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Sample records for acceptance tests

  1. L-286, Acceptance Test Record

    This document provides a detailed account of how the acceptance testing was conducted for Project L-286, ''200E Area Sanitary Water Plant Effluent Stream Reduction''. The testing of the L-286 instrumentation system was conducted under the direct supervision

  2. Nitrogen trailer acceptance test report

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-0249. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-108 Rev.0. The equipment being tested is a portable contained nitrogen supply. The test was conducted at Norco's facility

  3. Nitrogen trailer acceptance test report

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1996-02-12

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-0249. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-108 Rev.0. The equipment being tested is a portable contained nitrogen supply. The test was conducted at Norco`s facility.

  4. Acceptance tests and commissioning measurements

    Following the installation of a therapy machine, be it an orthovoltage X ray unit, cobalt unit, linac or brachytherapy machine, in a radiotherapy clinic, the medical physicist must perform a series of measurements and tasks prior to placing the unit into clinical operation. These duties include acceptance testing and commissioning. Various dosimetric and radiation measuring instruments and techniques are discussed

  5. Acceptance test of LANTIS system

    Acceptance tests of radiotherapy equipment are very important. It is essential for the quality control of the equipment. Quality assurance checks for LANTIS was done during the installation and also periodically. QA involves checks for individual workstations, as well as for overall system. In modern radiotherapy centers, transferring data from one workstation to another via networking improves the quality of the treatment, reduces the errors and reduces the overall treatment time. In this hospital, Local Area Network Therapy Information system (LANTIS) from Siemens, is available for patient data transfer. Here, some of the acceptance checks carried out are presented

  6. Mini-DACS acceptance test report

    The attached document is the acceptance test summary report, of the mini-DACS, that was used to test the spare mixer pump for tank 241-SY-101, at the maintenance and storage facility (MASF). It includes a copy of the acceptance test procedure (ATP) and all pertaining ECNS

  7. Acceptance testing of photographic film dosemeters

    The reports describes a system for acceptance testing of photographic film dosemeters in customary use in personal dosimetry. The system comprises a test of some of the fundamental dosimetric properties of the film. The acceptance test will be performed in connection with the semi-annual purchases of dosemeter film to the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene. The test program comprises both constancy tests and absolute requirements. The latter refer mainly to ISO 1757 - Personal photographic dosemeters. 2 refs

  8. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal

  9. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  10. Acceptance Test Plan for ANSYS Software

    This plan governs the acceptance testing of the ANSYS software (Full Mechanical Release 5.5) for use on Project Word Management Contract (PHMC) computer systems (either UNIX or Microsoft Windows/NT). There are two phases to the acceptance testing covered by this test plan: program execution in accordance with the guidance provided in installation manuals; and ensuring results of the execution are consistent with the expected physical behavior of the system being modeled

  11. Cone penetrometer moisture probe acceptance test report

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-146 (Prototype Cone Penetrometer Moisture Probe Acceptance Test Procedure) and WHC-SD-WM-ATP-145 (Cone Penetrometer Moisture Probe Acceptance Test Procedure). The master copy of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-145 can be found in Appendix A and the master copy of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-146 can be found in Appendix B. Also included with this report is a matrix showing design criteria of the cone penetrometer moisture probe and the verification method used (Appendix C)

  12. Generator acceptance test and inspection report

    This Acceptance Test Report(ATR) is the completed testing and inspection of the new portable generator. The testing and inspection is to verify that the generator provided by the vendor meets the requirements of specification WHC-S-0252, Revision 2. Attached is various other documentation to support the inspection and testing

  13. DACS upgrade acceptance test report

    The DACS, which is housed in a trailer located just outside of the north fence at the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors located in and around the SY-101 tank. These sensors provide information such as: (1) tank vapor space and ventilation system H2 concentration; (2) tank waste temperature; (3) tank pressure; (4) waste density; (5) operating pump parameters such as speed, flow, rotational position, discharge pressure, and internal temperature; (6) strain (for major equipment); and (7) waste level. The output of these sensors is conditioned and transmitted to the DACS computers where these signals are displayed, recorded, and monitored for out-of-specification conditions. If abnormal conditions are detected, then, in certain situations, the DACS automatically generates alarms and causes the system to abort pump operations. The report documents testing performed per WHC-SD-WM-ATP-082. Rev. 0-13

  14. Gas characterization system software acceptance test report

    This document details the results of software acceptance testing of gas characterization systems. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases

  15. Gas characterization system software acceptance test procedure

    This document details the Software Acceptance Testing of gas characterization systems. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases

  16. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal

  17. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-07-01

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

  18. Breathing air trailer acceptance test report

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-0251, Rev.0 and ECNs 613530 and 606113. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-104. The equipment tested is a Breathing Air Supply Trailer purchased as a design and fabrication procurement activity. The ATP was written by the Seller and was performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company witnessing portions of the test at the Seller's location

  19. Void fraction instrument acceptance test procedure

    This acceptance test procedure (ATP) was written to test the void fraction instrument (VFI) and verify that the unit is ready for field service. The procedure verifies that the mechanical and electrical features (not specifically addressed in the software ATP) and software alarms are operating as designed

  20. W-087 Acceptance test procedure. Revision 1

    Joshi, A.W.

    1997-06-10

    This Acceptance Test Procedure/Operational Test Procedure (ATP/OTP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Electrical/Instrumentation and Mechanical systems function as required by project criteria and to verify proper operation of the integrated system including the interlocks.

  1. Acceptance test report: Backup power system

    Acceptance Test Report for construction functional testing of Project W-030 Backup Power System. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. Backup power includes a single 125 KW diesel generator, three 10-kva uninterruptible power supply units, and all necessary control

  2. Diesel generator trailer acceptance test procedure

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document compliance with the requirements of WHC-S-0252 Rev. 1 and ECNs 609271, and 609272. The equipment being tested is a 150KW Diesel Generator mounted on a trailer with switchgear. The unit was purchased as a Design and Fabrication procurement activity. The ATP was written by the Seller and will be performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company witnessing the test at the Seller's location

  3. Void fraction instrument acceptance test procedure

    This document presents the results of the acceptance test for the mechanical and electrical features (not specifically addressed by the software ATP) of the void fraction instrument (VFI). Acceptance testing of the VFI, control console, and decontamination spray assembly was conducted in the 306E building high bay and area adjacent to the facility. The VFI was tested in the horizontal position supported in multiple locations on rolling tables. The control console was located next to the VFI pneumatic control assembly. The VFI system was operated exactly as is expected in the tank farm, with the following exceptions: power was provided from a building outlet and the VFI was horizontal. The testing described in this document verifies that the mechanical and electrical features are operating as designed and that the unit is ready for field service

  4. GERDA phase II detectors and acceptance tests

    The GERDA collaboration aims at searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge into 76Se. It uses enriched Ge detectors that are operated in liquid argon. Phase I of the experiment started with a target mass of approximately 20 kg on November 1, 2011, and it will last for 1 year. Phase II is in preparation and envisions the installation of at least 25 new Broad Energy Ge detectors (BEGe) that will increase the target mass by nearly 20 kg. These detectors, however, have to be extensively tested prior to their usage. The talk briefly reviews the preparation of the detector screening campaign and focuses on the corresponding acceptance test strategy. The tests include energy resolution and leakage current measurements, dead layer and active volume determination, as well as the pulse shape discrimination efficiencies of the detectors. Finally we present results obtained with depleted BEGe detectors that are used for the optimization of the enriched ones during the acceptance tests.

  5. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal

  6. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal

  7. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-10-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  8. Acceptance Testing Of Web Applications With Test Description Language

    Łukasz Olek; Bartosz Alchimowicz; Jerzy Nawrocki

    2014-01-01

    Acceptance tests are usually created by a client after a part of a system is implemented. However, some methodologies propose the elaboration of test cases before implementing a system. This approach increases the probability of system implementation that fulfills requirements, but may be problematic for customers and testers. To allow acceptance testing in such conditions, we propose to define test cases by recording them on an interactive mockup (a low detailed user-interface prototype). Th...

  9. W-026, acceptance test report manipulator system

    Watson, T.L.

    1997-04-15

    The purpose of the WRAP Manipulator System Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) is to verify that the 4 glovebox sets of WRAP manipulator components, including rail/carriage, slave arm, master controller and auxiliary equipment, meets the requirements of the functional segments of 14590 specification. The demonstration of performance elements of the ATP are performed as a part of the Assembly specifications. Manipulator integration is integrated in the performance testing of the gloveboxes. Each requirement of the Assembly specification will be carried out in conjunction with glovebox performance tests.

  10. Acceptance Testing Of Web Applications With Test Description Language

    Łukasz Olek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acceptance tests are usually created by a client after a part of a system is implemented. However, some methodologies propose the elaboration of test cases before implementing a system. This approach increases the probability of system implementation that fulfills requirements, but may be problematic for customers and testers. To allow acceptance testing in such conditions, we propose to define test cases by recording them on an interactive mockup (a low detailed user-interface prototype. The paper focuses on Test Description Language, a notation used to store test cases.

  11. Nevada test site waste acceptance criteria

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document

  12. Payload test philosophy. [JPL views on qualification/acceptance testing

    Gindorf, T.

    1979-01-01

    The general philosophy of how JPL views payload qualification/acceptance testing for programs that are done either in-house or by contractors is described. Particular attention is given to mission risk classifications, preliminary critical design reviews, environmental design requirements, the thermal and dynamics development tests, and the flight spacecraft system test.

  13. SPECT: How much acceptance testing is reasonable?

    Full text: Whereas in radiology national standards for acceptance testing of medical instrumentation are available, in nuclear medicine this is not the case. This resulted in some kind of uncertainty, so that the Austrian Societies for Nuclear Medicine and for Medical Physics decided to establish a task group for developing guidelines for acceptance testing. One important item that has to be kept in mind is the fact that acceptance testing of radiological equipment has to assure the observation of prescribed limits of radiation. Otherwise there would arise the risk of increased radiation exposure of the patient. On the other hand, the aim of acceptance testing of gamma cameras is only to assure that the specifications are observed. There are no prescribed limits and there is no risk for the patient. There are two standards for defining specifications of gamma cameras: the NEMA standards and the IEC standards. Most of the manufacturers determine the specifications of their gamma cameras according to the NEMA standards, so if we want to check the specifications in the field, we have to use the same methods as the manufacturer, that is the NEMA standards. The questions are: Should we check all parameters defined in the NEMA standards? That would not be possible in the field. Which parameters should we select? In which extent and how precisely should we check? In any case, there must be a reasonable balance between time and financial effort and technical information obtained. Facing these problems our task group decided to propose the following procedure: First, we apply all tests which are called 'primary tests' in the NEMA standards: 1. Intrinsic spatial resolution 2. Intrinsic energy resolution 3. Intrinsic flood field uniformity 4. System spatial resolution without scatter 5. System alignment 6. SPECT reconstructed spatial resolution without scatter 7. Whole body system spatial resolution without scatter. All these tests are basically performed according to the

  14. Acceptance testing and QA in interventional cardiology

    Interventional radiology has seen rapid growth in the field of cardiology over the past decade. This growth has been facilitated by advances in imaging technology and the development of increasingly sophisticated dedicated radiological equipment. Interventional cardiology (IC) procedures are complex and may involve prolonged irradiations, which may subject patients and operators to higher levels of risk than those, which normally prevail. Currently interventional cardiology contributes over 10% to annual collective dose in the UK in spite of contributing to a total annual frequency of 0.68%. The EU Medical Exposures Directive, 97/43/Euratom, identifies interventional radiology as an area of special concern. Acceptance testing and routine quality assurance (QA) programmes are particularly important in the field of interventional cardiology given the above. The requirements for acceptance testing and QA are underpinned in the EU Medical Exposures Directive and consequent national legislation. A QA survey of 16 interventional cardiology systems in Ireland was carried out by the Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St. James's Hospital, Dublin. This is the continuation of a recently published survey and represents over half of the interventional cardiology systems in Ireland including new technology digital flat panel systems and dedicated mobile equipment in trailors. Acceptance testing and QA protocols were developed and reviewed in accordance with current international and national guidelines, standards and literature. Testing included assessing the performance of the X ray tube and generator, the automatic exposure control (AEC) device in fluoroscopy and digital acquisition modes and a subjective assessment of image quality using the Leeds test objects. Radiation shielding calculations and measurements were performed to determine the structural shielding required by new installations and electrical, mechanical and general radiation safety was also

  15. Acceptance Test Report for 241-U compressed air system

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance testing of a newly upgraded compressed air system at 241-U Farm. The system was installed and the test successfully performed under work package 2W-92-01027

  16. Acceptance tests of a new gamma camera

    For best patient service, a QA programme is needed to produce quantitative/qualitative data and keep records of the results and equipment faults. Gamma cameras must be checked against the manufacturer's specifications.The service manual is usually useful to achieve this goal. Acceptance tests are very important not only to accept a new gamma camera system for routine clinical use but also to have a role in a reference for future measurements. In this study, acceptance tests were performed for a new gamma camera in our department. It is a General Electric MG system with two detectors, two collimators. They are low energy general purpose (LEGP) and medium energy general purpose (MEGP). All intrinsic calibrations and corrections were done by the service engineer at installation (PM tune, dynamic correction, energy calibration, geometric calibration, energy correction, linearity correction and second order corrections).After installation, calibrations and corrections, a close physical inspection of the mechanical and electrical safety aspects of the cameras were done by the responsible physicist of the department. The planar system is based on measurement of system uniformity, resolution/linearity and multiple window spatial registration. All test procedures were performed according to NEMA procedures developed by the manufacturer. Intrinsic uniformity: NEMA uniformity was done first by using service manual and then other isotope uniformities were acquired with 99mTc, 131I, 201Tl and 67Ga. They were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively, but non-uniformities were observed, especially for detector II, The service engineers repeated all tests and made necessary corrections. We repeated all the intrinsic uniformity tests. 99mTc intrinsic images were also performed at 'no correction', 'no energy correction', 'no linearity correction', 'all correction' and '±10% off peak', and compared. Extrinsic uniformity: At the beginning, collimators were checked for defects

  17. Acceptance-test specifications for Test Number Four: process sensor and display test

    This document provides the general instructions for performing acceptance Test Number Four as indicated in the Acceptance Test Index (TI-022-130-003). Also indicated are the plant conditions and special equipment required to conduct the test. The acceptance criteria for each portion of the test are specified

  18. Acceptance testing and QA in dental radiology

    The HPA (UK) reported in 2002 that although the effective dose from dental examinations is low, dental imaging is the most frequent type of X ray examination undertaken (approx. 30%); a similar situation is likely to exist in Ireland. It is most likely that this will increase further in the future as the dental X ray technology moves from film to digital equipment. Dental X rays are taken more frequently with digital equipment than film based technology. The Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St. James's Hospital, Dublin is particularly interested in the area of dental quality assurance (QA) as a result of a significant medical radiation safety incident in Ireland occurring with a faulty dental X ray installation. The implementation of a QA programme in Ireland has been enforced not only by the publication of the Dental Code of Practice by the Irish Regulatory Authority in the 1990s but also by the publication of the European Medical Exposures Directive. The current QA programme, which includes site visits in order to perform acceptance testing and routine QA checks on dental X ray equipment has been implemented in approximately 250 dental health centres to which the Department has provided radiation protection advisory services for approximately twenty years. In addition to the technical evaluation of the equipment, an assessment of the adequacy of the shielding in the X ray room and of the radiation protection facilities is performed. This paper identifies the findings from the dental radiology QA assessments. QA test protocols were developed in accordance with current national and internationally accepted guidelines. The tests include exposure time and kVp accuracy, radiation output consistency, filtration, irradiated field size, mechanical and electrical safety checks and measurement of tube output for specific X ray examinations to aid in the establishment of a national diagnostic reference levels, a requirement of the Medical Exposures

  19. On acceptance criteria for Mochovce startup physical tests

    Paper is focused on new acceptance criteria for physical startup tests of Mochovce Units 1, 2. The acceptance criteria are discussed at the stage of their development. The acceptance criteria determination is based on statistical processing of differences between the experimental and theoretical values of neutron-physical characteristics. The experimental values were taken from physical startup tests of Bohunice Unit 1, 2 and 4 and Dukovany Unit 1 - 4. The theoretical values were calculated by code BIPR-7. The acceptance criteria were established for critical boron concentration, core loading symmetry measurement, boric acid worth, temperature reactivity coefficient, 'ejected' control rod worth, pressure reactivity coefficient and power reactivity coefficient. The new acceptance criteria were applied to evaluate results of physical startup tests of Mochovce Unit 1 in June 1998. The acceptance criteria showed to be adequate. The summary results of statistical processing and the comparison of earlier, new and US acceptance criteria for physical startup tests are presented.(Authors)

  20. User acceptance testing a step-by-step guide

    Hambling, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Every information system brought into service in every type of organisation requires user acceptance testing. This book is a hands-on manual for non-testing specialists to plan and carry out an effective acceptance test of an information system. It also identifies ways of making the process as simple and cost-effective as possible.

  1. On acceptance criteria for Mochovce startup physical tests

    New acceptance criteria are discussed for physical startup tests of Mochovce Units 1, 2, at the stage of their development. The acceptance criteria determination is based on statistical processing of differences between the experimental and theoretical values of neutron-physical characteristics. The experimental values were taken from physical startup tests of Bohunice Unit 1, 2 and 4 and Dukovany Unit 1 - 4. The theoretical values were calculated by code BIPR-7. The acceptance criteria were established for critical boron concentration, core loading symmetry measurement, boric acid worth, temperature reactivity coefficient, 'ejected' control rod worth, pressure reactivity coefficient and power reactivity coefficient. The new acceptance criteria were applied to evaluate results of physical startup tests of Mochove Unit 1 in June 1998. The acceptance criteria showed to be adequate. The summary results of statistical processing and the comparison of earlier, new and US acceptance criteria for physical startup tests are presented. (author)

  2. 105-KE Isolation Barrier Leak Rate Acceptance Test Report

    McCracken, K.J.

    1995-06-14

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) contains the completed and signed Acceptance Procedure (ATP) for the 105-KE Isolations Barrier Leak Rate Test. The Test Engineer`s log, the completed sections of the ATP in the Appendix for Repeat Testing (Appendix K), the approved WHC J-7s (Appendix H), the data logger files (Appendices T and U), and the post test calibration checks (Appendix V) are included.

