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Sample records for accelerator-based boron neutron

  1. Beryllium Target for Accelerator - Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    This work is part of a project for developing Accelerator Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB- BNCT) for which the generation of neutrons through nuclear reactions like 9Be(d,n) is necessary. In this paper first results of the design and development of such neutron production targets are presented. For this purpose, the neutron production target has to be able to withstand the mechanical and thermal stresses produced by intense beams of deuterons (of 1.4 MeV with a total current of about 30mA). In particular, the target should be able to dissipate an energy density of up to 1 kW/cm2 and preserve its physical and mechanical properties for a sufficient length of time under irradiation conditions and hydrogen damage. The target is proposed to consist of a thin Be deposit (neutron producing material) on a thin W or Mo layer to stop the beam and a Cu backing to help carry away the heat load. To achieve the adhesion of the Be films on W, Mo and Cu substrates, a powder blasting technique was applied with quartz and alumina microspheres. On the other hand, Ag deposits were made on some of the substrates previously blasted to favor the chemical affinity between Beryllium and the substrate thus improving adhesion. Be deposits were characterized by means of different techniques including Electron Microscopy (Sem) and Xr Diffraction. Roughness and thickness measurements were also made. To satisfy the power dissipation requirements for the neutron production target, a microchannel system model is proposed. The simulation based on this model permits to determine the geometric parameters of the prototype complying with the requirements of a microchannel system. Results were compared with those in several publications and discrepancies lower than 10% were found in all cases. A prototype for model validation is designed here for which simulations of fluid and structural mechanics were carried out and discussed

  2. Research of accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Background: 7Li (p, n) reaction of high neutron yield and low threshold energy has become one of the most important neutron generating reactions for Accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Purpose Focuses on neutron yield and spectrum characteristics of this kind of neutron generating reaction which serves as an accelerator-based neutron source and moderates the high energy neutron beams to meet BNCT requirements. Methods: The yield and energy spectrum of neutrons generated by accelerator-based 7Li(p, n) reaction with incident proton energy from 1.9 MeV to 3.0 MeV are researched using the Monte Carlo code-MCNPX2.5.0. And the energy and angular distribution of differential neutron yield by 2.5-MeV incident proton are also given in this part. In the following part, the character of epithermal neutron beam generated by 2.5-MeV incident protons is moderated by a new-designed moderator. Results: Energy spectra of neutrons generated by accelerator-based 7Li(p, n) reaction with incident proton energy from 1.9 MeV to 3.0 MeV are got through the simulation and calculation. The best moderator thickness is got through comparison. Conclusions: Neutron beam produced by accelerator-based 7Li(p, n) reaction, with the bombarding beam of 10 mA and the energy of 2.5 MeV, can meet the requirement of BNCT well after being moderated. (authors)

  3. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Boron neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary cancer radiotherapy modality in which a boronated pharmaceutical that preferentially accumulates in malignant tissue is first administered, followed by exposing the tissue in the treatment volume to a thermal neutron field. Current usable beams are reactor-based but a viable alternative is the production of an epithermal neutron beam from an accelerator. Current literature cites various proposed accelerator-based designs, most of which are based on proton beams with beryllium or lithium targets. This dissertation examines the efficacy of a novel approach to BNCT treatments that incorporates an electron linear accelerator in the production of a photoneutron source. This source may help to resolve some of the present concerns associated with accelerator sources, including that of target cooling. The photoneutron production process is discussed as a possible alternate source of neutrons for eventual BNCT treatments for cancer. A conceptual design to produce epithermal photoneutrons by high photons (due to bremsstrahlung) impinging on deuterium targets is presented along with computational and experimental neutron production data. A clinically acceptable filtered epithermal neutron flux on the order of 107 neutrons per second per milliampere of electron current is shown to be obtainable. Additionally, the neutron beam is modified and characterized for BNCT applications by employing two unique moderating materials (an Al/AlF3 composite and a stacked Al/Teflon design) at various incident electron energies

  4. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Mitchell, H.E.

    1996-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary cancer radiotherapy modality in which a boronated pharmaceutical that preferentially accumulates in malignant tissue is first administered, followed by exposing the tissue in the treatment volume to a thermal neutron field. Current usable beams are reactor-based but a viable alternative is the production of an epithermal neutron beam from an accelerator. Current literature cites various proposed accelerator-based designs, most of which are based on proton beams with beryllium or lithium targets. This dissertation examines the efficacy of a novel approach to BNCT treatments that incorporates an electron linear accelerator in the production of a photoneutron source. This source may help to resolve some of the present concerns associated with accelerator sources, including that of target cooling. The photoneutron production process is discussed as a possible alternate source of neutrons for eventual BNCT treatments for cancer. A conceptual design to produce epithermal photoneutrons by high photons (due to bremsstrahlung) impinging on deuterium targets is presented along with computational and experimental neutron production data. A clinically acceptable filtered epithermal neutron flux on the order of 10{sup 7} neutrons per second per milliampere of electron current is shown to be obtainable. Additionally, the neutron beam is modified and characterized for BNCT applications by employing two unique moderating materials (an Al/AlF{sub 3} composite and a stacked Al/Teflon design) at various incident electron energies.

  5. Development of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    We describe the present status of an ongoing project to develop a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based (AB)-BNCT. The project final goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.4 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. The machine currently being constructed is a folded TESQ with a high-voltage terminal at 0.6 MV. We report here on the progress achieved in a number of different areas.

  6. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  7. Experimental and Simulated Characterization of a Beam Shaping Assembly for Accelerator- Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    In the frame of the construction of a Tandem Electrostatic Quadrupole Accelerator facility devoted to the Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a Beam Shaping Assembly has been characterized by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and measurements. The neutrons were generated via the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction by irradiating a thick LiF target with a 2.3 MeV proton beam delivered by the TANDAR accelerator at CNEA. The emerging neutron flux was measured by means of activation foils while the beam quality and directionality was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The parameters show compliance with those suggested by IAEA. Finally, an improvement adding a beam collimator has been evaluated.

  8. Accelerator based-boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)-clinical QA and QC

    Alpha-particle and recoil Li atom yielded by the reaction (10B, n), due to their high LET properties, efficiently and specifically kill the cancer cell that has incorporated the boron. Efficacy of this boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been demonstrated mainly in the treatment of recurrent head/neck and malignant brain cancers in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KUR). As the clinical trial of BNCT is to start from 2009 based on an accelerator (not on the Reactor), this paper describes the tentative outline of the standard operation procedure of BNCT for its quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) along the flow of its clinical practice. Personnel concerned in the practice involve the attending physician, multiple physicians in charge of BNCT, medical physicists, nurses and reactor stuff. The flow order of the actual BNCT is as follows: Pre-therapeutic evaluation mainly including informed consent and confirmation of the prescription; Therapeutic planning including setting of therapy volume, and of irradiation axes followed by meeting for stuffs' agreement, decision of irradiating field in the irradiation room leading to final decision of the axis, CT for the planning, decision of the final therapeutic plan according to Japan Atomic Energy Agency-Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS) and meeting of all related personnel for the final confirmation of therapeutic plan; and BNCT including the transport of patient to KUR, dripping of boronophenylalanine, setting up of the patient on the machine, blood sampling for pharmacokinetics, boron level measurement for decision of irradiating time, switch on/off of the accelerator, confirmation of patient's movement in the irradiated field after the neutron irradiation, blood sampling for confirmation of the boron level, and patient's leave from the room. The QA/QC check is principally to be conducted with the two-person rule. The purpose of the clinical trial is to establish the usefulness of BNCT, and

  9. Electrostatic design and beam transport for a folded tandem electrostatic quadrupole accelerator facility for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    Within the frame of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT), we discuss here the electrostatic design of the machine, including the accelerator tubes with electrostatic quadrupoles and the simulations for the transport and acceleration of a high intensity beam.

  10. Development of high intensity ion sources for a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Several ion sources have been developed and an ion source test stand has been mounted for the first stage of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility For Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. A first source, designed, fabricated and tested is a dual chamber, filament driven and magnetically compressed volume plasma proton ion source. A 4 mA beam has been accelerated and transported into the suppressed Faraday cup. Extensive simulations of the sources have been performed using both 2D and 3D self-consistent codes.

  11. Development of beryllium-based neutron target system with three-layer structure for accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugano, Tomei; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The iBNCT project team with University of Tsukuba is developing an accelerator-based neutron source. Regarding neutron target material, our project has applied beryllium. To deal with large heat load and blistering of the target system, we developed a three-layer structure for the target system that includes a blistering mitigation material between the beryllium used as the neutron generator and the copper heat sink. The three materials were bonded through diffusion bonding using a hot isostatic pressing method. Based on several verifications, our project chose palladium as the intermediate layer. A prototype of the neutron target system was produced. We will verify that sufficient neutrons for BNCT treatment are generated by the device in the near future. PMID:26260448

  12. High power accelerator-based boron neutron capture with a liquid lithium target and new applications to treatment of infectious diseases

    Halfon, S. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)], E-mail: halfon@phys.huji.ac.il; Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Steinberg, D. [Biofilm Laboratory, Institute of Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Hebrew University-Hadassah (Israel); Nagler, A.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Polacheck, I. [Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center (Israel); Srebnik, M. [Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel)

    2009-07-15

    A new conceptual design for an accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (ABNCT) facility based on the high-current low-energy proton beam driven by the linear accelerator at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) incident on a windowless forced-flow liquid-lithium target, is described. The liquid-lithium target, currently in construction at Soreq NRC, will produce a neutron field suitable for the BNCT treatment of deep-seated tumor tissues, through the reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be. The liquid-lithium target is designed to overcome the major problem of solid lithium targets, namely to sustain and dissipate the power deposited by the high-intensity proton beam. Together with diseases conventionally targeted by BNCT, we propose to study the application of our setup to a novel approach in treatment of diseases associated with bacterial infections and biofilms, e.g. inflammations on implants and prosthetic devices, cystic fibrosis, infectious kidney stones. Feasibility experiments evaluating the boron neutron capture effectiveness on bacteria annihilation are taking place at the Soreq nuclear reactor.

  13. High power accelerator-based boron neutron capture with a liquid lithium target and new applications to treatment of infectious diseases

    A new conceptual design for an accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (ABNCT) facility based on the high-current low-energy proton beam driven by the linear accelerator at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) incident on a windowless forced-flow liquid-lithium target, is described. The liquid-lithium target, currently in construction at Soreq NRC, will produce a neutron field suitable for the BNCT treatment of deep-seated tumor tissues, through the reaction 7Li(p,n)7Be. The liquid-lithium target is designed to overcome the major problem of solid lithium targets, namely to sustain and dissipate the power deposited by the high-intensity proton beam. Together with diseases conventionally targeted by BNCT, we propose to study the application of our setup to a novel approach in treatment of diseases associated with bacterial infections and biofilms, e.g. inflammations on implants and prosthetic devices, cystic fibrosis, infectious kidney stones. Feasibility experiments evaluating the boron neutron capture effectiveness on bacteria annihilation are taking place at the Soreq nuclear reactor.

  14. Use of accelerator based neutron sources

    With the objective of discussing new requirements related to the use of accelerator based neutron generators an Advisory Group meeting was held in October 1998 in Vienna. This meeting was devoted to the specific field of the utilization of accelerator based neutron generators. This TECDOC reports on the technical discussions and presentations that took place at this meeting and reflects the current status of neutron generators. The 14 MeV neutron generators manufactured originally for neutron activation analysis are utilised also for nuclear structure and reaction studies, nuclear data acquisition, radiation effects and damage studies, fusion related studies, neutron radiography

  15. Accelerator tube construction and characterization for a tandem-electrostatic-quadrupole for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    The accelerator tubes are essential components of the accelerator. Their function is to transport and accelerate a very intense proton or deuteron beam through the machine, from the ion source to the neutron production target, without significant losses. In this contribution, we discuss materials selected for the tube construction, the procedures used for their assembly and the testing performed to meet the stringent requirements to which it is subjected.

  16. High-power electron beam tests of a liquid-lithium target and characterization study of (7)Li(p,n) near-threshold neutrons for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Cohen, D; Eliyahu, I; Kijel, D; Mardor, I; Silverman, I

    2014-06-01

    A compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The target is intended to demonstrate liquid-lithium target capabilities to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals. The lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power >5kW generated by high-intensity proton beams, necessary for sufficient therapeutic neutron flux. In preliminary experiments liquid lithium was flown through the target loop and generated a stable jet on the concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power densities of more than 4kW/cm(2) and volumetric power density around 2MW/cm(3) at a lithium flow of ~4m/s, while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. These power densities correspond to a narrow (σ=~2mm) 1.91MeV, 3mA proton beam. A high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5MeV, 2mA) is being commissioned at the SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator. In order to determine the conditions of LiLiT proton irradiation for BNCT and to tailor the neutron energy spectrum, a characterization of near threshold (~1.91MeV) (7)Li(p,n) neutrons is in progress based on Monte-Carlo (MCNP and Geant4) simulation and on low-intensity experiments with solid LiF targets. In-phantom dosimetry measurements are performed using special designed dosimeters based on CR-39 track detectors. PMID:24387907

  17. Accelerator based steady state neutron source

    Using high current, cw linear accelerator technology, a spallation neutron source can achieve much higher average intensities than existing or proposed pulsed spallation sources. With about 100 mA of 300 MeV protons or deuterons, the accelerator based neutron research facility (ABNR) would initially achieve the 1016 n/cm2s thermal flux goal of the advanced steady state neutron source, and upgrading could provide higher steady state fluxes. The relatively low ion energy compared to other spallation sources has an important impact on R and D requirements as well as capital cost, for which a range of $300-450 M is estimated by comparison to other accelerator-based neutron source facilities. The source is similar to a reactor source is most respects. It has some higher energy neutrons but fewer gamma rays, and the moderator region is free of many of the design constraints of a reactor, which helps to implement sources for various neutron energy spectra, many beam tubes, etc., with the development of a multibeam concept and the basis for currents greater than 100 mA that is assumed in the R and D plan, the ABNR would serve many additional uses, such as fusion materials development, production of proton-rich isotopes, and other energy and defense program needs

  18. An accelerator based steady state neutron source

    Using high current, cw linear accelerator technology, a spallation neutron source can achieve much higher average intensities than existing or proposed pulsed spallation sources. With about 100 mA of 300 MeV protons or deuterons, the accelerator based neutron research facility (ABNR) would initially achieve the 1016 n/cm2 s themal flux goal of the advanced steady state neutron source, and upgrading could provide higher steady state fluxes. The relatively low ion energy compared to other spallation sources has an important impact on R and D requirements as well as capital cost, for which a range of Dollar 300-450 is estimated by comparison to other accelerator-based neutron source facilities. The source is similar to a reactor source in most respects. It has some higher energy neutrons but fewer gamma rays, and the moderator region is free of many of the design constraints of a reactor, which helps to implement sources for various neutron energy spectra, many beam tubes, etc. With the development of a multibeam concept and the basis for currents greater than 100 mA that is assumed in the R and D plan, the ABNR would serve many additional uses, such as fusion materials development, production of proton-rich isotopes, and other energy and defense program needs. (orig.)

  19. Accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    Full text: The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk) and the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Obninsk) have proposed an accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture and fast neutron therapy for hospital. Innovative approach is based upon vacuum insulation tandem accelerator (VITA) and near threshold 7Li(p,n)7Be neutron generation. Pilot accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture therapy is under construction now at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia. In the present report, the pilot facility design is presented and discussed. Design features of facility components are discussed. Results of experiments and simulations are presented. Complete experimental tests are planned by the end of the year 2005

  20. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. (author)

  1. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    Agosteo, S; D'Errico, F; Nath, R; Tinti, R

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in sup 1 sup 0 B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast ...

  2. Accelerator-based neutron radioscopic systems

    There is interest in non-reactor source, thermal neutron inspection systems for applications in aircraft maintenance, explosive devices, investment-cast turbine blades, etc. Accelerator sources, (d-T), RFQ accelerators and cyclotrons as examples, are available for either transportable or fixed neutron inspection systems. Sources are reviewed for neutron output, portability, ease of use and cost, and for use with an electronic neutron imaging camera (image intensifier or scintillator-camera system) to provide a prompt response, neutron inspection system. Particular emphasis is given to the current aircraft inspection problem to detect and characterize corrosion. Systems are analyzed to determine usefulness in providing an on-line inspection technique to detect corrosion in aluminum honeycomb aircraft components, either on-aircraft or in a shop environment. The neutron imaging sensitivity to hydrogenous aluminum corrosion product offers early detection advantages for aircraft corrosion, to levels of aluminum metal loss as small as 25 μm. The practical capability for a continuous scan thermal neutron radioscopic system to inspect up to 500 square feet of component surface per day is used as an evaluation criterion, with the system showing contrast sensitivity of at least 5% and image detail in the order of 4 mm for parts 10 cm thick. Under these practical conditions and 3-shift operation, the source must provide an incident thermal neutron flux of 5.6x104 n cm-2 s-1 at an L/D of 30. A stop and go inspection approach, offering improved resolution, would require a source with similar characteristics

  3. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2003-04-11

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  4. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  5. Spectrum shaping of accelerator-based neutron beams for BNCT

    Montagnini, B; Esposito, J; Giusti, V; Mattioda, F; Varone, R

    2002-01-01

    We describe Monte Carlo simulations of three facilities for the production of epithermal neutrons for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) and examine general aspects and problems of designing the spectrum-shaping assemblies to be used with these neutron sources. The first facility is based on an accelerator-driven low-power subcritical reactor, operating as a neutron amplifier. The other two facilities have no amplifier and rely entirely on their primary sources, a D-T fusion reaction device and a conventional 2.5 MeV proton accelerator with a Li target, respectively.

  6. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    Franklyn, C. B.

    2011-12-01

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >1011 nṡs-1. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  7. BINP pilot accelerator-based neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    Neutron source based on accelerator has been proposed for neutron capture therapy at hospital. Innovative approach is based upon tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation and near threshold 7Li(p,n)7Be neutron generation. Pilot innovative accelerator based neutron source is under going to start operating now at BINP, Novosibirsk. Negative ion source with Penning geometry of electrodes has been manufactured and dc H- ion beam has been obtained. Study of beam transport was carried out using prototype of tandem accelerator. Tandem accelerator and ion optical channels have been manufactured and assembled. Neutron producing target has been manufactured, thermal regimes of target were studied, and lithium evaporation on target substrate was realized. In the report, the pilot facility design is given and design features of facility components are discussed. Current status of project realization, results of experiments and simulations are presented. (author)

  8. Optimisation of resolution in accelerator-based fast neutron radiography

    Rahmanian, H; Watterson, J I W

    2002-01-01

    In fast neutron radiography, imaging geometry, neutron scattering, the fast neutron scintillator and the position-sensitive detector all influence feature contrast, resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio in the image. The effect of imaging geometry can be explored by using a ray-tracing method. This requires following the path of neutrons through the imaging field, which includes the sample of interest. A relationship between imaging geometry and feature detectability can be developed. Monte Carlo methods can be used to explore the effect of neutron scattering on the results obtained with the ray-tracing technique. Fast neutrons are detected indirectly via neutron-nucleon scattering reactions. Using hydrogen-rich scintillators and relying on the recoil protons to ionise the scintillator material is the most sensitive technique available. The efficiency, geometry and composition of these scintillators influence the detectability of features in fast neutron radiography. These scintillator properties have a di...

  9. Accelerator based neutron source for the neutron capture therapy at hospital

    Accelerator source of epithermal neutrons for the hospital-based boron neutron capture therapy is proposed and discussed. Kinematically collimated neutrons are produced via near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction at proton energies of 1.883 - 1.9 MeV. Steady-state accelerator current of 40 mA allows to provide therapeutically useful beams with treatment times of tens of minutes. The basic components of the facility are a hydrogen negative ion source, an electrostatic tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation, a sectioned rectifier, and a thin lithium neutron generating target on the surface of tungsten disk cooled by liquid metal heat carrier. Design features of facility components are discussed. The possibility of stabilization of proton energy is considered. At proton energy of 2.5 MeV the neutron beam production for NCT usage after moderation is also considered. (author)

  10. Fabrication of boron-phosphide neutron detectors

    Boron phosphide is a potentially viable candidate for high neutron flux neutron detectors. The authors have explored chemical vapor deposition methods to produce such detectors and have not been able to produce good boron phosphide coatings on silicon carbide substrates. However, semi-conducting quality films have been produced. Further testing is required

  11. Design of an accelerator-based neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    The boron neutron capture therapy is mainly suited in the treatment of some tumor kinds which revealed ineffective to the traditional radiotherapy. In order to take advantage of such a therapeutic modality in hospital environments, neutron beams of suitable energy and flux levels provided by compact size facilities are needed. The advantages and drawbacks of several neutron beams are here analysed in terms of therapeutic gains. In detail the GEANT-3/MICAP simulations show that high tumor control probability, with sub-lethal dose at healthy tissues, can be achieved by using neutron beams of few keV energy having a flux of about 109 neutrons/(cm2 s). To produce such a neutron beam, the feasibility of a proton accelerator is investigated. In particular an appropriate choice of the radiofrequency parameters (modulation, efficiency of acceleration, phase shift, etc.) allows the development of relatively compact accelerators, having a proton beam current of 30 mA and an energy of 2 MeV, which could eventually lead to setting up of hospital-based neutron facilities.

  12. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT

    Protecting the facility personnel and the general public from radiation exposure is a primary safety concern of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility. This work makes an attempt at answering the questions open-quotes How much?close quotes and open-quotes What kind?close quotes of shielding will meet the occupational limits of such a facility. Shielding effectiveness is compared for ordinary and barytes concretes in combination with and without borated polyethylene. A calculational model was developed of a treatment room, patient open-quotes scatterer,close quotes and the epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to compute the total effective dose equivalent rates at specific points of interest outside of the treatment room. A conservative occupational effective dose rate limit of 0.01 mSv h-1 was the guideline for this study. Conservative Monte Carlo calculations show that constructing the treatment room walls with 1.5 m of ordinary concrete, 1.2 m of barytes concrete, 1.0 m of ordinary concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene, or 0.8 m of barytes concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene will adequately protect facility personnel. 20 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Boron neutron capture therapy. What is next?

    BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) will have difficulties establishing itself without efficient and conclusive clinical trials of glioma, without the expansion to other tumors, and without efficient programs for compound development and testing. (author)

  14. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be u...

  15. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector ...

  16. Accelerator-Based Biological Irradiation Facility Simulating Neutron Exposure from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C; Marino, Stephen A; Geard, Charles R; Brenner, David J; Garty, Guy

    2015-10-01

    We describe here an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility, intended to expose blood or small animals to neutron fields mimicking those from an improvised nuclear device at relevant distances from the epicenter. Neutrons are generated by a mixed proton/deuteron beam on a thick beryllium target, generating a broad spectrum of neutron energies that match those estimated for the Hiroshima bomb at 1.5 km from ground zero. This spectrum, dominated by neutron energies between 0.2 and 9 MeV, is significantly different from the standard reactor fission spectrum, as the initial bomb spectrum changes when the neutrons are transported through air. The neutron and gamma dose rates were measured using a custom tissue-equivalent gas ionization chamber and a compensated Geiger-Mueller dosimeter, respectively. Neutron spectra were evaluated by unfolding measurements using a proton-recoil proportional counter and a liquid scintillator detector. As an illustration of the potential use of this facility we present micronucleus yields in single divided, cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral lymphocytes up to 1.5 Gy demonstrating 3- to 5-fold enhancement over equivalent X-ray doses. This facility is currently in routine use, irradiating both mice and human blood samples for evaluation of neutron-specific biodosimetry assays. Future studies will focus on dose reconstruction in realistic mixed neutron/photon fields. PMID:26414507

  17. Optimal Neutron Source and Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly

  18. Optimal Neutron Source and Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Vujic, J L; Greenspan, E; Guess, S; Karni, Y; Kastenber, W E; Kim, L; Leung, K N; Regev, D; Verbeke, J M; Waldron, W L; Zhu, Y

    2003-01-01

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  19. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W.E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; J.M. Verbeke, K.N. Leung; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-04-30

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  20. Quantitative boron detection by neutron transmission method

    //Quantitative boron detection is mainly performed by chemical methods like colorimetric titration. High neutron absorption cross section of natural boron makes attractive its detection by absorption measurements. This work is an extension of earlier investigations where neutron radiography technique was used for boron detection. In the present investigation, the neutron absorption rate of boron containing solutions is the way to measure quantitatively the boron content of the solutions. The investigation was carried out in Istanbul TRIGA Mark-II reactor. In the end of the experiments, it was observed that even |ppw| grade boron in aqueous solution can be easily detected. The use of this method is certainly very useful for boron utilizing industries like glass and steel industries.The major disadvantage of the method is the obligation to use always aqueous solutions to be able to detect homogeneously the boron content. Then, steel or glass samples have to be put first in an appropriate solution form. The irradiation of steel samples can give the distribution of boron by the help of a imaging and this suggested method will give its quantitative measurement. The superiority of this method are its quick response time and its accuracy. To test this accuracy, a supposed unknown , solution of boric acid is irradiated and then calculated by the help of the calibration curve. The measured value of boric acid was 0.89 mg and the calculated value was found to be 0.98 mg which gives an accuracy of 10 %. It was also seen that the method is more accurate for low concentration. (authors)

  1. A neutron diffraction study of amorphous boron

    Delaplane, R. G.; Lundström, T.; Dahlborg, U.; Howells, W. S.

    1991-07-01

    The structure of amorphous boron has been studied with pulsed neutron diffraction techniques using the ISIS facilities at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The experimental static structure factor S(Q) and radial distribution function support a structural model based on units of B12 icosahedra resembling those found in crystalline β-rhombohedral boron, but with a certain degree of disorder occurring in the linking between these subunits.

  2. Accelerator-based neutron source for the neutron-capture and fast neutron therapy at hospital

    Bayanov, B. F.; Belov, V. P.; Bender, E. D.; Bokhovko, M. V.; Dimov, G. I.; Kononov, V. N.; Kononov, O. E.; Kuksanov, N. K.; Palchikov, V. E.; Pivovarov, V. A.; Salimov, R. A.; Silvestrov, G. I.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Soloviov, N. A.; Taskaev, S. Yu.

    The proton accelerator complex for neutron production in lithium target discussed, which can operate in two modes. The first provides a neutron beam kinematically collimated with good forward direction in 25° and average energy of 30 keV, directly applicable for neutron-capture therapy with high efficiency of proton beam use. The proton energy in this mode is 1.883-1.890 MeV that is near the threshold of the 7Li( p, n) 7Be reaction. In the second mode, at proton energy of 2.5 MeV, the complex-produced neutron beam with maximum energy board of 790 keV which can be used directly for fast neutron therapy and for neutron-capture therapy after moderation. The project of such a neutron source is based on the 2.5 MeV original electrostatic accelerator tandem with vacuum insulation developed at BINP which is supplied with a high-voltage rectifier. The rectifier is produced in BINP as a part of ELV-type industrial accelerator. Design features of the tandem determining its high reliability in operation with a high-current (up to 40 mA) H - ion beam are discussed. They are: the absence of ceramic accelerator columns around the beam passage region, good conditions for pumping out of charge-exchange gaseous target region, strong focusing optics and high acceleration rate minimizing the space charge effects. The possibility of stabilization of protons energy with an accuracy level of 0.1% necessary for operation in the near threshold region is considered. The design description of H - continuous ion source with a current of 40 mA is also performed. To operate with a 100 kW proton beam it is proposed to use liquid-lithium targets. A thin lithium layer on the surface of a tungsten disk cooled intensively by a liquid metal heat carrier is proposed for use in case of the vertical beam, and a flat liquid lithium jet flowing through the narrow nozzle - for the horizontal beam.

  3. Accelerator-based neutron tomography cooperating with X-ray radiography

    Neutron resonance absorption spectroscopy (N-RAS) using a pulsed neutron source can be applied to time-of-flight (TOF) radiography, and the obtained parameters from the peak shape analysis can be reconstructed as the tomograms of nuclide distributions using computed tomography (CT). The problem is that the available spatial resolution is not sufficient for radiography imaging. In this study, we combined neutron and X-ray radiographies to improve the quantitative reconstruction of the neutron tomogram. The accelerator-based neutron source emits X-rays (or gamma-rays) at the same time the neutron pulse is emitted. We utilized the X-ray beam from the neutron source to obtain X-ray radiogram on the same beam line with neutron radiography and then reconstructed the neutron tomogram quantitatively with the help of a detailed sample internal structure obtained from the X-ray radiogram. We calculated the nuclide number density distribution tomogram using a statistical reconstruction procedure, which was easy to include in the structure model during the reconstruction. The obtained result of nuclide number density distribution showed good coincidence with the original object number density.

  4. Design and techniques for fusion blanket neutronics experiments using an accelerator-based deuterium-tritium neutron source

    The experiments performed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute/U.S. Department of Energy collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics are designed with consideration of geometrical and material configurations. The general guide that is used to design the engineering-oriented neutronics experiment, which uses an accelerator-based 14-MeV neutron source, is discussed and compared with neutronics characteristics of the reactor models. Preparation of the experimental assembly, blanket materials, and the neutron source is described. A variety of techniques for measuring the nuclear parameters such as the tritium production rate are developed or introduced through the collaboration as a basis of the neutronics experiments. The features of these techniques are discussed with the experimental error and compared with each other. 25 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Medical chemistry of boron neutron capture agents having pharmacological activity

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cancer treatment that selectively destroys cancer cells following administering a cancer-selective drug containing stable isotope boron-10 and neutron irradiation. In clinical trial of BNCT, disodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) and p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) have been used, however, development of a new drugs with high cancer selectivity and therapeutic efficiency is expected. Therefore, we review boron-containing drugs as a boron neutron capture agents having pharmacological activity, BNCT research on boron-modified porphyrin derivatives which have photosensitivity and neutron capture activity and our proposed neutron sensitizing agent. (author)

  6. High neutronic efficiency, low current targets for accelerator-based BNCT applications

    The neutronic efficiency of target/filters for accelerator-based BNCT applications is measured by the proton current required to achieve a desirable neutron current at the treatment port (109 n/cm2/s). In this paper the authors describe two possible targeyt/filter concepts wihch minimize the required current. Both concepts are based on the Li-7 (p,n)Be-7 reaction. Targets that operate near the threshold energy generate neutrons that are close tothe desired energy for BNCT treatment. Thus, the filter can be extremely thin (∼ 5 cm iron). However, this approach has an extremely low neutron yield (n/p ∼ 1.0(-6)), thus requiring a high proton current. The proposed solutino is to design a target consisting of multiple extremely thin targets (proton energy loss per target ∼ 10 keV), and re-accelerate the protons between each target. Targets operating at ihgher proton energies (∼ 2.5 MeV) have a much higher yield (n/p ∼ 1.0(-4)). However, at these energies the maximum neutron energy is approximately 800 keV, and thus a neutron filter is required to degrade the average neutron energy to the range of interest for BNCT (10--20 keV). A neutron filter consisting of fluorine compounds and iron has been investigated for this case. Typically a proton current of approximately 5 mA is required to generate the desired neutron current at the treatment port. The efficiency of these filter designs can be further increased by incorporating neutron reflectors that are co-axial with the neutron source. These reflectors are made of materials which have high scattering cross sections in the range 0.1--1.0 MeV

  7. Clinical aspects of boron neutron capture therapy

    Boron neutron capture therapy is potentially useful in treating malignant tumors of the central nervous system and is technically possible. Additional in vitro and in vivo testing is required to determine toxicities, normal tissue tolerances and tissue responses to treatment parameters. Adequate tumor uptake of the capture agent can be evaluated clinically prior to implementation of a finalized treatment protocol. Phase I and Phase II protocol development, clinical pharmacokinetic studies and neutron beam development

  8. Novel Boron Based Multilayer Thermal Neutron Detector

    SCHIEBER, M

    2010-01-01

    The detector contains four or more layers of natural Boron absorbing thermal neutrons. Thickness of a layer is 0.4 - 1.2 mg/cm2. The layers are deposited on one or on both sides of a metal surface used as contacts. Between the absorbing layers there are gas-filled gaps 3 - 6 mm thick. Electric field of 100 - 200 V/cm is applied to the gas-filled gaps. Natural Boron contains almost 20% of 10B isotope. When atoms of 10B capture a thermal neutron, nuclear reaction occurs, as a result of which two heavy particles - alpha particle and ion 7Li - from the thin absorber layer are emitted in opposing sides. One of the two particles penetrates into gas-filled gap between Boron layers and ionizes the gas. An impulse of electric current is created in the gas-filled gap actuated by the applied electric field. The impulse is registered by an electronic circuit. We have made and tested detectors containing from two to sixteen layers of natural Boron with an efficiency of thermal neutron registration from 2.9% to 12.5% accor...

  9. An optimized neutron-beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT

    Different materials and proton beam energies have been studied in order to search for an optimized neutron production target and beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT. The solution proposed in this work consists of successive stacks of Al, polytetrafluoroethylene, commercially known as Teflon[reg ], and LiF as moderator and neutron absorber, and Pb as reflector. This assembly is easy to build and its cost is relatively low. An exhaustive Monte Carlo simulation study has been performed evaluating the doses delivered to a Snyder model head phantom by a neutron production Li-metal target based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction for proton bombarding energies of 1.92, 2.0, 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. Three moderator thicknesses have been studied and the figures of merit show the advantage of irradiating with near-resonance-energy protons (2.3 MeV) because of the relatively high neutron yield at this energy, which at the same time keeps the fast neutron healthy tissue dose limited and leads to the lowest treatment times. A moderator of 34 cm length has shown the best performance among the studied cases

  10. Boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Joel, D.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.

    1996-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a bimodal form of radiation therapy for cancer. The first component of this treatment is the preferential localization of the stable isotope {sup 10}B in tumor cells by targeting with boronated compounds. The tumor and surrounding tissue is then irradiated with a neutron beam resulting in thermal neutron/{sup 10}B reactions ({sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li) resulting in the production of localized high LET radiation from alpha and {sup 7}Li particles. These products of the neutron capture reaction are very damaging to cells, but of short range so that the majority of the ionizing energy released is microscopically confined to the vicinity of the boron-containing compound. In principal it should be possible with BNCT to selectively destroy small nests or even single cancer cells located within normal tissue. It follows that the major improvements in this form of radiation therapy are going to come largely from the development of boron compounds with greater tumor selectivity, although there will certainly be advances made in neutron beam quality as well as the possible development of alternative sources of neutron beams, particularly accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams.

  11. Synovectomy by neutron capture in boron

    The rheumatoid arthritis is an illness which affect approximately at 3% of the World population. This illness is characterized by the inflammation of the joints which reduces the quality of life and the productivity of the patients. Since, it is an autoimmune illness, the inflammation is due to the overproduction of synovial liquid by the increase in the quantity of synoviocytes. The rheumatoid arthritis does not have a definitive recovery and the patients have three options of treatment: the use of drugs, the surgery and the radio synovectomy. The synovectomy by neutron capture in Boron is a novel proposal of treatment of the rheumatoid arthritis that consists in using a charged compound with Boron 10 that is preferently incorporated in the synoviocytes and to a less extent in the rest of surrounding tissues of the joint. Then, the joint is exposed to a thermal neutron field that induces the reaction (n, α) in the 10 B. the products of this reaction place their energy inside synoviocytes producing their reduction and therefore the reduction of the joint inflammation. Since it is a novel procedure, the synovectomy by neutron capture in boron has two problems: the source design and the design of the adequate drug. In this work it has been realized a Monte Carlo study with the purpose to design a moderating medium that with a 239 Pu Be source in its center, produces a thermal neutron field. With the produced neutron spectra, the neutrons spectra and neutron doses were calculated in different sites inside a model of knee joint. In Monte Carlo studies it is necessary to know the elemental composition of all the joint components, for the case of synovia and the synovial liquid this information does not exist in such way that it is supposed that its composition is equal than the water. In this work also it has been calculated the kerma factors by neutrons of synovia and the synovial liquid supposing that their elemental composition are similar to the blood tissue

  12. Microdosimetry for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    The specific aims of the research proposal were as follows: (1) To design and construct small volume tissue equivalent proportional counters for the dosimetry and microdosimetry of high intensity thermal and epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT, and of modified fast neutron beams designed for boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). (2) To develop analytical methods for estimating the biological effectiveness of the absorbed dose in BNCT and BNCEFNT based on the measured microdosimetric spectra. (3) To develop an analytical framework for comparing the biological effectiveness of different epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT and BNCEFNT, based on correlated sets of measured microdosimetric spectra and radiobiological data. Specific aims (1) and (2) were achieved in their entirety and are comprehensively documented in Jay Burmeister's Ph.D. dissertation entitled ''Specification of physical and biologically effective absorbed dose in radiation therapies utilizing the boron neutron capture reaction'' (Wayne State University, 1999). Specific aim (3) proved difficult to accomplish because of a lack of sufficient radiobiological data

  13. Boron-containing neutron shielding building ceramics

    The data are presented on the composition of raw materials as well as on the properties and chemical composition of finished products of ceramics intended for neutron shielding. It is shown that 0.8 % content of B2O3 in bricks of ceramic mass proposed halves neutron radiation from the source of 106 neutr·s-1 close rate compared to bricks of boron free ceramic mass. Results of tests on water absorption and compression strength make it possible to recommend new ceramics to be used as tiles and facade building materials

  14. Considerations for boron neutron capture therapy studies

    Radiotherapy is indispensable as a mean to eradicate deeply or infiltrating tumor tissue that can not be removed surgically. Therefore, it is not selective and may also kill the surrounding health tissue. The principle of BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) consist in targeting a tumor selectively with a boron-10 compound. This nuclide has a large capture cross section for thermal neutrons and the nuclear reaction and the delivered energy in locus will selective the tumor. Since its initial proposal in 1963 BNCT has made much progress, however it is not used in a routine treatment. In this work it was approached some complex procedures, as the obtention of selective boron compounds, the adequate set up of neutron beams, the biodistribution, the in vivo and in vitro studies, and also human patients treatments. This work provide fundamentals about BNCT to professional of different areas of knowledge since it comprises multidisciplinary study. It includes appendixes for the ones not related to the field for a better comprehension of the many aspects involved. It is also presented a glossary containing technical and basic aspects involved. It is also presented a glossary containing technical and basic terms referred in the work. (author). 174 refs, 1 fig, 12 apps

  15. Boron carbide neutron screen for GRR-1 neutron spectrum tailoring

    The presence of fast neutron spectra in new reactor concepts (such as Gas Cooled Fast Reactor, new generation Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor, Lead Fast Reactor, Accelerator Driven System and nuclear Fusion Reactors) is expected to induce a strong impact on the contained materials, including structural materials (e.g. steels), nuclear fuels, neutron reflecting materials (e.g. beryllium) and tritium breeding materials (for fusion reactors). Therefore, effective operation of these reactors will require extensive testing of their components, which must be performed under neutronic conditions representative of those expected to prevail inside the reactor cores when in operation. Depending on the material, the requirements of a test irradiation can vary. In this work preliminary studies were performed to observe the behavior of the neutron spectrum within a boron carbide neutron screen inserted in a hypothetical reflector test hole of the Greek Research Reactor. Four different screen configurations were simulated with Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4. The obtained data showed that the insertion of boron carbide caused not only elimination of the thermal (E < 1 eV) component of the neutron energy spectrum but also absorption of a considerable proportion of the intermediate energy neutrons (1x10-6 MeV < E < 1 MeV). (author)

  16. Isodose Curves and Treatment Planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Liu, Hungyuan B.

    The development of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been progressing in both ^{10 }B compound development and testing and neutron beam delivery. Animal tests are now in progress with several ^{10}B compounds and once the results of these animal tests are promising, patient trials can be initiated. The objective of this study is to create a treatment planning method based on the dose calculations by a Monte Carlo code of a mixed radiation field to provide linkage between phantom dosimetry and patient irradiation. The research started with an overall review of the development of BNCT. Three epithermal neutron facilities are described, including the operating Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) beam, the designed Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) beam, and a designed accelerator based neutron source. The flux and dose distributions in a head model have been calculated for irradiation by these neutron beams. Different beam parameters were inter -compared for effectiveness. Dosimetric measurements in an elliptical lucite phantom and a cylindrical water phantom were made and compared to the MCNP calculations for irradiation by the BMRR beam. Repeated measurements were made and show consistent. To improve the statistical results calculated by MCNP, a neutron source plane was designed to start neutrons at the BMRR irradiation port. The source plane was used with the phantoms for dosimetric calculations. After being verified by different phantom dosimetry and in-air flux measurements at the irradiation port, the source plane was used to calculate the flux and dose distributions in the head model. A treatment planning program was created for use on a PC which uses the MCNP calculated results as input. This program calculates the thermal neutron flux and dose distributions of each component of radiation in the central coronal section of the head model for irradiation by a neutron beam. Different combinations of head orientations and irradiation

  17. Dosimetry of the low fouence fast neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy

    For the research of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), fast neutrons generated from the MC-50 cyclotron with maximum energy of 34.4 MeV in Korea Cancer Center Hospital were moderated by 70 cm paraffin and then the dose characteristics were investigated. Using these results, we hope to establish the protocol about dose measurement of epi-thermal neutron, to make a basis of dose characteristic of epi-thermal neutron emitted from nuclear reactor, and to find feasibility about accelerator-based BNCT. For measuring the absorbed dose and dose distribution of fast neutron beams, we used Unidos 10005 (PTW, Germany) electrometer and IC-17 (Far West, USA), IC-18, EIC-1 ion chambers manufactured by A-150 plastic and used IC-17M ion chamber manufactured by magnesium for gamma dose. There chambers were flushed with tissue equivalent gas and argon gas and then the flow rate was 5 cc per minute. Using Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code, transport program in mixed field with neutron, photon, electron, two dimensional dose and energy fluence distribution was calculated and, there results were compared with measured results. The absorbed dose of fast neutron beams was 6.47 x 10-3 cGy per 1 MU at the 4 cm depth of the water phantom, which is assumed to be effective depth for BNCT. The magnitude of gamma contamination intermingled with fast neutron beams was 65.2±0.9% at the same depth. In the dose distribution according to the depth or water, the neutron dose decreased linearly and the gamma dose decreased exponentially as the depth was deepened. The factor expressed energy level, D20/DI0, of the total dose was 0.718. Through the direct measurement using the two ion chambers, which is made different wall materials, and computer calculation of isodose distribution using MCNP simulation method, we have found the dose characteristics of low fluence fast neutron beams. If the power supply and the target material, which generate high voltage and current, will be developed and gamma

  18. Proceedings of workshop on 'Boron Chemistry and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy'

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 3rd Workshop on 'the Boron Chemistry and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy' held on February 12, in 1991. In this workshop, our attention was focused on the chemical nature of boron compounds and the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). First, clinical experiences of BNCT in KURRI in 1990 and 1991 were reported (Chap. 3). The feasibility of the gadolinium neutron capture therapy for brain tumors was discussed (Chap. 4). In the chemical field, a rapid spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of borons in biological samples is described (Chap. 5). The chemical behaviours of p-boronophenylalanine and its analogs in aqueous solutions were investigated by a paper electrophoresis and infrared spectroscopy (Chap. 6). On the molecular design and synthesis of new boron carriers for BNCT, several new synthetic methods for B-10 containing nucleoside derivatives were shown (Chap. 7). (author)

  19. Study of medical RI production with accelerator-based neutron sources

    The single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been widely adopted for nuclear medicine imaging to make diagnoses of body functions, identification of site of cancers, and so on. Now, almost all of medical radio isotopes are produced by nuclear reactors or charged particle accelerators. We propose a new route to produce the medical radio isotopes with accelerator-based neutron sources. In this paper, as an example, we introduce the proposed production method of 99Mo, which is the mother nuclide of 99mTc for SPECT. We determined the 100Mo(n,2n)99Mo reaction cross section to 1,415±82mb and it was consistent with the value (1,398mb) obtained from JENDL-4.0. Therefore, it indicates yields of produced RIs can be predicted with nuclear data based simulations. The simulation also can be used to design irradiation condition. In this paper some results of the simulations are also shown. (author)

  20. Experimental boron neutron capture therapy for melanoma: Systemic delivery of boron to melanotic and amelanotic melanoma

    The boron-containing melanin precursor analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) has previously been shown to selectively deliver boron to pigmented murine melanomas when administered in a single intragastric dose. If boron neutron capture therapy is to become a clinically useful method of radiation therapy for human malignant melanoma, the boron carrier must be capable of delivering useful amounts of boron to remote tumor sites (metastases) and to poorly pigmented melanomas. The authors have now determined the ability of BPA to accumulate in several nonpigmented melanoma models including human melanoma xenografts in nude mice. The absolute amount of boron in the nonpigmented melanomas was about 50% of the observed in the pigmented counterparts but was still selectively concentrated in the tumor relative to normal tissues in amounts sufficient for effective neutron capture therapy. Single intragastric doses of BPA resulted in selective localization of boron in the amelanotic Greene melanoma carried in the anterior chamber of the rabbit eye and in a pigmented murine melanoma growing in the lungs. The ratio of the boron concentration in these tumors to the boron concentration in the immediately adjacent normal tissue was in the range of 3:1 to 4:1. These distribution studies support the proposal that boron neutron capture therapy may be useful as a regional therapy for malignant melanoma

  1. Exploratory calculations for boron capture therapy using epithermal neutron beams

    To get an insight into the problems of boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumours, some calculations of the neutron distribution in a spherical human skull have been made with an ANISN program. The energy of the source neutrons was varied from about 1 keV to about 100 keV. Two different neutron group structures were used with corresponding different cross section libraries. For a spherically symmetric irradiation of a skull with radius 10 cm a source neutron energy of about 50 - 100 keV gives a rather flat boron capture rate over a large part of the skull. This shows the advantage of using epithermal neutrons in the treatment of deepseated tumours by the boron neutron capture method. (Auth.)

  2. Considerations on boron neutron capture therapy

    This article reviews the radiotherapy technique called Boron Neutron Capture Therapy - BNCT. Herein, basic concepts in BNCT are addressed, particularly how BNCT has been used in the attempts of defeating multiform glioblastoma. The history of the BNCT trials in the 50's and 60's, including the previous trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are presented. The Japanese experience in BNCT is discussed. Recently, clinical trials at the MIT and BNL have started, focusing multiform glioblastoma and peripheral and intracranial melanomas. Radiobiological and clinical data from Phase I trials on MIT are discussed. Considerations in how BNCT can be developed in Brazil are presented. It shows that Cf-252 Brachytherapy coupled with NCT may be a non-expensive, alternative way of addressing BNCT. (author)

  3. Advancements in Tumor Targeting Strategies for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Luderer, Micah John; de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2015-09-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising cancer therapy modality that utilizes the nuclear capture reaction of epithermal neutrons by boron-10 resulting in a localized nuclear fission reaction and subsequent cell death. Since cellular destruction is limited to approximately the diameter of a single cell, primarily only cells in the neutron field with significant boron accumulation will be damaged. However, the emergence of BNCT as a prominent therapy has in large part been hindered by a paucity of tumor selective boron containing agents. While L-boronophenylalanine and sodium borocaptate are the most commonly investigated clinical agents, new agents are desperately needed due to their suboptimal tumor selectivity. This review will highlight the various strategies to improve tumor boron delivery including: nucleoside and carbohydrate analogs, unnatural amino acids, porphyrins, antibody-dendrimer conjugates, cationic polymers, cell-membrane penetrating peptides, liposomes and nanoparticles. PMID:26033767

  4. Proceedings of workshop on 'boron science and boron neutron capture therapy'

    Kitaoka, Y. [ed.

    1998-12-01

    This volume contains the abstracts and programs of the 8th (1996), 9th (1997) and 10th (1998) of the workshop on 'the Boron Science and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy' and the recent progress reports especially subscribed. The 11 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  5. Neutron beam monitor based on a boron-coated GEM

    ZHOU Jian-Rong; LI Yi; SUN Zhi-Jia; LIU Ben; WANG Yan-Feng; YANG Gui-An; ZHOU Liang; XU Hong; DONG Jing; YANG Lei

    2011-01-01

    A new thermal neutron beam monitor with a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) is developed to meet the needs of the next generation of neutron facilities. A prototype chamber has been constructed with two 100 mm×100 mm GEM foils. Enriched boron-10 is coated on one surface of the aluminum cathode plate as the neutron convertor. 96 channel pads with an area of 8 mm×8 mm each are used for fast signal readout.In order to study the basic characteristics of a boron-coated GEM, several irradiation tests were carried out with α source 239pu and neutron source 241Am(Be). The signal induced by the neutron source has a high signal-to-noise ratio. A clear image obtained from α source 239pu is presented, which shows that the neutron beam monitor based on a boron-coated GEM has a good two-dimensional imaging ability.

  6. Anesthetic management of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for glioblastoma

    General anesthesia was given to twenty-seven patients who received Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) under craniotomy at Kyoto University Research Reactor from 1991 to 1999. Special considerations are required for anesthesia. (author)

  7. Proceedings of workshop on 'boron chemistry for neutron capture therapy'

    This volume contains the proceedings of the workshop on the chemistry of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy held on 1st of August in 1988 and on 22nd of January in 1990. In this workshop, our attention was mainly focused on the chemical reactions and chemical analyses of boron compounds used for the therapy. There is additionally shown the basic knowledge of immunology related with the neutron capture therapy. We do hope that this proceedings will contribute to the development of new boron carriers for the therapy. (J.P.N.)

  8. Single photon emission tomography approach for online patient dose assessment in boron neutron capture therapy

    A tomographic imaging system for the measurement of the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose during a Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) session is presented. The 10B(n,α)7Li boron neutron capture reaction produces a 478 keV gamma ray in 94% of the cases. Therefore its detection can serve as a basis for a non-invasive online absorbed dose determination since the dose absorbed by the tumor and healthy tissue strongly depends on the boron uptake and the neutron flux. For this purpose, a dedicated tomographic imaging system based on Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography is proposed. Monte Carlo numerical simulations are used for the system design aimed to have a spatial resolution of 1 cm. Prototypes based on CdZnTe semiconductor detectors and LaBr3(Ce) scintillators with optimized shielding were designed with Monte Carlo simulations. They were built and tested in reactor and accelerator based BNCT facilities. A projection of a phantom with two tumors with 400 ppm of 10B was successfully measured at the accelerator facility of the University of Birmingham. (author)

  9. Characterization of a boron carbide-based polymer neutron sensor

    Tan, Chuting; James, Robinson; Dong, Bin; Driver, M. Sky; Kelber, Jeffry A.; Downing, Greg; Cao, Lei R.

    2015-12-01

    Boron is used widely in thin-film solid-state devices for neutron detection. The film thickness and boron concentration are important parameters that relate to a device's detection efficiency and capacitance. Neutron depth profiling was used to determine the film thicknesses and boron-concentration profiles of boron carbide-based polymers grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of ortho-carborane (1,2-B10C2H12), resulting in a pure boron carbide film, or of meta-carborane (1,7-B10C2H12) and pyridine (C5H5N), resulting in a pyridine composite film, or of pyrimidine (C4H4N2) resulting in a pure pyrimidine film. The pure boron carbide film had a uniform surface appearance and a constant thickness of 250 nm, whereas the thickness of the composite film was 250-350 nm, measured at three different locations. In the meta-carborane and pyridine composite film the boron concentration was found to increase with depth, which correlated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)-derived atomic ratios. A proton peak from 14N (n,p)14C reaction was observed in the pure pyrimidine film, indicating an additional neutron sensitivity to nonthermal neutrons from the N atoms in the pyrimidine.

  10. Inefficiency of high boron concentrations for cell killing in boron neutron capture therapy

    This study is to investigate the relationship between the cell-killing effect of the 10B(n, α)7Li capture reaction, intracellular boron concentration, and thermal neutron fluence in boron neutron capture therapy using in vitro cell survival based on a clonogenic assay, and biophysical analysis. Our results showed that the cell-killing yield of the 10B(n, α)7Li capture reaction per unit thermal neutron fluence declined with an increase in the intracellular boron concentration above 45 μg/ml 10B. The cell-killing effect was well described using an empirical power function of the intracellular boron concentration, with exponent 0.443. Knowledge of this effect will help in the optimization of BNCT. (author)

  11. Approach to boron neutron capture therapy in Europe: goals of a European Collaboration on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    A European Collaboration on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy has been founded in 1989. This Collaboration wants to create all necessary conditions to establish neutron capture therapy as a clinical therapy in Europe. For this, two main goals are being pursued: to initiate, at the High Flux Reactor in Petten (The Netherlands) clinical trials of glioma and melanoma and to create conditions that other tumors can be treated at this and other sites. The approach towards clinical trials of gliomas with boron neutron capture therapy is detailed. The necessary development of an epithermal neutron beam, and the necessary healthy tissue tolerance studies are discussed in view of the particularities of the radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy. (author) 5 refs.; 2 figs

  12. In-phantom dosimetry using the 13C(d,n)14N reaction for BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy)

    The use of the 13 C(d,n)14 N reaction at Ed =1.5 MeV for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy is investigated. The 13 C(d,n)14 N reaction presents the advantages of carbon as a target material and its large cross section. The deuteron beam was produced by a tandem accelerator at MIT's Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications. The resulting neutron spectra were evaluated in terms of RBE-dose rates at different depths inside a water-filled brain phantom using a heavy water moderator and lead reflector assembly. All results were simulated using the code MCNP. (author)

  13. Medical and biological requirements for boron neutron capture therapy

    In conventional radiation therapy, tumor doses applied to most solid tumors are limited by the tolerance of normal tissues. The promise of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy lies in its potential to deposit high doses of radiation very specifically to tumor tissue. Theoretically ratios of tumor to normal tissue doses can be achieved significantly higher than conventional radiotherapeutic techniques would allow. Effective dose distributions obtainable are a complex function of the neutron beam characteristics and the macro and micro distributions of boron in tumor and normal tissues. Effective RBE doses are calculated in tumors and normal tissue for thermal, epithermal and 2 keV neutrons

  14. Proceedings of workshop on 'boron chemistry and boron neutron capture therapy'

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 4th Workshop on 'the Boron Chemistry and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy' held on February 24 in 1992. First, clinical experiences of BNCT in the Kyoto University Research Reactor in 1992 were briefly reported. Then, the killing effects of boron cluster-containing nucleic acid precursors on tumor cells were shown (Chap. 2). The various trials of the optical resolution of B-p-boronophenylalanine for neutron capture therapy were made (Chap. 3). The borate-dextran gel complexes were investigated by the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The stability constants of borate complexes were listed, and are useful in the solution chemistry of boron compounds (Chap. 4). The interactions between boron compounds and biological materials were studied by the paper electrophoresis which had been developed by us (Chap. 5). Molecular design of boron-10 carriers and their organic synthesis were reported (Chap. 6). Carborane-containing aziridine boron carriers which were directed to the DNA alkylation were synthesized and their cancer cell killing efficacies were tested (Chap. 7). The solution chemistry of deuterium oxide which is a good neutron moderator was reported, relating to the BNCT (Chap. 8). (author)

  15. A novel boron-loaded liquid scintillator for neutron detection

    Bentoumi, G.; Dai, X.; Pruszkowski, E.; Li, L.; Sur, B., E-mail: bentoumg@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    A boron-loaded liquid scintillator (LS) has been optimized for neutron detection application in a high gamma field environment. It is composed of the solvent linear alkylbenzene (LAB), a boron containing material, o-carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}); a fluor, 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO); and a wavelength shifter, 1,4-bis[2-methylstyryl] benzene (bis-MSB). Preparation of the liquid scintillator and optimization of its chemical composition are described. The boron-loaded LS has been tested with a neutron beam at the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor. A peak at an equivalent energy of 60 keV is observed in the energy spectrum and is attributed to neutrons. The results confirm the possibility of using B-10 loaded scintillator as a sensitive medium for neutron detection in a relatively large background of gamma rays. (author)

  16. Boron-11 NMR spectroscopy of excised mouse tissues after infusion of boron compound used in neutron capture therapy

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on selective boron uptake by the tumor and in situ activation by neutron beam. The authors propose the use of B-11 MR spectroscopy to noninvasively study boron uptake in animal tumor models. Sodium mercaptoundeca-hydrododecaborate was infused into female BALB/cJ mice and liver, brain, spleen, kidney, and tumor tissues were excised for MR (27.4MHz) and total boron content measurements. Boron-11 was easily detectable in tumor, liver, spleen, and skin. The results gave a very good correlation (correlation coefficient of .997) between B-11 MR measurements and total boron content of excised mouse tissues

  17. An accelerator-based neutron microbeam system for studies of radiation effects

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A.; Bigelow, Alan W.; Akselrod, Mark S.; Sykora, Jeff G.; Brenner, David J.

    2010-01-01

    A novel neutron microbeam is being developed at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) of Columbia University. The RARAF microbeam facility has been used for studies of radiation bystander effects in mammalian cells for many years. Now a prototype neutron microbeam is being developed that can be used for bystander effect studies. The neutron microbeam design here is based on the existing charged particle microbeam technology at the RARAF. The principle of the neutron microbeam...

  18. Boron-10 layers, Neutron Reflectometry and Thermal Neutron Gaseous Detectors

    Piscitelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays neutron facilities are going toward higher fluxes, e.g. the European Spallation Source (ESS) in Lund (Sweden), and this translates into a higher demand in the instrument performances. Because of its favorable properties,He-3 has been the main actor in thermal neutron detection for years. Starting in about 2001 the He-3 stockpile has been declining. The world is now experiencing the shortage of He-3. This makes the construction of large area detectors (several squared meters) not realistic anymore. A way to reduce the He-3 demand for those applications is to move users to alternative technologies, such as Boron-10. Although it is absolutely necessary to replace He-3 for large area applications, this is not the main issue for what concerns small area detectors for which the research is focused on improving their performances. Some technologies appear promising, though implementation would likely present technical challenges. There are several aspects that must be investigated in order to validate those...

  19. Cubic boron nitride- a new material for ultracold neutron application

    For the first time, the Fermi potential of cubic boron nitride (cBN) was measured at the ultra cold neutron source at the TRIGA reactor, Mainz using the time of flight method (TOF). The investigated samples have a Fermi potential of about 300 neV. Because of its good dielectric characteristics, cubic boron nitride could be used as suitable coating for insulator in storage chambers of future EDM projects. This talk presents recent results and an outlook on further investigations.

  20. A colorimetric determination of boron in biological sample for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    The boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has shown better prognosis in the treatment of glyemas and gluoblastomas grade III and IV than other therapies. During the treatment the levels of Na210B12H11SH must be known in several compartiments of the organism and with this purpose the method of colorimetric determination of boron using curcumine was established. This method is simple, reprodutible and adequate sensitivity for this control. (author)

  1. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H3BO3). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

  2. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Singh, Paviter; Kumar, Manjeet; Thakur, Anup; Kumar, Akshay

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H3BO3). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

  3. Mass spectral investigations of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agents

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising technique for the treatment of selected types of brain tumor and potentially for other tumor types. In this therapy, a 10B-enriched species is administered to the bloodstream and selectively deposited in the tumor. The selective deposition in the tumor is due to either the breakdown of the blood-grain barrier or to the chemical nature of the boron-containing compounds. Once a sufficient concentration of boron is attained in the tumor (approximately 25 ppm), the tumor is irradiated with a controlled energy neutron beam (preferable epithermal, 1 eV to 10 keV), at which time neutrons are captured by the incorporated boron atoms. The capture results in the reaction, 10B(n, ) Li, which produces a localized nuclear reaction capable of destroying the tumor cell containing the boron. A variety of boron containing compounds have been evaluated for use in BNCT. This paper addresses some of the most promising of the compounds, the disodium salt of mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (Na2B12H11SH), commonly referred to as BSH

  4. Boron-Lined Multitube Neutron Proportional Counter Test

    Woodring, Mitchell L.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2010-09-07

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride (BF3)-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated non-scintillating plastic fibers. In addition, a few other companies have detector technologies that might be competitive in the near term as an alternative technology. Reported here are the results of tests of a boron-lined, “multitube” proportional counter manufactured by Centronic Ltd. (Surry, U.K. and Houston, TX). This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma-ray rejection capabilities of the detector.

  5. Boron-lined proportional counters with improved neutron sensitivity

    Dighe, P M; Prasad, K R; Kataria, S K; Athavale, S N; Pappachan, A L; Grover, A K

    2003-01-01

    Boron-lined proportional counters with higher neutron sensitivity have been developed by introducing baffle structures within the sensitive volume. the results are compared to devices developed with multiple cathode assemblies in a single enclosure. in either case, the increase in the boron-coated surface area results in higher neutron sensitivity. one of these counters has 51 annular baffles coated with natural boron with 10 mm hole for the anode wire to pass through. filled with p-10 gas at 20 cm hg, it has an overall diameter of 30 and 300 mm length. multiple dip coating method was employed for better uniformity in boron thickness. the neutron sensitivity of this counter is 1.6 cps/nv, which is 2.5 times that of a counter with standard electrode geometry. another counter was developed with three cathode assemblies (30 mm IDx300 mm) coated with 92% sup 1 sup 0 B while the third has seven assemblies coated with natural boron (16 mm IDx750 mm length). the neutron sensitivity is 10 and 5.5 cps/nv, respectively...

  6. A novel method of boron delivery using sodium iodide symporter for boron neutron capture therapy

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) effectiveness depends on the preferential sequestration of boron in cancer cells relative to normal tissue cells. We present a novel strategy for sequestering boron using an adenovirus expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS). Human glioma grown subcutaneously in athymic mice and orthotopic rat brain tumors were transfected with NIS using a direct tumor injection of adenovirus. Boron bound as sodium tetrafluoroborate (NaBF4) was administered systemically several days after transfection. Tumors were excised hours later and assessed for boron concentration using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. In the human glioma transfected with NIS, boron concentration was more than 10 fold higher with 100 mg/kg of NaBF4, compared to tumor not transfected. In the orthotopic tumor model, the presence of NIS conferred almost 4 times the boron concentration in rat tumors transfected with human virus compared with contralateral normal brain not transfected. We conclude that adenovirus expressing NIS has the potential to be used as a novel boron delivery agent and should be explored for future clinical applications. (author)

  7. Spectromicroscopy of boron for the optimization of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for cancer

    We used synchrotron spectromicroscopy to study the microscopic distribution of boron in rat brain tumour and healthy tissue in the field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The success of this experimental cancer therapy depends on the preferential uptake of 10B in tumour cells after injection of a boron compound (in our case B12H11SH, or BSH). With the Mephisto (microscope a emission de photoelectrons par illumination synchrotronique de type onduleur) spectromicroscope, high-magnification imaging and chemical analysis was performed on brain tissue sections from a rat carrying an implanted brain tumour and the results were compared with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) detection of boron in bulk tissue. Boron was found to have been taken up more favourably by regions of tumour rather than healthy tissue, but the resulting boron distribution in the tumour was inhomogeneous. The results demonstrate that Mephisto can perform microchemical analysis of tissue sections, detect and localize the presence of boron with submicron spatial resolution. The application of this technique to boron in brain tissue can therefore be used to evaluate the current efforts to optimize BNC therapy. (author)

  8. Accelerator-based neutron source using a cold deuterium target with degenerate electrons

    R. E. Phillips

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A neutron generator is considered in which a beam of tritons is incident on a hypothetical cold deuterium target with degenerate electrons. The energy efficiency of neutron generation is found to increase substantially with electron density. Recent reports of potential targets are discussed.

