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Sample records for accelerator test facility

  1. The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), presently under construction at Brookhaven National laboratory, is described. It consists of a 50-MeV electron beam synchronizable to a high-peak power CO2 laser. The interaction of electrons with the laser field will be probed, with some emphasis on exploring laser-based acceleration techniques. 5 refs., 2 figs

  2. The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies

  3. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility control system

    Described is the VAX/CAMAC-based control system for Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility, a laser/linac research complex. Details of hardware and software configurations are presented along with experiences of using Vsystem, a commercial control system package

  4. BNL ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY CONTROL SYSTEM UPGRADE.

    MALONE,R.; BEN-ZVI,I.; WANG,X.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    2001-06-18

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) has embarked on a complete upgrade of its decade old computer system. The planned improvements affect every major component: processors (Intel Pentium replaces VAXes), operating system (Linux/Real-Time Linux supplants OpenVMS), and data acquisition equipment (fast Ethernet equipment replaces CAMAC serial highway.) This paper summarizes the strategies and progress of the upgrade along with plans for future expansion.

  5. Operation of the Brookhaven national laboratory accelerator test facility

    Early operation of the 50 MeV high brightness electron linac of the Accelerator Test Facility is described along with experimental data. This facility is designed to study new linear acceleration techniques and new radiation sources based on linacs in combination with free electron lasers. The accelerator utilizes a photo-excited, metal cathode, radio frequency electron gun followed by two travelling wave accelerating sections and an Experimental Hall for the study program. (Author) 5 refs., 4 figs., tab

  6. Operation of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    Early operation of the 50 MeV high brightness electron linac of the Accelerator Test Facility is described along with experimental data. This facility is designed to study new linear acceleration techniques and new radiation sources based on linacs in combination with free electron lasers. The accelerator utilizes a photo-excited, metal cathode, radio frequency electron gun followed by two travelling wave accelerating sections and an Experimental Hall for the study program

  7. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    Tsakanov, V. M.; Amatuni, G. A.; Amirkhanyan, Z. G.; Aslyan, L. V.; Avagyan, V. Sh.; Danielyan, V. A.; Davtyan, H. D.; Dekhtiarov, V. S.; Gevorgyan, K. L.; Ghazaryan, N. G.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Hakobyan, L. S.; Haroutiunian, S. G.; Ivanyan, M. I.; Khachatryan, V. G.; Laziev, E. M.; Manukyan, P. S.; Margaryan, I. N.; Markosyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, N. V.; Mehrabyan, Sh. A.; Mkrtchyan, T. H.; Muradyan, L. Kh.; Nikogosyan, G. H.; Petrosyan, V. H.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Sargsyan, A. A.; Simonyan, A. S.; Toneyan, H. A.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Vardanyan, T. L.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.; Zanyan, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  8. European accelerator facilities for single event effects testing

    Adams, L.; Nickson, R.; Harboe-Sorensen, R. [ESA-ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Hajdas, W.; Berger, G.

    1997-03-01

    Single event effects are an important hazard to spacecraft and payloads. The advances in component technology, with shrinking dimensions and increasing complexity will give even more importance to single event effects in the future. The ground test facilities are complex and expensive and the complexities of installing a facility are compounded by the requirement that maximum control is to be exercised by users largely unfamiliar with accelerator technology. The PIF and the HIF are the result of experience gained in the field of single event effects testing and represent a unique collaboration between space technology and accelerator experts. Both facilities form an essential part of the European infrastructure supporting space projects. (J.P.N.)

  9. Optical fiber feasibility study in Accelerated Pavement Testing facility

    Bueche, N.; Rychen, P.; Dumont, A.-G.; Santagata, E.

    2009-01-01

    The presented research has been carried out within the European project Intelligent Roads (INTRO). The major objective followed was to assess the potential of optical fiber for pavement monitoring in comparison with classical strain gauges. Thus, both measurement devices have been tested under the same conditions in a full scale Accelerated Pavement Testing (APT) at LAVOC. This facility allows the user to control different parameters such as loading configuration and temperature and, as a mat...

  10. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high gradient acceleration and state of the art free electron lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 to 100 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps Nd:YAG laser and a 100 mJ, 10 ps CO2 laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high brightness electron beams. The AFT's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the High power laser will begin operation this year. 28 refs., 4 figs

  11. Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility photocathode gun and transport beamline

    We present an analysis of the electron beam emitted from a laser driven photocathode injector (Gun, operating at 2856 MHZ), through a Transport beamline, to the LINAC entrance for the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The beam parameters including beam energy, and emittance are calculated. Some of our results, are tabulated and the phase plots of the beam parameters, from Cathode, through the Transport line elements, to the LINAC entrance, are shown

  12. Linear Accelerator Test Facility at LNF Conceptual Design Report

    Valente, Paolo; Bolli, Bruno; Buonomo, Bruno; Cantarella, Sergio; Ceccarelli, Riccardo; Cecchinelli, Alberto; Cerafogli, Oreste; Clementi, Renato; Di Giulio, Claudio; Esposito, Adolfo; Frasciello, Oscar; Foggetta, Luca; Ghigo, Andrea; Incremona, Simona; Iungo, Franco; Mascio, Roberto; Martelli, Stefano; Piermarini, Graziano; Sabbatini, Lucia; Sardone, Franco; Sensolini, Giancarlo; Ricci, Ruggero; Rossi, Luis Antonio; Rotundo, Ugo; Stella, Angelo; Strabioli, Serena; Zarlenga, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Test beam and irradiation facilities are the key enabling infrastructures for research in high energy physics (HEP) and astro-particles. In the last 11 years the Beam-Test Facility (BTF) of the DA{\\Phi}NE accelerator complex in the Frascati laboratory has gained an important role in the European infrastructures devoted to the development and testing of particle detectors. At the same time the BTF operation has been largely shadowed, in terms of resources, by the running of the DA{\\Phi}NE electron-positron collider. The present proposal is aimed at improving the present performance of the facility from two different points of view: extending the range of application for the LINAC beam extracted to the BTF lines, in particular in the (in some sense opposite) directions of hosting fundamental physics and providing electron irradiation also for industrial users; extending the life of the LINAC beyond or independently from its use as injector of the DA{\\Phi}NE collider, as it is also a key element of the electron/...

  13. Status and Plans for an SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    Church, M; Nagaitsev, S

    2012-01-01

    A superconducting RF accelerator test facility is currently under construction at Fermilab. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, 40 MeV injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, and multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and performing beam experiments. With 3 cryomodules installed this facility will initially be capable of generating an 810 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. The facility can accommodate up to 6 cryomodules for a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. This facility will be used to test SRF cryomodules under high intensity beam conditions, RF power equipment, instrumentation, and LLRF and controls systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  14. Status and Plans for an SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-29

    A superconducting RF accelerator test facility is currently under construction at Fermilab. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, 40 MeV injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, and multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and performing beam experiments. With 3 cryomodules installed this facility will initially be capable of generating an 810 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. The facility can accommodate up to 6 cryomodules for a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. This facility will be used to test SRF cryomodules under high intensity beam conditions, RF power equipment, instrumentation, and LLRF and controls systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  15. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  16. Beam test of multi-bunch energy compensation system in the accelerator test facility at KEK

    A beam test of the multi-bunch energy compensation system (ECS) was performed using the ΔF method with the 2856±4.327 HMz accelerating structures in the accelerator test facility (ATF) at KEK. The 1.54 GeV S-band linac of the ATF was designed to accelerate a multi-bunch beam the consists of 20 bunches with 2.8 ns spacing. The multi-bunch beam with 2.0 x 1010 electrons/bunch has an energy deviation of about 8.5% at the end of the linac due to transient beam loading without ECS. The ATF linac is the injector of the ATF damping ring (DR), whose energy acceptance is ±0.5%. The beam loading compensation system is necessary in the ATF linac for the successful injection of multi-bunch into DR. The rf system of the linac consists of 8 regular rf units with the SLED system and 2 ECS rf units without the SLED system. The accelerating structures of the regular units are driven at 2856 MHz and the 2 ECS structures are operated with slightly different rf frequencies of 2856±4.327 MHz. In the beam test, we have succeeded in compressing the multi-bunch energy spread within the energy acceptance of the DR using ΔF ECS. The principle of the beam loading compensation system of KEK-ATF and the experimental results are described in this paper. (author)

  17. Operational status of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    Initial design parameters and early operational results of a 50 MeV high brightness electron linear accelerator are described. The system utilizes a radio frequency electron gun operating at a frequency of 2.856 GHz and a nominal output energy of 4.5 MeV followed by two, 2π/3 mode, disc loaded, traveling wave accelerating sections. The gun cathode is photo excited with short (6 psec) laser pulses giving design peak currents of a few hundred amperes. The system will be utilized to carry out infra-red FEL studies and investigation of new high gradient accelerating structures

  18. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    Leibfritz, J; Baffes, C M; Carlson, K; Chase, B; Church, M D; Harms, E R; Klebaner, A L; Kucera, M; Martinez, A; Nagaitsev, S; Nobrega, L E; Piot, P; Reid, J; Wendt, M; Wesseln, S J

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Acccelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beamlines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750-MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5-GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF a...

  19. X-band klystron modulator for the Accelerator Test Facility

    An X-band Klystron Modulator has been designed and constructed to drive two kinds of prototype X-band pulsed klystrons: (1) 30 MW klystron ( XB-50K) requiring a 450 kV beam voltage with a 0.5 μs flat top and (2) 120 MW klystron ( XB-72K) requiring a 550 kV beam voltage with a 0.5 μs flat top. The modulator generates 2.0 μs pulses with 37 kV voltage and 7,300 A peak current for the operation of the XB-72K. It is a conventional line-type modulator with a 6 section pulse forming network (PFN) which is resonantly charged and discharged by a thyratron switch at up to 200 pps. In order to reduce the size of the modulator, a special low inductance capacitors using a film coated thin Al-electrodes of 300 angstrom thickness has been developed for the PFN. Its output pulse voltage is stepped up to 15 times by a pulse transformer. The design, specifications and results of performance tests of the modulator are described in this paper

  20. Concept, implementation and commissioning of the automation system for the accelerator module test facility AMTF

    The European XFEL project launched on June 5, 2007 will require about 103 accelerator modules as a main part of the XFEL linear accelerator. All superconducting components constituting the accelerator module like cavities and magnets have to be tested before the assembly. For the tests of the individual cavities and the complete modules an XFEL Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF) has been erected at DESY. The process control system EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used to control and operate the cryogenic plant and all its subcomponents. A complementary component of EPICS is the Open Source software suit CSS (Control System Studio). CSS is an integrated engineering, maintenance and operating tool for EPICS. CSS enables local and remote operating and monitoring of the complete system and thus represents the human machine interface. More than 250 PROFIBUS nodes work at the accelerator module test facility. DESY installed an extensive diagnostic and condition monitoring system. With these diagnostic tools it is possible to examine the correct installation and configuration of all PROFIBUS nodes in real time. The condition monitoring system based on FDT/DTM technology shows the state of the PROFIBUS devices at a glance. This information can be used for preventive maintenance which is mandatory for continuous operation of the AMTF facility. The poster will describe all steps form engineering to implementation and commissioning

  1. Real time data acquisition system for the High Current Test Facility proton accelerator

    A real time data acquisition system was developed to monitor and control the High Current Test Facility Proton Accelerator. It is a PDP-8/E computer system with virtual memory capability that is fully interrupt driven and operates under a real-time, multi-tasking executive. The application package includes mode selection to automatically modify programs and optimize operation under varying conditions. (U.S.)

  2. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    This paper describes many of the nuclear physics heavy-ion accelerator facilities in the US and the research programs being conducted. The accelerators described are: Argonne National Laboratory--ATLAS; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) (Proposed); Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--Bevalac; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--88-Inch Cyclotron; Los Alamos National Laboratory--Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF); Massachusetts Institute of Technology--Bates Linear Accelerator Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center--Nuclear Physics Injector; Texas AandM University--Texas AandM Cyclotron; Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL); University of Washington--Tandem/Superconducting Booster; and Yale University--Tandem Van de Graaff

  3. Nuclear Physics accelerator facilities

    The Nuclear Physics program requires the existence and effective operation of large and complex accelerator facilities. These facilities provide the variety of projectile beams upon which virtually all experimental nuclear research depends. Their capability determine which experiments can be performed and which cannot. Seven existing accelerator facilities are operated by the Nuclear Physics program as national facilities. These are made available to all the Nation's scientists on the basis of scientific merit and technical feasibility of proposals. The national facilities are the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory; the Bates Linear Accelerator Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Bevalac at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory; the ATLAS facility at Argonne National Laboratory; the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Nuclear Physics Injector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) enables the SLAC facility to provide a limited amount of beam time for nuclear physics research on the same basis as the other national facilities. To complement the national facilities, the Nuclear Physics program supports on-campus accelerators at Duke University, Texas A and M University, the University of Washington, and Yale University. The facility at Duke University, called the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), is jointly staffed by Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina. These accelerators are operated primarily for the research use of the local university faculty, junior scientists, and graduate students

  4. Laserwire at the Accelerator Test Facility 2 with Sub-Micrometre Resolution

    Nevay, L. J.; Boogert, S.T.; Karataev, P.; Kruchinin, K.; Corner, L; Howell, D. F.; Walczak, R.; Aryshev, A.; Urakawa, J.; Terunuma, N.

