WorldWideScience

Sample records for acceptance criteria provisions

  1. Identification of permit and waste acceptance criteria provisions requiring modification for acceptance of commercial mixed waste

    In October 1990, representatives of States and compact regions requested that the US Department of Energy (DOE) explore an agreement with host States and compact regions under which DOE would accept commercial mixed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at DOE's own treatment and disposal facilities. A program for DOE management of commercial mixed waste is made potentially more attractive in light of the low commercial mixed waste volumes, high regulatory burdens, public opposition to new disposal sites, and relatively high cost of constructing commercial disposal facilities. Several studies were identified as essential in determining the feasibility of DOE accepting commercial mixed waste for disposal. The purpose of this report is to identify any current or proposed waste acceptance criteria (WAC) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) provisions that would have to be modified for commercial mixed waste acceptance at specified DOE facilities. Following the introduction, Section 2 of this report (a) provides a background summary of existing and proposed mixed waste disposal facilities at each DOE site, and (b) summarizes the status of any RCRA Part B permit and WAC provisions relating to the disposal of mixed waste, including provisions relating to acceptance of offsite waste. Section 3 provides overall conclusions regarding the current status and permit modifications that must be implemented in order to grant DOE sites authority under their permits to accept commercial mixed waste for disposal. Section 4 contains a list of references

  2. Robustness - acceptance criteria

    Rizzuto, Enrico; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Kroon, Inger B.

    2010-01-01

    This factsheet describes the general framework on the bases of which acceptance criteria for requirements on the robustness of structures can be set. Such framework is based on the more general concept of risk-based assessment of engineering systems. The present factsheet is to be seen in...

  3. Radioactive waste package acceptance criteria

    Preliminary acceptance criteria have been developed for packages containing nuclear waste which must be stored or disposed of by the US Department of Energy. Acceptance criteria are necessary to ensure that the waste packages are compatible with all elements of the Waste Management System. The acceptance criteria are subject to revision since many of the constraints that will be imposed on the waste packages by the Waste Management System have either not been defined or are being revised. Delineation of the acceptance criteria will provide bases for handling, transporting and disposing of the commercial waste

  4. Decision modeling and acceptance criteria

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2003-01-01

    formulation of decision criteria and public acceptance criteria connected to risk analysis of technical operations that may endanger human life and property. Public restrictions on the decisions concerning the design, construction and managing of the technical operation have in the past been imposed on the......, Ronold K. Societal indicators and risk acceptance. In: 17th International Conference on Offshote Mechanics and Arctic Engineering, number OMAE98-1488. ASME; 1998; Rackwitz R. Optimization and risk acceptability based on the Life Quality Index. Structural Safety 2002;24;297-331.). Keywords: Acceptance...

  5. Toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria

    This paper presents recommendations of a subcommittee of the Westinghouse M ampersand 0 Nuclear Facility Safety Committee concerning toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria. Two sets of criteria have been developed, one for use in the hazard classification of facilities, and the second for use in comparing risks in DOE non-reactor nuclear facility Safety Analysis Reports. The Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) values are intended to provide estimates of concentration ranges for specific chemicals above which exposure would be expected to lead to adverse heath effects of increasing severity for ERPG-1, -2, and -3s. The subcommittee recommends that criteria for hazard class or risk range be based on ERPGs for all chemicals. Probability-based Incremental Cancer Risk (ICR) criteria are recommended for additional analyses of risks from all known or suspected human carcinogens. Criteria are given for both on-site and off-site exposure. The subcommittee also recommends that the 5-minute peak concentration be compared with the relevant criterion with no adjustment for exposure time. Since ERPGs are available for only a limited number of chemicals, the subcommittee has developed a proposed hierarchy of concentration limit parameters for the different criteria

  6. Decision modeling and acceptance criteria

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2003-01-01

    formulation of decision criteria and public acceptance criteria connected to risk analysis of technical operations that may endanger human life and property. Public restrictions on the decisions concerning the design, construction and managing of the technical operation have in the past been imposed on the...... expected gain rate. The public money equivalent of a human life is assessed by use of a recently in (Nathwani JS, Lind NC, Pandey MD. Afordable safety by choice: the life quality method. Waterloo, Ontario, Canada: Institute for Risk Research, University of Waterloo, 1997) suggested Life Quality Index (LQI......) that combines wealth in terms of Gross Domestic Product per person, life expectancy at birth, and yearly work time into a single number. The philosophy behind the published evaluations is that the prevention of a loss of a life is counteracted by a cost such that the LQI remains unchanged (Skjong R...

  7. Heat exchanger staybolt acceptance criteria

    The structural integrity demonstration of the primary coolant piping system includes evaluating the structural capacity of each component against a large break or equivalent Double-Ended Guillotine Break. A large break at the inlet or outlet heads of the heat exchangers would occur if the restraint members of the heads become inactive. The structural integrity of the heads is demonstrated by showing the redundant capacity of the staybolts to restrain the head at design conditions and under seismic loadings. The Savannah River Site heat exchanger head is attached to the tubesheet by 84 staybolts. Access to the staybolts is limited due to a welded seal cap over the staybolts. An ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection technique to provide an in-situ examination of the staybolts has recently been developed at SRS. Examination of the staybolts will be performed to ensure their service condition and configuration is within acceptance limits. An acceptance criteria methodology has been developed to disposition flaws reported in the staybolt inspections while ensuring adequate restraint capacity of the staybolts to maintain integrity of the heat exchanger heads against collapse. The methodology includes an approach for the baseline and periodic inspections of the staybolts. The heat exchanger head is analyzed with a three-dimensional finite element model. The restraint provided by the staybolts is evaluated for several postulated cases of inactive or missing staybolts. Evaluation of specific, inactive staybolt configurations based on the UT results can be performed with the finite element model and fracture methodology in this report

  8. Design Criteria for Achieving Acceptable Indoor Radon Concentration

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Design criteria for achieving an acceptable indoor radon concentration are presented in this paper. The paper suggests three design criteria. These criteria have to be considered at the early stage of the building design phase to meet the latest recommendations from the World Health Organization in...... most countries. The three design criteria are; first, establishing a radon barrier facing the ground; second, lowering the air pressure in the lower zone of the slab on ground facing downwards; third, diluting the indoor air with outdoor air. The first two criteria can prevent radon from infiltrating...... from the ground, and the third criteria can dilute the indoor air. By combining these three criteria, the indoor radon concentration can be lowered achieving an acceptable level. In addition, a cheap and reliable method for measuring the radon concentration in the indoor air is described. The provision...

  9. Hanford Site liquid waste acceptance criteria

    This document provides the waste acceptance criteria for liquid waste managed by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (WMH). These waste acceptance criteria address the various requirements to operate a facility in compliance with applicable environmental, safety, and operational requirements. This document also addresses the sitewide miscellaneous streams program

  10. Design Criteria for Achieving Acceptable Indoor Radon Concentration

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2016-01-01

    from the ground, and the third criteria can dilute the indoor air. By combining these three criteria, the indoor radon concentration can be lowered achieving an acceptable level. In addition, a cheap and reliable method for measuring the radon concentration in the indoor air is described. The provision......Design criteria for achieving an acceptable indoor radon concentration are presented in this paper. The paper suggests three design criteria. These criteria have to be considered at the early stage of the building design phase to meet the latest recommendations from the World Health Organization...... on radon in the Danish Building Regulations complies with the latest recommendations from the World Health Organization. Radon can cause lung cancer and it is not known whether there is a lower limit for when it is not harmful to human beings. Therefore, it is important to reduce the radon concentration...

  11. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal

  12. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  13. Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria

    1993-11-17

    This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

  14. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal

  15. Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria

    This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities

  16. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-07-01

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

  17. Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria

    Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities

  18. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal

  19. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal

  20. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-10-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  1. Risk aversion in risk acceptance criteria

    The risk averse attitude that is included in some proposed risk acceptance criteria is examined. It is shown that it is a weaker attitude than risk aversion, as is commonly defined in decision theory. Consequently, the boundary curve separating acceptable and unacceptable regions does not have to be a straight line on the logarithmic frequency-consequence space. A curve of variable slope would express the same attitude as long as the slope is less than -1

  2. TOFD and acceptance criteria: a perfect team

    In recent years, it has become clear that the Time Of Flight Diffraction (TOFD) technique, developed in the UK in the seventies, is a most powerful technique not only for accurate sizing of known defects but also for defect detection in routine NDT. But, whereas TOFD may have been successfully introduced for recurrent inspections and fingerprinting, using Engineering Critical Assessment (ECA) or Fitness For Purpose (FFP) approaches, the lack of adequate acceptance criteria still prohibits its introduction for routine inspections. This paper also addresses a Dutch project that aims for the development of defect acceptance criteria for TOFD inspection. Examples of TOFD applications are given, ranging from pipeline girth welds to vessels with wall thicknesses up to 400 mm. Some experiences on complex geometries as well as high-alloy steels and titanium will also be highlighted

  3. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

  4. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-01-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

  5. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-09-03

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

  6. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-02-28

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  7. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    none,

    2013-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: • DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste • DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) • DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) • U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  8. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  9. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste; DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW); DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW); and, U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste. The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  10. Development of quantitative risk acceptance criteria

    Some of the major considerations for effective management of risk are discussed, with particular emphasis on risks due to nuclear power plant operations. Although there are impacts associated with the rest of the fuel cycle, they are not addressed here. Several previously published proposals for quantitative risk criteria are reviewed. They range from a simple acceptance criterion on individual risk of death to a quantitative risk management framework. The final section discussed some of the problems in the establishment of a framework for the quantitative management of risk

  11. Steam generator tube integrity flaw acceptance criteria

    Cochet, B. [FRAMATOME, Paris la Defense (France)

    1997-02-01

    The author discusses the establishment of a flaw acceptance criteria with respect to flaws in steam generator tubing. The problem is complicated because different countries take different approaches to the problem. The objectives in general are grouped in three broad areas: to avoid the unscheduled shutdown of the reactor during normal operation; to avoid tube bursts; to avoid excessive leak rates in the event of an accidental overpressure event. For each degradation mechanism in the tubes it is necessary to know answers to an array of questions, including: how well does NDT testing perform against this problem; how rapidly does such degradation develop; how well is this degradation mechanism understood. Based on the above information it is then possible to come up with a policy to look at flaw acceptance. Part of this criteria is a schedule for the frequency of in-service inspection and also a policy for when to plug flawed tubes. The author goes into a broad discussion of each of these points in his paper.

  12. On acceptance criteria for Mochovce startup physical tests

    Paper is focused on new acceptance criteria for physical startup tests of Mochovce Units 1, 2. The acceptance criteria are discussed at the stage of their development. The acceptance criteria determination is based on statistical processing of differences between the experimental and theoretical values of neutron-physical characteristics. The experimental values were taken from physical startup tests of Bohunice Unit 1, 2 and 4 and Dukovany Unit 1 - 4. The theoretical values were calculated by code BIPR-7. The acceptance criteria were established for critical boron concentration, core loading symmetry measurement, boric acid worth, temperature reactivity coefficient, 'ejected' control rod worth, pressure reactivity coefficient and power reactivity coefficient. The new acceptance criteria were applied to evaluate results of physical startup tests of Mochovce Unit 1 in June 1998. The acceptance criteria showed to be adequate. The summary results of statistical processing and the comparison of earlier, new and US acceptance criteria for physical startup tests are presented.(Authors)

  13. Grout Treatment Facility waste feed acceptance criteria

    This document establishes criteria for the acceptance of grout waste feed to provide assurance that the final grout form produced by the Grout Disposal Facility (GDF) will meet the regulatory, design, product, and process requirements. Contained in the report is an evaluation of the regulatory requirements associated with the grout disposal option along with a description of the waste currently stored on the site. An evaluation of the heat generation requirements for the waste feed stream is presented. This evaluation includes the heat resulting from the grout curing process as well as heat associated with the radiolytic decay of the radioisotopes present. Limits for individual elements as well as limits for classes of materials such as organics, sulfates, etc. are presented in Table 1-1. These values are based on regulatory, heat generation, and compositional limits to assure the integrity of the final grout products. Some compositional limits such as heavy metals will require Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing to demonstrate regulatory compliance

  14. Structural acceptance criteria Remote Handling Building Tritium Extraction Facility

    This structural acceptance criteria contains the requirements for the structural analysis and design of the Remote Handling Building (RHB) in the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF). The purpose of this acceptance criteria is to identify the specific criteria and methods that will ensure a structurally robust building that will safely perform its intended function and comply with the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) structural requirements

  15. Structural acceptance criteria Remote Handling Building Tritium Extraction Facility

    Mertz, G.

    1999-12-16

    This structural acceptance criteria contains the requirements for the structural analysis and design of the Remote Handling Building (RHB) in the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF). The purpose of this acceptance criteria is to identify the specific criteria and methods that will ensure a structurally robust building that will safely perform its intended function and comply with the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) structural requirements.

  16. On acceptance criteria for Mochovce startup physical tests

    New acceptance criteria are discussed for physical startup tests of Mochovce Units 1, 2, at the stage of their development. The acceptance criteria determination is based on statistical processing of differences between the experimental and theoretical values of neutron-physical characteristics. The experimental values were taken from physical startup tests of Bohunice Unit 1, 2 and 4 and Dukovany Unit 1 - 4. The theoretical values were calculated by code BIPR-7. The acceptance criteria were established for critical boron concentration, core loading symmetry measurement, boric acid worth, temperature reactivity coefficient, 'ejected' control rod worth, pressure reactivity coefficient and power reactivity coefficient. The new acceptance criteria were applied to evaluate results of physical startup tests of Mochove Unit 1 in June 1998. The acceptance criteria showed to be adequate. The summary results of statistical processing and the comparison of earlier, new and US acceptance criteria for physical startup tests are presented. (author)

  17. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria, December 2000

    NONE

    2000-12-01

    This document establishes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office waste acceptance criteria. The waste acceptance criteria provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed waste for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites for storage or disposal.

  18. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria, December 2000

    This document establishes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office waste acceptance criteria. The waste acceptance criteria provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed waste for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites for storage or disposal

  19. Editorial: acceptance criteria and editorial procedures for Optics Letters

    Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Andersen, Peter E.; Justus, Brian L.; Galtarossa, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Optics Letters Editors strive to provide timely reviews and decisions for authors while bringing top quality papers to the optics community. The purpose of this editorial is to explain Optics Letters' acceptance criteria and editorial procedures. Our hope is that greater transparency concerning the...... decision-making process will increase understanding as well as acceptance of our criteria and procedures....

  20. A study on the acceptance criteria of radioactive waste form

    It is essential to accept well solidified and packaged waste forms for the safety during the operational and post operational phase in the repository, and for this, waste the acceptance criterion is necessary for the distinction of the well solidified and packaged waste form. The objective of this report is to provide the preliminary acceptance criteria to help the later establishment of final acceptance criteria. The following factors were considered for establishing the preliminary waste acceptance criteria. 1) Matrix and waste form characteristics 2) the type of repository and its characteristics 3) establishment procedure of acceptance criteria and its technical background From this study, a qualitative preliminary criterion including the radionuclide contents, surface dose, surface contamination and so on was established. (Author)

  1. Studiees on quantitative risk acceptance criteria and comparative risks

    Two aspects of risk assessment are investigated in this report. The first deals with the comparison of selected technological risks with several proposed and augmented risk acceptance criteria. The second deals with preliminary criteria for comparative risk acceptance. It is found that values put forth for individual risk acceptance criterial appear to be at the lower end of implicitly accepted or calculated risks. Individual risk acceptance criteria based on a graded benefit scale are difficult to apply because it is difficult to determine the exact degree of benefit for each technology. Comparative risk assessment is difficult because technologies producing the same benefits often have disparate risks (i.e., range of impact, manifestation and degree of uncertainty). When the risks are not disparate, the benefits are usually quiite different. A set of preliminary criteria for comparative risk assessment are, however, proposed and discussed

  2. Risk acceptance criteria of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    This report describes some of the regulatory and control functions legally conferred upon the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority concerning radiological risks, as well as a critical analysis of the radiological risk acceptance criteria contained in the Argentine regulatory system. A summary of the application of regulatory standards AR 3.1.3. - 'Radiological criteria related to accidents in nuclear power reactors' and AR 4.1.3. - 'Radiological criteria related to accidents in research reactors' to concrete cases is made, while the favourable and unfavourable aspects of the risk acceptance criteria are discussed. The conclusion is that the Argentine regulatory system contains adequate radiological risk acceptance criteria, that the latter are consistent with the radiological protection principles applicable to man and that, for the moment, there is no need to perform any modifications that would broaden the conceptual framework on which such criteria are based. (author)

  3. Nevada test site waste acceptance criteria

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document

  4. Finite Automata with Generalized Acceptance Criteria

    Timo Peichl; Heribert Vollmer

    2001-01-01

    We examine the power of nondeterministic finite automata with acceptance of an input word defined by a leaf language, i.e., a condition on the sequence of leaves in the automaton's computation tree. We study leaf languages either taken from one of the classes of the Chomsky hierarchy, or taken from a time- or space-bounded complexity class. We contrast the obtained results with those known for leaf languages for Turing machines and Boolean circuits.

  5. Acceptance criteria considerations for miscellaneous wastes

    EPA standards set forth limitations regarding releases to the accessible environment adjacent to a geologic repository. The NRC criteria pertaining to waste form and engineered barrier performance place certain restrictions on the physical and chemical nature of the waste form and require substantially complete confinement of radioactivity until the high-heat-production period is past. After this period, the annual release of radionuclides from the waste package is normally limited to 1 part in 100,000 of the amounts calculated to be present at 1000-y decay. The regulation permits deviation from these criteria in exceptional circumstances. One such circumstance might be the absence of a significant perturbation in temperature around the stored waste. The lack of significant heat release will eliminate the hydrologic driving force for dispersal of radionuclides. Exceptional circumstances which potentially could justify a less stringent long-term release criterion are: small quantity of radioactivity, the nature of the radioactive species, and the nature of the geology in which the waste is to be emplaced. Because the MW after a suitable decay period have low heat release rates per unit volume, they apparently could be so emplaced in a repository that there would be no compelling need, according to the reasoning presented in 10 CFR 60, for a 1000-y container. Regarding attainment of the specified long-term release rate criterion, neither the solubility limits for the various waste forms nor the conductance of potential migration barriers are currently adequately characterized. The relatively small total heat generation rate for the MW in combination with the usual low volumetric heat generation rate apparently will allow application of migration barriers in a low temperature environment where barrier performance would be expected to be unchanged with time

  6. Heat exchanger, head and shell acceptance criteria

    Instability of postulated flaws in the head component of the heat exchanger could not produce a large break, equivalent to a DEGB in the PWS piping, due to the configuration of the head and restraint provided by the staybolts. Rather, leakage from throughwall flaws in the head would increase with flaw length with finite leakage areas that are bounded by a post-instability flaw configuration. Postulated flaws at instability in the shell of the heat exchanger or in the cooling water nozzles could produce a large break in the Cooling Water System (CWS) pressure boundary. An initial analysis of flaw stability for postulated flaws in the heat exchanger head was performed in January 1992. This present report updates that analysis and, additionally, provides acceptable flaw configurations to maintain defined structural or safety margins against flaw instability of the external pressure boundary components of the heat exchanger, namely the head, shell, and cooling water nozzles. Structural and flaw stability analyses of the heat exchanger tubes, the internal pressure boundary of the heat exchangers or interface boundary between the PWS and CWS, were previously completed in February 1992 as part of the heat exchanger restart evaluation and are not covered in this report

  7. Risk Acceptance Criteria and/or Decision optimization

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    1996-01-01

    Acceptance criteria applied in practical risk analysis are recapitulated including the concept of rist profile. Modelling of risk profiles is illustrated on the basis of compound Poisson process models. The current practice of authoritative acceptance criteria formulation is discussed from a...... decision theoretical point of view. It is argued that the phenomenon of risk aversion rather than being of concern to the authority should be of concern to the owner. Finally it is discussed whether there is an ethical problem when formally capitalising human lives with a positive interest rate. Keywords......: Risk acceptance, Risk profile, Compound Poisson model for risk profile, Capitalization of human life, Risk aversion....

