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Sample records for accelerator-based boron neutron

  1. Beryllium Target for Accelerator - Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    This work is part of a project for developing Accelerator Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB- BNCT) for which the generation of neutrons through nuclear reactions like 9Be(d,n) is necessary. In this paper first results of the design and development of such neutron production targets are presented. For this purpose, the neutron production target has to be able to withstand the mechanical and thermal stresses produced by intense beams of deuterons (of 1.4 MeV with a total current of about 30mA). In particular, the target should be able to dissipate an energy density of up to 1 kW/cm2 and preserve its physical and mechanical properties for a sufficient length of time under irradiation conditions and hydrogen damage. The target is proposed to consist of a thin Be deposit (neutron producing material) on a thin W or Mo layer to stop the beam and a Cu backing to help carry away the heat load. To achieve the adhesion of the Be films on W, Mo and Cu substrates, a powder blasting technique was applied with quartz and alumina microspheres. On the other hand, Ag deposits were made on some of the substrates previously blasted to favor the chemical affinity between Beryllium and the substrate thus improving adhesion. Be deposits were characterized by means of different techniques including Electron Microscopy (Sem) and Xr Diffraction. Roughness and thickness measurements were also made. To satisfy the power dissipation requirements for the neutron production target, a microchannel system model is proposed. The simulation based on this model permits to determine the geometric parameters of the prototype complying with the requirements of a microchannel system. Results were compared with those in several publications and discrepancies lower than 10% were found in all cases. A prototype for model validation is designed here for which simulations of fluid and structural mechanics were carried out and discussed

  2. Research of accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Background: 7Li (p, n) reaction of high neutron yield and low threshold energy has become one of the most important neutron generating reactions for Accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Purpose Focuses on neutron yield and spectrum characteristics of this kind of neutron generating reaction which serves as an accelerator-based neutron source and moderates the high energy neutron beams to meet BNCT requirements. Methods: The yield and energy spectrum of neutrons generated by accelerator-based 7Li(p, n) reaction with incident proton energy from 1.9 MeV to 3.0 MeV are researched using the Monte Carlo code-MCNPX2.5.0. And the energy and angular distribution of differential neutron yield by 2.5-MeV incident proton are also given in this part. In the following part, the character of epithermal neutron beam generated by 2.5-MeV incident protons is moderated by a new-designed moderator. Results: Energy spectra of neutrons generated by accelerator-based 7Li(p, n) reaction with incident proton energy from 1.9 MeV to 3.0 MeV are got through the simulation and calculation. The best moderator thickness is got through comparison. Conclusions: Neutron beam produced by accelerator-based 7Li(p, n) reaction, with the bombarding beam of 10 mA and the energy of 2.5 MeV, can meet the requirement of BNCT well after being moderated. (authors)

  3. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Mitchell, H.E.

    1996-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary cancer radiotherapy modality in which a boronated pharmaceutical that preferentially accumulates in malignant tissue is first administered, followed by exposing the tissue in the treatment volume to a thermal neutron field. Current usable beams are reactor-based but a viable alternative is the production of an epithermal neutron beam from an accelerator. Current literature cites various proposed accelerator-based designs, most of which are based on proton beams with beryllium or lithium targets. This dissertation examines the efficacy of a novel approach to BNCT treatments that incorporates an electron linear accelerator in the production of a photoneutron source. This source may help to resolve some of the present concerns associated with accelerator sources, including that of target cooling. The photoneutron production process is discussed as a possible alternate source of neutrons for eventual BNCT treatments for cancer. A conceptual design to produce epithermal photoneutrons by high photons (due to bremsstrahlung) impinging on deuterium targets is presented along with computational and experimental neutron production data. A clinically acceptable filtered epithermal neutron flux on the order of 10{sup 7} neutrons per second per milliampere of electron current is shown to be obtainable. Additionally, the neutron beam is modified and characterized for BNCT applications by employing two unique moderating materials (an Al/AlF{sub 3} composite and a stacked Al/Teflon design) at various incident electron energies.

  4. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Boron neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary cancer radiotherapy modality in which a boronated pharmaceutical that preferentially accumulates in malignant tissue is first administered, followed by exposing the tissue in the treatment volume to a thermal neutron field. Current usable beams are reactor-based but a viable alternative is the production of an epithermal neutron beam from an accelerator. Current literature cites various proposed accelerator-based designs, most of which are based on proton beams with beryllium or lithium targets. This dissertation examines the efficacy of a novel approach to BNCT treatments that incorporates an electron linear accelerator in the production of a photoneutron source. This source may help to resolve some of the present concerns associated with accelerator sources, including that of target cooling. The photoneutron production process is discussed as a possible alternate source of neutrons for eventual BNCT treatments for cancer. A conceptual design to produce epithermal photoneutrons by high photons (due to bremsstrahlung) impinging on deuterium targets is presented along with computational and experimental neutron production data. A clinically acceptable filtered epithermal neutron flux on the order of 107 neutrons per second per milliampere of electron current is shown to be obtainable. Additionally, the neutron beam is modified and characterized for BNCT applications by employing two unique moderating materials (an Al/AlF3 composite and a stacked Al/Teflon design) at various incident electron energies

  5. Development of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    We describe the present status of an ongoing project to develop a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based (AB)-BNCT. The project final goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.4 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. The machine currently being constructed is a folded TESQ with a high-voltage terminal at 0.6 MV. We report here on the progress achieved in a number of different areas.

  6. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  7. Experimental and Simulated Characterization of a Beam Shaping Assembly for Accelerator- Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    In the frame of the construction of a Tandem Electrostatic Quadrupole Accelerator facility devoted to the Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a Beam Shaping Assembly has been characterized by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and measurements. The neutrons were generated via the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction by irradiating a thick LiF target with a 2.3 MeV proton beam delivered by the TANDAR accelerator at CNEA. The emerging neutron flux was measured by means of activation foils while the beam quality and directionality was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The parameters show compliance with those suggested by IAEA. Finally, an improvement adding a beam collimator has been evaluated.

  8. Accelerator based-boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)-clinical QA and QC

    Alpha-particle and recoil Li atom yielded by the reaction (10B, n), due to their high LET properties, efficiently and specifically kill the cancer cell that has incorporated the boron. Efficacy of this boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been demonstrated mainly in the treatment of recurrent head/neck and malignant brain cancers in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KUR). As the clinical trial of BNCT is to start from 2009 based on an accelerator (not on the Reactor), this paper describes the tentative outline of the standard operation procedure of BNCT for its quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) along the flow of its clinical practice. Personnel concerned in the practice involve the attending physician, multiple physicians in charge of BNCT, medical physicists, nurses and reactor stuff. The flow order of the actual BNCT is as follows: Pre-therapeutic evaluation mainly including informed consent and confirmation of the prescription; Therapeutic planning including setting of therapy volume, and of irradiation axes followed by meeting for stuffs' agreement, decision of irradiating field in the irradiation room leading to final decision of the axis, CT for the planning, decision of the final therapeutic plan according to Japan Atomic Energy Agency-Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS) and meeting of all related personnel for the final confirmation of therapeutic plan; and BNCT including the transport of patient to KUR, dripping of boronophenylalanine, setting up of the patient on the machine, blood sampling for pharmacokinetics, boron level measurement for decision of irradiating time, switch on/off of the accelerator, confirmation of patient's movement in the irradiated field after the neutron irradiation, blood sampling for confirmation of the boron level, and patient's leave from the room. The QA/QC check is principally to be conducted with the two-person rule. The purpose of the clinical trial is to establish the usefulness of BNCT, and

  9. Electrostatic design and beam transport for a folded tandem electrostatic quadrupole accelerator facility for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    Within the frame of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT), we discuss here the electrostatic design of the machine, including the accelerator tubes with electrostatic quadrupoles and the simulations for the transport and acceleration of a high intensity beam.

  10. Development of high intensity ion sources for a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Several ion sources have been developed and an ion source test stand has been mounted for the first stage of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility For Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. A first source, designed, fabricated and tested is a dual chamber, filament driven and magnetically compressed volume plasma proton ion source. A 4 mA beam has been accelerated and transported into the suppressed Faraday cup. Extensive simulations of the sources have been performed using both 2D and 3D self-consistent codes.

  11. Development of beryllium-based neutron target system with three-layer structure for accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugano, Tomei; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The iBNCT project team with University of Tsukuba is developing an accelerator-based neutron source. Regarding neutron target material, our project has applied beryllium. To deal with large heat load and blistering of the target system, we developed a three-layer structure for the target system that includes a blistering mitigation material between the beryllium used as the neutron generator and the copper heat sink. The three materials were bonded through diffusion bonding using a hot isostatic pressing method. Based on several verifications, our project chose palladium as the intermediate layer. A prototype of the neutron target system was produced. We will verify that sufficient neutrons for BNCT treatment are generated by the device in the near future. PMID:26260448

  12. High power accelerator-based boron neutron capture with a liquid lithium target and new applications to treatment of infectious diseases

    A new conceptual design for an accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (ABNCT) facility based on the high-current low-energy proton beam driven by the linear accelerator at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) incident on a windowless forced-flow liquid-lithium target, is described. The liquid-lithium target, currently in construction at Soreq NRC, will produce a neutron field suitable for the BNCT treatment of deep-seated tumor tissues, through the reaction 7Li(p,n)7Be. The liquid-lithium target is designed to overcome the major problem of solid lithium targets, namely to sustain and dissipate the power deposited by the high-intensity proton beam. Together with diseases conventionally targeted by BNCT, we propose to study the application of our setup to a novel approach in treatment of diseases associated with bacterial infections and biofilms, e.g. inflammations on implants and prosthetic devices, cystic fibrosis, infectious kidney stones. Feasibility experiments evaluating the boron neutron capture effectiveness on bacteria annihilation are taking place at the Soreq nuclear reactor.

  13. High power accelerator-based boron neutron capture with a liquid lithium target and new applications to treatment of infectious diseases

    Halfon, S. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)], E-mail: halfon@phys.huji.ac.il; Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Steinberg, D. [Biofilm Laboratory, Institute of Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Hebrew University-Hadassah (Israel); Nagler, A.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Polacheck, I. [Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center (Israel); Srebnik, M. [Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel)

    2009-07-15

    A new conceptual design for an accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (ABNCT) facility based on the high-current low-energy proton beam driven by the linear accelerator at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) incident on a windowless forced-flow liquid-lithium target, is described. The liquid-lithium target, currently in construction at Soreq NRC, will produce a neutron field suitable for the BNCT treatment of deep-seated tumor tissues, through the reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be. The liquid-lithium target is designed to overcome the major problem of solid lithium targets, namely to sustain and dissipate the power deposited by the high-intensity proton beam. Together with diseases conventionally targeted by BNCT, we propose to study the application of our setup to a novel approach in treatment of diseases associated with bacterial infections and biofilms, e.g. inflammations on implants and prosthetic devices, cystic fibrosis, infectious kidney stones. Feasibility experiments evaluating the boron neutron capture effectiveness on bacteria annihilation are taking place at the Soreq nuclear reactor.

  14. Use of accelerator based neutron sources

    With the objective of discussing new requirements related to the use of accelerator based neutron generators an Advisory Group meeting was held in October 1998 in Vienna. This meeting was devoted to the specific field of the utilization of accelerator based neutron generators. This TECDOC reports on the technical discussions and presentations that took place at this meeting and reflects the current status of neutron generators. The 14 MeV neutron generators manufactured originally for neutron activation analysis are utilised also for nuclear structure and reaction studies, nuclear data acquisition, radiation effects and damage studies, fusion related studies, neutron radiography

  15. Accelerator tube construction and characterization for a tandem-electrostatic-quadrupole for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    The accelerator tubes are essential components of the accelerator. Their function is to transport and accelerate a very intense proton or deuteron beam through the machine, from the ion source to the neutron production target, without significant losses. In this contribution, we discuss materials selected for the tube construction, the procedures used for their assembly and the testing performed to meet the stringent requirements to which it is subjected.

  16. High-power electron beam tests of a liquid-lithium target and characterization study of (7)Li(p,n) near-threshold neutrons for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Cohen, D; Eliyahu, I; Kijel, D; Mardor, I; Silverman, I

    2014-06-01

    A compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The target is intended to demonstrate liquid-lithium target capabilities to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals. The lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power >5kW generated by high-intensity proton beams, necessary for sufficient therapeutic neutron flux. In preliminary experiments liquid lithium was flown through the target loop and generated a stable jet on the concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power densities of more than 4kW/cm(2) and volumetric power density around 2MW/cm(3) at a lithium flow of ~4m/s, while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. These power densities correspond to a narrow (σ=~2mm) 1.91MeV, 3mA proton beam. A high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5MeV, 2mA) is being commissioned at the SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator. In order to determine the conditions of LiLiT proton irradiation for BNCT and to tailor the neutron energy spectrum, a characterization of near threshold (~1.91MeV) (7)Li(p,n) neutrons is in progress based on Monte-Carlo (MCNP and Geant4) simulation and on low-intensity experiments with solid LiF targets. In-phantom dosimetry measurements are performed using special designed dosimeters based on CR-39 track detectors. PMID:24387907

  17. Accelerator based steady state neutron source

    Using high current, cw linear accelerator technology, a spallation neutron source can achieve much higher average intensities than existing or proposed pulsed spallation sources. With about 100 mA of 300 MeV protons or deuterons, the accelerator based neutron research facility (ABNR) would initially achieve the 1016 n/cm2s thermal flux goal of the advanced steady state neutron source, and upgrading could provide higher steady state fluxes. The relatively low ion energy compared to other spallation sources has an important impact on R and D requirements as well as capital cost, for which a range of $300-450 M is estimated by comparison to other accelerator-based neutron source facilities. The source is similar to a reactor source is most respects. It has some higher energy neutrons but fewer gamma rays, and the moderator region is free of many of the design constraints of a reactor, which helps to implement sources for various neutron energy spectra, many beam tubes, etc., with the development of a multibeam concept and the basis for currents greater than 100 mA that is assumed in the R and D plan, the ABNR would serve many additional uses, such as fusion materials development, production of proton-rich isotopes, and other energy and defense program needs

  18. An accelerator based steady state neutron source

    Using high current, cw linear accelerator technology, a spallation neutron source can achieve much higher average intensities than existing or proposed pulsed spallation sources. With about 100 mA of 300 MeV protons or deuterons, the accelerator based neutron research facility (ABNR) would initially achieve the 1016 n/cm2 s themal flux goal of the advanced steady state neutron source, and upgrading could provide higher steady state fluxes. The relatively low ion energy compared to other spallation sources has an important impact on R and D requirements as well as capital cost, for which a range of Dollar 300-450 is estimated by comparison to other accelerator-based neutron source facilities. The source is similar to a reactor source in most respects. It has some higher energy neutrons but fewer gamma rays, and the moderator region is free of many of the design constraints of a reactor, which helps to implement sources for various neutron energy spectra, many beam tubes, etc. With the development of a multibeam concept and the basis for currents greater than 100 mA that is assumed in the R and D plan, the ABNR would serve many additional uses, such as fusion materials development, production of proton-rich isotopes, and other energy and defense program needs. (orig.)

  19. Accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    Full text: The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk) and the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Obninsk) have proposed an accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture and fast neutron therapy for hospital. Innovative approach is based upon vacuum insulation tandem accelerator (VITA) and near threshold 7Li(p,n)7Be neutron generation. Pilot accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture therapy is under construction now at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia. In the present report, the pilot facility design is presented and discussed. Design features of facility components are discussed. Results of experiments and simulations are presented. Complete experimental tests are planned by the end of the year 2005

  20. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. (author)

  1. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    Agosteo, S; D'Errico, F; Nath, R; Tinti, R

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in sup 1 sup 0 B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast ...

  2. Accelerator-based neutron radioscopic systems

    There is interest in non-reactor source, thermal neutron inspection systems for applications in aircraft maintenance, explosive devices, investment-cast turbine blades, etc. Accelerator sources, (d-T), RFQ accelerators and cyclotrons as examples, are available for either transportable or fixed neutron inspection systems. Sources are reviewed for neutron output, portability, ease of use and cost, and for use with an electronic neutron imaging camera (image intensifier or scintillator-camera system) to provide a prompt response, neutron inspection system. Particular emphasis is given to the current aircraft inspection problem to detect and characterize corrosion. Systems are analyzed to determine usefulness in providing an on-line inspection technique to detect corrosion in aluminum honeycomb aircraft components, either on-aircraft or in a shop environment. The neutron imaging sensitivity to hydrogenous aluminum corrosion product offers early detection advantages for aircraft corrosion, to levels of aluminum metal loss as small as 25 μm. The practical capability for a continuous scan thermal neutron radioscopic system to inspect up to 500 square feet of component surface per day is used as an evaluation criterion, with the system showing contrast sensitivity of at least 5% and image detail in the order of 4 mm for parts 10 cm thick. Under these practical conditions and 3-shift operation, the source must provide an incident thermal neutron flux of 5.6x104 n cm-2 s-1 at an L/D of 30. A stop and go inspection approach, offering improved resolution, would require a source with similar characteristics

  3. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2003-04-11

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  4. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  5. Spectrum shaping of accelerator-based neutron beams for BNCT

    Montagnini, B; Esposito, J; Giusti, V; Mattioda, F; Varone, R

    2002-01-01

    We describe Monte Carlo simulations of three facilities for the production of epithermal neutrons for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) and examine general aspects and problems of designing the spectrum-shaping assemblies to be used with these neutron sources. The first facility is based on an accelerator-driven low-power subcritical reactor, operating as a neutron amplifier. The other two facilities have no amplifier and rely entirely on their primary sources, a D-T fusion reaction device and a conventional 2.5 MeV proton accelerator with a Li target, respectively.

  6. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    Franklyn, C. B.

    2011-12-01

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >1011 nṡs-1. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  7. BINP pilot accelerator-based neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    Neutron source based on accelerator has been proposed for neutron capture therapy at hospital. Innovative approach is based upon tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation and near threshold 7Li(p,n)7Be neutron generation. Pilot innovative accelerator based neutron source is under going to start operating now at BINP, Novosibirsk. Negative ion source with Penning geometry of electrodes has been manufactured and dc H- ion beam has been obtained. Study of beam transport was carried out using prototype of tandem accelerator. Tandem accelerator and ion optical channels have been manufactured and assembled. Neutron producing target has been manufactured, thermal regimes of target were studied, and lithium evaporation on target substrate was realized. In the report, the pilot facility design is given and design features of facility components are discussed. Current status of project realization, results of experiments and simulations are presented. (author)

  8. Optimisation of resolution in accelerator-based fast neutron radiography

    Rahmanian, H; Watterson, J I W

    2002-01-01

    In fast neutron radiography, imaging geometry, neutron scattering, the fast neutron scintillator and the position-sensitive detector all influence feature contrast, resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio in the image. The effect of imaging geometry can be explored by using a ray-tracing method. This requires following the path of neutrons through the imaging field, which includes the sample of interest. A relationship between imaging geometry and feature detectability can be developed. Monte Carlo methods can be used to explore the effect of neutron scattering on the results obtained with the ray-tracing technique. Fast neutrons are detected indirectly via neutron-nucleon scattering reactions. Using hydrogen-rich scintillators and relying on the recoil protons to ionise the scintillator material is the most sensitive technique available. The efficiency, geometry and composition of these scintillators influence the detectability of features in fast neutron radiography. These scintillator properties have a di...

  9. Accelerator based neutron source for the neutron capture therapy at hospital

    Accelerator source of epithermal neutrons for the hospital-based boron neutron capture therapy is proposed and discussed. Kinematically collimated neutrons are produced via near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction at proton energies of 1.883 - 1.9 MeV. Steady-state accelerator current of 40 mA allows to provide therapeutically useful beams with treatment times of tens of minutes. The basic components of the facility are a hydrogen negative ion source, an electrostatic tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation, a sectioned rectifier, and a thin lithium neutron generating target on the surface of tungsten disk cooled by liquid metal heat carrier. Design features of facility components are discussed. The possibility of stabilization of proton energy is considered. At proton energy of 2.5 MeV the neutron beam production for NCT usage after moderation is also considered. (author)

  10. Fabrication of boron-phosphide neutron detectors

    Boron phosphide is a potentially viable candidate for high neutron flux neutron detectors. The authors have explored chemical vapor deposition methods to produce such detectors and have not been able to produce good boron phosphide coatings on silicon carbide substrates. However, semi-conducting quality films have been produced. Further testing is required

  11. Design of an accelerator-based neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    The boron neutron capture therapy is mainly suited in the treatment of some tumor kinds which revealed ineffective to the traditional radiotherapy. In order to take advantage of such a therapeutic modality in hospital environments, neutron beams of suitable energy and flux levels provided by compact size facilities are needed. The advantages and drawbacks of several neutron beams are here analysed in terms of therapeutic gains. In detail the GEANT-3/MICAP simulations show that high tumor control probability, with sub-lethal dose at healthy tissues, can be achieved by using neutron beams of few keV energy having a flux of about 109 neutrons/(cm2 s). To produce such a neutron beam, the feasibility of a proton accelerator is investigated. In particular an appropriate choice of the radiofrequency parameters (modulation, efficiency of acceleration, phase shift, etc.) allows the development of relatively compact accelerators, having a proton beam current of 30 mA and an energy of 2 MeV, which could eventually lead to setting up of hospital-based neutron facilities.

  12. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT

    Protecting the facility personnel and the general public from radiation exposure is a primary safety concern of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility. This work makes an attempt at answering the questions open-quotes How much?close quotes and open-quotes What kind?close quotes of shielding will meet the occupational limits of such a facility. Shielding effectiveness is compared for ordinary and barytes concretes in combination with and without borated polyethylene. A calculational model was developed of a treatment room, patient open-quotes scatterer,close quotes and the epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to compute the total effective dose equivalent rates at specific points of interest outside of the treatment room. A conservative occupational effective dose rate limit of 0.01 mSv h-1 was the guideline for this study. Conservative Monte Carlo calculations show that constructing the treatment room walls with 1.5 m of ordinary concrete, 1.2 m of barytes concrete, 1.0 m of ordinary concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene, or 0.8 m of barytes concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene will adequately protect facility personnel. 20 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Boron neutron capture therapy. What is next?

    BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) will have difficulties establishing itself without efficient and conclusive clinical trials of glioma, without the expansion to other tumors, and without efficient programs for compound development and testing. (author)

  14. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be u...

  15. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector ...

  16. Accelerator-Based Biological Irradiation Facility Simulating Neutron Exposure from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C; Marino, Stephen A; Geard, Charles R; Brenner, David J; Garty, Guy

    2015-10-01

    We describe here an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility, intended to expose blood or small animals to neutron fields mimicking those from an improvised nuclear device at relevant distances from the epicenter. Neutrons are generated by a mixed proton/deuteron beam on a thick beryllium target, generating a broad spectrum of neutron energies that match those estimated for the Hiroshima bomb at 1.5 km from ground zero. This spectrum, dominated by neutron energies between 0.2 and 9 MeV, is significantly different from the standard reactor fission spectrum, as the initial bomb spectrum changes when the neutrons are transported through air. The neutron and gamma dose rates were measured using a custom tissue-equivalent gas ionization chamber and a compensated Geiger-Mueller dosimeter, respectively. Neutron spectra were evaluated by unfolding measurements using a proton-recoil proportional counter and a liquid scintillator detector. As an illustration of the potential use of this facility we present micronucleus yields in single divided, cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral lymphocytes up to 1.5 Gy demonstrating 3- to 5-fold enhancement over equivalent X-ray doses. This facility is currently in routine use, irradiating both mice and human blood samples for evaluation of neutron-specific biodosimetry assays. Future studies will focus on dose reconstruction in realistic mixed neutron/photon fields. PMID:26414507

  17. Optimal Neutron Source and Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly

  18. Optimal Neutron Source and Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Vujic, J L; Greenspan, E; Guess, S; Karni, Y; Kastenber, W E; Kim, L; Leung, K N; Regev, D; Verbeke, J M; Waldron, W L; Zhu, Y

    2003-01-01

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  19. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W.E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; J.M. Verbeke, K.N. Leung; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-04-30

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  20. Quantitative boron detection by neutron transmission method

    //Quantitative boron detection is mainly performed by chemical methods like colorimetric titration. High neutron absorption cross section of natural boron makes attractive its detection by absorption measurements. This work is an extension of earlier investigations where neutron radiography technique was used for boron detection. In the present investigation, the neutron absorption rate of boron containing solutions is the way to measure quantitatively the boron content of the solutions. The investigation was carried out in Istanbul TRIGA Mark-II reactor. In the end of the experiments, it was observed that even |ppw| grade boron in aqueous solution can be easily detected. The use of this method is certainly very useful for boron utilizing industries like glass and steel industries.The major disadvantage of the method is the obligation to use always aqueous solutions to be able to detect homogeneously the boron content. Then, steel or glass samples have to be put first in an appropriate solution form. The irradiation of steel samples can give the distribution of boron by the help of a imaging and this suggested method will give its quantitative measurement. The superiority of this method are its quick response time and its accuracy. To test this accuracy, a supposed unknown , solution of boric acid is irradiated and then calculated by the help of the calibration curve. The measured value of boric acid was 0.89 mg and the calculated value was found to be 0.98 mg which gives an accuracy of 10 %. It was also seen that the method is more accurate for low concentration. (authors)

  1. A neutron diffraction study of amorphous boron

    Delaplane, R. G.; Lundström, T.; Dahlborg, U.; Howells, W. S.

    1991-07-01

    The structure of amorphous boron has been studied with pulsed neutron diffraction techniques using the ISIS facilities at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The experimental static structure factor S(Q) and radial distribution function support a structural model based on units of B12 icosahedra resembling those found in crystalline β-rhombohedral boron, but with a certain degree of disorder occurring in the linking between these subunits.

  2. Accelerator-based neutron source for the neutron-capture and fast neutron therapy at hospital

    Bayanov, B. F.; Belov, V. P.; Bender, E. D.; Bokhovko, M. V.; Dimov, G. I.; Kononov, V. N.; Kononov, O. E.; Kuksanov, N. K.; Palchikov, V. E.; Pivovarov, V. A.; Salimov, R. A.; Silvestrov, G. I.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Soloviov, N. A.; Taskaev, S. Yu.

    The proton accelerator complex for neutron production in lithium target discussed, which can operate in two modes. The first provides a neutron beam kinematically collimated with good forward direction in 25° and average energy of 30 keV, directly applicable for neutron-capture therapy with high efficiency of proton beam use. The proton energy in this mode is 1.883-1.890 MeV that is near the threshold of the 7Li( p, n) 7Be reaction. In the second mode, at proton energy of 2.5 MeV, the complex-produced neutron beam with maximum energy board of 790 keV which can be used directly for fast neutron therapy and for neutron-capture therapy after moderation. The project of such a neutron source is based on the 2.5 MeV original electrostatic accelerator tandem with vacuum insulation developed at BINP which is supplied with a high-voltage rectifier. The rectifier is produced in BINP as a part of ELV-type industrial accelerator. Design features of the tandem determining its high reliability in operation with a high-current (up to 40 mA) H - ion beam are discussed. They are: the absence of ceramic accelerator columns around the beam passage region, good conditions for pumping out of charge-exchange gaseous target region, strong focusing optics and high acceleration rate minimizing the space charge effects. The possibility of stabilization of protons energy with an accuracy level of 0.1% necessary for operation in the near threshold region is considered. The design description of H - continuous ion source with a current of 40 mA is also performed. To operate with a 100 kW proton beam it is proposed to use liquid-lithium targets. A thin lithium layer on the surface of a tungsten disk cooled intensively by a liquid metal heat carrier is proposed for use in case of the vertical beam, and a flat liquid lithium jet flowing through the narrow nozzle - for the horizontal beam.