  3. 105-KE Isolation Barrier Leak Rate Acceptance Test Report

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) contains the completed and signed Acceptance Procedure (ATP) for the 105-KE Isolations Barrier Leak Rate Test. The Test Engineer's log, the completed sections of the ATP in the Appendix for Repeat Testing (Appendix K), the approved WHC J-7s (Appendix H), the data logger files (Appendices T and U), and the post test calibration checks (Appendix V) are included

  4. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria, December 2000

    NONE

    2000-12-01

    This document establishes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office waste acceptance criteria. The waste acceptance criteria provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed waste for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites for storage or disposal.

  5. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria, December 2000

    This document establishes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office waste acceptance criteria. The waste acceptance criteria provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed waste for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites for storage or disposal

  6. Acceptance test procedure for High Pressure Water Jet System

    The overall objective of the acceptance test is to demonstrate a combined system. This includes associated tools and equipment necessary to perform cleaning in the 105 K East Basin (KE) for achieving optimum reduction in the level of contamination/dose rate on canisters prior to removal from the KE Basin and subsequent packaging for disposal. Acceptance tests shall include necessary hardware to achieve acceptance of the cleaning phase of canisters. This acceptance test procedure will define the acceptance testing criteria of the high pressure water jet cleaning fixture. The focus of this procedure will be to provide guidelines and instructions to control, evaluate and document the acceptance testing for cleaning effectiveness and method(s) of removing the contaminated surface layer from the canister presently identified in KE Basin. Additionally, the desired result of the acceptance test will be to deliver to K Basins a thoroughly tested and proven system for underwater decontamination and dose reduction. This report discusses the acceptance test procedure for the High Pressure Water Jet

  7. Enraf Series 854 advanced technology gauge (ATG) acceptance test procedure

    This Acceptance Test Procedure was written to test the Enraf Series 854 Advanced Technology Gauge (ATG) prior to installation in the Tank Farms. The procedure sets various parameters and verifies that the gauge is functional

  8. Acceptance test report for core sample trucks 3 and 4

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Report is to provide documentation for the acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4, designated as HO-68K-4600 and HO-68K-4647, respectively. This report conforms to the guidelines established in WHC-IP-1026, ''Engineering Practice Guidelines,'' Appendix M, ''Acceptance Test Procedures and Reports.'' Rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4 were based upon the design of the second core sample truck (HO-68K-4345) which was constructed to implement rotary mode sampling of the waste tanks at Hanford. Successful completion of acceptance testing on June 30, 1995 verified that all design requirements were met. This report is divided into four sections, beginning with general information. Acceptance testing was performed on trucks 3 and 4 during the months of March through June, 1995. All testing was performed at the ''Rock Slinger'' test site in the 200 West area. The sequence of testing was determined by equipment availability, and the initial revision of the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was used for both trucks. Testing was directed by ICF-KH, with the support of WHC Characterization Equipment Engineering and Characterization Project Operations. Testing was completed per the ATP without discrepancies or deviations, except as noted

  9. Operator coil monitoring Acceptance Test Procedure

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software's ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY-101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations is correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ''ENABLE'' and ''DISABLE'' controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords

  10. First experiences with acceptance testing of multiple head SPECT cameras

    User acceptance testing of newly installed gamma cameras is mandatory in order to verify manufacturers' specifications and to ensure optimal image quality. Acceptance test procedures are widely standardized today and are carried out following commonly accepted test protocols. Two new triple head gamma cameras have been installed during the last year at the Department of Nuclear Medicine of the Vienna University Hospital. For acceptance testing of these cameras a modified and expanded version of the commonly used test protocol for single head SPECT systems has been employed. Details of the tests that have been carried out and a comparison of the results obtained for both cameras are presented. Furthermore, some specific problems that are encountered during acceptance testing of multiple head systems are discussed. In particular it has been noted that some important tests of intrinsic camera parameters cannot be carried out, which makes a complete verification of vendors' specifications impossible. In spite of these problems the acceptance test system for multiple head cameras presented in this work was sufficient for establishing proper working conditions for clinical use. (authors)

  11. Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer

    The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP's facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson's facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified

  12. Factory Acceptance Test Procedure Westinghouse 100 ton Hydraulic Trailer

    This Factory Acceptance Test Procedure (FAT) is for the Westinghouse 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer. The trailer will be used for the removal of the 101-SY pump. This procedure includes: safety check and safety procedures; pre-operation check out; startup; leveling trailer; functional/proofload test; proofload testing; and rolling load test

  13. The Murmansk Initiative - RF: Acceptance Testing

    Czajkowski, C.; Wester, D. W.; Dyer, R. S.; Soerlie, A. A.; Moller, B.; Barnes, E.

    2002-02-26

    The Murmansk Initiative-RF (MI) was conceived to provide the Russian Federation (RF) with the capacity to manage low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW) and comply with the requirements of the London Convention that prohibit ocean dumping. The trilateral project among Norway, the RF, and the United States of America (U.S.) began in 1994 and was the first to utilize exclusively Russian subcontractors to upgrade and expand an existing LLRW treatment plant on the premises of RTP Atomflot in Murmansk, Russia. The project moved quickly through the design phase. Progress during the construction phase was somewhat slower because of difficulties with acquisition of hardware, inexperience with automated instrumentation and control equipment, and unexpected design changes in the cementation unit. The project advanced into the test-operation phase, which is currently underway, in June 2001. Initial runs with liquid waste have revealed that procedures for unloading spent ion-exchange sorbents could be improved and that sludges formed during removal of alkaline-earth metals should be compacted in order for the facility to operate at its full potential. Resolution of these issues is expected within the next few months.

  14. Acceptance test procedure MICON software exhaust fan control modifications

    This acceptance test verifies the MICON program changes for the new automatic transfer switch ATS-2 alarms, the Closed Loop Cooling isolator status, the CB-3 position alarm, and the alarms for the new emergency fan damper backup air compressor

  15. W-026, acceptance test report LLW supercompactor (submittal number 567)

    The purpose of this acceptance test report was to verify the assembly is correct and complete and meets all the specification and performance requirements. On May 15--16, 1996, the LLW Supercompactor functional demonstrations and performance tests were carried out. These tests were carried out in accordance with the Acceptance Test Procedure, submittal 565, dated 5/3/96. The tests were performed by Herman Miller and Gene Rice of INET Corporation and Richard Lawrence and other PCL personnel. The VIHC representative on May 15, 1996 was Doug Dunlap and on May 16, 1996 the representative was Ken Leist

  16. Product acceptance environmental and destructive testing for reliability.

    Dvorack, Michael A.; Kerschen, Thomas J.; Collins, Elmer W.

    2007-08-01

    To determine whether a component is meeting its reliability requirement during production, acceptance sampling is employed in which selected units coming off the production line are subjected to additional environmental and/or destructive tests that are within the normal environment space to which the component is expected to be exposed throughout its life in the Stockpile. This report describes what these tests are and how they are scored for reliability purposes. The roles of screens, Engineering Use Only tests, and next assembly product acceptance testing are also discussed, along with both the advantages and disadvantages of environmental and destructive testing.

  17. Acceptance testing protocol for magnetic resonance imaging systems

    Objective: to develop an acceptance testing protocol for magnetic resonance imaging systems and to show which and how phantoms could be used to collect data. Materials and methods: the definition, procedure, analysis and the acceptation criteria were created for each of 15 selected tests. Results: These tests allow the evaluation of technical specifications stated on the manufacturer's sales proposal and to establish reference values to be used in subsequent constancy tests. Conclusion: future quality assurance programs in magnetic resonance imaging should consider employing tests similar or equal to the ones described in this paper. (author)

  18. Acceptance test report for the AY-102 ENRAF densitometer

    On February 11, 1998, the AY-1 02, Riser 15E ENRAF Densitometer was acceptance tested per HNF-SD-WM-ATP-077. The test was performed at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, 200 East Area, building MO-407. The test validated the functionality of the Densitometer for use by project W-320, C-1 06 Retrieval. The purpose of the test procedure was to verify the functionality of the ENRAF Series 854 ATG densitometer. Typically, all ENRAF Series 854 ATGs are acceptance tested before transport to the field. The ATP, as performed for level gauges, sets default program values within the gauge and verifies the gauge's force transducer calibration

  19. W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report

    On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report

  20. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report

  1. W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-03-11

    On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  2. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-17

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  3. PUREX SAMCONS uninterruptible power supply (UPS) acceptance test report

    This Acceptance Test Report for the PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) Acceptance Test Procedure validates the operation of the UPS, all alarming and display functions and the ability of the UPS to supply power to the SAMCONS as designed. The proper installation of the PUREX SAMCONS Trailer UPS components and wiring will be systematically evaluated by performance of this procedure. Proper operation of the SAMCONS computer UPS will be verified by performance of a timed functional load test, and verification of associated alarms and trouble indications. This test procedure will be performed in the SAMCONS Trailer and will include verification of receipt of alarms at the SAMCONS computer stations. This test may be performed at any time after the completion of HNF-SD-CP-ATP-083, PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Acceptance Test Procedure, when computer display and alarm functions have been proven to operate correctly

  4. Two Types of Test Assembly Checked and Accepted for CEFR

    2002-01-01

    The detail design of two types of test assembly used in the simulating transportation, and themounting and hydraulic test were completed in 2002. This two types of test assembly are manufactured inshanghai No.1 machine tool works, and checked and accepted in March 2003. The former is used in the

  5. Research on control rod drive mechanism seismic test acceptance criteria

    Background: There is no clear requirement on the rod drop performance of Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) in seismic condition. Purpose: Acceptance criteria of AP1OOO CRDM seismic test need to be determined. Methods: Related regulations and the safety function of AP1000 CRDM are investigated, as well as the conclusions drawn from the CRDM seismic tests worldwide. Results: Acceptance criteria of this test should be in accordance with the limit is in AP1OOO Nuclear Plant Safety Analysis Report. Conclusions: Drop time of control rods in AP1000 CRDM seismic test at the room temperature without flow is 2.7 s before and after Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE). (authors)

  6. Surface moisture measurement system hardware acceptance test procedure

    The purpose of this acceptance test procedure is to verify that the mechanical and electrical features of the Surface Moisture Measurement System are operating as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. This procedure will be used in conjunction with a software acceptance test procedure, which addresses testing of software and electrical features not addressed in this document. Hardware testing will be performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 Area and the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility in the 400 Area. These systems were developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks

  7. Neutron absorber qualification and acceptance testing from the designer's perspective

    Starting in the mid 1990's, the USNRC began to require less than 100% credit for the 10B present in fixed neutron absorbers spent fuel transport packages. The current practice in the US is to use only 75% of the specified 10B in criticality safety calculations unless extensive acceptance testing demonstrates both the presence of the 10B and uniformity of its distribution. In practice, the NRC has accepted no more than 90% credit for 10B in recent years, while other national competent authorities continue to accept 100%. More recently, with the introduction of new neutron absorber materials, particularly aluminum / boron carbide metal matrix composites, the NRC has also expressed expectations for qualification testing, based in large part on Transnuclear's successful application to use a new composite material in the TN-68 storage / transport cask. The difficulty is that adding more boron than is really necessary to a metal has some negative effects on the material, reducing the ductility and the thermal conductivity, and increasing the cost. Excessive testing requirements can have the undesired effect of keeping superior materials out of spent fuel package designs, without a corresponding justification based on public safety. In European countries and especially in France, 100% credit has been accepted up to now with materials controls specified in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR): Manufacturing process approved by qualification testing Materials manufacturing controlled under a Quality Assurance system. During fabrication, acceptance testing directly on products or on representative samples. Acceptance criteria taking into account a statistical uncertainty corresponding to 3σ. The original and current bases for the reduced 10B credit, the design requirements for neutron absorber materials, and the experience of Transnuclear and Cogema Logistics with neutron absorber testing are examined. Guidelines for qualification and acceptance testing and process controls

  8. Type of Speech Material Affects Acceptable Noise Level Test Outcome

    Koch, Xaver; Dingemanse, Gertjan; Goedegebure, André; Janse, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test, in which individuals indicate what level of noise they are willing to put up with while following speech, has been used to guide hearing aid fitting decisions and has been found to relate to prospective hearing aid use. Unlike objective measures of speech perception ability, ANL outcome is not related to individual hearing loss or age, but rather reflects an individual’s inherent acceptance of competing noise while listening to speech. As such, the measu...

  9. Type of speech material affects Acceptable Noise Level test outcome

    Xaver eKoch; Gertjan eDingemanse; André eGoedegebure; Esther eJanse

    2016-01-01

    The Acceptable Noise Level (ANL) test, in which individuals indicate what level of noise they are willing to put up with while following speech, has been used to guide hearing aid fitting decisions and has been found to relate to prospective hearing aid use. Unlike objective measures of speech perception ability, ANL outcome is not related to individual hearing loss or age, but rather reflects an individual's inherent acceptance of competing noise while listening to speech. As such, the measu...

  10. 105K West Isolation Barrier Acceptance Test results

    The objective of this document is to report and interpret the findings of the isolation barrier acceptance tests performed in 105KW/100K. The tests were performed in accordance with the test plan and acceptance test procedure. The test report contains the test data. This document compares the test data against the criteria. A discussion of the leak rate analytical characterization describes how the flow characteristics flow rate will be determined using the test data from the test report. Two modes of water loss were considered; basin and/or discharge chute leakage, and evaporation. An initial test established baseline leakage data and instrumentation performance. Test 2 evaluated the sealing performance of the isolation barrier by inducing an 11 in. (27.9 cm) level differential across the barrier. The leak rate at this 11 in. (27.9 cm) level is extrapolated to the 16 ft. (4.9 m) level differential postulated in the DBE post seismic event. If the leak rate, adjusted for evaporation and basin leakage (determined from Test 1), is less than the SAR limit of 1,500 gph (5,680 lph) at a 16 ft (4.9 m) level differential, the barriers pass the acceptance test

  11. Initial acceptance test experience with FFTF plant equipment

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the initial acceptance test experience of certain pieces of auxiliary equipment of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The scope focuses on the DHX blowers and drive train, inert gas blowers, H and V containment isolation valves, and the Surveillance and In-service Inspection (SISI) transporter and trolley. For each type of equipment, the discussion includes a summary of the design and system function, installation history, preoperational acceptance testing procedures and results, and unusual events and resolutions

  12. Acceptance testing of fluoroscopy systems used for interventional purposes

    This study presents the results of acceptance testing on 18 interventional fluoroscopy systems in Ireland. Acceptance testing and routine quality assurance (QA) of X-ray systems are the requirements of the EU Medical Exposures Directive (MED) and these requirements were subsequently implemented into Irish legislation. The MED states that special consideration should be given to the QA and dose assessment of high dose procedures such as interventional fluoroscopy. Owing to the advances in fluoroscopy technology, it has been found that comprehensive testing of interventional systems proves challenging in a busy hospital environment. A number of recurrent problems have been identified and are presented. (authors)

  13. Automated Acceptance Testing : Why and How to Implement?

    Muroma, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to investigate why manual acceptance tests should be automated in a software project and how the automation should be carried out. The topic is of relevance because automated testing is one way to improve the quality of software. Different methods, procedures, types and tools can be used to create automated testing. The challenges of automated testing are implementation, setting the right objectives and choosing the right tool. The benef...

  14. Acceptance test report, plutonium finishing plant life safety upgrade

    Hodge, S.G.

    1994-12-02

    This acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that modifications to the Fir Protection systems function as required by project criteria. The ATP will test the Fire Alarm Control Panels, Flow Alarm Pressure Switch, Heat Detectors, Smoke Detectors, Flow Switches, Manual Pull Stations, and Gong/Door By Pass Switches.

  15. Acceptance test report for portable exhauster POR-007/Skid E

    This document describes Acceptance Testing performed on Portable Exhauster POR-007/Skid E. It includes measurements of bearing vibration levels, pressure decay testing, programmable logic controller interlocks, high vacuum, flow and pressure control functional testing. The purpose of Acceptance testing documented by this report was to demonstrate compliance of the exhausters with the performance criteria established within HNF-0490, Rev. 1 following a repair and upgrade effort at Hanford. In addition, data obtained during this testing is required for the resolution of outstanding Non-conformance Reports (NCR), and finally, to demonstrate the functionality of the associated software for the pressure control and high vacuum exhauster operating modes provided for by W-320. Additional testing not required by the ATP was also performed to assist in the disposition and close out of receiving inspection report and for application design information (system curve). Results of this testing are also captured within this document

  16. Multiport riser and flange assemblies acceptance test report

    This document presents the results of the acceptance test for the multiport riser (MPR) and multiport flange (MPF) assemblies. The accepted MPR and MPF assemblies will be used in support of the hydrogen mitigation project for double-shell waste tank 241-SY-101 and other related projects. The testing described in this document verifies that the mechanical and interface features are operating as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. The objectives of the acceptance testing were as follows: Basic equipment functions and mechanical interfaces were verified; Installation and removal of equipment were demonstrated to the degree possible; Operation of the decon spray system and all valving was confirmed; and the accumulated leak rate of the MPR and MPF assemblies was determined

  17. Acceptance test for graphite components and construction status of HTTR

    In March, 1991, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started to constructed the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor(HTTR) which is a 30-MW(thermal) helium gas-cooled reactor with a core composed of prismatic graphite blocks piled on the core support graphite structures. Two types of graphite materials are used in the HTTR. One is the garde IG-110, isotropic fine grain graphite, another is the grade PGX, medium-to-fine grained molded graphite. These materials were selected on the basis of the appropriate properties required by the HTTR reactor design. Industry-wide standards for an acceptance test of graphite materials used as main components of a nuclear reactor had not been established. The acceptance standard for graphite components of the HTTR, therefore, was drafted by JAERI and reviewed by specialists outside JAERI. The acceptance standard consists of the material testing, non-destructive examination such as the ultrasonic and eddy current testings, dimensional and visual inspections and assembly test. Ultrasonic and eddy current testings are applied to graphite logs to detect an internal flaw and to graphite components to detect a surface flaw, respectively. The assembly test is performed at the works, prior to their installation in the reactor pressure vessel, to examine fabricating precision of each component and alignment of piled-up structures. The graphite components of the HTTR had been tested on the basis of the acceptance standard. It was confirmed that the graphite manufacturing process was well controlled and high quality graphite components were provided to the HTTR. All graphite components except for the fuel graphite blocks are to be installed in the reactor pressure vessel of the HTTR in September 1995. The paper describes the construction status of the HTTR focusing on the graphite components. The acceptance test results are also presented in this paper. (author). Figs

  18. ENRAF Series 854 Advanced Technology Gauge (ATG) Acceptance Test Procedure

    This procedure provides acceptance testing for Enraf Series 854 level gauges used to monitor levels in Hanford Waste Storage Tanks. The test will verify that the gauge functions according to the manufacturer's instructions and specifications and is properly setup prior to being delivered to the tank farm area. This ATP does not set up the gauge for any specific tank, but is generalized to permit testing the gauge prior to installation package preparation

  19. Acceptance test report MICON software exhaust fan control modifications

    This report documents the results the acceptance test HNF-4108 which verifies the MICON program changes for the new automatic transfer switch ATS-2 alarms, the Closed Loop Cooling isolator status, the CB-3 position alarm, the alarms for the new emergency fan damper backup air compressor, and the generator sequencer logic

  20. SEP BIMOD variable conductance heat pipes acceptance and characterization tests

    Hemminger, J. A.

