotype was determined, and HIV-1-specific CTL responses to an overlapping peptide set spanning the entire HIV clade A and clade B proteome were assayed. Results The virus isolated from the two unrelated cases of severe primary HIV-1 infection showed R5/X4 dual/mixed tropism, belonged to clade B and CRF02-AG, and were highly replicative in peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture. Impaired humoral responses were paralleled by a profound absence of HIV-1-specific CTL responses to the entire viral proteome in the two study cases. One case for which the virus source was available, showed a remarkable HLA similarity between the transmission pair as all 4 HLA-A and -B alleles were HLA supertype-matched between the subjects involved in the transmission case. Conclusions The data suggest that concurrence of viral and host factors contribute to the clinical severity of primary HIV-1 infection and that subjects infected with highly replicative dual tropic viruses are more prone to develop AIDS-defining symptoms during acute infection if they are unable to mount humoral and cellular HIV-1-specific immune responses. Concordant HLA supertypes might facilitate the preferential transmission of HLA-adapted viral variants, further accelerating disease progression. PMID:19093810

  8. Comparative analysis of measures of viral reservoirs in HIV-1 eradication studies.

    Susanne Eriksson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 reservoirs preclude virus eradication in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. The best characterized reservoir is a small, difficult-to-quantify pool of resting memory CD4(+ T cells carrying latent but replication-competent viral genomes. Because strategies targeting this latent reservoir are now being tested in clinical trials, well-validated high-throughput assays that quantify this reservoir are urgently needed. Here we compare eleven different approaches for quantitating persistent HIV-1 in 30 patients on HAART, using the original viral outgrowth assay for resting CD4(+ T cells carrying inducible, replication-competent viral genomes as a standard for comparison. PCR-based assays for cells containing HIV-1 DNA gave infected cell frequencies at least 2 logs higher than the viral outgrowth assay, even in subjects who started HAART during acute/early infection. This difference may reflect defective viral genomes. The ratio of infected cell frequencies determined by viral outgrowth and PCR-based assays varied dramatically between patients. Although strong correlations with the viral outgrowth assay could not be formally excluded for most assays, correlations achieved statistical significance only for integrated HIV-1 DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and HIV-1 RNA/DNA ratio in rectal CD4(+ T cells. Residual viremia was below the limit of detection in many subjects and did not correlate with the viral outgrowth assays. The dramatic differences in infected cell frequencies and the lack of a precise correlation between culture and PCR-based assays raise the possibility that the successful clearance of latently infected cells may be masked by a larger and variable pool of cells with defective proviruses. These defective proviruses are detected by PCR but may not be affected by reactivation strategies and may not require eradication to accomplish an effective cure. A molecular understanding of the discrepancy

  9. LILRB2 interaction with HLA class I correlates with control of HIV-1 infection.

    Arman A Bashirova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural progression of HIV-1 infection depends on genetic variation in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I locus, and the CD8+ T cell response is thought to be a primary mechanism of this effect. However, polymorphism within the MHC may also alter innate immune activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 by changing interactions of human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I molecules with leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILR, a group of immunoregulatory receptors mainly expressed on myelomonocytic cells including dendritic cells (DCs. We used previously characterized HLA allotype-specific binding capacities of LILRB1 and LILRB2 as well as data from a large cohort of HIV-1-infected individuals (N = 5126 to test whether LILR-HLA class I interactions influence viral load in HIV-1 infection. Our analyses in persons of European descent, the largest ethnic group examined, show that the effect of HLA-B alleles on HIV-1 control correlates with the binding strength between corresponding HLA-B allotypes and LILRB2 (p = 10(-2. Moreover, overall binding strength of LILRB2 to classical HLA class I allotypes, defined by the HLA-A/B/C genotypes in each patient, positively associates with viral replication in the absence of therapy in patients of both European (p = 10(-11-10(-9 and African (p = 10(-5-10(-3 descent. This effect appears to be driven by variations in LILRB2 binding affinities to HLA-B and is independent of individual class I allelic effects that are not related to the LILRB2 function. Correspondingly, in vitro experiments suggest that strong LILRB2-HLA binding negatively affects antigen-presenting properties of DCs. Thus, we propose an impact of LILRB2 on HIV-1 disease outcomes through altered regulation of DCs by LILRB2-HLA engagement.

  10. HIV-1 Tat protein increases microglial outward K(+ current and resultant neurotoxic activity.

    Jianuo Liu

    Full Text Available Microglia plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Increasing evidence indicates the voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels are involved in the regulation of microglia function, prompting us to hypothesize Kv channels may also be involved in microglia-mediated neurotoxic activity in HIV-1-infected brain. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the involvement of Kv channels in the response of microglia to HIV-1 Tat protein. Treatment of rat microglia with HIV-1 Tat protein (200 ng/ml resulted in pro-inflammatory microglial activation, as indicated by increases in TNF-α, IL-1β, reactive oxygen species, and nitric oxide, which were accompanied by enhanced outward K(+ current and Kv1.3 channel expression. Suppression of microglial Kv1.3 channel activity, either with Kv1.3 channel blockers Margatoxin, 5-(4-Phenoxybutoxypsoralen, or broad-spectrum K(+ channel blocker 4-Aminopyridine, or by knockdown of Kv1.3 expression via transfection of microglia with Kv1.3 siRNA, was found to abrogate the neurotoxic activity of microglia resulting from HIV-1 Tat exposure. Furthermore, HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal apoptosis was attenuated with the application of supernatant collected from K(+ channel blocker-treated microglia. Lastly, the intracellular signaling pathways associated with Kv1.3 were investigated and enhancement of microglial Kv1.3 was found to correspond with an increase in Erk1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. These data suggest targeting microglial Kv1.3 channels may be a potential new avenue of therapy for inflammation-mediated neurological disorders.

  11. Isolated HIV-1 core is active for reverse transcription

    Harrich David

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Whether purified HIV-1 virion cores are capable of reverse transcription or require uncoating to be activated is currently controversial. To address this question we purified cores from a virus culture and tested for the ability to generate authentic reverse transcription products. A dense fraction (approximately 1.28 g/ml prepared without detergent, possibly derived from disrupted virions, was found to naturally occur as a minor sub-fraction in our preparations. Core-like particles were identified in this active fraction by electron microscopy. We are the first to report the detection of authentic strong-stop, first-strand transfer and full-length minus strand products in this core fraction without requirement for an uncoating activity.

  12. Isolated HIV-1 core is active for reverse transcription.

    Warrilow, David; Stenzel, Deborah; Harrich, David

    2007-01-01

    Whether purified HIV-1 virion cores are capable of reverse transcription or require uncoating to be activated is currently controversial. To address this question we purified cores from a virus culture and tested for the ability to generate authentic reverse transcription products. A dense fraction (approximately 1.28 g/ml) prepared without detergent, possibly derived from disrupted virions, was found to naturally occur as a minor sub-fraction in our preparations. Core-like particles were identified in this active fraction by electron microscopy. We are the first to report the detection of authentic strong-stop, first-strand transfer and full-length minus strand products in this core fraction without requirement for an uncoating activity. PMID:17956635

  13. The Fate of HIV-1 Capsid: A Biochemical Assay for HIV-1 Uncoating

    Yang, Yang; Luban, Jeremy; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    The uncoating process of HIV-1 is a poorly understood process, so the development of a reliable assay to study uncoating is critical for moving the field forward. Here we describe an uncoating assay that currently represents the state-of-the-art biochemical procedure for monitoring uncoating and core stability during infection. This assay is based on the biochemical separation of soluble capsid protein from particulate capsid cores and provides information about the fate of the capsid during ...

  14. The fate of HIV-1 capsid: a biochemical assay for HIV-1 uncoating.

    Yang, Yang; Luban, Jeremy; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    The uncoating process of HIV-1 is a poorly understood process, so the development of a reliable assay to study uncoating is critical for moving the field forward. Here we describe an uncoating assay that currently represents the state-of-the-art biochemical procedure for monitoring uncoating and core stability during infection. This assay is based on the biochemical separation of soluble capsid protein from particulate capsid cores and provides information about the fate of the capsid during infection. PMID:24158811

  15. Microgravity access as a means for testing therapeutic pharmaceutics

    Zimmerman, Robert J.; Simske, Steven J.

    1995-01-01

    Spaceflight results in a unique combination of physiological effects. Immune, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, renal and other physiological systems are deleteriously affected by the microgravity environment. Many of these effects are analogous to diseases that afflict people on earth; for instance, immunosuppressive disorders and osteoporosis. Chiron Corporation (Emeryville, CA) is interested in using spaceflight as a testing ground for its unique therapeutic pharmaceutics. On STS-60 (Feb. 1994), Chiron, heading up a consortium managed by its CCDS (Center for the Commercial Development of Space) partner Bioserve Space Technologies, investigated the effects of its recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) pharmaceutic on preventing the immune system suppression induced that mimicked spaceflight (tail suspension). The recombinant, pegulated IL-2 largely prevented the deleterious effects of spaceflight and particularly suspension on the development of macrophages and the spleen. Based on these findings, Chiron hopes to expand its original market for Il-2 to include veterinary applications. In future missions, Chiron hopes to further explore the physiological effects of IL-2 in preventing the spaceflight effects (STS-63), and to use spaceflight access as a means for testing drugs which may be useful for the treatment of other diseases (e.g., M-CSF for osteoporosis). Spaceflight access has provided Chiron with new applications and new approaches for determining the effects of their pharmaceutics.

  16. LEDGF dominant interference proteins demonstrate prenuclear exposure of HIV-1 integrase and synergize with LEDGF depletion to destroy viral infectivity.

    Meehan, Anne M; Saenz, Dyana T; Morrison, James; Hu, Chunling; Peretz, Mary; Poeschla, Eric M

    2011-04-01

    Target cell overexpression of the integrase binding domain (IBD) of LEDGF/p75 (LEDGF) inhibits HIV-1 replication. The mechanism and protein structure requirements for this dominant interference are unclear. More generally, how and when HIV-1 uncoating occurs postentry is poorly defined, and it is unknown whether integrase within the evolving viral core becomes accessible to cellular proteins prior to nuclear entry. We used LEDGF dominant interference to address the latter question while characterizing determinants of IBD antiviral activity. Fusions of green fluorescent protein (GFP) with multiple C-terminal segments of LEDGF inhibited HIV-1 replication substantially, but minimal chimeras of either polarity (GFP-IBD or IBD-GFP) were most effective. Combining GFP-IBD expression with LEDGF depletion was profoundly antiviral. CD4(+) T cell lines were rendered virtually uninfectable, with single-cycle HIV-1 infectivity reduced 4 logs and high-input (multiplicity of infection = 5.0) replication completely blocked. We restricted GFP-IBD to specific intracellular locations and found that antiviral activity was preserved when the protein was confined to the cytoplasm or directed to the nuclear envelope. The life cycle block triggered by the cytoplasm-restricted protein manifested after nuclear entry, at the level of integration. We conclude that integrase within the viral core becomes accessible to host cell protein interaction in the cytoplasm. LEDGF dominant interference and depletion impair HIV-1 integration at distinct postentry stages. GFP-IBD may trigger premature or improper integrase oligomerization. PMID:21270171

  17. Varicella vaccination in HIV-1-infected children after immune reconstitution

    V. Bekker; G.H.A. Westerlaken; H. Scherpbier; S. Alders; H. Zaaijer; D. van Baarle; T. Kuijper

    2006-01-01

    Background: HIV-1-infected children have an increased risk of severe chickenpox. However, vaccination is not recommended in severely immunocompromised children. Objective: Can the live-attenuated varicella zoster virus (VZV) Oka strain be safely and effectively given to HIV-1-infected children despi

  18. The origin and emergence of an HIV-1 epidemic:

    Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne; Audelin, Anne M.; Helleberg, Marie;

    2014-01-01

    To describe, at patient-level detail, the determining events and factors involved in the development of a country's HIV-1 epidemic.......To describe, at patient-level detail, the determining events and factors involved in the development of a country's HIV-1 epidemic....

  19. Global human genetics of HIV-1 infection and China

    Tuo Fu ZHU; Tie Jian FENG; Xin XIAO; Hui WANG; Bo Ping ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in human genes can influence the risk for HIV-1 infection and disease progression, although the reported effects of these alleles have been inconsistent. This review highlights the recent discoveries on global and Chinese genetic polymorphisms and their association with HIV-1 transmission and disease progression.

  20. Iron chelators ICL670 and 311 inhibit HIV-1 transcription

    HIV-1 replication is induced by an excess of iron and iron chelation by desferrioxamine (DFO) inhibits viral replication by reducing proliferation of infected cells. Treatment of cells with DFO and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311) inhibit expression of proteins that regulate cell-cycle progression, including cycle-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Our recent studies showed that CDK2 participates in HIV-1 transcription and viral replication suggesting that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators might also affect HIV-1 transcription. Here we evaluated the effect of a clinically approved orally effective iron chelator, 4-[3,5-bis-(hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic acid (ICL670) and 311 on HIV-1 transcription. Both ICL670 and 311 inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription in CEM-T cells, 293T and HeLa cells. Neither ICL670 nor 311 induced cytotoxicity at concentrations that inhibited HIV-1 transcription. The chelators decreased cellular activity of CDK2 and reduced HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2. Neither ICL670A or 311 decreased CDK9 protein level but significantly reduced association of CDK9 with cyclin T1 and reduced phosphorylation of Ser-2 residues of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain. In conclusion, our findings add to the evidence that iron chelators can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating CDK2 and CDK9. Further consideration should be given to the development of iron chelators for future anti-retroviral therapeutics

  1. Neutralizing antibodies in slowly progressing HIV-1 infection

    Schønning, Kristian; Nielsen, C; Iversen, Johan;

    1995-01-01

    Ten asymptomatic individuals who had experienced only limited CD4+ cell loss after prolonged infection with HIV-1 were studied. These individuals had a mean CD4+ cell count of 674 x 10(6) cells/L and a mean duration of infection of 8.5 years. Also included were 10 asymptomatic HIV-1-infected indi...

  2. Dipyridodiazepinone derivatives; synthesis and anti HIV-1 activity

    Nisachon Khunnawutmanotham; Nitirat Chimnoi; Arunee Thitithanyanont; Patchreenart Saparpakorn; Kiattawee Choowongkomon; Pornpan Pungpo; Supa Hannongbua; Supanna Techasakul

    2009-01-01

    Ten dipyridodiazepinone derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their anti HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity against wild-type and mutant type enzymes, K103N and Y181C. Two of them were found to be promising inhibitors for HIV-1 RT.

  3. Structure and Dynamics of the Native HIV-1 Env Trimer

    Munro, James B.; Mothes, Walther

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1/AIDS remains one of the worst pandemics in human history. Despite tremendous efforts, no effective vaccine has been found. Recent reports give new insights into the structure and dynamics of the HIV-1 Env trimer and renew hopes that a better understanding of Env will translate into new vaccine candidates and more-effective antiretroviral therapies.

  4. Schistosomiasis and HIV-1 infection in rural Zimbabwe

    Kallestrup, Per; Zinyama, Rutendo; Gomo, Exnevia; Butterworth, Anthony E; van Dam, Govert J; Erikstrup, Christian; Ullum, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    Stunted development and reduced fecundity of Schistosoma parasites in immunodeficient mice and the impaired ability of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)-infected humans to excrete schistosome eggs have been described. This study explores the effect that HIV-1-associated immunodeficiency has ...

  5. Alterations in HIV-1 LTR promoter activity during AIDS progression

    HIV-1 variants evolving in AIDS patients frequently show increased replicative capacity compared to those present during early asymptomatic infection. It is known that late stage HIV-1 variants often show an expanded coreceptor tropism and altered Nef function. In the present study we investigated whether enhanced HIV-1 LTR promoter activity might also evolve during disease progression. Our results demonstrate increased LTR promoter activity after AIDS progression in 3 of 12 HIV-1-infected individuals studied. Further analysis revealed that multiple alterations in the U3 core-enhancer and in the transactivation-response (TAR) region seem to be responsible for the enhanced functional activity. Our findings show that in a subset of HIV-1-infected individuals enhanced LTR transcription contributes to the increased replicative potential of late stage virus isolates and might accelerate disease progression

  6. The G-quadruplex-forming aptamer AS1411 potently inhibits HIV-1 attachment to the host cell.

    Perrone, Rosalba; Butovskaya, Elena; Lago, Sara; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Pannecouque, Christophe; Palù, Giorgio; Richter, Sara N

    2016-04-01

    AS1411 is a G-rich aptamer that forms a stable G-quadruplex structure and displays antineoplastic properties both in vitro and in vivo. This oligonucleotide has undergone phase 2 clinical trials. The major molecular target of AS1411 is nucleolin (NCL), a multifunctional nucleolar protein also present in the cell membrane where it selectively mediates the binding and uptake of AS1411. Cell-surface NCL has been recognised as a low-affinity co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) anchorage on target cells. Here we assessed the anti-HIV-1 properties and underlying mechanism of action of AS1411. The antiviral activity of AS1411 was determined towards different HIV-1 strains, host cells and at various times post-infection. Acutely, persistently and latently infected cells were tested, including HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a healthy donor. Mechanistic studies to exclude modes of action other than virus binding via NCL were performed. AS1411 efficiently inhibited HIV-1 attachment/entry into the host cell. The aptamer displayed antiviral activity in the absence of cytotoxicity at the tested doses, therefore displaying a wide therapeutic window and favourable selectivity indexes. These findings, besides validating cell-surface-expressed NCL as an antiviral target, open the way for the possible use of AS1411 as a new potent and promisingly safe anti-HIV-1 agent. PMID:27032748

  7. The G-quadruplex-forming aptamer AS1411 potently inhibits HIV-1 attachment to the host cell

    Perrone, Rosalba; Butovskaya, Elena; Lago, Sara; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Pannecouque, Christophe; Palù, Giorgio; Richter, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    AS1411 is a G-rich aptamer that forms a stable G-quadruplex structure and displays antineoplastic properties both in vitro and in vivo. This oligonucleotide has undergone phase 2 clinical trials. The major molecular target of AS1411 is nucleolin (NCL), a multifunctional nucleolar protein also present in the cell membrane where it selectively mediates the binding and uptake of AS1411. Cell-surface NCL has been recognised as a low-affinity co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) anchorage on target cells. Here we assessed the anti-HIV-1 properties and underlying mechanism of action of AS1411. The antiviral activity of AS1411 was determined towards different HIV-1 strains, host cells and at various times post-infection. Acutely, persistently and latently infected cells were tested, including HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a healthy donor. Mechanistic studies to exclude modes of action other than virus binding via NCL were performed. AS1411 efficiently inhibited HIV-1 attachment/entry into the host cell. The aptamer displayed antiviral activity in the absence of cytotoxicity at the tested doses, therefore displaying a wide therapeutic window and favourable selectivity indexes. These findings, besides validating cell-surface-expressed NCL as an antiviral target, open the way for the possible use of AS1411 as a new potent and promisingly safe anti-HIV-1 agent. PMID:27032748

  8. Tracing the origin and northward dissemination dynamics of HIV-1 subtype C in Brazil.

    Edson Delatorre

    Full Text Available Previous studies indicate that the HIV-1 subtype C epidemic in southern Brazil was initiated by the introduction of a single founder strain probably originating from east Africa. However, the exact country of origin of such a founder strain as well as the origin of the subtype C viruses detected outside the Brazilian southern region remains unknown. HIV-1 subtype C pol sequences isolated in the southern, southeastern and central-western Brazilian regions (n = 209 were compared with a large number (n ~ 2,000 of subtype C pol sequences of African origin. Maximum-likelihood analyses revealed that most HIV-1 subtype C Brazilian sequences branched in a single monophyletic clade (CBR-I, nested within a larger monophyletic lineage characteristic of east Africa. Bayesian analyses indicate that the CBR-I clade most probably originated in Burundi and was introduced into the Paraná state (southern region around the middle 1970s, after which it rapidly disseminated to neighboring regions. The states of Paraná and Santa Catarina have been the most important hubs of subtype C dissemination, and routine travel and spatial accessibility seems to have been the major driving forces of this process. Five additional introductions of HIV-1 subtype C strains probably originated in eastern (n = 2, southern (n = 2 and central (n = 1 African countries were detected in the Rio de Janeiro state (southeastern region. These results indicate a continuous influx of HIV-1 subtype C strains of African origin into Brazil and also unveil the existence of unrecognized transmission networks linking this country to east Africa.

  9. Transportin 3 promotes a nuclear maturation step required for efficient HIV-1 integration.

    Lihong Zhou

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The HIV/AIDS pandemic is a major global health threat and understanding the detailed molecular mechanisms of HIV replication is critical for the development of novel therapeutics. To replicate, HIV-1 must access the nucleus of infected cells and integrate into host chromosomes, however little is known about the events occurring post-nuclear entry but before integration. Here we show that the karyopherin Transportin 3 (Tnp3 promotes HIV-1 integration in different cell types. Furthermore Tnp3 binds the viral capsid proteins and tRNAs incorporated into viral particles. Interaction between Tnp3, capsid and tRNAs is stronger in the presence of RanGTP, consistent with the possibility that Tnp3 is an export factor for these substrates. In agreement with this interpretation, we found that Tnp3 exports from the nuclei viral tRNAs in a RanGTP-dependent way. Tnp3 also binds and exports from the nuclei some species of cellular tRNAs with a defective 3'CCA end. Depletion of Tnp3 results in a re-distribution of HIV-1 capsid proteins between nucleus and cytoplasm however HIV-1 bearing the N74D mutation in capsid, which is insensitive to Tnp3 depletion, does not show nucleocytoplasmic redistribution of capsid proteins. We propose that Tnp3 promotes HIV-1 infection by displacing any capsid and tRNA that remain bound to the pre-integration complex after nuclear entry to facilitate integration. The results also provide evidence for a novel tRNA nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathway in human cells.

  10. Comparison of glycerolisation with cryopreservation methods on HIV-1 inactivation

    Cryopreservation and glycerolisation are two successful long-term preservation methods for human cadaveric donor skin, which is used in the treatment of bum patients. High concentrations of glycerol has been shown to be antibacterial and virucidal. Because fear of possible transmission of HIV-1 following allograft transplantation, this study was undertaken to investigate whether HIV can be effectively eliminated from skin explants. HIV-1 Ba-L, which has been shown to infect monocytes in skin explants and also dendritic cells, was. For the experiments we used cell-free virus, exogenously HIV infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and exogenously HIV infected cadaver split skin. Different concentrations of glycerol at various temperatures and the glycerolisation procedure as used by the Euro Skin Bank were used to determine the effects on HIV-1 Ba-L infectivity. For the cryopreservation technique we used 10% DMSO and a controlled rate freezer. HIV-1 Ba-L transfer was determined by adding uninfected PBMCs to the infected material and reverse transcriptase was measured. Cell-free HIV-1 Ba-L was not inactivated by 50% glycerol but was effectively inactivated within 30 minutes by 70% and 85% glycerol at 4 degree C, room temperature and 37 degree C. In contrast, cell-free HIV-1 Ba-L was not inactivated by cryopreservation. Most importantly, we have shown that HIV-1 Ba-L present in split skin is inactivated by incubating skin in 70% glycerol for three hours at 37-C. HIV in exogenously infected skin was not inactivated by cryopreservation. High concentrations of glycerol effectively inactivates free HIV-1 Ba-L and intracellular HIV-1 Ba-L. Also the current glycerolisation procedure carried out by the Euro Skin Bank effectively inactivates infectious virus. However, the cryopreservation technique did not show any reduction in HIV-1 Ba-L infectivity

  11. Evaluation of the Aptima(®) HIV-1 Quant Dx assay for HIV-1 RNA viral load detection and quantitation in plasma of HIV-1-infected individuals: A comparison with Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay.

    Amendola, Alessandra; Pisciotta, Maria; Aleo, Loredana; Ferraioli, Valeria; Angeletti, Claudio; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria

    2016-09-01

    The Hologic Aptima(®) HIV-1 Quant Dx assay (Aptima HIV) is a real-time transcription-mediated amplification method CE-approved for use in diagnosis and monitoring of HIV-1 infection. The analytical performance of this new assay was compared to the FDA-approved Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (RealTime). The evaluation was performed using 220 clinical plasma samples, the WHO 3rd HIV-1 International Standard, and the QCMD HIV-1 RNA EQA. Concordance on qualitative results, correlation between quantitative results, accuracy, and reproducibility of viral load data were analyzed. The ability to measure HIV-1 subtypes was assessed on the second WHO International Reference Preparation Panel for HIV-1 Subtypes. With clinical samples, inter-assay agreement for qualitative results was high (91.8%) with Cohen's kappa statistic equal to 0.836. For samples with quantitative results in both assays (n = 93), Lin's concordance correlation coefficient was 0.980 (P R(2)  > 0.970) and showed higher sensitivity compared to RealTime being able to detect HIV-1 RNA in 10 out of 10 replicates containing down to 7 cp/ml (20 IU/ml). Reproducibility was very high, even at low HIV-1 RNA values. The Aptima HIV was able to detect and accurately quantify all the main HIV-1 subtypes in both reference panels and clinical samples. Besides excellent performance, Aptima HIV shows full automation, ease of use, and improved workflow compared to RealTime. J. Med. Virol. 88:1535-1544, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864171

  12. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole;

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera on this...... infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...... CD4 and that post binding events may be common to the infection of lymphocytes. Anti HIV-1 sera showed neutralizing activity against heterologous and even autologous escape virus. This finding, together with the observation that monocytes and M phi s are infected in vivo, suggests that protection...

  13. Performance Characteristics of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Genotyping Systems in Sequence-Based Analysis of Subtypes Other than HIV-1 Subtype B

    Jagodzinski, Linda L; Cooley, John D.; Weber, Mark; Michael, Nelson L.

    2003-01-01

    Given the diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtypes and the emergence of subtypes other than HIV-1 subtype B in the United States, genotypic assays must be capable of delivering sequence data on diverse HIV-1 subtypes. We evaluated the performance of Visible Genetics TRUGENE HIV-1 genotyping kit and Applied Biosystems ViroSeq HIV-1 genotyping system on a panel of 34 well-characterized HIV-1 viral stocks (subtypes A through H). Both assays perform well on diverse HIV-1 ...

  14. LEDGF Dominant Interference Proteins Demonstrate Prenuclear Exposure of HIV-1 Integrase and Synergize with LEDGF Depletion To Destroy Viral Infectivity ▿ ‡

    Meehan, Anne M.; Saenz, Dyana T.; Morrison, James; Hu, Chunling; Peretz, Mary; Poeschla, Eric M.

    2011-01-01

    Target cell overexpression of the integrase binding domain (IBD) of LEDGF/p75 (LEDGF) inhibits HIV-1 replication. The mechanism and protein structure requirements for this dominant interference are unclear. More generally, how and when HIV-1 uncoating occurs postentry is poorly defined, and it is unknown whether integrase within the evolving viral core becomes accessible to cellular proteins prior to nuclear entry. We used LEDGF dominant interference to address the latter question while chara...

  15. HIV-1 Tat and HIV-associated Dementia%HIV-1Tat蛋白与艾滋病脑病

    周勤华; 姚鑫; 惠斌

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 gene expression requires the transcriptional activator protein Tal of human immunodeficiency virus-1 ( HIV-1) , which stimulates viral transcript elongation. A significant number of people infected with the HIV develop neurologic complications. HIV-1-associated dementia( HAD) is a severe central nervous system(CNS) disorder neurologically induced by HIV-1. HAD represents the most severe form of HIV-related neuropsychiatric impairment and is characterized by motor dysfunction and impaired cognitions and behaviors. HIV-1 trans-activator of transcription( Tat) is an important factor in viral pathogenesis. The Tat protein not only drives the regulatory regions of the virus, but also might be actively released from the cells and then interacts with the cell surface receptors of other uninfected cells in the brain leading to cellular dysfunction. Growing evidence indicates that HIV-1 Tat protein play a major role in pathogenesis of HAD. This article reviewed the pleomorphic actions of Tat protein and the evidence supporting its central role in the neuropathogenesis of HAD.%Tat蛋白是HIV-1编码的反式转录激活因子,其主要功能是反式激活HIV-1病毒基因组转录的起始和延伸,启动病毒复制,近年来研究发现,Tat蛋白在HIV-1感染所引起的严重中枢神经系统(CNS)并发症——艾滋病脑病中起重要作用,是艾滋病脑病发生与发展的重要致病因子.本文就HIV-1 Tat蛋白在艾滋病脑病中的研究进展作一综述.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of HIV-1 associated neurodegeneration

    Hakan Ozdener

    2005-06-01

    Since identification of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), numerous studies suggest a link between neurological impairments, in particular dementia, with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with alarming occurrence worldwide. Approximately, 60% of HIV-infected people show some form of neurological impairment, and neuropathological changes are found in 90% of autopsied cases. Approximately 30% of untreated HIV-infected persons may develop dementia. The mechanisms behind these pathological changes are still not understood. Mounting data obtained by in vivo and in vitro experiments suggest that neuronal apoptosis is a major feature of HIV associated dementia (HAD), which can occur in the absence of direct infection of neurons. The major pathway of neuronal apoptosis occurs indirectly through release of neurotoxins by activated cells in the central nervous system (CNS) involving the induction of excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. In addition a direct mechanism induced by viral proteins in the pathogenesis of HAD may also play a role. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms of HIV-associated dementia and possible therapeutic strategies.

  17. Cyclophilin B enhances HIV-1 infection.

    DeBoer, Jason; Madson, Christian J; Belshan, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a member of the immunophilin family and intracellular chaperone. It predominantly localizes to the ER, but also contains a nuclear localization signal and is secreted from cells. CypB has been shown to interact with the Gag protein of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1). Several proteomic and genetic studies identified it as a potential factor involved in HIV replication. Herein, we show that over-expression of CypB enhances HIV infection by increasing nuclear import of viral DNA. This enhancement was unaffected by cyclosporine treatment and requires the N-terminus of the protein. The N-terminus contains an ER leader sequence, putative nuclear localization signal, and is required for secretion. Deletion of the N-terminus resulted in mislocalization from the ER and suppression of HIV infection. Passive transfer experiments showed that secreted CypB did not impact HIV infection. Combined, these experiments show that intracellular CypB modulates a pathway of HIV nuclear import. PMID:26774171

  18. Development of HIV-1 rectal-specific microbicides and colonic tissue evaluation.

    Dezzutti, Charlene S; Russo, Julie; Wang, Lin; Abebe, Kaleab Z; Li, Jie; Friend, David R; McGowan, Ian M; Rohan, Lisa C

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is structurally and functionally different from the vagina. Thus, the paradigm of topical microbicide development and evaluation has evolved to include rectal microbicides (RMs). Our interest was to create unique RM formulations to safely and effectively deliver antiretroviral drugs to mucosal tissue. RMs were designed to include those that spread and coat all surfaces of the rectum and distal colon rapidly (liquid) and those that create a deformable, erodible barrier and remain localized at the administration site (gel). Tenofovir (TFV) (1%) was formulated as an aqueous thermoreversible fluid and a carbopol-based aqueous hydrogel. Lipid-based liquid and gel formulations were prepared for UC781 (0.1%) using isopropyl myristate and GTCC (Caprylic/Capric Triglycerides), respectively. Formulations were characterized for pH, viscosity, osmolality, and drug content. Pre-clinical testing incorporated ex vivo colonic tissue obtained through surgical resections and flexible sigmoidoscopy (flex sig). As this was the first time using tissue from both sources side-by-side, the ability to replicate HIV-1 was compared. Efficacy of the RM formulations was tested by applying the products with HIV-1 directly to polarized colonic tissue and following viral replication. Safety of the formulations was determined by MTT assay and histology. All products had a neutral pH and were isoosmolar. While HIV-1BaL and HIV-1JR-CSF alone and in the presence of semen had similar replication trends between surgically resected and flex sig tissues, the magnitude of viral replication was significantly better in flex sig tissues. Both TFV and UC781 formulations protected the colonic tissue, regardless of tissue source, from HIV-1 and retained tissue viability and architecture. Our in vitro and ex vivo results show successful formulation of unique RMs. Moreover, the results of flex sig and surgically resected tissues were comparable suggesting the incorporation of both in

  19. Development of HIV-1 rectal-specific microbicides and colonic tissue evaluation.

    Charlene S Dezzutti

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract is structurally and functionally different from the vagina. Thus, the paradigm of topical microbicide development and evaluation has evolved to include rectal microbicides (RMs. Our interest was to create unique RM formulations to safely and effectively deliver antiretroviral drugs to mucosal tissue. RMs were designed to include those that spread and coat all surfaces of the rectum and distal colon rapidly (liquid and those that create a deformable, erodible barrier and remain localized at the administration site (gel. Tenofovir (TFV (1% was formulated as an aqueous thermoreversible fluid and a carbopol-based aqueous hydrogel. Lipid-based liquid and gel formulations were prepared for UC781 (0.1% using isopropyl myristate and GTCC (Caprylic/Capric Triglycerides, respectively. Formulations were characterized for pH, viscosity, osmolality, and drug content. Pre-clinical testing incorporated ex vivo colonic tissue obtained through surgical resections and flexible sigmoidoscopy (flex sig. As this was the first time using tissue from both sources side-by-side, the ability to replicate HIV-1 was compared. Efficacy of the RM formulations was tested by applying the products with HIV-1 directly to polarized colonic tissue and following viral replication. Safety of the formulations was determined by MTT assay and histology. All products had a neutral pH and were isoosmolar. While HIV-1BaL and HIV-1JR-CSF alone and in the presence of semen had similar replication trends between surgically resected and flex sig tissues, the magnitude of viral replication was significantly better in flex sig tissues. Both TFV and UC781 formulations protected the colonic tissue, regardless of tissue source, from HIV-1 and retained tissue viability and architecture. Our in vitro and ex vivo results show successful formulation of unique RMs. Moreover, the results of flex sig and surgically resected tissues were comparable suggesting the incorporation

  20. Defining the roles for Vpr in HIV-1-associated neuropathogenesis.

    James, Tony; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Wigdahl, Brian; Krebs, Fred C

    2016-08-01

    It is increasingly evident that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) has a unique role in neuropathogenesis. Its ability to induce G2/M arrest coupled with its capacity to increase viral gene transcription gives it a unique role in sustaining viral replication and aiding in the establishment and maintenance of a systemic infection. The requirement of Vpr for HIV-1 infection and replication in cells of monocytic origin (a key lineage of cells involved in HIV-1 neuroinvasion) suggests an important role in establishing and sustaining infection in the central nervous system (CNS). Contributions of Vpr to neuropathogenesis can be expanded further through (i) naturally occurring HIV-1 sequence variation that results in functionally divergent Vpr variants; (ii) the dual activities of Vpr as a intracellular protein delivered and expressed during HIV-1 infection and as an extracellular protein that can act on neighboring, uninfected cells; (iii) cell type-dependent consequences of Vpr expression and exposure, including cell cycle arrest, metabolic dysregulation, and cytotoxicity; and (iv) the effects of Vpr on exosome-based intercellular communication in the CNS. Revealing that the effects of this pleiotropic viral protein is an essential part of a greater understanding of HIV-1-associated pathogenesis and potential approaches to treating and preventing disease caused by HIV-1 infection. PMID:27056720

  1. A Polyglot Approach to Bioinformatics Data Integration: A Phylogenetic Analysis of HIV-1.

    Reisman, Steven; Hatzopoulos, Thomas; Läufer, Konstantin; Thiruvathukal, George K; Putonti, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    As sequencing technologies continue to drop in price and increase in throughput, new challenges emerge for the management and accessibility of genomic sequence data. We have developed a pipeline for facilitating the storage, retrieval, and subsequent analysis of molecular data, integrating both sequence and metadata. Taking a polyglot approach involving multiple languages, libraries, and persistence mechanisms, sequence data can be aggregated from publicly available and local repositories. Data are exposed in the form of a RESTful web service, formatted for easy querying, and retrieved for downstream analyses. As a proof of concept, we have developed a resource for annotated HIV-1 sequences. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted for >6,000 HIV-1 sequences revealing spatial and temporal factors influence the evolution of the individual genes uniquely. Nevertheless, signatures of origin can be extrapolated even despite increased globalization. The approach developed here can easily be customized for any species of interest. PMID:26819543

  2. Extreme genetic fragility of the HIV-1 capsid.

    Rihn, Suzannah J; Wilson, Sam J; Loman, Nick J; Alim, Mudathir; Bakker, Saskia E; Bhella, David; Gifford, Robert J; Rixon, Frazer J; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    Genetic robustness, or fragility, is defined as the ability, or lack thereof, of a biological entity to maintain function in the face of mutations. Viruses that replicate via RNA intermediates exhibit high mutation rates, and robustness should be particularly advantageous to them. The capsid (CA) domain of the HIV-1 Gag protein is under strong pressure to conserve functional roles in viral assembly, maturation, uncoating, and nuclear import. However, CA is also under strong immunological pressure to diversify. Therefore, it would be particularly advantageous for CA to evolve genetic robustness. To measure the genetic robustness of HIV-1 CA, we generated a library of single amino acid substitution mutants, encompassing almost half the residues in CA. Strikingly, we found HIV-1 CA to be the most genetically fragile protein that has been analyzed using such an approach, with 70% of mutations yielding replication-defective viruses. Although CA participates in several steps in HIV-1 replication, analysis of conditionally (temperature sensitive) and constitutively non-viable mutants revealed that the biological basis for its genetic fragility was primarily the need to coordinate the accurate and efficient assembly of mature virions. All mutations that exist in naturally occurring HIV-1 subtype B populations at a frequency >3%, and were also present in the mutant library, had fitness levels that were >40% of WT. However, a substantial fraction of mutations with high fitness did not occur in natural populations, suggesting another form of selection pressure limiting variation in vivo. Additionally, known protective CTL epitopes occurred preferentially in domains of the HIV-1 CA that were even more genetically fragile than HIV-1 CA as a whole. The extreme genetic fragility of HIV-1 CA may be one reason why cell-mediated immune responses to Gag correlate with better prognosis in HIV-1 infection, and suggests that CA is a good target for therapy and vaccination strategies

  3. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 entry

    Heredia A

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alonso Heredia,1,3 Olga S Latinovic,2,3 Florent Barbault,4 Erik PH de Leeuw3,5 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 3Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland Baltimore School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS, UMRCNRS7086, Paris, France; 5Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Maryland Baltimore School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Background: Antiretroviral therapy has transformed HIV-1 infection into a managed condition with near-normal life expectancy. However, a significant number of patients remain with limited therapeutic options due to HIV-1 resistance, side effects, or drug costs. Further, it is likely that current drugs will not retain efficacy, due to risks of side effects and transmitted resistance.Results: We describe compound 5660386 (3-ethyl-2-[3-(1,3,3-trimethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-ylidene-1-propen-1-yl]-1,3-benzothiazol-3-ium as a novel inhibitor of HIV-1 entry. Compound 5660386 inhibits HIV-1 entry in cell lines and primary cells, binds to HIV-1 envelope protein, and inhibits the interaction of GP120 to CD4. Further, compound 5660386 showed a unique and broad-range activity against primary HIV-1 isolates from different subtypes and geographical areas.Conclusion: Development of small-molecule entry inhibitors of HIV-1 such as 5660386 may lead to novel classes of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. These inhibitors may be particularly effective against viruses resistant to current antiretroviral drugs and could have potential applications in both treatment and prevention. Keywords: HIV-1, defensin, drug, entry, antiviral therapy, CD4

  4. The anti-HIV-1 effect of scutellarin

    Scutellarin was purified from the plant Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand.-Mazz. The activity against 3 strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was determined in vitro in this study. These were laboratory-derived virus (HIV-1IIIB), drug-resistant virus (HIV-174V), and low-passage clinical isolated virus (HIV-1KM018). From syncytia inhibition study, the EC50 of scutellarin against HIV-1IIIB direct infection in C8166 cells was 26 μM with a therapeutic index of 36. When the mode of infection changed from acute infection to cell-to-cell infection, this compound became even more potent and the EC50 reduced to 15 μM. This suggested that cell fusion might be affected by this compound. By comparing the inhibitory effects on p24 antigen, scutellarin was also found to be active against HIV-174V (EC50 253 μM) and HIV-1KM018 (EC50 136 μM) infection with significant difference in potency. The mechanism of its action was also explored in this study. At a concentration of 433 μM, scutellarin inhibited 48% of the cell free recombinant HIV-1 RT activity. It also caused 82% inhibition of HIV-1 particle attachment and 45% inhibition of fusion at the concentrations of 54 μM. In summary, scutellarin was found to inhibit several strains of HIV-1 replication with different potencies. It appeared to inhibit HIV-1 RT activity, HIV-1 particle attachment and cell fusion. These are essential activities for viral transmission and replication

  5. Highly Accurate Structure-Based Prediction of HIV-1 Coreceptor Usage Suggests Intermolecular Interactions Driving Tropism.