  3. Accelerator-based neutron tomography cooperating with X-ray radiography

    Neutron resonance absorption spectroscopy (N-RAS) using a pulsed neutron source can be applied to time-of-flight (TOF) radiography, and the obtained parameters from the peak shape analysis can be reconstructed as the tomograms of nuclide distributions using computed tomography (CT). The problem is that the available spatial resolution is not sufficient for radiography imaging. In this study, we combined neutron and X-ray radiographies to improve the quantitative reconstruction of the neutron tomogram. The accelerator-based neutron source emits X-rays (or gamma-rays) at the same time the neutron pulse is emitted. We utilized the X-ray beam from the neutron source to obtain X-ray radiogram on the same beam line with neutron radiography and then reconstructed the neutron tomogram quantitatively with the help of a detailed sample internal structure obtained from the X-ray radiogram. We calculated the nuclide number density distribution tomogram using a statistical reconstruction procedure, which was easy to include in the structure model during the reconstruction. The obtained result of nuclide number density distribution showed good coincidence with the original object number density.

  4. Design and techniques for fusion blanket neutronics experiments using an accelerator-based deuterium-tritium neutron source

    The experiments performed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute/U.S. Department of Energy collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics are designed with consideration of geometrical and material configurations. The general guide that is used to design the engineering-oriented neutronics experiment, which uses an accelerator-based 14-MeV neutron source, is discussed and compared with neutronics characteristics of the reactor models. Preparation of the experimental assembly, blanket materials, and the neutron source is described. A variety of techniques for measuring the nuclear parameters such as the tritium production rate are developed or introduced through the collaboration as a basis of the neutronics experiments. The features of these techniques are discussed with the experimental error and compared with each other. 25 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Medical chemistry of boron neutron capture agents having pharmacological activity

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cancer treatment that selectively destroys cancer cells following administering a cancer-selective drug containing stable isotope boron-10 and neutron irradiation. In clinical trial of BNCT, disodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) and p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) have been used, however, development of a new drugs with high cancer selectivity and therapeutic efficiency is expected. Therefore, we review boron-containing drugs as a boron neutron capture agents having pharmacological activity, BNCT research on boron-modified porphyrin derivatives which have photosensitivity and neutron capture activity and our proposed neutron sensitizing agent. (author)

  6. High neutronic efficiency, low current targets for accelerator-based BNCT applications

    The neutronic efficiency of target/filters for accelerator-based BNCT applications is measured by the proton current required to achieve a desirable neutron current at the treatment port (109 n/cm2/s). In this paper the authors describe two possible targeyt/filter concepts wihch minimize the required current. Both concepts are based on the Li-7 (p,n)Be-7 reaction. Targets that operate near the threshold energy generate neutrons that are close tothe desired energy for BNCT treatment. Thus, the filter can be extremely thin (∼ 5 cm iron). However, this approach has an extremely low neutron yield (n/p ∼ 1.0(-6)), thus requiring a high proton current. The proposed solutino is to design a target consisting of multiple extremely thin targets (proton energy loss per target ∼ 10 keV), and re-accelerate the protons between each target. Targets operating at ihgher proton energies (∼ 2.5 MeV) have a much higher yield (n/p ∼ 1.0(-4)). However, at these energies the maximum neutron energy is approximately 800 keV, and thus a neutron filter is required to degrade the average neutron energy to the range of interest for BNCT (10--20 keV). A neutron filter consisting of fluorine compounds and iron has been investigated for this case. Typically a proton current of approximately 5 mA is required to generate the desired neutron current at the treatment port. The efficiency of these filter designs can be further increased by incorporating neutron reflectors that are co-axial with the neutron source. These reflectors are made of materials which have high scattering cross sections in the range 0.1--1.0 MeV

  7. Clinical aspects of boron neutron capture therapy

    Boron neutron capture therapy is potentially useful in treating malignant tumors of the central nervous system and is technically possible. Additional in vitro and in vivo testing is required to determine toxicities, normal tissue tolerances and tissue responses to treatment parameters. Adequate tumor uptake of the capture agent can be evaluated clinically prior to implementation of a finalized treatment protocol. Phase I and Phase II protocol development, clinical pharmacokinetic studies and neutron beam development

  8. Novel Boron Based Multilayer Thermal Neutron Detector

    SCHIEBER, M

    2010-01-01

    The detector contains four or more layers of natural Boron absorbing thermal neutrons. Thickness of a layer is 0.4 - 1.2 mg/cm2. The layers are deposited on one or on both sides of a metal surface used as contacts. Between the absorbing layers there are gas-filled gaps 3 - 6 mm thick. Electric field of 100 - 200 V/cm is applied to the gas-filled gaps. Natural Boron contains almost 20% of 10B isotope. When atoms of 10B capture a thermal neutron, nuclear reaction occurs, as a result of which two heavy particles - alpha particle and ion 7Li - from the thin absorber layer are emitted in opposing sides. One of the two particles penetrates into gas-filled gap between Boron layers and ionizes the gas. An impulse of electric current is created in the gas-filled gap actuated by the applied electric field. The impulse is registered by an electronic circuit. We have made and tested detectors containing from two to sixteen layers of natural Boron with an efficiency of thermal neutron registration from 2.9% to 12.5% accor...

  9. An optimized neutron-beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT

    Different materials and proton beam energies have been studied in order to search for an optimized neutron production target and beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT. The solution proposed in this work consists of successive stacks of Al, polytetrafluoroethylene, commercially known as Teflon[reg ], and LiF as moderator and neutron absorber, and Pb as reflector. This assembly is easy to build and its cost is relatively low. An exhaustive Monte Carlo simulation study has been performed evaluating the doses delivered to a Snyder model head phantom by a neutron production Li-metal target based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction for proton bombarding energies of 1.92, 2.0, 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. Three moderator thicknesses have been studied and the figures of merit show the advantage of irradiating with near-resonance-energy protons (2.3 MeV) because of the relatively high neutron yield at this energy, which at the same time keeps the fast neutron healthy tissue dose limited and leads to the lowest treatment times. A moderator of 34 cm length has shown the best performance among the studied cases

  10. Boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Joel, D.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.

    1996-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a bimodal form of radiation therapy for cancer. The first component of this treatment is the preferential localization of the stable isotope {sup 10}B in tumor cells by targeting with boronated compounds. The tumor and surrounding tissue is then irradiated with a neutron beam resulting in thermal neutron/{sup 10}B reactions ({sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li) resulting in the production of localized high LET radiation from alpha and {sup 7}Li particles. These products of the neutron capture reaction are very damaging to cells, but of short range so that the majority of the ionizing energy released is microscopically confined to the vicinity of the boron-containing compound. In principal it should be possible with BNCT to selectively destroy small nests or even single cancer cells located within normal tissue. It follows that the major improvements in this form of radiation therapy are going to come largely from the development of boron compounds with greater tumor selectivity, although there will certainly be advances made in neutron beam quality as well as the possible development of alternative sources of neutron beams, particularly accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams.

  11. Synovectomy by neutron capture in boron

    The rheumatoid arthritis is an illness which affect approximately at 3% of the World population. This illness is characterized by the inflammation of the joints which reduces the quality of life and the productivity of the patients. Since, it is an autoimmune illness, the inflammation is due to the overproduction of synovial liquid by the increase in the quantity of synoviocytes. The rheumatoid arthritis does not have a definitive recovery and the patients have three options of treatment: the use of drugs, the surgery and the radio synovectomy. The synovectomy by neutron capture in Boron is a novel proposal of treatment of the rheumatoid arthritis that consists in using a charged compound with Boron 10 that is preferently incorporated in the synoviocytes and to a less extent in the rest of surrounding tissues of the joint. Then, the joint is exposed to a thermal neutron field that induces the reaction (n, α) in the 10 B. the products of this reaction place their energy inside synoviocytes producing their reduction and therefore the reduction of the joint inflammation. Since it is a novel procedure, the synovectomy by neutron capture in boron has two problems: the source design and the design of the adequate drug. In this work it has been realized a Monte Carlo study with the purpose to design a moderating medium that with a 239 Pu Be source in its center, produces a thermal neutron field. With the produced neutron spectra, the neutrons spectra and neutron doses were calculated in different sites inside a model of knee joint. In Monte Carlo studies it is necessary to know the elemental composition of all the joint components, for the case of synovia and the synovial liquid this information does not exist in such way that it is supposed that its composition is equal than the water. In this work also it has been calculated the kerma factors by neutrons of synovia and the synovial liquid supposing that their elemental composition are similar to the blood tissue

  12. Microdosimetry for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    The specific aims of the research proposal were as follows: (1) To design and construct small volume tissue equivalent proportional counters for the dosimetry and microdosimetry of high intensity thermal and epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT, and of modified fast neutron beams designed for boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). (2) To develop analytical methods for estimating the biological effectiveness of the absorbed dose in BNCT and BNCEFNT based on the measured microdosimetric spectra. (3) To develop an analytical framework for comparing the biological effectiveness of different epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT and BNCEFNT, based on correlated sets of measured microdosimetric spectra and radiobiological data. Specific aims (1) and (2) were achieved in their entirety and are comprehensively documented in Jay Burmeister's Ph.D. dissertation entitled ''Specification of physical and biologically effective absorbed dose in radiation therapies utilizing the boron neutron capture reaction'' (Wayne State University, 1999). Specific aim (3) proved difficult to accomplish because of a lack of sufficient radiobiological data

  13. Boron-containing neutron shielding building ceramics

    The data are presented on the composition of raw materials as well as on the properties and chemical composition of finished products of ceramics intended for neutron shielding. It is shown that 0.8 % content of B2O3 in bricks of ceramic mass proposed halves neutron radiation from the source of 106 neutr·s-1 close rate compared to bricks of boron free ceramic mass. Results of tests on water absorption and compression strength make it possible to recommend new ceramics to be used as tiles and facade building materials

  14. Considerations for boron neutron capture therapy studies

    Radiotherapy is indispensable as a mean to eradicate deeply or infiltrating tumor tissue that can not be removed surgically. Therefore, it is not selective and may also kill the surrounding health tissue. The principle of BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) consist in targeting a tumor selectively with a boron-10 compound. This nuclide has a large capture cross section for thermal neutrons and the nuclear reaction and the delivered energy in locus will selective the tumor. Since its initial proposal in 1963 BNCT has made much progress, however it is not used in a routine treatment. In this work it was approached some complex procedures, as the obtention of selective boron compounds, the adequate set up of neutron beams, the biodistribution, the in vivo and in vitro studies, and also human patients treatments. This work provide fundamentals about BNCT to professional of different areas of knowledge since it comprises multidisciplinary study. It includes appendixes for the ones not related to the field for a better comprehension of the many aspects involved. It is also presented a glossary containing technical and basic aspects involved. It is also presented a glossary containing technical and basic terms referred in the work. (author). 174 refs, 1 fig, 12 apps

  15. Boron carbide neutron screen for GRR-1 neutron spectrum tailoring

    The presence of fast neutron spectra in new reactor concepts (such as Gas Cooled Fast Reactor, new generation Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor, Lead Fast Reactor, Accelerator Driven System and nuclear Fusion Reactors) is expected to induce a strong impact on the contained materials, including structural materials (e.g. steels), nuclear fuels, neutron reflecting materials (e.g. beryllium) and tritium breeding materials (for fusion reactors). Therefore, effective operation of these reactors will require extensive testing of their components, which must be performed under neutronic conditions representative of those expected to prevail inside the reactor cores when in operation. Depending on the material, the requirements of a test irradiation can vary. In this work preliminary studies were performed to observe the behavior of the neutron spectrum within a boron carbide neutron screen inserted in a hypothetical reflector test hole of the Greek Research Reactor. Four different screen configurations were simulated with Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4. The obtained data showed that the insertion of boron carbide caused not only elimination of the thermal (E < 1 eV) component of the neutron energy spectrum but also absorption of a considerable proportion of the intermediate energy neutrons (1x10-6 MeV < E < 1 MeV). (author)

  16. Isodose Curves and Treatment Planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Liu, Hungyuan B.

    The development of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been progressing in both ^{10 }B compound development and testing and neutron beam delivery. Animal tests are now in progress with several ^{10}B compounds and once the results of these animal tests are promising, patient trials can be initiated. The objective of this study is to create a treatment planning method based on the dose calculations by a Monte Carlo code of a mixed radiation field to provide linkage between phantom dosimetry and patient irradiation. The research started with an overall review of the development of BNCT. Three epithermal neutron facilities are described, including the operating Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) beam, the designed Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) beam, and a designed accelerator based neutron source. The flux and dose distributions in a head model have been calculated for irradiation by these neutron beams. Different beam parameters were inter -compared for effectiveness. Dosimetric measurements in an elliptical lucite phantom and a cylindrical water phantom were made and compared to the MCNP calculations for irradiation by the BMRR beam. Repeated measurements were made and show consistent. To improve the statistical results calculated by MCNP, a neutron source plane was designed to start neutrons at the BMRR irradiation port. The source plane was used with the phantoms for dosimetric calculations. After being verified by different phantom dosimetry and in-air flux measurements at the irradiation port, the source plane was used to calculate the flux and dose distributions in the head model. A treatment planning program was created for use on a PC which uses the MCNP calculated results as input. This program calculates the thermal neutron flux and dose distributions of each component of radiation in the central coronal section of the head model for irradiation by a neutron beam. Different combinations of head orientations and irradiation

  17. Dosimetry of the low fouence fast neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy

    For the research of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), fast neutrons generated from the MC-50 cyclotron with maximum energy of 34.4 MeV in Korea Cancer Center Hospital were moderated by 70 cm paraffin and then the dose characteristics were investigated. Using these results, we hope to establish the protocol about dose measurement of epi-thermal neutron, to make a basis of dose characteristic of epi-thermal neutron emitted from nuclear reactor, and to find feasibility about accelerator-based BNCT. For measuring the absorbed dose and dose distribution of fast neutron beams, we used Unidos 10005 (PTW, Germany) electrometer and IC-17 (Far West, USA), IC-18, EIC-1 ion chambers manufactured by A-150 plastic and used IC-17M ion chamber manufactured by magnesium for gamma dose. There chambers were flushed with tissue equivalent gas and argon gas and then the flow rate was 5 cc per minute. Using Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code, transport program in mixed field with neutron, photon, electron, two dimensional dose and energy fluence distribution was calculated and, there results were compared with measured results. The absorbed dose of fast neutron beams was 6.47 x 10-3 cGy per 1 MU at the 4 cm depth of the water phantom, which is assumed to be effective depth for BNCT. The magnitude of gamma contamination intermingled with fast neutron beams was 65.2±0.9% at the same depth. In the dose distribution according to the depth or water, the neutron dose decreased linearly and the gamma dose decreased exponentially as the depth was deepened. The factor expressed energy level, D20/DI0, of the total dose was 0.718. Through the direct measurement using the two ion chambers, which is made different wall materials, and computer calculation of isodose distribution using MCNP simulation method, we have found the dose characteristics of low fluence fast neutron beams. If the power supply and the target material, which generate high voltage and current, will be developed and gamma

  18. Proceedings of workshop on 'Boron Chemistry and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy'

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 3rd Workshop on 'the Boron Chemistry and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy' held on February 12, in 1991. In this workshop, our attention was focused on the chemical nature of boron compounds and the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). First, clinical experiences of BNCT in KURRI in 1990 and 1991 were reported (Chap. 3). The feasibility of the gadolinium neutron capture therapy for brain tumors was discussed (Chap. 4). In the chemical field, a rapid spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of borons in biological samples is described (Chap. 5). The chemical behaviours of p-boronophenylalanine and its analogs in aqueous solutions were investigated by a paper electrophoresis and infrared spectroscopy (Chap. 6). On the molecular design and synthesis of new boron carriers for BNCT, several new synthetic methods for B-10 containing nucleoside derivatives were shown (Chap. 7). (author)

  19. Study of medical RI production with accelerator-based neutron sources

    The single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been widely adopted for nuclear medicine imaging to make diagnoses of body functions, identification of site of cancers, and so on. Now, almost all of medical radio isotopes are produced by nuclear reactors or charged particle accelerators. We propose a new route to produce the medical radio isotopes with accelerator-based neutron sources. In this paper, as an example, we introduce the proposed production method of 99Mo, which is the mother nuclide of 99mTc for SPECT. We determined the 100Mo(n,2n)99Mo reaction cross section to 1,415±82mb and it was consistent with the value (1,398mb) obtained from JENDL-4.0. Therefore, it indicates yields of produced RIs can be predicted with nuclear data based simulations. The simulation also can be used to design irradiation condition. In this paper some results of the simulations are also shown. (author)

  20. Experimental boron neutron capture therapy for melanoma: Systemic delivery of boron to melanotic and amelanotic melanoma

    The boron-containing melanin precursor analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) has previously been shown to selectively deliver boron to pigmented murine melanomas when administered in a single intragastric dose. If boron neutron capture therapy is to become a clinically useful method of radiation therapy for human malignant melanoma, the boron carrier must be capable of delivering useful amounts of boron to remote tumor sites (metastases) and to poorly pigmented melanomas. The authors have now determined the ability of BPA to accumulate in several nonpigmented melanoma models including human melanoma xenografts in nude mice. The absolute amount of boron in the nonpigmented melanomas was about 50% of the observed in the pigmented counterparts but was still selectively concentrated in the tumor relative to normal tissues in amounts sufficient for effective neutron capture therapy. Single intragastric doses of BPA resulted in selective localization of boron in the amelanotic Greene melanoma carried in the anterior chamber of the rabbit eye and in a pigmented murine melanoma growing in the lungs. The ratio of the boron concentration in these tumors to the boron concentration in the immediately adjacent normal tissue was in the range of 3:1 to 4:1. These distribution studies support the proposal that boron neutron capture therapy may be useful as a regional therapy for malignant melanoma

  1. Exploratory calculations for boron capture therapy using epithermal neutron beams

    To get an insight into the problems of boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumours, some calculations of the neutron distribution in a spherical human skull have been made with an ANISN program. The energy of the source neutrons was varied from about 1 keV to about 100 keV. Two different neutron group structures were used with corresponding different cross section libraries. For a spherically symmetric irradiation of a skull with radius 10 cm a source neutron energy of about 50 - 100 keV gives a rather flat boron capture rate over a large part of the skull. This shows the advantage of using epithermal neutrons in the treatment of deepseated tumours by the boron neutron capture method. (Auth.)

  2. Considerations on boron neutron capture therapy

    This article reviews the radiotherapy technique called Boron Neutron Capture Therapy - BNCT. Herein, basic concepts in BNCT are addressed, particularly how BNCT has been used in the attempts of defeating multiform glioblastoma. The history of the BNCT trials in the 50's and 60's, including the previous trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are presented. The Japanese experience in BNCT is discussed. Recently, clinical trials at the MIT and BNL have started, focusing multiform glioblastoma and peripheral and intracranial melanomas. Radiobiological and clinical data from Phase I trials on MIT are discussed. Considerations in how BNCT can be developed in Brazil are presented. It shows that Cf-252 Brachytherapy coupled with NCT may be a non-expensive, alternative way of addressing BNCT. (author)

  3. Advancements in Tumor Targeting Strategies for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Luderer, Micah John; de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2015-09-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising cancer therapy modality that utilizes the nuclear capture reaction of epithermal neutrons by boron-10 resulting in a localized nuclear fission reaction and subsequent cell death. Since cellular destruction is limited to approximately the diameter of a single cell, primarily only cells in the neutron field with significant boron accumulation will be damaged. However, the emergence of BNCT as a prominent therapy has in large part been hindered by a paucity of tumor selective boron containing agents. While L-boronophenylalanine and sodium borocaptate are the most commonly investigated clinical agents, new agents are desperately needed due to their suboptimal tumor selectivity. This review will highlight the various strategies to improve tumor boron delivery including: nucleoside and carbohydrate analogs, unnatural amino acids, porphyrins, antibody-dendrimer conjugates, cationic polymers, cell-membrane penetrating peptides, liposomes and nanoparticles. PMID:26033767

  4. Proceedings of workshop on 'boron science and boron neutron capture therapy'

    Kitaoka, Y. [ed.

    1998-12-01

    This volume contains the abstracts and programs of the 8th (1996), 9th (1997) and 10th (1998) of the workshop on 'the Boron Science and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy' and the recent progress reports especially subscribed. The 11 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  5. Neutron beam monitor based on a boron-coated GEM

    ZHOU Jian-Rong; LI Yi; SUN Zhi-Jia; LIU Ben; WANG Yan-Feng; YANG Gui-An; ZHOU Liang; XU Hong; DONG Jing; YANG Lei

    2011-01-01

    A new thermal neutron beam monitor with a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) is developed to meet the needs of the next generation of neutron facilities. A prototype chamber has been constructed with two 100 mm×100 mm GEM foils. Enriched boron-10 is coated on one surface of the aluminum cathode plate as the neutron convertor. 96 channel pads with an area of 8 mm×8 mm each are used for fast signal readout.In order to study the basic characteristics of a boron-coated GEM, several irradiation tests were carried out with α source 239pu and neutron source 241Am(Be). The signal induced by the neutron source has a high signal-to-noise ratio. A clear image obtained from α source 239pu is presented, which shows that the neutron beam monitor based on a boron-coated GEM has a good two-dimensional imaging ability.

  6. Anesthetic management of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for glioblastoma

    General anesthesia was given to twenty-seven patients who received Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) under craniotomy at Kyoto University Research Reactor from 1991 to 1999. Special considerations are required for anesthesia. (author)

  7. Proceedings of workshop on 'boron chemistry for neutron capture therapy'

    This volume contains the proceedings of the workshop on the chemistry of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy held on 1st of August in 1988 and on 22nd of January in 1990. In this workshop, our attention was mainly focused on the chemical reactions and chemical analyses of boron compounds used for the therapy. There is additionally shown the basic knowledge of immunology related with the neutron capture therapy. We do hope that this proceedings will contribute to the development of new boron carriers for the therapy. (J.P.N.)

  8. Single photon emission tomography approach for online patient dose assessment in boron neutron capture therapy

    A tomographic imaging system for the measurement of the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose during a Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) session is presented. The 10B(n,α)7Li boron neutron capture reaction produces a 478 keV gamma ray in 94% of the cases. Therefore its detection can serve as a basis for a non-invasive online absorbed dose determination since the dose absorbed by the tumor and healthy tissue strongly depends on the boron uptake and the neutron flux. For this purpose, a dedicated tomographic imaging system based on Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography is proposed. Monte Carlo numerical simulations are used for the system design aimed to have a spatial resolution of 1 cm. Prototypes based on CdZnTe semiconductor detectors and LaBr3(Ce) scintillators with optimized shielding were designed with Monte Carlo simulations. They were built and tested in reactor and accelerator based BNCT facilities. A projection of a phantom with two tumors with 400 ppm of 10B was successfully measured at the accelerator facility of the University of Birmingham. (author)

  9. Characterization of a boron carbide-based polymer neutron sensor

    Tan, Chuting; James, Robinson; Dong, Bin; Driver, M. Sky; Kelber, Jeffry A.; Downing, Greg; Cao, Lei R.

    2015-12-01

    Boron is used widely in thin-film solid-state devices for neutron detection. The film thickness and boron concentration are important parameters that relate to a device's detection efficiency and capacitance. Neutron depth profiling was used to determine the film thicknesses and boron-concentration profiles of boron carbide-based polymers grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of ortho-carborane (1,2-B10C2H12), resulting in a pure boron carbide film, or of meta-carborane (1,7-B10C2H12) and pyridine (C5H5N), resulting in a pyridine composite film, or of pyrimidine (C4H4N2) resulting in a pure pyrimidine film. The pure boron carbide film had a uniform surface appearance and a constant thickness of 250 nm, whereas the thickness of the composite film was 250-350 nm, measured at three different locations. In the meta-carborane and pyridine composite film the boron concentration was found to increase with depth, which correlated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)-derived atomic ratios. A proton peak from 14N (n,p)14C reaction was observed in the pure pyrimidine film, indicating an additional neutron sensitivity to nonthermal neutrons from the N atoms in the pyrimidine.