    2014-01-01

    A laserwire transverse electron beam size measurement system has been developed and operated at the Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) at KEK. Special electron beam optics were developed to create an approximately 1 x 100 {\\mu}m (vertical x horizontal) electron beam at the laserwire location, which was profiled using a 150 mJ, 71 ps laser pulse with a wavelength of 532 nm. The precise characterisation of the laser propagation allows the non-Gaussian transverse profiles of the electron beam ca...

  5. SwissFEL injector conceptual design report. Accelerator test facility for SwissFEL

    This comprehensive report issued by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland takes a look at the design concepts behind the institute's SwissFEL X-ray Laser facility - in particular concerning the conceptual design of the injector system. The SwissFEL X-ray FEL project at PSI, involves the development of an injector complex that enables operation of a FEL system operating at 0.1 - 7 nm with permanent-magnet undulator technology and minimum beam energy. The injector pre-project was motivated by the challenging electron beam requirements necessary to drive the SwissFEL accelerator facility. The report takes a look at the mission of the test facility and its performance goals. The accelerator layout and the electron source are described, as are the low-level radio-frequency power systems and the synchronisation concept. The general strategy for beam diagnostics is introduced. Low energy electron beam diagnostics, the linear accelerator (Linac) and bunch compressor diagnostics are discussed, as are high-energy electron beam diagnostics. Wavelength selection for the laser system and UV pulse shaping are discussed. The laser room for the SwissFEL Injector and constructional concepts such as the girder system and alignment concepts involved are looked at. A further chapter deals with beam dynamics, simulated performance and injector optimisation. The facility's commissioning and operation program is examined, as are operating regimes, software applications and data storage. The control system structure and architecture is discussed and special subsystems are described. Radiation safety, protection systems and shielding calculations are presented and the lateral shielding of the silo roof examined

  6. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    Brief descriptions are given of DOE and Nuclear Physics program operated and sponsored accelerator facilities. Specific facilities covered are the Argonne Tandem/Linac Accelerator System, the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the proposed Continuous Beam Accelerator at Newport News, Virginia, the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory at Duke University, the Bevalac and the SuperHILAC at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Bates Linear Accelerator Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Nuclear Physics Injector at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the Texas A and M Cyclotrons, the Tandem/Superconducting Booster Accelerator at the University of Washington and the Tandem Van de Graaff at the A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory of Yale University. Included are acquisition cost, research programs, program accomplishments, future directions, and operating parameters of each facility

  7. Field Work Proposal: PUBLIC OUTREACH EVENT FOR ACCELERATOR STEWARDSHIP TEST FACILITY PILOT PROGRAM

    Hutton, Andrew [TJNAF; Areti, Hari [TJNAF

    2015-03-05

    Jefferson Lab’s outreach efforts towards the goals of Accelerator Stewardship Test Facility Pilot Program consist of the lab’s efforts in three venues. The first venue, at the end of March is to meet with the members of Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center (VTCRC) (http://www.vtcrc.com/tenant-directory/) in Blacksburg, Virginia. Of the nearly 160 members, we expect that many engineering companies (including mechanical, electrical, bio, software) will be present. To this group, we will describe the capabilities of Jefferson Lab’s accelerator infrastructure. The description will include not only the facilities but also the intellectual expertise. No funding is requested for this effort. The second venue is to reach the industrial exhibitors at the 6th International Particle Accelerator Conference (IPAC’15). Jefferson Lab will host a booth at the conference to reach out to the >75 industrial exhibitors (https://www.jlab.org/conferences/ipac2015/SponsorsExhibitors.php) who represent a wide range of technologies. A number of these industries could benefit if they can access Jefferson Lab’s accelerator infrastructure. In addition to the booth, where written material will be available, we plan to arrange a session A/V presentation to the industry exhibitors. The booth will be hosted by Jefferson Lab’s Public Relations staff, assisted on a rotating basis by the lab’s scientists and engineers. The budget with IPAC’15 designations represents the request for funds for this effort. The third venue is the gathering of Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) university presidents. Here we plan to reach the research departments of the universities who can benefit by availing themselves to the infrastructure (material sciences, engineering, medical schools, material sciences, to name a few). Funding is requested to allow for attendance at the SURA Board Meeting. We are coordinating with DOE regarding these costs to raise the projected conference

  8. Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    Kim, Y I; Aryshev, A; Boogert, S T; Boorman, G; Frisch, J; Heo, A; Honda, Y; Hwang, W H; Huang, J Y; Kim, E -S; Kim, S H; Lyapin, A; Naito, T; May, J; McCormick, D; Mellor, R E; Molloy, S; Nelson, J; Park, S J; Park, Y J; Ross, M; Shin, S; Swinson, C; Smith, T; Terunuma, N; Tauchi, T; Urakawa, J; White, G R

    2013-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM) system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1 m for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

  9. Extremely low vertical-emittance beam in accelerator-test facility at KEK

    Electron beams with the lowest, normalized transverse emittance recorded so far were produced and confirmed in single-bunch-mode operation of the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK. We established a tuning method of the damping rings which achieves a small vertical dispersion and small x-y orbit coupling. The vertical emittance was less than 1 percent of the horizontal emittance. At the zero-intensity limit, the vertical normalized emittance was less than 2.8 x 10-8 rad m at beam energy 1.3 GeV. At high intensity, strong effects of intrabeam scattering were observed, which had been expected in view of the extremely high particle density due to the small transverse emittance

  10. Status of the visible Free-Electron Laser at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    The 500 nm Free-Electron Laser (ATF) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory is reviewed. We present an overview of the ATF, a high-brightness, 50-MeV, electron accelerator and laser complex which is a users' facility for accelerator and beam physics. A number of laser acceleration and FEL experiments are under construction at the ATF. The visible FEL experiment is based on a novel superferric 8.8 mm period undulator. The electron beam parameters, the undulator, the optical resonator, optical and electron beam diagnostics are discussed. The operational status of the experiment is presented. 22 refs., 7 figs

  11. A modified feed-forward control system at the Accelerator Test Facility

    A modified feed-forward control system has been operated at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility to control the phase and amplitude of two high power klystron rf systems used to power a photocathode rf gun and a traveling wave electron linac. The changes to the control algorithm include an improved handling of cross coupling between the amplitude and the phase channels, an improved calibration routine that allows for changes in the matrix elements due to the variable base-line and improved filtering. The modifications to the software include modularity, portability, and user-friendliness. Improvements to the hardware include a linearized phase and amplitude controller with dc biasing for an improved dynamic range. The feed-forward system can handle nonlinear and noninstantaneous systems. With simultaneous regulation of two channels, the phase and the amplitude fluctuations over a time span of more than 3 μS were reduced to less than ±0.2 degree and ±0.2%, from the initial ±2.7 degree and ±1.8%, respectively. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  12. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to...

  13. Lead-bismuth spallation target design of the accelerator-driven test facility (ADTF)

    A design methodology for the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) spallation target has been developed and applied for the accelerator-driven test facility (ADTF) target. This methodology includes the target interface with the subcritical multiplier (SCM) of the ADTF and the different engineering aspects of the target design, physics, heat-transfer, hydraulics, structural, radiological, and safety analyses. Several design constrains were defined and utilised for the target design process to satisfy different engineering requirements and to minimise the time and the cost of the design development. Interface requirements with the subcritical multiplier were defined based on target performance parameters and material damage issues to enhance the lifetime of the target structure. Different structural materials were considered to define the most promising candidate based on the current database including radiation effects. The developed target design has a coaxial geometrical configuration to minimise the target footprint and it is installed vertically along the SCM axis. LBE is the target material and the target coolant with ferritic steel (HT-9 Alloy) structural material. The proton beam has 8.33 mA current uniformly distributed and 8.14 cm beam radius resulting in a current density of 40 μA/cm2. The beam power is 5 MW and the proton energy is 600 MeV. The beam tube has 10 cm radius to accommodate the halo current. A hemi-spherical geometry is used for the target window, which is connected to the beam tube. The beam tube is enclosed inside two coaxial tubes to provide inlet and outlet manifolds for the LBE coolant. The inlet and the outlet coolant manifolds and the proton beam are entered from the top above the SCM. The paper describes the design criteria, engineering constraints, and the developed target design for the ADTF. (authors)

  14. Use of the TACL [Thaumaturgic Automated Control Logic] system at CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] for control of the Cryogenic Test Facility

    A logic-based control software system, called Thaumaturgic Automated Control Logic (TACL), is under development at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA. The first version of the software was placed in service in November, 1987 for control of cryogenics during the first superconducting RF cavity tests at CEBAF. In August, 1988 the control system was installed at the Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) at CEBAF. CTF generated liquid helium in September, 1988 and is now in full operation for the current round of cavity tests. TACL is providing a powerful and flexible controls environment for the operation of CTF. 3 refs

  15. Electron Accelerator Facilities

    Lecture presents main aspects of progress in development of industrial accelerators: adaptation of accelerators primary built for scientific experiments, electron energy and beam power increase in certain accelerator constructions, computer control system managing accelerator start-up, routine operation and technological process, maintenance (diagnostics), accelerator technology perfection (electrical efficiency, operation cost), compact and more efficient accelerator constructions, reliability improvement according to industrial standards, accelerators for MW power levels and accelerators tailored for specific use

  16. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  17. Electromagnetic propulsion test facility

    Gooder, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    A test facility for the exploration of electromagnetic propulsion concept is described. The facility is designed to accommodate electromagnetic rail accelerators of various lengths (1 to 10 meters) and to provide accelerating energies of up to 240 kiloJoules. This accelerating energy is supplied as a current pulse of hundreds of kiloAmps lasting as long as 1 millisecond. The design, installation, and operating characteristics of the pulsed energy system are discussed. The test chamber and its operation at pressures down to 1300 Pascals (10 mm of mercury) are described. Some aspects of safety (interlocking, personnel protection, and operating procedures) are included.

  18. Design of CEBAF's [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] rf separator and results of cold tests

    The design of the CEBAF accelerator system is based upon a multipass racetrack configuration, the straight sections of which will utilize 1497-MHz superconducting linac sections with independent magnetic transport at the end of each linac segment. Room temperature SW rf separators operating at a frequency of 998 MHz will be used in each independent transport channel at one end of the racetrack to extract a portion of the recirculating current. With the frequency chosen and appropriate phasing, three independent beams of correlated energy may be extracted for use in the three experimental areas. The design of the rf separators, abased on an alternating periodic structure (APS), will be described and some preliminary prototype cold test results will be given. 11 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Joseph Grames, Douglas Higinbotham, Hugh Montgomery

    2010-09-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

  20. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Fifteen different experiments were run during these 12 months, approximately the same as the previous two years. Brief summaries of each experiment are included. Accelerator usage is summarized and development activities are discussed. 7 refs., 4 tabs

  1. THE MECHANICAL AND SHIELDING DESIGN OF A PORTABLE SPECTROMETER AND BEAM DUMP ASSEMBLY AT BNLS ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY

    A portable assembly containing a vertical-bend dipole magnet has been designed and installed immediately down-beam of the Compton electron-laser interaction chamber on beamline 1 of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The water-cooled magnet designed with field strength of up to 0.7 Tesla will be used as a spectrometer in the Thompson scattering and vacuum acceleration experiments, where field-dependent electron scattering, beam focusing and energy spread will be analyzed. This magnet will deflect the ATF's 60 MeV electron-beam 90o downward, as a vertical beam dump for the Compton scattering experiment. The dipole magnet assembly is portable, and can be relocated to other beamlines at the ATF or other accelerator facilities to be used as a spectrometer or a beam dump. The mechanical and shielding calculations are presented in this paper. The structural rigidity and stability of the assembly were studied. A square lead shield surrounding the assembly's Faraday Cup was designed to attenuate the radiation emerging from the 1 inch-copper beam stop. All photons produced were assumed to be sufficiently energetic to generate photoneutrons. A safety evaluation of groundwater tritium contamination due to the thermal neutron capturing by the deuterium in water was performed, using updated Monte Carlo neutron-photon coupled transport code (MCNP). High-energy neutron spallation, which is a potential source to directly generate radioactive tritium and sodium-22 in soil, was conservatively assessed in verifying personal and environmental safety

  2. Sequencer for n accelerator facilities

    Operation of machines like telescopes and accelerators requires the efficient and reproducible execution of many different types of procedures. These machines consist of different sub-systems whose operation entail the execution of many tasks with strict compulsion on the order and duration of the execution. To improve operational reliability and efficiency, automated execution of procedures is required. Creation of a single robust sequencing application permits the streamlining of this process and offers many benefits. At the same time, a drive for greater efficiency, a tendency for more complex accelerator operations and a need to reduce the risk of 'operator error' have rendered these tools essential. This paper presents the design of Sequencer tool for Indian Accelerator facility. It sites an examples of such tools used at different international accelerator facilities. The features considered desirable in a good sequencer and a description of the tools created to aid in sequence construction and diagnosis are discussed. (author)

  3. Optimization of parameters for the inline-injection system at Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    Parsa, Z. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Ko, S.K. [Ulsan Univ. (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-01

    We present some of our parameter optimization results utilizing code PARMLEA, for the ATF Inline-Injection System. The new solenoid-Gun-Solenoid -- Drift-Linac Scheme would improve the beam quality needed for FEL and other experiments at ATF as compared to the beam quality of the original design injection system. To optimize the gain in the beam quality we have considered various parameters including the accelerating field gradient on the photoathode, the Solenoid field strengths, separation between the gun and entrance to the linac as well as the (type size) initial charge distributions. The effect of the changes in the parameters on the beam emittance is also given.