    Chris A Kieslich

    Full Text Available HIV-1 entry into host cells is mediated by interactions between the V3-loop of viral glycoprotein gp120 and chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4, collectively known as HIV-1 coreceptors. Accurate genotypic prediction of coreceptor usage is of significant clinical interest and determination of the factors driving tropism has been the focus of extensive study. We have developed a method based on nonlinear support vector machines to elucidate the interacting residue pairs driving coreceptor usage and provide highly accurate coreceptor usage predictions. Our models utilize centroid-centroid interaction energies from computationally derived structures of the V3-loop:coreceptor complexes as primary features, while additional features based on established rules regarding V3-loop sequences are also investigated. We tested our method on 2455 V3-loop sequences of various lengths and subtypes, and produce a median area under the receiver operator curve of 0.977 based on 500 runs of 10-fold cross validation. Our study is the first to elucidate a small set of specific interacting residue pairs between the V3-loop and coreceptors capable of predicting coreceptor usage with high accuracy across major HIV-1 subtypes. The developed method has been implemented as a web tool named CRUSH, CoReceptor USage prediction for HIV-1, which is available at http://ares.tamu.edu/CRUSH/.

  6. Highly Accurate Structure-Based Prediction of HIV-1 Coreceptor Usage Suggests Intermolecular Interactions Driving Tropism

    Kieslich, Chris A.; Tamamis, Phanourios; Guzman, Yannis A.; Onel, Melis; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 entry into host cells is mediated by interactions between the V3-loop of viral glycoprotein gp120 and chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4, collectively known as HIV-1 coreceptors. Accurate genotypic prediction of coreceptor usage is of significant clinical interest and determination of the factors driving tropism has been the focus of extensive study. We have developed a method based on nonlinear support vector machines to elucidate the interacting residue pairs driving coreceptor usage and provide highly accurate coreceptor usage predictions. Our models utilize centroid-centroid interaction energies from computationally derived structures of the V3-loop:coreceptor complexes as primary features, while additional features based on established rules regarding V3-loop sequences are also investigated. We tested our method on 2455 V3-loop sequences of various lengths and subtypes, and produce a median area under the receiver operator curve of 0.977 based on 500 runs of 10-fold cross validation. Our study is the first to elucidate a small set of specific interacting residue pairs between the V3-loop and coreceptors capable of predicting coreceptor usage with high accuracy across major HIV-1 subtypes. The developed method has been implemented as a web tool named CRUSH, CoReceptor USage prediction for HIV-1, which is available at http://ares.tamu.edu/CRUSH/. PMID:26859389

  7. HIV-1 Replication and the Cellular Eukaryotic Translation Apparatus

    Santiago Guerrero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by targeting key translation factors and overcomes different cellular obstacles that affect protein translation. In this review, we describe how HIV-1 proteins target several components of the eukaryotic translation machinery, which consequently improves viral translation and replication.

  8. HIV-1 replication and the cellular eukaryotic translation apparatus.

    Guerrero, Santiago; Batisse, Julien; Libre, Camille; Bernacchi, Serena; Marquet, Roland; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by targeting key translation factors and overcomes different cellular obstacles that affect protein translation. In this review, we describe how HIV-1 proteins target several components of the eukaryotic translation machinery, which consequently improves viral translation and replication. PMID:25606970

  9. Cross-contamination during processing of dried blood spots used for rapid diagnosis of HIV-1 infection of infants is rare and avoidable

    Mitchell, Caroline; Kraft, Kelli; Peterson, Do; Frenkel, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) samples are a convenient way to collect infant blood for HIV-1 diagnostic testing. Minimizing the risk of false positives is critical for diagnostic tests. A protocol for processing and testing DBS for infant HIV-1 diagnosis was evaluated to identify the rate and source of false positive results. DBS were created on Flinders Technology Associates (FTA) filter paper with 500 copies/punch (high) or 5000 copies/punch (very high) concentrations of HIV-1 DNA. Blank discs of ...

  10. Impact of HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1+2 dual infection on the outcome of tuberculosis

    Wejse, C; Patsche, C B; Kühle, A;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HIV-1 infection has been shown to impact the outcome of patients with tuberculosis (TB), but data regarding the impact of HIV-2 on TB outcomes are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of HIV types on mortality among TB patients in Guinea-Bissau and to examine the...... predictive ability of the TBscoreII, a clinical score used to assess disease severity. METHODS: In a prospective follow-up study, we examined the prevalence of HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1+2 co-infection in TB patients in Guinea-Bissau, and the impact on outcomes at 12 months of follow-up. We included all adult...... seventy-nine patients were HIV-infected: 241 had HIV-1, 93 had HIV-2, and 45 were HIV-1+2 dual infected. The HIV type-associated risk of TB was 6-fold higher for HIV-1, 7-fold higher for HIV-1+2 dual infection, and 2-fold higher for HIV-2 compared with the HIV-uninfected. Of the patients included, 144 (11...

  11. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on efficiently targeting these three aspects. The degree to which HIV replicates during ART remains controversial. Most studies have failed to find any evidence of HIV evolution in blood, even with samples collected over many years, although a recent very intensive study of three individuals suggested that the virus population does shift, at least during the first few months of therapy. Stronger but still not definitive evidence for replication comes from a series of studies in which standard regimens were intensified with an integration inhibitor, resulting in changes in episomal DNA (blood) and cell-associated RNA (tissue). Limited drug penetration within tissues and the presence of immune sanctuaries have been argued as potential mechanisms allowing HIV to spread during ART. Mathematical models suggest that HIV replication and evolution is possible even without the selection of fully drug-resistant variants. As persistent HIV replication could have clinical consequences and might limit the efficacy of curative interventions, determining if HIV replicates during ART and why, should remain a key focus of the HIV research community. Summary Residual viral replication likely persists in lymphoid tissues, at least in a subset of individuals. Abnormal levels of immune activation might contribute to sustain virus replication. PMID:27078619

  12. Biophysical Characterization of a Vaccine Candidate against HIV-1: The Transmembrane and Membrane Proximal Domains of HIV-1 gp41 as a Maltose Binding Protein Fusion.

    Zhen Gong

    Full Text Available The membrane proximal region (MPR, residues 649-683 and transmembrane domain (TMD, residues 684-705 of the gp41 subunit of HIV-1's envelope protein are highly conserved and are important in viral mucosal transmission, virus attachment and membrane fusion with target cells. Several structures of the trimeric membrane proximal external region (residues 662-683 of MPR have been reported at the atomic level; however, the atomic structure of the TMD still remains unknown. To elucidate the structure of both MPR and TMD, we expressed the region spanning both domains, MPR-TM (residues 649-705, in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP. MPR-TM was initially fused to the C-terminus of MBP via a 42 aa-long linker containing a TEV protease recognition site (MBP-linker-MPR-TM. Biophysical characterization indicated that the purified MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein was a monodisperse and stable candidate for crystallization. However, crystals of the MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein could not be obtained in extensive crystallization screens. It is possible that the 42 residue-long linker between MBP and MPR-TM was interfering with crystal formation. To test this hypothesis, the 42 residue-long linker was replaced with three alanine residues. The fusion protein, MBP-AAA-MPR-TM, was similarly purified and characterized. Significantly, both the MBP-linker-MPR-TM and MBP-AAA-MPR-TM proteins strongly interacted with broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. With epitopes accessible to the broadly neutralizing antibodies, these MBP/MPR-TM recombinant proteins may be in immunologically relevant conformations that mimic a pre-hairpin intermediate of gp41.

  13. 对五种国产核酸筛查试剂检测HIV-1RNA效果的初步评价%Primary Evaluation on the Capacity of Five Domestic NAT Donor Screening Assays in Detecting HIV-1 RNA

    许四宏; 宋爱京; 聂建辉; 李秀华; 王佑春

    2011-01-01

    目的 对5种国产HBV/HCV/HIV-1核酸筛查试剂(A、B1、B2、C和D)检测HIV-1 RNA的能力进行初步评价.方法 从我国不同地区收集60份HIV-1感染者样品(包含1份HIV-1感染窗口期样品)及540份HIV阴性样品,将60份HIV-1感染者样品随机分布于540份HIV阴性样品中,按照合并检测模式(pool模式)对该600份样品进行检测,将每种试剂检测结果为阳性的pool分别按说明书进一步拆分和/或鉴别试验.结果 A、B1、B2和C四种试剂检测HIV-1RNA的效果较强,其阴性和阳性符合率均为100%;D试剂则较差,其中2份HIV-1感染者样品(基因型分别为BC和B/B′,HIV-1 RNA含量分别为9.70×102 copies/ml和5.20×103 copies/ml)分别处于2个pool中,该2个pool经D试剂检测,均为HIV-1 RNA阴性.对检测结果为阳性的35个pool进行拆分检测时,D试剂检测1份HIV-1感染者样品(B/B′亚型、HIV-1 RNA含量为1.09×103 copies/ml)为HIV-1 RNA阴性,3份HIV-1 RNA阴性样品为HIV-1 RNA阳性.对于1份HIV-1感染窗口期样品,5种试剂均检测为HIV-1 RNA阳性.结论 A、B1、B2和C四种试剂均有较高的一致性,但D试剂具有一定的假阳性和漏检,应进一步提高质量.%Objective To evaluate the capacity of five domestic NAT donor screening assays of HBV DNA, HCV RNA and HIV-1 RNA (A, B1, B2, C and D assays) in detecting HIV-1 RNA. Methods 60 HIV-1 positive plasma were collected from HIV-1-infected individuals and 540 HIV-1 negative plasma were collected from donors with negative for anti-HIV in different regions in China. The 60 samples positive for HIV-1 RNA were randomly distributed into 540 negative samples for HIV-1 RNA. Mini-pool test and further discrimination test were completed according to the manufactures' instruction of the five assays. Results For A, B1, B2 and C assays,the coincidence rates of HIV-1 infected and negative samples for HIV were 100%. However, for D assay, 2 pools containing one HIV-1 genotype BC sample (viral load: 9

  14. Prevalence and risk factors for HIV-1 infection in rural Kilimanjaro region of Tanzania: Implications for prevention and treatment

    Leyna Germana H

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variability in stages of the HIV-1 epidemic and hence HIV-1 prevalence exists in different areas in sub-Saharan Africa. The purpose of this study was to investigate the magnitude of HIV-1 infection and identify HIV-1 risk factors that may help to develop preventive strategies in rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between March and May of 2005 involving all individuals aged between 15–44 years having an address in Oria Village. All eligible individuals were registered and invited to participate. Participants were interviewed regarding their demographic characteristics, sexual behaviors, and medical history. Following a pre-test counseling, participants were offered an HIV test. Results Of the 2 093 eligible individuals, 1 528 (73.0% participated. The overall age and sex adjusted HIV-1 prevalence was 5.6%. Women had 2.5 times higher prevalence (8.0% vs. 3.2% as compared to men. The age group 25–44 years, marriage, separation and low education were associated with higher risk of HIV-1 infection for both sexes. HIV-1 infection was significantly associated with >2 sexual partners in the past 12 months (women: Adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.5 (95%CI: 1.3–4.7, and past 5 years, [(men: AOR, 2.2 (95%CI:1.2–5.6; women: AOR, 2.5 (95%CI: 1.4–4.0], unprotected casual sex (men: AOR,1.8 95%CI: 1.2–5.8, bottled alcohol (Men: AOR, 5.9 (95%CI:1.7–20.1 and local brew (men: AOR, 3.7 (95%CI: 1.5–9.2. Other factors included treatment for genital ulcers and genital discharge in the past 1 month. Health-related complaints were more common among HIV-1 seropositive as compared to seronegative participants and predicted the presence of HIV-1 infection. Conclusion HIV-1 infection was highly prevalent in this population. As compared to our previous findings, a shift of the epidemic from a younger to an older age group and from educated to uneducated individuals was observed. Women and married or

  15. Inhibiting Early-Stage Events in HIV-1 Replication by Small-Molecule Targeting of the HIV-1 Capsid

    Kortagere, Sandhya; Madani, Navid; Mankowski, Marie K.; Schön, Arne; Zentner, Isaac; Swaminathan, Gokul; Princiotto, Amy; Anthony, Kevin; Oza, Apara; Sierra, Luz-Jeannette; Passic, Shendra R.; Wang, Xiaozhao; Jones, David M; Stavale, Eric; Fred C. Krebs

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein plays essential roles in both early and late stages of virl replication and has emerged as a novel drug target. We report hybrid structure-based virtual screening to identify small molecules with the potential to interact with the N-terminal domain (NTD) of HIV-1 CA and disrupt early, preintegration steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. The small molecule 4,4′-[dibenzo[b,d]furan-2,8-diylbis(5-phenyl-1H-imidazole-4,2-diyl)]dibenzoic acid (CK026), which had anti-HI...

  16. Impact of HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1+2 dual infection on the outcome of tuberculosis

    C. Wejse; C.B. Patsche; Kühle, A.; F.J.V. Bamba; Mendes, M. S.; G. Lemvik; V.F. Gomes; F. Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Background: HIV-1 infection has been shown to impact the outcome of patients with tuberculosis (TB), but data regarding the impact of HIV-2 on TB outcomes are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of HIV types on mortality among TB patients in Guinea-Bissau and to examine the predictive ability of the TBscoreII, a clinical score used to assess disease severity. Methods: In a prospective follow-up study, we examined the prevalence of HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1+2 co-infection ...

  17. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Suppress HIV-1 Replication but Contribute to HIV-1 Induced Immunopathogenesis in Humanized Mice

    Guangming Li; Menglan Cheng; Jun-Ichi Nunoya; Liang Cheng; Haitao Guo; Haisheng Yu; Yong-Jun Liu; Lishan Su; Liguo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and pathogenesis remains unclear. HIV-1 infection in the humanized mouse model leads to persistent HIV-1 infection and immunopathogenesis, including type I interferons (IFN-I) induction, immune-activation and depletion of human leukocytes, including CD4 T cells. We developed a monoclonal antibody that specifically depletes human pDC in all lymphoid organs in humanized mice. When pDC were de...

  18. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 infection and inflammation

    Talia H Swartz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 38 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent anti-retroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are known to mediate inflammation and have been shown to be required for HIV-1 infection at the level of HIV-1 membrane fusion. Here we review the literature on the role of purinergic receptors in HIV-1 infection and associated inflammation and describe a role for these receptors as potential therapeutic targets.

  19. Chimpanzee reservoirs of pandemic and nonpandemic HIV-1.

    Keele, Brandon F; Van Heuverswyn, Fran; Li, Yingying; Bailes, Elizabeth; Takehisa, Jun; Santiago, Mario L; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Chen, Yalu; Wain, Louise V; Liegeois, Florian; Loul, Severin; Ngole, Eitel Mpoudi; Bienvenue, Yanga; Delaporte, Eric; Brookfield, John F Y; Sharp, Paul M; Shaw, George M; Peeters, Martine; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2006-07-28

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the cause of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), is a zoonotic infection of staggering proportions and social impact. Yet uncertainty persists regarding its natural reservoir. The virus most closely related to HIV-1 is a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) thus far identified only in captive members of the chimpanzee subspecies Pan troglodytes troglodytes. Here we report the detection of SIVcpz antibodies and nucleic acids in fecal samples from wild-living P. t. troglodytes apes in southern Cameroon, where prevalence rates in some communities reached 29 to 35%. By sequence analysis of endemic SIVcpz strains, we could trace the origins of pandemic (group M) and nonpandemic (group N) HIV-1 to distinct, geographically isolated chimpanzee communities. These findings establish P. t. troglodytes as a natural reservoir of HIV-1. PMID:16728595

  20. A novel biclustering approach to association rule mining for predicting HIV-1-human protein interactions.

    Anirban Mukhopadhyay

    Full Text Available Identification of potential viral-host protein interactions is a vital and useful approach towards development of new drugs targeting those interactions. In recent days, computational tools are being utilized for predicting viral-host interactions. Recently a database containing records of experimentally validated interactions between a set of HIV-1 proteins and a set of human proteins has been published. The problem of predicting new interactions based on this database is usually posed as a classification problem. However, posing the problem as a classification one suffers from the lack of biologically validated negative interactions. Therefore it will be beneficial to use the existing database for predicting new viral-host interactions without the need of negative samples. Motivated by this, in this article, the HIV-1-human protein interaction database has been analyzed using association rule mining. The main objective is to identify a set of association rules both among the HIV-1 proteins and among the human proteins, and use these rules for predicting new interactions. In this regard, a novel association rule mining technique based on biclustering has been proposed for discovering frequent closed itemsets followed by the association rules from the adjacency matrix of the HIV-1-human interaction network. Novel HIV-1-human interactions have been predicted based on the discovered association rules and tested for biological significance. For validation of the predicted new interactions, gene ontology-based and pathway-based studies have been performed. These studies show that the human proteins which are predicted to interact with a particular viral protein share many common biological activities. Moreover, literature survey has been used for validation purpose to identify some predicted interactions that are already validated experimentally but not present in the database. Comparison with other prediction methods is also discussed.

  1. In Vivo Molecular Dissection of the Effects of HIV-1 in Active Tuberculosis.

    Lucy C K Bell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Increased risk of tuberculosis (TB associated with HIV-1 infection is primarily attributed to deficient T helper (Th1 immune responses, but most people with active TB have robust Th1 responses, indicating that these are not sufficient to protect against disease. Recent findings suggest that favourable outcomes following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection arise from finely balanced inflammatory and regulatory pathways, achieving pathogen control without immunopathology. We hypothesised that HIV-1 and antiretroviral therapy (ART exert widespread changes to cell mediated immunity, which may compromise the optimal host protective response to TB and provide novel insights into the correlates of immune protection and pathogenesis. We sought to define these effects in patients with active TB by transcriptional profiling of tuberculin skin tests (TST to make comprehensive molecular level assessments of in vivo human immune responses at the site of a standardised mycobacterial challenge. We showed that the TST transcriptome accurately reflects the molecular pathology at the site of human pulmonary TB, and used this approach to investigate immune dysregulation in HIV-1/TB co-infected patients with distinct clinical phenotypes associated with TST reactivity or anergy and unmasking TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS after initiation of ART. HIV-1 infected patients with positive TSTs exhibited preserved Th1 responses but deficient immunoregulatory IL10-inducible responses. Those with clinically negative TSTs revealed profound anergy of innate as well as adaptive immune responses, except for preservation of type 1 interferon activity, implicated in impaired anti-mycobacterial immunity. Patients with unmasking TB IRIS showed recovery of Th1 immunity to normal levels, but exaggerated Th2-associated responses specifically. These mechanisms of immune dysregulation were localised to the tissue microenvironment and not evident in peripheral

  2. In Vivo Molecular Dissection of the Effects of HIV-1 in Active Tuberculosis.

    Bell, Lucy C K; Pollara, Gabriele; Pascoe, Mellissa; Tomlinson, Gillian S; Lehloenya, Rannakoe J; Roe, Jennifer; Meldau, Richard; Miller, Robert F; Ramsay, Alan; Chain, Benjamin M; Dheda, Keertan; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2016-03-01

    Increased risk of tuberculosis (TB) associated with HIV-1 infection is primarily attributed to deficient T helper (Th)1 immune responses, but most people with active TB have robust Th1 responses, indicating that these are not sufficient to protect against disease. Recent findings suggest that favourable outcomes following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection arise from finely balanced inflammatory and regulatory pathways, achieving pathogen control without immunopathology. We hypothesised that HIV-1 and antiretroviral therapy (ART) exert widespread changes to cell mediated immunity, which may compromise the optimal host protective response to TB and provide novel insights into the correlates of immune protection and pathogenesis. We sought to define these effects in patients with active TB by transcriptional profiling of tuberculin skin tests (TST) to make comprehensive molecular level assessments of in vivo human immune responses at the site of a standardised mycobacterial challenge. We showed that the TST transcriptome accurately reflects the molecular pathology at the site of human pulmonary TB, and used this approach to investigate immune dysregulation in HIV-1/TB co-infected patients with distinct clinical phenotypes associated with TST reactivity or anergy and unmasking TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after initiation of ART. HIV-1 infected patients with positive TSTs exhibited preserved Th1 responses but deficient immunoregulatory IL10-inducible responses. Those with clinically negative TSTs revealed profound anergy of innate as well as adaptive immune responses, except for preservation of type 1 interferon activity, implicated in impaired anti-mycobacterial immunity. Patients with unmasking TB IRIS showed recovery of Th1 immunity to normal levels, but exaggerated Th2-associated responses specifically. These mechanisms of immune dysregulation were localised to the tissue microenvironment and not evident in peripheral blood. TST

  3. HIV-1 infected monozygotic twins: a tale of two outcomes

    Pérez-Losada Marcos; Orsega Susan; Metcalf Julia A; Hirschfeld Steven; Imamichi Hiromi; Tazi Loubna; Posada David; Lane H Clifford; Crandall Keith A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Replicate experiments are often difficult to find in evolutionary biology, as this field is inherently an historical science. However, viruses, bacteria and phages provide opportunities to study evolution in both natural and experimental contexts, due to their accelerated rates of evolution and short generation times. Here we investigate HIV-1 evolution by using a natural model represented by monozygotic twins infected synchronically at birth with an HIV-1 population from ...

  4. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation

    Amjad Ali; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected...

  5. Cell-free Assays for HIV-1 Uncoating

    Aiken, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Uncoating is an essential step in the retrovirus life cycle about which little is known. Uncoating is defined as the specific dissociation of the capsid shell from the viral core in the host cell cytoplasm. In this chapter, biochemical assays for studying HIV-1 uncoating in vitro are described. These techniques have proven useful for characterizing HIV-1 mutants that exhibit defects in the uncoating step of infection.

  6. Cell-free assays for HIV-1 uncoating.

    Aiken, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Uncoating is an essential step in the retrovirus life cycle about which little is known. Uncoating is defined as the specific dissociation of the capsid shell from the viral core in the host cell cytoplasm. In this chapter, biochemical assays for studying HIV-1 uncoating in vitro are described. These techniques have proven useful for characterizing HIV-1 mutants that exhibit defects in the uncoating step of infection. PMID:19020817

  7. Protein methylation is required to maintain optimal HIV-1 infectivity

    Piller Sabine C; Warrilow David; Apolloni Ann; Bodetti Tracey J; Hitchen Eleanor M; Willemsen Nicole M; Harrich David

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background: Protein methylation is recognized as a major protein modification pathway regulating diverse cellular events such as protein trafficking, transcription, and signal transduction. More recently, protein arginine methyltransferase activity has been shown to regulate HIV-1 transcription via Tat. In this study, adenosine periodate (AdOx) was used to globally inhibit protein methyltransferase activity so that the effect of protein methylation on HIV-1 infectivity could be asses...

  8. Lipids and Membrane Microdomains in HIV-1 Replication

    Waheed, Abdul A.; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    Several critical steps in the replication cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) – entry, assembly and budding – are complex processes that take place at the plasma membrane of the host cell. A growing body of data indicates that these early and late steps in HIV-1 replication take place in specialized plasma membrane microdomains, and that many of the viral and cellular components required for entry, assembly, and budding are concentrated in these microdomains. In particular, a...

  9. Imaging HIV-1 nuclear pre-integration complexes.

    Cereseto, Anna; Giacca, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in fluorescent microscopy techniques now permit investigation of HIV-1 biology exploiting tools alternative to conventional molecular biology. Here we describe a novel, fluorescence-based method to visualize HIV-1 viral particles within intact nuclei of infected cells. This method allows investigating the localization of pre-integration complexes within the nuclear compartment with respect to the nuclear envelope and the chromatin territories. PMID:24158813

  10. HIV-1 Replication and the Cellular Eukaryotic Translation Apparatus

    Santiago Guerrero; Julien Batisse; Camille Libre; Serena Bernacchi; Roland Marquet; Jean-Christophe Paillart

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by ta...

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of HIV-1 protease complexed with saquinavir

    Watson, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Inhibition of the Human Immunode�ficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease enzyme blocks HIV-1 replication. Protease inhibitor drugs have successfully been used as a therapy for HIV-infected individuals to reduce their viral loads and slow the progression to Acquired Immune Defi�ciency Syndrome (AIDS). However, mutations readily and rapidly accrue in the protease gene resulting in a reduced sensitivity of the protein to the inhibitor. In this thesis, molecular dynamics simulations (MDS)...

  12. A multifaceted analysis of HIV-1 protease multidrug resistance phenotypes

    Doherty Kathleen M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Great strides have been made in the effective treatment of HIV-1 with the development of second-generation protease inhibitors (PIs that are effective against historically multi-PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Nevertheless, mutation patterns that confer decreasing susceptibility to available PIs continue to arise within the population. Understanding the phenotypic and genotypic patterns responsible for multi-PI resistance is necessary for developing PIs that are active against clinically-relevant PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Results In this work, we use globally optimal integer programming-based clustering techniques to elucidate multi-PI phenotypic resistance patterns using a data set of 398 HIV-1 protease sequences that have each been phenotyped for susceptibility toward the nine clinically-approved HIV-1 PIs. We validate the information content of the clusters by evaluating their ability to predict the level of decreased susceptibility to each of the available PIs using a cross validation procedure. We demonstrate the finding that as a result of phenotypic cross resistance, the considered clinical HIV-1 protease isolates are confined to ~6% or less of the clinically-relevant phenotypic space. Clustering and feature selection methods are used to find representative sequences and mutations for major resistance phenotypes to elucidate their genotypic signatures. We show that phenotypic similarity does not imply genotypic similarity, that different PI-resistance mutation patterns can give rise to HIV-1 isolates with similar phenotypic profiles. Conclusion Rather than characterizing HIV-1 susceptibility toward each PI individually, our study offers a unique perspective on the phenomenon of PI class resistance by uncovering major multidrug-resistant phenotypic patterns and their often diverse genotypic determinants, providing a methodology that can be applied to understand clinically-relevant phenotypic patterns to aid in the

  13. Targeting HIV-1 entry and reverse transcription by vaccination

    Zuber, Bartek

    2002-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) is a complex retrovirus, which uses the CD4 receptor and chemokine receptors to infect its target cells. The chemokine receptor CCR5 is essential for primary HIV-1 infection. The hallmark of retroviruses is the enzyme reverse transcriptase (RT), which transcribes the virus genome from RNA to DNA. RT is a major target for HIV drugs but antiviral treatment often selects for drug resistant virus variants. RT lacks proofreading, which ...

  14. Dendritic cells exposed to MVA-based HIV-1 vaccine induce highly functional HIV-1-specific CD8(+ T cell responses in HIV-1-infected individuals.

    Núria Climent

    Full Text Available Currently, MVA virus vectors carrying HIV-1 genes are being developed as HIV-1/AIDS prophylactic/therapeutic vaccines. Nevertheless, little is known about the impact of these vectors on human dendritic cells (DC and their capacity to present HIV-1 antigens to human HIV-specific T cells. This study aimed to characterize the interaction of MVA and MVA expressing the HIV-1 genes Env-Gag-Pol-Nef of clade B (referred to as MVA-B in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC and the subsequent processes of HIV-1 antigen presentation and activation of memory HIV-1-specific T lymphocytes. For these purposes, we performed ex vivo assays with MDDC and autologous lymphocytes from asymptomatic HIV-infected patients. Infection of MDDC with MVA-B or MVA, at the optimal dose of 0.3 PFU/MDDC, induced by itself a moderate degree of maturation of MDDC, involving secretion of cytokines and chemokines (IL1-ra, IL-7, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, IL-15, IL-8, MCP-1, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, IP-10, MIG, and IFN-α. MDDC infected with MVA or MVA-B and following a period of 48 h or 72 h of maturation were able to migrate toward CCL19 or CCL21 chemokine gradients. MVA-B infection induced apoptosis of the infected cells and the resulting apoptotic bodies were engulfed by the uninfected MDDC, which cross-presented HIV-1 antigens to autologous CD8(+ T lymphocytes. MVA-B-infected MDDC co-cultured with autologous T lymphocytes induced a highly functional HIV-specific CD8(+ T cell response including proliferation, secretion of IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, MIP-1β, MIP-1α, RANTES and IL-6, and strong cytotoxic activity against autologous HIV-1-infected CD4(+ T lymphocytes. These results evidence the adjuvant role of the vector itself (MVA and support the clinical development of prophylactic and therapeutic anti-HIV vaccines based on MVA-B.

  15. HIV-1, Methamphetamine and Astrocytes at Neuroinflammatory crossroads

    Kathleen eBorgmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As a popular psychostimulant, methamphetamine (METH use leads to long-lasting, strong euphoric effects. While METH abuse is common in the general population, between 10-15% of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 patients report having abused METH. METH exacerbates the severity and onset of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND through direct and indirect mechanisms. Repetitive METH use decreases adherence to antiretroviral drug regimens, increasing the likelihood of HIV-1 disease progression towards AIDS. METH exposure also directly affects both innate and adaptive immunity, altering lymphocyte number and activity, cytokine signaling, phagocytic function, and CNS infiltration through the blood brain barrier. Further, METH triggers the neuronal dopamine reward pathway and leads to altered neuronal activity and direct toxicity. Concurrently, METH and HIV-1 alter the neuroimmune balance and induce neuroinflammation. Neuroinflammation modulates a wide range of brain functions including neuronal signaling and activity, glial activation, viral infection, oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. Pathologically, glial activation is a hallmark of both HIV-1 and METH-associated neuroinflammation. Significant commonality exists in the neurotoxic mechanisms for both METH and HAND; however, the pathways dysregulated in astroglia during METH exposure are less clear. Thus alterations in astrocyte intracellular signaling pathways, gene expression and function during METH and HIV-1 comorbidity, neuroinflammation and HAND are carefully reviewed. Interventions targeting astrocytes in HAND and METH are presented as potential novel therapeutic approaches.

  16. Negative Feedback Regulation of HIV-1 by Gene Editing Strategy.

    Kaminski, Rafal; Chen, Yilan; Salkind, Julian; Bella, Ramona; Young, Won-Bin; Ferrante, Pasquale; Karn, Jonathan; Malcolm, Thomas; Hu, Wenhui; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method is comprised of the guide RNA (gRNA) to target a specific DNA sequence for cleavage and the Cas9 endonuclease for introducing breaks in the double-stranded DNA identified by the gRNA. Co-expression of both a multiplex of HIV-1-specific gRNAs and Cas9 in cells results in the modification and/or excision of the segment of viral DNA, leading to replication-defective virus. In this study, we have personalized the activity of CRISPR/Cas9 by placing the gene encoding Cas9 under the control of a minimal promoter of HIV-1 that is activated by the HIV-1 Tat protein. We demonstrate that functional activation of CRISPR/Cas9 by Tat during the course of viral infection excises the designated segment of the integrated viral DNA and consequently suppresses viral expression. This strategy was also used in a latently infected CD4+ T-cell model after treatment with a variety of HIV-1 stimulating agents including PMA and TSA. Controlled expression of Cas9 by Tat offers a new strategy for safe implementation of the Cas9 technology for ablation of HIV-1 at a very early stage of HIV-1 replication during the course of the acute phase of infection and the reactivation of silent proviral DNA in latently infected cells. PMID:27528385

  17. DBR1 siRNA inhibition of HIV-1 replication

    Naidu Yathi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 and all retroviruses are related to retroelements of simpler organisms such as the yeast Ty elements. Recent work has suggested that the yeast retroelement Ty1 replicates via an unexpected RNA lariat intermediate in cDNA synthesis. The putative genomic RNA lariat intermediate is formed by a 2'-5' phosphodiester bond, like that found in pre-mRNA intron lariats and it facilitates the minus-strand template switch during cDNA synthesis. We hypothesized that HIV-1 might also form a genomic RNA lariat and therefore that siRNA-mediated inhibition of expression of the human RNA lariat de-branching enzyme (DBR1 expression would specifically inhibit HIV-1 replication. Results We designed three short interfering RNA (siRNA molecules targeting DBR1, which were capable of reducing DBR1 mRNA expression by 80% and did not significantly affect cell viability. We assessed HIV-1 replication in the presence of DBR1 siRNA and found that DBR1 knockdown led to decreases in viral cDNA and protein production. These effects could be reversed by cotransfection of a DBR1 cDNA indicating that the inhibition of HIV-1 replication was a specific effect of DBR1 underexpression. Conclusion These data suggest that DBR1 function may be needed to debranch a putative HIV-1 genomic RNA lariat prior to completion of reverse transcription.