  9. The relationship between contrast, resolution and detectability in accelerator-based fast neutron radiography

    Fast neutron radiography as a method for non destructive testing is a fast growing field of research. At the Schonland Research Center for Nuclear Sciences we have been engaged in the formulation of a model for the physics of image formation in fast neutron radiography (FNR). This involves examining all the various factors that affect image formation in FNR by experimental and Monte Carlo methods. One of the major problems in the development of a model for fast neutron radiography is the determination of the factors that affect image contrast and resolution. Monte Carlo methods offer an ideal tool for the determination of the origin of many of these factors. In previous work the focus of these methods has been the determination of the scattered neutron field in both a scintillator and a fast neutron radiography facility. As an extension of this work MCNP has been used to evaluate the role neutron scattering in a specimen plays in image detectability. Image processing of fast neutron radiographs is a necessary method of enhancing the detectability of features in an image. MCNP has been used to determine the part it can play in indirectly improving image resolution and aiding in image processing. The role noise plays in fast neutron radiography and its impact on image reconstruction has been evaluated. All these factors aid in the development of a model describing the relationship between contrast, resolution and detectability

  10. Report of the advisory group meeting on optimal use of accelerator-based neutron generators

    During the past 20 to 25 years, the IAEA has provided a number of laboratories in the developing member states with neutron generators. These neutron generators were originally supplied for the primary purpose of neutron activation analysis. In order to promote the optimal use of these machines, a meeting was held in 1996, resulting in a technical document manual for the upgrading and troubleshooting of neutron generators. The present meeting is a follow-up to that earlier meeting. There are several reasons why some neutron generators are not fully utilized. These include lack of infrastructure, such as an appropriate shielded building and loss of adequately trained technical and academic personnel. Much of the equipment is old and lacking spare parts, and in a few cases there is a critical lack of locally available knowledge and experience in accelerator technology. The report contains recommendations for dealing with these obstacles

  11. Simulation study of accelerator based quasi-mono-energetic epithermal neutron beams for BNCT.

    Adib, M; Habib, N; Bashter, I I; El-Mesiry, M S; Mansy, M S

    2016-01-01

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-mono-energetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5-7.5 keV at the accelerator port using the generated neutron spectrum from a Li (p, n) Be reaction. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The feature of the filtered beams is detailed in terms of optimal thickness of the primary and additive components. A computer code named "QMNB-AS" was developed to carry out the required calculations. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity with low contamination from the accompanying thermal, fast neutrons and γ-rays. PMID:26474209

  12. Introduction to Neutron Coincidence Counter Design Based on Boron-10

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-01-22

    The Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Policy (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is ultimately to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based alternative system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report, providing background information for this project, is the deliverable under Task 1 of the project.

  13. Role of gel dosimeters in boron neutron capture therapy

    Gel dosimeters have acquired a unique status in radiotherapy, especially with the advent of the new techniques in which there is a need for three-dimensional dose measurement with high spatial resolution. One of the techniques in which the use of gel dosimeters has drawn the attention of the researchers is the boron neutron capture therapy. Exploring the history of gel dosimeters, this paper sets out to study their role in the boron neutron capture therapy dosimetric process. - Highlights: • Gel dosimeters have been investigated. • Conventional dosimetric proses of BNCT has been investigated. • Role of gel dosimeters in BNCT has been investigated

  14. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using fast neutrons: Effects in two human tumor cell lines

    The results demonstrate that the effect of fast neutrons on cell survival in cell culture can be enhanced by boron neutron capture reaction. Even with lower enhancement ratios, the concept of NCT assisted fast neutron therapy may successfully be applied for tumor treatment with the Essen cyclotron. (orig.)

  15. 350 keV accelerator-based neutron transmission setup at KFUPM for hydrogen detection

    Naqvi, A; Maslehuddin, M; Kidwai, S; Nassar, R

    2002-01-01

    An experimental setup has been developed to determine hydrogen contents of bulk samples using fast neutron transmission technique. Neutrons with 3 MeV energy were produced via D(d, n) reaction. The neutrons transmitted through the sample were detected by a NE213 scintillation detector. Preliminary tests of the setup were carried out using soil samples with different moisture contents. In addition to experimental study, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to generate calibration curve of the experimental setup. Finally, experimental tests results were compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations. A good agreement has been obtained between the simulation results and experimental results.

  16. Imaging of Texture, Crystallite Size and Strain in Materials Using Accelerator Based Pulsed Neutron Sources

    The pulsed neutron transmission method can give position dependent information on crystallographic microstructure, such as preferred orientation, crystallite size and strain for thick materials, for which the X ray cannot be applied, since the pulsed neutron measurements enable researchers to obtain neutron transmission spectrums depending on position by using a position sensitive detector. Furthermore, the transmission spectrums reflect the total neutron cross-section containing information of the crystallographic structure. By analysing the transmission spectrums, spatially dependent information can be obtained. An in situ transmission measurement was performed during a tensile test of an iron sample with notches. The results clearly showed changes of anisotropy, crystallite size and strain dependent on the load. (author)

  17. The Argonne ACWL, a potential accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT

    THE CWDD (Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator) accelerator was designed to accelerate 80 mA cw of D- to 7.5 MeV. Most of the hardware for the first 2 MeV was installed at Argonne and major subsystems had been commissioned when program funding from the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization ended in October 1993. Renamed the Argonne Continuous Wave Linac (ACWL), we are proposing to complete it to accelerate either deuterons to 2 MeV or protons to 3-3.5 MeV. Equipped with a beryllium or other light-element target, it would make a potent source of neutrons (on the order of 1013 n/s) for BNCT and/or neutron radiography. Project status and proposals for turning ACWL into a neutron source are reviewed, including the results of a computational study that was carried out to design a target/moderator to produce an epithermal neutron beam for BNCT. (orig.)

  18. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for cancer treatment

    Ackermann, A.L. (ed.); Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-08-01

    This report discusses monthly progress in the Power Boron Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program for Cancer Treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during August 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross Boron Analysis in Tissue, Blood, and Urine, boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development, noninvasive boron quantitative determination, analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support and PBF operations.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of boron folates for Boron-Neutron-Capture-Therapy (BNCT)

    Kettenbach, Kathrin; Schieferstein, Hanno; Grunewald, Catrin; Hampel, Gabriele; Schuetz, Christian L. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry; Iffland, Dorothee; Bings, Nicolas H. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry; Reffert, Laura M. [Hannover Medical School (Germany). Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry; Ross, Tobias L. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry; Hannover Medical School (Germany). Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry

    2015-07-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) employs {sup 10}B-pharmaceuticals administered for the treatment of malignancies, and subsequently irradiated with thermal neutrons. So far, clinical established pharmaceuticals like boron phenylalanine (BPA) or sodium boron mercaptate (BSH) use imperfect (BPA) or passive (BSH) targeting for accumulation at target sites. Due to the need of a selective transportation of boron drugs into cancer cells and sparing healthy tissues, we combined the BNCT approach with the specific and effective folate receptor (FR) targeting concept. The FR is overexpressed on many human carcinomas and provides a selective and specific target for molecular imaging as well as for tumor therapy. We synthesized and characterized a carborane-folate as well as a BSH-folate to study their in vitro characteristics and their potential as new boron-carriers for BNCT. Uptake studies were carried out using human KB cells showing a significant increase of the boron content in cells and demonstrating the successful combination of active FR-targeting and BNCT.

  20. Preliminary energy-filtering neutron imaging with time-of-flight method on PKUNIFTY: A compact accelerator based neutron imaging facility at Peking University

    Wang, Hu; Zou, Yubin; Wen, Weiwei; Lu, Yuanrong; Guo, Zhiyu

    2016-07-01

    Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility (PKUNIFTY) works on an accelerator-based neutron source with a repetition period of 10 ms and pulse duration of 0.4 ms, which has a rather low Cd ratio. To improve the effective Cd ratio and thus improve the detection capability of the facility, energy-filtering neutron imaging was realized with the intensified CCD camera and time-of-flight (TOF) method. Time structure of the pulsed neutron source was firstly simulated with Geant4, and the simulation result was evaluated with experiment. Both simulation and experiment results indicated that fast neutrons and epithermal neutrons were concentrated in the first 0.8 ms of each pulse period; meanwhile in the period of 0.8-2.0 ms only thermal neutrons existed. Based on this result, neutron images with and without energy filtering were acquired respectively, and it showed that detection capability of PKUNIFTY was improved with setting the exposure interval as 0.8-2.0 ms, especially for materials with strong moderating capability.

  1. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    MIYATAKE, Shin-Ichi; KAWABATA, Shinji; HIRAMATSU, Ryo; KUROIWA, Toshihiko; SUZUKI, Minoru; KONDO, Natsuko; ONO, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  2. Novel design concepts for generating intense accelerator based beams of mono-energetic fast neutrons

    Full text: Successful application of neutron techniques in research, medicine and industry depends on the availability of suitable neutron sources. This is particularly important for techniques that require mono-energetic fast neutrons with well defined energy spread. There are a limited number of nuclear reactions available for neutron production and often the reaction yield is low, particularly for thin targets required for the production of mono-energetic neutron beams. Moreover, desired target materials are often in a gaseous form, such as the reactions D(d,n)3He and T(d,n)3He, requiring innovative design of targets, with sufficient target pressure and particle beam handling capability. Additional requirements, particularly important in industrial applications, and for research institutions with limited funds, are the cost effectiveness as well as small size, coupled with reliable and continuous operation of the system. Neutron sources based on high-power, compact radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linacs can satisfy these criteria, if used with a suitable target system. This paper discusses the characteristics of a deuteron RFQ linear accelerator system coupled to a high pressure differentially pumped deuterium target. Such a source, provides in excess of 1010 mono- energetic neutrons per second with minimal slow neutron and gamma-ray contamination, and is utilised for a variety of applications in the field of mineral identification and materials diagnostics. There is also the possibility of utilising a proposed enhanced system for isotope production. The RFQ linear accelerator consists of: 1) Deuterium 25 keV ion source injector; 2) Two close-coupled RFQ resonators, each powered by an rf amplifier supplying up to 300 kW of peak power at 425 MHz; 3) High energy beam transport system consisting of a beam line, a toroid for beam current monitoring, two steering magnets and a quadrupole triplet for beam focusing. Basic technical specifications of the RFQ linac are

  3. The time-of-flight epithermal neutron spectrum measurement from accelerator based BNCT facility

    Results of epithermal neutrons spectrum measurement by time-of-flight method for different beam shaping assembly designed for BNCT purposes are presented. Discuss method to realize time-of-flight measurement at accelerator. Results looks are important for beam shaping assembly optimization and accurate and reliable treatment planning. (author)

  4. Tumor growth suppression by boron neutron capture therapy using PEG-liposomal boron delivery in vivo

    The tumor cell destruction in boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between 10B and thermal neutrons. We prepare a polyethylene glycol (PEG) binding liposome (DPPC/cholesterol/DSPC-PEG2000) entrapped 10B compound for the delivery system. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of intravenously injected 10B-PEG-liposome on human pancreatic carcinoma (AsPC-1) xenografts in nude mice with thermal neutron irradiation. After thermal neutron irradiation of mice injected with 10B-bare liposome or 10B-PEG-liposome, AsPC-1 tumour growth was suppressed relative to controls. Injection of 10B-PEG-liposome caused the greatest tumour suppression with thermal neutron irradiation in vivo. These results suggests that intravenous injection of 10B-PEG-liposome can increase the retention of 10B atoms by tumor cells, causing tumor growth suppression in vivo upon thermal neutron irradiation. (author)

  5. Preliminary results of a new boron coated neutron detector

    Gervino, G., E-mail: gervino@to.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica Università di Torino (Italy); INFN Torino (Italy); Balma, M.; Devona, D. [SELEX Galileo, San Maurizio Canavese, TO (Italy); Lavagno, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Politecnico di Torino (Italy); INFN Torino (Italy); Palmisano, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica Università di Torino (Italy); Zamprotta, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica Università di Torino (Italy); INFN Torino (Italy); Scarfone, A. [ISC-CNR Torino (Italy); INFN Torino (Italy); Tintori, C. [C.A.E.N. S.p.A., Viareggio, LU (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    The proliferation of neutron detection applications based upon {sup 3}He counter has triggered a critical shortage of {sup 3}He gas. Nowadays there is an increasing demand for alternative neutron detectors that can cover large solid angles, have low sensitivity to gamma background and low cost. We present a low cost neutron detector based upon 3 cm diameter, 150 cm long cylindrical metal tube coated on the inside with a thin layer of {sup 10}B-enriched boron carbide ({sup 10}B{sub 4}C) fulfilled by 1 atm nitrogen.

  6. Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detector

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Graff, Robert T.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Reinhardt, Catherine; Voss, Lars F.; Cheung, Chin Li; Heineck, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detectors utilize neutron sensitive conversion materials in the form of nano-powders and micro-sized particles, as opposed to thin films, suspensions, paraffin, etc. More specifically, methods to infiltrate, intersperse and embed the neutron nano-powders to form two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional charge sensitive platforms are specified. The use of nano-powders enables conformal contact with the entire charge-collecting structure regardless of its shape or configuration.

  7. Dosimetry methods in boron neutron capture therapy

    Gambarini, G.; Artuso, E.; Felisi, M.; Regazzoni, V.; Giove, D. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Physics, Via Festa del Patrono 7, 20122 Milano (Italy); Agosteo, S.; Barcaglioni, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milano (Italy); Campi, F.; Garlati, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Energy Department, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); De Errico, F. [Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Lungamo Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Borroni, M.; Carrara, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Medical Physics Unit, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milano (Italy); Burian, J.; Klupak, V.; Viererbl, L.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez, Department of Neutron Physics, 250-68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15

    Dosimetry studies have been carried out at thermal and epithermal columns of Lvr-15 research reactor for investigating the spatial distribution of gamma dose, fast neutron dose and thermal neutron fluence. Two different dosimetry methods, both based on solid state detectors, have been studied and applied and the accuracy and consistency of the results have been inspected. One method is based on Fricke gel dosimeters that are dilute water solutions and have good tissue equivalence for neutrons and also for all the secondary radiations produced by neutron interactions in tissue or water phantoms. Fricke gel dosimeters give the possibility of separating the various dose contributions, i.e. the gamma dose, the fast neutron dose and the dose due to charged particles generated during thermal neutron reactions by isotopes having high cross section, like 10-B. From this last dose, thermal neutron fluence can be obtained by means of the kerma factor. The second method is based on thermoluminescence dosimeters. In particular, the developed method draw advantage from the different heights of the peaks of the glow curve of such phosphors when irradiated with photons or with thermal neutrons. The results show that satisfactory results can be obtained with simple methods, in spite of the complexity of the subject. However, the more suitable dosimeters and principally their utilization and analysis modalities are different for the various neutron beams, mainly depending on the relative intensities of the three components of the neutron field, in particular are different for thermal and epithermal columns. (Author)

  8. Dosimetry methods in boron neutron capture therapy

    Dosimetry studies have been carried out at thermal and epithermal columns of Lvr-15 research reactor for investigating the spatial distribution of gamma dose, fast neutron dose and thermal neutron fluence. Two different dosimetry methods, both based on solid state detectors, have been studied and applied and the accuracy and consistency of the results have been inspected. One method is based on Fricke gel dosimeters that are dilute water solutions and have good tissue equivalence for neutrons and also for all the secondary radiations produced by neutron interactions in tissue or water phantoms. Fricke gel dosimeters give the possibility of separating the various dose contributions, i.e. the gamma dose, the fast neutron dose and the dose due to charged particles generated during thermal neutron reactions by isotopes having high cross section, like 10-B. From this last dose, thermal neutron fluence can be obtained by means of the kerma factor. The second method is based on thermoluminescence dosimeters. In particular, the developed method draw advantage from the different heights of the peaks of the glow curve of such phosphors when irradiated with photons or with thermal neutrons. The results show that satisfactory results can be obtained with simple methods, in spite of the complexity of the subject. However, the more suitable dosimeters and principally their utilization and analysis modalities are different for the various neutron beams, mainly depending on the relative intensities of the three components of the neutron field, in particular are different for thermal and epithermal columns. (Author)

  9. Some progress in boron neutron capture therapy

    After a historical overview of the application of neutrons to cancer therapy, collaboration is suggested for the application of BNCT with relativistic nuclei in the fields of neutron sources, microdosimetry and tumor selection. The treatment of uveal melanoma is considered. (R.P.) 4 refs.; 1 fig

  10. Physical engineering and medical physics on boron neutron capture therapy

    The contents of physical engineering and medical physics that support boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can be roughly classified to the four items, (1) neutron irradiation system, (2) development and improvement of dose assessment techniques, (3) development and improvement of dose planning system, and (4) quality assurance and quality control. This paper introduces the BNCT at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, with a focus on the basic physics of BNCT, thermal neutron irradiation and epithermal neutron irradiation, heavy water neutron irradiation facilities of KUR, and medical irradiation system of KUR. It also introduces the world's first BNCT clinical cyclotron irradiation system (C-BENS) of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, BNCT dose assessment techniques, dose planning system, and quality assurance and quality control. (A.O.)

  11. PGNAA of human arthritic synovium for boron neutron capture synovectomy

    Binello, E.; Yanch, J.C. [Massashucetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Shortkroff, S. [Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS), is a proposed new therapy modality for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease afflicting the joints. The synovium, which is the membrane lining the joint, becomes inflamed and represents the target tissue for therapy. When a joint is unresponsive to drug treatment, physical removal of the synovium, termed synovectomy, becomes necessary. Existing options include surgery and radiation synovectomy. BNCS has advantages over these options in that it is noninvasive and does not require the administration of radioactive substances. Previous studies have shown that the uptake of {sup 10}B by human arthritic synovium ex vivo is high, ranging from 194 to 545 ppm with an unenriched boron compound. While tissue samples remain viable up to 1 week, ex vivo conditions do not accurately reflect those in vivo. This paper presents results from experiments assessing the washout of boron from the tissue and examines the implications for in vivo studies.

  12. Multi-layer boron thin-film detectors for neutrons

    Intrinsic efficiencies of multi-layer boron-10 thin-film detectors were studied theoretically and experimentally. For multi-layer schemes based on an optimized single-layer film thickness, the practical efficiency is limited to about 42% for thermal neutrons. This is about half the efficiency of a moderated 3He detectors in commercial use for portal monitoring. The efficiency limitation is due to charged particle loss in the boron layers and substrates. The same loss mechanism will prevent all substrate-based boron detectors from ever reaching the intrinsic efficiencies of high-pressure 3He tubes, independent of substrate geometry and material composition. Experimental data also indicate that the multi-layer detector configuration can have an efficiency approaching the theoretical limit. Excellent n/γ discrimination has also been achieved using an ionization chamber.

  13. Potential of using boric acid as a boron drug for boron neutron capture therapy for osteosarcoma

    Osteosarcoma is a malignant tumor commonly found in human and animals. The ability of boric acid (BA) to accumulate in osteosarcoma due to the mechanism of the bone formation of cancer cells would make boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an alternative therapy for osteosarcoma. This study evaluated the feasibility of using BA as the boron drug for BNCT of bone cancer. The cytotoxicity of BA to L929 cells exceeded that of UMR-106 cells. With 25 μg 10B/mL medium of BA treatment, the boron concentration in UMR-106 cells was higher than that in L929 cells. The biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of BA in Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were studied by administrating 25 mg 10B/kg body weight to SD rats. Blood boron level decreased rapidly within one hour after BA injection. Boron concentration in the long bone was 4–6 time higher than that of blood. Results of this study suggest that BA may be a potential drug for BNCT for osteosarcoma.

  14. Development of a boron-copper neutron absorber composite

    This report describes the fabrication of a new boron-copper neutron absorbing material that was developed to meet the upgrading needs of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory. To increase the intensity of the neutron beams from the IPNS, the target uranium was changed from depleted uranium to uranium enriched to 77.5% 235U. To keep the multiplication factor, keff (number of fissions in one generation/number of fissions in preceding generation) at a safe level, a new neutron absorber material was needed. The previous materials, boral and cadmium, could not meet the new requirements and a search of the literature showed that no currently available material was acceptable. With previous powder metallurgy used as a base, the composite was fabricated with 43 vol. % 10B (81% enriched 10B) and the balance copper and voids. The powder metallurgy techniques was followed by hot-rolling the composite to a sheet. The material composed of boron particles dispersed in a pure copper matrix and clad with pure copper on both sides, exhibits the following properties: Loadings up to 43 vol. % boron, with the balance copper and voids. A loading of 0.5 x 102210B atoms/cm2 in sections as thin as 0.067 in. (1.7 mm), with copper cladding as thin as 0.010 in. (0.25 mm). Formability to radii as small as 2.1 in. (53.3 mm). No observed reaction between boron and the copper matrix and cladding at temperatures up to 900 degrees C for times as long as 7 h. Retains structural integrity at 900 degrees C

  15. A Novel Boron-Loaded Liquid Scintillator for Neutron Detection

    Sur, B.; Li, L.; E. Pruszkowski; Dai, X.; G. Bentoumi

    2012-01-01

    A boron-loaded liquid scintillator (LS) has been optimized for neutron detection application in a high gamma field environment. It is composed of the solvent linear alkylbenzene (LAB), a boroncontaining material, o-carborane (C2B10H12); a fluor, 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO); and a wavelength shifter, 1,4-bis[2-methylstyryl] benzene (bis-MSB). Preparation of the liquid scintillator and optimization of its chemical composition are described. The boronloaded LS has been tested with a neutron beam a...

  16. Design study of facilities for boron neutron capture therapy

    One of the authors organized a research group on boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) during 1975 to 1979. The results of the research were summarized in two Japanese reports. It was concluded in 1976 that a nuclear reactor facility was required for developing BNCT and related research. Conceptual design of the facility was performed according to consultation among the group members, and is reported here. The optimum neutron energy for BNCT is shown to be between 10eV and 500eV

  17. Experience of boron neutron capture therapy in Japan

    Four research reactors are currently licensed for medical application in Japan. As of July 1995, approximately 210 clinical irradiations using these research reactors have been done for brain and skin tumors as shown. The number of chief medical doctors certified by the Government is eleven so far. Among them, eight doctors have already treated tumor patients using the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR, 5MW). Recently in USA clinical trials have been restarted using epithermal neutrons at MIT and BNL. In this paper, the experience of clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) which have been performed in Japan, mainly physics studies, are reviewed, and current studies are also introduced

  18. Recombination methods for boron neutron capture therapy dosimetry

    The radiation effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are associated with four-dose-compartment radiation field - boron dose (from 10B(n,α)7Li) reaction), proton dose from 14N(n,p)14C reaction, neutron dose (mainly fast and epithermal neutrons) and gamma-ray dose (external and from capture reaction 1H(n,γ)2D). Because of this the relation between the absorbed dose and the biological effects is very complex and all the above mentioned absorbed dose components should be determined. From this point of view, the recombination chambers can be very useful instruments for characterization of the BNCT beams. They can be used for determination of gamma and high-LET dose components for the characterization of radiation quality of mixed radiation fields by recombination microdosimetric method (RMM). In present work, a graphite high-pressure recombination chamber filled with nitrogen, 10BF3 and tissue equivalent gas was used for studies on application of RMM for BNCT dosimetry. The use of these gases or their mixtures opens a possibility to design a recombination chamber for determination of the dose fractions due to gamma radiation, fast neutrons, neutron capture on nitrogen and high LET particles from (n,10B) reaction in simulated tissue with different content of 10B. (author)

  19. For boron neutron capture therapy,synthesizing boron-polymer compounds and testing in laboratory conditions

    The aim of this project is to establish a focus point at Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA) in the field of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy which is a binary radiotherapy method for brain tumours. Moreover in the scope of the project, a new alternative of 10B-carrier compounds will be synthesized, the neutron source will be determined and the infrastructure to start the clinical trials of BNCT in our country will be established. BNCT is a binary radiotherapy method and the successful of this method is depend on the synthesized boron compounds which have the selective targeting property with tumour cells and neutron optimization. The water-soluble polymer based boron compounds having biochemical and physiological properties will be synthesized and cell culture experiment will be done. In addition, after the neutron source is set up in our country, the infrastructure studies will be started in order to start the clinical trials of BNCT. In this project, there are three different groups as boron compounds, neutron physics and medical group. Neutron physics group is starting the calculations of neutron beam parameters using in BNCT application. But, medical group has no active studies yet. Boron compounds group has been carried out two different experimental studies. In the first experimental study, functional groups have been bound to boron containing polymers to enhance the selectively targeting property and characterized by various analysis methods. Later, cell culture experiment will be done. The first study has been carried out with Hacettepe University. Up to present, completed studies are listed as: -Maleic anhydride oligomer was synthesized and then 2-aminoethyl diphenyl borate (2-AEPB) and monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was bound to this oligomer, respectively. Thus, [MAH]n-g1-2-AEPB-g2-PEG was synthesized. -2-AEPB compound were bound to poly(acrylic acid) polymer at different three mole ratio.Then, the selected Poli(Ac)-g1-2-AEPB polymer was

  20. Towards epithermal boron neutron capture therapy for cancer

    Progress in the treatment of local disseminating cancer such as high grade brain tumours is poor, and the ability to kill individual cancer cells in the midst of normal cells has not been achieved. Binary therapies hold the most promise of this, and of these Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is the most advanced. Epithermal neutron beams are essential for outpatient treatment of high grade brain tumours and these are now installed and being characterised in Europe and the USA, and are at the design stage in Australia. These beams would allow the bilateral irradiation of the entire brain, and as such are ideally suited for the prophylactic therapy of subclinical metastases. When coupled with appropriate cancer affined boron compounds, therapeutic ratios of 2-3 should be achieved. At present the only source of an epithermal neutron beam is a nuclear reactor. The Euratom reactor at Petten and the Brookhaven Medical Reactor have been retrofitted with filters to produced an epithermal neutron beam. These beams have been characterised and used in dose escalation studies with dogs to study normal tissue tolerance using borocaptate (BSH). Another beam is available at the MIT medical research reactor. Clinical trails at Petten for glioblastoma with BSH and at MIT using boronophenylalanine for melanoma metastases to the extremities are expected to commence this year. The state of the art of reactor based BNCT is reviewed and the potential for a major change in the prognosis of local control of disseminating cancer is explored. 29 refs.,

  1. Dosimetry and dose planning in boron neutron capture therapy : Monte Carlo studies

    Koivunoro, H.

    2012-07-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biologically targeted radiotherapy modality. So far, 249 cancer patients have received BNCT at the Finnish Research Reactor 1 (FiR 1) in Finland. The effectiveness and safety of radiotherapy are dependent on the radiation dose delivered to the tumor and healthy tissues, and on the accuracy of the doses. At FiR 1, patient dose calculations are performed with the Monte Carlo (MC) -based treatmentplanning system (TPS), Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications (SERA). Initially, BNCT was applied to head and neck cancer, brain tumors, and malignant melanoma. To evaluate the applicability of the new target tumors for BNCT, calculation dosimetry studies are needed. So far, clinical BNCT has been performed with the neutrons from a nuclear reactor, while an accelerator based neutron sources applicable for hospital operation would be preferable. In this thesis, BNCT patient dose calculation practice in Finland was evaluated against reference calculations and experimental data in several cases. Calculations with two TPSs applied in clinical BNCT were compared. The suitability of the deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reaction-based compact neutron sources for BNCT were evaluated. In addition, feasibility of BNCT for noninvasive liver tumor treatments was examined. The deviation between SERA and the reference calculations was within 4% in the phantoms studied and in a brain cancer patient model elsewhere, except on the phantom or skin surface, for the boron, nitrogen, and photon dose components. These dose components produce 99% of the tumor dose and > 90% of the healthy tissue dose at points of relevance for treatment at the FiR 1 facility. The reduced voxel cell size ({<=} 0.5 cm) in the SERA edit mesh improved calculation accuracy on the surface. The erratic biased fastneutron run option in SERA led to significant underestimation (up to 30-60%) of the fastneutron dose, while more accurate fast-neutron

  2. Drug delivery system design and development for boron neutron capture therapy on cancer treatment

    We have already synthesized a boron-containing polymeric micellar drug delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The synthesized diblock copolymer, boron-terminated copolymers (Bpin-PLA-PEOz), consisted of biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide) (PLA) block and water-soluble polyelectrolyte poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEOz) block, and a cap of pinacol boronate ester (Bpin). In this study, we have demonstrated that synthesized Bpin-PLA-PEOz micelle has great potential to be boron drug delivery system with preliminary evaluation of biocompatibility and boron content. - Highlights: • Herein, we have synthesized boron-modified diblock copolymer. • Bpin-PLA-PEOz, which will be served as new boron containing vehicle for transporting the boron drug. • This boron containing Bpin-PLA-PEOz micelle was low toxicity can be applied to drug delivery

  3. Commercial Clinical Application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    CRADA No. 95-CR-09 among the LITCO--now Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC; a private company, Neutron Therapies Limited Liability Company, NTL formerly Ionix Corporation; and Washington State University was established in 1996 to further the development of BNCT. NTL has established a laboratory for the synthesis, under US FDA approved current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) guidelines, of key boron intermediates and final boron agents for BNCT. The company has focused initially on the development of the compound GB-10 (Na2B10H10) as the first boron agent of interest. An Investigational New Drug (IND) application for GB-10 has been filed and approved by the FDA for a Phase I human biodistribution trial in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and glioblastoma multiforme at UW under the direction of Professor Keith Stelzer, Principal Investigator (PI). These trials are funded by NTL under a contract with the UW, Department of Radiation Oncology, and the initial phases are nearing completion. Initial results show that boron-10 concentrations on the order of 100 micrograms per gram (100 ppm) can be achieved and maintained in blood with no indication of toxicity

  4. Commercial Clinical Application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    N/A

    1999-09-03

    CRADA No. 95-CR-09 among the LITCO--now Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC; a private company, Neutron Therapies Limited Liability Company, NTL formerly Ionix Corporation; and Washington State University was established in 1996 to further the development of BNCT. NTL has established a laboratory for the synthesis, under US FDA approved current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) guidelines, of key boron intermediates and final boron agents for BNCT. The company has focused initially on the development of the compound GB-10 (Na{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 10}) as the first boron agent of interest. An Investigational New Drug (IND) application for GB-10 has been filed and approved by the FDA for a Phase I human biodistribution trial in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and glioblastoma multiforme at UW under the direction of Professor Keith Stelzer, Principal Investigator (PI). These trials are funded by NTL under a contract with the UW, Department of Radiation Oncology, and the initial phases are nearing completion. Initial results show that boron-10 concentrations on the order of 100 micrograms per gram (100 ppm) can be achieved and maintained in blood with no indication of toxicity.

  5. Carborane derivative development for boron neutron capture therapy. Final report

    Barnum, Beverly A.; Yan Hao; Moore, Roger; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Baum, Kurt

    1999-04-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy [BNCT] is a binary method of cancer therapy based on the capture of neutrons by a boron-10 atom [{sup 10}B]. Cytotoxic {sup 7}Li nuclei and {alpha}-particles are emitted, with a range in tissue of 9 and 5 {micro}m, respectively, about one cell diameter. The major obstacle to clinically viable BNCT is the selective localization of 5-30 ppm {sup 10}B in tumor cells required for effective therapy. A promising approach to BNCT is based on hydrophilic boron-rich oligomeric phosphate diesters, or ''trailers'' that have been shown to concentrate selectively in tumor tissue. Examples of these compounds were prepared previously at high cost using an automated DNA synthesizer. Direct synthesis methods are needed for the production of gram-scale quantities for further biological evaluation. The work accomplished as a result of the collaboration between Fluorochem, Inc. and UCLA demonstrates that short oligomers containing at least five carborane units with four phosphodiester linkages can be prepared in substantial quantities. This work was accomplished by the application of standard phosphoramidite coupling chemistry.

  6. Medical aspects of boron-slow neutron capture therapy

    Earlier radiations of patients with cerebral tumors disclosed the need: (1) to find a carrier of the boron compound which would leave the blood and concentrate in the tumor, (2) to use a more penetrating neutron beam, and (3) to develop a much faster method for assaying boron in blood and tissue. To some extent number1 has been accomplished in the form of Na2 B12 H11 SH, number2 has yet to be achieved, and number3 has been solved by the measurement of the 478-keV gamma ray when the 10B atom disintegrates following its capture of a slow neutron. The hitherto unreported data in this paper describe through the courtesy of Professor Hiroshi Hatanaka his studies on the pharmacokinetics and quality control of Na2 B12 H11SH based on 96 boron infusions in 86 patients. Simultaneous blood and tumor data are plotted here for 30 patients with glioblastomas (Grade III-IV gliomas), illustrating remarkable variability. Detailed autopsy findings on 18 patients with BNCT showed radiation injury in only 1. Clinical results in 12 of the most favorably situated glioblastomas reveal that 5 are still alive with a 5-year survival rate of 58% and the excellent Karnofsky performance rating of 87%. For the first time evidence is presented that slow-growing astrocytomas may benefit from BNCT. 10 references, 8 figures, 5 tables

  7. Proceedings of workshop on 'boron chemistry and boron neutron capture therapy'

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 5th Workshop on 'the Boron Chemistry and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy' held on February 22 in 1993. The solubility of the boron carrier play an important role in the BNCT. New water-soluble p-boronophenylalanine derivatives are synthesized and their biological activities are investigated (Chap. 2 and 3). Some chemical problems on the BNCT were discussed, and the complex formation reaction of hydroxylboryl compounds were studied by the paper electrophoresis (Chap. 4). The results of the medical investigation on the BNCT using BSH compounds are shown in Chap. 5. Syntheses of o- and m-boronophenylalanine were done and their optical resolution was tried (Chap. 6). The complex formation reaction of p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) with L-DOPA and the oxidation reaction of the analogs are found in Chap. 7. The pka of BPA were determined by the isotachophoresis (Chap. 8). The chemical nature of dihydroxyboryl compounds were investigated by an infrared spectroscopy and electrophoresis (Chap. 9). New synthetic methods of BPA and p-boronophenylserine using ester of isocyanoacetic acid are described in Chap. 10. The induction of chromosomal aberations by neutron capture reaction are discussed from a point of the biological view. The a of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  8. Nuclear Physics meets Medicine and Biology: Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    F. Ballarini, F; S. Bortolussi, S; P. Bruschi, P; A.M. Clerici, A M; A. De Bari, A; P. Dionigi, P; C. Ferrari, C; M.A. Gadan, M A; N. Protti, N; S. Stella, S; C. Zonta, C; A. Zonta, A; S. Altieri, S

    2010-01-01

    BNCT is a tumour treatment based on thermal-neutron irradiation of tissues enriched with 10B, which according to the 10B(n, )7Li reaction produces particles with high Linear Energy Transfer and short range. Since this treatment can deliver a therapeutic tumour dose sparing normal tissues, BNCT represents an alternative for diffuse tumours and metastases, which show poor response to surgery and photontherapy. In 2001 and 2003, in Pavia BNCT was applied to an isolated liver, which was infused with boron, explanted, irradiated and re-implanted. A new project was then initiated for lung tumours, developing a protocol for Boron concentration measurements and performing organ-dose Monte Carlo calculations; in parallel, radiobiology studies are ongoing to characterize the BNCT effects down to cellular level. After a brief introduction, herein we will present the main activities ongoing in Pavia including the radiobiological ones, which are under investigation not only experimentally but also theoretically, basing on...

  9. Design of a boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly

    Wang, Zhonglu

    2006-08-01

    The use of boron neutron capture to boost tumor dose in fast neutron therapy has been investigated at several fast neutron therapy centers worldwide. This treatment is termed boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). It is a combination of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and fast neutron therapy (FNT). It is believed that BNCEFNT may be useful in the treatment of some radioresistant brain tumors, such as glioblastoma multiform (GBM). A boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly has been designed for the Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF). This assembly uses a tungsten filter and collimator near the patient's head, with a graphite reflector surrounding the head to significantly increase the dose due to boron neutron capture reactions. The assembly was designed using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP version 5 for a standard 20x20 cm{sup 2} treatment beam. The calculated boron dose enhancement at 5.7-cm depth in a water-filled head phantom in the assembly with a 5x5 cm{sup 2} collimation was 21.9% per 100-ppm {sup 10}B for a 5.0-cm tungsten filter and 29.8% for a 8.5-cm tungsten filter. The corresponding dose rate for the 5.0-cm and 8.5-cm thick filters were 0.221 and 0.127 Gy/min, respectively; about 48.5% and 27.9% of the dose rate of the standard 10x10 cm{sup 2} fast neutron treatment beam. To validate the design calculations, a simplified BNCEFNT assembly was built using four lead bricks to form a 5x5 cm{sup 2} collimator. Five 1.0-cm thick 20x20 cm{sup 2} tungsten plates were used to obtain different filter thicknesses and graphite bricks/blocks were used to form a reflector. Measurements of the dose enhancement of the simplified assembly in a water-filled head phantom were performed using a pair of tissue-equivalent ion chambers. One of the ion chambers is loaded with 1000-ppm natural boron (184-ppm {sup 10}B) to measure dose due to boron neutron capture. The measured dose enhancement at 5.0-cm depth

  10. Boron-10 prompt gamma analysis using a diffracted neutron beam

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) facility has been built at the 5 MW MITR-II Research Reactor to support the ongoing boron neutron capture therapy (NCT) program. This facility is used to determine the concentration of B-10 in NCT relevant samples such as blood and urine. The B-10 concentration is needed to determine the radiation doses that tumor and healthy brain receive during neutron irradiation of a patient. Assaying for B-10 by PGNAA has several advantages over conventional chemical methods. It is rapid, accurate, nondestructive (allowing for re-analysis), inexpensive, sensitive (ppm level), generally independent of the chemical or physical matrix of the B-10, and does not require chemical manipulations of the sample. The authors goal was to build an inexpensive facility with a suitably high thermal neutron flux for PGNAA and a low level of photon and fast neutron contamination. Their design is unique in that it uses a diffracted beam. Most prompt gamma facilities use direct beams; these beams have a high thermal flux (> 107 n/cm2-sec), but are heavily contaminated with protons and fast neutrons. Other prompt gamma facilities use totally reflecting guide tubes; these beams have little contamination, but are expensive. The high thermal flux of direct beam facilities might not be an advantage since the detector usually must be moved further away from the sample to avoid high dead times in the multichannel analyzer

  11. Investigation of current status in Europe and USA on boron neutron capture therapy

    This report describes on the spot investigation results of current status of medical irradiation in Europe and USA at Feb. 1999. In HFR (Netherlands), the phase 1 study with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the EU had been already finished in those days, at the same time, an improvement of medical irradiation field of VTT(Finland) had been finishing and then clinical trial research had been about to start. On the other hand, phase 1 studies by two groups of BNL (Brook heaven National Laboratory) and MIT (Nuclear Engineering of Massachusetts Institute of Technology) in US were now in almost final stage, and they would start on phase 2 study. Either reactors of MIT and BNL were in modification to increase neutron flux, especially that employing fission converter into the irradiation facility and installation of irradiation room were carrying out in the former. In Europe and USA, the accelerator-based BNCT planes are now in progress vigorously, and will have reality. A reform of dynamitron accelerator at University of Birmingham was progressed, and the clinical treatment would be started from September 2000. The accelerator group at MIT has a small type of tandem accelerator, and they were performing basic experiment for BNCS (Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy) with this accelerator. The concept design for an accelerator and a moderator had been finished at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of Berkeley. (author)

  12. Investigation of current status in Europe and USA on boron neutron capture therapy

    NONE

    2000-11-01

    This report describes on the spot investigation results of current status of medical irradiation in Europe and USA at Feb. 1999. In HFR (Netherlands), the phase 1 study with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the EU had been already finished in those days, at the same time, an improvement of medical irradiation field of VTT(Finland) had been finishing and then clinical trial research had been about to start. On the other hand, phase 1 studies by two groups of BNL (Brook heaven National Laboratory) and MIT (Nuclear Engineering of Massachusetts Institute of Technology) in US were now in almost final stage, and they would start on phase 2 study. Either reactors of MIT and BNL were in modification to increase neutron flux, especially that employing fission converter into the irradiation facility and installation of irradiation room were carrying out in the former. In Europe and USA, the accelerator-based BNCT planes are now in progress vigorously, and will have reality. A reform of dynamitron accelerator at University of Birmingham was progressed, and the clinical treatment would be started from September 2000. The accelerator group at MIT has a small type of tandem accelerator, and they were performing basic experiment for BNCS (Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy) with this accelerator. The concept design for an accelerator and a moderator had been finished at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of Berkeley. (author)

  13. Boron-10 layers, Neutron Reflectometry and Thermal Neutron Gaseous Detectors

    Piscitelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays neutron facilities are going toward higher fluxes, e.g. the European Spallation Source (ESS) in Lund (Sweden), and this translates into a higher demand in the instrument performances. Because of its favorable properties,He-3 has been the main actor in thermal neutron detection for years. Starting in about 2001 the He-3 stockpile has been declining. The world is now experiencing the shortage of He-3. This makes the construction of large area detectors (several squared meters) not real...

  14. Determination Of Natural Boron Concentration In Coffee Leaves, Using de Autobiography by Neutron Capture Technique

    Determination of natural boron concentration in coffee leaves, using the autoradiography, by neutron capture technique. The boron absorption coefficient in young coffee leaves was measured using autoradiography by neutron capture. In two experiments carried out in April and November, 1996, it was found that the coefficient varies between 0.9 and 5.3 nmol/h. the concentration of natural boron in coffee leaves in regard to age, symptoms and treatment received was also studied, using the same technique. (Author)

  15. Goals of the European Collaboration on boron neutron capture therapy

    Since 1989, the Commission of the European Community (CEC) funds, through their program Europe against Cancer, a Concerted Action European Collaboration on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The European Collaboration has two main goals. Goal 1 is to initiate clinical trials of glioma at the High Flux Reactor Petten at the earliest possible time. Goal 2 is to create all necessary conditions to initiate clinical trials of other tumors and treatment at other facilities. In this overview the activities of European Collaboration towards the two goals are summarized

  16. Discrimination methods between neutron and gamma rays for boron loaded plastic scintillators

    Normand, Stéphane; Mouanda, Brigitte; Haan, Serge; Louvel, Michel

    2002-05-01

    Boron loaded plastic scintillators exhibit interesting properties for neutron detection in nuclear waste management and especially in investigating the amount of fissile materials when enclosed in waste containers. Combining a high thermal neutron efficiency and a low mean neutron lifetime, they are suitable in neutron multiplicity counting. However, due to their high sensitivity to gamma rays, pulse shape discrimination methods need to be developed in order to optimize the passive neutron assay measurement. From the knowledge of their physical properties, it is possible to separate the three kinds of particles that have interacted in the boron loaded plastic scintillator (gamma, fast neutron and thermal neutron). For this purpose, we have developed and compared the two well known discrimination methods (zero crossing and charge comparison) applied for the first time to boron loaded plastic scintillator. The setup for the zero crossing discrimination method and the charge comparison methods is thoroughly explained, and the results on those boron loaded plastic scintillators are discussed.

  17. Development of a dual phantom technique for measuring the fast neutron component of dose in boron neutron capture therapy

    Sakurai, Yoshinori, E-mail: yosakura@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kondo, Natsuko; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Asashironishi 2-1010, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Research and development of various accelerator-based irradiation systems for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is underway throughout the world. Many of these systems are nearing or have started clinical trials. Before the start of treatment with BNCT, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the fast neutrons (over 10 keV) incident to the irradiation field must be estimated. Measurements of RBE are typically performed by biological experiments with a phantom. Although the dose deposition due to secondary gamma rays is dominant, the relative contributions of thermal neutrons (below 0.5 eV) and fast neutrons are virtually equivalent under typical irradiation conditions in a water and/or acrylic phantom. Uniform contributions to the dose deposited from thermal and fast neutrons are based in part on relatively inaccurate dose information for fast neutrons. This study sought to improve the accuracy in the dose estimation for fast neutrons by using two phantoms made of different materials in which the dose components can be separated according to differences in the interaction cross sections. The development of a “dual phantom technique” for measuring the fast neutron component of dose is reported. Methods: One phantom was filled with pure water. The other phantom was filled with a water solution of lithium hydroxide (LiOH) capitalizing on the absorbing characteristics of lithium-6 (Li-6) for thermal neutrons. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the ideal mixing ratio of Li-6 in LiOH solution. Changes in the depth dose distributions for each respective dose component along the central beam axis were used to assess the LiOH concentration at the 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 wt. % levels. Simulations were also performed with the phantom filled with 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution for 95%-enriched Li-6. A phantom was constructed containing 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution based on the simulation results. Experimental characterization of the

  18. Characterization of boron carbide particles and its shielding behavior against neutron radiation

    Highlights: • B4C was characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS, FT-IR and Raman Spectroscopy. • B4C was investigated for the neutron shielding behavior analysis. • Neutron permeability experiments were moderated in the Howitzer using Ra–Be source. • The pellet with 12.5 g B4C powder had the lowest neutron permeability rate. • Total macroscopic cross sections found between 1.491 ± 0.0074 and 0.722 ± 0.0071 cm-1. - Abstract: Boron minerals, considered future essential materials, can be used as raw materials in the production of boron carbide. In this study, boron carbide, the hardest material after diamond and cubic boron nitride, is characterized and the neutron shielding behavior is investigated. The characterization and structural evaluation of the boron carbide sample was performed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Raman Spectroscopy. In addition, a neutron Howitzer was used to measure the neutron permeability of boron carbide samples of various thicknesses. The sample composed of 12.5 g of boron carbide powder and 3 g of Wax® had the lowest neutron permeability rate (62.1%). Pellet 3 had the smallest total macroscopic cross section of boron carbide particles, 0.722 ± 0.0071 cm−1

  19. Real-time dosimetry for boron-neutron capture therapy

    Epithermal/thermal boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) is promising treatment method for malignant tumors. Because the doses and dose rates for medical therapeutic radiation are very close to the normal tissue tolerance, small errors in radiation delivery can result in harmful overdoses. A substantial need exists for a device that will monitor, in real time, the radiation dose being delivered to a patient. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed a scintillating glass optical fiber that is sensitive to thermal neutrons. The small size of the fibers offers the possibility of in vivo dose monitoring at several points within the radiation field. The count rate of such detectors can approach 10 MHz because the lifetime of the cerium activator is fast. Fluxes typical of those in BNCT (i.e., 109 n/cm2/sec) may be measured because of this potentially high count rate and the small diameter of the fiber

  20. The Finnish Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) project

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a new, binary radiotherapy, which has been developed especially for severe brain tumours, incurable by the present means. A suitable 10B containing carrier compound is injected into the blood circulation and taken up selectively by the cancer cells. When these cells are subjected to a thermal neutron field, the 10B atoms capture the neutrons and undergo fission reaction. The energy thereby released is killing the cancerous cell. The Finnish BNCT research and development project is in the situation where all the basic conditions exist to start clinical trials. An epithermal neutron irradiation facility has been constructed at the Finnish research reactor (FiR 1) operated by VTT in Otaniemi. This article is an overview over the developments within the Finnish BNCT project. A research project to carry out clinical application of BNCT was established in Finland in the early 1990's. It was motivated both by the need to create new uses for FiR 1 and by the ideas to start research and production of new boron carriers for BNCT in Finland. Soon also other medical, medical physics and chemistry disciplines joined the project. Now the project involves scientists from different departments of University of Helsinki (HU), Helsinki University Central Hospital (HUCH), Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) and of the Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) and other Finnish universities. The aim of this project has been to start BNC-treatment of malignant brain tumours in Finland by the end of the century

  1. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of p-boronophenylalanine (BPA): A therapeutic agent for boron neutron capture therapy

    Zuo, C. S.; Prasad, P V; Busse, Paul; L. Tang; Zamenhof, R. G.

    1999-01-01

    Noninvasive in vivo quantitation of boron is necessary for obtaining pharmacokinetic data on candidate boronated delivery agents developed for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Such data, in turn, would facilitate the optimization of the temporal sequence of boronated drug infusion and neutron irradiation. Current approaches to obtaining such pharmacokinetic data include: positron emission tomography employing F-18 labeled boronated delivery agents (e.g., p-boronophenylalanine), ex vivo n...

  2. Preliminary study of neutron absorption by concrete with boron carbide addition

    Abdullah, Yusof, E-mail: yusofabd@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Zali, Nurazila Mat; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Yazid, Hafizal [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ariffin, Fatin Nabilah Tajul; Ahmad, Sahrim [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Hamid, Roszilah [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Aziz [College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga National, Jalan Ikram-Uniten, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12

    Concrete has become a conventional material in construction of nuclear reactor due to its properties like safety and low cost. Boron carbide was added as additives in the concrete construction as it has a good neutron absorption property. The sample preparation for concrete was produced with different weight percent of boron carbide powder content. The neutron absorption rate of these samples was determined by using a fast neutron source of Americium-241/Be (Am-Be 241) and detection with a portable backscattering neutron detector. Concrete with 20 wt % of boron carbide shows the lowest count of neutron transmitted and this indicates the most neutrons have been absorbed by the concrete. Higher boron carbide content may affect the concrete strength and other properties.

  3. Synovectomy by neutron capture in boron; Sinovectomia por captura de neutrones en boro

    Vega C, H.R. [Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares, Ingenieria Electrica y Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, A.P. 336, C.P. 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The rheumatoid arthritis is an illness which affect approximately at 3% of the World population. This illness is characterized by the inflammation of the joints which reduces the quality of life and the productivity of the patients. Since, it is an autoimmune illness, the inflammation is due to the overproduction of synovial liquid by the increase in the quantity of synoviocytes. The rheumatoid arthritis does not have a definitive recovery and the patients have three options of treatment: the use of drugs, the surgery and the radio synovectomy. The synovectomy by neutron capture in Boron is a novel proposal of treatment of the rheumatoid arthritis that consists in using a charged compound with Boron 10 that is preferently incorporated in the synoviocytes and to a less extent in the rest of surrounding tissues of the joint. Then, the joint is exposed to a thermal neutron field that induces the reaction (n, {alpha}) in the {sup 10} B. the products of this reaction place their energy inside synoviocytes producing their reduction and therefore the reduction of the joint inflammation. Since it is a novel procedure, the synovectomy by neutron capture in boron has two problems: the source design and the design of the adequate drug. In this work it has been realized a Monte Carlo study with the purpose to design a moderating medium that with a {sup 239} Pu Be source in its center, produces a thermal neutron field. With the produced neutron spectra, the neutrons spectra and neutron doses were calculated in different sites inside a model of knee joint. In Monte Carlo studies it is necessary to know the elemental composition of all the joint components, for the case of synovia and the synovial liquid this information does not exist in such way that it is supposed that its composition is equal than the water. In this work also it has been calculated the kerma factors by neutrons of synovia and the synovial liquid supposing that their elemental composition are similar to the

  4. Design of a medical reactor generating high quality neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that can selectively irradiate tumor tissue. BNCT uses drugs containing a stable isotope of boron, B-10, that are capable of preferentially accumulating in the tumor, which is then irradiated with thermal neutrons. The interaction of the B-10 with a thermal neutron causes the B-10 nucleus to split, releasing an alpha particle and a lithium nucleus. These products of the boron neutron capture reaction are very damaging to cells but have a path length in tissue of approximately 14 micrometers, or roughly the diameter of one or two cells. Thus, most of the ionizing energy imparted to tissue is localized to B-10-loaded cells. Since the early 1980s, there have been considerable improvements in boron compounds and neutron beams. More is known now about the radiation biology of BNCT, which has reemerged as a potentially useful method for preferential irradiation of tumors. Clinical trials have been initiated at BNL and MIT, with an improved boron compound and epithermal neutrons. At this time, nuclear reactors are the only demonstrated satisfactory sources of epithermal neutrons. While some reactors are available and within reach of cancer treatment centers, a question arises as to the feasibility and practicality of placing new epithermal neutron sources in hospitals. In this thesis, we design a square reactor (that can easily be reconfigured into polygonal reactors as the need arises) with four slab type assemblies to produce two epithermal neutron beams and two thermal neutron beams for use in neutron capture therapy. This square reactor with four large-area faces consists of 1056 U3Si-Al fuel elements and 36 B4C control rods. The proposed facility, based on this square reactor core with a maximum operating power of 300kW, provides an epithermal neutron beam of 3.2x109 nepi/cm2 · s intensity with low contamination by fast neutrons (<1.6x10-13 Gy · cm2/nepi) and gamma rays (<1.0x10-13 Gy · cm2/nepi

  5. Epithermal neutron beam adoption for liver cancer treatment by boron and gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    Comparative evaluation was made on depth-dose distribution in boron neutron capture therapy (B-NCT) and gadolinium one (Gd-NCT) for the treatments of liver cancers. At present, epithermal neutron beam is expected to be applicable to the treatment of deep and widespread tumors. ICRU computational model of ADAM and EVA was used as a liver phantom loading a tumor at depth of 6 cm in its central region. Epithermal neutron beam of Musashi reactor was used as the primary neutron beam for the depth-dose calculation. Calculation was conducted using the three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP4A. The doses observed in both NCTs were bumped over the tumor region but the dose for Gd-NCT was not so tumor-specific compared with that for BNCT because radiation in Gd-NCT was due to γ-ray. The mean physical dose was 4 Gy/h for boron 30 ppm and 5 Gy/h for Gd 1000 ppm when exposed to an epithermal neutron flux of 5x108 n/cm-2/sec and the dose ratio of tumor-to normal tissue was 2.7 for boron and 2.5 for Gd. The lethal dose of 50 Gy for the liver can be accomplished under conditions where the dose has not reached 25 Gy, the tolerance dose of the normal tissue. This seems very encouraging and indicating that both B-NCT and Gd-NCT are applicable for the treatment for liver cancer. However, if normal tissue contain 1/4 of the tumor concentration of boron or Gd, the BNCT would still possible when considering a large RBE value for 10B(n, α) reaction but the Gd-NCT would impossible for deep liver treatment. (M.N.)

  6. Gamma scintillator system using boron carbide for neutron detection

    Ben-Galim, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Wengrowicz, U. [NRC-Negev, PO Box 9001, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Raveh, A. [Advanced Coatings Center at Rotem Industries Ltd., Mishor Yamin, D.N. Arava 86800 (Israel); Orion, I. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2014-08-21

    A new approach for neutron detection enhancement to scintillator gamma-ray detectors is suggested. By using a scintillator coupled with a boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) disc, the 478 keV gamma-photon emitted from the excited Li in 94% of the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li interactions was detected. This suggests that the performance of existing gamma detection systems in Homeland security applications can be improved. In this study, a B{sub 4}C disc (2 in. diameter, 0.125 in. thick) with ∼19.8% {sup 10}B was used and coupled with a scintillator gamma-ray detector. In addition, the neutron thermalization moderator was studied in order to be able to increase the neutron sensitivity. An improvement in the detector which is easy to assemble, affordable and efficient was demonstrated. Furthermore, a tailored Monte-Carlo code written in MATLAB was developed for validation of the proposed application through efficiency estimation for thermal neutrons. Validation of the code was accomplished by showing that the MATLAB code results were well correlated to a Monte-Carlo MCNP code results. The measured efficiency of the assembled experimental model was observed to be in agreement with both models calculations.

  7. Gamma scintillator system using boron carbide for neutron detection

    A new approach for neutron detection enhancement to scintillator gamma-ray detectors is suggested. By using a scintillator coupled with a boron carbide (B4C) disc, the 478 keV gamma-photon emitted from the excited Li in 94% of the 10B(n,α)7Li interactions was detected. This suggests that the performance of existing gamma detection systems in Homeland security applications can be improved. In this study, a B4C disc (2 in. diameter, 0.125 in. thick) with ∼19.8% 10B was used and coupled with a scintillator gamma-ray detector. In addition, the neutron thermalization moderator was studied in order to be able to increase the neutron sensitivity. An improvement in the detector which is easy to assemble, affordable and efficient was demonstrated. Furthermore, a tailored Monte-Carlo code written in MATLAB was developed for validation of the proposed application through efficiency estimation for thermal neutrons. Validation of the code was accomplished by showing that the MATLAB code results were well correlated to a Monte-Carlo MCNP code results. The measured efficiency of the assembled experimental model was observed to be in agreement with both models calculations

  8. Study of boron carbide evolution under neutron irradiation

    Owing to its high neutron efficiency, boron carbide (B4C) is used as a neutron absorber in control rods of nuclear plants. Its behaviour under irradiation has been extensively studied for many years. It now seems clear that brittleness of the material induced by the 10B(n,α)7Li capture reaction is due to penny shaped helium bubbles associated to a high strain field around them. However, no model explains the behaviour of the material under neutron irradiation. In order to build such a model, this work uses different techniques: nuclear microprobe X-ray diffraction profile analysis and Raman and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to present an evolution model of B4C under neutron irradiation. The use of nuclear reactions produced by a nuclear microprobe such as the 7Li(p,p'γ)7Li reaction, allows to measure lithium profile in B4C pellets irradiated either in Pressurised Water Reactors or in Fast Breeder Reactors. Examining such profiles enables us to describe the migration of lithium atoms out of B4C materials under neutron irradiation. The analysis of X-ray diffraction profiles of irradiated B4C samples allows us to quantify the concentrations of helium bubbles as well as the strain fields around such bubbles.Furthermore Raman spectroscopy studies of different B4C samples lead us to propose that under neutron irradiation. the CBC linear chain disappears. Such a vanishing of this CBC chain. validated by NMR analysis, may explain the penny shaped of helium bubbles inside irradiated B4C. (author)

  9. Novel semiconducting boron carbide/pyridine polymers for neutron detection at zero bias

    Thin films containing aromatic pyridine moieties bonded to boron, in the partially dehydrogenated boron-rich icosahedra (B10C2HX), prove to be an effective material for neutron detection applications when deposited on n-doped (100) silicon substrates. The characteristic I-V curves for the heterojunction diodes exhibit strong rectification and largely unperturbed normalized reverse bias leakage currents with increasing pyridine content. The neutron capture generated pulses from these heterojunction diodes were obtained at zero bias voltage although without the signatures of complete electron-hole collection. These results suggest that modifications to boron carbide may result in better neutron voltaic materials. (orig.)

  10. Biomedical irradiation system for boron neutron capture therapy at the Kyoto University reactor

    Physics studies related to radiation source, spectroscopy, beam quality, dosimetry, and biomedical applications using the Kyoto University Reactor Heavy Water Facility are described. Also, described are a Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube and a Super Mirror Neutron Guide Tube that are used both for the measurement of boron concentration in phantom and living tissue and for precise measurements of neutron flux in phantom in the presence of both light and heavy water. Discussed are: (1) spectrum measurements using the time of flight technique, (2) the elimination of gamma rays and fast neutrons from a thermal neutron irradiation field, (3) neutron collimation without producing secondary gamma rays, (4) precise neutron flux measurements, dose estimation, and the measurement of boron concentration in tumor and its periphery using guide tubes, (5) the dose estimation of boron-10 for the first melanoma patient, and (6) special-purpose biological irradiation equipment. Other related subjects are also described

  11. Discrimination methods between neutron and gamma rays for boron loaded plastic scintillators

    Normand, S; Haan, S; Louvel, M

    2002-01-01

    Boron loaded plastic scintillators exhibit interesting properties for neutron detection in nuclear waste management and especially in investigating the amount of fissile materials when enclosed in waste containers. Combining a high thermal neutron efficiency and a low mean neutron lifetime, they are suitable in neutron multiplicity counting. However, due to their high sensitivity to gamma rays, pulse shape discrimination methods need to be developed in order to optimize the passive neutron assay measurement. From the knowledge of their physical properties, it is possible to separate the three kinds of particles that have interacted in the boron loaded plastic scintillator (gamma, fast neutron and thermal neutron). For this purpose, we have developed and compared the two well known discrimination methods (zero crossing and charge comparison) applied for the first time to boron loaded plastic scintillator. The setup for the zero crossing discrimination method and the charge comparison methods is thoroughly expl...

  12. CASCADE - a multi-layer Boron-10 neutron detection system

    Köhli, M; Allmendinger, F; Perrevoort, A -K; Schröder, T; Martin, N; Schmidt, C J; Schmidt, U

    2016-01-01

    The globally increased demand for helium-3 along with the limited availability of this gas calls for the development of alternative technologies for the large ESS instrumentation pool. We report on the CASCADE Project - a novel detection system, which has been developed for the purposes of neutron spin echo spectroscopy. It features 2D spatially resolved detection of thermal neutrons at high rates. The CASCADE detector is composed of a stack of solid boron-10 coated Gas Electron Multiplier foils, which serve both as a neutron converter and as an amplifier for the primary ionization deposited in the standard Argon-CO2 counting gas environment. This multi-layer setup efficiently increases the detection efficiency and serves as a helium-3 alternative. It has furthermore been possible to extract the signal of the charge traversing the stack to identify the very thin conversion layer of about 1 micrometer. This allows the precise determination of the time-of-flight, necessary for the application in MIEZE spin echo...