  4. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    The Department of Energy's Nuclear Physics program is a comprehensive program of interdependent experimental and theoretical investigation of atomic nuclei. Long range goals are an understanding of the interactions, properties, and structures of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter at the most elementary level possible and an understanding of the fundamental forces of nature by using nuclei as a proving ground. Basic ingredients of the program are talented and imaginative scientists and a diversity of facilities to provide the variety of probes, instruments, and computational equipment needed for modern nuclear research. Approximately 80% of the total Federal support of basic nuclear research is provided through the Nuclear Physics program; almost all of the remaining 20% is provided by the National Science Foundation. Thus, the Department of Energy (DOE) has a unique responsibility for this important area of basic science and its role in high technology. Experimental and theoretical investigations are leading us to conclude that a new level of understanding of atomic nuclei is achievable. This optimism arises from evidence that: (1) the mesons, protons, and neutrons which are inside nuclei are themselves composed of quarks and gluons and (2) quantum chromodynamics can be developed into a theory which both describes correctly the interaction among quarks and gluons and is also an exact theory of the strong nuclear force. These concepts are important drivers of the Nuclear Physics program

  5. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Brief summaries of research experiments are included. Accelerator usage is summarized and development activities are discussed. 8 refs., 8 tabs

  6. Radiation control in accelerator facilities

    In view of radiation control, particle accelerator facilities have posed various problems involving radiation (mainly neutron) leakage, occupational exposure, environmental aspects in the surrounding area, and waste management. The intent of the workshop was to discuss these problems. This report contains nine topics that were presented and discussed: (1) Radiation safety system for the AVF cyclotron and the cyclotron cascade project at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University; (2) Calculation for the shielding design in the RIKEN Ring Cyclotron Facility; (3) Shielding design method for high-energy protons in the National Laboratory for High-energy Physics (KEK); (4) Radiation safety programme for the uses of medical accelerators in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences; (5) Development of the new stack air monitor; (6) Environmental radiation monitoring in the vicinity of the intense 14 Mev neutron source facility; (7) Radiation control around the KEK-proton synchroton; (8) Radiation safety control system for the RIKEN Ring Cyclotron; (9) Evaluation of radioactivity and skyshine induced by neutron production in an accelerator facility. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described.

  8. Accelerated cyclic corrosion tests

    Prošek T.

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated corrosion testing is indispensable for material selection, quality control and both initial and residual life time prediction for bare and painted metallic, polymeric, adhesive and other materials in atmospheric exposure conditions. The best known Neutral Salt Spray (NSS) test provides unrealistic conditions and poor correlation to exposures in atmosphere. Modern cyclic accelerated corrosion tests include intermittent salt spray, wet and dry phases and eventually other technical p...

  9. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities of the world

    this report is intended to provide a convenient summary of the world's major nuclear physics accelerator facility with emphasis on those facilities supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Previous editions of this report have contained only DOE facilities. However, as the extent of global collaborations in nuclear physics grows, gathering summary information on the world's nuclear physics accelerator facilities in one place is useful. Therefore, the present report adds facilities operated by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as well as the leading foreign facilities, with emphasis on foreign facilities that have significant outside user programs. The principal motivation for building and operating these facilities is, of course, basic research in nuclear physics. The scientific objectives for this research were recently reviewed by the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee, who developed a long range plan, Nuclei, Nucleons, and Quarks -- Nuclear Science in the 1990's. Their report begins as follows: The central thrust of nuclear science is the study of strongly interacting matter and of the forces that govern its structure and dynamics; this agenda ranges from large- scale collective nuclear behavior through the motions of individual nucleons and mesons, atomic nuclei, to the underlying distribution of quarks and gluons. It extends to conditions at the extremes of temperature and density which are of significance to astrophysics and cosmology and are conducive to the creation of new forms of strongly interacting matter; and another important focus is on the study of the electroweak force, which plays an important role in nuclear stability, and on precision tests of fundamental interactions. The present report provides brief descriptions of the accelerator facilities available for carrying out this agenda and their research programs

  10. CLIC Test Facility 3

    Kossyvakis, I; Faus-golfe, A

    2007-01-01

    The design of CLIC is based on a two-beam scheme, where short pulses of high power 30 GHz RF are extracted from a drive beam running parallel to the main beam. The 3rd generation CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) will demonstrate the generation of the drive beam with the appropriate time structure, the extraction of 30 GHz RF power from this beam, as well as acceleration of a probe beam with 30 GHz RF cavities. The project makes maximum use of existing equipment and infrastructure of the LPI complex, which became available after the closure of LEP.

  11. A nanosecond pulsed accelerator facility

    The operation and performance of a 3-MeV pulsed electrostatic generator producing 1-ns (10-9 s) pulses is described. The system employs terminal pulsing and post-acceleration time-compression to achieve short pulses and high average current. The specifications for this system were based on the following considerations. A 10-μA average beam current represents a reasonable limit based on the ability of a target to dissipate beam power, the 1-ns pulse-length was consistent with other factors such as detector response, energy homogeneity, etc. which determine over-all time resolution, and a repetition rate of 1 MHz/s gives a duty factor consistent with the current capabilities of existing accelerator ion sources. The system consists of a terminal pulsing component which produces pulses of 10 ns in duration by sweeping a beam over an aperture located at the entrance to an accelerator tube. An average output of a current of 10 μA requires a source capable of producing 1 mA of atomic ions. After acceleration this pulse is compressed to 1 ns by the scheme suggested by Mobley. This involves sweeping the beam with proper synchronization across the aperture of a 90o doubly-focusing deflection magnet so that the early portion of the pulse travels through a longer trajectory thani the later portions, thus achieving time compression when the beam is brought to a focus on a suitable target. The radius of beam curvature in the compression magnet is 30 in and the over-all beam divergence at the target is 5o. The choice of these parameters and the effect of the deflection scheme in the beam-energy homogeneity will be discussed. Using existing nanosecond detector techniques, this system has produced over-all system resolutions of 1 ns full-width at half-maximum for both gamma rays and neutrons. It is not yet known what component or components of the system determine the limits on the time resolution of the system. As a facility for investigating neutron inelastic scattering and

  12. Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility (formerly LOASIS) develops advanced accelerators and radiation sources. High gradient (1-100 GV/m) laser-plasma...

  13. Test accelerator for linear collider

    KEK has proposed to build Test Accelerator Facility (TAF) capable of producing a 2.5 GeV electron beam for the purpose of stimulating R ampersand D for linear collider in TeV region. The TAF consists of a 1.5 GeV S-band linear accelerator, 1.5 GeV damping ring and 1.0 GeV X-band linear accelerator. The TAF project will be carried forward in three phases. Through Phase-I and Phase-II, the S-band and X-band linacs will be constructed, and in Phase-III, the damping ring will be completed. The construction of TAF Phase-I has started, and the 0.2 GeV S-band injector linac has been almost completed. The Phase-I linac is composed of a 240 keV electron gun, subharmonic bunchers, prebunchers and traveling buncher followed by high-gradient accelerating structures. The SLAC 5045 klystrons are driven at 450 kV in order to obtain the rf-power of 100 MW in a 1 μs pulse duration. The rf-power from a pair of klystrons are combined into an accelerating structure. The accelerating gradient up to 100 MeV/m will be obtained in a 0.6 m long structure. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  14. GPS Test Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Global Positioning System (GPS) Test Facility Instrumentation Suite (GPSIS) provides great flexibility in testing receivers by providing operational control of...

  15. Textiles Performance Testing Facilities

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textiles Performance Testing Facilities has the capabilities to perform all physical wet and dry performance testing, and visual and instrumental color analysis...

  16. CESR Test Accelerator

    Rubin, David L

    2013-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) was reconfigured in 2008 as a test accelerator to investigate the physics of ultra-low emittance damping rings. During the approximately 40 days/year available for dedicated operation as a test accelerator, specialized instrumentation is used to measure growth and mitigation of the electron cloud, emittance growth due to electron cloud, intra-beam scattering, and ions, and single and multi-bunch instabilities generated by collective effects. The flexibility of the CESR guide field optics and the integration of accelerator modeling codes with the control system have made possible an extraordinary range of experiments. Findings at CesrTA with respect to electron cloud effects, emittance tuning techniques, and beam instrumentation for measuring electron cloud, beam sizes, and beam positions are the basis for much of the design of the ILC damping rings as documented in the ILC-Technical Design Report. The program has allowed the Cornell group to cultivate the kind of talen...

  17. Recent US target-physics-related research in heavy-ion inertial fusion: simulations for tamped targets and for disk experiments in accelerator test facilities

    Calculations suggest that experiments relating to disk heating, as well as beam deposition, focusing and transport can be performed within the context of current design proposals for accelerator test-facilities. Since the test-facilities have lower ion kinetic energy and beam pulse power as compared to reactor drivers, we achieve high-beam intensities at the focal spot by using short focal distance and properly designed beam optics. In this regard, the low beam emittance of suggested multi-beam designs are very useful. Possibly even higher focal spot brightness could be obtained by plasma lenses which involve external fields on the beam which is stripped to a higher charge state by passing through a plasma cell. Preliminary results suggest that intensities approx. 1013 - 1014 W/cm2 are achievable. Given these intensities, deposition experiments with heating of disks to greater than a million degrees Kelvin (100 eV) are expected

  18. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to: Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  19. Mark 1 Test Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Mark I Test Facility is a state-of-the-art space environment simulation test chamber for full-scale space systems testing. A $1.5M dollar upgrade in fiscal year...

  20. Structural Test Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Provides a wide variety of testing equipment, fixtures and facilities to perform both unique aviation component testing as well as common types of materials testing...

  1. Radiation safety training for accelerator facilities

    In November 1992, a working group was formed within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) accelerator facilities to develop a generic safety training program to meet the basic requirements for individuals working in accelerator facilities. This training, by necessity, includes sections for inserting facility-specific information. The resulting course materials were issued by DOE as a handbook under its technical standards in 1996. Because experimenters may be at a facility for only a short time and often at odd times during the day, the working group felt that computer-based training would be useful. To that end, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) together have developed a computer-based safety training program for accelerator facilities. This interactive course not only enables trainees to receive facility- specific information, but time the training to their schedule and tailor it to their level of expertise

  2. Pavement Testing Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Comprehensive Environmental and Structural Analyses The ERDC Pavement Testing Facility, located on the ERDC Vicksburg campus, was originally constructed to provide...

  3. Testing Gravity on Accelerators

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2016-01-01

    Weak equivalence principle (WEP) is one of the cornerstones of the modern theories of gravity, stating that the trajectory of a freely falling test body is independent of its internal structure and composition. Even though WEP is known to be valid for the normal matter with a high precision, it has never been experimentally confirmed for relativistic matter and antimatter. We make an attempt to constrain possible deviations from WEP utilizing the modern accelerator technologies. We analyze the (absence of) vacuum Cherenkov radiation, photon decay, anomalous synchrotron losses and the Compton spectra to put limits on the isotropic Lorentz violation and further convert them to the constraints on the difference between the gravitational and inertial masses of the relativistic electrons/positrons. Our main result is the 0.1% limit on the mentioned difference.

  4. Ballistic Test Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Ballistic Test Facility is comprised of two outdoor and one indoor test ranges, which are all instrumented for data acquisition and analysis. Full-size aircraft...

  5. Environmental Test Facility (ETF)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Test Facility (ETF) provides non-isolated shock testing for stand-alone equipment and full size cabinets under MIL-S-901D specifications. The ETF...

  6. Laser solenoid radiation test facility

    The Laser Solenoid Radiation Test Facility (LSRTF) is a concept based on a pulsed plasma source of neutrons, alpha particles, and bremsstrahlung and is characterized by a moderate radiation flux and a large test sample volume. The LSRTF is intermediate in its size, technology, and availability (1985-1990), and consequently has potential for bridging the gap between small present day accelerator-target sources and a large pulsed plasma engineering research facility in the 1990's. It also has important potential as a compact engineering test reactor for realistic operational testing of integrated subsystems for a linear fusion reactor. Its design, performance and operating characteristics are discussed in the present paper. The necessary development programs to bring such a facility into timely operation are also described. (Auth.)

  7. IFMIF accelerator facility RAMI analyses in the engineering design phase

    Bargalló Font, Enric

    2014-01-01

    The planned International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has the mission to test and qualify materials for future fusion reactors. IFMIF will employ the deuteron-lithium stripping reaction to irradiate the test samples with a high-energy neutron flux. IFMIF will consist mainly of two linear deuteron accelerators, a liquid lithium loop and a test cell. Accelerated deuterons will collide with the lithium producing a high-energy neutron flux that will irradiate the material sample...

  8. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC_LAB test facility

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Dabagov, S.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Marocchino, A.; Paroli, B.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A. R.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC_LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation.

  9. Wind Tunnel Testing Facilities

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NASA Ames Research Center is pleased to offer the services of our premier wind tunnel facilities that have a broad range of proven testing capabilities to customers...

  10. Toroid magnet test facility

    2002-01-01

    Because of its exceptional size, it was not feasible to assemble and test the Barrel Toroid - made of eight coils - as an integrated toroid on the surface, prior to its final installation underground in LHC interaction point 1. It was therefore decided to test these eight coils individually in a dedicated test facility.