  10. Inefficiency of high boron concentrations for cell killing in boron neutron capture therapy

    This study is to investigate the relationship between the cell-killing effect of the 10B(n, α)7Li capture reaction, intracellular boron concentration, and thermal neutron fluence in boron neutron capture therapy using in vitro cell survival based on a clonogenic assay, and biophysical analysis. Our results showed that the cell-killing yield of the 10B(n, α)7Li capture reaction per unit thermal neutron fluence declined with an increase in the intracellular boron concentration above 45 μg/ml 10B. The cell-killing effect was well described using an empirical power function of the intracellular boron concentration, with exponent 0.443. Knowledge of this effect will help in the optimization of BNCT. (author)

  11. Approach to boron neutron capture therapy in Europe: goals of a European Collaboration on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    A European Collaboration on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy has been founded in 1989. This Collaboration wants to create all necessary conditions to establish neutron capture therapy as a clinical therapy in Europe. For this, two main goals are being pursued: to initiate, at the High Flux Reactor in Petten (The Netherlands) clinical trials of glioma and melanoma and to create conditions that other tumors can be treated at this and other sites. The approach towards clinical trials of gliomas with boron neutron capture therapy is detailed. The necessary development of an epithermal neutron beam, and the necessary healthy tissue tolerance studies are discussed in view of the particularities of the radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy. (author) 5 refs.; 2 figs

  12. In-phantom dosimetry using the 13C(d,n)14N reaction for BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy)

    The use of the 13 C(d,n)14 N reaction at Ed =1.5 MeV for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy is investigated. The 13 C(d,n)14 N reaction presents the advantages of carbon as a target material and its large cross section. The deuteron beam was produced by a tandem accelerator at MIT's Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications. The resulting neutron spectra were evaluated in terms of RBE-dose rates at different depths inside a water-filled brain phantom using a heavy water moderator and lead reflector assembly. All results were simulated using the code MCNP. (author)

  13. Medical and biological requirements for boron neutron capture therapy

    In conventional radiation therapy, tumor doses applied to most solid tumors are limited by the tolerance of normal tissues. The promise of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy lies in its potential to deposit high doses of radiation very specifically to tumor tissue. Theoretically ratios of tumor to normal tissue doses can be achieved significantly higher than conventional radiotherapeutic techniques would allow. Effective dose distributions obtainable are a complex function of the neutron beam characteristics and the macro and micro distributions of boron in tumor and normal tissues. Effective RBE doses are calculated in tumors and normal tissue for thermal, epithermal and 2 keV neutrons

  14. Proceedings of workshop on 'boron chemistry and boron neutron capture therapy'

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 4th Workshop on 'the Boron Chemistry and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy' held on February 24 in 1992. First, clinical experiences of BNCT in the Kyoto University Research Reactor in 1992 were briefly reported. Then, the killing effects of boron cluster-containing nucleic acid precursors on tumor cells were shown (Chap. 2). The various trials of the optical resolution of B-p-boronophenylalanine for neutron capture therapy were made (Chap. 3). The borate-dextran gel complexes were investigated by the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The stability constants of borate complexes were listed, and are useful in the solution chemistry of boron compounds (Chap. 4). The interactions between boron compounds and biological materials were studied by the paper electrophoresis which had been developed by us (Chap. 5). Molecular design of boron-10 carriers and their organic synthesis were reported (Chap. 6). Carborane-containing aziridine boron carriers which were directed to the DNA alkylation were synthesized and their cancer cell killing efficacies were tested (Chap. 7). The solution chemistry of deuterium oxide which is a good neutron moderator was reported, relating to the BNCT (Chap. 8). (author)

  15. A novel boron-loaded liquid scintillator for neutron detection

    Bentoumi, G.; Dai, X.; Pruszkowski, E.; Li, L.; Sur, B., E-mail: bentoumg@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    A boron-loaded liquid scintillator (LS) has been optimized for neutron detection application in a high gamma field environment. It is composed of the solvent linear alkylbenzene (LAB), a boron containing material, o-carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}); a fluor, 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO); and a wavelength shifter, 1,4-bis[2-methylstyryl] benzene (bis-MSB). Preparation of the liquid scintillator and optimization of its chemical composition are described. The boron-loaded LS has been tested with a neutron beam at the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor. A peak at an equivalent energy of 60 keV is observed in the energy spectrum and is attributed to neutrons. The results confirm the possibility of using B-10 loaded scintillator as a sensitive medium for neutron detection in a relatively large background of gamma rays. (author)

  16. Boron-11 NMR spectroscopy of excised mouse tissues after infusion of boron compound used in neutron capture therapy

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on selective boron uptake by the tumor and in situ activation by neutron beam. The authors propose the use of B-11 MR spectroscopy to noninvasively study boron uptake in animal tumor models. Sodium mercaptoundeca-hydrododecaborate was infused into female BALB/cJ mice and liver, brain, spleen, kidney, and tumor tissues were excised for MR (27.4MHz) and total boron content measurements. Boron-11 was easily detectable in tumor, liver, spleen, and skin. The results gave a very good correlation (correlation coefficient of .997) between B-11 MR measurements and total boron content of excised mouse tissues

  17. An accelerator-based neutron microbeam system for studies of radiation effects

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A.; Bigelow, Alan W.; Akselrod, Mark S.; Sykora, Jeff G.; Brenner, David J.

    2010-01-01

    A novel neutron microbeam is being developed at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) of Columbia University. The RARAF microbeam facility has been used for studies of radiation bystander effects in mammalian cells for many years. Now a prototype neutron microbeam is being developed that can be used for bystander effect studies. The neutron microbeam design here is based on the existing charged particle microbeam technology at the RARAF. The principle of the neutron microbeam...

  18. Boron-10 layers, Neutron Reflectometry and Thermal Neutron Gaseous Detectors

    Piscitelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays neutron facilities are going toward higher fluxes, e.g. the European Spallation Source (ESS) in Lund (Sweden), and this translates into a higher demand in the instrument performances. Because of its favorable properties,He-3 has been the main actor in thermal neutron detection for years. Starting in about 2001 the He-3 stockpile has been declining. The world is now experiencing the shortage of He-3. This makes the construction of large area detectors (several squared meters) not realistic anymore. A way to reduce the He-3 demand for those applications is to move users to alternative technologies, such as Boron-10. Although it is absolutely necessary to replace He-3 for large area applications, this is not the main issue for what concerns small area detectors for which the research is focused on improving their performances. Some technologies appear promising, though implementation would likely present technical challenges. There are several aspects that must be investigated in order to validate those...

  19. Cubic boron nitride- a new material for ultracold neutron application

    For the first time, the Fermi potential of cubic boron nitride (cBN) was measured at the ultra cold neutron source at the TRIGA reactor, Mainz using the time of flight method (TOF). The investigated samples have a Fermi potential of about 300 neV. Because of its good dielectric characteristics, cubic boron nitride could be used as suitable coating for insulator in storage chambers of future EDM projects. This talk presents recent results and an outlook on further investigations.

  20. A colorimetric determination of boron in biological sample for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    The boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has shown better prognosis in the treatment of glyemas and gluoblastomas grade III and IV than other therapies. During the treatment the levels of Na210B12H11SH must be known in several compartiments of the organism and with this purpose the method of colorimetric determination of boron using curcumine was established. This method is simple, reprodutible and adequate sensitivity for this control. (author)

  1. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H3BO3). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

  2. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Singh, Paviter; Kumar, Manjeet; Thakur, Anup; Kumar, Akshay

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H3BO3). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

  3. Mass spectral investigations of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agents

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising technique for the treatment of selected types of brain tumor and potentially for other tumor types. In this therapy, a 10B-enriched species is administered to the bloodstream and selectively deposited in the tumor. The selective deposition in the tumor is due to either the breakdown of the blood-grain barrier or to the chemical nature of the boron-containing compounds. Once a sufficient concentration of boron is attained in the tumor (approximately 25 ppm), the tumor is irradiated with a controlled energy neutron beam (preferable epithermal, 1 eV to 10 keV), at which time neutrons are captured by the incorporated boron atoms. The capture results in the reaction, 10B(n, ) Li, which produces a localized nuclear reaction capable of destroying the tumor cell containing the boron. A variety of boron containing compounds have been evaluated for use in BNCT. This paper addresses some of the most promising of the compounds, the disodium salt of mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (Na2B12H11SH), commonly referred to as BSH

  4. Boron-lined proportional counters with improved neutron sensitivity

    Dighe, P M; Prasad, K R; Kataria, S K; Athavale, S N; Pappachan, A L; Grover, A K

    2003-01-01

    Boron-lined proportional counters with higher neutron sensitivity have been developed by introducing baffle structures within the sensitive volume. the results are compared to devices developed with multiple cathode assemblies in a single enclosure. in either case, the increase in the boron-coated surface area results in higher neutron sensitivity. one of these counters has 51 annular baffles coated with natural boron with 10 mm hole for the anode wire to pass through. filled with p-10 gas at 20 cm hg, it has an overall diameter of 30 and 300 mm length. multiple dip coating method was employed for better uniformity in boron thickness. the neutron sensitivity of this counter is 1.6 cps/nv, which is 2.5 times that of a counter with standard electrode geometry. another counter was developed with three cathode assemblies (30 mm IDx300 mm) coated with 92% sup 1 sup 0 B while the third has seven assemblies coated with natural boron (16 mm IDx750 mm length). the neutron sensitivity is 10 and 5.5 cps/nv, respectively...

  5. Boron-Lined Multitube Neutron Proportional Counter Test

    Woodring, Mitchell L.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2010-09-07

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride (BF3)-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated non-scintillating plastic fibers. In addition, a few other companies have detector technologies that might be competitive in the near term as an alternative technology. Reported here are the results of tests of a boron-lined, “multitube” proportional counter manufactured by Centronic Ltd. (Surry, U.K. and Houston, TX). This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma-ray rejection capabilities of the detector.

  6. A novel method of boron delivery using sodium iodide symporter for boron neutron capture therapy

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) effectiveness depends on the preferential sequestration of boron in cancer cells relative to normal tissue cells. We present a novel strategy for sequestering boron using an adenovirus expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS). Human glioma grown subcutaneously in athymic mice and orthotopic rat brain tumors were transfected with NIS using a direct tumor injection of adenovirus. Boron bound as sodium tetrafluoroborate (NaBF4) was administered systemically several days after transfection. Tumors were excised hours later and assessed for boron concentration using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. In the human glioma transfected with NIS, boron concentration was more than 10 fold higher with 100 mg/kg of NaBF4, compared to tumor not transfected. In the orthotopic tumor model, the presence of NIS conferred almost 4 times the boron concentration in rat tumors transfected with human virus compared with contralateral normal brain not transfected. We conclude that adenovirus expressing NIS has the potential to be used as a novel boron delivery agent and should be explored for future clinical applications. (author)

  7. Spectromicroscopy of boron for the optimization of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for cancer

    We used synchrotron spectromicroscopy to study the microscopic distribution of boron in rat brain tumour and healthy tissue in the field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The success of this experimental cancer therapy depends on the preferential uptake of 10B in tumour cells after injection of a boron compound (in our case B12H11SH, or BSH). With the Mephisto (microscope a emission de photoelectrons par illumination synchrotronique de type onduleur) spectromicroscope, high-magnification imaging and chemical analysis was performed on brain tissue sections from a rat carrying an implanted brain tumour and the results were compared with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) detection of boron in bulk tissue. Boron was found to have been taken up more favourably by regions of tumour rather than healthy tissue, but the resulting boron distribution in the tumour was inhomogeneous. The results demonstrate that Mephisto can perform microchemical analysis of tissue sections, detect and localize the presence of boron with submicron spatial resolution. The application of this technique to boron in brain tissue can therefore be used to evaluate the current efforts to optimize BNC therapy. (author)

  8. The relationship between contrast, resolution and detectability in accelerator-based fast neutron radiography

    Fast neutron radiography as a method for non destructive testing is a fast growing field of research. At the Schonland Research Center for Nuclear Sciences we have been engaged in the formulation of a model for the physics of image formation in fast neutron radiography (FNR). This involves examining all the various factors that affect image formation in FNR by experimental and Monte Carlo methods. One of the major problems in the development of a model for fast neutron radiography is the determination of the factors that affect image contrast and resolution. Monte Carlo methods offer an ideal tool for the determination of the origin of many of these factors. In previous work the focus of these methods has been the determination of the scattered neutron field in both a scintillator and a fast neutron radiography facility. As an extension of this work MCNP has been used to evaluate the role neutron scattering in a specimen plays in image detectability. Image processing of fast neutron radiographs is a necessary method of enhancing the detectability of features in an image. MCNP has been used to determine the part it can play in indirectly improving image resolution and aiding in image processing. The role noise plays in fast neutron radiography and its impact on image reconstruction has been evaluated. All these factors aid in the development of a model describing the relationship between contrast, resolution and detectability

  9. Accelerator-based neutron source using a cold deuterium target with degenerate electrons

    R. E. Phillips

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A neutron generator is considered in which a beam of tritons is incident on a hypothetical cold deuterium target with degenerate electrons. The energy efficiency of neutron generation is found to increase substantially with electron density. Recent reports of potential targets are discussed.

  10. Simulation study of accelerator based quasi-mono-energetic epithermal neutron beams for BNCT.

    Adib, M; Habib, N; Bashter, I I; El-Mesiry, M S; Mansy, M S

    2016-01-01

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-mono-energetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5-7.5 keV at the accelerator port using the generated neutron spectrum from a Li (p, n) Be reaction. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The feature of the filtered beams is detailed in terms of optimal thickness of the primary and additive components. A computer code named "QMNB-AS" was developed to carry out the required calculations. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity with low contamination from the accompanying thermal, fast neutrons and γ-rays. PMID:26474209

  11. Report of the advisory group meeting on optimal use of accelerator-based neutron generators

    During the past 20 to 25 years, the IAEA has provided a number of laboratories in the developing member states with neutron generators. These neutron generators were originally supplied for the primary purpose of neutron activation analysis. In order to promote the optimal use of these machines, a meeting was held in 1996, resulting in a technical document manual for the upgrading and troubleshooting of neutron generators. The present meeting is a follow-up to that earlier meeting. There are several reasons why some neutron generators are not fully utilized. These include lack of infrastructure, such as an appropriate shielded building and loss of adequately trained technical and academic personnel. Much of the equipment is old and lacking spare parts, and in a few cases there is a critical lack of locally available knowledge and experience in accelerator technology. The report contains recommendations for dealing with these obstacles

  12. Role of gel dosimeters in boron neutron capture therapy

    Gel dosimeters have acquired a unique status in radiotherapy, especially with the advent of the new techniques in which there is a need for three-dimensional dose measurement with high spatial resolution. One of the techniques in which the use of gel dosimeters has drawn the attention of the researchers is the boron neutron capture therapy. Exploring the history of gel dosimeters, this paper sets out to study their role in the boron neutron capture therapy dosimetric process. - Highlights: • Gel dosimeters have been investigated. • Conventional dosimetric proses of BNCT has been investigated. • Role of gel dosimeters in BNCT has been investigated

  13. Introduction to Neutron Coincidence Counter Design Based on Boron-10

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-01-22

    The Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Policy (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is ultimately to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based alternative system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report, providing background information for this project, is the deliverable under Task 1 of the project.

  14. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using fast neutrons: Effects in two human tumor cell lines

    The results demonstrate that the effect of fast neutrons on cell survival in cell culture can be enhanced by boron neutron capture reaction. Even with lower enhancement ratios, the concept of NCT assisted fast neutron therapy may successfully be applied for tumor treatment with the Essen cyclotron. (orig.)

  15. 350 keV accelerator-based neutron transmission setup at KFUPM for hydrogen detection

    Naqvi, A; Maslehuddin, M; Kidwai, S; Nassar, R

    2002-01-01

    An experimental setup has been developed to determine hydrogen contents of bulk samples using fast neutron transmission technique. Neutrons with 3 MeV energy were produced via D(d, n) reaction. The neutrons transmitted through the sample were detected by a NE213 scintillation detector. Preliminary tests of the setup were carried out using soil samples with different moisture contents. In addition to experimental study, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to generate calibration curve of the experimental setup. Finally, experimental tests results were compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations. A good agreement has been obtained between the simulation results and experimental results.

  16. Imaging of Texture, Crystallite Size and Strain in Materials Using Accelerator Based Pulsed Neutron Sources

    The pulsed neutron transmission method can give position dependent information on crystallographic microstructure, such as preferred orientation, crystallite size and strain for thick materials, for which the X ray cannot be applied, since the pulsed neutron measurements enable researchers to obtain neutron transmission spectrums depending on position by using a position sensitive detector. Furthermore, the transmission spectrums reflect the total neutron cross-section containing information of the crystallographic structure. By analysing the transmission spectrums, spatially dependent information can be obtained. An in situ transmission measurement was performed during a tensile test of an iron sample with notches. The results clearly showed changes of anisotropy, crystallite size and strain dependent on the load. (author)

  17. The Argonne ACWL, a potential accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT

    THE CWDD (Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator) accelerator was designed to accelerate 80 mA cw of D- to 7.5 MeV. Most of the hardware for the first 2 MeV was installed at Argonne and major subsystems had been commissioned when program funding from the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization ended in October 1993. Renamed the Argonne Continuous Wave Linac (ACWL), we are proposing to complete it to accelerate either deuterons to 2 MeV or protons to 3-3.5 MeV. Equipped with a beryllium or other light-element target, it would make a potent source of neutrons (on the order of 1013 n/s) for BNCT and/or neutron radiography. Project status and proposals for turning ACWL into a neutron source are reviewed, including the results of a computational study that was carried out to design a target/moderator to produce an epithermal neutron beam for BNCT. (orig.)

  18. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for cancer treatment

    Ackermann, A.L. (ed.); Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-08-01

    This report discusses monthly progress in the Power Boron Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program for Cancer Treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during August 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross Boron Analysis in Tissue, Blood, and Urine, boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development, noninvasive boron quantitative determination, analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support and PBF operations.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of boron folates for Boron-Neutron-Capture-Therapy (BNCT)

    Kettenbach, Kathrin; Schieferstein, Hanno; Grunewald, Catrin; Hampel, Gabriele; Schuetz, Christian L. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry; Iffland, Dorothee; Bings, Nicolas H. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry; Reffert, Laura M. [Hannover Medical School (Germany). Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry; Ross, Tobias L. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry; Hannover Medical School (Germany). Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry

    2015-07-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) employs {sup 10}B-pharmaceuticals administered for the treatment of malignancies, and subsequently irradiated with thermal neutrons. So far, clinical established pharmaceuticals like boron phenylalanine (BPA) or sodium boron mercaptate (BSH) use imperfect (BPA) or passive (BSH) targeting for accumulation at target sites. Due to the need of a selective transportation of boron drugs into cancer cells and sparing healthy tissues, we combined the BNCT approach with the specific and effective folate receptor (FR) targeting concept. The FR is overexpressed on many human carcinomas and provides a selective and specific target for molecular imaging as well as for tumor therapy. We synthesized and characterized a carborane-folate as well as a BSH-folate to study their in vitro characteristics and their potential as new boron-carriers for BNCT. Uptake studies were carried out using human KB cells showing a significant increase of the boron content in cells and demonstrating the successful combination of active FR-targeting and BNCT.

  20. Preliminary energy-filtering neutron imaging with time-of-flight method on PKUNIFTY: A compact accelerator based neutron imaging facility at Peking University

    Wang, Hu; Zou, Yubin; Wen, Weiwei; Lu, Yuanrong; Guo, Zhiyu

    2016-07-01

    Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility (PKUNIFTY) works on an accelerator-based neutron source with a repetition period of 10 ms and pulse duration of 0.4 ms, which has a rather low Cd ratio. To improve the effective Cd ratio and thus improve the detection capability of the facility, energy-filtering neutron imaging was realized with the intensified CCD camera and time-of-flight (TOF) method. Time structure of the pulsed neutron source was firstly simulated with Geant4, and the simulation result was evaluated with experiment. Both simulation and experiment results indicated that fast neutrons and epithermal neutrons were concentrated in the first 0.8 ms of each pulse period; meanwhile in the period of 0.8-2.0 ms only thermal neutrons existed. Based on this result, neutron images with and without energy filtering were acquired respectively, and it showed that detection capability of PKUNIFTY was improved with setting the exposure interval as 0.8-2.0 ms, especially for materials with strong moderating capability.

  1. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    MIYATAKE, Shin-Ichi; KAWABATA, Shinji; HIRAMATSU, Ryo; KUROIWA, Toshihiko; SUZUKI, Minoru; KONDO, Natsuko; ONO, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  2. Novel design concepts for generating intense accelerator based beams of mono-energetic fast neutrons

    Full text: Successful application of neutron techniques in research, medicine and industry depends on the availability of suitable neutron sources. This is particularly important for techniques that require mono-energetic fast neutrons with well defined energy spread. There are a limited number of nuclear reactions available for neutron production and often the reaction yield is low, particularly for thin targets required for the production of mono-energetic neutron beams. Moreover, desired target materials are often in a gaseous form, such as the reactions D(d,n)3He and T(d,n)3He, requiring innovative design of targets, with sufficient target pressure and particle beam handling capability. Additional requirements, particularly important in industrial applications, and for research institutions with limited funds, are the cost effectiveness as well as small size, coupled with reliable and continuous operation of the system. Neutron sources based on high-power, compact radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linacs can satisfy these criteria, if used with a suitable target system. This paper discusses the characteristics of a deuteron RFQ linear accelerator system coupled to a high pressure differentially pumped deuterium target. Such a source, provides in excess of 1010 mono- energetic neutrons per second with minimal slow neutron and gamma-ray contamination, and is utilised for a variety of applications in the field of mineral identification and materials diagnostics. There is also the possibility of utilising a proposed enhanced system for isotope production. The RFQ linear accelerator consists of: 1) Deuterium 25 keV ion source injector; 2) Two close-coupled RFQ resonators, each powered by an rf amplifier supplying up to 300 kW of peak power at 425 MHz; 3) High energy beam transport system consisting of a beam line, a toroid for beam current monitoring, two steering magnets and a quadrupole triplet for beam focusing. Basic technical specifications of the RFQ linac are

  3. The time-of-flight epithermal neutron spectrum measurement from accelerator based BNCT facility

    Results of epithermal neutrons spectrum measurement by time-of-flight method for different beam shaping assembly designed for BNCT purposes are presented. Discuss method to realize time-of-flight measurement at accelerator. Results looks are important for beam shaping assembly optimization and accurate and reliable treatment planning. (author)

  4. Tumor growth suppression by boron neutron capture therapy using PEG-liposomal boron delivery in vivo

    The tumor cell destruction in boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between 10B and thermal neutrons. We prepare a polyethylene glycol (PEG) binding liposome (DPPC/cholesterol/DSPC-PEG2000) entrapped 10B compound for the delivery system. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of intravenously injected 10B-PEG-liposome on human pancreatic carcinoma (AsPC-1) xenografts in nude mice with thermal neutron irradiation. After thermal neutron irradiation of mice injected with 10B-bare liposome or 10B-PEG-liposome, AsPC-1 tumour growth was suppressed relative to controls. Injection of 10B-PEG-liposome caused the greatest tumour suppression with thermal neutron irradiation in vivo. These results suggests that intravenous injection of 10B-PEG-liposome can increase the retention of 10B atoms by tumor cells, causing tumor growth suppression in vivo upon thermal neutron irradiation. (author)

  5. Preliminary results of a new boron coated neutron detector

    Gervino, G., E-mail: gervino@to.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica Università di Torino (Italy); INFN Torino (Italy); Balma, M.; Devona, D. [SELEX Galileo, San Maurizio Canavese, TO (Italy); Lavagno, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Politecnico di Torino (Italy); INFN Torino (Italy); Palmisano, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica Università di Torino (Italy); Zamprotta, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica Università di Torino (Italy); INFN Torino (Italy); Scarfone, A. [ISC-CNR Torino (Italy); INFN Torino (Italy); Tintori, C. [C.A.E.N. S.p.A., Viareggio, LU (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    The proliferation of neutron detection applications based upon {sup 3}He counter has triggered a critical shortage of {sup 3}He gas. Nowadays there is an increasing demand for alternative neutron detectors that can cover large solid angles, have low sensitivity to gamma background and low cost. We present a low cost neutron detector based upon 3 cm diameter, 150 cm long cylindrical metal tube coated on the inside with a thin layer of {sup 10}B-enriched boron carbide ({sup 10}B{sub 4}C) fulfilled by 1 atm nitrogen.

  6. Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detector

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Graff, Robert T.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Reinhardt, Catherine; Voss, Lars F.; Cheung, Chin Li; Heineck, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detectors utilize neutron sensitive conversion materials in the form of nano-powders and micro-sized particles, as opposed to thin films, suspensions, paraffin, etc. More specifically, methods to infiltrate, intersperse and embed the neutron nano-powders to form two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional charge sensitive platforms are specified. The use of nano-powders enables conformal contact with the entire charge-collecting structure regardless of its shape or configuration.

  7. Dosimetry methods in boron neutron capture therapy

    Gambarini, G.; Artuso, E.; Felisi, M.; Regazzoni, V.; Giove, D. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Physics, Via Festa del Patrono 7, 20122 Milano (Italy); Agosteo, S.; Barcaglioni, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milano (Italy); Campi, F.; Garlati, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Energy Department, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); De Errico, F. [Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Lungamo Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Borroni, M.; Carrara, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Medical Physics Unit, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milano (Italy); Burian, J.; Klupak, V.; Viererbl, L.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez, Department of Neutron Physics, 250-68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15

    Dosimetry studies have been carried out at thermal and epithermal columns of Lvr-15 research reactor for investigating the spatial distribution of gamma dose, fast neutron dose and thermal neutron fluence. Two different dosimetry methods, both based on solid state detectors, have been studied and applied and the accuracy and consistency of the results have been inspected. One method is based on Fricke gel dosimeters that are dilute water solutions and have good tissue equivalence for neutrons and also for all the secondary radiations produced by neutron interactions in tissue or water phantoms. Fricke gel dosimeters give the possibility of separating the various dose contributions, i.e. the gamma dose, the fast neutron dose and the dose due to charged particles generated during thermal neutron reactions by isotopes having high cross section, like 10-B. From this last dose, thermal neutron fluence can be obtained by means of the kerma factor. The second method is based on thermoluminescence dosimeters. In particular, the developed method draw advantage from the different heights of the peaks of the glow curve of such phosphors when irradiated with photons or with thermal neutrons. The results show that satisfactory results can be obtained with simple methods, in spite of the complexity of the subject. However, the more suitable dosimeters and principally their utilization and analysis modalities are different for the various neutron beams, mainly depending on the relative intensities of the three components of the neutron field, in particular are different for thermal and epithermal columns. (Author)

  8. Dosimetry methods in boron neutron capture therapy

    Dosimetry studies have been carried out at thermal and epithermal columns of Lvr-15 research reactor for investigating the spatial distribution of gamma dose, fast neutron dose and thermal neutron fluence. Two different dosimetry methods, both based on solid state detectors, have been studied and applied and the accuracy and consistency of the results have been inspected. One method is based on Fricke gel dosimeters that are dilute water solutions and have good tissue equivalence for neutrons and also for all the secondary radiations produced by neutron interactions in tissue or water phantoms. Fricke gel dosimeters give the possibility of separating the various dose contributions, i.e. the gamma dose, the fast neutron dose and the dose due to charged particles generated during thermal neutron reactions by isotopes having high cross section, like 10-B. From this last dose, thermal neutron fluence can be obtained by means of the kerma factor. The second method is based on thermoluminescence dosimeters. In particular, the developed method draw advantage from the different heights of the peaks of the glow curve of such phosphors when irradiated with photons or with thermal neutrons. The results show that satisfactory results can be obtained with simple methods, in spite of the complexity of the subject. However, the more suitable dosimeters and principally their utilization and analysis modalities are different for the various neutron beams, mainly depending on the relative intensities of the three components of the neutron field, in particular are different for thermal and epithermal columns. (Author)

  9. Some progress in boron neutron capture therapy

    After a historical overview of the application of neutrons to cancer therapy, collaboration is suggested for the application of BNCT with relativistic nuclei in the fields of neutron sources, microdosimetry and tumor selection. The treatment of uveal melanoma is considered. (R.P.) 4 refs.; 1 fig

  10. Physical engineering and medical physics on boron neutron capture therapy

    The contents of physical engineering and medical physics that support boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can be roughly classified to the four items, (1) neutron irradiation system, (2) development and improvement of dose assessment techniques, (3) development and improvement of dose planning system, and (4) quality assurance and quality control. This paper introduces the BNCT at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, with a focus on the basic physics of BNCT, thermal neutron irradiation and epithermal neutron irradiation, heavy water neutron irradiation facilities of KUR, and medical irradiation system of KUR. It also introduces the world's first BNCT clinical cyclotron irradiation system (C-BENS) of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, BNCT dose assessment techniques, dose planning system, and quality assurance and quality control. (A.O.)

  11. Multi-layer boron thin-film detectors for neutrons

    Intrinsic efficiencies of multi-layer boron-10 thin-film detectors were studied theoretically and experimentally. For multi-layer schemes based on an optimized single-layer film thickness, the practical efficiency is limited to about 42% for thermal neutrons. This is about half the efficiency of a moderated 3He detectors in commercial use for portal monitoring. The efficiency limitation is due to charged particle loss in the boron layers and substrates. The same loss mechanism will prevent all substrate-based boron detectors from ever reaching the intrinsic efficiencies of high-pressure 3He tubes, independent of substrate geometry and material composition. Experimental data also indicate that the multi-layer detector configuration can have an efficiency approaching the theoretical limit. Excellent n/γ discrimination has also been achieved using an ionization chamber.