  8. Performance-based waste acceptance criteria preliminary baseline assumptions

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) strategy for the management of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed wastes has focused on the development of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP repository is designated to receive DOE defense wastes that meet the established criteria for acceptance. As a national strategy [DOE, 1993], DOE does not intend to treat candidate wastes unless treatment or processing are necessary to meet the safety, health, and regulatory criteria for transport and disposal at WIPP. The WIPP WAC has evolved over the past 10 years to include criteria and requirements in support of the Waste Characterization program and other related compliance programs. In aggregate, the final health, safety and regulatory criteria for the waste will be documented in the Disposal WAC. This document serves two purposes. First, it familiarizes regulators and stakeholders with the concept of performance based waste acceptance criteria as an augmentation within a final Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria. Second, the document preliminarily identifies certain waste characteristics that appear important to the performance assessment process for WIPP; therefore, these could become component characteristics in the Performance Based Waste Acceptance Criteria (PBWAC). Identification of the final PBWAC will be accomplished through iterative runs of the System Prioritization Method (SPM). These iterations will serve to more clearly isolate and identify those waste characteristics that directly and predominately impact on the performance assessment

  9. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria

    W. Mahlon Heileson

    2006-10-01

    The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

  10. Acceptance criteria for corroded carbon steel piping containing weld defects

    Acceptance criteria for corroded low temperature, low pressure carbon steel piping containing weld defects is presented along with a typical application of these criteria. They are intended to preclude gross rupture or rapidly propagating failure due to uniform wall thinning, local wall thinning, pitting corrosion and weld defects. The minimum allowable uniform wail thickness is based on the code-of-record allowable stress and fracture criteria. Weld defects are postulated as potential sites for fracture initiation. CEGB/R6 failure assessment diagram is used as the fracture criteria to determine the minimum allowable wall thickness. Design of a large portion of the low temperature, low pressure piping is dominated by axial stresses. Existing local wall thinning acceptance criteria address high pressure piping where hoop stress dominates the design. The existing criteria is over conservative, in some cases, when used on low pressure piping. Local wall thinning criteria is developed to limit the axial stress on the locally thinned section, based on a reduced average thickness. Limits on pit density are also developed to provide acceptance criteria for pitted piping

  11. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2006-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  12. Research on control rod drive mechanism seismic test acceptance criteria

    Background: There is no clear requirement on the rod drop performance of Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) in seismic condition. Purpose: Acceptance criteria of AP1OOO CRDM seismic test need to be determined. Methods: Related regulations and the safety function of AP1000 CRDM are investigated, as well as the conclusions drawn from the CRDM seismic tests worldwide. Results: Acceptance criteria of this test should be in accordance with the limit is in AP1OOO Nuclear Plant Safety Analysis Report. Conclusions: Drop time of control rods in AP1000 CRDM seismic test at the room temperature without flow is 2.7 s before and after Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE). (authors)

  13. Anticipating Potential Waste Acceptance Criteria for Defense Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Rechard, R.P.; Lord, M.E.; Stockman, C.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nuclear Waste Management Center; McCurley, R.D. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Mexico Engineering Research Institute

    1997-12-31

    The Office of Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and disposal of DOE owned defense spent nuclear fuel and high level waste (DSNF/DHLW). A desirable option, direct disposal of the waste in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, depends on the final waste acceptance criteria, which will be set by DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). However, evolving regulations make it difficult to determine what the final acceptance criteria will be. A method of anticipating waste acceptance criteria is to gain an understanding of the DOE owned waste types and their behavior in a disposal system through a performance assessment and contrast such behavior with characteristics of commercial spent fuel. Preliminary results from such an analysis indicate that releases of 99Tc and 237Np from commercial spent fuel exceed those of the DSNF/DHLW; thus, if commercial spent fuel can meet the waste acceptance criteria, then DSNF can also meet the criteria. In large part, these results are caused by the small percentage of total activity of the DSNF in the repository (1.5%) and regulatory mass (4%), and also because commercial fuel cladding was assumed to provide no protection.

  14. Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    This Revision 4 of the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), WIPP-DOE-069, identifies and consolidates existing criteria and requirements which regulate the safe handling and preparation of Transuranic (TRU) waste packages for transportation to and emplacement in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This consolidation does not invalidate any existing certification of TRU waste to the WIPP Operations and Safety Criteria (Revision 3 of WIPP-DOE--069) and/or Transportation: Waste Package Requirements (TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging [SARP]). Those documents being consolidated, including Revision 3 of the WAC, currently support the Test Phase

  15. ICRP perspective on criteria of acceptability for medical radiological equipment

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) does not have a specific publication or recent detailed advice on acceptability criteria and suspension levels for medical radiological equipment. However, a number of the Commission's publications clearly stress the need to carry out acceptance testing of radiological equipment. Such general recommendations are frequent in earlier and recent reports related to external radiation therapy. Over 30 y ago, the ICRP even included some examples of parameter accuracies concerning acceptance levels in connection with radiotherapy units. Later more general advices related to acceptability tests as important parts of various quality assurance programs were formulated for radiation therapy as well as for radiodiagnostics without going into details to give values for specific parameters. In the radiodiagnostic field, there are such general recommendations in reports related to equipment for X-ray interventional procedures, digital radiology and computed tomography. The ICRP highly supports the elaboration of detailed and clear acceptability and suspension criteria for equipment used in medical radiology carried out by organisations like International Atomic Energy Agency, International Electrotechnical Commission, European Commission, National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA, USA) and others and consider such criteria as important parts of the quality programmes to guarantee good radiation safety conditions for patients in radiation therapy as well as in radiodiagnostics. (authors)

  16. Acceptability criteria for final underground disposal of radioactive waste

    Specialists now generally agree that the underground disposal of suitably immobilized radioactive waste offers a means of attaining the basic objective of ensuring the immediate and long-term protection of man and the environment throughout the requisite period of time and in all foreseeable circumstances. Criteria of a more general as well as a more specific nature are practical means through which this basic protection objective can be reached. These criteria, which need not necessarily be quantified, enable the authorities to gauge the acceptability of a given project and provide those responsible for waste management with a basis for making decisions. In short, these principles constitute the framework of a suitably safety-oriented waste management policy. The more general criteria correspond to the protection objectives established by the national authorities on the basis of principles and recommendations formulated by international organizations, in particular the ICRP and the IAEA. They apply to any underground disposal system considered as a whole. The more specific criteria provide a means of evaluating the degree to which the various components of the disposal system meet the general criteria. They must also take account of the interaction between these components. As the ultimate aim is the overall safety of the disposal system, individual components can be adjusted to compensate for the performance of others with respect to the criteria. This is the approach adopted by the international bodies and national authorities in developing acceptability criteria for the final underground radioactive disposal systems to be used during the operational and post-operational phases respectively. The main criteria are reviewed and an attempt is made to assess the importance of the specific criteria according to the different types of disposal systems. (author)

  17. Use of risk aversion in risk acceptance criteria

    Quantitative risk acceptance criteria for technological systems must be both justifiable, based upon societal values and objectives, and workable in the sense that compliance is possible and can be demonstrated in a straightforward manner. Societal values have frequently been assessed using recorded accident statistics on a wide range of human activities assuming that the statistics in some way reflect societal preferences, or by psychometric surveys concerning perceptions and evaluations of risk. Both methods indicate a societal aversion to risk e.g., many small accidents killing a total of 100 people are preferred over one large accident in which 100 lives are lost. Some of the implications of incorporating risk aversion in acceptance criteria are discussed. Calculated risks of various technological systems are converted to expected social costs using various risk aversion factors. The uncertainties in these assessments are also discussed

  18. MCO combustible gas management leak test acceptance criteria

    Existing leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed multi-canister overpacks (MCO) were evaluated to ensure that MCOs can be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCO's or within their surroundings. The document concludes that the integrated leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs (1 x 10-5 std cc/sec and 1 x 10-7 std cc/sec, respectively) are adequate to meet all current and foreseeable needs of the project, including capability to demonstrate compliance with the NFPA 60 Paragraph 3-3 requirement to maintain hydrogen concentrations [within the air atmosphere CSB tubes] t or below 1 vol% (i.e., at or below 25% of the LFL)

  19. Waste-acceptance criteria for greater confinement disposal

    A methodology for establishing waste-acceptance criteria based on quantitative performance factors that characterize the confinement capabilities of a waste disposal site and facility has been developed. The methodology starts from the basic objective of protecting public health and safety by providing assurance that disposal of the waste will not result in a radiation dose to any member of the general public, in either the short or long term, in excess of an established basic dose limit. The method is based on an explicit, straight-forward, and quantitative relationship among individual risk, confinement capabilities, and waste characteristics. A key aspect of the methodology is introduction of a confinement factor that characterizes the overall confinement capability of a particular facility and can be used for quantitative assessments of the performance of different disposal sites and facilities, as well as for establishing site-specific waste acceptance criteria. Confinement factors are derived by means of site-specific pathway analyses. They make possible a direct and simple conversion of a basic dose limit into waste-acceptance criteria, specified as concentration limits on radionuclides in the waste streams and expressed in quantitative form as a function of parameters that characterize the site, facility design, waste containers, and waste form. Waste acceptance criteria can be represented visually as activity/time plots for various waste streams. These plots show the concentrations of radionuclides in a waste stream as a function of time and permit a visual, quantitative assessment of long-term performance, relative risks from different radionuclides in the waste stream, and contributions from ingrowth. 13 references, 7 figures

  20. Establishing seismic design criteria to achieve an acceptable seismic margin

    In order to develop a risk based seismic design criteria the following four issues must be addressed: (1) What target annual probability of seismic induced unacceptable performance is acceptable? (2). What minimum seismic margin is acceptable? (3) Given the decisions made under Issues 1 and 2, at what annual frequency of exceedance should the Safe Shutdown Earthquake ground motion be defined? (4) What seismic design criteria should be established to reasonably achieve the seismic margin defined under Issue 2? The first issue is purely a policy decision and is not addressed in this paper. Each of the other three issues are addressed. Issues 2 and 3 are integrally tied together so that a very large number of possible combinations of responses to these two issues can be used to achieve the target goal defined under Issue 1. Section 2 lays out a combined approach to these two issues and presents three potentially attractive combined resolutions of these two issues which reasonably achieves the target goal. The remainder of the paper discusses an approach which can be used to develop seismic design criteria aimed at achieving the desired seismic margin defined in resolution of Issue 2. Suggestions for revising existing seismic design criteria to more consistently achieve the desired seismic margin are presented

  1. Establishing seismic design criteria to achieve an acceptable seismic margin

    Kennedy, R.P. [RPK Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    In order to develop a risk based seismic design criteria the following four issues must be addressed: (1) What target annual probability of seismic induced unacceptable performance is acceptable? (2). What minimum seismic margin is acceptable? (3) Given the decisions made under Issues 1 and 2, at what annual frequency of exceedance should the Safe Shutdown Earthquake ground motion be defined? (4) What seismic design criteria should be established to reasonably achieve the seismic margin defined under Issue 2? The first issue is purely a policy decision and is not addressed in this paper. Each of the other three issues are addressed. Issues 2 and 3 are integrally tied together so that a very large number of possible combinations of responses to these two issues can be used to achieve the target goal defined under Issue 1. Section 2 lays out a combined approach to these two issues and presents three potentially attractive combined resolutions of these two issues which reasonably achieves the target goal. The remainder of the paper discusses an approach which can be used to develop seismic design criteria aimed at achieving the desired seismic margin defined in resolution of Issue 2. Suggestions for revising existing seismic design criteria to more consistently achieve the desired seismic margin are presented.

  2. Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) V2.0 logistics module PBI acceptance criteria

    This document defines the acceptance criteria for the Automated Transportation Management System V2.0 Logistics Module Performance Based Incentive (PBI). This acceptance criteria will be the primary basis for the generation of acceptance test procedures. The purpose of this document is to define the minimum criteria that must be fulfilled to guarantee acceptance of the Logistics Module

  3. E-Commerce Mobile Marketing Model Resolving Users Acceptance Criteria

    Veronica S. Moertini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth of e-commerce and mobile services has been creating business opportunities. Among these,mobile marketing is predicted to be a new trend of marketing. As mobile devices are personal tools suchthat the services ought to be unique, in the last few years, researches have been conducted studies relatedto the user acceptance of mobile services and produced results. This research aims to develop a model ofmobile e-commerce mobile marketing system, in the form of computer-based information system (CBISthat addresses the recommendations or criteria formulated by researchers. In this paper, the criteriaformulated by researches are presented then each of the criteria is resolved and translated into mobileservices. A model of CBIS, which is an integration of a website and a mobile application, is designed tomaterialize the mobile services. The model is presented in the form of business model, system procedures,network topology, software model of the website and mobile application, and database models.

  4. Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), DOE/WIPP-069, was initially developed by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Steering Committee to provide performance requirements to ensure public health and safety as well as the safe handling of transuranic (TRU) waste at the WIPP. This revision updates the criteria and requirements of previous revisions and deletes those which were applicable only to the test phase. The criteria and requirements in this document must be met by participating DOE TRU Waste Generator/Storage Sites (Sites) prior to shipping contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste forms to the WIPP. The WIPP Project will comply with applicable federal and state regulations and requirements, including those in Titles 10, 40, and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). The WAC, DOE/WIPP-069, serves as the primary directive for assuring the safe handling, transportation, and disposal of TRU wastes in the WIPP and for the certification of these wastes. The WAC identifies strict requirements that must be met by participating Sites before these TRU wastes may be shipped for disposal in the WIPP facility. These criteria and requirements will be reviewed and revised as appropriate, based on new technical or regulatory requirements. The WAC is a controlled document. Revised/changed pages will be supplied to all holders of controlled copies

  5. Acceptance criteria for the low enriched uranium reform amendments

    Revisions have been made to the material control and accounting requirements for NRC licensees authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material of low strategic significance to have material control and accounting systems able to (1) confirm the presence of special nuclear material, (2) resolve indications of missing material, and (3) aid in the investigation and recovery of missing material. This document presents criteria that can be used to aid in judging the acceptability of licensee plans that would be submitted to the NRC for implementing these capabilities. General performance objectives, system capabilities, and recordkeeping are addressed

  6. Synthetic seismic acceleration time-histories and their acceptance criteria

    In seismic dynamic response analysis of structures and equipment, time-history analysis is now widely used. The 3-D seismic acceleration time-histories or 3-D seismic displacement time-histories are required in the 3-D seismic dynamic response analysis as the seismic excitation input data. Because of the lack of actual acceleration time-histories for the field where the structures or equipment are installed, the general practice is to use the synthetic seismic acceleration time-histories, which are derived from the design seismic response spectra of the field, as the seismic excitation input data. However, from one specified design response spectrum indefinite solutions of acceleration time-histories can be derived depending on the values of the input parameters. Not all the derived synthetic time-histories can be used as seismic excitation input data. Only those which meet the acceptance criteria can be used. The factors (input parameters), which will affect the time-history solution from a specified seismic response spectrum, and the acceptance criteria are discussed

  7. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of nuclear power reactor security plans

    This guidance document contains acceptance criteria to be used in the NRC license review process. It contains specific criteria for use in evaluating the acceptability of nuclear power reactor security programs as detailed in security plans

  8. Acceptability criteria for the storage of radioactive wastes from accidents

    The hierarchy of criteria with respect to the possible extent of their violation is determined for the situation where radioactive wastes from nonstandard and accident situations are admitted to a repository. Conditions for the possibility of violation of the criteria are established so as to keep the best waste management patterns and to hold radiation exposure as low as possible. Each criterion is assigned a weight factor between 1 and 5 as follows: basic health physics criterion (2), mobile activity (3), specific alpha activity (3), exposure rate on the surface (1), leachability or hardness (2), free liquids (1), package integrity and structural stability (4), pyrophoric substances (1), toxic substances (1), explosive substances (1), for non-monolithic wastes: specific activity (2), double confinement (2), package weight (2), solid radioactive waste (3), usability of space (1), necessity of backfilling (5), approval from: operator (1), regulatory body (1), health physics body (1). Information on radioactive wastes from actual accidents is included in an Appendix, which also deals with the feasibility of applying the acceptability criteria. (J.B.). 2 tabs., 1 fig., 3 refs

  9. Determination of acceptable risk criteria for nuclear waste management

    Cohen, J.J.

    1977-10-21

    The initial phase of the work performed during FY 1977 consisted of performing a ''scoping'' study to define issues, determine an optimal methodology for their resolution, and compile a data base for acceptable risk criteria development. The issues, spanning technical, psychological, and ethical dimensions, were categorized in seven major areas: (1) unplanned or accidental events, (2) present vs future risks, (3) institutional controls and retrievability, (4) dose-response mechanism and uncertainty, (5) spatial distribution of exposed populations, (6) different types of nuclear wastes, and (7) public perception. The optimum methodology for developing ARC was determined to be multi-attribute decision analysis encompassing numerous specific techniques for choosing, from among several alternatives, the optimal course of action when the alternatives are constrained to meet specified attributes. The data base developed during the study comprises existing regulations and guidelines, maximum permissible dose, natural geologic hazards, nonradioactive hazardous waste practices, bioethical perspectives, and data from an opinion survey.

  10. Acceptance criteria for disposal of radioactive waste in Romania

    In Romania the institutional radioactive waste are managed by National Institute of R and D for Physics and Nuclear Engineering. The institutional radioactive waste are collected, treated and conditioned at the Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant then transferred and disposed to the National Repository of Radioactive Waste at Baita Bihor. National Repository for Radioactive Waste is a long term storage facility. The repository is placed in a former worked out uranium ore mine, being excavated in the Bihor peak. The repository has been sited taking into account the known geological, hydrogeoloical, seismic and meteorological and mining properties of a uranium mining site. In the absence of an updated Safety Analysis Report, the maximum radioactive content permitted by the regulatory authority in the operation license is below the values reported for other engineered repositories in mine galleries. The paper presents the acceptance criteria for disposal of radioactive waste in National Repository for Radioactive Waste at Baita Bihor. (author)

  11. Determination of acceptable risk criteria for nuclear waste management

    The initial phase of the work performed during FY 1977 consisted of performing a ''scoping'' study to define issues, determine an optimal methodology for their resolution, and compile a data base for acceptable risk criteria development. The issues, spanning technical, psychological, and ethical dimensions, were categorized in seven major areas: (1) unplanned or accidental events, (2) present vs future risks, (3) institutional controls and retrievability, (4) dose-response mechanism and uncertainty, (5) spatial distribution of exposed populations, (6) different types of nuclear wastes, and (7) public perception. The optimum methodology for developing ARC was determined to be multi-attribute decision analysis encompassing numerous specific techniques for choosing, from among several alternatives, the optimal course of action when the alternatives are constrained to meet specified attributes. The data base developed during the study comprises existing regulations and guidelines, maximum permissible dose, natural geologic hazards, nonradioactive hazardous waste practices, bioethical perspectives, and data from an opinion survey

  12. Safety analysis, risk assessment, and risk acceptance criteria

    This paper discusses a number of topics that relate safety analysis as documented in the Department of Energy (DOE) safety analysis reports (SARs), probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) as characterized primarily in the context of the techniques that have assumed some level of formality in commercial nuclear power plant applications, and risk acceptance criteria as an outgrowth of PRA applications. DOE SARs of interest are those that are prepared for DOE facilities under DOE Order 5480.23 and the implementing guidance in DOE STD-3009-94. It must be noted that the primary area of application for DOE STD-3009 is existing DOE facilities and that certain modifications of the STD-3009 approach are necessary in SARs for new facilities. Moreover, it is the hazard analysis (HA) and accident analysis (AA) portions of these SARs that are relevant to the present discussions. Although PRAs can be qualitative in nature, PRA as used in this paper refers more generally to all quantitative risk assessments and their underlying methods. HA as used in this paper refers more generally to all qualitative risk assessments and their underlying methods that have been in use in hazardous facilities other than nuclear power plants. This discussion includes both quantitative and qualitative risk assessment methods. PRA has been used, improved, developed, and refined since the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) was published in 1975 by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Much debate has ensued since WASH-1400 on exactly what the role of PRA should be in plant design, reactor licensing, 'ensuring' plant and process safety, and a large number of other decisions that must be made for potentially hazardous activities. Of particular interest in this area is whether the risks quantified using PRA should be compared with numerical risk acceptance criteria (RACs) to determine whether a facility is 'safe.' Use of RACs requires quantitative estimates of consequence frequency and magnitude

  13. An approach to societal risk acceptance criteria and risk management

    A quantitative approach to risk acceptance criteria and risk management is proposed for activities involving risk to individuals not receiving direct benefits, such as employment, from the activity. Societal activities are divided into major facilities or technologies, all or part of which are categorized as essential, beneficial, or peripheral, and a decreasing level of acceptable risk to the most exposed individual is proposed (say, 0.0002/year for essential, 0.00001/year for beneficial, and 0.000002/year for peripheral activity). The risk would be assessed at a high confidence level (say, 90%), thereby providing an incentive to the gaining of better knowledge. Each risk-producing facility, technology, etc., would have to undergo assessment both of risk to the individual and to society. The cost of the latter would have to be internalized, probably via a tax paid to the Federal Government, which in turn would redistribute the benefit as national health insurance or reduced taxes to the individual. Risk aversion to large events would be built into the internalization of the cost of risk

  14. CTOD-based acceptance criteria for heat exchanger head staybolts

    The primary coolant piping system of the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors contains twelve heat exchangers to remove the waste heat from the nuclear materials production. A large break at the inlet or outlet heads of the heat exchangers would occur if the restraint members of the heads become inactive. The heat exchanger head is attached to the tubesheet by 84 staybolts. The structural integrity of the heads is demonstrated by showing the redundant capacity of the staybolts to restrain the head at design conditions and under seismic loadings. The beat exchanger head is analyzed with a three- dimensional finite element model. The restraint provided by the staybolts is evaluated for several postulated cases of inactive or missing staybolts, that is, bolts that have a flaw exceeding the ultrasonic testing (UT) threshold depth of 25% of the bolt diameter. A limit of 6 inactive staybolts is reached with a fracture criterion based on the maximum allowable local displacement at the active staybolts which corresponds to the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) of 0.032 inches. An acceptance criteria methodology has been developed to disposition flaws reported in the staybolt inspections while ensuring adequate restraint capacity of the staybolts to maintain integrity of the heat exchanger heads against collapse. The methodology includes an approach for the baseline and periodic inspections of the staybolts. A total of up to 6 staybolts, reported as containing flaws with depths at or exceeding 25% would be acceptable in the heat exchanger

  15. Data Quality Objectives for WTP Feed Acceptance Criteria - 12043

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is under construction for the U.S. Department of Energy by Bechtel National, Inc. and subcontractor URS Corporation (contract no. DE-AC27-01RV14136). The plant when completed will be the world's largest nuclear waste treatment facility. Bechtel and URS are tasked with designing, constructing, commissioning, and transitioning the plant to the long term operating contractor to process the legacy wastes that are stored in underground tanks (from nuclear weapons production between the 1940's and the 1980's). Approximately 56 million gallons of radioactive waste is currently stored in these tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. There are three major WTP facilities being constructed for processing the tank waste feed. The Pretreatment (PT) facility receives feed where it is separated into a low activity waste (LAW) fraction and a high level waste (HLW) fraction. These fractions are transferred to the appropriate (HLW or LAW) facility, combined with glass former material, and sent to high temperature melters for formation of the glass product. In addition to PT, HLW and LAW, other facilities in WTP include the Laboratory (LAB) for analytical services and the Balance of Facilities (BOF) for plant maintenance, support and utility services. The transfer of staged feed from the waste storage tanks and acceptance in WTP receipt vessels require data for waste acceptance criteria (WAC) parameters from analysis of feed samples. The Data Quality Objectives (DQO) development was a joint team effort between WTP and Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) representatives. The focus of this DQO effort was to review WAC parameters and develop data quality requirements, the results of which will determine whether or not the staged feed can be transferred from the TOC to WTP receipt vessels. The approach involved systematic planning for data collection consistent with EPA guidance for the seven-step DQO process

  16. On the consistency of risk acceptance criteria with normative theories for decision-making

    In evaluation of safety in projects it is common to use risk acceptance criteria to support decision-making. In this paper, we discuss to what extent the risk acceptance criteria is in accordance with the normative theoretical framework of the expected utility theory and the rank-dependent utility theory. We show that the use of risk acceptance criteria may violate the independence axiom of the expected utility theory and the comonotonic independence axiom of the rank-dependent utility theory. Hence the use of risk acceptance criteria is not in general consistent with these theories. The level of inconsistency is highest for the expected utility theory

  17. Human factors engineering design review acceptance criteria for the safety parameter display

    McGevna, V.; Peterson, L.R.