  11. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    On February 13, 1987, construction started on the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility - a 4-GeV, 200-μA, continuous beam, electron accelerator facility designed for nuclear physics research. The machine has a racetrack configuration with two antiparallel, 500-MeV, superconducting linac segments connected by beam lines to allow four passes of recirculation. The accelerating structure consists of 1500-MHz, five-cell niobium cavities developed at Cornell University. A liquid helium cryogenic system cools the cavities to an operating temperature of 2 K. Beam extraction after any three of the four passes allows simultaneous delivery of up to three beams of independently variable currents and different, but correlated, energies to the three experimental areas. Beam breakup thresholds exceed the design current by nearly two orders of magnitude. Project completion and the start of physics operations are scheduled for 1993. The total estimated cost is $255 million

  12. Present status and first results of the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Bambade, P; Amann, J; Angal-Kalinin, D; Apsimon, R; Araki, S; Aryshev, A; Bai, S; Bellomo, P; Bett, D; Blair, G; Bolzon, B; Boogert, S; Boorman, G; Burrows, P N; Christian, G; Coe, P; Constance, B; Delahaye, J P; Deacon, L; Elsen, E; Faus-Golfe, A; Fukuda, M; Gao, J; Geffroy, N; Gianfelice-Wendt, E; Guler, H; Hayano, H; Heo, A Y; Honda, Y; Huang, J Y; Hwang, W H; Iwashita, Y; Jeremie, A; Jones, J; Kamiya, Y; Karataev, P; Kim, E S; Kim, H S; Kim, S H; Komamiya, S; Kubo, K; Kume, T; Kuroda, S; Lam, B; Lyapin, A; Masuzawa, M; McCormick, D; Molloy, S; Naito, T; Nakamura, T; Nelson, J; Okamoto, D; Okugi, T; Oroku, M; Park, Y J; Parker, B; Paterson, E; Perry, C; Pivi, M; Raubenheimer, T; Renier, Y; Resta-Lopez, J; Rimbault, C; Ross, M; Sanuki, T; Scarfe, A; Schulte, D; Seryi, A; Spencer, C; Suehara, T; Sugahara, R; Swinson, C; Takahashi, T; Tauchi, T; Terunuma, N; Tomas, R; Urakawa, J; Urner, D; Verderi, M; Wang, M H; Warden, M; Wendt, M; White, G; Wittmer, W; Wolski, A; Woodley, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamanaka, T; Yan, Y; Yoda, H; Yokoya, K; Zhou, F; Zimmermann, F

    2010-01-01

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  13. Present Status And First Results of the Final Focus Beam Line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Bambade, P.; /Orsay /KEK, Tsukuba; Alabau Pons, M.; /Valencia U., IFIC; Amann, J.; /SLAC; Angal-Kalinin, D.; /Daresbury; Apsimon, R.; /Oxford U., JAI; Araki, S.; Aryshev, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Bai, S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Bellomo, P.; /SLAC; Bett, D.; /Oxford U., JAI; Blair, G.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Bolzon, B.; /Savoie U.; Boogert, S.; Boorman, G.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Burrows, P.N.; Christian, G.; Coe, P.; Constance, B.; /Oxford U., JAI; Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; /CERN; Deacon, L.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Elsen, E.; /DESY /Valencia U., IFIC /KEK, Tsukuba /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Savoie U. /Fermilab /Ecole Polytechnique /KEK, Tsukuba /Kyungpook Natl. U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Kyoto U., Inst. Chem. Res. /Savoie U. /Daresbury /Tokyo U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /University Coll. London /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /Royal Holloway, U. of London /KEK, Tsukuba /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Tohoku U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Tokyo U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Brookhaven /SLAC /Oxford U., JAI /SLAC /Orsay /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Orsay /Fermilab /Tohoku U. /Manchester U. /CERN /SLAC /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Hiroshima U. /KEK, Tsukuba /CERN /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Ecole Polytechnique /SLAC /Oxford U., JAI /Fermilab /SLAC /Liverpool U. /SLAC /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /CERN

    2011-11-11

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  14. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility in the United States of its type. This unique facility provides experimental engineering...

  15. In vacuum diamond sensor scanner for beam halo measurements in the beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Liu, Shan; Cornebise, Patrick; Faus-Golfe, Angeles; Fuster-Martínez, Nuria; Griesmayer, Erich; Guler, Hayg; Kubytskyi, Viacheslav; Sylvia, Christophe; Toshiaki, Tauchi; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Bambade, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of beam halo transverse distributions is important for the understanding of beam losses and the control of backgrounds in Future Linear Colliders (FLC). A novel in vacuum diamond sensor (DSv) scanner with four strips has been designed and developed for the investigation of the beam halo transverse distributions and also for the diagnostics of Compton recoil electrons after the interaction point (IP) of ATF2, a low energy (1.3 GeV) prototype of the final focus system for the ILC and CLIC linear collider projects. Using the DSv, a dynamic range of $\\sim10^6$ has been successfully demonstrated and confirmed for the first time by simultaneous beam core ($\\sim10^9$ electrons) and beam halo ($\\sim10^3$ electrons) measurements at ATF2. This report presents the characterization, performance studies and tests of the diamond sensors using an $\\alpha$ source as well as using the electron beams at PHIL, a low energy ($< 10$ MeV) photo-injector at LAL, and at ATF2. First beam halo measurement results ...

  16. Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    On October 1, 1977 work began at LLL on the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), an advanced experimental fusion device. Scheduled for operation in late 1981, MFTF is designed as an intermediate step between present mirror machines, such as 2XIIB, and an experimental fusion reactor. This design incorporates improved technology and a better theoretical understanding of how neutral beam injection, plasma guns, and gas injection into the plasma region compensate for cooling and particle losses. With the new facility, we expect to achieve a confinement factor (n tau) of 1012 particles . sm/cm3--a tenfold increase over 2XIIB n tau values--and to increase plasma temperature to over 500 million K. The following article describes this new facility and reports on progress in some of the R and D projects that are providing the technological base for its construction

  17. Environmental test facilities

    This paper discusses environmental test facilities which are used to simulate an environment or combination of environments under laboratory controlled conditions that duplicate or exaggerate the effects found in actual service. They assist the engineer and scientist in exploring the effects of equipment and in developing equipment for resistance to the many environmental forces. The acceptance of and demand for environmental simulation facilities result form the following factors: parallel and reproducible tests can be made; equipment being tested can usually be observed and analyzed during testing; and supporting equipment requirements are reduced to a minimum. Field testing and product development costs are reduced, lead time required for completion of product development is shortened, and most desirable reliability features can be incorporated in the original manufacture of the product. Environmental equipment is used not only to determine the performance of mechanical and electrical equipment, but for certain tests on personnel as well. Personnel testing includes: checking protective equipment and clothing; altitude and space procedures indoctrination; and studying physiological and psychological effects on the human body and mind. Environmental testing is usually divided into two general classifications-climatic and dynamic

  18. Improving the energy efficiency of accelerator facilities

    Seidel, M.; E., Jensen; R., Gehring; J., Stadlmann; P., Spiller; Parker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    New particle accelerator based research facilities tend to be much more productive, but often in coincidence with higher energy consumption. The total energy consumption of mankind is steeply rising and this is mainly caused by quickly developing countries. Some European countries decided to terminate nuclear power generation and to switch to sustainable energy production. Also the CO2 problem gives rise to new approaches for energy production and in all strategies the efficiency of utilizati...

  19. Future accelerators and experimental facilities at GSI

    During the last years GSI developed plans for future accelerators and experimental facilities with the intention to extend heavy ion research in a wide scope to higher energies and into new fields of research using novel techniques for acceleration, accumulation, storage and phase space density increase of heavy ion beams up to 238U. The prime goals of this development plan using as a first step a synchrotron acceleration ring connected with an accumulator-, storage-, cooling- and experimental ring are the following: 1. Provide completely stripped heavy ion beams up to U92+ with the highest possible phase space densities using various cooling techniques in a storage ring. 2. Provide radioactive heavy ion beams by accumulation, storage and cooling of fragmentation or fission products from beams of the synchrotron. 3. Provide facilities for internal target experiments using simultaneously cooled circulating beams. 4. Provide two merging beams in the storage ring with well defineable collision energies up to the Coulomb barrier of the heaviest ions like U92+ in order to study atomic collision processes in high Coulomb fields with both nuclei highly ionized. 5. Provide a beam of heavy ions up to U92+ with best phase space density for further acceleration and collisions in superconducting collider rings at very high c.m. energies (> 20 GeV/u) and as high as possible luminosities. (orig.)

  20. SINP MSU accelerator facility and applied research

    Full text: SINP accelerator facility includes 120 cm cyclotron, electrostatic generator with the upper voltage 3.0 MeV, electrostatic generator with the upper voltage 2.5 MeV, Cocroft -Walton generator with the upper voltage 500 keV, 150 keV accelerator for solid microparticles. A new generation of electron beam accelerators has been developed during the last decade. The SINP accelerator facility will be shortly described in the report. A wide range of basic research in nuclear and atomic physics, physics of ion-beam interactions with condensed matter is currently carried out. SINP activity in the applied research is concentrated in the following areas of materials science: - Materials diagnostics with the Rutherford backscattering techniques (RBS) and channeling of ions (RBS/C). A large number of surface ad-layers and multilayer systems for advanced micro- and nano-electronic technology have been investigated. A selected series of examples will be illustrated. - Concentration depth profiles of hydrogen by the elastic recoils detection techniques (ERD). Primarily, the hydrogen depth profiles in perspective materials for thermonuclear reactors have been investigated. - Lattice site locations of hydrogen by a combination of ERD and channeling techniques. This is a new technique which was successfully applied for investigation of hydrogen and hydrogen-defect complexes in silicon for the smart-cut technology. - Light element diagnostics by RBS and nuclear backscattering techniques (NBS). The technique is illustrated by applications for nitrogen concentration profiling in steels. Nitrogen take-up and release, nitrides precipitate formation will be illustrated. - New medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) facility and applications. Ultra-high vacuum and superior energy resolution electrostatic toroidal analyzer is designed to be applied for characterization of composition and structure of several upper atomic layers of materials

  1. Accelerated Testing Validation

    Mukundan, Rangachary; James, Greg; Davey, John; Langlois, David; Torraco, Dennis; Yoon, Wonseok; Weber, Adam Z; Borup, Rodney L.

    2011-07-01

    The DOE Fuel Cell technical team recommended ASTs were performed on 2 different MEAs (designated P5 and HD6) from Ballard Power Systems. These MEAs were also incorporated into stacks and operated in fuel cell bus modules that were either operated in the field (three P5 buses) in Hamburg, or on an Orange county transit authority drive cycle in the laboratory (HD6 bus module). Qualitative agreement was found in the degradation mechanisms and rates observed in the AST and in the field. The HD6 based MEAs exhibited lower voltage degradation rates (due to catalyst corrosion) and slower membrane degradation rates in the field as reflected by their superior performance in the high potential hold and open-circuit potential AST tests. The quantitative correlation of the degradation rates will have to take into account the various stressors in the field including temperature, relative humidity, start/stops and voltage cycles.

  2. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes >1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa (“displacement-per-atom”, the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  3. Universal Test Facility

    Laughery, Mike

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  4. Beam Physics of Integrable Optics Test Accelerator at Fermilab

    Nagaitsev, S.; Valishev, A.; Danilov, V. V.; Shatilov, D. N.

    2013-01-01

    Fermilab's Integrable Optics Test Accelerator is an electron storage ring designed for testing advanced accelerator physics concepts, including implementation of nonlinear integrable beam optics and experiments on optical stochastic cooling. The machine is currently under construction at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator facility. In this report we present the goals and the current status of the project, and describe the details of machine design. In particular, we concentrate on ...

  5. Accelerator Design Concept for Future Neutrino Facilities

    ISS Accelerator Working Group; Zisman, Michael S; Berg, J. S.; Blondel, A.; Brooks, S.; Campagne, J.-E.; Caspar, D.; Cevata, C.; Chimenti, P.; Cobb, J.; Dracos, M.; Edgecock, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Fernow, R.; Filthaut, F.; Gallardo, J.; Garoby, R.; Geer, S.; Gerigk, F.; Hanson, G.; Johnson, R.; Johnstone, C.; Kaplan, D.; Keil, E.; Kirk, H.; Klier, A.; Kurup, A.; Lettry, J.; Long, K.; Machida, S.; McDonald, K.; Meot, F.; Mori, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R.; Paul, K.; Poklonskiy, A.; Popovic, M.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rossi, C.; Rovelli, T.; Sandstrom, R.; Sevior, R.; Sievers, P.; Simos, N.; Torun, Y.; Vretenar, M.; Yoshimura, K.; Zisman, Michael S

    2008-02-03

    This document summarizes the findings of the Accelerator Working Group (AWG) of the International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Future Neutrino Factory and Superbeam Facility. The work of the group took place at three plenary meetings along with three workshops, and an oral summary report was presented at the NuFact06 workshop held at UC-Irvine in August, 2006. The goal was to reach consensus on a baseline design for a Neutrino Factory complex. One aspect of this endeavor was to examine critically the advantages and disadvantages of the various Neutrino Factory schemes that have been proposed in recent years.

  6. Accelerator design concept for future neutrino facilities

    Apollonio, M; Blondel, A; Bogacz, A; Brooks, S; Campagne, Jean-Eric; Caspar, D; Cavata, C; Chimenti, P; Cobb, J; Dracos, M; Edgecock, R; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fabich, A; Fernow, R; Filthaut, F; Gallardo, J; Garoby, R; Geer, S; Gerigk, F; Hanson, G; Johnson, R; Johnstone, C; Kaplan, D; Keil, E; Kirk, H; Klier, A; Kurup, A; Lettry, J; Long, K; Machida, S; McDonald, K; Méot, F; Mori, Y; Neuffer, D; Palladino, V; Palmer, R; Paul, K; Poklonskiy, A; Popovic, M; Prior, C; Rees, G; Rossi, C; Rovelli, T; Sandström, R; Sevior, R; Sievers, P; Simos, N; Torun, Y; Vretenar, M; Yoshimura, K; Zisman, M S

    2009-01-01

    This document summarizes the findings of the Accelerator Working Group (AWG) of the International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Future Neutrino Factory and super-beam Facility. The work of the group took place at three plenary meetings along with three workshops, and an oral summary report was presented at the NuFact06 workshop held at UC-Irvine in August, 2006. The goal was to reach consensus on a baseline design for a Neutrino Factory complex. One aspect of this endeavor was to examine critically the advantages and disadvantages of the various Neutrino Factory schemes that have been proposed in recent years.