  18. Structure of HIV-1 protease determined by neutron crystallography

    HIV-1 protease is an aspartic protease, and plays an essential role in replication of HIV. To develop HIV-1 protease inhibitors through structure-based drug design, it is necessary to understand the catalytic mechanism and inhibitor recognition of HIV-1 protease. We have determined the crystal structure of HIV-1 protease in complex with KNI-272 to 1.9 A resolution by neutron crystallography in combination with 1.4 A resolution X-ray diffraction data. The results show that the carbonyl group of hydroxymethylcarbonyl (HMC) in KNI-272 forms a hydrogen bonding interaction with protonated Asp 25 and the hydrogen atom from the hydroxyl group of HMC forms a hydrogen bonding interaction with the deprotonated Asp125. This is the first neutron report for HIV-1/inhibitor complex and shows directly the locations of key hydrogen atoms in catalysis and in the binding of a transition-state analog. The results confirm key aspect of the presumed catalytic mechanism of HIV-1 protease and will aid in the further development of protease inhibitors. (author)

  19. Negative Feedback Regulation of HIV-1 by Gene Editing Strategy

    Kaminski, Rafal; Chen, Yilan; Salkind, Julian; Bella, Ramona; Young, Won-bin; Ferrante, Pasquale; Karn, Jonathan; Malcolm, Thomas; Hu, Wenhui; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method is comprised of the guide RNA (gRNA) to target a specific DNA sequence for cleavage and the Cas9 endonuclease for introducing breaks in the double-stranded DNA identified by the gRNA. Co-expression of both a multiplex of HIV-1-specific gRNAs and Cas9 in cells results in the modification and/or excision of the segment of viral DNA, leading to replication-defective virus. In this study, we have personalized the activity of CRISPR/Cas9 by placing the gene encoding Cas9 under the control of a minimal promoter of HIV-1 that is activated by the HIV-1 Tat protein. We demonstrate that functional activation of CRISPR/Cas9 by Tat during the course of viral infection excises the designated segment of the integrated viral DNA and consequently suppresses viral expression. This strategy was also used in a latently infected CD4+ T-cell model after treatment with a variety of HIV-1 stimulating agents including PMA and TSA. Controlled expression of Cas9 by Tat offers a new strategy for safe implementation of the Cas9 technology for ablation of HIV-1 at a very early stage of HIV-1 replication during the course of the acute phase of infection and the reactivation of silent proviral DNA in latently infected cells. PMID:27528385

  20. The evolution of HIV-1 and the origin of AIDS.

    Sharp, Paul M; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2010-08-27

    The major cause of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). We have been using evolutionary comparisons to trace (i) the origin(s) of HIV-1 and (ii) the origin(s) of AIDS. The closest relatives of HIV-1 are simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) infecting wild-living chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) and gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in west central Africa. Phylogenetic analyses have revealed the origins of HIV-1: chimpanzees were the original hosts of this clade of viruses; four lineages of HIV-1 have arisen by independent cross-species transmissions to humans and one or two of those transmissions may have been via gorillas. However, SIVs are primarily monkey viruses: more than 40 species of African monkeys are infected with their own, species-specific, SIV and in at least some host species, the infection seems non-pathogenic. Chimpanzees acquired from monkeys two distinct forms of SIVs that recombined to produce a virus with a unique genome structure. We have found that SIV infection causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion and increases mortality in wild chimpanzees, and so the origin of AIDS is more ancient than the origin of HIV-1. Tracing the genetic changes that occurred as monkey viruses adapted to infect first chimpanzees and then humans may provide insights into the causes of the pathogenicity of these viruses. PMID:20643738

  1. CRISPR-mediated Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression.

    Limsirichai, Prajit; Gaj, Thomas; Schaffer, David V

    2016-03-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of cells that harbor chromosomally integrated but transcriptionally inactive provirus. These cells can persist for years without producing viral progeny, rendering them refractory to immune surveillance and antiretroviral therapy and providing a permanent reservoir for the stochastic reactivation and reseeding of HIV-1. Strategies for purging this latent reservoir are thus needed to eradicate infection. Here, we show that engineered transcriptional activation systems based on CRISPR/Cas9 can be harnessed to activate viral gene expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further demonstrate that complementing Cas9 activators with latency-reversing compounds can enhance latent HIV-1 transcription and that epigenome modulation using CRISPR-based acetyltransferases can also promote viral gene activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CRISPR systems are potentially effective tools for inducing latent HIV-1 expression and that their use, in combination with antiretroviral therapy, could lead to improved therapies for HIV-1 infection. PMID:26607397

  2. Anti-HIV-1 activity of cellulose acetate phthalate: Synergy with soluble CD4 and induction of "dead-end" gp41 six-helix bundles

    Li Yun-Yao

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP, a promising candidate microbicide for prevention of sexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and other sexually transmitted disease (STD pathogens, was shown to inactivate HIV-1 and to block the coreceptor binding site on the virus envelope glycoprotein gp120. It did not interfere with virus binding to CD4. Since CD4 is the primary cellular receptor for HIV-1, it was of interest to study CAP binding to HIV-1 complexes with soluble CD4 (sCD4 and its consequences, including changes in the conformation of the envelope glycoprotein gp41 within virus particles. Methods Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA were used to study CAP binding to HIV-1-sCD4 complexes and to detect gp41 six-helix bundles accessible on virus particles using antibodies specific for the α-helical core domain of gp41. Results 1 Pretreatment of HIV-1 with sCD4 augments subsequent binding of CAP; 2 there is synergism between CAP and sCD4 for inhibition of HIV-1 infection; 3 treatment of HIV-1 with CAP induced the formation of gp41 six-helix bundles. Conclusions CAP and sCD4 bind to distinct sites on HIV-1 IIIB and BaL virions and their simultaneous binding has profound effects on virus structure and infectivity. The formation of gp41 six-helical bundles, induced by CAP, is known to render the virus incompetent for fusion with target cells thus preventing infection.

  3. An anti-HIV-1 gp120 antibody expressed as an endocytotic transmembrane protein mediates internalization of HIV-1

    In this study, we used HIV-1 as a model to demonstrate a novel approach for receptor-independent cell entry of virus. The heavy chain of an anti-HIV-1 gp120 antibody was engineered with endocytotic and transmembrane motifs from either the cation-independent mannose 6-phospate receptor or the low-density lipoprotein receptor. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence studies showed that the chimeric antibodies were expressed on the cell surface and can undergo rapid internalization. Furthermore, one of the chimeric antibodies was able to bind and internalize HIV-1. Using a luciferase reporter HIV-1, we further showed that internalized viruses could undergo replication. Therefore, we have demonstrated a proof-of-principle of a novel method that can be used to internalize virus into cells, without prior knowledge of the cellular receptor for the virus. We propose that this approach would be particularly useful for studying viruses whose cellular receptor(s) is not known

  4. High frequency of antiviral drug resistance and non-b subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing antiviral therapy in Cuba

    Kouri, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Pérez, Lissette; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Álvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vinken, Lore; Limia, Celia; Soto, Yudira; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance may limit the sustained benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in settings with limited laboratory monitoring and drug options. The objective is to implement the surveillance of drug resistance and subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing ART in Cuba. Methods This study compiled clinical and genotypic drug resistance data 588 ART-experienced HIV-1 patients attending a clinical center in Havana in 2009–2013. Drug resistance testing was performed as part of routine clinical care. Drug resistance mutations and levels were determined using Rega version 8.0.2. Results Eighty-three percent received solely ART containing at least three drugs. Patients from 2009 to 2010 were longer treated (median: 4.9 vs 2.7 years) and exposed to more ART regimens (median: 4 vs 2 regimens) compared to patients from 2011–2013. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI) and PI mutations were present in 83.5, 77.4 and 52.0%. Full-class resistance (FCR) to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and multidrug resistance (MDR) were detected in 25.0, 33.7, 11.4 and 6.3%. FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and MDR were present in 12.8, 28.7, 0 and 0% after first-line failure (164 patients) and in 23.1, 34.6, 3.8 and 3.1% after second-line failure (130 patients). Subtype B (32.5%), BG recombinants (19.6%) and CRF19_cpx (16.2%) were the most prevalent genetic forms. Subtype distribution did not change significantly between 2009–2010 and 2011–2013, except for BG recombinants that increased from 12.2 to 21.3% (p=0.002). Conclusions Our study found a high prevalence of drug resistance and supports the need for appropriate laboratory monitoring in clinical practice and access to drug options in case of virological failure. PMID:25397499

  5. High frequency of antiviral drug resistance and non-b subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing antiviral therapy in Cuba

    Vivian Kouri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance may limit the sustained benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART in settings with limited laboratory monitoring and drug options. The objective is to implement the surveillance of drug resistance and subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing ART in Cuba. Methods: This study compiled clinical and genotypic drug resistance data 588 ART-experienced HIV-1 patients attending a clinical center in Havana in 2009–2013. Drug resistance testing was performed as part of routine clinical care. Drug resistance mutations and levels were determined using Rega version 8.0.2. Results: Eighty-three percent received solely ART containing at least three drugs. Patients from 2009 to 2010 were longer treated (median: 4.9 vs 2.7 years and exposed to more ART regimens (median: 4 vs 2 regimens compared to patients from 2011–2013. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI, non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI and PI mutations were present in 83.5, 77.4 and 52.0%. Full-class resistance (FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and multidrug resistance (MDR were detected in 25.0, 33.7, 11.4 and 6.3%. FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and MDR were present in 12.8, 28.7, 0 and 0% after first-line failure (164 patients and in 23.1, 34.6, 3.8 and 3.1% after second-line failure (130 patients. Subtype B (32.5%, BG recombinants (19.6% and CRF19_cpx (16.2% were the most prevalent genetic forms. Subtype distribution did not change significantly between 2009–2010 and 2011–2013, except for BG recombinants that increased from 12.2 to 21.3% (p=0.002. Conclusions: Our study found a high prevalence of drug resistance and supports the need for appropriate laboratory monitoring in clinical practice and access to drug options in case of virological failure.

  6. HIV-1 vif基因人工miRNA的构建和功能分析%Construction and Function Analysis of Artificial miRNA Targeting to HIV-1 Vif Gene

    王芳宇; 周云; 何丽芳; 滕涛; 杨海; 陈小卫

    2013-01-01

    Objective To construct artificial miR-vif and study their effects on HIV-1 infection. Methods To replace the stem sequence in the stem-loop structure of the well-characterized native miR-155 with siRNA sequences targeting to HIV-1 vif gene, and construct four artificial miR-vif. To detect the vif gene silence efficiency and the expression of IFN-β gene by qPCR; to test the cell toxicity through MTT assays and analyze the HIV-1 infection by using HIV-1 pseudotyped virus experiment. Results The qPCR results showed that four miR-vif could downregulate vif gene expression, and miR-vif-1 presented the highest gene silence efficiency, reached 68%. The further experiments confirmed that miR-vif-1 had neither effect on the viability of the transfected cells nor interference the expression of IFN-β gene. In addition, the results verified that miR-vif-1 has inhibition effect of 66. 5% on HIV-1 replication. Conclusion The miR-vif-1 could efficiently suppress HIV-1 replication and would be a useful candidate for further study on anti-HIV-1 infection.%目的 构建人工miR-vif,并研究其对HIV-1感染宿主细胞的影响.方法 以miR-155为基础骨架,根据HIV-1 vif基因序列设计并合成4对miRNA寡聚单链DNA,构建4个人工miR-vif.采用qPCR技术检测其对vif基因的沉默效率和对干扰素表达的影响;MTT法测定其对被转染细胞的毒性;HIV-1假病毒实验技术检测其对感染的抑制作用.结果 qPCR结果显示,4个人工miR-vif对vif基因都具有一定的沉默效果,其中miR-vif-1的沉默效率最高,达68%.且不会对细胞干扰素的表达产生影响.MTT实验证实miR-vif-1不会影响被转染细胞的活性,此外,HIV-1假病毒实验显示,miR-vif-1对HIV-1 p24的抑制作用达66.5%,效果明显.结论 所获得的miR-vif-1对HIV-1的复制具有良好的抑制作用,可为进一步的抗HIV-1感染研究提供基础.

  7. Inhibiting early-stage events in HIV-1 replication by small-molecule targeting of the HIV-1 capsid.

    Kortagere, Sandhya; Madani, Navid; Mankowski, Marie K; Schön, Arne; Zentner, Isaac; Swaminathan, Gokul; Princiotto, Amy; Anthony, Kevin; Oza, Apara; Sierra, Luz-Jeannette; Passic, Shendra R; Wang, Xiaozhao; Jones, David M; Stavale, Eric; Krebs, Fred C; Martín-García, Julio; Freire, Ernesto; Ptak, Roger G; Sodroski, Joseph; Cocklin, Simon; Smith, Amos B

    2012-08-01

    The HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein plays essential roles in both early and late stages of virl replication and has emerged as a novel drug target. We report hybrid structure-based virtual screening to identify small molecules with the potential to interact with the N-terminal domain (NTD) of HIV-1 CA and disrupt early, preintegration steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. The small molecule 4,4'-[dibenzo[b,d]furan-2,8-diylbis(5-phenyl-1H-imidazole-4,2-diyl)]dibenzoic acid (CK026), which had anti-HIV-1 activity in single- and multiple-round infections but failed to inhibit viral replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), was identified. Three analogues of CK026 with reduced size and better drug-like properties were synthesized and assessed. Compound I-XW-053 (4-(4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)benzoic acid) retained all of the antiviral activity of the parental compound and inhibited the replication of a diverse panel of primary HIV-1 isolates in PBMCs, while displaying no appreciable cytotoxicity. This antiviral activity was specific to HIV-1, as I-XW-053 displayed no effect on the replication of SIV or against a panel of nonretroviruses. Direct interaction of I-XW-053 was quantified with wild-type and mutant CA protein using surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Mutation of Ile37 and Arg173, which are required for interaction with compound I-XW-053, crippled the virus at an early, preintegration step. Using quantitative PCR, we demonstrated that treatment with I-XW-053 inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcription in multiple cell types, indirectly pointing to dysfunction in the uncoating process. In summary, we have identified a CA-specific compound that targets and inhibits a novel region in the NTD-NTD interface, affects uncoating, and possesses broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity. PMID:22647699

  8. Abasic phosphorothioate oligomers inhibit HIV-1 reverse transcription and block virus transmission across polarized ectocervical organ cultures.

    Fraietta, Joseph A; Mueller, Yvonne M; Lozenski, Karissa L; Ratner, Deena; Boesteanu, Alina C; Hancock, Aidan S; Lackman-Smith, Carol; Zentner, Isaac J; Chaiken, Irwin M; Chung, Suhman; LeGrice, Stuart F J; Snyder, Beth A; Mankowski, Marie K; Jones, Natalie M; Hope, Jennifer L; Gupta, Phalguni; Anderson, Sharon H; Wigdahl, Brian; Katsikis, Peter D

    2014-12-01

    In the absence of universally available antiretroviral (ARV) drugs or a vaccine against HIV-1, microbicides may offer the most immediate hope for controlling the AIDS pandemic. The most advanced and clinically effective microbicides are based on ARV agents that interfere with the earliest stages of HIV-1 replication. Our objective was to identify and characterize novel ARV-like inhibitors, as well as demonstrate their efficacy at blocking HIV-1 transmission. Abasic phosphorothioate 2' deoxyribose backbone (PDB) oligomers were evaluated in a variety of mechanistic assays and for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection and virus transmission through primary human cervical mucosa. Cellular and biochemical assays were used to elucidate the antiviral mechanisms of action of PDB oligomers against both lab-adapted and primary CCR5- and CXCR4-utilizing HIV-1 strains, including a multidrug-resistant isolate. A polarized cervical organ culture was used to test the ability of PDB compounds to block HIV-1 transmission to primary immune cell populations across ectocervical tissue. The antiviral activity and mechanisms of action of PDB-based compounds were dependent on oligomer size, with smaller molecules preventing reverse transcription and larger oligomers blocking viral entry. Importantly, irrespective of molecular size, PDBs potently inhibited virus infection and transmission within genital tissue samples. Furthermore, the PDB inhibitors exhibited excellent toxicity and stability profiles and were found to be safe for vaginal application in vivo. These results, coupled with the previously reported intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties of PDBs, support further investigations in the development of PDB-based topical microbicides for preventing the global spread of HIV-1. PMID:25224013

  9. HIV-1C疫苗研究进展%Advances in the Research of HIV-1 Subtype C Vaccine

    王晶晶; 寸韡

    2008-01-01

    对于HIV-1,抗逆转录病毒药物能显著改善HIV/AIDS病人的健康并延长其寿命.但高昂的费用和治疗条件令大多数HIV患者望而却步,尤其在感染水平高、公共资源极度匮乏的发展中国家.到2004年底,撒哈拉以南非洲地区有2540万HIV感染者,该地区迄今仍是HIV-1C感染最严重的地区.几种候选HIV-1C疫苗目前正在进行临床前和临床研究.这些候选疫苗的设计主要是来自HIV-1C的HIV-1调控蛋白和结构蛋白.本文重点介绍HIV-1C疫苗的研究进展.

  10. 7,8-secolignans from Schisandra neglecta and their anti-HIV-1 activities

    Gao, Xuemei; Mu, Huaixue; Hu, Qiufen, E-mail: huqiufena@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Chemistry in Ethnic Medicinal Resources, State Ethnic Affairs Commission and Ministry of Education, Yunnan University of Nationalities (China); Wang, Ruirui; Yang, Liumeng; Zheng, Yongtang [Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Sun, Handong; Xiao, Weilie, E-mail: xwl@mail.kib.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming (China)

    2012-10-15

    Four new 7,8-secolignans (neglectahenols A-D), together with two known 7,8-secolignans, were isolated from leaves and stems of Schisandra neglecta. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, including extensive one and two dimension NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) techniques. 7,8-Secolignans and neglectahenols A-D were also tested for their anti-HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) activities, and all of them showed modest activities. (author)

  11. Incorporation of the HIV-1 microbicide cyanovirin-N in a food product

    Li, Ming; Patton, Dorothy L.; Cosgrove-Sweeney, Yvonne; Ratner, Deena; Rohan, Lisa C.; Cole, Alexander M.; Tarwater, Patrick M.; Gupta, Phalguni; Ramratnam, Bharat

    2011-01-01

    An urgent need exists for HIV-1 microbicides. Here, we describe the in vivo testing of lactic acid bacteria bioengineered to secrete cyanovirin-N. We fed pigtail macaques a yogurt formulation that used bioengineered strains as a starter culture. Cyanovirin-N expression could be detected in the rectal vault during and immediately after feeding. Ex vivo viral challenge of rectal tissue biopsies revealed that peak viral burden was significantly lower in tissue obtained from experimental animals ...

  12. Source identification in two criminal cases using phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 DNA sequences

    Scaduto, Diane I.; Brown, Jeremy M.; Haaland, Wade C.; Zwickl, Derrick J; Hillis, David M.; Metzker, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis has been widely used to test the a priori hypothesis of epidemiological clustering in suspected transmission chains of HIV-1. Among studies showing strong support for relatedness between HIV samples obtained from infected individuals, evidence for the direction of transmission between epidemiologically related pairs has been lacking. During transmission of HIV, a genetic bottleneck occurs, resulting in the paraphyly of source viruses with respect to those of the recipien...

  13. 7,8-secolignans from Schisandra neglecta and their anti-HIV-1 activities

    Four new 7,8-secolignans (neglectahenols A-D), together with two known 7,8-secolignans, were isolated from leaves and stems of Schisandra neglecta. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, including extensive one and two dimension NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) techniques. 7,8-Secolignans and neglectahenols A-D were also tested for their anti-HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) activities, and all of them showed modest activities. (author)

  14. Impaired production of cytokines is an independent predictor of mortality in HIV-1-infected patients

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Gerstoft, Jan; Pedersen, Bente K;

    2003-01-01

    With regard to the natural history of HIV-1 infection this study investigated whether whole-blood culture cytokine production was associated with mortality in HIV-1-infected patients.......With regard to the natural history of HIV-1 infection this study investigated whether whole-blood culture cytokine production was associated with mortality in HIV-1-infected patients....

  15. HIV-1 Continues To Replicate and Evolve in Patients with Natural Control of HIV Infection

    Mens, Helene; Kearney, Mary; Wiegand, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Elucidating mechanisms leading to the natural control of HIV-1 infection is of great importance for vaccine design and for understanding viral pathogenesis. Rare HIV-1-infected individuals, termed HIV-1 controllers, have plasma HIV-1 RNA levels below the limit of detection by standard clinical...

  16. HIV-1 evades innate immune recognition through specific cofactor recruitment

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Tan, Choon Ping; Fletcher, Adam J.; Price, Amanda J.; Blondeau, Caroline; Hilditch, Laura; Jacques, David A.; Selwood, David L.; James, Leo C.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Towers, Greg J.

    2013-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is able to replicate in primary human macrophages without stimulating innate immunity despite reverse transcription of genomic RNA into double-stranded DNA, an activity that might be expected to trigger innate pattern recognition receptors. We reasoned that if correctly orchestrated HIV-1 uncoating and nuclear entry is important for evasion of innate sensors then manipulation of specific interactions between HIV-1 capsid and host factors that putatively regulate these processes should trigger pattern recognition receptors and stimulate type 1 interferon (IFN) secretion. Here we show that HIV-1 capsid mutants N74D and P90A, which are impaired for interaction with cofactors cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6) and cyclophilins (Nup358 and CypA), respectively, cannot replicate in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages because they trigger innate sensors leading to nuclear translocation of NF-κB and IRF3, the production of soluble type 1 IFN and induction of an antiviral state. Depletion of CPSF6 with short hairpin RNA expression allows wild-type virus to trigger innate sensors and IFN production. In each case, suppressed replication is rescued by IFN-receptor blockade, demonstrating a role for IFN in restriction. IFN production is dependent on viral reverse transcription but not integration, indicating that a viral reverse transcription product comprises the HIV-1 pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Finally, we show that we can pharmacologically induce wild-type HIV-1 infection to stimulate IFN secretion and an antiviral state using a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine analogue. We conclude that HIV-1 has evolved to use CPSF6 and cyclophilins to cloak its replication, allowing evasion of innate immune sensors and induction of a cell-autonomous innate immune response in primary human macrophages.

  17. HIV-1 latency in actively dividing human T cell lines

    Berkhout Ben

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eradication of HIV-1 from an infected individual cannot be achieved by current drug regimens. Viral reservoirs established early during the infection remain unaffected by anti-retroviral therapy and are able to replenish systemic infection upon interruption of the treatment. Therapeutic targeting of viral latency will require a better understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying the establishment and long-term maintenance of HIV-1 in resting memory CD4 T cells, the most prominent reservoir of transcriptional silent provirus. However, the molecular mechanisms that permit long-term transcriptional control of proviral gene expression in these cells are still not well understood. Exploring the molecular details of viral latency will provide new insights for eventual future therapeutics that aim at viral eradication. Results We set out to develop a new in vitro HIV-1 latency model system using the doxycycline (dox-inducible HIV-rtTA variant. Stable cell clones were generated with a silent HIV-1 provirus, which can subsequently be activated by dox-addition. Surprisingly, only a minority of the cells was able to induce viral gene expression and a spreading infection, eventhough these experiments were performed with the actively dividing SupT1 T cell line. These latent proviruses are responsive to TNFα treatment and alteration of the DNA methylation status with 5-Azacytidine or genistein, but not responsive to the regular T cell activators PMA and IL2. Follow-up experiments in several T cell lines and with wild-type HIV-1 support these findings. Conclusion We describe the development of a new in vitro model for HIV-1 latency and discuss the advantages of this system. The data suggest that HIV-1 proviral latency is not restricted to resting T cells, but rather an intrinsic property of the virus.

  18. Phylodynamics of the HIV-1 epidemic in Cuba.

    Edson Delatorre

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the HIV-1 epidemic in Cuba displayed a complex molecular epidemiologic profile with circulation of several subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRF; but the evolutionary and population history of those viral variants remains unknown. HIV-1 pol sequences of the most prevalent Cuban lineages (subtypes B, C and G, CRF18_cpx, CRF19_cpx, and CRFs20/23/24_BG isolated between 1999 and 2011 were analyzed. Maximum-likelihood analyses revealed multiple introductions of subtype B (n≥66, subtype C (n≥10, subtype G (n≥8 and CRF18_cpx (n≥2 viruses in Cuba. The bulk of HIV-1 infections in this country, however, was caused by dissemination of a few founder strains probably introduced from North America/Europe (clades B(CU-I and B(CU-II, east Africa (clade C(CU-I and central Africa (clades G(CU, CRF18(CU and CRF19(CU, or locally generated (clades CRFs20/23/24_BG. Bayesian-coalescent analyses show that the major HIV-1 founder strains were introduced into Cuba during 1985-1995; whereas the CRFs_BG strains emerged in the second half of the 1990s. Most HIV-1 Cuban clades appear to have experienced an initial period of fast exponential spread during the 1990s and early 2000s, followed by a more recent decline in growth rate. The median initial growth rate of HIV-1 Cuban clades ranged from 0.4 year⁻¹ to 1.6 year⁻¹. Thus, the HIV-1 epidemic in Cuba has been a result of the successful introduction of a few viral strains that began to circulate at a rather late time of the AIDS pandemic, but then were rapidly disseminated through local transmission networks.

  19. HIV-1 evades innate immune recognition through specific cofactor recruitment.

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Tan, Choon Ping; Fletcher, Adam J; Price, Amanda J; Blondeau, Caroline; Hilditch, Laura; Jacques, David A; Selwood, David L; James, Leo C; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Towers, Greg J

    2013-11-21

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is able to replicate in primary human macrophages without stimulating innate immunity despite reverse transcription of genomic RNA into double-stranded DNA, an activity that might be expected to trigger innate pattern recognition receptors. We reasoned that if correctly orchestrated HIV-1 uncoating and nuclear entry is important for evasion of innate sensors then manipulation of specific interactions between HIV-1 capsid and host factors that putatively regulate these processes should trigger pattern recognition receptors and stimulate type 1 interferon (IFN) secretion. Here we show that HIV-1 capsid mutants N74D and P90A, which are impaired for interaction with cofactors cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6) and cyclophilins (Nup358 and CypA), respectively, cannot replicate in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages because they trigger innate sensors leading to nuclear translocation of NF-κB and IRF3, the production of soluble type 1 IFN and induction of an antiviral state. Depletion of CPSF6 with short hairpin RNA expression allows wild-type virus to trigger innate sensors and IFN production. In each case, suppressed replication is rescued by IFN-receptor blockade, demonstrating a role for IFN in restriction. IFN production is dependent on viral reverse transcription but not integration, indicating that a viral reverse transcription product comprises the HIV-1 pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Finally, we show that we can pharmacologically induce wild-type HIV-1 infection to stimulate IFN secretion and an antiviral state using a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine analogue. We conclude that HIV-1 has evolved to use CPSF6 and cyclophilins to cloak its replication, allowing evasion of innate immune sensors and induction of a cell-autonomous innate immune response in primary human macrophages. PMID:24196705

  20. Frequency of class I anti-HLA alloantibodies in patients infected by HIV-1

    Elza Regina Manzolli Leite

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of class I anti-HLA alloantibodies in patients infected by HIV-1 and relate it with the different clinical courses of the disease. Blood samples were collected in EDTA tubes from 145 individuals. HIV-1 infection was confirmed by ELISA test. The presence of class I anti-HLA alloantibodies and HLA allele's were determined. Clinical evolution was set as fast (3 years. Class I anti-HLA alloantibodies presence was lower in healthy individuals than in those infected by HIV-1 (4.2% against 32.4%. However, an equal distribution of these alloantibodies was found among the individuals infected, independent on the clinical evolution. Thus, class I anti-HLA alloantibodies was not a determinant factor for patient worsening.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I em pacientes infectados pelo HIV-1 e relacioná-la aos diferentes cursos clínicos da doença. Amostras de sangue de 145 indivíduos HIV positivo foram coletadas em tubos com EDTA. A infecção pelo HIV-1 foi confirmada por teste ELISA e a presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I determinada em seguida. A evolução clínica foi definida como rápida (3 anos. A presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I foi menor em indivíduos saudáveis em relação aos infectados pelo HIV-1 (4,2% contra 32,4%. Porém, a distribuição destes aloanticorpos entre os indivíduos infectados foi igual, independente da evolução clínica. Deste modo, a presença de aloanticorpos anti-HLA classe I não é um fator determinante na piora clínica do paciente.

  1. [Companion Diagnostics for Selecting Antiretroviral Drugs against HIV-1].

    Fukutake, Katsuyuki

    2015-11-01

    Currently, the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus involves combination therapy, as antiretroviral therapy(ART). The treatment has improved steadily since the advent of potent combination therapy in 1996. New drugs that offer new mechanisms of action, improvements in potency and activity even against multidrug-resistant viruses, dosing convenience, and tolerability have been approved. Among ART with useful drugs, there are two important examinations before starting the treatment using the two kinds of drug. CCR5 co-receptor antagonists, maraviroc, prevent HIV entry into target cells by binding to CCR5 receptors. Genotypic assays have been developed that can determine or predict the co-receptor tropism(i.e., CCR5, CXCR4, or both) of the patient's dominant virus population. The assay for HIV-1 co-receptor usage should be performed whenever the use of a CCR5 antagonist is being considered. One of the nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), abacavir, is an important agent to develop recommended regimens for antiretroviral therapy. Serious and sometimes fatal hypersensitivity reactions have been associated with abacavir-containing products, ZIAGEN, Epzicom, and Triumeq. Patients who carry the HLA-B*5701 allele are at high-risk of a hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir. Prior to initiating therapy with abacavir, performing a screening test for the HLA-B*5701 allele is recommended. [Review]. PMID:26995879

  2. Modeling HIV-1 drug resistance as episodic directional selection.

    Ben Murrell

    Full Text Available The evolution of substitutions conferring drug resistance to HIV-1 is both episodic, occurring when patients are on antiretroviral therapy, and strongly directional, with site-specific resistant residues increasing in frequency over time. While methods exist to detect episodic diversifying selection and continuous directional selection, no evolutionary model combining these two properties has been proposed. We present two models of episodic directional selection (MEDS and EDEPS which allow the a priori specification of lineages expected to have undergone directional selection. The models infer the sites and target residues that were likely subject to directional selection, using either codon or protein sequences. Compared to its null model of episodic diversifying selection, MEDS provides a superior fit to most sites known to be involved in drug resistance, and neither one test for episodic diversifying selection nor another for constant directional selection are able to detect as many true positives as MEDS and EDEPS while maintaining acceptable levels of false positives. This suggests that episodic directional selection is a better description of the process driving the evolution of drug resistance.

  3. Direct evidence of extensive diversity of HIV-1 in Kinshasa by 1960

    Worobey, Michael; Gemmel, Marlea; Teuwen, Dirk E;

    2008-01-01

    calibration points to convert evolutionary distance into time, are lacking, however; ZR59 is the only one sampled before 1976. Here we report the amplification and characterization of viral sequences from a Bouin's-fixed paraffin-embedded lymph node biopsy specimen obtained in 1960 from an adult female in...... occurred long before the recognized AIDS pandemic. The recovery of viral gene sequences from decades-old paraffin-embedded tissues opens the door to a detailed palaeovirological investigation of the evolutionary history of HIV-1 that is not accessible by other methods....

  4. Loss to Followup: A Major Challenge to Successful Implementation of Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV-1 Programs in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Kalembo, Fatch W; Zgambo, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this paper was to explore how loss to followup (LFTU) has affected the successful implementation of prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV-1 (PMTCT) programs in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods. We conducted an electronic search from the following databases PubMed, ScienceDirect, Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJs), and PyscINFO. Additional searches were made in WHO, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Google, and Google scholar websites for (1) peer-reviewed published research, (2) scientific and technical reports, and (3) papers presented on scientific conferences. Results. A total of 678 articles, published from 1990 to 2011, were retrieved. Only 44 articles met our inclusion criteria and were included in the study. The rates of LTFU of mother-child pairs ranged from 19% to 89.4 in the reviewed articles. Health facility factors, fear of HIV-1 test, stigma and discrimination, home deliveries and socioeconomic factors were identified as reasons for LTFU. Conclusion. There is a great loss of mother-child pairs to follow up in PMTCT programs in sub-Saharan Africa. There is need for more research studies to develop public health models of care that can help to improve followup of mother-child pairs in PMTCT programs in Sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24052879

  5. Alkaloids from the Sponge Stylissa carteri Present Prospective Scaffolds for the Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1)

    O’Rourke, Aubrie

    2016-02-04

    The sponge Stylissa carteri is known to produce a number of secondary metabolites displaying anti-fouling, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activity. However, the anti-viral potential of metabolites produced by S. carteri has not been extensively explored. In this study, an S. carteri extract was HPLC fractionated and a cell based assay was used to evaluate the effects of HPLC fractions on parameters of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) infection and cell viability. Candidate HIV-1 inhibitory fractions were then analyzed for the presence of potential HIV-1 inhibitory compounds by mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of three previously characterized compounds, i.e., debromohymenialdisine (DBH), hymenialdisine (HD), and oroidin. Commercially available purified versions of these molecules were re-tested to assess their antiviral potential in greater detail. Specifically, DBH and HD exhibit a 30%–40% inhibition of HIV-1 at 3.1 μM and 13 μM, respectively; however, both exhibited cytotoxicity. Conversely, oroidin displayed a 50% inhibition of viral replication at 50 μM with no associated toxicity. Additional experimentation using a biochemical assay revealed that oroidin inhibited the activity of the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase up to 90% at 25 μM. Taken together, the chemical search space was narrowed and previously isolated compounds with an unexplored anti-viral potential were found. Our results support exploration of marine natural products for anti-viral drug discovery.

  6. Alkaloids from the Sponge Stylissa carteri Present Prospective Scaffolds for the Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1

    Aubrie O’Rourke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The sponge Stylissa carteri is known to produce a number of secondary metabolites displaying anti-fouling, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activity. However, the anti-viral potential of metabolites produced by S. carteri has not been extensively explored. In this study, an S. carteri extract was HPLC fractionated and a cell based assay was used to evaluate the effects of HPLC fractions on parameters of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1 infection and cell viability. Candidate HIV-1 inhibitory fractions were then analyzed for the presence of potential HIV-1 inhibitory compounds by mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of three previously characterized compounds, i.e., debromohymenialdisine (DBH, hymenialdisine (HD, and oroidin. Commercially available purified versions of these molecules were re-tested to assess their antiviral potential in greater detail. Specifically, DBH and HD exhibit a 30%–40% inhibition of HIV-1 at 3.1 μM and 13 μM, respectively; however, both exhibited cytotoxicity. Conversely, oroidin displayed a 50% inhibition of viral replication at 50 μM with no associated toxicity. Additional experimentation using a biochemical assay revealed that oroidin inhibited the activity of the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase up to 90% at 25 μM. Taken together, the chemical search space was narrowed and previously isolated compounds with an unexplored anti-viral potential were found. Our results support exploration of marine natural products for anti-viral drug discovery.

  7. Production of Mucosally Transmissible SHIV Challenge Stocks from HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form 01_AE env Sequences.

    Lawrence J Tartaglia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV challenge stocks are critical for preclinical testing of vaccines, antibodies, and other interventions aimed to prevent HIV-1. A major unmet need for the field has been the lack of a SHIV challenge stock expressing circulating recombinant form 01_AE (CRF01_AE env sequences. We therefore sought to develop mucosally transmissible SHIV challenge stocks containing HIV-1 CRF01_AE env derived from acutely HIV-1 infected individuals from Thailand. SHIV-AE6, SHIV-AE6RM, and SHIV-AE16 contained env sequences that were >99% identical to the original HIV-1 isolate and did not require in vivo passaging. These viruses exhibited CCR5 tropism and displayed a tier 2 neutralization phenotype. These challenge stocks efficiently infected rhesus monkeys by the intrarectal route, replicated to high levels during acute infection, and established chronic viremia in a subset of animals. SHIV-AE16 was titrated for use in single, high dose as well as repetitive, low dose intrarectal challenge studies. These SHIV challenge stocks should facilitate the preclinical evaluation of vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and other interventions targeted at preventing HIV-1 CRF01_AE infection.

  8. Multistage virtual screening and identification of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors by integrating SVM, shape, pharmacophore and docking methods.

    Wei, Yu; Li, Jinlong; Chen, Zeming; Wang, Fengwei; Huang, Weiqiang; Hong, Zhangyong; Lin, Jianping

    2015-08-28

    The HIV-1 protease has proven to be a crucial component of the HIV replication machinery and a reliable target for anti-HIV drug discovery. In this study, we applied an optimized hierarchical multistage virtual screening method targeting HIV-1 protease. The method sequentially applied SVM (Support Vector Machine), shape similarity, pharmacophore modeling and molecular docking. Using a validation set (270 positives, 155,996 negatives), the multistage virtual screening method showed a high hit rate and high enrichment factor of 80.47% and 465.75, respectively. Furthermore, this approach was applied to screen the National Cancer Institute database (NCI), which contains 260,000 molecules. From the final hit list, 6 molecules were selected for further testing in an in vitro HIV-1 protease inhibitory assay, and 2 molecules (NSC111887 and NSC121217) showed inhibitory potency against HIV-1 protease, with IC50 values of 62 μM and 162 μM, respectively. With further chemical development, these 2 molecules could potentially serve as HIV-1 protease inhibitors. PMID:26185005

  9. Alkaloids from the Sponge Stylissa carteri Present Prospective Scaffolds for the Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1).