    1981-10-02

    This report contains human factors engineering design review acceptance criteria developed by the Human Factors Engineering Branch (HFEB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to use in evaluating designs of the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS). These criteria were developed in response to the functional design criteria for the SPDS defined in NUREG-0696, Functional Criteria for Emergency Response Facilities. The purpose of this report is to identify design review acceptance criteria for the SPDS installed in the control room of a nuclear power plant. Use of computer driven cathode ray tube (CRT) displays is anticipated. General acceptance criteria for displays of plant safety status information by the SPDS are developed. In addition, specific SPDS review criteria corresponding to the SPDS functional criteria specified in NUREG-0696 are established.

  18. Human factors engineering design review acceptance criteria for the safety parameter display

    This report contains human factors engineering design review acceptance criteria developed by the Human Factors Engineering Branch (HFEB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to use in evaluating designs of the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS). These criteria were developed in response to the functional design criteria for the SPDS defined in NUREG-0696, Functional Criteria for Emergency Response Facilities. The purpose of this report is to identify design review acceptance criteria for the SPDS installed in the control room of a nuclear power plant. Use of computer driven cathode ray tube (CRT) displays is anticipated. General acceptance criteria for displays of plant safety status information by the SPDS are developed. In addition, specific SPDS review criteria corresponding to the SPDS functional criteria specified in NUREG-0696 are established

  19. Probability-Based Design Criteria of the ASCE 7 Tsunami Loads and Effects Provisions (Invited)

    Chock, G.

    2013-12-01

    Mitigation of tsunami risk requires a combination of emergency preparedness for evacuation in addition to providing structural resilience of critical facilities, infrastructure, and key resources necessary for immediate response and economic and social recovery. Critical facilities would include emergency response, medical, tsunami refuges and shelters, ports and harbors, lifelines, transportation, telecommunications, power, financial institutions, and major industrial/commercial facilities. The Tsunami Loads and Effects Subcommittee of the ASCE/SEI 7 Standards Committee is developing a proposed new Chapter 6 - Tsunami Loads and Effects for the 2016 edition of the ASCE 7 Standard. ASCE 7 provides the minimum design loads and requirements for structures subject to building codes such as the International Building Code utilized in the USA. In this paper we will provide a review emphasizing the intent of these new code provisions and explain the design methodology. The ASCE 7 provisions for Tsunami Loads and Effects enables a set of analysis and design methodologies that are consistent with performance-based engineering based on probabilistic criteria. . The ASCE 7 Tsunami Loads and Effects chapter will be initially applicable only to the states of Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, and Hawaii. Ground shaking effects and subsidence from a preceding local offshore Maximum Considered Earthquake will also be considered prior to tsunami arrival for Alaska and states in the Pacific Northwest regions governed by nearby offshore subduction earthquakes. For national tsunami design provisions to achieve a consistent reliability standard of structural performance for community resilience, a new generation of tsunami inundation hazard maps for design is required. The lesson of recent tsunami is that historical records alone do not provide a sufficient measure of the potential heights of future tsunamis. Engineering design must consider the occurrence of events greater than

  20. Acceptable risk as the criteria for NPP efficiency and safety

    Four types of criteria of effective and safe operation of NPP power units are studied and formulated. Criterion types are formulated in risk terms of failure to comply problems, losses of capital outlays and territory (ecological risk), NPP personnel and population health damage. The structure of losses and profiles under conditions of the modern economic system is considered for the given types of criteria. The mathematical cost-profit model of a stochastic processes of power unit utilization is developed. The explicit functional form of the positive effect on the process trajectories for each of criterion types is constructed. The functional construction is based on the representation of a power unit as a generator of random events leading to power unit failure its damage or loss of territory, correspondingly

  1. Nevada Test Site waste acceptance criteria [Revision 1

    None

    1997-08-01

    Revision one updates the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document.

  2. Nevada Test Site waste acceptance criteria [Revision 1

    Revision one updates the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document

  3. E-Commerce Mobile Marketing Model Resolving Users Acceptance Criteria

    Veronica S. Moertini; Criswanto D. Nugroho

    2012-01-01

    The growth of e-commerce and mobile services has been creating business opportunities. Among these,mobile marketing is predicted to be a new trend of marketing. As mobile devices are personal tools suchthat the services ought to be unique, in the last few years, researches have been conducted studies relatedto the user acceptance of mobile services and produced results. This research aims to develop a model ofmobile e-commerce mobile marketing system, in the form of computer-based information...

  4. Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX

    Judkoff, Ron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Polly, Ben [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bianchi, Marcus [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Neymark, Joel [J. Neymark & Associates, Golden, CO (United States)

    2010-08-01

    This document provides an example procedure for establishing acceptance-range criteria to assess results from software undergoing BESTEST-EX. This example method for BESTEST-EX is a modified version of the method described in HERS BESTEST.

  5. Research on Health Risk-Based Radioactive Acceptance Criteria of Municipal Solid Waste Landfill

    2011-01-01

    The article focuses on the topics of Health Risk-Based Radioactive Acceptance Criteria of Municipal Solid Waste Landfill (MSWL, including municipal refuse landfills or industrial solid waste landfills, MSWL). At first, health risk assessment

  6. 14 CFR 91.1071 - Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, training to accepted standards.

    2010-01-01

    ... performance to the person conducting the check, the program manager may not use the pilot, nor may the pilot... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Fractional Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1071 Crewmember: Tests... provisions, training to accepted standards. 91.1071 Section 91.1071 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  7. Review of issues relevant to acceptable risk criteria for nuclear waste management

    Cohen, J.J.

    1978-02-22

    Development of acceptable risk criteria for nuclear waste management requires the translation of publicly determined goals and objectives into definitive issues which, in turn, require resolution. Since these issues are largely of a subjective nature, they cannot be resolved by technological methods. Development of acceptable risk criteria might best be accomplished by application of a systematic methodology for the optimal implementation of subjective values. Multi-attribute decision analysis is well suited for this purpose.

  8. Review of issues relevant to acceptable risk criteria for nuclear waste management

    Development of acceptable risk criteria for nuclear waste management requires the translation of publicly determined goals and objectives into definitive issues which, in turn, require resolution. Since these issues are largely of a subjective nature, they cannot be resolved by technological methods. Development of acceptable risk criteria might best be accomplished by application of a systematic methodology for the optimal implementation of subjective values. Multi-attribute decision analysis is well suited for this purpose

  9. Acceptance criteria for deposition of low-level and intermediate-level radiation levels radioactive wastes

    This norm establishes the criteria for acceptance low and intermediate radiation level for safe deposition in repositories, for assuring the protection of workers, population and environment against the hazardous effects of the ionizing radiations. The criteria of this norm applies to the low and intermediate radiation levels

  10. Summary of research and development activities in support of waste acceptance criteria for WIPP

    The development of waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is summarized. Specifications for acceptable waste forms are included. Nine program areas are discussed. They are: TRU characterization, HLW interactions, thermal/structural interactions, nuclide migration, permeability, brine migration, borehole plugging, operation/design support, and instrumentation development. Recommendations are included

  11. Review comments on the report of the steering committee on waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    General comments by the EEG on waste acceptance criteria (WAC) as published in recent WIPP reports are: methods to be used by waste generating facilities to determine compliance with the WAC are lacking; provisions for inspection of the WIPP and the waste generating facility to determine compliance with WAC are needed; standardized terminology is needed in the WAC so that mandatory compliance is understood; some criteria apply only to CH- and RH-TRU wastes not to experimental high-level wastes; a statement should be included stating what further action would be taken if a contaminated waste shipment required overpacking. Specific comments are also included on gas generation, pyrophoric materials, toxic and corrosive materials, waste containers and overbacks, waste package size, surface dose rate, surface contamination, certification and labelling

  12. Acceptance criteria for disposal of radioactive wastes in shallow ground and rock cavities

    This document provides an overview of basic information related to waste acceptance criteria for disposal in shallow ground and rock cavity repositories, consisting of a discussion of acceptable waste types. The last item includes identification of those waste characteristics which may influence the performance of the disposal system and as such are areas of consideration for criteria development. The material is presented in a manner similar to a safety assessment. Waste acceptance criteria aimed at limiting the radiation exposure to acceptable levels are presented for each pathway. Radioactive wastes considered here are low-level radioactive wastes and intermediate-level radioactive wastes from nuclear fuel cycle operations and applications of radionuclides in research, medicine and industry

  13. Development on inelastic analysis acceptance criteria for radioactive material transportation packages

    The response of radioactive material transportation packages to mechanical accident loadings can be more accurately characterized by non-linear dynamic analysis than by the ''Equivalent dynamic'' static elastic analysis typically used in the design of these packages. This more accurate characterization of the response can lead to improved package safety and design efficiency. For non-linear dynamic analysis to become the preferred method of package design analysis, an acceptance criterion must be established that achieves an equivalent level of safety as the currently used criterion defined in NRC Regulatory Guide 7.6 (NRC 1978). Sandia National Laboratories has been conducting a study of possible acceptance criteria to meet this requirement. In this paper non-linear dynamic analysis acceptance criteria based on stress, strain, and strain-energy-density will be discussed. An example package design will be compared for each of the design criteria, including the approach of NRC Regulatory Guide 7.6

  14. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC), Rev. 7-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NTSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal.

  15. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC), Rev. 7-01

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-05-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NTSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal.

  16. Forest owners' willingness to accept contracts for ecosystem service provision is sensitive to additionality

    Vedel, Suzanne Elizabeth; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark

    2015-01-01

    eliciting current practice prior to a choice experiment on contracts. For most of these ecosystem services, owners differentiate their WTA significantly according to their current management. Owners who did not provide extended access had a mean WTA of €14/ha/year for accepting access up to 15 m from roads...... contracts for the provision of ecosystem services in Natura 2000 policies in a sample covering 12.5% of the total private forest area. This involves allowing old trees to decay naturally, setting aside forest areas, accepting a fixed percentage of broadleaves and increasing access for the public. Forest...... and paths and €28/ha/year for accepting access everywhere in their forest. However, forest owners who already allow extended access have a mean WTA around zero....

  17. La composition academique: les limites de l'acceptabilite (Composition for Academic Purposes: Criteria for Acceptability).

    Grenall, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the pedagogical approaches and problems attendant to the development of English writing programs for foreign students. Discusses the skills necessary to handle course work, such as essay tests, term papers and reports, theses and dissertations, and focuses particularly on diagnostic problems and acceptability criteria. Societe Nouvelle…

  18. Qualitative acceptance criteria for radioactive wastes to be disposed of in deep geological formations

    The present Safety Guide has to be seen as a companion document to the IAEA Safety Series No. 99. It is concerned with the waste form which is an important component of the overall disposal system. Because of the broad range of waste types and conditioned forms and variations in the sites, designs and constructional approaches being considered for deep geological repositories, this report necessarily approaches the waste acceptance criteria in a general way, recognizing that the assignment of quantitative limits to these criteria has to be the responsibility of national authorities. The main objective of this Safety Guide is to set out qualitative waste acceptance criteria as a basis for specifying quantitative limits for the waste forms and packages which are intended to be disposed of in deep geological repositories. It should serve as guidance for assigning such parameter values which would fully comply with the safety assessment and performance of a waste disposal system as a whole. This document is intended to serve both national authorities and regulatory bodies involved in the development of deep underground disposal systems. The qualitative waste acceptance criteria dealt with in the present Safety Guide are primarily concerned with the disposal of high level, intermediate level and long-lived alpha bearing wastes in deep geological repositories. Although some criteria are also applicable in other waste disposal concepts, it has to be borne in mind that the set of criteria presented here shall ensure the isolation capability of a waste disposal system for periods of time much longer than for other waste streams with shorter lifetimes. 51 refs, 1 tab

  19. Defining waste acceptance criteria for the Hanford Replacement Cross-Site Transfer System

    This document provides a methodology for defining waste acceptance criteria for the Hanford Replacement Cross-Site Transfer System (RCSTS). This methodology includes characterization, transport analysis, and control. A framework is described for each of these functions. A tool was developed for performing the calculations associated with the transport analysis. This tool, a worksheet that is available in formats acceptable for a variety of PC spreadsheet programs, enables a comparison of the pressure required to transport a given slurry at a rate that particulate suspension is maintained to the pressure drop available from the RCSTS

  20. Development of Waste Acceptance Criteria at 221-U Building: Initial Flow and Transport Scoping Calculations

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhang, Z. F.; Keller, Jason M.; Chen, Yousu

    2007-05-30

    This report documents numerical flow and transport simulations performed that establish initial waste acceptance criteria for the potential waste streams that may be safely sequestered in the 221-U Building and similar canyon structures. Specifically, simulations were executed to identify the maximum loading of contaminant mass (without respect to volume) that can be emplaced within the 221-U Building with no more than 1 pCi/m2 of contaminant migrating outside the structure within a 1,000 year time period. The initial scoping simulations were executed in one dimension to assess important processes, and then two dimensions to establish waste acceptance criteria. Two monolithic conditions were assessed: (1) a grouted canyon monolith; and (2) a canyon monolith filled with sand, both assuming no cracks or fissures were present to cause preferential transport. A three-staged approach was taken to account for different processes that may impact the amount of contaminant that can be safely sequestered in canyon structure. In the first stage, flow and transport simulations established waste acceptance criteria based on a linear (Kd) isotherm approach. In the second stage, impacts on thermal loading were examined and the differences in waste acceptance criteria quantified. In the third stage of modeling, precipitation/dissolution reactions were considered on the release and transport of the contaminants, and the subsequent impact on the maximum contaminant loading. The reactive transport modeling is considered a demonstration of the reactive transport capability, and shows the importance of its use for future performance predictions once site-specific data have been obtained.

  1. Qualifications of and acceptance criteria for transporting special form radioactive material

    A special form radioactive material is a radioactive material that is in an inert, insoluble, indispersible form such that even in the event of an accident, it will not be dispersed into the environment in a way that could have an adverse impact on public health and safety. Methods of qualifying a special form radioactive material are discussed. Interpretation of acceptance criteria are proposed for the transportation of Type B quantities of a special form radioactive material. 11 refs

  2. Predictions and acceptance criteria for K Reactor startup and power ascension

    The purpose of this report is to consolidate all the work performed on the predictions and acceptance criteria for the K Reactor Startup and Power Ascension Test Program. All results reported in this document are referenced to technical documents. This report consolidates the results of several technical reports previously issued. The technical background of the results can be found in the references given in this document

  3. Waste-acceptance criteria and risk-based thinking for radioactive-waste classification

    The US system of radioactive-waste classification and its development provide a reference point for the discussion of risk-based thinking in waste classification. The official US system is described and waste-acceptance criteria for disposal sites are introduced because they constitute a form of de facto waste classification. Risk-based classification is explored and it is found that a truly risk-based system is context-dependent: risk depends not only on the waste-management activity but, for some activities such as disposal, it depends on the specific physical context. Some of the elements of the official US system incorporate risk-based thinking, but like many proposed alternative schemes, the physical context of disposal is ignored. The waste-acceptance criteria for disposal sites do account for this context dependence and could be used as a risk-based classification scheme for disposal. While different classes would be necessary for different management activities, the waste-acceptance criteria would obviate the need for the current system and could better match wastes to disposal environments saving money or improving safety or both

  4. A Study on Establishment of Event Classification and Acceptance Criteria of Safety Analysis for new PWRs

    Classification of the events of the NPPs is a fundamental basis for the nuclear safety and thus it can be regarded as a starting point of the safety classification of systems, components or structures (SCSs) and safety analysis. The classification and acceptance criteria would be determined based on the defense-in-depth (DiD) concept for the plant safety architecture needed to assure the confinement of radioactive materials and, therefore, to meet the general safety objectives. Previous studies indicate that a new consistent approach based on quantitative probabilistic criteria would be necessary for the systematic licensing with the global standard. This paper presents a new proposal of the safety classification and the global safety criteria which is applicable to the new PWRs with the current domestic regulatory environment

  5. Radioactive waste management: Review on clearance levels and acceptance criteria legislation, requirements and standards

    In 2011 the joint research project Metrology for Radioactive Waste Management (MetroRWM) of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) started with a total duration of three years. Within this project, new metrological resources for the assessment of radioactive waste, including their calibration with new reference materials traceable to national standards will be developed. This paper gives a review on national, European and international strategies as basis for science-based metrological requirements in clearance and acceptance of radioactive waste. - Highlights: • Legislation, requirements and standards in radioactive waste management. • Strategies and methods to maintain the relevant clearance levels and acceptance criteria. • International, European and national activity levels and limits for exemption and clearance of radioactive waste. • Requirements for acceptance for storage and final disposal of radioactive waste. • Metrological requirements for radioactive waste characterisation

  6. Lung transplantation from donors outside standard acceptability criteria--are they really marginal?

    Zych, Bartlomiej; García Sáez, Diana; Sabashnikov, Anton; De Robertis, Fabio; Amrani, Mohamed; Bahrami, Toufan; Mohite, Prashant N; Patil, Nikhil P; Weymann, Alexander; Popov, Aron F; Reed, Anna; Carby, Martin; Simon, André R

    2014-11-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) from "extended donor criteria" donors may reduce significantly organ shortage. However, its influence on results remains unclear. In this study, we evaluate retrospectively the results of LTx from donors outside standard criteria: PaO2/FiO2 ratio history of smoking > 20 pack-years. Two hundred and forty-eight patients underwent first time LTx in our institution between January 2007 and January 2013. Seventy-nine patients (Group I) received organs from "extended donor criteria" and 169 patients (Group II) from "standard donor criteria." Recipients' and donors' demographics, perioperative variables, and outcome were compared. Donors from Group I were significantly older [median (interquartile range)]: 52.5 (44;58) vs. 42 (28.5;48.5) years (P history: 57.7% vs. 41.8% (P = 0.013), and more extensive smoking history: 24(15;30) vs. 10(3.75;14) pack-years (P donor lungs from outside the standard acceptability criteria may expand existing donor pool with no detrimental effect on LTx outcome. PMID:25070600

  7. Compliance with the Nevada Test Site's waste acceptance criteria for vitrified cesium-loaded crystalline silicotitanates

    As part of a joint project between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), Cs-137 loaded crystalline silicotitanate (CST) sorbent will be vitrified in a joule-heated melter. Glass formulation development for this CST sorbent is discussed in an accompanying abstract for this conference. One of the objectives for this project was to ensure that the vitrified waste form could be disposed of at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). To accomplish this objective, the waste form must meet the NTS Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). This paper presents SRTC's efforts at ensuring that the glass waste form produced as a result of vitrification of CST will meet all of the criteria of the WAC. The producer must demonstrate that the waste is neither TRU nor mixed, and that the glass has a radionuclide content which is less than the Class C limit of 4,600 Ci/m3. The impact of this requirement on the CST loading in the glass is discussed along with the benefits to the producer which result if greater than Class C waste is accepted by NTS since this limit may be relaxed in the near future. This paper demonstrates that vitrification leads to a waste form which meets all of the criteria of the NTS WAC

  8. Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Combustible Gas Management Leak Test Acceptance Criteria (OCRWM)

    The purpose of this document is to support the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's combustible gas management strategy while avoiding the need to impose any requirements for oxygen free atmospheres within storage tubes that contain multi-canister overpacks (MCO). In order to avoid inerting requirements it is necessary to establish and confirm leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs that are adequte to ensure that, in the unlikely event the leak test results for any MCO were to approach either of those criteria, it could still be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the SNF Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCOs or within their surroundings. To support that strategy, this document: (1) establishes combustible gas management functions and minimum functional requirements for the MCO's mechanical seals and closure weld(s); (2) establishes a maximum practical value for the minimum required initial MCO inert backfill gas pressure; and (3) based on items 1 and 2, establishes and confirms leak test acceptance criteria for the MCO's mechanical seal and final closure weld(s)

  9. Structural acceptance criteria for the evaulation of existing double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington

    Julyk, L.J.; Day, A.D.; Dyrness, A.D.; Moore, C.J.; Peterson, W.S.; Scott, M.A.; Shrivastava, H.P.; Sholman, J.S.; Watts, T.N.

    1995-09-01

    The structural acceptance criteria contained herein for the evaluation of existing underground double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site is part of the Life Management/Aging Management Program of the Tank Waste Remediation System. The purpose of the overall life management program is to ensure that confinement of the waste is maintained over the required service life of the tanks. Characterization of the present condition of the tanks, understanding and characterization of potential degradation mechanisms, and development of tank structural acceptance criteria based on previous service and projected use are prerequisites to assessing tank integrity, to projecting the length of tank service, and to developing and applying prudent fixes or repairs. The criteria provided herein summarize the requirements for the analysis and structural qualification of the existing double-shell tanks for continued operation. Code reconciliation issues and material degradation under aging conditions are addressed. Although the criteria were developed for double-shell tanks, many of the provisions are equally applicable to single-shell tanks. However, the criteria do not apply to the evaluation of tank appurtenances and buried piping.