  13. Epithermal neutron beam adoption for lung and pancreatic cancer treatment by boron neutron capture therapy

    The depth-dose distributions were evaluated for possible treatment of both lung and pancreatic cancers using an epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP) calculations showed that physical dose in tumors were 6 and 7 Gy/h, respectively, for lung and pancreas, attaining an epithermal neutron flux of 5 x 108 ncm-2s-1. The boron concentrations were assumed at 100 ppm and 30 ppm, respectively, for lung and pancreas tumors and normal tissues contains 1/10 tumor concentrations. The dose ratios of tumor to normal tissue were 2.5 and 2.4, respectively, for lung and pancreas. The dose evaluation suggests that BNCT using an epithermal neutron beam could be applied for both lung and pancreatic cancer treatment. (author)

  14. Development of a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator facility for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    There is a generalized perception that the availability of suitable particle accelerators installed in hospitals, as neutron sources, may be crucial for the advancement of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). An ongoing project to develop a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based (AB)-BNCT is described here. The project goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.4-2.5 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction slightly beyond its resonance at 2.25 MeV. A folded tandem, with 1.20-1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an ESQ chain is being designed and constructed. This machine is conceptually shown to be capable of accelerating a 30 mA proton beam to 2.5 MeV. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep-seated tumors in less than an hour. This electrostatic machine is one of the technologically simplest and cheapest solutions for optimized AB-BNCT. At present there is no BNCT facility in the world with the characteristics presented in this work. For the accelerator, results on its design, construction and beam transport calculations are discussed. Taking into account the peculiarities of the expected irradiation field, the project also considers a specific study of the treatment room. This study aims at the design of the treatment room emphasizing aspects related to patient, personnel and public radiation protection; dose monitoring; patient positioning and room construction. The design considers both thermal (for the treatment of shallow tumors) and epithermal (for deep-seated tumors) neutron beams entering the room through a port connected to the accelerator via a moderation and neutron beam shaping assembly. Preliminary results of dose calculations for the treatment room design, using the MCNP program, are presented

  15. Novel design concepts for creating and utilizing intense accelerator based beams of mono-energetic fast neutrons

    The delivered intensity from neutron sources plays a major role in the applicability of neutron techniques. This is particularly true when the application requires mono-energetic neutron beams. Development of such neutron sources depends on two main factors; i) the output ion beam current from the accelerator and, ii) the design of the target system for generating neutrons. The design of an intense monoenergetic neutron source reported in this paper is based on a radio-frequency quadrupole deuteron linac system, coupled to a novel high pressure differentially pumped deuterium gas target. The operation of a working system, capable of generating in excess of 1010 neutrons per second is reported, along with examples of diverse applications. Also discussed are proposed improvements to the design, such that in excess of 1012 neutron per second will be generated. (author)

  16. Aluminum-titanium hydride-boron carbide composite provides lightweight neutron shield material

    Poindexter, A. M.

    1967-01-01

    Inexpensive lightweight neutron shield material has high strength and ductility and withstands high internal heat generation rates without excessive thermal stress. This composite material combines structural and thermal properties of aluminum, neutron moderating properties of titanium hydride, and neutron absorbing characteristics of boron carbide.

  17. Boron neutron capture therapy design calculation of a 3H(p,n reaction based BSA for brain cancer setup

    Bassem Elshahat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT is a promising technique for the treatment of malignant disease targeting organs of the human body. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to calculate optimum design parameters of an accelerator based beam shaping assembly (BSA for BNCT of brain cancer setup.Methods: Epithermal beam of neutrons were obtained through moderation of fast neutrons from 3H(p,n reaction in a high density polyethylene moderator and a graphite reflector. The dimensions of the moderator and the reflector were optimized through optimization of epithermal / fast neutron intensity ratio as a function of geometric parameters of the setup. Results: The results of our calculation showed the capability of our setup to treat the tumor within 4 cm of the head surface. The calculated peak therapeutic ratio for the setup was found to be 2.15. Conclusion: With further improvement in the polyethylene moderator design and brain phantom irradiation arrangement, the setup capabilities can be improved to reach further deep-seated tumor.

  18. Prompt gamma activation analysis of boron in reference materials using diffracted polychromatic neutron beam

    Boron concentrations were analyzed for standard reference materials by prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA). The measurements were performed at the SNU-KAERI PGAA facility installed at Hanaro, the research reactor of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The facility uses a diffracted polychromatic beam with a neutron flux of 7.9 x 107 n/cm2 s. Elemental sensitivity for boron was calibrated from the prompt gamma-ray spectra of boric acid samples containing 2-45 μg boron. The sensitivity of 2131 cps/mg-B was obtained from the linearity of the boron peak count rate versus the boron mass. The detection limit for boron was estimated to be 67 ng from an empty sample bag spectrum for a counting time of 10,000 s. The measured boron concentrations for standard reference materials showed good consistency with the certified or information values

  19. Prompt gamma activation analysis of boron in reference materials using diffracted polychromatic neutron beam

    Byun, S. H.; Sun, G. M.; Choi, H. D.

    2004-01-01

    Boron concentrations were analyzed for standard reference materials by prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA). The measurements were performed at the SNU-KAERI PGAA facility installed at Hanaro, the research reactor of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The facility uses a diffracted polychromatic beam with a neutron flux of 7.9 × 10 7 n/cm 2 s. Elemental sensitivity for boron was calibrated from the prompt gamma-ray spectra of boric acid samples containing 2-45 μg boron. The sensitivity of 2131 cps/mg-B was obtained from the linearity of the boron peak count rate versus the boron mass. The detection limit for boron was estimated to be 67 ng from an empty sample bag spectrum for a counting time of 10,000 s. The measured boron concentrations for standard reference materials showed good consistency with the certified or information values.

  20. New carbon-carbon linked amphiphilic carboranyl-porphyrins as boron neutron capture agents

    Novel amphiphilic carboranyl-porphyrins have been synthesized for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). These compounds have carbon-carbon bonds between the carborane residues and the porphyrin meso-phenyl groups, and contain 28-31% boron by weight . (author)

  1. The comparison of four neutron sources for Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) in vivo detections of boron

    Fantidis, J. G.; Nicolaou, G. E.; C. Potolias; N. Vordos; Bandekas, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    A Prompt Gamma Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system, incorporating an isotopic neutron source has been simulated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In order to improve the signal to noise ratio different collimators and a filter were placed between the neutron source and the object. The effect of the positioning of the neutron beam and the detector relative to the object has been studied. In this work the optimisation procedure is demonstrated for boron. Monte Carlo calculations were...

  2. Investigation of the boron nitrate compound for the use of neutron shield

    Full text: Boron nitride can be found in hexagonal structure (hBN) which is very much like graphite or in cubic structure with properties very close to diamond. Since cBN is the hardest known material after diamond is used in making hard metal covers. In addition, while diamond can be doped only in p type, both p and n type doping is possible in cBN, therefore cBN can be used to make p-n junction which is a basic part of the microelectronic circuits. That means cBN can be used to make a detector or Light Emitting Diode (LED) in violet-blue region. In addition to these optoelectronic properties, cBN based circuit parts are expected to withstand very high temperatures due to the higher forbidden energy gap of cBN compared to that of diamond. Considering the crucial role of neutron capture capability of boron, in this study, it is focused on the shielding behavior of boron nitride. For that purpose, locally obtained boron nitride particles are subjected to some characterization analyses to identify the boron nitride particles. After the identification the neutron radiation experiments are conducted. For the characterization analyses, X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques are conducted. For the radiation experiments boron nitride particles are pelletized with 40 MPa hydraulic press than neutron permeability experiments are carried through the thermal neutrons which were generated from Ra-Be source moderated in a howitzer. As a conclusion boron nitride particles had a neutron permeability value at about 63%. It is seen that boron nitride can be used for the purpose of neutron radiation. Keywords: boron nitride, XRD, FT-IR, neutron permeability

  3. Tumor cell killing effect of boronated dipeptide. Boromethylglycylphenylalanine on boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumors

    Takagaki, Masao; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kobayashi, Toru [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Oda, Yoshifumi; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Spielvogel, B.F.

    1994-03-01

    The killing effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy; BNCT, is dependant on the boron concentration ratio of tumor to normal brain (T/N ratio), and also that of tumor to blood (T/B ratio). The clinical boron carrier of boro-captate (BSH) showed the large T/N ratio of ca. 8, however the T/B ratio was around 1, which indicated nonselective accumulation into tumor. Indeed high boron concentration of blood restrict the neutron irradiation dose in order to circumvent the normal endothelial damage, especially in the case of deeply seated tumor. Phenylalanine analogue of para borono-phenylalanine (BPA) is an effective boron carrier on BNCT for malignant melanoma. For the BNCT on brain tumors, however, BPA concentration in normal brain was reported to be intolerably high. In order to improve the T/N ratio of BPA in brain, therefore, a dipeptide of boromethylglycylphenylalanine (BMGP) was synthesized deriving from trimethylglycine conjugated with BPA. It is expected to be selectively accumulated into tumor with little uptake into normal brain. Because a dipeptide might not pass through the normal blood brain barrier (BBB). Its killing effect on cultured glioma cell, T98G, and its distribution in rat brain bearing 9L glioma have been investigated in this paper. The BNCT effect of BMGP on cultured cells was nearly triple in comparison with DL-BPA. The neutron dose yielding 1% survival ratio were 7x10{sup 12}nvt for BMGP and 2x10{sup 13}nvt for BPA respectively on BNCT after boron loading for 16 hrs in the same B-10 concentration of 20ppm. Quantitative study of boron concentration via the {alpha}-auto radiography and the prompt gamma ray assay on 9L brain tumor rats revealed that T/N ratio and T/B ratio are 12.0 and 3.0 respectively. Those values are excellent for BNCT use. (author).

  4. The production of nitrogen-13 by neutron capture in boron compounds

    The 10B(α,n)13N reaction is studied as an activation process in a variety of solid boron-containing neutron shielding materials. The source of α-particles is the neutron capture reaction 10B(n,α)7Li. Samples of boron carbide, boron oxide, and boron nitride are irradiated with thermal neutrons and the rate of 13N production is determined. 13N promptly decays, emitting a positron. This positron efficiently annihilates with electrons in the material and the resultant 511 keV gamma ray is detected. For each of the above-mentioned materials, the rate of 13N production is (1-2) x 10-10 per captured neutron

  5. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver.

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2007-12-01

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ((phi(max)/phi(min)) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a phi(max)/phi(min) ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations. PMID:18196797

  6. Neutron capture therapy of murine melanoma on new boron carriers with use of capillary neutron optics

    Borisov, G. I.; Naidenov, M. G.; Koldaeva, E. Y.; Petrov, S. A.; Zhizhin, K. Y.; Kuznettsov, N. T.; Brattsev, V. A.; Grigorieva, E. Y.

    2005-07-01

    The Boron-10 NCT is one of the most perspective methods of human anticancer treatment. The introduction of this efficient method into medical practice makes possible more selective and precise destruction of tumour cells without any damage of normal tissues. The basis of NCT method is destructive effect of products of nuclear reaction 10B(n,α,γ)7Li. This reaction produces particles-helium nuclei (alpha-particles) and lithium nuclei-with too high linear energetic loss in animal tissues and poor integrated sweep (to 14 μm) what is comparable with single cell diameter. Actual use of BNCT for treatment of human malignant tumours is dependent on resolution of various and complex scientific and technical problems. Namely: the development of novel boron preparations selectively carrying 10B into cancer cells, providing optimal concentration and microdistribution of 10B in these and remaining there during all necessary irradiation time; formation of therapeutic neutron fluxes of needed power, spectrum and intensity; provision of adequate planning and monitoring methods for current 10B-NCT making possible to evaluate a boron concentration in animal tissues in real time, to see macro- and microdistribution of the same, allowing precise microdosimetry; optimization of irradiation regimens and of drug administration schedules conformably to concrete neutron flux in different objects.

  7. Quality Assurance of Patient Dosimetry in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    The verification of the correctness of planned and executed treatments is imperative for safety in radiotherapy. The purpose of the present work is to describe and evaluate the quality assurance (QA) procedures for patient dosimetry implemented at the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility at Studsvik, Sweden. The dosimetric complexity of the mixed neutron-photon field during BNCT suggests a careful verification of routine procedures, specifically the treatment planning calculations. In the present study, two methods for QA of patient dosimetry are presented. The first is executed prior to radiotherapy and involves an independent check of the planned absorbed dose to be delivered to a point in the patient for each treatment field. The second QA procedure involves in vivo dosimetry measurements using post-treatment activation analysis. Absorbed dose conversion factors taking the difference in material composition and geometry of the patient and the PMMA phantom used for reference dosimetry were determined using the Monte Carlo method. The agreement of the QA procedure prior to radiotherapy reveals an acceptably small deviation for 60 treatment fields of ±4.2% (1 SD), while the in vivo dosimetry method presented may benefit from improvements, as the deviations observed were quite substantial (±12%, 1 SD), and were unlikely to be due to actual errors in the clinical dosimetry

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy for children with malignant brain tumor

    Among the 131 cases with brain tumors treated by boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT), seventeen were children. Eight supratentorial tumors included five astrocytomas(grade 2-4), two primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) and one rhabdomyosarcoma. Seven pontine tumors included one astrocytoma, one PNET and 5 unverified gliomas. Two cerebellar tumors (PNET and astrocytoma) were also treated. All pontine tumors showed remarkable decrease in size after BNCT. However, most of them showed regrowth of the tumors because the neutrons were insufficient due to the depth. Four cases with cerebral tumor died of remote cell dissemination, although they all responded to BNCT. One of them survived 7 years after repeated BNCTs. An 11 years old girl with a large astrocytoma in the right frontal lobe has lived more than 11 years and is now a draftswoman at a civil engineering company after graduating from a technical college. An 8 years old girl with an astrocytoma in the left occipital lobe has no recurrence of the tumor for 2 years and attends on elementary school without mental and physical problems. Two children (one year old girl and four years old boy) with cerebellar tumors have shown showed an excellent growth after BNCT and had no neurological deficits. Mental and physical development in patients treated by BNCT is usually better than that in patients treated by conventional radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Application of a Bonner sphere spectrometer for the determination of the angular neutron energy spectrum of an accelerator-based BNCT facility

    Experimental activities are underway at INFN Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) (Padua, Italy) and Pisa University aimed at angular-dependent neutron energy spectra measurements produced by the 9Be(p,xn) reaction, under a 5 MeV proton beam. This work has been performed in the framework of INFN TRASCO-BNCT project. Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS), based on 6LiI (Eu) scintillator, was used with the shadow-cone technique. Proper unfolding codes, coupled to BSS response function calculated by Monte Carlo code, were finally used. The main results are reported here. - Highlights: • Bonner sphere spectrometer is used to determine the angular neutron energy spectrum of an accelerator-based BNCT facility. • The shadow-cone technique is a method used with Bonner sphere spectrometer to remove the neutron scattered contribution. • The response function matrix for the set of Bonner sphere spectrometer is calculated by Monte Carlo code. • Unfolding codes are used to obtain neutron spectra at different neutron emission angles (0°, 40°, 80° and 120°)

  10. Measurement and analysis of the radio frequency radiation (non-ionizing) in DC accelerator based 14 MeV neutron generator facility

    Radio frequency (RF) driven ion sources are used in various scientific applications like neutral beam injection systems for fusion reactors, particle accelerators, proton therapy machines, ion implantation systems, neutron generator and neutron spallation source. In BARC, a DC accelerator based 14 MeV neutron generator uses RF type ion source for generation of deuterium ion beam current that is used in DT reaction for neutron generation. An indigenously developed RF amplifier system, capacitively couples (via two electrode rings) the RF power at 100 MHz to deuterium gas filled RF ion source assembly. The RF radiation (non ionizing radiation) emanates from the capacitively coupling that is in the form of circular electrode (metal) rings across deuterium plasma column. A very minor RF leakage may arise from the amplifier assembly itself. This total radiation was measured at various locations within the neutron generator facility and also in two set ups. It was then quantified, analyzed and qualified from the allowed RF emissions standards. This would and have ensured equipment and personnel safety in addition to avoiding of the radio frequency interference (RFI) towards other instrumentation. This paper describes in detail all these measurements and their analysis done. (author)

  11. Comparison of neutron attenuation properties of ferro boron slabs containing 5% natural boron with other high density materials

    Modeling and designing cost-effective neutron attenuation along with shield volume reduction is a challenging task in fast reactors. It involves reducing the neutron energy and absorbing them with suitable materials. A series of experiments were conducted in the South beam end of Kalpakkam Mini reactor with powders of ferro boron (FeB), ferrotungsten (FeW), boron carbide, slabs of FeB, and mild steel plates to study their neutron attenuation characteristics. In one of the experiments, FeB slab cast with 5% natural boron was used, and neutron attenuation measurements were carried out. The attenuation factors were found over a thickness of 28 cm for the measured reaction rates of 195Pt (n, n') 195mPt, 111Cd (n, n') 111mCd, 103Rh (n, n') 103mRh, 115In (n, n') 115mIn, 180Hf (n, n') 180mHf, 63Cu (n,γ) 64Cu, 23Na (n,γ) 24Na, 55Mn (n,γ) 56Mn, and 197Au (n,γ) 198Au reactions representative of fast, epithermal, and thermal neutron fluxes. A comparative analysis of the neutron attenuation behavior measured with various materials is presented. In case of attenuation of both thermal and fast fluxes, FeB is better than other high density materials such as mild steel and FeW. The outcome of the experimental study is that FeB slab cast with 5% natural boron can be utilized as cost-effective neutron shield in streaming paths in nuclear reactors. (author)

  12. Monte Carlo simulation on the application of boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector to the compensated neutron logging

    Background: The compensated neutron logging technology is widely used in oil exploration and development. The neutron detector commonly used in this technology is the helium-3 proportional counter. Due to the decreasing in supply of the helium-3 gas, the price of the helium-3 proportional counter rises quickly. Purpose: The aim is to develop a new type of neutron detector to replace the helium-3 tubes in the compensated neutron logging technology. Methods: A new thermal neutron detector coated with a layer of thermal neutron converter in the inner glass of the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) was developed. Under the conventional and underbalanced conditions, Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the response of the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector and helium-3 proportional counter employed in compensated neutron logging technology. Results: It is shown that the SS/LS increases with the rise of porosity using either the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector or the helium-3 proportional counter, and the results of these two detectors are basically identical. Conclusion: It indicates that the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector can be used for compensated neutron logging. (authors)

  13. Boron neutron capture synovectomy at SINQ in Switzerland

    One percent of the Swiss population suffers from the crippling disease rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the hand with associated inflammation of various finger joints. Loss of manual dexterity results in a greatly reduced quality of life, especially in the elderly. Current medical treatment of pharmaceutically unresponsive RA involves either surgery or application of the β-emitters: Yttrium or Erbium. However, both procedures have disadvantages. The small size of the finger joints makes surgery impractical and is therefore not practiced in Switzerland. However, application of Yttrium or Erbium presents a radiation protection problem because the arthritic joint has the potential to leak. For this reason application of β-emitters for RA does not have FDA approval in the US. A promising alternative has recently been under investigation at MIT: Neutron Capture Synovectomy (NCS). Treatment of the arthritic human hand, in particular the metacarpopharangeal and proximal interpharangeal finger joints, involves prior injection of an enriched Boron-10 compound and subsequent irradiation with thermal neutrons. This method avoids the drawbacks of the existing treatments. Introduction of NCS to the SINQ will require preclinical studies to establish the treatment conditions necessary and the effectivity of the planned treatment (Phase 0). The studies will include neutron exposures of cell cultures and joint samples at the new neutron capture radiography facility (NCR) on the cold neutron guide 13. Introduction of NCS will also require construction of a suitable treatment facility for human patients at Sektor 80 of SINQ. Prerequisites which ensure comfortable and expedient treatment of the patient and exposure conditions respecting the demands of radiation protection regulations and the complete safety of the patient must be fulfilled in the construction of the NCS treatment facility. A temporary construction is envisaged for the early clinical trials (Phase I). A more permanent

  14. Epithermal neutron formation for boron neutron capture therapy by adiabatic resonance crossing concept

    Low-energy protons from the cyclotron in the range of 15–30 MeV and low current have been simulated on beryllium (Be) target with a lead moderator around the target. This research was accomplished to design an epithermal neutron beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using the moderated neutron on the average produced from 9Be target via (p, xn) reaction in Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) concept. Generation of neutron to proton ratio, energy distribution, flux and dose components in head phantom have been simulated by MCNP5 code. The reflector and collimator were designed in prevention and collimation of derivation neutrons from proton bombarding. The scalp-skull-brain phantom consisting of bone and brain equivalent material has been simulated in order to evaluate the dosimetric effect on the brain. Results of this analysis demonstrated while the proton energy decreased, the dose factor altered according to filters thickness. The maximum epithermal flux revealed using fluental, Fe and bismuth (Bi) filters with thicknesses of 9.4, 3 and 2 cm, respectively and also the epithermal to thermal neutron flux ratio was 103.85. The potential of the ARC method to replace or complement the current reactor-based supply sources of BNCT purposes. (author)

  15. Optimal timing of neutron irradiation for boron neutron capture therapy after intravenous infusion of sodium borocaptate in patients with glioblastoma

    Purpose: A cooperative study in Europe and Japan was conducted to determine the pharmacokinetics and boron uptake of sodium borocaptate (BSH: Na2B12H11SH), which has been introduced clinically as a boron carrier for boron neutron capture therapy in patients with glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: Data from 56 patients with glioblastoma who received BSH intravenous infusion were retrospectively reviewed. The pharmacokinetics were evaluated in 50 patients, and boron uptake was investigated in 47 patients. Patients received BSH doses between 12 and 100 mg/kg of body weight. For the evaluation, the infused boron dose was scaled linearly to 100 mg/kg BSH. Results: In BSH pharmacokinetics, the average value for total body clearance, distribution volume of steady state, and mean residence time was 3.6±1.5 L/h, 223.3±160.7 L, and 68.0±52.5 h, respectively. The average values of the boron concentration in tumor adjusted to 100 mg/kg BSH, the boron concentration in blood adjusted to 100 mg/kg BSH, and the tumor/blood boron concentration ratio were 37.1±35.8 ppm, 35.2±41.8 ppm, and 1.53±1.43, respectively. A good correlation was found between the logarithmic value of Tadj and the interval from BSH infusion to tumor tissue sampling. About 12-19 h after infusion, the actual values for Tadj and tumor/blood boron concentration ratio were 46.2±36.0 ppm and 1.70±1.06, respectively. The dose ratio between tumor and healthy tissue peaked in the same interval. Conclusion: For boron neutron capture therapy using BSH administered by intravenous infusion, this work confirms that neutron irradiation is optimal around 12-19 h after the infusion is started

  16. Research on shielding neutron efficiency of some boron-bearing fabric and transparent resin materials

    The shielding neutron efficiency of boron-bearing materials developed recently is introduced. The thermal neutron shield ratios for two kinds of non-woven cloth with thickness of 58 mg/cm2 and 153 mg/cm2 are 51% and 79% respectively. Their mass attenuation coefficient for 0.186, 24.4 and 144 keV neutron are 1.56, 1.29 and 0.9 cm2/g respectively. The thermal neutron shield ratio is 85% for the natural boron-bearing transparent resin plate with the thickness of 0.59 g/cm2, and 97% for enriched boron or gadolinium bearing resin plate. The shield ratios of all three materials for 24.4 keV neutrons are 38%. The transparence of natural light for enriched boron-bearing resin plates shows no considerable change after they were exposed to thermal neutrons up to 6 Sv. After they were exposed up to 20 Sv, the transparence decreases to 50% but thermal neutron shield ratio does not change. The gadolinium-bearing plate has a very strong thermal neutron-capture gamma radiation and its dose-equivalent is greater than that of incident thermal neutrons

  17. Microdosimetric spectra of the THOR neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy

    A primary objective of the BNCT project in Taiwan, involving THOR (Tsing Hua Open Pool Reactor), was to examine the potential treatment of hepatoma. To characterise the epithermal neutron beam in THOR, the microdosimetry distributions in lineal energy were determined using paired tissue-equivalent proportional counters with and without boron microfoils. Microdosimetry results were obtained in free-air and at various depths in a PMMA phantom near the exit of the beam port. A biological weighting function, dependent on lineal energy, was used to estimate the relative biological effectiveness of the beam. An effective RBE of 2.7 was found at several depths in the phantom. (author)

  18. Design study of Be-target for proton accelerator based neutron source with 13MeV cyclotron

    There is a cyclotron named KIRAMS-13 in Pusan National University, Busan, Korea, which has the proton energy of 13MeV and the beam current of 0.05mA. Originally, it was developed for producing medical radioisotopes and nuclear physics research. To improve the utilization of the facility, we are considering the possibilities of installing a neutron generation target in it. The Beryllium target has been considered and neutrons can be generated by 9Be(p,n)9B reaction above the threshold proton energy of 2.057MeV. In this presentation, we suggest candidate materials and structures, thicknesses, metal layers and cooling systems of target, which is optimal for the KIRAMS-13. We chose the Beryllium material of 1.14mm thick, which is calculated by stopping power of Beryllium, based on PSTAR, NIST. As for the cooling system, we chose to use water as a coolant, which will also act as a moderator. As protons pass through the target, hydrogen ions continue to pile up in the material and this makes the material brittle. To solve this problem, we chose Vanadium material because it has high hydrogen diffusion coefficient and short half-life isotope after being activated by neutrons. We simulated the neutron characteristics by the Monte Carlo simulation code, Geant4, CERN and performed thermal analysis on the target. The design of target system is very important to produce neutrons for the desired purposes. There are several other existing facilities in Korea, in addition to the cyclotron facility considered in this study, where new neutron target system can be installed and neutrons can be generated. Two prominent facilities are KOMAC, Gyeongju and RFT-30, Jeongeup and we are planning to do study on the possibilities of utilizing the accelerators for neutron generation.

  19. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    2009-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of10B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots) to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors. PMID:20596476

  20. Design of neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy in a fast reactor

    The BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) technique makes use of thermal or epithermal neutrons to irradiate tumours previously loaded with 10B. Reactors are currently seen as a suitable neutron source for BNCT implementation, due to the high intensity of the flux they can provide. The TAPIRO reactor, that is located at the ENEA Casaccia Centre near Rome, is a low-power fast-flux research reactor that can be usefully employed for this application. In this work computer simulations were carried out on this reactor to obtain epithermal and thermal neutron beams for the application of BNCT in Italy in the framework of a specific research program. Comparisons with measurements are also reported. Using the MCNP-4B code, Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to determine the materials suitable for the design of the thermal and epithermal columns. Various arrangements of reflector and moderator materials have been investigated to achieve the desired experimental constraints. On the basis of these calculations, a thermal column was designed and installed in the TAPIRO reactor to perform preliminary experiments on small laboratory animals. For the planning of a therapy treatment of gliomas on larger size animals, several material configurations were investigated in the search for an optimal epithermal facility. The aim of the present study is to indicate how a fast research reactor can be successfully modified for generating neutron beams suitable for BNCT applications. (author)

  1. Boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent head and neck malignancies

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a tumor-cell targeted radiotherapy. When 10B absorbs thermal neutrons, the alpha and 7Li particles generated by the 10B (n, α) 7Li reaction are high linear energy transfer (LET) particles, and carry high kinetic energy (2.34 MeV), and have short ranges (4-9 micron-meters) of approximately one-cell diameter, resulting in a large relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and selective destruction of tumor cells containing 10B. We have, for the first time in the world, used BNCT to treat 11 patients with recurrent head and neck malignancies (HNM) after a standard primary therapy since 2001. The 11 patients were composed of 6 squamous cell carcinomas, 3 salivary gland tumors and 2 sarcomas. The results of BNCT were as follows. Regression rates (volume %) were complete response (CR): 2 cases, >90%: 5 cases, 73%: 1 case, 54%: 1 case, progressive disease (PD): 1 case, NE (not evaluated): 1 case. The response rate was 82%. Improvement of quality of life (QOL) was recognized, such as disappearance of tumor ulceration and covering with normal skin: relief of severe pain, bleeding, trismus and dyspnea: improvement of performance status (PS) (from 4 to 2) allowing the patients to return to work and elongate his survival period. Survival periods after BNCT were 1-38 months (mean: 8.5 months). The survival rate was 36% (4 cases). There are a few side-effects such as transient mucositis and alopecia less than Grade-2. These results indicate that BNCT represents a new and promising treatment approach even for a huge or far-advanced HNM. (author)

  2. Neutron shielding properties of boron-containing ore and epoxy composites

    Using the boron-containing iron ore concentrate and boron-rich slag as studying object, the starting materials were got after the specific green ore containing boron dressing in China and blast furnace separation respectively. Monte-Carlo method was used to study the effect of the boron-containing iron ore concentrate and boron-rich slag and their composites with epoxy on the neutron shielding abilities. The reasons that affecting the shielding materials properties was discussed and the suitable proportioning of boron-containing ore to epoxy composites was confirmed; the 14.1 MeV fast neutron removal cross section and the total thermal neutron attenuation coefficient were obtained and compared with that of the common used concrete. The results show that the shielding property of 14.1 MeV fast neutron is mainly concerned with the low-Z elements in the shielding materials, the thermal neutron shielding ability is mainly concerned with boron concentrate in the composite, the attenuation of the accompany γ-ray photon is mainly concerned with the high atom number elements content in the ore and the density of the shielding material. The optimum Janume fractions of composites are in the range of 0.4-0.6 and the fast neutron shielding properties are similar to concrete while the thermal neutron shielding properties are higher than concrete. The composites are expected to be used as biological concrete shields crack injection and filling of the anomalous holes through the concrete shields around the radiation fields or directly to be prepared as shielding materials.(authors)

  3. Time-of-flight neutron detection using PECVD grown boron carbide diode detector

    The development of novel neutron detectors requires an understanding of the entire neutron detection process, a process which depends strongly on material properties. Here we present accurate measurements of the neutron detection efficiency of an unenriched 640 nm thick boron carbide solid state neutron detector grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition as a function of the neutron wavelength at a time-of-flight facility. The data were compared to that obtained simultaneously by a calibrated nitrogen detector over the same wavelength range. The measured spectra of both detectors fit a Maxwell–Boltzmann wavelength distribution, thereby indicating that the boron carbide detector can be used as a reliable beam monitor. Measurements of the material properties (density, thickness and elemental composition) of the semiconducting boron carbide enable a precise calculation of the ideal expected neutron detection efficiency. The calculated neutron detection efficiency for the effective moderator temperature (obtained from a fit to the Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution) showed excellent agreement with the experimentally determined neutron detection efficiency of 1.25%. Higher efficiencies may be obtained either by increased film thickness and/or 100% 10B enrichment of the boron carbide source molecule

  4. {sup 1}H and {sup 10}B NMR and MRI investigation of boron- and gadolinium-boron compounds in boron neutron capture therapy

    Bonora, M., E-mail: marco.bonora@unipv.it [Physics Department ' A. Volta' , University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)] [CNISM Unit (Italy); Corti, M.; Borsa, F. [Physics Department ' A. Volta' , University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)] [CNISM Unit (Italy); Bortolussi, S.; Protti, N.; Santoro, D.; Stella, S.; Altieri, S. [Nuclear and Theoretical Physics Department, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)] [INFN Pavia (Italy); Zonta, C.; Clerici, A.M.; Cansolino, L.; Ferrari, C.; Dionigi, P. [Surgical Sciences Department, Experimental Surgery Laboratory, University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Porta, A.; Zanoni, G.; Vidari, G. [Organic Chemistry Department, University of Pavia, Via Taramelli 10, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    {sup 10}B molecular compounds suitable for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) are tagged with a Gd(III) paramagnetic ion. The newly synthesized molecule, Gd-BPA, is investigated as contrast agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with the final aim of mapping the boron distribution in tissues. Preliminary Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements, which include {sup 1}H and {sup 10}B relaxometry in animal tissues, proton relaxivity of the paramagnetic Gd-BPA molecule in water and its absorption in tumoral living cells, are reported.

  5. Clinical results of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of BSH-based intra-operative BNCT (IO-BNCT) and BSH and BPA-based non-operative BNCT (NO-BNCT). We have treated 23 glioblastoma patients with BNCT without any additional chemotherapy since 1998. The median survival time (MST) of BNCT was 19.5 months, and 2-year, 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 26.1%, 17.4% and 5.8%, respectively. This clinical result of BNCT in patients with GBM is superior to that of single treatment of conventional radiotherapy compared with historical data of conventional treatment. - Highlights: ► In this study, we evaluate the clinical outcome of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant brain tumors. ► We have treated 23 glioblastoma (GBM) patients with BNCT without any additional chemotherapy. ► Clinical results of BNCT in patients with GBM are superior to that of single treatment of conventional radiotherapy compared with historical data of conventional treatment.

  6. Boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent head and neck malignancies

    To avoid severe impairment of oro-facial structures and functions, it is necessary to explore new treatments for recurrent head and neck malignancies (HNM). Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is tumor-cell targeted radiotherapy that has significant superiority over conventional radiotherapies in principle. So far for 4 years and 3 months, we have treated with 37 times of BNCT for 21 patients (14 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 4 salivary gland carcinomas and 3 sarcomas) with a recurrent and far advanced HNM since 2001. Results are (1) 10B concentration of tumor/normal tissue ratio (T/N ratio) of FBPA-PET studies were SCC: 1.8-5.7, sarcoma: 2.5-4.0, parotid tumor: 2.5-3.7. (2) Therapeutic effects were CR: 6cases, PR: 11cases, PD: 3cases NE (not evaluated): 1case. Response rate was 81%. (3) Improvement of QOL such as a relief of severe pain, bleeding, and exudates at the local lesion, improvement of PS, disappearance of ulceration, covered with normal skin and preserved oral and maxillofacial functions and tissues. (4) Survival periods after BNCT were 1-51 months (mean: 9.8 months). 4-year survival rate was 39% by Kaplan-Meier analysis. (5) A few adverse-effects such as transient mucositis, alopecia were recognized. These results indicate that BNCT represents a new and promising treatment approach for advanced HNM. (author)

  7. High-current electrostatic accelerator-tandem for neutron generation for boron-neutron capture therapy

    The proton beam tandem accelerator project on the energy of 2.5 MeV and direct current up to 40 mA for solving the problems of boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and fast neutron therapy is presented. The sectional high-voltage rectifier of the electron accelerator of the series EhLV is chosen as a high-voltage source. The rectifier voltage should be stabilized with accuracy of 0.1%. The recharge target and cryogenic vacuum discharge system are disposed inside high-voltage electrode. The problems on developing the reliable source of negative hydrogen ions, capable of maintaining the direct current up to 40 mA, are discussed

  8. Histopathological changes of testes and eyes by neutron irradiation with boron compounds in mice

    Kim, Yeon-Joo; Yoon, Won-Ki; Ryu, Si-Yun; Chun, Ki-Jung; Son, Hwa-Young; Cho, Sung-Whan

    2006-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the biological effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on the testes and eyes in mice using HANARO Nuclear Reactor, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. BNCT relies on the high capacity of 10B in capturing thermal neutrons. Sodium borocaptate (BSH, 75 ppm, iv) and boronophenylalanine (BPA, 750 ppm, ip) have been used as the boron delivery agents. Mice were irradiated with neutron (flux: 1.036739E +09, Fluence 9.600200E+12) by lying flat pose ...

  9. Cubic boron nitride: a new prospective material for ultracold neutron application

    Sobolev, Yu; Borisov, Yu; Daum, M; Fresne, N du; Goeltl, L; Hampel, G; Heil, W; Knecht, A; Keunecke, M; Kratz, J V; Lang, T; Meister, M; Plonka-Spehr, Ch; Pokotilovski, Yu; Reichert, P; Schmidt, U; Krist, Th; Wiehl, N; Zenner, J

    2009-01-01

    For the first time, the neutron optical wall-potential of natural cubic boron nitride (cBN) was measured at the ultracold neutron (UCN) source of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz using the time-of-flight method (TOF). The samples investigated had a wall-potential of (305 +/- 15) neV. This value is in good agreement with the result extracted from neutron reflectometry data and theoretical expectations. Because of its high critical velocity for UCN and its good dielectric characteristics, cubic boron nitride coatings (isotopically enriched) will be useful for a number of applications in UCN experiments.

  10. A study on the behavior of boron in iron-base alloys by neutron induced autoradiography

    Jang, Jin Sung; Rhee, Chang Kyu; Cho, Hae Dong; Han, Chang Hee; Lee, Chang Hee; Jung, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yi Kyung; Lee, Yong Bok

    2001-02-01

    Boron is widely utilized in steel or alloy making to improve certain properties. However, due to its lightness boron is difficult to detect or characterize its behavior even through TEM/EDS or EELS techniques. Although many companies recognize the beneficial effects of boron, the role or mechanism of the boron is not yet clearly understood. Therefore it is required to develop the autoradiography technique to elucidate the boron behavior in alloys. As the only institute operating research reactor in the country, it would be the responsibility of the institute to develop the technique and provide it to the industries. Quantitative analyses of boron in type 316 L stainless steel by neutron induced autoradiography was attempted in this study. Nine experimental reference alloys with different amount of boron were prepared and reliable chemical composition data were obtained. Autoradiographs of reference materials with three different neutron fluences ( 1.9 10{sup 13}, 1.9 10{sup 14} and 1.9 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2} ) were obtained and a trial calibration curve of boron content vs. track density was acquired.

  11. Dose calculation from a D-D-reaction-based BSA for boron neutron capture synovectomy

    Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to calculate dose in a knee phantom from a D-D-reaction-based Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). The BSA consists of a D(d,n)-reaction-based neutron source enclosed inside a polyethylene moderator and graphite reflector. The polyethylene moderator and graphite reflector sizes were optimized to deliver the highest ratio of thermal to fast neutron yield at the knee phantom. Then neutron dose was calculated at various depths in a knee phantom loaded with boron and therapeutic ratios of synovium dose/skin dose and synovium dose/bone dose were determined. Normalized to same boron loading in synovium, the values of the therapeutic ratios obtained in the present study are 12-30 times higher than the published values.

  12. Dose calculation from a D-D-reaction-based BSA for boron neutron capture synovectomy

    Abdalla, Khalid [Department of Physics, Hail University, Hail (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: khalidafnan@uoh.edu.sa; Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals and Center for Applied Physical Sciences, Box No. 1815, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Maalej, N.; Elshahat, B. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals and Center for Applied Physical Sciences, Box No. 1815, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-04-15

    Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to calculate dose in a knee phantom from a D-D-reaction-based Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). The BSA consists of a D(d,n)-reaction-based neutron source enclosed inside a polyethylene moderator and graphite reflector. The polyethylene moderator and graphite reflector sizes were optimized to deliver the highest ratio of thermal to fast neutron yield at the knee phantom. Then neutron dose was calculated at various depths in a knee phantom loaded with boron and therapeutic ratios of synovium dose/skin dose and synovium dose/bone dose were determined. Normalized to same boron loading in synovium, the values of the therapeutic ratios obtained in the present study are 12-30 times higher than the published values.

  13. Biodistribution of Boron compounds in an experimental model of liver metastases for Boron Neutron Capture (BNCT) Studies

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that involves the selective accumulation of 10B carriers in tumors followed by irradiation with thermal or epithermal neutrons. The high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling 7Li nuclei emitted during the capture of a thermal neutron by a 10B nucleus have a short range and a high biological effectiveness. Thus, BNCT would potentially target neoplastic tissue selectively. In previous studies we demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of different BNCT protocols in an experimental model of oral cancer. More recently we performed experimental studies in normal rat liver that evidenced the feasibility of treating liver metastases employing a novel BNCT protocol proposed by JEC based on ex-situ treatment and partial liver auto-transplant. The aim of the present study was to perform biodistribution studies with different boron compounds and different administration protocols to determine the protocols that would be therapeutically useful in 'in vivo' BNCT studies at the RA-3 Nuclear Reactor in an experimental model of liver metastases in rats. Materials and Methods. A total of 70 BDIX rats (Charles River Lab., MA, USA) were inoculated in the liver with syngeneic colon cancer cells DH/DK12/TRb (ECACC, UK) to induce the development of subcapsular metastatic nodules. 15 days post-inoculation the animals were used for biodistribution studies. A total of 11 protocols were evaluated employing the boron compounds boronophenylalanine (BPA) and GB-10 (Na210B1-0H10), alone or combined employing different doses and administration routes. Tumor, normal tissue and blood samples were processed for boron measurement by ICP-OES. Results. Several protocols proved potentially useful for BNCT studies in terms of absolute boron concentration in tumor and preferential uptake of boron by tumor tissue, i.e. BPA 15.5 mg 10B/kg iv + GB-10 50 mg 10B/kg iv; BPA 46.5 mg 10B/kg ip; BPA 46.5 mg 10B/kg ip + iv; BPA 46

  14. Boron concentration measurements by alpha spectrometry and quantitative neutron autoradiography in cells and tissues treated with different boronated formulations and administration protocols

    The possibility to measure boron concentration with high precision in tissues that will be irradiated represents a fundamental step for a safe and effective BNCT treatment. In Pavia, two techniques have been used for this purpose, a quantitative method based on charged particles spectrometry and a boron biodistribution imaging based on neutron autoradiography. A quantitative method to determine boron concentration by neutron autoradiography has been recently set-up and calibrated for the measurement of biological samples, both solid and liquid, in the frame of the feasibility study of BNCT. This technique was calibrated and the obtained results were cross checked with those of α spectrometry, in order to validate them. The comparisons were performed using tissues taken form animals treated with different boron administration protocols. Subsequently the quantitative neutron autoradiography was employed to measure osteosarcoma cell samples treated with BPA and with new boronated formulations. - Highlights: • A method for 10B measurements in samples based on neutron autoradiography was developed. • The results were compared with those of alpha spectrometry applied on tissue and cell samples. • Boronated liposomes were developed and administered to osteosarcoma cell cultures. • Neutron autoradiography was employed to measure boron concentration due to liposomes. • Liposomes were proved to be more effective in concentrating boron in cells than BPA

  15. Dose evaluation of boron neutron capture synovectomy using the THOR epithermal neutron beam: a feasibility study

    Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common epidemic diseases in the world. For some patients, the treatment with steroids or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is not effective, thus necessitating physical removal of the inflamed synovium. Alternative approaches other than surgery will provide appropriate disease control and improve the patient's quality of life. In this research, we evaluated the feasibility of conducting boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) with the Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) as a neutron source. Monte Carlo simulations were performed with arthritic joint models and uncertainties were within 5%. The collimator, reflector and boron concentration were optimized to reduce the treatment time and normal tissue doses. For the knee joint, polyethylene with 40%-enriched Li2CO3 was used as the collimator material, and a rear reflector of 15 cm thick graphite and side reflector of 10 cm thick graphite were chosen. The optimized treatment time was 5.4 min for the parallel-opposed irradiation. For the finger joint, polymethyl methacrylate was used as the reflector material. The treatment time can be reduced to 3.1 min, while skin and bone doses can be effectively reduced by approximately 9% compared with treatment using the graphite reflector. We conclude that using THOR as a treatment modality for BNCS could be a feasible alternative in clinical practice

  16. Accelerator-based BNCT

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the 9Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. - Highlights: • The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. • Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. • The present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. • Topics cover intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams and beam diagnostics, among others

  17. Preliminary study of MAGAT polymer gel dosimetry for boron-neutron capture therapy

    MAGAT gel dosimeter with boron is irradiated in Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility (HWNIF) of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). The cylindrical gel phantoms are exposed to neutron beams of three different energy spectra (thermal neutron rich, epithermal and fast neutron rich and the mixed modes) in air. Preliminary results corresponding to depth-dose responses are obtained as the transverse relaxation rate (R2=1/T2) from magnetic resonance imaging data. As the results MAGAT gel dosimeter has the higher sensitivity on thermal neutron than on epi-thermal and fast neutron, and the gel with boron showed an enhancement and a change in the depth-R2 response explicitly. From these results, it is suggested that MAGAT gel dosimeter can be an effective tool in BNCT dosimetry

  18. Preliminary study of MAGAT polymer gel dosimetry for boron-neutron capture therapy

    Hayashi, Shin-ichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Uchida, Ryohei; Suzuki, Minoru; Usui, Shuji; Tominaga, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    MAGAT gel dosimeter with boron is irradiated in Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility (HWNIF) of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). The cylindrical gel phantoms are exposed to neutron beams of three different energy spectra (thermal neutron rich, epithermal and fast neutron rich and the mixed modes) in air. Preliminary results corresponding to depth-dose responses are obtained as the transverse relaxation rate (R2=1/T2) from magnetic resonance imaging data. As the results MAGAT gel dosimeter has the higher sensitivity on thermal neutron than on epi-thermal and fast neutron, and the gel with boron showed an enhancement and a change in the depth-R2 response explicitly. From these results, it is suggested that MAGAT gel dosimeter can be an effective tool in BNCT dosimetry.

  19. Thermal neutron response of a boron-coated GEM detector via GEANT4 Monte Carlo code.

    Jamil, M; Rhee, J T; Kim, H G; Ahmad, Farzana; Jeon, Y J

    2014-10-22

    In this work, we report the design configuration and the performance of the hybrid Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector. In order to make the detector sensitive to thermal neutrons, the forward electrode of the GEM has been coated with the enriched boron-10 material, which works as a neutron converter. A total of 5×5cm(2) configuration of GEM has been used for thermal neutron studies. The response of the detector has been estimated via using GEANT4 MC code with two different physics lists. Using the QGSP_BIC_HP physics list, the neutron detection efficiency was determined to be about 3%, while with QGSP_BERT_HP physics list the efficiency was around 2.5%, at the incident thermal neutron energies of 25meV. The higher response of the detector proves that GEM-coated with boron converter improves the efficiency for thermal neutrons detection. PMID:25464183

  20. Boron content in type 316 L stainless steel by neutron induced autoradiography

    Boron is effective to the improvement of various properties of alloys, but it is difficult to characterize its behavior during the alloy processing. Neutron induced autoradiography (or called as F.T.E: Fission Track Etching) technique was attempted to quantitatively analyze boron content in type 316 L austenitic stainless steel. Reference samples with nine different boron contents were prepared and analyzed by conventional analysis method as well as by autoradiography technique using 'HANARO', a 30 MW research reactor in K.A.E.R.I. (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Cd ratio of the neutron flux was about 200 and thermal neutron flux was around 2x1013/cm2/sec. A Kodak CN-85TM detector with an alloy sample was irradiated with two different thermal neutron fluences of 1013 and 1014/cm2. Track densities on the autoradiographs were measured using image analyzer. Within the range of 10 to 50 ppm of boron, track densities from autoradiography showed the linear relationship with results from conventional analyses. When complementarily applied with other analysis technique like E.B.S.D. (Electron Backscattered Diffraction) or E.D.S. (Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) neutron induced autoradiography technique was found very useful in distinguishing and identifying phases with the different distribution coefficient of boron. (author)

  1. CR-39 personnel neutron dosimeters: Enhanced sensitivity via boron-doping

    An improved CR-39 neutron dosimeter has been designed and tested. This dosimeter has a thin (roughly 20 μm) boron-containing layer between the poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) radiator and the CR-39 substrate, which increases its sensitivity to low energy (50 keV) neutrons by an order of magnitude and to thermal neutrons by nearly two orders of magnitude. This layer consists of sodium borate dispersed in a poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix. The response of the improved dosimeter was measured with monoenergetic neutron beams from thermal energies to 15 MeV, and boron contents from zero to 52 μg cm-2 (saturated solution). Maximum sensitivity occurs at a boron content of about 35 μg cm-2, but a significant improvement in sensitivity was observed for even a boron content of 11μg cm-2. By incorporating just a small amount of boron (less than 1 μg cm-2), it is possible that a dosimeter with a nearly flat response over the neutron energies tested could be achieved

  2. MOSFET with a boron-loaded gate as a low-energy neutron dosimeter

    Gavelle, M. [CNRS, LAAS, 7 avenue du colonel Roche, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, INP, ISAE, LAAS, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Sarrabayrouse, G., E-mail: sarra@laas.fr [CNRS, LAAS, 7 avenue du colonel Roche, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, INP, ISAE, LAAS, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Scheid, E. [CNRS, LAAS, 7 avenue du colonel Roche, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, INP, ISAE, LAAS, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Siskos, S.; Fragopoulou, M.; Zamani, M. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Physics Department, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2011-12-15

    A MOSFET-based low-energy neutron dosimeter has been fabricated using a {sup 10}B loaded gate electrode as (n,{alpha}) converter. The response to thermal neutrons has been studied. - Highlights: > Feasibility of a metal-oxide-semiconductor thermal neutron dosimeter is investigated. > Monolithically integrated boron-loaded gate electrode acts as a (n,{alpha}) converter. > Sensitivity of 2 V/Sv is obtained.

  3. Prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis methodology for determination of boron from trace to major contents

    Prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis methodologies were standardized using a reflected neutron beam and Compton suppressed γ-ray spectrometer to quantify boron from trace to major concentrations. Neutron self-shielding correction factors for higher boron contents (0.2-10 mg) in samples were obtained from the sensitivity of chlorine by irradiating KCl with and without boron. This method was validated by determining boron concentrations in six boron compounds and applied to three borosilicate glass samples with boron contents in the range of 1-10 mg. Low concentrations of boron (10-58 mg kg-1) were also determined in two samples and five reference materials from NIST and IAEA. (author)

  4. Nominal effective radiation doses delivered during clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary system that, in theory, should selectively deliver lethal, high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation to tumor cells dispersed within normal tissues. It is based on the nuclear reaction 10-B(n, α)7-Li, which occurs when the stable nucleus of boron-10 captures a thermal neutron. Due to the relatively high cross-section of the 10-B nucleus for thermal neutron capture and short ranges of the products of this reaction, tumor cells in the volume exposed to thermal neutrons and containing sufficiently high concentration of 10-B would receive a much higher radiation dose than the normal cells contained within the exposed volume. Nevertheless, radiation dose deposited in normal tissue by gamma and fast neutron contamination of the neutron beam, as well as neutron capture in nitrogen, 14-N(n,p)14-C, hydrogen, 1-H(n,γ)2-H, and in boron present in blood and normal cells, limits the dose that can be delivered to tumor cells. It is, therefore, imperative for the success of the BNCT the dosed delivered to normal tissues be accurately determined in order to optimize the irradiation geometry and to limit the volume of normal tissue exposed to thermal neutrons. These are the major objectives of BNCT treatment planning

  5. Development of boronated tumor-seeking materials for application in neutron capture therapy of cancer

    Full text: At the present time the main field of application of boron compounds in medicine is Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of cancer. In this presentation the main principles of BNCT and main types of polyhedral boron compounds used for BNCT will be shown. The successful treatment of tumors by BNCT requires selective delivery of the boron moiety into the tumor cells. One of ways to solve this problem is attachment of boron fragment to different tumor-specific targeting molecules. Literature and our recent results on the preparation of novel boronated amino acids, carboranecarboxylic acids, a design of different conjugates of polyhedral boron compounds with tumor-seeking molecules, like porphyrins, phthalocyanines, nucleosides, carbohydrates, and lipids will be presented. Conjugates of natural porphyrins and phthalocyanines with carborane, closo-dodecaborate and cobalt bis(dicarbollide) were synthesized. The combination of these two fragments in one molecule makes these compounds potentially useful for both fluorescence diagnostics (FD) and BNCT of tumours. Boronated nucleosides are considered to be potential BNCT candidates because they can accumulate in the tumor cells. Thus, we have succeeded in preparation of the very first conjugates of closo-dodecaborate anion with one canonic nucleoside (thymidine)

  6. Boron concentrations in brain during boron neutron capture therapy: in vivo measurements from the Phase I trial EORTC 11961 using a gamma-ray telescope

    Purpose: Gamma-ray spectroscopic scans to measure boron concentrations in the irradiated volume were performed during treatment of 5 patients suffering from brain tumors with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In BNCT, the dose that is meant to be targeted primarily to the tumor is the dose coming from the reaction 10B(n,α)7Li, which is determined by the boron concentration in tissue and the thermal neutron fluence rate. The boron distribution throughout the head of the patient during the treatment is therefore of major interest. The detection of the boron distribution during the irradiation was until now not possible. Methods and Materials: Five patients suffering from glioblastoma multiforme and treated with BNCT in a dose escalation study were administered the boron compound, boron sulfhydryl (BSH; Na2B12H11SH). Boron concentrations were reconstructed from measurements performed with the gamma-ray telescope which detects locally the specific gamma rays produced by neutron capture in 10B and 1H. Results: For all patients, at a 10B concentration in blood of 30 ppm, the boron concentration in nonoperated areas of the brain was very low, between 1 and 2.5 ppm. In the target volume, which included the area where the tumor had been removed and where remaining tumor cells have to be assumed, much higher boron concentrations were measured with large variations from one patient to another. Superficial tissue contained a higher concentration of 10B than the nonoperated areas of the brain, ranging between 8 and 15 ppm. Conclusions: The measured results correspond with previous tissue uptake studies, confirming that normal brain tissue hardly absorbs the boron compound BSH. Gamma-ray telescope measurements seem to be a promising method to provide information on the biodistribution of boron during therapy. Furthermore, it also opens the possibility of in vivo dosimetry

  7. The comparison of four neutron sources for Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) in vivo detections of boron

    A Prompt Gamma Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system, incorporating an isotopic neutron source has been simulated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In order to improve the signal to noise ratio different collimators and a filter were placed between the neutron source and the object. The effect of the positioning of the neutron beam and the detector relative to the object has been studied. In this work the optimisation procedure is demonstrated for boron. Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to compare the performance of the proposed PGNAA system using four different neutron sources (241Am/Be, 252Cf, 241Am/B, and DT neutron generator). Among the different systems the 252Cf neutron based PGNAA system has the best performance. (author)

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using the p- boronophenylalanine-fructose complex and epithermal neutrons

    The amino acid analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is under investigation as a neutron capture agent for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme. A series of patients undergoing surgical removal of tumor received BPA orally as the free amino acid. Favorable tumor/blood boron concentration ratios were obtained but the absolute amount of boron in the tumor would have been insufficient for BNCT. BPA can be solubilized at neutral pH by complexation with fructose (BPA-F). Studies with rats suggest that intraperitoneal injection of BPA-F complex produces a much higher tumor boron concentration to rat intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma that were possible with oral BPA. Higher boron concentrations have allowed higher tumor radiation doses to be delivered while maintaining the dose to the normal brain vascular endothelium below the threshold of tolerance. The experience to date of the administration of BPA-F to one patient is provided in this report

  9. Boron neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using the p- boronophenylalanine-fructose complex and epithermal neutrons

    Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.; Liu, H.B.; Slatkin, D.N.; Wielopolski, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E. [Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Chadha, M. [Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1994-12-31

    The amino acid analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is under investigation as a neutron capture agent for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme. A series of patients undergoing surgical removal of tumor received BPA orally as the free amino acid. Favorable tumor/blood boron concentration ratios were obtained but the absolute amount of boron in the tumor would have been insufficient for BNCT. BPA can be solubilized at neutral pH by complexation with fructose (BPA-F). Studies with rats suggest that intraperitoneal injection of BPA-F complex produces a much higher tumor boron concentration to rat intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma that were possible with oral BPA. Higher boron concentrations have allowed higher tumor radiation doses to be delivered while maintaining the dose to the normal brain vascular endothelium below the threshold of tolerance. The experience to date of the administration of BPA-F to one patient is provided in this report.

  10. Analysis of boron, samarium and gadolinium in rock samples by neutron capture gamma-ray spectrometry

    Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is useful for determining many of the elements found in sedimentary rocks. It is particularly suitable for the trace elements boron, samarium and gadolinium. The sensitivity of detection can be of the order of 0.1 ppm with an adequate neutron source. Twenty-five sedimentary rock samples were analyzed in the PGNAA facility at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The materials included Ottawa sand, Berea sandstone, Royer dolomite and several other formations of interest in the petroleum industry. Results of the analyses are presented. Correlations of gadolinium and samarium and of boron with the sum of samarium and gadolinium are given. (author)

  11. Improvements in Boron Plate Coating Technology for Higher Efficiency Neutron Detection and Coincidence Counting Error Reduction

    Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-25

    This informal report presents the measurement data and information to document the performance of the advanced Precision Data Technology, Inc. (PDT) sealed cell boron-10 plate neutron detector that makes use of the advanced coating materials and procedures. In 2015, PDT changed the boron coating materials and application procedures to significantly increase the efficiency of their basic corrugated plate detector performance. A prototype sealed cell unit was supplied to LANL for testing and comparison with prior detector cells. Also, LANL had reference detector slabs from the original neutron collar (UNCL) and the new Antech UNCL with the removable 3He tubes. The comparison data is presented in this report.

  12. Application of the boron neutron capture therapy to undifferentiated thyroid cancer using two boron compounds (BPA and BOPP)

    We have shown the selective uptake of boronophenylalanine (BPA) by undifferentiated thyroid cancer (UTC) human cell line ARO, both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, a 50% histologic cure of mice bearing the tumor was observed when the complete boron neutron capture therapy was applied. More recently we have analyzed the biodistribution of BOPP (tetrakis-carborane carboxylate ester of 2,4-bis-(ba-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX) and showed that when BOPP was injected 5 days before BPA, and the animals were sacrificed 60 min after the ip injection of BPA, a significant increase in boron uptake by the tumor was found (38-45ppm with both compounds Vs. 20 ppm with BPA alone). Five days post the ip BOPP injection and 1 hr after BPA, the ratios were: tumor/blood 3,75; tumor /distal skin 2. Other important ratios were tumor/thyroid 6,65 and tumor/lung 3,8. The present studies were performed in mice transplanted with ARO cells and injected with BOPP and BPA. Only in mice treated with the neutron beam and injected with the boronated compounds we observed a 100% control of tumor growth. Two groups of mice received different total absorbed doses: 3.00 and 6.01 Gy, but no further improvement in the outcome was found compared to the previous results using BPA alone (4.3 Gy). (author)

  13. Thermal neutron response of a boron-coated GEM detector via GEANT4 Monte Carlo code

    In this work, we report the design configuration and the performance of the hybrid Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector. In order to make the detector sensitive to thermal neutrons, the forward electrode of the GEM has been coated with the enriched boron-10 material, which works as a neutron converter. A total of 5×5 cm2 configuration of GEM has been used for thermal neutron studies. The response of the detector has been estimated via using GEANT4 MC code with two different physics lists. Using the QGSPBICHP physics list, the neutron detection efficiency was determined to be about 3%, while with QGSPBERTHP physics list the efficiency was around 2.5%, at the incident thermal neutron energies of 25 meV. The higher response of the detector proves that GEM-coated with boron converter improves the efficiency for thermal neutrons detection. - Highlights: • The results of boron-coated GEM for thermal neutrons are described. • The simulations were performed by GEANT4 MC code. • The evaluation was determined by GEANT4 using two physics lists. • The response of the detector was taken for En=25–100 meV

  14. Application of drug delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy. Basic research toward clinical application

    Tumour cell destruction in boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between 10B and thermal neutrons (10B+1n → 7Li+4He (α) +2.31 MeV (93.7%)/2.79 MeV (6.3%)). The resulting lithium ions and αparticles are high linear energy transfer (LET) particles which give high biological effect. Their short range in tissue (5-9 μm) restricts radiation damage to those cells in which boron atoms are located at the time of neutron irradiation. BNCT has been applied clinically for the treatment of malignant brain tumors, malignant melanoma, head and neck cancer and hepatoma etc, recently. Sodium borocaptate (Na210B12H11SH; BSH) and borono-phenylalanine (10BPA) are currently being used in clinical treatments. To achieve the selective delivery of boron atoms to cancer cells, drug delivery system (DDS) becomes an attractive intelligent technology as targeting and controlled release of drugs. We have firstly reported that 10B atoms delivered by immunoliposomes are cytotoxic to human pancreatic carcinoma cells (AsPC-1) after thermal neutron irradiation in vitro. The intra-tumoural injection of boronated immunoliposomes can increase the retention of 10B atoms in tumour cells, causing suppression of tumour growth in vivo following thermal neutron irradiation. We prepared polyethylene-glycol binding liposomes (PEG-liposomes) as an effective 10B carrier to obviate phagocytosis by reticuloendotherial systems. We had prepared 10BSH entrapped Water-in-Oil-in-Water (WOW) emulsion. The 10B concentration in VX-2 tumour after intra-arterial injection of 10BSH entrapped WOW emulsion was superior to the groups of 10BSH entrapped conventional Lipiodol mix emulsion. 10Boron entrapped WOW emulsion is one of the most useful for intra-arterial boron delivery carrier on BNCT to hepatocellular carcinoma. (author)

  15. Boron-loaded plastic scintillator with neutron-γ pulse shape discrimination capability

    Development of the plastic scintillator with neutron sensitivity from thermal to multi-MeV and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) has been demonstrated. Incorporation of 10B-containing compounds into the plastic scintillator with PSD capability leads to detector improvement in regard to neutron detection efficiency while preserving the discrimination between neutrons and γ-rays. Effects of boron loading on scintillation and pulse shape discrimination properties are discussed. A PSD figure-of-merit value of 1.4±0.03 has been achieved for events in a thermal neutron energy domain, 50–100 keVee, for PSD plastic loaded with 5 wt.% of m-carborane

  16. Standard specification for boron-Based neutron absorbing material systems for use in nuclear spent fuel storage racks

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This specification defines criteria for boron-based neutron absorbing material systems used in racks in a pool environment for storage of nuclear light water reactor (LWR) spent-fuel assemblies or disassembled components to maintain sub-criticality in the storage rack system. 1.2 Boron-based neutron absorbing material systems normally consist of metallic boron or a chemical compound containing boron (for example, boron carbide, B4C) supported by a matrix of aluminum, steel, or other materials. 1.3 In a boron-based absorber, neutron absorption occurs primarily by the boron-10 isotope that is present in natural boron to the extent of 18.3 ± 0.2 % by weight (depending upon the geological origin of the boron). Boron, enriched in boron-10 could also be used. 1.4 The materials systems described herein shall be functional – that is always be capable to maintain a B10 areal density such that subcriticality Keff <0.95 or Keff <0.98 or Keff < 1.0 depending on the design specification for the service...

  17. Enhanced therapeutic effect on murine melanoma and angiosarcoma cells by boron neutron capture therapy using a boronated metalloporphyrin

    We have already achieved successful treatment of several human patients with malignant melanoma by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine (10B1-BPA·HCl). In this study we used a new compound, a manganese boronated protoporphyrin (Mn-10BOPP), and compared it to 10B1-BPA·HCl with respect to uptake in murine melanoma and angiosarcoma cells as well as to their cell killing effect. 10B uptake was measured in a new method, and the new compound was much more incorporated into both cells than 10B1-BPA·HCl. Furthermore, melanoma and angiosarcoma cells preincubated with the new compound were 15 to 20 times more efficiently killed by BNCT than cells preincubated with 10B1-BPA·HCl. (author)

  18. Experimental and simulation study of the response of a boron-loaded plastic scintillator to neutrons and gamma-rays

    A boron-loaded plastic scintillator has been investigated for possible use in neutron spectrometry. The sensor composition of hydrogen and carbon leads to multiple scattering collisions that are useful for fast neutron spectroscopy, while its boron component can serve as a thermal neutron detector. The response function of this detector has been simulated using MCNPX code for gamma-rays and neutrons. The sensor has been mounted on a photomultiplier tube connected to a data acquisition system. The system has been tested in different gamma-ray and neutron fields at the UOIT Neutron Facility. The simulation and experimental results have been compared and analyzed. (author)

  19. Application of neutron induced radiography technique in determination of boron in aluminium

    The technique of Neutron Induced Radiography has been applied to determine boron concentration and its spatial distribution in aluminium using Allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39) detectors. The technique is based upon the simultaneous irradiation of sample and a standard fixed on a track detector with thermal neutrons and the counting of alpha and /sup 7/Li tracks produced in the detector from the nuclear reaction /sup 10/B(n,α)/sup 7/Li after chemical etching. Boron concentration is determined by comparing the /sup 7/Li and alpha particle tracks density with that of a standard of known boron concentration. Boron concentration in aluminium has been found to be (135.8 ±0.7) ppm in this study which is on the higher side within the normal range reported in the literature. The technique of boron determination by Neutron Induced Radiography is a simple and reliable. It can be used to study the other α-emitting radionuclides in minerals and other materials. (author)

  20. The prospects of using boron nitride in nuclear reactors as an absorbant and decelerator of neutrons

    Full text: The given work tells us that there are a widespread materials having an ability of amorphism, magnezation, hightemperature stability, wear resistance and corrosion resisting. To special requests which being presented to modern materials by some spheres of science and technics concern an ability of materials to work not only within the conditions of radioactive irradiation nor also capture heating neutrons. Hexagonal boron nitride has the most of these features. Boron nitride is used by the aircraft industry, because of its hightemperature resistance for a long time in extreme conditions. That is why the given material had been suggested as a neutron immerse material during production of containers for radioactive wastes long-lived storage. Using of enriched boron nitride in the first wall of thermonuclear reactor gives an oppotunity of refining nuclear and physical characteristics of reactor installation as a whole. Boron nitride has feeble activation in reactor neutron shell and high radiation resistance. All abovementioned boron nitride features, also its lower atmoic weight are very important for application in plasma devices, such as for using in installations of thermonuclear synthesis.