    O'Rourke, Aubrie; Kremb, Stephan; Bader, Theresa Maria; Helfer, Markus; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Gerwick, William H; Brack-Werner, Ruth; Voolstra, Christian R

    2016-02-01

    The sponge Stylissa carteri is known to produce a number of secondary metabolites displaying anti-fouling, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activity. However, the anti-viral potential of metabolites produced by S. carteri has not been extensively explored. In this study, an S. carteri extract was HPLC fractionated and a cell based assay was used to evaluate the effects of HPLC fractions on parameters of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) infection and cell viability. Candidate HIV-1 inhibitory fractions were then analyzed for the presence of potential HIV-1 inhibitory compounds by mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of three previously characterized compounds, i.e., debromohymenialdisine (DBH), hymenialdisine (HD), and oroidin. Commercially available purified versions of these molecules were re-tested to assess their antiviral potential in greater detail. Specifically, DBH and HD exhibit a 30%-40% inhibition of HIV-1 at 3.1 μM and 13 μM, respectively; however, both exhibited cytotoxicity. Conversely, oroidin displayed a 50% inhibition of viral replication at 50 μM with no associated toxicity. Additional experimentation using a biochemical assay revealed that oroidin inhibited the activity of the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase up to 90% at 25 μM. Taken together, the chemical search space was narrowed and previously isolated compounds with an unexplored anti-viral potential were found. Our results support exploration of marine natural products for anti-viral drug discovery. PMID:26861355

  10. Interactions of HIV-1 proteins with their cellular partners : insights from computational methods

    Quy, Vo Cam

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 attacks vital cells in the human immune system. HIV-1 differs from many viruses since it is characterized by a very high genetic variability. This means that many variants of HIV-1 virus can be generated in a single infected patient in the course of one day. HIV-1 hypervariability causes drug resistance and, consequently, medical treatment failure. Targeting the interactions between proteins from HIV-1 and from Homo sapiens may represent an excellent solution for drug design because it ...

  11. Quantitation of HIV-1 RNA in breast milk by real time PCR

    Becquart, Pierre; Foulongne, Vincent; Willumsen, J.; Rouzioux, C; Segondy, Michel; Van De Perre, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 RNA in breast milk is a strong predictor of HIV-1 transmission through breastfeeding. In the present report, breast milk samples from HIV-1 uninfected donors were spiked with dilution of quantified culture supernatant from HIV-1(NDK) infected PBMC. Two RNA extraction techniques based on silica extraction, Nuclisens (R) (BioMerieux) and Triazol (Qiagen), two techniques based on guanidine thiocynanate/chloroforme extraction, TRIzol (Life Technologic) and Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor (TM) (Roche...

  12. DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin mediates internalization of HIV-1 into human podocytes

    J. Mikulak; TEICHBERG, S; Arora, S.; KUMAR, D; Yadav, A.; Salhan, D.; Pullagura, S.; Mathieson, P. W.; Saleem, M A; Singhal, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 has been demonstrated to contribute to the pathogenesis of HIV-associated nephropathy. In renal biopsy studies, podocytes have been reported to be infected by HIV-1. However, the mechanism involved in HIV-1 internalization into podocytes is not clear. In the present study, we evaluated the occurrence of HIV-1 internalization into conditionally immortalized human podocytes and the mechanism involved. Human podocytes rapidly internalized R5 and X4 HIV-1 prim...

  13. Histone deacetylase inhibitors for purging HIV-1 from the latent reservoir.

    Matalon, S.; Rasmussen, T.A.; Dinarello, C A

    2011-01-01

    A reservoir of latently infected memory CD4(+) T cells is believed to be the source of HIV-1 reemergence after discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy. HIV-1 eradication may depend on depletion of this reservoir. Integrated HIV-1 is inaccessible for expression, in part because of histone deacetylases (HDACs). One approach is to exploit the ability of HDAC inhibitors to induce HIV-1 expression from an integrated virus. With effective antiretroviral therapy, newly expressed HIV-1 is incapable...

  14. Characterization of HIV-1 Resistance to Tenofovir Alafenamide In Vitro.

    Margot, Nicolas A; Johnson, Audun; Miller, Michael D; Callebaut, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) is an investigational prodrug of the HIV-1 nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NtRTI) tenofovir (TFV), with improved potency and drug delivery properties over the current prodrug, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF). TAF is currently in phase 3 clinical studies for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, in combination with other antiretroviral agents. Phase 1 and 2 studies have shown that TAF was associated with increased peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) drug loading and increased suppression of HIV-1 replication compared to treatment with TDF. In this study, selection of in vitro resistance to both TAF and the parent compound, TFV, led to the emergence of HIV-1 with the K65R amino acid substitution in RT with 6.5-fold-reduced susceptibility to TAF. Although TAF is more potent than TFV in vitro, the antiviral susceptibilities to TAF and TFV of a large panel of nucleoside/nucleotide RT inhibitor (NRTI)-resistant mutants were highly correlated (R(2) = 0.97), indicating that the two compounds have virtually the same resistance profile when assessed as fold change from the wild type. TAF showed full antiviral activity in PBMCs against primary HIV-1 isolates with protease inhibitor, nonnucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI), or integrase strand transfer inhibitor resistance but reduced activity against isolates with extensive NRTI resistance amino acid substitutions. However, the increased cell loading of TFV with TAF versus TDF observed in vivo suggests that TAF may retain activity against TDF-resistant mutant viruses. PMID:26149983

  15. HIV-1 subtype B: Traces of a pandemic.

    Junqueira, Dennis Maletich; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2016-08-01

    Human migration is a major process that shaped the origin and dissemination of HIV. Within HIV-1, subtype B (HIV-1B) is the most disseminated variant and it is assumed to be the causative agent in approximately 11% of all cases of HIV worldwide. Phylogenetic studies have revealed that HIV-1B emerged in Kinshasa (Africa) and was introduced into the Caribbean region via Haiti in or around 1966 by human migration. After localized dispersion, the virus was brought to the United States of America via homosexual/bisexual contact around 1969. Inside USA, the incidence of HIV-1B infection increased exponentially and it became established in the population, affecting not only homosexual individuals but also heterosexual individuals and injecting drug users. Soon after, the virus was disseminated and became established in other regions, including Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Australia. Recent studies suggest that, in addition to this pandemic clade, several lineages have emerged from Haiti and reached other Caribbean and Latin American countries via short-distance dissemination. Different subtype B genetic variants have also been detected in these epidemics. Four genetic variants have been described to date: subtype B', which mainly circulates in Thailand and other Asian countries; a specific variant mainly found in Trinidad and Tobago; the GPGS variant, which is primarily detected in Korea; and the GWGR variant, which is mainly detected in Brazil. This paper reviews the evolution of HIV-1B and its impact on the human population. PMID:27228177

  16. Neutralizing antibodies decrease the envelope fluidity of HIV-1

    For successful penetration of HIV-1, the formation of a fusion pore may be required in order to accumulate critical numbers of fusion-activated gp41 with the help of fluidization of the plasma membrane and viral envelope. An increase in temperature to 40 oC after viral adsorption at 25 oC enhanced the infectivity by 1.4-fold. The enhanced infectivity was inhibited by an anti-CXCR4 peptide, T140, and anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies (0.5β and 694/98-D) by post-attachment neutralization, but not by non-neutralizing antibodies (670-30D and 246-D) specific for the C5 of gp120 and cluster I of gp41, respectively. Anti-HLA-II and an anti-HTLV-I gp46 antibody, LAT27, neutralized the molecule-carrying HIV-1C-2(MT-2). The anti-V3 antibodies suppressed the fluidity of the HIV-1C-2 envelope, whereas the non-neutralizing antibodies did not. The anti-HLA-II antibody decreased the envelope fluidity of HIV-1C-2(MT-2), but not that of HIV-1C-2. Therefore, fluidity suppression by these antibodies represents an important neutralization mechanism, in addition to inhibition of viral attachment

  17. An Everting Ureteral Access Sheath: Concepts and In Vitro Testing

    Lee, Keith L.; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2007-04-01

    Ureteral access sheaths have been a recent innovation in facilitating ureteral stone surgery. Once properly placed, access sheaths allow the movement of ureteroscopes and other instruments through the ureter with minimal injury to the urothelium. However, there are shortcomings of the current device designs. Initial sheath placement requires significant force, and shear stress can injure the ureter. In addition, inadvertent advancement of the outer sheath without the inner introducer stylet can tear and avulse the ureter. A novel eversion design incorporating a lubricous film provides marked improvement over current access sheaths. In bench top and animal models, the eversion shealths require less force during advancement, cause less injury to the urothelial tissue, and have a lower potential of introducing extraneous materials (e.g., microbes) into a simulated urinary tract. While, the everting design provides important advantages over traditional non-everting designs, further preclinical and clinical trials are required.

  18. Discordance between Frequency of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Specific Gamma Interferon-Producing CD4+ T Cells and HIV-1-Specific Lymphoproliferation in HIV-1-Infected Subjects with Active Viral Replication

    Palmer, B. E.; Boritz, E; Blyveis, N.; Wilson, C C

    2002-01-01

    One hallmark of uncontrolled, chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is the absence of strong HIV-1-specific, CD4+ T-cell-proliferative responses, yet the mechanism underlying this T helper (Th)-cell defect remains controversial. To better understand the impact of HIV-1 replication on Th-cell function, we compared the frequency of CD4+ Th-cell responses based on production of gamma interferon to lymphoproliferative responses directed against HIV-1 proteins in HIV-1-infe...

  19. Community study of the relative impact of HIV-1 and HIV-2 on intrathoracic tuberculosis

    Seng, R; Gustafson, P; Gomes, VF;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HIV-1 infection is associated with an increased incidence of and mortality from tuberculosis. Few community studies have examined the effect of HIV-2 on tuberculosis. METHODS: We investigated the association between HIV-1, HIV-2 and active tuberculosis in four districts (population 42...... 709) in Bissau, capital of Guinea-Bissau, with the highest known seroprevalence of HIV-2 infection in the world. From May 1996 to June 1998, tuberculosis surveillance and active case finding among contacts was conducted. Patients were HIV-tested, given specific tuberculosis treatment for 8 months and...... followed regarding mortality. Simultaneously, an HIV sero-survey was performed in a random sample of 1748 permanent residents. RESULTS: During a 25-month period, 366 tuberculosis cases were identified. After excluding cases among visitors to the area, and adjusting for age, the incidence of tuberculosis...

  20. Perinatal acquisition of drug-resistant HIV-1 infection: mechanisms and long-term outcome

    Dollfus Catherine

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary-HIV-1-infection in newborns that occurs under antiretroviral prophylaxis that is a high risk of drug-resistance acquisition. We examine the frequency and the mechanisms of resistance acquisition at the time of infection in newborns. Patients and Methods We studied HIV-1-infected infants born between 01 January 1997 and 31 December 2004 and enrolled in the ANRS-EPF cohort. HIV-1-RNA and HIV-1-DNA samples obtained perinatally from the newborn and mother were subjected to population-based and clonal analyses of drug resistance. If positive, serial samples were obtained from the child for resistance testing. Results Ninety-two HIV-1-infected infants were born during the study period. Samples were obtained from 32 mother-child pairs and from another 28 newborns. Drug resistance was detected in 12 newborns (20%: drug resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was seen in 10 cases, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in two cases, and protease inhibitors in one case. For 9 children, the detection of the same resistance mutations in mothers' samples (6 among 10 available and in newborn lymphocytes (6/8 suggests that the newborn was initially infected by a drug-resistant strain. Resistance variants were either transmitted from mother-to-child or selected during subsequent temporal exposure under suboptimal perinatal prophylaxis. Follow-up studies of the infants showed that the resistance pattern remained stable over time, regardless of antiretroviral therapy, suggesting the early cellular archiving of resistant viruses. The absence of resistance in the mother of the other three children (3/10 and neonatal lymphocytes (2/8 suggests that the newborns were infected by a wild-type strain without long-term persistence of resistance when suboptimal prophylaxis was stopped. Conclusion This study confirms the importance of early resistance genotyping of HIV-1-infected newborns. In most cases (75%, drug

  1. Transmitted antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in newly diagnosed HIV-1 positive patients in Turkey

    Murat Sayan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to determine the transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRMs in newly diagnosed HIV-1 positive patients in Turkey. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out between 2009 and 2014 and antiretroviral naïve 774 HIV-1 infected patients from 19 Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Departments in Turkey were included; gender: 664 (86% male, median age: 37 (range; 1–77, median CD4+T-cell: 360 (range; 1–1320 count/mm3, median HIV-RNA load: 2.10+E6 (range; 4.2+E2–7.41+E8 IU/mL. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations were detected by population based sequencing of the reverse transcriptase (codon 41–238 and protease (codon 1–99 domains of pol gene of HIV-1, and analyzed according to the criteria by the World Health Organization 2009 list of surveillance drug resistance mutations [1]. Results: The patients had TDRMs to NRTIs (K65R, M184V, NNRTIs (K101E, K103N/S, G190A/E/S, Y181I/C, Y188H/L and PIs (M46L, I54V, L76V, V82L/T, N83D, I84V, L90M. The prevalence of overall TDRMs was 6.7% (52/774. Resistance mutations were found to be 0.7% (6/774, 4.1% (32/774 and 2.1% (17/774 to NRTIs, NNRTIs and PIs drug groups, respectively. Three patients had NRTIs+NNRTs resistance mutations (M184V+K103N as multi-class drug resistance. However, thymidine analogue resistance mutations (TAMs determined two distinct genotypic profiles in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: TAM1: M41L, L210W and T215Y, and TAM2: D67N, K70R, K219E/Q, and T215F. The prevalence of TAM1 and TAM2 were 7.7% (60/774 and 4.3% (34/774, respectively. Conclusions: The TDRMs prevalence of antiretroviral naïve HIV-1 infected patients may be suggested current situation of Turkey. These long-term and large-scale results show that the resistance testing must be an integral part of the management of HIV infection in Turkey.

  2. Molecular Epidemiology of HIV-1 Infection among Men who Have Sex with Men in Taiwan in 2012.

    Szu-Wei Huang

    Full Text Available The number of men who have sex with men (MSM infected with HIV-1 in Taiwan has increased rapidly in the past few years. The goal of this study was to conduct a molecular epidemiological study of HIV-1 infection among MSM in Taiwan to identify risk factors for intervention. Voluntary counseling program and anonymous testing were provided to patrons at 1 gay bar, 7 night clubs and 3 gay saunas in Taipei and New Taipei Cities in 2012. HIV-1 subtypes were determined using gag subtype-specific PCR and phylogenetic analysis by env sequences. Recent HIV-1 infection was determined using LAg-Avidity EIA. In-depth interviews and questionnaires were used to identify risk factors. The prevalence and incidence of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan were 4.38% (53/1,208 and 3.29 per 100 person-years, respectively. Of 49 cases genotyped, 48 (97.9% were infected with subtype B and 1 with CRF01_AE (2%. Phylogenetic analysis of 46 HIV-1 strains showed that 25 (54.4% subtype B strains formed 9 clusters with each other or with other local strains. The CRF01_AE case clustered with a reference strain from a Thai blood donor with bootstrap value of 99. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that risk factors associated with HIV-1 infection included use of oil-based solution as lubricant (vs. saliva or water-based lubricants, OR= 4.23; p <0.001; exclusively receptive role (vs. insertive role, OR= 9.69; p <0.001; versatile role (vs. insertive role, OR= 6.45; p= 0.003; oral sex (vs. insertive role, OR= 11.93; p= 0.044; times of sexual contact per week (2-3 vs. zero per week, OR= 3.41; p= 0.021; illegal drug use (OR= 4.12; p <0.001; and history of sexually transmitted diseases (OR= 3.65; p= 0.002. In conclusion, there was no new HIV-1 subtype or circulating recombinant form responsible for the increase of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan in 2012. Misuse of oil-based solution as lubricant is a new risk factor identified among MSM in Taiwan. The Taiwan's Centers for Disease

  3. Anti - HIV-1 integrase activity of Thai Medicinal Plants

    Kingkan Bunluepuech

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of discovering anti-HIV-1 agents from natural sources, the aqueous and EtOH extracts of eight Thaiplants including Clerodendron indicum (whole plant, Tiliacora triandra (stem, Capparis micracantha (wood, Harrissoniaperforata (wood, Ficus glomerata (wood, Diospyros decandra (wood, Dracaena loureiri (heartwood, and Tinospora crispa (stem were screened for their inhibitory activities against HIV-1 integrase (IN using the multiplate integration assay(MIA. Of the EtOH extracts, Ficus glomerata (wood was the most potent with an IC50 value of 7.8 g/ml; whereas the water extract of Harrisonia perforata (wood was the most potent aqueous extract with an IC50 value of 2.3 g/ml. The isolation of active principles against HIV-1 IN from Ficus glomerata is now actively pursued.

  4. Stable assembly of HIV-1 export complexes occurs cotranscriptionally

    Nawroth, Isabel; Mueller, Florian; Basyuk, Eugenia;

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 Rev protein mediates export of unspliced and singly spliced viral transcripts by binding to the Rev response element (RRE) and recruiting the cellular export factor CRM1. Here, we investigated the recruitment of Rev to the transcription sites of HIV-1 reporters that splice either post- or...... cotranscriptionally. In both cases, we observed that Rev localized to the transcription sites of the reporters and recruited CRM1. Rev and CRM1 remained at the reporter transcription sites when cells were treated with the splicing inhibitor Spliceostatin A (SSA), showing that the proteins associate with RNA prior to...... or during early spliceosome assembly. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) revealed that Rev and CRM1 have similar kinetics as the HIV-1 RNA, indicating that Rev, CRM1, and RRE-containing RNAs are released from the site of transcription in one single export complex. These results suggest...

  5. Oral and systemic manifestations in HIV-1 patients

    Tatiany Oliveira de Alencar Menezes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of the most frequent oral and systemic manifestations in human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1-positive patients. METHODS: The study was conducted on 300 HIV-1 patients attending the Reference Unit Specialized in Special Infectious Parasitic Diseases in Belém, Pará, Brazil. RESULTS: The most prevalent oral conditions were caries (32.6%, candidiasis (32%, and periodontal disease (17%. Among the systemic manifestations, hepatitis (29.2%, gastritis (16%, arterial hypertension (14.7%, and tuberculosis (12% were the most commonly observed. CONCLUSIONS: We here reported on the most prevalent oral and systemic conditions in HIV-1-positive patients. The healthcare professional's knowledge of the various manifestations among these patients is fundamental to ensure prompt and accurate diagnosis and treatment, and for improving the quality of life of these patients.

  6. Glycosylation in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein and its biological implications

    Ho, Yung Shwen

    2013-08-01

    Glycosylation of HIV-1 envelope proteins (Env gp120/gp41) plays a vital role in viral evasion from the host immune response, which occurs through the masking of key neutralization epitopes and the presentation of the Env glycosylation as \\'self\\' to the host immune system. Env glycosylation is generally conserved, yet its continual evolution plays an important role in modulating viral infectivity and Env immunogenicity. Thus, it is believed that Env glycosylation, which is a vital part of the HIV-1 architecture, also controls intra- and inter-clade genetic variations. Discerning intra- and inter-clade glycosylation variations could therefore yield important information for understanding the molecular and biological differences between HIV clades and may assist in effectively designing Env-based immunogens and in clearly understanding HIV vaccines. This review provides an in-depth perspective of various aspects of Env glycosylation in the context of HIV-1 pathogenesis. © 2013 Future Medicine Ltd.

  7. Structural basis for membrane anchoring of HIV-1 envelope spike.

    Dev, Jyoti; Park, Donghyun; Fu, Qingshan; Chen, Jia; Ha, Heather Jiwon; Ghantous, Fadi; Herrmann, Tobias; Chang, Weiting; Liu, Zhijun; Frey, Gary; Seaman, Michael S; Chen, Bing; Chou, James J

    2016-07-01

    HIV-1 envelope spike (Env) is a type I membrane protein that mediates viral entry. We used nuclear magnetic resonance to determine an atomic structure of the transmembrane (TM) domain of HIV-1 Env reconstituted in bicelles that mimic a lipid bilayer. The TM forms a well-ordered trimer that protects a conserved membrane-embedded arginine. An amino-terminal coiled-coil and a carboxyl-terminal hydrophilic core stabilize the trimer. Individual mutations of conserved residues did not disrupt the TM trimer and minimally affected membrane fusion and infectivity. Major changes in the hydrophilic core, however, altered the antibody sensitivity of Env. These results show how a TM domain anchors, stabilizes, and modulates a viral envelope spike and suggest that its influence on Env conformation is an important consideration for HIV-1 immunogen design. PMID:27338706

  8. No evidence of association between HIV-1 and malaria in populations with low HIV-1 prevalence.

    Diego F Cuadros

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The geographic overlap between HIV-1 and malaria has generated much interest in their potential interactions. A variety of studies have evidenced a complex HIV-malaria interaction within individuals and populations that may have dramatic effects, but the causes and implications of this co-infection at the population level are still unclear. In a previous publication, we showed that the prevalence of malaria caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum is associated with HIV infection in eastern sub-Saharan Africa. To complement our knowledge of the HIV-malaria co-infection, the objective of this work was to assess the relationship between malaria and HIV prevalence in the western region of sub-Saharan Africa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Population-based cross-sectional data were obtained from the HIV/AIDS Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in Burkina Faso, Ghana, Guinea, Mali, Liberia and Cameroon, and the malaria atlas project. Using generalized linear mixed models, we assessed the relationship between HIV-1 and Plasmodium falciparum parasite rate (PfPR adjusting for important socio-economic and biological cofactors. We found no evidence that individuals living in areas with stable malaria transmission (PfPR>0.46 have higher odds of being HIV-positive than individuals who live in areas with PfPR≤0.46 in western sub-Saharan Africa (estimated odds ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval 0.86-1.50. In contrast, the results suggested that PfPR was associated with being infected with HIV in Cameroon (estimated odds ratio 1.56, 95% confidence interval 1.23-2.00. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Contrary to our previous research on eastern sub-Saharan Africa, this study did not identify an association between PfPR and infection with HIV in western sub-Saharan Africa, which suggests that malaria might not play an important role in the spread of HIV in populations where the HIV prevalence is low. Our work highlights the importance of

  9. Binding of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube to WT and Mutant HIV-1 Proteases: Analysis of Flap Dynamics and Binding Mechanism

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2012-01-01

    Most of the currently treated HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR) inhibitors have been prone to suffer from the mutations associated drug resistance. Therefore, it is necessary to search for potent alternatives against the drug resistance. In the current study we have tested the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as an inhibitor in wild type (WT) as well as in three primary mutants (I50VPR, V82APR and I84VPR) of the HIV-1-PR through docking the SWCNT in the active site region, and then performed all-a...

  10. Selective elimination of HIV-1-infected cells by Env-directed, HIV-1-based virus-like particles

    We recently showed that both replicating and resting cells cultivated with ganciclovir (GCV) were killed when challenged with vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein pseudotyped HIV-1-based virus-like particles (VLPs) carrying the Nef7 (i.e., an HIV-1 Nef mutant incorporating in virions at high levels)/herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) fusion product. On this basis, a novel anti-HIV therapeutic approach based on Nef7/TK VLPs expressing X4 or R5 HIV cell receptor complexes has been attempted. We here report that (CD4-CXCR4) and (CD4-CCR5) Nef7-based VLPs efficiently enter cells infected by X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. Importantly, the delivery of the VLP-associated Nef7/TK led to cell death upon GCV treatment. Of interest, VLPs were effective also against non-replicating, HIV-1-infected primary human monocyte-derived macrophages. HIV-targeted VLPs represent a promising candidate for the treatment of persistently HIV-1-infected cells that are part of virus reservoirs resistant to HAART therapies

  11. Genotypic and functional properties of early infant HIV-1 envelopes

    Sullivan John L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the properties of HIV-1 variants that are transmitted from women to their infants is crucial to improving strategies to prevent transmission. In this study, 162 full-length envelope (env clones were generated from plasma RNA obtained from 5 HIV-1 Clade B infected mother-infant pairs. Following extensive genotypic and phylogenetic analyses, 35 representative clones were selected for functional studies. Results Infant quasispecies were highly homogeneous and generally represented minor maternal variants, consistent with transmission across a selective bottleneck. Infant clones did not differ from the maternal in env length, or glycosylation. All infant variants utilized the CCR5 co-receptor, but were not macrophage tropic. Relatively high levels (IC50 ≥ 100 μg/ml of autologous maternal plasma IgG were required to neutralize maternal and infant viruses; however, all infant viruses were neutralized by pooled sera from HIV-1 infected individuals, implying that they were not inherently neutralization-resistant. All infant viruses were sensitive to the HIV-1 entry inhibitors Enfuvirtide and soluble CD4; none were resistant to Maraviroc. Sensitivity to human monoclonal antibodies 4E10, 2F5, b12 and 2G12 varied. Conclusions This study provides extensive characterization of the genotypic and functional properties of HIV-1 env shortly after transmission. We present the first detailed comparisons of the macrophage tropism of infant and maternal env variants and their sensitivity to Maraviroc, the only CCR5 antagonist approved for therapeutic use. These findings may have implications for improving approaches to prevent mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission.

  12. Comparison of HIV-1 protease expression in different fusion forms.

    Wan, M; Takagi, M; Loh, B N; Imanaka, T

    1995-06-01

    Earlier observations showed that the expression of recombinant protease of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 PR) was usually in a low level, and its proteolytic activity and hydrophobicity were believed to be toxic for the host cells. Various constructs were investigated that contained an N-terminal extended HIV-1 PR gene (PR107) in order to find a system which can express this protease in high level. The constructs of PR107 gene expressed as fusion proteins either with glutathione S-transferase (GST) by pGEX-PR107 or with maltose-binding protein (MBP) by pMAL-PR107 showed that the full length of fusion protein exhibited self-cleavage in E. coli. The results from expression experiments indicated that the size of the fusion portion does not affect the self-processing of fused HIV-1 PR to release its mature form, despite the attachment of only one subunit of the dimeric protease to GST or MBP. The construct, pET-PR107, under the control of strong bacteriophage T7 promoter system, did not show clear advantages for expression of this HIV-1 PR. Comparing these three constructs, the pGEX-PR107 system showed the highest expression level. Quantitative immuno-blotting indicated that the amount of HIV-1 PR expressed by pGEX-PR107 was twice that expressed by pMAL-PR107, and thrice that expressed by pET-PR107. More than 1 mg of pure HIV-1 PR from per liter culture of E. coli. DH5 alpha containing pGEX-PR107 can be obtained via the purification procedures [Biochem. Mol. Biol. International, (1995) 35:899-912].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7663445

  13. A novel peptide that inhibits HIV-1 entry

    YU Yong; HUANG Xiaoxing; WANG Qiong; YANG Yaling; TIAN Po; ZHANG Wentao

    2004-01-01

    @@ The global epidemic of HIV infection, the cause of AIDS, has created an urgent need for novel classes of antiretroviral agent. Besides reverse transcriptase and protease, the viral entry process provides new anti-HIV-1 targets. A new generation of antiviral drugs intended to block HIV entry into host cells is now under develop- ment[1]. These compounds are generally referred to as fusion or entry inhibitor. Several HIV-1 entry inhibitors that target CD4-gp120 interactions, co-receptor function, and gp41-mediated membrane fusion are in different stages of clinical development[2].

  14. Human cellular restriction factors that target HIV-1 replication

    Jeang Kuan-Teh; Luban Jeremy; Strebel Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Recent findings have highlighted roles played by innate cellular factors in restricting intracellular viral replication. In this review, we discuss in brief the activities of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme 3G (APOBEC3G), bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST-2), cyclophilin A, tripartite motif protein 5 alpha (Trim5α), and cellular microRNAs as examples of host restriction factors that target HIV-1. We point to countermeasures encoded by HIV-1 for moderating the potency of th...

  15. Identification of N-phenyl-N'-(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-4-yl)-oxalamides as a new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors that prevent gp120 binding to CD4

    We have identified two N-phenyl-N'-(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-4-yl)-oxalamide analogs as a novel class of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry inhibitors that block the gp120-CD4 interaction, using database screening techniques. The lead compounds, NBD-556 and NBD-557, are small molecule organic compounds with drug-like properties. These compounds showed potent cell fusion and virus-cell fusion inhibitory activity at low micromolar levels. A systematic study showed that these compounds target viral entry by inhibiting the binding of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cellular receptor CD4 but did not inhibit reverse transcriptase, integrase, or protease, indicating that they do not target the later stages of the HIV-1 life cycle to inhibit HIV-1 infection. These compounds were equally potent inhibitors of both X4 and R5 viruses tested in CXCR4 and CCR5 expressing cell lines, respectively, indicating that their anti-HIV-1 activity is not dependent on the coreceptor tropism of the virus. A surface plasmon resonance study, which measures binding affinity, clearly demonstrated that these compounds bind to unliganded HIV-1 gp120 but not to the cellular receptor CD4. NBD-556 and NBD-557 were active against HIV-1 laboratory-adapted strains including an AZT-resistant strain and HIV-1 primary isolates, indicating that these compounds can potentially be further modified to become potent HIV-1 entry inhibitors

  16. Strong HIV-1-Specific T Cell Responses in HIV-1-Exposed Uninfected Infants and Neonates Revealed after Regulatory T Cell Removal

    Legrand, Fatema A.; Nixon, Douglas F.; Loo, Christopher P.; Erika Ono; Chapman, Joan M; Maristela Miyamoto; Diaz, Ricardo S.; Amélia M N Santos; Succi, Regina C. M.; Jacob Abadi; Rosenberg, Michael G.; Maria Isabel de Moraes-Pinto; Esper G Kallas

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In utero transmission of HIV-1 occurs on average in only 3%-15% of HIV-1-exposed neonates born to mothers not on antiretroviral drug therapy. Thus, despite potential exposure, the majority of infants remain uninfected. Weak HIV-1-specific T-cell responses have been detected in children exposed to HIV-1, and potentially contribute to protection against infection. We, and others, have recently shown that the removal of CD4(+) CD25(+) T-regulatory (Treg) cells can reveal strong HIV-1...

  17. CB2 receptor agonists protect human dopaminergic neurons against damage from HIV-1 gp120.

    Shuxian Hu

    Full Text Available Despite the therapeutic impact of anti-retroviral therapy, HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND remains a serious threat to AIDS patients, and there currently remains no specific therapy for the neurological manifestations of HIV-1. Recent work suggests that the nigrostriatal dopaminergic area is a critical brain region for the neuronal dysfunction and death seen in HAND and that human dopaminergic neurons have a particular sensitivity to gp120-induced damage, manifested as reduced function (decreased dopamine uptake, morphological changes, and reduced viability. Synthetic cannabinoids inhibit HIV-1 expression in human microglia, suppress production of inflammatory mediators in human astrocytes, and there is substantial literature demonstrating the neuroprotective properties of cannabinoids in other neuropathogenic processes. Based on these data, experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that synthetic cannabinoids will protect dopaminergic neurons against the toxic effects of the HIV-1 protein gp120. Using a human mesencephalic neuronal/glial culture model, which contains dopaminergic neurons, microglia, and astrocytes, we were able to show that the CB1/CB2 agonist WIN55,212-2 blunts gp120-induced neuronal damage as measured by dopamine transporter function, apoptosis and lipid peroxidation; these actions were mediated principally by the CB2 receptor. Adding supplementary human microglia to our cultures enhances gp120-induced damage; WIN55,212-2 is able to alleviate this enhanced damage. Additionally, WIN55,212-2 inhibits gp120-induced superoxide production by purified human microglial cells, inhibits migration of human microglia towards supernatants generated from gp120-stimulated human mesencephalic neuronal/glial cultures and reduces chemokine and cytokine production from the human mesencephalic neuronal/glial cultures. These data suggest that synthetic cannabinoids are capable of protecting human dopaminergic neurons from

  18. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by aqueous extracts of Prunella vulgaris L.

    McCoy Joe-Ann

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mint family (Lamiaceae produces a wide variety of constituents with medicinal properties. Several family members have been reported to have antiviral activity, including lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L., sage (Salvia spp., peppermint (Mentha × piperita L., hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L., basil (Ocimum spp. and self-heal (Prunella vulgaris L.. To further characterize the anti-lentiviral activities of Prunella vulgaris, water and ethanol extracts were tested for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection. Results Aqueous extracts contained more anti-viral activity than did ethanol extracts, displaying potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 at sub μg/mL concentrations with little to no cellular cytotoxicity at concentrations more than 100-fold higher. Time-of-addition studies demonstrated that aqueous extracts were effective when added during the first five hours following initiation of infection, suggesting that the botanical constituents were targeting entry events. Further analysis revealed that extracts inhibited both virus/cell interactions and post-binding events. While only 40% inhibition was maximally achieved in our virus/cell interaction studies, extract effectively blocked post-binding events at concentrations similar to those that blocked infection, suggesting that it was targeting of these latter steps that was most important for mediating inhibition of virus infectivity. Conclusions We demonstrate that aqueous P. vulgaris extracts inhibited HIV-1 infectivity. Our studies suggest that inhibition occurs primarily by interference of early, post-virion binding events. The ability of aqueous extracts to inhibit early events within the HIV life cycle suggests that these extracts, or purified constituents responsible for the antiviral activity, are promising microbicides and/or antivirals against HIV-1.

  19. Origin of the HIV-1 group O epidemic in western lowland gorillas.

    D'arc, Mirela; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Esteban, Amandine; Learn, Gerald H; Boué, Vanina; Liegeois, Florian; Etienne, Lucie; Tagg, Nikki; Leendertz, Fabian H; Boesch, Christophe; Madinda, Nadège F; Robbins, Martha M; Gray, Maryke; Cournil, Amandine; Ooms, Marcel; Letko, Michael; Simon, Viviana A; Sharp, Paul M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Delaporte, Eric; Mpoudi Ngole, Eitel; Peeters, Martine

    2015-03-17

    HIV-1, the cause of AIDS, is composed of four phylogenetic lineages, groups M, N, O, and P, each of which resulted from an independent cross-species transmission event of simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) infecting African apes. Although groups M and N have been traced to geographically distinct chimpanzee communities in southern Cameroon, the reservoirs of groups O and P remain unknown. Here, we screened fecal samples from western lowland (n = 2,611), eastern lowland (n = 103), and mountain (n = 218) gorillas for gorilla SIV (SIVgor) antibodies and nucleic acids. Despite testing wild troops throughout southern Cameroon (n = 14), northern Gabon (n = 16), the Democratic Republic of Congo (n = 2), and Uganda (n = 1), SIVgor was identified at only four sites in southern Cameroon, with prevalences ranging from 0.8-22%. Amplification of partial and full-length SIVgor sequences revealed extensive genetic diversity, but all SIVgor strains were derived from a single lineage within the chimpanzee SIV (SIVcpz) radiation. Two fully sequenced gorilla viruses from southwestern Cameroon were very closely related to, and likely represent the source population of, HIV-1 group P. Most of the genome of a third SIVgor strain, from central Cameroon, was very closely related to HIV-1 group O, again pointing to gorillas as the immediate source. Functional analyses identified the cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G as a barrier for chimpanzee-to-gorilla, but not gorilla-to-human, virus transmission. These data indicate that HIV-1 group O, which spreads epidemically in west central Africa and is estimated to have infected around 100,000 people, originated by cross-species transmission from western lowland gorillas. PMID:25733890

  20. Selection and characterization of HIV-1 with a novel S68 deletion in reverse transcriptase.

    Schinazi, Raymond F; Massud, Ivana; Rapp, Kimberly L; Cristiano, Meta; Detorio, Mervi A; Stanton, Richard A; Bennett, Matthew A; Kierlin-Duncan, Monique; Lennerstrand, Johan; Nettles, James H

    2011-05-01

    Resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) represents a significant problem in the design of novel therapeutics and the management of treatment regimens in infected persons. Resistance profiles can be elucidated by defining modifications to the viral genome conferred upon exposure to novel nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTI). In vitro testing of HIV-1LAI-infected primary human lymphocytes treated with β-D-2',3'-dideoxy-2',3'-didehydro-5-fluorocytidine (DFC; Dexelvucitabine; Reverset) produced a novel deletion of AGT at codon 68 (S68Δ) alone and in combination with K65R that differentially affects drug response. Dual-approach clone techniques utilizing TOPO cloning and pyrosequencing confirmed the novel S68Δ in the HIV-1 genome. The S68Δ HIV-1 RT was phenotyped against various antiviral agents in a heteropolymeric DNA polymerase assay and in human lymphocytes. Drug susceptibility results indicate that the S68Δ displayed a 10- to 30-fold increase in resistance to DFC, lamivudine, emtricitabine, tenofovir, abacavir, and amdoxovir and modest resistance to stavudine, β-d-2',3'-oxa-5-fluorocytidine, or 9-(β-D-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl)guanine and remained susceptible to 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI), 1-(β-D-dioxolane)thymine (DOT) and lopinavir. Modeling revealed a central role for S68 in affecting conformation of the β3-β4 finger region and provides a rational for the selective resistance. These data indicate that the novel S68Δ is a previously unrecognized deletion that may represent an important factor in NRTI multidrug resistance treatment strategies. PMID:21357304

  1. Inter-laboratory assessment of a prototype multiplex kit for determination of recent HIV-1 infection.

    Kelly A Curtis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate and reliable laboratory-based assays are needed for estimating HIV-1 incidence from cross-sectional samples. We recently described the development of a customized, HIV-1-specific Bio-Plex assay that allows for the measurement of HIV-specific antibody levels and avidity to multiple analytes for improved HIV-1 incidence estimates. METHODS: To assess intra- and inter-laboratory assay performance, prototype multiplex kits were developed and evaluated by three distinct laboratories. Longitudinal seroconversion specimens were tested in parallel by each laboratory and kit performance was compared to that of an in-house assay. Additionally, the ability of the kit to distinguish recent from long-term HIV-1 infection, as compared to the in-house assay, was determined by comparing the reactivity of known recent (infected 12 months drug naïve specimens. RESULTS: Although the range of reactivity for each analyte varied between the prototype kit and in-house assay, a measurable distinction in reactivity between recent and long-term specimens was observed with both assays in all three laboratories. Additionally, kit performance was consistent between all three laboratories. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV, between sample replicates for all laboratories, ranged from 0.5% to 6.1%. The inter-laboratory CVs ranged from 8.5% to 21.3% for gp160-avidity index (a and gp120-normalized mean fluorescent intensity (MFI value (n, respectively. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate the feasibility of producing a multiplex kit for measuring HIV antibody levels and avidity, with the potential for improved incidence estimates based on multi-analyte algorithms. The availability of a commercial kit will facilitate the transfer of technology among diverse laboratories for widespread assay use.