  12. PGNAA of human arthritic synovium for boron neutron capture synovectomy

    Binello, E.; Yanch, J.C. [Massashucetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Shortkroff, S. [Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS), is a proposed new therapy modality for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease afflicting the joints. The synovium, which is the membrane lining the joint, becomes inflamed and represents the target tissue for therapy. When a joint is unresponsive to drug treatment, physical removal of the synovium, termed synovectomy, becomes necessary. Existing options include surgery and radiation synovectomy. BNCS has advantages over these options in that it is noninvasive and does not require the administration of radioactive substances. Previous studies have shown that the uptake of {sup 10}B by human arthritic synovium ex vivo is high, ranging from 194 to 545 ppm with an unenriched boron compound. While tissue samples remain viable up to 1 week, ex vivo conditions do not accurately reflect those in vivo. This paper presents results from experiments assessing the washout of boron from the tissue and examines the implications for in vivo studies.

  13. Potential of using boric acid as a boron drug for boron neutron capture therapy for osteosarcoma

    Osteosarcoma is a malignant tumor commonly found in human and animals. The ability of boric acid (BA) to accumulate in osteosarcoma due to the mechanism of the bone formation of cancer cells would make boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an alternative therapy for osteosarcoma. This study evaluated the feasibility of using BA as the boron drug for BNCT of bone cancer. The cytotoxicity of BA to L929 cells exceeded that of UMR-106 cells. With 25 μg 10B/mL medium of BA treatment, the boron concentration in UMR-106 cells was higher than that in L929 cells. The biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of BA in Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were studied by administrating 25 mg 10B/kg body weight to SD rats. Blood boron level decreased rapidly within one hour after BA injection. Boron concentration in the long bone was 4–6 time higher than that of blood. Results of this study suggest that BA may be a potential drug for BNCT for osteosarcoma.

  14. Development of a boron-copper neutron absorber composite

    This report describes the fabrication of a new boron-copper neutron absorbing material that was developed to meet the upgrading needs of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory. To increase the intensity of the neutron beams from the IPNS, the target uranium was changed from depleted uranium to uranium enriched to 77.5% 235U. To keep the multiplication factor, keff (number of fissions in one generation/number of fissions in preceding generation) at a safe level, a new neutron absorber material was needed. The previous materials, boral and cadmium, could not meet the new requirements and a search of the literature showed that no currently available material was acceptable. With previous powder metallurgy used as a base, the composite was fabricated with 43 vol. % 10B (81% enriched 10B) and the balance copper and voids. The powder metallurgy techniques was followed by hot-rolling the composite to a sheet. The material composed of boron particles dispersed in a pure copper matrix and clad with pure copper on both sides, exhibits the following properties: Loadings up to 43 vol. % boron, with the balance copper and voids. A loading of 0.5 x 102210B atoms/cm2 in sections as thin as 0.067 in. (1.7 mm), with copper cladding as thin as 0.010 in. (0.25 mm). Formability to radii as small as 2.1 in. (53.3 mm). No observed reaction between boron and the copper matrix and cladding at temperatures up to 900 degrees C for times as long as 7 h. Retains structural integrity at 900 degrees C

  15. A Novel Boron-Loaded Liquid Scintillator for Neutron Detection

    Sur, B.; Li, L.; E. Pruszkowski; Dai, X.; G. Bentoumi

    2012-01-01

    A boron-loaded liquid scintillator (LS) has been optimized for neutron detection application in a high gamma field environment. It is composed of the solvent linear alkylbenzene (LAB), a boroncontaining material, o-carborane (C2B10H12); a fluor, 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO); and a wavelength shifter, 1,4-bis[2-methylstyryl] benzene (bis-MSB). Preparation of the liquid scintillator and optimization of its chemical composition are described. The boronloaded LS has been tested with a neutron beam a...

  16. Design study of facilities for boron neutron capture therapy

    One of the authors organized a research group on boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) during 1975 to 1979. The results of the research were summarized in two Japanese reports. It was concluded in 1976 that a nuclear reactor facility was required for developing BNCT and related research. Conceptual design of the facility was performed according to consultation among the group members, and is reported here. The optimum neutron energy for BNCT is shown to be between 10eV and 500eV

  17. Experience of boron neutron capture therapy in Japan

    Four research reactors are currently licensed for medical application in Japan. As of July 1995, approximately 210 clinical irradiations using these research reactors have been done for brain and skin tumors as shown. The number of chief medical doctors certified by the Government is eleven so far. Among them, eight doctors have already treated tumor patients using the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR, 5MW). Recently in USA clinical trials have been restarted using epithermal neutrons at MIT and BNL. In this paper, the experience of clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) which have been performed in Japan, mainly physics studies, are reviewed, and current studies are also introduced

  18. Recombination methods for boron neutron capture therapy dosimetry

    The radiation effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are associated with four-dose-compartment radiation field - boron dose (from 10B(n,α)7Li) reaction), proton dose from 14N(n,p)14C reaction, neutron dose (mainly fast and epithermal neutrons) and gamma-ray dose (external and from capture reaction 1H(n,γ)2D). Because of this the relation between the absorbed dose and the biological effects is very complex and all the above mentioned absorbed dose components should be determined. From this point of view, the recombination chambers can be very useful instruments for characterization of the BNCT beams. They can be used for determination of gamma and high-LET dose components for the characterization of radiation quality of mixed radiation fields by recombination microdosimetric method (RMM). In present work, a graphite high-pressure recombination chamber filled with nitrogen, 10BF3 and tissue equivalent gas was used for studies on application of RMM for BNCT dosimetry. The use of these gases or their mixtures opens a possibility to design a recombination chamber for determination of the dose fractions due to gamma radiation, fast neutrons, neutron capture on nitrogen and high LET particles from (n,10B) reaction in simulated tissue with different content of 10B. (author)

  19. For boron neutron capture therapy,synthesizing boron-polymer compounds and testing in laboratory conditions

    The aim of this project is to establish a focus point at Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA) in the field of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy which is a binary radiotherapy method for brain tumours. Moreover in the scope of the project, a new alternative of 10B-carrier compounds will be synthesized, the neutron source will be determined and the infrastructure to start the clinical trials of BNCT in our country will be established. BNCT is a binary radiotherapy method and the successful of this method is depend on the synthesized boron compounds which have the selective targeting property with tumour cells and neutron optimization. The water-soluble polymer based boron compounds having biochemical and physiological properties will be synthesized and cell culture experiment will be done. In addition, after the neutron source is set up in our country, the infrastructure studies will be started in order to start the clinical trials of BNCT. In this project, there are three different groups as boron compounds, neutron physics and medical group. Neutron physics group is starting the calculations of neutron beam parameters using in BNCT application. But, medical group has no active studies yet. Boron compounds group has been carried out two different experimental studies. In the first experimental study, functional groups have been bound to boron containing polymers to enhance the selectively targeting property and characterized by various analysis methods. Later, cell culture experiment will be done. The first study has been carried out with Hacettepe University. Up to present, completed studies are listed as: -Maleic anhydride oligomer was synthesized and then 2-aminoethyl diphenyl borate (2-AEPB) and monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was bound to this oligomer, respectively. Thus, [MAH]n-g1-2-AEPB-g2-PEG was synthesized. -2-AEPB compound were bound to poly(acrylic acid) polymer at different three mole ratio.Then, the selected Poli(Ac)-g1-2-AEPB polymer was

  20. Towards epithermal boron neutron capture therapy for cancer

    Progress in the treatment of local disseminating cancer such as high grade brain tumours is poor, and the ability to kill individual cancer cells in the midst of normal cells has not been achieved. Binary therapies hold the most promise of this, and of these Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is the most advanced. Epithermal neutron beams are essential for outpatient treatment of high grade brain tumours and these are now installed and being characterised in Europe and the USA, and are at the design stage in Australia. These beams would allow the bilateral irradiation of the entire brain, and as such are ideally suited for the prophylactic therapy of subclinical metastases. When coupled with appropriate cancer affined boron compounds, therapeutic ratios of 2-3 should be achieved. At present the only source of an epithermal neutron beam is a nuclear reactor. The Euratom reactor at Petten and the Brookhaven Medical Reactor have been retrofitted with filters to produced an epithermal neutron beam. These beams have been characterised and used in dose escalation studies with dogs to study normal tissue tolerance using borocaptate (BSH). Another beam is available at the MIT medical research reactor. Clinical trails at Petten for glioblastoma with BSH and at MIT using boronophenylalanine for melanoma metastases to the extremities are expected to commence this year. The state of the art of reactor based BNCT is reviewed and the potential for a major change in the prognosis of local control of disseminating cancer is explored. 29 refs.,

  1. Dosimetry and dose planning in boron neutron capture therapy : Monte Carlo studies

    Koivunoro, H.

    2012-07-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biologically targeted radiotherapy modality. So far, 249 cancer patients have received BNCT at the Finnish Research Reactor 1 (FiR 1) in Finland. The effectiveness and safety of radiotherapy are dependent on the radiation dose delivered to the tumor and healthy tissues, and on the accuracy of the doses. At FiR 1, patient dose calculations are performed with the Monte Carlo (MC) -based treatmentplanning system (TPS), Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications (SERA). Initially, BNCT was applied to head and neck cancer, brain tumors, and malignant melanoma. To evaluate the applicability of the new target tumors for BNCT, calculation dosimetry studies are needed. So far, clinical BNCT has been performed with the neutrons from a nuclear reactor, while an accelerator based neutron sources applicable for hospital operation would be preferable. In this thesis, BNCT patient dose calculation practice in Finland was evaluated against reference calculations and experimental data in several cases. Calculations with two TPSs applied in clinical BNCT were compared. The suitability of the deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reaction-based compact neutron sources for BNCT were evaluated. In addition, feasibility of BNCT for noninvasive liver tumor treatments was examined. The deviation between SERA and the reference calculations was within 4% in the phantoms studied and in a brain cancer patient model elsewhere, except on the phantom or skin surface, for the boron, nitrogen, and photon dose components. These dose components produce 99% of the tumor dose and > 90% of the healthy tissue dose at points of relevance for treatment at the FiR 1 facility. The reduced voxel cell size ({<=} 0.5 cm) in the SERA edit mesh improved calculation accuracy on the surface. The erratic biased fastneutron run option in SERA led to significant underestimation (up to 30-60%) of the fastneutron dose, while more accurate fast-neutron

  2. Drug delivery system design and development for boron neutron capture therapy on cancer treatment

    We have already synthesized a boron-containing polymeric micellar drug delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The synthesized diblock copolymer, boron-terminated copolymers (Bpin-PLA-PEOz), consisted of biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide) (PLA) block and water-soluble polyelectrolyte poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEOz) block, and a cap of pinacol boronate ester (Bpin). In this study, we have demonstrated that synthesized Bpin-PLA-PEOz micelle has great potential to be boron drug delivery system with preliminary evaluation of biocompatibility and boron content. - Highlights: • Herein, we have synthesized boron-modified diblock copolymer. • Bpin-PLA-PEOz, which will be served as new boron containing vehicle for transporting the boron drug. • This boron containing Bpin-PLA-PEOz micelle was low toxicity can be applied to drug delivery

  3. Commercial Clinical Application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    CRADA No. 95-CR-09 among the LITCO--now Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC; a private company, Neutron Therapies Limited Liability Company, NTL formerly Ionix Corporation; and Washington State University was established in 1996 to further the development of BNCT. NTL has established a laboratory for the synthesis, under US FDA approved current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) guidelines, of key boron intermediates and final boron agents for BNCT. The company has focused initially on the development of the compound GB-10 (Na2B10H10) as the first boron agent of interest. An Investigational New Drug (IND) application for GB-10 has been filed and approved by the FDA for a Phase I human biodistribution trial in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and glioblastoma multiforme at UW under the direction of Professor Keith Stelzer, Principal Investigator (PI). These trials are funded by NTL under a contract with the UW, Department of Radiation Oncology, and the initial phases are nearing completion. Initial results show that boron-10 concentrations on the order of 100 micrograms per gram (100 ppm) can be achieved and maintained in blood with no indication of toxicity

  4. Commercial Clinical Application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    N/A

    1999-09-03

    CRADA No. 95-CR-09 among the LITCO--now Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC; a private company, Neutron Therapies Limited Liability Company, NTL formerly Ionix Corporation; and Washington State University was established in 1996 to further the development of BNCT. NTL has established a laboratory for the synthesis, under US FDA approved current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) guidelines, of key boron intermediates and final boron agents for BNCT. The company has focused initially on the development of the compound GB-10 (Na{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 10}) as the first boron agent of interest. An Investigational New Drug (IND) application for GB-10 has been filed and approved by the FDA for a Phase I human biodistribution trial in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and glioblastoma multiforme at UW under the direction of Professor Keith Stelzer, Principal Investigator (PI). These trials are funded by NTL under a contract with the UW, Department of Radiation Oncology, and the initial phases are nearing completion. Initial results show that boron-10 concentrations on the order of 100 micrograms per gram (100 ppm) can be achieved and maintained in blood with no indication of toxicity.

  5. Medical aspects of boron-slow neutron capture therapy

    Earlier radiations of patients with cerebral tumors disclosed the need: (1) to find a carrier of the boron compound which would leave the blood and concentrate in the tumor, (2) to use a more penetrating neutron beam, and (3) to develop a much faster method for assaying boron in blood and tissue. To some extent number1 has been accomplished in the form of Na2 B12 H11 SH, number2 has yet to be achieved, and number3 has been solved by the measurement of the 478-keV gamma ray when the 10B atom disintegrates following its capture of a slow neutron. The hitherto unreported data in this paper describe through the courtesy of Professor Hiroshi Hatanaka his studies on the pharmacokinetics and quality control of Na2 B12 H11SH based on 96 boron infusions in 86 patients. Simultaneous blood and tumor data are plotted here for 30 patients with glioblastomas (Grade III-IV gliomas), illustrating remarkable variability. Detailed autopsy findings on 18 patients with BNCT showed radiation injury in only 1. Clinical results in 12 of the most favorably situated glioblastomas reveal that 5 are still alive with a 5-year survival rate of 58% and the excellent Karnofsky performance rating of 87%. For the first time evidence is presented that slow-growing astrocytomas may benefit from BNCT. 10 references, 8 figures, 5 tables

  6. Carborane derivative development for boron neutron capture therapy. Final report

    Barnum, Beverly A.; Yan Hao; Moore, Roger; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Baum, Kurt

    1999-04-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy [BNCT] is a binary method of cancer therapy based on the capture of neutrons by a boron-10 atom [{sup 10}B]. Cytotoxic {sup 7}Li nuclei and {alpha}-particles are emitted, with a range in tissue of 9 and 5 {micro}m, respectively, about one cell diameter. The major obstacle to clinically viable BNCT is the selective localization of 5-30 ppm {sup 10}B in tumor cells required for effective therapy. A promising approach to BNCT is based on hydrophilic boron-rich oligomeric phosphate diesters, or ''trailers'' that have been shown to concentrate selectively in tumor tissue. Examples of these compounds were prepared previously at high cost using an automated DNA synthesizer. Direct synthesis methods are needed for the production of gram-scale quantities for further biological evaluation. The work accomplished as a result of the collaboration between Fluorochem, Inc. and UCLA demonstrates that short oligomers containing at least five carborane units with four phosphodiester linkages can be prepared in substantial quantities. This work was accomplished by the application of standard phosphoramidite coupling chemistry.

  7. Proceedings of workshop on 'boron chemistry and boron neutron capture therapy'

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 5th Workshop on 'the Boron Chemistry and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy' held on February 22 in 1993. The solubility of the boron carrier play an important role in the BNCT. New water-soluble p-boronophenylalanine derivatives are synthesized and their biological activities are investigated (Chap. 2 and 3). Some chemical problems on the BNCT were discussed, and the complex formation reaction of hydroxylboryl compounds were studied by the paper electrophoresis (Chap. 4). The results of the medical investigation on the BNCT using BSH compounds are shown in Chap. 5. Syntheses of o- and m-boronophenylalanine were done and their optical resolution was tried (Chap. 6). The complex formation reaction of p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) with L-DOPA and the oxidation reaction of the analogs are found in Chap. 7. The pka of BPA were determined by the isotachophoresis (Chap. 8). The chemical nature of dihydroxyboryl compounds were investigated by an infrared spectroscopy and electrophoresis (Chap. 9). New synthetic methods of BPA and p-boronophenylserine using ester of isocyanoacetic acid are described in Chap. 10. The induction of chromosomal aberations by neutron capture reaction are discussed from a point of the biological view. The a of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  8. Nuclear Physics meets Medicine and Biology: Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    F. Ballarini, F; S. Bortolussi, S; P. Bruschi, P; A.M. Clerici, A M; A. De Bari, A; P. Dionigi, P; C. Ferrari, C; M.A. Gadan, M A; N. Protti, N; S. Stella, S; C. Zonta, C; A. Zonta, A; S. Altieri, S

    2010-01-01

    BNCT is a tumour treatment based on thermal-neutron irradiation of tissues enriched with 10B, which according to the 10B(n, )7Li reaction produces particles with high Linear Energy Transfer and short range. Since this treatment can deliver a therapeutic tumour dose sparing normal tissues, BNCT represents an alternative for diffuse tumours and metastases, which show poor response to surgery and photontherapy. In 2001 and 2003, in Pavia BNCT was applied to an isolated liver, which was infused with boron, explanted, irradiated and re-implanted. A new project was then initiated for lung tumours, developing a protocol for Boron concentration measurements and performing organ-dose Monte Carlo calculations; in parallel, radiobiology studies are ongoing to characterize the BNCT effects down to cellular level. After a brief introduction, herein we will present the main activities ongoing in Pavia including the radiobiological ones, which are under investigation not only experimentally but also theoretically, basing on...

  9. Design of a boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly

    Wang, Zhonglu

    2006-08-01

    The use of boron neutron capture to boost tumor dose in fast neutron therapy has been investigated at several fast neutron therapy centers worldwide. This treatment is termed boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). It is a combination of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and fast neutron therapy (FNT). It is believed that BNCEFNT may be useful in the treatment of some radioresistant brain tumors, such as glioblastoma multiform (GBM). A boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly has been designed for the Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF). This assembly uses a tungsten filter and collimator near the patient's head, with a graphite reflector surrounding the head to significantly increase the dose due to boron neutron capture reactions. The assembly was designed using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP version 5 for a standard 20x20 cm{sup 2} treatment beam. The calculated boron dose enhancement at 5.7-cm depth in a water-filled head phantom in the assembly with a 5x5 cm{sup 2} collimation was 21.9% per 100-ppm {sup 10}B for a 5.0-cm tungsten filter and 29.8% for a 8.5-cm tungsten filter. The corresponding dose rate for the 5.0-cm and 8.5-cm thick filters were 0.221 and 0.127 Gy/min, respectively; about 48.5% and 27.9% of the dose rate of the standard 10x10 cm{sup 2} fast neutron treatment beam. To validate the design calculations, a simplified BNCEFNT assembly was built using four lead bricks to form a 5x5 cm{sup 2} collimator. Five 1.0-cm thick 20x20 cm{sup 2} tungsten plates were used to obtain different filter thicknesses and graphite bricks/blocks were used to form a reflector. Measurements of the dose enhancement of the simplified assembly in a water-filled head phantom were performed using a pair of tissue-equivalent ion chambers. One of the ion chambers is loaded with 1000-ppm natural boron (184-ppm {sup 10}B) to measure dose due to boron neutron capture. The measured dose enhancement at 5.0-cm depth

  10. Boron-10 prompt gamma analysis using a diffracted neutron beam

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) facility has been built at the 5 MW MITR-II Research Reactor to support the ongoing boron neutron capture therapy (NCT) program. This facility is used to determine the concentration of B-10 in NCT relevant samples such as blood and urine. The B-10 concentration is needed to determine the radiation doses that tumor and healthy brain receive during neutron irradiation of a patient. Assaying for B-10 by PGNAA has several advantages over conventional chemical methods. It is rapid, accurate, nondestructive (allowing for re-analysis), inexpensive, sensitive (ppm level), generally independent of the chemical or physical matrix of the B-10, and does not require chemical manipulations of the sample. The authors goal was to build an inexpensive facility with a suitably high thermal neutron flux for PGNAA and a low level of photon and fast neutron contamination. Their design is unique in that it uses a diffracted beam. Most prompt gamma facilities use direct beams; these beams have a high thermal flux (> 107 n/cm2-sec), but are heavily contaminated with protons and fast neutrons. Other prompt gamma facilities use totally reflecting guide tubes; these beams have little contamination, but are expensive. The high thermal flux of direct beam facilities might not be an advantage since the detector usually must be moved further away from the sample to avoid high dead times in the multichannel analyzer

  11. Investigation of current status in Europe and USA on boron neutron capture therapy

    NONE

    2000-11-01

    This report describes on the spot investigation results of current status of medical irradiation in Europe and USA at Feb. 1999. In HFR (Netherlands), the phase 1 study with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the EU had been already finished in those days, at the same time, an improvement of medical irradiation field of VTT(Finland) had been finishing and then clinical trial research had been about to start. On the other hand, phase 1 studies by two groups of BNL (Brook heaven National Laboratory) and MIT (Nuclear Engineering of Massachusetts Institute of Technology) in US were now in almost final stage, and they would start on phase 2 study. Either reactors of MIT and BNL were in modification to increase neutron flux, especially that employing fission converter into the irradiation facility and installation of irradiation room were carrying out in the former. In Europe and USA, the accelerator-based BNCT planes are now in progress vigorously, and will have reality. A reform of dynamitron accelerator at University of Birmingham was progressed, and the clinical treatment would be started from September 2000. The accelerator group at MIT has a small type of tandem accelerator, and they were performing basic experiment for BNCS (Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy) with this accelerator. The concept design for an accelerator and a moderator had been finished at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of Berkeley. (author)

  12. Investigation of current status in Europe and USA on boron neutron capture therapy

    This report describes on the spot investigation results of current status of medical irradiation in Europe and USA at Feb. 1999. In HFR (Netherlands), the phase 1 study with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the EU had been already finished in those days, at the same time, an improvement of medical irradiation field of VTT(Finland) had been finishing and then clinical trial research had been about to start. On the other hand, phase 1 studies by two groups of BNL (Brook heaven National Laboratory) and MIT (Nuclear Engineering of Massachusetts Institute of Technology) in US were now in almost final stage, and they would start on phase 2 study. Either reactors of MIT and BNL were in modification to increase neutron flux, especially that employing fission converter into the irradiation facility and installation of irradiation room were carrying out in the former. In Europe and USA, the accelerator-based BNCT planes are now in progress vigorously, and will have reality. A reform of dynamitron accelerator at University of Birmingham was progressed, and the clinical treatment would be started from September 2000. The accelerator group at MIT has a small type of tandem accelerator, and they were performing basic experiment for BNCS (Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy) with this accelerator. The concept design for an accelerator and a moderator had been finished at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of Berkeley. (author)

  13. Boron-10 layers, Neutron Reflectometry and Thermal Neutron Gaseous Detectors

    Piscitelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays neutron facilities are going toward higher fluxes, e.g. the European Spallation Source (ESS) in Lund (Sweden), and this translates into a higher demand in the instrument performances. Because of its favorable properties,He-3 has been the main actor in thermal neutron detection for years. Starting in about 2001 the He-3 stockpile has been declining. The world is now experiencing the shortage of He-3. This makes the construction of large area detectors (several squared meters) not real...

  14. Determination Of Natural Boron Concentration In Coffee Leaves, Using de Autobiography by Neutron Capture Technique

    Determination of natural boron concentration in coffee leaves, using the autoradiography, by neutron capture technique. The boron absorption coefficient in young coffee leaves was measured using autoradiography by neutron capture. In two experiments carried out in April and November, 1996, it was found that the coefficient varies between 0.9 and 5.3 nmol/h. the concentration of natural boron in coffee leaves in regard to age, symptoms and treatment received was also studied, using the same technique. (Author)

  15. Goals of the European Collaboration on boron neutron capture therapy

    Since 1989, the Commission of the European Community (CEC) funds, through their program Europe against Cancer, a Concerted Action European Collaboration on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The European Collaboration has two main goals. Goal 1 is to initiate clinical trials of glioma at the High Flux Reactor Petten at the earliest possible time. Goal 2 is to create all necessary conditions to initiate clinical trials of other tumors and treatment at other facilities. In this overview the activities of European Collaboration towards the two goals are summarized

  16. Discrimination methods between neutron and gamma rays for boron loaded plastic scintillators

    Normand, Stéphane; Mouanda, Brigitte; Haan, Serge; Louvel, Michel

    2002-05-01

    Boron loaded plastic scintillators exhibit interesting properties for neutron detection in nuclear waste management and especially in investigating the amount of fissile materials when enclosed in waste containers. Combining a high thermal neutron efficiency and a low mean neutron lifetime, they are suitable in neutron multiplicity counting. However, due to their high sensitivity to gamma rays, pulse shape discrimination methods need to be developed in order to optimize the passive neutron assay measurement. From the knowledge of their physical properties, it is possible to separate the three kinds of particles that have interacted in the boron loaded plastic scintillator (gamma, fast neutron and thermal neutron). For this purpose, we have developed and compared the two well known discrimination methods (zero crossing and charge comparison) applied for the first time to boron loaded plastic scintillator. The setup for the zero crossing discrimination method and the charge comparison methods is thoroughly explained, and the results on those boron loaded plastic scintillators are discussed.