  1. Early clinical experience of boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that can selectively irradiate tumor tissue. BNCT uses drugs containing a stable isotope of boron. 10B, to sensitize tumor cells to irradiation by low energy (thermal) neutrons. The interaction of the 10B with a thermal neutron (neutron capture) causes the 10B nucleus to split, releasing an alpha particle and a lithium nucleus. These products of the 10B(n, α)7Li reaction are very damaging to cells but have a combined path length in tissue of approximately 14 μm, or roughly the diameter of one or two cells. Thus, most of the ionizing energy imparted to tissue is localized to 10B-loaded cells

  2. Early clinical experience of boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    Joel, D.D.; Bergland, R.; Capala, J. [and others

    1995-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that can selectively irradiate tumor tissue. BNCT uses drugs containing a stable isotope of boron. {sup 10}B, to sensitize tumor cells to irradiation by low energy (thermal) neutrons. The interaction of the {sup 10}B with a thermal neutron (neutron capture) causes the {sup 10}B nucleus to split, releasing an alpha particle and a lithium nucleus. These products of the {sup 10}B(n, {alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction are very damaging to cells but have a combined path length in tissue of approximately 14 {mu}m, or roughly the diameter of one or two cells. Thus, most of the ionizing energy imparted to tissue is localized to {sup 10}B-loaded cells.

  3. Design of an epi-thermal neutron flux intensity monitor with GaN wafer for boron neutron capture therapy

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising cancer therapy. Epi-thermal neutron (0.5 eV < En < 10 keV) flux intensity is one of the basic characteristics for modern BNCT. In this work, based on the 71Ga(n, γ)72Ga reaction, a new simple monitor with gallium nitride (GaN) wafer as activation material was designed by Monte Carlo simulations to precisely measure the absolute integral flux intensity of epi-thermal neutrons especially for practical BNCT. In the monitor, a GaN wafer was positioned in the center of a polyethylene sphere as neutron moderator covered with cadmium (Cd) layer as thermal neutron absorber outside. The simulation results and related analysis indicated that the epi-thermal neutron flux intensity could be precisely measured by the presently designed monitor. (author)

  4. Boron neutron capture therapy of ocular melanoma and intracranial glioma using p-boronophenylalanine

    During conventional radiotherapy, the dose that can be delivered to the tumor is limited by the tolerance of the surrounding normal tissue within the treatment volume. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) represents a promising modality for selective tumor irradiation. The key to effective BNCT is selective localization of 10B in the tumor. We have shown that the synthetic amino acid p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) will selectively deliver boron to melanomas and other tumors such as gliosarcomas and mammary carcinomas. Systemically delivered BPA may have general utility as a boron delivery agent for BNCT. In this paper, BNCT with BPA is used in treatment of experimentally induced gliosarcoma in rats and nonpigmented melanoma in rabbits. The tissue distribution of boron is described, as is response to the BNCT. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. A suggestion for B-10 imaging during boron neutron capture therapy

    Cortesi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Selective accumulation of B-10 compound in tumour tissue is a fundamental condition for the achievement of BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy), since the effectiveness of therapy irradiation derives just from neutron capture reaction of B-10. Hence, the determination of the B-10 concentration ratio, between tumour and healthy tissue, and a control of this ratio, during the therapy, are essential to optimise the effectiveness of the BNCT, which it is known to be based on the selective uptake ...

  6. Boron cage compound materials and composites for shielding and absorbing neutrons

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2014-03-04

    Boron cage compound-containing materials for shielding and absorbing neutrons. The materials include BCC-containing composites and compounds. BCC-containing compounds comprise a host polymer and a BCC attached thereto. BCC-containing composites comprise a mixture of a polymer matrix and a BCC filler. The BCC-containing materials can be used to form numerous articles of manufacture for shielding and absorbing neutrons.

  7. Slow neutron capture therapy for malignant glioma (boron or lithium neutron capture therapy)

    In recurrent glioblastoma, the mean survival period is approx. 6 months by the routine methods of treatment, but is extended more than 3-fold by neutron capture therapy. This method and a routine method with 60Co or an accelerator were used for comparison in the clinical treatment of 26 patients with supratentorial malignant glioma. There were no significant differences as for prognostic factors of the group treated by this method and those of the control group; No. of cases 14 and 12, the mean age 46 and 53.5 yr, and the stage (TNM) 3.14 and 2.83, respectively. As of the end of Feb. 1980, this method showed a lifeprolonging effect 3 times that of the control, the mean survival period being 67 weeks for this method and 21 for the control. Although 100% improvement was observed in about one half of the cases by this method, the control group showed improvement of only 80% at maximum. It is also possible to treat any deep portion of the brain with thermal neutrons. As a Boron compound, mercaptoundecahydrododecarborate with a low toxicity has been put into practical use for brain tumors, and as Li, the use of 6LiCl for lung cancer is under examination. (Chiba, N.)

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of boronated polyglycerol dendrimers as potential agent for neutron capture therapy

    In this work, the polyglycerol dendrimer (PGLD) generation 5 was used to obtain a boronated macromolecule for boron neutron capture therapy. The PGLD dendrimer was synthesized by the ring opening polymerization of deprotonated glycidol using polyglycerol as core functionality in a step-growth processes denominated divergent synthesis. The PGLD dendritic structure was confirmed by gel permeation chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR, 13C-NMR) and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization techniques. The synthesized dendrimer presented low dispersion in molecular weights (Mw/Mn = 1.05) and a degree of branching of 0.82, which characterize the polymer dendritic structure. Quantitative neutron capture radiography was used to investigate the boron-10 enrichment of the polyglycerol dendrimer. The in vitro cytotoxicity to Chinese hamster ovary cells of 10B-PGLD dendrimer indicate lower cytotoxicity, suggesting that the macromolecule is a biocompatible material. (author)

  9. The three dimensional map of dose components in a head phantom for boron neutron capture therapy

    Bavarnegin Elham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The in-phantom measurement of physical dose distribution and construction of a convenient phantom is very important for boron neutron capture therapy planning validation. In this study we have simulated a head phantom, suggested for construction in boron neutron capture therapy facilities, and calculated all relevant dose components inside of it using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. A “generic” epithermal neutron beam with a broad neutron spectrum, similar to beams used for neutron capture therapy clinical trials, was used. The calculated distributions of all relevant dose components in brain tissue equivalent were compared with those in water. The results show that water is a suitable dosimetry material and that the simulated head phantom is a suitable design for producing accurate three-dimensional maps of dose components at enough points inside of the phantom for boron neutron capture therapy dosimetry measurements and the use of these dose maps in beam development and benchmarking of computer-based treatment codes.

  10. The radiobiological principles of boron neutron capture therapy: A critical review

    The radiobiology of the dose components in a BNCT exposure is examined. The effect of exposure time in determining the biological effectiveness of γ-rays, due to the repair of sublethal damage, has been largely overlooked in the application of BNCT. Recoil protons from fast neutrons vary in their relative biological effectiveness (RBE) as a function of energy and tissue endpoint. Thus the energy spectrum of a beam will influence the RBE of this dose component. Protons from the neutron capture reaction in nitrogen have not been studied but in practice protons from nitrogen capture have been combined with the recoil proton contribution into a total proton dose. The relative biological effectiveness of the products of the neutron capture reaction in boron is derived from two factors, the RBE of the short range particles and the bio-distribution of boron, referred to collectively as the compound biological effectiveness factor. Caution is needed in the application of these factors for different normal tissues and tumors. - Highlights: ► Radiobiological properties of different dose components in BNCT are considered. ► Effectiveness of γ-ray dose depends strongly on exposure time due to sublethal damage repair. ► Effectiveness of fast neutron dose depends on neutron energy spectrum. ► γ-ray and fast neutron characteristics vary between beams and thus weighting factors will differ. ► Weighing factors for boron dose depend on the carrier, the tissue and its mode of administration.

  11. The determination of boron in ferrous and non-ferrous alloys by neutron transmission

    A method has been developed for the determination of 0.1 to over 20% of boron in aluminium- and complex ferro-alloys, based on the neutron-absorbing properties of the 10B nucleus. It has also been applied to stainless steel. The determination is fully automatic and results are conveniently processed by computer. (author)

  12. Histopathological changes of testes and eyes by neutron irradiation with boron compounds in mice.

    Kim, Yeon-Joo; Yoon, Won-Ki; Ryu, Si-Yun; Chun, Ki-Jung; Son, Hwa-Young; Cho, Sung-Whan

    2006-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the biological effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on the testes and eyes in mice using HANARO Nuclear Reactor, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. BNCT relies on the high capacity of 10B in capturing thermal neutrons. Sodium borocaptate (BSH, 75 ppm, iv) and boronophenylalanine (BPA, 750 ppm, ip) have been used as the boron delivery agents. Mice were irradiated with neutron (flux: 1.036739E +09, Fluence 9.600200E+12) by lying flat pose for 30 (10 Gy) or 100 min (33 Gy) with or without boron carrier treatment. In 45 days of irradiation, histopathological changes of the testes and eyes were examined. Thirty-three Gy neutron irradiation for 100 min induced testicular atrophy in which some of seminiferous tubules showed complete depletion of spermatogenic germ cells. Lens epithelial cells and lens fiber were swollen and showed granular changes in an exposure time dependent manner. However, boron carrier treatment had no significant effect on the lesions. These results suggest that the examination of histopathological changes of lens and testis can be used as "biological dosimeters" for gauging radiation responses and the HANARO Nuclear Reactor has sufficient capacities for the BNCT. PMID:16434844

  13. The measurement of thermal neutron flux depression for determining the concentration of boron in blood

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a form of targeted radiotherapy that relies on the uptake of the capture element boron by the volume to be treated. The treatment procedure requires the measurement of boron in the patient's blood. The investigation of a simple and inexpensive method for determining the concentration of the capture element 10B in blood is described here. This method, neutron flux depression measurement, involves the determination of the flux depression of thermal neutrons as they pass through a boron-containing sample. It is shown via Monte Carlo calculations and experimental verification that, for a maximum count rate of 1x104 counts/s measured by the detector, a 10 ppm 10B sample of volume 20 ml can be measured with a statistical precision of 10% in 32±2 min. For a source activity of less than 1.11x1011 Bq and a maximum count rate of less than 1x104 counts/s, a 10 ppm 10B sample of volume 20 ml can be measured with a statistical precision of 10% in 58±3 min. It has also been shown that this technique can be applied to the measurement of the concentration of any element with a high thermal neutron cross section such as 157Gd. (author)

  14. Boron-Containing Compounds for Liposome-Mediated Tumor Localization and Application to Neutron Capture Therapy

    Medical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been significantly hindered by the slow development of boron drug-targeting methodologies for the selective delivery of high boron concentration sto malignant cells. We have successfully sought to fill this need by creating liposomes suitable as in vivo boron delivery vehicles for BNCT. Delivery of therapeutic quantities of boron to tumors in murine models has been achieved with small unilamellar boron-rich liposomes. Subsequently, attempts have been made to improve delivery efficiency of liposomes encapsulating boron-containing water-soluble species into their hollow core by incorporating lipophilic boron compounds as addenda to the liposome bilayer, incorporating boron compounds as structural components of the bilayer (which however, poses the risk of sacrificing some stability), and combinations thereof. Regardless of the method, approximately 90% of the total liposome mass remains therapeutically inactive and comprised of the vehicle's construction materials, while less than 5% is boron for neutron targeting. Following this laboratory's intensive study, the observed tumor specificity of certain liposomes has been attributed to their diminutive size of these liposomes (30-150 nm), which enables these small vesicles to pass through the porous, immature vasculature of rapidly growing tumor tissue. We surmised that any amphiphilic nanoparticle of suitable size could possess some tumor selectivity. Consequently, the discovery of a very boron-rich nanoparticle delivery agent with biodistribution performance similar to unilamellar liposomes became one of our goals. Closomers, a new class of polyhedral borane derivatives, attracted us as an alternative BNCT drug-delivery system. We specifically envisioned dodeca (nido-carboranyl)-substituted closomers as possibly having a great potential role in BNCT drug delivery. They could function as extraordinarily boron-rich BNCT drugs since they are amphiphilic

  15. Boron-Containing Compounds for Liposome-Mediated Tumor Localization and Application to Neutron Capture Therapy

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-04-07

    Medical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been significantly hindered by the slow development of boron drug-targeting methodologies for the selective delivery of high boron concentration sto malignant cells. We have successfully sought to fill this need by creating liposomes suitable as in vivo boron delivery vehicles for BNCT. Delivery of therapeutic quantities of boron to tumors in murine models has been achieved with small unilamellar boron-rich liposomes. Subsequently, attempts have been made to improve delivery efficiency of liposomes encapsulating boron-containing water-soluble species into their hollow core by incorporating lipophilic boron compounds as addenda to the liposome bilayer, incorporating boron compounds as structural components of the bilayer (which however, poses the risk of sacrificing some stability), and combinations thereof. Regardless of the method, approximately 90% of the total liposome mass remains therapeutically inactive and comprised of the vehicle's construction materials, while less than 5% is boron for neutron targeting. Following this laboratory's intensive study, the observed tumor specificity of certain liposomes has been attributed to their diminutive size of these liposomes (30-150 nm), which enables these small vesicles to pass through the porous, immature vasculature of rapidly growing tumor tissue. We surmised that any amphiphilic nanoparticle of suitable size could possess some tumor selectivity. Consequently, the discovery of a very boron-rich nanoparticle delivery agent with biodistribution performance similar to unilamellar liposomes became one of our goals. Closomers, a new class of polyhedral borane derivatives, attracted us as an alternative BNCT drug-delivery system. We specifically envisioned dodeca (nido-carboranyl)-substituted closomers as possibly having a great potential role in BNCT drug delivery. They could function as extraordinarily boron-rich BNCT drugs since they are

  16. Novel Boron-10-based detectors for Neutron Scattering Science

    Piscitelli, Francesco; project, for the ILL/ESS/LiU collaboration for the development of the B10 detector technology in the framework of the CRISP

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays neutron scattering science is increasing its instrumental power. Most of the neutron sources in the world are pushing the development of their technologies to be more performing. The neutron scattering development is also pushed by the European Spallation Source (ESS) in Sweden, a neutron facility which has just started construction. Concerning small area detectors (1m^2), the 3He technology, which is today cutting edge, is reaching fundamental limits in its development. Counting rat...

  17. Physical engineering for boron neutron capture therapy in KUR

    Kobayashi, Toru [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst

    2001-01-01

    Basic results of physical engineering study for neutron capture therapy in KUR have been reported since 1970, such as (1) development of thermal neutron fields for therapy following with low {gamma}-ray, (2) development of thermal neutron shield material ({sup 6}LiF) following with low secondary {gamma}-ray, (3) establishment of measurement techniques for B-10 concentration in tissue by using then (n,{gamma}) reaction, (4) evaluation of absorbed dose in a cell level during neutron capture therapy. It is difficult for many of thermal neutrons to reach to the depths in tissue. The thermal neutron irradiation, therefore, is suitable for the therapy of cancer on surface tissue, but not suitable for the therapy of cancer in the depths. Uses of epi-thermal (0.5 eV - 10 keV) or hyper-thermal (>0.5 eV) neutrons, instead of thermal neutron are considered for the neutron capture therapy to cancer in the depth. The depth dose distributions of thermal neutron are improved by increase of forward component of the epi-thermal or the hyper-thermal neutron. Thermal neutron fluxes have been measured by the activation method of Au-197. Thermo-luminescent detector (MgSiO4, or BeO) is used for the measurement of {gamma}-ray doses. Noninvasive dose estimation at cancer parts is developed with a prompt {gamma}-ray analysis method using HPGe and CdTe semiconductor detectors. (Suetake, M.)

  18. Damage to plasmid DNA by a neutron or γ-irradiation in the presence of boron compounds

    Damage levels of plasmid DNAs were observed according to the concentrations of the boron compounds and irradiation doses of a neutron or gamma irradiation. Plasmid used were pBR322 (2870 bp), ψX174 RF (5286 bp) and pTZ19R (4363 bp). DNA damage of plasmid DNA treated with boron compounds after an irradiation was obtained by an agarose gel electrophoresis and observed by a UV illuminator. In the case of a neutron irradiation with boron compounds, DNA damages of the plasmid DNAs were induced according to the high concentrations of the boron compounds and the high irradiation doses. But in the case of a γ-irradiation, the DNA damage was similar when compared to non-irradiated control. Therefore, DNA damage patterns of plasmid DNA by a treatment of boron compounds and a neutron or γ-irradiation were somewhat different showing that the higher the boron concentrations and irradiation doses, the higher the damage of plasmid DNA for a neutron irradiation but no damage for a gamma irradiation in spite of the high boron concentrations and irradiation doses. This result suggest that boron compounds such as BPA and BSH have an important role regarding the damage of plamid DNA by a neutron irradiation, however, not by a gamma irradiation. (author)

  19. Early detection of deteriorations affecting neutrons boron detectors

    Domenech, T.; Hamrita, H.; Normand, S. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteur et Architectures Electroniques, F-91191 Gif/Yvette (France); Daviaud, J. P. [EDF, DPN, 1 place Pleyel, 93 282 Saint Denis Cedex (France); Laroche, M. [EDF, SEPTEN, 12-14 rue Dutrievoz, 69628 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2011-07-01

    The objective of these studies is to design and to industrialize a new device taking back the features of the actual system of control of boron detectors and updating them by adding some analysis of the pulses shapes for predictive maintenance. (authors)

  20. Determination of boron in water solution by an indirect neutron activation technique from a 241Am/Be source

    Boron content in water solutions has been analysed by Indirect Activation Technique a twin 241Am/Be neutron source with a source strength of 9x106 n/seg. The boron concentration was inferred from the measurement of the activity induced in a vanadium flux monitor. The vanadium rod was located inside the boron solution in a standart geometrical set up with respect to the neutron source. Boron concentrations in the range of 100 to 1000 ppm were determined with an overall accuracy of about 2% during a total analysis time of about 20 minutes. Eventhough the analysis is not selective for boron yet due the rapid, simple and precise nature, it is proposed for the analysis of boron in the primary coolant circuit of Nuclear Power Plants of PWR type. (Author)

  1. Antitumor potential induction and free radicals production in melanoma cells by Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Antiproliferative and oxidative damage effects occurring in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in normal fibroblasts and melanoma cell lines were analyzed. Melanoma cells and normal fibroblasts were treated with different concentrations of Boronophenylalanine and irradiated with thermal neutron flux. The cellular viability and the oxidative stress were determined. BNCT induced free radicals production and proliferative potential inhibition in melanoma cells. Therefore, this therapeutic technique could be considered efficient to inhibit growth of melanoma with minimal effects on normal tissues. - Highlights: ► Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) induces melanoma cell death. ► BNCT stimulates free radicals production and proliferative inhibition in melanoma cells. ► It produces tumor membrane degeneration and destruction with apoptotic bodies formation. ► This therapy damages tumor cells selectively, with minimum effects on normal adjacent tissue.

  2. Feasibility study on pinhole camera system for online dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy

    The feasibility of a pinhole camera system for online dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was studied. A prototype system was designed and built. Prompt γ-rays from the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction from a phantom irradiated with neutrons were detected with the prototype system. An image was reconstructed from the experimental data. The reconstructed image showed a good separation of the two borated regions in the phantom. The counting rates and signal-to-noise ratio when using the system in actual BNCT applications are also discussed. - Author-Highlights: • The feasibility of a pinhole camera system for online dosimetry in BNCT was studied. • A prototype pinhole camera system for online dose imaging for BNCT was built. • Prompt γ-rays from a phantom irradiated with neutrons were detected. • The boron-10 reaction rate distribution was reconstructed from the experimental data

  3. Neutron dosimetry by the spark counting of tracks in boron-doped film

    Thin cellulose nitrate films are doped with a boron compound. After thermal neutron irradiation, the films are etched in an aqueous solution of 10% NaOH, at 50 deg C, for 1.5 hr, during which the 27 μm thick films are reduced to about 7 μm. The etch-pits caused by 10B(n,α)7Li reactions are punched twice at 600 V and then counted at 500 V. The ratio of the spark density to the thermal neutron fluence was found to be 1.0 x 10-4 for a boron concentration of 1%. After due consideration of background counts, a thermal neutron dose of 0.3 mrem (3 x 10-6 Sv) can be measured with this system. (author)

  4. Antitumor potential induction and free radicals production in melanoma cells by Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Faiao-Flores, F. [Biochemical and Biophysical Laboratory, Butantan Institute, 1500 Vital Brasil Avenue, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Faculty of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, 455 Doutor Arnaldo Avenue, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Coelho, P.R.P.; Muniz, R.O.R.; Souza, G.S. [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Research, 2242 Lineu Prestes Avenue, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Arruda-Neto, J. [Physics Institute, University of Sao Paulo, 187 Matao Street, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [FESP, Sao Paulo Engineering School, 5520 Nove de Julho Avenue, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Maria, Durvanei A., E-mail: durvaneiaugusto@yahoo.com.br [Biochemical and Biophysical Laboratory, Butantan Institute, 1500 Vital Brasil Avenue, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-12-15

    Antiproliferative and oxidative damage effects occurring in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in normal fibroblasts and melanoma cell lines were analyzed. Melanoma cells and normal fibroblasts were treated with different concentrations of Boronophenylalanine and irradiated with thermal neutron flux. The cellular viability and the oxidative stress were determined. BNCT induced free radicals production and proliferative potential inhibition in melanoma cells. Therefore, this therapeutic technique could be considered efficient to inhibit growth of melanoma with minimal effects on normal tissues. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) induces melanoma cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BNCT stimulates free radicals production and proliferative inhibition in melanoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It produces tumor membrane degeneration and destruction with apoptotic bodies formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This therapy damages tumor cells selectively, with minimum effects on normal adjacent tissue.

  5. Formulation and preliminary evaluation of delivery vehicles for the boron neutron capture therapy of cancer

    Olusanya, Temidayo; Stich, Theresia; Higgins, Samantha Caroline; Lloyd, Rhiannon Eleanor Iris; Smith, James Richard; Fatouros, Dimitrios; Calabrese, Gianpiero; Pilkington, Geoffrey John; Tsibouklis, John

    2015-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a method for selectively destroying malignant (normally glioma) cells whilst sparing normal tissue1. Irradiation of 10B (large neutron capture cross-section) with thermal neutrons effects the nuclear fission reaction: 10B + 1n → → 7Li+ + α + γ; where the penetration of α-particles and 7Li+ is only 8 and 5 µm, respectively, i.e., within a single cell thickness, assuming 10B can be preferentially located within glioma cells2. Poor selectivity is the main ...

  6. Formulation and preliminary evaluation of delivery vehicles for the boron neutron capture therapy of cancer

    Olusanya, Temidayo Olajumoke Bolanle

    2015-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a method for selectively destroying malignant (normally glioma) cells whilst sparing normal tissue. Irradiation of 10B (large neutron capture cross-section) with thermal neutrons effects the nuclear fission reaction: 10B + 1n → → 7Li+ + α + γ; where the penetration of -particles and 7Li+ is only 8 and 5 μm, respectively, i.e., within a single cell thickness, assuming 10B can be preferentially located within glioma cells. Poor selectivity is the main r...

  7. Cubic boron nitride: a new prospective material for ultracold neutron application

    Sobolev, Yu.; Lauer, Th.; Borisov, Yu.; Daum, M.; Fresne, N. du; Goeltl, L.; Hampel, G.; Heil, W.; Knecht, A.; Keunecke, M.; Kratz, J.V.; Lang, T.; Meister, M.; Plonka-Spehr, Ch.; Pokotilovski, Yu.

    2009-01-01

    For the first time, the neutron optical wall-potential of natural cubic boron nitride (cBN) was measured at the ultracold neutron (UCN) source of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz using the time-of-flight method (TOF). The samples investigated had a wall-potential of (305 +/- 15) neV. This value is in good agreement with the result extracted from neutron reflectometry data and theoretical expectations. Because of its high critical velocity for UCN and its good dielectric characteristics, cubic...

  8. Application of HVJ envelope system to boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been used clinically for the treatment of malignant tumors. Two drugs, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) and sulfhydral borane (BSH), have been used as boron delivery agents. These drugs seem to be taken up preferentially in solid tumors, but it is uncertain whether therapeutic quantities of boron atoms are taken up by micro-invasive or distant tumor cells. High accumulation and high selective delivery of boron into tumor tissues are the most important requirements to achieve efficient BNCT for malignant tumor. The HVJ envelope (HVJ-E) vector system is a novel fusion-mediated gene delivery system based on inactivated hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ; Sendai virus). Although we developed this vector system for gene transfer, it can also deliver proteins, synthetic oligonucleotides, and drugs. HVJ-liposome, which is liposome fused with HVJ-E, has higher boron trapping efficiency than HVJ-E alone. We report the boron delivery into cultured cells with HVJ-liposome systems. The cellular 10B concentration after 60 min incubation with HVJ-E containing BSH was 24.9 μg/g cell pellet for BHK-21 cells (baby hamster kidney cells) and 19.4 μg/g cell pellet for SCC VII cells (murine squamous cell carcinoma). These concentrations are higher than that of 60 min incubated cells with BSH containing (100μg 10B/ml) medium. These results indicate the HVJ-E fused with tumor cell membrane and rapidly delivered boron agents, and that the HVJ-E-mediated delivery system could be applicable to BNCT. Plans are underway to begin neutron radiation experiments in vivo and in vitro. (author)

  9. Design, building and evaluation of a neutron detection device based on boron loaded plastic scintillator

    This work focuses on the study, the characterization and the fabrication of Boron-loaded plastic scintillators. Their use in thermal and fast neutron detection devices is also investigated. Fabrication process, especially boron doping, is explained in the first part of this work. Several FTIR, UV-visible and NMR analysis methods were used in order to characterize the material and to check its structure and stoichiometry. Experiences were done using alpha particles and proton beams to measure the scintillation characteristics. Light emission could therefore be completely determined by the Birks semi-empirical relation. In the second part, the whole detector simulation is undergone: interaction between material and radiation, light generation, paths and signal generation. Neutron simulation by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particles) is coupled to a light generation and propagation code developed especially during this work. These simulation tools allow us to optimize the detector geometry for neutron detection and to determine the geometry influence to the photon collection efficiency. Neutron detection efficiency and mean lifetime in this scintillator are also simulated. The close fit obtained between experimental measurements and simulations demonstrate the reliability of the method used. The third part deals with the discrimination methods between neutron and gamma, such as analog (zero crossing) and digital (charge comparison) ones. Their performances were explained and compared. The last part of this work reports on few applications where neutron detection is essential and can be improved with the use of boron loaded plastic scintillators. In particular, the cases of doped scintillation fibers, neutron spectrometry devices and more over neutron multiplicity counting devices are presented. (author)

  10. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  11. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Wang, Lumin [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science

    2015-04-08

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  12. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 x 108 n/cm2 · s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 x 10-11cGy·cm2/nepi and 20 x 10-11 cGy·cm2/nepi, respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power

  13. [Principles of therapy with fission neutrons and boron neutron capture therapy for radioresistant head-neck malignancies].

    Clasen, B

    1990-08-01

    Neutron therapy has proven to be clinically useful in cases of advanced, slow-growing radioresistant head and neck carcinoma. Therapeutic effects might be based on direct DNA damaging and thus immediate cell-killing, on the generation of free oxygen radicals and, among others, on the fact that heavy particle radiation is said to be less dependent on the presence of oxygen than gamma rays, i.e. on a lower oxygen enhancement ratio (OER). The smaller difference in reaction between oxygenated and nonoxygenated cells could entail advantages as well as disadvantages, depending on the characteristics of the tumor cell population and of the normal tissue. It is therefore essential to select patients and tumours with an expectedly high therapeutic gain factor. Fission neutrons for tumour therapy: As evaluated by several in vitro and in vivo studies (11/13) the biological efficiency (RBE) of the RENT (Reactor Neutron Therapy) beam in Munich seems to be among the highest of all clinically used neutron beams. For a single dose range between 2 and 8 Gy the RBE for chronic radiation damage is relatively small (2). Consequently, patients with recurrent or metastatic carcinomas of the head and neck are treated with a single dose of 200-250 cGy after previous surgery and/or combined radiochemotherapy. The main limitation of fission neutrons is the small penetration depth. Possibilities of clinical implementation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in otorhinolaryngology: In near surface tumours it is possible to administer high doses of 10boron not selectively, i.e. no selective tumour-seeking compound is needed. Animal experiments with intratumoural injection of 10boron glycine have shown a strong effect on tumour growth delay (18).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2222692

  14. SBNCT plan: A 3-dimensional treatment planning system for boron neutron capture therapy

    The need for accurate and comprehensive 3-dimensional treatment planning for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been debated for the past several years. Although many argue against the need for elaborate and expensive treatment planning programs which mimic conventional radiotherapy planning systems, it is clear that in order to realize significant gains over conventional fractionated radiation therapy, patients must be treated to the edge of normal tissue tolerance. Just how close to this edge is dictated by the uncertainties in dosimetry. Hence the focus of BNCT planning is the determination of dose distribution throughout normal tissue volumes. Although precise geometric manipulation of the epithermal neutron beam is not achievable, the following variables play an important role in BNCT optimization: patient orientation, dose fractionation, number of fields, megawatt-minutes per fraction, use of surface bolus, and use of collimation. Other variables which are not as easily adjustable and would not, therefore, be part of treatment planning optimization, include external patient contour, internal patient heterogeneities, boron compound distributions, and RBE's. The boron neutron capture therapy planning system developed at SUNY Stony Brook (SBNCT-Plan) was designed as an interactive graphic tool to assist the radiation oncologist in generating the optimum plan for a neutron capture treatment

  15. Experimental evaluation of neutron performance in boron-doped low activation concrete

    Reaction rate distribution in concrete with/without boron dopant up to a thickness of 60 cm was measured using Yayoi fast reactor located at Univ. of Tokyo. The 7 reaction rates such as 197Au(n, γ), 59Co(n, γ), 115In(n, n'), 55Mn(n, γ), 23Na(n, γ), 94Zr(n, γ) and 96Zr(n, γ) were measured at 12 different depths, and the reduction of the reaction rate as a result of boron doping was quantitatively analysed. These reaction rates were also used to determine epithermal neutron spectrum shape parameter. Monte Carlo simulations of the experimental setup were performed using the MCNP-5 code. Simulated depth profiles of reaction rates and the epithermal neutron spectrum shape parameter agreed with the experimental results with fair accuracy. This experimental results provide useful data to benchmark the accuracy of neutron transport codes in the prediction of transmission and neutron spectrum distortion in boron-doped concrete. (authors)

  16. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma multiforme using the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Capala, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Diaz, A.Z.; Chadha, M. [Univ. Hospital, State Univ. of New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    The abstract describes evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for two groups of glioblastoma multiforme patients. From September 1994 to February 1996 15 patients have been treated. In September 1997 another 34 patients were examined. Authors determined a safe starting dose for BNCT using epithermal neutrons and BPA-F. They have also evaluated adverse effects of BNCT at this starting dose. Therapeutic effectiveness of this starting dose has been evaluated. No significant side effects from BPA-F infusion or BNCT treatment were observed in normal brains.

  17. Basic research of boron neutron-capture therapy for treatment of pancreatic cancer. Application of neutron radiography for visualization of boron compound on BNCT

    Yanagie, Hironobu [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Medical Science

    1997-02-01

    The cytotoxic effects of locally injected {sup 10}B-immunoliposomes (anti-CEA) on human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice were evaluated with thermal neutron irradiation. After thermal neutron irradiation of mice injected with {sup 10}B-immunoliposomes, AsPC-1 tumour growth was suppressed relative to controls. Histopathologically, hyalinization and necrosis were found in {sup 10}B-treated tumours, while tumour tissue injected with saline or saline-containing immunoliposomes showed neither destruction nor necrosis. These results suggest that intratumoral injection of boronated immunoliposomes can increase the retention of {sup 10}B atoms by tumour cells, causing tumour growth suppression in vivo upon thermal neutron irradiation. We prepared boronated PEG-binding bovine serum albumin ({sup 10}B-PEG-BSA). {sup 10}B concentrations in AsPC-1, human pancreatic cancer cells (2 x 10{sup 5} /well) obtained 24 hrs after incubation with {sup 10}B-PEG-BSA was 13.01 {+-} 1.74 ppm. The number of {sup 10}B atoms delivered to the tumor cells was calculated to be 7.83 x 10{sup 11} at 24 hrs after incubation with {sup 10}B-PEG-BSA. These data indicated that the {sup 10}B-PEG-BSA could deliver a sufficient amount of {sup 10}B atoms (more than 10{sup 9} atoms/cell) to the tumor cells to induce cytotoxic effects after incubation upon thermal neutron irradiation. Neutron capture autoradiography by using an Imaging Plate (IP-NCR) was performed on AsPC-1 tumor-bearing mouse that had been given an intratumoral injection of {sup 10}B-PEG BSA or {sup 10}B-cationic liposome. We had demonstrated the {sup 10}B-PEG BSA or {sup 10}B-cationic liposome is taken up by AsPC-1 tumor tissue to a much greater extent than by normal tissues. (J.P.N.)

  18. Basic research of boron neutron-capture therapy for treatment of pancreatic cancer. Application of neutron radiography for visualization of boron compound on BNCT

    The cytotoxic effects of locally injected 10B-immunoliposomes (anti-CEA) on human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice were evaluated with thermal neutron irradiation. After thermal neutron irradiation of mice injected with 10B-immunoliposomes, AsPC-1 tumour growth was suppressed relative to controls. Histopathologically, hyalinization and necrosis were found in 10B-treated tumours, while tumour tissue injected with saline or saline-containing immunoliposomes showed neither destruction nor necrosis. These results suggest that intratumoral injection of boronated immunoliposomes can increase the retention of 10B atoms by tumour cells, causing tumour growth suppression in vivo upon thermal neutron irradiation. We prepared boronated PEG-binding bovine serum albumin (10B-PEG-BSA). 10B concentrations in AsPC-1, human pancreatic cancer cells (2 x 105 /well) obtained 24 hrs after incubation with 10B-PEG-BSA was 13.01 ± 1.74 ppm. The number of 10B atoms delivered to the tumor cells was calculated to be 7.83 x 1011 at 24 hrs after incubation with 10B-PEG-BSA. These data indicated that the 10B-PEG-BSA could deliver a sufficient amount of 10B atoms (more than 109 atoms/cell) to the tumor cells to induce cytotoxic effects after incubation upon thermal neutron irradiation. Neutron capture autoradiography by using an Imaging Plate (IP-NCR) was performed on AsPC-1 tumor-bearing mouse that had been given an intratumoral injection of 10B-PEG BSA or 10B-cationic liposome. We had demonstrated the 10B-PEG BSA or 10B-cationic liposome is taken up by AsPC-1 tumor tissue to a much greater extent than by normal tissues. (J.P.N.)

  19. OPTIMIZATION OF THE EPITHERMAL NEUTRON BEAM FOR BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY AT THE BROOKHAVEN MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR

    Clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for patients with malignant brain tumor had been carried out for half a decade, using an epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven's Medical Reactor. The decision to permanently close this reactor in 2000 cut short the efforts to implement a new conceptual design to optimize this beam in preparation for use with possible new protocols. Details of the conceptual design to produce a higher intensity, more forward-directed neutron beam with less contamination from gamma rays, fast and thermal neutrons are presented here for their potential applicability to other reactor facilities. Monte Carlo calculations were used to predict the flux and absorbed dose produced by the proposed design. The results were benchmarked by the dose rate and flux measurements taken at the facility then in use

  20. Incorporation and characterization of boron neutron capture therapy agents into mesoporous silicon and silicon nanowires

    The tunable pore size, biodegradability, and surface chemistry of mesoporous silicon (BioSilicon trademark) are important to a broad spectrum of uses for drug delivery. For the case of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), encapsulation of a given boron-containing drug molecule within a porous BioSilicon trademark microparticle provides a vehicle for a brachytherapy method that avoids the necessity of drug modification. In this work, the loading and characterization of three clinically approved BNCT drugs into mesoporous Si is demonstrated. Because of difficulties associated with light element detection, a method based on a Beer's Law analysis of selected FTIR vibrational bands has been developed to estimate boron-containing drug loading in these materials. As a complementary nanostructural platform, a cathodic deposition process for the surface enriched growth of selected drugs onto the surface of silicon nanowires is also described. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Incorporation and characterization of boron neutron capture therapy agents into mesoporous silicon and silicon nanowires

    Jiang, Ke; Coffer, Jeffery L. [Department of Chemistry, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Loni, Armando; Canham, Leigh T. [PSi Medica Ltd., Malvern, Worcestershire, WR14 3SZ (United Kingdom); Intrinsiq Materials Ltd., Malvern, Worcestershire, WR14 3SZ (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    The tunable pore size, biodegradability, and surface chemistry of mesoporous silicon (BioSilicon trademark) are important to a broad spectrum of uses for drug delivery. For the case of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), encapsulation of a given boron-containing drug molecule within a porous BioSilicon trademark microparticle provides a vehicle for a brachytherapy method that avoids the necessity of drug modification. In this work, the loading and characterization of three clinically approved BNCT drugs into mesoporous Si is demonstrated. Because of difficulties associated with light element detection, a method based on a Beer's Law analysis of selected FTIR vibrational bands has been developed to estimate boron-containing drug loading in these materials. As a complementary nanostructural platform, a cathodic deposition process for the surface enriched growth of selected drugs onto the surface of silicon nanowires is also described. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Biological models in vivo for boron neutronic capture studies as tumors therapy

    The use of experimental models for Boron Neutronic Capture studies as Tumors Therapy have as two main objectives: 1) To contribute to the basic knowledge of the biological mechanisms involved to increase the method therapeutical advantage, and 2) To explore the possible application of this therapeutic method to other pathologies. In this frame it was studied the carcinogenesis model of hamster cheek pouch, a type of human buccal cancer. Biodistribution studies of boron compound were performed in tumor, blood and in different precancerous and normal tissues as well as BNCT studies. Results validated this method for BNCT studies and show the capacity of the oral mucosa tumors of selectively concentrate the boron compound, showing a deleterious clear effect on the tumor after 24 hours with BNCT treatment. (author)

  3. Gamma and neutron attenuation behaviours of boron carbide–silicon carbide composites

    Highlights: • Gamma and neutron attenuation behaviours of B4C–SiC composites were investigated. • Increasing SiC ratio increases gamma attenuation behaviour of the B4C–SiC composites. • Increasing SiC ratio decrease attenuation behaviour of the B4C–SiC composites. • HVT values of the B4C–SiC composites were calculated for Cs-137, Co-60 and Pu–Be sources. • Experimental mass attenuation coefficient are compatible with theoretical (XCOM) values. - Abstract: In this study, the gamma and neutron attenuation behaviors of pure boron carbide and boron carbide–silicon carbide composites which include three different silicon carbide ratios (20%, 30%, and 40%) by volume were investigated against Cs-137, Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources and Pu–Be neutron source. Transmission technique was used in the experiments to investigate the gamma and neutron attenuation properties of the materials. Linear and mass attenuation coefficients of the samples were determined for 0.662 (Cs-137) and 1.25 MeV (Co-60) energetic gamma rays. In addition the total macroscopic cross-sections (∑T) were calculated for the materials against Pu–Be neutron source. Theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were calculated from XCOM computer code. The experimental and theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were compared and evaluated with each other. In addition half value thickness (HVT) calculations were carried out by using linear attenuation coefficients and total macroscopic cross-sections. The results showed that increasing silicon carbide ratio decreases HVTs against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources whereas increases HVTs against Pu–Be neutron source. The mass attenuation coefficients were compatible with the theoretical (XCOM) values. Increasing silicon carbide ratio in boron carbide–silicon carbide composites causes higher gamma attenuation and lower neutron attenuation values

  4. Optimization of the indirect at neutron activation technique for the determination of boron in aqueous solutions

    The purpose of this work was the development of an instrumental method for the optimization of the indirect neutron activation analysis of boron in aqueous solutions. The optimization took into account the analytical parameters under laboratory conditions: activation carried out with a 241Am/Be neutron source and detection of the activity induced in vanadium with two NaI(Tl) gamma spectrometers. A calibration curve was thus obtained for a concentration range of 0 to 5000 ppm B. Later on, experimental models were built in order to study the feasibility of automation. The analysis of boron was finally performed, under the previously established conditions, with an automated system comprising the operations of transport, irradiation and counting. An improvement in the quality of the analysis was observed, with boron concentrations as low as 5 ppm being determined with a precision level better than 0.4%. The experimental model features all basic design elements for an automated device for the analysis of boron in agueous solutions wherever this is required, as in the operation of nuclear reactors. (Author)

  5. Effect of fast neutron irradiation on the properties of boron carbide pellet

    Boron carbide pellets were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' to 10B burnup of up to 170x1026 cap/m3, fluences of 2x1026/m2 (E>0.1 MeV), and maximum temperatures of about 1,200degC. Post irradiation examinations were made of microstructural changes, helium release, swelling, and thermal conductivity. Boron carbide pellets irradiated to high burnups developed extensive cracking. Helium release from the pellets was initially low, but enhanced helium release was observed at high burnups and high temperatures. The swelling linearly increased with burnup, and when boron carbide was irradiated at high temperatures, the swelling rate began to decrease corresponding to the beginning of enhanced helium release. The correlation between swelling and the helium release was studied and the swelling was interpreted in terms of accumulation of helium in the boron carbide pellet. The thermal conductivity of the boron carbide pellets decreased rapidly by neutron irradiation accompanied with loss of temperature dependence. (author)

  6. Analysis of boron, samarium and gadolinium in rock samples by neutron capture gamma ray spectrometry

    Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is useful for determining many of the elements found in sedimentary rocks. It is particularly suitable for the trace elements boron, samarium and gadolinium. The sensitivity of detection can be of the order of 0.1 part per million with an adequate neutron source. Twenty-five sedimentary rock samples were analyzed in the PGNAA facility at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The materials included Ottawa sand, Berea sandstone, Royer dolomite and several other formations of interest in the petroleum industry. Results of the analyses are presented. Correlations of gadolinium and samarium and of boron with the sum of samarium and gadolinium are given. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs, 4 tabs

  7. The production, characterization, and neutronic performance of boron nitride coated uranium dioxide fuel

    The fuel pellets produced by sol-gel technique were coated with boron nitride (BN). This was achieved through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using boron trichloride and ammonia. Mixing and chemical reaction take place at a temperature around 875 K. The coated samples were then sintered at 1600 K. Thermal reactor physics lattice-cell code WIMS-D/4 was used in the neutronic analysis of CANDU fuel bundle to observe the neutronic performance of the coated fuel. Three types of fuel were considered; fuel made of natural uranium, slightly enriched uranium (SEU, enrichment: 0.82 % U-235), and SEU with various BN coatings. The burnup calculations showed that feasible coating thickness is between 1 to 2 μm. (author)

  8. Development of a method to extend by boron neutron capture process the therapeutic possibilities of a liver autograft

    Pinelli, Tazio; Altieri, Saverio; Fossati, F.; Zonta, Aris; Prati, U.; Roveda, L.; Nano, Rosanna

    1997-02-01

    We present results on surgical technique, neutron filed and irradiation facility concerning the original treatment of the liver diffused metastases. Our method plans to irradiate the isolated organ at a thermal neutron field soon after having been explanted and boron enriched and before being grafted into the same donor. In particular the crucial point of boron uptake was investigated by a rat model with a relevant number of procedure. We give for the first time statistically significant results on the selective boron absorption by tumor tissues.

  9. Study of boron carbide evolution under neutron irradiation by Raman spectroscopy

    Boron carbide, B12C3, is an absorbing material used to control the reactivity of nuclear reactors by taking advantage of nuclear reactions (e.g. 10B(n,α)7Li), where neutrons are absorbed. During such reactions, radiation damages originating both from these nuclear reactions and from elastic collisions between neutrons and atoms lead to a partial destruction of this material, which gives the main limitation of its lifetime in nuclear reactors. In order to understand the evolution of B12C3 in nuclear plants, the effect of neutron irradiation in B12C3 has been investigated by Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Comparisons of B12C3 samples irradiated by 1 MeV electrons, 180 keV helium ions and neutrons are used to study the microstructure evolution of this material by Raman scattering. The analysis of Raman spectra of different B12C3 samples irradiated by neutrons clearly shows that during the cascade displacements, the 485 and 527 cm-1 modes disappear. These characteristic features of Raman spectra of the neutron irradiated samples are interpreted by a microscopic model. This model assumes that the CBC linear chain is destroyed whereas icosahedra are self-healed. 10B atoms destroyed during the neutron irradiation are replaced in icosahedra by other boron and carbon atoms coming from the linear CBC chain. The 11B NMR analysis performed on unirradiated and irradiated B4C samples shows the vanishing of a strong quadrupolar interaction associated to the CBC chain during the high neutron irradiation. The 11B NMR spectroscopy confirms the previous Raman spectroscopy and the proposed microscopic model of B12C3 evolution under neutron irradiation

  10. Boron neutron capture therapy for oral precancer: proof of principle in an experimental animal model

    A. Monti Hughes; ECC Pozzi; S. Thorp; M. A. Garabalino; R. O. Farias; S. J. Gonzalez; E. M. Heber; M. E. Itoiz; R. F. Aromando; A. J. Molinari; M. Miller; D. W. Nigg; P. Curotto; V. A. Trivillin; A. E. Schwint

    2013-11-01

    Field-cancerized tissue can give rise to second primary tumours, causing therapeutic failure. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on biological targeting and would serve to treat undetectable foci of malignant transformation. The aim of this study was to optimize BNCT for the integral treatment for oral cancer, with particular emphasis on the inhibitory effect on tumour development originating in precancerous conditions, and radiotoxicity of different BNCT protocols in a hamster cheek pouch oral precancer model.

  11. Using BPA alone for boron neutron capture therapy of recurrent head and neck malignancies

    In recent years, boron neutron capture therapy(BNCT) has been established as a special treatment technique for overcoming the radiation resistance of malignant melanomas and brain tumors. Head and neck malignancies were consequently selected as adaptable cancers. We report the clinical results of treatment with BPA alone utilizing 18F-BPA·PET and discuss several advantages to the application of BNCT to head and neck malignancies. (author)

  12. P13.09ADVANCES IN CLINICAL APPLICATION OF BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY (BNCT) IN GLIOBLASTOMA

    Detta, A.; Cruickshank, G.C.; Green, S.; Lockyer, N.P.; Ngoga, D.; Ghani, Z.; Phoenix, B

    2014-01-01

    BNCT is a biologically targeted form of enhanced cellular radiotherapy where preferential accumulation of boron in the cancerous as opposed to adjacent normal cells is able to interact with incident neutrons to cause irreversible alpha particle DNA damage. The key to the implementation of this potentially powerful and selective therapy is the delivery of at least 30ppm 10B within the tumour tissue while minimising superfluous 10B in healthy tissue. It is thus an elegant technique for treating...

  13. Simulation and design of a neutron detector based on Boron-Loaded linear alkyl benzene (LAB) liquid scintillator

    A Boron-Loaded linear alkyl benzene (LAB) liquid scintillator (LS) neutron detector has been designed to detect neutrons in high gamma field environment. The detector is made robust by piping the light from a remotely located LS module by an optical fibre. Here we describe a GEANT4 based model to optimize the design of the LS detector. This model includes the physics of neutron interaction with Boron-10, light scintillation by the LAB and light transport in the optical fiber. All the detector components including the scintillator, light guides and an approximation of the photomultiplier tube response, are simulated. The results show that for unidirectional beam of thermal neutrons, a small detector with 70 % neutron detection efficiency can be achieved by loading the LAB with 4.5% Boron-10 and by using a 2 meter optical fibre. The simulated output results are compared to actual measurement. (author)

  14. Biological Tests for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Research at the TRIGA Mark II Reactor in Pavia

    The thermal column of the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Pavia University is used as an irradiation facility to perform biological tests and irradiations of living systems for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) research. The suitability of the facility has been ensured by studying the neutron flux and the photon background in the irradiation chamber inside the thermal column. This characterization has been realized both by flux and dose measurements as well as by Monte Carlo simulations. The routine irradiations concern in vitro cells cultures and different tumor animal models to test the efficacy of the BNCT treatment. Some results about these experiments will be described. (author)

  15. Biological Tests for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Research at the TRIGA Mark II Reactor in Pavia

    Protti, N.; Ballarini, F.; Bortolussi, S.; De Bari, A.; Stella, S.; Altieri, S. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Nuclear Physics National Institute (INFN), Pavia (Italy); Bruschi, P. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Bakeine, J.G.; Cansolino, L.; Clerici, A.M. [Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    The thermal column of the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Pavia University is used as an irradiation facility to perform biological tests and irradiations of living systems for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) research. The suitability of the facility has been ensured by studying the neutron flux and the photon background in the irradiation chamber inside the thermal column. This characterization has been realized both by flux and dose measurements as well as by Monte Carlo simulations. The routine irradiations concern in vitro cells cultures and different tumor animal models to test the efficacy of the BNCT treatment. Some results about these experiments will be described. (author)

  16. Online detection of radiation produced in Boron-10 neutron capture reaction: preliminary studies

    Boron microdistribution in both tumor and normal tissue sections can be studied by the autoradiography technique in solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). A measurement of boron concentration in tissue is obtained through the evaluation of the density of tracks produced by alpha and lithium ions generated in the neutron capture reaction 10B(n,α) 7Li. This knowledge is pivotal when a BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) protocol is considered. A new methodology is proposed in order to record alpha and lithium events in real time, as light spots superimposed to the tissue section image. CCD (Charge-Coupled Device) and CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) are used as detectors, with the advantage of avoiding the superposition of events. Commercial web cams were employed for the preliminary experiments. They were partially disassembled in order to get the sensor chip uncovered. These devices were exposed to different radiation sources: 6.118 MeV alpha particles (252Cf), 0.662 MeV gamma rays (137Cs) and thermal neutrons (moderated 241Am-Be source, 103n.cm2.seg-1), to analyze the characteristics of the respective images. Pictures from tissue sections put in contact with the sensor surface were also acquired. A software was developed in Matlab to perform the image capture and processing. Early results show the feasibility of using these devices to study the distribution 10B in tissue samples. (author)

  17. The feasibility of using boron-loaded plastic fibers for neutron detection

    The results from simulations and laboratory experiments with boron-loaded plastic scintillating fibers as a nondestructive assay tool are presented. Single and multiclad fibers in three diameters of 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mm were examined for their application in neutron coincident counting. For this application, the simulation results show that various configurations of boro-loaded plastic scintillating fibers have a die-away time (τ) of 12 micros with an efficiency (var-epsilon) of 50%. For a comparable efficiency, 3He proportional tubes have a typical die-away time of 50 micros. The shortened die-away time can reduce the relative error for measurement of similar samples by up to 50%. Plastic scintillating fibers also offer flexible configurations with the potential to discriminate between signals from gamma-ray and neutron events. To date, the emphasis of the investigation has been the detection capability of plastic scintillating fibers for neutrons and gamma rays and evaluation of their ability to discriminate between the two events. Quantitative calculations and experiments have also been conducted to determine the light output, evaluate the noise,quantify light attenuation, and determine neutron detection efficiency. Current experimental data support the analytical results that boron-loaded plastic fibers can detect thermal neutrons with performance metrics that are comparable or better than those of 3He proportional tubes

  18. New concepts for compact accelerator/target for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Two new target concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, that enable a large reduction in the proton beam current needed to produce epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) are described. In the NIFTI concept, high energy neutrons produced by (p, n) reactions of 2.5 MeV protons on Li are down scattered to treatment energies (∼ 20 keV) by relatively thin layers of PbF2 and iron. In the DISCOS concept, treatment energy neutrons are produced directly in a succession of thin (∼ 1 micron) liquid Li films on rotating Be foils. These foils interact with a proton beam that operates just above threshold for the (p, n) reaction, with an applied DC field to re-accelerate the proton beam between the target foils

  19. Gel dosimeters as useful dose and thermal-fluence detectors in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    The dosimetry method based on Fricke-Xylenol-Orange-infused gels in form of layers has shown noticeable potentiality for in-phantom or in-free-beam dose and thermal flux profiling and imaging in the high fluxes of thermal or epithermal neutrons utilised for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Gel-dosimeters in form of layers give the possibility not only of obtaining spatial dose distributions but also of achieving measurements of each dose contribution in neutron fields. The discrimination of the various dose components is achieved by means of pixel-to-pixel manipulations of pairs of images obtained with gel-dosimeters having different isotopic composition. It is possible to place large dosimeters, detecting in such a way large dose images, because the layer geometry of dosimeters avoids sensitive variation of neutron transport due to the gel isotopic composition. Some results obtained after the last improvements of the method are reported. (Author)

  20. Boron-loaded plastic scintillator with neutron-γ pulse shape discrimination capability

    Pawełczak, I.A., E-mail: pawelczak1@llnl.gov; Glenn, A.M.; Martinez, H.P.; Carman, M.L.; Zaitseva, N.P.; Payne, S.A.

    2014-07-01

    Development of the plastic scintillator with neutron sensitivity from thermal to multi-MeV and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) has been demonstrated. Incorporation of {sup 10}B-containing compounds into the plastic scintillator with PSD capability leads to detector improvement in regard to neutron detection efficiency while preserving the discrimination between neutrons and γ-rays. Effects of boron loading on scintillation and pulse shape discrimination properties are discussed. A PSD figure-of-merit value of 1.4±0.03 has been achieved for events in a thermal neutron energy domain, 50–100 keV{sub ee}, for PSD plastic loaded with 5 wt.% of m-carborane.

  1. Gel dosimeters as useful dose and thermal-fluence detectors in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    Gambarini, G.; Valente, M. [Department of Physics of the University and INFN, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Moss, R.L.; Daquino, G.G.; Nievaart, V.A. [Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755ZG Petten, The Netherlands (Netherlands); Mariani, M.; Vanossi, E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering of Polytechnic, CESNEF, Via Ponzio, 34/3 - I-20133 Milan (Italy); Carrara, M. [Medical Physics Department, National Cancer Institute, Via Venezian 1, I-20131, Milan (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    The dosimetry method based on Fricke-Xylenol-Orange-infused gels in form of layers has shown noticeable potentiality for in-phantom or in-free-beam dose and thermal flux profiling and imaging in the high fluxes of thermal or epithermal neutrons utilised for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Gel-dosimeters in form of layers give the possibility not only of obtaining spatial dose distributions but also of achieving measurements of each dose contribution in neutron fields. The discrimination of the various dose components is achieved by means of pixel-to-pixel manipulations of pairs of images obtained with gel-dosimeters having different isotopic composition. It is possible to place large dosimeters, detecting in such a way large dose images, because the layer geometry of dosimeters avoids sensitive variation of neutron transport due to the gel isotopic composition. Some results obtained after the last improvements of the method are reported. (Author)

  2. Study on the effect of moderator of the proportional Boron-lined counter on the neutron detection efficiency

    The proportional boron-lined counter as a common source-range detector is widely used in reactor monitoring, which has high detection efficiency for thermal neutron. The detection efficiency of the proportional boron-lined counter for fast reactor monitoring can be improved by using proper moderator. The relative detection efficiency and absolute detection efficiency of the proportional boron-lined counter in different thickness of the moderator for mono-energy neutrons of different energy were simulated by using MCNP, the tend-line of the relative detection efficiency and absolute detection efficiency were obtained. Also the detection efficiency of selected proportional boron-lined counter to the typical neutron spectrum of the fast reactor was simulated, and then the optimized moderator was designed. It would have some degree of guiding significance to design the nuclear measurement system of the fast reactor. (authors)

  3. Potential of para-boronophenylalaninol as a boron carrier in boron neutron capture therapy, referring to that of its enantiomers

    We evaluated the potential of a newly developed 10B-containing alpha-amino alcohol of para-boronophenylalanine-10B (BPA), para-boronophenylalaninol (BPAol), as a boron carrier in boron neutron capture therapy. C57BL mice bearing EL4 tumors and C3H/He mice bearing SCC VII tumors received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously via implanted mini-osmotic pumps to label all proliferating (P) cells. After oral administration of L-BPA or D-BPA, or intraperitoneal injection of L-BPAol or D-BPAol, the tumors were irradiated with reactor thermal neutron beams. For the combination with mild temperature hyperthermia (MTH) and/or tirapazamine (TPZ), the tumors were heated at 40 degrees centigrade for 30 minutes right before neutron exposure, and/or TPZ was intraperitoneally injected 30 minutes before irradiation. The tumors were then excised, minced and trypsinized. The tumor cell suspensions thus obtained were incubated with cytochalasin-B (a cytokinesis blocker), and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labeling ( = quiescent (Q) cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. Meanwhile, 6 hours after irradiation, tumor cell suspensions obtained in the same manner were used for determining the apoptosis frequency in Q cells. The apoptosis and MN frequency in total (P + Q) tumor cells were determined from the tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU. Without TPZ or MTH, L- and D-BPAol increased both frequencies markedly, especially for total cells. Although not significantly, L-BPA and D-BPAol increased both frequencies slightly more remarkably than D-BPA and L-BPAol, respectively. On combined treatment with both MTH and TPZ, the sensitivity difference between total and Q cells was markedly reduced. MTH increased the 10B uptake of all 10B-carriers into both tumor cells to some degree. Both L- and D-BPAol have potential as 10B-carriers in neutron capture therapy, especially when combined with both MTH and TPZ

  4. Fabrication and characterization of silicon based thermal neutron detector with hot wire chemical vapor deposited boron carbide converter

    In order to utilize the well established silicon detector technology for neutron detection application, a silicon based thermal neutron detector was fabricated by integrating a thin boron carbide layer as a neutron converter with a silicon PIN detector. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), which is a low cost, low temperature process for deposition of thin films with precise thickness was explored as a technique for direct deposition of a boron carbide layer over the metalized front surface of the detector chip. The presence of B-C bonding and 10B isotope in the boron carbide film were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry respectively. The deposition of HWCVD boron carbide layer being a low temperature process was observed not to cause degradation of the PIN detector. The response of the detector with 0.2 µm and 0.5 µm thick boron carbide layer was examined in a nuclear reactor. The pulse height spectrum shows evidence of thermal neutron response with signature of (n, α) reaction. The results presented in this article indicate that HWCVD boron carbide deposition technique would be suitable for low cost industrial fabrication of PIN based single element or 1D/2D position sensitive thermal neutron detectors

  5. Fabrication and characterization of silicon based thermal neutron detector with hot wire chemical vapor deposited boron carbide converter

    Chaudhari, Pradip; Singh, Arvind; Topkar, Anita; Dusane, Rajiv

    2015-04-01

    In order to utilize the well established silicon detector technology for neutron detection application, a silicon based thermal neutron detector was fabricated by integrating a thin boron carbide layer as a neutron converter with a silicon PIN detector. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), which is a low cost, low temperature process for deposition of thin films with precise thickness was explored as a technique for direct deposition of a boron carbide layer over the metalized front surface of the detector chip. The presence of B-C bonding and 10B isotope in the boron carbide film were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry respectively. The deposition of HWCVD boron carbide layer being a low temperature process was observed not to cause degradation of the PIN detector. The response of the detector with 0.2 μm and 0.5 μm thick boron carbide layer was examined in a nuclear reactor. The pulse height spectrum shows evidence of thermal neutron response with signature of (n, α) reaction. The results presented in this article indicate that HWCVD boron carbide deposition technique would be suitable for low cost industrial fabrication of PIN based single element or 1D/2D position sensitive thermal neutron detectors.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of silicon based thermal neutron detector with hot wire chemical vapor deposited boron carbide converter

    Chaudhari, Pradip, E-mail: pradipcha@gmail.com [Semiconductor Thin Films and Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai – 400076 (India); Singh, Arvind, E-mail: arvindsingh1884@gmail.com [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai – 400085 (India); Topkar, Anita, E-mail: anita.topkar@gmail.com [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai – 400085 (India); Dusane, Rajiv, E-mail: rodusane@iitb.ac.in [Semiconductor Thin Films and Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai – 400076 (India)

    2015-04-11

    In order to utilize the well established silicon detector technology for neutron detection application, a silicon based thermal neutron detector was fabricated by integrating a thin boron carbide layer as a neutron converter with a silicon PIN detector. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), which is a low cost, low temperature process for deposition of thin films with precise thickness was explored as a technique for direct deposition of a boron carbide layer over the metalized front surface of the detector chip. The presence of B-C bonding and {sup 10}B isotope in the boron carbide film were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry respectively. The deposition of HWCVD boron carbide layer being a low temperature process was observed not to cause degradation of the PIN detector. The response of the detector with 0.2 µm and 0.5 µm thick boron carbide layer was examined in a nuclear reactor. The pulse height spectrum shows evidence of thermal neutron response with signature of (n, α) reaction. The results presented in this article indicate that HWCVD boron carbide deposition technique would be suitable for low cost industrial fabrication of PIN based single element or 1D/2D position sensitive thermal neutron detectors.

  7. Boron determination in biological samples - Intercomparison of three analytical methods to assist development of a treatment protocol for neoplastic diseases of the liver with Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Schütz, Christian L.

    2012-01-01

    Die Bor-Neuroneneinfang-Therapie (engl.: Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, BNCT) ist eine indirekte Strahlentherapie, welche durch die gezielte Freisetzung von dicht ionisierender Strahlung Tumorzellen zerstört. Die freigesetzten Ionen sind Spaltfragmente einer Kernreaktion, bei welcher das Isotop 10B ein niederenergetisches (thermisches) Neutron einfängt. Das 10B wird durch ein spezielles Borpräparat in den Tumorzellen angereichert, welches selbst nicht radioaktiv ist. rnAn der Johannes Gutenbe...