  2. Review The Emerging Profile of Cross-Resistance among the Nonnucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Nicolas Sluis-Cremer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs are widely used to treat HIV-1-infected individuals; indeed most first-line antiretroviral therapies typically include one NNRTI in combination with two nucleoside analogs. In 2008, the next-generation NNRTI etravirine was approved for the treatment of HIV-infected antiretroviral therapy-experienced individuals, including those with prior NNRTI exposure. NNRTIs are also increasingly being included in strategies to prevent HIV-1 infection. For example: (1 nevirapine is used to prevent mother-to-child transmission; (2 the ASPIRE (MTN 020 study will test whether a vaginal ring containing dapivirine can prevent HIV-1 infection in women; (3 a microbicide gel formulation containing the urea-PETT derivative MIV-150 is in a phase I study to evaluate safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and acceptability; and (4 a long acting rilpivirine formulation is under-development for pre-exposure prophylaxis. Given their widespread use, particularly in resource-limited settings, as well as their low genetic barriers to resistance, there are concerns about overlapping resistance between the different NNRTIs. Consequently, a better understanding of the resistance and cross-resistance profiles among the NNRTI class is important for predicting response to treatment, and surveillance of transmitted drug-resistance.

  3. Definition of the viral targets of protective HIV-1-specific T cell responses

    Mothe Beatriz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of the CTL component of a future HIV-1 vaccine will depend on the induction of responses with the most potent antiviral activity and broad HLA class I restriction. However, current HIV vaccine designs are largely based on viral sequence alignments only, not incorporating experimental data on T cell function and specificity. Methods Here, 950 untreated HIV-1 clade B or -C infected individuals were tested for responses to sets of 410 overlapping peptides (OLP spanning the entire HIV-1 proteome. For each OLP, a "protective ratio" (PR was calculated as the ratio of median viral loads (VL between OLP non-responders and responders. Results For both clades, there was a negative relationship between the PR and the entropy of the OLP sequence. There was also a significant additive effect of multiple responses to beneficial OLP. Responses to beneficial OLP were of significantly higher functional avidity than responses to non-beneficial OLP. They also had superior in-vitro antiviral activities and, importantly, were at least as predictive of individuals' viral loads than their HLA class I genotypes. Conclusions The data thus identify immunogen sequence candidates for HIV and provide an approach for T cell immunogen design applicable to other viral infections.

  4. Enhanced HIV-1 neutralization by a CD4-VH3-IgG1 fusion protein

    HIV-1 gp120 is an alleged B cell superantigen, binding certain VH3+ human antibodies. We reasoned that a CD4-VH3 fusion protein could possess higher affinity for gp120 and improved HIV-1 inhibitory capacity. To test this we produced several human IgG1 immunoligands harboring VH3. Unlike VH3-IgG1 or VH3-CD4-IgG1, CD4-VH3-IgG1 bound gp120 considerably stronger than CD4-IgG1. CD4-VH3-IgG1 exhibited ∼1.5-2.5-fold increase in neutralization of two T-cell laboratory-adapted strains when compared to CD4-IgG1. CD4-VH3-IgG1 improved neutralization of 7/10 clade B primary isolates or pseudoviruses, exceeding 20-fold for JR-FL and 13-fold for Ba-L. It enhanced neutralization of 4/8 clade C viruses, and had negligible effect on 1/4 clade A pseudoviruses. We attribute this improvement to possible pairing of VH3 with CD4 D1 and stabilization of an Ig Fv-like structure, rather than to superantigen interactions. These novel findings support the current notion that CD4 fusion proteins can act as better HIV-1 entry inhibitors with potential clinical implications.

  5. Follow-up of a multi-drug resistant HIV-1 infected patient successfully treated with darunavir and etravirine

    Audelin, Anne Margrethe; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Petersen, Ann Berith;

    2008-01-01

    A multi-drug-resistant, non-compliant HIV-1 patient was treated successfully with a combination of the drugs darunavir and etravirine for more than 8 months. The patient experienced an immunoreconstitution syndrome due to improved compliance. Examining previous resistance tests for this type of...

  6. Cognitive bias test as a tool for accessing fish welfare

    Krzysztof Wojtas

    2015-12-01

    Difference in behaviour during the cognitive bias test suggests that fish cognitive bias can be affected by living conditions. Therefore this type of test should be taken to consideration as a tool in further fish welfare studies. It can be especially useful in studies concerning influence of living conditions that cannot be examined in direct way for example by preference test.

  7. Controle de polidrâmnio recorrente em gestante portadora do HIV-1: relato de caso Recurrent polyhydramnios management in an HIV-1 infected pregnant woman: a case report

    Geraldo Duarte

    2004-04-01

    fluid. The patient started preterm labor with 30 weeks and 5 days resulting in vaginal delivery of a male neonate weighing 1,690g and measuring 43cm. The baby presented a post natal diagnosis of a sodium-losing nephropathy and was submitted to three negative polymerase chain reaction tests for HIV-1. The authors point out that the option to manage cases of HIV-1 infected pregnancies that could need invasive obstetric procedures should be to give the patient 2 mg//kg of ZDV endovenously before the procedure, in order to avoid MTCT of HIV-1, as it has demonstrated good results in this case.

  8. Analysis of memory B cell responses and isolation of novel monoclonal antibodies with neutralizing breadth from HIV-1-infected individuals.

    Davide Corti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that neutralize a broad spectrum of primary HIV-1 isolates and the characterization of the human neutralizing antibody B cell response to HIV-1 infection are important goals that are central to the design of an effective antibody-based vaccine. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We immortalized IgG(+ memory B cells from individuals infected with diverse clades of HIV-1 and selected on the basis of plasma neutralization profiles that were cross-clade and relatively potent. Culture supernatants were screened using various recombinant forms of the envelope glycoproteins (Env in multiple parallel assays. We isolated 58 mAbs that were mapped to different Env surfaces, most of which showed neutralizing activity. One mAb in particular (HJ16 specific for a novel epitope proximal to the CD4 binding site on gp120 selectively neutralized a multi-clade panel of Tier-2 HIV-1 pseudoviruses, and demonstrated reactivity that was comparable in breadth, but distinct in neutralization specificity, to that of the other CD4 binding site-specific neutralizing mAb b12. A second mAb (HGN194 bound a conserved epitope in the V3 crown and neutralized all Tier-1 and a proportion of Tier-2 pseudoviruses tested, irrespective of clade. A third mAb (HK20 with broad neutralizing activity, particularly as a Fab fragment, recognized a highly conserved epitope in the HR-1 region of gp41, but showed striking assay-dependent selectivity in its activity. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals that by using appropriate screening methods, a large proportion of memory B cells can be isolated that produce mAbs with HIV-1 neutralizing activity. Three of these mAbs show unusual breadth of neutralization and therefore add to the current panel of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies with potential for passive protection and template-based vaccine design.

  9. Algorithms for detecting antibodies to HIV-1: results from a rural Ugandan cohort.

    Nunn, A J; Biryahwaho, B; Downing, R G; van der Groen, G; Ojwiya, A; Mulder, D W

    1993-08-01

    Although the Western blot test is widely used to confirm HIV-1 serostatus, concerns over its additional cost have prompted review of the need for supplementary testing and the evaluation of alternative test algorithms. Serostatus tends to be confirmed with this additional test especially when tested individuals will be informed of their serostatus or when results will be used for research purposes. The confirmation procedure has been adopted as a means of securing suitably high levels of specificity and sensitivity. With the goal of exploring potential alternatives to Western blot confirmation, the authors describe the use of parallel testing with a competitive and an indirect enzyme immunoassay with and without supplementary Western blots. Sera were obtained from 7895 people in the rural population survey and tested with an algorithm based on the Recombigen HIV-1 EIA and Wellcozyme HIV-1 Recombinant; alternative algorithms were assessed on negative or confirmed positive sera. None of the 227 sera classified as negative by the 2 assays were positive by Western blot. Of the 192 identified ass positive by both assays, 4 were found to be seronegative with Western blot. The possibility of technical error does, however, exist for 3 of these latter cases. One of the alternative algorithms assessed classified all borderline or discordant assay results as negative with 100% specificity and 98.4% sensitivity. This particular algorithm costs only one-third the price of the conventional algorithm. These results therefore suggest that high specificity and sensitivity may be obtained without using Western blot and at a considerable reduction in cost. PMID:8397940

  10. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of 2-Thioxopyrimidin-4(1H-one Derivatives as Potential Non-Nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Nagy M. Khalifa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of new 5-allyl-6-benzylpyrimidin-4(3H-ones bearing different substituents at the C-2 position of the pyrimidine core have been synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro activities against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 in the human T-lymphotropic type (MT-4 cell cultures. The majority of the title compounds showed moderate to good activities against HIV-1. Amongst them, 5-allyl-6-benzyl-2-(3-hydroxypropylthiopyrimidin-4(3H-one analogue 11c exhibited the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity (IC50 0.32 µM. The biological testing results clearly indicated that the substitution at C-2 position of the pyrimidine ring could increase the anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT activity.

  11. Selection dramatically reduces effective population size in HIV-1 infection

    Mittler John E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In HIV-1 evolution, a 100–100,000 fold discrepancy between census size and effective population size (Ne has been noted. Although it is well known that selection can reduce Ne, high in vivo mutation and recombination rates complicate attempts to quantify the effects of selection on HIV-1 effective size. Results We use the inbreeding coefficient and the variance in allele frequency at a linked neutral locus to estimate the reduction in Ne due to selection in the presence of mutation and recombination. With biologically realistic mutation rates, the reduction in Ne due to selection is determined by the strength of selection, i.e., the stronger the selection, the greater the reduction. However, the dependence of Ne on selection can break down if recombination rates are very high (e.g., r ≥ 0.1. With biologically likely recombination rates, our model suggests that recurrent selective sweeps similar to those observed in vivo can reduce within-host HIV-1 effective population sizes by a factor of 300 or more. Conclusion Although other factors, such as unequal viral reproduction rates and limited migration between tissue compartments contribute to reductions in Ne, our model suggests that recurrent selection plays a significant role in reducing HIV-1 effective population sizes in vivo.

  12. Raltegravir with optimized background therapy for resistant HIV-1 infection

    Steigbigel, Roy T; Cooper, David A; Kumar, Princy N;

    2008-01-01

    recipients (1.5%) and 6 of the 237 placebo recipients (2.5%). The results of the two studies were consistent. At week 16, counting noncompletion as treatment failure, 355 of 458 raltegravir recipients (77.5%) had HIV-1 RNA levels below 400 copies per milliliter, as compared with 99 of 236 placebo recipients...

  13. A delayed HIV-1 model with virus waning term.

    Li, Bing; Chen, Yuming; Lu, Xuejuan; Liu, Shengqiang

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose and analyze a delayed HIV-1 model with CTL immune response and virus waning. The two discrete delays stand for the time for infected cells to produce viruses after viral entry and for the time for CD8+ T cell immune response to emerge to control viral replication. We obtain the positiveness and boundedness of solutions and find the basic reproduction number R0. If R0 1, then the system is uniformly persistent and the viral concentration maintains at some constant level. The global dynamics when R0 > 1 is complicated. We establish the local stability of the infected steady state and show that Hopf bifurcation can occur. Both analytical and numerical results indicate that if, in the initial infection stage, the effect of delays on HIV-1 infection is ignored, then the risk of HIV-1 infection (if persists) will be underestimated. Moreover, the viral load differs from that without virus waning. These results highlight the important role of delays and virus waning on HIV-1 infection. PMID:26776264

  14. Copy number variation of KIR genes influences HIV-1 control

    Pelak, Kimberly; Need, Anna C; Fellay, Jacques;

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide screen for large structural variants showed that a copy number variant (CNV) in the region encoding killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) associates with HIV-1 control as measured by plasma viral load at set point in individuals of European ancestry. This CNV encompasses t...

  15. APOBEC3G inhibits elongation of HIV-1 reverse transcripts.

    Kate N Bishop

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available APOBEC3G (A3G is a host cytidine deaminase that, in the absence of Vif, restricts HIV-1 replication and reduces the amount of viral DNA that accumulates in cells. Initial studies determined that A3G induces extensive mutation of nascent HIV-1 cDNA during reverse transcription. It has been proposed that this triggers the degradation of the viral DNA, but there is now mounting evidence that this mechanism may not be correct. Here, we use a natural endogenous reverse transcriptase assay to show that, in cell-free virus particles, A3G is able to inhibit HIV-1 cDNA accumulation not only in the absence of hypermutation but also without the apparent need for any target cell factors. We find that although reverse transcription initiates in the presence of A3G, elongation of the cDNA product is impeded. These data support the model that A3G reduces HIV-1 cDNA levels by inhibiting synthesis rather than by inducing degradation.

  16. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation

    Ali, Amjad; Banerjea, Akhil C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected HEK-293T cells showed a dose and time dependent degradation of Tat protein. Contrary to this HIV-1 Gag which is a properly folded protein, remained unaffected with curcumin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that curcumin treatment did not affect Tat gene transcription. Curcumin increased the rate of Tat protein degradation as shown by cycloheximide (CHX) chase assay. Degradation of the Tat protein is accomplished through proteasomal pathway as proteasomal inhibitor MG132 blocked Tat degradation. Curcumin also decreased Tat mediated LTR promoter transactivation and inhibited virus production from HIV-1 infected cells. Taken together our study reveals a novel observation that curcumin causes potent degradation of Tat which may be one of the major mechanisms behind its anti HIV activity. PMID:27283735

  17. Mode of antiviral action of silver nanoparticles against HIV-1

    Rodriguez-Padilla Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silver nanoparticles have proven to exert antiviral activity against HIV-1 at non-cytotoxic concentrations, but the mechanism underlying their HIV-inhibitory activity has not been not fully elucidated. In this study, silver nanoparticles are evaluated to elucidate their mode of antiviral action against HIV-1 using a panel of different in vitro assays. Results Our data suggest that silver nanoparticles exert anti-HIV activity at an early stage of viral replication, most likely as a virucidal agent or as an inhibitor of viral entry. Silver nanoparticles bind to gp120 in a manner that prevents CD4-dependent virion binding, fusion, and infectivity, acting as an effective virucidal agent against cell-free virus (laboratory strains, clinical isolates, T and M tropic strains, and resistant strains and cell-associated virus. Besides, silver nanoparticles inhibit post-entry stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. Conclusions These properties make them a broad-spectrum agent not prone to inducing resistance that could be used preventively against a wide variety of circulating HIV-1 strains.

  18. Differentially-Expressed Pseudogenes in HIV-1 Infection

    Aditi Gupta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Not all pseudogenes are transcriptionally silent as previously thought. Pseudogene transcripts, although not translated, contribute to the non-coding RNA pool of the cell that regulates the expression of other genes. Pseudogene transcripts can also directly compete with the parent gene transcripts for mRNA stability and other cell factors, modulating their expression levels. Tissue-specific and cancer-specific differential expression of these “functional” pseudogenes has been reported. To ascertain potential pseudogene:gene interactions in HIV-1 infection, we analyzed transcriptomes from infected and uninfected T-cells and found that 21 pseudogenes are differentially expressed in HIV-1 infection. This is interesting because parent genes of one-third of these differentially-expressed pseudogenes are implicated in HIV-1 life cycle, and parent genes of half of these pseudogenes are involved in different viral infections. Our bioinformatics analysis identifies candidate pseudogene:gene interactions that may be of significance in HIV-1 infection. Experimental validation of these interactions would establish that retroviruses exploit this newly-discovered layer of host gene expression regulation for their own benefit.

  19. Stepping toward a Macaque Model of HIV-1 Induced AIDS

    Jason T. Kimata

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 exhibits a narrow host range, hindering the development of a robust animal model of pathogenesis. Past studies have demonstrated that the restricted host range of HIV-1 may be largely due to the inability of the virus to antagonize and evade effector molecules of the interferon response in other species. They have also guided the engineering of HIV-1 clones that can replicate in CD4 T-cells of Asian macaque species. However, while replication of these viruses in macaque hosts is persistent, it has been limited and without progression to AIDS. In a new study, Hatziioannou et al., demonstrate for the first time that adapted macaque-tropic HIV-1 can persistently replicate at high levels in pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina, but only if CD8 T-cells are depleted at the time of inoculation. The infection causes rapid disease and recapitulates several aspects of AIDS in humans. Additionally, the virus undergoes genetic changes to further escape innate immunity in association with disease progression. Here, the importance of these findings is discussed, as they relate to pathogenesis and model development.

  20. Characterization of Antiviral Activity of Benzamide Derivative AH0109 against HIV-1 Infection

    Chen, Liyu; Ao, Zhujun; Jayappa, Kallesh Danappa; Kobinger, Gary; Liu, ShuiPing; Wu, Guojun; Wainberg, Mark A.; Yao, Xiaojian

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 infection, anti-HIV-1 strategies play a major role in disease control. However, the rapid emergence of drug resistance against all currently used anti-HIV-1 molecules necessitates the development of new antiviral molecules and/or strategies against HIV-1 infection. In this study, we have identified a benzamide derivative named AH0109 that exhibits potent anti-HIV-1 activity at an 50% effective concentration of 0.7 μM in HIV-1-susceptible CD...

  1. The use of dried blood spots on filter paper for the diagnosis of HIV-1 in infants born to HIV seropositive women

    Jacob S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymerase chain reaction (PCR is the most sensitive test to diagnose HIV-1 infection among infants born to HIV seropositive mothers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of dried blood spot (DBS specimens for PCR and to compare it with whole-blood stored in tubes for HIV-1 DNA PCR. Five hundred and seventy-seven whole-blood infant samples were tested using HIV-1 qualitative in-house nested DNA PCR. Three hundred and fifty-nine samples were from infants at 48 hours of birth and 218 samples at second month. All positive samples tested from whole-blood and every fifth negative sample were coated onto filter paper. DNA was extracted from the filter paper and was amplified using in-house nested PCR. Among the whole-blood samples tested using HIV-1 DNA PCR, 19 of 359 (5.29% samples were HIV-1 positive and 340 (94.7% were negative at 48 hours of birth. At second month, 19 (8.7% of the 218 samples were positive and 199 (91.2% were negative. Using dried filter paper, 18 samples (95% tested positive from 19 positive samples (using whole-blood and 1 tested negative at 48 hours of birth. The 68 negative samples tested using whole-blood were also negative in the DBS test (sensitivity 95% and specificity 100%. At second month, 19 were positive and 40 samples (every fifth sample of 199 were negative (sensitivity and specificity, 100%. PCR performed using DNA extracted from filter paper permits the diagnosis of HIV-1 infection among infants born to HIV-1 seropositive mothers. This assay is simple, rapid, sensitive and specific and can be used in resource limited settings.

  2. Quality Test Template toward Multi-user Access Control of Internet-Based System

    Nan Nie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at three kinds of Internet-based system quality problems, which is performance, liability and security, the paper proposes a kind of test template during multi-user login and resource access control, which includes test requirement, login script, role-resource correlating and mutation test technique. Some Internet-based systems are tested and diagnosed by automation test technique of test template. At last, system quality can be verified and improved through the realization mechanism of test template.

  3. Computational analysis of HIV-1 protease protein binding pockets.

    Ko, Gene M; Reddy, A Srinivas; Kumar, Sunil; Bailey, Barbara A; Garg, Rajni

    2010-10-25

    Mutations that arise in HIV-1 protease after exposure to various HIV-1 protease inhibitors have proved to be a difficult aspect in the treatment of HIV. Mutations in the binding pocket of the protease can prevent the protease inhibitor from binding to the protein effectively. In the present study, the crystal structures of 68 HIV-1 proteases complexed with one of the nine FDA approved protease inhibitors from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were analyzed by (a) identifying the mutational changes with the aid of a developed mutation map and (b) correlating the structure of the binding pockets with the complexed inhibitors. The mutations of each crystal structure were identified by comparing the amino acid sequence of each structure against the HIV-1 wild-type strain HXB2. These mutations were visually presented in the form of a mutation map to analyze mutation patterns corresponding to each protease inhibitor. The crystal structure mutation patterns of each inhibitor (in vitro) were compared against the mutation patterns observed in in vivo data. The in vitro mutation patterns were found to be representative of most of the major in vivo mutations. We then performed a data mining analysis of the binding pockets from each crystal structure in terms of their chemical descriptors to identify important structural features of the HIV-1 protease protein with respect to the binding conformation of the HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Data mining analysis is performed using several classification techniques: Random Forest (RF), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and logistic regression (LR). We developed two hybrid models, RF-LDA and RF-LR. Random Forest is used as a feature selection proxy, reducing the descriptor space to a few of the most relevant descriptors determined by the classifier. These descriptors are then used to develop the subsequent LDA, LR, and hierarchical classification models. Clustering analysis of the binding pockets using the selected descriptors used to

  4. GIT (Glucose Infusion Test): polycentric evaluation of a new test for vascular access recirculation.

    Alloatti, S; Magnasco, A; Bonfant, G; Bonello, F; Ciciani, A M; Fidelio, T; Filiberti, O; Forneris, G; Martina, G; Robaudo, C; Romano, U; Schelotto, C

    2000-01-01

    Introduction. Vascular access recirculation (AR), which is often unacknowledged, remains an important cause of inadequate dialytic dose. The glucose infusion test (GIT) is a new method for detecting and quantifying AR. This paper reports on a polycentric evaluation of the new test and a comparison with the classical Urea-test (UT). Methods. GIT protocol comprises withdrawal from the arterial port (sample A), injection into the venous drip chamber of 1 g glucose in 4 seconds, withdrawal from the arterial port (sample B) continuously from 13 to 17 seconds. Glucose is determined on A and B by a reflectance photometer. If B = A then there is no recirculation. If B exceeds A by at least 20 mg/dl there is recirculation. AR quantification: AR% = (B-A) / 20. GIT was performed on 623 patients from eleven dialysis centers to screen the patients for AR. Subsequently, GIT and Urea-test (UT) were compared in 189 paired tests. The reproducibility of GIT and UT was studied in 28 paired tests performed in sequence. Results. The screening test by GIT was positive in 68 cases (11 %). The majority of positivities was found in central venous catheters (CVC, 27/50 cases, 54 %), whereas only 7 % of artero-venous fistulas (AVF) were positive. In the CVC group, Tesio catheters were more frequently positive compared to Dual Lumen Catheters (64 % vs. 29 %). The comparison GIT - UT showed that results matched in 162 tests (79 negative and 83 positive both by GIT and UT), showing that on the grounds of UT, GIT has high sensitivity and specificity. In 27 tests GIT was positive, but UT negative. This disagreement is due to the different minimal limit of detection, 1 % for GIT and 5% for UT. The reproducibility was greater with GIT than with UT with a lower D% (respectively -0.6 +/- 2.5 and -0.4 +/- 6.1 %, p<0.001) and a lower coefficient of variation (17 vs 33 %). Conclusions. The screening of 623 patients by GIT confirmed that AR in AVF is normally absent, whereas an un-expectedly high

  5. Protein methylation is required to maintain optimal HIV-1 infectivity

    Piller Sabine C

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Protein methylation is recognized as a major protein modification pathway regulating diverse cellular events such as protein trafficking, transcription, and signal transduction. More recently, protein arginine methyltransferase activity has been shown to regulate HIV-1 transcription via Tat. In this study, adenosine periodate (AdOx was used to globally inhibit protein methyltransferase activity so that the effect of protein methylation on HIV-1 infectivity could be assessed. Results: Two cell culture models were used: HIV-1-infected CEM T-cells and HEK293T cells transfected with a proviral DNA plasmid. In both models, AdOx treatment of cells increased the levels of virion in culture supernatant. However, these viruses had increased levels of unprocessed or partially processed Gag-Pol, significantly increased diameter, and displayed reduced infectivity in a MAGI X4 assay. AdOx reduced infectivity equally in both dividing and non-dividing cells. However, infectivity was further reduced if Vpr was deleted suggesting virion proteins, other than Vpr, were affected by protein methylation. Endogenous reverse transcription was not inhibited in AdOx-treated HIV-1, and infectivity could be restored by pseudotyping HIV with VSV-G envelope protein. These experiments suggest that AdOx affects an early event between receptor binding and uncoating, but not reverse transcription. Conclusion: Overall, we have shown for the first time that protein methylation contributes towards maximal virus infectivity. Furthermore, our results also indicate that protein methylation regulates HIV-1 infectivity in a complex manner most likely involving the methylation of multiple viral or cellular proteins and/or multiple steps of replication.

  6. In vitro nuclear interactome of the HIV-1 Tat protein.

    Gautier, Virginie W

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One facet of the complexity underlying the biology of HIV-1 resides not only in its limited number of viral proteins, but in the extensive repertoire of cellular proteins they interact with and their higher-order assembly. HIV-1 encodes the regulatory protein Tat (86-101aa), which is essential for HIV-1 replication and primarily orchestrates HIV-1 provirus transcriptional regulation. Previous studies have demonstrated that Tat function is highly dependent on specific interactions with a range of cellular proteins. However they can only partially account for the intricate molecular mechanisms underlying the dynamics of proviral gene expression. To obtain a comprehensive nuclear interaction map of Tat in T-cells, we have designed a proteomic strategy based on affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Our approach resulted in the identification of a total of 183 candidates as Tat nuclear partners, 90% of which have not been previously characterised. Subsequently we applied in silico analysis, to validate and characterise our dataset which revealed that the Tat nuclear interactome exhibits unique signature(s). First, motif composition analysis highlighted that our dataset is enriched for domains mediating protein, RNA and DNA interactions, and helicase and ATPase activities. Secondly, functional classification and network reconstruction clearly depicted Tat as a polyvalent protein adaptor and positioned Tat at the nexus of a densely interconnected interaction network involved in a range of biological processes which included gene expression regulation, RNA biogenesis, chromatin structure, chromosome organisation, DNA replication and nuclear architecture. CONCLUSION: We have completed the in vitro Tat nuclear interactome and have highlighted its modular network properties and particularly those involved in the coordination of gene expression by Tat. Ultimately, the highly specialised set of molecular interactions identified will

  7. Varying modulation of HIV-1 LTR activity by Baf complexes.

    Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Narayanan, Aarthi; Gregg, Edward; Shafagati, Nazly; Tyagi, Mudit; Easley, Rebecca; Klase, Zachary; Nekhai, Sergei; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2011-08-19

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat is present on both ends of the integrated viral genome and contains regulatory elements needed for transcriptional initiation and elongation. Post-integration, a highly ordered chromatin structure consisting of at least five nucleosomes, is found at the 5' long terminal repeat, the location and modification state of which control the state of active viral replication as well as silencing of the latent HIV-1 provirus. In this context, the chromatin remodeling field rapidly emerges as having a critical role in the control of viral gene expression. In the current study, we focused on unique Baf subunits that are common to the most highly recognized of chromatin remodeling proteins, the SWI/SNF (switching-defective-sucrose non-fermenting) complexes. We find that at least two Baf proteins, Baf53 and Baf170, are highly regulated in HIV-1-infected cells. Previously, studies have shown that the depletion of Baf53 in uninfected cells leads to the expansion of chromosomal territories and the decompaction of the chromatin. Baf53, in the presence of HIV-1 infection, co-elutes off of a chromatographic column as a different-sized complex when compared to uninfected cells and appears to be predominantly phosphorylated. The innate function of Baf53-containing complexes appears to be transcriptionally suppressive, in that knocking down Baf53 increases viral gene expression from cells both transiently and chronically infected with HIV-1. Additionally, cdk9/cyclin T in the presence of Tat is able to phosphorylate Baf53 in vitro, implying that this posttranslationally modified form relieves the suppressive effect and allows for viral transcription to proceed. PMID:21699904

  8. In vitro nuclear interactome of the HIV-1 Tat protein

    Gautier Virginie W

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One facet of the complexity underlying the biology of HIV-1 resides not only in its limited number of viral proteins, but in the extensive repertoire of cellular proteins they interact with and their higher-order assembly. HIV-1 encodes the regulatory protein Tat (86–101aa, which is essential for HIV-1 replication and primarily orchestrates HIV-1 provirus transcriptional regulation. Previous studies have demonstrated that Tat function is highly dependent on specific interactions with a range of cellular proteins. However they can only partially account for the intricate molecular mechanisms underlying the dynamics of proviral gene expression. To obtain a comprehensive nuclear interaction map of Tat in T-cells, we have designed a proteomic strategy based on affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Results Our approach resulted in the identification of a total of 183 candidates as Tat nuclear partners, 90% of which have not been previously characterised. Subsequently we applied in silico analysis, to validate and characterise our dataset which revealed that the Tat nuclear interactome exhibits unique signature(s. First, motif composition analysis highlighted that our dataset is enriched for domains mediating protein, RNA and DNA interactions, and helicase and ATPase activities. Secondly, functional classification and network reconstruction clearly depicted Tat as a polyvalent protein adaptor and positioned Tat at the nexus of a densely interconnected interaction network involved in a range of biological processes which included gene expression regulation, RNA biogenesis, chromatin structure, chromosome organisation, DNA replication and nuclear architecture. Conclusion We have completed the in vitro Tat nuclear interactome and have highlighted its modular network properties and particularly those involved in the coordination of gene expression by Tat. Ultimately, the highly specialised set of molecular

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis of Ethiopian HIV-1 Subtype C Near Full-Length Genomes Reveals High Intrasubtype Diversity and a Strong Geographical Cluster.

    Amogne, Wondwossen; Bontell, Irene; Grossmann, Sebastian; Aderaye, Getachew; Lindquist, Lars; Sönnerborg, Anders; Neogi, Ujjwal

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we characterize HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) strains at the near full-length genome (NFLG) level and perform genotypic drug resistance testing (GRT) and genotypic tropism testing (GTT) from Ethiopia (HIV-1CET). Plasma samples (n = 150) were obtained from therapy-naive individuals residing in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in 2008. HIV-NFLG was performed in a subset of patients (n = 30). GRT (pol) and GTT (V3 env) were performed using in-house methods. GTT was analyzed by PhenoSeq-C. The phylogenetic analysis of the NLFG identified two separate clusters of HIV-1CET, although all strains formed one large overarching cluster together. At NFLG, greater diversity was found among HIV-1CET strains compared to HIV-1C strains from other geographical locations. The geographic clustering was weak in the small subgenomic (pol and env) regions. The primary drug-resistant mutations were identified at a low level (<5%). GTT identified that 12% (12/102) of the patients were predicted to be harboring X4-tropic or both R5/X4-tropic viruses. PMID:26881451

  10. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo

  11. Flow-test device fits into restricted access passages

    Fitzgerald, J. J.; Oberschmidt, M.; Rosenbaum, B. J.

    1967-01-01

    Test device using a mandrel with a collapsible linkage assembly enables a fluid flow sensor to be properly positioned in a restricted passage by external manipulation. This device is applicable to the combustion chamber of a rocket motor.

  12. HIV-1 DNA vaccine with adjuvant cytokines induces specific immune responses against HIV-1 infection in mice

    WANG Fu-xiang; SUN Yong-tao; WANG Lin-xu; LIU Juan

    2006-01-01

    @@ There is mounting evidence that the induction of strong mucosal and cell-mediated immune responses is key element to consider in constructing efficacious HIV-1 vaccine. Therapeutic vaccines that induce high levels of CTL specific to HIV are currently being developed worldwide.

  13. Association of HIV-1 Envelope-Specific Breast Milk IgA Responses with Reduced Risk of Postnatal Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV-1

    Pollara, Justin; McGuire, Erin; Fouda, Genevieve G.; Rountree, Wes; Eudailey, Josh; Overman, R. Glenn; Seaton, Kelly E.; Deal, Aaron; Edwards, R. Whitney; Tegha, Gerald; Kamwendo, Deborah; Kumwenda, Jacob; Nelson, Julie A. E.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Brinkley, Christie; Denny, Thomas N.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Ellington, Sascha; King, Caroline C.; Jamieson, Denise J.; van der Horst, Charles; Kourtis, Athena P.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Ferrari, Guido

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infants born to HIV-1-infected mothers in resource-limited areas where replacement feeding is unsafe and impractical are repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 throughout breastfeeding. Despite this, the majority of infants do not contract HIV-1 postnatally, even in the absence of maternal antiretroviral therapy. This suggests that immune factors in breast milk of HIV-1-infected mothers help to limit vertical transmission. We compared the HIV-1 envelope-specific breast milk and plasma antibody responses of clade C HIV-1-infected postnatally transmitting and nontransmitting mothers in the control arm of the Malawi-based Breastfeeding Antiretrovirals and Nutrition Study using multivariable logistic regression modeling. We found no association between milk or plasma neutralization activity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, or HIV-1 envelope-specific IgG responses and postnatal transmission risk. While the envelope-specific breast milk and plasma IgA responses also did not reach significance in predicting postnatal transmission risk in the primary model after correction for multiple comparisons, subsequent exploratory analysis using two distinct assay methodologies demonstrated that the magnitudes of breast milk total and secretory IgA responses against a consensus HIV-1 envelope gp140 (B.con env03) were associated with reduced postnatal transmission risk. These results suggest a protective role for mucosal HIV-1 envelope-specific IgA responses in the context of postnatal virus transmission. This finding supports further investigations into the mechanisms by which mucosal IgA reduces risk of HIV-1 transmission via breast milk and into immune interventions aimed at enhancing this response. IMPORTANCE Infants born to HIV-1-infected mothers are repeatedly exposed to the virus in breast milk. Remarkably, the transmission rate is low, suggesting that immune factors in the breast milk of HIV-1-infected mothers help to limit transmission. We compared the antibody

  14. Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected patients after rapid scaling up of antiretroviral therapy in Thailand

    Sungkanuparph Somnuek

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After rapid scaling up of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected patients, the data of primary HIV-1 drug resistance in Thailand is still limited. This study aims to determine the prevalence and associated factors of primary HIV-1 drug resistance in Thailand. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted among antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected Thai patients from 2007 to 2010. HIV-1 subtypes and mutations were assayed by sequencing a region of HIV-1 pol gene. Surveillance drug resistance mutations recommended by the World Health Organization for surveillance of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in 2009 were used in all analyses. Primary HIV-1 drug resistance was defined as the presence of one or more surveillance drug resistance mutations. Results Of 466 patients with a mean age of 38.8 years, 58.6% were males. Risks of HIV-1 infection included heterosexual (77.7%, homosexual (16.7%, and intravenous drug use (5.6%. Median (IQR CD4 cell count and HIV-1 RNA were 176 (42-317 cells/mm3 and 68,600 (19,515-220,330 copies/mL, respectively. HIV-1 subtypes were CRF01_AE (86.9%, B (8.6 and other recombinants (4.5%. The prevalence of primary HIV-1 drug resistance was 4.9%; most of these (73.9% had surveillance drug resistance mutations to only one class of antiretroviral drugs. The prevalence of patients with NRTI, NNRTI, and PI surveillance drug resistance mutations was 1.9%, 2.8% and 1.7%, respectively. From logistic regression analysis, there was no factor significantly associated with primary HIV-1 drug resistance. There was a trend toward higher prevalence in females [odds ratio 2.18; 95% confidence interval 0.896-5.304; p = 0.086]. Conclusions There is a significant emergence of primary HIV-1 drug resistance in Thailand after rapid scaling up of antiretroviral therapy. Although HIV-1 genotyping prior to antiretroviral therapy initiation is not routinely recommended in Thailand, our results raise concerns about the

  15. Is wetter better? An evaluation of over-the-counter personal lubricants for safety and anti-HIV-1 activity.

    Dezzutti, Charlene S; Brown, Elizabeth R; Moncla, Bernard; Russo, Julie; Cost, Marilyn; Wang, Lin; Uranker, Kevin; Kunjara Na Ayudhya, Ratiya P; Pryke, Kara; Pickett, Jim; Leblanc, Marc-André; Rohan, Lisa C

    2012-01-01

    Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9), KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm. PMID:23144863

  16. Is wetter better? An evaluation of over-the-counter personal lubricants for safety and anti-HIV-1 activity.

    Charlene S Dezzutti

    Full Text Available Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC aqueous- (n = 10, lipid- (n = 2, and silicone-based (n = 2 products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9, KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm.