  10. Structural acceptance criteria for the evaulation of existing double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington

    The structural acceptance criteria contained herein for the evaluation of existing underground double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site is part of the Life Management/Aging Management Program of the Tank Waste Remediation System. The purpose of the overall life management program is to ensure that confinement of the waste is maintained over the required service life of the tanks. Characterization of the present condition of the tanks, understanding and characterization of potential degradation mechanisms, and development of tank structural acceptance criteria based on previous service and projected use are prerequisites to assessing tank integrity, to projecting the length of tank service, and to developing and applying prudent fixes or repairs. The criteria provided herein summarize the requirements for the analysis and structural qualification of the existing double-shell tanks for continued operation. Code reconciliation issues and material degradation under aging conditions are addressed. Although the criteria were developed for double-shell tanks, many of the provisions are equally applicable to single-shell tanks. However, the criteria do not apply to the evaluation of tank appurtenances and buried piping

  11. Long-Term Safety Analysis of Baldone Radioactive Waste Repository and Updating of Waste Acceptance Criteria

    The main objective of the project was to provide advice to the Latvian authorities on the safety enhancements and waste acceptance criteria for near surface radioactive waste disposal facilities of the Baldone repository. The project included the following main activities: Analysis of the current status of the management of radioactive waste in Latvia in general and, at the Baldone repository in particular Development of the short and long-term safety analysis of the Baldone repository, including: the planned increasing of capacity for disposal and long term storage, the radiological analysis for the post-closure period Development of the Environment Impact Statement, for the new foreseen installations, considering the non radiological components Proposal of recommendations for future updating of radioactive waste acceptance criteria Proposal of recommendations for safety upgrades to the facility. The work programme has been developed in phases and main tasks as follows. Phase 0: Project inception, Phase 1: Establishment of current status, plans and practices (Legislation, regulation and standards, Radioactive waste management, Waste acceptance criteria), Phase 2: Development of future strategies for long-term safety management and recommendations for safety enhancements. The project team found the general approach use at the installation, the basic design and the operating practices appropriate to international standards. Nevertheless, a number of items subject to potential improvements were also identified. These upgrading recommendations deal with general aspects of the management (mainly storage versus disposal of long-lived sources), site and environmental surveillance, packaging (qualification of containers, waste characterization requirements), the design of an engineered cap and strategies for capping. (author)

  12. Acceptance criteria for the low enriched uranium reform amendments. Revision 1

    Revisions have been made to the material control and accounting requirements for NRC licensees authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material of low strategic significance to have MC and A systems able to (1) confirm the presence of special nuclear material, (2) resolve indications of missing material, and (3) aid in the investigation and recovery of missing material. This document presents criteria that can be used to aid in judging the acceptability of licensee plans that would be submitted to the NRC for implementing these capabilities. General performance objectives, system capabilities, and recordkeeping are addressed

  13. RSE-M code progress in the field of examination evaluation and flaw acceptance criteria

    The RSE-M Code provides rules and requirements for in service inspection of light water cooled nuclear power plants. The code first edition was established by EDF and published in 1990 by AFCEN. In 1992, a second RSE-M project was launched by EDF and FRAMATOME with the objective to address a 1995 edition more completed considering the needs of owners, users, manufacturers and inspectors. This paper focuses on evaluation of examination results and presents the work done in the field of flaw acceptance criteria over the last three years. (author). 5 refs., 3 figs

  14. Acceptance criteria for the physical protection upgrade rule requirements for fixed sites. Information guide

    This document has been developed as a tool to assist in providing consistent evaluation of upgraded physical security plans submitted in response to the Physical Protection Upgrade Rule, effective March 25, 1980. It presents a means for assuring licensee compliance with every regulatory requirement of particular significance to the protection of the public health and safety. Acceptance criteria are included to determine the extent to which each licensee meets the regulatory requirements. The format parallels Regulatory Guide 5.52, Standard Format and Content of a Licensee Physical Protection Plan for Strategic Special Nuclear Material at Fixed Sites

  15. Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria

    This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility's WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator's waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits

  16. Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria

    NONE

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility`s WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator`s waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits.

  17. Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the waste acceptance criteria applicable to the transportation, storage, and disposal of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These criteria serve as the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary directive for ensuring that CH-TRU waste is managed and disposed of in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment.The authorization basis of WIPP for the disposal of CH-TRU waste includes the U.S.Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear EnergyAuthorization Act of 1980 (reference 1) and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA;reference 2). Included in this document are the requirements and associated criteriaimposed by these acts and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,reference 3), as amended, on the CH-TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP.|The DOE TRU waste sites must certify CH-TRU waste payload containers to thecontact-handled waste acceptance criteria (CH-WAC) identified in this document. Asshown in figure 1.0, the flow-down of applicable requirements to the CH-WAC istraceable to several higher-tier documents, including the WIPP operational safetyrequirements derived from the WIPP CH Documented Safety Analysis (CH-DSA;reference 4), the transportation requirements for CH-TRU wastes derived from theTransuranic Package Transporter-Model II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT Certificates ofCompliance (references 5 and 5a), the WIPP LWA (reference 2), the WIPP HazardousWaste Facility Permit (reference 6), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) Compliance Certification Decision and approval for PCB disposal (references 7,34, 35, 36, and 37). The solid arrows shown in figure 1.0 represent the flow-down of allapplicable payload container-based requirements. The two dotted arrows shown infigure 1.0 represent the flow-down of summary level requirements only; i.e., the sitesmust reference the regulatory source

  18. Development of performance assessment methodology for establishment of quantitative acceptance criteria of near-surface radioactive waste disposal

    Kim, C. R.; Lee, E. Y.; Park, J. W.; Chang, G. M.; Park, H. Y.; Yeom, Y. S. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    The contents and the scope of this study are as follows : review of state-of-the-art on the establishment of waste acceptance criteria in foreign near-surface radioactive waste disposal facilities, investigation of radiological assessment methodologies and scenarios, investigation of existing models and computer codes used in performance/safety assessment, development of a performance assessment methodology(draft) to derive quantitatively radionuclide acceptance criteria of domestic near-surface disposal facility, preliminary performance/safety assessment in accordance with the developed methodology.

  19. Development of performance assessment methodology for establishment of quantitative acceptance criteria of near-surface radioactive waste disposal

    The contents and the scope of this study are as follows : review of state-of-the-art on the establishment of waste acceptance criteria in foreign near-surface radioactive waste disposal facilities, investigation of radiological assessment methodologies and scenarios, investigation of existing models and computer codes used in performance/safety assessment, development of a performance assessment methodology(draft) to derive quantitatively radionuclide acceptance criteria of domestic near-surface disposal facility, preliminary performance/safety assessment in accordance with the developed methodology

  20. Evaluation of ISDP Batch 2 Qualification Compliance to 512-S, DWPF, Tank Farm, and Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria

    Shafer, A.

    2010-05-05

    The purpose of this report is to document the acceptability of the second macrobatch (Salt Batch 2) of Tank 49H waste to H Tank Farm, DWPF, and Saltstone for operation of the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). Tank 49 feed meets the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) requirements specified by References 11, 12, and 13. Salt Batch 2 material is qualified and ready to be processed through ARP/MCU to the final disposal facilities.

  1. Development of flaw acceptance criteria for aging management of spent nuclear fuel multi-purpose canisters

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation when it is exposed to aggressive atmospheric environments during a possibly long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of an MPC, stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic in-service Inspection. The first-order instability flaw sizes has been determined with bounding flaw configurations, that is, through-wall axial or circumferential cracks, and part-through-wall long axial flaw or 360° circumferential crack. The procedure recommended by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service code (Second Edition) is used to estimate the instability crack length or depth by implementing the failure assessment diagram (FAD) methodology. The welding residual stresses are mostly unknown and are therefore estimated with the API 579 procedure. It is demonstrated in this paper that the residual stress has significant impact on the instability length or depth of the crack. The findings will limit the applicability of the flaw tolerance obtained from limit load approach where residual stress is ignored and only ligament yielding is considered.

  2. Development of flaw acceptance criteria for aging management of spent nuclear fuel multi-purpose canisters

    Lam, Poh -Sang [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Materials Science and Technology; Sindelar, Robert L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Materials Science and Technology

    2015-03-09

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation when it is exposed to aggressive atmospheric environments during a possibly long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of an MPC, stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic in-service Inspection. The first-order instability flaw sizes has been determined with bounding flaw configurations, that is, through-wall axial or circumferential cracks, and part-through-wall long axial flaw or 360° circumferential crack. The procedure recommended by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service code (Second Edition) is used to estimate the instability crack length or depth by implementing the failure assessment diagram (FAD) methodology. The welding residual stresses are mostly unknown and are therefore estimated with the API 579 procedure. It is demonstrated in this paper that the residual stress has significant impact on the instability length or depth of the crack. The findings will limit the applicability of the flaw tolerance obtained from limit load approach where residual stress is ignored and only ligament yielding is considered.

  3. Development of flaw acceptance criteria for aging management of spent nuclear fuel multiple-purpose canisters

    Lam, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Materials Science and Technology; Sindelar, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Materials Science and Technology

    2015-03-09

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation when it is exposed to aggressive atmospheric environments during a possibly long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of an MPC, stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic In-service Inspection. The first-order instability flaw sizes has been determined with bounding flaw configurations, that is, through-wall axial or circumferential cracks, and part-through-wall long axial flaw or 360° circumferential crack. The procedure recommended by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service code (Second Edition) is used to estimate the instability crack length or depth by implementing the failure assessment diagram (FAD) methodology. The welding residual stresses are mostly unknown and are therefore estimated with the API 579 procedure. It is demonstrated in this paper that the residual stress has significant impact on the instability length or depth of the crack. The findings will limit the applicability of the flaw tolerance obtained from limit load approach where residual stress is ignored and only ligament yielding is considered.

  4. 10 CFR 50.60 - Acceptance criteria for fracture prevention measures for lightwater nuclear power reactors for...

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for fracture prevention measures for lightwater nuclear power reactors for normal operation. 50.60 Section 50.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Issuance, Limitations, and Conditions of Licenses and Construction Permits...

  5. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Acceptance Criteria for Light Water Reactor Spent Fuel Storage System [OCRWM PER REV2

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-12-20

    As part of the decommissioning of the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells there is a need to remove commercial Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presently stored in these hot cells. To enable fuel removal from the hot cells, the commercial LWR SNF will be packaged and shipped to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) in a manner that satisfies site requirements for SNF interim storage. This document identifies the criteria that the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cell Clean-out Project must satisfy for acceptance of the LWR SNF by the SNF Project at the 200 Area ISA. In addition to the acceptance criteria identified herein, acceptance is contingent on adherence to applicable Project Hanford Management Contract requirements and procedures in place at the time of work execution.

  6. Safety assessment of the Dukovany repository and waste acceptance criteria evaluation

    The safety assessment of the Dukovany repository is based on the evaluation of two critical scenarios: groundwater transport; and intrusion and residence after institutional control (300 years after closure of the repository). These scenarios use source term values derived from the actual waste inventory and evaluation of data on engineered and natural barriers. Acceptance criteria are presented as volume activity limitations for various repository volume units (barrel, vault, two rows of vaults, i.e. 112 vaults). The mobile activity as the sum of the surface contamination, the leachability limit and the non-standard waste activity is also limited. The limits and conditions of operation do not directly include a limit on long term β nuclides. The State Organization for Nuclear Safety requested an impact evaluation to be done and the Nuclear Research Institute performed a safety analysis evaluating β nuclides. Model calculations proved that the migration curves are non-zero only for long lived radionuclides with high migration parameters, i.e. for 14C, 99Tc and 134Cs. Other radionuclides are limited by intrusion scenarios. In 1995, the operational safety report was completed. A realistic approach was adopted to evaluate the groundwater transport pathway using source term quantification. The release from the repository, considering the real properties of the barrier system, is very low and the limiting pathway for all radionuclides is then intrusion and residence. The probable doses are very low. Limits and conditions were derived in 1992 using the recommended limit of an annual dose of 10 μSv and unit activities for critical radionuclides. In 1995, the real inventory and real data from the repository and hydrogeological system were used to prove the safety of the repository. (author). 2 figs, 7 tabs

  7. Acceptance criteria for ultrasonic flaw indications in the inner liner of double-shell waste storage tanks

    Radioactive defense waste, resulting from the chemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, has been stored in double-shell tanks (DSTS) at the Hanford Site since 1970. As part of the program to assure that the DSTs maintain their structural integrity, an inspection plan is being developed and implemented. This report provides recommendations and technical bases for acceptance criteria for flaw indications detected during ultrasonic inspection of inner liners of the DSTS. The types of indications addressed are crack-like flaws, wall thinning, and pitting. In establishing acceptable flaw sizes, the evaluations have taken into consideration the potential for crack growth by the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking. Consideration was given to technical approaches used in ASME Codes, for reactor tanks at the Department of Energy Savannah River facilities, and in recommendations by the Tank Structural Integrity Panel. The goal was to ensure that indications discovered during inspections are not large enough to ever cause a leak or rupture of the tank inner liner. The acceptance criteria are intended to be simple to apply using a set of tables giving acceptable flaw sizes. These tables are sufficiently conservative to be applicable to all double-shell tanks. In those cases that a flaw exceeds the size permitted by the tables, it is proposed that additional criteria permit more detailed and less conservative evaluations to address specific conditions of stress levels, operating temperature, flaw location, and material properties

  8. Fuel R&D Needs and Strategy towards a Revision of Acceptance Criteria

    François Barré

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of fuel behaviour under accidental conditions is a major concern in the safety analysis of the Pressurised Water Reactors. The consequences of Design Basis Accidents, such as Loss of Coolant Accident and Reactivity Initiated Accident, have to be quantified in comparison to the safety criteria. Those criteria have been established in the 1970s on the basis of experiments performed with fresh or low irradiated fuel. Starting in the 1990s, the increased industrial competition and constraints led utilities to use fuel in more and more aggressive conditions (higher discharge burnup, higher power, load follow, etc. and create incentive conditions for the development of advanced fuel designs with improved performance (new fuel types with additives, cladding material with better resistance to corrosion, etc.. These long anticipated developments involved the need for new investigations of irradiated fuel behaviour in order to check the adequacy of the current criteria, evaluate the safety margins, provide new technical bases for modelling and allow an evolution of these criteria. Such an evolution is presently under discussion in France and several other countries, in view of a revision in the next coming years. For this purpose, a R&D strategy has been defined at IRSN.

  9. On the assessment of marginal life saving costs for risk acceptance criteria

    Fischer, Katharina; Virguez, Edgar; Sánchez-Silva, Mauricio;

    2013-01-01

    During the evaluation of societal risk acceptance based on the Life Quality Index (LQI), the marginal life saving costs have to be assessed and compared with the Societal Willingness to Pay for a marginal increase in life safety. With this procedure, decisions on investments into different risk r...

  10. Preliminary waste acceptance criteria for the ICPP spent fuel and waste management technology development program

    The purpose of this document is to identify requirements to be met by the Producer/Shipper of Spent Nuclear Fuel/High-LeveL Waste SNF/HLW in order for DOE to be able to accept the packaged materials. This includes defining both standard and nonstandard waste forms

  11. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

    2011-08-01

    This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

  12. Flaw acceptance criteria taking into consideration the NDT: radiographic and ultrasonic testing. Analysis through the fracture mechanics methods

    The present study compares and evaluates the flaw acceptance criteria of the non-destructive inspections meeting European Community standards, through the application of the fracture mechanics methods that were determined and verified by the previous activity. Some choices were made; these, however, do not change the general validity of the conclusions. Shaved full-penetration butt welds of Class 1 components making up the primary circuit were considered and the following parameters varied: standards: French, German, Italian (ASME III) and UK; material: AISI 316 and low alloy steel A 533; base material and weld metal; temperature: RT, 370 deg C for the austenitic and 260 deg C for the ferritic steel; ultrasonic and radiographic methods; defect position: surface and internal; stress condition: situations with different primary and secondary stresses. From a preliminary examination of this study it is evident that the large quantity of results available and the abundance of information contained therein make a simple and exhaustive synthesis difficult. In fact, different analyses are possible and we have, therefore, limited the research to activities to perform a comparison and a general evaluation of the acceptance criteria of the non-destructive testing. (authors). 57 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs

  13. Protein-enhanced soups: a consumer-accepted food for increasing dietary protein provision among older adults.

    Donahue, Elizabeth; Crowe, Kristi Michele; Lawrence, Jeannine

    2015-02-01

    Protein-enhanced soups (PES) may improve protein intake among older adults. This study examined sensory attributes (aroma, texture, taste, and overall acceptability) and preferences of PES (chicken noodle and cheddar broccoli) compared with flavor-matched control soups (FCS) among older adults (≥65 years) and evaluated dietary profile changes of a standard menu based on the substitution of one PES serving/d for a standard soup. Modified paired preference tests and 5-point facial hedonic scales were administered to participants (n = 44). No significant differences in sensory attributes between either PES compared with FCS were identified, but significant gender- and age-related differences (p noodle soup while only 38% preferred protein-enhanced cheddar broccoli soup to their respective FCS. Substituting one PES serving for one non-fortified soup serving per day resulted in significantly higher (p < 0.001) protein profile. Results suggest that all attributes of PES were consistent with sensory expectations and PES substitution could improve protein provision. PMID:25265204

  14. Recommended provisions for equipment seismic qualification consistent with IEEE and ASME criteria for use of experience

    Recommendations are being developed to incorporate into IEEE and ASME standards the recent developments for the seismic qualification of equipment in nuclear power plants by use of experience, primarily from past earthquakes and shake table tests. These developments are by a Special Working Group appointed by standards groups of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Nuclear Power Engineering Committee and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Main Committee on Qualification of Mechanical Equipment. This paper presents the objective and scope of the Special Working Group. The IEEE and ASME committees have initiated this ongoing activity, so that the industry standards on equipment seismic qualification evolve more towards the advances made by the Seismic Qualification Utility Group Generic Implementation Procedure, which was developed for the resolution of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Unresolved Safety Issue A-46. The Special Working Group also incorporates the advances made by the Advanced Reactor Corporation and US Department of Energy first-of-a-kind engineering towards equipment seismic qualification criteria based on experience, for the Advanced Light Water Reactor

  15. R&D Plan for RISMC Industry Application #1: ECCS/LOCA Cladding Acceptance Criteria

    Szilard, Ronaldo Henriques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Epiney, Aaron Simon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tu, Lei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is finalizing a rulemaking change that would revise the requirements in 10 CFR 50.46. In the proposed new rulemaking, designated as 10 CFR 50.46c, the NRC proposes a fuel performance-based equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) criterion as a function of cladding hydrogen content before the accident (pre-transient) in order to include the effects of higher burnup on cladding performance as well as to address other technical issues. A loss of operational margin may result due to the more restrictive cladding embrittlement criteria. Initial and future compliance with the rule may significantly increase vendor workload and licensee costs as a spectrum of fuel rod initial burnup states may need to be analyzed to demonstrate compliance. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated a project, as part of the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), to develop analytical capabilities to support the industry in the transition to the new rule. This project is called the Industry Application 1 (IA1) within the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of LWRS. The general idea behind the initiative is the development of an Integrated Evaluation Model (IEM). The motivation is to develop a multiphysics framework to analyze how uncertainties are propagated across the stream of physical disciplines and data involved, as well as how risks are evaluated in a LOCA safety analysis as regulated under 10 CFR 50.46c. This IEM is called LOTUS which stands for LOCA Toolkit for US and it represents the LWRS Program’s response to the proposed new rule making. The focus of this report is to complete an R&D plan to describe the demonstration of the LOCA/ECCS RISMC Industry Application # 1 using the advanced RISMC Toolkit and methodologies. This report includes the description and development plan for a RISMC LOCA tool that fully couples advanced MOOSE tools already in development in order to characterize and optimize

  16. Final report on a study of coherence in acceptability criteria for the technical aspects of risks associated with potentially hazardous installations

    This report describes the results of the study that was made, under Contract No ECI-1390-B7221-85D, for the European Atomic Energy Community. The aim of the study was to examine and assess the feasibility of developing coherent and uniform criteria for judging the acceptability of the technical aspects of the risks associated with potentially hazardous installations. The report is arranged in five main parts. First the nature of hazardous installations is considered and this provides the basis for examination of the currently-used technical risk acceptability criteria. Next, the possible forms of criteria are explored and then universally consistent partial and overall technical risk acceptability criteria are proposed. Following this the implications of using the criteria proposed at the design, regulatory and operating levels are examined. Then, by testing the criteria against some real decisions, the practical problems of using the proposed criteria are explored. This leads to consideration of possible alternatives to the proposed criteria. Finally the conclusions that appear to be justified are summarized and the need for further work is identified

  17. Compliance with the Nevada Test Site's waste acceptance criteria for vitrified cesium-loaded crystalline silicotitanate (CST)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) are involved in a joint project for immobilization of radionuclides from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) at Oak Ridge (OR). The supernate from Tank W-29 of the MVST will be treated by passage through a crystalline silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange medium. The CST was designed to sorb cesium, the primary radio nuclide (Cs-137) in the supernate of MVST's. A smaller amount of strontium (Sr-90) will also be sorbed. This demonstration will be performed by ORNL. One column volume of cesium-loaded CST (∼10 gallons or 38 liters) will then be shipped to SRTC where it will be mixed with glass formers and fed as an aqueous slurry to a joule-heated melter within the SRTC Shielded Cells. A borosilicate glass formulation which will incorporate the CST has been developed as part oft SRTC's role in this project. The molten glass (∼1150 degrees C) will be poured into 500 ml stainless steel beakers which in turn will be placed in 30 gallon drums for disposal. An import ampersand f part of this project is to demonstrate that the glass waste form produced will meet the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). If vitrification of the cesium-loaded CST is implemented as the immobilization method for all of the MVST supernate, then it is essential to demonstrate that the waste can be disposed of at an acceptable disposal facility. NTS accepts low-level radioactive waste as long as it is not TRU and not hazardous. This paper documents the efforts in the development stage of this work to integrate the requirements of NTS into the formulation and processing efforts. This work is funded by the Tank Focus Area with additional funding for ORNL provided by EM-30 at OR

  18. Proposed approach to derivation of acceptance criteria for disposal of disused sealed sources mixed with other accepted wastes in near-surface repository

    The Mochovce repository is described in the report. It is vault type near surface repository with 80 concrete vaults (2x2x20), 90 FRC containers (3.1 m3) in one vault (3x10x3), compacted clay bath-tub around double row. 300 years of institutional control are envisioned.The following scenarios are examined: Normal evolution scenario; Alternative evolution scenarios (perforated clay barrier; well in close proximity); Intruder scenarios (construction of simple dwelling; construction of multi-storey building; construction of road; residence scenario). It is being proposed that the DSSs are disposed of in the containers together with normal operational waste. Long-lived alpha emitters - excluded a priori (e.g. 226Ra); Short-lived (T1/2 = 102 days) radionuclides - interim stored until decayed down to clearance level 60Co - no activity limit, with due consideration of operational safety. The DSSs disposal issue is thus reduced to the disposal of 137Cs. No limit has been imposed on total activity. Existing limits for operational waste: 3.13.1013 Bq / container in the upper layer; 3.41.1013 Bq / container in the bottom or intermediate layer. The acceptance criteria are assessed according to the risk. Two are models set up in MicroShield ver. 5.0. Homogenous source of 137Cs in cubic concrete container and point source (hot spot) of the same activity. The result is - dose from the point source is 16.6 times higher than the one from the cube. As a result the following new restrictions arise for disposal of the 137Cs spent industrial sources: disposal of DSSs is forbidden in the upper layer of the containers; maximum activity of the 137Cs disused industrial source emplaced into the FRC container is 3.41x1013 / 16.6 = 2.05x1012 Bq in case of FRC filling by non-radioactive cement mortar; if the cemented radioactive waste is to be used for filling of FRC, decrease of the limit for the disused sealed source is equivalent to the radioactivity of the cement mixture multiplied by

  19. A proposed rationale and test methodology for establishment of acceptance criteria for vacuum integrity testing of pharmaceutical freeze dryers.