  7. Status report of the TESLA Test facility

    The goal of the TESLA Test facility [1] is to demonstrate the feasibility of a 500 GeV e+e- Linear Collider with an integrated X-Ray-FEL based on 9-cell superconducting accelerating L-band structures with accelerating gradients higher than 25 MV/m. Two accelerating modules with eight superconducting (sc) cavities each are in operation. A report is given on the latest results of cavity preparation and on the first observations of 80-180 nm Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) FEL radiation. (author)

  8. Air gun test facility

    This paper describes a facility that is potentially useful in providing data for models to predict the effects of nuclear explosions on cities. IIT Research Institute has a large air gun facility capable of launching heavy items of a wide variety of geometries to velocities ranging from about 80 fps to 1100 fps. The facility and its capabilities are described, and city model problem areas capable of investigation using the air gun are presented

  9. Liquid Methane Conditioning Capabilities Developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Small Multi- Purpose Research Facility (SMiRF) for Accelerated Lunar Surface Storage Thermal Testing

    Bamberger, Helmut H.; Robinson, R. Craig; Jurns, John M.; Grasl, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Glenn Research Center s Creek Road Cryogenic Complex, Small Multi-Purpose Research Facility (SMiRF) recently completed validation / checkout testing of a new liquid methane delivery system and liquid methane (LCH4) conditioning system. Facility checkout validation was conducted in preparation for a series of passive thermal control technology tests planned at SMiRF in FY10 using a flight-like propellant tank at simulated thermal environments from 140 to 350K. These tests will validate models and provide high quality data to support consideration of LCH4/LO2 propellant combination option for a lunar or planetary ascent stage.An infrastructure has been put in place which will support testing of large amounts of liquid methane at SMiRF. Extensive modifications were made to the test facility s existing liquid hydrogen system for compatibility with liquid methane. Also, a new liquid methane fluid conditioning system will enable liquid methane to be quickly densified (sub-cooled below normal boiling point) and to be quickly reheated to saturation conditions between 92 and 140 K. Fluid temperatures can be quickly adjusted to compress the overall test duration. A detailed trade study was conducted to determine an appropriate technique to liquid conditioning with regard to the SMiRF facility s existing infrastructure. In addition, a completely new roadable dewar has been procured for transportation and temporary storage of liquid methane. A new spherical, flight-representative tank has also been fabricated for integration into the vacuum chamber at SMiRF. The addition of this system to SMiRF marks the first time a large-scale liquid methane propellant test capability has been realized at Glenn.This work supports the Cryogenic Fluid Management Project being conducted under the auspices of the Exploration Technology Development Program, providing focused cryogenic fluid management technology efforts to support NASA s future robotic or human exploration missions.

  10. Accelerator mass spectrometry programme at Mumbai pelletron accelerator facility

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) programme and the related developments based on the Mumbai Pelletron accelerator are described. The initial results of the measurement of the ratio, 36Cl / Cl in water samples are presented. (author)

  11. Photovoltaic systems test facility

    1979-01-01

    Facility provides broad and flexible capability for evaluating photovoltaic systems and design concepts. As 'breadboard' system, it can be used to check out complete systems, subsystems, and components before installation in actual service.

  12. The Integral Test Facility Karlstein

    Stephan Leyer; Michael Wich

    2012-01-01

    The Integral Test Facility Karlstein (INKA) test facility was designed and erected to test the performance of the passive safety systems of KERENA, the new AREVA Boiling Water Reactor design. The experimental program included single component/system tests of the Emergency Condenser, the Containment Cooling Condenser and the Passive Core Flooding System. Integral system tests, including also the Passive Pressure Pulse Transmitter, will be performed to simulate transients and Loss of Coolant A...

  13. Status of superconducting RF test facility (STF)

    The superconducting RF test facility (STF) in KEK is the facility to promote R and D of the International Linear Collider (ILC) cavities and cryomodule. The STF accelerator to promote the Quantum beam project was installed, commissioned and operated in 2011-2012. It consists of the L-band photocathode RF-gun, two superconducting cavities, and the Compton chamber, which was combined and utilized 4-mirror laser accumulator. The X-ray generation experiment in the accelerator was successfully performed. Now, the accelerator is under installation of the 12m-cryomodule and another 6m-cryomodule. All of the STF development done in 2012-2013 is summarized in this paper. (author)

  14. Defocusing beam line design for an irradiation facility at the TAEA SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility

    Gencer, A.; Demirköz, B.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Yiğitoğlu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic components must be tested to ensure reliable performance in high radiation environments such as Hi-Limu LHC and space. We propose a defocusing beam line to perform proton irradiation tests in Turkey. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility was inaugurated in May 2012 for radioisotope production. The facility has also an R&D room for research purposes. The accelerator produces protons with 30 MeV kinetic energy and the beam current is variable between 10 μA and 1.2 mA. The beam kinetic energy is suitable for irradiation tests, however the beam current is high and therefore the flux must be lowered. We plan to build a defocusing beam line (DBL) in order to enlarge the beam size, reduce the flux to match the required specifications for the irradiation tests. Current design includes the beam transport and the final focusing magnets to blow up the beam. Scattering foils and a collimator is placed for the reduction of the beam flux. The DBL is designed to provide fluxes between 107 p /cm2 / s and 109 p /cm2 / s for performing irradiation tests in an area of 15.4 cm × 21.5 cm. The facility will be the first irradiation facility of its kind in Turkey.

  15. Electromagnetic Interface Testing Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electromagnetic Interface Testing facilitysupports such testing asEmissions, Field Strength, Mode Stirring, EMP Pulser, 4 Probe Monitoring/Leveling System, and...

  16. New Accelerator Projects: Rare Isotope Facilities and Electron Ion Colliders

    Roser, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Presently there are two major areas of new accelerator projects in particle physics: a next generation of Rare Isotope facilities in the field of Nuclear Structure Physics and high luminosity Electron Ion Colliders as next generation QCD faciliies in the field of Hadron Physics. This paper presents a review of the present and future facilities and the required novel accelerator technologies for these two types of accelerator projects.

  17. Ion source test bench facility at IUAC, New Delhi

    Ion source test bench facility has been developed at IUAC for research and development works related to the studies of the efficient production of sputtered negative ions using single cathode SNICS and gas cathodes. This ion source test bench facility has been installed at Ion source room of Pelletron accelerator. The paper reports the installation and initial test results of this setup. (author)

  18. Massachusetts Large Blade Test Facility Final Report

    Rahul Yarala; Rob Priore

    2011-09-02

    Project Objective: The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (CEC) will design, construct, and ultimately have responsibility for the operation of the Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility, which is an advanced blade testing facility capable of testing wind turbine blades up to at least 90 meters in length on three test stands. Background: Wind turbine blade testing is required to meet international design standards, and is a critical factor in maintaining high levels of reliability and mitigating the technical and financial risk of deploying massproduced wind turbine models. Testing is also needed to identify specific blade design issues that may contribute to reduced wind turbine reliability and performance. Testing is also required to optimize aerodynamics, structural performance, encourage new technologies and materials development making wind even more competitive. The objective of this project is to accelerate the design and construction of a large wind blade testing facility capable of testing blades with minimum queue times at a reasonable cost. This testing facility will encourage and provide the opportunity for the U.S wind industry to conduct more rigorous testing of blades to improve wind turbine reliability.

  19. The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab: Science Program

    Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Harms, Elvin [Fermilab; Henderson, Stuart [Fermilab; Leibfritz, Jerry [Fermilab; Nagaitsev, Sergei [Fermilab; Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab; Valishev, Alexander [Fermilab

    2014-07-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) currently in commissioning phase at Fermilab is foreseen to support a broad range of beam-based experiments to study fundamental limitations to beam intensity and to develop novel approaches to particle-beam generation, acceleration and manipulation. ASTA incorporates a superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) linac coupled to a flexible high-brightness photoinjector. The facility also includes a small-circumference storage ring capable of storing electrons or protons. This report summarizes the facility capabilities, and provide an overview of the accelerator-science researches to be enabled.

  20. Stanford Linear Accelerator Center pulsed x-ray facility

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) operates a high-energy (up to 33 GeV) linear accelerator delivering pulses up to a few microseconds wide. The pulsed nature of the electron beam creates problems in the detection and measurement of radiation both from the accelerator beam and the klystrons that provide the radio-frequency power for the accelerator. Hence, a pulsed x-ray facility has been built at SLAC mainly for testing the response of different radiation detection instruments to pulsed radiation fields. The x-ray tube consists of an electron gun with a control grid. This provides a stream of pulsed electrons that can be accelerated towards a confined target window. The window consists of Al 0.051 cm (20 mils) thick, plated on the vacuum side with a layer of Au 0.0006 cm (1/4 mil) thick. The frequency of electron pulses can be varied by an internal pulser from 60 to 360 pulses per second with pulse widths of 360 ns to 5 microseconds. The pulse amplitude can be varied over a wide range of currents. An external pulser can be used to obtain other frequencies or special pulse shapes. The voltage across the gun can be varied from 0 to 100 kV. The maximum absorbed dose rate obtained at 6.35 cm below the target window as measured by an ionization chamber is 258 Gy/h. The major part of the x-ray tube is enclosed in a large walk-in cabinet made of 1.9-cm-thick (3/4-inch-thick) plywood and lined with 0.32-cm-thick (1/8-inch-thick) Pb to make a very versatile facility

  1. Static Loads Test Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides the capability to perform large-scale structural loads testing on spacecraft and other structures. Results from these tests can be used to verify...

  2. Status and plans for a SRF accelerator test faciliy at Fermilab

    Leibfritz, J.; R. Andrews; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; HARMS, E.; Klebaner, A.; Kucera, M.; Lackey, S.; Martinez, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; Nobrega, L.; Piot, P; Reid, J; Wendt, M

    2012-01-01

    A superconducting RF accelerator test facility is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of gen...

  3. Accelerated tests of coil coatings

    Rosales, B. M.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated laboratory tests on 12 materials in study in the Subgroup 6 of the PATINA Network (CYTED, are discussed for different exposition periods in salt spray, SO2 and Prohesion chambers. International standards used to evaluate failures caused by the different aggressive agents of these laboratory tests are the same as those applied for outdoor expositions. The results exposed contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms occurred in the diverse natural environments, being mentioned the main analogies and differences respect to factors affecting natural tests. They also allowed to evidence the advantages and limitations in the application of these tests during several days, as compared to the years required to attain similar failure magnitudes through outdoor tests.

    En este trabajo se discuten los ensayos de laboratorio acelerados, realizados sobre 12 materiales de estudio en el Subgrupo 6 de la Red PATINA (CYTED, a diferentes periodos de exposición en cámaras de niebla salina, SO2 y Prohesion. Se utilizaron las normas internacionales para evaluar los fallos causados por los diferentes agentes agresivos de estos ensayos de laboratorio, las cuales se aplican también para los ensayos de exposición a la intemperie. Los resultados expuestos contribuyen a una mejor comprensión de los mecanismos ocurridos en los diversos ambientes naturales, mencionándose las principales analogías y diferencias respecto de los factores que afectan los ensayos naturales. También permitieron evidenciar las ventajas y limitaciones en la aplicación de estos ensayos durante varios días, en comparación con los años requeridos para alcanzar magnitudes de fallos similares por medio de ensayos a intemperie.

  4. Required performance to the concrete structure of the accelerator facilities

    As for the accelerator facility, there is many a thing which is constructed as underground concrete structure from viewpoint such as cover of radiation and stability of the structure. Required performance to the concrete structure of the accelerator facility is the same as the general social infrastructure, but it has been possessed the feature where target performance differs largely. As for the body sentence, expressing the difference of the performance which is required from the concrete structure of the social infrastructure and the accelerator facility, construction management of the concrete structure which it plans from order of the accelerator engineering works facility, reaches to the design, supervision and operation it is something which expresses the method of thinking. In addition, in the future of material structural analysis of the concrete which uses the neutron accelerator concerning view it showed. (author)

  5. The Integral Test Facility Karlstein

    Stephan Leyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Integral Test Facility Karlstein (INKA test facility was designed and erected to test the performance of the passive safety systems of KERENA, the new AREVA Boiling Water Reactor design. The experimental program included single component/system tests of the Emergency Condenser, the Containment Cooling Condenser and the Passive Core Flooding System. Integral system tests, including also the Passive Pressure Pulse Transmitter, will be performed to simulate transients and Loss of Coolant Accident scenarios at the test facility. The INKA test facility represents the KERENA Containment with a volume scaling of 1 : 24. Component heights and levels are in full scale. The reactor pressure vessel is simulated by the accumulator vessel of the large valve test facility of Karlstein—a vessel with a design pressure of 11 MPa and a storage capacity of 125 m3. The vessel is fed by a benson boiler with a maximum power supply of 22 MW. The INKA multi compartment pressure suppression Containment meets the requirements of modern and existing BWR designs. As a result of the large power supply at the facility, INKA is capable of simulating various accident scenarios, including a full train of passive systems, starting with the initiating event—for example pipe rupture.