    1981-08-01

    A series of six heat pipes, similar in design to those flown on the Comunications Technology Satellite Hermes, for use in a prototype Solar Electric Propulsion BIMOD thrust module are evaluated. The results of acceptance and characterization tests performed on the heat pipe subassemble are reported. The performance of all the heat pipes met, or exceeded, design specifications.

  1. Acceptance Test Plan for Fourth-Generation Corrosion Monitoring Cabinet

    This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the third-generation corrosion monitoring cabinet (Hiline Engineering Part No.0004-CHM-072-C01). This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer of the cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinet. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation

  2. Automatically generated acceptance test: A software reliability experiment

    Protzel, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    This study presents results of a software reliability experiment investigating the feasibility of a new error detection method. The method can be used as an acceptance test and is solely based on empirical data about the behavior of internal states of a program. The experimental design uses the existing environment of a multi-version experiment previously conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center, in which the launch interceptor problem is used as a model. This allows the controlled experimental investigation of versions with well-known single and multiple faults, and the availability of an oracle permits the determination of the error detection performance of the test. Fault interaction phenomena are observed that have an amplifying effect on the number of error occurrences. Preliminary results indicate that all faults examined so far are detected by the acceptance test. This shows promise for further investigations, and for the employment of this test method on other applications.

  3. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2006-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  4. Specification and acceptance testing of radiotherapy treatment planning systems

    Quality assurance (QA) in the radiation therapy treatment planning process is essential to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient and to minimize the possibility of accidental exposure. The computerized radiotherapy treatment planning systems (RTPSs) are now widely available in industrialized and developing countries and it is of special importance to support hospitals in Member States in developing procedures for acceptance testing, commissioning and QA of their RTPSs. Responding to these needs, a group of experts developed an IAEA publication with such recommendations, which was published in 2004 as IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 430. This report provides a general framework and describes a large number of tests and procedures that should be considered by the users of new RTPSs. However, small hospitals with limited resources or large hospitals with high patient load and limited staff are not always able to perform complete characterization, validation and software testing of algorithms used in RTPSs. Therefore, the IAEA proposed more specific guidelines that provide a step-by-step recommendation for users at hospitals or cancer centres how to implement acceptance and commissioning procedures for newly purchased RTPSs. The current publication was developed in the framework of the Coordinated Research Project on Development of Procedures for Quality Assurance for Dosimetry Calculations in Radiotherapy and uses the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard IEC 62083, Requirements for the Safety of Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems as its basis. The report addresses the procedures for specification and acceptance testing of RTPSs to be used by both manufacturers and users at the hospitals. Recommendations are provided for specific tests to be performed at the manufacturing facility known as type tests, and for acceptance tests to be performed at the hospital known as site tests. The purpose of acceptance testing is to demonstrate to the

  5. Startup of the FFTF sodium cooled reactor. [Acceptance Test Program

    Redekopp, R.D.; Umek, A.M.

    1981-03-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington, is a 3 Loop 400 MW(t) sodium cooled fast reactor with a primary mission to test fuels and materials for development of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR). Bringing FFTF to a condition to accomplish this mission is the goal of the Acceptance Test Program (ATP). This program was the mechanism for achieving startup of the FFTF. Highlights of the ATP involving the system inerting, liquid metal and inerted cell testing and initial ascent to full power are discussed.

  6. Swiss requirements concerning gamma camera acceptance and status testing

    Like in the field of radiology, digital systems are also becoming the standard in the field of nuclear medicine. This offers not only the possibility to process, transmit and archive data from patients more easily but also to introduce quantitative measurements for quality controls. In this framework standards concerning the qualification of gamma camera systems have been updated and appeared to be useful to set legal requirements, in spite of the fact that this is not their goal. The aim of this study was first to choose a set of tests described in standards to define measurements to be performed at the acceptance of the systems, after the regular maintenances (at least once every six months; status test) and for assuring the stability of the systems. To verify the feasibility, from the point of view of technical and a time requirements, the quality assurance programme proposed has been applied on three gamma camera systems. The results of this study show that, based on international standards, new requirements concerning the quality assurance of the gamma camera of the Swiss Public Health Authority make it necessary to slightly modify some procedures to reduce the time required for the acceptance and status tests. In the Ordinance related to the use of unsealed radioactive sources (November 1997) the Swiss Public Health Authority requires the supplier to carry out a reception test on all imaging devices used in the field of nuclear medicine before they can be used on patients. Moreover, a maintenance procedure of the imaging device has to be performed at least every six months by properly trained staff. This maintenance has to be followed by a status test that assures the integrity of the system before it can be used for further clinical applications. Daily and weekly stability tests, under the responsibility of the users of the system, are also defined. According to the Swiss Ordinance, all the measurements required for the acceptance and status tests should

  7. Central Acceptance Testing for Camera Technologies for CTA

    Bonardi, A; Chadwick, P; Dazzi, F; Förster, A; Hörandel, J R; Punch, M

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is an international initiative to build the next generation ground based very-high energy gamma-ray observatory. It will consist of telescopes of three different sizes, employing several different technologies for the cameras that detect the Cherenkov light from the observed air showers. In order to ensure the compliance of each camera technology with CTA requirements, CTA will perform central acceptance testing of each camera technology. To assist with this, the Camera Test Facilities (CTF) work package is developing a detailed test program covering the most important performance, stability, and durability requirements, including setting up the necessary equipment. Performance testing will include a wide range of tests like signal amplitude, time resolution, dead-time determination, trigger efficiency, performance testing under temperature and humidity variations and several others. These tests can be performed on fully-integrated cameras using a portable setup at the came...

  8. Acceptance of genetic testing in a general population

    Aro, A R; Hakonen, A; Hietala, M;

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze effects of age, education and gender on acceptance of genetic testing. Subjects, n = 1967 aged 15-69, were a stratified random sample of the Finnish population. One thousand, one hundred and sixty nine subjects, 530 men and 639 women, returned the questionnaire....... The majority of the respondents approved of the availability of genetic testing. Young, aged 15-24, were more favourable towards testing and more willing to undergo suggested tests, but they were also more worried than others about the misuse of test results. Men aged 45-69 with only basic education...... were more in favour of mandatory genetic testing than other respondents. Respondents with university education were more critical towards genetic testing and expressed their worry about eugenics more often than other education groups. In conclusion, there are age, education and gender related...

  9. MCO combustible gas management leak test acceptance criteria

    Existing leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed multi-canister overpacks (MCO) were evaluated to ensure that MCOs can be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCO's or within their surroundings. The document concludes that the integrated leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs (1 x 10-5 std cc/sec and 1 x 10-7 std cc/sec, respectively) are adequate to meet all current and foreseeable needs of the project, including capability to demonstrate compliance with the NFPA 60 Paragraph 3-3 requirement to maintain hydrogen concentrations [within the air atmosphere CSB tubes] t or below 1 vol% (i.e., at or below 25% of the LFL)

  10. Acceptance test plan for the Waste Information Control System

    Flynn, D.F.

    1994-09-14

    This document describes the acceptance test plan for the WICS system. The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Hazardous Material Control Group (HMC) of the 222-S Laboratory has requested the development of a system to help resolve many of the difficulties associated with tracking and data collection of containers and drums of waste. This system has been identified as Waste Information and Control System (WICS). The request for developing and implementing WICS has been made to the Automation and Simulation Engineering Group (ASE).

  11. Project W-049H Collection System Acceptance Test

    The Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) Program for Project W-049H covers the following activities: Disposal system, Collection system, Instrumentation and control system. Each activity has its own ATP. The purpose of the ATPs is to verify that the systems have been constructed in accordance with the construction documents and to demonstrate that the systems function as required by the Project criteria. This ATP has been prepared to demonstrate that the Collection System Instrumentation functions as required by project criteria

  12. Central Acceptance Testing for Camera Technologies for CTA

    Bonardi, A.; T. Buanes; Chadwick, P.; Dazzi, F.; A. Förster(CERN, Geneva, Switzerland); Hörandel, J. R.; Punch, M.; Consortium, R. M. Wagner for the CTA

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is an international initiative to build the next generation ground based very-high energy gamma-ray observatory. It will consist of telescopes of three different sizes, employing several different technologies for the cameras that detect the Cherenkov light from the observed air showers. In order to ensure the compliance of each camera technology with CTA requirements, CTA will perform central acceptance testing of each camera technology. To assist with thi...

  13. 242A Distributed Control System Year 2000 Acceptance Test Report

    This report documents acceptance test results for the 242-A Evaporator distributive control system upgrade to D/3 version 9.0-2 for year 2000 compliance. This report documents the test results obtained by acceptance testing as directed by procedure HNF-2695. This verification procedure will document the initial testing and evaluation of the potential 242-A Distributed Control System (DCS) operating difficulties across the year 2000 boundary and the calendar adjustments needed for the leap year. Baseline system performance data will be recorded using current, as-is operating system software. Data will also be collected for operating system software that has been modified to correct year 2000 problems. This verification procedure is intended to be generic such that it may be performed on any D/3(trademark) (GSE Process Solutions, Inc.) distributed control system that runs with the VMSTM (Digital Equipment Corporation) operating system. This test may be run on simulation or production systems depending upon facility status. On production systems, DCS outages will occur nine times throughout performance of the test. These outages are expected to last about 10 minutes each

  14. Acceptance test report for portable exhauster POR-008/Skid F

    Portable Exhauster POR-008 was procured via HNF-0490, Specification for a Portable Exhausted System for Waste Tank Ventilation. Prior to taking ownership, acceptance testing was performed at the vendors. However at the conclusion of testing a number of issues remained that required resolution before the exhausters could be used by Project W-320. The purpose of acceptance testing documented by this report was to demonstrate compliance of the exhausters with the performance criteria established within HNF-O49O, Rev. 1 following a repair and upgrade effort at Hanford. In addition, data obtained during this testing is required for the resolution of outstanding Non-conformance Reports (NCR), and finally, to demonstrate the functionality of the associated software for the pressure control and high vacuum exhauster operating modes provided for by W-320. Additional testing not required by the ATP was also performed to assist in the disposition and close out of receiving inspection report and for application design information (system curve). Results of this testing are also captured within this document

  15. Project W-049H collection system Acceptance Test Procedure

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) for the Project W-049H, Treated Effluent Disposal Facility, is to verify that the collection system equipment installed as Pump Station No. 1 (225-W) and Pump Station No. 2 (225-E) have been installed in accordance with the design documents and function as required by the project criteria. This will be a wet test with potable water being introduced into the pump pits to test for leakage. Potable water will also be employed in the testing of the pumps and related mechanical equipment. All Instrument and Control equipment related to the pump stations will be checked electronically with simulated inputs/outputs when actual input/output signals are unavailable. Water from Pump Station 1 will be moved through the TEDF piping system and discharged into the disposal ponds. This will check the proper function of the air/vac valves not tested during construction, and the automated samplers

  16. Project W-049H instrument and control Acceptance Test Procedure

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) for the Project W-049H, Treated Effluent Disposal Facility, is to verify that the instrument and control systems have been installed in accordance with the design documents and function as required by the project criteria. The instrument and control system includes three operator control stations, modems, and general purpose LAN interface cabinets in the Effluent Treatment Facility control room; two pump stations; disposal station pumping building; and all local control units installed in the fold. Testing will be performed using actual signals when available and simulated signals when actual signals are unavailable

  17. Planning and acceptance testing of MV therapy installations

    Purpose: This course is designed for practitioners and beginners in brachytherapy. The aim is to review biological principles equipment are aware of all aspects involved. The object is to cover in a broad overview the considerations that go into selecting, installing, testing and accepting megavoltage therapy equipment and to provide a resource for more detailed information. Planning and acceptance testing of a megavoltage therapy installation is a major undertaking for any size group, institution or department. It can take approximately two years from the time a decision is made to get a machine to where the first patient is treated. Because the equipment and site preparation are expensive, and most of the machines are complex and can be supplied by several different manufacturers, it is imperative that a great deal of thought and care go into the decision: the aim being that the specifications of the machine that is installed meet the immediate need of the department and the needs for the projected lifetime of the equipment. A general survey of the types of equipment available will be presented. This will concentrate on general purpose linear accelerators, although Cobalt 60 machines, microtrons and special purpose machines (intra-operative equipment) will also be covered. General descriptions of the machines along with typical specifications will be given. Selecting the best machine to meet specific needs can be quite complex and criteria for making the selection are presented in a series of twelve steps. site selection and room design, including the console area, are also critical. The general principles for shielding calculations will be provided. Critical to any installation is the acceptance testing of the equipment including material and radiation oncology performance tests. These tests will be outlined. A reading list of suitable references describing in detail many of the aspects of this course will be provided

  18. Planning and acceptance testing of Mv therapy installations

    Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this course is to ensure that the individuals responsible for acquiring megavoltage therapy equipment are aware of all aspects involved. The object is to cover in a broad overview the considerations that go into selecting, installing, testing and accepting megavoltage therapy equipment and to provide a resource for more detailed information. Planning and acceptance testing of a megavoltage therapy installation is a major undertaking for any size group, institution or department. It can take approximately two years from the time a decision is made to get a machine to where the first patient is treated. Because the equipment and site preparation are expensive, and most of the machines are complex and can be supplied by several different manufacturers, it is imperative that a great deal of thought and care go into the decision: the aim being that the specifications of the machine that is installed meet the immediate need of the department and the needs for the projected lifetime of the equipment. A general survey of the types of equipment available will be presented. This will concentrate on general purpose linear accelerators, although Cobalt 60 machines, microtrons and special purpose machines (intra-operative equipment) will also be covered. General descriptions of the machines along with typical specifications will be given. Selecting the best machine to meet specific needs can be quite complex and criteria for making the selection are presented in a series of twelve steps. Site selection and room design, including the console area, are also critical. The general principles for shielding calculations will be provided. Critical to any installation is the acceptance testing of the equipment including material and radiation oncology performance tests. These tests will be outlined. A reading list of suitable references describing in detail many of the aspects of this course will be provided

  19. Planning and acceptance testing of MV therapy installations

    Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this course is to ensure that the individuals responsible for acquiring megavoltage therapy equipment are aware of all aspects involved. The object is to cover in a broad overview the considerations that go into selecting, installing, testing and accepting megavoltage therapy equipment and to provide a resource for more detailed information. Planning and acceptance testing of a megavoltage therapy installation is a major undertaking for any size group, institution or department. It can take approximately two years from the time a decision is made to get a machine to where the first patient is treated. Because the equipment and site preparation are expensive, and most of the machines are complex and can be supplied by several different manufacturers, it is imperative that a great deal of thought and care go into the decision: the aim being that the specifications of the machine that is installed meet the immediate need of the department and the needs for the projected lifetime of the equipment. A general survey of the types of equipment available will be presented. This will concentrate on general purpose linear accelerators, although Cobalt 60 machines, microtrons and special purpose machines (intra-operative equipment) will also be covered. General descriptions of the machines along with typical specifications will be given. Selecting the best machine to meet specific needs can be quite complex and criteria for making the selection are presented in a series of twelve steps. Site selection and room design, including the console area, are also critical. The general principles for shielding calculations will be provided. Critical to any installation is the acceptance testing of the equipment including material and radiation oncology performance tests. These tests will be outlined. A reading list of suitable references describing in detail many of the aspects of this course will be provided

  20. Nevada Test Site waste acceptance criteria [Revision 1

    None

    1997-08-01

    Revision one updates the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document.