    Hardwick, Lisa M; Nail, Steven L; Jarman, James; Hasler, Kai; Hense, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    A scientific rationale is proposed for the establishment of acceptance criteria for leak rates in pharmaceutical freeze dryers. A method was developed to determine the quantity of air that could leak into any lyophilizer from the outside while still maintaining Class 100/Grade A microbial conditions. A lyophilizing product is assumed most vulnerable to microbial contamination during secondary drying, when mass transfer of water vapor from product to condenser is minimal. Using the void volume of the dryer, calculated from change in internal pressure when a known volume of air is introduced, and the potential maximum bioburden of the leaked air (based on measured values), calculations can determine the allowable leaked volume of air, the flow rate required to admit that volume in a given time frame, and the pressure rise that would result from the leak over a given testing period. For the dryers in this study, using worst-case air quality conditions, it was determined that a leak resulting in a pressure rise of 0.027 mbar over a 30 min period would allow the dryers to remain in secondary drying conditions for 62 h before the established action level of one colony forming unit for each cubic meter of air space would be reached. PMID:23899644

  20. The Romanian experience on testing and quality acceptance criteria of packages used for transportation and storage of radioactive wastes

    The transport of radioactive wastes generated by nuclear facilities from non-power applications (research institutes, hospitals, nuclear fuel work) in Romania is one of the important subprograms of Romanian Waste Management Programme and the overall aim is to promote a safe transport of radioactive materials in Romania. After emphasizing the importance of the packaging tests in ensuring that the required safety features built into the design of packages comply with the Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body - National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (NCNAC) requirements and to IAEA's Regulations, the paper presents the type and production testing for type A packages (containers) which have been developed within Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti. The paper describes and contains illustrations showing the various tests conducted on the prototype package and how they relate to normal conditions and minor mishaps during transport. Quality assurance and quality acceptance criteria as well as measures taken in order to meet technical specification provided by the design are also presented and commented. The paper concludes that the justification for containment, based on the use of freight container and the pessimistic assessment of potential inhalation doses to those persons involved with the packaging and transport of radwastes, supports the containers as being suitable for classification as an Industrial Type 3 (IP-3). (author)

  1. Derivation of quantitative acceptance criteria for disposal of radioactive waste to near surface facilities: Development and implementation of an approach for the post-closure phase

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has established a project to develop and illustrate, through practical examples, an approach that allows the derivation of quantitative waste acceptance criteria for near surface disposal of radioactive waste. The first phase focussed on the derivation of example post-closure safety waste acceptance criteria through the use of a safety assessment approach that allows for the derivation of values in a clear and well documented manner. The approach consists of five steps: the specification of the assessment context; the description of the disposal system; the development and justification of scenarios; the formulation and implementation of models; and the calculation and derivation of example values. The approach has been successfully used to derive activity values for the disposal of radioactive waste to illustrative near surface facilities. (author)

  2. Derivation of quantitative acceptance criteria for disposal of radioactive waste to near surface facilities: Review and implementation of an approach for the operational phase

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has developed an approach to derive quantitative waste acceptance criteria for near surface disposal of radioactive waste. This approach has been successfully used to derive activity limits with regards to post-closure safety assessment. In a second step it has been recognised as necessary to take into account operational safety considerations and to study how this approach could be used for the derivation of operational safety acceptance criteria. The paper presents the work currently being undertaken for the operational phase, following the step by step approach already developed for the post-closure phase, with particular emphasis on the assessment context, system description and the selection of scenarios. (author)

  3. Selecting the Acceptance Criteria of Medicines in the Reimbursement List of Public Health Insurance of Iran, Using the “Borda” Method: a Pilot Study

    Viyanchi, Amir; Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Rajabzadeh Ghatari, Ali; SafiKhani, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Decision-making for medicines to be accepted in Iran’s public health insurance reimbursement list is a complex process and involves factors, which should be considered in applying a coverage for medicine costs. These processes and factors are not wholly assessed, while assessment of these factors is an essential need for getting a transparent and evidence-based approach toward medicine reimbursement in Iran. This paper aims to show an evidence-based approach toward medicine selection criteria...

  4. Impact of service provision platforms on maternal and newborn health in conflict areas and their acceptability in Pakistan: a systematic review.

    Lassi, Zohra S; Aftab, Wafa; Ariff, Shabina; Kumar, Rohail; Hussain, Imtiaz; Musavi, Nabiha B; Memon, Zahid; Soofi, Sajid B; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2015-01-01

    Various models and strategies have been implemented over the years in different parts of the world to improve maternal and newborn health (MNH) in conflict affected areas. These strategies are based on specific needs and acceptability of local communities. This paper has undertaken a systematic review of global and local (Pakistan) information from conflict areas on platforms of health service provision in the last 10 years and information on acceptability from local stakeholders on effective models of service delivery; and drafted key recommendations for improving coverage of health services in conflict affected areas. The literature search revealed ten studies that described MNH service delivery platforms. The results from the systematic review showed that with utilisation of community outreach services, the greatest impacts were observed in skilled birth attendance and antenatal consultation rates. Facility level services, on the other hand, showed that labour room services for an internally displaced population (IDP) improved antenatal care coverage, contraceptive prevalence rate and maternal mortality. Consultative meetings and discussions conducted in Quetta and Peshawar (capitals of conflict affected provinces) with relevant stakeholders revealed that no systematic models of MNH service delivery, especially tailored for conflict areas, are available. During conflict, even previously available services and infrastructure suffered due to various barriers specific to times of conflict and unrest. A number of barriers that hinder MNH services were discussed. Suggestions for improving MNH services in conflict areas were also laid down by participants. The review identified some important steps that can be undertaken to mitigate the effects of conflict on MNH services, which include: improve provision and access to infrastructure and equipment; development and training of healthcare providers; and advocacy at different levels for free access to healthcare

  5. Evaluation of local hospital discharge for thyroid cancer patients treated with Iodine-131; comparison with internationally accepted release criteria

    Full text: Aim: Patients with Thyroid Cancer treated with I-131 in our institution, stay in a shielded room for two days, or until they emit less than 40 μSv/hr at 1m, based on the Cyprus legislation for radiation protection. Other countries have different regulations and public dose limits, and their hospital discharge guidelines vary accordingly. The purpose of this study is to evaluate local hospital discharge regulations, make a comparison with other countries' accepted release criteria, and find where improvements can be made. Methods: 267 patients were treated with I-131 (activity 1.8-8.9GBq) from September 2001 to April 2007. The dose equivalent rate (DER) was measured within 30 min of the administration at a distance of 1 m from the patient. Measurements at 1m were also obtained before the release of the patient. For a group of these patients, measurements were also carried out a week after the treatment with I-131. The doses given to members of the public, from each of the above patients, were calculated using the Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) concept, which is based on the line source model. For 10% of these patients, measurements of the dose emitted to surroundings were taken, using two different methods. (a) Doses were measured with TLD dosimeters placed at specific points of the room during the two day restriction of the patient in the shielded room. These points were at bedside, at 1 m from the patient's bed, at 3m from the patient's bed, in the shower area, and at the side of the toilet. (b) On the day of release, personal dosimeters were given to a member of the immediate family (carer) of the patient for a minimum of five days. The skin dose and dose at approximately 10cm depth were measured by the National personnel monitoring for radiation protection authority of Cyprus. Results: Our calculation of the TEDE values indicated that, had the patients been released just after the administration of the radiopharmaceutical, members of the

  6. A FRAMEWORK TO DEVELOP FLAW ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA FOR STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPURPOSE CANISTERS FOR EXTENDED STORAGE OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL

    Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.; Duncan, A.; Adams, T.

    2014-04-07

    A multipurpose canister (MPC) made of austenitic stainless steel is loaded with used nuclear fuel assemblies and is part of the transfer cask system to move the fuel from the spent fuel pool to prepare for storage, and is part of the storage cask system for on-site dry storage. This weld-sealed canister is also expected to be part of the transportation package following storage. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation especially if exposed to aggressive environments during possible very long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone because the construction of MPC does not require heat treatment for stress relief. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic Inservice Inspection. The external loading cases include thermal accident scenarios and cask drop conditions with the contribution from the welding residual stresses. The determination of acceptable flaw size is based on the procedure to evaluate flaw stability provided by American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service (Second Edition). The material mechanical and fracture properties for base and weld metals and the stress analysis results are obtained from the open literature such as NUREG-1864. Subcritical crack growth from stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and its impact on inspection intervals and acceptance criteria, is not addressed.

  7. Quality of laboratory studies assessing effects of Bt-proteins on non-target organisms: minimal criteria for acceptability.

    De Schrijver, Adinda; Devos, Yann; De Clercq, Patrick; Gathmann, Achim; Romeis, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    The potential risks that genetically modified plants may pose to non-target organisms and the ecosystem services they contribute to are assessed as part of pre-market risk assessments. This paper reviews the early tier studies testing the hypothesis whether exposure to plant-produced Cry34/35Ab1 proteins as a result of cultivation of maize 59122 is harmful to valued non-target organisms, in particular Arthropoda and Annelida. The available studies were assessed for their scientific quality by considering a set of criteria determining their relevance and reliability. As a case-study, this exercise revealed that when not all quality criteria are met, weighing the robustness of the study and its relevance for risk assessment is not obvious. Applying a worst-case expected environmental concentration of bioactive toxins equivalent to that present in the transgenic crop, confirming exposure of the test species to the test substance, and the use of a negative control were identified as minimum criteria to be met to guarantee sufficiently reliable data. This exercise stresses the importance of conducting studies meeting certain quality standards as this minimises the probability of erroneous or inconclusive results and increases confidence in the results and adds certainty to the conclusions drawn. PMID:26980555

  8. The effect of discounting, different mortality reduction schemes and predictive cohort life tables on risk acceptability criteria

    Technical facilities should be optimal with respect to benefits and cost. Optimization of technical facilities involving risks for human life and limb require an acceptability criterion and suitable discount rates both for the public and the operator depending on for whom the optimization is carried out. The life quality index is presented and embedded into modem socio-economic concepts. A general risk acceptability criterion is derived. The societal life saving cost to be used in optimization as life saving or compensation cost and the societal willingness-to-pay based on the societal value of a statistical life or on the societal life quality index are developed. Different mortality reduction schemes are studied. Also, predictive cohort life tables are derived and applied. Discount rates γ must be long-term averages in view of the time horizon of some 20 to more than 100 years for the facilities of interest and net of inflation and taxes. While the operator may use long-term averages from the financial market for his cost-benefit analysis the assessment of interest rates for investments of the public into risk reduction is more difficult. The classical Ramsey model decomposes the real interest rate (=output growth rate) into the rate of time preference of consumption and the rate of economical growth multiplied by the elasticity of marginal utility of consumption. It is proposed to use a relatively small interest rate of 3% implying a rate of time preference of consumption of about 1%. This appears intergenerationally acceptable from an ethical point of view. Risk-consequence curves are derived for an example

  9. Data Quality Objectives and Criteria for Basic Information, Acceptable Uncertainty, and Quality-Assurance and Quality-Control Documentation

    Granato, Gregory E.; Bank, Fred G.; Cazenas, Patricia A.

    1998-01-01

    The Federal Highway Administration and State transportation agencies have the responsibility of determining and minimizing the effects of highway runoff on water quality; therefore, they have been conducting an extensive program of water-quality monitoring and research during the last 25 years. The objectives and monitoring goals of highway runoff studies have been diverse, because the highway community must address many different questions about the characteristics and impacts of highway runoff. The Federal Highway Administration must establish that available data and procedures that are used to assess and predict pollutant loadings and impacts from highway stormwater runoff are valid, current, and technically supportable. This report examines criteria for evaluating water-quality data and resultant interpretations. The criteria used to determine if data are valid (useful for intended purposes), current, and technically supportable are derived from published materials from the Federal Highway Administration, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Intergovernmental Task Force on Monitoring Water Quality, the U.S. Geological Survey and from technical experts throughout the U.S. Geological Survey. Water-quality data that are documented to be meaningful, representative, complete, precise, accurate, comparable, and admissible as legal evidence will meet the scientific, engineering, and regulatory needs of highway agencies. Documentation of basic information, such as compatible monitoring objectives and program design features; metadata (when, where, and how data were collected as well as who collected and analyzed the data); ancillary information (explanatory variables and study-site characteristics); and legal requirements are needed to evaluate data. Documentation of sufficient quality-assurance and quality-control information to establish the quality and uncertainty in the data and interpretations also are needed to determine the comparability and utility of

  10. The Romanian experience on testing and quality acceptance criteria of packages used for transportation and storage of radioactive wastes

    Full text: The transport of radioactive wastes generated by nuclear facilities from non-power applications (research institutes, hospitals, nuclear fuel work) in Romania is one of the important subprograms of Romanian Waste Management and the overall aim is to promote the safe transport of the radioactive materials in Romania. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency Regulations on 'Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials' the package is the main instrument to ensure safety during handling, transport and storage of radioactive materials. After emphasizing the importance of the packaging tests in ensuring that the requisite safety features built into the design of packages comply with the Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body - National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN) requirements and with IAEA's Regulations, the paper presents the type and production testing for type A packages (containers) which have been developed within Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti taking into consideration that packages (drums) when tested to this requirements, should prevent: loss of dispersal of the radioactive contents, and loss of shielding integrity which results in more than a 20% increase in radiation level at any external surface of the package. The criteria used for successful testing of type A packages are: 'would prevent loss or dispersal'. The wastes to be packaged are generated by INR TRIGA research reactor, by the post-irradiation laboratory and radiochemistry activities such as: metallic pieces, protection equipment, used ion exchanger, organic liquid radioactive wastes, used filters, etc. The paper describes and contains: a review of the qualification tests that have been laid down to simulate different conditions encountered during transport, normal conditions as well as the accident. These tests have been performed in order to simulate specific or accident scenarios and to produce the same kind of amount of damage that account for the

  11. Risk analysis and risk acceptance criteria in the planning processes of hazardous facilities-A case of an LNG plant in an urban area

    Planning of hazardous facilities is usually carried out on the basis of a risk-informed decision-making and planning process making use of risk analysis. This practice is well established in Norway under petroleum legislation but less so for onshore facilities under non-petroleum legislation. The present paper focuses on the use of risk analysis studies for risk evaluation against risk acceptance criteria, risk communication and derivation of technical and operational requirements in these circumstances. This is demonstrated through reference to a case study involving an LNG plant currently under construction in an urban area in Norway. The main finding is that risk-informed legislation is a fragile legislative system which is dependent on conscientious and open-minded use by the industrial developer. In the opposite case, the authorities may well be unable to correct the situation and the legislation may fail to protect the neighbourhood from unreasonable exposure to risk. Reference is also made to the international perspective where authorities define what is deemed tolerable risk, which would appear to be a more robust and defensible approach.

  12. The Romanian experience on testing and quality acceptance criteria of packages used for transportation and storage of low level radioactive wastes

    The transport of radioactive wastes generated by nuclear facilities from non-power applications (research institutes, hospitals, nuclear fuel work) in Romania is one of the important subprogram of Romanian Waste Management Programme and the overall aim is to promote a safe transport and storage (disposal) of the low activity radioactive materials in Romania. After emphasizing the importance of the packaging tests in ensuring that the requisite safety features built into the design of packages comply with the Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body - National Commission for Nuclear activities Control (NCNAC) requirements and to IAEA's Regulations, the paper presents the type and production testing for type A packages (containers) which have been developed within Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti. The paper describes and contains illustrations showing the various tests conducted on the prototype package and how they relate to normal conditions and minor mishaps during transport. Quality assurance and quality acceptance criteria as well as measures taken in order to meet technical specification provided by the design are also presented and commented. The paper concludes that the justification for containment, based on the use of freight container and the pessimistic assessment of potential inhalation doses to those persons involved with the packaging and transport of radwastes, supports the containers as being suitable for classification as an Industrial Type 3 (IP-3). (author)

  13. Draft principles, policy, and acceptance criteria for decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy contaminated surplus facilities and summary of international decommissioning programs

    Decommissioning activities enable the DOE to reuse all or part of a facility for future activities and reduce hazards to the general public and any future work force. The DOE Office of Environment, Health and Safety has prepared this document, which consists of decommissioning principles and acceptance criteria, in an attempt to establish a policy that is in agreement with the NRC policy. The purpose of this document is to assist individuals involved with decommissioning activities in determining their specific responsibilities as identified in Draft DOE Order 5820.DDD, ''Decommissioning of US Department of Energy Contaminated Surplus Facilities'' (Appendix A). This document is not intended to provide specific decommissioning methodology. The policies and principles of several international decommissioning programs are also summarized. These programs are from the IAEA, the NRC, and several foreign countries expecting to decommission nuclear facilities. They are included here to demonstrate the different policies that are to be followed throughout the world and to allow the reader to become familiar with the state of the art for environment, safety, and health (ES and H) aspects of nuclear decommissioning

  14. Acceptance-criteria for the bedrock for deep geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Proceedings from a seminar at Gothenburg University

    The seminar was directed to Nordic participants, and discussed disposal in the Nordic crystalline bedrock. Criteria for the bedrock should include: It should give durable mechanical protection for the engineered barriers; give a stable and favorable chemical environment for these barriers; have a low turnover of ground water in the near field; be easy to characterize; give favorable recipient-conditions; not have valuable minerals in workable quantities. These general criteria raise several questions coupled to the safety analysis: e.g. the need for geological, hydrological and geochemical parameters. Which data are missing, which are most difficult to find? What should the site characterization program look like to focus on factors that are of the highest importance according to the safety analysis. The demands on the conditions at a site need to be translated into quantitative criteria, which should be expressed as values that can be measured at the site or deduced from such measurements. These questions were discussed at the seminar, and 21 contributions from Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish participants are reported in these proceedings under the chapters: Coupling to the safety analysis; Methodology and criteria for site selection in a regional geoscientific perspective; Rock as a building material - prognosis and result; Geoscientific criteria for the bedrock at the repository - Mechanical protection; Geoscientific criteria for the bedrock at the repository - Low ground water turnover, chemically favorable and stable environment in the near field; Geoscientific criteria for the bedrock at the repository - Demands on the bedrock concerning the migration of radionuclides

  15. Proposed limiting values for performance criteria in acceptance testing of diagnostic X-ray equipment in the Federal Republic of Germany

    In the Federal Republic of Germany a new X-ray ordinance came into force in 1988 containing a specific paragraph on quality assurance for all medical X-ray units stipulating acceptance tests, regular checks and supervision by medical bodies and the competent authorities. Acceptance testing is to be performed by engineers from equipment suppliers of manufacturers in new and existing installations. It is expected that the service engineers will adjust the equipment in such a way as to obtain optimal performance before measurements are made, the results of which are to be stated in a certificate describing quality status of the equipment. A working group has developed guidelines for these acceptance tests. Items to be measured are reported and proposed limiting values and their tolerances are discussed. (author)

  16. Proposed limiting values for performance criteria in acceptance testing of diagnostic X-ray equipment in the Federal Republic of Germany

    In the Federal Republic of Germany a new X-ray ordinance came into force in 1988 containing a specific paragraph on quality assurance for all medical X-ray units stipulating acceptance tests, regular checks and supervision by medical bodies and the competent authorities. Acceptance testing is to be performed by engineers from the equipment suppliers or manufacturers in new and also existing installations. It is expected that the service engineers will adjust the equipment in such a way as to obtain optimal performance before measurements are made, the results of which are to be stated in a certificate describing the quality status of the equipment. A working group has developed guidelines for these acceptance tests. The items to be measured are reported and the proposed limiting values and their tolerances are discussed. (author)

  17. [Permanent essential defacement--remarks on the possibilities of verification of the accepted criteria in medico-legal certification in criminal and civil law proceedings].