  17. Clinical presentation and opportunistic infections in HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients in Guinea-Bissau

    Sørensen, Allan; Jespersen, Sanne; Katzenstein, Terese L;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Better understanding of HIV-2 infection is likely to affect the patient care in areas where HIV-2 is prevalent. In this study, we aimed to characterize the clinical presentations among HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, newly...... diagnosed HIV patients attending the HIV outpatient clinic at Hospital Nacional Simão Mendes in Guinea-Bissau were enrolled. Demographical and clinical data were collected and compared between HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients. RESULTS: A total of 169 patients (76% HIV-1, 17% HIV-2 and 6......% HIV 1/2) were included in the study between 21 March 2012 and 14 December 2012. HIV-1 seropositive patients were younger than HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 seropositive patients, but no difference in sex was observed. Patients with HIV-1 and HIV-1/2 had a lower baseline CD4 cell count than HIV-2 seropositive...

  18. HIV-1 Induced Nuclear Factor I-B (NF-IB Expression Negatively Regulates HIV-1 Replication through Interaction with the Long Terminal Repeat Region

    Sai Vikram Vemula

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Retroviruses rely on host factors for cell entry, replication, transcription, and other major steps during their life cycle. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1 is well known for utilizing a plethora of strategies to evade the host immune response, including the establishment of latent infection within a subpopulation of susceptible cells. HIV-1 also manipulates cellular factors in latently infected cells and persists for long periods of time, despite the presence of successful highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Results: In this study we demonstrate that Nuclear Factor-IB (NF-IB is induced during HIV-1 infection and its expression negatively impacts viral replication. During HIV-1 infection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, and the T cell line, Jurkat or during induction of virus replication in latently infected cells, ACH2 and J1.1, we observed a time-dependent alteration in NF-IB expression pattern that correlated with HIV-1 viral expression. Using the Chip assay, we observed an association of NF-IB with the long terminal repeat region of HIV-1 (LTR (-386 to -453 nt, and this association negatively correlated with HIV-1 transcription. Furthermore, knock-down of NF-IB levels in J1.1 cells resulted in an increase of HIV-1 levels. Knock-down of NF-IB levels in J-Lat-Tat-GFP (A1, (a Jurkat cell GFP reporter model for latent HIV-1 infection resulted in an increase in GFP levels, indicating a potential negative regulatory role of NF-IB in HIV-1 replication. Conclusion: Overall, our results suggest that NF-IB may play a role in intrinsic antiretroviral defenses against HIV-1. These observations may offer new insights into the correlation of the latently infected host cell types and HIV-1, and help to define new therapeutic approaches for triggering the switch from latency to active replication thereby eliminating HIV-1 latent infection.

  19. HIV-1 vaccine development: constrained peptide immunogens show improved binding to the anti-HIV-1 gp41 MAb.

    McGaughey, G B; Citron, M; Danzeisen, R C; Freidinger, R M; Garsky, V M; Hurni, W M; Joyce, J G; Liang, X; Miller, M; Shiver, J; Bogusky, M J

    2003-03-25

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 mediates viral entry through fusion of the target cellular and viral membranes. A segment of gp41 containing the sequence Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala has previously been identified as the epitope of the HIV-1 neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2F5 (MAb 2F5). The 2F5 epitope is highly conserved among HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Antibodies directed at the 2F5 epitope have neutralizing effects on a broad range of laboratory-adapted HIV-1 variants and primary isolates. Recently, a crystal structure of the epitope bound to the Fab fragment of MAb 2F5 has shown that the 2F5 peptide adopts a beta-turn conformation [Pai, E. F., Klein, M. H., Chong, P., and Pedyczak, A. (2000) World Intellectual Property Organization Patent WO-00/61618]. We have designed cyclic peptides to adopt beta-turn conformations by the incorporation of a side-chain to side-chain lactam bridge between the i and i + 4 residues containing the Asp-Lys-Trp segment. Synthesis of extended, nonconstrained peptides encompassing the 2F5 epitope revealed that the 13 amino acid sequence, Glu-Leu-Leu-Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala-Ser-Leu-Trp-Asn, maximized MAb 2F5 binding. Constrained analogues of this sequence were explored to optimize 2F5 binding affinity. The solution conformations of the constrained peptides have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling techniques. The results presented here demonstrate that both inclusion of the lactam constraint and extension of the 2F5 segment are necessary to elicit optimal antibody binding activity. The ability of these peptide immunogens to stimulate a high titer, peptide-specific immune response incapable of viral neutralization is discussed in regard to developing an HIV-1 vaccine designed to elicit a 2F5-like immune response. PMID:12641452

  20. Prevalence of XMRV Nucleic Acid and Antibody in HIV-1-Infected Men and in Men at Risk for HIV-1 Infection

    J. Spindler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Xenotropic MLV-Related Virus (XMRV was recently reported to be associated with prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Infection was also reported in 3.7% of healthy individuals. These highly reported frequencies of infection prompted concerns about the possibility of a new, widespread retroviral epidemic. The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS provides an opportunity to assess the prevalence of XMRV infection and its association with HIV-1 infection among men who have sex with men. Reliable detection of XMRV infection requires the application of multiple diagnostic methods, including detection of human antibodies to XMRV and detection of XMRV nucleic acid. We, therefore, tested 332 patient plasma and PBMC samples obtained from recent visits in a subset of patients in the MACS cohort for XMRV antibodies using Abbott prototype ARCHITECT chemiluminescent immunoassays (CMIAs and for XMRV RNA and proviral DNA using a XMRV single-copy qPCR assay (X-SCA. Although 9 of 332 (2.7% samples showed low positive reactivity against a single antigen in the CMIA, none of these samples or matched controls were positive for plasma XMRV RNA or PBMC XMRV DNA by X-SCA. Thus, we found no evidence of XMRV infection among men in the MACS regardless of HIV-1 serostatus.

  1. P24 antigen detection, viral isolation, DNA-PCR and in vitro antibody production for the diagnosis of HIV-1 latent infection in heterosexual women at high risk for HIV-1 infection.

    M. Di Stefano; J.R. Fiore; M. Chironna; G. Buccoliero; Romanelli, C.; La Grasta, L; QUARTO, M.; Angarano, G.; Pastore, G.

    1995-01-01

    INTRODUCTION--The report of the existence of at-risk seronegative subjects, latently infected with HIV-1 and producing "in vitro" HIV-1 specific antibodies, prompted the authors to evaluate extensively twenty-five heterosexual HIV-1 seronegative women at high risk for HIV-1 infection. MATERIAL AND METHODS--The capability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from such subjects to produce "in vitro" HIV-1 specific antibodies after pokeweed-mitogen stimulation, was studied. Silent HIV-1 infecti...

  2. UV-induced transcription from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat and UV-induced secretion of an extracellular factor that induces HIV-1 transcription in nonirradiated cells

    UV irradiation, but not visible sunlight, induces the transcription of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Chimeric constructs carrying all or parts of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat linked to an indicator gene were transfected into HeLa cells or murine and human T-cell lines, and their response to irradiation was tested. The cis-acting element conferring UV responsiveness is identical to the sequence binding transcription factor NF kappa B. UV irradiation enhances NF kappa B binding activity as assayed by gel retardation experiments. Interestingly, the requirement for UV irradiation can be replaced by cocultivation of transfected cells with UV-irradiated nontransfected (HIV-1-negative) cells. A UV-induced extracellular protein factor is detected in the culture medium conditioned by UV-treated cells. The factor is produced upon UV irradiation by several murine and human cell lines, including HeLa, Molt-4, and Jurkat, and acts on several cells. These data suggest that the UV response of keratinocytes in human skin can be magnified and spread to deeper layers that are more shielded, including the Langerhans cells, and that this indirect UV response may contribute to the activation of HIV-1 in humans

  3. Maternal HIV-1 envelope–specific antibody responses and reduced risk of perinatal transmission

    Sallie R Permar; Fong, Youyi; Vandergrift, Nathan; Genevieve G Fouda; Gilbert, Peter; Parks, Robert,; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Pollara, Justin; Martelli, Amanda; Liebl, Brooke E.; Lloyd, Krissey; Yates, Nicole L.; Overman, R. Glenn; Shen, Xiaoying; Whitaker, Kaylan

    2015-01-01

    Despite the wide availability of antiretroviral drugs, more than 250,000 infants are vertically infected with HIV-1 annually, emphasizing the need for additional interventions to eliminate pediatric HIV-1 infections. Here, we aimed to define humoral immune correlates of risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1, including responses associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial. Eighty-three untreated, HIV-1–transmitting mothers and 165 propensity score–mat...

  4. Inhibition of Reverse Transcriptase Activity Increases Stability of the HIV-1 Core

    Yang, Yang; Fricke, Thomas; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies showed that HIV-1 reverse transcription occurs during or before uncoating, linking mechanistically reverse transcription with uncoating. Here we show that inhibition of reverse transcriptase (RT) during HIV-1 infection by pharmacologic or genetic means increased the stability of the HIV-1 core during infection. Interestingly, HIV-1 particles with increased core stability were resistant to the core-destabilizing effects of rhesus TRIM5α (TRIM5αrh). Collectively, this work impl...

  5. Neurobehavioral Alterations in HIV-1 Transgenic Rats: Evidence for Dopaminergic Dysfunction

    Moran, L. M.; Booze, R.M.; Webb, K. M.; Mactutus, C. F.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies have provided evidence that the progression of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) involves alterations in dopamine (DA) systems. Drugs of abuse that act on the brain DA system, such as cocaine (Coc), may exacerbate HIV-1 infection and consequent behavioral and neurological manifestations. In the present study, we used the HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rat, which constitutively expresses 7 of the 9 HIV-1 genes, to assess potential DA system alterations in three behaviora...

  6. Predictors of impaired HDL function in HIV-1 infected compared to uninfected individuals

    Kelesidis, Theodoros

    2016-01-01

    Objective: HDL function rather than absolute level may be a more accurate indicator for cardiovascular disease (CVD) but it is unclear what drives HDL dysfunction in HIV-1 infection. The objective of this study is to identify factors that may contribute to HDL dysfunction in chronic HIV-1 infection. Design: Retrospective study of HIV-1 infected males with low overall CVD risk and healthy males with no known CVD risk matched by race to the HIV-1 infected participants. Methods: We related para...

  7. SAMHD1: a new insight into HIV-1 restriction in myeloid cells

    Wu Li; St Gelais Corine

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Human myeloid-lineage cells are refractory to HIV-1 infection. The Vpx proteins from HIV-2 and sooty mangabey SIV render these cells permissive to HIV-1 infection through proteasomal degradation of a putative restriction factor. Two recent studies discovered the cellular protein SAMHD1 to be this restriction factor, demonstrating that Vpx induces proteasomal degradation of SAMHD1 and enhances HIV-1 infection in myeloid-lineage cells. SAMHD1 functions as a myeloid-cell-specific HIV-1 ...

  8. Prevalence and Correlates of Helminth Co-infection in Kenyan HIV-1 Infected Adults

    Walson, Judd L; Stewart, Barclay T; Sangaré, Laura; Mbogo, Loice W.; Otieno, Phelgona A.; Piper, Benjamin K. S.; Richardson, Barbra A.; John-Stewart, Grace

    2010-01-01

    Background Deworming HIV-1 infected individuals may delay HIV-1 disease progression. It is important to determine the prevalence and correlates of HIV-1/helminth co-infection in helminth-endemic areas. Methods HIV-1 infected individuals (CD4>250 cells/ul) were screened for helminth infection at ten sites in Kenya. Prevalence and correlates of helminth infection were determined. A subset of individuals with soil-transmitted helminth infection was re-evaluated 12 weeks following albendazole the...

  9. Up-regulation of alveolar macrophage matrix metalloproteinases in HIV1+ smokers with early emphysema

    Kaner, Robert J.; Santiago, Francisco; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2009-01-01

    HIV1+ smokers develop emphysema at an earlier age and with a higher incidence than HIV1– smokers. Since human alveolar macrophages (AMs) are capable of producing proteases that degrade extracellular matrix components, we hypothesized that up-regulation of AM matrix metalloproteinases may be associated with the emphysema of HIV1+ smokers. Microarray analysis was used to screen which matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) genes were expressed by AM of HIV1+ smokers with early emphysema. For each of t...

  10. A Haplotype Block Model for Fine Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci Regulating HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    Zhu, Yun; Hou, Wei; Wu, Rongling

    2003-01-01

    The dynamic change of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) particles that cause AIDS displays considerable variation from patients to patients. It is likely that such variation in HIV-1 pathogenesis is correlated with the genetic architecture of hosts. Traditional genetic analysis of HIV-1 infection is based on various biochemical approaches, but it has been little successful because HIV-1 dynamics, as a complex trait, is under polygenic control and sensitive to environmental changes. ...

  11. Astrocyte apoptosis induced by HIV-1 transactivation of the c-kit protooncogene

    He, Jianglin; Decastro, Carlos M.; Vandenbark, George R.; Busciglio, Jorge; Gabuzda, Dana

    1997-01-01

    HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system (CNS) frequently causes dementia and other neurological disorders. The mechanisms of CNS injury in HIV-1 infection are poorly understood. Apoptosis of neurons and astrocytes is induced by HIV-1 infection in vitro and in brain tissue from AIDS patients, but the apoptotic stimuli have not been identified. We report herein that HIV-1 infection of primary brain cultures induces the receptor tyrosine kinase protooncogene c-kit and that high levels of c...

  12. A Simple and Highly Efficient Preparation of Structurally Diverse Aryl β-diketoacids as HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    JIANG Xiao-Hua姜晓华; LONG Ya-Qiu龙亚秋

    2004-01-01

    In order to provide a facile and practical access to structurally diverse aryl β-diketoacids, An improved and highly efficient oxalylation method was developed which employed commercially available and cheap reagents.The oxalylation of aryl methyl ketones, the key step to construct the pharmacophore of aryl β-diketoacids, was considerably facilitated by a new combination of dimethyl oxalate as an oxalic source and sodium tert-butoxide as a base. A wide variety of aryl β-diketoacids bearing different functional groups can be prepared rapidly in high yields at room t. emperature with this method, which has significant advantages over the previously reported procedures in a wider application range, much less amount of reagents, pretty higher yields and quite shorter reaction time. The bis-aryldiketoacids 3k and 31, readily prepared by this method, displayed interesting and promising inhibitory activities against HIV-1 integrase and HIV-1 replication in cells.

  13. Application of a case–control study design to investigate genotypic signatures of HIV-1 transmission

    Mota Talia M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The characterization of HIV-1 transmission strains may inform the design of an effective vaccine. Shorter variable loops with fewer predicted glycosites have been suggested as signatures enriched in envelope sequences derived during acute HIV-1 infection. Specifically, a transmission-linked lack of glycosites within the V1 and V2 loops of gp120 provides greater access to an α4β7 binding motif, which promotes the establishment of infection. Also, a histidine at position 12 in the leader sequence of Env has been described as a transmission signature that is selected against during chronic infection. The purpose of this study is to measure the association of the presence of an α4β7 binding motif, the number of N-linked glycosites, the length of the variable loops, and the prevalence of histidine at position 12 with HIV-1 transmission. A case–control study design was used to measure the prevalence of these variables between subtype B and C transmission sequences and frequency-matched randomly-selected sequences derived from chronically infected controls. Results Subtype B transmission strains had shorter V3 regions than chronic strains (p = 0.031; subtype C transmission strains had shorter V1 loops than chronic strains (p = 0.047; subtype B transmission strains had more V3 loop glycosites (p = 0.024 than chronic strains. Further investigation showed that these statistically significant results were unlikely to be biologically meaningful. Also, there was no difference observed in the prevalence of a histidine at position 12 among transmission strains and controls of either subtype. Conclusions Although a genetic bottleneck is observed after HIV-1 transmission, our results indicate that summary characteristics of Env hypothesised to be important in transmission are not divergent between transmission and chronic strains of either subtype. The success of a transmission strain to initiate infection may be a random

  14. [Development of vaccines for HIV-1. Relevance of subtype-specific cellular immunity].

    Rodríguez, Ana María; Turk, Gabriela; Pascutti, María Fernanda; Falivene, Juliana; Gherardi, María Magdalena

    2010-01-01

    It has been almost 30 years since the detection of the first HIV-1 cases and yet an effective and safe vaccine has not been developed. Although, advances in antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have produced a major impact on the pandemic, and even though HIV/aids remains a major concern for developing countries, where access to therapy is limited. The last report from UNAIDS notified 33 million people living with HIV/aids, worldwide, while in Argentina it is estimated that 120,000 persons have been infected. One of the challenges to address and ultimately overcome when developing a vaccine is the high variability of HIV-1. The M group, responsible for the pandemic, is divided into 10 subtypes and several sub-subtypes, in addition to the 48 circulating recombinant forms (CRF) and over one hundred unique recombinant forms (URF). The HIV epidemic in Argentina is as complex as in the rest of the world, characterized by the high prevalence of infections caused by subtype B and BF variants. Despite the wide range of publications focused on the immune response against HIV as well as to vaccine development, how to overcome variability on vaccine antigen selection is still unclear. Studies performed in our laboratory showed the impact of the immunogenicity of BF recombinant variants, both in humans and in animal models. These results are of great concern in vaccine development for our region. PMID:21163746

  15. β-catenin/TCF-4 signaling regulates susceptibility of macrophages and resistance of monocytes to HIV-1 productive infection

    Aljawai, Yosra; Richards, Maureen H.; Seaton, Melanie S.; Narasipura, Srinivas D.; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage are an important target for HIV-1 infection. They are often at anatomical sites linked to HIV-1 transmission and are an important vehicle for disseminating HIV-1 throughout the body, including the central nervous system. Monocytes do not support extensive productive HIV-1 replication, but they become more susceptible to HIV-1 infection as they differentiate into macrophages. The mechanisms guiding susceptibility of HIV-1 replication in monocytes versus...

  16. Role of protein disulfide isomerase and other thiol-reactive proteins in HIV-1 envelope protein-mediated fusion

    Cell-surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has been proposed to promote disulfide bond rearrangements in HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) that accompany Env-mediated fusion. We evaluated the role of PDI in ways that have not been previously tested by downregulating PDI with siRNA and by overexpressing wild-type or variant forms of PDI in transiently and stably transfected cells. These manipulations, as well as treatment with anti-PDI antibodies, had only small effects on infection or cell fusion mediated by NL4-3 or AD8 strains of HIV-1. However, the cell-surface thiol-reactive reagent 5, 5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) had a much stronger inhibitory effect in our system, suggesting that cell-surface thiol-containing molecules other than PDI, acting alone or in concert, have a greater effect than PDI on HIV-1 Env-mediated fusion. We evaluated one such candidate, thioredoxin, a PDI family member reported to reduce a labile disulfide bond in CD4. We found that the ability of thioredoxin to reduce the disulfide bond in CD4 is enhanced in the presence of HIV-1 Env gp120 and that thioredoxin also reduces disulfide bonds in gp120 directly in the absence of CD4. We discuss the implications of these observations for identification of molecules involved in disulfide rearrangements in Env during fusion

  17. Discovery of small-molecule HIV-1 fusion and integrase inhibitors oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol: Part I. Integrase inhibition

    We have identified oleuropein (Ole) and hydroxytyrosol (HT) as a unique class of HIV-1 inhibitors from olive leaf extracts effective against viral fusion and integration. We used molecular docking simulation to study the interactions of Ole and HT with viral targets. We find that Ole and HT bind to the conserved hydrophobic pocket on the surface of the HIV-gp41 fusion domain by hydrogen bonds with Q577 and hydrophobic interactions with I573, G572, and L568 on the gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat peptide N36, interfering with formation of the gp41 fusion-active core. To test and confirm modeling predications, we examined the effect of Ole and HT on HIV-1 fusion complex formation using native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Ole and HT exhibit dose-dependent inhibition on HIV-1 fusion core formation with EC50s of 66-58 nM, with no detectable toxicity. Our findings on effects of HIV-1 integrase are reported in the subsequent article

  18. RNA Control of HIV-1 Particle Size Polydispersity

    Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Thomas, Audrey; Tartour, Kevin; Beck, Yvonne; Iazykov, Maksym; Danial, John; Lourdin, Morgane; Muriaux, Delphine; Castelnovo, Martin

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1, an enveloped RNA virus, produces viral particles that are known to be much more heterogeneous in size than is typical of non-enveloped viruses. We present here a novel strategy to study HIV-1 Viral Like Particles (VLP) assembly by measuring the size distribution of these purified VLPs and subsequent viral cores thanks to Atomic Force Microscopy imaging and statistical analysis. This strategy allowed us to identify whether the presence of viral RNA acts as a modulator for VLPs and cores size heterogeneity in a large population of particles. These results are analyzed in the light of a recently proposed statistical physics model for the self-assembly process. In particular, our results reveal that the modulation of size distribution by the presence of viral RNA is qualitatively reproduced, suggesting therefore an entropic origin for the modulation of RNA uptake by the nascent VLP.

  19. Persistent HIV-1 replication maintains the tissue reservoir during therapy.

    Lorenzo-Redondo, Ramon; Fryer, Helen R; Bedford, Trevor; Kim, Eun-Young; Archer, John; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Chung, Yoon-Seok; Penugonda, Sudhir; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Fletcher, Courtney V; Schacker, Timothy W; Malim, Michael H; Rambaut, Andrew; Haase, Ashley T; McLean, Angela R; Wolinsky, Steven M

    2016-02-01

    Lymphoid tissue is a key reservoir established by HIV-1 during acute infection. It is a site associated with viral production, storage of viral particles in immune complexes, and viral persistence. Although combinations of antiretroviral drugs usually suppress viral replication and reduce viral RNA to undetectable levels in blood, it is unclear whether treatment fully suppresses viral replication in lymphoid tissue reservoirs. Here we show that virus evolution and trafficking between tissue compartments continues in patients with undetectable levels of virus in their bloodstream. We present a spatial and dynamic model of persistent viral replication and spread that indicates why the development of drug resistance is not a foregone conclusion under conditions in which drug concentrations are insufficient to completely block virus replication. These data provide new insights into the evolutionary and infection dynamics of the virus population within the host, revealing that HIV-1 can continue to replicate and replenish the viral reservoir despite potent antiretroviral therapy. PMID:26814962

  20. Analysis of dinucleotide signatures in HIV-1 subtype B genomes

    Aridaman Pandit; Jyothirmayi Vadlamudi; Somdatta Sinha

    2013-12-01

    Dinucleotide usage is known to vary in the genomes of organisms. The dinucleotide usage profiles or genome signatures are similar for sequence samples taken from the same genome, but are different for taxonomically distant species. This concept of genome signatures has been used to study several organisms including viruses, to elucidate the signatures of evolutionary processes at the genome level. Genome signatures assume greater importance in the case of host–pathogen interactions, where molecular interactions between the two species take place continuously, and can influence their genomic composition. In this study, analyses of whole genome sequences of the HIV-1 subtype B, a retrovirus that caused global pandemic of AIDS, have been carried out to analyse the variation in genome signatures of the virus from 1983 to 2007.We show statistically significant temporal variations in some dinucleotide patterns highlighting the selective evolution of the dinucleotide profiles of HIV-1 subtype B, possibly a consequence of host specific selection.

  1. Construction of HIV-1 Virus-like Particle Vaccine

    ZHAO Dong-hai; ZHANG Xi-zhen; YU Xiang-hui; KONG Wei

    2008-01-01

    The virus-like particle(VLPs) vaccine is an ideal HIV-1 vaccine,which can simultaneously induce a neutralizing antibody reaction and ceil-mediated immunity effectively.In this study,two kinds of plasmids have been used,one can express the HIV-1 main structure proteins,Gagpol and Env,and the other contains an antibiotic gene.The two kinds of plasmids have been cotransfected into 293 cells.A stable cell line that can express Gagpol and Env proteins efficiently and lastingly has been screened.It has been confirmed that Gagpol and Env proteins in the cell culture supernatant can be self-assembled into virus-like particles.The authors have detected the secretion of VLPs in the cell medium,defined the peak of the secretion,and followed and monitored the stability of expression.

  2. Structure based activity prediction of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    de Jonge, Marc R; Koymans, Lucien M H; Vinkers, H Maarten; Daeyaert, Frits F D; Heeres, Jan; Lewi, Paul J; Janssen, Paul A J

    2005-03-24

    We have developed a fast and robust computational method for prediction of antiviral activity in automated de novo design of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. This is a structure-based approach that uses a linear relation between activity and interaction energy with discrete orientation sampling and with localized interaction energy terms. The localization allows for the analysis of mutations of the protein target and for the separation of inhibition and a specific binding to the enzyme. We apply the method to the prediction of pIC(50) of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The model predicts the activity of an arbitrary compound with a q(2) of 0.681 and an average absolute error of 0.66 log value, and it is fast enough to be used in high-throughput computational applications. PMID:15771460

  3. Copy number variation of KIR genes influences HIV-1 control

    Pelak, Kimberly; Need, Anna C; Fellay, Jacques;

    2011-01-01

    KIR3DL1-KIR3DS1 locus, encoding receptors that interact with specific HLA-Bw4 molecules to regulate the activation of lymphocyte subsets including natural killer (NK) cells. We quantified the number of copies of KIR3DS1 and KIR3DL1 in a large HIV-1 positive cohort, and showed that an increase in KIR3...... individuals with multiple copies of KIR3DL1, in the presence of KIR3DS1 and the appropriate ligands, inhibit HIV-1 replication more robustly, and associated with a significant expansion in the frequency of KIR3DS1+, but not KIR3DL1+, NK cells in their peripheral blood. Our results suggest that the relative...

  4. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding.

    Susan Morrison

    Full Text Available During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART, despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  5. Mother-to-Child HIV-1 Transmission Events Are Differentially Impacted by Breast Milk and Its Components from HIV-1-Infected Women.

    Ruizhong Shen

    Full Text Available Breast milk is a vehicle of infection and source of protection in post-natal mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission (MTCT. Understanding the mechanism by which breast milk limits vertical transmission will provide critical insight into the design of preventive and therapeutic approaches to interrupt HIV-1 mucosal transmission. However, characterization of the inhibitory activity of breast milk in human intestinal mucosa, the portal of entry in postnatal MTCT, has been constrained by the limited availability of primary mucosal target cells and tissues to recapitulate mucosal transmission ex vivo. Here, we characterized the impact of skimmed breast milk, breast milk antibodies (Igs and non-Ig components from HIV-1-infected Ugandan women on the major events of HIV-1 mucosal transmission using primary human intestinal cells and tissues. HIV-1-specific IgG antibodies and non-Ig components in breast milk inhibited the uptake of Ugandan HIV-1 isolates by primary human intestinal epithelial cells, viral replication in and transport of HIV-1- bearing dendritic cells through the human intestinal mucosa. Breast milk HIV-1-specific IgG and IgA, as well as innate factors, blocked the uptake and transport of HIV-1 through intestinal mucosa. Thus, breast milk components have distinct and complementary effects in reducing HIV-1 uptake, transport through and replication in the intestinal mucosa and, therefore, likely contribute to preventing postnatal HIV-1 transmission. Our data suggests that a successful preventive or therapeutic approach would require multiple immune factors acting at multiple steps in the HIV-1 mucosal transmission process.

  6. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding

    Susan Morrison; Grace John-Stewart; John J Egessa; Sezi Mubezi; Sylvia Kusemererwa; Dennis K Bii; Nulu Bulya; Francis Mugume; Campbell, James D.; Jonathan Wangisi; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Connie Celum; Baeten, Jared M.

    2015-01-01

    During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  7. Minimal residual HIV viremia: verification of the Abbott Real-Time HIV-1 assay sensitivity

    Alessandra Amendola

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the HIV-1 infection, the increase in number of CD4 T lymphocytes and the viral load decline are the main indicators of the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy. On average, 85% of patients receiving effective treatment has a persistent suppression of plasma viral load below the detection limit (<50 copies/mL of clinically used viral load assays, regardless of treatment regimen in use. It is known, however, that, even when viremia is reduced below the sensitivity limit of current diagnostic assays, the virus persists in “reservoirs” and traces of free virions can be detected in plasma.There is a considerable interest to investigate the clinical significance of residual viremia. Advances in molecular diagnostics allows nowadays to couple a wide dynamic range to a high sensitivity.The Abbott Real-time HIV-1 test is linear from 40 to 107 copies/mL and provides, below 40 copies/mL, additional information such as “<40cp/mL, target detected” or “target not detected”. The HIV-1 detection is verified by the max-Ratio algorithm software.We assessed the test sensitivity when the qualitative response is considered as well. Methods: A ‘probit’ analysis was performed using dilutions of the HIV-1 RNA Working Reagent 1 for NAT assays (NIBSC code: 99/634, defined in IU/mL and different from that used by the manufacturer (VQA,Virology Quality Assurance Laboratory of the AIDS Clinical Trial Group for standardization and definition of performances.The sample input volume (0.6 mL was the same used in clinical routine. A total of 196 replicates at concentrations decreasing from 120 to 5 copies/mL, in three different sessions, have been tested.The ‘probit’ analysis (binomial dose-response model, 95% “hit-rate” has been carried out on the SAS 9.1.3 software package. Results: The sensitivity of the “<40cp/mL, target detected” response was equal to 28,76 copies/mL, with 95% confidence limits between 22,19 and 52,27 copies

  8. Evidence for a base triple in the free HIV-1 TAR RNA

    Huthoff, Hendrik; GIRARD, FREDERIC; Wijmenga, Sybren S.; Berkhout, Ben

    2004-01-01

    We propose the existence of a novel base triple in the HIV-1 TAR hairpin. This triple is supported by covariation of loop residue 31 with residue 22, which is part of an unusual base pair with U40 below the 3-nucleotide bulge. A set of mutants was constructed to test the involvement of bases A22, U31, and U40 in a triple interaction. RNA structure probing, trans-activation assays, and structure modeling are consistent with the existence of this base triple in a bent conformation of the free T...

  9. Assisted Reproductive Technology for HIV-1 Serodiscordant Couples:A Review of Current Controversies

    Gary S. Nakhuda; Mark V. Sauer

    2007-01-01

    Since 1992, assisted reproductive technology (ART) has been reported as a viable means of helping HIV-1 serodiscordant couples achieve pregnancy while theoretically reducing the risk for viral transmission. While the sum of the evidence suggests that ART is effective and safe, numerous controversies still exist. The following review addresses several of the important issues involved in the use of ART for HIV-serodiscordant couples, including patient selection, semen processing techniques,post-process HIV testing, the use of IUI vs IVF-ICSI.

  10. nef gene sequence variation among HIV-1-infected African children

    Chakraborty, R.; Reiniš, Milan; Rostron, T.; Philpott, S.; Dong, T.; D'Agostino, A.; Musoke, R.; de Silva, E.; Stumpf, M.; Weiser, B.; Burger, H.; Rowland-Jones, S.L.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2006), s. 75-84. ISSN 1464-2662 Grant ostatní: Fogarty International Center, NIH(US) 3D43TW00915; NIH(US) RO1 AI 42555 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HIV-1 nef gene * non-clade B * Kenya Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.674, year: 2006

  11. HIV-1 Tat interaction with Dicer: requirement for RNA

    Jeang Kuan-Teh; Bennasser Yamina

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Dicer is an RNase III which processes two classes of cellular small RNAs: the microRNAs (miRNA) and short interfering RNAs (siRNA). Previously, we observed that over-expressed HIV-1 Tat protein can suppress the processing of small RNAs inside cells. Here, we have investigated the requirements for Tat interaction with Dicer. We report that Tat-Dicer interaction depends on RNA, requires the helicase domain of Dicer, and is independent of Tat's transactivation domain.

  12. HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor Resistance and Its Clinical Implications

    Blanco, Jose-Luis; Varghese, Vici; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Gatell, Jose M.; Shafer, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    With the approval in 2007 of the first integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, clinicians became better able to suppress virus replication in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) who were harboring many of the most highly drug-resistant viruses. Raltegravir also provided clinicians with additional options for first-line therapy and for the simplification of regimens in patients with stable virological suppression. Two additional INIs in advanced clinical developm...

  13. HIV-1 Uncoating Is Facilitated by Dynein and Kinesin 1

    Lukic, Zana; Dharan, Adarsh; Fricke, Thomas; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Campbell, Edward M

    2014-01-01

    Following entry into the target cell, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) must reverse transcribe its RNA genome to DNA and traffic to the nuclear envelope, where the viral genome is translocated into the nucleus for subsequent integration into the host cell chromosome. During this time, the viral core, which houses the genome, undergoes a poorly understood process of disassembly, known as uncoating. Collectively, many studies suggest that uncoating is tightly regulated to allow nucle...

  14. TRIM5 and the Regulation of HIV-1 Infectivity

    Jeremy Luban

    2012-01-01

    The past ten years have seen an explosion of information concerning host restriction factors that inhibit the replication of HIV-1 and other retroviruses. Among these factors is TRIM5, an innate immune signaling molecule that recognizes the capsid lattice as soon as the retrovirion core is released into the cytoplasm of otherwise susceptible target cells. Recognition of the capsid lattice has several consequences that include multimerization of TRIM5 into a complementary lattice, premature un...

  15. Characterization of the in vitro HIV-1 Capsid Assembly Pathway

    Barklis, Eric; Alfadhli, Ayna; McQuaw, Carolyn; Yalamuri, Suraj; Still, Amelia; Barklis, Robin Lid; Kukull, Ben; López, Claudia S.

    2009-01-01

    During morphogenesis of mature HIV-1 cores, the viral capsid (CA) proteins assemble conical or tubular shells around the viral ribonucleoprotein complexes. This assembly step is mimicked in vitro through reactions in which CA proteins oligomerize to form long tubes, and this process can be modeled as consisting of a slow nucleation period followed by a rapid phase of tube growth. We have developed a novel fluorescence microscopy approach to monitor in vitro assembly reactions and have employe...

  16. Extreme genetic fragility of the HIV-1 capsid

    Rihn, S.J.; Wilson, S. J.; Loman, N. J.; Alim, M.; Bakker, S.E.; Bhella, D.; Gifford, R.J.; Rixon, F J; Bieniasz, P D

    2013-01-01

    Genetic robustness, or fragility, is defined as the ability, or lack thereof, of a biological entity to maintain function in the face of mutations. Viruses that replicate via RNA intermediates exhibit high mutation rates, and robustness should be particularly advantageous to them. The capsid (CA) domain of the HIV-1 Gag protein is under strong pressure to conserve functional roles in viral assembly, maturation, uncoating, and nuclear import. However, CA is also under strong immunological pres...

  17. Copy number variation of KIR genes influences HIV-1 control.

    Kimberly Pelak

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A genome-wide screen for large structural variants showed that a copy number variant (CNV in the region encoding killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR associates with HIV-1 control as measured by plasma viral load at set point in individuals of European ancestry. This CNV encompasses the KIR3DL1-KIR3DS1 locus, encoding receptors that interact with specific HLA-Bw4 molecules to regulate the activation of lymphocyte subsets including natural killer (NK cells. We quantified the number of copies of KIR3DS1 and KIR3DL1 in a large HIV-1 positive cohort, and showed that an increase in KIR3DS1 count associates with a lower viral set point if its putative ligand is present (p = 0.00028, as does an increase in KIR3DL1 count in the presence of KIR3DS1 and appropriate ligands for both receptors (p = 0.0015. We further provide functional data that demonstrate that NK cells from individuals with multiple copies of KIR3DL1, in the presence of KIR3DS1 and the appropriate ligands, inhibit HIV-1 replication more robustly, and associated with a significant expansion in the frequency of KIR3DS1+, but not KIR3DL1+, NK cells in their peripheral blood. Our results suggest that the relative amounts of these activating and inhibitory KIR play a role in regulating the peripheral expansion of highly antiviral KIR3DS1+ NK cells, which may determine differences in HIV-1 control following infection.