  8. Development of the epithermal neutron beam and its clinical application for boron neutron capture therapy at the Brookhaven medical research reactor

    The failures of the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) trials conducted between 1951 and 1961 were attributed to inadequate penetration of the thermal neutron beams and poor localization of boron compound in the tumour. The epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR was designed and installed to improve the penetration of the neutron beam. The use of this epithermal neutron beam for the clinical trial initiated in 1994 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was preceded by the neutron beam optimization and characterization, the validation of the treatment planning software and the establishment of a procedure for treatment plan evaluation and dose reporting and recording. To date, a total of 54 patients have been treated. Our experience in the development of the epithermal neutron beam for clinical BNCT at the BMRR may be useful to other investigators desirous of developing similar programs for cancer therapy. (author)

  9. Novel Boron-10-based detectors for Neutron Scattering Science

    Piscitelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays neutron scattering science is increasing its instrumental power. Most of the neutron sources in the world are pushing the development of their technologies to be more performing. The neutron scattering development is also pushed by the European Spallation Source (ESS) in Sweden, a neutron facility which has just started construction. Concerning small area detectors (1m^2), the 3He technology, which is today cutting edge, is reaching fundamental limits in its development. Counting rate capability, spatial resolution and cost-e?ectiveness, are only a few examples of the features that must be improved to ful?fill the new requirements. On the other hand, 3He technology could still satisfy the detector requirements for large area applications (50m^2), however, because of the present 3He shortage that the world is experiencing, this is not practical anymore. The recent detector advances (the Multi-Grid and the Multi-Blade prototypes) developed in the framework of the collaboration between the Institut Laue...

  10. Application of flame spraying coatings of neutron-absorbing boron-polymer composite powder for spent nuclear fuel container

    The traditional shielding method was mostly to use a thicker shielding of lead plates, and cast reinforced concrete, etc., mainly by reducing the neutron speed and preventing the passage of neutrons. However, the problem of making or machining the thick protective layers cannot meet the development needs of the security of the nuclear power industry. Currently, most widely used nuclear protective materials are polyethylene plastic plates adding boron carbide, because of polyethylene containing a relatively high content of hydrogen atoms that is an effective neutron moderator by virtue of its scattering power, and boron carbide that is also a good thermal neutron absorber by means of huge thermal neutron absorbing cross section. In this regard, in the present work, polymer flame spraying coatings of neutron-absorbing boron containing polymer composite powder is developed for application in the field of spent nuclear fuel. Changes in the microstructure of the coating layer are discussed with respect to the content of boron carbide and the thickness of the coating layer in view of the neutron absorbing efficiency. In this work, polymer flame spraying coatings of neutron-absorbing boron containing polymer composite powder was developed for application in the field of spent nuclear fuel. From the observation of coating layer, B4C particles were distributed uniformly in the polymer matrix and the LDPE-B4C composite coating layer was joined well with Al substrate without any detachment. The thermal neutron absorbing property is enhanced with an increase in the coating thickness. A flame spraying coating method of boron-containing polymer composite powder is very effective way for the application in a spent nuclear fuel facility

  11. Transport calculations in the influence of physical factors on depth-dose distributions in boron neutron capture therapy

    Matsumoto, T. (Musashi Inst. of Tech., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Lab.)

    1990-07-01

    Distributions of thermal neutron fluence and capture {gamma} ray absorbed dose rates were evaluated, taking into consideration various physical factors relevant to boron neutron capture therapy. The use of a larger neutron irradiation aperture was associated with an increase in thermal neutron fluence and capture {gamma} ray absorbed dose rates. Radiation leakage was more significant with smaller phantoms. Attenuation of thermal neutron fluence rates by {sup 10}B suggested that there was an optimal {sup 10}B concentration (<100 PPM) for a given tumour. Deuteration of water allowed better penetration of thermal neutrons with less capture {gamma} rays and is potentially applicable for the treatment of deep-seated brain tumours. (author).

  12. Synthesis and characterization of alanine boron hydrate for its use in thermal neutron dosimetry

    Alanine boron hydrate was synthesized for its possible use as intercomparison dosimeter for thermal neutron irradiation. The irradiations were performed in the Nuclear Reactor of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. The salt was prepared by reacting alanine and boric acid in a (1:1) stoichiometric ratio in neutral pH 7.5 aqueous solution and also in a basic pH 13 solution. The latter reaction was prepared with the addition of ammonia hydroxide (25%). Solutions were stirred and afterwards were let to evaporate. The obtained product in each reaction is a white solid. Dosimeters were prepared with the obtained reaction products and irradiated under thermal neutron flux of 5 x 107 n/cm2 s. For 30 hours. The analysis of irradiated samples was made in a Variant E-15 Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectrometer. The observed response of the samples prepared with the reaction product at the basic pH is approximately 50% higher than the neutral pH samples. In order to investigate the optimum signal enhancement samples were prepared in a basic pH medium in the following stoichiometric ratios: (1:0.5); (1:0.75); (1:1.25); (1:1.5) and (1:1.75). It was observed that the samples of the reaction (1:0.75) produced the higher response. The response was 2728% higher than the alanine only dosimeters. The reaction product was chemically characterized by X-ray diffraction, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Chromatography, Refractometry and Solubility tests. Results indicate that alanine boron hydrate is formed in basic media and in a stoichiometric ratio (1:0.75). The dosimetric characterization of alanine boron hydrate was performed, results are reported. It is concluded that alanine boron hydrate may be a good intercomparison dosimeter for thermal neutron irradiation. (Author)

  13. Can epithermal boron neutron capture therapy treat primary and metastatic liver cancer?

    Full text: The poor prognosis of metastatic cancer to the liver calls for the investigation of alternative treatment modalities. This paper analyses the possible use of epithermal boron neutron capture therapy for the palliative treatment of these cancers. We examine possible treatment planning scenarios for selected tumour to liver boron ratios, and specifically for the epithermal beam at the HFR, Petten. It is required that a therapeutic ratio> 1 be achieved over the entire organ. Monte Carlo calculations were performed using the radiation transport code MCNP. The geometrical model used a 'variable voxel' technique to reconstruct an anthropomorphic phantom from CT scans. Regions of interest such as the liver were modelled to a resolution of a few millimetres, whereas surrounding regions were modelled with lesser detail thereby facilitating faster computation time. Three dimensional dose distributions were calculated for a frontal beam directed at the liver, and found to be in satisfactory agreement with measurements using bare and cadmium covered gold foils, PIN and MOSFET dosimeters for fast neutron and gamma measurements respectively. Dose distributions were calculated for orthogonal epithermal neutron beams to the front and side, using the parameters of the epithermal beam at Petten, and assumed tumour and normal tissue boron-10 concentrations of 30 ppm and 7.5 ppm boron-10 respectively. The therapeutic ratio (i e the dose to the tumour relative to the maximum dose to normal tissue) was found to be about 1.8, reducing to unity for the limiting condition of a tumour in the posterior liver. This result opens up the possibility of palliative therapy for the management of primary and metastatic liver cancer

  14. In-phantom two-dimensional thermal neutron distribution for intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumours

    The aim of this study was to determine the in-phantom thermal neutron distribution derived from neutron beams for intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy (IOBNCT). Gold activation wires arranged in a cylindrical water phantom with (void-in-phantom) or without (standard phantom) a cylinder styrene form placed inside were irradiated by using the epithermal beam (ENB) and the mixed thermal-epithermal beam (TNB-1) at the Japan Research Reactor No 4. With ENB, we observed a flattened distribution of thermal neutron flux and a significantly enhanced thermal flux delivery at a depth compared with the results of using TNB-1. The thermal neutron distribution derived from both the ENB and TNB-1 was significantly improved in the void-in-phantom, and a double high dose area was formed lateral to the void. The flattened distribution in the circumference of the void was observed with the combination of ENB and the void-in-phantom. The measurement data suggest that the ENB may provide a clinical advantage in the form of an enhanced and flattened dose delivery to the marginal tissue of a post-operative cavity in which a residual and/or microscopically infiltrating tumour often occurs. The combination of the epithermal neutron beam and IOBNCT will improve the clinical results of BNCT for brain tumours. (author)

  15. Performance of Boron-10 based Neutron Coincidence Counters

    Helium-3 gas-filled detectors have been used in neutron coincidence counting for non-destructive assay for over 30 years. With the current shortage of 3He gas, GE's Reuter-Stokes business developed a 10B lined proportional counter and a 10B hybrid coincidence counter, in which a small amount of 3He is added to a 10B detector to enhance the neutron sensitivity. GE's Reuter-Stokes business modelled, designed, built and tested prototype coincidence counters using the 10B lined detectors and the 10B hybrid detectors. We will present these systems and their applications for non-destructive assay. (author)

  16. Basic and clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumor

    Nose, Tadao; Matsumura, Akira; Nakai, Kei; Nakagawa, Kunio; Yoshii, Yoshihiko [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Shibata, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Hayakawa, Yoshinori; Yamada, Takashi

    1998-01-01

    Rat malignant cells (9L glioma cell) were exposed to neutron radiation after culturing with boron compounds; BSH and STA-BX909, and cell growing ability after the exposure was determined by colony forming assay. The effects of in vivo radiation were examined by measuring neutron flux levels in rat brain and skin aiming to use neutron radiation in clinical study. STA-BX909 was found to show a dose-dependent cell toxicity, which was higher than that of BSH. The radiation induced G2/M block in 9L-glioma cells and their cell cycles recovered thereafter in low-dose radiated cells, but high-dose radiated cells became aneuploidy. Furthermore, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was applied in two patients, 41-year old woman with glioma grade 3 recurred and 45-year old man with glioblastoma multiforme. The former died from systemic deterioration due to ileus, but BNCT was made only one time although conventional radiotherapy is carried out for a relatively long period. Therefore, BNCT was thought to be beneficial from an aspect of `quality of life` and the effects to repress a recurrence of cancer also seemed larger than the conventional one. (M.N.)

  17. NIFTI and DISCOS: New concepts for a compact accelerator neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy applications

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses fluoride compounds, such as lead or beryllium fluoride, to efficiently degrade high energy neutrons from the lithium target to the lower energies required for BNCT. The fluoride compounds are in turn encased in an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron filter, which has a deep window in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin (∼ 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films or sheets of discrete droplets--through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is re-accelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator--target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production--resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons--while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current. Parametric trade studies of the NIFTI and DISCOS concepts are described. These include analyses of a broad range of NIFTI designs using the Monte carlo MCNP neutronics code, as well as mechanical and thermal-hydraulic analyses of various DISCOS designs

  18. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    Burns, T.D. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 {times} 10{sup {minus}11}cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi} and 20 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi}, respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power.

  19. Hemorrhage in mouse tumors induced by dodecaborate cluster lipids intended for boron neutron capture therapy

    Schaffran T

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tanja Schaffran,1 Nan Jiang,1 Markus Bergmann,2,3 Ekkehard Küstermann,4 Regine Süss,5 Rolf Schubert,5 Franz M Wagner,6 Doaa Awad,7 Detlef Gabel1,2,8 1Department of Chemistry, University of Bremen, 2Institute of Neuropathology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte; 3Cooperative Center Medicine, University of Bremen, 4“In-vivo-MR” AG, FB2, University of Bremen, Bremen, 5Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau, 6Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II, Technische Unversitaet Muenchen, Garching, Germany; 7Department of Biochemistry, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt; 8School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University Bremen, Bremen, Germany Abstract: The potential of boron-containing lipids with three different structures, which were intended for use in boron neutron capture therapy, was investigated. All three types of boron lipids contained the anionic dodecaborate cluster as the headgroup. Their effects on two different tumor models in mice following intravenous injection were tested; for this, liposomes with boron lipid, distearoyl phosphatidylcholine, and cholesterol as helper lipids, and containing a polyethylene glycol lipid for steric protection, were administered intravenously into tumor-bearing mice (C3H mice for SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma and BALB/c mice for CT26/WT colon carcinoma. With the exception of one lipid (B-THF-14, the lipids were well tolerated, and no other animal was lost due to systemic toxicity. The lipid which led to death was not found to be much more toxic in cell culture than the other boron lipids. All of the lipids that were well tolerated showed hemorrhage in both tumor models within a few hours after administration. The hemorrhage could be seen by in vivo magnetic resonance and histology, and was found to occur within a few hours. The degree of hemorrhage depended on the amount of boron administered and on the tumor model. The observed unwanted effect of the lipids

  20. Boron microquantification in oral mucosa and skin following administration of a neutron capture therapy agent

    Kiger, S.W. III; Micca, P.L.; Morris, G.M.; Coderre, J.A

    2002-07-01

    Clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for intracranial tumours using boronphenylalanine-fructose undertaken at Harvard-MIT and Brookhaven National Laboratory have observed acute normal tissue reactions in the skin and oral mucosa. Because the range of the {sup 10}B(n,a){sup 7}Li reaction products is very short, 10-14 {mu}m combined, knowledge of the 10B microdistribution in tissue is critical for understanding the microdosimetry and radiobiology of BNCT. This paper reports measurements of the microdistribution of {sup 10}B in an animal model, rat skin and tongue, using high resolution quantitative autoradiography (HRQAR), a neutron-induced track etch autoradiographic technique. The steep spatial gradient and high absolute value relative to blood of the {sup 10}B concentration observed in some strata of the rat tongue epithelium and skin are important for properly evaluating the radiobiology and the biological effectiveness factors for normal tissue reactions such as oral mucositis, which are generally assessed using the blood boron concentration rather than the tissue boron concentration. (author)

  1. Clinical treatment planning for subjects undergoing boron neutron capture therapy at Harvard-MIT

    Treatment planning is a crucial component of the Harvard-MIT boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) clinical trials. Treatment planning can be divided into five stages: (1) pre-planning, based on CT and MRI scans obtained when the subject arrives at the hospital and on assumed boron-10 distribution parameters; (2) subject set-up, or simulation, in the MITR-II medical therapy room to determine the boundary conditions for possible set-up configurations; (3) re-planning, following the subject simulation; (4) final localization of the subject in the medical therapy room for BNCT; and (5) final post facto recalculation of the doses delivered based on firm knowledge of the blood boron-10 concentration profiles and the neutron flux histories from precise online monitoring. The computer-assisted treatment planning is done using a specially written BNCT treatment planning code called MacNCTPLAN. The code uses the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Monte Carlo n-particle radiation transport code MCNPv.4b as the dose calculation engine and advanced anatomical model simulation based on an automatic evaluation of CT scan data. Results are displayed as isodose contours and dose-volume histograms, the latter correlated precisely with corresponding anatomical CT or MRI image planes. Examples of typical treatment planning scenarios will be presented. (author)

  2. A Neutronic Feasibility Study of an OPR-1000 Core Design with Boron-bearing Fuel

    Lee, Kyung Hoon; Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Chung Chan; Yang, Yong Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In Westinghouse plants, boron is mainly used as a form of the integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) with a thin coating of zirconium diboride (ZrB{sub 2}) or wet annular burnable absorber (WABA) with a hollow Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}+B{sub 4}C pellet. In OPR-1000, on the other hand, gadolinia is currently employed as a form of an admixture which consists of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} of 6∼8 w/o and UO{sub 2} of natural uranium. Recently, boron-bearing UO{sub 2} fuel (BBF) with the high density of greater than 94%TD has been developed by using a low temperature sintering technique. In this paper, the feasibility of replacing conventional gadolinia-bearing UO{sub 2} fuel (GBF) in OPR-1000 with newly developed boron-bearing fuel is evaluated. Neutronic feasibility study to utilize the BBF in OPR-1000 core has been performed. The results show that the OPR-1000 core design with the BBF is feasible and promising in neutronic aspects. Therefore, the use of the BBF in OPR-1000 can reduce the dependency on the rare material such as gadolinium. However, the burnout of the {sup 10}B isotope results in helium gas, so fuel performance related study with respect to helium generation is needed.

  3. Carborane derivatives loaded into liposomes as efficient delivery systems for boron neutron capture therapy.

    Altieri, S; Balzi, M; Bortolussi, S; Bruschi, P; Ciani, L; Clerici, A M; Faraoni, P; Ferrari, C; Gadan, M A; Panza, L; Pietrangeli, D; Ricciardi, G; Ristori, S

    2009-12-10

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an anticancer therapy based on the incorporation of (10)B in tumors, followed by neutron irradiation. Recently, the synthesis and delivery of new boronated compounds have been recognized as some of the main challenges in BNCT application. Here, we report on the use of liposomes as carriers for BNCT active compounds. Two carborane derivatives, i.e., o-closocarboranyl beta-lactoside (LCOB) and 1-methyl-o-closocarboranyl-2-hexylthioporphyrazine (H(2)PzCOB), were loaded into liposomes bearing different surface charges. The efficacy of these formulations was tested on model cell cultures, that is, DHD/K12/TRb rat colon carcinoma and B16-F10 murine melanoma. These induce liver and lung metastases, respectively, and are used to study the uptake of standard BNCT drugs, including borophenylalanine (BPA). Boron concentration in treated cells was measured by alpha spectrometry at the TRIGA mark II reactor (University of Pavia). Results showed high performance of the proposed formulations. In particular, the use of cationic liposomes increased the cellular concentration of (10)B by at least 30 times more than that achieved by BPA. PMID:19954249

  4. Boron-coated straws as a replacement for 3He-based neutron detectors

    Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Athanasiades, Athanasios; Sun, Liang; Martin, Christopher S.; Lyons, Tom D.; Foss, Michael A.; Haygood, Hal B.

    2011-10-01

    US and international government efforts to equip major seaports with large area neutron detectors, aimed to intercept the smuggling of nuclear materials, have precipitated a critical shortage of 3He gas. It is estimated that the annual demand of 3He for US security applications alone is more than the worldwide supply. This is strongly limiting the prospects of neutron science, safeguards, and other applications that rely heavily on 3He-based detectors. Clearly, alternate neutron detection technologies that can support large sensitive areas, and have low gamma sensitivity and low cost must be developed. We propose a low-cost technology based on long copper tubes (straws), coated on the inside with a thin layer of 10B-enriched boron carbide ( 10B 4C). In addition to the high abundance of boron on Earth and low cost of 10B enrichment, the boron-coated straw (BCS) detector offers distinct advantages over conventional 3He-based detectors, and alternate technologies such as 10BF 3 tubes and 10B-coated rigid tubes. These include better distribution inside moderator assemblies, many-times faster electronic signals, no pressurization, improved gamma-ray rejection, no toxic or flammable gases, and ease of serviceability. We present the performance of BCS detectors dispersed in a solid plastic moderator to address the need for portal monitoring. The design adopts the outer dimensions of currently deployed 3He-based monitors, but takes advantage of the small BCS diameter to achieve a more uniform distribution of neutron converter throughout the moderating material. We show that approximately 63 BCS detectors, each 205 cm long, distributed inside the moderator, can match or exceed the detection efficiency of typical monitors fitted with a 5 cm diameter 3He tube, 187 cm long, pressurized to 3 atm.

  5. Boron-coated straws as a replacement for {sup 3}He-based neutron detectors

    Lacy, Jeffrey L., E-mail: jlacy@proportionaltech.com [Proportional Technologies, Inc., 8022 El Rio Street, Houston, TX 77054 (United States); Athanasiades, Athanasios; Sun, Liang; Martin, Christopher S.; Lyons, Tom D.; Foss, Michael A.; Haygood, Hal B. [Proportional Technologies, Inc., 8022 El Rio Street, Houston, TX 77054 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    US and international government efforts to equip major seaports with large area neutron detectors, aimed to intercept the smuggling of nuclear materials, have precipitated a critical shortage of {sup 3}He gas. It is estimated that the annual demand of {sup 3}He for US security applications alone is more than the worldwide supply. This is strongly limiting the prospects of neutron science, safeguards, and other applications that rely heavily on {sup 3}He-based detectors. Clearly, alternate neutron detection technologies that can support large sensitive areas, and have low gamma sensitivity and low cost must be developed. We propose a low-cost technology based on long copper tubes (straws), coated on the inside with a thin layer of {sup 10}B-enriched boron carbide ({sup 10}B{sub 4}C). In addition to the high abundance of boron on Earth and low cost of {sup 10}B enrichment, the boron-coated straw (BCS) detector offers distinct advantages over conventional {sup 3}He-based detectors, and alternate technologies such as {sup 10}BF{sub 3} tubes and {sup 10}B-coated rigid tubes. These include better distribution inside moderator assemblies, many-times faster electronic signals, no pressurization, improved gamma-ray rejection, no toxic or flammable gases, and ease of serviceability. We present the performance of BCS detectors dispersed in a solid plastic moderator to address the need for portal monitoring. The design adopts the outer dimensions of currently deployed {sup 3}He-based monitors, but takes advantage of the small BCS diameter to achieve a more uniform distribution of neutron converter throughout the moderating material. We show that approximately 63 BCS detectors, each 205 cm long, distributed inside the moderator, can match or exceed the detection efficiency of typical monitors fitted with a 5 cm diameter {sup 3}He tube, 187 cm long, pressurized to 3 atm.

  6. Application of generalized perturbation theory to sensitivity analysis in boron neutron capture therapy

    Garcia, Vanessa S. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (EEIMVR/UFF-RJ), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia Industrial e Metalurgica. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional em Ciencia e Tecnologia; Silva, Fernando C.; Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: fernando@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Alvarez, Gustavo B. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (EEIMVR/UFF-RJ), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia Industrial e Metalurgica. Dept. de Ciencias Exatas

    2011-07-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy - BNCT - is a binary cancer treatment used in brain tumors. The tumor is loaded with a boron compound and subsequently irradiated by thermal neutrons. The therapy is based on the {sup 10}B (n, {alpha}) {sup 7}Li nuclear reaction, which emits two types of high-energy particles, {alpha} particle and the {sup 7}Li nuclei. The total kinetic energy released in this nuclear reaction, when deposited in the tumor region, destroys the cancer cells. Since the success of the BNCT is linked to the different selectivity between the tumor and healthy tissue, it is necessary to carry out a sensitivity analysis to determinate the boron concentration. Computational simulations are very important in this context because they help in the treatment planning by calculating the lowest effective absorbed dose rate to reduce the damage to healthy tissue. The objective of this paper is to present a deterministic method based on generalized perturbation theory (GPT) to perform sensitivity analysis with respect to the {sup 10}B concentration and to estimate the absorbed dose rate by patients undergoing this therapy. The advantage of the method is a significant reduction in computational time required to perform these calculations. To simulate the neutron flux in all brain regions, the method relies on a two-dimensional neutron transport equation whose spatial, angular and energy variables are discretized by the diamond difference method, the discrete ordinate method and multigroup formulation, respectively. The results obtained through GPT are consistent with those obtained using other methods, demonstrating the efficacy of the proposed method. (author)

  7. Phantoms with 10BF3 detectors for boron neutron capture therapy applications

    Two acrylic cube phantoms have been constructed for BNCT applications that allow the depth distribution of neutrons to be measured with miniature 10BF3 detectors in 0.5-cm steps beginning at 1-cm depth. Sizes and weights of the cubes are 14 cm, 3.230 kg, and 11 cm, 1.567 kg. Tests were made with the epithermal neutron beam from the patient treatment port of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. Thermal neutron depth profiles were measured with a bare 10BF3 detector at a reactor power of 50 W, and Cd-covered detector profiles were measured at a reactor power of 1 kW. The resulting plots of counting rate versus depth illustrate the dependence of neutron moderation on the size of the phantom. But more importantly the data can serve as benchmarks for testing the thermal and epithermal neutron profiles obtained with accelerator-based BNCT facilities. Such tests could be made with these phantoms at power levels about five orders of magnitude lower than that required for the treatment of patients with brain tumors. copyright 1998 American Association of Physicists in Medicine

  8. A Tandem-electrostatic-quadrupole for accelerator-based BNCT

    A project to develop a Tandem-electrostatic-quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (AB-BNCT) is described. A folded Tandem, with 1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) chain is being proposed. The project goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.5 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction slightly beyond its resonance at 2.25 MeV. This machine is conceptually shown to be capable of accelerating a 30 mA proton beam to 2.5 MeV. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep-seated tumors in less than an hour. This electrostatic machine is the technologically simplest and cheapest solution for optimized AB-BNCT

  9. Tandem-ESQ for accelerator-based BNCT

    A project to develop a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT) is described. A folded tandem, with 1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an ElectroStatic Quadrupole (ESQ) chain is being proposed. The project goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.5 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction beyond its resonance at 2.25 MeV. This machine is conceptually shown to be capable of accelerating a 30 mA proton beam to 2.5 MeV. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the '7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep-seated tumors in less than an hour. This electrostatic machine is the technologically simplest and cheapest solution for optimized AB-BNCT. (author)

  10. Research related to boron neutron capture therapy at The Ohio State University

    Research in the area of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at The Ohio State University is a highly multidisciplinary effort involving approximately twenty investigators in nine different departments. Major areas of interest include: (1) Boronation of monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens for the delivery of 10B; (2) Synthesis of 10B-containing derivatives of promazines and porphyrins that possess tumor-localizing properties; (3) Development of a rat model for the treatment of glioblastoma by BNCT; (4) Quantitation and microdistribution of 10B in tissues by means of a solid state nuclear track detector. The ultimate goal of this research is to carry out the extensive preclinical studies that are required to bring BNCT to the point of a clinical trial. 13 references

  11. Use of boron cluster-containing redox nanoparticles with ROS scavenging ability in boron neutron capture therapy to achieve high therapeutic efficiency and low adverse effects.

    Gao, Zhenyu; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nakai, Kei; Matsumura, Akira; Suzuki, Minoru; Ono, Koji; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-10-01

    A boron delivery system with high therapeutic efficiency and low adverse effects is crucial for a successful boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this study, we developed boron cluster-containing redox nanoparticles (BNPs) via polyion complex (PIC) formation, using a newly synthesized poly(ethylene glycol)-polyanion (PEG-polyanion, possessing a (10)B-enriched boron cluster as a side chain of one of its segments) and PEG-polycation (possessing a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger as a side chain of one of its segments). The BNPs exhibited high colloidal stability, selective uptake in tumor cells, specific accumulation, and long retention in tumor tissue and ROS scavenging ability. After thermal neutron irradiation, significant suppression of tumor growth was observed in the BNP-treated group, with only 5-ppm (10)B in tumor tissues, whereas at least 20-ppm (10)B is generally required for low molecular weight (LMW) (10)B agents. In addition, increased leukocyte levels were observed in the LMW (10)B agent-treated group after thermal neutron irradiation, and not in BNP-treated group, which might be attributed to its ROS scavenging ability. No visual metastasis of tumor cells to other organs was observed 1 month after irradiation in the BNP-treated group. These results suggest that BNPs are promising for enhancing the BNCT performance. PMID:27467416

  12. Gamma/neutron dose evaluation using Fricke gel and alanine gel dosimeters to be applied in boron neutron capture therapy

    Full text: Radiosurgery is a non-invasive surgery carried out by means of directed beams of ionizing radiation. This procedure was developed since there are many diseases for which conventional surgical treatment can not be applied, due to difficult or vital structures being damaged. Neutron radiation from nuclear reactors is used in a kind of radiosurgery called Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of brain tumours which depends on the interaction of slow neutrons with 10B isotope injected in the tumour to produce alpha particles. Gel Dosimetry allows three-dimensional (3D) measurement of absorbed dose in tissueequivalent dosimeter phantoms. The measure technique is based on the transformation of ferrous ions (Fe2+) and ferric ions (Fe3+). The ferric ions concentration can be measured by spectrophotometry technique comparing the two wavelengths, 457 nm band that corresponds to ferrous ions concentration and 588 nm band that corresponds to ferric ions concentration. This work aims to study the gamma/neutron reactor dose relationship to be applied in BNCT using gel dosimeters. The Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG) and Alanine Gel (AG) gel solutions produced at IPEN using gelatine 300 bloom were mixed with Na2B4O7 salt containing 19,9% of 10B isotope. This solutions were used to evaluate thermal and epithermal neutrons and gamma doses at an irradiation cell on BH3 of the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN

  13. Selective uptake of p-boronophenylalanine by osteosarcoma cells for boron neutron capture therapy

    Ferrari, C. [Department of Surgery, Experimental Surgery Laboratory, University of Pavia, Piazza Botta, Pavia (Italy)], E-mail: ferraric@unipv.it; Zonta, C.; Cansolino, L.; Clerici, A.M.; Gaspari, A. [Department of Surgery, Experimental Surgery Laboratory, University of Pavia, Piazza Botta, Pavia (Italy); Altieri, S.; Bortolussi, S.; Stella, S. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics of University, Via Bassi, 6, Pavia (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) Section of Pavia, Via Bassi, 6, Pavia (Italy); Bruschi, P. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics of University, Via Bassi, 6, Pavia (Italy); Dionigi, P.; Zonta, A. [Department of Surgery, Experimental Surgery Laboratory, University of Pavia, Piazza Botta, Pavia (Italy)

    2009-07-15

    Osteosarcoma is the most common non-hematologic primary cancer type that develops in bone. Current osteosarcoma treatments combine multiagent chemotherapy with extensive surgical resection, which in some cases makes necessary the amputation of the entire limb. Nevertheless its infiltrative growth leads to a high incidence of local and distant recurrences that reduce the percentage of cured patients to less than 60%. These poor data required to set up a new therapeutic approach aimed to restrict the surgical removal meanwhile performing a radical treatment. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a particular radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions by atoms of {sup 10}B, when irradiated with thermal neutrons, could be a valid alternative or integrative option in case of osteosarcoma management, thanks to its peculiarity in selectively destroying neoplastic cells without damaging normal tissues. Aim of the present work is to investigate the feasibility of employing BNCT to treat the limb osteosarcoma. Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is used to carry {sup 10}B inside the neoplastic cells. As a first step the endocellular BPA uptake is tested in vitro on the UMR-106 osteosarcoma cell line. The results show an adequate accumulation capability. For the in vivo experiments, an animal tumor model is developed in Sprague-Dawley rats by means of an intrafemoral injection of UMR-106 cells at the condyle site. The absolute amounts of boron loading and the tumor to normal tissue {sup 10}B ratio are evaluated 2 h after the i.v. administration of BPA. The boron uptake by the neoplastic tissue is almost twice the normal one. However, higher values of boron concentration in tumor are requested before upholding BNCT as a valid therapeutic option in the treatment of osteosarcoma.

  14. Selective uptake of p-boronophenylalanine by osteosarcoma cells for boron neutron capture therapy

    Osteosarcoma is the most common non-hematologic primary cancer type that develops in bone. Current osteosarcoma treatments combine multiagent chemotherapy with extensive surgical resection, which in some cases makes necessary the amputation of the entire limb. Nevertheless its infiltrative growth leads to a high incidence of local and distant recurrences that reduce the percentage of cured patients to less than 60%. These poor data required to set up a new therapeutic approach aimed to restrict the surgical removal meanwhile performing a radical treatment. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a particular radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions by atoms of 10B, when irradiated with thermal neutrons, could be a valid alternative or integrative option in case of osteosarcoma management, thanks to its peculiarity in selectively destroying neoplastic cells without damaging normal tissues. Aim of the present work is to investigate the feasibility of employing BNCT to treat the limb osteosarcoma. Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is used to carry 10B inside the neoplastic cells. As a first step the endocellular BPA uptake is tested in vitro on the UMR-106 osteosarcoma cell line. The results show an adequate accumulation capability. For the in vivo experiments, an animal tumor model is developed in Sprague-Dawley rats by means of an intrafemoral injection of UMR-106 cells at the condyle site. The absolute amounts of boron loading and the tumor to normal tissue 10B ratio are evaluated 2 h after the i.v. administration of BPA. The boron uptake by the neoplastic tissue is almost twice the normal one. However, higher values of boron concentration in tumor are requested before upholding BNCT as a valid therapeutic option in the treatment of osteosarcoma.

  15. Development of a new neutron monitor using a boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector

    Rasolonjatovo, A H D; Kim, E; Nakamura, T; Nunomiya, T; Endo, A; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshizawa, M

    2002-01-01

    A new type of neutron dose monitor was developed by using a 12.7 cm diameterx12.7 cm long boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector BC523A. This detector aims to have a response in the wide energy range of thermal energy to 100 MeV by using the H and C reactions to the fast neutrons of organic liquid and the sup 1 sup 0 B(n, alpha) reaction to thermalized neutrons in the liquid. The response functions of this detector were determined by the Monte Carlo simulation in the energy region from thermal energy to 100 MeV. Using these response functions, the spectrum-weighted dose function, G-function, to get the neutron dose from the light output spectrum of the detector was also determined by the unfolding technique. The calculated G-function was applied to determine the neutron dose in real neutron fields having energies ranging from thermal energy to several tens of MeV, where the light output spectra were measured with the BC523A detector. The thus-obtained ambient doses and effective doses show rather ...

  16. Development of the JAERI computational dosimetry system (JCDS) for boron neutron capture therapy. Cooperative research

    Kumada, H; Matsumura, A; Nakagawa, Y; Nose, T; Torii, Y; Uchiyama, J; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, T

    2003-01-01

    The Neutron Beam Facility at JRR-4 enables us to carry out boron neutron capture therapy with epithermal neutron beam. In order to make treatment plans for performing the epithermal neutron beam BNCT, it is necessary to estimate radiation doses in a patient's head in advance. The JAERI Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS), which can estimate distributions of radiation doses in a patient's head by simulating in order to support the treatment planning for epithermal neutron beam BNCT, was developed. JCDS is a software that creates a 3-dimentional head model of a patient by using CT and MRI images, and that generates a input data file automatically for calculation of neutron flux and gamma-ray dose distributions in the brain with the Monte Carlo code MCNP, and that displays these dose distributions on the head model for dosimetry by using the MCNP calculation results. JCDS has any advantages as follows; By using CT data and MRI data which are medical images, a detail three-dimensional model of patient's head is...

  17. Dose Determination using alanine detectors in a Mixed Neutron and Gamma Field for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of Liver Malignancies

    Schmitz, T.; Blaickner, M.; Ziegner, M.;

    2011-01-01

    be suitable for measurements in mixed neutron and gamma fields. Materials and Methods Two experiments have been carried out in the thermal column of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Mainz. Alanine dosimeters have been irradiated in a phantom and in liver tissue. Results For the...... interpretation and prediction of the dose for each pellet, beside the results of the measurements, calculations with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA are presented here. For the phantom, as well as for the liver tissue, the measured and calculated dose and flux values are in good agreement. Discussion Alanine......Introduction Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for liver malignancies is being investigated at the University of Mainz. One important aim is the set-up of a reliable dosimetry system. Alanine dosimeters have previously been applied for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields in antiproton therapy, and may...

  18. Noble gas excimer scintillation following neutron capture in boron thin films

    McComb, Jacob C; al-Sheikhly, Mohamed; Thompson, Alan K; Vest, Robert E; Clark, Charles W

    2014-01-01

    Far-ultraviolet (FUV) scintillation signals have been measured in heavy noble gases (argon, krypton, xenon) following boron-neutron capture ($^{10}$B($n,\\alpha$)$^7$Li) in $^{10}$B thin films. The observed scintillation yields are comparable to the yields from some liquid and solid neutron scintillators. At noble gas pressures of 10$^7$ kPa, the number of photons produced per neutron absorbed following irradiation of a 1200 nm thick $^{10}$B film was 14,000 for xenon, 11,000 for krypton, and 6000 for argon. The absolute scintillation yields from the experimental configuration were calculated using data from (1) experimental irradiations, (2) thin-film characterizations, (3) photomultiplier tube calibrations, and (4) photon collection modeling. Both the boron films and the photomultiplier tube were characterized at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Monte Carlo modeling of the reaction cell provided estimates of the photon collection efficiency and the transport behavior of $^{10}$B($n,\\alpha$...

  19. Testing boron-containing estrogens on human breast cancer cells in a neutron beam

    Of the several boron-containing estrogen derivatives synthesized by the authors, they found that 17α-carboranyestradiol (Carbestrol) had estrogenic potency equal to natural estradiol both in female rats and also in human breast cancer cells (cell line MCF-7, estrogen sensitive). The therapy neutron beam from the MITR II nuclear reactor was trained on the MCF-7 cells which had been pre-incubated with various concentrations of Carbestrol. The background γ-radiation was 300 rads. Both the test cells and also the control cells were markedly damaged by the irradiation. Under similar experimental conditions, 300 rads of γ-radiation from a calibrated cesium source were found to produce about half of the cell damage observed in the neutron irradiation experiments. Experiments involving the treatment of estrogen-sensitive cancer cells with a boron-containing estrogen may be more productive when the non-selectively destructive γ-radiation is removed from the neutron beam and also by enriching Carbestrol with 10B

  20. Conceptual study of a compact accelerator-driven neutron source for radioisotope production, boron neutron capture therapy and fast neutron therapy

    Angelone, M; Rollet, S

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of a compact accelerator-driven device for the generation of neutron spectra suitable for isotope production by neutron capture, boron neutron capture therapy and fast neutron therapy, is analyzed by Monte Carlo simulations. The device is essentially an extension of the activator proposed by Rubbia left bracket CERN/LHC/97-04(EET) right bracket , in which fast neutrons are diffused and moderated within a properly sized lead block. It is shown that by suitable design of the lead block, as well as of additional elements of moderating and shielding materials, one can generate and exploit neutron fluxes with the spectral features required for the above applications. The linear dimensions of the diffusing-moderating device can be limited to about 1 m. A full-scale device for all the above applications would require a fast neutron source of about 10**1**4 s**-**1, which could be produced by a 1 mA, 30 MeV proton beam impinging on a Be target. The concept could be tested at the Frascati Neutron Gener...

  1. Design of a γ-ray analysis system for determination of boron in a patient's head, during neutron irradiation

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a new radiation therapy in which thermal neutron capture by 10B is used for the selective destruction of a cancer tumour. At the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, Netherlands, a therapy facility is built for the neutron irradiations. In first instance, patients with a brain tumour will be treated. The doses delivered to the tumour and to the healthy tissue depend on the thermal neutron fluence and on the boron concentrations in these regions. Yet, both concentrations change in time after the administration of the tumour-seeking boron compound. An accurate determination of the patient's dose requires the knowledge of these time dependent concentrations during the therapy. For this reason, a γ-ray telescope system, together with a reconstruction tool, are developed. Two HPGe-detectors measure the 478 keV prompt γ-rays which are emitted at the boron neutron capture reaction, in a large background of γ-rays and neutrons. By using the detectors in a telescope configuration, only γ-rays emitted by a small specific region are detected. The best shielding of the detectors is obtained by performing the measurements through a small hole in the iron roof. A reconstruction tool is developed to calculate absolute boron concentrations using the measured boron γ-ray detection rates. Besides the boron γ-rays, a large component of 2.2 MeV γ-rays emitted at thermal neutron capture in hydrogen is measured. Since the hydrogen distribution is almost homogeneous over the head, this component can serve as a measure of the total number of thermal neutrons in the observed volume. By using the hydrogen γ-line for normalisation of the boron concentration, the reconstruction tool eliminates the greater part of the influence of the inhomogeneity of the thermal neutron distribution. MCNP calculations are used as a tool for the optimisation of the detector configuration. Experiments on a head phantom with 5 ppm 10B in healthy tissue and 62 ppm in

  2. DNA damage induced by boron neutron capture therapy is partially repaired by DNA ligase IV.

    Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Hirota, Yuki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Narabayashi, Masaru; Kinashi, Yuko; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ohnishi, Takeo; Ono, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a particle radiation therapy that involves the use of a thermal or epithermal neutron beam in combination with a boron ((10)B)-containing compound that specifically accumulates in tumor. (10)B captures neutrons and the resultant fission reaction produces an alpha ((4)He) particle and a recoiled lithium nucleus ((7)Li). These particles have the characteristics of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and therefore have marked biological effects. High-LET radiation is a potent inducer of DNA damage, specifically of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of DNA ligase IV, a key player in the non-homologous end-joining repair pathway, in the repair of BNCT-induced DSBs. We analyzed the cellular sensitivity of the mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines Lig4-/- p53-/- and Lig4+/+ p53-/- to irradiation using a thermal neutron beam in the presence or absence of (10)B-para-boronophenylalanine (BPA). The Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line had a higher sensitivity than the Lig4+/+ p53-/-cell line to irradiation with the beam alone or the beam in combination with BPA. In BNCT (with BPA), both cell lines exhibited a reduction of the 50 % survival dose (D 50) by a factor of 1.4 compared with gamma-ray and neutron mixed beam (without BPA). Although it was found that (10)B uptake was higher in the Lig4+/+ p53-/- than in the Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line, the latter showed higher sensitivity than the former, even when compared at an equivalent (10)B concentration. These results indicate that BNCT-induced DNA damage is partially repaired using DNA ligase IV. PMID:26573366

  3. Comparative assessment of single-dose and fractionated boron neutron capture therapy

    The effects of fractionating boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) were evaluated in the intracerebral rat 9L gliosarcoma and rat spinal cord models using the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) thermal neutron beam. The amino acid analog p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) was administered prior to each exposure to the thermal neutron beam. The total physical absorbed dose to the tumor during BNCT using BPA was 91% high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Two tumor doses of 5.2 Gy spaced 48 h apart (n = 14) or three tumor doses of 5.2 Gy, each separated by 48 h (n = 10), produced 50 and 60% long-term (>1 year) survivors, respectively. The outcome of neither the two nor the three fractions of radiation was statistically different from that of the corresponding single-fraction group. In the rat spinal cord, the ED50 for radiation myelopathy (as indicated by limb paralysis within 7 months) after exposure to the thermal beam alone was 13.6 ± 0.4 Gy. Dividing the beam-only irradiation into two or four consecutive daily fractions increased the ED50 to 14.7 ± 0.2 Gy and 15.5 ± 0.4 Gy, respectively. Thermal neutron irradiation in the presence of BPA resulted in an ED50 for myelopathy of 13.8 ± 0.6 Gy after a single fraction and 14.9 ± 0.9 Gy after two fractions. An increase in the number of fractions to four resulted in an ED50 of 14.3 ± 0.6 Gy. The total physical absorbed dose to the blood in the vasculature of the spinal cord during BNCT using BPA was 80% high-LET radiation. It was observed that fractionation was of minor significance in the amelioration of damage to the normal central nervous system in the rat after boron neutron capture irradiation. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Porous structure variation of boron-doped graphite during neutron irradiation

    Dynamics of porous structure variation of graphite during neutron irradiation was studied with the use of recrystallized boron-doped graphite as model material. It was shown that specific volume of open pores grew but density of RG-B graphite decreased at low temperature irradiation (320-340 K). Thermal annealing at 2100 K of irradiated samples partially reduces their elongation and leads to additional increase of volume of open pores. Linear relation (in semilogarithmic coordinates) of decrease of coefficient of elasticity with growth of volume of open pores was established for irradiated and annealed samples

  5. Production of epithermal neutron beams for BNCT

    Bisceglie, E; Colonna, N; Paticchio, V; Santorelli, P; Variale, V

    2002-01-01

    The use of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of deep-seated tumors requires neutron beams of suitable energy and intensity. Simulations indicate the optimal energy to reside in the epithermal region, in particular between 1 and 10 keV. Therapeutic neutron beams with high spectral purity in this energy range could be produced with accelerator-based neutron sources through a suitable neutron-producing reaction. Herein, we report on different solutions that have been investigated as possible sources of epithermal neutron beams for BNCT. The potential use of such sources for a hospital-based therapeutic facility is discussed.

  6. Sodium borocaptate (BSH) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model: boron biodistribution at 9 post administration time-points

    The therapeutic success of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) depends centrally on boron concentration in tumor and healthy tissue. We previously demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of boronophenylalanine (BPA) and sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) as boron carriers for BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Given the clinical relevance of sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) as a boron carrier, the aim of the present study was to expand the ongoing BSH biodistribution studies in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. In particular, we studied 3 additional post-administration time-points and increased the sample size corresponding to the time-points evaluated previously, to select more accurately the post-administration time at which neutron irradiation would potentially confer the greatest therapeutic advantage. BSH was dissolved in saline solution in anaerobic conditions to avoid the formation of the dimer BSSB and its oxides which are toxic. The solution was injected intravenously at a dose of 50 mg 10 B/kg (88 mg BSH / kg). Different groups of animals were killed humanely at 7, 8, and 10 h after administration of BSH. The sample size corresponding to the time-points 3, 4, 6, 9 and 12 h was increased. Samples of blood, tumor, precancerous tissue, normal pouch tissue, cheek mucosa, parotid gland, palate, skin, tongue, spinal cord marrow, brain, liver, kidney, spleen and lung were processed for boron measurement by Optic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Boron concentration in tumor peaked to 24-34 ppm, 3-10 h post-administration of BSH, with a spread in values that resembled that previously reported in other experimental models and human subjects. The boron concentration ratios tumor/normal pouch tissue and tumor/blood ranged from 1.3 to 1.8. No selective tumor uptake was observed at any of the time points evaluated. The times post-administration of BSH that would be therapeutically most useful would be 5, 7 and 9 h. The

  7. Boron

    The trace element boron (B) is of interest in reclamation situations for several reasons. It plays an essential through largely unidentified role in the growth of higher plants. In argronomic situations B deficiencies are common, and deficiencies in reclamation situations have been suggested but not documented. Among micronutrients, B is unique because the range from deficient concentrations to toxic concentrations either in the soil solution or in plant tissue is narrower than for any other micronutrient. In reclamation situations excessive amounts of B can occur in the soil or in near-surface mining wastes and thus interfere with reclamation objectives, especially in arid and semiarid regions. Also, B is mobile and appears subject to both upward transport (and possible contamination of overlying material) and downward transport (and possible contamination of surface water and groundwater)

  8. Use of GEANT4 vs. MCNPX for the characterization of a boron-lined neutron detector

    van der Ende, B. M.; Atanackovic, J.; Erlandson, A.; Bentoumi, G.

    2016-06-01

    This work compares GEANT4 with MCNPX in the characterization of a boron-lined neutron detector. The neutron energy ranges simulated in this work (0.025 eV to 20 MeV) are the traditional domain of MCNP simulations. This paper addresses the question, how well can GEANT4 and MCNPX be employed for detailed thermal neutron detector characterization? To answer this, GEANT4 and MCNPX have been employed to simulate detector response to a 252Cf energy spectrum point source, as well as to simulate mono-energetic parallel beam source geometries. The 252Cf energy spectrum simulation results demonstrate agreement in detector count rate within 3% between the two packages, with the MCNPX results being generally closer to experiment than are those from GEANT4. The mono-energetic source simulations demonstrate agreement in detector response within 5% between the two packages for all neutron energies, and within 1% for neutron energies between 100 eV and 5 MeV. Cross-checks between the two types of simulations using ISO-8529 252Cf energy bins demonstrates that MCNPX results are more self-consistent than are GEANT4 results, by 3-4%.

  9. PGNAA system preliminary design and measurement of In-Hospital Neutron Irradiator for boron concentration measurement.

    Zhang, Zizhu; Chong, Yizheng; Chen, Xinru; Jin, Congjun; Yang, Lijun; Liu, Tong

    2015-12-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system has been recently developed at the 30-kW research reactor In-Hospital Neutron Irradiator (IHNI) in Beijing. Neutrons from the specially designed thermal neutron beam were used. The thermal flux of this beam is 3.08×10(6) cm(-2) s(-1) at a full reactor power of 30 kW. The PGNAA system consists of an n-type high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector of 40% efficiency, a digital spectrometer, and a shielding part. For both the detector shielding part and the neutron beam shielding part, the inner layer is composed of (6)Li2CO3 powder and the outer layer lead. The boron-10 sensitivity of the PGNAA system is approximately 2.5 cps/ppm. Two calibration curves were produced for the 1-10 ppm and 10-50 ppm samples. The measurement results of the control samples were in accordance with the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) results. PMID:26242556

  10. P13.09ADVANCES IN CLINICAL APPLICATION OF BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY (BNCT) IN GLIOBLASTOMA

    Detta, A.; Cruickshank, G.C.; Green, S.; Lockyer, N.P.; Ngoga, D.; Ghani, Z.; Phoenix, B.

    2014-01-01

    BNCT is a biologically targeted form of enhanced cellular radiotherapy where preferential accumulation of boron in the cancerous as opposed to adjacent normal cells is able to interact with incident neutrons to cause irreversible alpha particle DNA damage. The key to the implementation of this potentially powerful and selective therapy is the delivery of at least 30ppm 10B within the tumour tissue while minimising superfluous 10B in healthy tissue. It is thus an elegant technique for treating infiltrating tumours such as diffuse gliomas. In order to assess its clinical potential we carried out a pharmacokinetic study in glioblastoma patients where we sought to determine the optimal route of delivering a new formulation of the boronated drug (p-boronophenylalanine, BPA), its pharmacokinetic behaviour, toxicity profile, and cellular uptake. Using a number of analytical techniques, including inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), boron was measured at various times in blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, extracellular fluid (ECF), and tumour-related solid tissue spanning 0.5 h pre- and up to 48 h post-BPA infusion in newly-diagnosed patients (n = 10). Blood was sampled through a central catheter whilst the ECF was sampled by parenchymal microdialysis catheters, placed remotely from the tumour site. Urine was collected over the same time period. Tumour and brain-around tumour (BAT) tissue was sampled stereotactically at 2.5 h and 3.5 h post-infusion. IHC expression levels of the BPA transporter molecule, L-amino acid transporter 1 (LAT-1), were recorded as % LAT-1 positive cells, and cellular boron levels were estimated as spatially resolved pixels in normalised-to-C+ isotopic SIMS images of the biopsies. There were no toxicity-related issues with this new formulation of BPA given at 375 mg/kg as a 2 h intravenous or intracarotid infusion with or without pre-infusion mannitol-induced BBB

  11. Comparison of the radiobiological effects of Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and conventional Gamma Radiation

    BNCT is an experimental radiotherapeutic modality that uses the capacity of the isotope 10B to capture thermal neutrons leading to the production of 4He and 7Li, particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). The aim was to evaluate and compare in vitro the mechanisms of response to the radiation arising of BNCT and conventional gamma therapy. We measured the survival cell fraction as a function of the total physical dose and analyzed the expression of p27/Kip1 and p53 by Western blotting in cells of colon cancer (ARO81-1). Exponentially growing cells were distributed into the following groups: 1) BPA (10 ppm 10B) + neutrons; 2) BOPP (10 ppm 10B) + neutrons; 3) neutrons alone; 4) gamma-rays. A control group without irradiation for each treatment was added. The cells were irradiated in the thermal neutron beam of the RA-3 (flux= 7.5 109 n/cm2 sec) or with 60Co (1Gy/min) during different times in order to obtain total physical dose between 1-5 Gy (±10 %). A decrease in the survival fraction as a function of the physical dose was observed for all the treatments. We also observed that neutrons and neutrons + BOPP did not differ significantly and that BPA was the more effective compound. Protein extracts of irradiated cells (3Gy) were isolated to 24 h and 48 h post radiation exposure. The irradiation with neutrons in presence of 10BPA or 10BOPP produced an increase of p53 at 24 h maintain until 48 h. On the contrary, in the groups irradiated with neutrons alone or gamma the peak was observed at 48 hr. The level of expression of p27/Kip1 showed a reduction of this protein in all the groups irradiated with neutrons (neutrons alone or neutrons plus boron compound), being more marked at 24 h. These preliminary results suggest different radiobiological response for high and low let radiation. Future studies will permit establish the role of cell cycle in the tumor radio sensibility to BNCT. (author)

  12. Study of characteristics for heavy water photoneutron source in boron neutron capture therapy

    Salehi, Danial; Sardari, Dariush

    2013-01-01

    Bremsstrahlung photon beams produced by medical linear accelerators are currently the most commonly used method of radiation therapy for cancerous tumors. Photons with energies greater than 8-10 MeV potentially generate neutrons through photonuclear interactions in the accelerator's treatment head, patient's body, and treatment room ambient. Electrons impinging on a heavy target generate a cascade shower of bremsstrahlung photons, the energy spectrum of which shows an end point equal to the electron beam energy. By varying the target thickness, an optimum thickness exists for which, at the given electron energy, maximum photon flux is achievable. If a source of high-energy photons i.e. bremsstrahlung, is conveniently directed to a suitable D2O target, a novel approach for production of an acceptable flux of filterable photoneturons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) application is possible. This study consists of two parts. 1. Comparison and assessment of deuterium photonuclear cross section data. 2. Ev...

  13. Determination of boron in biological samples for the needs of neutron capture therapy

    Monitoring the actual concentration of 10B in a patient's blood is a prerequisite for determining the start and length of patient irradiation. The Prompt Gamma Ray Analysis (PGRA) method enables this nuclide to be determined rapidly and reliably within the region of 1 to 100 ppm. In this method, the characteristic line at 478 keV from the nuclear reaction 10B+n → 7Li+α+γ during sample exposure to thermal neutrons is used to determine boron. The facility which has been built up for this purpose comprises, in particular, a large-volume semiconductor detector for recording gamma rays emerging from the radiative neutron capture on the target

  14. Boron neutron capture therapy for advanced and/or recurrent cancers in the oral cavity

    This preliminary study of 5 patients with advanced and/or recurrent cancer in the oral cavity was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The patients received therapy with the 10B-carrier p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) with or without borocaptate sodium (BSH) and irradiation thereafter with epithermal neutrons. All underwent 18F-BPA PET studies before receiving BNCT to determine the accumulation ratios of BPA in tumor and normal tissues. The tumor mass was decreased in size and at minimum a transient partial response was achieved in all cases, though rapid tumor re-growth was observed in 2. Although tentative clinical responses and improvements in quality of life were recognized, obliteration of the tumor was not obtained in any of the cases. Additional studies are required to determine the utility and indication of BNCT for oral cancer. (author)

  15. Design of polymeric carrier containing boron for boron neutron capture therapy and its use in tissue cultures

    The aim of this study is the synthesis of a new alternative boron containing polymer carrier to be used for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) (one of the treatment methods for brain tumours) and to investigate its use in cell cultures. First of all, B-containing copolymer were synthesized by complex-radical copolymerization of vinylphenylboronic acid and maleic anhydride with 2, 2- azobisisobutyronitrile as an initiator in DMF solvent at 65 degree Celsius under nitrogen atmosphere. Macro branched derivatives of these polymers were synthesized by the partial grafting with α-hydroxy,ω -methoxy-poly(ethylene oxide). Characterization of Poly(VPBA-co-MA) and these macro branched copolymers were performed by FTIR, 1H NMR spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction, DSC and TGA analyses. As a result of these analyses, it was observed that these macro branched copolymers had a higher crystallinity and thermal stability than the copolymer. These properties of macro branched copolymers are explained by self-organized H-bonding effect in radical copolymerization and grafting reactions and by the formation of self assembled supramolecular architecture. The selected macro branched copolymer was incorporated by poly(ethylene imine) in order to uptake to cell and thus, this synthesized macro complex copolymer [(VFBA-co-MA)-g-PEG/PEI] was charged with positive charge. As a result of FTIR analysis, it was observed that COO-.NH+ complex was formed. After the cell culture experiment, it was observed that this macro complex copolymer labelled with fluorescein up took to HeLa cells with 7 % efficiency. And then, folic acid was incorporated in [(VFBA-co-MA)-g-PEG/PEI] macro complex in order to provide selective targeting properties with tumour cells. As a result of the experiment of cell culture containing mixture of HeLa and fibroblast cell, it was observed that [(VFBA-co-MA)-g-PEG/PEI]-FA macro complex went towards to HeLa cells selectively by means of fluorescence microscopy. Poly

  16. Therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy mediated by boron-rich liposomes for oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model

    Unilamellar liposomes formulated with an equimolar mixture of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the lipid bilayer, and encapsulating Na3[ae-B10-H9)-2-NH3B10H8] were prepared by probe sonication and investigated in vivo. Microwave assisted digestion followed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy was utilized to determine the biodistribution of boron in various tissues following either a single tail vein injection or two identical injections (separated by 24 hours) of the liposomal suspension in BALB/c mice bearing EMT6 mammary adenocarcinomas in their right flank. Double-injection protocols resulted in a boron content in the tumor exceeding 50 µg of boron per gram of tissue for 48 to 72 hours subsequent to the initial injection while tumor:blood boron ratios were more ideal from 54 hours (1.9:1) to 96 hours (5.7:1) subsequent to the initial injection. Tumor bearing mice were given a double-injection of liposomes containing the 10B-enriched analogs of the aforementioned agents and subjected to a 30 minute irradiation by thermal neutrons with a flux of 8.8 x 108 (±7%) neutrons/cm2 s integrated over the energy range of 0.0 - 0.414 eV. Significant tumor response for a single BNCT treatment was demonstrated by growth curves versus a control group. Vastly diminished tumor growth was witnessed at 14 days (186% increase versus 1551% in controls) in mice that were given a second injection/radiation treatment 7 days after the first. Mice given a one hour neutron irradiation following the double-injection of liposomes had a similar response (169% increase at 14 days) suggesting that neutron fluence is the limiting factor towards BNCT efficacy in this study.

  17. Survey of boron detectors for thermal neutrons operating in the non proportional regime

    In gas counters, the alternative of directly detecting (i.e. without using the phenomenon of multiplication the charges ionized by the reaction 10B (n,α)7Li, offers many advantages as to the conception of such a detector. After examining the ionization phenomenon and deducing the characteristics of low-noise amplifiers, various prototypes are studied. - The D.I.N. 5/4, intended for fast neutrons detector, grants leave to have good isotropic proprieties thanks to its geometry and good sensitivity imputable to the BF3 filling pressure of 1 atm. - A flat counter (D.E.H. type), with plane and parallel electrodes, grants leave to work out a low height of influence, soil moisture measurer. The confrontation between various filling pressures (0.5, 1, 2, 3 atm.) points out the importance of attachment in BF3. - Thanks to neutronic diffraction counter (C.D.N. 2 type) filled under 2 atm and parallelepiped, one can considerably reduce the weight of the goniometer protection, and lightly increase its sensitivity. - The results given by the experimental boron coating device have allowed to build a boron coating counter to be used in current collection. (author)

  18. Catalytic growth of vertically aligned neutron sensitive 10Boron nitride nanotubes

    10Boron nitride nanotubes (10BNNTs) are a potential neutron sensing element in a solid-state neutron detector. The aligned 10BNNT can be used for its potential application without any further purification. Argon-supported thermal CVD is used to achieve vertically aligned 10BNNT with the help of nucleation sites produced in a thin layer of magnesium–iron alloy deposited at the top of Si substrate. FESEM shows vertically aligned 10BNNTs with ball-like catalytic tips at top. EDX reveals magnesium (Mg) contents in the tips that refer to catalytic growth of 10BNNT. HR-TEM shows tubular morphology of the synthesized 10BNNT with lattice fringes on its outer part having an interlayer spacing of ∼0.34 nm. XPS shows B 1 s and N 1 s peaks at 190.5 and 398 eV that correspond to hexagonal 10Boron nitride (10h-BN) nature of the synthesized 10BNNT, whereas the Mg kll auger peaks at ∼301 and ∼311 eV represents Mg contents in the sample. Raman spectrum has a peak at 1390 (cm−1) that corresponds to E2g mode of vibration in 10h-BN

  19. The effects of boron neutron capture therapy on liver tumors and normal hepatocytes in mice

    To explore the feasibility of employing boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to treat liver tumors, the effects of BNCT were investigated by using liver tumor models and normal hepatocytes in mice. Liver tumor models in C3H mice were developed by intrasplenic injection of SCCVII tumor cells. After borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylalanine (BPA) administration, 10B concentrations were measured in tumors and liver and the liver was irradiated with thermal neutrons. The effects of BNCT on the tumor and normal hepatocytes were studied by using colony formation assay and micronucleus assay, respectively. To compare the effects of BSH-BNCT and BPA-BNCT, the compound biological effectiveness (CBE) factor was determined. The CBE factors for BSH on the tumor were 4.22 and 2.29 using D10 and D0 as endpoints, respectively. Those for BPA were 9.94 and 5.64. In the case of hepatocytes, the CBE factors for BSH and BPA were 0.94 and 4.25, respectively. Tumor-to-liver ratios of boron concentration following BSH and BPA administration were 0.3 and 2.8, respectively. Considering the accumulation ratios of 10B, the therapeutic gain factors for BSH and BPA were 0.7-1.3 and 3.8-6.6, respectively. Therefore, it may be feasible to treat liver tumors with BPA-BNCT. (author)

  20. Catalytic growth of vertically aligned neutron sensitive {sup 10}Boron nitride nanotubes

    Ahmad, Pervaiz, E-mail: pervaizahmad@siswa.um.edu.my, E-mail: Pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin, E-mail: mu-khandaker@yahoo.com, E-mail: mu-khandaker@um.edu.my; Amin, Yusoff Mohd [University of Malaya, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Malaysia); Khan, Ghulamullah [University of Malaya, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Malaysia); Ramay, Shahid M. [King Saud University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science (Saudi Arabia); Mahmood, Asif [King Saud University, Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering (Saudi Arabia); Amin, Muhammad [University of the Punjab, Department of Physics (Pakistan); Muhammad, Nawshad [Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Biomedical Materials (IRCBM) COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (Pakistan)

    2016-01-15

    {sup 10}Boron nitride nanotubes ({sup 10}BNNTs) are a potential neutron sensing element in a solid-state neutron detector. The aligned {sup 10}BNNT can be used for its potential application without any further purification. Argon-supported thermal CVD is used to achieve vertically aligned {sup 10}BNNT with the help of nucleation sites produced in a thin layer of magnesium–iron alloy deposited at the top of Si substrate. FESEM shows vertically aligned {sup 10}BNNTs with ball-like catalytic tips at top. EDX reveals magnesium (Mg) contents in the tips that refer to catalytic growth of {sup 10}BNNT. HR-TEM shows tubular morphology of the synthesized {sup 10}BNNT with lattice fringes on its outer part having an interlayer spacing of ∼0.34 nm. XPS shows B 1 s and N 1 s peaks at 190.5 and 398 eV that correspond to hexagonal {sup 10}Boron nitride ({sup 10}h-BN) nature of the synthesized {sup 10}BNNT, whereas the Mg kll auger peaks at ∼301 and ∼311 eV represents Mg contents in the sample. Raman spectrum has a peak at 1390 (cm{sup −1}) that corresponds to E{sub 2g} mode of vibration in {sup 10}h-BN.

  1. Boron carbide based solid state neutron detectors: the effects of bias and time constant on detection efficiency

    Neutron detection in thick boron carbide(BC)/n-type Si heterojunction diodes shows a threefold increase in efficiency with applied bias and longer time constants. The improved efficiencies resulting from long time constants have been conclusively linked to the much longer charge collection times in the BC layer. Neutron detection signals from both the p-type BC layer and the n-type Si side of the heterojunction diode are observed, with comparable efficiencies. Collectively, these provide strong evidence that the semiconducting BC layer plays an active role in neutron detection, both in neutron capture and in charge generation and collection.