  17. Development of a dual phantom technique for measuring the fast neutron component of dose in boron neutron capture therapy

    Sakurai, Yoshinori, E-mail: yosakura@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kondo, Natsuko; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Asashironishi 2-1010, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Research and development of various accelerator-based irradiation systems for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is underway throughout the world. Many of these systems are nearing or have started clinical trials. Before the start of treatment with BNCT, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the fast neutrons (over 10 keV) incident to the irradiation field must be estimated. Measurements of RBE are typically performed by biological experiments with a phantom. Although the dose deposition due to secondary gamma rays is dominant, the relative contributions of thermal neutrons (below 0.5 eV) and fast neutrons are virtually equivalent under typical irradiation conditions in a water and/or acrylic phantom. Uniform contributions to the dose deposited from thermal and fast neutrons are based in part on relatively inaccurate dose information for fast neutrons. This study sought to improve the accuracy in the dose estimation for fast neutrons by using two phantoms made of different materials in which the dose components can be separated according to differences in the interaction cross sections. The development of a “dual phantom technique” for measuring the fast neutron component of dose is reported. Methods: One phantom was filled with pure water. The other phantom was filled with a water solution of lithium hydroxide (LiOH) capitalizing on the absorbing characteristics of lithium-6 (Li-6) for thermal neutrons. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the ideal mixing ratio of Li-6 in LiOH solution. Changes in the depth dose distributions for each respective dose component along the central beam axis were used to assess the LiOH concentration at the 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 wt. % levels. Simulations were also performed with the phantom filled with 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution for 95%-enriched Li-6. A phantom was constructed containing 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution based on the simulation results. Experimental characterization of the

  18. Characterization of boron carbide particles and its shielding behavior against neutron radiation

    Highlights: • B4C was characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS, FT-IR and Raman Spectroscopy. • B4C was investigated for the neutron shielding behavior analysis. • Neutron permeability experiments were moderated in the Howitzer using Ra–Be source. • The pellet with 12.5 g B4C powder had the lowest neutron permeability rate. • Total macroscopic cross sections found between 1.491 ± 0.0074 and 0.722 ± 0.0071 cm-1. - Abstract: Boron minerals, considered future essential materials, can be used as raw materials in the production of boron carbide. In this study, boron carbide, the hardest material after diamond and cubic boron nitride, is characterized and the neutron shielding behavior is investigated. The characterization and structural evaluation of the boron carbide sample was performed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Raman Spectroscopy. In addition, a neutron Howitzer was used to measure the neutron permeability of boron carbide samples of various thicknesses. The sample composed of 12.5 g of boron carbide powder and 3 g of Wax® had the lowest neutron permeability rate (62.1%). Pellet 3 had the smallest total macroscopic cross section of boron carbide particles, 0.722 ± 0.0071 cm−1

  19. Real-time dosimetry for boron-neutron capture therapy

    Epithermal/thermal boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) is promising treatment method for malignant tumors. Because the doses and dose rates for medical therapeutic radiation are very close to the normal tissue tolerance, small errors in radiation delivery can result in harmful overdoses. A substantial need exists for a device that will monitor, in real time, the radiation dose being delivered to a patient. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed a scintillating glass optical fiber that is sensitive to thermal neutrons. The small size of the fibers offers the possibility of in vivo dose monitoring at several points within the radiation field. The count rate of such detectors can approach 10 MHz because the lifetime of the cerium activator is fast. Fluxes typical of those in BNCT (i.e., 109 n/cm2/sec) may be measured because of this potentially high count rate and the small diameter of the fiber

  20. The Finnish Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) project

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a new, binary radiotherapy, which has been developed especially for severe brain tumours, incurable by the present means. A suitable 10B containing carrier compound is injected into the blood circulation and taken up selectively by the cancer cells. When these cells are subjected to a thermal neutron field, the 10B atoms capture the neutrons and undergo fission reaction. The energy thereby released is killing the cancerous cell. The Finnish BNCT research and development project is in the situation where all the basic conditions exist to start clinical trials. An epithermal neutron irradiation facility has been constructed at the Finnish research reactor (FiR 1) operated by VTT in Otaniemi. This article is an overview over the developments within the Finnish BNCT project. A research project to carry out clinical application of BNCT was established in Finland in the early 1990's. It was motivated both by the need to create new uses for FiR 1 and by the ideas to start research and production of new boron carriers for BNCT in Finland. Soon also other medical, medical physics and chemistry disciplines joined the project. Now the project involves scientists from different departments of University of Helsinki (HU), Helsinki University Central Hospital (HUCH), Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) and of the Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) and other Finnish universities. The aim of this project has been to start BNC-treatment of malignant brain tumours in Finland by the end of the century

  1. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of p-boronophenylalanine (BPA): A therapeutic agent for boron neutron capture therapy

    Zuo, C. S.; Prasad, P V; Busse, Paul; L. Tang; Zamenhof, R. G.

    1999-01-01

    Noninvasive in vivo quantitation of boron is necessary for obtaining pharmacokinetic data on candidate boronated delivery agents developed for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Such data, in turn, would facilitate the optimization of the temporal sequence of boronated drug infusion and neutron irradiation. Current approaches to obtaining such pharmacokinetic data include: positron emission tomography employing F-18 labeled boronated delivery agents (e.g., p-boronophenylalanine), ex vivo n...

  2. Preliminary study of neutron absorption by concrete with boron carbide addition

    Abdullah, Yusof, E-mail: yusofabd@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Zali, Nurazila Mat; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Yazid, Hafizal [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ariffin, Fatin Nabilah Tajul; Ahmad, Sahrim [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Hamid, Roszilah [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Aziz [College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga National, Jalan Ikram-Uniten, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12

    Concrete has become a conventional material in construction of nuclear reactor due to its properties like safety and low cost. Boron carbide was added as additives in the concrete construction as it has a good neutron absorption property. The sample preparation for concrete was produced with different weight percent of boron carbide powder content. The neutron absorption rate of these samples was determined by using a fast neutron source of Americium-241/Be (Am-Be 241) and detection with a portable backscattering neutron detector. Concrete with 20 wt % of boron carbide shows the lowest count of neutron transmitted and this indicates the most neutrons have been absorbed by the concrete. Higher boron carbide content may affect the concrete strength and other properties.

  3. Synovectomy by neutron capture in boron; Sinovectomia por captura de neutrones en boro

    Vega C, H.R. [Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares, Ingenieria Electrica y Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, A.P. 336, C.P. 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The rheumatoid arthritis is an illness which affect approximately at 3% of the World population. This illness is characterized by the inflammation of the joints which reduces the quality of life and the productivity of the patients. Since, it is an autoimmune illness, the inflammation is due to the overproduction of synovial liquid by the increase in the quantity of synoviocytes. The rheumatoid arthritis does not have a definitive recovery and the patients have three options of treatment: the use of drugs, the surgery and the radio synovectomy. The synovectomy by neutron capture in Boron is a novel proposal of treatment of the rheumatoid arthritis that consists in using a charged compound with Boron 10 that is preferently incorporated in the synoviocytes and to a less extent in the rest of surrounding tissues of the joint. Then, the joint is exposed to a thermal neutron field that induces the reaction (n, {alpha}) in the {sup 10} B. the products of this reaction place their energy inside synoviocytes producing their reduction and therefore the reduction of the joint inflammation. Since it is a novel procedure, the synovectomy by neutron capture in boron has two problems: the source design and the design of the adequate drug. In this work it has been realized a Monte Carlo study with the purpose to design a moderating medium that with a {sup 239} Pu Be source in its center, produces a thermal neutron field. With the produced neutron spectra, the neutrons spectra and neutron doses were calculated in different sites inside a model of knee joint. In Monte Carlo studies it is necessary to know the elemental composition of all the joint components, for the case of synovia and the synovial liquid this information does not exist in such way that it is supposed that its composition is equal than the water. In this work also it has been calculated the kerma factors by neutrons of synovia and the synovial liquid supposing that their elemental composition are similar to the

  4. Design of a medical reactor generating high quality neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that can selectively irradiate tumor tissue. BNCT uses drugs containing a stable isotope of boron, B-10, that are capable of preferentially accumulating in the tumor, which is then irradiated with thermal neutrons. The interaction of the B-10 with a thermal neutron causes the B-10 nucleus to split, releasing an alpha particle and a lithium nucleus. These products of the boron neutron capture reaction are very damaging to cells but have a path length in tissue of approximately 14 micrometers, or roughly the diameter of one or two cells. Thus, most of the ionizing energy imparted to tissue is localized to B-10-loaded cells. Since the early 1980s, there have been considerable improvements in boron compounds and neutron beams. More is known now about the radiation biology of BNCT, which has reemerged as a potentially useful method for preferential irradiation of tumors. Clinical trials have been initiated at BNL and MIT, with an improved boron compound and epithermal neutrons. At this time, nuclear reactors are the only demonstrated satisfactory sources of epithermal neutrons. While some reactors are available and within reach of cancer treatment centers, a question arises as to the feasibility and practicality of placing new epithermal neutron sources in hospitals. In this thesis, we design a square reactor (that can easily be reconfigured into polygonal reactors as the need arises) with four slab type assemblies to produce two epithermal neutron beams and two thermal neutron beams for use in neutron capture therapy. This square reactor with four large-area faces consists of 1056 U3Si-Al fuel elements and 36 B4C control rods. The proposed facility, based on this square reactor core with a maximum operating power of 300kW, provides an epithermal neutron beam of 3.2x109 nepi/cm2 · s intensity with low contamination by fast neutrons (<1.6x10-13 Gy · cm2/nepi) and gamma rays (<1.0x10-13 Gy · cm2/nepi

  5. Epithermal neutron beam adoption for liver cancer treatment by boron and gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    Comparative evaluation was made on depth-dose distribution in boron neutron capture therapy (B-NCT) and gadolinium one (Gd-NCT) for the treatments of liver cancers. At present, epithermal neutron beam is expected to be applicable to the treatment of deep and widespread tumors. ICRU computational model of ADAM and EVA was used as a liver phantom loading a tumor at depth of 6 cm in its central region. Epithermal neutron beam of Musashi reactor was used as the primary neutron beam for the depth-dose calculation. Calculation was conducted using the three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP4A. The doses observed in both NCTs were bumped over the tumor region but the dose for Gd-NCT was not so tumor-specific compared with that for BNCT because radiation in Gd-NCT was due to γ-ray. The mean physical dose was 4 Gy/h for boron 30 ppm and 5 Gy/h for Gd 1000 ppm when exposed to an epithermal neutron flux of 5x108 n/cm-2/sec and the dose ratio of tumor-to normal tissue was 2.7 for boron and 2.5 for Gd. The lethal dose of 50 Gy for the liver can be accomplished under conditions where the dose has not reached 25 Gy, the tolerance dose of the normal tissue. This seems very encouraging and indicating that both B-NCT and Gd-NCT are applicable for the treatment for liver cancer. However, if normal tissue contain 1/4 of the tumor concentration of boron or Gd, the BNCT would still possible when considering a large RBE value for 10B(n, α) reaction but the Gd-NCT would impossible for deep liver treatment. (M.N.)

  6. Gamma scintillator system using boron carbide for neutron detection

    Ben-Galim, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Wengrowicz, U. [NRC-Negev, PO Box 9001, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Raveh, A. [Advanced Coatings Center at Rotem Industries Ltd., Mishor Yamin, D.N. Arava 86800 (Israel); Orion, I. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2014-08-21

    A new approach for neutron detection enhancement to scintillator gamma-ray detectors is suggested. By using a scintillator coupled with a boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) disc, the 478 keV gamma-photon emitted from the excited Li in 94% of the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li interactions was detected. This suggests that the performance of existing gamma detection systems in Homeland security applications can be improved. In this study, a B{sub 4}C disc (2 in. diameter, 0.125 in. thick) with ∼19.8% {sup 10}B was used and coupled with a scintillator gamma-ray detector. In addition, the neutron thermalization moderator was studied in order to be able to increase the neutron sensitivity. An improvement in the detector which is easy to assemble, affordable and efficient was demonstrated. Furthermore, a tailored Monte-Carlo code written in MATLAB was developed for validation of the proposed application through efficiency estimation for thermal neutrons. Validation of the code was accomplished by showing that the MATLAB code results were well correlated to a Monte-Carlo MCNP code results. The measured efficiency of the assembled experimental model was observed to be in agreement with both models calculations.

  7. Gamma scintillator system using boron carbide for neutron detection

    A new approach for neutron detection enhancement to scintillator gamma-ray detectors is suggested. By using a scintillator coupled with a boron carbide (B4C) disc, the 478 keV gamma-photon emitted from the excited Li in 94% of the 10B(n,α)7Li interactions was detected. This suggests that the performance of existing gamma detection systems in Homeland security applications can be improved. In this study, a B4C disc (2 in. diameter, 0.125 in. thick) with ∼19.8% 10B was used and coupled with a scintillator gamma-ray detector. In addition, the neutron thermalization moderator was studied in order to be able to increase the neutron sensitivity. An improvement in the detector which is easy to assemble, affordable and efficient was demonstrated. Furthermore, a tailored Monte-Carlo code written in MATLAB was developed for validation of the proposed application through efficiency estimation for thermal neutrons. Validation of the code was accomplished by showing that the MATLAB code results were well correlated to a Monte-Carlo MCNP code results. The measured efficiency of the assembled experimental model was observed to be in agreement with both models calculations

  8. Study of boron carbide evolution under neutron irradiation

    Owing to its high neutron efficiency, boron carbide (B4C) is used as a neutron absorber in control rods of nuclear plants. Its behaviour under irradiation has been extensively studied for many years. It now seems clear that brittleness of the material induced by the 10B(n,α)7Li capture reaction is due to penny shaped helium bubbles associated to a high strain field around them. However, no model explains the behaviour of the material under neutron irradiation. In order to build such a model, this work uses different techniques: nuclear microprobe X-ray diffraction profile analysis and Raman and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to present an evolution model of B4C under neutron irradiation. The use of nuclear reactions produced by a nuclear microprobe such as the 7Li(p,p'γ)7Li reaction, allows to measure lithium profile in B4C pellets irradiated either in Pressurised Water Reactors or in Fast Breeder Reactors. Examining such profiles enables us to describe the migration of lithium atoms out of B4C materials under neutron irradiation. The analysis of X-ray diffraction profiles of irradiated B4C samples allows us to quantify the concentrations of helium bubbles as well as the strain fields around such bubbles.Furthermore Raman spectroscopy studies of different B4C samples lead us to propose that under neutron irradiation. the CBC linear chain disappears. Such a vanishing of this CBC chain. validated by NMR analysis, may explain the penny shaped of helium bubbles inside irradiated B4C. (author)

  9. Novel semiconducting boron carbide/pyridine polymers for neutron detection at zero bias

    Thin films containing aromatic pyridine moieties bonded to boron, in the partially dehydrogenated boron-rich icosahedra (B10C2HX), prove to be an effective material for neutron detection applications when deposited on n-doped (100) silicon substrates. The characteristic I-V curves for the heterojunction diodes exhibit strong rectification and largely unperturbed normalized reverse bias leakage currents with increasing pyridine content. The neutron capture generated pulses from these heterojunction diodes were obtained at zero bias voltage although without the signatures of complete electron-hole collection. These results suggest that modifications to boron carbide may result in better neutron voltaic materials. (orig.)

  10. Discrimination methods between neutron and gamma rays for boron loaded plastic scintillators

    Normand, S; Haan, S; Louvel, M

    2002-01-01

    Boron loaded plastic scintillators exhibit interesting properties for neutron detection in nuclear waste management and especially in investigating the amount of fissile materials when enclosed in waste containers. Combining a high thermal neutron efficiency and a low mean neutron lifetime, they are suitable in neutron multiplicity counting. However, due to their high sensitivity to gamma rays, pulse shape discrimination methods need to be developed in order to optimize the passive neutron assay measurement. From the knowledge of their physical properties, it is possible to separate the three kinds of particles that have interacted in the boron loaded plastic scintillator (gamma, fast neutron and thermal neutron). For this purpose, we have developed and compared the two well known discrimination methods (zero crossing and charge comparison) applied for the first time to boron loaded plastic scintillator. The setup for the zero crossing discrimination method and the charge comparison methods is thoroughly expl...

  11. Biomedical irradiation system for boron neutron capture therapy at the Kyoto University reactor

    Physics studies related to radiation source, spectroscopy, beam quality, dosimetry, and biomedical applications using the Kyoto University Reactor Heavy Water Facility are described. Also, described are a Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube and a Super Mirror Neutron Guide Tube that are used both for the measurement of boron concentration in phantom and living tissue and for precise measurements of neutron flux in phantom in the presence of both light and heavy water. Discussed are: (1) spectrum measurements using the time of flight technique, (2) the elimination of gamma rays and fast neutrons from a thermal neutron irradiation field, (3) neutron collimation without producing secondary gamma rays, (4) precise neutron flux measurements, dose estimation, and the measurement of boron concentration in tumor and its periphery using guide tubes, (5) the dose estimation of boron-10 for the first melanoma patient, and (6) special-purpose biological irradiation equipment. Other related subjects are also described

  12. CASCADE - a multi-layer Boron-10 neutron detection system

    Köhli, M; Allmendinger, F; Perrevoort, A -K; Schröder, T; Martin, N; Schmidt, C J; Schmidt, U

    2016-01-01

    The globally increased demand for helium-3 along with the limited availability of this gas calls for the development of alternative technologies for the large ESS instrumentation pool. We report on the CASCADE Project - a novel detection system, which has been developed for the purposes of neutron spin echo spectroscopy. It features 2D spatially resolved detection of thermal neutrons at high rates. The CASCADE detector is composed of a stack of solid boron-10 coated Gas Electron Multiplier foils, which serve both as a neutron converter and as an amplifier for the primary ionization deposited in the standard Argon-CO2 counting gas environment. This multi-layer setup efficiently increases the detection efficiency and serves as a helium-3 alternative. It has furthermore been possible to extract the signal of the charge traversing the stack to identify the very thin conversion layer of about 1 micrometer. This allows the precise determination of the time-of-flight, necessary for the application in MIEZE spin echo...

  13. Epithermal neutron beam adoption for lung and pancreatic cancer treatment by boron neutron capture therapy

    The depth-dose distributions were evaluated for possible treatment of both lung and pancreatic cancers using an epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP) calculations showed that physical dose in tumors were 6 and 7 Gy/h, respectively, for lung and pancreas, attaining an epithermal neutron flux of 5 x 108 ncm-2s-1. The boron concentrations were assumed at 100 ppm and 30 ppm, respectively, for lung and pancreas tumors and normal tissues contains 1/10 tumor concentrations. The dose ratios of tumor to normal tissue were 2.5 and 2.4, respectively, for lung and pancreas. The dose evaluation suggests that BNCT using an epithermal neutron beam could be applied for both lung and pancreatic cancer treatment. (author)

  14. Development of a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator facility for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    There is a generalized perception that the availability of suitable particle accelerators installed in hospitals, as neutron sources, may be crucial for the advancement of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). An ongoing project to develop a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based (AB)-BNCT is described here. The project goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.4-2.5 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction slightly beyond its resonance at 2.25 MeV. A folded tandem, with 1.20-1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an ESQ chain is being designed and constructed. This machine is conceptually shown to be capable of accelerating a 30 mA proton beam to 2.5 MeV. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep-seated tumors in less than an hour. This electrostatic machine is one of the technologically simplest and cheapest solutions for optimized AB-BNCT. At present there is no BNCT facility in the world with the characteristics presented in this work. For the accelerator, results on its design, construction and beam transport calculations are discussed. Taking into account the peculiarities of the expected irradiation field, the project also considers a specific study of the treatment room. This study aims at the design of the treatment room emphasizing aspects related to patient, personnel and public radiation protection; dose monitoring; patient positioning and room construction. The design considers both thermal (for the treatment of shallow tumors) and epithermal (for deep-seated tumors) neutron beams entering the room through a port connected to the accelerator via a moderation and neutron beam shaping assembly. Preliminary results of dose calculations for the treatment room design, using the MCNP program, are presented

  15. Aluminum-titanium hydride-boron carbide composite provides lightweight neutron shield material

    Poindexter, A. M.

    1967-01-01

    Inexpensive lightweight neutron shield material has high strength and ductility and withstands high internal heat generation rates without excessive thermal stress. This composite material combines structural and thermal properties of aluminum, neutron moderating properties of titanium hydride, and neutron absorbing characteristics of boron carbide.

  16. Novel design concepts for creating and utilizing intense accelerator based beams of mono-energetic fast neutrons

    The delivered intensity from neutron sources plays a major role in the applicability of neutron techniques. This is particularly true when the application requires mono-energetic neutron beams. Development of such neutron sources depends on two main factors; i) the output ion beam current from the accelerator and, ii) the design of the target system for generating neutrons. The design of an intense monoenergetic neutron source reported in this paper is based on a radio-frequency quadrupole deuteron linac system, coupled to a novel high pressure differentially pumped deuterium gas target. The operation of a working system, capable of generating in excess of 1010 neutrons per second is reported, along with examples of diverse applications. Also discussed are proposed improvements to the design, such that in excess of 1012 neutron per second will be generated. (author)

  17. Boron neutron capture therapy design calculation of a 3H(p,n reaction based BSA for brain cancer setup

    Bassem Elshahat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT is a promising technique for the treatment of malignant disease targeting organs of the human body. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to calculate optimum design parameters of an accelerator based beam shaping assembly (BSA for BNCT of brain cancer setup.Methods: Epithermal beam of neutrons were obtained through moderation of fast neutrons from 3H(p,n reaction in a high density polyethylene moderator and a graphite reflector. The dimensions of the moderator and the reflector were optimized through optimization of epithermal / fast neutron intensity ratio as a function of geometric parameters of the setup. Results: The results of our calculation showed the capability of our setup to treat the tumor within 4 cm of the head surface. The calculated peak therapeutic ratio for the setup was found to be 2.15. Conclusion: With further improvement in the polyethylene moderator design and brain phantom irradiation arrangement, the setup capabilities can be improved to reach further deep-seated tumor.

  18. Prompt gamma activation analysis of boron in reference materials using diffracted polychromatic neutron beam

    Boron concentrations were analyzed for standard reference materials by prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA). The measurements were performed at the SNU-KAERI PGAA facility installed at Hanaro, the research reactor of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The facility uses a diffracted polychromatic beam with a neutron flux of 7.9 x 107 n/cm2 s. Elemental sensitivity for boron was calibrated from the prompt gamma-ray spectra of boric acid samples containing 2-45 μg boron. The sensitivity of 2131 cps/mg-B was obtained from the linearity of the boron peak count rate versus the boron mass. The detection limit for boron was estimated to be 67 ng from an empty sample bag spectrum for a counting time of 10,000 s. The measured boron concentrations for standard reference materials showed good consistency with the certified or information values

  19. Prompt gamma activation analysis of boron in reference materials using diffracted polychromatic neutron beam

    Byun, S. H.; Sun, G. M.; Choi, H. D.

    2004-01-01

    Boron concentrations were analyzed for standard reference materials by prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA). The measurements were performed at the SNU-KAERI PGAA facility installed at Hanaro, the research reactor of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The facility uses a diffracted polychromatic beam with a neutron flux of 7.9 × 10 7 n/cm 2 s. Elemental sensitivity for boron was calibrated from the prompt gamma-ray spectra of boric acid samples containing 2-45 μg boron. The sensitivity of 2131 cps/mg-B was obtained from the linearity of the boron peak count rate versus the boron mass. The detection limit for boron was estimated to be 67 ng from an empty sample bag spectrum for a counting time of 10,000 s. The measured boron concentrations for standard reference materials showed good consistency with the certified or information values.

  20. New carbon-carbon linked amphiphilic carboranyl-porphyrins as boron neutron capture agents

    Novel amphiphilic carboranyl-porphyrins have been synthesized for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). These compounds have carbon-carbon bonds between the carborane residues and the porphyrin meso-phenyl groups, and contain 28-31% boron by weight . (author)

  1. The comparison of four neutron sources for Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) in vivo detections of boron

    Fantidis, J. G.; Nicolaou, G. E.; C. Potolias; N. Vordos; Bandekas, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    A Prompt Gamma Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system, incorporating an isotopic neutron source has been simulated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In order to improve the signal to noise ratio different collimators and a filter were placed between the neutron source and the object. The effect of the positioning of the neutron beam and the detector relative to the object has been studied. In this work the optimisation procedure is demonstrated for boron. Monte Carlo calculations were...

  2. Investigation of the boron nitrate compound for the use of neutron shield

    Full text: Boron nitride can be found in hexagonal structure (hBN) which is very much like graphite or in cubic structure with properties very close to diamond. Since cBN is the hardest known material after diamond is used in making hard metal covers. In addition, while diamond can be doped only in p type, both p and n type doping is possible in cBN, therefore cBN can be used to make p-n junction which is a basic part of the microelectronic circuits. That means cBN can be used to make a detector or Light Emitting Diode (LED) in violet-blue region. In addition to these optoelectronic properties, cBN based circuit parts are expected to withstand very high temperatures due to the higher forbidden energy gap of cBN compared to that of diamond. Considering the crucial role of neutron capture capability of boron, in this study, it is focused on the shielding behavior of boron nitride. For that purpose, locally obtained boron nitride particles are subjected to some characterization analyses to identify the boron nitride particles. After the identification the neutron radiation experiments are conducted. For the characterization analyses, X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques are conducted. For the radiation experiments boron nitride particles are pelletized with 40 MPa hydraulic press than neutron permeability experiments are carried through the thermal neutrons which were generated from Ra-Be source moderated in a howitzer. As a conclusion boron nitride particles had a neutron permeability value at about 63%. It is seen that boron nitride can be used for the purpose of neutron radiation. Keywords: boron nitride, XRD, FT-IR, neutron permeability

  3. Tumor cell killing effect of boronated dipeptide. Boromethylglycylphenylalanine on boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumors

    Takagaki, Masao; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kobayashi, Toru [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Oda, Yoshifumi; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Spielvogel, B.F.

    1994-03-01

    The killing effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy; BNCT, is dependant on the boron concentration ratio of tumor to normal brain (T/N ratio), and also that of tumor to blood (T/B ratio). The clinical boron carrier of boro-captate (BSH) showed the large T/N ratio of ca. 8, however the T/B ratio was around 1, which indicated nonselective accumulation into tumor. Indeed high boron concentration of blood restrict the neutron irradiation dose in order to circumvent the normal endothelial damage, especially in the case of deeply seated tumor. Phenylalanine analogue of para borono-phenylalanine (BPA) is an effective boron carrier on BNCT for malignant melanoma. For the BNCT on brain tumors, however, BPA concentration in normal brain was reported to be intolerably high. In order to improve the T/N ratio of BPA in brain, therefore, a dipeptide of boromethylglycylphenylalanine (BMGP) was synthesized deriving from trimethylglycine conjugated with BPA. It is expected to be selectively accumulated into tumor with little uptake into normal brain. Because a dipeptide might not pass through the normal blood brain barrier (BBB). Its killing effect on cultured glioma cell, T98G, and its distribution in rat brain bearing 9L glioma have been investigated in this paper. The BNCT effect of BMGP on cultured cells was nearly triple in comparison with DL-BPA. The neutron dose yielding 1% survival ratio were 7x10{sup 12}nvt for BMGP and 2x10{sup 13}nvt for BPA respectively on BNCT after boron loading for 16 hrs in the same B-10 concentration of 20ppm. Quantitative study of boron concentration via the {alpha}-auto radiography and the prompt gamma ray assay on 9L brain tumor rats revealed that T/N ratio and T/B ratio are 12.0 and 3.0 respectively. Those values are excellent for BNCT use. (author).

  4. The production of nitrogen-13 by neutron capture in boron compounds

    The 10B(α,n)13N reaction is studied as an activation process in a variety of solid boron-containing neutron shielding materials. The source of α-particles is the neutron capture reaction 10B(n,α)7Li. Samples of boron carbide, boron oxide, and boron nitride are irradiated with thermal neutrons and the rate of 13N production is determined. 13N promptly decays, emitting a positron. This positron efficiently annihilates with electrons in the material and the resultant 511 keV gamma ray is detected. For each of the above-mentioned materials, the rate of 13N production is (1-2) x 10-10 per captured neutron

  5. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver.

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2007-12-01

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ((phi(max)/phi(min)) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a phi(max)/phi(min) ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations. PMID:18196797

  6. Neutron capture therapy of murine melanoma on new boron carriers with use of capillary neutron optics

    Borisov, G. I.; Naidenov, M. G.; Koldaeva, E. Y.; Petrov, S. A.; Zhizhin, K. Y.; Kuznettsov, N. T.; Brattsev, V. A.; Grigorieva, E. Y.