  18. DETERMINANTS OF THE HIV-1 CORE ASSEMBLY PATHWAY

    López, Claudia S.; Eccles, Jacob D.; Still, Amelia; Sloan, Rachel E.; Barklis, Robin Lid; Tsagli, Seyram M.; Barklis, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Based on structural information, we have analyzed the mechanism of mature HIV-1 core assembly and the contributions of structural elements to the assembly process. Through the use of several in vitro assembly assay systems, we have examined details of how capsid (CA) protein helix 1, β-hairpin and cyclophilin loop elements impact assembly-dependent protein interactions, and we present evidence for a contribution of CA helix 6 to the mature assembly-competent conformation of CA. Additional exp...

  19. HIV-1 tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome

    Lai, Rachel P. J.; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Patients co-infected with HIV-1 and tuberculosis (TB) are at risk of developing TB-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) following commencement of antiretroviral therapy (ART). TB-IRIS is characterized by transient but severe localized or systemic inflammatory reactions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens. Here, we review the risk factors and clinical management of TB-IRIS, as well as the roles played by different aspects of the immune response in contributi...

  20. Digoxin Suppresses HIV-1 Replication by Altering Viral RNA Processing

    Wong, Raymond W; Ahalya Balachandran; Ostrowski, Mario A.; Alan Cochrane

    2013-01-01

    Author Summary Antiretroviral therapies (ART) for HIV/AIDS are successful in slowing disease progression by inhibiting viral proteins. However, the ability of HIV to adapt to ARTs has given rise to drug-resistant virus strains that now represent ≥16% of newly infected people. This development calls for the generation of new treatment strategies. Since HIV is dependent upon RNA processing under control of the host, we searched for compounds/drugs that inhibit HIV-1 replication at this step. We...

  1. Exercise and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Infection

    Lawless, DeSales; Jackson, Catherine G. R.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The human immune system is highly efficient and remarkably protective when functioning properly. Similar to other physiological systems, it functions best when the body is maintained with a balanced diet, sufficient rest and a moderately stress-free lifestyle. It can be disrupted by inappropriate drug use and extreme emotion or exertion. The functioning of normal or compromised immune systems can be enhanced by properly prescribed moderate exercise conditioning regimens in healthy people, and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients but not in others who unable to complete an interval training program. Regular exercise conditioning in healthy people reduces cardiovascular risk factors, increases stamina, facilitates bodyweight control, and reduces stress by engendering positive feelings of well-being. Certain types of cancer may also be suppressed by appropriate exercise conditioning. Various exercise regimens are being evaluated as adjunct treatments for medicated patients with the HIV-1 syndrome. Limited anecdotal evidence from patients suggests that moderate exercise conditioning is per se responsible for their survival well beyond expectancy. HIV-1-infected patients respond positively, both physiologically and psychologically, to moderate exercise conditioning. However, the effectiveness of any exercise treatment programme depends on its mode, frequency, intensity and duration when prescribed o complement the pathological condition of the patient. The effectiveness of exercise conditioning regimens in patients with HIV-1 infection is reviewed in this article. In addition, we discuss mechanisms and pathways, involving the interplay of psychological and physiological factors, through which the suppressed immune system can be enhanced. The immune modulators discussed are endogenous opioids, cytokines, neurotransmitters and other hormones. Exercise conditioning treatment appears to be more effective when combined with other stress management

  2. HMBG-1 and other soluble factors in HIV-1 pathogenesis

    Barqasho, Babilonia

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first defense mechanism invading pathogens encounter. Macrophages, dendritic cells and cytokines/chemokines are important factors for the functionality of the innate immunity, and provide the adaptive immune system with sufficient signals for the proper action. Immune activation occurring during HIV-1 infection is essential to understand and investigate. The aims of this thesis were to evaluate the role of immune activation factors of the ...

  3. Neuroimaging studies of the aging HIV-1-infected brain

    Holt, John L.; Kraft-Terry, Stephanie D.; Chang, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has increased life expectancy among HIV-infected individuals, and by 2015, at least half of all HIV-infected individuals will be over 50 years of age. Neurodegenerative processes associated with aging may be facilitated by HIV-1 infection, resulting in premature brain aging. This review will highlight brain abnormalities in HIV patients in the setting of aging, focusing on recent neuroimaging studies of the structural, physiological, functional and...

  4. HIV-1 Vpr: A Novel Role in Regulating RNA Splicing

    Zhang, Xianfeng; Aida, Yoko

    2009-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is a critical step in gene expression for metazoans. Several viral proteins regulate the splicing of pre-mRNAs through complex interactions between the virus and the host cell RNA splicing machinery. Here, we focus on a novel function of HIV-1 Vpr, that selectively inhibit cellular and viral pre-mRNA splicing, via interactions with components of functional spliceosomal complexes. This review discusses our current knowledge of how RNA splicing regulation is accomplished by Vp...

  5. Accuracy of the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit

    Grant, Robert M.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Johnson, Victoria A.; Mellors, John W.; Sullivan, John L.; Swanstrom, Ronald; D'Aquila, Richard T.; Van Gorder, Mark; Holodniy, Mark; Lloyd, Jr., Robert M.; Reid, Caroline; Morgan, Gillian F.; Winslow, Dean L.

    2003-01-01

    Drug resistance and poor virological responses are associated with well-characterized mutations in the viral reading frames that encode the proteins that are targeted by currently available antiretroviral drugs. An integrated system was developed that includes target gene amplification, DNA sequencing chemistry (TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit), and hardware and interpretative software (the OpenGene DNA Sequencing System) for detection of mutations in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV...

  6. Molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in Rio Grande, RS, Brazil

    Martínez Ana Maria Barral de; Barbosa Edel Figueirêdo; Ferreira Paulo César Pelegrino; Cardoso Fabiola Adriene; Silveira Jussara; Sassi Gabriela; Silva Cláudio Moss da; Mendonça-Signorini Vera; Antunes Carlos Maurício de Figueiredo

    2002-01-01

    We conducted a molecular epidemiological study to investigate HIV-1 strains in Rio Grande, southern Brazil, searching for an association with transmission mode and risk behavior. Patients (185) identified at an AIDS treatment reference Hospital, from 1994 to 1997, were included; from which 107 blood samples were obtained. Nested PCR was realized once for each sample; for amplified samples (69) HIV subtypes were classified using the heteroduplex mobility assay. Subtypes identified were B (75%)...

  7. HIV-1 envelope subregion length variation during disease progression.

    Marcel E Curlin

    Full Text Available The V3 loop of the HIV-1 Env protein is the primary determinant of viral coreceptor usage, whereas the V1V2 loop region is thought to influence coreceptor binding and participate in shielding of neutralization-sensitive regions of the Env glycoprotein gp120 from antibody responses. The functional properties and antigenicity of V1V2 are influenced by changes in amino acid sequence, sequence length and patterns of N-linked glycosylation. However, how these polymorphisms relate to HIV pathogenesis is not fully understood. We examined 5185 HIV-1 gp120 nucleotide sequence fragments and clinical data from 154 individuals (152 were infected with HIV-1 Subtype B. Sequences were aligned, translated, manually edited and separated into V1V2, C2, V3, C3, V4, C4 and V5 subregions. V1-V5 and subregion lengths were calculated, and potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNLGS counted. Loop lengths and PNLGS were examined as a function of time since infection, CD4 count, viral load, and calendar year in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. V1V2 length and PNLGS increased significantly through chronic infection before declining in late-stage infection. In cross-sectional analyses, V1V2 length also increased by calendar year between 1984 and 2004 in subjects with early and mid-stage illness. Our observations suggest that there is little selection for loop length at the time of transmission; following infection, HIV-1 adapts to host immune responses through increased V1V2 length and/or addition of carbohydrate moieties at N-linked glycosylation sites. V1V2 shortening during early and late-stage infection may reflect ineffective host immunity. Transmission from donors with chronic illness may have caused the modest increase in V1V2 length observed during the course of the pandemic.

  8. Complement-Opsonized HIV-1 Overcomes Restriction in Dendritic Cells.

    Wilfried Posch

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available DCs express intrinsic cellular defense mechanisms to specifically inhibit HIV-1 replication. Thus, DCs are productively infected only at very low levels with HIV-1, and this non-permissiveness of DCs is suggested to go along with viral evasion. We now illustrate that complement-opsonized HIV-1 (HIV-C efficiently bypasses SAMHD1 restriction and productively infects DCs including BDCA-1 DCs. Efficient DC infection by HIV-C was also observed using single-cycle HIV-C, and correlated with a remarkable elevated SAMHD1 T592 phosphorylation but not SAMHD1 degradation. If SAMHD1 phosphorylation was blocked using a CDK2-inhibitor HIV-C-induced DC infection was also significantly abrogated. Additionally, we found a higher maturation and co-stimulatory potential, aberrant type I interferon expression and signaling as well as a stronger induction of cellular immune responses in HIV-C-treated DCs. Collectively, our data highlight a novel protective mechanism mediated by complement opsonization of HIV to effectively promote DC immune functions, which might be in the future exploited to tackle HIV infection.

  9. Targeting dendritic cells for improved HIV-1 vaccines.

    Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Loré, Karin

    2013-01-01

    As dendritic cells (DCs) have the unique capacity to activate antigen-naive T cells they likely play a critical role in eliciting immune responses to vaccines. DCs are therefore being explored as attractive targets for vaccines, but understanding the interaction of DCs and clinically relevant vaccine antigens and adjuvants is a prerequisite. The HIV-1/AIDS epidemic continues to be a significant health problem, and despite intense research efforts over the past 30 years a protective vaccine has not yet been developed. A common challenge in vaccine design is to find a vaccine formulation that best shapes the immune response to protect against and/or control the given pathogen. Here, we discuss the importance of understanding the diversity, anatomical location and function of different human DC subsets in order to identify the optimal target cells for an HIV-1 vaccine. We review human DC interactions with some of the HIV-1 vaccine antigen delivery vehicles and adjuvants currently utilized in preclinical and clinical studies. Specifically, the effects of distinctly different vaccine adjuvants in terms of activation of DCs and improving DC function and vaccine efficacy are discussed. The susceptibility and responses of DCs to recombinant adenovirus vectors are reviewed, as well as the strategy of directly targeting DCs by using DC marker-specific monoclonal antibodies coupled to an antigen. PMID:22975879

  10. TRIM5 and the Regulation of HIV-1 Infectivity.

    Luban, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    The past ten years have seen an explosion of information concerning host restriction factors that inhibit the replication of HIV-1 and other retroviruses. Among these factors is TRIM5, an innate immune signaling molecule that recognizes the capsid lattice as soon as the retrovirion core is released into the cytoplasm of otherwise susceptible target cells. Recognition of the capsid lattice has several consequences that include multimerization of TRIM5 into a complementary lattice, premature uncoating of the virion core, and activation of TRIM5 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Unattached, K63-linked ubiquitin chains are generated that activate the TAK1 kinase complex and downstream inflammatory mediators. Polymorphisms in the capsid recognition domain of TRIM5 explain the observed species-specific differences among orthologues and the relatively weak anti-HIV-1 activity of human TRIM5. Better understanding of the complex interaction between TRIM5 and the retrovirus capsid lattice may someday lead to exploitation of this interaction for the development of potent HIV-1 inhibitors. PMID:22701176

  11. Positron emission tomography in patients suffering from HIV-1 infection

    This paper reviews currently available PET studies performed either to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection or to assess the value of PET imaging in the clinical decision making of patients infected with HIV-1 presenting with AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies. FDG PET has shown that HIV-1 infection progresses by distinct anatomical steps, with involvement of the upper torso preceding involvement of the lower part of the torso, and that the degree of FDG uptake relates to viral load. The former finding suggests that lymphoid tissues are engaged in a predictable sequence and that diffusible mediators of activation might be important targets for vaccine or therapeutic intervention strategies. In lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients, limited available data support the hypothesis that stavudine-related lipodystrophy is associated with increased glucose uptake by adipose tissue as a result of the metabolic stress of adipose tissue in response to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Finally, in early AIDS-related dementia complex (ADC), striatal hypermetabolism is observed, whereas progressive ADC is characterized by a decrease in subcortical and cortical metabolism. In the clinical setting, PET has been shown to allow the differentiation of AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies, and to allow monitoring of side effects of HAART. However, in patients suffering from HIV infection and presenting with extracerebral lymphoma or other human malignancies, knowledge of viraemia is essential when interpreting FDG PET imaging. (orig.)

  12. Innate immune reconstitution with suppression of HIV-1

    Scully, Eileen P.; Lockhart, Ainsley; Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo; Palmer, Christine D.; Musante, Chelsey; Rosenberg, Eric; Allen, Todd M.; Chang, J. Judy; Bosch, Ronald J.; Altfeld, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Progressive HIV-1 infection leads to both profound immune suppression and pathologic inflammation in the majority of infected individuals. While adaptive immune dysfunction, as evidenced by CD4+ T cell depletion and exhaustion, has been extensively studied, less is known about the functional capacity of innate immune cell populations in the context of HIV-1 infection. Given the broad susceptibility to opportunistic infections and the dysregulated inflammation observed in progressive disease, we hypothesized that there would be significant changes in the innate cellular responses. Using a cohort of patients with multiple samplings before and after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, we demonstrated increased responses to innate immune stimuli following viral suppression, as measured by the production of inflammatory cytokines. Plasma viral load itself had the strongest association with this change in innate functional capacity. We further identified epigenetic modifications in the TNFA promoter locus in monocytes that are associated with viremia, suggesting a molecular mechanism for the observed changes in innate immune function following initiation of ART. These data indicate that suppression of HIV-1 viremia is associated with changes in innate cellular function that may in part determine the restoration of protective immune responses. PMID:27158667

  13. HIV-1 infected monozygotic twins: a tale of two outcomes

    Pérez-Losada Marcos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Replicate experiments are often difficult to find in evolutionary biology, as this field is inherently an historical science. However, viruses, bacteria and phages provide opportunities to study evolution in both natural and experimental contexts, due to their accelerated rates of evolution and short generation times. Here we investigate HIV-1 evolution by using a natural model represented by monozygotic twins infected synchronically at birth with an HIV-1 population from a shared blood transfusion source. We explore the evolutionary processes and population dynamics that shape viral diversity of HIV in these monozygotic twins. Results Despite the identical host genetic backdrop of monozygotic twins and the identical source and timing of the HIV-1 inoculation, the resulting HIV populations differed in genetic diversity, growth rate, recombination rate, and selection pressure between the two infected twins. Conclusions Our study shows that the outcome of evolution is strikingly different between these two "replicates" of viral evolution. Given the identical starting points at infection, our results support the impact of random epigenetic selection in early infection dynamics. Our data also emphasize the need for a better understanding of the impact of host-virus interactions in viral evolution.

  14. TRIM5 and the Regulation of HIV-1 Infectivity

    Jeremy Luban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The past ten years have seen an explosion of information concerning host restriction factors that inhibit the replication of HIV-1 and other retroviruses. Among these factors is TRIM5, an innate immune signaling molecule that recognizes the capsid lattice as soon as the retrovirion core is released into the cytoplasm of otherwise susceptible target cells. Recognition of the capsid lattice has several consequences that include multimerization of TRIM5 into a complementary lattice, premature uncoating of the virion core, and activation of TRIM5 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Unattached, K63-linked ubiquitin chains are generated that activate the TAK1 kinase complex and downstream inflammatory mediators. Polymorphisms in the capsid recognition domain of TRIM5 explain the observed species-specific differences among orthologues and the relatively weak anti-HIV-1 activity of human TRIM5. Better understanding of the complex interaction between TRIM5 and the retrovirus capsid lattice may someday lead to exploitation of this interaction for the development of potent HIV-1 inhibitors.

  15. Flap Conformations in HIV-1 Protease are Altered by Mutations

    Fanucci, Gail; Blackburn, Mandy; Veloro, Angelo; Galiano, Luis; Fangu, Ding; Simmerling, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) is an enzyme that is a major drug target in the treatment of AIDS. Although the structure and function of HIV-1 PR have been studied for over 20 years, questions remain regarding the conformations and dynamics of the β-hairpin turns (flaps) that cover the active site cavity. Distance measurements with pulsed EPR spectroscopy of spin labeled constructs of HIV-1 PR have been used to characterize the flap conformations in the apo and inhibitor bound states. From the most probably distances and the breadth of the distance distribution profiles from analysis of the EPR data, insights regarding the flap conformations and flexibility are gained. The EPR results clearly show how drug pressure selected mutations alter the average conformation of the flaps and the degree of opening of the flaps. Molecular dynamics simulations successfully regenerate the experimentally determined distance distribution profiles, and more importantly, provide structural models for full interpretation of the EPR results. By combining experiment and theory to understand the role that altered flap flexibility/conformations play in the mechanism of drug resistance, key insights are gained toward the rational development of new inhibitors of this important enzyme.

  16. Oligodendrocyte Injury and Pathogenesis of HIV-1-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders.

    Liu, Han; Xu, Enquan; Liu, Jianuo; Xiong, Huangui

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes wrap neuronal axons to form myelin, an insulating sheath which is essential for nervous impulse conduction along axons. Axonal myelination is highly regulated by neuronal and astrocytic signals and the maintenance of myelin sheaths is a very complex process. Oligodendrocyte damage can cause axonal demyelination and neuronal injury, leading to neurological disorders. Demyelination in the cerebrum may produce cognitive impairment in a variety of neurological disorders, including human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1)-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Although the combined antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of HIV-1-associated dementia, a severe form of HAND, milder forms of HAND remain prevalent even when the peripheral viral load is well controlled. HAND manifests as a subcortical dementia with damage in the brain white matter (e.g., corpus callosum), which consists of myelinated axonal fibers. How HIV-1 brain infection causes myelin injury and resultant white matter damage is an interesting area of current HIV research. In this review, we tentatively address recent progress on oligodendrocyte dysregulation and HAND pathogenesis. PMID:27455335

  17. Positron emission tomography in patients suffering from HIV-1 infection

    Sathekge, Mike [University Hospital of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Goethals, Ingeborg; Wiele, Christophe van de [University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Maes, Alex [AZ Groening, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2009-07-15

    This paper reviews currently available PET studies performed either to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection or to assess the value of PET imaging in the clinical decision making of patients infected with HIV-1 presenting with AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies. FDG PET has shown that HIV-1 infection progresses by distinct anatomical steps, with involvement of the upper torso preceding involvement of the lower part of the torso, and that the degree of FDG uptake relates to viral load. The former finding suggests that lymphoid tissues are engaged in a predictable sequence and that diffusible mediators of activation might be important targets for vaccine or therapeutic intervention strategies. In lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients, limited available data support the hypothesis that stavudine-related lipodystrophy is associated with increased glucose uptake by adipose tissue as a result of the metabolic stress of adipose tissue in response to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Finally, in early AIDS-related dementia complex (ADC), striatal hypermetabolism is observed, whereas progressive ADC is characterized by a decrease in subcortical and cortical metabolism. In the clinical setting, PET has been shown to allow the differentiation of AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies, and to allow monitoring of side effects of HAART. However, in patients suffering from HIV infection and presenting with extracerebral lymphoma or other human malignancies, knowledge of viraemia is essential when interpreting FDG PET imaging. (orig.)

  18. HIV-1 early diagnosis of men having sex with men in Hong Kong and discovery of novel agents for HIV-1 treatment from traditional Chinese herbal medicine

    Liang, Jianguo; 梁建国

    2013-01-01

    Over the 30 years since it was first identified, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has had historically unprecedented severity and impact. There are approximately 33.4 million people living with HIV-1/AIDS which urges to seek novel approaches for HIV-1 diagnosis and HIV-1 therapy. Men who have sex with men (MSM) are severely affected by HIV-1 and constitute a large proportion of HIV-infected individuals. In Hong Kong, the transmission route of homosexual and bisexual contacts accounted for nearly 50% ...

  19. Artificial 64-Residue HIV-1 Enhancer-Binding Peptide Is a Potent Inhibitor of Viral Replication in HIV-1-Infected Cells

    Mouhssin Oufir; Bisset, Leslie R.; Hoffmann, Stefan R. K.; Gongda Xue; Stephan Klauser; Bianca Bergamaschi; Alain Gervaix; Jürg Böni; Jörg Schüpbach; Bernd Gutte

    2011-01-01

    An artificial HIV-1 enhancer-binding peptide was extended by nine consecutive arginine residues at the C-terminus and by the nuclear localization signal of SV40 large T antigen at the N-terminus. The resulting synthetic 64-residue peptide was found to bind to the two enhancers of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, cross the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope of human cells, and suppress the HIV-1 enhancer-controlled expression of a green fluorescent protein reporter gene. Moreover, HIV-1 r...

  20. Sexual behaviour does not reflect HIV-1 prevalence differences: a comparison study of Zimbabwe and Tanzania

    Mapingure Munyaradzi P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substantial heterogeneity in HIV prevalence has been observed within sub-Saharan Africa. It is not clear which factors can explain these differences. Our aim was to identify risk factors that could explain the large differences in HIV-1 prevalence among pregnant women in Harare, Zimbabwe, and Moshi, Tanzania. Methods Cross-sectional data from a two-centre study that enrolled pregnant women in Harare (N = 691 and Moshi (N = 2654 was used. Consenting women were interviewed about their socio-demographic background and sexual behaviour, and tested for presence of sexually transmitted infections and reproductive tract infections. Prevalence distribution of risk factors for HIV acquisition and spread were compared between the two areas. Results The prevalence of HIV-1 among pregnant women was 26% in Zimbabwe and 7% in Tanzania. The HIV prevalence in both countries rises constantly with age up to the 25-30 year age group. After that, it continues to rise among Zimbabwean women, while it drops for Tanzanian women. Risky sexual behaviour was more prominent among Tanzanians than Zimbabweans. Mobility and such infections as HSV-2, trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis were more prevalent among Zimbabweans than Tanzanians. Reported male partner circumcision rates between the two countries were widely different, but the effect of male circumcision on HIV prevalence was not apparent within the populations. Conclusions The higher HIV-1 prevalence among pregnant women in Zimbabwe compared with Tanzania cannot be explained by differences in risky sexual behaviour: all risk factors tested for in our study were higher for Tanzania than Zimbabwe. Non-sexual transmission of HIV might have played an important role in variation of HIV prevalence. Male circumcision rates and mobility could contribute to the rate and extent of spread of HIV in the two countries.

  1. HIV-1 specific IgA detected in vaginal secretions of HIV uninfected women participating in a microbicide trial in Southern Africa are primarily directed toward gp120 and gp140 specificities.

    Kelly E Seaton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many participants in microbicide trials remain uninfected despite ongoing exposure to HIV-1. Determining the emergence and nature of mucosal HIV-specific immune responses in such women is important, since these responses may contribute to protection and could provide insight for the rational design of HIV-1 vaccines. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We first conducted a pilot study to compare three sampling devices (Dacron swabs, flocked nylon swabs and Merocel sponges for detection of HIV-1-specific IgG and IgA antibodies in vaginal secretions. IgG antibodies from HIV-1-positive women reacted broadly across the full panel of eight HIV-1 envelope (Env antigens tested, whereas IgA antibodies only reacted to the gp41 subunit. No Env-reactive antibodies were detected in the HIV-negative women. The three sampling devices yielded equal HIV-1-specific antibody titers, as well as total IgG and IgA concentrations. We then tested vaginal Dacron swabs archived from 57 HIV seronegative women who participated in a microbicide efficacy trial in Southern Africa (HPTN 035. We detected vaginal IgA antibodies directed at HIV-1 Env gp120/gp140 in six of these women, and at gp41 in another three women, but did not detect Env-specific IgG antibodies in any women. CONCLUSION: Vaginal secretions of HIV-1 infected women contained IgG reactivity to a broad range of Env antigens and IgA reactivity to gp41. In contrast, Env-binding antibodies in the vaginal secretions of HIV-1 uninfected women participating in the microbicide trial were restricted to the IgA subtype and were mostly directed at HIV-1 gp120/gp140.

  2. Screening of Potential HIV-1 Inhibitors/Replication Blockers Using Secure Lentiviral in Vitro System

    Prokofjeva, M.; Spirin, P.; Yanvarev, D.; Ivanov, A.; M Novikov; Stepanov, O.; Gottikh, M.; Kochetkov, S.; Fehse, B; Stocking, C; Prassolov, V

    2011-01-01

    The development and usage of safe cell systems for testing agents which possess anti-HIV activity is a very important factor in the design of new drugs. We have described in detail a system we designed that is based on lentiviral vectors (Prokofjeva et. al., Antiviral Therapy, in print) for swift and completely safe screening of potential HIV-1 replication inhibitors. The system enables one to test the efficiency of the inhibitory activity of compounds whose action is directed towards either ...

  3. Focus on Chirality of HIV-1 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Valeria Famiglini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chiral HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs are of great interest since one enantiomer is often more potent than the corresponding counterpart against the HIV-1 wild type (WT and the HIV-1 drug resistant mutant strains. This review exemplifies the various studies made to investigate the effect of chirality on the antiretroviral activity of top HIV-1 NNRTI compounds, such as nevirapine (NVP, efavirenz (EFV, alkynyl- and alkenylquinazolinone DuPont compounds (DPC, diarylpyrimidine (DAPY, dihydroalkyloxybenzyloxopyrimidine (DABO, phenethylthiazolylthiourea (PETT, indolylarylsulfone (IAS, arylphosphoindole (API and trifluoromethylated indole (TFMI The chiral separation, the enantiosynthesis, along with the biological properties of these HIV-1 NNRTIs, are discussed.

  4. Inhibition of reverse transcriptase activity increases stability of the HIV-1 core.

    Yang, Yang; Fricke, Thomas; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies showed that HIV-1 reverse transcription occurs during or before uncoating, linking mechanistically reverse transcription with uncoating. Here we show that inhibition of reverse transcriptase (RT) during HIV-1 infection by pharmacologic or genetic means increased the stability of the HIV-1 core during infection. Interestingly, HIV-1 particles with increased core stability were resistant to the core-destabilizing effects of rhesus TRIM5α (TRIM5α(rh)). Collectively, this work implies that the surface of the HIV-1 core is dynamic and changes upon the ongoing processes within the core. PMID:23077298

  5. HTLV-1/-2 and HIV-1 co-infections: retroviral interference on host immune status

    Pilotti, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Maria V.; De Maria, Andrea; Bozzano, Federica; Romanelli, Maria G.; Bertazzoni, Umberto; Casoli, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    The human retroviruses HIV-1 and HTLV-1/HTLV-2 share similar routes of transmission but cause significantly different diseases. In this review we have outlined the immune mediated mechanisms by which HTLVs affect HIV-1 disease in co-infected hosts. During co-infection with HIV-1, HTLV-2 modulates the cellular microenvironment favoring its own viability and inhibiting HIV-1 progression. This is achieved when the HTLV-2 proviral load is higher than that of HIV-1, and thanks to the ability of HT...

  6. Role of mannose-binding lectin deficiency in HIV-1 and schistosoma infections in a rural adult population in Zimbabwe.

    Rutendo B L Zinyama-Gutsire

    Full Text Available Polymorphism in the MBL2 gene lead to MBL deficiency, which has been shown to increase susceptibility to various bacterial, viral and parasitic infections. We assessed role of MBL deficiency in HIV-1 and schistosoma infections in Zimbabwean adults enrolled in the Mupfure Schistosomiasis and HIV Cohort (MUSH Cohort.HIV-1, S. haematobium and S. mansoni infections were determined at baseline. Plasma MBL concentration was measured by ELISA and MBL2 genotypes determined by PCR. We calculated and compared the proportions of plasma MBL deficiency, MBL2 structural variant alleles B (codon 54A>G, C (codon 57A>G, and D (codon 52T>C as well as MBL2 promoter variants -550(H/L, -221(X/Y and +4(P/Q between HIV-1 and schistosoma co-infection and control groups using Chi Square test.We assessed 379 adults, 80% females, median age (IQR 30 (17-41 years. HIV-1, S. haematobium and S. mansoni prevalence were 26%, 43% and 18% respectively in the MUSH baseline survey. Median (IQR plasma MBL concentration was 800μg/L (192-1936μg/L. Prevalence of plasma MBL deficiency was 18% with high frequency of the C (codon 57G>A mutant allele (20%. There was no significant difference in median plasma MBL levels between HIV negative (912μg/L and HIV positive (688μg/L, p = 0.066. However plasma MBL levels at the assay detection limit of 20μg/L were more frequent among the HIV-1 infected (p = 0.007. S. haematobium and S. mansoni infected participants had significantly higher MBL levels than uninfected. All MBL2 variants were not associated with HIV-1 infection but promoter variants LY and LL were significantly associated with S. haematobium infection.Our data indicate high prevalence of MBL deficiency, no evidence of association between MBL deficiency and HIV-1 infection. However, lower plasma MBL levels were protective against both S. haematobium and S. mansoni infections and MBL2 promoter and variants LY and LL increased susceptibility to S. haematobium infection.

  7. German-austrian recommendations for HIV1-therapy in pregnancy and in HIV1-exposed newborn - update 2008

    Buchholz Bernd; Beichert Matthias; Marcus Ulrich; Grubert Thomas; Gingelmaier Andrea; Haberl Annette; Schmied Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Abstract German-Austrian recommendations for HIV1-therapy in pregnancy - Update 2008 Bernd Buchholz (University Medical Centre Mannheim, Pediatric Clinic), Matthias Beichert (Mannheim, Gynecology and Obstetrics Practice), Ulrich Marcus (Robert Koch Institute, Berlin), Thomas Grubert, Andrea Gingelmaier (Gynecology Clinic of the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich), Dr. med. Annette Haberl (HIV-Department, J. W. Goethe-University Hospital, Frankfurt), Dr. med. Brigitte Schmied (Otto-Wagner...

  8. Molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in Rio Grande, RS, Brazil Epidemiologia molecular do HIV-1 em Rio Grande, RS, Brasil

    Ana Maria Barral de Martínez; Edel Figueirêdo Barbosa; Paulo César Pelegrino Ferreira; Fabiola Adriene Cardoso; Jussara Silveira; Gabriela Sassi; Cláudio Moss da Silva; Vera Mendonça-Signorini; Carlos Maurício de Figueiredo Antunes

    2002-01-01

    We conducted a molecular epidemiological study to investigate HIV-1 strains in Rio Grande, southern Brazil, searching for an association with transmission mode and risk behavior. Patients (185) identified at an AIDS treatment reference Hospital, from 1994 to 1997, were included; from which 107 blood samples were obtained. Nested PCR was realized once for each sample; for amplified samples (69) HIV subtypes were classified using the heteroduplex mobility assay. Subtypes identified were B (75%)...

  9. Somatic populations of PGT135-137 HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies identified by 454 pyrosequencing and bioinformatics

    Jiang eZhu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Select HIV-1-infected individuals develop sera capable of neutralizing diverse viral strains. The molecular basis of this neutralization is currently being deciphered by the isolation of HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies. In one infected donor, three neutralizing antibodies, PGT135-137, were identified by assessment of neutralization from individually sorted B cells and found to recognize an epitope containing an N-linked glycan at residue 332 on HIV-1 gp120. Here we use deep sequencing and bioinformatics methods to interrogate the B cell record of this donor to gain a more complete understanding of the humoral immune response. PGT135-137-gene family-specific primers were used to amplify heavy and light chain-variable domain sequences. 454 pyrosequencing produced 141,298 heavy-chain sequences of IGHV4-39 origin and 87,229 light-chain sequences of IGKV3-15 origin. A number of heavy and light chain sequences of ~90% identity to PGT137, several to PGT136, and none of high identity to PGT135 were identified. After expansion of these sequences to include close phylogenetic relatives, a total of 202 heavy-chain sequences and 72 light-chain sequences were identified. These sequences were clustered into populations of 95% identity comprising 15 for heavy chain and 10 for light chain, and a select sequence from each population was synthesized and reconstituted with a PGT137-partner chain. Reconstituted antibodies showed varied neutralization phenotypes for HIV-1 clade A and D isolates. Sequence diversity of the antibody population represented by these tested sequences was notably higher than observed with a 454 pyrosequencing-control analysis on 10 antibodies of defined sequence, suggesting that this diversity results primarily from somatic maturation. Our results thus provide an example of how pathogens like HIV-1 are opposed by a varied humoral immune response, derived from intrinsic mechanisms of antibody development, and embodied by somatic populations

  10. Binding of single walled carbon nanotube to WT and mutant HIV-1 proteases: analysis of flap dynamics and binding mechanism.

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2012-09-01

    Most of the currently treated HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR) inhibitors have been prone to suffer from the mutations associated drug resistance. Therefore, it is necessary to search for potent alternatives against the drug resistance. In the current study we have tested the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as an inhibitor in wild type (WT) as well as in three primary mutants (I50V(PR), V82A(PR) and I84V(PR)) of the HIV-1-PR through docking the SWCNT in the active site region, and then performed all-atom MD simulations for the complexes. The conformational dynamics of HIV-PR with a 20 ns trajectory reveals that the SWCNT can effectively bind to the HIV-1-PR active site and regulate the flap dynamics such as maintaining the flap-flap closed. To gain an insight into the binding affinity, we also performed the MM-PBSA based binding free energy calculations for the four HIV-PR/SWCNT complexes. It was observed that, although the binding between the SWCNT and the HIV-PR decreases due to the mutations, the SWCNTs bind to the HIV-PRs 3-5 folds stronger than the most potent HIV-1-PR inhibitor, TMC114. Remarkably, the significant interactions with binding energy higher than 1kcal/mol focus on the flap and active regions, which favors closing flap-flap and deactivating the active residues of the HIV-PR. The flap dynamics and binding strength information for HIV-PR and SWCNTs can help design SWCNT-based HIV-1-PR inhibitors. PMID:23142620

  11. Neutralization resistance of virological synapse-mediated HIV-1 Infection is regulated by the gp41 cytoplasmic tail.

    Durham, Natasha D; Yewdall, Alice W; Chen, Ping; Lee, Rebecca; Zony, Chati; Robinson, James E; Chen, Benjamin K

    2012-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can spread efficiently from infected to uninfected T cells through adhesive contacts called virological synapses (VSs). In this process, cell-surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) initiates adhesion and viral transfer into an uninfected recipient cell. Previous studies have found some HIV-1-neutralizing patient sera to be less effective at blocking VS-mediated infection than infection with cell-free virus. Here we employ sensitive flow cytometry-based infection assays to measure the inhibitory potency of HIV-1-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAb) and HIV-1-neutralizing patient sera against cell-free and VS-mediated infection. To various degrees, anti-Env MAbs exhibited significantly higher 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)s) against VS-mediated infection than cell-free infection. Notably, the MAb 17b, which binds a CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope on gp120, displayed a 72-fold reduced efficacy against VS-mediated inocula compared to cell-free inocula. A mutant with truncation mutation in the gp41 cytoplasmic tail (CT) which is unable to modulate Env fusogenicity in response to virus particle maturation but which can still engage in cell-to-cell infection was tested for the ability to resist neutralizing antibodies. The ΔCT mutation increased cell surface staining by neutralizing antibodies, significantly enhanced neutralization of VS-mediated infection, and had reduced or no effect on cell-free infection, depending upon the antibody. Our results suggest that the gp41 CT regulates the exposure of key neutralizing epitopes during cell-to-cell infection and plays an important role in immune evasion. Vaccine strategies should consider immunogens that reflect Env conformations exposed on the infected cell surface to enhance protection against VS-mediated HIV-1 spread. PMID:22553332

  12. Performance of V3-based HIV-1 sero subtyping in HIV endemic areas

    Lara Tavoschi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 serosubtyping based on reactivity to peptides from the V3 region of gp120 is a low-cost and easy to perform procedure often used in geographical areas with high prevalence and incidence of HIV infection. We evaluated the performance of V3-based serotyping on 148 sera from 118 HIV-1-infected individuals living in Uganda, with estimated dates of seroconversion. Of the 148 tested samples, 68 (46.0% specifically reacted with only one of the V3 peptides included in the test (SP, 64 (43.2% did not react with any peptide (NR and 16 (10.8% reacted with two or more peptides (CR. According to the estimated seroconversion date, the large majority of samples collected early after infection belonged to the NR group. These samples had also a low Avidity Index. In contrast, samples collected later after infection belonged mainly to CR and SP groups and had also a higher avidity index. These results indicate that the performance of V3-based assays depends on maturation of HIV-specific immune response and can be significantly lowered when these tests are carried out on specimens collected from recently infected individuals.

  13. Down-regulation of HIV-1 Infection by Inhibition of the MAPK Signaling Pathway

    Jian Gong; Xi-hui Shen; Chao Chen; Hui Qiu; Rong-ge Yang

    2011-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1)can interact with and exploit the host cellular machinery to replicate and propagate itself.Numerous studies have shown that the Mitogen-activated protein kinase(MAPK)signal pathway can positively regulate the replication of HIV-1,but exactly how each MAPK pathway affects HIV-1 infection and replication is not understood.In this study,we used the Extracellular signal-regulated kinase(ERK)pathway inhibitor,PD98059,the Jun N-terminal kinase(JNK)pathway inhibitor,SP600125,and the p38 pathway inhibitor,SB203580,to investigate the roles of these pathways in HIV-1replication.We found that application of PD98059 results in a strong VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1NL4-3 luciferase reporter virus and HIV-1NL4-3 virus inhibition activity.In addition,SB203580 and SP600125 also elicited marked VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1NL4-3 luciferase reporter virus inhibition activity but no HIV-1NL4-3 virus inhibition activity.We also found that SB203580 and SP600125 can enhance the HIV-1 inhibition activity of PD98059when cells were treated with all three MAPK pathway inhibitors in combination.Finally,we show that HIV-1virus inhibition activity of the MAPK pathway inhibitors was the result of the negative regulation of HIV-1 LTR promoter activity.