  2. Materials Development for Boron Phosphide Based Neutron Detectors: Final Technical Report

    Edgar, James Howard [Ksnsas State University

    2014-09-12

    The project goal was to improve the quality of boron phosphide (BP) by optimizing its epitaxial growth on single crystal substrates and by producing bulk BP single crystals with low dislocation densities. BP is potentially a good semiconductor for high efficiency solid state neutron detectors by combining neutron capture and charge creation within the same volume. The project strategy was to use newly available single crystal substrates, silicon carbide and aluminum nitride, engineered to produce the best film properties. Substrate variables included the SiC polytype, crystallographic planes, misorientation of the substrate surface (tilt direction and magnitude) from the major crystallographic plane, and surface polarity (Si and C). The best films were (111)BP on silicon-face (0001) 4H-SiC misoriented 4° in the [1-100] direction, and BP on (100) and (111) 3C-SiC/Si; these substrates resulted in films that were free of in-plane twin defects, as determined by x-ray topography. The impact of the deposition temperature was also assessed: increasing the temperature from 1000 °C to 1200 °C produced films that were more ordered and more uniform, and the size of individual grains increased by more than a factor of twenty. The BP films were free of other compounds such as icosahedral boron phosphide (B12P2) over the entire temperature range, as established by Raman spectroscopy. The roughness of the BP films was reduced by increasing the phosphine to diborane ratio from 50 to 200. Bulk crystals were grown by reacting boron dissolved in nickel with phosphorus vapor to precipitate BP. Crystals with dimensions up to 2 mm were produced.

  3. Boron-neutron capture therapy for incurable cancer and inoperable brain tumors

    Recent advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment have not yet improved the survival rate of patients with cancers of the brain, liver, etc. In these organs, an extirpation of the organ, which can be done for stomach, breast, cervix, lung, etc. is not allowed, and this fact is the cause of poor therapeutic results. Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) utilizes the nuclear reaction which will take place between the boron-10 (loaded in the cancer cells artificially) and the thermal neutrons (delivered by reactors). The secondary radiations, helium and lithium hit the cancer cell itself and cause the death of the cancer cell while sparing the surrounding normal cells. BNCT is now being tried also by Oda of Kyoto University (9 cases) and by Nakagawa of Tokushima University (7 cases). It has been tried by Mishima (Kobe University) on 12 skin melanoma patients, proving satisfactory local control of the melanomas. Mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BHS) and boronophenylalanine (BPA) have been tried for brain tumors and for melanoma. For cancers of the liver and abdominal viscerae, antibody to the tumor specific antigen has been considered a good carrier of boron-10. Surgeons Takahashi, Fujii, Fujii, Yanagie, and Sekiguchi and immunologist Nariuchi of Tokyo University have been involved in the research and have obtained encouraging results in animals. Hatanaka has been proving good effect of BNCT upon giant cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) and skull base meningioma. These diseases, although pathologically benign, have posed difficult problems in neurosurgery. It will be exciting good news to the patients. In conclusion, BNCT appears to be a good means to treat difficult lesions in the brain and other organs which defy sophisticated modern therapeutic means. (author)

  4. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for BNCT

    Nigg, D.W.; Mitchell, H.E.; Harker, Y.D.; Yoon, W.Y. [and others

    1995-11-01

    Therapeutically-useful epithermal-neutron beams for BNCT are currently generated by nuclear reactors. Various accelerator-based neutron sources for BNCT have been proposed and some low intensity prototypes of such sources, generally featuring the use of proton beams and beryllium or lithium targets have been constructed. This paper describes an alternate approach to the realization of a clinically useful accelerator-based source of epithermal neutrons for BNCT that reconciles the often conflicting objectives of target cooling, neutron beam intensity, and neutron beam spectral purity via a two stage photoneutron production process.

  5. Simultaneous Observation of Cells and Nuclear Tracks from the Boron Neutron Capture Reaction by UV-C Sensitization of Polycarbonate.

    Portu, Agustina; Rossini, Andrés Eugenio; Thorp, Silvia Inés; Curotto, Paula; Pozzi, Emiliano César Cayetano; Granell, Pablo; Golmar, Federico; Cabrini, Rómulo Luis; Martin, Gisela Saint

    2015-08-01

    The distribution of boron in tissue samples coming from boron neutron capture therapy protocols can be determined through the analysis of its autoradiography image on a nuclear track detector. A more precise knowledge of boron atom location on the microscopic scale can be attained by the observation of nuclear tracks superimposed on the sample image on the detector. A method to produce an "imprint" of cells cultivated on a polycarbonate detector was developed, based on the photodegradation properties of UV-C radiation on this material. Optimal conditions to generate an appropriate monolayer of Mel-J cells incubated with boronophenylalanine were found. The best images of both cells and nuclear tracks were obtained for a neutron fluence of 1013 cm-2, 6 h UV-C (254 nm) exposure, and 4 min etching time with a KOH solution. The imprint morphology was analyzed by both light and scanning electron microscopy. Similar samples, exposed to UV-A (360 nm) revealed no cellular imprinting. Etch pits were present only inside the cell imprints, indicating a preferential boron uptake (about threefold the incubation concentration). Comparative studies of boron absorption in different cell lines and in vitro evaluation of the effect of diverse boron compounds are feasible with this methodology. PMID:26155721

  6. Boron delivery with liposomes for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): biodistribution studies in an experimental model of oral cancer demonstrating therapeutic potential

    David W. Nigg

    2012-05-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) combines selective accumulation of 10B carriers in tumor tissue with subsequent neutron irradiation. We previously demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Optimization of BNCT depends largely on improving boron targeting to tumor cells. Seeking to maximize the potential of BNCT for the treatment for head and neck cancer, the aim of the present study was to perform boron biodistribution studies in the oral cancer model employing two different liposome formulations that were previously tested for a different pathology, i.e., in experimental mammary carcinoma in BALB/c mice: (1) MAC: liposomes incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer membrane and encapsulating a hypertonic buffer, administered intravenously at 6 mg B per kg body weight, and (2) MAC-TAC: liposomes incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer membrane and encapsulating a concentrated aqueous solution of the hydrophilic species Na3 [ae-B20H17NH3], administered intravenously at 18 mg B per kg body weight. Samples of tumor, precancerous and normal pouch tissue, spleen, liver, kidney, and blood were taken at different times post-administration and processed to measure boron content by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No ostensible clinical toxic effects were observed with the selected formulations. Both MAC and MAC-TAC delivered boron selectively to tumor tissue. Absolute tumor values for MAC-TAC peaked to 66.6 {+-} 16.1 ppm at 48 h and to 43.9 {+-} 17.6 ppm at 54 h with very favorable ratios of tumor boron relative to precancerous and normal tissue, making these protocols particularly worthy of radiobiological assessment. Boron concentration values obtained would result in therapeutic BNCT doses in tumor without exceeding radiotolerance in precancerous/normal tissue at the thermal neutron facility at RA-3.

  7. Insights into the use of gadolinium and gadolinium/boron-based agents in imaging-guided neutron capture therapy applications.

    Deagostino, Annamaria; Protti, Nicoletta; Alberti, Diego; Boggio, Paolo; Bortolussi, Silva; Altieri, Saverio; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (Gd-NCT) is currently under development as an alternative approach for cancer therapy. All of the clinical experience to date with NCT is done with (10)B, known as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a binary treatment combining neutron irradiation with the delivery of boron-containing compounds to tumors. Currently, the use of Gd for NCT has been getting more attention because of its highest neutron cross-section. Although Gd-NCT was first proposed many years ago, its development has suffered due to lack of appropriate tumor-selective Gd agents. This review aims to highlight the recent advances for the design, synthesis and biological testing of new Gd- and B-Gd-containing compounds with the task of finding the best systems able to improve the NCT clinical outcome. PMID:27195428

  8. Hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) of boron carbide thin films from ortho-carborane for neutron detection application

    Detection of neutrons is possible if suitable converters such as Li, LiF or 10B in the form of thin films are used along with the semiconductor device. The use of boron (10B) in some host matrix as a neutron detector is attractive due to its large neutron capture cross-section. Boron carbide (BC) films are deposited on silicon substrates by HWCVD technique using solid ortho-carborane (o-C2B10H12) precursor with argon as carrier gas. The films contain 10B required for neutron detection as confirmed by the Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy. Variations in its structure as well as the chemical bonding configurations using Fourier Transform Infra-Red, Raman and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy have been studied.

  9. In vitro determination of toxicity, binding, retention, subcellular distribution and biological efficacy of the boron neutron capture agent DAC-1

    In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), 10B is delivered selectively to the tumour cells and the nuclide then forms high-LET radiation (4He2+ and 7Li3+) upon neutron capture. Today much research is focused on development of a variety of boron compounds aimed for BNCT. The compounds must be thoroughly analysed in preclinical tests regarding basic characteristics such as binding and subcellular distribution to enable accurate estimations of dose-modifying factors. DAC-1, 2-[2-(3-amino-propyl)-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaboran(12)-1-yl-methoxyl]-1,3 -propanediol was synthesized at our laboratories and the human colon carcinoma cells LS-174T were used as an in vitro model. The boron compound showed a remarkable intracellular accumulation, 20-100 times higher than the boron content in the culture medium, in cultured cells and was not removed by extensive washes. Approximately half of the boron taken up also remained within the cells for at least 4 days. The DAC-1 compound alone was not toxic at boron concentrations below 2.5 μg B/g. The intracellular distribution of the boron compound was investigated by subcellular fractionation experiments and low pH treatments. It is possible that DAC-1 binds to some intracellular molecules or to membranes connected with organelles in the cytoplasm or even to the inside of the outer cell membrane. Another possibility is that the compound, due to the somewhat lipophilic properties, is embedded in the membranes. Thermal neutron irradiations were carried out at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). At a survival level of 0.1, DAC-1 + thermal neutrons were about 10.5 times more effective in cell inactivation than the thermal neutrons alone. Monte Carlo calculations gave a mean value of the 10B-dependent specific energy, the dose, of 0.22 Gy. The total physical dose during irradiation of DAC-1-containing cells with a neutron fluence of 0.18 x 1012 n/cm2 was 0.39 Gy. The dose-modifying factor, at survival level 0.1, when comparing

  10. In vitro determination of toxicity, binding, retention, subcellular distribution and biological efficacy of the boron neutron capture agent DAC-1.

    Tilly, N; Olsson, P; Hartman, T; Coderre, J; Makar, M; Malmquist, J; Sjöberg, S; Pettersson, J; Carlsson, J; Glimelius, B

    1996-01-01

    In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), 10B is delivered selectively to the tumour cells and the nuclide then forms high-LET radiation (4He2+ and 7Li3+) upon neutron capture. Today much research is focused on development of a variety of boron compounds aimed for BNCT. The compounds must be thoroughly analysed in preclinical tests regarding basic characteristics such as binding and subcellular distribution to enable accurate estimations of dose-modifying factors. DAC-1,2-[2-(3-amino-propyl)-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaboran (12)-1-yl-methoxy]- 1,3-propanediol was synthesized at our laboratories and the human colon carcinoma cells LS-174T were used as an in vitro model. The boron compound showed a remarkable intracellular accumulation, 20-100 times higher than the boron content in the culture medium, in cultured cells and was not removed by extensive washes. Approximately half of the boron taken up also remained within the cells for at least 4 days. The DAC-1 compound alone was not toxic at boron concentrations below 2.5 micrograms B/g. The intracellular distribution of the boron compound was investigated by subcellular fractionation experiments and low pH treatments. It is possible that DAC-1 binds to some intracellular molecules or to membranes connected with organelles in the cytoplasm or even to the inside of the outer cell membrane. Another possibility is that the compound, due to the somewhat lipophilic properties, is embedded in the membranes. Thermal neutron irradiations were carried out at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). At a survival level of 0.1, DAC-1 + thermal neutrons were about 10.5 times more effective in cell inactivation than the thermal neutrons alone. Monte Carlo calculations gave a mean value of the 10B-dependent specific energy, the dose, of 0.22 Gy. The total physical dose during irradiation of DAC-1-containing cells with a neutron fluence of 0.18 x 10(12) n/cm2 was 0.39 Gy. The dose-modifying factor, at survival level 0.1, when

  11. A suggestion for B-10 imaging during boron neutron capture therapy

    Cortesi, M

    2007-01-01

    Selective accumulation of B-10 compound in tumour tissue is a fundamental condition for the achievement of BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy), since the effectiveness of therapy irradiation derives just from neutron capture reaction of B-10. Hence, the determination of the B-10 concentration ratio, between tumour and healthy tissue, and a control of this ratio, during the therapy, are essential to optimise the effectiveness of the BNCT, which it is known to be based on the selective uptake of B-10 compound. In this work, experimental methods are proposed and evaluated for the determination in vivo of B-10 compound in biological samples, in particular based on neutron radiography and gammaray spectroscopy by telescopic system. Measures and Monte Carlo calculations have been performed to investigate the possibility of executing imaging of the 10B distribution, both by radiography with thermal neutrons, using 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillator screen and a CCD camera, and by spectroscopy, based on the revelation of gamm...

  12. 72 MeV proton cyclotron for boron neutron capture therapy in Slovakia

    A cyclotron complex named CYLAB is being built at the Slovak Institute of Metrology. The main equipment, a cyclotron producing 72 MeV protons and light and heavy ions up to 129Xe20+, will be manufactured by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna. Medicine, physics, and metrology will be the main CYLAB application fields. The 66 MeV p-Be reaction will be used for fast neutron therapy, the spallation reactions of 72 MeV p on a tungsten target will be used in neutron capture therapy, and 72 MeV, 100 nA protons will be used in eye therapy. The medical applications of CYLAB are described with emphasis on boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the gantry built for it, based on the 72 MeV/50 μA proton cyclotron. Theoretical calculations showed that in comparison with the equipment with a conventional configuration of moderators, reflectors, filters and shielding, significant improvements in epithermal neutron production will emerge, leading to a higher RBE dose rate at a 7 cm depth of the brain. (P.A.)

  13. FiR 1 reactor in service for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and isotope production

    The FiR 1 reactor, a 250 kW Triga reactor, has been in operation since 1962. The main purpose for the existence of the reactor is now the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), but FiR 1 has also an important national role in providing local enterprises and research institutions in the fields of industrial measurements, pharmaceuticals, electronics etc. with isotope production and activation analysis services. In the 1990's a BNCT treatment facility was built at the FiR 1 reactor located at Technical Research Centre of Finland. A special new neutron moderator material FluentalTM (Al+AlF3+Li) developed at VTT ensures the superior quality of the neutron beam. Also the treatment environment is of world top quality after a major renovation of the whole reactor building in 1997. Recently the lithiated polyethylene neutron shielding of the beam aperture was modified to ease the positioning of the patient close to the beam aperture. Increasing the reactor power to 500 kW would allow positioning of the patient further away from the beam aperture. Possibilities to accomplish a safety analysis for this is currently under considerations. Over thirty patients have been treated at FiR 1 since May 1999, when the license for patient treatment was granted to the responsible BNCT treatment organization, Boneca Corporation. Currently three clinical trial protocols for tumours in the brain as well as in the head and neck region are recruiting patients. (author)

  14. Hexagonal boron nitride thin film thermal neutron detectors with high energy resolution of the reaction products

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is highly promising for solid-state thermal neutron detector applications due to its many outstanding physical properties, especially its very large thermal neutron capture cross-section (~3840 barns for 10B), which is several orders of magnitude larger than those of most other isotopes. The focus of the present work is to carry out studies on h-BN thin film and detector properties to lay the foundation for the development of a direct-conversion solid-state thermal neutron detector with high sensitivity. The measured carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) product of h-BN thin films grown on sapphire substrates is 2.83×10−7 cm2/V for electrons and holes, which is comparable to the value of about 10−7 cm2/V for GaN thin films grown on sapphire. Detectors based on h-BN thin films were fabricated and the nuclear reaction product pulse height spectra were measured. Under a bias of 20 V, very narrow individual peaks corresponding to the reaction product energies of α and Li particles as well as the sum peaks have been clearly resolved in the pulse height spectrum for the first time by a B-based direct-conversion semiconductor neutron detector. Our results indicate that h-BN thin film detectors possess unique advantages including small size, low weight, portability, low voltage operation and high energy resolution of specific reaction products

  15. Hexagonal boron nitride thin film thermal neutron detectors with high energy resolution of the reaction products

    Doan, T. C.; Majety, S.; Grenadier, S.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2015-05-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is highly promising for solid-state thermal neutron detector applications due to its many outstanding physical properties, especially its very large thermal neutron capture cross-section (~3840 barns for 10B), which is several orders of magnitude larger than those of most other isotopes. The focus of the present work is to carry out studies on h-BN thin film and detector properties to lay the foundation for the development of a direct-conversion solid-state thermal neutron detector with high sensitivity. The measured carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) product of h-BN thin films grown on sapphire substrates is 2.83×10-7 cm2/V for electrons and holes, which is comparable to the value of about 10-7 cm2/V for GaN thin films grown on sapphire. Detectors based on h-BN thin films were fabricated and the nuclear reaction product pulse height spectra were measured. Under a bias of 20 V, very narrow individual peaks corresponding to the reaction product energies of α and Li particles as well as the sum peaks have been clearly resolved in the pulse height spectrum for the first time by a B-based direct-conversion semiconductor neutron detector. Our results indicate that h-BN thin film detectors possess unique advantages including small size, low weight, portability, low voltage operation and high energy resolution of specific reaction products.

  16. Gamma Scintillator System Enhancement for Neutron Detection using Boron Carbide for Homeland Security

    An efficient and low cost 10B based thermal neutron detector as a replacement for 3He based neutron detectors is suggested. The detection is based on an enhancement to a scintillator gamma-rays detector. 3He supply for neutron detectors is gradually become harder to obtain(1) since the commercial production of this isotope has been practically ended. The 10B(n, )7Li interaction is characterized with two energetic ion and a 478 keV gamma photon which is emitted from the excited 7Li in 94% of the interactions(2). A tailored Monte-Carlo code for the detector model was written in MATLAB in order to assess the detector's efficiency. The simulation model is based on ENDF/B-VII.0(3) libraries for neutrons cross sections, and XCOM(4) database for gamma absorption coefficients. By varying the B4C thickness, optimal efficiency was obtained both for natural occurring 10B compound with atomic abundance of 19.8% as well as for boron-10 enriched to 96%

  17. Dose determination using alanine detectors in a mixed neutron and gamma field for boron neutron capture therapy of liver malignancies

    Schmitz, Tobias (Inst. for Nuclear Chemistry, Univ. of Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Dept. of Pharmacy and Toxicology, Univ. of Mainz, Mainz (Germany)), e-mail: schmito@uni-mainz.de; Blaickner, Matthias (AIT Austrian Inst. of Technology GmbH, Vienna (Austria)); Ziegner, Markus (AIT Austrian Inst. of Technology GmbH, Vienna (Austria); TU Wien, Vienna Univ. of Technology, Vienna (Austria)) (and others)

    2011-08-15

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for liver malignancies is being investigated at the Univ. of Mainz. One important aim is the set-up of a reliable dosimetry system. Alanine dosimeters have previously been applied for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields in antiproton therapy, and may be suitable for measurements in mixed neutron and gamma fields. Material and methods. Two experiments have been carried out in the thermal column of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Univ. of Mainz. Alanine dosimeters have been irradiated in a phantom and in liver tissue. Results. For the interpretation and prediction of the dose for each pellet, beside the results of the measurements, calculations with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA are presented here. For the phantom, as well as for the liver tissue, the measured and calculated dose and flux values are in good agreement. Discussion. Alanine dosimeters, in combination with flux measurements and Monte Carlo calculations with FLUKA, suggest that it is possible to establish a system for monitoring the dose in a mixed neutron and gamma field for BNCT and other applications in radiotherapy

  18. Dose determination using alanine detectors in a mixed neutron and gamma field for boron neutron capture therapy of liver malignancies

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for liver malignancies is being investigated at the Univ. of Mainz. One important aim is the set-up of a reliable dosimetry system. Alanine dosimeters have previously been applied for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields in antiproton therapy, and may be suitable for measurements in mixed neutron and gamma fields. Material and methods. Two experiments have been carried out in the thermal column of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Univ. of Mainz. Alanine dosimeters have been irradiated in a phantom and in liver tissue. Results. For the interpretation and prediction of the dose for each pellet, beside the results of the measurements, calculations with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA are presented here. For the phantom, as well as for the liver tissue, the measured and calculated dose and flux values are in good agreement. Discussion. Alanine dosimeters, in combination with flux measurements and Monte Carlo calculations with FLUKA, suggest that it is possible to establish a system for monitoring the dose in a mixed neutron and gamma field for BNCT and other applications in radiotherapy

  19. Development of a novel neutron detection technique by using a boron layer coating a Charge Coupled Device

    Blostein, Juan Jerónimo; Estrada, Juan; Tartaglione, Aureliano; Haro, Miguel Sofo; Moroni, Guillermo Fernández; Cancelo, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the design features and the first test measurements obtained during the installation of a novel high resolution 2D neutron detection technique. The technique proposed in this work consists of a boron layer (enriched in ${^{10}}$B) placed on a scientific Charge Coupled Device (CCD). After the nuclear reaction ${^{10}}$B(n,$\\alpha$)${^{7}}$Li, the CCD detects the emitted charge particles thus obtaining information on the neutron absorption position. The above mentioned io...

  20. Practical consequences for the use of a personal dosemeter for fast neutrons at high-energy accelerators based on PADC detectors exposed up to one year

    Since 1998, Paul Scherrer Institut has employed the routine use of a personal neutron dosimetry system based on chemically etched PADC (poly allyl diglycol carbonate) detectors and automatic track counting. In 2004, a new concept for individual monitoring at high-energy accelerators was implemented. In this concept the photon dosemeter of a combined photon/neutron dosemeter is evaluated monthly. The neutron dosemeter is only evaluated if the personal photon dose exceeds 2 mSv, or if the exposition period of the neutron dosemeter exceeds one year. Significant consequences for the evaluation of the neutron dosemeter in the dosimetry service were evidenced in the new concept. The wearing period of the neutron dosemeter can range from 1 to 12 months, potentially longer. Therefore, the long-term behavior of background track density and variation of response to Am-Be within 17 months was studied. The effects of 'fading' and 'aging' that influence the response of PADC detectors are determined. The application of an algorithm for neutron dose calculation takes into account long-term behavior and is described. Furthermore, repeated field calibrations were performed at the CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility.

  1. Preparation of a radioactive boron compound (B-I-131-lipiodol) for neutron capture therapy of hepatoma

    In our research, a radioactive boron compound, B-I-131-lipiodol, that can be selectively retained in hepatoma cells was prepared. Combining the effect of α particles produced by boron neutron capture reaction with the β particles released by radionuclides in the radioactive boron compounds will produce a synergistic killing effect on cancer cells. Human hepatoma HepG2 cell cultures were used to examine the stability and the intracellular distribution of the radioactive boron drug. Microscopes were used to examine the interaction and retention of B-I-131-lipiodol globules in the individual hepatoma cell. Moreover, ICP-AES and NaI scintillation counter were performed to determine boron concentrations and I-131 radioactivity, respectively. Results showed that B-I-131-lipiodol with a boron concentration and a specific radioactivity ranged from 500-2000 ppm and 0.05-10 mCi/mL respectively was stably retained in serum. The radiochemical purity of B-I-131-lipiodol was 98%. After supplement with a medium containing B-I-131-lipiodol, the HepG2 cells had intracellular B-I-131-lipiodol globules in the cytoplasm as seen by inverted light microscope, the I-131 and boron can be stably retained in HepG2 cells. (author)

  2. Development of the JAERI computational dosimetry system (JCDS) for boron neutron capture therapy. Cooperative research

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Torii, Yoshiya; Uchiyama, Junzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Matsumura, Akira; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Nose, Tadao [Tsukuba Univ., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nakagawa, Yoshinobu [National Sanatorium Kagawa-Children' s Hospital, Kagawa (Japan); Kageji, Teruyoshi [Tokushima Univ., Tokushima (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    The Neutron Beam Facility at JRR-4 enables us to carry out boron neutron capture therapy with epithermal neutron beam. In order to make treatment plans for performing the epithermal neutron beam BNCT, it is necessary to estimate radiation doses in a patient's head in advance. The JAERI Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS), which can estimate distributions of radiation doses in a patient's head by simulating in order to support the treatment planning for epithermal neutron beam BNCT, was developed. JCDS is a software that creates a 3-dimentional head model of a patient by using CT and MRI images, and that generates a input data file automatically for calculation of neutron flux and gamma-ray dose distributions in the brain with the Monte Carlo code MCNP, and that displays these dose distributions on the head model for dosimetry by using the MCNP calculation results. JCDS has any advantages as follows; By using CT data and MRI data which are medical images, a detail three-dimensional model of patient's head is able to be made easily. The three-dimensional head image is editable to simulate the state of a head after its surgical processes such as skin flap opening and bone removal in the BNCT with craniotomy that are being performed in Japan. JCDS can provide information for the Patient Setting System which can support to set the patient to an actual irradiation position swiftly and accurately. This report describes basic design of JCDS and functions in several processing, calculation methods, characteristics and performance of JCDS. (author)

  3. Growth inhibition of human pancreatic cancer grafts in nude mice by boron neutron capture therapy

    Cell destruction in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between 10B and thermal neutrons to release alpha-particles (4He) and lithium-7 ions (7Li). The 4He kills cells in the range of 10 μm from the site of 4He generation. Therefore, it is theoretically possible to kill tumor cells without affecting adjacent healthy tissues, if 10B-compounds could be selectively delivered. We have described that 10B atoms delivered by immunoliposomes exerted cytotoxic effect on human pancreatic carcinoma cells (AsPC-1) in a dose-dependent manner by thermal neutron irradiation in vitro as reported previously. In the present study, the cytotoxic effect of a locally injected 10B compound solution or multilamellar liposomes containing a 10B compound to human pancreatic carcinoma xenograft in nude mice was evaluated after thermal neutron irradiation. AsPC-1 cells (1 x 107) injected subcutaneously into a nude mouse grew to a tumor weighing 100-300 mg after 2 weeks. At this time 200 μg 10B compounds was locally injected in the tumor and irradiated with 2 x 1012 n/cm2 thermal neutron. Tumor growth of 10B-treated groups was suppressed as compared with control group. Histopathologically, hyalinization and necrosis were found in the tumor tissues. For effective tumor destruction, 10B dose more than 60 μg was necessary. The tumor tissue injected with saline only and irradiated showed neither destruction nor necrosis. These data indicate that the accumulation of 10B atoms to the tumor site is mandatory for the cytotoxic effect by thermal neutron irradiation. (author)

  4. Antiproliferative effect and apoptosis induction in melanoma treatment by boron neutron capture therapy (BCNT)

    Full text: Introduction: Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an experimental radiotherapy where a compound having 10B is administered to cancer patients and is accumulated in tumor tissues. Thus, the tumor is irradiated with thermal neutrons, 10B absorbs and destroys them, producing alpha radiation. Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is the agent responsible for delivering boron to the tumor tissue. After BPA administration, BNCT is used as a localized radiotherapy for many tumors treatment, mainly melanoma, which has a high mortality rate among all types of tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro antiproliferative and antitumor effects of BNCT application in human melanoma treatment. Materials and Methods: MEWO cells (human melanoma) were cultured and treated with different concentrations of BPA (8.36 to 0.52 mg/ml). After 90 minutes, they were irradiated with thermal neutron flux up to a dose of 8.4 Gy. The parameters analyzed were free radical production, cell cycle progression, cell death signaling pathways, cycling D1, caspase-3 and extracellular matrix synthesis produced, beyond the mitochondrial electric potential analysis. Results: After BNCT treatment, MEWO cells showed an amount of free radical increase about 10 times. Still, there was a significant decrease of cyclin D1, G0/G1 proliferation, synthesis and G2/M cell cycle phases. BNCT induced a mitochondrial electrical potential decrease, as well as fibrillar proteins of extracellular matrix. BNCT had a significant number of dead cell increase, mainly by necrosis. However, BNCT induced phosphorylated caspase 3 increase. Discussion/Conclusion: BNCT induced cell death increase by necrosis, mitochondrial electric potential decrease and free radical production increase. BNCT is cytotoxic to melanoma cells. Besides necrosis, phosphorylated caspase 3 increase was observed, accompanied by a proliferative response decrease regulated by the G1/S checkpoint and matrix extracellular synthesis reduction

  5. An international dosimetry exchange for boron neutron capture therapy. Part I: Absorbed dose measurements.

    Binns, P J; Riley, K J; Harling, O K; Kiger, W S; Munck af Rosenschöld, P M; Giusti, V; Capala, J; Sköld, K; Auterinen, I; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Uusi-Simola, J; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Spurny, F

    2005-12-01

    An international collaboration was organized to undertake a dosimetry exchange to enable the future combination of clinical data from different centers conducting neutron capture therapy trials. As a first step (Part I) the dosimetry group from the Americas, represented by MIT, visited the clinical centers at Studsvik (Sweden), VTT Espoo (Finland), and the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) at Rez (Czech Republic). A combined VTT/NRI group reciprocated with a visit to MIT. Each participant performed a series of dosimetry measurements under equivalent irradiation conditions using methods appropriate to their clinical protocols. This entailed in-air measurements and dose versus depth measurements in a large water phantom. Thermal neutron flux as well as fast neutron and photon absorbed dose rates were measured. Satisfactory agreement in determining absorbed dose within the experimental uncertainties was obtained between the different groups although the measurement uncertainties are large, ranging between 3% and 30% depending upon the dose component and the depth of measurement. To improve the precision in the specification of absorbed dose amongst the participants, the individually measured dose components were normalized to the results from a single method. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) that is typical of concentrations realized clinically with the boron delivery compound boronophenylalanine-fructose, systematic discrepancies in the specification of the total biologically weighted dose of up to 10% were apparent between the different groups. The results from these measurements will be used in future to normalize treatment plan calculations between the different clinical dosimetry protocols as Part II of this study. PMID:16475772

  6. Neutron radiography experiments for verification of soluble boron mixing and transport modeling under natural circulation conditions

    The use of neutron radiography for visualization of fluid flow through flow visualization modules has been very successful. Current experiments at the Penn State Breazeale Reactor serve to verify the mixing and transport of soluble boron under natural flow conditions as would be experienced in a pressurized water reactor. Different flow geometries have been modeled including holes, slots, and baffles. Flow modules are constructed of aluminum box material 1 1/2 inches by 4 inches in varying lengths. An experimental flow system was built which pumps fluid to a head tank and natural circulation flow occurs from the head tank through the flow visualization module to be radiographed. The entire flow system is mounted on a portable assembly to allow placement of the flow visualization module in front of the neutron beam port. A neutron-transparent fluorinert fluid is used to simulate water at different densities. Boron is modeled by gadolinium oxide powder as a tracer element, which is placed in a mixing assembly and injected into the system by remote operated electric valve, once the reactor is at power. The entire sequence is recorded on real-time video. Still photographs are made frame-by-frame from the video tape. Computers are used to digitally enhance the video and still photographs. The data obtained from the enhancement will be used for verification of simple geometry predictions using the TRAC and RELAP thermal-hydraulic codes. A detailed model of a reactor vessel inlet plenum, downcomer region, flow distribution area and core inlet is being constructed to model the AP600 plenum. Successive radiography experiments of each section of the model under identical conditions will provide a complete vessel/core model for comparison with the thermal-hydraulic codes

  7. Antiproliferative effect and apoptosis induction in melanoma treatment by boron neutron capture therapy (BCNT)

    Faiao-Flores, Fernanda; Coelho, Paulo; Arruda-Neto, Joao; Maria, Durvanei [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an experimental radiotherapy where a compound having {sup 10}B is administered to cancer patients and is accumulated in tumor tissues. Thus, the tumor is irradiated with thermal neutrons, {sup 10}B absorbs and destroys them, producing alpha radiation. Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is the agent responsible for delivering boron to the tumor tissue. After BPA administration, BNCT is used as a localized radiotherapy for many tumors treatment, mainly melanoma, which has a high mortality rate among all types of tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro antiproliferative and antitumor effects of BNCT application in human melanoma treatment. Materials and Methods: MEWO cells (human melanoma) were cultured and treated with different concentrations of BPA (8.36 to 0.52 mg/ml). After 90 minutes, they were irradiated with thermal neutron flux up to a dose of 8.4 Gy. The parameters analyzed were free radical production, cell cycle progression, cell death signaling pathways, cycling D1, caspase-3 and extracellular matrix synthesis produced, beyond the mitochondrial electric potential analysis. Results: After BNCT treatment, MEWO cells showed an amount of free radical increase about 10 times. Still, there was a significant decrease of cyclin D1, G0/G1 proliferation, synthesis and G2/M cell cycle phases. BNCT induced a mitochondrial electrical potential decrease, as well as fibrillar proteins of extracellular matrix. BNCT had a significant number of dead cell increase, mainly by necrosis. However, BNCT induced phosphorylated caspase 3 increase. Discussion/Conclusion: BNCT induced cell death increase by necrosis, mitochondrial electric potential decrease and free radical production increase. BNCT is cytotoxic to melanoma cells. Besides necrosis, phosphorylated caspase 3 increase was observed, accompanied by a proliferative response decrease regulated by the G1/S checkpoint and matrix extracellular synthesis

  8. Design of a scattering chamber for double differential cross-section measurement with an accelerator based 14 MeV neutron generator

    The measurement of double-differential cross-sections (DDX) for the fast neutron induced charged particle reactions on fusion technology relevant structural materials are very important for estimating the level of nuclear heating, radiation damage in a reactor environment. Such reactions are induced on bombardment of fast neutrons on the first wall, structural, and blanket components of the reactor thereby leading to formation of gases (helium, hydrogen, deuterium etc.) in the bulk of materials

  9. Modelling collimator of radial beam port Kartini reactor for boron neutron capture therapy

    One of the cancer therapy methods is BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy). BNCT utilizes neutron nature by 10B deposited on cancer cells. The superiority of BNCT compared to the radiation therapy is the high level of selectivity since its level is within cell. This study was carried out on collimator modelling in radial beam port of reactor Kartini for BNCT. The modelling was conducted by simulation using software of Monte Carlo N-Particle version 5 (MCNP 5). MCNP5 is a package of the programs for both simulating and calculating the problem of particle transport by following the life cycle of a neutron since its birth from fission reaction, transport on materials, until eventually lost due to the absorption reaction or out from the system. The collimator modelling used materials which varied in size in order to generate the value of each of the parameters in accordance with the recommendation of the IAEA, the epithermal neutron flux (ϕepi) > 1.0 x 109n.cm-2s-1, the ratio between the neutron dose rate fast and epithermal neutron flux (Df/ϕepi) < 2.0 x 10-13 Gy.cm2.n-1, the ratio of gamma dose rate and epithermal neutron flux (Dγ/ϕepi) < 2.0 X10-13 Gy.cm2.n-1, the ratio between the thermal and epithermal neutron flux (ϕTh/ϕepi)< 0.05 and the ratio between the current and flux of the epithermal neutron (J/ϕepi) > 0.7. Based on the results of the optimization of the modeling, the materials and sizes of the collimator construction obtained were 0.75 cm Ni as collimator wall, 22 cm Al as a moderator and 4.5 cm Bi as a gamma shield. The outputs of the radiation beam generated from collimator modeling of the radial beam port were ϕepi = 5.25 x 106 n.cm-2.s-1, Df/ϕepi = 1.17 x 10-13Gy.cm2.n-1, Dγ/ϕepi = 1.70 x 10-12 Gy.cm2.n-1, ϕTh/ϕepi = 1.51 and J/ϕepi = 0.731. Based on this study, the result of the beam radiation coming out of the radial beam port dis not fully meet the criteria recommended by IAEA so need to continue this study to get the criteria of IAEA

  10. Technical aspects of boron neutron capture therapy at the BNL Medical Research Reactor

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, BMRR, is a 3 MW heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for biomedical studies. Early BNL work in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) used a beam of thermal neutrons for experimental treatment of brain tumors. Research elsewhere and at BNL indicated that higher energy neutrons would be required to treat deep seated brain tumors. Epithermal neutrons would be thermalized as they penetrated the brain and peak thermal neutron flux densities would occur at the depth of brain tumors. One of the two BMRR thermal port shutters was modified in 1988 to include plates of aluminum and aluminum oxide to provide an epithermal port. Lithium carbonate in polyethylene was added in 1991 around the bismuth port to reduce the neutron flux density coming from outside the port. To enhance the epithermal neutron flux density, the two vertical thimbles A-3 (core edge) and E-3 (in core) were replaced with fuel elements. There are now four fuel elements of 190 grams each and 28 fuel elements of 140 grams each for a total of 4.68 kg of 235U in the core. The authors have proposed replacing the epithermal shutter with a fission converter plate shutter. It is estimated that the new shutter would increase the epithermal neutron flux density by a factor of seven and the epithermal/fast neutron ratio by a factor of two. The modifications made to the BMRR in the past few years permit BNCT for brain tumors without the need to reflect scalp and bone flaps. Radiation workers are monitored via a TLD badge and a self-reading dosimeter during each experiment. An early concern was raised about whether workers would be subject to a significant dose rate from working with patients who have been irradiated. The gamma ray doses for the representative key personnel involved in the care of the first 12 patients receiving BNCT are listed. These workers did not receive unusually high exposures

  11. Investigation of the neutron contamination in IMRT deliveries with a paired magnesium and boron coated magnesium ionization chamber system

    Background and Purpose: Photon beams used in IMRT treatments with high energies (>10 MV) are contaminated with neutrons. Measurement of this neutron dose is of significance to the overall risk estimate of high energy radiotherapy. Materials and methods: For measuring neutron doses a paired magnesium and boron coated magnesium chamber system was used. All measurements were performed inside the solid water phantom EasyCube using abdominal extensions. 4 different clinical treatment plans were studied. Results: The measured neutron dose showed to be homogeneous inside the phantom and increased with increased number of applied monitor units. The sum over all fractions showed neutron doses of 1 - 2 mGy, depending on the kind of treatment. Conclusions: Using large conversion factors of 25 Sv/Gy, none of the studied treatment plans exceeded dose equivalents of 50 mSv for the whole treatment. This dose equivalent has to be considered whole body dose due to the homogeneous distribution of neutrons

  12. Multi-Grid Boron-10 detector for large area applications in neutron scattering science

    Andersen, Ken; Birch, Jens; Buffet, Jean-Claude; Correa, Jonathan; van Esch, Patrick; Guerard, Bruno; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Hultman, Lars; Höglund, Carina; Jensen, Jens; Khaplanov, Anton; Kirstein, Oliver; Piscitelli, Francesco; Vettier, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The present supply of 3He can no longer meet the detector demands of the upcoming ESS facility and continued detector upgrades at current neutron sources. Therefore viable alternative technologies are required to support the development of cutting-edge instrumentation for neutron scattering science. In this context, 10B-based detectors are being developed by collaboration between the ESS, ILL, and Link\\"{o}ping University. This paper reports on progress of this technology and the prospects applying it in modern neutron scattering experiments. The detector is made-up of multiple rectangular gas counter tubes coated with B4C, enriched in 10B. An anode wire reads out each tube, thereby giving position of conversion in one of the lateral co-ordinates as well as in depth of the detector. Position resolution in the remaining co-ordinate is obtained by segmenting the cathode tube itself. Boron carbide films have been produced at Link\\"{o}ping University and a detector built at ILL. The characterization study is pres...

  13. Determination of liposomal boron biodistribution in tumor bearing mice by using neutron capture autoradiography

    It is necessary to accumulate the 10B atoms selectively to the tumor cells for effective boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In order to achieve accurate measurements of 10B concentrations in biological samples, we employ a technique of neutron capture autoradiography (NCAR) of the sliced whole body samples of tumor bearing mice using CR- 39 plastic track detectors. The CR-39 detectors attached with samples were exposed to thermal neutrons in the thermal column of the TRIGA II reactor at the Institute for Atomic Energy, Rikkyo University. We obtained NCAR images for mice injected intraveneously by 10B-polyethylene-glycol (PEG) binding liposome or 10B-bare liposome. The 10B concentrations in the tumor tissue of mice were estimated by means of alpha and lithium track density measurements. In this study, we increased the accumulation of 10B atoms in the tumor tissues by binding PEG chains to the surface of liposome, which increase the retension in the blood flow and escape the phagocytosis by reticulo-endotherial systems. Therefore, 10B-PEG liposome is a candidate for an effective 10B carrier in BNCT.(author)

  14. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at European research reactors - Status and perspectives

    Over the last decade. there has been a significant revival in the development of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) as a treatment modality for curing cancerous tumours, especially glioblastoma multiforme and subcutaneous malignant melanoma. In 1987 a European Collaboration on BNCT was formed, with the prime task to identify suitable research reactors in Europe where BNCT could be applied. Due to reasons discussed in this paper, the HFR Petten was chosen as the test-bed for demonstrating BNCT. Currently, the European Collaboration is approaching the start of clinical trials, using epithermal neutrons and borocaptate sodium (BSH) as the 10B delivery agent. The treatment is planned to start in the first half of 1996. The paper here presents an overview on the principle of BNCT, the requirements imposed on a research reactor in order to be considered for BNCT, and the perspectives for other European materials testing reactors. A brief summary on the current status of the work at Petten is given, including: the design, construction and characterisation of the epithermal neutron beam: performance and results of the healthy tissue tolerance study; the development of a treatment planning programme based on the Monte Carlo code MCNP; the design of an irradiation room; and on the clinical trials themselves. (author)

  15. Sonoporation as an enhancing method for boron neutron capture therapy for squamous cell carcinomas

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a selective radiotherapy that is dependent on the accumulation of 10B compound in tumors. Low-intensity ultrasound produces a transient pore on cell membranes, sonoporation, which enables extracellular materials to enter cells. The effect of sonoporation on BNCT was examined in oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) xenografts in nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were administrated boronophenylalanine (BPA) or boronocaptate sodium (BSH) intraperitoneally. Two hours later, tumors were subjected to sonoporation using microbubbles followed by neutron irradiation. The 10B concentration was higher in tumors treated with sonoporation than in untreated tumors, although the difference was not significant in BPA. When tumors in mice that received BPA intraperitoneally were treated with sonoporation followed by exposure to thermal neutrons, tumor volume was markedly reduced and the survival rate was prolonged. Such enhancements by sonoporation were not observed in mice treated with BSH-mediated BNCT. These results indicate that sonoporation enhances the efficiency of BPA-mediated BNCT for oral SCC. Sonoporation may modulate the microlocalization of BPA and BSH in tumors and increase their intracellular levels

  16. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at IRT -Sofia Research Reactor. Basics and activities

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) proved itself to be vital option for severe cancer treatment during the last 20 years. The building of BNCT facility was a main task of the reconstruction of the IRT-Sofia research reactor at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. A number of activities in the development of appropriate infrastructure including accumulation of the existing experience, and creation of a multidisciplinary team and infrastructure, collecting BNCT oriented information in the IT-system was done. The technical design of the BNCT irradiation channel followed the beam tube configuration of the reactor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, and took also into account the limits of the reactor construction geometry. The results of neutron and gamma transport calculations performed for the reactor model showed that the facility would be able to supply epithermal neutron flux with quality, equal to the best values reached in the world until now. The BNCT will play a significant role in the sustainable utilization of the reactor for cancer treatment of patients from the Balkan region. (authors)

  17. A novel reactor concept for boron neutron capture therapy: annular low-low power reactor (ALLPR)

    Petrovic, B.; Levine, S.H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNC), originally proposed in 50's, has been getting renewed attention over the last {approx}10 years. This is in particular due to its potential for treating deep-seated brain tumors by employing epithermal neutron beams. Large (several MW) research reactors are currently used to obtain epithermal beams for BNCT, but because of cost and licensing issues it is not likely that such high-power reactors can be placed in regular medical centers. This paper describes a novel reactor concept for BNCT devised to overcome this obstacle. The design objective was to produce a beam of epithermal neutrons of sufficient intensity for BNCT at <50 kW using low enriched uranium. It is achieved by the annular reactor design, which is called Annular Low-Low Power Reactor (ALLPR). Preliminary studies using Monte Carlo simulations are summarized in this paper. The ALLPR should be relatively economical to build, and safe and easy to operate. This novel concept may increase the viability of using BNCT in medical centers worldwide. (author)

  18. Boron dilution transient simulation analyses in a PWR with neutronics/thermal-hydraulics coupled codes in the NURISP project

    Highlights: • We simulated three boron dilution transient with different NK–TH coupled codes. • We extensively analyzed the sensitivity to the main parameters. • We found the most balanced combination to reproduce the results. - Abstract: The detailed 3D calculation of a boron slug transient with neutronics/thermal-hydraulics coupled systems has been a highly demanding exercise because of the difficulty coupling with boron transport models. Within subproject 3 of the FP7 European Project NURISP, two neutron kinetics codes, COBAYA3 and DYN3D, coupled with the thermal-hydraulics code FLICA4 in the NURESIM platform were employed to simulate boron dilution transients. Three transients were defined in the project, involving increasing volumes of diluted water entering the core inlet, to test the adequacy of the coupling between the codes. The results obtained with COBAYA3/FLICA4 and DYN3D/FLICA4 couplings for the PWR boron dilution benchmark defined are presented. Additionally, results from the coupled codes DYN3D/FLOCAL are applied for further verification. The results verify the applicability of the implemented couplings to this type of problems, where peak powers reached can be very high during short periods after which the reactor stabilizes at a few per cent of the nominal power. Also generation of vapour is obtained in the simulations

  19. Boron neutron capture therapy outcomes for advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer

    We retrospectively review outcomes of applying boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to unresectable advanced or recurrent head and neck cancers. Patients who were treated with BNCT for either local recurrent or newly diagnosed unresectable head or neck cancers between December 2001 and September 2007 were included. Clinicopathological characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrieved from hospital records. Either a combination of borocaptate sodium and boronophenylalanine (BPA) or BPA alone were used as boron compounds. In all the treatment cases, the dose constraint was set to deliver a dose <10–12 Gy-eq to the skin or oral mucosa. There was a patient cohort of 62, with a median follow-up of 18.7 months (range, 0.7–40.8). A total of 87 BNCT procedures were performed. The overall response rate was 58% within 6 months after BNCT. The median survival time was 10.1 months from the time of BNCT. The 1- and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 43.1% and 24.2%, respectively. The major acute Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were hyperamylasemia (38.6%), fatigue (6.5%), mucositis/stomatitis (9.7%) and pain (9.7%), all of which were manageable. Three patients died of treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced carotid artery hemorrhage, two of whom had coexistent infection of the carotid artery. This study confirmed the feasibility of our dose-estimation method and that controlled trials are warranted. (author)

  20. Thermal properties of neutron-irradiated SiC; effects of boron doping

    Lee, C. W.; Pineau, F. J.; Corelli, J. C.

    1982-08-01

    The temperature dependence (25°C to 1000°C) of thermal conductivity for siliconized (reaction bonded) SiC and alpha phase (sintered) SiC irradiated to neutron fluences of 4 to 8 × 10 24n/ m2 ( E>1 MeV) were studied utilizing the heat pulse technique. The fluences are equivalent to 0.8 and 1.6 dpa and the sample temperature during irradiation was ~ 140°C. Silicon carbide exhibits a significant decrease in thermal conductivity after irradiation, specifically a factor of ~ 5 decrease is observed for siliconized SiC. Comparisons were made with SiC samples doped with 10B, 11B, and natural boron to investigate the effects of impurity doping. It was found that the presence of natural boron and 11B have no significant effect on the thermal conductivity of irradiated SiC, whereas SiC doped with 10B exhibits a slightly larger decrease in thermal conductivity due to the enhanced radiation damage (e.g., helium production) through the 10B (n, α) 7Li reaction. The lowering of the thermal conductivity after irradiation can explain the decreased resistance against thermal shcok of irradiated SiC. The decrease in thermal conductivity is due to enhanced phonon scattering by radiation-induced vacancies and dislocations. Results on annealing effects and comparison with mechanical properties are presented.

  1. Thermal properties of neutron-irradiated SiC; effects of boron doping

    The temperature dependence (250C to 10000C) of thermal conductivity for siliconized (reaction bonded) SiC and alpha phase (sintered) SiC irradiated to neutron fluences of 4 to 8x1024n/m2 (E > 1 MeV) were studied utilizing the heat pulse technique. The fluences are equivalent to 0.8 and 1.6 dpa and the sample temperature during irradiation was approx. equal to 140 0C. Silicon carbide exhibits a significant decrease in thermal conductivity after irradiation, specifically a factor of approx. equal to 5 decrease is observed for siliconized SiC. Comparisons were made with SiC samples doped with 10B, 11B, and natural boron to investigate the effects of impurity doping. It was found that the presence of natural boron and 11B have no significant effect on the thermal conductivity of irradiated SiC, whereas SiC doped with 10B exhibits a slightly larger decrease in thermal conductivity due to the conductivity after irradiation can explain the decreased resistance against thermal shock of irradiated SiC. The decrease in thermal conductivity is due to enhanced phonon scattering by radiation-induced vacancies and dislocations. Results on annealing effects and comparison with mechanical properties are presented. (orig.)

  2. GPU-based prompt gamma ray imaging from boron neutron capture therapy

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suk Suh, Tae, E-mail: suhsanta@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 505 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jo Hong, Key [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Sil Lee, Keum [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to perform the fast reconstruction of a prompt gamma ray image using a graphics processing unit (GPU) computation from boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) simulations. Methods: To evaluate the accuracy of the reconstructed image, a phantom including four boron uptake regions (BURs) was used in the simulation. After the Monte Carlo simulation of the BNCT, the modified ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm using the GPU computation was used to reconstruct the images with fewer projections. The computation times for image reconstruction were compared between the GPU and the central processing unit (CPU). Also, the accuracy of the reconstructed image was evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: The image reconstruction time using the GPU was 196 times faster than the conventional reconstruction time using the CPU. For the four BURs, the area under curve values from the ROC curve were 0.6726 (A-region), 0.6890 (B-region), 0.7384 (C-region), and 0.8009 (D-region). Conclusions: The tomographic image using the prompt gamma ray event from the BNCT simulation was acquired using the GPU computation in order to perform a fast reconstruction during treatment. The authors verified the feasibility of the prompt gamma ray image reconstruction using the GPU computation for BNCT simulations.

  3. GPU-based prompt gamma ray imaging from boron neutron capture therapy

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to perform the fast reconstruction of a prompt gamma ray image using a graphics processing unit (GPU) computation from boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) simulations. Methods: To evaluate the accuracy of the reconstructed image, a phantom including four boron uptake regions (BURs) was used in the simulation. After the Monte Carlo simulation of the BNCT, the modified ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm using the GPU computation was used to reconstruct the images with fewer projections. The computation times for image reconstruction were compared between the GPU and the central processing unit (CPU). Also, the accuracy of the reconstructed image was evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: The image reconstruction time using the GPU was 196 times faster than the conventional reconstruction time using the CPU. For the four BURs, the area under curve values from the ROC curve were 0.6726 (A-region), 0.6890 (B-region), 0.7384 (C-region), and 0.8009 (D-region). Conclusions: The tomographic image using the prompt gamma ray event from the BNCT simulation was acquired using the GPU computation in order to perform a fast reconstruction during treatment. The authors verified the feasibility of the prompt gamma ray image reconstruction using the GPU computation for BNCT simulations

  4. GPU-based prompt gamma ray imaging from boron neutron capture therapy

    This reaction can be applied to the therapy and diagnosis about the tumor simultaneously. After the compound labeled with the boron is accumulated at the tumor site, the alpha particle induced by the reaction between the thermal neutron and the boron induces tumor cell death. Also, the 478 keV prompt gamma ray is emitted from the same reaction point. If this single prompt photon is detected by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), the tomographic image of the therapy region can be monitored during the radiation treatment. However, in order to confirm the therapy region using the image during the treatment, the image needs to be provided promptly. Due to a relatively long acquisition time required to get SPECT images, both reduced number of projections and the fast image reconstruction schemes are needed to provide the images during radiation treatment. The computation time for image reconstruction using the GPU with the modified OSEM algorithm was measured and compared with the computation time using CPU. Through the results, we confirmed the feasibility of the image reconstruction for prompt gamma ray image using GPU for the BNCT. In the further study, the development of the algorithm for faster reconstruction of the prompt gamma ray image during the BNCT using the GPU computation will be conducted. Also, the analysis of the target to background level about the reconstructed image will be performed using the extracted image profile

  5. Stability of high-speed lithium sheet jets for the neutron source in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    The stability of high-speed liquid lithium sheet jets was analytically studied for the neutron source in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), which makes cancers and tumors curable with cell-level selections and hence high QOL. The object of our research is to realize the thin and high-speed plane sheet jets of liquid lithium in a high-vacuum as an accelerator target. Linear analysis approach is made to the stability on thin plane sheet jets of liquid lithium in a high-vacuum, and then our analytical results were compared with the previous experimental ones. We proved that the waves of surface tension on thin lithium sheet jets in a high-vacuum are of supercritical flows and neutral stable under about 17.4 m/s in flow velocity and that the fast non-dispersive anti-symmetric waves are more significant than the very slow dispersive symmetric waves. We also formulated the equation of shrinking angle in isosceles-triangularly or isosceles-trapezoidal shrinking sheet jets corresponding to the Mach angle of supersonic gas flows. This formula states universally the physical meaning of Weber number of sheet jets on the wave of surface tension in supercritical flows. We obtained satisfactory prospects (making choice of larger flow velocity U and larger thickness of sheet a) to materialize a liquid target of accelerator in BNCT. (author)

  6. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in an experimental model of lung metastases in BDIX rats

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in an experimental model of lung metastases in BDIX rats Introduction: Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on selective tumor uptake of boron compounds, followed by neutron irradiation. BNCT was proposed for the treatment of unresectable, diffuse lung metastases. The aim of the present study was to perform BNCT studies in an experimental model of lung metastases. Materials and Methods: 3 x 106/0.5 ml colon carcinoma cells (DHD/K12/TRb) were injected iv in syngeneic BDIX rats. Three weeks post-inoculation, rats with diffuse lung metastases were used for in vivo BNCT studies in the RA-3 Nuclear Reactor. Based on previous biodistribution studies and computational dosimetry with Monte Carlo simulation, 2 doses were prescribed, i.e. 4 Gy and 8 Gy minimum absorbed dose to tumor. The animals were assigned to 5 experimental groups (n= 4 to 8) at each dose level: T0 (euthanized pre-treatment), BPA-BNCT, Comb-BNCT (BPA+GB-10), Beam only (background dose) and Sham (same manipulation, no treatment). Boron concentration was measured in a blood sample taken pre-irradiation to verify that the value was in the range established in previous biodistribution studies. The animals were followed clinically for 2 weeks after neutron irradiation and then euthanized to assess the response of tumor and normal lung, macroscopically and histologically. To date we have evaluated the end-point weight of lung (normal lung + metastases) and % lung weight/body weight as an indicator of tumor growth. Results: The statistical analysis (ANOVA) of % lung weight/body weight showed statistically significant differences (p<0.05) between groups T0 (0.79 ± 0.38) and Sham (1.87 ± 0.91). No statistically significant differences were observed between the Beam only groups (at both dose levels) and Sham. Similar and statistically significant tumor control was induced in the groups BPA-BNCT Low dose (LD) (0.56 ± 0.11), BPA-BNCT High dose (HD) (0.80 ± 0.16), Comb

  7. The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Project at the TRIGA Reactor in Mainz, Germany

    Hampel, G.; Grunewald, C.; Schutz, C.; Schmitz, T.; Kratz, J.V. [Nuclear Chemistry, University of Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Brochhausen, C.; Kirkpatrick, J. [Department of Pathology, University of Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Bortulussi, S.; Altieri, S. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) Pavia Section, Pavia (Italy); Kudejova, P. [Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Appelman, K.; Moss, R. [Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Bassler, N. [University of Aarhus, Norde Ringade, DK-8000, Aarhus C (Denmark); Blaickner, M.; Ziegner, M. [Molecular Medicine, Health and Environment Department, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH (Austria); Sharpe, P.; Palmans, H. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Otto, G. [Department of Hepatobiliary, Pancreatic and Transplantation Surgery, University of Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The thermal column of the TRIGA reactor in Mainz is being used very effectively for medical and biological applications. The BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy) project at the University of Mainz is focussed on the treatment of liver tumours, similar to the work performed in Pavia (Italy) a few years ago, where patients with liver metastases were treated by combining BNCT with auto-transplantation of the organ. Here, in Mainz, a preclinical trial has been started on patients suffering from liver metastases of colorectal carcinoma. In vitro experiments and the first animal tests have also been initiated to investigate radiobiological effects of radiation generated during BNCT. For both experiments and the treatment, a reliable dosimetry system is necessary. From work elsewhere, the use of alanine detectors appears to be an appropriate dosimetry technique. (author)

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy as new treatment for clear cell sarcoma: Trial on different animal model

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is a rare malignant tumor with a poor prognosis. In our previous study, the tumor disappeared under boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on subcutaneously-transplanted CCS-bearing animals. In the present study, the tumor disappeared under this therapy on model mice intramuscularly implanted with three different human CCS cells. BNCT led to the suppression of tumor-growth in each of the different model mice, suggesting its potentiality as an alternative to, or integrative option for, the treatment of CCS. - Highlights: • BNCT with the use of L-BPA was applied for three human clear cell sarcoma (CCS) cell lines. • BNCT trial was performed on a newly established intramuscularly CCS-bearing animal model. • A significant decrease of the tumor-volume was seen by single BNCT with the use of L-BPA. • A multiple BNCT application would be required for controlling the growth of any residual tumors

  9. A case of radiation-induced osteosarcoma treated effectively by boron neutron capture therapy

    We treated a 54-year-old Japanese female with a recurrent radiation-induced osteosarcoma arising from left occipital skull, by reactor-based boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Her tumor grew rapidly with subcutaneous and epidural extension. She eventually could not walk because of cerebellar ataxia. The tumor was inoperable and radioresistant. BNCT showed a marked initial therapeutic effect: the subcutaneous/epidural tumor reduced without radiation damage of the scalp except hair loss and the patient could walk again only 3 weeks after BNCT. BNCT seems to be a safe and very effective modality in the management of radiation-induced osteosarcomas that are not eligible for operation and other treatment modalities

  10. FiR 1 Reactor in Service for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) and Isotope Production

    The FiR 1 reactor, a 250 kW Triga reactor, has been in operation since 1962. The main purpose to run the reactor is now the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Although BNCT dominates the current utilization of the reactor, it also has an important national role in providing local enterprises and research institutions in the fields of industrial measurements, pharmaceuticals, electronics, etc. with isotope produc- tion and activation analysis services. The whole reactor building has been renovated, creating a dedicated clinical BNCT facility at the reactor. Close to 30 patients have been treated since May 1999, when the licence for patient treatment was granted to the responsible BNCT treatment organization. The treatment organization has a close connection to the Helsinki University Central Hospital. (author)

  11. Micro-dosimetric study for interpretation of outcomes from boron neutron capture therapy clinical trials

    Boron neutron capture therapy is a brachy-radiotherapy utilizing the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction that has been used to treat glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), melanoma and colon carcinoma liver metastases. GBM clinical trials resulted in modestly improved life expectancies compared with conventional therapies. Early results trials focused on malignant melanoma and colon carcinoma provide dramatically better results. Macro-dosimetry cannot explain these apparent differences. The dichotomy can only be understood using Micro-dosimetry techniques. A computer program has been created to provide an improved tissue model. This model permits the dose in each cell's cytoplasm, nucleus, and the interstitium to be calculated for ellipsoidal cells placed in either random or ordered locations. The nuclei can be centered or eccentric. The new model provides insight into the micro level for differences in the trials. The differences arise from the tissue's cellular geometry and the effects of neighboring cells. These results help to explain the observed clinical outcomes. (authors)

  12. Case numbers for a randomized clinical trial of boron neutron capture therapy for Glioblastoma multiforme

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) with Na2B12H11SH (BSH) or p-dihydroxyborylphenylalanine (BPA), and with a combination of both, was compared to radiotherapy with temozolomide, and the number of patients required to show statistically significant differences between the treatments was calculated. Whereas arms using BPA require excessive number of patients in each arm, a two-armed clinical trial with BSH and radiotherapy plus temozolomide is feasible. - Highlights: • BNCT of Glioblastoma with BPA is not more effective than RT+TMZ. • BNCT of Glioblastoma with BSH is probably more effective than RT+TMZ. • A clinical trial with patients of class V and an unmethylated MGMT gene should be conducted

  13. Radiation effects of boron neutron capture therapy on brain, skin, and eye of rats

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the radiation effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on the brain, skin, and eyes of nude rats following systemic administration of boronophenylalanine (BPA) and neutron irradiation to the head. A solution containing 120 mg of 10B-enriched-L-BPA complexed with fructose was administered IP to nude rats. Boron concentrations were ∼ 8.4, 9.4, 10.0, and 11.0 μg/g in the brain, blood, skin, and eyes, respectively, at 6 h when the animals were irradiated at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor to cause tumor regression in nude rats carrying intracerebral implants of the human melanoma cell line MRA 27. Mild to moderate increases in loose fibrous tissue were observed in the choroid plexus at estimated physical doses to the brain and blood that ranged from 4.3-7.1 Gy and 4.6-7.7 Gy, respectively, and these appeared to be dose and time dependent. Other changes in the choroid plexus included occasional infiltrates of macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes and vacuolation of epithelial cells. Dose-dependent moist desquamation of the skin was observed in all rats, but this had healed by 28 days following irradiation. Cataracts and keratitis developed in the eyes of most animals, and these were dose dependent. The minimal histopathological changes seen in the brain at doses that were sufficient to eradicate intracerebral melanoma indicates that BNCT has the potential to cure a tumor-bearing host without producing the normal brain injury usually associated with conventional external beam radiation therapy. Studies in canines, which currently are in progress, should further define the dose-effect relationships of BNCT on critical neuroanatomic structures within the brain. 42 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Atomic force microscopic neutron-induced alpha-autoradiography for boron imaging in detailed cellular histology

    The information on subcellular microdistribution of 10B compounds a cell is significant to evaluate the efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) because the damage brought by the released alpha/lithium particles is highly localized along their path, and radiation sensitivity is quite different among each cell organelles. In neutron-induced alpha-autoradiography (NIAR) technique, 10B can be measured as tracks for the energetic charged particles from 10B(n, alpha)7Li reactions in solid state track detectors. To perform the NIAR at intracellular structure level for research of 10B uptake and/or microdosimetry in BNCT, we have developed high-resolution NIAR method with an atomic force microscope (AFM). AFM has been used for analyses of biological specimens such as proteins, DNAs and surface of living cells have, however, intracellular detailed histology of cells has been hardly resolved with AFM since flat surface of sectioned tissue has quite less topographical contrast among each organelle. In our new sample preparation method using UV processing, materials that absorb UV in a semi-thin section are selectively eroded and vaporized by UV exposure, and then fine relief for cellular organelles such as mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, filament structure and so on reveals on flat surface of the section, which can be observed with an AFM. The imaging resolution was comparable to TEM imaging of cells. This new method provides fast and cost-effective observation of histological sections with an AFM. Combining this method with NIAR technique, intracellular boron mapping would be possible. (author)

  15. Determination of boron in aqueous solutions by solid state nuclear track detectors technique, using a filtered neutron beam

    The solid state nuclear track detectors technique has been used for determination of boron in aqueous solutions, using a filtered neutron beam. The particles tracks from the 10B(n,α)Li7 reaction were registered in the CR-39 film, chemically etched in a (30%) KOH solution 700C during 90 minutes. The obtained results showed the usefulness of this technique for boron determination in the ppm range. The inferior detectable limit was 9 ppm. The combined track registration efficiency factor K has been evaluated in the solutions, for the CR-39 detector and its values is K= (4,60 -+ 0,06). 10 -4 cm. (Author)

  16. Molecular Medicine: Synthesis and In Vivo Detection of Agents for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. Final Report

    The primary objective of the project was the development of in vivo methods for the detection and evaluation of tumors in humans. The project was focused on utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to monitor the distribution and pharmacokinetics of a current boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) by labeling it with a fluorine-18, a positron emitting isotope. The PET data was then used to develop enhanced treatment planning protocols. The study also involved the synthesis of new tumor selective BNCT agents that could be labeled with radioactive nuclides for the in vivo detection of boron

  17. Molecular Medicine: Synthesis and In Vivo Detection of Agents for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. Final Report

    Kabalka, G. W.