  1. Nevada Test Site waste acceptance criteria [Revision 1

    Revision one updates the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document

  2. Acceptance test report for project C-157 ''T-Plant electrical upgrade''

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents for record purposes the field results, acceptance, and approvals of the completed acceptance test per WHC-SD-Cl57-ATP-001, Rev. 0, ''Acceptance Test Proceedure for Project C-157 'T Plant Electrical Upgrade''' The test was completed and approved without any problems or exceptions

  3. Acceptance test plan for fourth generation Hanford corrosion monitoring system

    This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the corrosion probe cabinets destined for installation on tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer on each cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinets to be installed on tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. One cabinet will be installed on each tank. Each cabinet will contain corrosion monitoring hardware to be connected to existing corrosion probes already installed in each tank. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation (input a known signal and see if the instrumentation records the proper value)

  4. Acceptance Test Report for Fourth Generation Hanford Corrosion Monitoring System

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) will document the satisfactory operation of the corrosion probe cabinets destined for installation on tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. This ATR will be performed by the manufacturer on each cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinets to be installed on tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. One cabinet will be installed on each tank. Each cabinet will contain corrosion monitoring hardware to be connected to existing corrosion probes already installed in each tank. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation (input a known signal and see if the instrumentation records the proper value)

  5. Acceptance test report: Field test of mixer pump for 241-AN-107 caustic addition project

    The field acceptance test of a 75 HP mixer pump (Hazleton serial number N-20801) installed in Tank 241-AN-107 was conducted from October 1995 thru February 1996. The objectives defined in the acceptance test were successfully met, with two exceptions recorded. The acceptance test encompassed field verification of mixer pump turntable rotation set-up and operation, verification that the pump instrumentation functions within established limits, facilitation of baseline data collection from the mixer pump mounted ultrasonic instrumentation, verification of mixer pump water flush system operation and validation of a procedure for its operation, and several brief test runs (bump) of the mixer pump

  6. Acceptance test report for ENRAF control panel software

    On March 5, 1998, the ENRAF Control Panel Software program was acceptance tested per HNF-1991 Revision 0. The test was performed at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, 200 West Area, building MO-281. The test validated the functionality of the software for use by project W-320, C-1 06 Retrieval. The purpose of the test procedure was to partially verify the functionality of the ENRAF Control Panel Software. The test cycled through the majority of functions within the program. Functions not tested will be tested per Operational Test Procedure OTP-320-01 0 at a later date. The following criteria was used to determine whether the software passed or failed the test. The gauge responds correctly (as described in vendor documentation, Reference 1) to all commands sent through the program. If gauge related error codes are encountered, they may be cleared either through the PET or the program. However, the program, while running, must provide some indication of all gauge related errors encountered. If any of the pass criteria are not met and cannot be immediately resolved. If the system crashes for reasons that are clearly related to program performance and cannot be immediately resolved

  7. Acceptability of prenatal testing and termination of pregnancy in Pakistan.

    Jafri, H; Hewison, J; Sheridan, E; Ahmed, S

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess acceptability of prenatal testing (PNT) and termination of pregnancy (TOP) for a range of conditions in Pakistani parents with and without a child with a genetic condition. A structured questionnaire assessing acceptability of PNT and TOP for 30 conditions was completed by 400 Pakistani participants: 200 parents with a child with a genetic condition (100 fathers and 100 mothers) and 200 parents without an affected child (100 fathers and 100 mothers). There was a high level of interest in PNT, where over 80 % of parents in all four study groups would want PNT for the majority of the conditions. There was comparatively less interest in TOP for the same conditions (ranging from 5 to 70 % of parents, with mothers of an affected child being most interested). Parents were most likely to be interested in TOP for conditions at the serious end of the continuum. More than half of the participants in each group would consider TOP for anencephaly and quadriplegia. The interest in PNT and TOP for a range of conditions suggests that rapidly developing PNT technologies are likely to be acceptable in Pakistan, a low-middle income level and Muslim country. The comparatively lower level of interest in TOP for the same conditions highlights ethical dilemmas that such technologies are likely to raise. PMID:25081227

  8. Could quantitative liver function tests gain wide acceptance among hepatologists?

    Giovanni Tarantino

    2009-01-01

    It has been emphasized that the assessment of residual liver function is of paramount importance to determine the following: severity of acute or chronic liver diseases independent of etiology; long-term prognosis; step-bystep disease progression; surgical risk; and efficacy of antiviral treatment. The most frequently used tools are the galactose elimination capacity to asses hepatocyte cytosol activity, plasma clearance of indocyanine green to assess excretory function, and antipyrine clearance to estimate microsomal activity. However, a widely accepted liver test (not necessarily a laboratory one) to assess quantitative functional hepatic reserve still needs to be established, although there have been various proposals. Furthermore, who are the operators that should order these tests? Advances in analytic methods are expected to allow quantitative liver function tests to be used in clinical practice.

  9. [Clinical trial data validation and user acceptance testing].

    Sun, Hua-long; Dai, Nan

    2015-11-01

    For pharmaceutical industries, clinical data is one of the most valuable deliverables. It is also the basis of analysis, submission, approval, labeling and marketing of a drug product. To ensure the integrity and reliability of clinical data, a scientific standardized quality control (QC) has to be established at each step of a clinical trial. Data validation is conducted to ensure the reasonability and compliance of clinical data by checking data quality before the data is statistically analyzed. This paper focuses on purpose of data validation, creation of data validation plan, rationale of data validation, types of data validation and performance of user acceptance testing on clinical database. PMID:26911047

  10. Acceptance testing and quality assurance of Simulix evolution radiotherapy simulator

    The success of radiotherapy depends on precise treatment simulation and proper patient positioning. The simulator is a conventional radiographic and fluoroscopic system which emulates the geometrical positions of radiotherapy treatment unit. Hence, the acceptance tests and quality assurance (QA) of the simulator are important prior to its commissioning for the safe and precise clinical use. The verification of mechanical and optical readouts, field size, isocenter, optical and radiation field congruence were performed. The X-ray beam parameters were tested for kVp, mAs and consistency of radiation output. The flat panel detector performance was checked with respect to resolution, low contrast sensitivity (LCS), automatic dose rate control (ADRC), and gray image resolution (GIR). Gantry, table, and imaging system collision possibility was checked. Radiation survey around the room was also performed. The field size test for digital readout and on graph paper, the results of isocenter checkup for rotation of gantry, collimator, and couch, and the deviations observed in auto stop for various movements were found within the tolerance limits. Optical field and radiation field was found congruent. All the lasers were found aligned with the established isocenter. Maximum deviation for set and measured kV was found to be 3% in fluoro mode. The maximum deviation observed in mAs was 1.5% in 3-point as well as in 2-point film exposed mode. The X-ray output was found consistent. The results of tests for resolution, LCS, ADRC, and GIR of the flat panel detector were within tolerance limits. All the six safety interlocks were found working. Radiation level around the room was found within the acceptable limits. All the tests carried out were found within the tolerance limits. The data which has been taken in this study will provide basic support to the routine QA of the simulator. (author)

  11. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid L

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-11-09

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5055. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''L''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

  12. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid ''K''

    Johns, B R

    1999-01-01

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) HNF-4276. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid designed as ''K''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

  13. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid ''K''

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) HNF-4276. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid designed as ''K''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document

  14. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid L

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5055. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''L''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document

  15. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid N

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5489. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''N''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document

  16. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid M

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5073. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''M''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document

  17. Topographical mapping system for radiological and hazardous environments acceptance testing

    During the summer of 1996, the Topographical Mapping System (TMS) for hazardous and radiological environments and its accompanying three-dimensional (3-D) visualization tool, the Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote-Viewing System (ICERVS), were delivered to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL and Mechanical Technology, Inc., performed final acceptance testing of the TMS during the next eight months. The TMS was calibrated and characterized during this period. This paper covers the calibration, characterization, and acceptance testing of the TMS. Development of the TMS and ICERVS was initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the purpose of characterization and remediation of underground storage tanks (USTs) at DOE sites across the country. DOE required a 3-D, topographical mapping system suitable for use in hazardous and radiological environments. The intended application is the mapping of the interior of USTs as part of DOE's waste characterization and remediation efforts and to obtain baseline data on the content of the storage tank interiors as well as data on changes in the tank contents and levels brought about by waste remediation steps. Initially targeted for deployment at the Hanford Washington site, the TMS is designed to be a self-contained, compact, and reconfigurable system that is capable of providing rapid, variable-resolution mapping information in poorly characterized workspaces with a minimum of operator intervention

  18. Type of speech material affects Acceptable Noise Level test outcome

    Xaver eKoch

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Acceptable Noise Level (ANL test, in which individuals indicate what level of noise they are willing to put up with while following speech, has been used to guide hearing aid fitting decisions and has been found to relate to prospective hearing aid use. Unlike objective measures of speech perception ability, ANL outcome is not related to individual hearing loss or age, but rather reflects an individual's inherent acceptance of competing noise while listening to speech. As such, the measure may predict aspects of hearing aid success. Crucially, however, recent studies have questioned its repeatability (test-retest reliability. The first question for this study was whether the inconsistent results regarding the repeatability of the ANL test may be due to differences in speech material types used in previous studies. Second, it is unclear whether meaningfulness and semantic coherence of the speech modify ANL outcome. To investigate these questions, we compared ANLs obtained with three types of materials: the International Speech Test Signal (ISTS, which is non-meaningful and semantically non-coherent by definition, passages consisting of concatenated meaningful standard audiology sentences, and longer fragments taken from conversational speech. We included conversational speech as this type of speech material is most representative of everyday listening. Additionally, we investigated whether ANL outcomes, obtained with these three different speech materials, were associated with self-reported limitations due to hearing problems and listening effort in everyday life, as assessed by a questionnaire. ANL data were collected for 57 relatively good-hearing adult participants with an age range representative for hearing aid users. Results showed that meaningfulness, but not semantic coherence of the speech material affected ANL. Less noise was accepted for the non-meaningful ISTS signal than for the meaningful speech materials. ANL repeatability was

  19. Type of Speech Material Affects Acceptable Noise Level Test Outcome.

    Koch, Xaver; Dingemanse, Gertjan; Goedegebure, André; Janse, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test, in which individuals indicate what level of noise they are willing to put up with while following speech, has been used to guide hearing aid fitting decisions and has been found to relate to prospective hearing aid use. Unlike objective measures of speech perception ability, ANL outcome is not related to individual hearing loss or age, but rather reflects an individual's inherent acceptance of competing noise while listening to speech. As such, the measure may predict aspects of hearing aid success. Crucially, however, recent studies have questioned its repeatability (test-retest reliability). The first question for this study was whether the inconsistent results regarding the repeatability of the ANL test may be due to differences in speech material types used in previous studies. Second, it is unclear whether meaningfulness and semantic coherence of the speech modify ANL outcome. To investigate these questions, we compared ANLs obtained with three types of materials: the International Speech Test Signal (ISTS), which is non-meaningful and semantically non-coherent by definition, passages consisting of concatenated meaningful standard audiology sentences, and longer fragments taken from conversational speech. We included conversational speech as this type of speech material is most representative of everyday listening. Additionally, we investigated whether ANL outcomes, obtained with these three different speech materials, were associated with self-reported limitations due to hearing problems and listening effort in everyday life, as assessed by a questionnaire. ANL data were collected for 57 relatively good-hearing adult participants with an age range representative for hearing aid users. Results showed that meaningfulness, but not semantic coherence of the speech material affected ANL. Less noise was accepted for the non-meaningful ISTS signal than for the meaningful speech materials. ANL repeatability was comparable across

  20. Loss on Ignition Furnace Acceptance and Operability Test Procedure

    JOHNSON, D.C.

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure and Operability Test Procedure (ATP/OTP)is to verify the operability of newly installed LOI equipment, including a model 1608FL CM{trademark} Furnace, a dessicator, and balance. The operability of the furnace will be verified. The arrangement of the equipment placed in Glovebox 157-3/4 to perform Loss on Ignition (LOI) testing on samples supplied from the Thermal Stabilization line will be verified. In addition to verifying proper operation of the furnace, this ATP/OTP will also verify the air flow through the filters, verify a damper setting to establish and maintain the required differential pressure between the glovebox and the room pressure, and test the integrity of the newly installed HEPA filter. In order to provide objective evidence of proper performance of the furnace, the furnace must heat 15 crucibles, mounted on a crucible rack, to 1000 C, according to a program entered into the furnace controller located outside the glovebox. The glovebox differential pressure will be set to provide the 0.5 to 2.0 inches of water (gauge) negative pressure inside the glovebox with an airflow of 100 to 125 cubic feet per minute (cfm) through the inlet filter. The glovebox inlet Glfilter will he flow tested to ensure the integrity of the filter connections and the efficiency of the filter medium. The newly installed windows and glovebox extension, as well as all disturbed joints, will be sonically tested via ultra probe to verify no leaks are present. The procedure for DOS testing of the filter is found in Appendix A.

  1. Acceptance test procedure for Project W-049H

    The Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) program for Project W-049H (200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility [TEDF]) covers three activities as follows: (1) Disposal System; (2) Collection System; and (3) Instrumentation and Control System. Each activity has its own ATP. The purpose of the ATPs is to reverify that the systems have been constructed in accordance with the construction documents and to demonstrate that the systems function as required by the Project criteria. The Disposal System ATP covers the testing of the following: disposal line flowmeters, room air temperatures in the Disposal Station Sampling Building, effluent valves and position indicators, disposal pond level monitors, automated sampler, pressure relief valves, and overflow diversion sluice gates. The Collection System ATP covers the testing of the two pump stations and all equipment installed therein. The Instrumentation and Control (I and C) ATP covers the testing of the entire TEDF I and C system. This includes 3 OCS units, modem, and GPLI cabinets in the ETC control room; 2 pump stations; disposal station sampling building; and all LCUs installed in the field

  2. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid ''P''

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) provides the test results for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''P''. The ATR summaries the results and provides a copy of the ATP and inspections in the Appendix

  3. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid Q

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) provides the test results for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''Q''. The ATR summaries the results and provides a copy of the ATP and inspections in the Appendix

  4. Test marketing and consumer acceptance of irradiated meat products

    This study consists of two parts: irradiation processing of cooked meat and irradiation preservation of prepackaged chilled fresh cut meats. Irradiation of prepackaged pickled meat products dipped in grains stillage at a dose 6-8 kGy eliminated common food-borne microorganisms, such as E. Coli and other microbial pathogens and extended the shelf life of the product to 10 days at 5 deg. C. Test marketing of 40,000 bags (about 10,000 kg) of the product in more than 100 supermarkets in the city of Shanghai showed no untoward problem with consumer acceptance. Irradiation of prepackaged chilled fresh cut pork at a dose 3 kGy led to inactivation of microbial pathogens and parasites with a concomitant reduction in numbers of common spoilage microorganisms and extension of shelf life of the product for 30 days at 5 deg. C. The cost benefit and marketing applications were evaluated. (author)

  5. Acceptance testing and commissioning of a new model HDR afterloader

    We have recently performed acceptance testing procedures and have commissioned a new model HDR afterloader, the Varian VariSource with ''Intelligent Drive.'' Our site was one of the first installations worldwide. It is our intent to describe our tests and the results of the tests particularly as they may differ from other afterloaders. The Ir-192 source is unique among afterloaders marketed in the US in that it is very slender (OD of source wire is 0.59 mm) and relatively long (two 0.5 cm sources for a total active length of 1.0 cm). A check of source homogeneity by autoradiograph as urged by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission demonstrates no detectable source inhomogeneity. Reentrant well ionization chambers are calibrated in the US with a 3.5 mm long source at Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratories. Therefore calibration needs to be considered with some care. Calibration of the first delivered source with a well ionization chamber indicated agreement with the manufacturer's stated activity to within 0.5%. Source positioning is checked with a device called a 'cam scale'. Tests have been carried out on this system and it has been found to accurately indicate source position to within ±0.5 mm. Timer accuracy has been found to be better than 0.1% for dwell times of several hundred seconds. The intelligent drive system and the small source diameter allow the source wire to negotiate paths with small radius of curvature. A series of tests have been made in which the source is forced to negotiate 'U' turns of decreasing radius of curvature. A 4.7 F, 100 cm long catheter was used for these tests and the 'U' turn was positioned at approximately 90 cm. Under these conditions, the VariSource was consistently able to traverse a 1.25 cm radius of curvature, which is better than the manufacturer's stated limit of 1.5 cm

  6. Acceptance test of graphite components in nuclear reactor

    The HTTR is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor in Japan. It is a test reactor with thermal power of 30 MW and coolant outlet temperature of 950degC at maximum. To achieve high temperature coolant core internals were made of graphite and carbon materials due to their excellent thermal resistivity. After fabrication of graphite and carbon components at works they were installed in the HTTR, and now it is in the power up testing stage. Concerning the inspection standard of the graphite and carbon components, nondomestic standard exists as main components in the nuclear reactor. It is necessary, therefore, to prescribe the inspection standards for the HTTR graphite components. Many research and developments in relation to the inspection standard, e.g. in the research field of nondestructive examination of the graphite material, had been performed, and then the JAERI established the inspection standard. The acceptance test of the graphite and carbon components was carried out based on the inspection standard. This paper prescribes the outline of the established inspection standard. (author)

  7. Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 3 testing

    This document summarizes the results of the phase 3 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the sealing integrity of the FRS to ensure that the release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from Tank 241-SY-101. The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the mixer pump. This acceptance test was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 area from January 10, 1995 to January 17, 1995. The Phase 3 test consisted of two parts. Part one was a water leak test of the seal between the blast shield and mock load distribution frame (LDF) to ensure that significant contamination of the pump pit and waste interaction with the aluminum impact-limiting material under the LDF are prevented during the pump removal operation. The second part of this acceptance test was an air leak test of the assembled flexible receiver system. The purpose of this test was to verify that the release of hazardous aerosols will be minimized if the tank dome pressure becomes slightly positive during the decontamination of the mixer pump

  8. Isolok Valve Acceptance Testing For DWPF SME Sampling Process

    Evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. Of the opportunities, a focus area related to optimizing the equipment and efficiency of the sample turnaround time for DWPF Analytical Laboratory was identified. The Mechanical Systems and Custom Equipment Development (MS and CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the possibility of using an Isolok(regsign) sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard(regsign) valve for taking process samples. Previous viability testing was conducted with favorable results using the Isolok sampler and reported in SRNL-STI-2010-00749 (1). This task has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time and decrease CPC cycle time. This report summarizes the results from acceptance testing which was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 (2) and which was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-RP-2011-00145 (3). The Isolok to be tested is the same model which was tested, qualified, and installed in the Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) sample system. RW-0333P QA requirements apply to this task. This task was to qualify the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) sampling process. The Hydragard, which is the current baseline sampling method, was used for comparison to the Isolok sampling data. The Isolok sampler is an air powered grab sampler used to 'pull' a sample volume from a process line. The operation of the sampler is shown in Figure 1. The image on the left shows the Isolok's spool extended into the process line and the image on the right shows the sampler retracted and then dispensing the liquid into the sampling container. To determine tank homogeneity, a Coliwasa sampler was used to grab samples at a high and low location within the mixing tank. Data from the two

  9. ISOLOK VALVE ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR DWPF SME SAMPLING PROCESS

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

    2011-12-05

    Evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. Of the opportunities, a focus area related to optimizing the equipment and efficiency of the sample turnaround time for DWPF Analytical Laboratory was identified. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the possibility of using an Isolok{reg_sign} sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard{reg_sign} valve for taking process samples. Previous viability testing was conducted with favorable results using the Isolok sampler and reported in SRNL-STI-2010-00749 (1). This task has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time and decrease CPC cycle time. This report summarizes the results from acceptance testing which was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 (2) and which was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-RP-2011-00145 (3). The Isolok to be tested is the same model which was tested, qualified, and installed in the Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) sample system. RW-0333P QA requirements apply to this task. This task was to qualify the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) sampling process. The Hydragard, which is the current baseline sampling method, was used for comparison to the Isolok sampling data. The Isolok sampler is an air powered grab sampler used to 'pull' a sample volume from a process line. The operation of the sampler is shown in Figure 1. The image on the left shows the Isolok's spool extended into the process line and the image on the right shows the sampler retracted and then dispensing the liquid into the sampling container. To determine tank homogeneity, a Coliwasa sampler was used to grab samples at a high and low location within the mixing tank. Data from

  10. Overcoming Denial through the Group: A Test of Acceptance Theory.

    Rugel, Robert P.; Barry, Denise

    1990-01-01

    Found participants (N=28) in alcohol treatment groups showed decreases in denial of drinking problems and decreases in psychopathology following 12 weeks of group counseling. Determined greater self-acceptance was associated with experiencing acceptance by group and with greater decreases in denial; decreases in denial and psychopathology were…

  11. Specification and acceptance testing of nuclear medicine equipment

    The purchase of nuclear medicine equipment is of prime importance in the operation of a clinical service. Failure to properly evaluate the potential uses of the instrumentation and the various operational characteristics of the equipment can often result in the purchase of inappropriate or inferior instruments. The magnitude of the purchase in terms of time and financial investments make it imperative that the purchase be approached in a systematic manner. Consideration of both the intended clinical functions and personnel requirements is important. It is necessary also to evaluate the ability of the equipment vendor to support the instrumentation after the purchase has been completed and the equipment installed in the clinical site. The desired specifications of the instrument characteristics should be stated in terms that can be verified by acceptance testing. The complexity of modern instrumentation and the sensitivity of it to the environment require the buyer to take into account the potential problems of controlling the temperature, humidity, and electrical power of the installation site. If properly and systematically approached, the purchase of new nuclear medicine instrumentation can result in the acquisition of a powerful diagnostic tool which will have a useful lifetime of many years. If not so approached, it may result in the expenditure of a large amount of money and personnel time without the concomitant return in useful clinical service. (author)

  12. Acceptance test procedure for the 105-KW isolation barrier leak rate

    This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals. This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared in accordance with CM-6-1 EP 4.2, Standard Engineering Practices

  13. Acceptance test procedure for the 105-KW isolation barrier leak rate

    McCracken, K.J.