  14. Sargassum fusiforme fraction is a potent and specific inhibitor of HIV-1 fusion and reverse transcriptase

    Thornber Carol

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sargassum fusiforme (Harvey Setchell has been shown to be a highly effective inhibitor of HIV-1 infection. To identify its mechanism of action, we performed bioactivity-guided fractionation on Sargassum fusiforme mixture. Here, we report isolation of a bioactive fraction SP4-2 (S. fusiforme, which at 8 μg/ml inhibited HIV-1 infection by 86.9%, with IC50 value of 3.7 μg. That represents 230-fold enhancement of antiretroviral potency as compared to the whole extract. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4 and CCR5 (R5 tropic HIV-1. Specifically, 10 μg/ml SP4-2 blocked HIV-1 fusion and entry by 53%. This effect was reversed by interaction of SP4-2 with sCD4, suggesting that S. fusiforme inhibits HIV-1 infection by blocking CD4 receptor, which also explained observed inhibition of both X4 and R5-tropic HIV-1. SP4-2 also inhibited HIV-1 replication after virus entry, by directly inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT in a dose dependent manner by up to 79%. We conclude that the SP4-2 fraction contains at least two distinct and biologically active molecules, one that inhibits HIV-1 fusion by interacting with CD4 receptor, and another that directly inhibits HIV-1 RT. We propose that S. fusiforme is a lead candidate for anti-HIV-1 drug development.

  15. In vivo functions of CPSF6 for HIV-1 as revealed by HIV-1 capsid evolution in HLA-B27-positive subjects.

    Matthew S Henning

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The host protein CPSF6 possesses a domain that can interact with the HIV-1 capsid (CA protein. CPSF6 has been implicated in regulating HIV-1 nuclear entry. However, its functional significance for HIV-1 replication has yet to be firmly established. Here we provide evidence for two divergent functions of CPSF6 for HIV-1 replication in vivo. We demonstrate that endogenous CPSF6 exerts an inhibitory effect on naturally occurring HIV-1 variants in individuals carrying the HLA-B27 allele. Conversely, we find a strong selective pressure in these individuals to preserve CPSF6 binding, while escaping from the restrictive activity by CPSF6. This active maintenance of CPSF6 binding during HIV-1 CA evolution in vivo contrasts with the in vitro viral evolution, which can reduce CPSF6 binding to evade from CPSF6-mediated restriction. Thus, these observations argue for a beneficial role of CPSF6 for HIV-1 in vivo. CPSF6-mediated restriction renders HIV-1 less dependent or independent from TNPO3, RanBP2 and Nup153, host factors implicated in HIV-1 nuclear entry. However, viral evolution that maintains CPSF6 binding in HLA-B27+ subjects invariably restores the ability to utilize these host factors, which may be the major selective pressure for CPSF6 binding in vivo. Our study uncovers two opposing CA-dependent functions of CPSF6 in HIV-1 replication in vivo; however, the benefit for binding CPSF6 appears to outweigh the cost, providing support for a vital function of CPSF6 during HIV-1 replication in vivo.

  16. Expression of HIV-1 antigens in plants as potential subunit vaccines

    Tanzer Fiona L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 has infected more than 40 million people worldwide, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa. The high prevalence of HIV-1 subtype C in southern Africa necessitates the development of cheap, effective vaccines. One means of production is the use of plants, for which a number of different techniques have been successfully developed. HIV-1 Pr55Gag is a promising HIV-1 vaccine candidate: we compared the expression of this and a truncated Gag (p17/p24 and the p24 capsid subunit in Nicotiana spp. using transgenic plants and transient expression via Agrobacterium tumefaciens and recombinant tobamovirus vectors. We also investigated the influence of subcellular localisation of recombinant protein to the chloroplast and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER on protein yield. We partially purified a selected vaccine candidate and tested its stimulation of a humoral and cellular immune response in mice. Results Both transient and transgenic expression of the HIV antigens were successful, although expression of Pr55Gag was low in all systems; however, the Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of p24 and p17/p24 yielded best, to more than 1 mg p24/kg fresh weight. Chloroplast targeted protein levels were highest in transient and transgenic expression of p24 and p17/p24. The transiently-expressed p17/p24 was not immunogenic in mice as a homologous vaccine, but it significantly boosted a humoral and T cell immune response primed by a gag DNA vaccine, pTHGagC. Conclusion Transient agroinfiltration was best for expression of all of the recombinant proteins tested, and p24 and p17/p24 were expressed at much higher levels than Pr55Gag. Our results highlight the usefulness of plastid signal peptides in enhancing the production of recombinant proteins meant for use as vaccines. The p17/p24 protein effectively boosted T cell and humoral responses in mice primed by the DNA vaccine pTHGagC, showing that this plant

  17. Topical Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate Nanoparticles Prevent HIV-1 Vaginal Transmission in a Humanized Mouse Model.

    Destache, Christopher J; Mandal, Subhra; Yuan, Zhe; Kang, Guobin; Date, Abhijit A; Lu, Wuxun; Shibata, Annemarie; Pham, Rachel; Bruck, Patrick; Rezich, Michael; Zhou, You; Vivekanandan, Renuga; Fletcher, Courtney V; Li, Qingsheng

    2016-06-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with 1% tenofovir (TFV) vaginal gel has failed in clinical trials. To improve TFV efficacy in vaginal gel, we formulated tenofovir disoproxil fumarate nanoparticles in a thermosensitive (TMS) gel (TDF-NP-TMS gel). TDF-NPs were fabricated using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer and an ion-pairing agent by oil-in-water emulsification. The efficacy of TDF-NP-TMS gel was tested in humanized bone marrow-liver-thymus (hu-BLT) mice. Hu-BLT mice in the treatment group (Rx; n = 15) were administered TDF-NP-TMS gel intravaginally, having TDF at 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1% (wt/vol) concentrations, whereas the control (Ctr; n = 8) group received a blank TMS gel. All Rx mice (0.1% [n = 4], 0.5% [n = 6], and 1% [n = 5]) were vaginally challenged with two transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 strains (2.5 × 10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious doses). Rx mice were challenged at 4 h (0.1%), 24 h (0.5%), and 7 days (1%) posttreatment (p.t.) and Ctr mice were challenged at 4 h p.t. Blood was drawn weekly for 4 weeks postinoculation (p.i.) for plasma viral load (pVL) using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Ctr mice had positive pVL within 2 weeks p.i. Rx mice challenged at 4 h and 24 h showed 100% protection and no detectable pVL throughout the 4 weeks of follow-up (P = 0.009; Mantel-Cox test). Mice challenged at 7 days were HIV-1 positive at 14 days p.i. Further, HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA) in vaginal and spleen tissues of Rx group mice with negative pVL were examined using an in situ hybridization (ISH) technique. The detection of vRNA was negative in all Rx mice studied. The present studies elucidate TDF-NP-TMS gel as a long-acting, coitus-independent HIV-1 vaginal protection modality. PMID:27044548

  18. Molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 strains in the south-east and east of Turkey

    Mustafa Kemal elen; Mehmet Sinan Dal; Sevgi Kalkanl; Murat Sayan; Tuba Dal; Celal Ayaz; Alicem Tekin; Tuncer zekinci; Suda Tekin Koruk; Tunga Barcin; Recep Tekin

    2015-01-01

    To detect the subtype characterization and drug-resistant mutations in HIV-1 strains after the refugee movement from Syria to Turkey between 2011 and 2014 in south east border lines. Methods: A total of 65 patients were included in this study, of which 57 (88%) patients were antiretroviral therapy-naive patients. HIV-1 RNA was detected and quantified by real-time PCR assay. HIV-1 subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) were identified by phylogenetic analysis (neighbor-joining method), and drug-resistant mutations were analyzed. Results: Three major HIV groups were indicated. Two of these groups were located in subtype B. The other group showed heterogeneity. Subtype B (48/65, 73.8%), followed by CRFs (12/65, 18.5%) was the most common strain. Subtype of CRFs consisted of CRF01_AE (9/65, 13.8%) and CRF02_AG (3/65, 4.6%). Subtype C (1/65, 1.5%), sub-subtypes A1 (2/65, 3.1%) and F1 (2/65, 3.1%) were also detected with low prevalence. The rate of overall primary antiretroviral resistance was 4.9% (3/61). Drug-resistant rate for non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was 4.9%. The thymidine analogue mutation rate was 13.1% (8/61). Conclusions: HIV molecular epidemiology studies are necessary to determine transmission patterns and spread. Subtype B and CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG are the most prevalent strains in the south-east of Turkey. However, subtype C, sub-subtypes A1 and F1 are of low prevalence but persist in the south-east of Turkey. In the near future, changing of HIV epidemiology will be possible in Turkey due to migration movement in border lines and resistance testing will play an important role in HIV management.

  19. Predicting drug resistance of the HIV-1 protease using molecular interaction energy components.

    Hou, Tingjun; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei

    2009-03-01

    Drug resistance significantly impairs the efficacy of AIDS therapy. Therefore, precise prediction of resistant viral mutants is particularly useful for developing effective drugs and designing therapeutic regimen. In this study, we applied a structure-based computational approach to predict mutants of the HIV-1 protease resistant to the seven FDA approved drugs. We analyzed the energetic pattern of the protease-drug interaction by calculating the molecular interaction energy components (MIECs) between the drug and the protease residues. Support vector machines (SVMs) were trained on MIECs to classify protease mutants into resistant and nonresistant categories. The high prediction accuracies for the test sets of cross-validations suggested that the MIECs successfully characterized the interaction interface between drugs and the HIV-1 protease. We conducted a proof-of-concept study on a newly approved drug, darunavir (TMC114), on which no drug resistance data were available in the public domain. Compared with amprenavir, our analysis suggested that darunavir might be more potent to combat drug resistance. To quantitatively estimate binding affinities of drugs and study the contributions of protease residues to causing resistance, linear regression models were trained on MIECs using partial least squares (PLS). The MIEC-PLS models also achieved satisfactory prediction accuracy. Analysis of the fitting coefficients of MIECs in the regression model revealed the important resistance mutations and shed light into understanding the mechanisms of these mutations to cause resistance. Our study demonstrated the advantages of characterizing the protease-drug interaction using MIECs. We believe that MIEC-SVM and MIEC-PLS can help design new agents or combination of therapeutic regimens to counter HIV-1 protease resistant strains. PMID:18704937

  20. Molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 strains in the south-east and east of Turkey

    Mustafa; Kemal; ?elen; Murat; Sayan; Tuba; Dal; Celal; Ayaz; Alicem; Tekin; Tuncer; ?zekinci; Suda; Tekin; Koruk; Tunga; Barcin; Recep; Tekin; Mehmet; Sinan; Dal; Sevgi; Kalkanl?

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To detect the subtype characterization and drug-resistant mutations in HIV-1 strains after the refugee movement from Syria to Turkey between 2011 and 2014 in south east border lines. Methods: A total of 65 patients were included in this study, of which 57(88%) patients were antiretroviral therapy-naive patients. HIV-1 RNA was detected and quantii ed by realtime PCR assay. HIV-1 subtypes and circulating recombinant forms(CRFs) were identii ed by phylogenetic analysis(neighbor-joining method), and drug-resistant mutations were analyzed.Results: Three major HIV groups were indicated. Two of these groups were located in subtype B. The other group showed heterogeneity. Subtype B(48/65, 73.8%), followed by CRFs(12/65, 18.5%) was the most common strain. Subtype of CRFs consisted of CRF01_AE(9/65, 13.8%) and CRF02_AG(3/65, 4.6%). Subtype C(1/65, 1.5%), sub-subtypes A1(2/65, 3.1%) and F1(2/65, 3.1%) were also detected with low prevalence. The rate of overall primary antiretroviral resistance was 4.9%(3/61). Drug-resistant rate for non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was 4.9%. The thymidine analogue mutation rate was 13.1%(8/61).Conclusions: HIV molecular epidemiology studies are necessary to determine transmission patterns and spread. Subtype B and CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG are the most prevalent strains in the south-east of Turkey. However, subtype C, sub-subtypes A1 and F1 are of low prevalence but persist in the south-east of Turkey. In the near future, changing of HIV epidemiology will be possible in Turkey due to migration movement in border lines and resistance testing will play an important role in HIV management.

  1. HIV-1 RNAs are Not Part of the Argonaute 2 Associated RNA Interference Pathway in Macrophages.

    Valentina Vongrad

    Full Text Available MiRNAs and other small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs are key players in post-transcriptional gene regulation. HIV-1 derived small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs have been described in HIV-1 infected cells, but their biological functions still remain to be elucidated. Here, we approached the question whether viral sncRNAs may play a role in the RNA interference (RNAi pathway or whether viral mRNAs are targeted by cellular miRNAs in human monocyte derived macrophages (MDM.The incorporation of viral sncRNAs and/or their target RNAs into RNA-induced silencing complex was investigated using photoactivatable ribonucleoside-induced cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP as well as high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP, which capture Argonaute2-bound miRNAs and their target RNAs. HIV-1 infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM were chosen as target cells, as they have previously been shown to express HIV-1 sncRNAs. In addition, we applied small RNA deep sequencing to study differential cellular miRNA expression in HIV-1 infected versus non-infected MDMs.PAR-CLIP and HITS-CLIP data demonstrated the absence of HIV-1 RNAs in Ago2-RISC, although the presence of a multitude of HIV-1 sncRNAs in HIV-1 infected MDMs was confirmed by small RNA sequencing. Small RNA sequencing revealed that 1.4% of all sncRNAs were of HIV-1 origin. However, neither HIV-1 derived sncRNAs nor putative HIV-1 target sequences incorporated into Ago2-RISC were identified suggesting that HIV-1 sncRNAs are not involved in the canonical RNAi pathway nor is HIV-1 targeted by this pathway in HIV-1 infected macrophages.

  2. Evidence that creation of invasion sites determines the rate of strand transfer mediated by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    Hanson, Mark Nils; Balakrishnan, Mini; Roques, Bernard P; Bambara, Robert A

    2006-11-10

    Strand transfer during reverse transcription can produce genetic recombination in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) when two genomic RNAs, that are not identical, are co-packaged in the virus. Strand transfer was measured in vitro, in reactions involving primer switching from a donor to acceptor RNA template. The transfer product appeared with much slower kinetics than full-length synthesis on the donor template. The goal of this study was to learn more about the transfer mechanism by defining the steps that limit its rate. We previously proposed transfer to include the steps of acceptor invasion, hybrid propagation, terminus transfer, and re-initiation of synthesis on the acceptor template. Unexpectedly, with our templates increasing acceptor concentration increased the transfer efficiency but had no effect on the rate of transfer. Templates with a short region of homology limiting hybrid propagation exhibited a slow accumulation of transfer products, suggesting that for tested long homology templates hybrid propagation was not rate limiting. Substituting a DNA acceptor and adding Klenow polymerase accelerated re-initiation and extension exclusively on the DNA acceptor. This lead to a small rate increase due to faster extension on the acceptor, suggesting re-initiation of synthesis on the tested RNA acceptors was not rate limiting. A substrate was designed in which the 5' end of the primer was single stranded, and complimentary to the acceptor, i.e. having a pre-made invasion site. With this substrate, increasing concentrations of acceptor increased the rate of transfer. Together these data suggest that RNase H cleavage, and dissociation of RNA fragments creating an invasion site was rate limiting on most tested templates. When an accessible invasion site was present, acceptor interaction at that site influence the rate. PMID:16997325

  3. Randomized pilot trial of a synbiotic dietary supplement in chronic HIV-1 infection

    Schunter Marco

    2012-06-01

    Synbiotic treatment for 4 weeks can successfully augment the levels of probiotic species in the gut during chronic HIV-1 infection. Associated changes in microbial translocation appear to be absent, and markers of systemic immune activation appear largely unchanged. These findings may help inform future studies aimed at testing pre- and probiotic approaches to improve gut function and mucosal immunity in chronic HIV-1 infection. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov: NCT00688311

  4. Severe anaemia is not associated with HIV-1 env gene characteristics in Malawian children

    Kachala David

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaemia is the most common haematological complication of HIV and associated with a high morbidity and a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of HIV-associated anaemia is poorly understood and may include a direct effect of HIV on erythropoiesis. In vitro studies have suggested that specific HIV strains, like X4 that uses the CXCR4 co-receptor present on erythroid precursors, are associated with diminished erythropoiesis. This co-receptor affinity is determined by changes in the hypervariable loop of the HIV-1 envelope genome. In a previous case-control study we observed an association between HIV and severe anaemia in Malawian children that could not be fully explained by secondary infections and micronutrient deficiencies alone. We therefore explored the possibility that alterations in the V1-V2-V3 fragment of HIV-1 were associated with severe anaemia. Methods Using peripheral blood nucleic acid isolates of HIV-infected children identified in the previous studied we assessed if variability of the V1-V2-V3 region of HIV and the occurrence of X4 strains were more common in HIV-infected children with (cases, n = 29 and without severe anaemia (controls, n = 30. For 15 cases bone marrow isolates were available to compare against peripheral blood. All children were followed for 18 months after recruitment. Results Phylogenetic analysis showed that HIV-1 subtype C was present in all but one child. All V1-V2-V3 characteristics tested: V3 charge, V1-V2 length and potential glycosylation sites, were not found to be different between cases and controls. Using a computer model (C-PSSM four children (7.8% were identified to have an X4 strain. This prevalence was not different between study groups (p = 1.00. The V3 loop characteristics for bone marrow and peripheral blood isolates in the case group were identical. None of the children identified as having an X4 strain developed a (new episode of severe anaemia during follow up. Conclusion

  5. Anti-HIV-1 integrase compounds from Dioscorea bulbifera and molecular docking study.

    Chaniad, Prapaporn; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Pianwanit, Somsak; Tewtrakul, Supinya

    2016-06-01

    Context Dioscorea bulbifera L. (Dioscoreaceae) has been used in a traditional Thai longevity medicine preparation. Isolation of inhibitors from natural products is a potential source for continuous development of new HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors. Objective The objective of this study is to isolate the compounds and evaluate their anti-HIV-1 IN activity, as well as to predict the potential interactions of the compounds with an IN. Materials and methods The ethyl acetate and water fractions (1-100 μg/mL) of Dioscorea bulbifera bulbils were isolated and tested for their anti-HIV-1 IN activity using the multiplate integration assay (MIA). The interactions of the active compounds with IN were investigated using a molecular docking method. Results and discussions The ethyl acetate and water fractions of Dioscorea bulbifera bulbils afforded seven compounds. Among these, allantoin (1), 2,4,3',5'-tetrahydroxybibenzyl (2), and 5,7,4'-trihydroxy-2-styrylchromone (5) were isolated for the first time from this plant. Myricetin (4) exhibited the most potent activity with an IC50 value of 3.15 μM, followed by 2,4,6,7-tetrahydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (3, IC50 value= 14.20 μM), quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (6, IC50 value = 19.39 μM) and quercetin-3-O-β-d-galactopyranoside (7, IC50 value = 21.80 μM). Potential interactions of the active compounds (3, 4, 6, and 7) with the IN active site were additionally investigated. Compound 4 showed the best binding affinity to IN and formed strong interactions with various amino acid residues. These compounds interacted with Asp64, Thr66, His67, Glu92, Asp116, Gln148, Glu152, Asn155, and Lys159, which are involved in both the 3'-processing and strand transfer reactions of IN. In particular, galloyl, catechol, and sugar moieties were successful inhibitors for HIV-1 IN. PMID:26864337

  6. Docking of anti-HIV-1 oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone derivatives as potential HSV-1 DNA polymerase inhibitors

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Santos, Fernanda da Costa; Batalha, Pedro Netto; Brozeguini, Leonardo; Seidl, Peter R.; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Cunha, Anna Cláudia; de Souza, Maria Cecília B. V.; Ferreira, Vitor F.; Giongo, Viveca A.; Cirne-Santos, Cláudio; Paixão, Izabel C. P.

    2014-09-01

    Although there are many antiviral drugs available for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, still the synthesis of new anti-HSV candidates is an important strategy to be pursued, due to the emergency of resistant HSV strains mainly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected patients. Some 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinolines, such as PNU-183792 (1), show a broad spectrum antiviral activity against human herpes viruses, inhibiting the viral DNA polymerase (POL) without affecting the human POLs. Thus, on an ongoing antiviral research project, our group has synthesized ribonucleosides containing the 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (quinolone) heterocyclic moiety, such as the 6-Cl derivative (2), which is a dual antiviral agent (HSV-1 and HIV-1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes of 1 and 2 with the HSV-1 POL suggest that structural modifications of 2 should increase its experimental anti-HSV-1 activity, since its ribosyl and carboxyl groups are highly hydrophilic to interact with a hydrophobic pocket of this enzyme. Therefore, in this work, comparative molecular docking simulations of 1 and three new synthesized oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone HIV-1 inhibitors (3-5), which do not contain those hydrophilic groups, were carried out, in order to access these modifications in the proposition of new potential anti-HSV-1 agents, but maintaining the anti-HIV-1 activity. Among the docked compounds, the oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 3 is the best candidate for an anti-HSV-1 agent, and, in addition, it showed anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 3.4 ± 0.3 μM). Compounds 2 and 3 were used as templates in the design of four new oxoquinoline-acylhydrazones (6-9) as potential anti-HSV-1 agents to increase the antiviral activity of 2. Among the docked compounds, oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 7 was selected as the best candidate for further development of dual anti-HIV/HSV activity.

  7. Improved therapy-success prediction with GSS estimated from clinical HIV-1 sequences

    Alejandro Pironti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rules-based HIV-1 drug-resistance interpretation (DRI systems disregard many amino-acid positions of the drug's target protein. The aims of this study are (1 the development of a drug-resistance interpretation system that is based on HIV-1 sequences from clinical practice rather than hard-to-get phenotypes, and (2 the assessment of the benefit of taking all available amino-acid positions into account for DRI. Materials and Methods: A dataset containing 34,934 therapy-naïve and 30,520 drug-exposed HIV-1 pol sequences with treatment history was extracted from the EuResist database and the Los Alamos National Laboratory database. 2,550 therapy-change-episode baseline sequences (TCEB were assigned to test set A. Test set B contains 1,084 TCEB from the HIVdb TCE repository. Sequences from patients absent in the test sets were used to train three linear support vector machines to produce scores that predict drug exposure pertaining to each of 20 antiretrovirals: the first one uses the full amino-acid sequences (DEfull, the second one only considers IAS drug-resistance positions (DEonlyIAS, and the third one disregards IAS drug-resistance positions (DEnoIAS. For performance comparison, test sets A and B were evaluated with DEfull, DEnoIAS, DEonlyIAS, geno2pheno[resistance], HIVdb, ANRS, HIV-GRADE, and REGA. Clinically-validated cut-offs were used to convert the continuous output of the first four methods into susceptible-intermediate-resistant (SIR predictions. With each method, a genetic susceptibility score (GSS was calculated for each therapy episode in each test set by converting the SIR prediction for its compounds to integer: S=2, I=1, and R=0. The GSS were used to predict therapy success as defined by the EuResist standard datum definition. Statistical significance was assessed using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: A comparison of the therapy-success prediction performances among the different interpretation systems for test

  8. Reduced expression of glutamate transporter EAAT2 and impaired glutamate transport in human primary astrocytes exposed to HIV-1 or gp120

    L-Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Astrocytes maintain low levels of synaptic glutamate by high-affinity uptake and defects in this function may lead to neuronal cell death by excitotoxicity. We tested the effects of HIV-1 and its envelope glycoprotein gp120 upon glutamate uptake and expression of glutamate transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 in fetal human astrocytes in vitro. Astrocytes isolated from fetal tissues between 16 and 19 weeks of gestation expressed EAAT1 and EAAT2 RNA and proteins as detected by Northern blot analysis and immunoblotting, respectively, and the cells were capable of specific glutamate uptake. Exposure of astrocytes to HIV-1 or gp120 significantly impaired glutamate uptake by the cells, with maximum inhibition within 6 h, followed by gradual decline during 3 days of observation. HIV-1-infected cells showed a 59% reduction in Vmax for glutamate transport, indicating a reduction in the number of active transporter sites on the cell surface. Impaired glutamate transport after HIV-1 infection or gp120 exposure correlated with a 40-70% decline in steady-state levels of EAAT2 RNA and protein. EAAT1 RNA and protein levels were less affected. Treatment of astrocytes with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) decreased the expression of both EAAT1 and EAAT2, but neither HIV-1 nor gp120 were found to induce TNF-α production by astrocytes. These findings demonstrate that HIV-1 and gp120 induce transcriptional downmodulation of the EAAT2 transporter gene in human astrocytes and coordinately attenuate glutamate transport by the cells. Reduction of the ability of HIV-1-infected astrocytes to take up glutamate may contribute to the development of neurological disease

  9. Design, discovery, modelling, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel and small, low toxicity s-triazine derivatives as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Viira, Birgit; Selyutina, Anastasia; García-Sosa, Alfonso T; Karonen, Maarit; Sinkkonen, Jari; Merits, Andres; Maran, Uko

    2016-06-01

    A set of top-ranked compounds from a multi-objective in silico screen was experimentally tested for toxicity and the ability to inhibit the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in cell-free assay and in cell-based assay using HIV-1 based virus-like particles. Detailed analysis of a commercial sample that indicated specific inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcription revealed that a minor component that was structurally similar to that of the main compound was responsible for the strongest inhibition. As a result, novel s-triazine derivatives were proposed, modelled, discovered, and synthesised, and their antiviral activity and cellular toxicity were tested. Compounds 18a and 18b were found to be efficient HIV-1 RT inhibitors, with an IC50 of 5.6±1.1μM and 0.16±0.05μM in a cell-based assay using infectious HIV-1, respectively. Compound 18b also had no detectable toxicity for different human cell lines. Their binding mode and interactions with the RT suggest that there was strong and adaptable binding in a tight (NNRTI) hydrophobic pocket. In summary, this iterative study produced structural clues and led to a group of non-toxic, novel compounds to inhibit HIV-RT with up to nanomolar potency. PMID:27108399

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in Chinese infected with HIV-1 B'/C Recombinant (CRF07_BC

    Yu Xu G

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The characterization of HIV-1-specific T cell responses in people infected with locally circulating HIV-1 strain will facilitate the development of HIV-1 vaccine. Sixty intravenous drug users infected with HIV-1 circulating recombinant form 07_BC (CRF07_BC, which has been spreading rapidly in western China from north to south, were recruited from Xinjiang, China to assess the HIV-1-specific T cell responses at single peptide level with overlapping peptides (OLP covering the whole concensus clades B and C proteome. Results The median of the total magnitude and total number of OLPs recognized by CTL responses were 10925 SFC/million PBMC and 25 OLPs, respectively, when tested by clade C peptides, which was significantly higher than when tested by clade B peptides. The immunodominant regions, which cover 14% (58/413 of the HIV-1 proteome, are widely distributed throughout the HIV-1 proteome except in Tat, Vpu and Pol-PR, with Gag, Pol-RT, Pol-Int and Nef being most frequently targeted. The subdominant epitopes are mostly located in p24, Nef, integrase, Vpr and Vif. Of the responses directed to clade C OLPs, 61.75% (972/1574 can be observed when tested with corresponding clade B OLPs. However, Pol-PR and Vpu tend to be targeted in the clade B sequence rather than the clade C sequence, which is in line with the recombinant pattern of CRF07_BC. Stronger and broader CTL responses in subjects with CD4 cell counts ranging from 200 to 400/mm3 were observed when compared to those with less than 200/mm3 or more than 400/mm3, though there have been no significant correlations identified between the accumulative CTL responses or overall breadth and CD4 cell count or plasma viral load. Conclusion This is the first study conducted to comprehensively address T cell responses in Chinese subjects infected with HIV-1 CRF07_BC in which subtle differences in cross-reactivity were observed, though similar patterns of overall immune responses were

  11. HIV-1 Tat interaction with Dicer: requirement for RNA

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dicer is an RNase III which processes two classes of cellular small RNAs: the microRNAs (miRNA and short interfering RNAs (siRNA. Previously, we observed that over-expressed HIV-1 Tat protein can suppress the processing of small RNAs inside cells. Here, we have investigated the requirements for Tat interaction with Dicer. We report that Tat-Dicer interaction depends on RNA, requires the helicase domain of Dicer, and is independent of Tat's transactivation domain.

  12. Positive Selection of Primate Genes that Promote HIV-1 Replication

    Meyerson, Nicholas R.; Rowley, Paul A.; Swan, Christina H; Le, Dona T.; Wilkerson, Greg K; Sawyer, Sara L

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary analyses have revealed that most host-encoded restriction factors against HIV-1 have experienced virus-driven selection during primate evolution. However, HIV also depends on the function of many human proteins, called host factors, for its replication. It is not clear whether virus-driven selection shapes the evolution of host factor genes to the extent that it is known to shape restriction factor genes. We show that 5 out of 40 HIV host factor genes (13%) analyzed do bear stron...

  13. Modeling HIV-1 viral capsid nucleation by dynamical systems.

    Sadre-Marandi, Farrah; Liu, Yuewu; Liu, Jiangguo; Tavener, Simon; Zou, Xiufen

    2015-12-01

    There are two stages generally recognized in the viral capsid assembly: nucleation and elongation. This paper focuses on the nucleation stage and develops mathematical models for HIV-1 viral capsid nucleation based on six-species dynamical systems. The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is used for parameter fitting to estimate the association and dissociation rates from biological experiment data. Numerical simulations of capsid protein (CA) multimer concentrations demonstrate a good agreement with experimental data. Sensitivity and elasticity analysis of CA multimer concentrations with respect to the association and dissociation rates further reveals the importance of CA trimer-of- dimers in the nucleation stage of viral capsid self- assembly. PMID:26596714

  14. HIV-1 tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    Lai, Rachel P J; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Patients co-infected with HIV-1 and tuberculosis (TB) are at risk of developing TB-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) following commencement of antiretroviral therapy (ART). TB-IRIS is characterized by transient but severe localized or systemic inflammatory reactions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens. Here, we review the risk factors and clinical management of TB-IRIS, as well as the roles played by different aspects of the immune response in contributing to TB-IRIS pathogenesis. PMID:26423994

  15. Synthesis, Antimicrobial, and Anti-HIV1 Activity of Quinazoline-4(3H)-one Derivatives

    K. Vijayakumar; A. Jafar Ahamed; Thiruneelakandan, G.

    2013-01-01

    The present investigation aims to synthesize 11 compounds of quinazoline-1 derivatives and to test their antimicrobial and anti-HIV1 activities. A quick-witted method was developed for the synthesis of novel substituted quinazolinone derivatives by summarizing diverse diamines with benzoxazine reactions, and it demonstrated the benefits of typical reactions, handy operation, and outstanding product yields. These compounds were confirmed by elemental analysis, I R, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and mass sp...

  16. Mindfulness meditation training effects on CD4+ T lymphocytes in HIV-1 infected adults: A small randomized controlled trial

    Creswell, J. David; Myers, Hector F.; Cole, Steven W.; Irwin, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation training has stress reduction benefits in various patient populations, but its effects on biological markers of HIV-1 progression are unknown. The present study tested the efficacy of an 8-week Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) meditation program compared to a 1-day control seminar on CD4+ T lymphocyte counts in stressed HIV infected adults. A single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted with enrollment and follow-up occurring between November 2005 and...

  17. Pin1 liberates the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1): Must we stop it?

    Hou, Hai; Wang, Jing-Zhang; Liu, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Ting

    2015-07-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is mainly caused by the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). To our knowledge, this is the first review focusing on the vital role of Pin1 in the infection of HIV-1 and the development of AIDS. We and others have demonstrated that Pin1, the only known cis-to-trans isomerase recognizing the pThr/pSer-Pro motifs in proteins, plays striking roles in several human diseases. Interestingly, recent evidence gradually indicates that Pin1 regulates several key steps of the life cycle of HIV-1, including the uncoating of the HIV-1 core, the reverse transcription of the RNA genome of HIV-1, and the integration of the HIV-1 cDNA into human chromosomes. Whereas inhibiting Pin1 suppresses all of these key steps and attenuates the replication of HIV-1, at the same time different PIN1 gene variants are correlated with the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, Pin1 potentially promotes HIV-1 infection by activating multiple oncogenes and inactivating multiple tumor suppressors, extending the life span of HIV-infected cells. These descriptions suggest Pin1 as a promising therapeutic target for the prevention of HIV-1 and highlight the possibility of blocking the development of AIDS by Pin1 inhibitors. PMID:25913034

  18. Recombinant rabies virus as potential live-viral vaccines for HIV-1.

    Schnell, M J; Foley, H D; Siler, C A; McGettigan, J P; Dietzschold, B; Pomerantz, R J

    2000-03-28

    Recombinant, replication-competent rabies virus (RV) vaccine strain-based vectors were developed expressing HIV type I (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (gp160) from both a laboratory-adapted (CXCR4-tropic) and a primary (dual-tropic) HIV-1 isolate. An additional transcription stop/start unit within the RV genome was used to express HIV-1 gp160 in addition to the other RV proteins. The HIV-1 gp160 protein was stably and functionally expressed, as indicated by fusion of human T cell lines after infection with the recombinant RVs. Inoculation of mice with the recombinant RVs expressing HIV-1 gp160 induced a strong humoral response directed against the HIV-1 envelope protein after a single boost with recombinant HIV-1 gp120 protein. Moreover, high neutralization titers up to 1:800 against HIV-1 could be detected in the mouse sera. These data indicate that a live recombinant RV, a rhabdovirus, expressing HIV-1 gp160 may serve as an effective vector for an HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:10706640

  19. Higher Desolvation Energy Reduces Molecular Recognition in Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease

    Ladislau C. Kovari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing HIV-1 protease inhibitors that overcome drug-resistance is still a challenging task. In this study, four clinical isolates of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases that exhibit resistance to all the US FDA-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors and also reduce the substrate recognition ability were examined. A multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease isolate, MDR 769, was co-crystallized with the p2/NC substrate and the mutated CA/p2 substrate, CA/p2 P1’F. Both substrates display different levels of molecular recognition by the wild-type and multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease. From the crystal structures, only limited differences can be identified between the wild-type and multi-drug resistant protease. Therefore, a wild-type HIV-1 protease and four multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases in complex with the two peptides were modeled based on the crystal structures and examined during a 10 ns-molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results reveal that the multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases require higher desolvation energy to form complexes with the peptides. This result suggests that the desolvation of the HIV-1 protease active site is an important step of protease-ligand complex formation as well as drug resistance. Therefore, desolvation energy could be considered as a parameter in the evaluation of future HIV-1 protease inhibitor candidates.

  20. Why do HIV-1 and HIV-2 use different pathways to develop AZT resistance?

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 develops resistance to all available drugs, including the nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs such as AZT. ATP-mediated excision underlies the most common form of HIV-1 resistance to AZT. However, clinical data suggest that when HIV-2 is challenged with AZT, it usually accumulates resistance mutations that cause AZT resistance by reduced incorporation of AZTTP rather than selective excision of AZTMP. We compared the properties of HIV-1 and HIV-2 reverse transcriptase (RT in vitro. Although both RTs have similar levels of polymerase activity, HIV-1 RT more readily incorporates, and is more susceptible to, inhibition by AZTTP than is HIV-2 RT. Differences in the region around the polymerase active site could explain why HIV-2 RT incorporates AZTTP less efficiently than HIV-1 RT. HIV-1 RT is markedly more efficient at carrying out the excision reaction with ATP as the pyrophosphate donor than is HIV-2 RT. This suggests that HIV-1 RT has a better nascent ATP binding site than HIV-2 RT, making it easier for HIV-1 RT to develop a more effective ATP binding site by mutation. A comparison of HIV-1 and HIV-2 RT shows that there are numerous differences in the putative ATP binding sites that could explain why HIV-1 RT binds ATP more effectively. HIV-1 RT incorporates AZTTP more efficiently than does HIV-2 RT. However, HIV-1 RT is more efficient at ATP-mediated excision of AZTMP than is HIV-2 RT. Mutations in HIV-1 RT conferring AZT resistance tend to increase the efficiency of the ATP-mediated excision pathway, while mutations in HIV-2 RT conferring AZT resistance tend to increase the level of AZTTP exclusion from the polymerase active site. Thus, each RT usually chooses the pathway best suited to extend the properties of the respective wild-type enzymes.