    2005-06-28

    The primary objective of the project was the development of in vivo methods for the detection and evaluation of tumors in humans. The project was focused on utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to monitor the distribution and pharamacokinetics of a current boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) by labeling it with a fluorine-18, a positron emitting isotope. The PET data was then used to develop enhanced treatment planning protocols. The study also involved the synthesis of new tumor selective BNCTagents that could be labeled with radioactive nuclides for the in vivo detection of boron.

  18. Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) as a potential therapy for rheumatoid arthritis: boron biodistribution study in a model of antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits.

    Trivillin, Verónica A; Abramson, David B; Bumaguin, Gaston E; Bruno, Leandro J; Garabalino, Marcela A; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Heber, Elisa M; Feldman, Sara; Schwint, Amanda E

    2014-11-01

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) is explored for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to perform boron biodistribution studies in a model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in female New Zealand rabbits, with the boron carriers boronophenylalanine (BPA) and sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) to assess the potential feasibility of BNCS for RA. Rabbits in chronic phase of AIA were used for biodistribution studies employing the following protocols: intra-articular (ia) (a) BPA-f 0.14 M (0.7 mg (10)B), (b) GB-10 (5 mg (10)B), (c) GB-10 (50 mg (10)B) and intravenous (iv), (d) BPA-f 0.14 M (15.5 mg (10)B/kg), (e) GB-10 (50 mg (10)B/kg), and (f) BPA-f (15.5 mg (10)B/kg) + GB-10 (50 mg (10)B/kg). At different post-administration times (13-85 min for ia and 3 h for iv), samples of blood, pathological synovium (target tissue), cartilage, tendon, muscle, and skin were taken for boron measurement by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The intra-articular administration protocols at 20 ppm) in the pathological synovium. Dosimetric estimations suggest that BNCS would be able to achieve a therapeutically useful dose in pathological synovium without exceeding the radiotolerance of normal tissues in the treatment volume, employing boron carriers approved for use in humans. Radiobiological in vivo studies will be necessary to determine the actual therapeutic efficacy of BNCS to treat RA in an experimental model. PMID:25156017

  19. Current status of boron neutron capture therapy of high grade gliomas and recurrent head and neck cancer

    Barth Rolf F

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Clinical interest in BNCT has focused primarily on the treatment of high grade gliomas, recurrent cancers of the head and neck region and either primary or metastatic melanoma. Neutron sources for BNCT currently have been limited to specially modified nuclear reactors, which are or until the recent Japanese natural disaster, were available in Japan, United States, Finland and several other European countries, Argentina and Taiwan. Accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams also could be used for BNCT and these are being developed in several countries. It is anticipated that the first Japanese accelerator will be available for therapeutic use in 2013. The major hurdle for the design and synthesis of boron delivery agents has been the requirement for selective tumor targeting to achieve boron concentrations in the range of 20 μg/g. This would be sufficient to deliver therapeutic doses of radiation with minimal normal tissue toxicity. Two boron drugs have been used clinically, a dihydroxyboryl derivative of phenylalanine, referred to as boronophenylalanine or “BPA”, and sodium borocaptate or “BSH” (Na2B12H11SH. In this report we will provide an overview of other boron delivery agents that currently are under evaluation, neutron sources in use or under development for BNCT, clinical dosimetry, treatment planning, and finally a summary of previous and on-going clinical studies for high grade gliomas and recurrent tumors of the head and neck region. Promising results have been obtained with both groups of patients but these outcomes must be more rigorously evaluated in larger

  20. Current status of boron neutron capture therapy of high grade gliomas and recurrent head and neck cancer

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Clinical interest in BNCT has focused primarily on the treatment of high grade gliomas, recurrent cancers of the head and neck region and either primary or metastatic melanoma. Neutron sources for BNCT currently have been limited to specially modified nuclear reactors, which are or until the recent Japanese natural disaster, were available in Japan, the United States, Finland and several other European countries, Argentina and Taiwan. Accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams also could be used for BNCT and these are being developed in several countries. It is anticipated that the first Japanese accelerator will be available for therapeutic use in 2013. The major hurdle for the design and synthesis of boron delivery agents has been the requirement for selective tumor targeting to achieve boron concentrations in the range of 20 μg/g. This would be sufficient to deliver therapeutic doses of radiation with minimal normal tissue toxicity. Two boron drugs have been used clinically, a dihydroxyboryl derivative of phenylalanine, referred to as boronophenylalanine or “BPA”, and sodium borocaptate or “BSH” (Na2B12H11SH). In this report we will provide an overview of other boron delivery agents that currently are under evaluation, neutron sources in use or under development for BNCT, clinical dosimetry, treatment planning, and finally a summary of previous and on-going clinical studies for high grade gliomas and recurrent tumors of the head and neck region. Promising results have been obtained with both groups of patients but these outcomes must be more rigorously evaluated in larger, possibly randomized clinical

  1. Intracellular boron localization and uptake in cell cultures using imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (ion microscopy) for neutron capture therapy for cancer.

    Bennett, B D; Zha, X; Gay, I; Morrison, G H

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative ion microscopy of freeze-fractured, freeze-dried cultured cells is a technique for single cell and subcellular elemental analysis. This review describes the technique and its usefulness in determining the uptake and subcellular distribution of the boron from boron neutron capture therapy drugs. PMID:1511239

  2. Three-dimensional radiation dose distribution analysis for boron neutron capture therapy

    This paper reports that calculation of physically realistic radiation dose distributions for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a complex, three-dimensional problem. Traditional one-dimensional (slab) and two-dimensional (cylindrical) models, while useful for neutron beam design and performance analysis, do not provide sufficient accuracy for actual clinical use because the assumed symmetries inherent in such models do not ordinarily exist in the real world. Fortunately, however, it is no longer necessary to make these types of simplifying assumptions. Recent dramatic advances in computing technology have brought full three-dimensional dose distribution calculations for BNCT into the realm of practicality for a wide variety of routine applications. Once a geometric model and the appropriate material compositions have been determined, either stochastic (Monte Carlo) or deterministic calculations of all dose components of interest can now be performed more rapidly and inexpensively for the true three-dimensional geometries typical of actual clinical applications of BNCT. Demonstrations of both Monte Carlo and Deterministic techniques for performing three-dimensional dose distribution analysis for BNCT are provided. Calculated results are presented for a three-dimensional Lucite canine-head phantom irradiated in the epithermal neutron beam available at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. The deterministic calculations are performed using the three-dimensional discrete ordinates method. The Monte Carlo calculations employ a novel method for obtaining spatially detailed radiation flux and dose distributions without the use of flux-at-a-point estimators. The calculated results are in good agreement with each other and with thermal neutron flux measurements taken using copper-gold flux wires placed at various locations in the phantom

  3. Physical and tumor biological aspects and calculation model of dosage in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    Rassow, J.; Poeller, F.; Meissner, P. (Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Abt. fuer Medizinische Strahlenphysik); Steinberg, F. (Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Strahlenbiologie)

    1993-01-01

    Fundamentally different aspects apply to dosage in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) compared to that in the case of normal radiotherapy with photons, electrons or heavy particles such as neutrons. The reason is that the latter only requires a knowledge of the stochastic distribution of the absorbed dose within cells, radiation quality and atomic composition of tissue in the regions of interest, whereas for the former the absolute concentration and microscopic distribution of [sup 10]B atoms in inter- and intracellular spaces of tumor and healthy cells is additionally of equal importance. The effects of radiation without [sup 10]B must always be superimposed on those of heavy particles resulting from neutron capture reactions on [sup 10]B atoms. Complex geometrical calculaations are necessary with respect to ranges of the heavy particles smaller than a cell diameter. Apart from the direct effects of radiation without [sup 10]B, the dosage therefore depends on thermal neutron fluence, [sup 10]B concentration, its extreme inhomogeneous macroscopic distribution in the tumor tissue, the cellular localization of the [sup 10]B atoms in the large intercellular space, the cell membrane, within cytoplasm or the cell nucleus, the geometrical probability of hitting the cell nucleus, and that such a hit finally results in a cell killing, and a Poisson statistical enhancement factor, which describes the dose-effect relation for cell survival. The calculations necessary are demonstrated in the case of a normal and a tumor cell type, each with representative cell diameter and nucleus size. It is evident that the microscopic distribution of [sup 10]B atoms is one of the most critical parameters which is still insufficiently known. (orig.).

  4. Design of a plate type fuel based - low power medical reactor for boron neutron capture therapy

    The interest in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been renewed for cancer therapy with some indication of its potential efficacy in recent years. To solve the most important problem that thermal neutrons are attenuated rapidly in tissue due to absorption and scattering, thermal neutron beams are replaced by epithermal neutron beams. Thus, epithermal neutron beams are directed towards a patient's head, during their passage through tissue these neutrons rapidly lose energy by elastic scattering until they end up as thermal neutrons in target tumor volume. The thermal neutrons thus formed, are captured by the 10B atoms which become 11B atoms in the excited state for a very short time 10-12 sec. The 11B atoms then decay producing alpha particles, 7Li recoil nuclei and gamma rays. Tumor cells are killed selectively by the energetic alpha particles and 7Li fission products. We propose a 300kW slab type reactor core having thin and large surface areas so that most of the neutrons emerging from the faces and entering moderator region are fission spectrum neutrons to acquire high intense epithermal neutron beam with high quality. All faces of the slab core, East-West region and North-South region, were considered for epithermal neutron beam collimators. Plate-type U3Si2-Al dispersion fuel having high uranium density is very compatible with composing of a slab type core. The reactor core is loaded with 3.89kg U235 and has the dimension of about 23.46cm width, 31.28cm length and 64.8cm height, with 216 locations to place 204 fuel elements, eight control plates and four safety plates. The general-purpose MCNP 4B code was used to carry out the neutron and photon transport computations. Both keff criticality and fixed source problems were computed. We could reduce at least 7 times long computer time (105 to 140 h in a run) needed to initiate enough neutrons in a run ( 6000 to 8000 cycles in a run with 3000 neutrons per cycle) using the PVM (Parallel Virtual

  5. Calculations of neutron source at the KYIV research reactor for the boron neutron capture therapy aims

    Calculation results of an epithermal neutron source which can be created at the Kyiv Research Reactor (KRR) by means of placing of specially selected moderators, filters, collimators, and shielding into the 10-th horizontal experimental tube (so-called thermal column) are presented. The general Monte-Carlo radiation transport code MCNP4C [1], the Oak Ridge isotope generation code ORIGEN2 [2] and the NJOY99 [3] nuclear data processing system have been used for these calculations

  6. Comparison of calculated and measured spectral response and intrinsic efficiency for a boron-loaded plastic neutron detector

    Boron-loaded scintillators offer the potential for neutron spectrometers with a simplified, peak-shaped response. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, has been used to calculate the detector characteristics of a scintillator made of a boron-loaded plastic, BC454, for neutrons between 1 and 7 MeV. Comparisons with measurements are made of spectral response for neutron energies between 4 and 6 MeV and of intrinsic efficiencies for neutrons up to 7 MeV. In order to compare the calculated spectra with measured data, enhancements to MCNP were introduced to generate tallies of light output spectra for recoil events terminating in a final capture by 10B. The comparison of measured and calculated spectra shows agreement in response shape, full width at half maximum, and recoil energy deposition. Intrinsic efficiencies measured to 7 MeV are also in agreement with the MCNP calculations. These results validate the code predictions and affirm the value of MCNP as a useful tool for development of sensor concepts based on boron-loaded plastics. (orig.)

  7. Therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy mediated by boron-rich liposomes for oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model

    Heber, Elisa M. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Hawthorne, M. Frederick [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). International Inst. of Nano and Molecular Medicine; Kueffer, Peter J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). International Inst. of Nano and Molecular Medicine; Garabalino, Marcela A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thorp, Silvia I. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pozzi, Emiliano C. C. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Hughes, Andrea Monti [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Maitz, Charles A. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). International Inst. of Nano and Molecular Medicine; Jalisatgi, Satish S. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). International Inst. of Nano and Molecular Medicine; Nigg, David W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Curotto, Paula [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Trivillin, Verónica A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Schwint, Amanda E. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-11-11

    Unilamellar liposomes formulated with an equimolar mixture of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the lipid bilayer, and encapsulating Na3[1-(2’-B10-H9)-2-NH3B10H8] were prepared by probe sonication and investigated in vivo. Microwave assisted digestion followed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy was utilized to determine the biodistribution of boron in various tissues following either a single tail vein injection or two identical injections (separated by 24 hours) of the liposomal suspension in BALB/c mice bearing EMT6 mammary adenocarcinomas in their right flank. Double-injection protocols resulted in a boron content in the tumor exceeding 50 µg of boron per gram of tissue for 48 to 72 hours subsequent to the initial injection while tumor:blood boron ratios were more ideal from 54 hours (1.9:1) to 96 hours (5.7:1) subsequent to the initial injection. Tumor bearing mice were given a double-injection of liposomes containing the 10B-enriched analogs of the aforementioned agents and subjected to a 30 minute irradiation by thermal neutrons with a flux of 8.8 x 108 (±7%) neutrons/cm2 s integrated over the energy range of 0.0 – 0.414 eV. Significant tumor response for a single BNCT treatment was demonstrated by growth curves versus a control group. Vastly diminished tumor growth was witnessed at 14 days (186% increase versus 1551% in controls) in mice that were given a second injection/radiation treatment 7 days after the first. Mice given a one hour neutron irradiation following the double-injection of liposomes had a similar response (169% increase at 14 days) suggesting that neutron fluence is the limiting factor towards BNCT efficacy in this study.

  8. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Breaks New Ground for Cancer Radiotherapy

    10B nucleus captures a slow speed neutron (thermal neutron), and imediately the nucleus slits into 4He nucleus and 7Li nucleus, These have very short track rangs that don't exceed general cell diameter. So, if 10B-compound accumulates in cancer cells by considerable selectivity, the cancer is destroyed selectively. BNCT was applied to malignant brain tumor (GBM) in USA for 10 years (1951-1961). In Japan the clinical study was done for GBM in 1968, and thereafter, malignant melanoma of the skin was also treated by BNCT using Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). In 2001, the first application to the recurrent H&N cancer was performed at KURRI and scored a great sucess. The research team of KURRI have performed a lot of BNCT using KUR neutron beam in collaboration with many co-investrigatiors outside KURRI. The current number of BNCT exceeded 660 (over 50% of total BNCT in the world). It includes several world's first trials represented by case of recurrent head and neck cancers, malignant pleural mesotheliomas, local recurrence of digestive organ cancers and breast cancers. The utility of FBPA PET for sucessful BNCT has been also asscssed. Based on these achievement, we earnestly promoted the project to develop an accelerator BNCT system from 2007. The neutron fluence rate must be high sufficiently and stable at least for 1 hour. An equipment has to casyto operate and small enough in order to install in a hospital. The operation cost of the equipment also have to be inexpensive for the future spread. We chose a cyclotron, 30 MeV proton, over 1 Ma of electric current and a beryllium target. After pre-clinical tests on neutron beam characteristics, phase I clinical test was started in 2012 to examine the safety and acceptability of neutron system, boron compound BPA and their combination. The first target cancer is a recurrent malignat glioma, and the second is an inoperable locally advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer. For malignant glioma, it

  9. Irradiation hardening of pressure vessel steels at 60 C: The role of thermal neutrons and boron

    Six split melt A533B-type model alloys, with different combinations of copper, nickel and boron contents, were irradiated at 60 C in a neutron spectrum with a thermal-to-fast (E > 1 MeV) ratio of about 370. The resulting yield stress increases were compared to hardening produced by irradiations at a low thermal-to-fast flux ratio. The latter data were obtained in a larger experiment on 60 C hardening that showed: (i) a negligible effect of flux; (ii) hardening increases with the square root of fluence above a low threshold; and (iii) an individually weak, but collectively significant, influence of copper, nickel, manganese, phosphorus and molybdenum. These and other observations have been interpreted to suggest that low temperature hardening is caused by features formed in displacement cascades. However, this interpretation is not consistent with the results of this study which show that yield stress increases are even larger for conditions dominated by low energy PKAs created by thermal neutrons. The thermal-to-fast dpa hardening efficiency factor was estimated to be about 1.7 ± 0.5, which is comparable to the corresponding theoretical ratio of residual defects. The data also suggest that transmutant products from the 10B(n,α) reaction may contribute a small increment to hardening

  10. Summary of dose plan system for boron neutron capture therapy 'SERA' and it's application at Kyoto University Reactor (KUR)

    It is difficult for epithermal neutron irradiation to measure doses of thermal and fast neutron at near the surface of body in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Dose plan system for the BNCT, 'SERA' (Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications) was developed by the groups of INEEL (Idaho National Engineering and Environment Laboratory) and MSU (Montana State University) in USA. The SERA system consists of seven modules in which contain image data of CT or MRI, three dimensional image data, two or three dimensional calculation, Monte Carlo simulation calculation, plan of irradiation conditions including boron concentration, one dimensional dose distribution and dose-volume histogram, and two dimensional dose distribution each. The BNCT using epithermal neutron irradiation and the SERA system was carried out to eight patients of tumor, six persons of oral tumor and two persons of brain tumor, in the KUR during Dec. 2001 - Oct. 2002. Thermal neutron flux, epithermal neutron flux and gamma ray doses are measured by phantom experiments. The calculated results of the SERA system give good agreement with the values obtained by the phantom experiments, within accuracy of 10%. (M. Suetake)

  11. Refinement of the dual ionisation chamber dosimetry carried out at the accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility of the University of Birmingham

    The paper presents the refined dual ionisation chamber technique used for in-air and in-phantom measurements in the Birmingham epithermal neutron beam. The study includes the derivation of the spectrum-dependent relative neutron sensitivity of the tissue-equivalent ionisation chamber. The average values over shallow depths for the kt parameter in A150 is 0.85 +/- 0.04, corresponding to an average value of 0.80 for water. For photon dosimetry in mixed fields, the formalism initially proposed by Munck af Rosenschold et al has been applied at a specific depth of 3 cm using MCNP4C as the radiation transport tool in the mixed beam and the reference calibration beam to generate electron fluence profiles in the detector gas cavities. The BEAMnrc code was used to generate the starting photon spectrum for the 8MV photon beam. The effect of the chosen energy-indexing algorithm on the in-cavity electron dose using the MNCP4C *F8 tally was also investigated. (author)

  12. Development of an accelerator based BNCT facility. Following the Ibaraki BNCT project development process

    An accelerator-based BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) facility is being constructed at the Ibaraki Neutron Medical Research Center. It consists of a proton linac (8 MeV energy and 10 mA average current), a beryllium target, and a moderator system to provide an epi-thermal neutron flux for patient treatment. The technology choices for this present system were driven by the need to site the facility in a hospital and where low residual activity is essential. The maximum neutron energy produced from an 8 MeV-proton is 6 MeV, which is below the threshold energy of the main nuclear reactions which produce radioactive products. The down side of this technology choice is that it produces a high density heat load on the target so that cooling and hydrogen blistering amelioration prevent sever challenges requiring successful R and D progress. The latest design of the target and moderator system shows that a flux of 2.5x109 epi-thermal neutrons/cm2/sec can be obtained. This is two times higher than the flux from the existing nuclear reactor based BNCT facility at JAEA (JRR-4). (author)

  13. Dosimetric analysis of BNCT - Boron Neutron Capture Therapy - coupled to 252Cf brachytherapy

    The incidence of brain tumors is increasing in world population; however, the treatments employed in this type of tumor have a high rate of failure and in some cases have been considered palliative, depending on histology and staging of tumor. Its necessary to achieve the control tumor dose without the spread irradiation cause damage in the brain, affecting patient neurological function. Stereotactic radiosurgery is a technique that achieves this; nevertheless, other techniques that can be used on the brain tumor control must be developed, in order to guarantee lower dose on health surroundings tissues other techniques must be developing. The 252Cf brachytherapy applied to brain tumors has already been suggested, showing promising results in comparison to photon source, since the active source is placed into the tumor, providing greater dose deposition, while more distant regions are spared. BNCT - Boron Neutron Capture Therapy - is another technique that is in developing to brain tumors control, showing theoretical superiority on the rules of conventional treatments, due to a selective irradiation of neoplasics cells, after the patient receives a borate compound infusion and be subjected to a epithermal neutrons beam. This work presents dosimetric studies of the coupling techniques: BNCT with 252Cf brachytherapy, conducted through computer simulation in MCNP5 code, using a precise and well discretized voxel model of human head, which was incorporated a representative Glioblastoma Multiform tumor. The dosimetric results from MCNP5 code were exported to SISCODES program, which generated isodose curves representing absorbed dose rate in the brain. Isodose curves, neutron fluency, and dose components from BNCT and 252Cf brachytherapy are presented in this paper. (author)

  14. Tomographic image of prompt gamma ray from boron neutron capture therapy: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    The resulting neutron captures in 10B are used for radiation therapy. The occurrence point of the characteristic 478 keV prompt gamma rays agrees with the neutron capture point. If these prompt gamma rays are detected by external instruments such as a gamma camera or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), the therapy region can be monitored during the treatment using images. A feasibility study and analysis of a reconstructed image using many projections (128) were conducted. The optimization of the detection system and a detailed neutron generator simulation were beyond the scope of this study. The possibility of extracting a 3D BNCT-SPECT image was confirmed using the Monte Carlo simulation and OSEM algorithm. The quality of the prompt gamma ray SPECT image obtained from BNCT was evaluated quantitatively using three different boron uptake regions and was shown to depend on the location and size relations. The prospects for obtaining an actual BNCT-SPECT image were also estimated from the quality of the simulated image and the simulation conditions. When multi tumor regions should be treated using the BNCT method, a reasonable model to determine how many useful images can be obtained from SPECT can be provided to the BNCT facilities based on the preceding imaging research. However, because the scope of this research was limited to checking the feasibility of 3D BNCT-SPECT image reconstruction using multiple projections, along with an evaluation of the image, some simulation conditions were taken from previous studies. In the future, a simulation will be conducted that includes optimized conditions for an actual BNCT facility, along with an imaging process for motion correction in BNCT. Although an excessively long simulation time was required to obtain enough events for image reconstruction, the feasibility of acquiring a 3D BNCT-SPECT image using multiple projections was confirmed using a Monte Carlo simulation, and a quantitative image analysis was

  15. Influence of working gas on the properties of boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector by Garfield simulation

    Background: Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) is a kind of gas detector developed in 1995. Purpose: For its excellent time resolution and high efficiency, MRPC is used to detect thermal neutron by coating boron on the inner glass. Methods: The performances of the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector are largely affected by the component or proportion of the working gas, so it is important to optimize the proportion of working gas. Then Garfield was used to simulate the gas parameter, such as Townsend coefficient η, electron attachment coefficient α, drift velocity ν and diffusion coefficient D. Results: The time resolution σt and detection efficiency E of MRPC were calculated. Conclusion: Through the simulation, the proportion of working gas is optimized to provide necessary guidance for the fabrication of the detector. (authors)

  16. Intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy for malignant gliomas. First clinical results of Tsukuba phase I/II trial using JAERI mixed thermal-epithermal beam

    Since October 1999, a clinical trial of intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy (IOBNCT) is in progress at JRR-4 (Japan Research Reactor-4) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using mixed thermal-epithermal beam (thermal neutron beam I: TNB-I). Compared to pure thermal beam (thermal neutron beam II: TNB-II), TNB-I has an improved neutron delivery into the deep region than TNB-II. The clinical protocol and the preliminary results will be discussed. (author)

  17. Boron neutron capture therapy induces apoptosis of glioma cells through Bcl-2/Bax

    Mao Xinggang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT is an alternative treatment modality for patients with glioma. The aim of this study was to determine whether induction of apoptosis contributes to the main therapeutic efficacy of BNCT and to compare the relative biological effect (RBE of BNCT, γ-ray and reactor neutron irradiation. Methods The neutron beam was obtained from the Xi'an Pulsed Reactor (XAPR and γ-rays were obtained from [60Co] γ source of the Fourth Military Medical University (FMMU in China. Human glioma cells (the U87, U251, and SHG44 cell lines were irradiated by neutron beams at the XAPR or [60Co] γ-rays at the FMMU with different protocols: Group A included control nonirradiated cells; Group B included cells treated with 4 Gy of [60Co] γ-rays; Group C included cells treated with 8 Gy of [60Co] γ-rays; Group D included cells treated with 4 Gy BPA (p-borono-phenylalanine-BNCT; Group E included cells treated with 8 Gy BPA-BNCT; Group F included cells irradiated in the reactor for the same treatment period as used for Group D; Group G included cells irradiated in the reactor for the same treatment period as used for Group E; Group H included cells irradiated with 4 Gy in the reactor; and Group I included cells irradiated with 8 Gy in the reactor. Cell survival was determined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT cytotoxicity assay. The morphology of cells was detected by Hoechst33342 staining and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The apoptosis rate was detected by flow cytometer (FCM. The level of Bcl-2 and Bax protein was measured by western blot analysis. Results Proliferation of U87, U251, and SHG44 cells was much more strongly inhibited by BPA-BNCT than by irradiation with [60Co] γ-rays (P 60Co] γ-rays (P P Conclusions Compared with ��-ray and reactor neutron irradiation, a higher RBE can be achieved upon treatment of glioma cells with BNCT. Glioma cell apoptosis induced by

  18. Intercomparison of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples.

    Schütz, C L; Brochhausen, C; Hampel, G; Iffland, D; Kuczewski, B; Otto, G; Schmitz, T; Stieghorst, C; Kratz, J V

    2012-10-01

    Boron determination in blood and tissue samples is a crucial task especially for treatment planning, preclinical research, and clinical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Comparison of clinical findings remains difficult due to a variety of analytical methods, protocols, and standard reference materials in use. This paper addresses the comparability of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples. It was possible to demonstrate that three different methods relying on three different principles of sample preparation and boron detection can be validated against each other and yield consistent results for both blood and tissue samples. The samples were obtained during a clinical study for the application of BNCT for liver malignancies and therefore represent a realistic situation for boron analysis. PMID:22918535

  19. Intercomparison of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples

    Schuetz, C.L. [University of Mainz, Institute for Nuclear Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg-University of Mainz, Institute for Nuclear Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Brochhausen, C. [University of Mainz, Institute of Pathology, Mainz (Germany); Hampel, G.; Iffland, D.; Schmitz, T.; Stieghorst, C.; Kratz, J.V. [University of Mainz, Institute for Nuclear Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Kuczewski, B. [Regional Council Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Otto, G. [University of Mainz, Department of Hepatobiliary, Pancreatic and Transplantation Surgery, Mainz (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Boron determination in blood and tissue samples is a crucial task especially for treatment planning, preclinical research, and clinical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Comparison of clinical findings remains difficult due to a variety of analytical methods, protocols, and standard reference materials in use. This paper addresses the comparability of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples. It was possible to demonstrate that three different methods relying on three different principles of sample preparation and boron detection can be validated against each other and yield consistent results for both blood and tissue samples. The samples were obtained during a clinical study for the application of BNCT for liver malignancies and therefore represent a realistic situation for boron analysis. (orig.)

  20. Intercomparison of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples

    Boron determination in blood and tissue samples is a crucial task especially for treatment planning, preclinical research, and clinical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Comparison of clinical findings remains difficult due to a variety of analytical methods, protocols, and standard reference materials in use. This paper addresses the comparability of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples. It was possible to demonstrate that three different methods relying on three different principles of sample preparation and boron detection can be validated against each other and yield consistent results for both blood and tissue samples. The samples were obtained during a clinical study for the application of BNCT for liver malignancies and therefore represent a realistic situation for boron analysis. (orig.)

  1. Synthesis of conjugates of polyhedral boron compounds with tumor-seeking molecules for neutron capture therapy

    Bregadze, V., E-mail: bre@ineos.ac.ru [A.N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Str. 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Semioshkin, A.; Sivaev, I. [A.N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Str. 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    Recent achievements in design and synthesis of boronated acids, amino acids, glycerols as well as conjugates of polyhedral boron hydrides (ortho-carborane, closo-dodecaborate and cobalt bis(dicarbollide)) with natural porphyrins, carbohydrates and nucleosides are described.

  2. Considerations for boron neutron capture therapy studies; Consideracoes sobre o estudo da BNCT (terapia de captura neutronica por boro)

    Faria Gaspar, P. de

    1994-12-31

    Radiotherapy is indispensable as a mean to eradicate deeply or infiltrating tumor tissue that can not be removed surgically. Therefore, it is not selective and may also kill the surrounding health tissue. The principle of BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) consist in targeting a tumor selectively with a boron-10 compound. This nuclide has a large capture cross section for thermal neutrons and the nuclear reaction and the delivered energy in locus will selective the tumor. Since its initial proposal in 1963 BNCT has made much progress, however it is not used in a routine treatment. In this work it was approached some complex procedures, as the obtention of selective boron compounds, the adequate set up of neutron beams, the biodistribution, the in vivo and in vitro studies, and also human patients treatments. This work provide fundamentals about BNCT to professional of different areas of knowledge since it comprises multidisciplinary study. It includes appendixes for the ones not related to the field for a better comprehension of the many aspects involved. It is also presented a glossary containing technical and basic aspects involved. It is also presented a glossary containing technical and basic terms referred in the work. (author). 174 refs, 1 fig, 12 apps.

  3. FIR 1 reactor in service for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and isotope production

    Full text: The FIR 1-reactor, a 250 kW Triga reactor, has been in operation since 1962. The main purpose for the existence of the reactor is now the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The BNCT work dominates the current utilization of the reactor: three or four days per week are reserved for BNCT purposes and the rest for other purposes such as isotope production and neutron activation analysis. In the 1990's a BNCT treatment facility was build at the FiR1 reactor located at Technical Research Centre of Finland. A special new neutron moderator material FluentalTM (Al+AlF3+Li) developed at VTT ensures the superior quality of the neutron beam. Also the treatment environment is of world top quality. The ground floor of the reactor hall was provided with a new entrance, easily accessible by any patient vehicle, a radio therapy control room and rooms for patient preparation and laboratories. The top of the reactor tank was separated from the reactor hall in order to confine contamination in case of a leakage from irradiation samples or fuel elements. The ventilation of the building, emergency power supply system, heat exchangers and the secondary cooling circuit of the reactor including cooling towers were completely redesigned and rebuilt. The expenditure of designing and accomplishing the construction work described was about 4 million euros. The costs were partly financed with venture capital via Radtek Ltd., particularly established for this enterprise. Close to thirty patients have been treated at FiR 1 since May 1999, when the license for patient treatment was granted to the responsible BNCT treatment organization, Boneca Corporation. VTT as the reactor operator has a long term contract with the Boneca Corp. to provide the facility and irradiation services for the patient treatments. The BNCT facility has been licensed for clinical use and is being surveyed by several national public health authorities including the Finnish Nuclear and Radiation Safety

  4. The thermal conductivity of boron carbide after fast-neutron irradiation to a burn-up of 12% total boron

    The thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide pellets has been measured between 20 and 2000 oC by the laser flash method. Thermal conductivity has been derived from the measured thermal diffusivity and density, and calculated specific heat capacity values, which allow for fission product retention. Pellets of this material have been irradiated in the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) at Dounreay, with pellet centre temperatures up to 1500 oC and a maximum total boron burn-up of 12%. Thermal diffusivity measurements on the irradiated material up to 2000 oC showed a marked decrease in the thermal conductivity. This decrease was caused largely by the formation of helium bubbles in the material. Heating of the material during the thermal diffusivity measurements caused the helium bubbles to coalesce, producing fewer, larger bubbles, with a corresponding increase in the thermal conductivity of the material measured on subsequent runs. The thermal conductivity of the irradiated material is almost temperature independent on an individual measurement run. The thermal conductivity values reported extend the database on irradiated boron carbide in terms of both the measurement temperature and the burn-up, and have been incorporated into the fast-reactor control-rod modelling code, BORCON. (Author)

  5. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), using the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Objective: BNCT is a binary treatment modality based on the nuclear reactions that occur when boron (10B) is exposed to thermal neutrons. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of p-boronophenylalanine (BPA)-based BNCT. The objective of the Phase I/II trial was to evaluate BPA-fructose (BPA-F) as a boron delivery agent for GBM and to study the feasibility and safety of a single-fraction of BNCT. Materials and Methods: The trial design required i) a BPA-F biodistribution study performed at the time of craniotomy; and ii) BNCT within 4 weeks of the craniotomy. From September 94 to July 95, 10 patients with biopsy proven GBM were treated. All but 1 patient underwent a biodistribution study receiving IV BPA-F at the time of craniotomy. Multiple tissue samples and concurrent blood and urine samples were collected for evaluation of the boron concentration and clearance kinetics. For BNCT all patients received 250 mg/kgm of BPA-F (IV infusion over 2 hrs) followed by neutron irradiation. The blood 10B concentration during irradiation was used to calculate the time of neutron exposure. The 3D treatment planning was done using the BNCT treatment planning software developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The BNCT dose is expressed as the sum of the physical dose components corrected for both the RBE and the 10B localization factor with the unit Gy-Eq. The photon-equivalent dose, where the thermal neutron fluence reaches a maximum, is the peak-dose equivalent. A single-fraction of BNCT was delivered prescribing 10.5 Gy-Eq (9 patients) and 13.8 Gy-Eq (1 patient) as the peak dose-equivalent to the normal brain. The peak dose rate was kept below 27 cGy-Eq/min. Results: Biodistribution data: The maximum blood 10B concentration was observed at the end of the infusion and scaled as a linear function of the administered dose. The 10B concentration in the scalp and in the GBM tissue was higher than in blood by 1.5 x and at least 3.5 x

  6. A benchmark analysis of radiation flux distribution for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of canine brain tumors

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly-heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This work describes a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador Retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador Retriever head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for the model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that the peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10-20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models

  7. The radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy: Are ''photon-equivalent'' doses really photon-equivalent?

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) produces a mixture of radiation dose components. The high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles are more damaging in tissue than equal doses of low-LET radiation. Each of the high-LET components can multiplied by an experimentally determined factor to adjust for the increased biological effectiveness and the resulting sum expressed in photon-equivalent units (Gy-Eq). BNCT doses in photon-equivalent units are based on a number of assumptions. It may be possible to test the validity of these assumptions and the accuracy of the calculated BNCT doses by 1) comparing the effects of BNCT in other animal or biological models where the effects of photon radiation are known, or 2) if there are endpoints reached in the BNCT dose escalation clinical trials that can be related to the known response to photons of the tissue in question. The calculated Gy-Eq BNCT doses delivered to dogs and to humans with BPA and the epithermal neutron beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor were compared to expected responses to photon irradiation. The data indicate that Gy-Eq doses in brain may be underestimated. Doses to skin are consistent with the expected response to photons. Gy-Eq doses to tumor are significantly overestimated. A model system of cells in culture irradiated at various depths in a lucite phantom using the epithermal beam is under development. Preliminary data indicate that this approach can be used to detect differences in the relative biological effectiveness of the beam. The rat 9L gliosarcoma cell survival data was converted to photon-equivalent doses using the same factors assumed in the clinical studies. The results superimposed on the survival curve derived from irradiation with Cs-137 photons indicating the potential utility of this model system. (author)

  8. A benchmark analysis of radiation flux distribution for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of canine brain tumors

    Moran, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly-heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This work describes a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador Retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador Retriever head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for the model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that the peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10-20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  9. Neutron capture therapy of epidermal growth factor (+) gliomas using boronated cetuximab (IMC-C225) as a delivery agent

    Cetuximab (IMC-C225) is a monoclonal antibody directed against both the wild-type and mutant vIII isoform of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the monoclonal antibody (MoAb), cetuximab, as a boron delivery agent for neutron capture therapy (NCT) of brain tumors. Twenty-four hours following intratumoral (i.t.) administration of boronated cetuximab (C225-G5-B1100), the mean boron concentration in rats bearing either F98EGFR or F98WT gliomas were 92.3±23.3 μg/g and 36.5±18.8 μg/g, respectively. In contrast, the uptake of boronated dendrimer (G5-B1000) was 6.7±3.6 μg/g. Based on its favorable in vivo uptake, C225-G5-B1100 was evaluated as a delivery agent for BNCT in F98EGFR glioma bearing rats. The mean survival time (MST) of rats that received C225-G5-B1100, administered by convection enhanced delivery (CED), was 45±3 d compared to 25±3 d for untreated control animals. A further enhancement in MST to >59 d was obtained by administering C225-G5-B1100 in combination with i.v. boronophenylalanine (BPA). These data are the first to demonstrate the efficacy of a boronated MoAb for BNCT of an intracerebral (i.c.) glioma and are paradigmatic for future studies using a combination of boronated MoAbs and low molecular weight delivery agents

  10. Neutron capture therapy of epidermal growth factor (+) gliomas using boronated cetuximab (IMC-C225) as a delivery agent

    Barth, Rolf F. E-mail: barth.1@osu.edu; Wu Gong; Yang Weilian; Binns, Peter J.; Riley, Kent J.; Patel, Hemant; Coderre, Jeffrey A.; Tjarks, Werner; Bandyopadhyaya, A.K.; Thirumamagal, B.T.S.; Ciesielski, Michael J.; Fenstermaker, Robert A

    2004-11-01

    Cetuximab (IMC-C225) is a monoclonal antibody directed against both the wild-type and mutant vIII isoform of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the monoclonal antibody (MoAb), cetuximab, as a boron delivery agent for neutron capture therapy (NCT) of brain tumors. Twenty-four hours following intratumoral (i.t.) administration of boronated cetuximab (C225-G5-B{sub 1100}), the mean boron concentration in rats bearing either F98{sub EGFR} or F98{sub WT} gliomas were 92.3{+-}23.3 {mu}g/g and 36.5{+-}18.8 {mu}g/g, respectively. In contrast, the uptake of boronated dendrimer (G5-B{sub 1000}) was 6.7{+-}3.6 {mu}g/g. Based on its favorable in vivo uptake, C225-G5-B{sub 1100} was evaluated as a delivery agent for BNCT in F98{sub EGFR} glioma bearing rats. The mean survival time (MST) of rats that received C225-G5-B{sub 1100}, administered by convection enhanced delivery (CED), was 45{+-}3 d compared to 25{+-}3 d for untreated control animals. A further enhancement in MST to >59 d was obtained by administering C225-G5-B{sub 1100} in combination with i.v. boronophenylalanine (BPA). These data are the first to demonstrate the efficacy of a boronated MoAb for BNCT of an intracerebral (i.c.) glioma and are paradigmatic for future studies using a combination of boronated MoAbs and low molecular weight delivery agents.

  11. Effectiveness of boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent head and neck malignancies

    Kato, Itsuro [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, II Osaka University, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka (Japan)], E-mail: katoitsu@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp; Fujita, Yusei [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, II Osaka University, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka (Japan); Maruhashi, Akira [Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, Research Reactor Institut, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Kumada, Hiroaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai Research and Development Center, Ibaraki (Japan); Ohmae, Masatoshi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Izimisano Municipal Hospital, Rinku General Hospital, Izumisano, Osaka (Japan); Kirihata, Mitsunori [Graduate School of Environment and Life Science, Osaka prefectural University, Osaka (Japan); Imahori, Yoshio [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto Prefectural University, Kyoto (Japan); CEO of Cancer Intelligence Care Systems, Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Minoru [Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, Research Reactor Institut, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Sakrai, Yoshinori [Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo Medical University of Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan); Sumi, Tetsuro; Iwai, Soichi; Nakazawa, Mitsuhiro [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, II Osaka University, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka (Japan); Murata, Isao; Miyamaru, Hiroyuki [Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (Japan); Ono, Koji [Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, Research Reactor Institut, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    It is necessary to explore new treatments for recurrent head and neck malignancies (HNM) to avoid severe impairment of oro-facial structures and functions. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is tumor-cell targeted radiotherapy that has significant superiority over conventional radiotherapies in principle. We have treated with BNCT 42 times for 26 patients (19 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 4 salivary gland carcinomas and 3 sarcomas) with a recurrent and far advanced HNM since 2001. Results of (1) {sup 10}B concentration of tumor/normal tissue ratios (T/N ratio) of FBPA-PET studies were SCC: 1.8-5.7, sarcoma: 2.5-4.0, parotid tumor: 2.5-3.7. (2) Therapeutic effects were CR: 12 cases, PR: 10 cases, PD: 3 cases NE (not evaluated): 1 case. Response rate was 85%. (3) Improvement of QOL such as a relief of severe pain, bleeding, and exudates at the local lesion, improvement of PS, disappearance of ulceration, covered with normal skin and preserved oral and maxillofacial functions and tissues. (4) Survival periods after BNCT were 1-72 months (mean: 13.6 months). Six-year survival rate was 24% by Kaplan-Meier analysis. (5) Adverse-events were transient mucositis and alopecia in most of the cases; three osteomyelitis and one brain necrosis were recognized. These results indicate that BNCT represents a new and promising treatment approach for advanced HNM.

  12. Early effects of boron neutron capture therapy on rat glioma models

    Early effects of boron neutron capture therapy on malignant gliomas are characterized by reduction of the enhanced area regression of the peritumoral edema radiologically. The aim of this study is to investigate the early histological changes of tumors and inflammatory cells after BNCT in the rat brain. The rats were treated with BNCT using boronophenyialanine (BPA) 7 days after implantation of C6 glioma cells. The tumors were assessed their sizes and configurations with magnetic resonance imaging, then killed 4 days after BNCT. The mean tumor volumes were 39mm3 in BNCT-treated group, and 138 mm3 in the control group. In the histological examination, tumors of the BNCT group showed less pleomorphic appearance with atypical nuclei and mitotic figures, compared with the control group. Necrosis and edematous changes in the neuropile were negligible. There existed remnant tumors adjacent to the lateral ventricle. The reactions of the inflammatory cells were examined with ED-1 of macrophage marker. ED-1 positive cells and their processes were reduced in the marginal area of tumor in the BNCT group. BNCT reduce the tumor progression by suppression of the proliferation. Inhibition of the activated macrophages may reduce peritumoral edema in early phase. (author)

  13. Pseudoprogression in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant gliomas and meningiomas.

    Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kawabata, Shinji; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Yokoyama, Kunio; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Matsui, Hideki; Ono, Koji

    2009-08-01

    Pseudoprogression has been recognized and widely accepted in the treatment of malignant gliomas, as transient increases in the volume of the enhanced area just after chemoradiotherapy, especially using temozolomide. We experienced a similar phenomenon in the treatment of malignant gliomas and meningiomas using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a cell-selective form of particle radiation. Here, we introduce representative cases and analyze the pathogenesis. Fifty-two cases of malignant glioma and 13 cases of malignant meningioma who were treated by BNCT were reviewed retrospectively mainly via MR images. Eleven of 52 malignant gliomas and 3 of 13 malignant meningiomas showed transient increases of enhanced volume in MR images within 3 months after BNCT. Among these cases, five patients with glioma underwent surgery because of suspicion of relapse. In histology, most of the specimens showed necrosis with small amounts of residual tumor cells. Ki-67 labeling showed decreased positivity compared with previous samples from the individuals. Fluoride-labeled boronophenylalanine PET was applied in four and two cases of malignant gliomas and meningiomas, respectively, at the time of transient increase of lesions. These PET scans showed decreased lesion:normal brain ratios in all cases compared with scans obtained prior to BNCT. With or without surgery, all lesions were decreased or stable in size during observation. Transient increases in enhanced volume in malignant gliomas and meningiomas immediately after BNCT seemed to be pseudoprogression. This pathogenesis was considered as treatment-related intratumoral necrosis in the subacute phase after BNCT. PMID:19289492

  14. Effectiveness of boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent head and neck malignancies

    It is necessary to explore new treatments for recurrent head and neck malignancies (HNM) to avoid severe impairment of oro-facial structures and functions. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is tumor-cell targeted radiotherapy that has significant superiority over conventional radiotherapies in principle. We have treated with BNCT 42 times for 26 patients (19 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 4 salivary gland carcinomas and 3 sarcomas) with a recurrent and far advanced HNM since 2001. Results of (1) 10B concentration of tumor/normal tissue ratios (T/N ratio) of FBPA-PET studies were SCC: 1.8-5.7, sarcoma: 2.5-4.0, parotid tumor: 2.5-3.7. (2) Therapeutic effects were CR: 12 cases, PR: 10 cases, PD: 3 cases NE (not evaluated): 1 case. Response rate was 85%. (3) Improvement of QOL such as a relief of severe pain, bleeding, and exudates at the local lesion, improvement of PS, disappearance of ulceration, covered with normal skin and preserved oral and maxillofacial functions and tissues. (4) Survival periods after BNCT were 1-72 months (mean: 13.6 months). Six-year survival rate was 24% by Kaplan-Meier analysis. (5) Adverse-events were transient mucositis and alopecia in most of the cases; three osteomyelitis and one brain necrosis were recognized. These results indicate that BNCT represents a new and promising treatment approach for advanced HNM.

  15. Indication and possibility of boron neutron capture therapy in head and neck cancer

    Background: Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a targeted type of radiotherapy that has a number of significant advantages over conventional external beam photon irradiation, especially in that radiation can be selectively delivered to tumor cells. We had, first in the world, treated with BNCT for a patient with recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC) in 2001. Methods : From December, 2001 to February, 2013, we had treated 37 patients with recurrent HNC by means of 54 applications of BNCT at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). All of them had received standard therapy and subsequently developed recurrent disease for which there were no other treatment options. Results : All of the (1) Regression rates were complete response (CR) : 19 patients (51%), partial response (PR) : 14(38%), progressive disease (PD) : 3(8%), and not evaluated (NE) : 1(3%) patient. (2) The overall patient response rate was 91%, though all the patients had advanced disease. The 4-year and 7-year OS rates were 42% and 36%, respectively. (3) BNCT improved quality of life (QOL), performance status (PS) and survival times. (4) The primary adverse events were brain necrosis, osteomyelitis and transient mucositis and alopecia. Conclusions : Our results indicate that we could make sure that safety and effectiveness of BNCT, and BNCT represents a new and promising treatment modality in patients for whom there are no other treatment options. (author)

  16. Boron neutron capture therapy for advanced salivary gland carcinoma in head and neck

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a among the radiation treatments known to have a selective lethal effect on tumor cells. This study summarizes the tumor responses and the acute and late adverse effects of BNCT in the treatment of patients with both recurrent and newly diagnosed T4 salivary gland carcinoma. Two patients with recurrent cancer and 3 with newly diagnosed T4 advanced malignancy were registered between October 2003 and September 2007, with the approval of the medical ethics committees of Kawasaki Medical School and Kyoto University. BNCT was performed, in a single fraction using an epithermal beam, at Japan Research Reactor 4. All patients achieved a complete response within 6 months of treatment. The median duration of the complete response was 24.0 months; the median overall survival time was 32.0 months. Three of the 5 patients are still alive; the other 2 died of distant metastatic disease. Open biopsy of the parotid gland after BNCT was performed in 1 patient and revealed no residual viable cancer cells and no serious damage to the normal glandular system. Although mild alopecia, xerostomia, and fatigue occurred in all patients, there were no severe adverse effects of grade 3 or greater. Our preliminary results demonstrate that BNCT is a potential curative therapy for patients with salivary gland carcinoma. The treatment does not cause any serious adverse effects, and may be used regardless of whether the primary tumor has been previously treated. (author)

  17. Whole-body dose evaluation with an adaptive treatment planning system for boron neutron capture therapy

    Dose evaluation for out-of-field organs during radiotherapy has gained interest in recent years. A team led by University of Tsukuba is currently implementing a project for advancing boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), along with a radiation treatment planning system (RTPS). In this study, the authors used the RTPS (the 'Tsukuba-Plan') to evaluate the dose to out-of-field organs during BNCT. Computed tomography images of a whole-body phantom were imported into the RTPS, and a voxel model was constructed for the Monte Carlo calculations, which used the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System. The results indicate that the thoraco-abdominal organ dose during BNCT for a brain tumour and maxillary sinus tumour was 50-360 and 120-1160 mGy-Eq, respectively. These calculations required ∼29.6 h of computational time. This system can evaluate the out-of-field organ dose for BNCT irradiation during treatment planning with patient-specific irradiation conditions. (authors)

  18. The relationship between boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and positron emission tomography (PET) for malignant brain tumors

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a particle irradiation therapy that is theoretically available for selective radiation of tumor cells. Boronophenylalanine-positron emission tomography (18F-BPA-PET) was used in this study. Boron is used as a tracer compound for the neutron capture reaction and has been particularly useful for the recent noncraniotomy BNCT. In this report, we introduce this type of PET as a principal axis in BNCT and relationship with PET. We calculated the drug accumulation to the tumor before neutron irradiation to individualize the treatment. We decided the indication for BNCT on the basis of a PET study and are now expanding the indications to other systemic cancers, including head and neck, lung, and liver cancers. In addition, other irradiation modalities have developed a radiation plan on the basis of a PET study, and several studies attempted improving the results; however, the lesion is exposed to high radiation doses and appear as high accumulation on BPA-PET during BNCT. We determined the neutron exposure time from the dosage for normal tissue in the actual treatment, but the lesion/normal tissue ratio obtained from BPA-PET is for evaluating the tumor dose and following the treatment plan. We also found that a PET study was useful in the follow-up stage to aid in diagnosis of pathologic conditions such as increase in tumor volume, recurrence, or radiation necrosis and for patients who had already been treated for malignant brain tumor. (author)

  19. Development and characteristics of the HANARO ex-core neutron irradiation facility for applications in the boron neutron capture therapy field

    Kim, M S; Jun, B J; Kim, H; Lee, B C; Hwang, Sung-Yul; Jun, Byung-Jin; Kim, Heonil; Kim, Myong-Seop; Lee, Byung-Chul

    2006-01-01

    The HANARO ex-core neutron irradiation facility was developed for various applications in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) field, and its characteristics have been investigated. In order to obtain a sufficient thermal neutron flux with a low level contamination of fast neutrons and gamma-rays, a radiation filtering method is adopted. The radiation filter has been designed by using a silicon single crystal cooled by liquid nitrogen and a bismuth crystal. The installation of the main components of the irradiation facility and the irradiation room are finished. Experimental measurements of the neutron beam characteristics have been performed by using bare and cadmium covered gold foils and wires. The in-phantom neutron flux distribution was measured for a flux mapping inside the phantom. The gamma-ray dose was determined by using TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosimeters. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes and the gamma-ray dose were calculated by using the MCNP code, and they were compared with experimenta...

  20. Electrophoretic deposits of boron on duralumin plates used for measuring neutron flux

    Preparation of boron thin film deposits of around 1 mg per cm2 on duralumin plates with a diameter of 8 cm. The boron coated plates for ionization chambers were originally prepared at the CEA by pulverization of boron carbides on sodium silicates. This method is not controlling precisely enough the quantity of boron deposit. Thus, an electrophoretic method is considered for a better control of the quantity of boron deposit in the scope of using in the future boron 10 which is costly and rare. The method described by O. Flint is not satisfying enough and a similar electrophoretic process has been developed. Full description of the method is given as well as explanation of the use of dried methanol as solvent, tannin as electrolyte and magnesium chloride to avoid alumina formation. (M.P.)

  1. Development of a novel neutron detection technique by using a boron layer coating a Charge Coupled Device

    Blostein, Juan Jerónimo; Tartaglione, Aureliano; Haro, Miguel Sofo; Moroni, Guillermo Fernández; Cancelo, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the design features and the first test measurements obtained during the installation of a novel high resolution 2D neutron detection technique. The technique proposed in this work consists of a boron layer (enriched in ${^{10}}$B) placed on a scientific Charge Coupled Device (CCD). After the nuclear reaction ${^{10}}$B(n,$\\alpha$)${^{7}}$Li, the CCD detects the emitted charge particles thus obtaining information on the neutron absorption position. The above mentioned ionizing particles, with energies in the range 0.5-5.5 MeV, produce a plasma effect in the CCD which is recorded as a circular spot. This characteristic circular shape, as well as the relationship observed between the spot diameter and the charge collected, is used for the event recognition, allowing the discrimination of undesirable gamma events. We present the first results recently obtained with this technique, which has the potential to perform neutron tomography investigations with a spatial resolution better than that...

  2. Quantitative evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) drugs for boron delivery and retention at subcellular scale resolution in human glioblastoma cells with imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    Chandra, S.; Ahmad, T.; Barth, R. F.; Kabalka, G. W.

    2014-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of cancer depends on the selective delivery of a sufficient number of boron-10 (10B) atoms to individual tumor cells. Cell killing results from the 10B (n, α)7Li neutron capture and fission reactions that occur if a sufficient number of 10B atoms are localized in the tumor cells. Intranuclear 10B localization enhances the efficiency of cell killing via damage to the DNA. The net cellular content of 10B atoms reflects both bound and free pools of boron in individual tumor cells. The assessment of these pools, delivered by a boron delivery agent, currently cannot be made at subcellular scale resolution by clinically applicable techniques such as PET and MRI. In this study, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging instrument, a CAMECA IMS 3f ion microscope, capable of 500 nm spatial resolution was employed. Cryogenically prepared cultured human T98G glioblastoma cells were evaluated for boron uptake and retention of two delivery agents. The first, L-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA), has been used clinically for BNCT of high grade gliomas, recurrent tumors of the head and neck region and melanomas. The second, a boron analogue of an unnatural amino acid, 1-amino-3-borono-cyclopentanecarboxylic acid (cis-ABCPC), has been studied in rodent glioma and melanoma models by quantification of boron in the nucleus and cytoplasm of individual tumor cells. The bound and free pools of boron were assessed by exposure of cells to boron-free nutrient medium. Both BPA and cis-ABCPC delivered almost 70% of the pool of boron in the free or loosely bound form to the nucleus and cytoplasm of human glioblastoma cells. This free pool of boron could be easily mobilized out of the cell and was in some sort of equilibrium with extracellular boron. In the case of BPA, the intracellular free pool of boron also was affected by the presence of phenylalanine in the nutrient medium. This suggests that it might be advantageous if patients were placed on a

  3. Application of neutron absorption method of the analysis on thermal neutrons for the control of substances and products containing boron in a nuclear power engineering and industry

    of the boron-10 isotope in the coolant of the primary circuit and other technological solutions of the boric acid in the power blocks utilising PWR. The purpose of the control is the maintenance of nuclear safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. The measurement results of the isotopic concentration are used for boron control. The measurements in the stream are provided with the normalised accuracy within the range from 1% to 2.5% and no more than 0.5% with sampling at the contents of H3BO3 up to 50 g/dm3. The method is also used to monitor the degree of absorption of thermal neutrons in items made of boron steel for the storage of spent nuclear fuel. The definition error of absorption factor for thermal neutrons in hexahedral tubes made of boron steel constitutes ±0.025 for the range of factor from 0.8 to 1.0

  4. The 3D tomographic image reconstruction software for prompt-gamma measurement of the boron neutron capture therapy

    A tomographic imaging system based on the spatial distribution measurement of the neutron capture reaction during Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) would be very useful for clinical purpose. Using gamma-detectors in a 2D-panel, boron neutron capture and hydrogen neutron capture gamma-rays emitted by the neutron irradiated region can be detected, and an image of the neutron capture events can be reconstructed. A 3D reconstruction software package has been written to support the development of a 3D prompt-gamma tomographic system. The package consists of three independent modules: phantom generation, reconstruction and evaluation modules. The reconstruction modules are based on algebraic approach of the iterative reconstruction algorithm (ART), and on the maximum likelihood estimation method (ML-EM). In addition to that, two subsets of the ART, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) and the component averaging algorithms (CAV) have been included to the package employing parallel codes for multiprocessor architecture. All implemented algorithms use two different field functions for the reconstruction of the region. One is traditional voxel function, another is, so called, blob function, smooth spherically symmetric generalized Kaiser-Bessel function. The generation module provides the phantom and projections with background by tracing the prompt gamma-rays for a given scanner geometry. The evaluation module makes statistical comparisons between the generated and reconstructed images, and provides figure-of-merit (FOM) values for the applied reconstruction algorithms. The package has been written in C language and tested under Linux and Windows platforms. The simple graphical user interface (GUI) is used for command execution and visualization purposed. (author)

  5. Determination of isotopic composition of boron in various neutron absorbers by a particle induced gamma-ray emission method

    A particle induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) method was utilized for non-destructive determination of isotopic composition of boron (10B/11B atom ratio) in seven natural and two enriched boron based neutron absorber samples. Samples in pellet forms were irradiated with 4 MeV proton beam from FOlded Tandem Ion Accelerator (FOTIA) at BARC, Mumbai. The prompt gamma rays of 429, 718 and 2125 keV from 10B (p, αγ)7Be, 10B(p,p'γ)10B and 11B(p,p' γ)11B, respectively, were measured using high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. Isotopic composition values were arrived by a relative method using corresponding peak areas of 10B and 11B. (author)

  6. A preclinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of spontaneous tumors in cats at RA-6 in Argentina

    BNCT is a binary treatment modality that combines irradiation with a thermal or epithermal neutron beam with tumor-seeking, boron containing drugs to produce selective irradiation of tumor tissue. Having demonstrated that BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) induced control of experimental squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the hamster cheek pouch mucosa with no damage to normal tissue we explored the feasibility and safety of treating spontaneous head and neck tumors, with particular focus on SCC, of terminal feline patients with low dose BPA-BNCT employing the thermal beam of RA-1. Having demonstrated partial tumor control with no radio toxic effects, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of BPA-BNCT on tumor and normal tissue in 3 cases of spontaneous SCC in feline patients employing a higher neutron fluence than in the previous study. The present study was performed at RA-6 with the thermalized epithermal neutron beam. All three irradiations were successful. Except for an initial, moderate and reversible mucositis, no significant radio toxic effects were observed in terms of clinical follow-up, histological examination, biochemical analysis and assessment of autopsy material. Partial tumor control was evidenced in terms of growth inhibition and partial necrosis and improvement in the quality of life during the survival period. Optimization of the therapeutic efficacy of BNCT would require improvement in boron tumor targeting and strategies to increase in-depth dose in large tumors. (author)

  7. Dynamic infrared imaging for cancer: research and development in the Argentine Boron neutron capture therapy

    In the framework of the Argentine Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) project for treating metastatic cutaneous melanoma, we have initiated a research and development program aimed at obtaining a noninvasive methodology for following-up the treated patients. The technique is called Dynamic Infrared Imaging (DIRI) and comprises the acquisition of infrared images as a function of time of the anatomical part under study, when the region is subjected to a mild cold stress. Vascular, metabolic and regulating differences between normal and tumor tissues appear as differences in the pattern of temperature evolution, which can be correlated with the anatomical and functional aspects of both. Two patients enrolled in the BNCT protocol were studied with DIRI. A good spatial correlation between dose, temperature recovery velocity and skin reaction distributions was observed at the time of maximum expression of the erythematous reaction. Melanoma nodules appear as highly localized hyperthermic regions, surrounded and interconnected by elevated temperature areas. Their temperature recovery velocity after the thermal cold stress was substantially faster than that of normal skin with an appreciably large temperature difference (6 degreesC to 10 degreesC). These tissue differences can be related with the thermal conductivity and metabolic rate as explained by a simple one-directional heat transport model. Compared with other imaging modalities (CT and Doppler ultrasound) DIRI has had a similar ability for confirming the already diagnosed nodules. Together with the clinical observation, DIRI provides a potentially useful amount of information, at a competitive cost-benefit relationship suitable for performing a non-invasive functional assessment of this kind of cutaneous lesions and the evaluation of the acute skin reaction following irradiation. (author)

  8. The combined effect of electroporation and borocaptate in boron neutron capture therapy for murine solid tumors

    10B-Enriched borocaptate (BSH) was administered intraperitoneally to SCCVII tumor-bearing C3H/He mice. Electroporation (EP) was conducted by using a tweezers-type electrode. The 10B contents in tumors were measured by prompt γ-ray spectrometry. The colony formation assay was applied to investigate the antitumor effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and thereby to estimate the intratumor localization of BSH. The 10B concentrations in tumors decreased with time following BSH administration, falling to 5.4(±0.1) ppm at 3 h, whereas EP treatment (3 repetitions) 15 min after BSH injection delayed the clearance of BSH from tumors, and the 10B level remained at 19.4(±0.9) ppm at 3 h. The effect of BNCT increased with the 10B concentration in tumors, and the combination with EP showed a remarkably large cell killing effect even at 3 h after BSH injection. The effect of BNCT, i.e., slope coefficient of the cell survival curve of tumors, without EP was proportional to tumor 10B level (r=0.982), and that of BSH-BNCT combined with EP lay close to the same correlation line. However, tumors subjected to EP after BSH injection did not show high radiosensitivity when irradiated after conversion to a single cell suspension by enzymatic digestion. This indicates that the increase of the BNCT effect by EP was a consequence of enclosure of BSH in the interstitial space of tumor tissue and not within tumor cells. This is different from a previous in vitro study. The combination of EP and BNCT may be clinically useful, if a procedure to limit EP to the tumor region becomes available or if an alternative similar method is employed. (author)

  9. Dynamic infrared imaging of the skin reaction in melanoma patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy

    As part of the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) project conducted jointly by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica and the oncology institute A. Roffo, Argentina, we have recently started a program designed to investigate the ability of dynamic infrared imaging for following-up our cutaneous melanoma patients. BNCT offers a unique opportunity to study the response of the integumentary system to single fractions and high doses of neutrons and heavy ions, providing information that could be potentially important in radiation accidents for people exposed to these kinds of radiation fields. Medical infrared thermography is a non-invasive and functional imaging method, that provides information on the normal and abnormal status and response of the nervous and vascular systems, as well as the local metabolic rate and inflammatory processes that appear as differences in the skin infrared emission. Although it is highly sensitive, it is unspecific, like other conventional imaging techniques. For this reason, infrared thermography must be employed as an adjunct method to other diagnostic procedures and the clinical observation. An infrared camera is employed, with an uncooled ferroelectric focal plane array of 320x240 detector elements, providing a video signal of the infrared emission in the 8-14 μm wavelength band. After patient preparation and acclimation, a basal study of the irradiated region is performed, including high and low dose areas, as well as normal and tumor tissues, and eventually other detectable structures (e.g. scars and veins). Thereafter, a provocation test (a cold stimulus) is applied and the temperature recovery is registered as a function of time. In addition, a 3D computational dosimetry of the irradiated region is performed, which allows a complete representation of the isodose contours mapped onto the 3D reconstruction representing the skin. This reconstruction permits selecting regions of different doses for studying the local response

  10. Clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy [in humans] [at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center][at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Assessment of research records of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy was conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center using the Code of Federal Regulations, FDA Regulations and Good Clinical Practice Guidelines. Clinical data were collected FR-om subjects' research charts, and differences in conduct of studies at both centers were examined. Records maintained at Brookhaven National Laboratory were not in compliance with regulatory standards. Beth Israel's records followed federal regulations. Deficiencies discovered at both sites are discussed in the reports

  11. Development of the process of boron electrophoresis deposition on aluminum substate to be used in the construction of neutron detectors

    Process of baron electrophoresis depositon on large areas of aluminum substrates was developed with the aim of using them in the construction of neutron detectors. After definition and optimization of the boron electrophoresis parameters, depositions of 10B on aluminium cylinders were performed and used as electrodes in gamma compensated and non-compensated ionization chambers and in proportional detectors. Prototypers of ionization chambers were designed, built and assembled at the Departinent for Engineering and Industry Application (TE) of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), and submited for characterization tests at IEA-R1 reactor. They fully met the technical specifications of the projects. (author)

  12. Neutron detection and multiplicity counting using a boron-loaded plastic scintillator/bismuth germanate phoswich detector array

    Neutron detection and multiplicity counting has been investigated using a boron-loaded plastic scintillator/bismuth germanate phoswich detector array. Boron-loaded plastic combines neutron moderation (H) and detection (10B) at the molecular level, thereby physically coupling increasing detection efficiency and decreasing die-away time with detector volume. Both of these characteristics address a fundamental limitation of thermal-neutron multiplicity counters, where 3He proportional counters are embedded in a polyethylene matrix. Separation of the phoswich response into its plastic scintillator and bismuth germanate components was accomplished on a pulse-by-pulse basis using custom integrator and timing circuits. In addition, a custom time-tag module was used to provide a time for each detector event. Analysis of the combined energy and time event stream was performed by calibrating each detector's response and filtering based on the presence of a simultaneous energy deposition corresponding to the 10B(n,alpha) reaction products in the plastic scintillator (93 keVee) and the accompanying neutron-capture gamma ray in the bismuth germanate (478 keV). Time-correlation analysis was subsequently performed on the filtered event stream to obtain shift-register-type singles and doubles count rates. Proof-of-principle measurements were conducted with a variety of gamma-ray and neutron sources including 137Cs, 54Mn, AmLi, and 252Cf. Results of this study indicate that a neutron-capture probability of ∼10% and a die-away time of ∼10 micros are possible with a 4-detector array with a detector volume of 1600 cm3. Simulations were performed that indicate neutron-capture probabilities on the order of 50% and die-away times of less than 4 micros are realistically achievable. While further study will be required for practical application of such a detection system, the results obtained in this investigation are encouraging and may lead to a new class of high-efficiency, short

  13. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at the TRIGA Mark II of Pavia, Italy - The BNCT of the diffuse tumours

    Altieri, S.; Bortolussi, S.; Stella, S.; Bruschi, P.; Gadan, M.A. [University of Pavia (Italy); INFN - National Institute for Nuclear Physics, of Pavia (Italy)

    2008-10-29

    The selectivity based on the B distribution rather than on the irradiation field makes Boron neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) a valid option for the treatment of the disseminated tumours. As the range of the high LET particles is shorter than a cell diameter, the normal cells around the tumour are not damaged by the reactions occurring in the tumoral cells. PAVIA 2001: first treatment of multiple hepatic metastases from colon ca by BNCT and auto-transplantation technique: TAOrMINA project. The liver was extracted after BPA infusion, irradiated in the Thermal Column of the Pavia TRIGA Mark II reactor, and re-implanted in the patient. Two patients were treated, demonstrating the feasibility of the therapy and the efficacy in destroying the tumoral nodules sparing the healthy tissues. In the last years, the possibility of applying BNCT to the lung tumours using epithermal collimated neutron beams and without explanting the organ, is being explored. The principal obtained results of the BNCT research are presented, with particular emphasis on the following aspects: a) the project of a new thermal column configuration to make the thermal neutron flux more uniform inside the explanted liver, b) the Monte Carlo study by means of the MCNP code of the thermal neutron flux distribution inside a patient's thorax irradiated with epithermal neutrons, and c) the measurement of the boron concentration in tissues by (n,{alpha}) spectroscopy and neutron autoradiography. The dose distribution in the thorax are simulated using MCNP and the anthropomorphic model ADAM. To have a good thermal flux distribution inside the lung epithermal neutrons must be used, which thermalize crossing the first tissue layers. Thermal neutrons do not penetrate and the obtained uniformity is poor. In the future, the construction of a PGNAA facility using a horizontal channel of the TRIGA Mark II is planned. With this method the B concentration can be measured also in liquid samples (blood, urine) and

  14. Transferrin-loaded nido-carborane liposomes. Synthesis and intracellular targeting to solid tumors for boron neutron capture therapy

    The boron ion cluster lipids, as a double-tailed boron lipid synthesized from heptadecanol, formed stable liposomes at 25% molar ratio toward DSPC with cholesterol. Transferrin was able to be introduced on the surface of boron liposomes (Tf-PEG-CL liposomes) by the coupling of transferrin to the PEG-CO2H moieties of PEG-CL liposomes. The biodistribution of Tf-PEG-CL liposomes showed that Tf-PEG-CL liposomes accumulated in tumor tissues and stayed there for a sufficiently long time to increase tumor:blood concentration ratio. A 10B concentration of 22 ppm in tumor tissues was achieved by the injection of Tf-PEG-CL liposome at 7.2 mg/kg body weight 10B in tumor-bearing mice. After neutron irradiation, the average survival rate of mice not treated with Tf-PEG-CL liposomes was 21 days, whereas that of the treated mice was 31 days. Longer survival rates were observed in the mice treated with Tf-PEG-CL liposomes; one of them even survived for 52 days after BNCT. (author)

  15. Determination of boron and lithium in diverse biological matrices using neutron activation-mass spectrometry (NA-MS)

    Essential features of the neutron activation-mass Spectrometry (NA-MS) technique are described. Applicability of this technique for the simultaneous determination of boron and lithium is demonstrated for a diverse group of biomaterials. NA-MS is a nondestructive analytical technique, and dynamic in nature since its coverage extends to a broad range of concentration levels. Contamination after the irradiation step, extraneous by natural lithium or boron is inconsequential, since only the activation products are the analyted assayed. Coupling the nuclear activation phenomenon which generates 4He and 3He (from 10B and 6Li, respectively), with the high precision potential of mass spectrometry forms the bases of this technique. Under ideal conditions the detection limit is extendable to pg g-1 concentration ranges and therefore, it is extremely well suited to investigate the natural concentration levels of boron and lithium in biomaterials. The potential of this method for the determination of lithium in biomedical trace element research is of special significance since determination of sub-ppb levels of lithium by other analytical techniques faces serious analytical difficulties mainly due to contamination control and in some cases to insufficiently low detection limits. (orig.)