    1995-05-19

    This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals. This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared in accordance with CM-6-1 EP 4.2, Standard Engineering Practices.

  14. In situ vitrification large-scale operational acceptance test analysis

    A thermal treatment process is currently under study to provide possible enhancement of in-place stabilization of transuranic and chemically contaminated soil sites. The process is known as in situ vitrification (ISV). In situ vitrification is a remedial action process that destroys solid and liquid organic contaminants and incorporates radionuclides into a glass-like material that renders contaminants substantially less mobile and less likely to impact the environment. A large-scale operational acceptance test (LSOAT) was recently completed in which more than 180 t of vitrified soil were produced in each of three adjacent settings. The LSOAT demonstrated that the process conforms to the functional design criteria necessary for the large-scale radioactive test (LSRT) to be conducted following verification of the performance capabilities of the process. The energy requirements and vitrified block size, shape, and mass are sufficiently equivalent to those predicted by the ISV mathematical model to confirm its usefulness as a predictive tool. The LSOAT demonstrated an electrode replacement technique, which can be used if an electrode fails, and techniques have been identified to minimize air oxidation, thereby extending electrode life. A statistical analysis was employed during the LSOAT to identify graphite collars and an insulative surface as successful cold cap subsidence techniques. The LSOAT also showed that even under worst-case conditions, the off-gas system exceeds the flow requirements necessary to maintain a negative pressure on the hood covering the area being vitrified. The retention of simulated radionuclides and chemicals in the soil and off-gas system exceeds requirements so that projected emissions are one to two orders of magnitude below the maximum permissible concentrations of contaminants at the stack

  15. 7 CFR 1755.400 - RUS standard for acceptance tests and measurements of telecommunications plant.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false RUS standard for acceptance tests and measurements of telecommunications plant. 1755.400 Section 1755.400 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.400 RUS standard for acceptance tests...

  16. 49 CFR 232.505 - Pre-revenue service acceptance testing plan.

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-revenue service acceptance testing plan. 232... § 232.505 Pre-revenue service acceptance testing plan. (a) General; submission of plan. Except as... its system the operating railroad or railroads shall submit a pre-revenue service acceptance...

  17. Acceptance Test Report for the 241-AZ-101 Ultrasonic Interface Level Analyzer

    This document comprises the Acceptance Test Report for the 241-AZ-101 Ultrasonic Interface Level Analyzer. This document presents the results of Acceptance Testing of the 241-AZ-101 Ultrasonic Interface Level Analyzers (URSILLAs). Testing of the URSILLAs was performed in accordance with ATP-260-001, ''URSILLA Pre-installation Acceptance Test Procedure''. The objective of the testing was to verify that all equipment and components function in accordance with design specifications and original equipment manufacturer's specifications

  18. Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 2 testing

    This document summarizes the results of the Phase 2 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the test mixer pump currently installed in Tank 241-SY-101. The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the strength of the containment bag and bag bottom cinching mechanism. It is postulated that 68 gallons of waste could be trapped inside the pump internals. The bag must be capable of supporting this waste if it shakes loose and drains to the bottom of the bag after the bag bottom has been cinched closed. This acceptance test was performed at the Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) Facility in the 400 area on January 23, 1995. The bag assembly supported the weight of 920 kg (2,020 lbs) of water with no leakage or damage to the bag. This value meets the acceptance criteria of 910 kg of water and therefore the results were found to be acceptable. The maximum volume of liquid expected to be held up in the pump internals is 258 L (68 gallons), which corresponds to 410 kg. This test weight gives just over a safety factor of 2. The bag also supported a small shock load while it was filled with water when the crane hoisted the bag assembly up and down. Based on the strength rating of the bag components, the bag assembly should support 2--3 times the test weight of 910 kg

  19. Acceptance Test Report for the 241-AN-107 Enraf Advanced Technology Gauges

    Dowell, J.L.; Enderlin, V.R.

    1995-06-01

    This Acceptance Test Report covers the results of the execution of the Acceptance Test Procedure for the 241-AN-107 Enraf Advanced Technology Gauges. The test verified the proper operation of the gauges to measure waste density and level in the 241-AN-107 tank.

  20. Acceptance Test Report for the 241-AN-107 Enraf Advanced Technology Gauges

    This Acceptance Test Report covers the results of the execution of the Acceptance Test Procedure for the 241-AN-107 Enraf Advanced Technology Gauges. The test verified the proper operation of the gauges to measure waste density and level in the 241-AN-107 tank

  1. PDSS/IMC qualification test software acceptance procedures

    1984-01-01

    Tests to be performed for qualifying the payload development support system image motion compensator (IMC) are identified. The performance of these tests will verify the IMC interfaces and thereby verify the qualification test software.

  2. Eddy current testing on structures of nuclear-grade PGX graphite for acceptance test in HTTR

    Acceptance test with eddy current testing is planned to be applied to the core support graphite structures made of PGX graphite, nuclear-grade near-isotropic graphite, in the HTTR. The eddy current testing widely applied to metallic components is not applicable to porous graphite materials due to different characteristics compared with metallic ones. Hence, the eddy current testing method for the fine-grained, nuclear-grade IG-110 graphite had been established. However, this method is also not applicable to the PGX graphite owing to the different flaw detectability because the PGX consists of larger grains and pores than the IG-110. Therefore the eddy current testing method and condition for the PGX graphite were established on the bases of the experimental investigation. (author)

  3. Tank Monitoring and Control System (TMACS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    This document is intended to test the software portion of TMACS. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver devices. The development system will not be talking to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab

  4. 49 CFR 238.111 - Pre-revenue service acceptance testing plan.

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-revenue service acceptance testing plan. 238... and General Requirements § 238.111 Pre-revenue service acceptance testing plan. (a) Passenger equipment that has previously been used in revenue service in the United States. For passenger...

  5. Project W-151 flexible receiver radiation detector system acceptance test plan. Revision 1

    The attached document is the Acceptance Test Plan for the portion of Project W-151 dealing with acceptance of gamma-ray detectors and associated electronics manufactured at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The document provides a written basis for testing the detector system, which will take place in the 305 building (300 Area)

  6. Determining the acceptance of the Brookhaven EBIS Test Stand for primary ions by computer simulation

    We report on computer studies to determine the acceptance of the Electron Beam Ion Source Test Stand (EBTS) at BNL. Knowledge of the acceptance is a useful guide in selecting a source of primary ions, and in designing a transfer line which best matches the primary ion beam to the acceptance of the EBTS. In this work, an ion beam with suitable parameters is tracked out of the EBIS, to a plane where knowledge of the acceptance is wanted. The emittance of the extracted beam in this plane gives a starting point for determining a more reliable value of acceptance. The result will be compared with a theoretical estimate

  7. Project B610 process control configuration acceptance test report

    The purpose of this test is to verify the Westinghouse configuration of the MICON A/S Distributed Control System for project B610. The following will be verified: (1) proper assignment and operation of all field inputs to and outputs from the MICON Termination panels; (2) proper operation of all display data on the operators' console; (3) proper operation of all required alarms; and (4) proper operation of all required interlocks. This test only verifies the proper operation of the Westinghouse control configuration (or program). It will not be responsible for verifying proper operation of the MICON hardware or operating software. Neither does it test any of the B610 instrument. The MICON hardware and software has been tested as part of the equipment procurement. Instrumentation and wiring installed under project B620 will be tested under a separate functional test. In some cases, precise transmitter ranges, alarm setpoints, and controller tuning parameters are not available at this time. Therefore, approximate values are used during the test. This should not affect the proper operation of the configuration or the validity of this test. Final values will be assigned during operability testing

  8. Tank Monitoring and Control System (TMACS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    BARNES, D.A.

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 12.0 of the TMACS Monitor and Control System (TMACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. This document is intended to test the software portion of TMACS. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be communicating to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab.

  9. Tank Monitoring and Control System (TMACS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 12.0 of the TMACS Monitor and Control System (TMACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. This document is intended to test the software portion of TMACS. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be communicating to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab

  10. Acceptance test report for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver Gamma Detector System

    This Acceptance Test Report is for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver Gamma Detector System. This test verified that the data logger and data converter for the gamma detector system functions as intended

  11. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid W

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''W''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  12. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid L

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid designed as ''L''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the shop

  13. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid ''P''

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''P''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  14. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid ''V''

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designated as ''V''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  15. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid ''U''

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''U''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  16. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid T

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing Of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''T''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  17. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid R

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''R''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  18. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid ''Q''

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''Q''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  19. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid ''T''

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designated as ''T''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  20. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid N

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid designed as ''N''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the shop

  1. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid V

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control. (PIC) skid designed as ''V''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  2. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid sup L sup

    Koch, M R

    1999-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid designed as ''L''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the shop.

  3. Test and acceptance from the AE point of view

    The power industry has undergone the transition from utilizing construction engineers for startup activities to utilizing test engineers who are responsible for the preparation or execution of a formal test program. This has come about because testing has been given sufficient importance to justify those participating within the industry to establish it as a specialty phase apart from engineering/design and construction. Presently testing is being conducted by those organizations that have either engineered and/or constructed the unit which may be a position of conflict in regards to unbiased test. The tester (third party) concept promotes the repetition, independence, and expertise of a test organization responsible to the utility for certifying that each system has been tested to the design criteria established by others. A move to this concept should result in better generating stations with higher availability because it has been completely tested by an organization with this sole contractual responsibility. The AE, NSSS, and utility would all benefit with possibly no additional costs incurred

  4. Waste retrieval sluicing system data acquisition system acceptance test report

    This document describes the test procedure for the Project W-320 Tank C-106 Sluicing Data Acquisition System (W-320 DAS). The Software Test portion will test items identified in the WRSS DAS System Description (SD), HNF-2115. Traceability to HNF-2115 will be via a reference that follows in parenthesis, after the test section title. The Field Test portion will test sensor operability, analog to digital conversion, and alarm setpoints for field instrumentation. The W-320 DAS supplies data to assist thermal modeling of tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. It is designed to be a central repository for information from sources that would otherwise have to be read, recorded, and integrated manually. Thus, completion of the DAS requires communication with several different data collection devices and output to a usable PC data formats. This test procedure will demonstrate that the DAS functions as required by the project requirements stated in Section 3 of the W-320 DAS System Description, HNF-2115

  5. Tank Monitoring and Control System (TMACS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 11.2 of the TMACS Monitor and Control System (TMCACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be talking to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab

  6. CSI computer system/remote interface unit acceptance test results

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The validation tests conducted on the Control/Structures Interaction (CSI) Computer System (CCS)/Remote Interface Unit (RIU) is discussed. The CCS/RIU consists of a commercially available, Langley Research Center (LaRC) programmed, space flight qualified computer and a flight data acquisition and filtering computer, developed at LaRC. The tests were performed in the Space Structures Research Laboratory (SSRL) and included open loop excitation, closed loop control, safing, RIU digital filtering, and RIU stand alone testing with the CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM) Phase-0 testbed. The test results indicated that the CCS/RIU system is comparable to ground based systems in performing real-time control-structure experiments.

  7. Acceptance Test Procedure: SY101 air pallet system

    The purpose of this test procedure is to verify that the system(s) procured to load the SY-101 Mitigation Test Pump package fulfills its functional requirements. It will also help determine the man dose expected due to handling of the package during the actual event. The scope of this procedure focuses on the ability of the air pallets and container saddles to carry the container package from the new 100 foot concrete pad into 2403-WD where it will be stored awaiting final disposition. This test attempts to simulate the actual event of depositing the SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test pump into the 2403-WD building. However, at the time of testing road modifications required to drive the 100 ton trailer into CWC were not performed. Therefore a flatbed trailer will be use to transport the container to CWC. The time required to off load the container from the 100 ton trailer will be recorded for man dose evaluation on location. The cranes used for this test will also be different than the actual event. This is not considered to be an issue due to minimal effects on man dose

  8. The Northern Regional Programme for the acceptance testing of X-ray equipment

    Since 1984 the Regional Medical Physics Department has participated in a regional acceptance testing programme for all X-ray equipment from mobile units to computed tomography scanners. The organizational and radiation physics aspects of the programme are described. Three levels of tests are performed by physicists: the first on installation, the second after 3 months, and the final visit just prior to the end of the manufacturer's warranty. The second test is only performed if any aspect of performance requires rechecking as a result of the first visit. Acceptance test protocols are based on those published by the Institute of Physical Sciences in Medicine. Details of the limiting values for the acceptance test measurements are given. The results of the programme are discussed. In some instances the testing has resulted in modifications to the design and construction of X-ray equipment. Acceptance testing is important in determining a baseline standard of performance against which routine quality assurance may be assessed. (author)

  9. Acceptance tests of the BEPC II RF transmitter and the circulator

    The high power RF transmitter and the circulator with 500 MHz/250 kW which will be operated in Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPC II) project have been installed on site, and adjustments and acceptance test have been finished, which is the first transmitter system of 500 MHz/250 kW in China. In this paper, the test principle and all measurements as well as commissioning result in the acceptance test are introduced in details, and the actual machine technical parameters and performance are presented. An acceptance test conclusion by comparing with the design requirements is given. (authors)

  10. Acceptance tests of cryogenic components for SST-1

    The cryogenics system is one of the critical sub-systems in SST-1. The role of cryogenics systems is to facilitate the smooth cool-down, warm up and steady state operation as well as to take care about any abnormal events in safe mode during the operation. As a part of SST-1 machine shell, the cryogenics division is responsible for cold helium (at 4.5 K) and liquid nitrogen (at 77 K) hydraulics. This hydraulic network consists of headers, 80 K embossed shields, interconnecting loops, ceramic feed through at the vacuum barrier, flexible hoses and electrical breaks for cold helium as well as liquid nitrogen circuits. Before installation of individual components in SST-1, the performance validation tests were mandatory as part of mandatory stringent protocols fulfillment. The performance validation tests were conducted from individual components to integrated assembly level. In this paper, we report the essence of procedures followed and the performance test results. (author)

  11. WRAP low level waste restricted waste management (LLW RWM) glovebox acceptance test report

    Leist, K.J.

    1997-11-24

    On April 22, 1997, the Low Level Waste Restricted Waste Management (LLW RWM) glovebox was tested using acceptance test procedure 13027A-87. Mr. Robert L. Warmenhoven served as test director, Mr. Kendrick Leist acted as test operator and test witness, and Michael Lane provided miscellaneous software support. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine glovebox control system interlocks, operator Interface Unit (OIU) menus, alarms, and messages. Basic drum port and lift table control sequences were demonstrated. OIU menus, messages, and alarm sequences were examined, with few exceptions noted. Barcode testing was bypassed, due to the lack of installed equipment as well as the switch from basic reliance on fixed bar code readers to the enhanced use of portable bar code readers. Bar code testing was completed during performance of the LLW RWM OTP. Mechanical and control deficiencies were documented as Test Exceptions during performance of this Acceptance Test. These items are attached as Appendix A to this report.