  6. The Integral Test Facility Karlstein

    The Integral Test Facility Karlstein (INKA) test facility was designed and erected to test the performance of the passive safety systems of KERENA, the new AREVA Boiling Water Reactor design. The experimental program included single component/system tests of the Emergency Condenser, the Containment Cooling Condenser and the Passive Core Flooding System. Integral system tests, including also the Passive Pressure Pulse Transmitter, will be performed to simulate transients and Loss of Coolant Accident scenarios at the test facility. The INKA test facility represents the KERENA Containment with a volume scaling of 1?:?24. Component heights and levels are in full scale. The reactor pressure vessel is simulated by the accumulator vessel of the large valve test facility of Karlstein vessel with a design pressure of 11?MPa and a storage capacity of 125?m3. The vessel is fed by a benson boiler with a maximum power supply of 22?MW. The INKA multi compartment pressure suppression Containment meets the requirements of modern and existing BWR designs. As a result of the large power supply at the facility, INKA is capable of simulating various accident scenarios, including a full train of passive systems, starting with the initiating event for example pipe rupture.

  7. Status and plans for a SRF accelerator test faciliy at Fermilab

    Leibfritz, J; Carlson, K; Chase, B; Church, M; Harms, E; Klebaner, A; Kucera, M; Lackey, S; Martinez, A; Nagaitsev, S; Nobrega, L; Piot, P; Reid, J; Wendt, M; Wesseln, S

    2012-01-01

    A superconducting RF accelerator test facility is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating an 810 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. Expansion plans of the facility are underway that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power equipment, instrumentation, LLRF and controls systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  8. Solenoid Testing Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Current Configuration: Accommodate a device under test up to 2.8 m diameter, 0.7 m height and 15,000 lbs. weight. Up to 10 g/s, 4.5 K helium flow. Up to 250 A test...

  9. Elevated Fixed Platform Test Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Elevated Fixed Platform (EFP) is a helicopter recovery test facility located at Lakehurst, NJ. It consists of a 60 by 85 foot steel and concrete deck built atop...

  10. Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The very large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, is currently under construction and is due to...

  11. Ice Adhesion Testing Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Uses Evaluate and compare the relative performance of materials and surfcae coating based on their ability to aid in ice removal Test the effectiveness of de-icing...

  12. Upgrade of the Cryogenic CERN RF Test Facility

    Pirotte, O; Brunner, O; Inglese, V; Koettig, T; Maesen, P; Vullierme, B

    2014-01-01

    With the large number of superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cryomodules to be tested for the former LEP and the present LHC accelerator a RF test facility was erected early in the 1990’s in the largest cryogenic test facility at CERN located at Point 18. This facility consisted of four vertical test stands for single cavities and originally one and then two horizontal test benches for RF cryomodules operating at 4.5 K in saturated helium. CERN is presently working on the upgrade of its accelerator infrastructure, which requires new superconducting cavities operating below 2 K in saturated superfluid helium. Consequently, the RF test facility has been renewed in order to allow efficient cavity and cryomodule tests in superfluid helium and to improve its thermal performances. The new RF test facility is described and its performances are presented.

  13. Plasma wakefield acceleration at CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory

    Xia, G.; Nie, Y.; Mete, O.; Hanahoe, K.; Dover, M.; Wigram, M.; Wright, J.; Zhang, J.; Smith, J.; Pacey, T.; Li, Y.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.

    2016-09-01

    A plasma accelerator research station (PARS) has been proposed to study the key issues in electron driven plasma wakefield acceleration at CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory. In this paper, the quasi-nonlinear regime of beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration is analysed. The wakefield excited by various CLARA beam settings are simulated by using a 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) code. For a single drive beam, an accelerating gradient up to 3 GV/m can be achieved. For a two bunch acceleration scenario, simulation shows that a witness bunch can achieve a significant energy gain in a 10-50 cm long plasma cell.

  14. A linear electron accelerator radiation processing facility

    A description is given of the operations of a contract radiation processing facility. The radiation sources are medium energy linacs. Provision is being made for the installation of a cobalt 60 processing facility. A list is given of the radiation processing programmes presently being undertaken. The dosimetry system is described. (U.K.)

  15. Los Alamos High-Brightness Accelerator FEL (HIBAF) facility

    This paper reports that the 10-μm Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) facility is being upgraded. The conventional electron gun and bunchers have been replaced with a much more compact 6-MeV photoinjector accelerator. By adding existing parts from previous experiments, the primary beam energy will be doubled to 40 MeV. With the existing 1-m wiggler (λw = 2.7 cm) and resonator, the facility can produce photons with wavelengths from 3 to 10 μm when lasing on the fundamental mode and produce photons in the visible spectrum with short-period wigglers or harmonic operation. After installation of a 150 degrees bend, a second wiggler will be added as an amplifier. The installation of laser transport tubes between the accelerator vault and an upstairs laboratory will provide experimenters with a radiation-free environment for experiments. At the time of writing (Jan. 1990), the injector plus one additional tank has been installed and tested with beam to an energy of 17 MeV

  16. Start-to-end simulation for the RISP test facility

    The RAON accelerator of Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) has been developed to accelerate heavy ion beams generated by superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECR-IS). The beams produced by the ECR-IS are transported through Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section to Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) section, and low energy superconducting linac (SCL1). Prior to the construction of the RAON accelerator, the components of the LEBT section, the RFQ, the MEBT section, and the part of the SCL1 need to put to the test with the beams generated by the ECR-IS. For that reason, a test facility is under development and will be installed within a few year. Also, in order to build the test facility more efficiently within its restrictive space requirements, we designed the lattice of the test facility newly and then, with this newly designed lattice, in order to demonstrate that the test facility performs well, the start-to-end beam simulation needs to be carried out. In this paper, we will describe the new lattice design of the test facility and the result of the start-to-end beam simulation for the test facility. In addition to the simulation for the single charge state beam, the transportation and acceleration of the three charge state beams will be also examined in the test facility

  17. Status of superconducting RF test facility (STF)

    The superconducting RF test facility (STF) in KEK is the R and D facility for the International Linear Collider (ILC) cavities and cryomodule. The surface treatment and field test of fabricated 9-cell superconducting cavities are performed for the cryomodule installation. As an international project, S1-Global cryomodule test was successfully completed for the various studies on different type of cavity system. The construction of the Quantum-Beam experiment accelerator, as part of STF phase-2 development, has started in 2011, after the S1-Global cryomodule dis-installation from the tunnel. The photocathode RF gun and the capture cryomodule are constructed, installed and commissioned. All of the STF development done in 2011-2012 is summarized in this paper. (author)

  18. MALT accelerator facility; characteristic of ion sources

    Nakano, Chuichiro; Kobayashi, Koichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Sunohara, Yoko [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    A tandem accelerator has been operated since 1995 with a continual effort to increase the accuracy and reliability of the measurement. In the present paper, after a brief discussion on a cesium sputter ion source incorporated in the MALT accelerator, basic characteristics such as temperature of cesium reservoir, and ioniser plate cathode potential. Production of negative ions in the ion source proceed in two step. The first step is generation of positive ions due to the surface ionization on a hot Ta plate, and the second step, electron detachment on a cathode. (M. Tanaka)

  19. Information services in the Tesla test facility control system

    The Tesla test facility (TTF) consists of a linear accelerator of electrons and equipment for studying the accelerating modules based on superconducting cavities. The main TTF information services and their status to October 1998 are described. The services are the following ones: equipment name server, WWW supported document management system and TTF cavity database

  20. TESLA test facility control system and its current status

    Tesla test facility electron linear accelerator control system (TTF CS) is described. The TTF CS subsystems and principles of their integration are presented. The integration is ensured with the distributed object oriented control system (DOOCS). The DOOCS architecture and device servers are discussed. At present the TTF CS provides reliable and flexible control of all systems of the TTF linear accelerator

  1. IFMIF test facilities. 3 years of EVEDA

    Arbeiter, F.; Fischer, U.; Heinzel, V.; Klix, A.; Simakov, S.; Tian, K. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany). Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology; Heidinger, R. [Fusion for Energy, Garching (Germany); Moeslang, A.; Vladimirov, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany). Inst. for Material Research I; Garin, P.

    2010-05-15

    The International-Fusion-Material-Irradiation-Facility (IFMIF) is an accelerator driven neutron source to create a displacement rate per full power year of more than 20 dpa/fpy in materials like steel within the High-Flux-Test-Module (HFTM) with a volume of 0.5 litres. It also reflects helium/dpa and hydrogen/dpa production rates very similar to those ones expected in a DEMO Fusion reactor. In addition, a Medium-Flux-Test-Module (MFTM) is dedicated to in situ creep-fatigue tests of structural materials and in situ tritium release tests of functional materials for which a fusion relevant neutron energy spectrum is adapted by a tungsten spectral shifter. In a Low-Flux-Test-Module (LFTM) diagnostic materials of components can be tested. (orig.)

  2. The PSI/ETH tandem accelerator facility

    Synal, H.A.; Doebeli, M.; Fuhrmann, H.; Kubik, P.W.; Nebiker, P.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    The 1996 operation of the PSI/ETH tandem accelerator at ETH Hoenggerberg is summarised with a detailed compilation of the beam time statistics and the statistics of AMS samples for the different radioisotopes and for the major fields of research. (author) 2 tab.

  3. High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility (HIAF) in China

    HIAF (High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility), a new facility planned in China for heavy ion related researches, consists of two ion sources, a high intensity Heavy Ion Superconducting Linac (HISCL), a 45 Tm Accumulation and Booster Ring (ABR-45) and a multifunction storage ring system. The key features of HIAF are unprecedented high pulse beam intensity and versatile operation mode. The HIAF project aims to expand nuclear and related researches into presently unreachable region and give scientists possibilities to conduct cutting-edge researches in these fields. The general description of the facility is given in this article with a focus on the accelerator design

  4. Possible upgrade of an existing tandem accelerator facility to an ISOL facility for neutron rich rare isotope beams

    Worldwide, many existing accelerator facilities were upgraded to RIB facilities in the past decade including two tandem accelerator facilities at HRIBF,ORNL and LNS, Catania. However, both these tandems are folded tandems with the injector at ground level. In this paper, we explore the feasibility of using aerosol He-jet technique to transport RIBs from driver accelerator to the SNICS ion source. As a test case, we take a 50 MeV, 100- k watt commercial electron accelerator as driver accelerator and the existing Tandem+SC linac at IUAC as post accelerator. In this scheme, RIBs can be produced in Uranium target using Bremsstrahlung photons generated by the de-accelerated electrons. In a broad sense, two main difference in implementing this scheme compared to will be the high power target and a skimmer ion source operable at high throughput of aerosol loaded He. A multijet target system capable of containing few dozen target had been developed and tested for efficiency and cooling at HRIBF,ORNL. A skimmer ion source, operable at 6 std. 1pm flow is still needed to be developed. If this development is carried out, negative ion scheme is feasible and could possibly be implemented in a short period of time with modest investment. (author)

  5. Antiquark Flavor Asymmetry with New Accelerator Facilities

    Kumano, S.

    1997-01-01

    Flavor asymmetry in light antiquark distributions is discussed. In particular, recent progress on the u-bar/d-bar asymmetry is explained. Then, we discuss possible future experimental studies. 1. Introduction 2. Present situation 3. Future u-bar/d-bar asymmetry studies 3.1 Drell-Yan process 3.2 Charged-hadron production 3.3 W charge asymmetry 3.4 Deuteron acceleration at HERA

  6. New Accelerating Modules RF Test at TTF

    Kostin, D

    2004-01-01

    Five new accelerating modules were installed into the TTF tunnel as a part of the VUV FEL Linac. They are tested prior to the linac operation. The RF test includes processing of the superconducting cavities, as well as maximum module performance tests. The test procedure and the achieved performance together with the test statistical analysis are presented.

  7. Conceptual study of transmutation experimental facility. (2) Study on ADS target test facility

    To perform the research and development for accelerator-driven system (ADS), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) plans to build a Transmutation Experimental Facility within the JAERI-KEK joint J-PARC program. Transmutation Experimental Facility consists of two buildings, Transmutation Physics Experimental Facility to make reactor physics experiment with subcritical core, and ADS Target Test Facility for the preparation of irradiation database for various structural materials. In this report, purpose to build, experimental schedule, and design study of the ADS Target Test Facility with drawer type spallation target are summarized. (author)

  8. Accelerator technical design report for high-intensity proton accelerator facility project, J-PARC

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    This report presents the detail of the technical design of the accelerators for the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility Project, J-PARC. The accelerator complex comprises a 400-MeV room-temperature linac (600-MeV superconducting linac), 3-GeV rapid-cycling synchrotron (RCS), and a 50-GeV synchrotron (MR). The 400-MeV beam is injected to the RCS, being accelerated to 3 GEV. The 1-MW beam thus produced is guided to the Materials Life Science Experimental Facility, with both the pulsed spallation neutron source and muon source. A part of the beam is transported to the MR, which provides the 0.75-MW beam to either the Nuclear and Fundamental Particle Experimental Facility or the Neutrino Production Target. On the other hand, the beam accelerated to 600 MeV by the superconducting linac is used for the Nuclear Waster Transmutation Experiment. In this way, this facility is unique, being multipurpose one, including many new inventions and Research and Development Results. This report is based upon the accomplishments made by the Accelerator Group and others of the Project Team, which is organized on the basis of the Agreement between JAERI and KEK on the Construction and Research and Development of the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility. (author)

  9. Accelerator technical design report for high-intensity proton accelerator facility project, J-PARC

    This report presents the detail of the technical design of the accelerators for the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility Project, J-PARC. The accelerator complex comprises a 400-MeV room-temperature linac (600-MeV superconducting linac), 3-GeV rapid-cycling synchrotron (RCS), and a 50-GeV synchrotron (MR). The 400-MeV beam is injected to the RCS, being accelerated to 3 GEV. The 1-MW beam thus produced is guided to the Materials Life Science Experimental Facility, with both the pulsed spallation neutron source and muon source. A part of the beam is transported to the MR, which provides the 0.75-MW beam to either the Nuclear and Fundamental Particle Experimental Facility or the Neutrino Production Target. On the other hand, the beam accelerated to 600 MeV by the superconducting linac is used for the Nuclear Waster Transmutation Experiment. In this way, this facility is unique, being multipurpose one, including many new inventions and Research and Development Results. This report is based upon the accomplishments made by the Accelerator Group and others of the Project Team, which is organized on the basis of the Agreement between JAERI and KEK on the Construction and Research and Development of the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility. (author)

  10. BNL ACCELERATOR-BASED RADIOBIOLOGY FACILITIES

    LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    2000-05-28

    For the past several years, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) has provided ions of iron, silicon and gold, at energies from 600 MeV/nucleon to 10 GeV/nucleon, for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) radiobiology research program. NASA has recently funded the construction of a new dedicated ion facility, the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The Booster synchrotron will supply ion beams ranging from protons to gold, in an energy range from 40--3,000 MeV/nucleon with maximum beam intensities of 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 11} ions per pulse. The BAF Project is described and the future AGS and BAF operation plans are presented.