    2005-07-01

    The Boron-10 NCT is one of the most perspective methods of human anticancer treatment. The introduction of this efficient method into medical practice makes possible more selective and precise destruction of tumour cells without any damage of normal tissues. The basis of NCT method is destructive effect of products of nuclear reaction 10B(n,α,γ)7Li. This reaction produces particles-helium nuclei (alpha-particles) and lithium nuclei-with too high linear energetic loss in animal tissues and poor integrated sweep (to 14 μm) what is comparable with single cell diameter. Actual use of BNCT for treatment of human malignant tumours is dependent on resolution of various and complex scientific and technical problems. Namely: the development of novel boron preparations selectively carrying 10B into cancer cells, providing optimal concentration and microdistribution of 10B in these and remaining there during all necessary irradiation time; formation of therapeutic neutron fluxes of needed power, spectrum and intensity; provision of adequate planning and monitoring methods for current 10B-NCT making possible to evaluate a boron concentration in animal tissues in real time, to see macro- and microdistribution of the same, allowing precise microdosimetry; optimization of irradiation regimens and of drug administration schedules conformably to concrete neutron flux in different objects.

  7. Quality Assurance of Patient Dosimetry in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    The verification of the correctness of planned and executed treatments is imperative for safety in radiotherapy. The purpose of the present work is to describe and evaluate the quality assurance (QA) procedures for patient dosimetry implemented at the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility at Studsvik, Sweden. The dosimetric complexity of the mixed neutron-photon field during BNCT suggests a careful verification of routine procedures, specifically the treatment planning calculations. In the present study, two methods for QA of patient dosimetry are presented. The first is executed prior to radiotherapy and involves an independent check of the planned absorbed dose to be delivered to a point in the patient for each treatment field. The second QA procedure involves in vivo dosimetry measurements using post-treatment activation analysis. Absorbed dose conversion factors taking the difference in material composition and geometry of the patient and the PMMA phantom used for reference dosimetry were determined using the Monte Carlo method. The agreement of the QA procedure prior to radiotherapy reveals an acceptably small deviation for 60 treatment fields of ±4.2% (1 SD), while the in vivo dosimetry method presented may benefit from improvements, as the deviations observed were quite substantial (±12%, 1 SD), and were unlikely to be due to actual errors in the clinical dosimetry

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy for children with malignant brain tumor

    Among the 131 cases with brain tumors treated by boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT), seventeen were children. Eight supratentorial tumors included five astrocytomas(grade 2-4), two primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) and one rhabdomyosarcoma. Seven pontine tumors included one astrocytoma, one PNET and 5 unverified gliomas. Two cerebellar tumors (PNET and astrocytoma) were also treated. All pontine tumors showed remarkable decrease in size after BNCT. However, most of them showed regrowth of the tumors because the neutrons were insufficient due to the depth. Four cases with cerebral tumor died of remote cell dissemination, although they all responded to BNCT. One of them survived 7 years after repeated BNCTs. An 11 years old girl with a large astrocytoma in the right frontal lobe has lived more than 11 years and is now a draftswoman at a civil engineering company after graduating from a technical college. An 8 years old girl with an astrocytoma in the left occipital lobe has no recurrence of the tumor for 2 years and attends on elementary school without mental and physical problems. Two children (one year old girl and four years old boy) with cerebellar tumors have shown showed an excellent growth after BNCT and had no neurological deficits. Mental and physical development in patients treated by BNCT is usually better than that in patients treated by conventional radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Measurement and analysis of the radio frequency radiation (non-ionizing) in DC accelerator based 14 MeV neutron generator facility

    Radio frequency (RF) driven ion sources are used in various scientific applications like neutral beam injection systems for fusion reactors, particle accelerators, proton therapy machines, ion implantation systems, neutron generator and neutron spallation source. In BARC, a DC accelerator based 14 MeV neutron generator uses RF type ion source for generation of deuterium ion beam current that is used in DT reaction for neutron generation. An indigenously developed RF amplifier system, capacitively couples (via two electrode rings) the RF power at 100 MHz to deuterium gas filled RF ion source assembly. The RF radiation (non ionizing radiation) emanates from the capacitively coupling that is in the form of circular electrode (metal) rings across deuterium plasma column. A very minor RF leakage may arise from the amplifier assembly itself. This total radiation was measured at various locations within the neutron generator facility and also in two set ups. It was then quantified, analyzed and qualified from the allowed RF emissions standards. This would and have ensured equipment and personnel safety in addition to avoiding of the radio frequency interference (RFI) towards other instrumentation. This paper describes in detail all these measurements and their analysis done. (author)

  10. Application of a Bonner sphere spectrometer for the determination of the angular neutron energy spectrum of an accelerator-based BNCT facility

    Experimental activities are underway at INFN Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) (Padua, Italy) and Pisa University aimed at angular-dependent neutron energy spectra measurements produced by the 9Be(p,xn) reaction, under a 5 MeV proton beam. This work has been performed in the framework of INFN TRASCO-BNCT project. Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS), based on 6LiI (Eu) scintillator, was used with the shadow-cone technique. Proper unfolding codes, coupled to BSS response function calculated by Monte Carlo code, were finally used. The main results are reported here. - Highlights: • Bonner sphere spectrometer is used to determine the angular neutron energy spectrum of an accelerator-based BNCT facility. • The shadow-cone technique is a method used with Bonner sphere spectrometer to remove the neutron scattered contribution. • The response function matrix for the set of Bonner sphere spectrometer is calculated by Monte Carlo code. • Unfolding codes are used to obtain neutron spectra at different neutron emission angles (0°, 40°, 80° and 120°)

  11. Comparison of neutron attenuation properties of ferro boron slabs containing 5% natural boron with other high density materials

    Modeling and designing cost-effective neutron attenuation along with shield volume reduction is a challenging task in fast reactors. It involves reducing the neutron energy and absorbing them with suitable materials. A series of experiments were conducted in the South beam end of Kalpakkam Mini reactor with powders of ferro boron (FeB), ferrotungsten (FeW), boron carbide, slabs of FeB, and mild steel plates to study their neutron attenuation characteristics. In one of the experiments, FeB slab cast with 5% natural boron was used, and neutron attenuation measurements were carried out. The attenuation factors were found over a thickness of 28 cm for the measured reaction rates of 195Pt (n, n') 195mPt, 111Cd (n, n') 111mCd, 103Rh (n, n') 103mRh, 115In (n, n') 115mIn, 180Hf (n, n') 180mHf, 63Cu (n,γ) 64Cu, 23Na (n,γ) 24Na, 55Mn (n,γ) 56Mn, and 197Au (n,γ) 198Au reactions representative of fast, epithermal, and thermal neutron fluxes. A comparative analysis of the neutron attenuation behavior measured with various materials is presented. In case of attenuation of both thermal and fast fluxes, FeB is better than other high density materials such as mild steel and FeW. The outcome of the experimental study is that FeB slab cast with 5% natural boron can be utilized as cost-effective neutron shield in streaming paths in nuclear reactors. (author)

  12. Monte Carlo simulation on the application of boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector to the compensated neutron logging

    Background: The compensated neutron logging technology is widely used in oil exploration and development. The neutron detector commonly used in this technology is the helium-3 proportional counter. Due to the decreasing in supply of the helium-3 gas, the price of the helium-3 proportional counter rises quickly. Purpose: The aim is to develop a new type of neutron detector to replace the helium-3 tubes in the compensated neutron logging technology. Methods: A new thermal neutron detector coated with a layer of thermal neutron converter in the inner glass of the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) was developed. Under the conventional and underbalanced conditions, Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the response of the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector and helium-3 proportional counter employed in compensated neutron logging technology. Results: It is shown that the SS/LS increases with the rise of porosity using either the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector or the helium-3 proportional counter, and the results of these two detectors are basically identical. Conclusion: It indicates that the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector can be used for compensated neutron logging. (authors)

  13. Boron neutron capture synovectomy at SINQ in Switzerland

    One percent of the Swiss population suffers from the crippling disease rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the hand with associated inflammation of various finger joints. Loss of manual dexterity results in a greatly reduced quality of life, especially in the elderly. Current medical treatment of pharmaceutically unresponsive RA involves either surgery or application of the β-emitters: Yttrium or Erbium. However, both procedures have disadvantages. The small size of the finger joints makes surgery impractical and is therefore not practiced in Switzerland. However, application of Yttrium or Erbium presents a radiation protection problem because the arthritic joint has the potential to leak. For this reason application of β-emitters for RA does not have FDA approval in the US. A promising alternative has recently been under investigation at MIT: Neutron Capture Synovectomy (NCS). Treatment of the arthritic human hand, in particular the metacarpopharangeal and proximal interpharangeal finger joints, involves prior injection of an enriched Boron-10 compound and subsequent irradiation with thermal neutrons. This method avoids the drawbacks of the existing treatments. Introduction of NCS to the SINQ will require preclinical studies to establish the treatment conditions necessary and the effectivity of the planned treatment (Phase 0). The studies will include neutron exposures of cell cultures and joint samples at the new neutron capture radiography facility (NCR) on the cold neutron guide 13. Introduction of NCS will also require construction of a suitable treatment facility for human patients at Sektor 80 of SINQ. Prerequisites which ensure comfortable and expedient treatment of the patient and exposure conditions respecting the demands of radiation protection regulations and the complete safety of the patient must be fulfilled in the construction of the NCS treatment facility. A temporary construction is envisaged for the early clinical trials (Phase I). A more permanent

  14. Epithermal neutron formation for boron neutron capture therapy by adiabatic resonance crossing concept

    Low-energy protons from the cyclotron in the range of 15–30 MeV and low current have been simulated on beryllium (Be) target with a lead moderator around the target. This research was accomplished to design an epithermal neutron beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using the moderated neutron on the average produced from 9Be target via (p, xn) reaction in Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) concept. Generation of neutron to proton ratio, energy distribution, flux and dose components in head phantom have been simulated by MCNP5 code. The reflector and collimator were designed in prevention and collimation of derivation neutrons from proton bombarding. The scalp-skull-brain phantom consisting of bone and brain equivalent material has been simulated in order to evaluate the dosimetric effect on the brain. Results of this analysis demonstrated while the proton energy decreased, the dose factor altered according to filters thickness. The maximum epithermal flux revealed using fluental, Fe and bismuth (Bi) filters with thicknesses of 9.4, 3 and 2 cm, respectively and also the epithermal to thermal neutron flux ratio was 103.85. The potential of the ARC method to replace or complement the current reactor-based supply sources of BNCT purposes. (author)

  15. Optimal timing of neutron irradiation for boron neutron capture therapy after intravenous infusion of sodium borocaptate in patients with glioblastoma

    Purpose: A cooperative study in Europe and Japan was conducted to determine the pharmacokinetics and boron uptake of sodium borocaptate (BSH: Na2B12H11SH), which has been introduced clinically as a boron carrier for boron neutron capture therapy in patients with glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: Data from 56 patients with glioblastoma who received BSH intravenous infusion were retrospectively reviewed. The pharmacokinetics were evaluated in 50 patients, and boron uptake was investigated in 47 patients. Patients received BSH doses between 12 and 100 mg/kg of body weight. For the evaluation, the infused boron dose was scaled linearly to 100 mg/kg BSH. Results: In BSH pharmacokinetics, the average value for total body clearance, distribution volume of steady state, and mean residence time was 3.6±1.5 L/h, 223.3±160.7 L, and 68.0±52.5 h, respectively. The average values of the boron concentration in tumor adjusted to 100 mg/kg BSH, the boron concentration in blood adjusted to 100 mg/kg BSH, and the tumor/blood boron concentration ratio were 37.1±35.8 ppm, 35.2±41.8 ppm, and 1.53±1.43, respectively. A good correlation was found between the logarithmic value of Tadj and the interval from BSH infusion to tumor tissue sampling. About 12-19 h after infusion, the actual values for Tadj and tumor/blood boron concentration ratio were 46.2±36.0 ppm and 1.70±1.06, respectively. The dose ratio between tumor and healthy tissue peaked in the same interval. Conclusion: For boron neutron capture therapy using BSH administered by intravenous infusion, this work confirms that neutron irradiation is optimal around 12-19 h after the infusion is started

  16. Research on shielding neutron efficiency of some boron-bearing fabric and transparent resin materials

    The shielding neutron efficiency of boron-bearing materials developed recently is introduced. The thermal neutron shield ratios for two kinds of non-woven cloth with thickness of 58 mg/cm2 and 153 mg/cm2 are 51% and 79% respectively. Their mass attenuation coefficient for 0.186, 24.4 and 144 keV neutron are 1.56, 1.29 and 0.9 cm2/g respectively. The thermal neutron shield ratio is 85% for the natural boron-bearing transparent resin plate with the thickness of 0.59 g/cm2, and 97% for enriched boron or gadolinium bearing resin plate. The shield ratios of all three materials for 24.4 keV neutrons are 38%. The transparence of natural light for enriched boron-bearing resin plates shows no considerable change after they were exposed to thermal neutrons up to 6 Sv. After they were exposed up to 20 Sv, the transparence decreases to 50% but thermal neutron shield ratio does not change. The gadolinium-bearing plate has a very strong thermal neutron-capture gamma radiation and its dose-equivalent is greater than that of incident thermal neutrons

  17. Microdosimetric spectra of the THOR neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy

    A primary objective of the BNCT project in Taiwan, involving THOR (Tsing Hua Open Pool Reactor), was to examine the potential treatment of hepatoma. To characterise the epithermal neutron beam in THOR, the microdosimetry distributions in lineal energy were determined using paired tissue-equivalent proportional counters with and without boron microfoils. Microdosimetry results were obtained in free-air and at various depths in a PMMA phantom near the exit of the beam port. A biological weighting function, dependent on lineal energy, was used to estimate the relative biological effectiveness of the beam. An effective RBE of 2.7 was found at several depths in the phantom. (author)

  18. Design study of Be-target for proton accelerator based neutron source with 13MeV cyclotron

    There is a cyclotron named KIRAMS-13 in Pusan National University, Busan, Korea, which has the proton energy of 13MeV and the beam current of 0.05mA. Originally, it was developed for producing medical radioisotopes and nuclear physics research. To improve the utilization of the facility, we are considering the possibilities of installing a neutron generation target in it. The Beryllium target has been considered and neutrons can be generated by 9Be(p,n)9B reaction above the threshold proton energy of 2.057MeV. In this presentation, we suggest candidate materials and structures, thicknesses, metal layers and cooling systems of target, which is optimal for the KIRAMS-13. We chose the Beryllium material of 1.14mm thick, which is calculated by stopping power of Beryllium, based on PSTAR, NIST. As for the cooling system, we chose to use water as a coolant, which will also act as a moderator. As protons pass through the target, hydrogen ions continue to pile up in the material and this makes the material brittle. To solve this problem, we chose Vanadium material because it has high hydrogen diffusion coefficient and short half-life isotope after being activated by neutrons. We simulated the neutron characteristics by the Monte Carlo simulation code, Geant4, CERN and performed thermal analysis on the target. The design of target system is very important to produce neutrons for the desired purposes. There are several other existing facilities in Korea, in addition to the cyclotron facility considered in this study, where new neutron target system can be installed and neutrons can be generated. Two prominent facilities are KOMAC, Gyeongju and RFT-30, Jeongeup and we are planning to do study on the possibilities of utilizing the accelerators for neutron generation.

  19. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    2009-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of10B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots) to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors. PMID:20596476

  20. Design of neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy in a fast reactor

    The BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) technique makes use of thermal or epithermal neutrons to irradiate tumours previously loaded with 10B. Reactors are currently seen as a suitable neutron source for BNCT implementation, due to the high intensity of the flux they can provide. The TAPIRO reactor, that is located at the ENEA Casaccia Centre near Rome, is a low-power fast-flux research reactor that can be usefully employed for this application. In this work computer simulations were carried out on this reactor to obtain epithermal and thermal neutron beams for the application of BNCT in Italy in the framework of a specific research program. Comparisons with measurements are also reported. Using the MCNP-4B code, Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to determine the materials suitable for the design of the thermal and epithermal columns. Various arrangements of reflector and moderator materials have been investigated to achieve the desired experimental constraints. On the basis of these calculations, a thermal column was designed and installed in the TAPIRO reactor to perform preliminary experiments on small laboratory animals. For the planning of a therapy treatment of gliomas on larger size animals, several material configurations were investigated in the search for an optimal epithermal facility. The aim of the present study is to indicate how a fast research reactor can be successfully modified for generating neutron beams suitable for BNCT applications. (author)

  1. Boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent head and neck malignancies

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a tumor-cell targeted radiotherapy. When 10B absorbs thermal neutrons, the alpha and 7Li particles generated by the 10B (n, α) 7Li reaction are high linear energy transfer (LET) particles, and carry high kinetic energy (2.34 MeV), and have short ranges (4-9 micron-meters) of approximately one-cell diameter, resulting in a large relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and selective destruction of tumor cells containing 10B. We have, for the first time in the world, used BNCT to treat 11 patients with recurrent head and neck malignancies (HNM) after a standard primary therapy since 2001. The 11 patients were composed of 6 squamous cell carcinomas, 3 salivary gland tumors and 2 sarcomas. The results of BNCT were as follows. Regression rates (volume %) were complete response (CR): 2 cases, >90%: 5 cases, 73%: 1 case, 54%: 1 case, progressive disease (PD): 1 case, NE (not evaluated): 1 case. The response rate was 82%. Improvement of quality of life (QOL) was recognized, such as disappearance of tumor ulceration and covering with normal skin: relief of severe pain, bleeding, trismus and dyspnea: improvement of performance status (PS) (from 4 to 2) allowing the patients to return to work and elongate his survival period. Survival periods after BNCT were 1-38 months (mean: 8.5 months). The survival rate was 36% (4 cases). There are a few side-effects such as transient mucositis and alopecia less than Grade-2. These results indicate that BNCT represents a new and promising treatment approach even for a huge or far-advanced HNM. (author)

  2. Neutron shielding properties of boron-containing ore and epoxy composites

    Using the boron-containing iron ore concentrate and boron-rich slag as studying object, the starting materials were got after the specific green ore containing boron dressing in China and blast furnace separation respectively. Monte-Carlo method was used to study the effect of the boron-containing iron ore concentrate and boron-rich slag and their composites with epoxy on the neutron shielding abilities. The reasons that affecting the shielding materials properties was discussed and the suitable proportioning of boron-containing ore to epoxy composites was confirmed; the 14.1 MeV fast neutron removal cross section and the total thermal neutron attenuation coefficient were obtained and compared with that of the common used concrete. The results show that the shielding property of 14.1 MeV fast neutron is mainly concerned with the low-Z elements in the shielding materials, the thermal neutron shielding ability is mainly concerned with boron concentrate in the composite, the attenuation of the accompany γ-ray photon is mainly concerned with the high atom number elements content in the ore and the density of the shielding material. The optimum Janume fractions of composites are in the range of 0.4-0.6 and the fast neutron shielding properties are similar to concrete while the thermal neutron shielding properties are higher than concrete. The composites are expected to be used as biological concrete shields crack injection and filling of the anomalous holes through the concrete shields around the radiation fields or directly to be prepared as shielding materials.(authors)

  3. Time-of-flight neutron detection using PECVD grown boron carbide diode detector

    The development of novel neutron detectors requires an understanding of the entire neutron detection process, a process which depends strongly on material properties. Here we present accurate measurements of the neutron detection efficiency of an unenriched 640 nm thick boron carbide solid state neutron detector grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition as a function of the neutron wavelength at a time-of-flight facility. The data were compared to that obtained simultaneously by a calibrated nitrogen detector over the same wavelength range. The measured spectra of both detectors fit a Maxwell–Boltzmann wavelength distribution, thereby indicating that the boron carbide detector can be used as a reliable beam monitor. Measurements of the material properties (density, thickness and elemental composition) of the semiconducting boron carbide enable a precise calculation of the ideal expected neutron detection efficiency. The calculated neutron detection efficiency for the effective moderator temperature (obtained from a fit to the Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution) showed excellent agreement with the experimentally determined neutron detection efficiency of 1.25%. Higher efficiencies may be obtained either by increased film thickness and/or 100% 10B enrichment of the boron carbide source molecule

  4. {sup 1}H and {sup 10}B NMR and MRI investigation of boron- and gadolinium-boron compounds in boron neutron capture therapy

    Bonora, M., E-mail: marco.bonora@unipv.it [Physics Department ' A. Volta' , University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)] [CNISM Unit (Italy); Corti, M.; Borsa, F. [Physics Department ' A. Volta' , University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)] [CNISM Unit (Italy); Bortolussi, S.; Protti, N.; Santoro, D.; Stella, S.; Altieri, S. [Nuclear and Theoretical Physics Department, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)] [INFN Pavia (Italy); Zonta, C.; Clerici, A.M.; Cansolino, L.; Ferrari, C.; Dionigi, P. [Surgical Sciences Department, Experimental Surgery Laboratory, University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Porta, A.; Zanoni, G.; Vidari, G. [Organic Chemistry Department, University of Pavia, Via Taramelli 10, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    {sup 10}B molecular compounds suitable for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) are tagged with a Gd(III) paramagnetic ion. The newly synthesized molecule, Gd-BPA, is investigated as contrast agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with the final aim of mapping the boron distribution in tissues. Preliminary Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements, which include {sup 1}H and {sup 10}B relaxometry in animal tissues, proton relaxivity of the paramagnetic Gd-BPA molecule in water and its absorption in tumoral living cells, are reported.

  5. Clinical results of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of BSH-based intra-operative BNCT (IO-BNCT) and BSH and BPA-based non-operative BNCT (NO-BNCT). We have treated 23 glioblastoma patients with BNCT without any additional chemotherapy since 1998. The median survival time (MST) of BNCT was 19.5 months, and 2-year, 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 26.1%, 17.4% and 5.8%, respectively. This clinical result of BNCT in patients with GBM is superior to that of single treatment of conventional radiotherapy compared with historical data of conventional treatment. - Highlights: ► In this study, we evaluate the clinical outcome of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant brain tumors. ► We have treated 23 glioblastoma (GBM) patients with BNCT without any additional chemotherapy. ► Clinical results of BNCT in patients with GBM are superior to that of single treatment of conventional radiotherapy compared with historical data of conventional treatment.

  6. Boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent head and neck malignancies

    To avoid severe impairment of oro-facial structures and functions, it is necessary to explore new treatments for recurrent head and neck malignancies (HNM). Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is tumor-cell targeted radiotherapy that has significant superiority over conventional radiotherapies in principle. So far for 4 years and 3 months, we have treated with 37 times of BNCT for 21 patients (14 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 4 salivary gland carcinomas and 3 sarcomas) with a recurrent and far advanced HNM since 2001. Results are (1) 10B concentration of tumor/normal tissue ratio (T/N ratio) of FBPA-PET studies were SCC: 1.8-5.7, sarcoma: 2.5-4.0, parotid tumor: 2.5-3.7. (2) Therapeutic effects were CR: 6cases, PR: 11cases, PD: 3cases NE (not evaluated): 1case. Response rate was 81%. (3) Improvement of QOL such as a relief of severe pain, bleeding, and exudates at the local lesion, improvement of PS, disappearance of ulceration, covered with normal skin and preserved oral and maxillofacial functions and tissues. (4) Survival periods after BNCT were 1-51 months (mean: 9.8 months). 4-year survival rate was 39% by Kaplan-Meier analysis. (5) A few adverse-effects such as transient mucositis, alopecia were recognized. These results indicate that BNCT represents a new and promising treatment approach for advanced HNM. (author)

  7. High-current electrostatic accelerator-tandem for neutron generation for boron-neutron capture therapy

    The proton beam tandem accelerator project on the energy of 2.5 MeV and direct current up to 40 mA for solving the problems of boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and fast neutron therapy is presented. The sectional high-voltage rectifier of the electron accelerator of the series EhLV is chosen as a high-voltage source. The rectifier voltage should be stabilized with accuracy of 0.1%. The recharge target and cryogenic vacuum discharge system are disposed inside high-voltage electrode. The problems on developing the reliable source of negative hydrogen ions, capable of maintaining the direct current up to 40 mA, are discussed

  8. Histopathological changes of testes and eyes by neutron irradiation with boron compounds in mice

    Kim, Yeon-Joo; Yoon, Won-Ki; Ryu, Si-Yun; Chun, Ki-Jung; Son, Hwa-Young; Cho, Sung-Whan

    2006-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the biological effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on the testes and eyes in mice using HANARO Nuclear Reactor, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. BNCT relies on the high capacity of 10B in capturing thermal neutrons. Sodium borocaptate (BSH, 75 ppm, iv) and boronophenylalanine (BPA, 750 ppm, ip) have been used as the boron delivery agents. Mice were irradiated with neutron (flux: 1.036739E +09, Fluence 9.600200E+12) by lying flat pose ...

  9. Cubic boron nitride: a new prospective material for ultracold neutron application

    Sobolev, Yu; Borisov, Yu; Daum, M; Fresne, N du; Goeltl, L; Hampel, G; Heil, W; Knecht, A; Keunecke, M; Kratz, J V; Lang, T; Meister, M; Plonka-Spehr, Ch; Pokotilovski, Yu; Reichert, P; Schmidt, U; Krist, Th; Wiehl, N; Zenner, J

    2009-01-01

    For the first time, the neutron optical wall-potential of natural cubic boron nitride (cBN) was measured at the ultracold neutron (UCN) source of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz using the time-of-flight method (TOF). The samples investigated had a wall-potential of (305 +/- 15) neV. This value is in good agreement with the result extracted from neutron reflectometry data and theoretical expectations. Because of its high critical velocity for UCN and its good dielectric characteristics, cubic boron nitride coatings (isotopically enriched) will be useful for a number of applications in UCN experiments.

  10. A study on the behavior of boron in iron-base alloys by neutron induced autoradiography

    Jang, Jin Sung; Rhee, Chang Kyu; Cho, Hae Dong; Han, Chang Hee; Lee, Chang Hee; Jung, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yi Kyung; Lee, Yong Bok

    2001-02-01

    Boron is widely utilized in steel or alloy making to improve certain properties. However, due to its lightness boron is difficult to detect or characterize its behavior even through TEM/EDS or EELS techniques. Although many companies recognize the beneficial effects of boron, the role or mechanism of the boron is not yet clearly understood. Therefore it is required to develop the autoradiography technique to elucidate the boron behavior in alloys. As the only institute operating research reactor in the country, it would be the responsibility of the institute to develop the technique and provide it to the industries. Quantitative analyses of boron in type 316 L stainless steel by neutron induced autoradiography was attempted in this study. Nine experimental reference alloys with different amount of boron were prepared and reliable chemical composition data were obtained. Autoradiographs of reference materials with three different neutron fluences ( 1.9 10{sup 13}, 1.9 10{sup 14} and 1.9 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2} ) were obtained and a trial calibration curve of boron content vs. track density was acquired.

  11. Dose calculation from a D-D-reaction-based BSA for boron neutron capture synovectomy

    Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to calculate dose in a knee phantom from a D-D-reaction-based Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). The BSA consists of a D(d,n)-reaction-based neutron source enclosed inside a polyethylene moderator and graphite reflector. The polyethylene moderator and graphite reflector sizes were optimized to deliver the highest ratio of thermal to fast neutron yield at the knee phantom. Then neutron dose was calculated at various depths in a knee phantom loaded with boron and therapeutic ratios of synovium dose/skin dose and synovium dose/bone dose were determined. Normalized to same boron loading in synovium, the values of the therapeutic ratios obtained in the present study are 12-30 times higher than the published values.