  12. WRAP low level waste restricted waste management (LLW RWM) glovebox acceptance test report

    On April 22, 1997, the Low Level Waste Restricted Waste Management (LLW RWM) glovebox was tested using acceptance test procedure 13027A-87. Mr. Robert L. Warmenhoven served as test director, Mr. Kendrick Leist acted as test operator and test witness, and Michael Lane provided miscellaneous software support. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine glovebox control system interlocks, operator Interface Unit (OIU) menus, alarms, and messages. Basic drum port and lift table control sequences were demonstrated. OIU menus, messages, and alarm sequences were examined, with few exceptions noted. Barcode testing was bypassed, due to the lack of installed equipment as well as the switch from basic reliance on fixed bar code readers to the enhanced use of portable bar code readers. Bar code testing was completed during performance of the LLW RWM OTP. Mechanical and control deficiencies were documented as Test Exceptions during performance of this Acceptance Test. These items are attached as Appendix A to this report

  13. MAC mini acceptance test procedures, software Version 3.3

    The K Basins Materials Accounting (MAC) programs had some improvements made to it to to change slightly the access authorized users had to the modification of critical data. This ATP describes how the code was to be tested to verify its correctness

  14. Probabilistic Requirements (Partial) Verification Methods Best Practices Improvement. Variables Acceptance Sampling Calculators: Empirical Testing. Volume 2

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; White, K. Preston, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center was requested to improve on the Best Practices document produced for the NESC assessment, Verification of Probabilistic Requirements for the Constellation Program, by giving a recommended procedure for using acceptance sampling by variables techniques as an alternative to the potentially resource-intensive acceptance sampling by attributes method given in the document. In this paper, the results of empirical tests intended to assess the accuracy of acceptance sampling plan calculators implemented for six variable distributions are presented.

  15. Solar panel acceptance testing using a pulsed solar simulator

    Hershey, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    Utilizing specific parameters as area of an individual cell, number in series and parallel, and established coefficient of current and voltage temperature dependence, a solar array irradiated with one solar constant at AMO and at ambient temperature can be characterized by a current-voltage curve for different intensities, temperatures, and even different configurations. Calibration techniques include: uniformity in area, depth and time, absolute and transfer irradiance standards, dynamic and functional check out procedures. Typical data are given for individual cell (2x2 cm) to complete flat solar array (5x5 feet) with 2660 cells and on cylindrical test items with up to 10,000 cells. The time and energy saving of such testing techniques are emphasized.

  16. Acceptance test report for the Tank 241-C-106 in-tank imaging system

    This document presents the results of Acceptance Testing of the 241-C-106 in-tank video camera imaging system. The purpose of this imaging system is to monitor the Project W-320 sluicing of Tank 241-C-106. The objective of acceptance testing of the 241-C-106 video camera system was to verify that all equipment and components function in accordance with procurement specification requirements and original equipment manufacturer's (OEM) specifications. This document reports the results of the testing

  17. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation test pump-2

    This document provides the results of the run-in test of the replacement mixer pump for the Tank 241-SY-101. The test was conducted at the 400 Area MASF facility between August 12 and September 29, 1994. The report includes findings, analysis, recommendations, and corrective actions taken

  18. MBA acceptance test procedures, software Version 1.4

    The Mass Balance Program (MBA) is an adjunct to the Materials Accounting database system, Version 3.4. MBA was written to equip the personnel performing K-Basin encapsulation tasks with a conservative estimate of accumulated sludge during the processing of canisters into and out of the chute. The K Basins Materials Balance programs had some minor improvements made to it to feedback the chute processing status to the operator better. This ATP describes how the code was to be tested to verify its correctness

  19. 242-A MCS Logic Acceptance Test Report for Year 2000 Upgrade

    242-A Evaporator distributive control system upgrade to D/3 version 9.0-2 for year 2000 compliance. Testing was performed per test procedure HNF-3568. There were no unresolved exceptions. The system responded correctly to all testing and meets the requirements to operate the 242-A This report documents the acceptance test results for the Evaporator facility

  20. Acceptance of Genetic Testing in a General Population: Age, Education and Gender Differences.

    Aro, A. R.; Hakonen, A.; Hietala, M.; Lonnqvist, J.; Niemela, P.; Peltonen, L; Aula, P.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of age, education, and gender on acceptance of genetic testing were studied. Finnish participants responded to a questionnaire presenting reasons for and against genetic testing (N=1,967). Intentions to take genetic tests, worries, and experience of genetic test or hereditary disease were also assessed. Results are presented and discussed.…

  1. Acceptance Test Report for the high pressure water jet system canister cleaning fixture

    This Acceptance Test confirmed the test results and recommendations, documented in WHC-SD-SNF-DTR-001, Rev. 0 Development Test Report for the High Pressure Water Jet System Nozzles, for decontaminating empty fuel canisters in KE-Basin. Optimum water pressure, water flow rate, nozzle size and overall configuration were tested

  2. Affect and technology acceptance: A test of two mechanisms

    Scholderer, Joachim; Grunert, Klaus G.; Søndergaard, Helle Alsted

    Commercialization of new technologies may be hampered by stakeholder resistance and a sceptical public. Genetic modification (GM) has suffered particularly from such problems. At present, for example, practically no products exist on the shelves of European retailers that are labelled as containing...... resistant to all forms of communicative interventions. A study is presented in which the effectiveness and mechanisms of direct-experience interventions are experimentally tested. Results indicate that the positive affect evoked by a single trial of a high-quality genetically modified food can lead to...... practice, focusing on point-of-sale promotions that could be the key element in the launch of the first genetically modified foods in markets that are as yet GM-free....

  3. Project B610 process control configuration acceptance test procedure

    The purpose of this test is to verify the Westinghouse configuration of the MICON A/S Distributed Control System for project B610. The following will be verified: proper assignment and operation of all field inputs to and outputs from the MICON Termination panels; proper operation of all display data on the operator's console; proper operation of all required alarms; and proper operation of all required interlocks. The MICON A/S control system is configured to replace all the control, indication, and alarm panels now located in the Power Control Room. Nine systems are covered by this control configuration, 2736-ZB HVAC, 234-5Z HVAC, Process Vacuum, Dry Air, 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling, Building Accelerometer, Evacuation Siren, Stack CAMs, and Fire. The 2736-ZB HVAC system consists of the ventilation controls for 2736-ZB and 2736-Z as well as alarms for the emergency generators and 232-Z. The 234-5Z HVAC system is the ventilation controls for 235-5Z and 236-Z buildings. Process Vacuum covers the controls for the 26 inch vacuum system. Dry Air covers the controls for the steam and electric air dryers. The 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling system consists of the status indications and alarms for the 291-Z compressor and vacuum pump closed loop cooling system. The rest of closed loop cooling was tested earlier. The Building Accelerometer system consists of the status indications for the two seismic system accelerometers. The Evacuation Siren system includes the controls for the evacuation and take cover sirens. Stack CAMs cover the alarms for the various building ventilation stack continuous air monitors. Finally, the Fire system covers the various fire alarms now located in Room 321-A

  4. Acceptance/Operational Test Report for Tank 241-AN-104 camera and camera purge control system

    This Acceptance/Operational Test Procedure (ATP/OTP) will document the satisfactory operation of the camera purge panel, purge control panel, color camera system and associated control components destined for installation. The final acceptance of the complete system will be performed in the field. The purge panel and purge control panel will be tested for its safety interlock which shuts down the camera and pan-and-tilt inside the tank vapor space during loss of purge pressure and that the correct purge volume exchanges are performed as required by NFPA 496. This procedure is separated into seven sections. This Acceptance/Operational Test Report documents the successful acceptance and operability testing of the 241-AN-104 camera system and camera purge control system

  5. Delinquency and Peer Acceptance in Adolescence: A Within-Person Test of Moffitt’s Hypotheses

    Rulison, Kelly L.; Kreager, Derek A.; Osgood, D. Wayne

    2014-01-01

    We tested two hypotheses derived from Moffitt’s (1993) taxonomic theory of antisocial behavior, both of which are central to her explanation for the rise in delinquency during adolescence. Specifically, we tested whether persistently delinquent individuals become more accepted by their peers during adolescence and whether individuals who abstain from delinquent behavior become less accepted. Participants were 4,359 adolescents from 14 communities in the PROSPER study, which assessed friendshi...

  6. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid ''K''

    JOHNS, B.R.

    1999-10-28

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) HNF-4276. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid designed as ''K''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

  7. Test report for the run-in acceptance testing of the hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3

    This report will provide the findings of the demonstration test conducted on the Double-Shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 HMR Pump-3 in accordance with WHC-SDWM-TP-434 ''Test plan for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation/retrieval pump-3'' at the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building from 7 June 1996 through 30 July 1996 per work package 4A-96-92/W. The DST 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3 is a 200-HP submersible electric driven pump that has been modified for use in the DST 241-SY-101 containing mixed waste located in the 200W area. The pump has a motor driven rotation mechanism that allows the pump column to rotate through 355 degree. Prior to operation, pre-operational checks were performed which included loop calibration grooming and alignment of instruments, learning how plumb HMR-3 assembly hung in a vertical position and bump test of the motor to determine rotation direction. The pump was tested in the MASF Large Diameter Cleaning Vessel (LDCV) with process water at controlled temperatures and levels. In addition, the water temperature of the cooling water to the motor oil heat exchanger was recorded during testing. A 480-volt source powered a Variable Frequency Drive (VFD). The VFD powered the pump at various frequencies and voltages to control speed and power output of the pump. A second VFD powered the oil cooling pump. A third VFD was not available to operate the rotational drive motor during the 72 hour test, so it was demonstrated as operational before and after the test. A Mini Acquisition and Control System (Mini-DACS) controls pump functions and monitoring of the pump parameters. The Mini-DACS consists of three computers, software and some Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). Startup and shutdown of either the pump motor or the oil cooling pump can be accomplished by the Mini-DACS. When the pump was in operation, the Mini-DACS monitors automatically collects data electronically. However, some required data

  8. Acceptance testing protocol for magnetic resonance imaging systems; Protocolo de testes de aceitacao em equipamentos de imagem por ressonancia magnetica

    Mazzola, Alessandro Andre [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Programa de Pos-graduacao em Radiologia]. E-mail: aam.ez@terra.com.br; Herdade, Silvio Bruni [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Koch, Hilton Augusto; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia

    2005-05-15

    Objective: to develop an acceptance testing protocol for magnetic resonance imaging systems and to show which and how phantoms could be used to collect data. Materials and methods: the definition, procedure, analysis and the acceptation criteria were created for each of 15 selected tests. Results: These tests allow the evaluation of technical specifications stated on the manufacturer's sales proposal and to establish reference values to be used in subsequent constancy tests. Conclusion: future quality assurance programs in magnetic resonance imaging should consider employing tests similar or equal to the ones described in this paper. (author)

  9. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

    2011-08-01

    This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

  10. Community acceptability of use of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria by community health workers in Uganda

    Waiswa Peter; Pariyo George W; Kiguli Juliet; Tibenderana James K; Mukanga David; Bajunirwe Francis; Mutamba Brian; Counihan Helen; Ojiambo Godfrey; Kallander Karin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Many malarious countries plan to introduce artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) at community level using community health workers (CHWs) for treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Use of ACT with reliance on presumptive diagnosis may lead to excessive use, increased costs and rise of drug resistance. Use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) could address these challenges but only if the communities will accept their use by CHWs. This study assessed community acceptability of the...

  11. Standard-B auto grab sampler hydrogen monitoring system, Acceptance Test Report

    Project W-369, Watch List Tank Hydrogen Monitors, installed a Standard-C Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) on the Flammable gas waste tank AN-104. General Support Projects (8K510) was support by Test Engineering (7CH30) in the performance of the Acceptance Test Procedures (ATP) to qualify the SHMS cabinets on the waste tank. The ATP's performance was controlled by Tank Farm work package. This completed ATP is transmitted by EDT-601748 as an Acceptance Test Report (ATR) in accordance with WHC-6-1, EP 4.2 and EP 1.12

  12. Understanding Student Teachers’ Behavioural Intention to Use Technology: Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) Validation and Testing

    Kung-Teck, Wong; Rosma bt Osman; Pauline Swee Choo, Goh; Mohd Khairezan Rahmat

    2013-01-01

    This study sets out to validate and test the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in the context of Malaysian student teachers’ integration of their technology in teaching and learning. To establish factorial validity, data collected from 302 respondents were tested against the TAM using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and structural equation modelling (SEM) was used for model comparison and hypotheses testing. The goodness-of-fit test of the analysis shows partial support of the applicabili...

  13. Delinquency and peer acceptance in adolescence: a within-person test of Moffitt's hypotheses.

    Rulison, Kelly L; Kreager, Derek A; Osgood, D Wayne

    2014-11-01

    We tested 2 hypotheses derived from Moffitt's (1993) taxonomic theory of antisocial behavior, both of which are central to her explanation for the rise in delinquency during adolescence. We tested whether persistently delinquent individuals become more accepted by their peers during adolescence and whether individuals who abstain from delinquent behavior become less accepted. Participants were 4,359 adolescents from 14 communities in the PROSPER study, which assessed friendship networks and delinquency from 6th (M = 11.8 years) to 9th (M = 15.3 years) grade. We operationalized peer acceptance as number of nominations received (indegree centrality), attractiveness as a friend (adjusted indegree centrality), and network bridging potential (betweenness centrality) and tested the hypotheses with multilevel modeling. Contrary to Moffitt's hypothesis, persistently delinquent youths did not become more accepted between early and middle adolescence, and although abstainers were less accepted in early adolescence, they became more accepted over time. Results were similar for boys and girls; when differences occurred, they provided no support for Moffitt's hypotheses for boys and were opposite of her hypotheses for girls. Sensitivity analyses in which alternative strategies and additional data were used to identify persistently delinquent adolescents produced similar results. We explore the implications of these results for Moffitt's assertions that social mimicry of persistently antisocial adolescents leads to increases in delinquency and that social isolation leads to abstention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25243328

  14. Delinquency and Peer Acceptance in Adolescence: A Within-Person Test of Moffitt’s Hypotheses

    Rulison, Kelly L; Kreager, Derek A.; Osgood, D. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    We tested two hypotheses derived from Moffitt’s (1993) taxonomic theory of antisocial behavior, both of which are central to her explanation for the rise in delinquency during adolescence. Specifically, we tested whether persistently delinquent individuals become more accepted by their peers during adolescence and whether individuals who abstain from delinquent behavior become less accepted. Participants were 4,359 adolescents from 14 communities in the PROSPER study, which assessed friendship networks and delinquency from 6th (M = 11.8 years) to 9th (M = 15.3 years) grade. We operationalized peer acceptance as: number of nominations received (indegree centrality), attractiveness as a friend (adjusted indegree centrality), and network bridging potential (betweenness centrality) and tested the hypotheses using multilevel modeling. Contrary to Moffitt’s hypothesis, persistently delinquent youth did not become more accepted between early and middle adolescence, and although abstainers were less accepted in early adolescence, they became more accepted over time. Results were similar for boys and girls; when differences occurred, they provided no support for Moffitt’s hypotheses for boys and were opposite of her hypotheses for girls. Sensitivity analyses using alternative strategies and additional data to identify persistently delinquent adolescents produced similar results. We explore the implications of these results for Moffitt’s assertions that social mimicry of persistently antisocial adolescents leads to increases in delinquency and that social isolation leads to abstention. PMID:25243328

  15. Enraf series 854 Advanced Technology Gauge (ATG) acceptance test procedure. Revision 3

    This procedure provides acceptance testing for Enraf Series 854 level gauges used to monitor levels in Hanford Waste Storage Tanks. The test will verify that the gauge functions according to the manufacturer's instructions and specifications and is properly setup prior to being delivered to the tank farm area

  16. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid ''V''

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) verifies proper construction per the design drawings and tests for proper functioning of the Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid ''V''. The scope section lists the systems and functions to be checked. This ATP will be performed at the Site Fabrication Services (SFS) shop upon completion of the construction of the PIC skid

  17. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid M

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) verifies proper construction per the design drawings and tests for proper functioning of the Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid ''M''. The Scope section lists the systems and functions to be checked. This ATP will be performed at the Site Fabrication Service's (SFS) shop upon completion of construction of the PIC skid

  18. Project W-320 acceptance test report for AY-farm electrical distribution

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the AY-Farm Electrical Distribution System functions as required by the design criteria. This test is divided into three parts to support the planned construction schedule; Section 8 tests Mini-Power Pane AY102-PPI and the EES; Section 9 tests the SSS support systems; Section 10 tests the SSS and the Multi-Pak Group Control Panel. This test does not include the operation of end-use components (loads) supplied from the distribution system. Tests of the end-use components (loads) will be performed by other W-320 ATPs

  19. High acceptance of an early dyslexia screening test involving genetic analyses in Germany.

    Wilcke, Arndt; Müller, Bent; Schaadt, Gesa; Kirsten, Holger; Boltze, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    Dyslexia is a developmental disorder characterized by severe problems in the acquisition of reading and writing skills. It has a strong neurobiological basis. Genetic influence is estimated at 50-70%. One of the central problems with dyslexia is its late diagnosis, normally not before the end of the 2nd grade, resulting in the loss of several years for early therapy. Currently, research is focusing on the development of early tests for dyslexia, which may be based on EEG and genetics. Our aim was to determine the acceptance of such a future test among parents. We conducted a representative survey in Germany with 1000 parents of children aged 3-7 years, with and without experience of dyslexia. 88.7% of the parents supported the introduction of an early test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics; 82.8% would have their own children tested, and 57.9% were willing to pay for the test if health insurance did not cover the costs. Test acceptance was significantly higher if parents had prior experience with dyslexia. The perceived benefits of such a test were early recognition and remediation and, preventing deficits. Concerns regarded the precision of the test, its potentially stigmatizing effect and its costs. The high overall support for the test leads to the conclusion that parents would accept a test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics. PMID:26036858

  20. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC), Rev. 7-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NTSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal.

  1. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC), Rev. 7-01

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-05-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NTSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal.

  2. W-026 acceptance test report plant control system hardware (submittal {number_sign} 220.C)

    Watson, T.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-14

    Acceptance Testing of the WRAP1 Plant Control System Hardware was conducted throughout the construction of WRAPI with the final testing on the Process Area hardware being completed in November 1996. The hardware tests were broken out by the following functional areas; Local Control Units, Operator Control Stations in the WRAP Control Room, DMS Server, PCS Server, Operator Interface Units, printers, DMS terminals, WRAP Local Area Network/Communications, and bar code equipment. This document contains a completed copy of each of the hardware tests along with the applicable test logs and completed test exception reports.

  3. W-026 acceptance test plan plant control system hardware (submittal {number_sign} 216)

    Watson, T.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-14

    Acceptance Testing of the WRAP 1 Plant Control System Hardware will be conducted throughout the construction of WRAP I with the final testing on the Process Area hardware being completed in November 1996. The hardware tests will be broken out by the following functional areas; Local Control Units, Operator Control Stations in the WRAP Control Room, DMS Server, PCS Server, Operator Interface Units, printers, DNS terminals, WRAP Local Area Network/Communications, and bar code equipment. This document will contain completed copies of each of the hardware tests along with the applicable test logs and completed test exception reports.