  11. Accelerating sustainability in large-scale facilities

    Marina Giampietro

    2011-01-01

    Scientific research centres and large-scale facilities are intrinsically energy intensive, but how can big science improve its energy management and eventually contribute to the environmental cause with new cleantech? CERN’s commitment to providing tangible answers to these questions was sealed in the first workshop on energy management for large scale scientific infrastructures held in Lund, Sweden, on the 13-14 October.   Participants at the energy management for large scale scientific infrastructures workshop. The workshop, co-organised with the European Spallation Source (ESS) and  the European Association of National Research Facilities (ERF), tackled a recognised need for addressing energy issues in relation with science and technology policies. It brought together more than 150 representatives of Research Infrastrutures (RIs) and energy experts from Europe and North America. “Without compromising our scientific projects, we can ...

  12. Hurricane Isabel gives accelerators a severe test

    Hurricane Isabel was at category five--the most violent on the Saffir-Simpson scale of hurricane strength--when it began threatening the central Atlantic seaboard of the US. Over the course of several days, precautions against the extreme weather conditions were taken across the Jefferson Lab site in south-east Virginia. On 18 September 2003, when Isabel struck North Carolina's Outer Banks and moved northward, directly across the region around the laboratory, the storm was still quite destructive, albeit considerably reduced in strength. The flood surge and trees felled by wind substantially damaged or even devastated buildings and homes, including many belonging to Jefferson Lab staff members. For the laboratory itself, Isabel delivered an unplanned and severe challenge in another form: a power outage that lasted nearly three-and-a-half days, and which severely tested the robustness of Jefferson Lab's two superconducting machines, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and the superconducting radiofrequency ''driver'' accelerator of the laboratory's free-electron laser. Robustness matters greatly for science at a time when microwave superconducting linear accelerators (linacs) are not only being considered, but in some cases already being built for projects such as neutron sources, rare-isotope accelerators, innovative light sources and TeV-scale electron-positron linear colliders. Hurricane Isabel interrupted a several-week-long maintenance shutdown of CEBAF, which serves nuclear and particle physics and represents the world's pioneering large-scale implementation of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology. The racetrack-shaped machine is actually a pair of 500-600 MeV SRF linacs interconnected by recirculation arc beamlines. CEBAF delivers simultaneous beams at up to 6 GeV to three experimental halls. An imminent upgrade will double the energy to 12 GeV and add an extra hall for ''quark confinement'' studies. On a smaller scale

  13. RHIC sextant test: Accelerator systems and performance

    One sextant of the RHIC Collider was commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the performance of the accelerator systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. We also describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems performance and their impact on the planning for RHIC installation and commissioning

  14. Folded tandem ion accelerator facility at Trombay

    P Singh

    2001-08-01

    The folded tandem ion accelerator (FOTIA) project at BARC has been commissioned. The analysed carbon beams of 40 nA(3+) and 25 nA(4+), at terminal voltage of 2.5 MV with N2 + CO2 as insulating gas, were obtained. The beams were characterized by performing the Rutherford back scattering (RBS) on gold, tin and iron targets. The beam energy of 12.5 MeV for 12C4+ was consistent with the terminal voltage of 2.5 MV. The N2 + CO2 mixture is being replaced by SF6 gas in order to achieve 6 MV on the terminal. In this paper, some of the salient features of the FOTIA and its present status are discussed.

  15. Testing general relativity on accelerators

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2015-11-01

    Within the general theory of relativity, the curvature of spacetime is related to the energy and momentum of the present matter and radiation. One of the more specific predictions of general relativity is the deflection of light and particle trajectories in the gravitational field of massive objects. Bending angles for electromagnetic waves and light in particular were measured with a high precision. However, the effect of gravity on relativistic massive particles was never studied experimentally. Here we propose and analyze experiments devoted to that purpose. We demonstrate a high sensitivity of the laser Compton scattering at high energy accelerators to the effects of gravity. The main observable - maximal energy of the scattered photons - would experience a significant shift in the ambient gravitational field even for otherwise negligible violation of the equivalence principle. We confirm predictions of general relativity for ultrarelativistic electrons of energy of tens of GeV at a current level of resolution and expect our work to be a starting point of further high-precision studies on current and future accelerators, such as PETRA, European XFEL and ILC.

  16. Testing general relativity on accelerators

    Tigran Kalaydzhyan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the general theory of relativity, the curvature of spacetime is related to the energy and momentum of the present matter and radiation. One of the more specific predictions of general relativity is the deflection of light and particle trajectories in the gravitational field of massive objects. Bending angles for electromagnetic waves and light in particular were measured with a high precision. However, the effect of gravity on relativistic massive particles was never studied experimentally. Here we propose and analyze experiments devoted to that purpose. We demonstrate a high sensitivity of the laser Compton scattering at high energy accelerators to the effects of gravity. The main observable – maximal energy of the scattered photons – would experience a significant shift in the ambient gravitational field even for otherwise negligible violation of the equivalence principle. We confirm predictions of general relativity for ultrarelativistic electrons of energy of tens of GeV at a current level of resolution and expect our work to be a starting point of further high-precision studies on current and future accelerators, such as PETRA, European XFEL and ILC.

  17. Peking university superconducting accelerator facility for free electron laser

    Peking University Superconducting Accelerator Facility (PKU-SCAF) is to generate high-quality electron beams with high average current. It is mainly composed of a DC-SC photocathode injector and a superconducting accelerator. It will operate in CW mode. The energy of the electrons is 20-35 MeV and the emittance is <15 π mm mrad. PKU-SCAF will be used for Free Electron Lasers

  18. Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing

    Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

  19. Testing general relativity on accelerators

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2015-01-01

    Within the general theory of relativity, the curvature of spacetime is related to the energy and momentum of the present matter and radiation. One of the more specific predictions of general relativity is the deflection of light and particle trajectories in the gravitational field of massive objects. Bending angles for electromagnetic waves and light in particular were measured with a high precision. However, the effect of gravity on relativistic massive particles was never studied experimentally. Here we propose and analyse experiments devoted to that purpose. We demonstrate a high sensitivity of the laser Compton scattering at high energy accelerators to the effects of gravity. The main observable -- maximal energy of the scattered photons -- would experience a significant shift in the Earth's gravitational field even for otherwise negligible violation of the equivalence principle. We confirm predictions of general relativity for ultrarelativistic electrons of energy of tens of GeV at a current level of res...

  20. Experience on high voltage testing and conditioning of accelerator tube for 3 MeV DC accelerator

    In DC Electron Beam Accelerator, accelerating potentials are generated using high voltage multiplier column. Accelerating potentials are uniformly graded to the accelerator tubes for accelerating the electron to attain the required energy. 3 MeV DC Accelerator is in the advance stages of commissioning at Electron Beam Centre Kharghar, Navi Mumbai. It has 10 numbers of accelerating tube each rated for 335 kVdc in 6 kg/cm2 SF6 gas environment outside and vacuum better than 10-7 mbar inside the tube. For safe and reliable operation of the accelerator, all the dynode gaps have to be conditioned and tested for high voltage withstand capability. Accelerating Tube Test Facility (ATTF) was developed for the testing and HV Conditioning of the accelerator tube. Tubes are conditioned with plasma, baking and application of ascending high Voltages. This paper describes the experience on the high voltage conditioning and testing of the accelerator tube of 3 MeV DC Accelerator. The accelerator has been successfully tested at 1 MeV and 10 kW beam power and 1.8 MeV at no load. (author)

  1. The electron test accelerator beam injector

    A beam chopper and buncher system has been designed to improve the capture efficiency and reduce the beam spill in the Electron Test Accelerator. The buncher increases the dc beam capture from 30 to 70%. 100% beam transmission through the accelerator structures is obtained with the chopper. This report describes results of experimental tests with the beam injector. Results from computer modeling and from measurements with prototypes that have led to the design of the beam chopper and buncher system are discussed

  2. Radiation Safety of Accelerator Facility with Regard to Regulation

    The radiation safety of accelerator facility and the status of the facilities according to licensee in Indonesia as well as lesson learned from the accidents are described. The atomic energy Act No. 10 of 1997 enacted by the Government of Indonesia which is implemented in Radiation Safety Government Regulation No. 63 and 64 as well as practice-specific model regulation for licensing request are discussed. (author)

  3. CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] design report

    This book describes the conceptual design of, and the planning for, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), which will be a high-intensity, continuous-wave electron linear accelerator (linac) for nuclear physics. Its principal scientific goal is to understand the quark structure, behavior, and clustering of individual nucleons in the nuclear medium, and simultaneously to understand the forces governing this behavior. The linac will consist of 1 GeV of accelerating structure, split into two antiparallel 0.5-GeV segments. The segments will be connected by a beam transport system to circulate the electron beams from one segment to the other for up to four complete passes of acceleration. The maximum beam energy will be 4 GeV at a design current of 200 microamperes. The accelerator complex will also include systems to extract three continuous beams from the linac and to deliver them to three experimental halls equipped with detectors and instrumentation for nuclear physics research. The accelerating structure will be kept superconducting within insulated cryostats filled with liquid helium produced at a central helium refrigerator and distributed to the cryostats via insulated transfer lines. An injector, instrumentation and controls for the accelerator, radio-frequency power systems, and several support facilities will also be provided. A cost estimate based on the Work Breakdown Structure has been completed. Assuming a five-year construction schedule starting early in FY 1987, the total estimated cost is $236 million (actual year dollars), including contingency

  4. Importance of testing in nuclear facilities

    In nuclear facilities systems and materials important for safety and reliability are frequently tested. This paper analyzes testing during design, building and operation of nuclear facilities. Then different aspects of test quality are examined: requirements, test programming, test quality, interfaces. Mainly new facilities, pilots or prototypes are concerned

  5. A Comprehensive Review of Accelerated Life Test

    ZHANG Chun-hua; WANG Ya-shun; CHEN Xun; WEN Xi-sen

    2005-01-01

    Accelerated life test (ALT) is an important branch of reliability test and is a focus of research both for statisticians and reliability engineers. The paper outlines the four topics of study embodied in ALT: statistical analysis of constant-stress test, step-stress test and progressive stress test, and optimal design of ALT. It gives a general review of engineering applications of ALT, and points out some possible directions in ALT, gives some suggestions for further study.

  6. Reliability Considerations for the Operation of Large Accelerator User Facilities

    Willeke, F J

    2016-01-01

    The lecture provides an overview of considerations relevant for achieving highly reliable operation of accelerator based user facilities. The article starts with an overview of statistical reliability formalism which is followed by high reliability design considerations with examples. The article closes with operational aspects of high reliability such as preventive maintenance and spares inventory.

  7. Cable systems for experimental facilities in JAERI TANDEM ACCELERATOR BUILDING

    Measuring cable systems for experimental facilities in JAERI TANDEM ACCELERATOR BUILDING were completed recently. Measures are taken to prevent penetration of noises into the measuring systems. The cable systems are described in detail, including power supplies and grounding for the measuring systems. (author)

  8. New heavy-ion accelerator facility at Oak Ridge

    Funds were obtained to establish a new national heavy-ion facility to be located at Oak Ridge. The principal component of this facility is a 25-MW tandem designed specifically for good heavy-ion acceleration, which will provide high quality beams of medium weight ions for nuclear research by itself. The tandem beams will also be injected into ORIC for additional energy gain, so that usable beams for nuclear physics research can be extended to about A = 160. A notable feature of the tandem is that it will be of the ''folded'' type, in which both the negative and positive accelerating tubes are contained in the same column. The accelerator system, the experimental lay-out, and the time schedule for the project are discussed

  9. Hardware availability calculations and results of the IFMIF accelerator facility

    Highlights: • IFMIF accelerator facility hardware availability analyses methodology is described. • Results of the individual hardware availability analyses are shown for the reference design. • Accelerator design improvements are proposed for each system. • Availability results are evaluated and compared with the requirements. - Abstract: Hardware availability calculations have been done individually for each system of the deuteron accelerators of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). The principal goal of these analyses is to estimate the availability of the systems, compare it with the challenging IFMIF requirements and find new paths to improve availability performances. Major unavailability contributors are highlighted and possible design changes are proposed in order to achieve the hardware availability requirements established for each system. In this paper, such possible improvements are implemented in fault tree models and the availability results are evaluated. The parallel activity on the design and construction of the linear IFMIF prototype accelerator (LIPAc) provides detailed design information for the RAMI (reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability) analyses and allows finding out the improvements that the final accelerator could have. Because of the R and D behavior of the LIPAc, RAMI improvements could be the major differences between the prototype and the IFMIF accelerator design

  10. Next linear collider test accelerator injector upgrade

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) is being constructed at SLAC to demonstrate multibunch beam loading compensation, suppression of higher order deflecting modes and measure transverse components of the accelerating fields in X-band accelerating structures. Currently a simple injector which provides the average current necessary for the beam loading compensations studies is under construction. An injector upgrade is planned to produce bunch trains similar to that of the NLC with microbunch intensity, separation and energy spread, identical to that of NLC. We discuss the design of the NLCTA injector upgrade.