  12. Dose calculation from a D-D-reaction-based BSA for boron neutron capture synovectomy

    Abdalla, Khalid [Department of Physics, Hail University, Hail (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: khalidafnan@uoh.edu.sa; Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals and Center for Applied Physical Sciences, Box No. 1815, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Maalej, N.; Elshahat, B. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals and Center for Applied Physical Sciences, Box No. 1815, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-04-15

    Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to calculate dose in a knee phantom from a D-D-reaction-based Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). The BSA consists of a D(d,n)-reaction-based neutron source enclosed inside a polyethylene moderator and graphite reflector. The polyethylene moderator and graphite reflector sizes were optimized to deliver the highest ratio of thermal to fast neutron yield at the knee phantom. Then neutron dose was calculated at various depths in a knee phantom loaded with boron and therapeutic ratios of synovium dose/skin dose and synovium dose/bone dose were determined. Normalized to same boron loading in synovium, the values of the therapeutic ratios obtained in the present study are 12-30 times higher than the published values.

  13. Biodistribution of Boron compounds in an experimental model of liver metastases for Boron Neutron Capture (BNCT) Studies

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that involves the selective accumulation of 10B carriers in tumors followed by irradiation with thermal or epithermal neutrons. The high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling 7Li nuclei emitted during the capture of a thermal neutron by a 10B nucleus have a short range and a high biological effectiveness. Thus, BNCT would potentially target neoplastic tissue selectively. In previous studies we demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of different BNCT protocols in an experimental model of oral cancer. More recently we performed experimental studies in normal rat liver that evidenced the feasibility of treating liver metastases employing a novel BNCT protocol proposed by JEC based on ex-situ treatment and partial liver auto-transplant. The aim of the present study was to perform biodistribution studies with different boron compounds and different administration protocols to determine the protocols that would be therapeutically useful in 'in vivo' BNCT studies at the RA-3 Nuclear Reactor in an experimental model of liver metastases in rats. Materials and Methods. A total of 70 BDIX rats (Charles River Lab., MA, USA) were inoculated in the liver with syngeneic colon cancer cells DH/DK12/TRb (ECACC, UK) to induce the development of subcapsular metastatic nodules. 15 days post-inoculation the animals were used for biodistribution studies. A total of 11 protocols were evaluated employing the boron compounds boronophenylalanine (BPA) and GB-10 (Na210B1-0H10), alone or combined employing different doses and administration routes. Tumor, normal tissue and blood samples were processed for boron measurement by ICP-OES. Results. Several protocols proved potentially useful for BNCT studies in terms of absolute boron concentration in tumor and preferential uptake of boron by tumor tissue, i.e. BPA 15.5 mg 10B/kg iv + GB-10 50 mg 10B/kg iv; BPA 46.5 mg 10B/kg ip; BPA 46.5 mg 10B/kg ip + iv; BPA 46

  14. Boron concentration measurements by alpha spectrometry and quantitative neutron autoradiography in cells and tissues treated with different boronated formulations and administration protocols

    The possibility to measure boron concentration with high precision in tissues that will be irradiated represents a fundamental step for a safe and effective BNCT treatment. In Pavia, two techniques have been used for this purpose, a quantitative method based on charged particles spectrometry and a boron biodistribution imaging based on neutron autoradiography. A quantitative method to determine boron concentration by neutron autoradiography has been recently set-up and calibrated for the measurement of biological samples, both solid and liquid, in the frame of the feasibility study of BNCT. This technique was calibrated and the obtained results were cross checked with those of α spectrometry, in order to validate them. The comparisons were performed using tissues taken form animals treated with different boron administration protocols. Subsequently the quantitative neutron autoradiography was employed to measure osteosarcoma cell samples treated with BPA and with new boronated formulations. - Highlights: • A method for 10B measurements in samples based on neutron autoradiography was developed. • The results were compared with those of alpha spectrometry applied on tissue and cell samples. • Boronated liposomes were developed and administered to osteosarcoma cell cultures. • Neutron autoradiography was employed to measure boron concentration due to liposomes. • Liposomes were proved to be more effective in concentrating boron in cells than BPA

  15. Dose evaluation of boron neutron capture synovectomy using the THOR epithermal neutron beam: a feasibility study

    Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common epidemic diseases in the world. For some patients, the treatment with steroids or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is not effective, thus necessitating physical removal of the inflamed synovium. Alternative approaches other than surgery will provide appropriate disease control and improve the patient's quality of life. In this research, we evaluated the feasibility of conducting boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) with the Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) as a neutron source. Monte Carlo simulations were performed with arthritic joint models and uncertainties were within 5%. The collimator, reflector and boron concentration were optimized to reduce the treatment time and normal tissue doses. For the knee joint, polyethylene with 40%-enriched Li2CO3 was used as the collimator material, and a rear reflector of 15 cm thick graphite and side reflector of 10 cm thick graphite were chosen. The optimized treatment time was 5.4 min for the parallel-opposed irradiation. For the finger joint, polymethyl methacrylate was used as the reflector material. The treatment time can be reduced to 3.1 min, while skin and bone doses can be effectively reduced by approximately 9% compared with treatment using the graphite reflector. We conclude that using THOR as a treatment modality for BNCS could be a feasible alternative in clinical practice

  16. Accelerator-based BNCT

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the 9Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. - Highlights: • The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. • Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. • The present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. • Topics cover intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams and beam diagnostics, among others

  17. Thermal neutron response of a boron-coated GEM detector via GEANT4 Monte Carlo code.

    Jamil, M; Rhee, J T; Kim, H G; Ahmad, Farzana; Jeon, Y J

    2014-10-22

    In this work, we report the design configuration and the performance of the hybrid Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector. In order to make the detector sensitive to thermal neutrons, the forward electrode of the GEM has been coated with the enriched boron-10 material, which works as a neutron converter. A total of 5×5cm(2) configuration of GEM has been used for thermal neutron studies. The response of the detector has been estimated via using GEANT4 MC code with two different physics lists. Using the QGSP_BIC_HP physics list, the neutron detection efficiency was determined to be about 3%, while with QGSP_BERT_HP physics list the efficiency was around 2.5%, at the incident thermal neutron energies of 25meV. The higher response of the detector proves that GEM-coated with boron converter improves the efficiency for thermal neutrons detection. PMID:25464183

  18. Preliminary study of MAGAT polymer gel dosimetry for boron-neutron capture therapy

    MAGAT gel dosimeter with boron is irradiated in Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility (HWNIF) of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). The cylindrical gel phantoms are exposed to neutron beams of three different energy spectra (thermal neutron rich, epithermal and fast neutron rich and the mixed modes) in air. Preliminary results corresponding to depth-dose responses are obtained as the transverse relaxation rate (R2=1/T2) from magnetic resonance imaging data. As the results MAGAT gel dosimeter has the higher sensitivity on thermal neutron than on epi-thermal and fast neutron, and the gel with boron showed an enhancement and a change in the depth-R2 response explicitly. From these results, it is suggested that MAGAT gel dosimeter can be an effective tool in BNCT dosimetry

  19. Preliminary study of MAGAT polymer gel dosimetry for boron-neutron capture therapy

    Hayashi, Shin-ichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Uchida, Ryohei; Suzuki, Minoru; Usui, Shuji; Tominaga, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    MAGAT gel dosimeter with boron is irradiated in Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility (HWNIF) of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). The cylindrical gel phantoms are exposed to neutron beams of three different energy spectra (thermal neutron rich, epithermal and fast neutron rich and the mixed modes) in air. Preliminary results corresponding to depth-dose responses are obtained as the transverse relaxation rate (R2=1/T2) from magnetic resonance imaging data. As the results MAGAT gel dosimeter has the higher sensitivity on thermal neutron than on epi-thermal and fast neutron, and the gel with boron showed an enhancement and a change in the depth-R2 response explicitly. From these results, it is suggested that MAGAT gel dosimeter can be an effective tool in BNCT dosimetry.

  20. CR-39 personnel neutron dosimeters: Enhanced sensitivity via boron-doping

    An improved CR-39 neutron dosimeter has been designed and tested. This dosimeter has a thin (roughly 20 μm) boron-containing layer between the poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) radiator and the CR-39 substrate, which increases its sensitivity to low energy (50 keV) neutrons by an order of magnitude and to thermal neutrons by nearly two orders of magnitude. This layer consists of sodium borate dispersed in a poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix. The response of the improved dosimeter was measured with monoenergetic neutron beams from thermal energies to 15 MeV, and boron contents from zero to 52 μg cm-2 (saturated solution). Maximum sensitivity occurs at a boron content of about 35 μg cm-2, but a significant improvement in sensitivity was observed for even a boron content of 11μg cm-2. By incorporating just a small amount of boron (less than 1 μg cm-2), it is possible that a dosimeter with a nearly flat response over the neutron energies tested could be achieved

  1. Boron content in type 316 L stainless steel by neutron induced autoradiography

    Boron is effective to the improvement of various properties of alloys, but it is difficult to characterize its behavior during the alloy processing. Neutron induced autoradiography (or called as F.T.E: Fission Track Etching) technique was attempted to quantitatively analyze boron content in type 316 L austenitic stainless steel. Reference samples with nine different boron contents were prepared and analyzed by conventional analysis method as well as by autoradiography technique using 'HANARO', a 30 MW research reactor in K.A.E.R.I. (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Cd ratio of the neutron flux was about 200 and thermal neutron flux was around 2x1013/cm2/sec. A Kodak CN-85TM detector with an alloy sample was irradiated with two different thermal neutron fluences of 1013 and 1014/cm2. Track densities on the autoradiographs were measured using image analyzer. Within the range of 10 to 50 ppm of boron, track densities from autoradiography showed the linear relationship with results from conventional analyses. When complementarily applied with other analysis technique like E.B.S.D. (Electron Backscattered Diffraction) or E.D.S. (Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) neutron induced autoradiography technique was found very useful in distinguishing and identifying phases with the different distribution coefficient of boron. (author)

  2. MOSFET with a boron-loaded gate as a low-energy neutron dosimeter

    Gavelle, M. [CNRS, LAAS, 7 avenue du colonel Roche, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, INP, ISAE, LAAS, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Sarrabayrouse, G., E-mail: sarra@laas.fr [CNRS, LAAS, 7 avenue du colonel Roche, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, INP, ISAE, LAAS, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Scheid, E. [CNRS, LAAS, 7 avenue du colonel Roche, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, INP, ISAE, LAAS, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Siskos, S.; Fragopoulou, M.; Zamani, M. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Physics Department, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2011-12-15

    A MOSFET-based low-energy neutron dosimeter has been fabricated using a {sup 10}B loaded gate electrode as (n,{alpha}) converter. The response to thermal neutrons has been studied. - Highlights: > Feasibility of a metal-oxide-semiconductor thermal neutron dosimeter is investigated. > Monolithically integrated boron-loaded gate electrode acts as a (n,{alpha}) converter. > Sensitivity of 2 V/Sv is obtained.

  3. Prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis methodology for determination of boron from trace to major contents

    Prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis methodologies were standardized using a reflected neutron beam and Compton suppressed γ-ray spectrometer to quantify boron from trace to major concentrations. Neutron self-shielding correction factors for higher boron contents (0.2-10 mg) in samples were obtained from the sensitivity of chlorine by irradiating KCl with and without boron. This method was validated by determining boron concentrations in six boron compounds and applied to three borosilicate glass samples with boron contents in the range of 1-10 mg. Low concentrations of boron (10-58 mg kg-1) were also determined in two samples and five reference materials from NIST and IAEA. (author)

  4. Nominal effective radiation doses delivered during clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary system that, in theory, should selectively deliver lethal, high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation to tumor cells dispersed within normal tissues. It is based on the nuclear reaction 10-B(n, α)7-Li, which occurs when the stable nucleus of boron-10 captures a thermal neutron. Due to the relatively high cross-section of the 10-B nucleus for thermal neutron capture and short ranges of the products of this reaction, tumor cells in the volume exposed to thermal neutrons and containing sufficiently high concentration of 10-B would receive a much higher radiation dose than the normal cells contained within the exposed volume. Nevertheless, radiation dose deposited in normal tissue by gamma and fast neutron contamination of the neutron beam, as well as neutron capture in nitrogen, 14-N(n,p)14-C, hydrogen, 1-H(n,γ)2-H, and in boron present in blood and normal cells, limits the dose that can be delivered to tumor cells. It is, therefore, imperative for the success of the BNCT the dosed delivered to normal tissues be accurately determined in order to optimize the irradiation geometry and to limit the volume of normal tissue exposed to thermal neutrons. These are the major objectives of BNCT treatment planning

  5. Development of boronated tumor-seeking materials for application in neutron capture therapy of cancer

    Full text: At the present time the main field of application of boron compounds in medicine is Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of cancer. In this presentation the main principles of BNCT and main types of polyhedral boron compounds used for BNCT will be shown. The successful treatment of tumors by BNCT requires selective delivery of the boron moiety into the tumor cells. One of ways to solve this problem is attachment of boron fragment to different tumor-specific targeting molecules. Literature and our recent results on the preparation of novel boronated amino acids, carboranecarboxylic acids, a design of different conjugates of polyhedral boron compounds with tumor-seeking molecules, like porphyrins, phthalocyanines, nucleosides, carbohydrates, and lipids will be presented. Conjugates of natural porphyrins and phthalocyanines with carborane, closo-dodecaborate and cobalt bis(dicarbollide) were synthesized. The combination of these two fragments in one molecule makes these compounds potentially useful for both fluorescence diagnostics (FD) and BNCT of tumours. Boronated nucleosides are considered to be potential BNCT candidates because they can accumulate in the tumor cells. Thus, we have succeeded in preparation of the very first conjugates of closo-dodecaborate anion with one canonic nucleoside (thymidine)

  6. Boron concentrations in brain during boron neutron capture therapy: in vivo measurements from the Phase I trial EORTC 11961 using a gamma-ray telescope

    Purpose: Gamma-ray spectroscopic scans to measure boron concentrations in the irradiated volume were performed during treatment of 5 patients suffering from brain tumors with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In BNCT, the dose that is meant to be targeted primarily to the tumor is the dose coming from the reaction 10B(n,α)7Li, which is determined by the boron concentration in tissue and the thermal neutron fluence rate. The boron distribution throughout the head of the patient during the treatment is therefore of major interest. The detection of the boron distribution during the irradiation was until now not possible. Methods and Materials: Five patients suffering from glioblastoma multiforme and treated with BNCT in a dose escalation study were administered the boron compound, boron sulfhydryl (BSH; Na2B12H11SH). Boron concentrations were reconstructed from measurements performed with the gamma-ray telescope which detects locally the specific gamma rays produced by neutron capture in 10B and 1H. Results: For all patients, at a 10B concentration in blood of 30 ppm, the boron concentration in nonoperated areas of the brain was very low, between 1 and 2.5 ppm. In the target volume, which included the area where the tumor had been removed and where remaining tumor cells have to be assumed, much higher boron concentrations were measured with large variations from one patient to another. Superficial tissue contained a higher concentration of 10B than the nonoperated areas of the brain, ranging between 8 and 15 ppm. Conclusions: The measured results correspond with previous tissue uptake studies, confirming that normal brain tissue hardly absorbs the boron compound BSH. Gamma-ray telescope measurements seem to be a promising method to provide information on the biodistribution of boron during therapy. Furthermore, it also opens the possibility of in vivo dosimetry

  7. The comparison of four neutron sources for Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) in vivo detections of boron

    A Prompt Gamma Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system, incorporating an isotopic neutron source has been simulated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In order to improve the signal to noise ratio different collimators and a filter were placed between the neutron source and the object. The effect of the positioning of the neutron beam and the detector relative to the object has been studied. In this work the optimisation procedure is demonstrated for boron. Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to compare the performance of the proposed PGNAA system using four different neutron sources (241Am/Be, 252Cf, 241Am/B, and DT neutron generator). Among the different systems the 252Cf neutron based PGNAA system has the best performance. (author)

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using the p- boronophenylalanine-fructose complex and epithermal neutrons

    Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.; Liu, H.B.; Slatkin, D.N.; Wielopolski, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E. [Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Chadha, M. [Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1994-12-31

    The amino acid analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is under investigation as a neutron capture agent for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme. A series of patients undergoing surgical removal of tumor received BPA orally as the free amino acid. Favorable tumor/blood boron concentration ratios were obtained but the absolute amount of boron in the tumor would have been insufficient for BNCT. BPA can be solubilized at neutral pH by complexation with fructose (BPA-F). Studies with rats suggest that intraperitoneal injection of BPA-F complex produces a much higher tumor boron concentration to rat intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma that were possible with oral BPA. Higher boron concentrations have allowed higher tumor radiation doses to be delivered while maintaining the dose to the normal brain vascular endothelium below the threshold of tolerance. The experience to date of the administration of BPA-F to one patient is provided in this report.

  9. Boron neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using the p- boronophenylalanine-fructose complex and epithermal neutrons

    The amino acid analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is under investigation as a neutron capture agent for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme. A series of patients undergoing surgical removal of tumor received BPA orally as the free amino acid. Favorable tumor/blood boron concentration ratios were obtained but the absolute amount of boron in the tumor would have been insufficient for BNCT. BPA can be solubilized at neutral pH by complexation with fructose (BPA-F). Studies with rats suggest that intraperitoneal injection of BPA-F complex produces a much higher tumor boron concentration to rat intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma that were possible with oral BPA. Higher boron concentrations have allowed higher tumor radiation doses to be delivered while maintaining the dose to the normal brain vascular endothelium below the threshold of tolerance. The experience to date of the administration of BPA-F to one patient is provided in this report

  10. Analysis of boron, samarium and gadolinium in rock samples by neutron capture gamma-ray spectrometry

    Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is useful for determining many of the elements found in sedimentary rocks. It is particularly suitable for the trace elements boron, samarium and gadolinium. The sensitivity of detection can be of the order of 0.1 ppm with an adequate neutron source. Twenty-five sedimentary rock samples were analyzed in the PGNAA facility at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The materials included Ottawa sand, Berea sandstone, Royer dolomite and several other formations of interest in the petroleum industry. Results of the analyses are presented. Correlations of gadolinium and samarium and of boron with the sum of samarium and gadolinium are given. (author)

  11. Improvements in Boron Plate Coating Technology for Higher Efficiency Neutron Detection and Coincidence Counting Error Reduction

    Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-25

    This informal report presents the measurement data and information to document the performance of the advanced Precision Data Technology, Inc. (PDT) sealed cell boron-10 plate neutron detector that makes use of the advanced coating materials and procedures. In 2015, PDT changed the boron coating materials and application procedures to significantly increase the efficiency of their basic corrugated plate detector performance. A prototype sealed cell unit was supplied to LANL for testing and comparison with prior detector cells. Also, LANL had reference detector slabs from the original neutron collar (UNCL) and the new Antech UNCL with the removable 3He tubes. The comparison data is presented in this report.

  12. Application of the boron neutron capture therapy to undifferentiated thyroid cancer using two boron compounds (BPA and BOPP)

    We have shown the selective uptake of boronophenylalanine (BPA) by undifferentiated thyroid cancer (UTC) human cell line ARO, both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, a 50% histologic cure of mice bearing the tumor was observed when the complete boron neutron capture therapy was applied. More recently we have analyzed the biodistribution of BOPP (tetrakis-carborane carboxylate ester of 2,4-bis-(ba-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX) and showed that when BOPP was injected 5 days before BPA, and the animals were sacrificed 60 min after the ip injection of BPA, a significant increase in boron uptake by the tumor was found (38-45ppm with both compounds Vs. 20 ppm with BPA alone). Five days post the ip BOPP injection and 1 hr after BPA, the ratios were: tumor/blood 3,75; tumor /distal skin 2. Other important ratios were tumor/thyroid 6,65 and tumor/lung 3,8. The present studies were performed in mice transplanted with ARO cells and injected with BOPP and BPA. Only in mice treated with the neutron beam and injected with the boronated compounds we observed a 100% control of tumor growth. Two groups of mice received different total absorbed doses: 3.00 and 6.01 Gy, but no further improvement in the outcome was found compared to the previous results using BPA alone (4.3 Gy). (author)

  13. Thermal neutron response of a boron-coated GEM detector via GEANT4 Monte Carlo code

    In this work, we report the design configuration and the performance of the hybrid Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector. In order to make the detector sensitive to thermal neutrons, the forward electrode of the GEM has been coated with the enriched boron-10 material, which works as a neutron converter. A total of 5×5 cm2 configuration of GEM has been used for thermal neutron studies. The response of the detector has been estimated via using GEANT4 MC code with two different physics lists. Using the QGSPBICHP physics list, the neutron detection efficiency was determined to be about 3%, while with QGSPBERTHP physics list the efficiency was around 2.5%, at the incident thermal neutron energies of 25 meV. The higher response of the detector proves that GEM-coated with boron converter improves the efficiency for thermal neutrons detection. - Highlights: • The results of boron-coated GEM for thermal neutrons are described. • The simulations were performed by GEANT4 MC code. • The evaluation was determined by GEANT4 using two physics lists. • The response of the detector was taken for En=25–100 meV

  14. Application of drug delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy. Basic research toward clinical application

    Tumour cell destruction in boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between 10B and thermal neutrons (10B+1n → 7Li+4He (α) +2.31 MeV (93.7%)/2.79 MeV (6.3%)). The resulting lithium ions and αparticles are high linear energy transfer (LET) particles which give high biological effect. Their short range in tissue (5-9 μm) restricts radiation damage to those cells in which boron atoms are located at the time of neutron irradiation. BNCT has been applied clinically for the treatment of malignant brain tumors, malignant melanoma, head and neck cancer and hepatoma etc, recently. Sodium borocaptate (Na210B12H11SH; BSH) and borono-phenylalanine (10BPA) are currently being used in clinical treatments. To achieve the selective delivery of boron atoms to cancer cells, drug delivery system (DDS) becomes an attractive intelligent technology as targeting and controlled release of drugs. We have firstly reported that 10B atoms delivered by immunoliposomes are cytotoxic to human pancreatic carcinoma cells (AsPC-1) after thermal neutron irradiation in vitro. The intra-tumoural injection of boronated immunoliposomes can increase the retention of 10B atoms in tumour cells, causing suppression of tumour growth in vivo following thermal neutron irradiation. We prepared polyethylene-glycol binding liposomes (PEG-liposomes) as an effective 10B carrier to obviate phagocytosis by reticuloendotherial systems. We had prepared 10BSH entrapped Water-in-Oil-in-Water (WOW) emulsion. The 10B concentration in VX-2 tumour after intra-arterial injection of 10BSH entrapped WOW emulsion was superior to the groups of 10BSH entrapped conventional Lipiodol mix emulsion. 10Boron entrapped WOW emulsion is one of the most useful for intra-arterial boron delivery carrier on BNCT to hepatocellular carcinoma. (author)

  15. Boron-loaded plastic scintillator with neutron-γ pulse shape discrimination capability

    Development of the plastic scintillator with neutron sensitivity from thermal to multi-MeV and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) has been demonstrated. Incorporation of 10B-containing compounds into the plastic scintillator with PSD capability leads to detector improvement in regard to neutron detection efficiency while preserving the discrimination between neutrons and γ-rays. Effects of boron loading on scintillation and pulse shape discrimination properties are discussed. A PSD figure-of-merit value of 1.4±0.03 has been achieved for events in a thermal neutron energy domain, 50–100 keVee, for PSD plastic loaded with 5 wt.% of m-carborane

  16. Standard specification for boron-Based neutron absorbing material systems for use in nuclear spent fuel storage racks

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This specification defines criteria for boron-based neutron absorbing material systems used in racks in a pool environment for storage of nuclear light water reactor (LWR) spent-fuel assemblies or disassembled components to maintain sub-criticality in the storage rack system. 1.2 Boron-based neutron absorbing material systems normally consist of metallic boron or a chemical compound containing boron (for example, boron carbide, B4C) supported by a matrix of aluminum, steel, or other materials. 1.3 In a boron-based absorber, neutron absorption occurs primarily by the boron-10 isotope that is present in natural boron to the extent of 18.3 ± 0.2 % by weight (depending upon the geological origin of the boron). Boron, enriched in boron-10 could also be used. 1.4 The materials systems described herein shall be functional – that is always be capable to maintain a B10 areal density such that subcriticality Keff <0.95 or Keff <0.98 or Keff < 1.0 depending on the design specification for the service...

  17. Enhanced therapeutic effect on murine melanoma and angiosarcoma cells by boron neutron capture therapy using a boronated metalloporphyrin

    We have already achieved successful treatment of several human patients with malignant melanoma by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine (10B1-BPA·HCl). In this study we used a new compound, a manganese boronated protoporphyrin (Mn-10BOPP), and compared it to 10B1-BPA·HCl with respect to uptake in murine melanoma and angiosarcoma cells as well as to their cell killing effect. 10B uptake was measured in a new method, and the new compound was much more incorporated into both cells than 10B1-BPA·HCl. Furthermore, melanoma and angiosarcoma cells preincubated with the new compound were 15 to 20 times more efficiently killed by BNCT than cells preincubated with 10B1-BPA·HCl. (author)

  18. Experimental and simulation study of the response of a boron-loaded plastic scintillator to neutrons and gamma-rays

    A boron-loaded plastic scintillator has been investigated for possible use in neutron spectrometry. The sensor composition of hydrogen and carbon leads to multiple scattering collisions that are useful for fast neutron spectroscopy, while its boron component can serve as a thermal neutron detector. The response function of this detector has been simulated using MCNPX code for gamma-rays and neutrons. The sensor has been mounted on a photomultiplier tube connected to a data acquisition system. The system has been tested in different gamma-ray and neutron fields at the UOIT Neutron Facility. The simulation and experimental results have been compared and analyzed. (author)

  19. Application of neutron induced radiography technique in determination of boron in aluminium

    The technique of Neutron Induced Radiography has been applied to determine boron concentration and its spatial distribution in aluminium using Allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39) detectors. The technique is based upon the simultaneous irradiation of sample and a standard fixed on a track detector with thermal neutrons and the counting of alpha and /sup 7/Li tracks produced in the detector from the nuclear reaction /sup 10/B(n,α)/sup 7/Li after chemical etching. Boron concentration is determined by comparing the /sup 7/Li and alpha particle tracks density with that of a standard of known boron concentration. Boron concentration in aluminium has been found to be (135.8 ±0.7) ppm in this study which is on the higher side within the normal range reported in the literature. The technique of boron determination by Neutron Induced Radiography is a simple and reliable. It can be used to study the other α-emitting radionuclides in minerals and other materials. (author)

  20. The prospects of using boron nitride in nuclear reactors as an absorbant and decelerator of neutrons

    Full text: The given work tells us that there are a widespread materials having an ability of amorphism, magnezation, hightemperature stability, wear resistance and corrosion resisting. To special requests which being presented to modern materials by some spheres of science and technics concern an ability of materials to work not only within the conditions of radioactive irradiation nor also capture heating neutrons. Hexagonal boron nitride has the most of these features. Boron nitride is used by the aircraft industry, because of its hightemperature resistance for a long time in extreme conditions. That is why the given material had been suggested as a neutron immerse material during production of containers for radioactive wastes long-lived storage. Using of enriched boron nitride in the first wall of thermonuclear reactor gives an oppotunity of refining nuclear and physical characteristics of reactor installation as a whole. Boron nitride has feeble activation in reactor neutron shell and high radiation resistance. All abovementioned boron nitride features, also its lower atmoic weight are very important for application in plasma devices, such as for using in installations of thermonuclear synthesis.