    Chowaniec, Czesław; Nowak, Agnieszka; Jabłoński, Christian; Neniczka, Stanisława

    2007-01-01

    Despite the fact that some criteria of medico-legal certification in criminal and civil proceedings have been established, there are still some topics which are controversial and thus require modification. This is also true of the notion of "permanent essential defacement". In the opinion of the authors, changes in social conventions that are occurring nowadays, as well as a highly diversified, subjective perception of esthetic values indicate the need for discussing a possible modification of the presently obligatory criteria. Apart from the assessment of posttraumatic changes, an important problem is posed by defining the notion of "a part of the body customarily open to the view ". Additionally, the authors bring up for discussion the issue of experts taking into consideration the age and sex of the victims while assessing damages. A separate problem lies in difficulties in assessing the degree of detriment to health because of defacement due to the fact that official tables for evaluating permanent or long-term detriment to health do not include relevant information. PMID:17571513

  18. Standard format and content acceptance criteria for the material control and accounting (MC and A) reform amendment: 10 CFR Part 74, Subpart E

    Revisions have been made to the material control and accounting requirements for NRC licensees authorized to possess and use a formula quantity or more of strategic special nuclear material. The revisions require timely monitoring of in-process inventory and discrete items in order to detect anomalies potentially indicative of material losses. Timely detection and enhanced loss localization capabilities will be beneficial to alarm resolution and material recovery in the event of an actual loss. This document presents criteria that can be used by the license applicants and the license reviewers in the preparation and subsequent review of plans to be submitted in response to the the Reform Amendment. General performance objectives, system capabilities, process monitoring, item monitoring, alarm resolution, quality assurance, and accounting are addressed. 43 refs

  19. Criteria for the development and use of the methodology for environmentally-acceptable fossil energy site evaluation and selection. Volume 2. Final report

    Eckstein, L.; Northrop, G.; Scott, R.

    1980-02-01

    This report serves as a companion document to the report, Volume 1: Environmentally-Acceptable Fossil Energy Site Evaluation and Selection: Methodology and Users Guide, in which a methodology was developed which allows the siting of fossil fuel conversion facilities in areas with the least environmental impact. The methodology, known as SELECS (Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems) does not replace a site specific environmental assessment, or an environmental impact statement (EIS), but does enhance the value of an EIS by thinning down the number of options to a manageable level, by doing this in an objective, open and selective manner, and by providing preliminary assessment and procedures which can be utilized during the research and writing of the actual impact statement.

  20. Perspective: Towards environmentally acceptable criteria for downstream fish passage through mini hydro and irrigation infrastructure in the Lower Mekong River Basin

    Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Thorncraft, Garry; Boys, Craig A.; Brown, Richard S.; Singhanouvong, Douangkham; Phonekhampeng, Oudom

    2014-02-26

    Tropical rivers have high annual discharges optimal for hydropower and irrigation development. The Mekong River is one of the largest tropical river systems, supporting a unique mega-diverse fish community. Fish are an important commodity in the Mekong, contributing a large proportion of calcium, protein, and essential nutrients to the diet of the local people and providing a critical source of income for rural households. Many of these fish migrate not only upstream and downstream within main-channel habitats but also laterally into highly productive floodplain habitat to both feed and spawn. Most work to date has focused on providing for upstream fish passage, but downstream movement is an equally important process to protect. Expansion of hydropower and irrigation weirs can disrupt downstream migrations and it is important to ensure that passage through regulators or mini hydro systems is not harmful or fatal. Many new infrastructure projects (<6 m head) are proposed for the thousands of tributary streams throughout the Lower Mekong Basin and it is important that designs incorporate the best available science to protect downstream migrants. Recent advances in technology have provided new techniques which could be applied to Mekong fish species to obtain design criteria that can facilitate safe downstream passage. Obtaining and applying this knowledge to new infrastructure projects is essential in order to produce outcomes that are more favorable to local ecosystems and fisheries.

  1. Decisions during courtship by male and female medflies (Diptera, Tephritidae): Correlated changes in male behavior and female acceptance criteria in mass-reared flies

    Analyses of more than 300 videotaped courtships of wild and mass-reared medflies from Costa Rica showed that the tendency for male and female to align themselves facing directly toward each other increased, and that the distance between them decreased as courtship proceeded. More direct alignments and shorter distances between the flies at the moment the male jumped onto the female were correlated with greater female acceptance of copulation. There were no consistent differences in durations of components of intermittent buzzing songs or male size between successful and unsuccessful courtship in either strain. Several possible cues may release different courtship responses: males of both strains tend to initiate both continuous vibration and intermittent buzzing after reduction of the distance to the female; slow creeping toward the female was associated with longer courtships that had failed to lure the female close; and females tended to turn to face more directly toward the male soon after the male began continuous vibration, and especially after he began intermittent buzzing. Females became progressively more immobile as courtship progressed, especially soon after intermittent buzzing began. There were numerous differences between strains. Mass-reared males were more likely to mount females without previous courtship than were wild males. Wild males initiated continuous wing vibration when farther from the female and when the female was looking less directly toward them, but the two strains did not differ in the distances and angles at which males initiated intermittent buzzing and jumped. Wild males were more likely to creep toward the female during intermittent buzzing. Mass-reared females but not wild females were more likely to copulate when the proportion of time the male had spent in intermittent buzzing was low, and if the courtship began when the flies were nearer each other. Wild but not mass-reared females were less likely to copulate if courtship was

  2. WIPP waste acceptance criteria and transportation system

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, USA, is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility designed as a permanent repository for transuranic wastes in the center of a 2,000-foot-thick salt bed situated 2,150 feet underground. Construction of the facility started in 1975, under a congressional act of site selection. In 1979, demonstration of safe disposal at the WIPP was authorized by Public Law 96-164. The operational philosophy and practice at the facility are: (1) start clean -- stay clean, (2) meet or exceed regulatory requirements, and (3) control radiation exposure levels to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Strict safety measures must be taken in the areas of waste preparation, transportation, and facility operation

  3. Acceptance criteria for environmental radionuclide measurement traceability

    It is insufficient for laboratories to claim measurement traceability simply through the possession of standard reference materials, traceable reference materials, or instrument calibrations because of the potential for improper use. Independent testing of measurement traceability is the only mean by which it is truly demonstrated. The National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) radiochemistry intercomparison program evaluates environmental measurement traceability and it must have the highest confidence in its reference values. Verification measurements provide NIST with confidence in the reference values. However, it is proposed that a simple t test based on the PT test results be used to independently evaluate the accuracy of the reference values. (author)

  4. Acceptable risk

    The hazards of nuclear power, radioactive wastes and radiation are analysed in a general book describing and defining acceptable-risk problems, the difficulties in resolving them and considering such issues as uncertainty about their definition, lack of relevant facts, conflicting and conflicted social values and disagreements between technical experts and the lay public. The many methods that have been proposed for resolving acceptable-risk problems are identified and criticised. (author)

  5. 76 FR 44199 - Area Risk Protection Insurance Regulations and Area Risk Protection Insurance Crop Provisions

    2011-07-22

    ... accepted application, Area Risk Protection Insurance Basic Provisions, Crop Provisions, Special Provisions... select regulatory approaches that maximize net benefits (including potential economic, environmental... regulation will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small ] entities....

  6. 基于农户受偿意愿的武汉市农田生态补偿标准估算%Ecological Compensation Criteria for Agricultural Land Based on Farmers′ Willingness to Accept in Wuhan City

    杨欣; 蔡银莺

    2012-01-01

    以武汉市的实证调查为基础,采用意愿调查法,测算以农户最低受偿意愿为出发点的农田生态补偿标准。对182份有效问卷进行分析表明,(1)武汉市农民普遍认识到了保护农田生态环境的重要性,74.45%的受访农户有正的受偿意愿。(2)在对农药、化肥进行不同程度限制施用下,农户的受偿率随着农药、化肥限制程度的增强而降低,受访农户的受偿率在69.66%~85.25%。农户对农田生态环境的最低受偿意愿随着农药、化肥限制程度的增强而提高,8种不同方式下农户的受偿意愿在3 866.55~7 624.43元/hm2,并且同等限制程度下,农户对农药的受偿意愿高于对化肥的受偿意愿。(3)农户的受偿意愿的高低与其性别、年龄、从事农业年限和是否兼业相关。%Based on the practical investigations in Wuhan City,ecological compensation criteria for agricultural land in view of the minimum farmers′ willingness to accept(WTA) are estimated by using willingness survey method.Results from the statistical analysis of 182 questionnaires show that firstly,farmers have generally recognized the essentials of farmland environmental protection and 74.45% of them have a positive attitude toward the WTA.Secondly,under the different restrictions on pesticide and fertilizer uses,farmers′ acceptance percentage decreases with the enhanced restriction and the acceptance percentage varies from 69.66% to 85.25%.Moreover,the minimum farmers′ WTA in farmland environmental protection rises with the enhanced restriction.The values for farmers′ WTA under the eight modes are between 3 866.55 and 7 624.43 RMB/hm2.In the case of the same restriction,farmers′ WTA for pesticides is higher than that for fertilizers.Lastly,farmers′ WTA is obviously correlated with their sexes,ages,and farming experiences.

  7. Safety culture and public acceptance

    After the Chernobyl NPP accident a public acceptance has become a key factor in nuclear power development all over the world. Therefore, nuclear safety culture should be based not only on technical principles, responsibilities, supervision, regulatory provisions, emergency preparedness, but the public awareness of minimum risk during the operation and decommissioning of NPPs, radioactive waste management, etc. (author)

  8. Acceptance-criteria for the bedrock for deep geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Proceedings from a seminar at Gothenburg University; Acceptanskriterier foer berggrunden vid djup geologisk slutfoervaring av anvaent kaernbraensle

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The seminar was directed to Nordic participants, and discussed disposal in the Nordic crystalline bedrock. Criteria for the bedrock should include: It should give durable mechanical protection for the engineered barriers; give a stable and favorable chemical environment for these barriers; have a low turnover of ground water in the near field; be easy to characterize; give favorable recipient-conditions; not have valuable minerals in workable quantities. These general criteria raise several questions coupled to the safety analysis: e.g. the need for geological, hydrological and geochemical parameters. Which data are missing, which are most difficult to find? What should the site characterization program look like to focus on factors that are of the highest importance according to the safety analysis. The demands on the conditions at a site need to be translated into quantitative criteria, which should be expressed as values that can be measured at the site or deduced from such measurements. These questions were discussed at the seminar, and 21 contributions from Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish participants are reported in these proceedings under the chapters: Coupling to the safety analysis; Methodology and criteria for site selection in a regional geoscientific perspective; Rock as a building material - prognosis and result; Geoscientific criteria for the bedrock at the repository - Mechanical protection; Geoscientific criteria for the bedrock at the repository - Low ground water turnover, chemically favorable and stable environment in the near field; Geoscientific criteria for the bedrock at the repository - Demands on the bedrock concerning the migration of radionuclides.

  9. Lung donor selection criteria

    Chaney, John; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Cantu, Edward; van Berkel, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The criteria that define acceptable physiologic and social parameters for lung donation have remained constant since their empiric determination in the 1980s. These criteria include a donor age between 25-40, a arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)/FiO2 ratio greater than 350, no smoking history, a clear chest X-ray, clean bronchoscopy, and a minimal ischemic time. Due to the paucity of organ donors, and the increasing number of patients requiring lung transplant, finding a donor that me...

  10. Does the provision of a native language maternity information DVD for non-English-speaking Somali women improve their knowledge of maternity care in a manner that they find acceptable and useful?

    Rowland, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is well documented in the literature that many Somali women living in the UK do not speak English and have poor access to maternity services because of communication and language barriers. This project was designed to determine knowledge change and women’s acceptance of a maternity information Digital Video Disk (DVD), developed for non-English-speaking Somali women using a social marketing approach. Objectives of the Study: 1. To identify and recruit Somali wome...

  11. The acceptability of waiting times for elective general surgery and the appropriateness of prioritising patients

    Knol Dirk L

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Problematic waiting lists in public health care threaten the equity and timeliness of care provision in several countries. This study assesses different stakeholders' views on the acceptability of waiting lists in health care, their preferences for priority care of patients, and their judgements on acceptable waiting times for surgical patients. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted among 257 former patients (82 with varicose veins, 86 with inguinal hernia, and 89 with gallstones, 101 surgeons, 95 occupational physicians, and 65 GPs. Judgements on acceptable waiting times were assessed using vignettes of patients with varicose veins, inguinal hernia, and gallstones. Results Participants endorsed the prioritisation of patients based on clinical need, but not on ability to benefit. The groups had significantly different opinions (p Acceptable waiting times ranged between 2 and 25 weeks depending on the type of disorder (p Conclusion The explicit prioritisation of patients seems an accepted means for reducing the overall burden from waiting lists. The disagreement about appropriate prioritisation criteria and the need for uniformity, however, raises concern about equity when implementing prioritisation in daily practice. Single factor waiting time thresholds seem insufficient for securing timely care provision in the presence of long waiting lists as they do not account for the different consequences of waiting between patients.

  12. Monitoring Reading Behavior: Criteria for Performance.

    Powell, William R.

    Effective use of the informal reading inventory (IRI) depends upon the criteria used in determining the functional reading levels and more specifically the word recognition criteria employed in describing acceptable limits of oral reading behavior. The author of this paper looks at the diverse sets of criteria commonly used, the problems…

  13. Lung donor selection criteria.

    Chaney, John; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Cantu, Edward; van Berkel, Victor

    2014-08-01

    The criteria that define acceptable physiologic and social parameters for lung donation have remained constant since their empiric determination in the 1980s. These criteria include a donor age between 25-40, a arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)/FiO2 ratio greater than 350, no smoking history, a clear chest X-ray, clean bronchoscopy, and a minimal ischemic time. Due to the paucity of organ donors, and the increasing number of patients requiring lung transplant, finding a donor that meets all of these criteria is quite rare. As such, many transplants have been performed where the donor does not meet these stringent criteria. Over the last decade, numerous reports have been published examining the effects of individual acceptance criteria on lung transplant survival and graft function. These studies suggest that there is little impact of the historical criteria on either short or long term outcomes. For age, donors should be within 18 to 64 years old. Gender may relay benefit to all female recipients especially in male to female transplants, although results are mixed in these studies. Race matched donor/recipients have improved outcomes and African American donors convey worse prognosis. Smoking donors may decrease recipient survival post transplant, but provide a life saving opportunity for recipients that may otherwise remain on the transplant waiting list. No specific gram stain or bronchoscopic findings are reflected in recipient outcomes. Chest radiographs are a poor indicator of lung donor function and should not adversely affect organ usage aside for concerns over malignancy. Ischemic time greater than six hours has no documented adverse effects on recipient mortality and should not limit donor retrieval distances. Brain dead donors and deceased donors have equivalent prognosis. Initial PaO2/FiO2 ratios less than 300 should not dissuade donor organ usage, although recruitment techniques should be implemented with intent to transplant. PMID:25132970

  14. Morsleben waste acceptance requirements

    The Morsleben waste acceptance requirements take into account the valid stipulations in the permanent operational license of the Morsleben repository for radioactive waste (Eram) dated April 22, 1986, and in the documents underlying it. In line with the guaranteed continued validity until June 30, 2000 of this permanent operational license, also the classification of radioactive waste by waste types (A) and radiation protection groups (S) was retained. The revised requirements to be met by radioactive waste to be disposed of in Eram as issued by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) effective August 1996 constitute the safety framework which must be adhered to by this waste. They also take into account other stipulations by the BfS, especially voluntary restrictions and conditions imposed by the self-surveillance. Eram accepts the 'solid waste' and 'spent sealed radiation sources' categories. The waste generators must observe the requirements to be met by waste to be stored permanently. In the case of solid waste, these conditions include criteria to be met by waste forms, activity limitations for radionuclides and groups of radionuclides, and packaging criteria. (orig.)

  15. Criteria for decommissioning

    In this paper the authors describe three risk acceptability criteria as parts of a strategy to clean up decommissioned facilities, related to both the status quo and to a variety of alternative technical clean-up options. The acceptability of risk is a consideration that must enter into any decision to establish when a site is properly decommissioned. To do so, both the corporate and public aspects of the acceptability issue must be considered. The reasons for discussion the acceptability of risk are to: Legitimize the process for making cleanup decisions; Determine who is at risk, who benefits, and who bears the costs of site cleanup, for each specific cleanup option, including the do nothing option; Establish those factors that, taken as a whole, determine measures of acceptability; Determine chemical-specific aggregate and individual risk levels; and Establish levels for cleanup. The choice of these reasons is pragmatic. The method consistent with these factors is risk-risk-effectiveness: the level of cleanup must be consistent with the foreseeable use of the site and budget constraints. Natural background contamination is the level below which further cleanup is generally inefficient. Case-by-case departures from natural background are to be considered depending on demonstrated risk. For example, a hot spot is obviously a prima facie exception, but should be rebuttable. Rebuttability means that, through consensus, the ''hot spot'' is shown not to be associated with exposure

  16. Acceptability, acceptance and decision making

    There is a fundamental difference between the acceptability of a civilizatory or societal risk and the acceptability of the decision-making process that leads to a civilizatory or societal risk. The analysis of individual risk decisions - regarding who, executes when which indisputably hazardous, unhealthy or dangerous behaviour under which circumstances - is not helpful in finding solutions for the political decisions at hand in Germany concerning nuclear energy in particular or energy in general. The debt for implementation of any technology, in the sense of making the technology a success in terms of broad acceptance and general utilisation, lies with the particular industry involved. Regardless of the technology, innovation research identifies the implementation phase as most critical to the success of any innovation. In this sense, nuclear technology is at best still an innovation, because the implementation has not yet been completed. Fear and opposition to innovation are ubiquitous. Even the economy - which is often described as 'rational' - is full of this resistance. Innovation has an impact on the pivotal point between stability, the presupposition for the successful execution of decisions already taken and instability, which includes insecurity, but is also necessary for the success of further development. By definition, innovations are beyond our sphere of experience; not at the level of reliability and trust yet to come. Yet they are evaluated via the simplifying heuristics for making decisions proven not only to be necessary and useful, but also accurate in the familiar. The 'settlement of the debt of implementation', the accompanying communication, the decision-making procedures concerning the regulation of averse effects of the technology, but also the tailoring of the new technology or service itself must be directed to appropriate target groups. But the group often aimed at in the nuclear debate, the group, which largely determines political

  17. Sustainability and acceptance - new challenges for nuclear energy

    This paper discusses the concept of sustainability in relation to acceptance of nuclear energy. Acceptance is viewed in terms of public acceptance, industrial acceptance, and internal acceptance/consensus within the nuclear community. It addresses sustainability criteria, the need for innovation, and the different levels of acceptability. The mechanisms of risk perception are discussed along with the technological consequences from risk perception mechanisms leading to specific objections against nuclear energy. (author)

  18. 10 CFR 905.34 - Adjustment provisions.

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adjustment provisions. 905.34 Section 905.34 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Power Marketing Initiative § 905.34 Adjustment... continue to take place based on existing contract/marketing criteria principles....

  19. Safety and reliability criteria

    Nuclear power plants and, in particular, reactor pressure boundary components have unique reliability requirements, in that usually no significant redundancy is possible, and a single failure can give rise to possible widespread core damage and fission product release. Reliability may be required for availability or safety reasons, but in the case of the pressure boundary and certain other systems safety may dominate. Possible Safety and Reliability (S and R) criteria are proposed which would produce acceptable reactor design. Without some S and R requirement the designer has no way of knowing how far he must go in analysing his system or component, or whether his proposed solution is likely to gain acceptance. The paper shows how reliability targets for given components and systems can be individually considered against the derived S and R criteria at the design and construction stage. Since in the case of nuclear pressure boundary components there is often very little direct experience on which to base reliability studies, relevant non-nuclear experience is examined. (author)

  20. 48 CFR 1352.215-75 - Evaluation criteria.

    2010-10-01

    ... criteria. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1315.204-570(b)(2) and (3), insert the following provision: Evaluation... customer satisfaction. The Government reserves the right to assess the past performance of...

  1. 10 CFR 905.36 - Marketing criteria.

    2010-01-01

    ... contracts. Western must retain important marketing plan provisions such as classes of service, marketing... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marketing criteria. 905.36 Section 905.36 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Power Marketing Initiative § 905.36...

  2. 14 CFR Sec. 2-1 - Generally accepted accounting principles.

    2010-01-01

    ...). Persons subject to this part are authorized to implement, as prescribed by the Financial Accounting... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Generally accepted accounting principles... AIR CARRIERS General Accounting Provisions Sec. 2-1 Generally accepted accounting principles. (a)...

  3. Quantum Cryptography: Security Criteria Revisited

    Kaszlikowski, D; Liang, Y C; Kwek, L C; Englert, Berthold-Georg; Kaszlikowski, Dagomir; Gopinathan, Ajay; Liang, Yeong Cherng; Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2003-01-01

    We find that the generally accepted security criteria are flawed for a whole class of protocols for quantum cryptography. This is so because a standard assumption of the security analysis, namely that the so-called square-root measurement is optimal for eavesdropping purposes, is not true in general. There are rather large parameter regimes in which the optimal measurement extracts substantially more information than the square-root measurement.