  4. MAC Version 3.3, MBA Version 1.3 acceptance test summary report

    The K Basins Materials Accounting (MAC) and Materials Balance (MBA) programs had the Paradox Code Cleanup ATP run to check out the systems. This report describes the results of the test and provides the signoff sheets associated with the testing. The Acceptance Test results indicate that the MAC and MBA systems are ready for operation using the cleaned up code. The final codes were removed to the production space on the customer server on April 15th

  5. 105 K east ion exchange and cartridge filter restart instrumentation acceptance test report

    Acceptance Test Report following the completion of ATP-012 for the 105KE CP-A and CP-A Computer and PLC Panels. The test was conducted from 11/13/95 to 12/11/95. Three test discrepancies were generated during the ATP and all were dispositioned and closed. All sections were completed except Section 5.9 which was deleted per ECN 190556

  6. KE basin recirculation/skimmer/IX systems restart acceptance test report

    The 105 KE Basin Recirculation System and Skimmer Loop have been upgraded to provide the flexibility to run the Ion Exchange Modules on either system to support spent fuel removal for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. This Acceptance Test Report Provides the documentation of the leak Testing for the construction work associated with the IXM inlet and outlet piping, places the cartridge filters back in service and provides the functional testing of the IXM's on the recirculation and skimmer systems

  7. Accepting test-anxiety-related thoughts increases academic performance among undergraduate students

    Senay Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Given that unwanted thoughts are enhanced when suppressed, we tested among college freshmen who were about to take an academic exam if an acceptance strategy consisting of not suppressing intrusive thoughts will improve test performance. This strategy proved superior to students’ own default strategies as much as a modified, alternative strategy, avoiding the antecedents of intrusive thoughts. Moreover, the combination of the two strategies counteracted a stronger, negative effect of test anxiety on test performance as compared with each strategy used alone. The results suggest that not only intrusive thoughts per se but also the suppression of these thoughts can disrupt test performance, and hint that approaching such thoughts with acceptance may not interfere with simultaneously working toward avoiding the antecedents of these thoughts.

  8. Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines

    Kearney, D.

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

  9. Acceptance test procedure for a portable, self-contained nitrogen supply

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document compliance with the requirements of WHC-S-0249 Rev. 1 and ECN 606112. The equipment being tested is a Portable, Self-Contained Nitrogen Supply. The unit was purchased as a Design and Fabrication procurement activity. The Functional Test was written by the Seller and is contained in Appendix A. The Functional test will be performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company performing inspection and witnessing the functional test at the Seller's location

  10. Integrating Telemedicine for Disaster Response: Testing the Emergency Telemedicine Technology Acceptance Model

    Davis, Theresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is little evidence that technology acceptance is well understood in healthcare. The hospital environment is complex and dynamic creating a challenge when new technology is introduced because it impacts current processes and workflows which can significantly affect patient care delivery and outcomes. This study tested the effect…

  11. Acceptance Test Report for the Modular Automation System (MAS) Manufactured by Honeywell Inc

    This document details the performance of the acceptance test of the Honeywell MAS Control System for equipment to be installed in gloveboxes HA-20MB and HA-211 at a later date. Equipment that was anticipated included 6 stabilization furnaces, only three and their associated equipment were installed

  12. 14 CFR 91.1071 - Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, training to accepted standards.

    2010-01-01

    ... performance to the person conducting the check, the program manager may not use the pilot, nor may the pilot... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Fractional Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1071 Crewmember: Tests... provisions, training to accepted standards. 91.1071 Section 91.1071 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  13. A FORTRAN IV Program for Multiple-choice Tests with Predetermined Minimal Acceptable Performance Levels

    Noe, Michael J.

    1976-01-01

    A Fortran IV multiple choice test scoring program for an IBM 370 computer is described that computes minimally acceptable performance levels and compares student scores to these levels. The program accomodates up to 500 items with no more than nine alternatives from a group of examinees numbering less than 10,000. (Author)

  14. Acceptance Test Report for Fourth-Generation Hanford Corrosion Monitoring Cabinet

    This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the third-generation corrosion monitoring cabinet (Hiline Engineering Part No.0004-CHM-072-C01). This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer of the cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinet. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation

  15. Rein tension acceptance in young horses in a voluntary test situation

    Christensen, Janne Winther; zharkikh, T.L.; Antoine, A.;

    2011-01-01

    inexperienced horses are willing to accept in order to obtain a food reward; whether the tension acceptance changes during 3 consecutive test days; and whether rein tension correlates with the expression of conflict behaviour and heart rate. Hypotheses: Pressure-naïve horses will apply only little rein tension...... bar) to obtain a food reward in a voluntary test situation. On each test day, each horse was exposed to 2 control sessions (loose reins), an intermediate and a short rein session (1 min/session). Rein tension, heart rate and behaviour were recorded. Results: The horses applied significantly more...... tension on the first day (mean rein tension: 10.2 N), compared to the second and third test day (Day 2: 6.0 and Day 3: 5.7 N). The horses showed significantly more conflict behaviour in the short rein treatment. There was no treatment effect on heart rate. Conclusions and potential relevance: The horses...

  16. Accepting test-anxiety-related thoughts increases academic performance among undergraduate students

    Senay Ibrahim; Cetinkaya Mustafa; Usak Muhammet

    2012-01-01

    Given that unwanted thoughts are enhanced when suppressed, we tested among college freshmen who were about to take an academic exam if an acceptance strategy consisting of not suppressing intrusive thoughts will improve test performance. This strategy proved superior to students’ own default strategies as much as a modified, alternative strategy, avoiding the antecedents of intrusive thoughts. Moreover, the combination of the two strategies counteracted a stronger, negative effect of te...

  17. W-026, acceptance test report TRU empty drum compactor (submittal number-sign 634)

    On 10/19/96 and 10/21/96, the 06/04/96 version of the Empty Drum Compactor Acceptance Test Procedure was used to perform tests by INET Corporation at the Hanford WRAP facility. The INET compaction components were installed in the Diversified glovebox. The Diversified glovebox and cart and the INET compaction components, EDC HPU and drum centering device constitute the Empty Drum Compactor

  18. Acceptance test procedure for K basins dose reduction project clean and coat equipment

    This document is the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) for the clean and coat equipment designed by Oceaneering Hanford, Inc. under purchase order MDK-XVC-406988 for use in the 105 K East Basin. The ATP provides the guidelines and criteria to test the equipment's ability to clean and coat the concrete perimeter, divider walls, and dummy elevator pit above the existing water level. This equipment was designed and built in support of the Spent Nuclear Fuel, Dose Reduction Project. The ATP will be performed at the 305 test facility in the 300 Area at Hanford. The test results will be documented in WHC-SD-SNF-ATR-020

  19. Acceptance test procedure for K basins dose reduction project clean and coat equipment

    Creed, R.F.

    1996-03-11

    This document is the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) for the clean and coat equipment designed by Oceaneering Hanford, Inc. under purchase order MDK-XVC-406988 for use in the 105 K East Basin. The ATP provides the guidelines and criteria to test the equipment`s ability to clean and coat the concrete perimeter, divider walls, and dummy elevator pit above the existing water level. This equipment was designed and built in support of the Spent Nuclear Fuel, Dose Reduction Project. The ATP will be performed at the 305 test facility in the 300 Area at Hanford. The test results will be documented in WHC-SD-SNF-ATR-020.

  20. Acceptance test procedure, 241-SY-101/241-C-106 shot loading system

    This Acceptance Test Procedure is for the 241-SY-101/241-C-106 Shot Loading System. The procedure will test the components of the Shot Loading System and its capability of adequately loading shot into the annular space of the Container. The loaded shot will provide shielding as required for transporting and storage of a contaminated pump after removal from the tank. This test serves as verification that the SLS is acceptable for use in the pump removal operations for Tanks 241-SY-101, 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. The pump removal operation for these three tanks will be performed by two different organizations with different equipment, but the Shot Loading System will be compatible between the two operations

  1. The deformable secondary mirror of VLT: final electro-mechanical and optical acceptance test results

    Briguglio, Runa; Biasi, Roberto; Xompero, Marco; Riccardi, Armando; Andrighettoni, Mario; Pescoller, Dietrich; Angerer, Gerald; Gallieni, Daniele; Vernet, Elise; Kolb, Johann; Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves

    2014-07-01

    The Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) for the VLT ended the stand-alone electro-mechanical and optical acceptance process, entering the test phase as part of the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) at the ESO Headquarter (Garching). The VLT-DSM currently represents the most advanced already-built large-format deformable mirror with its 1170 voice-coil actuators and its internal metrology based on co-located capacitive sensors to control the shape of the 1.12m-diameter 2mm-thick convex shell. The present paper reports the final results of the electro-mechanical and optical characterization of the DSM executed in a collaborative effort by the DSM manufacturing companies (Microgate s.r.l. and A.D.S. International s.r.l.), INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri and ESO. The electro-mechanical acceptance tests have been performed in the company premises and their main purpose was the dynamical characterization of the internal control loop response and the calibration of the system data that are needed for its optimization. The optical acceptance tests have been performed at ESO (Garching) using the ASSIST optical test facility. The main purpose of the tests are the characterization of the optical shell flattening residuals, the corresponding calibration of flattening commands, the optical calibration of the capacitive sensors and the optical calibration of the mirror influence functions.

  2. Mixed Variables-Attributes Test Plans for Single and DoubleAcceptance Sampling under Exponential Distribution

    Dongdong Xiang; Xiaolong Pu; Yan Li

    2011-01-01

    The mixed variables-attributes test plans for single acceptance sampling are proposed to protect “good lots” from attributes aspect and to optimize sample sizes from variables aspect. For the single and double mixed plans, exact formulas of the operating characteristic and average sample number are developed for the exponential distribution. Numerical illustrations show that the mixed sampling plans have some advantages over the variables plans or attributes plans alone.

  3. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of Project W-151 300 HP mixing pumps

    This report documents the results of a performance demonstration and operational checkout of three 300 HP mixer pumps in accordance with WHC-SD-WI51-TS-001 ''Mixer Pump Test Specification for Project W-151'' and Statement of Work 8K520-EMN-95-004 ''Mixer Pump Performance Demonstration at MASF'' in the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building. Testing of the pumps was performed by Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Engineering and funded by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project W-151. Testing began with the first pump on 04-01-95 and ended with the third pump on 11-01-96. Prior to testing, the MASF was modified and prepared to meet the pump testing requirements set forth by the Test Specification and the Statement of Work

  4. Social trust, risk perceptions and public acceptance of recycled water: testing a social-psychological model.

    Ross, Victoria L; Fielding, Kelly S; Louis, Winnifred R

    2014-05-01

    Faced with a severe drought, the residents of the regional city of Toowoomba, in South East Queensland, Australia were asked to consider a potable wastewater reuse scheme to supplement drinking water supplies. As public risk perceptions and trust have been shown to be key factors in acceptance of potable reuse projects, this research developed and tested a social-psychological model of trust, risk perceptions and acceptance. Participants (N = 380) were surveyed a few weeks before a referendum was held in which residents voted against the controversial scheme. Analysis using structural equation modelling showed that the more community members perceived that the water authority used fair procedures (e.g., consulting with the community and providing accurate information), the greater their sense of shared identity with the water authority. Shared social identity in turn influenced trust via increased source credibility, that is, perceptions that the water authority is competent and has the community's interest at heart. The findings also support past research showing that higher levels of trust in the water authority were associated with lower perceptions of risk, which in turn were associated with higher levels of acceptance, and vice versa. The findings have a practical application for improving public acceptance of potable recycled water schemes. PMID:24603028

  5. W-026 acceptance test report system integration equipment (SIE)(submittal {number_sign} 018.6.A)

    Watson, T.L.

    1997-01-27

    Acceptance testing of the System Integration Equipment (SIE) at Hanford was performed in two stages. The first was inconclusive, and resulted in a number of findings. These finding. are summarized as part of this report. The second stage of testing addressed these findings, and performed full system testing per the approved test procedure. This report includes summaries of all testing, results and finding.. Although the SIE did not in some cases perform as required for plant operations, it did perform per the system specification. (These discrepancies were noted and are addressed elsewhere.) Following testing, the system was formaLLy accepted. Documentation of this acceptance is incLuded in this report.

  6. Biological and chemical tests of contaminated soils to determine bioavailability and environmentally acceptable endpoints (EAE)

    The understanding of the concept of bioavailability of soil contaminants to receptors and its use in supporting the development of EAE is growing but still incomplete. Nonetheless, there is increased awareness of the importance of such data to determine acceptable cleanup levels and achieve timely site closures. This presentation discusses a framework for biological and chemical testing of contaminated soils developed as part of a Gas Research Institute (GRI) project entitled ''Environmentally Acceptable Endpoints in Soil Using a Risk Based Approach to Contaminated Site Management Based on Bioavailability of Chemicals in Soil.'' The presentation reviews the GRI program, and summarizes the findings of the biological and chemical testing section published in the GRI report. The three primary components of the presentation are: (1) defining the concept of bioavailability within the existing risk assessment paradigm, (2) assessing the usefulness of the existing tests to measure bioavailability and test frameworks used to interpret these measurements, and (3) suggesting how a small selection of relevant tests could be incorporated into a flexible testing scheme for soils to address this issue

  7. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, mass properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents the thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is the backup RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at the Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on these tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also shown. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over 5% are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission

  8. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is tile back-up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission

  9. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) Testing

    Anchondo, Ian; Cox, Marlon; Meginnis, Carly; Westheimer, David; Vogel, Matt R.

    2016-01-01

    Following successful completion of the space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 1.0 development and testing in 2011, the second system-level prototype, PLSS 2.0, was developed in 2012 to continue the maturation of the advanced PLSS design. This advanced PLSS is intended to reduce consumables, improve reliability and robustness, and incorporate additional sensing and functional capabilities over the current Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS. PLSS 2.0 represents the first attempt at a packaged design comprising first generation or later component prototypes and medium fidelity interfaces within a flight-like representative volume. Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) is carryover terminology from the Space Shuttle Program referring to the series of test sequences used to verify functionality of the EMU PLSS prior to installation into the Space Shuttle airlock for launch. As applied to the PLSS 2.0 development and testing effort, PIA testing designated the series of 27 independent test sequences devised to verify component and subsystem functionality, perform in situ instrument calibrations, generate mapping data, define set-points, evaluate control algorithms, evaluate hardware performance against advanced PLSS design requirements, and provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on evolving design requirements and performance specifications. PLSS 2.0 PIA testing was carried out in 2013 and 2014 using a variety of test configurations to perform test sequences that ranged from stand-alone component testing to system-level testing, with evaluations becoming increasingly integrated as the test series progressed. Each of the 27 test sequences was vetted independently, with verification of basic functionality required before completion. Because PLSS 2.0 design requirements were evolving concurrently with PLSS 2.0 PIA testing, the requirements were used as guidelines to assess performance during the tests; after the

  10. Quality assurance in diagnostic radiology in Hungary - first experiences in acceptance testing

    It is a general experience that optimum imaging with minimum patient doses, moreover, the safe operation and long life of X-ray equipment can be assured by regular measurement of technical parameters and checking of their constancy (routine performance testing) only. These tests are generally known as quality control, while together with the so-called corrective actions and its management it is called (physical-technical) quality assurance (QA). In the European Union, Directive 97/43/EURATOM about radiation protection of patients requires - among others - the good practice of (physical-technical) quality assurance. In Hungary, Decree No. 31/2001. (X.3.) of the Minister of Health harmonizes all of its requirements. Acceptance testing of new diagnostic X-ray equipment is assigned to NPHC-NRIRR. QA has been a daily practice in radiation therapy and nuclear medicine for a long time. A National Patient Dose Assessment Programme has also successfully run since 1989. We had, however, only few preliminaries in QA in diagnostic radiology in the second half of the eighties. Nowadays there are running QA programmes in some hospitals and mammography centres. he testing activity of our institute is independent from manufacturers, it is run within the frame of an accredited testing laboratory, using calibrated measuring instruments and based on valid international standards. So the started way of implementing QA in diagnostic radiology needs a lot of further efforts, adapting experiences of other countries, and also some financial help to reach an acceptable level in the EU. (authors)

  11. Consumer acceptance, market test and market development of irradiated rice, dehydrated vegetables and spices

    Establishment of irradiation processing parameters, a quality assurance system, consumer acceptance, market test and market development of irradiated rice, dehydrated vegetables and spices were the activities carried out in this project by the Chinese Agricultural Irradiation Center. The results of the studies showed that the process dose for rice was 0.2-0.5 kGy when the non-uniformity was lower than 2.5, dose range for dehydrated vegetables was 5-7 kGy, dose for spices was 7-8 kGy. The system for quality assurance was established. The processing standards for several irradiated food items were set up. Market test showed that more than 70-80% of consumers accepted irradiated food. Industrial companies also accepted irradiated dehydrated vegetables and spices. The latter were successfully introduced to the markets and successful commercialization of irradiated garlic was followed. The economic benefit of operating the Chinese Agricultural Irradiation Center was analyzed and found attractive, especially for low dose irradiation of foods in sufficient supply. (author)

  12. User Acceptance Test of Computer-Assisted Problem-Based Learning Assessment Tool (CAPBLAT

    Muhammad Qomaruddin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Problem-based Learning (PBL is an instructional design method that is used by many lecturers to create more efficient and meaningful learning experiences. PBL emphasizes the lecturer in facilitating in collaborative learning. They conventionally play a little role in the formal assessment process. Peer-assessment and self-assessment are the most frequent methods of assessment employed by the lecturers in conducting PBL approach. This paper presents acceptance testing of a computer-based tool for peer-assessment and self-assessment in PBL approach, which called Computer-Assisted Problem-Based Learning Assessment Tool (CAPBLAT. The tool was designed to assist a lecturer in conducting PBL teaching method and assess students learning progress. Two PBL classes participated in the testing of the tool. During the study, questionnaires were administered to students. The results concerning the assessment tool acceptance demonstrate that using CAPBLAT in the PBL assessment process received better acceptance from both the students and lecturers.