  16. Radioprotective agents to reduce BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) induced mucositis in the hamster cheek pouch

    Introduction: BNCT is based on the capture reaction between boron, selectively targeted to tumor tissue, and thermal neutrons which gives rise to lethal, short-range high linear energy transfer particles that selectively damage tumor tissue, sparing normal tissue. We previously evidenced a remarkable therapeutic success of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer and pre cancer model. Despite therapeutic efficacy, mucositis induced in premalignant tissue was dose limiting and favored, in some cases, tumor development. In a clinical scenario, oral mucositis limits the dose administered to head and neck tumors. Aim: Our aim was to evaluate the effect of the administration of different radioprotective agents, seeking to reduce BNCT-induced mucositis to acceptable levels in dose-limiting premalignant tissue; without compromising therapeutic effect evaluated as inhibition on tumor development in premalignant tissue; without systemic or local side effects; and without negative effects on the biodistribution of the boron compound used for treatment. Materials and methods: Cancerized hamsters with DMBA (dimethylbenzanthracene) were treated with BPA-BNCT 5 Gy total absorbed dose to premalignant tissue, at the RA-3 Nuclear Reactor, divided into different groups: 1-treated with FLUNIXIN; 2- ATORVASTATIN; 3-THALIDOMIDE; 4-HISTAMINE (two concentrations: Low -1 mg/ml- and High -5 mg/ml-); 5-JNJ7777120; 6-JNJ10191584; 7-SALINE (vehicle). Cancerized animals without any treatment (neither BNCT nor radioprotective therapy) were also analyzed. We followed the animals during one month and evaluated the percentage of animals with unacceptable/severe mucositis, clinical status and percentage of animals with new tumors post treatment. We also performed a preliminary biodistribution study of BPA + Histamine “low” concentration to evaluate the potential effect of the radioprotector on BPA biodistribution. Results: Histamine

  17. Antibodies and antiestrogens combined with boron for use in the neutron capture therapy

    The ZR-75-1 cell line developed from a mammary carcinoma was chosen to characterise the binding of antiestrogen U23.469-M to the cell, which was subsequently compared to that of a derivative combined with boron. It was found that the original U23.469-M showed antiestrogenic activity, while this effect was largely abolished after the substance had been modified using b-decachloro-o-carborane. In this study, boron-conjugated antibodies were produced in order to find out whether those modified immunoglobulins would be suitable to bind sufficient quantities of boron to the tumour cells. It was calculated by experts on radiation biology that a minimum of 1000 boron atoms is required for a tumour-specific antibody to be therapeutically effective. When oxidated dextran of a molecular weight of 33 kD was used as a linking molecule, a reproducible method could be developed that permitted more than 1000 boron atoms to be bound per antibody. In one of the monoclonal antibodies tested here a combination with boron could, however, only be achieved at the expense of complete inactivation. A model was developed allowing to significantly increase the number modified antibodies attached to any one tumour cell. The cell binding experiments and radioimmunoassays then carried out were able to show that the number of antibodies bound to tumour cells can be increased to different degrees, depending on the monoclonal antibody used in each case. (orig./MG)

  18. From radiation-induced chromosome damage to cell death: modelling basic mechanisms and applications to boron neutron capture therapy.

    Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Clerici, A M; Ferrari, C; Protti, N; Altieri, S

    2011-02-01

    Cell death is a crucial endpoint in radiation-induced biological damage: on one side, cell death is a reference endpoint to characterise the action of radiation in biological targets; on the other side, any cancer therapy aims to kill tumour cells. Starting from Lea's target theory, many models have been proposed to interpret radiation-induced cell killing; after briefly discussing some of these models, in this paper, a mechanistic approach based on an experimentally observed link between chromosome aberrations and cell death was presented. More specifically, a model and a Monte Carlo code originally developed for chromosome aberrations were extended to simulate radiation-induced cell death applying an experimentally observed one-to-one relationship between the average number of 'lethal aberrations' (dicentrics, rings and deletions) per cell and -ln S, S being the fraction of surviving cells. Although such observation was related to X rays, in the present work, the approach was also applied to protons and alpha particles. A good agreement between simulation outcomes and literature data provided a model validation for different radiation types. The same approach was then successfully applied to simulate the survival of cells enriched with boron and irradiated with thermal neutrons at the Triga Mark II reactor in Pavia, to mimic a typical treatment for boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:21159746

  19. Application of neutron capture autoradiography to Boron Delivery seeking techniques for selective accumulation of boron compounds to tumor with intra-arterial administration of boron entrapped water-in-oil-in-water emulsion

    It is necessary to accumulate the 10B atoms selectively to the tumor cells for effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). In order to achieve an accurate measurement of 10B accumulations in the biological samples, we employed a technique of neutron capture autoradiography (NCAR) of sliced samples of tumor tissues using CR-39 plastic track detectors. The CR-39 track detectors attached with the biological samples were exposed to thermal neutrons in the thermal column of the JRR3 of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). We obtained quantitative NCAR images of the samples for VX-2 tumor in rabbit liver after injection of 10BSH entrapped water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) emulsion by intra-arterial injection via proper hepatic artery. The 10B accumulations and distributions in VX-2 tumor and normal liver of rabbit were investigated by means of alpha-track density measurements. In this study, we showed the selective accumulation of 10B atoms in the VX-2 tumor by intra-arterial injection of 10B entrapped WOW emulsion until 3 days after injection by using digitized NCAR images (i.e. alpha-track mapping).

  20. Combined action of thermal neutron irradiation and boron-10-amino acid analogs on a solid experimental tumor (EO771 C57 B1/6J)

    Two boron-amino acid analogs were synthesized with enriched boron (90% 10B): (a) The compound Trimethylamine-carboxyborane (Mol weight: 116.2) contains 8.7% boron, and (b) Amine-carboxyborane (Mol weight: 74.1) contains 13.6% boron and shows a good solubility in water. The solid Adenocarcinoma EO 771 on C57 B1/6J mice was used as test object. The tumor-bearing animals were irradiated in a thermal column of the swimming-pool type reactor FRJ-1 (MERLIN); the bodies were shielded against thermal neutrons by a boron carbide-plastic mixture. The thermal neutron flux was 2.3 x 1010n/cm2 sec. at the tumor. Boron concentrations in tumor, liver, muscle and in blood were analysed by emission spectroscopy. The effects of the tumor treatment were evaluated by tumor volume measurements. Cell cycle changes were analysed by means of flow cytometry using the ICP-22 from Phywe

  1. Boron neutron capture therapy induces cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis of glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro

    Glioma stem cells in the quiescent state are resistant to clinical radiation therapy. An almost inevitable glioma recurrence is due to the persistence of these cells. The high linear energy transfer associated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) could kill quiescent and proliferative cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of BNCT on glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro. The damage induced by BNCT was assessed using cell cycle progression, apoptotic cell ratio and apoptosis-associated proteins expression. The surviving fraction and cell viability of glioma stem/progenitor cells were decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells using the same boronophenylalanine pretreatment and the same dose of neutron flux. BNCT induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, with changes in the expression of associated proteins. Glioma stem/progenitor cells, which are resistant to current clinical radiotherapy, could be effectively killed by BNCT in vitro via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis using a prolonged neutron irradiation, although radiosensitivity of glioma stem/progenitor cells was decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells when using the same dose of thermal neutron exposure and boronophenylalanine pretreatment. Thus, BNCT could offer an appreciable therapeutic advantage to prevent tumor recurrence, and may become a promising treatment in recurrent glioma

  2. User's manual of a supporting system for treatment planning in boron neutron capture therapy. JAERI computational dosimetry system

    Kumada, H

    2002-01-01

    A boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) with epithermal neutron beam is expected to treat effectively for malignant tumor that is located deeply in the brain. It is indispensable to estimate preliminarily the irradiation dose in the brain of a patient in order to perform the epithermal neutron beam BNCT. Thus, the JAERI Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS), which can calculate the dose distributions in the brain, has been developed. JCDS is a software that creates a 3-dimensional head model of a patient by using CT and MRI images and that generates a input data file automatically for calculation neutron flux and gamma-ray dose distribution in the brain by the Monte Carlo code: MCNP, and that displays the dose distribution on the head model for dosimetry by using the MCNP calculation results. JCDS has any advantages as follows; By treating CT data and MRI data which are medical images, a detail three-dimensional model of patient's head is able to be made easily. The three-dimensional head image is editable to ...

  3. Radiosensitivity of pimonidazole-unlabelled intratumour quiescent cell population to γ-rays, accelerated carbon ion beams and boron neutron capture reaction.

    Masunaga, S; Sakurai, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Hirayama, R; Matsumoto, Y; Uzawa, A; Suzuki, M.; Kondo, N; Narabayashi, M.; Maruhashi, A; Ono, K.

    2013-01-01

    [Objectives] To detect the radiosensitivity of intratumour quiescent (Q) cells unlabelled with pimonidazole to accelerated carbon ion beams and the boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR). [Methods] EL4 tumour-bearing C57BL/J mice received 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously to label all intratumour proliferating (P) cells. After the administration of pimonidazole, tumours were irradiated with γ-rays, accelerated carbon ion beams or reactor neutron beams with the prior administration of...

  4. Design calculations of an epithermal neutron beam and development of a treatment planning system for the renovation of thor for boron neutron capture therapy

    Tsing Hua University was recently granted by National Science Council a five-year project to renovate its Open-Pool reactor (THOR) for boron neutron capture therapy. With this support, the whole graphite blocks in the original thermal column region can be removed for redesigning and constructing a better epithermal neutron beam. THOR is a 1 MW research reactor. The cross section area of the core facing the thermal column is 60 cm x 50 cm. By using 60 cm FLUENTAL plus 10 cm Pb, with cross section area of 70 cm x 60 cm and surrounded by 6 cm thick PbF2 reflector, the epithermal neutron flux at the filter/moderator exit can reach ∼8.5 x 109 n/cm2/s. When the collimator is added, the epithermal neutron beam intensity at the beam exit is reduced to 3 x 109 n/cm2/sec, but is still six times higher than the previous beam. Facing the clinical trials scheduled 3 and half years from now, a preliminary version of treatment planning system is developed. It includes a pre-processor to read CT scan and post-processors to display dose distributions. (author)

  5. Monitoring the distribution of prompt gamma rays in boron neutron capture therapy using a multiple-scattering Compton camera: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    This study evaluated the use of Compton imaging technology to monitor prompt gamma rays emitted by 10B in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) applied to a computerized human phantom. The Monte Carlo method, including particle-tracking techniques, was used for simulation. The distribution of prompt gamma rays emitted by the phantom during irradiation with neutron beams is closely associated with the distribution of the boron in the phantom. Maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) method was applied to the information obtained from the detected prompt gamma rays to reconstruct the distribution of the tumor including the boron uptake regions (BURs). The reconstructed Compton images of the prompt gamma rays were combined with the cross-sectional images of the human phantom. Quantitative analysis of the intensity curves showed that all combined images matched the predetermined conditions of the simulation. The tumors including the BURs were distinguishable if they were more than 2 cm apart

  6. Monitoring the distribution of prompt gamma rays in boron neutron capture therapy using a multiple-scattering Compton camera: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Lee, Taewoong; Lee, Hyounggun; Lee, Wonho, E-mail: wonhol@korea.ac.kr

    2015-10-21

    This study evaluated the use of Compton imaging technology to monitor prompt gamma rays emitted by {sup 10}B in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) applied to a computerized human phantom. The Monte Carlo method, including particle-tracking techniques, was used for simulation. The distribution of prompt gamma rays emitted by the phantom during irradiation with neutron beams is closely associated with the distribution of the boron in the phantom. Maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) method was applied to the information obtained from the detected prompt gamma rays to reconstruct the distribution of the tumor including the boron uptake regions (BURs). The reconstructed Compton images of the prompt gamma rays were combined with the cross-sectional images of the human phantom. Quantitative analysis of the intensity curves showed that all combined images matched the predetermined conditions of the simulation. The tumors including the BURs were distinguishable if they were more than 2 cm apart.

  7. A PC-based computer program for the estimation of the radiation dose in vitro and in vivo boron neutron capture irradiation experiments

    In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) microdosimetry of charged particle radiation depends on total boron concentration and intracellular boron distribution. Due to the inhomogeneity of boron distribution in cells, radiation doses to both tumor and normal tissue are influenced by boron and nitrogen concentrations and intracellular distributions, cell volume and shape, nuclear size and geometrical structure of the tissue. For correct calculation of the radiation dose in BNCT, these factors should be taken into account. Several computer models have been developed previously in order to estimate the absorbed dose from charged particles in BNCT (Gabel et al.; Kobayashi and Kanda). In these models, however, single values for mean Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) are used to convert high LET radiation doses to isoeffective photon equivalent doses. The RBE depends on both LET and endpoint, such as surviving fraction of tumor cells or normal tissue tolerance (Barendsen et al.). Since LET is not constant along the track of a charged particle, the RBE cannot be considered constant for particles generated by boron and nitrogen neutron capture. Experimental RBE data to be used in BNCT have been gathered, but without consensus (Gabel et al.; Fukuda et al.). A computer program designed to run on a microcomputer has been written in Turbo Pascal to determine energy deposition in cell nuclei resulting from charged particle emission after boron or nitrogen neutron capture in nuclear, cytoplasmic and extracellular compartments. This computer model goes beyond former models in estimating a microscopic RBE for each individual charged particle track segment that traverses a cell nucleus. Another refinement is the implementation of dynamic modelling, which offers a more realistic simulation of cell and tissue geometry. This was approached by varying cell geometry and arrangement parameters within a simulation

  8. Medical set-up of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant glioma at the Japan research reactor (JRR)-4

    The University of Tsukuba project for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was initiated at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in 1992. The clinical study for BNCT began at the Japan Research Reactor (JRR)-2 of the JAERI in November 1995. By the end of 1998, a new medical irradiation facility had been installed in JRR-4 of that included a new medical treatment room and patient-monitoring area adjacent to the irradiation room. The medical treatment room was built to reflect a hospital-type operation room that includes an operating table with a carbon head frame, anesthesia apparatus with several cardiopulmonary monitors, etc. Following craniotomy in the treatment room, a patient under anesthesia is transported into the irradiation room for BNCT. The boron concentration in tissue is measured with prompt gamma ray analysis (PGA) and simultaneously by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) methods. For the immediate pre- and post-BNCT care, a collaborating neurosurgical department of the University of Tsukuba was prepared in the vicinity of the JAERI. The long term follow-up is done at the University of Tsukuba Hospital. Epithermal neutron beam also became available at the new JRR-4. By changing the thickness and/or the configuration of heavy water, a cadmium plate, and a graphite reflector, the JRR-4 provides a variety of neutron beams, including three typical beams (Epithermal mode and Thermal modes I and II). Intraoperative BNCT using the thermal beam is planned to study at the beginning of the clinical trial. The ongoing development of the JAERI Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS) and radiobiological studies have focused in the application of the epithermal beam for BNCT. After obtaining these basic data, we are planning to use the epithermal beam for intraoperative BNCT. (author)

  9. Prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis of boron using Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) neutron generator

    Prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is a nuclear analytical technique for the determination of trace and other elements in solid, liquid or gaseous samples. The method consists in observing gamma rays emitted by a sample during neutron irradiation. The PGNAA system was built using a moderated and shielded deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron generator. This facility has been developed to determine the chemical composition of materials. The neutron generator is composed of three major components: An RF-Induction Ion Source, the Secondary Electron Shroud, and the Diode Accelerator Structure and Target. The generator produces monoenergetic neutrons (2.5 MeV) with a yield of 1010 n/s using 25-50 mA of beam current and 125 kV of acceleration voltage. Prompt γ-ray neutron activation analysis of 10B concentrations in Si and SiO2 matrices was carried out using a germanium detector (HPGe) and the results obtained are compared with a PGNAA system using a NaI detector. Neutron flux and energy distribution from D-D neutron generator at the sample position was calculated using Monte Carlo simulation. The interaction properties of neutrons in a Germanium detector have been studied. (author)

  10. Studies on the antitumor activity of boron neutron capture therapy for human p53-mutated oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Mutation of the tumor-suppressing, cell cycle regulating p53 gene in the oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is seen in more than half of its patient population. The purpose of the present studies is to investigate the in vitro and in vivo effects of boron neutron therapy (BNCT) to OSCC cells with the mutation. OSCC SAS cells used were derived from human lingual tumor and were SAS/mp53 and SAS/neo, which were the recombinants of mutated p53 gene and of neo (neomycin-resistant)/wild type p53 as a control, respectively. For BNCT, borono-phenylalanine (BPA) and thermal neutron flux from Kyoto University Reactor were used. In vitro, cell cultures were irradiated in the presence of BPA (10B, 50 ppm) at a physical dose of 6 Gy/914.5 sec. This dose condition was defined by prior measurement of an actual neutron flux of 1.57 x 109/cm2/sec with Au wire-dosimeter and of concomitant gamma-ray of 9.06 x 10-4 Gy/sec with thermoluminescent dosimeter. In vivo, cells were transplanted subcutaneously in nude mice and at the tumor size of 5 mm, neutron was irradiated for 70 min (8.21 x 1012 n/cm2 in total, measured on site by the Au wire) to the target 2 hr after ip injection of BPA 250 mg/kg (10B, 21.28 mg/kg) with concomitant on site gamma-ray dose of 1.41 Gy in total. Under the condition, total physical dose of neutron to the tumor was found to be around 13 Gy when calculated on the boron tissue levels of about 17 ppm. Results were: p53-mutated cells were resistant to BNCT; BNCT induced G1 and G2/M arrest in SAS/neo and the latter only in SAS/mp53; apoptosis occurred post G1 arrest in the wild type and in the mutant, post G2/M arrest; recurrence was not observable after BNCT in wild type but seen in half of mice with mutated p53 tumor. Treatment to suppress the relapse after BNCT was thus thought necessary in the p53-mutated tumor. (R.T.)

  11. Demonstration of three-dimensional deterministic radiation transport theory dose distribution analysis for boron neutron capture therapy

    The Monte Carlo stochastic simulation technique has traditionally been the only well-recognized method for computing three-dimensional radiation dose distributions in connection with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) research. A deterministic approach to this problem would offer some advantages over the Monte Carlo method. This paper describes an application of a deterministic method to analytically simulate BNCT treatment of a canine head phantom using the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven medical research reactor (BMRR). Calculations were performed with the TORT code from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an implementation of the discrete ordinates, or Sn method. Calculations were from first principles and used no empirical correction factors. The phantom surface was modeled by flat facets of approximately 1 cm2. The phantom interior was homogeneous. Energy-dependent neutron and photon scalar fluxes were calculated on a 32x16x22 mesh structure with 96 discrete directions in angular phase space. The calculation took 670 min on an Apollo DN10000 workstation. The results were subsequently integrated over energy to obtain full three-dimensional dose distributions. Isodose contours and depth-dose curves were plotted for several separate dose components of interest. Phantom measurements were made by measuring neutron activation (and therefore neutron flux) as a function of depth in copper--gold alloy wires that were inserted through catheters placed in holes drilled in the phantom. Measurements agreed with calculations to within about 15%. The calculations took about an order of magnitude longer than comparable Monte Carlo calculations but provided various conveniences, as well as a useful check

  12. Cumulative fission yields of short-lived isotopes under natural-abundance-boron-carbide-moderated neutron spectrum

    Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Pierson, Bruce; Wittman, Richard S.; Friese, Judah I.; Kephart, Rosara F.

    2015-04-09

    The availability of gamma spectroscopy data on samples containing mixed fission products at short times after irradiation is limited. Due to this limitation, data interpretation methods for gamma spectra of mixed fission product samples, where the individual fission products have not been chemically isolated from interferences, are not well-developed. The limitation is particularly pronounced for fast pooled neutron spectra because of the lack of available fast reactors in the United States. Samples containing the actinide isotopes 233, 235, 238U, 237Np, and 239Pu individually were subjected to a 2$ pulse in the Washington State University 1 MW TRIGA reactor. To achieve a fission-energy neutron spectrum, the spectrum was tailored using a natural abundance boron carbide capsule to absorb neutrons in the thermal and epithermal region of the spectrum. Our tailored neutron spectrum is unique to the WSU reactor facility, consisting of a soft fission spectrum that contains some measurable flux in the resonance region. This results in a neutron spectrum at greater than 0.1 keV with an average energy of 70 keV, similar to fast reactor spectra and approaching that of 235U fission. Unique fission product gamma spectra were collected from 4 minutes to 1 week after fission using single-crystal high purity germanium detectors. Cumulative fission product yields measured in the current work generally agree with published fast pooled fission product yield values from ENDF/B-VII, though a bias was noted for 239Pu. The present work contributes to the compilation of energy-resolved fission product yield nuclear data for nuclear forensic purposes.

  13. Study of the interaction of boron-containing amino acids for the neutron capture therapy with biologically interesting compounds by using 'three-spot zone electrophoresis'

    As the boron carriers for boron neutron capture therapy, p-borono phenylalanine (BPA) is the boron compound which has been clinically used together with sodium borocaptate. It was found by the electrophoresis behavior that the BPA interacted with organic carboxylic acids in its dissolved state. In this paper, the electrophoresis behavior of general amino acids as seen in three-spot zone electrophoresis and the peculiar interaction of the amino acids having dihydroxyboryl radical are described. Zone electrophoresis has been developed as separation means, and three-spot process excludes the errors due to accidental factors as far as possible. The behaviors of zone electrophoresis of ordinary neutral amino acids, orthoboric acid and p-BPA are reported. For utilizing the features of boron neutron capture therapy, it is necessary to develop the carrier which is singularly taken into cancer cells. There is not a good method for discriminating normal cells and cancer cells. As for the administration of BPA to patients, its solubility is insufficient, therefore, its fructose complex has been used. The research on the biochemical peculiarity of boron is important. (K.I.)

  14. Radiological protection considerations during the treatment of glioblastoma patients by boron neutron capture therapy at the high flux reactor in Petten, The Netherlands

    A clinical trial of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma patients has been in progress at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten since October 1997. The JRC (as licence holder of the HFR) must ensure that radiological protection measures are provided. The BNCT trial is a truly European trial, whereby the treatment takes place at a facility in the Netherlands under the responsibility of clinicians from Germany and patients are treated from several European countries. Consequently, radiological protection measures satisfy both German and Dutch laws. To respect both laws, a BNCT radioprotection committee was formed under the chairmanship of an independent radioprotection expert, with members representing all disciplines in the trial. A special nuance of BNCT is that the radiation is provided by a mixed neutron/gamma beam. The radiation dose to the patient is thus a complex mix due to neutrons, gammas and neutron capture in boron, nitrogen and hydrogen, which, amongst others, need to be correctly calculated in non-commercial and validated treatment planning codes. Furthermore, due to neutron activation, measurements on the patient are taken regularly after treatment. Further investigations along these lines include dose determination using TLDs and boron distribution measurements using on-line gamma ray spectroscopy. (author)

  15. Prediction of In-Phantom Dose Distribution Using In-Air Neutron Beam Characteristics for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy

    A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study was carried out to determine the optimal neutron energy range for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using radiation synovectomy. The goal of the treatment is the ablation of diseased synovial membranes in joints such as knees and fingers. This study focuses on human knee joints. Two figures of merit are used to measure the neutron beam quality, the ratio of the synovium-absorbed dose to the skin-absorbed dose, and the ratio of the synovium-absorbed dose to the bone-absorbed dose. It was found that (a) thermal neutron beams are optimal for treatment and that (b) similar absorbed dose rates and therapeutic ratios are obtained with monodirectional and isotropic neutron beams. Computation of the dose distribution in a human knee requires the simulation of particle transport from the neutron source to the knee phantom through the moderator. A method was developed to predict the dose distribution in a knee phantom from any neutron and photon beam spectra incident on the knee. This method was revealed to be reasonably accurate and enabled one to reduce the particle transport simulation time by a factor of 10 by modeling the moderator only

  16. Nine-year interval recurrence after treatment of boron neutron capture therapy in a patient with glioblastoma: A case report

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been reported to be effective in the patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Median survival time (MST) of GBM patients treated with BNCT is approximately two years. GBM patients surviving 2 or 3 years are considered long-term survivors. In general, most recurrences are local and dissemination is rare. We report an unusual patient with three recurrences; the first and the second recurrences were local, and the third recurrence was dissemination nine years after BNCT. - Highlights: • A patients with glioblastoma mutliforme could be alive more than 9 years after BNCT. • BNCT may be effective for the local control of GBM. • The following TMZ and conventional radiation may be effective for prevention of CSF dissemination

  17. Correlation between radiation dose and histopathological findings in patients with gliblastoma treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the correlation between the radiation dose and histopathological findings in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Histopathological studies were performed on specimens from 8 patients, 3 had undergone salvage surgery and 5 were autopsied. For histopathological cure of GBM at the primary site, the optimal minimal dose to the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the clinical target volume (CTV) were 68 Gy(w) and 44 Gy(w), respectively. - Highlights: • It is very important to determine the curable BNCT radiation dose on histopathological aspect in BNCT. • Of 23 patients with GBM treated with BNCT, autopsy was performed in 5, salvage surgery in 3, and histopathological study in 8. • To achieve the histopathological cure of GBM at the primary site, the optimal minimal dose to the GTV and CTV was 68 Gy(w) and 44 Gy(w), respectively

  18. Pilot clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent hepatic cancer involving the intra-arterial injection of a (10)BSH-containing WOW emulsion.

    Yanagie, Hironobu; Higashi, Syushi; Seguchi, Koji; Ikushima, Ichiro; Fujihara, Mituteru; Nonaka, Yasumasa; Oyama, Kazuyuki; Maruyama, Syoji; Hatae, Ryo; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Kinashi, Tomoko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Kajiyama, Tetsuya; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Eriguchi, Masazumi

    2014-06-01

    A 63-year-old man with multiple HCC in his left liver lobe was enrolled as the first patient in a pilot study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) involving the selective intra-arterial infusion of a (10)BSH-containing water-in-oil-in-water emulsion ((10)BSH-WOW). The size of the tumorous region remained stable during the 3 months after the BNCT. No adverse effects of the BNCT were observed. The present results show that (10)BSH-WOW can be used as novel intra-arterial boron carriers during BNCT for HCC. PMID:24559940

  19. DNA double-strand break induction in Ku80-deficient CHO cells following Boron Neutron Capture Reaction

    Boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR) is based on irradiation of tumors after accumulation of boron compound. 10B captures neutrons and produces an alpha (4He) particle and a recoiled lithium nucleus (7Li). These particles have the characteristics of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and have marked biological effects. The purpose of this study is to verify that BNCR will increase cell killing and slow disappearance of repair protein-related foci to a greater extent in DNA repair-deficient cells than in wild-type cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells and a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair deficient mutant derivative, xrs-5 (Ku80 deficient CHO mutant cells), were irradiated by thermal neutrons. The quantity of DNA-DSBs following BNCR was evaluated by measuring the phosphorylation of histone protein H2AX (gamma-H2AX) and 53BP1 foci using immunofluorescence intensity. Two hours after neutron irradiation, the number of gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in the CHO-K1 cells was decreased to 36.5-42.8% of the levels seen 30 min after irradiation. In contrast, two hours after irradiation, foci levels in the xrs-5 cells were 58.4-69.5% of those observed 30 min after irradiation. The number of gamma-H2AX foci in xrs-5 cells at 60-120 min after BNCT correlated with the cell killing effect of BNCR. However, in CHO-K1 cells, the RBE (relative biological effectiveness) estimated by the number of foci following BNCR was increased depending on the repair time and was not always correlated with the RBE of cytotoxicity. Mutant xrs-5 cells show extreme sensitivity to ionizing radiation, because xrs-5 cells lack functional Ku-protein. Our results suggest that the DNA-DSBs induced by BNCR were not well repaired in the Ku80 deficient cells. The RBE following BNCR of radio-sensitive mutant cells was not increased but was lower than that of radio-resistant cells. These results suggest that gamma-ray resistant cells have an advantage over gamma-ray sensitive cells in BNCR

  20. DNA double-strand break induction in Ku80-deficient CHO cells following Boron Neutron Capture Reaction

    Masunaga Shinichiro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR is based on irradiation of tumors after accumulation of boron compound. 10B captures neutrons and produces an alpha (4He particle and a recoiled lithium nucleus (7Li. These particles have the characteristics of high linear energy transfer (LET radiation and have marked biological effects. The purpose of this study is to verify that BNCR will increase cell killing and slow disappearance of repair protein-related foci to a greater extent in DNA repair-deficient cells than in wild-type cells. Methods Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1 cells and a DNA double-strand break (DSB repair deficient mutant derivative, xrs-5 (Ku80 deficient CHO mutant cells, were irradiated by thermal neutrons. The quantity of DNA-DSBs following BNCR was evaluated by measuring the phosphorylation of histone protein H2AX (gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci using immunofluorescence intensity. Results Two hours after neutron irradiation, the number of gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in the CHO-K1 cells was decreased to 36.5-42.8% of the levels seen 30 min after irradiation. In contrast, two hours after irradiation, foci levels in the xrs-5 cells were 58.4-69.5% of those observed 30 min after irradiation. The number of gamma-H2AX foci in xrs-5 cells at 60-120 min after BNCT correlated with the cell killing effect of BNCR. However, in CHO-K1 cells, the RBE (relative biological effectiveness estimated by the number of foci following BNCR was increased depending on the repair time and was not always correlated with the RBE of cytotoxicity. Conclusion Mutant xrs-5 cells show extreme sensitivity to ionizing radiation, because xrs-5 cells lack functional Ku-protein. Our results suggest that the DNA-DSBs induced by BNCR were not well repaired in the Ku80 deficient cells. The RBE following BNCR of radio-sensitive mutant cells was not increased but was lower than that of radio-resistant cells. These results suggest that gamma-ray resistant cells have

  1. In vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for the screening of boron-10 distribution in a rabbit knee: a simulation study.

    Zhu, X; Clackdoyle, R; Shortkroff, S; Yanch, J

    2008-05-21

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) is under development as a potential treatment modality for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is characterized by the inflammation of the synovium (the membrane lining articular joints), which leads to pain and a restricted range of motion. BNCS is a two-part procedure involving the injection of a boronated compound directly into the diseased joint followed by irradiation with a low-energy neutron beam. The neutron capture reactions taking place in the synovium deliver a local, high-linear energy transfer (LET) dose aimed at destroying the inflamed synovial membrane. For successful treatment via BNCS, a boron-labeled compound exhibiting both high synovial uptake and long retention time is necessary. Currently, the in vivo uptake behavior of potentially useful boronated compounds is evaluated in the knee joints of rabbits in which arthritis has been induced. This strategy involves the sacrifice and dissection of a large number of animals. An in vivo (10)B screening approach is therefore under investigation with the goal of significantly reducing the number of animals needed for compound evaluation via dissection studies. The 'in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis' (IVPGNAA) approach uses a narrow neutron beam to irradiate the knee from several angular positions following the intra-articular injection of a boronated compound whose uptake characteristics are unknown. A high-purity germanium detector collects the 478 keV gamma photons produced by the (10)B capture reactions. The (10)B distribution in the knee is then reconstructed by solving a system of simultaneous equations using a weighted least squares algorithm. To study the practical feasibility of IVPGNAA, simulation data were generated with the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code. The boron-containing region of a rabbit knee was partitioned into 8 compartments, and the (10)B prompt gamma signals were tallied from 16 angular positions. Results demonstrate that for

  2. In vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for the screening of boron-10 distribution in a rabbit knee: a simulation study

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) is under development as a potential treatment modality for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is characterized by the inflammation of the synovium (the membrane lining articular joints), which leads to pain and a restricted range of motion. BNCS is a two-part procedure involving the injection of a boronated compound directly into the diseased joint followed by irradiation with a low-energy neutron beam. The neutron capture reactions taking place in the synovium deliver a local, high-linear energy transfer (LET) dose aimed at destroying the inflamed synovial membrane. For successful treatment via BNCS, a boron-labeled compound exhibiting both high synovial uptake and long retention time is necessary. Currently, the in vivo uptake behavior of potentially useful boronated compounds is evaluated in the knee joints of rabbits in which arthritis has been induced. This strategy involves the sacrifice and dissection of a large number of animals. An in vivo 10B screening approach is therefore under investigation with the goal of significantly reducing the number of animals needed for compound evaluation via dissection studies. The 'in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis' (IVPGNAA) approach uses a narrow neutron beam to irradiate the knee from several angular positions following the intra-articular injection of a boronated compound whose uptake characteristics are unknown. A high-purity germanium detector collects the 478 keV gamma photons produced by the 10B capture reactions. The 10B distribution in the knee is then reconstructed by solving a system of simultaneous equations using a weighted least squares algorithm. To study the practical feasibility of IVPGNAA, simulation data were generated with the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code. The boron-containing region of a rabbit knee was partitioned into 8 compartments, and the 10B prompt gamma signals were tallied from 16 angular positions. Results demonstrate that for this

  3. In vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for the screening of boron-10 distribution in a rabbit knee: a simulation study

    Zhu, X; Yanch, J [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Clackdoyle, R [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Mixed Research Unit (UMR) 5516, CNRS and Universite Jean Monnet, Saint Etienne (France); Shortkroff, S [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-05-21

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) is under development as a potential treatment modality for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is characterized by the inflammation of the synovium (the membrane lining articular joints), which leads to pain and a restricted range of motion. BNCS is a two-part procedure involving the injection of a boronated compound directly into the diseased joint followed by irradiation with a low-energy neutron beam. The neutron capture reactions taking place in the synovium deliver a local, high-linear energy transfer (LET) dose aimed at destroying the inflamed synovial membrane. For successful treatment via BNCS, a boron-labeled compound exhibiting both high synovial uptake and long retention time is necessary. Currently, the in vivo uptake behavior of potentially useful boronated compounds is evaluated in the knee joints of rabbits in which arthritis has been induced. This strategy involves the sacrifice and dissection of a large number of animals. An in vivo {sup 10}B screening approach is therefore under investigation with the goal of significantly reducing the number of animals needed for compound evaluation via dissection studies. The 'in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis' (IVPGNAA) approach uses a narrow neutron beam to irradiate the knee from several angular positions following the intra-articular injection of a boronated compound whose uptake characteristics are unknown. A high-purity germanium detector collects the 478 keV gamma photons produced by the {sup 10}B capture reactions. The {sup 10}B distribution in the knee is then reconstructed by solving a system of simultaneous equations using a weighted least squares algorithm. To study the practical feasibility of IVPGNAA, simulation data were generated with the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code. The boron-containing region of a rabbit knee was partitioned into 8 compartments, and the {sup 10}B prompt gamma signals were tallied from 16 angular positions

  4. Neutron-photon mixed field dosimetry by TLD-700 glow curve analysis and its implementation in dose monitoring for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatments

    Boggio, E. F.; Longhino, J. M. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Departamento de Fisica de Reactores y Radiaciones / CNEA, Av. E. Bustillo Km 9.5, R8402AGP San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Andres, P. A., E-mail: efboggio@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Division Proteccion Radiologica / CNEA, Av. E. Bustillo Km 9.5, R8402AGP San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2015-10-15

    BNCT is a cancerous cells selective, non-conventional radiotherapy modality to treat malignant tumors such as glioblastoma, melanoma and recurrent head and neck cancer. It consists of a two-step procedure: first, the patient is injected with a tumor localizing drug containing a non-radioactive isotope (Boron-10) with high slow neutron capture cross-section. In a second step, the patient is irradiated with neutrons, which are absorbed by the Boron-10 agent with the subsequently nuclear reaction B- 10(n,a)Li-7, thereby resulting in dose at cellular level due to the high-Let particles. The neutron fields suitable for BNCT are characterized by high neutron fluxes and low gamma dose. Determination of each component is not an easy task, especially when the volume of measurement is quite small or inaccessible for a miniature ionization chamber, for example. A method of measuring the photon and slow neutron dose(mainly by N-14 and B-10) from the glow curve (GC) analysis of a single {sup 7}LiF thermoluminescence detector is evaluated. This method was suggested by the group headed by Dr. Grazia Gambarini. The dosemeters used were TLD-600 ({sup 6}LiF:Mg,Ti with 95.6% {sup 6}Li) and TLD-700 ({sup 7}LiF:Mg,Ti with 99.9% {sup 7}LiF) from Harshaw. Photon dose measurement using the GC analysis method with TLD-700 in mixed fields requires the relation of the two main peaks of a TLD-600 GC shape obtained from an exposition to the same neutron field, and a photon calibrated GC with TLD-700. The requirements for slow neutron dose measurements are similar. In order to properly apply the GC analysis method at the Ra-6 Research Reactor BNCT facility, measurements were carried out in a standard water phantom, fully characterized on the BNCT beam by conventional techniques (activation detectors and paired ionization chambers technique). Next, the method was implemented in whole body dose monitoring of a patient undergoing a BNCT treatment, using a Bo MAb (Bottle Manikin Absorption) phantom

  5. Neutron-photon mixed field dosimetry by TLD-700 glow curve analysis and its implementation in dose monitoring for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatments

    BNCT is a cancerous cells selective, non-conventional radiotherapy modality to treat malignant tumors such as glioblastoma, melanoma and recurrent head and neck cancer. It consists of a two-step procedure: first, the patient is injected with a tumor localizing drug containing a non-radioactive isotope (Boron-10) with high slow neutron capture cross-section. In a second step, the patient is irradiated with neutrons, which are absorbed by the Boron-10 agent with the subsequently nuclear reaction B- 10(n,a)Li-7, thereby resulting in dose at cellular level due to the high-Let particles. The neutron fields suitable for BNCT are characterized by high neutron fluxes and low gamma dose. Determination of each component is not an easy task, especially when the volume of measurement is quite small or inaccessible for a miniature ionization chamber, for example. A method of measuring the photon and slow neutron dose(mainly by N-14 and B-10) from the glow curve (GC) analysis of a single 7LiF thermoluminescence detector is evaluated. This method was suggested by the group headed by Dr. Grazia Gambarini. The dosemeters used were TLD-600 (6LiF:Mg,Ti with 95.6% 6Li) and TLD-700 (7LiF:Mg,Ti with 99.9% 7LiF) from Harshaw. Photon dose measurement using the GC analysis method with TLD-700 in mixed fields requires the relation of the two main peaks of a TLD-600 GC shape obtained from an exposition to the same neutron field, and a photon calibrated GC with TLD-700. The requirements for slow neutron dose measurements are similar. In order to properly apply the GC analysis method at the Ra-6 Research Reactor BNCT facility, measurements were carried out in a standard water phantom, fully characterized on the BNCT beam by conventional techniques (activation detectors and paired ionization chambers technique). Next, the method was implemented in whole body dose monitoring of a patient undergoing a BNCT treatment, using a Bo MAb (Bottle Manikin Absorption) phantom, with representative

  6. Impact of intra-arterial administration of boron compounds on dose-volume histograms in boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent head-and-neck tumors

    Purpose: To analyze the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of head-and-neck tumors treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and to determine the advantage of the intra-arterial (IA) route over the intravenous (IV) route as a drug delivery system for BNCT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen BNCTs for 12 patients with recurrent head-and-neck tumors were included in the present study. Eight irradiations were done after IV administration of boronophenylalanine and seven after IA administration. The maximal, mean, and minimal doses given to the gross tumor volume were assessed using a BNCT planning system. Results: The results are reported as median values with the interquartile range. In the IA group, the maximal, mean, and minimal dose given to the gross tumor volume was 68.7 Gy-Eq (range, 38.8-79.9), 45.0 Gy-Eq (range, 25.1-51.0), and 13.8 Gy-Eq (range, 4.8-25.3), respectively. In the IV group, the maximal, mean, and minimal dose given to the gross tumor volume was 24.2 Gy-Eq (range, 21.5-29.9), 16.4 Gy-Eq (range, 14.5-20.2), and 7.8 Gy-Eq (range, 6.8-9.5), respectively. Within 1-3 months after BNCT, the responses were assessed. Of the 6 patients in the IV group, 2 had a partial response, 3 no change, and 1 had progressive disease. Of 4 patients in the IA group, 1 achieved a complete response and 3 a partial response. Conclusion: Intra-arterial administration of boronophenylalanine is a promising drug delivery system for head-and-neck BNCT

  7. Biodistribution of the boron carriers boronophenylalanine (BPA) and/or decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in an experimental model of lung metastases

    BNCT was proposed for the treatment of diffuse, non-resectable tumors in the lung. We performed boron biodistribution studies with 5 administration protocols employing the boron carriers BPA and/or GB-10 in an experimental model of disseminated lung metastases in rats. All 5 protocols were non-toxic and showed preferential tumor boron uptake versus lung. Absolute tumor boron concentration values were therapeutically useful (25–76 ppm) for 3 protocols. Dosimetric calculations indicate that BNCT at RA-3 would be potentially therapeutic without exceeding radiotolerance in the lung. - Highlights: • We performed experimental boron biodistribution studies for lung metastases. • 3 protocols employing BPA and GB-10 would be therapeutically useful. • BNCT at RA-3 would be potentially therapeutic for experimental lung metastases

  8. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of a boron neutron capture therapy 10B-carrier, L-p-boronophenylalanine-fructose complex

    Timonen, M.

    2010-07-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapy that has mainly been used to treat malignant brain tumours, melanomas, and head and neck cancer. In BNCT, the patient receives an intravenous infusion of a 10B-carrier, which accumulates in the tumour area. The tumour is irradiated with epithermal or thermal neutrons, which result in a boron neutron capture reaction that generates heavy particles to damage tumour cells. In Finland, boronophenylalanine fructose (BPA-F) is used as the 10B-carrier. Currently, the drifting of boron from blood to tumour as well as the spatial and temporal accumulation of boron in the brain, are not precisely known. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) could be used for selective BPA-F detection and quantification as aromatic protons of BPA resonate in the spectrum region, which is clear of brain metabolite signals. This study, which included both phantom and in vivo studies, examined the validity of 1H MRS as a tool for BPA detection. In the phantom study, BPA quantification was studied at 1.5 and 3.0 T with single voxel 1H MRS, and at 1.5 T with magnetic resonance imaging (MRSI). The detection limit of BPA was determined in phantom conditions at 1.5 T and 3.0 T using single voxel 1H MRS, and at 1.5 T using MRSI. In phantom conditions, BPA quantification accuracy of +- 5% and +- 15% were achieved with single voxel MRS using external or internal (internal water signal) concentration references, respectively. For MRSI, a quantification accuracy of <5% was obtained using an internal concentration reference (creatine). The detection limits of BPA in phantom conditions for the PRESS sequence were 0.7 (3.0 T) and 1.4 mM (1.5 T) mM with 20 x 20 single voxel MRS, and 1.0 mM with acquisition-weighted MRSI, respectively. In the in vivo study, an MRSI or single voxel MRS or both was performed for ten patients (patients 1-10) on the day of BNCT. Three patients had glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and five patients had a recurrent or

  9. Measurements and analysis of neutron reaction rates and gamma-ray energy deposition in a critical assembly containing a central simulated boron control rod

    The main contributions to the power in a Boron control rod are provided by the energy deposition rates from alpha rays generated in the Boron and from gamma rays issued in the absorber and the surrounding fuel material. To check the validity of calculational methods and data for such a system, a simulated enriched Boron control rod has been built in the centre of the critical assembly BALZAC DE-2 in the MASURCA facility. Neutron capture rates in B10, fission rates in U-235, U-238 and Pu-239 have been measured through the core and the control rod. Gamma heat deposition rates and doses have been measured with ionization chamber and thermoluminescent dosemeters respectively, in a joint effort involving three European laboratories. This paper presents the experimental results and compares them with theoretical calculations. (author). 27 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Boron carbide coatings for neutron detection probed by x-rays, ions, and neutrons to determine thin film quality

    Nowak, G., E-mail: Gregor.Nowak@hzg.de; Störmer, M.; Horstmann, C.; Kampmann, R.; Höche, D.; Lorenz, U.; Müller, M.; Schreyer, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Straße 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Becker, H.-W. [RUBION-Zentrale Einrichtung für Ionenstrahlen und Radionuklide, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Haese-Seiller, M.; Moulin, J.-F.; Pomm, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Außenstelle an der Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), Technische Universität München, 85747 Garching (Germany); Randau, C. [Georg-August Universität Göttingen, Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum, 37077 Göttingen, Germany and Außenstelle an der Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), Technische Universität München, 85747 Garching (Germany); Hall-Wilton, R. [European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-01-21

    Due to the present shortage of {sup 3}He and the associated tremendous increase of its price, the supply of large neutron detection systems with {sup 3}He becomes unaffordable. Alternative neutron detection concepts, therefore, have been invented based on solid {sup 10}B converters. These concepts require development in thin film deposition technique regarding high adhesion, thickness uniformity and chemical purity of the converter coating on large area substrates. We report on the sputter deposition of highly uniform large-area {sup 10}B{sub 4}C coatings of up to 2 μm thickness with a thickness deviation below 4% using the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht large area sputtering system. The {sup 10}B{sub 4}C coatings are x-ray amorphous and highly adhesive to the substrate. Material analysis by means of X-ray-Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry, and Rutherford-Back-Scattering (RBS) revealed low impurities concentration in the coatings. The isotope composition determined by Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry, RBS, and inelastic nuclear reaction analysis of the converter coatings evidences almost identical {sup 10}B isotope contents in the sputter target and in the deposited coating. Neutron conversion and detection test measurements with variable irradiation geometry of the converter coating demonstrate an average relative quantum efficiency ranging from 65% to 90% for cold neutrons as compared to a black {sup 3}He-monitor. Thus, these converter coatings contribute to the development of {sup 3}He-free prototype detectors based on neutron grazing incidence. Transferring the developed coating process to an industrial scale sputtering system can make alternative {sup 3}He-free converter elements available for large area neutron detection systems.

  11. The boron neutron capture therapy facility of the ETRR-2: a promising opportunity for cancer research and treatment

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary modality that can selectively irradiate tumor tissue using drugs containing 10B that are capable of preferntially accumulating in the tumor, which is then irradiated with thermal neutrins. This casuses the 10B nucleus to split, releasing an alpha particle and a lithium nucleus. These products are very damaging to cells but have ranges of the order of cell diameters. The technique is minly used for the treatment of Glioblastoma, a highly malignant tumor whose treatment is not statisfactory using conventional techniques. Other types of cancer, like melanoma, are also considered. Since early nineties, the area of BNCT is witnessing active developments in the USA, Japan, and Europe. the Egyptian second experimental and training research reactor (ETRR-2) is a pool-type MPR. It has four neutron beam and a thermal column as the main experimental devices. One of the main reactor facilities is the BNCT unit. The paper highlights the basics of the BNCT, its development, and status around the world. A brief description of the reactor, the BNCt uint as well as the preliminary analysis done for the facility is presented. The BNCT offers a unique opportunity for coordinated efforts by the arab nuclear organizations and medical institutions similar to the on going efforts at Petten, the netherlands

  12. An Accelerator Neutron Source for BNCT

    The overall goal of this project was to develop an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Specifically, our goals were to design, and confirm by measurement, a target assembly and a moderator assembly that would fulfill the design requirements of the ABNS. These design requirements were (1) that the neutron field quality be as good as the neutron field quality for the reactor-based neutron sources for BNCT, (2) that the patient treatment time be reasonable, (3) that the proton current required to treat patients in reasonable times be technologically achievable at reasonable cost with good reliability, and accelerator space requirements which can be met in a hospital, and finally (4) that the treatment be safe for the patients

  13. An Accelerator Neutron Source for BNCT

    Blue, Thomas, E

    2006-03-14

    The overall goal of this project was to develop an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Specifically, our goals were to design, and confirm by measurement, a target assembly and a moderator assembly that would fulfill the design requirements of the ABNS. These design requirements were 1) that the neutron field quality be as good as the neutron field quality for the reactor-based neutron sources for BNCT, 2) that the patient treatment time be reasonable, 3) that the proton current required to treat patients in reasonable times be technologially achievable at reasonable cost with good reliability, and accelerator space requirements which can be met in a hospital, and finally 4) that the treatment be safe for the patients.

  14. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for cancer treatment

    Ackermann, A.L. (ed.); Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-09-01

    This monthly bulletin describes activities in the following project areas during this reporting period: supporting technology development, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support, and PBF operations. (FI)

  15. Synthesis of PBAD-lipiodol nanoparticles for combination treatment with boric acid in boron neutron capture therapy for hepatoma in-vitro

    This study attempted to increase BNCT efficiency for hepatoma by a combined treatment of phenylboric acid derivative entrapped lipiodol nanoparticles (PBAD-L nanoparticles) with boric acid. The size of PBAD-L nanoparticles were 400-750 nm at the boron concentrations of 0.3-2.7 mg/ml. After 24 hours the boron concentration in PBAD-L nanoparticles treated human hepatoma HepG2 cells was 112 ppm, while that in rat liver Clone 9 cells was 52 ppm. With the use of 25 μg B/ml boric acid, after 6 hours the boron concentration in HepG2 and Clone 9 cells were 75 ppm and 40 ppm, respectively. In a combined treatment, boron concentration in HepG2 cells which were treated with PBAD-L nanoparticles for 18 hours and then combined with boric acid for 6 hours was 158 ppm. After neutron irradiation, the surviving fraction of HepG2 cells treated with PBAD-L nanoparticles was 12.6%, while that in the ones with a combined treatment was 1.3%. In conclusion, the combined treatment provided a higher boron concentration in HepG2 cells than treatments with either PBAD-L nanoparticles or boric acid, resulting in a higher therapeutic efficacy of BNCT in hepatoma cells. (author)

  16. The development of the process of electrophoresis deposition of the boron on aluminium substrate to be used in the construction of neutron detectors

    The development in the country of autonomous nuclear technology made it necessary to construct radiation detectors to substitute the imported ones among others the boron lined neutron detectors. For this reason was developed the process of boron electrophoresis deposition on aluminium substrate of large area for use in the construction of these neutron detectors. After the definition and optimization of the parameters involved in the process, depositions of 10B were made on cylinders to be used after wards as electrodes in gamma compensated and non-compensated ionization chambers and in proportional detectors. Prototype of ionization were designed, builted and mounted in the department of Application for Engineering and Industry (TE) of Nuclear Energy Research Institute (IPEN) belonging to the National Atomic Energy Comission (CNEN). Submited to caracterization tests at IPEN's IEA-RL reactor, they satisfied fully the technical especifications of the project. (author)

  17. Maleimide-functionalized closo-dodecaborate albumin conjugates (MID-AC): Unique ligation at cysteine and lysine residues enables efficient boron delivery to tumor for neutron capture therapy.

    Kikuchi, Shunsuke; Kanoh, Daisuke; Sato, Shinichi; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Minoru; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-10

    Maleimide-conjugating closo-dodecaborate sodium form 5c (MID) synthesized by the nucleophilic ring-opening reaction of closo-dodecaborate-1,4-dioxane complex 2 with tetrabutylammonium (TBA) azide was found to conjugate to free SH of cysteine and lysine residues in BSA under physiological conditions, forming highly boronated BSA that showed high and selective accumulation in tumor and significant tumor growth inhibition in colon 26 tumor-bearing mice subjected to thermal neutron irradiation. PMID:27422608

  18. Selective irradiation of the blood vessels by using boron neutron capture reaction - development and its utilization

    Full text: The purposes are development of the method to irradiate blood vessels selectively by using B-10(n, alpha) Li-7 reaction and examination of its effect on tumor and normal tissues. We made BSH-enclosed large size liposome (=300 nm) conjugated with PEG ; BSH-PEG-liposome. This type liposome is thought to escapes from macrophage in the liver, and can stay in the blood at high concentration level for long time. They are also considered not to be able to leak from the vessels into the surrounding tissues. If they receive neutron, B-10 emits extreme short-range (<9 micron) alpha-particle and recoil Li-7 nucleus. C3H/He mice and tumor model SCCVII were used to examine the character and effect of this type liposome. Thermal neutron irradiation was performed by KUR heavy water facility and B-10 concentrations in the blood or tissues were measured by prompt gamma-ray spectrometry. The B-10 concentration ratio between blood and tumor 30 minutes after BSH-PEG-liposome administration was 35- 40, and this ratio was stable for several hours. The effect on the tumors that received neutrons was examined by colony formation assay. The tumor cell survival rate of the BSH-PEG-liposome neutron group was very slightly suppressed in comparison with that of neutron alone group, however, the growth of the tumors was remarkably suppressed in BSH-PEG-liposome neutron group. In the mice that received whole body neutron irradiation after BSH-PEF-liposome injection, the mouse group of 50 Gy to the endothelium of the vessel did exhibit no death, and in the groups of 127 and 183 Gy, all individuals died. But diarrhea and bloody anal discharge that suggested radiation intestinal death were not observed at all. Cause of the death seemed to be bone marrow death

  19. Standard practice for qualification and acceptance of boron based metallic neutron absorbers for nuclear criticality control for dry cask storage systems and transportation packaging

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides procedures for qualification and acceptance of neutron absorber materials used to provide criticality control by absorbing thermal neutrons in systems designed for nuclear fuel storage, transportation, or both. 1.2 This practice is limited to neutron absorber materials consisting of metal alloys, metal matrix composites (MMCs), and cermets, clad or unclad, containing the neutron absorber boron-10 (10B). 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  20. Evaluation of carboranylporphyrins as boron delivery agents for neutron capture therapy

    The goals of the present study were two-fold. First, to determine the biodistribution of three carboranyl-porphyrins, designated H2DCP, H2TCP and H2TBP following intracerebral (i.c.) administration by means of convection enhanced delivery (CED) to F98 glioma bearing rats. Tumor boron concentrations immediately after CED were 36 and 88 μg/g for H2DCP and H2TCP, respectively, and were 103 and 62 μg/g for H2TCP and H2TBP, respectively, 24h after termination of CED. The corresponding normal brain concentrations were 5.2, 3.3 and 0.8 μg/g, and blood and liver concentrations all were 2TCP and H2TBP as boron delivery agents in F98 glioma bearing rats. BNCT was carried out at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITRR) 24 h after CED of 200 μl of either 0.5 mg of H2TCP or H2TBP. Untreated control rats all died within 29 days after tumor implantation and had a mean survival time (MST) of 23±3 days and irradiated controls had a MST of 27±3 days. Animals that received H2TCP by CED, followed by BNCT, had a MST of 35±4 days and animals received H2TBP had a MST of 44±10 days. Further studies were carried out using H2TBP at a dose of 0.2 mg administered by a Harvard pump, either alone or in combination with i.v. BPA, and the corresponding MSTs were 34±3 d and 43±9 d, respectively. Histopathologic examination of the brains of animals that died revealed large numbers of porphyrin laden macrophages and extracellular accumulations of free porphyrin indicating that tumor cell uptake was suboptimal. Further studies are planned to synthesize and evaluate new compounds that will have enhanced cellular uptake and efficacy as boron delivery agents for NCT. (author)