  4. Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant pumps and valves

    Each of the six primary coolant loop systems of the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors contains one reactor coolant pump, one PUMP suction side motor operated valve, and other smaller valves. The pumps me double suction, double volute, and radially split type pumps. The valves are different size shutoff and control valves rated from ANSI B16.5 construction class 150 to class 300. The reactor coolant system components, also known as the process water system (PWS), are classified as nuclear Safety Class I components. These components were constructed in the 1950's in accordance with the then prevailing industry practices. No uniform construction codes were used for design and analysis of these components. However, no pressure boundary failures or bolting failures have ever been recorded throughout their operating history. Over the years, the in-service inspection (ISI) was limited to visual inspection of the pressure boundaries, and surface and volumetric examination of the pressure retaining bolts. Efforts are now underway to implement ISI requirements similar to the ASME Section XI requirements for pumps and valves. This report discusses the new ISI requirements which also call for volumetric examination of the pump casing and valve body welds

  5. Criteria for risk acceptance: a health physicist's view

    A controversy over the safety of nuclear energy has grown in the U.S. since about 1970 and has now spread to near worldwide proportions. This controversy has been fueled by a variety of issues. Initially in the U.S. the most prominent issue concerned the degree of hazard of low-level radiation, in particular that associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. Since then, attention has shifted successively to the reliability of emergency core cooling systems, the longevity of nuclear wastes, the possible misuse of radioactivity by terrorists and the potential for diversion of nuclear-power-produced plutonium to weapons fabrication. Underlying each of these issues has been the implication that the employment of nuclear power will entail an unacceptable risk to the public. A reasonable perspective in this regard is a yearly risk of 1 x 10-6 compared to the level of natural hazards such as earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, and tornados. Following a satisfactory demonstration of the safety of nuclear energy, hopefully the nuclear argument could be terminated. Society could then move on to the real issues affecting energy, population and quality of life

  6. Electricity supply between acceptance, acceptability and social compatibility; Energieversorgung zwischen Akzeptanz, Akzeptabilitaet und Sozialvertraeglichkeit

    Schubert, Katharina; Koch, Marco K. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl Energiesysteme und Energiewirtschaft (LEE)

    2012-11-01

    Acceptance promotion is supposed to be an indispensable premise for a successful realization of an energy concept. The contribution identifies deficiencies of the energy policy, including intransparency, complexity of decision procedures, for instance in case of the so called energy transmission line extension acceleration law, that has caused irritation and anger in the public. The justification of acceptance promotion is questioned in connection with the German nuclear policy reversal following the Fukushima accident. A research program ''public acceptance of large-scale power plants for electricity generation'' is presented. The issues criteria and limits of acceptability are of main importance for this discussion.

  7. Cone penetrometer moisture probe acceptance test report

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-146 (Prototype Cone Penetrometer Moisture Probe Acceptance Test Procedure) and WHC-SD-WM-ATP-145 (Cone Penetrometer Moisture Probe Acceptance Test Procedure). The master copy of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-145 can be found in Appendix A and the master copy of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-146 can be found in Appendix B. Also included with this report is a matrix showing design criteria of the cone penetrometer moisture probe and the verification method used (Appendix C)

  8. W-087 Acceptance test procedure. Revision 1

    Joshi, A.W.

    1997-06-10

    This Acceptance Test Procedure/Operational Test Procedure (ATP/OTP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Electrical/Instrumentation and Mechanical systems function as required by project criteria and to verify proper operation of the integrated system including the interlocks.

  9. 50 CFR 91.23 - Scoring criteria for contest.

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scoring criteria for contest. 91.23... (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING AND CONSERVATION STAMP CONTEST Procedures for Administering the Contest § 91.23 Scoring criteria for contest. Entries will be judged on the basis...

  10. Responsible technology acceptance

    Toft, Madeleine Broman; Schuitema, Geertje; Thøgersen, John

    2014-01-01

    on private consumers’ acceptance of having Smart Grid technology installed in their home. We analyse acceptance in a combined framework of the Technology Acceptance Model and the Norm Activation Model. We propose that individuals are only likely to accept Smart Grid technology if they assess...... usefulness in terms of a positive impact for society and the environment. Therefore, we expect that Smart Grid technology acceptance can be better explained when the well-known technology acceptance parameters included in the Technology Acceptance Model are supplemented by moral norms as suggested by the...... Norm Activation Model. We tested this proposition by means of an online survey of Danish (N=323), Norwegian (N=303) and Swiss (N=324) private consumers. The study confirms that adding personal norms to the independent variables of the Technology Acceptance Model leads to a significant increase in the...

  11. Nuclear wastes and public acceptance

    A new approach to the storage of nuclear wastes is described. Certain criteria for a nuclear waste storage system that is based on ideas of technical soundess and public acceptability are set forth. These criteria are 1.) the wastes must be reliably contained at all times, 2.) the containers must be retrievable and maintainable, 3.) the storage facility must also provide isolation from external events and must also permit careful control of human access, 4.) the storage facility and containers must have plausible or demonstratble likelihood of lasting for 100 years, and 5.) the storage system should be able to accept and retrieve both processed waste and spent fuel elements interchangeably. A specific storage system concept that is based on proved data and that meets the 5 criteria is described. The waste, either glassified high-level waste or spent fuel-fuel bundles from which the end structures have been removed, is stored in sealed stainless steel containers, which is sealed in a second sealed container made of a durable metal such as Ti. The space between the two containers is filled with a gas that can be detected at very low concentrations. These containers are stored in a tunnel excavated into the side of a convenient mountain. The tunnel is excavated above flood level, is accessible by rail and/or road, and is designed for self-draining. A free-standing inner lining is constructed within the tunnel. Offset vertical shafts provide for ventilation. Continuous monitoring leak detectors are maintained in the tunnel and in the stack

  12. Extended BRS algebra and color confinement criteria

    We examine the color-confinement criteria proposed by Kugo and Ojima. With the use of the extended BRS symmetry and the Nakanishi's theorem, we look for the representations of the BRS algebra compatible with the first condition of their criteria (the K-O condition) and then ask whether or not they are physically acceptable. As a result, the quartet mechanism does not work, and the K-O condition is not regarded as a confinement condition. (author)

  13. ARC Code TI: ACCEPT

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ACCEPT consists of an overall software infrastructure framework and two main software components. The software infrastructure framework consists of code written to...

  14. [Criteria for the diagnosis of corticobasal degeneration].

    Shimohata, Takayoshi; Aiba, Ikuko; Nishizawa, Masatoyo

    2015-04-01

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a distinct neurodegenerative disorder characterized by widespread neuronal and glial accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein. Patients with CBD often present with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) showing impairment of the motor system, cognition, or both. Several studies demonstrate that they may also present with progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome (PSPS), aphasia, Alzheimer disease-like dementia, or behavioral changes, suggesting that CBS is merely one of the presenting phenotypes of CBD. Accurate diagnosis is important for future clinical trials using drugs aimed at modifying the underlying tau pathology. Although previous CBD diagnostic criteria reflected only CBS, Armstrong et al. proposed new diagnostic criteria for CBD in 2013 (Armstrong's criteria). The new criteria include 4 CBD phenotypes, including CBS, frontal behavioral-spatial syndrome (FBS), nonfluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia (naPPA), and PSPS. These phenotypes were combined to create 2 sets of criteria: specific clinical research criteria for probable CBD (cr-CBD) and broader criteria for possible CBD that are more inclusive but have a higher probability of detecting other tau-based pathologies (p-CBD). However, two recent studies revealed that the sensitivity and specificity of these criteria were insufficient. Further refinement of the criteria is needed via biomarker research with prospective study designs. (Received August 19, 2014; Accepted December 26, 2014: Published April 1, 2015). PMID:25846600

  15. Quality criteria for landscape visualisation

    The rapid expansion of wind energy utilisation in Western Europe can strain the limits of social acceptance with citizens living in wind development areas. One of the problems wind farm engineers and local authorities face is the visual impact of wind turbines. To determine the influence on the landscape visualisations of wind farms photorealistic compositions are used. In many cases it is part of the planning procedure. The quality of this visualization can strongly influence the success of the permission procedure. We will give criteria which can give help to reduce the possibility of unwanted manipulations. (author)

  16. Acceptable noise level

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes;

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjects...

  17. IHE material qualification tests description and criteria

    Slape, R J [comp.

    1984-06-01

    This report describes the qualification tests presently being used at Pantex Plant, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory that are required by the Department of Energy prior to the approval for an explosive as an Insensitive High Explosive (IHE) material. The acceptance criteria of each test for IHE qualification is also discussed. 5 references, 10 figures.

  18. Seismic design and evaluation criteria based on target performance goals

    Seismic design and evaluation criteria have been developed based on target probabilistic performance goals. These criteria include selection of design/evaluation seismic input from probabilistic seismic hazard curves combined with commonly practiced deterministic response evaluation methods and acceptance criteria with controlled levels of conservatism. Conservatism is intentionally introduced in specification of material strengths and capacities, in the allowance of limited inelastic behavior, and by a seismic scale factor. Criteria have been developed following a graded approach for several performance goals ranging from that appropriate for normal-use facilities to that appropriate for facilities involving hazardous or critical operations. Performance goals are comprised of qualitative expressions of acceptable behavior and of quantitative probabilities that acceptable limits of behavior are maintained. The criteria are simple procedures but with a sound, rigorous basis for the achievement of goals

  19. Acceptance Probability (P a) Analysis for Process Validation Lifecycle Stages.

    Alsmeyer, Daniel; Pazhayattil, Ajay; Chen, Shu; Munaretto, Francesco; Hye, Maksuda; Sanghvi, Pradeep

    2016-04-01

    This paper introduces an innovative statistical approach towards understanding how variation impacts the acceptance criteria of quality attributes. Because of more complex stage-wise acceptance criteria, traditional process capability measures are inadequate for general application in the pharmaceutical industry. The probability of acceptance concept provides a clear measure, derived from specific acceptance criteria for each quality attribute. In line with the 2011 FDA Guidance, this approach systematically evaluates data and scientifically establishes evidence that a process is capable of consistently delivering quality product. The probability of acceptance provides a direct and readily understandable indication of product risk. As with traditional capability indices, the acceptance probability approach assumes that underlying data distributions are normal. The computational solutions for dosage uniformity and dissolution acceptance criteria are readily applicable. For dosage uniformity, the expected AV range may be determined using the s lo and s hi values along with the worst case estimates of the mean. This approach permits a risk-based assessment of future batch performance of the critical quality attributes. The concept is also readily applicable to sterile/non sterile liquid dose products. Quality attributes such as deliverable volume and assay per spray have stage-wise acceptance that can be converted into an acceptance probability. Accepted statistical guidelines indicate processes with C pk > 1.33 as performing well within statistical control and those with C pk  1.33 is associated with a centered process that will statistically produce less than 63 defective units per million. This is equivalent to an acceptance probability of >99.99%. PMID:26024723

  20. Newbery Medal Acceptance.

    Freedman, Russell

    1988-01-01

    Presents the Newbery Medal acceptance speech of Russell Freedman, writer of children's nonfiction. Discusses the place of nonfiction in the world of children's literature, the evolution of children's biographies, and the author's work on "Lincoln." (ARH)

  1. Accepting grammars and systems.

    Bordihn, Henning; Fernau, Henning

    2007-01-01

    We investigate several kinds of regulated rewriting (programmed, matrix, with regular control, ordered, and variants thereof) and of parallel rewriting mechanisms (Lindenmayer systems, uniformly limited Lindenmayer systems, limited Lindenmayer systems and scattered context grammars) as accepting devices, in contrast with the usual generating mode. In some cases, accepting mode turns out to be just as powerful as generating mode, e.g. within the grammars of the Chomsky ...

  2. Operations Acceptance Management

    Suchá, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the process of Operations Acceptance Management, whose main task is to control Operations Acceptance Tests (OAT). In the first part the author focuses on the theoretical ground for the problem in the context of ITSM best practices framework ITIL. Benefits, process pitfalls and possibilities for automation are discussed in this part. The second part contains a case study of DHL IT Services (Prague), where a solution optimizing the overall workflow was implemented using simp...

  3. Analysis of Scrum acceptance

    Vončina, Bojan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the thesis was to analyse the acceptance of Scrum methodology, which has become one of the leading agile methodologies, and to find out which were the key factors that influenced the acceptance. The analysis was conducted in Comtrade, which is one of the largest Slovenian software development companies. The First part (theoretical part) contains an introduction chapter, a detailed presentation of Scrum methodology and the presentation of theoretical models, on which practical ...

  4. Acceptability of human risk.

    Kasperson, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper has three objectives: to explore the nature of the problem implicit in the term "risk acceptability," to examine the possible contributions of scientific information to risk standard-setting, and to argue that societal response is best guided by considerations of process rather than formal methods of analysis. Most technological risks are not accepted but are imposed. There is also little reason to expect consensus among individuals on their tolerance of risk. Moreover, debates abo...

  5. Acceptable noise level

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes;

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjects...... using running Danish and non-semantic speech materials as stimuli and modulated speech-spectrum and multi-talker babble noises as competing stimuli....

  6. Top-level regulatory criteria for the standard MHTGR

    The Licensing Plan for the Standard MHTGR (Ref. 1) describes a program to support a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) design review and approval. The Plan calls for the submittal of Top-Level Regulatory Criteria to the NRC for concurrence with their completeness and acceptability for the MHTGR program. The Top-Level Regulatory Criteria are defined as the standards for judging licensability that directly specify acceptable limits for protection of the public health and safety and the environment. The criteria proposed herein are for normal plant operation and a broad spectrum of anticipated events, including accidents. The approach taken is to define a set of criteria which are general as opposed to being design specific. Specifically, it is recommended that criteria be met which: 1. Are less prescriptive than current regulation, thereby encouraging maximum flexibility in design approaches. 2. Are measurable. 3. Are not more strict than the criteria for current power plants

  7. FFTBM and primary pressure acceptance criterion

    When thermalhydraulic computer codes are used for simulation in the area of nuclear engineering the question is how to conduct an objective comparison between the code calculation and measured data. To answer this the fast Fourier transform based method (FFTBM) was developed. When the FFTBM method was developed the acceptance criteria for primary pressure and total accuracy were set. In the recent study the FFTBM method was used for accuracy quantification of RD-14M large LOCA test B9401 calculations. The blind accuracy analysis indicated good total accuracy while the primary pressure criterion was not fulfilled. The objective of the study was therefore to investigate the reasons for not fulfilling the primary pressure acceptance criterion and the applicability of the criterion to experimental facilities simulating heavy water reactor. The results of the open quantitative analysis showed that sensitivity analysis for influence parameters provide sufficient information to judge in which calculation the accuracy of primary pressure is acceptable. (author)

  8. Democratic Public Good Provision

    Hassler, John; Storesletten, Kjetil; Zilibotti, Fabrizio

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyzes an overlapping generation model of redistribution and public good provision under repeated voting. Expenditures are financed through age-dependent taxation that distorts human capital investment. Taxes redistribute income both across skill groups and across generations. We focus on politico-economic Markov equilibria and contrast these with the Ramsey allocation under commitment. The model features indeterminate equilibria, with a key role of forward-looking strategic voti...

  9. 基于农户受偿意愿的农田生态补偿额度测算——以武汉市的调查为实证%Agricultural Land's Ecological Compensation Criteria Based on the Producers' Willingness to Accept: A Case Study of Farmer Households in Wuhan

    蔡银莺; 张安录

    2011-01-01

    services and products, it is similar to the standard elements of the market. According to Provider Gets Principle (PGP), this research estimates agricultural land's ecological compensation criteria based on the farmer households' willingness to supply and accept, and the results have some reference for reducing the negative externalities of agriculture. Based on the empirical survey on farmer households in Wuhan area, the current research studied the farmers willingness to accept if they will be given certain compensations for reducing the use of chemical fertilizers, pesticides and other chemicals. Several conclusions can be drawn from this study. Firstly, most farmers recognize the negative impacts of fertilizers and pesticides on the agricultural land' s eco-environment. However, they stick to current practice due to the easy use and quick effects of chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Secondly, if we take the application of fertilizer and pesticide under different limits, it is a significant negative relationship between producers' willingness to supply and application restrictions of chemical fertilizers and pesticides. About 69. 32% -85. 25% farmers have willingness to provide ecological services as the limitation standards were settled, namely, reducing chemical fertilizers and pesticides applications by 50% or 100%. When the chemical fertilizers and pesticides utilization reduced 50% or 100%, the amount of compensation that the farmers would accept is 3928. 88 - 8367. 00 yuan per hectare per year. Based on the simulation of the agricultural products market, about 54. 29% -82. 12% of the farmers have willinness to produce agricultural products according to the limit standards of utilization of chemical fertilizers and pesticides. And, farmers are willing to produce environment-friendly agricultural products when the rice' s price is higher than common agriculture products at 1.65 -2. 66 yuan per kilogram, which increases 42. 52% -68. 45%.

  10. Finnish safety criteria for geological waste disposal

    The author presented the history of the development of regulations for spent fuel disposal in Finland. The government decision 478/1999 introduced safety criteria which depend on the time frames: dose constraints in the first thousands of years, radionuclide release constraints up to 100 000 years and qualitative arguments in the longer time frames. J. Vira stressed the importance of ethical considerations for deriving the regulation. Since these criteria met a wide acceptance it is not felt advisable to revise them in the near future. (author)

  11. Acceptance-test specifications for Test Number Four: process sensor and display test

    This document provides the general instructions for performing acceptance Test Number Four as indicated in the Acceptance Test Index (TI-022-130-003). Also indicated are the plant conditions and special equipment required to conduct the test. The acceptance criteria for each portion of the test are specified

  12. Approaches to acceptable risk

    Several alternative approaches to address the question open-quotes How safe is safe enough?close quotes are reviewed and an attempt is made to apply the reasoning behind these approaches to the issue of acceptability of radiation exposures received in space. The approaches to the issue of the acceptability of technological risk described here are primarily analytical, and are drawn from examples in the management of environmental health risks. These include risk-based approaches, in which specific quantitative risk targets determine the acceptability of an activity, and cost-benefit and decision analysis, which generally focus on the estimation and evaluation of risks, benefits and costs, in a framework that balances these factors against each other. These analytical methods tend by their quantitative nature to emphasize the magnitude of risks, costs and alternatives, and to downplay other factors, especially those that are not easily expressed in quantitative terms, that affect acceptance or rejection of risk. Such other factors include the issues of risk perceptions and how and by whom risk decisions are made

  13. Approaches to acceptable risk

    Whipple, C.

    1997-04-30

    Several alternative approaches to address the question {open_quotes}How safe is safe enough?{close_quotes} are reviewed and an attempt is made to apply the reasoning behind these approaches to the issue of acceptability of radiation exposures received in space. The approaches to the issue of the acceptability of technological risk described here are primarily analytical, and are drawn from examples in the management of environmental health risks. These include risk-based approaches, in which specific quantitative risk targets determine the acceptability of an activity, and cost-benefit and decision analysis, which generally focus on the estimation and evaluation of risks, benefits and costs, in a framework that balances these factors against each other. These analytical methods tend by their quantitative nature to emphasize the magnitude of risks, costs and alternatives, and to downplay other factors, especially those that are not easily expressed in quantitative terms, that affect acceptance or rejection of risk. Such other factors include the issues of risk perceptions and how and by whom risk decisions are made.

  14. Spain accepts safeguards controls

    Spain became the 26th country to accept safeguards controls by the Agency in December. An agreement was signed in Vienna, transferring to IAEA the administration of safeguards against diversion of materials and installations to military purposes provided for under a nuclear co-operation agreement concluded between Spain and USA in 1957

  15. 1984 Newbery Acceptance Speech.

    Cleary, Beverly

    1984-01-01

    This acceptance speech for an award honoring "Dear Mr. Henshaw," a book about feelings of a lonely child of divorce intended for eight-, nine-, and ten-year-olds, highlights children's letters to author. Changes in society that affect children, the inception of "Dear Mr. Henshaw," and children's reactions to books are highlighted. (EJS)

  16. Den betingede accept

    Kolind, Torsten

    1999-01-01

    difficulties in underscoring this normality. This conditioned accept tends to leave the ex-prisoner in an vacuum of signification; he is neither fully normal nor fully deviant. In regard to identity, this vacuum, and the practices that follows, leaves the ex-prisoner badly equipped in his attempt to live up to...

  17. Why was Relativity Accepted?

    Brush, S. G.

    Historians of science have published many studies of the reception of Einstein's special and general theories of relativity. Based on a review of these studies, and my own research on the role of the light-bending prediction in the reception of general relativity, I discuss the role of three kinds of reasons for accepting relativity (1) empirical predictions and explanations; (2) social-psychological factors; and (3) aesthetic-mathematical factors. According to the historical studies, acceptance was a three-stage process. First, a few leading scientists adopted the special theory for aesthetic-mathematical reasons. In the second stage, their enthusiastic advocacy persuaded other scientists to work on the theory and apply it to problems currently of interest in atomic physics. The special theory was accepted by many German physicists by 1910 and had begun to attract some interest in other countries. In the third stage, the confirmation of Einstein's light-bending prediction attracted much public attention and forced all physicists to take the general theory of relativity seriously. In addition to light-bending, the explanation of the advance of Mercury's perihelion was considered strong evidence by theoretical physicists. The American astronomers who conducted successful tests of general relativity became defenders of the theory. There is little evidence that relativity was `socially constructed' but its initial acceptance was facilitated by the prestige and resources of its advocates.