  1. Early clinical experience of boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    Joel, D.D.; Bergland, R.; Capala, J. [and others

    1995-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that can selectively irradiate tumor tissue. BNCT uses drugs containing a stable isotope of boron. {sup 10}B, to sensitize tumor cells to irradiation by low energy (thermal) neutrons. The interaction of the {sup 10}B with a thermal neutron (neutron capture) causes the {sup 10}B nucleus to split, releasing an alpha particle and a lithium nucleus. These products of the {sup 10}B(n, {alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction are very damaging to cells but have a combined path length in tissue of approximately 14 {mu}m, or roughly the diameter of one or two cells. Thus, most of the ionizing energy imparted to tissue is localized to {sup 10}B-loaded cells.

  2. Early clinical experience of boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that can selectively irradiate tumor tissue. BNCT uses drugs containing a stable isotope of boron. 10B, to sensitize tumor cells to irradiation by low energy (thermal) neutrons. The interaction of the 10B with a thermal neutron (neutron capture) causes the 10B nucleus to split, releasing an alpha particle and a lithium nucleus. These products of the 10B(n, α)7Li reaction are very damaging to cells but have a combined path length in tissue of approximately 14 μm, or roughly the diameter of one or two cells. Thus, most of the ionizing energy imparted to tissue is localized to 10B-loaded cells

  3. Design of an epi-thermal neutron flux intensity monitor with GaN wafer for boron neutron capture therapy

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising cancer therapy. Epi-thermal neutron (0.5 eV < En < 10 keV) flux intensity is one of the basic characteristics for modern BNCT. In this work, based on the 71Ga(n, γ)72Ga reaction, a new simple monitor with gallium nitride (GaN) wafer as activation material was designed by Monte Carlo simulations to precisely measure the absolute integral flux intensity of epi-thermal neutrons especially for practical BNCT. In the monitor, a GaN wafer was positioned in the center of a polyethylene sphere as neutron moderator covered with cadmium (Cd) layer as thermal neutron absorber outside. The simulation results and related analysis indicated that the epi-thermal neutron flux intensity could be precisely measured by the presently designed monitor. (author)

  4. Boron neutron capture therapy of ocular melanoma and intracranial glioma using p-boronophenylalanine

    During conventional radiotherapy, the dose that can be delivered to the tumor is limited by the tolerance of the surrounding normal tissue within the treatment volume. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) represents a promising modality for selective tumor irradiation. The key to effective BNCT is selective localization of 10B in the tumor. We have shown that the synthetic amino acid p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) will selectively deliver boron to melanomas and other tumors such as gliosarcomas and mammary carcinomas. Systemically delivered BPA may have general utility as a boron delivery agent for BNCT. In this paper, BNCT with BPA is used in treatment of experimentally induced gliosarcoma in rats and nonpigmented melanoma in rabbits. The tissue distribution of boron is described, as is response to the BNCT. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. A suggestion for B-10 imaging during boron neutron capture therapy

    Cortesi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Selective accumulation of B-10 compound in tumour tissue is a fundamental condition for the achievement of BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy), since the effectiveness of therapy irradiation derives just from neutron capture reaction of B-10. Hence, the determination of the B-10 concentration ratio, between tumour and healthy tissue, and a control of this ratio, during the therapy, are essential to optimise the effectiveness of the BNCT, which it is known to be based on the selective uptake ...

  6. Boron cage compound materials and composites for shielding and absorbing neutrons

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2014-03-04

    Boron cage compound-containing materials for shielding and absorbing neutrons. The materials include BCC-containing composites and compounds. BCC-containing compounds comprise a host polymer and a BCC attached thereto. BCC-containing composites comprise a mixture of a polymer matrix and a BCC filler. The BCC-containing materials can be used to form numerous articles of manufacture for shielding and absorbing neutrons.

  7. Slow neutron capture therapy for malignant glioma (boron or lithium neutron capture therapy)

    In recurrent glioblastoma, the mean survival period is approx. 6 months by the routine methods of treatment, but is extended more than 3-fold by neutron capture therapy. This method and a routine method with 60Co or an accelerator were used for comparison in the clinical treatment of 26 patients with supratentorial malignant glioma. There were no significant differences as for prognostic factors of the group treated by this method and those of the control group; No. of cases 14 and 12, the mean age 46 and 53.5 yr, and the stage (TNM) 3.14 and 2.83, respectively. As of the end of Feb. 1980, this method showed a lifeprolonging effect 3 times that of the control, the mean survival period being 67 weeks for this method and 21 for the control. Although 100% improvement was observed in about one half of the cases by this method, the control group showed improvement of only 80% at maximum. It is also possible to treat any deep portion of the brain with thermal neutrons. As a Boron compound, mercaptoundecahydrododecarborate with a low toxicity has been put into practical use for brain tumors, and as Li, the use of 6LiCl for lung cancer is under examination. (Chiba, N.)

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of boronated polyglycerol dendrimers as potential agent for neutron capture therapy

    In this work, the polyglycerol dendrimer (PGLD) generation 5 was used to obtain a boronated macromolecule for boron neutron capture therapy. The PGLD dendrimer was synthesized by the ring opening polymerization of deprotonated glycidol using polyglycerol as core functionality in a step-growth processes denominated divergent synthesis. The PGLD dendritic structure was confirmed by gel permeation chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR, 13C-NMR) and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization techniques. The synthesized dendrimer presented low dispersion in molecular weights (Mw/Mn = 1.05) and a degree of branching of 0.82, which characterize the polymer dendritic structure. Quantitative neutron capture radiography was used to investigate the boron-10 enrichment of the polyglycerol dendrimer. The in vitro cytotoxicity to Chinese hamster ovary cells of 10B-PGLD dendrimer indicate lower cytotoxicity, suggesting that the macromolecule is a biocompatible material. (author)

  9. The three dimensional map of dose components in a head phantom for boron neutron capture therapy

    Bavarnegin Elham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The in-phantom measurement of physical dose distribution and construction of a convenient phantom is very important for boron neutron capture therapy planning validation. In this study we have simulated a head phantom, suggested for construction in boron neutron capture therapy facilities, and calculated all relevant dose components inside of it using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. A “generic” epithermal neutron beam with a broad neutron spectrum, similar to beams used for neutron capture therapy clinical trials, was used. The calculated distributions of all relevant dose components in brain tissue equivalent were compared with those in water. The results show that water is a suitable dosimetry material and that the simulated head phantom is a suitable design for producing accurate three-dimensional maps of dose components at enough points inside of the phantom for boron neutron capture therapy dosimetry measurements and the use of these dose maps in beam development and benchmarking of computer-based treatment codes.

  10. The radiobiological principles of boron neutron capture therapy: A critical review

    The radiobiology of the dose components in a BNCT exposure is examined. The effect of exposure time in determining the biological effectiveness of γ-rays, due to the repair of sublethal damage, has been largely overlooked in the application of BNCT. Recoil protons from fast neutrons vary in their relative biological effectiveness (RBE) as a function of energy and tissue endpoint. Thus the energy spectrum of a beam will influence the RBE of this dose component. Protons from the neutron capture reaction in nitrogen have not been studied but in practice protons from nitrogen capture have been combined with the recoil proton contribution into a total proton dose. The relative biological effectiveness of the products of the neutron capture reaction in boron is derived from two factors, the RBE of the short range particles and the bio-distribution of boron, referred to collectively as the compound biological effectiveness factor. Caution is needed in the application of these factors for different normal tissues and tumors. - Highlights: ► Radiobiological properties of different dose components in BNCT are considered. ► Effectiveness of γ-ray dose depends strongly on exposure time due to sublethal damage repair. ► Effectiveness of fast neutron dose depends on neutron energy spectrum. ► γ-ray and fast neutron characteristics vary between beams and thus weighting factors will differ. ► Weighing factors for boron dose depend on the carrier, the tissue and its mode of administration.

  11. The determination of boron in ferrous and non-ferrous alloys by neutron transmission

    A method has been developed for the determination of 0.1 to over 20% of boron in aluminium- and complex ferro-alloys, based on the neutron-absorbing properties of the 10B nucleus. It has also been applied to stainless steel. The determination is fully automatic and results are conveniently processed by computer. (author)

  12. Histopathological changes of testes and eyes by neutron irradiation with boron compounds in mice.

    Kim, Yeon-Joo; Yoon, Won-Ki; Ryu, Si-Yun; Chun, Ki-Jung; Son, Hwa-Young; Cho, Sung-Whan

    2006-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the biological effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on the testes and eyes in mice using HANARO Nuclear Reactor, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. BNCT relies on the high capacity of 10B in capturing thermal neutrons. Sodium borocaptate (BSH, 75 ppm, iv) and boronophenylalanine (BPA, 750 ppm, ip) have been used as the boron delivery agents. Mice were irradiated with neutron (flux: 1.036739E +09, Fluence 9.600200E+12) by lying flat pose for 30 (10 Gy) or 100 min (33 Gy) with or without boron carrier treatment. In 45 days of irradiation, histopathological changes of the testes and eyes were examined. Thirty-three Gy neutron irradiation for 100 min induced testicular atrophy in which some of seminiferous tubules showed complete depletion of spermatogenic germ cells. Lens epithelial cells and lens fiber were swollen and showed granular changes in an exposure time dependent manner. However, boron carrier treatment had no significant effect on the lesions. These results suggest that the examination of histopathological changes of lens and testis can be used as "biological dosimeters" for gauging radiation responses and the HANARO Nuclear Reactor has sufficient capacities for the BNCT. PMID:16434844

  13. The measurement of thermal neutron flux depression for determining the concentration of boron in blood

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a form of targeted radiotherapy that relies on the uptake of the capture element boron by the volume to be treated. The treatment procedure requires the measurement of boron in the patient's blood. The investigation of a simple and inexpensive method for determining the concentration of the capture element 10B in blood is described here. This method, neutron flux depression measurement, involves the determination of the flux depression of thermal neutrons as they pass through a boron-containing sample. It is shown via Monte Carlo calculations and experimental verification that, for a maximum count rate of 1x104 counts/s measured by the detector, a 10 ppm 10B sample of volume 20 ml can be measured with a statistical precision of 10% in 32±2 min. For a source activity of less than 1.11x1011 Bq and a maximum count rate of less than 1x104 counts/s, a 10 ppm 10B sample of volume 20 ml can be measured with a statistical precision of 10% in 58±3 min. It has also been shown that this technique can be applied to the measurement of the concentration of any element with a high thermal neutron cross section such as 157Gd. (author)

  14. Boron-Containing Compounds for Liposome-Mediated Tumor Localization and Application to Neutron Capture Therapy

    Medical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been significantly hindered by the slow development of boron drug-targeting methodologies for the selective delivery of high boron concentration sto malignant cells. We have successfully sought to fill this need by creating liposomes suitable as in vivo boron delivery vehicles for BNCT. Delivery of therapeutic quantities of boron to tumors in murine models has been achieved with small unilamellar boron-rich liposomes. Subsequently, attempts have been made to improve delivery efficiency of liposomes encapsulating boron-containing water-soluble species into their hollow core by incorporating lipophilic boron compounds as addenda to the liposome bilayer, incorporating boron compounds as structural components of the bilayer (which however, poses the risk of sacrificing some stability), and combinations thereof. Regardless of the method, approximately 90% of the total liposome mass remains therapeutically inactive and comprised of the vehicle's construction materials, while less than 5% is boron for neutron targeting. Following this laboratory's intensive study, the observed tumor specificity of certain liposomes has been attributed to their diminutive size of these liposomes (30-150 nm), which enables these small vesicles to pass through the porous, immature vasculature of rapidly growing tumor tissue. We surmised that any amphiphilic nanoparticle of suitable size could possess some tumor selectivity. Consequently, the discovery of a very boron-rich nanoparticle delivery agent with biodistribution performance similar to unilamellar liposomes became one of our goals. Closomers, a new class of polyhedral borane derivatives, attracted us as an alternative BNCT drug-delivery system. We specifically envisioned dodeca (nido-carboranyl)-substituted closomers as possibly having a great potential role in BNCT drug delivery. They could function as extraordinarily boron-rich BNCT drugs since they are amphiphilic

  15. Boron-Containing Compounds for Liposome-Mediated Tumor Localization and Application to Neutron Capture Therapy

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-04-07

    Medical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been significantly hindered by the slow development of boron drug-targeting methodologies for the selective delivery of high boron concentration sto malignant cells. We have successfully sought to fill this need by creating liposomes suitable as in vivo boron delivery vehicles for BNCT. Delivery of therapeutic quantities of boron to tumors in murine models has been achieved with small unilamellar boron-rich liposomes. Subsequently, attempts have been made to improve delivery efficiency of liposomes encapsulating boron-containing water-soluble species into their hollow core by incorporating lipophilic boron compounds as addenda to the liposome bilayer, incorporating boron compounds as structural components of the bilayer (which however, poses the risk of sacrificing some stability), and combinations thereof. Regardless of the method, approximately 90% of the total liposome mass remains therapeutically inactive and comprised of the vehicle's construction materials, while less than 5% is boron for neutron targeting. Following this laboratory's intensive study, the observed tumor specificity of certain liposomes has been attributed to their diminutive size of these liposomes (30-150 nm), which enables these small vesicles to pass through the porous, immature vasculature of rapidly growing tumor tissue. We surmised that any amphiphilic nanoparticle of suitable size could possess some tumor selectivity. Consequently, the discovery of a very boron-rich nanoparticle delivery agent with biodistribution performance similar to unilamellar liposomes became one of our goals. Closomers, a new class of polyhedral borane derivatives, attracted us as an alternative BNCT drug-delivery system. We specifically envisioned dodeca (nido-carboranyl)-substituted closomers as possibly having a great potential role in BNCT drug delivery. They could function as extraordinarily boron-rich BNCT drugs since they are

  16. Novel Boron-10-based detectors for Neutron Scattering Science

    Piscitelli, Francesco; project, for the ILL/ESS/LiU collaboration for the development of the B10 detector technology in the framework of the CRISP

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays neutron scattering science is increasing its instrumental power. Most of the neutron sources in the world are pushing the development of their technologies to be more performing. The neutron scattering development is also pushed by the European Spallation Source (ESS) in Sweden, a neutron facility which has just started construction. Concerning small area detectors (1m^2), the 3He technology, which is today cutting edge, is reaching fundamental limits in its development. Counting rat...

  17. Physical engineering for boron neutron capture therapy in KUR

    Kobayashi, Toru [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst

    2001-01-01

    Basic results of physical engineering study for neutron capture therapy in KUR have been reported since 1970, such as (1) development of thermal neutron fields for therapy following with low {gamma}-ray, (2) development of thermal neutron shield material ({sup 6}LiF) following with low secondary {gamma}-ray, (3) establishment of measurement techniques for B-10 concentration in tissue by using then (n,{gamma}) reaction, (4) evaluation of absorbed dose in a cell level during neutron capture therapy. It is difficult for many of thermal neutrons to reach to the depths in tissue. The thermal neutron irradiation, therefore, is suitable for the therapy of cancer on surface tissue, but not suitable for the therapy of cancer in the depths. Uses of epi-thermal (0.5 eV - 10 keV) or hyper-thermal (>0.5 eV) neutrons, instead of thermal neutron are considered for the neutron capture therapy to cancer in the depth. The depth dose distributions of thermal neutron are improved by increase of forward component of the epi-thermal or the hyper-thermal neutron. Thermal neutron fluxes have been measured by the activation method of Au-197. Thermo-luminescent detector (MgSiO4, or BeO) is used for the measurement of {gamma}-ray doses. Noninvasive dose estimation at cancer parts is developed with a prompt {gamma}-ray analysis method using HPGe and CdTe semiconductor detectors. (Suetake, M.)

  18. Damage to plasmid DNA by a neutron or γ-irradiation in the presence of boron compounds

    Damage levels of plasmid DNAs were observed according to the concentrations of the boron compounds and irradiation doses of a neutron or gamma irradiation. Plasmid used were pBR322 (2870 bp), ψX174 RF (5286 bp) and pTZ19R (4363 bp). DNA damage of plasmid DNA treated with boron compounds after an irradiation was obtained by an agarose gel electrophoresis and observed by a UV illuminator. In the case of a neutron irradiation with boron compounds, DNA damages of the plasmid DNAs were induced according to the high concentrations of the boron compounds and the high irradiation doses. But in the case of a γ-irradiation, the DNA damage was similar when compared to non-irradiated control. Therefore, DNA damage patterns of plasmid DNA by a treatment of boron compounds and a neutron or γ-irradiation were somewhat different showing that the higher the boron concentrations and irradiation doses, the higher the damage of plasmid DNA for a neutron irradiation but no damage for a gamma irradiation in spite of the high boron concentrations and irradiation doses. This result suggest that boron compounds such as BPA and BSH have an important role regarding the damage of plamid DNA by a neutron irradiation, however, not by a gamma irradiation. (author)

  19. Early detection of deteriorations affecting neutrons boron detectors

    Domenech, T.; Hamrita, H.; Normand, S. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteur et Architectures Electroniques, F-91191 Gif/Yvette (France); Daviaud, J. P. [EDF, DPN, 1 place Pleyel, 93 282 Saint Denis Cedex (France); Laroche, M. [EDF, SEPTEN, 12-14 rue Dutrievoz, 69628 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2011-07-01

    The objective of these studies is to design and to industrialize a new device taking back the features of the actual system of control of boron detectors and updating them by adding some analysis of the pulses shapes for predictive maintenance. (authors)

  20. Determination of boron in water solution by an indirect neutron activation technique from a 241Am/Be source

    Boron content in water solutions has been analysed by Indirect Activation Technique a twin 241Am/Be neutron source with a source strength of 9x106 n/seg. The boron concentration was inferred from the measurement of the activity induced in a vanadium flux monitor. The vanadium rod was located inside the boron solution in a standart geometrical set up with respect to the neutron source. Boron concentrations in the range of 100 to 1000 ppm were determined with an overall accuracy of about 2% during a total analysis time of about 20 minutes. Eventhough the analysis is not selective for boron yet due the rapid, simple and precise nature, it is proposed for the analysis of boron in the primary coolant circuit of Nuclear Power Plants of PWR type. (Author)

  1. Neutron dosimetry by the spark counting of tracks in boron-doped film

    Thin cellulose nitrate films are doped with a boron compound. After thermal neutron irradiation, the films are etched in an aqueous solution of 10% NaOH, at 50 deg C, for 1.5 hr, during which the 27 μm thick films are reduced to about 7 μm. The etch-pits caused by 10B(n,α)7Li reactions are punched twice at 600 V and then counted at 500 V. The ratio of the spark density to the thermal neutron fluence was found to be 1.0 x 10-4 for a boron concentration of 1%. After due consideration of background counts, a thermal neutron dose of 0.3 mrem (3 x 10-6 Sv) can be measured with this system. (author)

  2. Antitumor potential induction and free radicals production in melanoma cells by Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Faiao-Flores, F. [Biochemical and Biophysical Laboratory, Butantan Institute, 1500 Vital Brasil Avenue, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Faculty of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, 455 Doutor Arnaldo Avenue, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Coelho, P.R.P.; Muniz, R.O.R.; Souza, G.S. [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Research, 2242 Lineu Prestes Avenue, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Arruda-Neto, J. [Physics Institute, University of Sao Paulo, 187 Matao Street, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [FESP, Sao Paulo Engineering School, 5520 Nove de Julho Avenue, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Maria, Durvanei A., E-mail: durvaneiaugusto@yahoo.com.br [Biochemical and Biophysical Laboratory, Butantan Institute, 1500 Vital Brasil Avenue, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-12-15

    Antiproliferative and oxidative damage effects occurring in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in normal fibroblasts and melanoma cell lines were analyzed. Melanoma cells and normal fibroblasts were treated with different concentrations of Boronophenylalanine and irradiated with thermal neutron flux. The cellular viability and the oxidative stress were determined. BNCT induced free radicals production and proliferative potential inhibition in melanoma cells. Therefore, this therapeutic technique could be considered efficient to inhibit growth of melanoma with minimal effects on normal tissues. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) induces melanoma cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BNCT stimulates free radicals production and proliferative inhibition in melanoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It produces tumor membrane degeneration and destruction with apoptotic bodies formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This therapy damages tumor cells selectively, with minimum effects on normal adjacent tissue.

  3. Antitumor potential induction and free radicals production in melanoma cells by Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Antiproliferative and oxidative damage effects occurring in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in normal fibroblasts and melanoma cell lines were analyzed. Melanoma cells and normal fibroblasts were treated with different concentrations of Boronophenylalanine and irradiated with thermal neutron flux. The cellular viability and the oxidative stress were determined. BNCT induced free radicals production and proliferative potential inhibition in melanoma cells. Therefore, this therapeutic technique could be considered efficient to inhibit growth of melanoma with minimal effects on normal tissues. - Highlights: ► Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) induces melanoma cell death. ► BNCT stimulates free radicals production and proliferative inhibition in melanoma cells. ► It produces tumor membrane degeneration and destruction with apoptotic bodies formation. ► This therapy damages tumor cells selectively, with minimum effects on normal adjacent tissue.

  4. Feasibility study on pinhole camera system for online dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy

    The feasibility of a pinhole camera system for online dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was studied. A prototype system was designed and built. Prompt γ-rays from the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction from a phantom irradiated with neutrons were detected with the prototype system. An image was reconstructed from the experimental data. The reconstructed image showed a good separation of the two borated regions in the phantom. The counting rates and signal-to-noise ratio when using the system in actual BNCT applications are also discussed. - Author-Highlights: • The feasibility of a pinhole camera system for online dosimetry in BNCT was studied. • A prototype pinhole camera system for online dose imaging for BNCT was built. • Prompt γ-rays from a phantom irradiated with neutrons were detected. • The boron-10 reaction rate distribution was reconstructed from the experimental data

  5. Formulation and preliminary evaluation of delivery vehicles for the boron neutron capture therapy of cancer

    Olusanya, Temidayo; Stich, Theresia; Higgins, Samantha Caroline; Lloyd, Rhiannon Eleanor Iris; Smith, James Richard; Fatouros, Dimitrios; Calabrese, Gianpiero; Pilkington, Geoffrey John; Tsibouklis, John

    2015-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a method for selectively destroying malignant (normally glioma) cells whilst sparing normal tissue1. Irradiation of 10B (large neutron capture cross-section) with thermal neutrons effects the nuclear fission reaction: 10B + 1n → → 7Li+ + α + γ; where the penetration of α-particles and 7Li+ is only 8 and 5 µm, respectively, i.e., within a single cell thickness, assuming 10B can be preferentially located within glioma cells2. Poor selectivity is the main ...

  6. Formulation and preliminary evaluation of delivery vehicles for the boron neutron capture therapy of cancer

    Olusanya, Temidayo Olajumoke Bolanle

    2015-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a method for selectively destroying malignant (normally glioma) cells whilst sparing normal tissue. Irradiation of 10B (large neutron capture cross-section) with thermal neutrons effects the nuclear fission reaction: 10B + 1n → → 7Li+ + α + γ; where the penetration of -particles and 7Li+ is only 8 and 5 μm, respectively, i.e., within a single cell thickness, assuming 10B can be preferentially located within glioma cells. Poor selectivity is the main r...

  7. Cubic boron nitride: a new prospective material for ultracold neutron application

    Sobolev, Yu.; Lauer, Th.; Borisov, Yu.; Daum, M.; Fresne, N. du; Goeltl, L.; Hampel, G.; Heil, W.; Knecht, A.; Keunecke, M.; Kratz, J.V.; Lang, T.; Meister, M.; Plonka-Spehr, Ch.; Pokotilovski, Yu.

    2009-01-01

    For the first time, the neutron optical wall-potential of natural cubic boron nitride (cBN) was measured at the ultracold neutron (UCN) source of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz using the time-of-flight method (TOF). The samples investigated had a wall-potential of (305 +/- 15) neV. This value is in good agreement with the result extracted from neutron reflectometry data and theoretical expectations. Because of its high critical velocity for UCN and its good dielectric characteristics, cubic...

  8. Application of HVJ envelope system to boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been used clinically for the treatment of malignant tumors. Two drugs, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) and sulfhydral borane (BSH), have been used as boron delivery agents. These drugs seem to be taken up preferentially in solid tumors, but it is uncertain whether therapeutic quantities of boron atoms are taken up by micro-invasive or distant tumor cells. High accumulation and high selective delivery of boron into tumor tissues are the most important requirements to achieve efficient BNCT for malignant tumor. The HVJ envelope (HVJ-E) vector system is a novel fusion-mediated gene delivery system based on inactivated hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ; Sendai virus). Although we developed this vector system for gene transfer, it can also deliver proteins, synthetic oligonucleotides, and drugs. HVJ-liposome, which is liposome fused with HVJ-E, has higher boron trapping efficiency than HVJ-E alone. We report the boron delivery into cultured cells with HVJ-liposome systems. The cellular 10B concentration after 60 min incubation with HVJ-E containing BSH was 24.9 μg/g cell pellet for BHK-21 cells (baby hamster kidney cells) and 19.4 μg/g cell pellet for SCC VII cells (murine squamous cell carcinoma). These concentrations are higher than that of 60 min incubated cells with BSH containing (100μg 10B/ml) medium. These results indicate the HVJ-E fused with tumor cell membrane and rapidly delivered boron agents, and that the HVJ-E-mediated delivery system could be applicable to BNCT. Plans are underway to begin neutron radiation experiments in vivo and in vitro. (author)

  9. Design, building and evaluation of a neutron detection device based on boron loaded plastic scintillator

    This work focuses on the study, the characterization and the fabrication of Boron-loaded plastic scintillators. Their use in thermal and fast neutron detection devices is also investigated. Fabrication process, especially boron doping, is explained in the first part of this work. Several FTIR, UV-visible and NMR analysis methods were used in order to characterize the material and to check its structure and stoichiometry. Experiences were done using alpha particles and proton beams to measure the scintillation characteristics. Light emission could therefore be completely determined by the Birks semi-empirical relation. In the second part, the whole detector simulation is undergone: interaction between material and radiation, light generation, paths and signal generation. Neutron simulation by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particles) is coupled to a light generation and propagation code developed especially during this work. These simulation tools allow us to optimize the detector geometry for neutron detection and to determine the geometry influence to the photon collection efficiency. Neutron detection efficiency and mean lifetime in this scintillator are also simulated. The close fit obtained between experimental measurements and simulations demonstrate the reliability of the method used. The third part deals with the discrimination methods between neutron and gamma, such as analog (zero crossing) and digital (charge comparison) ones. Their performances were explained and compared. The last part of this work reports on few applications where neutron detection is essential and can be improved with the use of boron loaded plastic scintillators. In particular, the cases of doped scintillation fibers, neutron spectrometry devices and more over neutron multiplicity counting devices are presented. (author)

  10. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Wang, Lumin [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science

    2015-04-08

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.