  13. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) Instrument: Flight Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) Acceptance Thermal Vacuum Test

    Baker, Charles; Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Grob, Eric; Swanson, Ted; Nikitkin, Michael; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Two loop heat pipes (LHPs) are to be used for tight thermal control of the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) instrument, planned for flight in late 2001. The LHPs are charged with Propylene as a working fluid. One LHP will be used to transport 110 W from a laser to a radiator, the other will transport 160 W from electronic boxes to a separate radiator. The application includes a large amount of thermal mass in each LHP system and low initial startup powers. The initial design had some non-ideal flight design compromises, resulted in a less than ideal charge level for this design concept with a symmetrical secondary wick. This less than ideal charge was identified as the source of inadequate performance of the flight LHPs during the flight thermal vacuum test in October of 2000. We modified the compensation chamber design, re-built and charged the LHPs for a final LHP acceptance thermal vacuum test. This test performed March of 2001 was 100% successful. This is the last testing to be performed on the LHPs prior to instrument thermal vacuum test. This sensitivity to charge level was shown through varying the charge on a Development Model Loop Heat Pipe (DM LHP) and evaluating performance at various fill levels. At lower fills similar to the original charge in the flight units, the same poor performance was observed. When the flight units were re-designed and filled to the levels similar to the initial successful DM LHP test, the flight units also successfully fulfilled all requirements. This final flight Acceptance test assessed performance with respect to startup, low power operation, conductance, and control heater power, and steady state control. The results of the testing showed that both LHPs operated within specification. Startup on one of the LHPs was better than the other LHP because of the starter heater placement and a difference in evaporator design. These differences resulted in a variation in the achieved superheat prior to startup. The LHP with

  14. Home-based voluntary HIV counselling and testing found highly acceptable and to reduce inequalities

    Michelo Charles

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low uptake of voluntary HIV counselling and testing (VCT in sub-Saharan Africa is raising acceptability concerns which might be associated with ways by which it is offered. We investigated the acceptability of home-based delivery of counselling and HIV testing in urban and rural populations in Zambia where VCT has been offered mostly from local clinics. Methods A population-based HIV survey was conducted in selected communities in 2003 (n = 5035. All participants stating willingness to be HIV tested were offered VCT at home and all counselling was conducted in the participants' homes. In the urban area post-test counselling and giving of results were done the following day whereas in rural areas this could take 1-3 weeks. Results Of those who indicated willingness to be HIV tested, 76.1% (95%CI 74.9-77.2 were counselled and received the test result. Overall, there was an increase in the proportion ever HIV tested from 18% before provision of home-based VCT to 38% after. The highest increase was in rural areas; among young rural men aged 15-24 years up from 14% to 42% vs. for urban men from 17% to 37%. Test rates by educational attainment changed from being positively associated to be evenly distributed after home-based VCT. Conclusions A high uptake was achieved by delivering HIV counselling and testing at home. The highest uptakes were seen in rural areas, in young people and groups with low educational attainment, resulting in substantial reductions in existing inequalities in accessing VCT services.

  15. ENRAF Series 854 Advanced Technology Gauge (ATG) with SPU II card for Leak Detector Use Acceptance Test Procedure

    The following Acceptance Test Procedure was written to test the ENRAF series 854 ATG with SPU II card prior to installation in the Tank Farms. The procedure sets various parameters and verifies the gauge and alarms functionality

  16. ENRAF Series 854 Advanced Technology Gauge (ATG) with SPU ll Card for Leak Detector Use Acceptance Test Procedure

    The following Acceptance Test Procedure was written to test the Enraf Series 854 ATG with SPU-II card prior to installation in the Tank Farms. The procedure sets various parameters and verifies the gauge and the alarms functionality

  17. Ten years experience in acceptance testing of diagnostic radiology equipment in Hungary

    The EURATOM directive for the radiation protection of patients, which declares the mandatory evaluation of the performance of diagnostic X-ray machines, took effect in 1997. In Hungary, this became a harmonized act, the 31/2001. (X. 3.) decree of the Minister of Health. The most highlighted segment of the evaluation of technical performance is acceptance testing. The NRIRR Department of Radiohygiene performs acceptance tests since 2002. From then on we have performed more than 400 examinations on different modalities such as radiographic, fluoroscopic, DSA, mammographic, CT and dental panoramic X-rays. The tests were performed according to IEC = EN = MSZ EN international, European and at the same time Hungarian standards. This presentation discusses our experience and gives a comprehensive overview of the examinations by the evaluation of the measurement data. Our results show the importance of testing, done independently from the manufacturer and installer: in est. 25 % of the cases overall we have found inadequacies which required remedial action on the part of the service

  18. Evaluation of a standard test method and material for low-activity waste product acceptance

    The dissolution behavior of a candidate reference glass has been measured under a range of test conditions. The data base from these tests can be used to evaluate the credibility and validity of test results reported by Private Contractors as part of the acceptance process for immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) products for DOE wastes. The LRM-1 glass that was used in the tests was formulated to be compositionally representative of anticipated ILAW products for Hanford and other Department of Energy sites. Replicate tests with this glass were used to measure the variability in the response (i.e., the solution concentrations of B, Na, and Si) under different test conditions. The glass was further evaluated for possible use as a standard material by analysis of its composition, microstructure, density, and compressive strength. In addition, the Na leachability index was measured with the ANS 16.1 test, and the Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure was run. The results of those tests and analyses are summarized

  19. Utility-Scale Parabolic Trough Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines, April 2009 - December 2010

    Kearney, D.

    2011-05-01

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The Guidelines contained here are specifically written for parabolic trough collector systems with a heat-transport system using a high-temperature synthetic oil, but the basic principles are relevant to other CSP systems.

  20. Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Combustible Gas Management Leak Test Acceptance Criteria (OCRWM)

    The purpose of this document is to support the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's combustible gas management strategy while avoiding the need to impose any requirements for oxygen free atmospheres within storage tubes that contain multi-canister overpacks (MCO). In order to avoid inerting requirements it is necessary to establish and confirm leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs that are adequte to ensure that, in the unlikely event the leak test results for any MCO were to approach either of those criteria, it could still be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the SNF Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCOs or within their surroundings. To support that strategy, this document: (1) establishes combustible gas management functions and minimum functional requirements for the MCO's mechanical seals and closure weld(s); (2) establishes a maximum practical value for the minimum required initial MCO inert backfill gas pressure; and (3) based on items 1 and 2, establishes and confirms leak test acceptance criteria for the MCO's mechanical seal and final closure weld(s)

  1. Factory acceptance test of COLDDIAG: A cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics

    Gerstl, Stefan; Baumbach, Tilo; Casalbuoni, Sara; Grau, Andreas; Hagelstein, Michael; Saez de Jauregui, David; Holubek, Tomas [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Boffo, Cristian; Sikler, Guenther [Babcock Noell GmbH, Wuerzburg (Germany); Baglin, Vincent [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Cox, Matthew; Schouten, Jos [Diamond Light Source, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Cimino, Roberto; Commisso, Mario; Spataro, Bruno [INFN/LNF, Frascatti (Italy); Mostacci, Andrea [Rome University La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Wallen, Eric [MAX-Lab, Lund (Sweden); Weigel, Ralf [Max-Planck Institute for Metal Research, Stuttgart (Germany); Clarke, Jim; Scott, Duncan [STFC/ASTeC, Daresbury (United Kingdom); Bradshaw, Tom [STFC/RAL, Chilton (United Kingdom); Jones, Roger; Shinton, Ian [University Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    Superconductive insertion devices (IDs) have higher fields for a given gap and period length compared with the state of the art technology of permanent magnet IDs. This technological solution is very interesting for synchrotron light sources since it permits to increase the brilliance and/or the photon energy at moderate costs. One of the key issues for the development of superconducting IDs is the understanding of the beam heat load to the cold vacuum chamber. Therefore a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostic was built. Here we report about the design, planned measurements and the factory acceptance test of COLDDIAG.

  2. Factory acceptance test of COLDDIAG: A cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics

    Superconductive insertion devices (IDs) have higher fields for a given gap and period length compared with the state of the art technology of permanent magnet IDs. This technological solution is very interesting for synchrotron light sources since it permits to increase the brilliance and/or the photon energy at moderate costs. One of the key issues for the development of superconducting IDs is the understanding of the beam heat load to the cold vacuum chamber. Therefore a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostic was built. Here we report about the design, planned measurements and the factory acceptance test of COLDDIAG.

  3. Formulation of a candidate glass for use as an acceptance test standard material

    In this report, the authors discuss the formulation of a glass that will be used in a laboratory testing program designed to measure the precision of test methods identified in the privatization contracts for the immobilization of Hanford low-activity wastes. Tests will be conducted with that glass to measure the reproducibility of tests and analyses that must be performed by glass producers as a part of the product acceptance procedure. Test results will be used to determine if the contractually required tests and analyses are adequate for evaluating the acceptability of likely immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) products. They will also be used to evaluate if the glass designed for use in these tests can be used as an analytical standard test material for verifying results reported by vendors for tests withg ILAW products. The results of those tests and analyses will be presented in a separate report. The purpose of this report is to document the strategy used to formulate the glass to be used in the testing program. The low-activity waste reference glass LRM that will be used in the testing program was formulated to be compositionally similar to ILAW products to be made with wastes from Hanford. Since the ILAW product compositions have not been disclosed by the vendors participating in the Hanford privatization project, the composition of LRM was formulated based on simulated Hanford waste stream and amounts of added glass forming chemicals typical for vitrified waste forms. The major components are 54 mass % SiO2, 20 mass % Na2O, 10 mass % Al2O3, 8 mass % B2O3, and 1.5 mass % K2O. Small amounts of other chemicals not present in Hanford wastes were also included in the glass, since they may be included as chemical additives in ILAW products. This was done so that the use of LRM as a composition standard could be evaluated. Radionuclides were not included in LRM because a nonradioactive material was desired

  4. The Rapid Integration and Test Environment - A Process for Achieving Software Test Acceptance

    Rick Jack

    2010-01-01

    The Rapid Integration and Test Environment (RITE) initiative, implemented by the Program Executive Office, Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence, Command and Control Program Office (PMW-150), was born of necessity. Existing processes for requirements definition and management, as well as those for software development, did not consistently deliver high-quality Navy command and control (C2) systems on time and within budget. Navy C2 software programs experienced an inc...

  5. For your interest? The ethical acceptability of using non-invasive prenatal testing to test 'purely for information'.

    Deans, Zuzana; Clarke, Angus J; Newson, Ainsley J

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) is an emerging form of prenatal genetic testing that provides information about the genetic constitution of a foetus without the risk of pregnancy loss as a direct result of the test procedure. As with other prenatal tests, information from NIPT can help to make a decision about termination of pregnancy, plan contingencies for birth or prepare parents to raise a child with a genetic condition. NIPT can also be used by women and couples to test purely 'for information'. Here, no particular action is envisaged following the test; it is motivated entirely by an interest in the result. The fact that NIPT can be performed without posing a risk to the pregnancy could give rise to an increase in such requests. In this paper, we examine the ethical aspects of using NIPT 'purely for information', including the competing interests of the prospective parents and the future child, and the acceptability of testing for 'frivolous' reasons. Drawing on several clinical scenarios, we claim that arguments about testing children for genetic conditions are relevant to this debate. In addition, we raise ethical concerns over the potential for objectification of the child. We conclude that, in most cases, using NIPT to test for adult-onset conditions, carrier status or non-serious traits presenting in childhood would be unacceptable. PMID:25521970

  6. Acceptance/operational test procedure 241-AN-107 Video Camera System

    This procedure will document the satisfactory operation of the 241-AN-107 Video Camera System. The camera assembly, including camera mast, pan-and-tilt unit, camera, and lights, will be installed in Tank 241-AN-107 to monitor activities during the Caustic Addition Project. The camera focus, zoom, and iris remote controls will be functionally tested. The resolution and color rendition of the camera will be verified using standard reference charts. The pan-and-tilt unit will be tested for required ranges of motion, and the camera lights will be functionally tested. The master control station equipment, including the monitor, VCRs, printer, character generator, and video micrometer will be set up and performance tested in accordance with original equipment manufacturer's specifications. The accuracy of the video micrometer to measure objects in the range of 0.25 inches to 67 inches will be verified. The gas drying distribution system will be tested to ensure that a drying gas can be flowed over the camera and lens in the event that condensation forms on these components. This test will be performed by attaching the gas input connector, located in the upper junction box, to a pressurized gas supply and verifying that the check valve, located in the camera housing, opens to exhaust the compressed gas. The 241-AN-107 camera system will also be tested to assure acceptable resolution of the camera imaging components utilizing the camera system lights

  7. Accuracy and user-acceptability of HIV self-testing using an oral fluid-based HIV rapid test.

    Oon Tek Ng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The United States FDA approved an over-the-counter HIV self-test, to facilitate increased HIV testing and earlier linkage to care. We assessed the accuracy of self-testing by untrained participants compared to healthcare worker (HCW testing, participants' ability to interpret sample results and user-acceptability of self-tests in Singapore. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross-sectional study, involving 200 known HIV-positive patients and 794 unknown HIV status at-risk participants was conducted. Participants (all without prior self-test experience performed self-testing guided solely by visual instructions, followed by HCW testing, both using the OraQuick ADVANCE Rapid HIV 1/2 Antibody Test, with both results interpreted by the HCW. To assess ability to interpret results, participants were provided 3 sample results (positive, negative, and invalid to interpret. Of 192 participants who tested positive on HCW testing, self-testing was positive in 186 (96.9%, negative in 5 (2.6%, and invalid in 1 (0.5%. Of 794 participants who tested negative on HCW testing, self-testing was negative in 791 (99.6%, positive in 1 (0.1%, and invalid in 2 (0.3%. Excluding invalid tests, self-testing had sensitivity of 97.4% (95% CI 95.1% to 99.7% and specificity of 99.9% (95% CI: 99.6% to 100%. When interpreting results, 96%, 93.1% and 95.2% correctly read the positive, negative and invalid respectively. There were no significant demographic predictors for false negative self-testing or wrongly interpreting positive or invalid sample results as negative. Eighty-seven percent would purchase the kit over-the-counter; 89% preferred to take HIV tests in private. 72.5% and 74.9% felt the need for pre- and post-test counseling respectively. Only 28% would pay at least USD15 for the test. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Self-testing was associated with high specificity, and a small but significant number of false negatives. Incorrectly identifying model results as

  8. Community acceptability of use of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria by community health workers in Uganda

    Waiswa Peter

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many malarious countries plan to introduce artemisinin combination therapy (ACT at community level using community health workers (CHWs for treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Use of ACT with reliance on presumptive diagnosis may lead to excessive use, increased costs and rise of drug resistance. Use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs could address these challenges but only if the communities will accept their use by CHWs. This study assessed community acceptability of the use of RDTs by Ugandan CHWs, locally referred to as community medicine distributors (CMDs. Methods The study was conducted in Iganga district using 10 focus group discussions (FGDs with CMDs and caregivers of children under five years, and 10 key informant interviews (KIIs with health workers and community leaders. Pre-designed FGD and KII guides were used to collect data. Manifest content analysis was used to explore issues of trust and confidence in CMDs, stigma associated with drawing blood from children, community willingness for CMDs to use RDTs, and challenges anticipated to be faced by the CMDs. Results CMDs are trusted by their communities because of their commitment to voluntary service, access, and the perceived effectiveness of anti-malarial drugs they provide. Some community members expressed fear that the blood collected could be used for HIV testing, the procedure could infect children with HIV, and the blood samples could be used for witchcraft. Education level of CMDs is important in their acceptability by the community, who welcome the use of RDTs given that the CMDs are trained and supported. Anticipated challenges for CMDs included transport for patient follow-up and picking supplies, adults demanding to be tested, and caregivers insisting their children be treated instead of being referred. Conclusion Use of RDTs by CMDs is likely to be acceptable by community members given that CMDs are properly trained, and receive regular technical

  9. Evaluation Of ARG-1 Samples Prepared By Cesium Carbonate Dissolution During The Isolok SME Acceptability Testing

    Evaluation of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. The Mechanical Systems and Custom Equipment Development (MS and CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently completed the evaluation of one of these opportunities - the possibility of using an Isolok sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard valve for taking DWPF process samples at the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The use of an Isolok for SME sampling has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time, and decrease CPC cycle time. The SME acceptability testing for the Isolok was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 and was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNLRP-2011-00145. RW-0333P QA requirements applied to the task, and the results from the investigation were documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00693. Measurement of the chemical composition of study samples was a critical component of the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. A sampling and analytical plan supported the investigation with the analytical plan directing that the study samples be prepared by a cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) fusion dissolution method and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The use of the cesium carbonate preparation method for the Isolok testing provided an opportunity for an additional assessment of this dissolution method, which is being investigated as a potential replacement for the two methods (i.e., sodium peroxide fusion and mixed acid dissolution) that have been used at the DWPF for the analysis of SME samples. Earlier testing of the Cs2CO3 method yielded promising results which led to a TTR from Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) to SRNL for additional support and an associated TTQAP to direct the SRNL efforts. A technical report resulting from this work was

  10. EVALUATION OF ARG-1 SAMPLES PREPARED BY CESIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION DURING THE ISOLOK SME ACCEPTABILITY TESTING

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.

    2011-12-05

    Evaluation of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently completed the evaluation of one of these opportunities - the possibility of using an Isolok sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard valve for taking DWPF process samples at the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The use of an Isolok for SME sampling has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time, and decrease CPC cycle time. The SME acceptability testing for the Isolok was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 and was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNLRP-2011-00145. RW-0333P QA requirements applied to the task, and the results from the investigation were documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00693. Measurement of the chemical composition of study samples was a critical component of the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. A sampling and analytical plan supported the investigation with the analytical plan directing that the study samples be prepared by a cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) fusion dissolution method and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The use of the cesium carbonate preparation method for the Isolok testing provided an opportunity for an additional assessment of this dissolution method, which is being investigated as a potential replacement for the two methods (i.e., sodium peroxide fusion and mixed acid dissolution) that have been used at the DWPF for the analysis of SME samples. Earlier testing of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method yielded promising results which led to a TTR from Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) to SRNL for additional support and an associated TTQAP to direct the SRNL efforts. A technical report resulting