  18. Knowledge management review criteria

    The paper presents knowledge management review criteria, which are intended to be used by a nuclear power plant operating organization in conducting a self-assessment or an external review of knowledge management functions. Most of these criteria have been used by IAEA experts during the missions on knowledge management at Krsko nuclear power plant, Slovenia and Kozloduy nuclear power plant, Bulgaria. (author)

  19. Project W-049H Collection System Acceptance Test

    The Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) Program for Project W-049H covers the following activities: Disposal system, Collection system, Instrumentation and control system. Each activity has its own ATP. The purpose of the ATPs is to verify that the systems have been constructed in accordance with the construction documents and to demonstrate that the systems function as required by the Project criteria. This ATP has been prepared to demonstrate that the Collection System Instrumentation functions as required by project criteria

  20. Plutonium storage criteria

    Chung, D. [Scientech, Inc., Germantown, MD (United States); Ascanio, X. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy has issued a technical standard for long-term (>50 years) storage and will soon issue a criteria document for interim (<20 years) storage of plutonium materials. The long-term technical standard, {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides,{close_quotes} addresses the requirements for storing metals and oxides with greater than 50 wt % plutonium. It calls for a standardized package that meets both off-site transportation requirements, as well as remote handling requirements from future storage facilities. The interim criteria document, {open_quotes}Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Solid Materials{close_quotes}, addresses requirements for storing materials with less than 50 wt% plutonium. The interim criteria document assumes the materials will be stored on existing sites, and existing facilities and equipment will be used for repackaging to improve the margin of safety.

  1. Acceptance of Tinnitus : Validation of the Tinnitus Acceptance Questionnaire

    Weise, Cornelia; Kleinstäuber, Maria; Hesser, Hugo; Westin, Vendela; Andersson, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The concept of acceptance has recently received growing attention within tinnitus research due to the fact that tinnitus acceptance is one of the major targets of psychotherapeutic treatments. Accordingly, acceptance-based treatments will most likely be increasingly offered to tinnitus patients and assessments of acceptance-related behaviours will thus be needed. The current study investigated the factorial structure of the Tinnitus Acceptance Questionnaire (TAQ) and the role of tinnitus acce...

  2. Waste acceptance and logistics

    There are three major components which are normally highlighted when the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is discussed - the repository, the monitored retrievable storage facility, and the transportation system. These are clearly the major physical system elements and they receive the greatest external attention. However, there will not be a successful, operative waste management system without fully operational waste acceptance plans and logistics arrangements. This paper will discuss the importance of developing, on a parallel basis to the normally considered waste management system elements, the waste acceptance and logistics arrangements to enable the timely transfer of spent nuclear fuel from more than one hundred and twenty waste generators to the Federal government. The paper will also describe the specific activities the Program has underway to make the necessary arrangements. (author)

  3. kitchingroup-57: Accepted

    John Kitchin

    2016-01-01

    This is the accepted version of this manuscript. @article{kitchin-2015-examp, author = {Kitchin, John R.}, title = {Examples of Effective Data Sharing in Scientific Publishing}, journal = {ACS Catalysis}, volume = {5}, number = {6}, pages = {3894-3899}, year = 2015, doi = {10.1021/acscatal.5b00538}, url = { http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acscatal.5b00538 }, keywords = {DESC0004031, early-career, orgmode, Data sharing }, eprint = { http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acscatal.5b00538 }, }

  4. Environment and public acceptance

    The problems involved in the siting of nuclear power stations at a local level are of a political economic, social or ecological order. The acceptance of a nuclear station mostly depends on its interest for the local population. In order to avoid negative reactions, the men who are responsible must make the harmonious integration of the station within the existing economic and social context their first priority

  5. Nuclear reactor philosophy and criteria

    Nuclear power plant safety criteria and principles developed in Canada are directed towards minimizing the chance of failure of the fuel and preventing or reducing to an acceptably low level the escape of fission products should fuel failure occur. Safety criteria and practices are set forth in the Reactor Siting Guide, which is based upon the concept of defence in depth. The Guide specifies that design and construction shall follow the best applicable code, standard or practice; the total of all serious process system failures shall not exceed one in three years; special safety systems are to be physically and functionally separate from process systems and each other; and safety systems shall be testable, with unavailability less than 10-3. Doses to the most exposed member of the public due to normal operation, serious process failures, and dual failures are specified. Licensees are also required to consider the effects of extreme conditions due to airplane crashes, explosions, turbine disintegration, pipe burst, and natural disasters. Safety requirements are changing as nuclear power plant designs evolve and in response to social and economic pressures

  6. Age and Acceptance of Euthanasia.

    Ward, Russell A.

    1980-01-01

    Study explores relationship between age (and sex and race) and acceptance of euthanasia. Women and non-Whites were less accepting because of religiosity. Among older people less acceptance was attributable to their lesser education and greater religiosity. Results suggest that quality of life in old age affects acceptability of euthanasia. (Author)

  7. Plugging criteria for WWER SG tubes

    Papp, L.; Wilam, M. [Vitkovice NPP Services (Switzerland); Herman, M. [Vuje, Trnava (Slovakia)

    1997-12-31

    At operated Czech and Slovak nuclear power plants the 80 % criteria for crack or other bulk defect depth is used for steam generator heat exchanging tubes plugging. This criteria was accepted as the recommendation of designer of WWER steam generators. Verification of this criteria was the objective of experimental program performed by Vitkovice, J.S.C., UJV Rez, J.S.C. and Vuje Trnava, J.S.C .. Within this program the following factors were studied: (1) Influence of secondary water chemistry on defects initiation and propagation, (2) Statistical evaluation of corrosion defects progression at operated SG, and (3) Determination of critical pressure for tube rupture as a function of eddy current indications. In this presentation items (2) and (3) are considered.

  8. Plugging criteria for WWER SG tubes

    At operated Czech and Slovak nuclear power plants the 80 % criteria for crack or other bulk defect depth is used for steam generator heat exchanging tubes plugging. This criteria was accepted as the recommendation of designer of WWER steam generators. Verification of this criteria was the objective of experimental program performed by Vitkovice, J.S.C., UJV Rez, J.S.C. and Vuje Trnava, J.S.C .. Within this program the following factors were studied: (1) Influence of secondary water chemistry on defects initiation and propagation, (2) Statistical evaluation of corrosion defects progression at operated SG, and (3) Determination of critical pressure for tube rupture as a function of eddy current indications. In this presentation items (2) and (3) are considered

  9. Safety criteria for nuclear chemical plants

    Safety measures have always been required to limit the hazards due to accidental release of radioactive substances from nuclear power plants and chemical plants. The risk associated with the discharge of radioactive substances during normal operation has also to be kept acceptably low. BNFL (British Nuclear Fuels Ltd.) are developing risk criteria as targets for safe plant design and operation. The numerical values derived are compared with these criteria to see if plants are 'acceptably safe'. However, the criteria are not mandatory and may be exceeded if this can be justified. The risk assessments are subject to independent review and audit. The Nuclear Installations Inspectorate also has to pass the plants as safe. The assessment principles it uses are stated. The development of risk criteria for a multiplant site (nuclear chemical plants tend to be sited with many others which are related functionally) is discussed. This covers individual members of the general public, societal risks, risks to the workforce and external hazards. (U.K.)

  10. DOE natural phenomenal hazards design and evaluation criteria

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) to design, construct, and operate DOE facilities so that workers, the general public, and the environment are protected from the impacts of natural phenomena hazards (NPH). Furthermore, DOE has established explicit goals of acceptable risk for NPH performance. As a result, natural phenomena hazard (earthquake, extreme wind, and flood) design and evaluation criteria for DOE facilities have been developed based on target probabilistic performance goals. These criteria include selection of design/evaluation NPH input from probabilistic hazard curves combined with commonly practiced deterministic response evaluation methods and acceptance criteria with controlled levels of conservatism. For earthquake considerations, conservatism is intentionally introduced in specification of material strengths and capacities, in the allowance of limited inelastic behavior, and by a seismic scale factor. Criteria have been developed following a graded approach for several performance goals ranging from that appropriate for normal-use facilities to that appropriate for facilities involving hazardous or critical operations. Performance goals are comprised of qualitative expressions of acceptable behavior and of target quantitative probabilities that acceptable limits of behavior are maintained. The criteria are simple procedures but have a rigorous basis. This paper addresses DOE seismic design and evaluation criteria

  11. Validation and acceptance of synthetic infrared imagery

    Smith, Moira I.; Bernhardt, Mark; Angell, Christopher R.; Hickman, Duncan; Whitehead, Philip; Patel, Dilip

    2004-08-01

    This paper describes the use of an image query database (IQ-DB) tool as a means of implementing a validation strategy for synthetic long-wave infrared images of sea clutter. Specifically it was required to determine the validity of the synthetic imagery for use in developing and testing automatic target detection algorithms. The strategy adopted for exploiting synthetic imagery is outlined and the key issues of validation and acceptance are discussed in detail. A wide range of image metrics has been developed to achieve pre-defined validation criteria. A number of these metrics, which include post processing algorithms, are presented. Furthermore, the IQ-DB provides a robust mechanism for configuration management and control of the large volume of data used. The implementation of the IQ-DB is reviewed in terms of its cardinal point specification and its central role in synthetic imagery validation and EOSS progressive acceptance.

  12. Design Criteria for Achieving Low Radon Concentration Indoors

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Design criteria for achieving low radon concentration indoors are presented in this paper. The paper suggests three design criteria. These criteria have to be considered at the early stage of the building design phase to meet the latest recommendations from the World Health Organization in most...... countries. The three design criteria are; first, establishing a radon barrier facing the ground; second, lowering the air pressure in the lower zone of the slab on ground facing downwards; third, diluting the indoor air with outdoor air. Three criteria when used can prevent radon infiltration and lower the...... radon concentration in the indoor air. In addition, a cheap and reliable method for measuring the radon concentration in the air indoors is described. The provision on radon in the Danish Building Regulations complies with the latest recommendations from the World Health Organization. Radon can cause...

  13. Green Supplier Selection Criteria

    Nielsen, Izabela Ewa; Banaeian, Narges; Golinska, Paulina;

    2014-01-01

    Green supplier selection (GSS) criteria arise from an organization inclination to respond to any existing trends in environmental issues related to business management and processes, so GSS is integrating environmental thinking into conventional supplier selection. This research is designed to...

  14. Integrated Criteria document Chlorophenols

    Slooff W; Bremmer HJ; Janus JA; Matthijsen AJCM; van Beelen P; van den Berg R; Bloemen HJT; Canton JH; Eerens HC; Hrubec J; Janssens H; Jumelet JC; Knaap AGAC; de Leeuw FAAM; van der Linden AMA; Loch JPG; van Loveren H; Peijnenburg WJGM; Piersma AH; Struijs J; Taalman RDFM; Theelen RMC; van der Velde JMA; Verburgh JJ; Versteegh JFM; van der Woerd KF

    1991-01-01

    Bij dit rapport behoort een bijlage onder hetzelfde nummer getiteld: "Integrated Criteria document Chlorophenols: Effects:" Auteurs : Janus JA
    Taalman RDFM; Theelen RMC en is de engelse editie van 710401003

  15. Criteria Air Emissions Trends

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Air Emissions Trends site provides national trends of criteria pollutant and precursor emissions data based on the the National Emissions Inventory (NEI) from...

  16. Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer

    The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP's facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson's facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified

  17. Acceptance, Tolerance, Participation

    The problem of radioactive waste management from an ethical and societal viewpoint was treated in this seminar, which had participants from universities (social, theological, philosophical and science institutes), waste management industry, and regulatory and controlling authorities. After initial reviews on repository technology, policies and schedules, knowledge gaps, and ethical aspects on decision making under uncertainty, four subjects were treated in lectures and discussions: Democratic collective responsibility, Handling threats in democratic decision making, Waste management - a technological operation with a social dimension, Acceptance and legitimity. Lectures with comments and discussions are collected in this report

  18. Marketing for Acceptance

    Tina L. Johnston, Ph.D.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Becoming a researcher comes with the credentializing pressure to publish articles in peer-reviewed journals (Glaser, 1992; Glaser, 2007; Glaser, 2008. The work intensive process is exacerbated when the author’s research method is grounded theory. This study investigated the concerns of early and experienced grounded theorists to discover how they worked towards publishing research projects that applied grounded theory as a methodology. The result was a grounded theory of marketing for acceptance that provides the reader with insight into ways that classic grounded theorists have published their works. This is followed by a discussion of ideas for normalizing classic grounded theory research methods in our substantive fields.

  19. High acceptance recoil polarimeter

    In order to detect neutrons and protons in the 50 to 600 MeV energy range and measure their polarization, an efficient, low-noise, self-calibrating device is being designed. This detector, known as the High Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter (HARP), is based on the recoil principle of proton detection from np→n'p' or pp→p'p' scattering (detected particles are underlined) which intrinsically yields polarization information on the incoming particle. HARP will be commissioned to carry out experiments in 1994

  20. Selection criteria for dental radiography

    The Faculty of General Dental Practitioners (UK) has a declared commitment to 'improving the standards of patient care'. By the provision of standards and guidelines it aims to help the profession to achieve this goal. Standards and guidelines are simply tools a dentist may use to improve treatment planning and care outcomes. The Self-Assessment Manual and Standards, SAMS, first published in 1991, is now well known to the profession and has become a frequently quoted source in clinical audit and quality assurance initiatives. Since its publication the scientific methodology of systematic reviews of the literature has progressed dramatically and this book is based on these developments. Evidence-based care is well established in medicine and dentistry and these selection criteria and guidelines follow these established protocols by basing advice on the available scientific evidence wherever possible. This book's purpose is a practical one, it is not intended to be limiting or restrictive but to be useful in the decision-making process. This is the first in a series of standards documents from the FGDP(UK) which are based on reviews of the scientific literature and employ the Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network (SIGN) methodology for guideline production. They are not constraints but an aid to effective treatment planning and patient care

  1. Multi criteria analysis in the renewable energy industry

    San Cristóbal Mateo, José Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Decision makers in the Renewable Energy sector face an increasingly complex social, economic, technological, and environmental scenario in their decision process. Different groups of decision-makers become involved in the process, each group bringing along different criteria therefore, policy formulation for fossil fuel substitution by Renewable Energies must be addressed in a multi-criteria context. Multi Criteria Analysis in the Renewable Energy Industry is a direct response to the increasing interest in the Renewable Energy industry which can be seen as an important remedy to many environmental problems that the world faces today. The multiplicity of criteria and the increasingly complex social, economic, technological, and environmental scenario makes multi-criteria analysis a valuable tool in the decision-making process for fossil fuel substitution. The detailed chapters explore the use of the Multi-criteria decision-making methods and how they provide valuable assistance in reaching equitable and accept...

  2. Hybrid resource provisioning for clouds

    Flexible resource provisioning, the assignment of virtual machines (VMs) to physical machine, is a key requirement for cloud computing. To achieve 'provisioning elasticity', the cloud needs to manage its available resources on demand. A-priori, static, VM provisioning introduces no runtime overhead but fails to deal with unanticipated changes in resource demands. Dynamic provisioning addresses this problem but introduces runtime overhead. To reduce VM management overhead so more useful work can be done and to also avoid sub-optimal provisioning we propose a hybrid approach that combines static and dynamic provisioning. The idea is to adapt a good initial static placement of VMs in response to evolving load characteristics, using live migration, as long as the overhead of doing so is low and the effectiveness is high. When this is no longer so, we trigger a revised static placement. (Thus, we are essentially applying local multi-objective optimization to tune a global optimization with reduced overhead.) This approach requires a complicated migration decision algorithm based on current and predicted:future workloads, power consumptions and memory usage in the host machines as well as network burst characteristics for the various possible VM multiplexings (combinations of VMs on a host). A further challenge is to identify those characteristics of the dynamic provisioning that should trigger static re-provisioning.

  3. Acceptance test report, plutonium finishing plant life safety upgrade

    Hodge, S.G.

    1994-12-02

    This acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that modifications to the Fir Protection systems function as required by project criteria. The ATP will test the Fire Alarm Control Panels, Flow Alarm Pressure Switch, Heat Detectors, Smoke Detectors, Flow Switches, Manual Pull Stations, and Gong/Door By Pass Switches.

  4. The legal standards and provisions

    On the basis of the facts of Section 7, Subsection 3 of the German Atomic Energy Act, stock is taken of the legal position. Points of special importance in this regard are the precise distinction between an operating permit and a decommissioning permit, and the question of the ranking order of decommissioning variants. Ultimately, decommissioning legally must be interpreted as a phase between the final discontinuation of operations and the safe enclosure and dismantling, respectively, of a plant. Another open point is the ranking order of the variances of fact included in Section 7, Subsection 3 of the German Atomic Energy Act, on which it can be said that there is the possibility of arranging these variances in time after decommissioning as well as the possibility to choose freely among the variants available. Also a partial permit relationship linking the individual variants of Section 7, Subsection 3 of the Atomic Energy Act cannot be accepted. The substantive criteria to be met in a permit under Section 7, Subsection 3 of the German Atomic Energy Act raise major practical difficulties due to the reference contained in Section 7, Subsection 3, second sentence of the German Atomic Energy Act. These problems become manifest especially in the open question applying the body of nuclear technical codes, most in which were set up with the construction and operating of a nuclear facility in mind. In the matter of discretionary refusal, important reasons would favor a reduction to zero of this discretionary power. After all, also the question of waste management has not yet been clarified in general terms with respect to the waste arising from activities under Section 7, Subsection 3, German Atomic Energy Act. For this point to be sattled, permissible limits, measurement techniques, and demonstration of use must be defined in the light of each individual case. (orig.HP)

  5. Is nuclear power acceptable

    The energy shortage forecast for the early 21st century is considered. Possible energy sources other than fossil fuel are stated as geothermal, fusion, solar and fission, of which only fission has been demonstrated technically and economically. The environmental impacts of fission are examined. The hazards are discussed under the following headings: nuclear accident, fatality risk, safe reactor, property damage, acts of God, low-level release of radioactivity, diversion of fissile material and sabotage, radioactive waste disposal, toxicity of plutonium. The public reaction to nuclear power is analyzed, and proposals are made for a programme of safety and security which the author hopes will make it acceptable as the ultimate energy source. (U.K.)

  6. Public acceptance of nuclear power

    The lecture addresses the question why we need public acceptance work and provides some clues to it. It explains various human behaviour patterns which determine the basics for public acceptance. To some extent, the opposition to nuclear energy and the role the media play are described. Public acceptance efforts of industry are critically reviewed. Some hints on difficulties with polling are provided. The lecture concludes with recommendations for further public acceptance work. (author)

  7. Sediment quality criteria: A review with recommendations for developing criteria for the Hanford Site

    Driver, C.J.

    1994-05-01

    Criteria for determining the quality of liver sediment are necessary to ensure that concentrations of contaminants in aquatic systems are within acceptable limits for the protection of aquatic and human life. Such criteria should facilitate decision-making about remediation, handling, and disposal of contaminants. Several approaches to the development of sediment quality criteria (SQC) have been described and include both descriptive and numerical methods. However, no single method measures all impacts at all times to all organisms (U.S. EPA 1992b). The U.S. EPA`s interest is primarily in establishing chemically based, numerical SQC that are applicable nation-wide (Shea 1988). Of the approaches proposed for SQC development, only three are being considered for numerical SQC on a national level. These approaches include an Equilibrium Partitioning Approach, a site-specific method using bioassays (the Apparent Effects Threshold Approach), and an approach similar to EPA`s water quality criteria (Pavlou and Weston 1984). Although national (or even regional) criteria address a number of political, litigative, and engineering needs, some researchers feel that protection of benthic communities require site-specific, biologically based criteria (Baudo et al. 1990). This is particularly true for areas where complex mixtures of contaminants are present in sediments. Other scientifically valid and accepted procedures for freshwater SQC include a background concentration approach, methods using field or spiked bioassays, a screening level concentration approach, the Apparent Effects Threshold Approach, the Sediment Quality Triad, the International Joint Commission Sediment Assessment Strategy, and the National Status and Trends Program Approach. The various sediment assessment approaches are evaluated for application to the Hanford Reach and recommendations for Hanford Site sediment quality criteria are discussed.

  8. 48 CFR 217.7601 - Provisioning.

    2010-10-01

    ... Provisioning Requirements 217.7601 Provisioning. (a) Follow the procedures at PGI 217.7601 for contracts with provisioning requirements. (b) For technical requirements of provisioning, see DoD 4140.1-R, DoD Supply Chain... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provisioning....

  9. Dual Criteria Decisions

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten Igel; Rutström, Elisabet E.

    2014-01-01

    The most popular models of decision making use a single criterion to evaluate projects or lotteries. However, decision makers may actually consider multiple criteria when evaluating projects. We consider a dual criteria model from psychology. This model integrates the familiar tradeoffs between...... risk and utility that economists traditionally assume, allowance for rank-dependent decision weights, and consideration of income thresholds. We examine the issues involved in full maximum likelihood estimation of the model using observed choice data. We propose a general method for integrating the...... multiple criteria, using the logic of mixture models, which we believe is attractive from a decision-theoretic and statistical perspective. The model is applied to observed choices from a major natural experiment involving intrinsically dynamic choices over highly skewed outcomes. The evidence points to...

  10. Summarized water quality criteria

    The available world literature from 27 sources on existing water quality criteria are summarized for the 15 main uses of water. The minimum, median and maximum specified values for 96 different determinands are included. Under each water use the criteria are grouped according to the functional significance of the determinands e.g. aesthetic/physical effects, high toxic potential, low toxic potential etc. A synopsis is included summarizing salient facts for each determinand such as the conditions under which it is toxic and its relationship to other determinands. The significance of the criteria is briefly discussed and the importance of considering functional interactions between determinands emphasized in evaluating the potential for toxic or beneficial effects. From the source literature it appears that the toxic potential, in addition to being determined by concentration, is also affected by the origin of the substance concerned, i.e. whether from natural sources or from anthropogenic pollution