  11. A Staged Muon Accelerator Facility For Neutrino and Collider Physics

    Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; Brice, Stephen; Bross, Alan David; Denisov, Dmitri; Eichten, Estia; Holmes, Stephen; Lipton, Ronald; Neuffer, David; Palmer, Mark Alan; Bogacz, S Alex; Huber, Patrick; Kaplan, Daniel M; Snopok, Pavel; Kirk, Harold G; Palmer, Robert B; Ryne, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    Muon-based facilities offer unique potential to provide capabilities at both the Intensity Frontier with Neutrino Factories and the Energy Frontier with Muon Colliders. They rely on a novel technology with challenging parameters, for which the feasibility is currently being evaluated by the Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). A realistic scenario for a complementary series of staged facilities with increasing complexity and significant physics potential at each stage has been developed. It takes advantage of and leverages the capabilities already planned for Fermilab, especially the strategy for long-term improvement of the accelerator complex being initiated with the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP-II) and the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF). Each stage is designed to provide an R&D platform to validate the technologies required for subsequent stages. The rationale and sequence of the staging process and the critical issues to be addressed at each stage, are presented.

  12. Mirror Fusion Test Facility magnet

    Henning, C.H.; Hodges, A.J.; Van Sant, J.H.; Hinkle, R.E.; Horvath, J.A.; Hintz, R.E.; Dalder, E.; Baldi, R.; Tatro, R.

    1979-11-13

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is the largest of the mirror program experiments for magnetic fusion energy. It seeks to combine and extend the near-classical plasma confinement achieved in 2XIIB with the most advanced neutral-beam and magnet technologies. The product of ion density and confinement time will be improved more than an order of magnitude, while the superconducting magnet weight will be extrapolated from the 15 tons in Baseball II to 375 tons in MFTF. Recent reactor studies show that the MFTF will traverse much of the distance in magnet technology towards the reactor regime. Design specifics of the magnet are given. (MOW)

  13. Mirror Fusion Test Facility magnet

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is the largest of the mirror program experiments for magnetic fusion energy. It seeks to combine and extend the near-classical plasma confinement achieved in 2XIIB with the most advanced neutral-beam and magnet technologies. The product of ion density and confinement time will be improved more than an order of magnitude, while the superconducting magnet weight will be extrapolated from the 15 tons in Baseball II to 375 tons in MFTF. Recent reactor studies show that the MFTF will traverse much of the distance in magnet technology towards the reactor regime. Design specifics of the magnet are given

  14. New linear accelerator (Linac) design based on C-band accelerating structures for SXFEL facility

    ZHANG Meng; GU Qiang

    2011-01-01

    A C-band accelerator structure is one promising technique for a compact XFEL facility.It is also attractive in beam dynamics in maintaining a high quality electron beam,which is an important factor in the performance of a free electron laser.In this paper,a comparison between traditional S-band and C-band accelerating structures is made based on the linac configuration of a Shanghai Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser (SXFEL) facility.Throughout the comprehensive simulation,we conclude that the C-band structure is much more competitive.

  15. FBR related test facilities data base

    The questionnaire of main specifications, test performance and features of each FBR related test facility in the O-arai Engineering Center were made from 2001 to 2002. This report equipped these questionnaires with database. Two tables list 134 facilities. These related test facilities contains the safety test, thermal hydraulics test, test facilities for structure, reactor, Na related test, irradiation rig, fuel monitoring facility and apparatus and others (failed fuel detection and location, helium accumulation fluence monitor measurement system, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer, laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry system, pressurized resistance welding equipment, fuel inspection system and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer). This report contains all questionnaires as data. (S.Y.)

  16. Survey of Facilities for Testing Photovoltaics

    Weaver, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    42-page report describes facilities capable of testing complete photovoltaic systems, subsystems, or components. Compilation includes facilities and capabilities of five field centers of national photovoltaics program, two state-operated agencies, and five private testing laboratories.

  17. Accelerated degradation testing of a photovoltaic module

    Charki, Abdérafi; Laronde, Rémi; Bigaud, David

    2013-01-01

    There are a great many photovoltaic (PV) modules installed around the world. Despite this, not enough is known about the reliability of these modules. Their electrical power output decreases with time mainly as a result of the effects of corrosion, encapsulation discoloration, and solder bond failure. The failure of a PV module is defined as the point where the electrical power degradation reaches a given threshold value. Accelerated life tests (ALTs) are commonly used to assess the reliability of a PV module. However, ALTs provide limited data on the failure of a module and these tests are expensive to carry out. One possible solution is to conduct accelerated degradation tests. The Wiener process in conjunction with the accelerated failure time model makes it possible to carry out numerous simulations and thus to determine the failure time distribution based on the aforementioned threshold value. By this means, the failure time distribution and the lifetime (mean and uncertainty) can be evaluated.

  18. GERDA test facilities in Munich

    The GERDA (Germanium Detector Array) experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge. Germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge will be submerged in pure liquid argon. The cryogenic liquid is used as cooling liquid for the detectors and as shielding against gamma radiation. Several test facilities are currently under construction at the MPI Munich. Prototype Germanium detectors are tested in conditions close to the experimental setup of GERDA. Detector parameters are determined in a specialized vacuum teststand as well as directly in liquid argon. A new vacuum teststand named Galatea is under construction. It will be used to expose germanium detectors to α- and β-particles and study their response to surface events. This yields information about dead layers and the response to surface contaminations. (orig.)

  19. A Statistical Perspective on Highly Accelerated Testing.

    Thomas, Edward V.

    2015-02-01

    Highly accelerated life testing has been heavily promoted at Sandia (and elsewhere) as a means to rapidly identify product weaknesses caused by flaws in the product's design or manufacturing process. During product development, a small number of units are forced to fail at high stress. The failed units are then examined to determine the root causes of failure. The identification of the root causes of product failures exposed by highly accelerated life testing can instigate changes to the product's design and/or manufacturing process that result in a product with increased reliability. It is widely viewed that this qualitative use of highly accelerated life testing (often associated with the acronym HALT) can be useful. However, highly accelerated life testing has also been proposed as a quantitative means for "demonstrating" the reliability of a product where unreliability is associated with loss of margin via an identified and dominating failure mechanism. It is assumed that the dominant failure mechanism can be accelerated by changing the level of a stress factor that is assumed to be related to the dominant failure mode. In extreme cases, a minimal number of units (often from a pre-production lot) are subjected to a single highly accelerated stress relative to normal use. If no (or, sufficiently few) units fail at this high stress level, some might claim that a certain level of reliability has been demonstrated (relative to normal use conditions). Underlying this claim are assumptions regarding the level of knowledge associated with the relationship between the stress level and the probability of failure. The primary purpose of this document is to discuss (from a statistical perspective) the efficacy of using accelerated life testing protocols (and, in particular, "highly accelerated" protocols) to make quantitative inferences concerning the performance of a product (e.g., reliability) when in fact there is lack-of-knowledge and uncertainty concerning

  20. RHIC Sextant Test - Accelerator Systems and Performance

    Pilat, F.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Connolly, R.; dell, G. F.; Fischer, W.; Kewisch, J.; Mackay, W.; Mane, V.; Peggs, S.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Thompson, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Wei, J.

    1997-05-01

    One sextant of the RHIC collider and the full AtR (AGS to RHIC) transfer line have been commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the design and performance of the accelerator systems during the test, such as the magnet and power supply systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. After reviewing the main milestones of the commissioning we describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems preformance and their impact on the plannig for RHIC installation and commissioning.

  1. Survey of solar thermal test facilities

    Masterson, K.

    1979-08-01

    The facilities that are presently available for testing solar thermal energy collection and conversion systems are briefly described. Facilities that are known to meet ASHRAE standard 93-77 for testing flat-plate collectors are listed. The DOE programs and test needs for distributed concentrating collectors are identified. Existing and planned facilities that meet these needs are described and continued support for most of them is recommended. The needs and facilities that are suitable for testing components of central receiver systems, several of which are located overseas, are identified. The central contact point for obtaining additional details and test procedures for these facilities is the Solar Thermal Test Facilities Users' Association in Albuquerque, N.M. The appendices contain data sheets and tables which give additional details on the technical capabilities of each facility. Also included is the 1975 Aerospace Corporation report on test facilities that is frequently referenced in the present work.

  2. A 3 MV tandem accelerator at Seville. The first IBA facility in Spain

    The first Spanish tandem accelerator, of the Pelletron type, has recently been installed at the University of Seville. The laboratory has been created with the aim to fulfill the increasing demand for ion beam analysis existing in Spain. The facility mainly consists of a 3 MV accelerator with two ion sources and a capacity of seven beam lines, which will be used for interdisciplinary studies such as material research and modification, arts, archaeology, biology, medicine, environmental sciences and so on. The laboratory and the first tests of the accelerator performance are described. (author)

  3. SSC string test facility for superconducting magnets: Testing capabilities and program for collider magnets

    Kraushaar, P.; Burgett, W.; Dombeck, T.; McInturff, A.; Robinson, W.; Saladin, V.

    1993-05-01

    The Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) R&D Testing Facility has been established at the SSC Laboratory to test Collider and High Energy Booster (HEB) superconducting magnet strings. The facility is operational and has had two testing periods utilizing a half cell of collider prototypical magnets with the associated spool pieces and support systems. This paper presents a description of the testing capabilities of the facility with respect to components and supporting subsystems (cryogenic, power, quench protection, controls and instrumentation), the planned testing program for the collider magnets.

  4. SSC string test facility for superconducting magnets: Testing capabilities and program for collider magnets

    The Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) R ampersand D Testing Facility has been established at the SSC Laboratory to test Collider and High Energy Booster (HEB) superconducting magnet strings. The facility is operational and has had two testing periods utilizing a half cell of collider prototypical magnets with the associated spool pieces and support systems. This paper presents a description of the testing capabilities of the facility with respect to components and supporting subsystems (cryogenic, power, quench protection, controls and instrumentation), the planned testing program for the collider magnets

  5. Construction Management for Conventional Facilities of Proton Accelerator

    Proton Engineering Frontier Project, puts its aim to building 100MeV 20mA linear proton accelerator which is national facility for NT, BT, IT, and future technologies, expected to boost up the national industry competitiveness. This R and D, Construction Management is in charge of the supportive works such as site selection, architecture and engineering of conventional facilities, and overall construction management. The major goals of this work are as follows: At first, architecture and engineering of conventional facilities. Second, construction management, supervision and inspection on construction of conventional facilities. Lastly, cooperation with the project host organization, Gyeongju city, for adjusting technically interrelated work during construction. In this research, We completed the basic, detail, and field changed design of conventional facilities. Acquisition of necessary construction and atomic license, radiation safety analysis, site improvement, access road construction were successfully done as well. Also, we participated in the project host related work as follows: Project host organization and site selection, construction technical work for project host organization and procedure management, etc. Consequently, we so fulfilled all of the own goals which were set up in the beginning of this construction project that we could made contribution for installing and running PEFP's developed 100MeV 20mA linear accelerator

  6. A new electron accelerator facility for commercial and educational uses

    Uribe, R. M.; Vargas-Aburto, C.

    2001-07-01

    A 5 MeV 150 kW electron accelerator facility (NEO Beam Alliance Inc.) has recently initiated operations in Ohio. NEO Beam is the result of a "partnership" between Kent State University (KSU) and a local plastics company (Mercury Plastics, Inc.). The accelerator will be used for electron beam processing, and for educational activities. KSU has created a university-wide Program on Electron Beam Technology (EBT) to address both instructional (including workforce training and development) and research opportunities. In this work, a description is made of the facility and its genesis. Present curricular initiatives are described. Preliminary dosimetry measurements performed with radiochromic (RC) dye films, calorimeters, and alanine pellets are presented and discussed.

  7. Recent program at the TESLA test facility

    The design goal of the TESLA Test facility (TTF) to demonstrate the possibility of routine operation at 15 MV/m with superconducting 9-cell cavities has been more than achieved. Average accelerating gradients in the cryomodule up to 23 MV/m have been reached. Average gradients well above 25 MV/m have been achieved for the 9-cell cavities from the latest production series. For electropolished one-cell cavities up to 43 MV/m have been reached. The rf source for TESLA, the 10 MW multibeam-klystron has produced full power at 65% efficiency, and it has been operating now at the TTF for over 1000 hrs. High grain self-amplified spontaneous emission at wave length ranging from 80 to 181 nm has been demonstrated

  8. The CERN linear collider test facility (CTF)

    The CTF (Collider Test Facility) was brought into service last year. The 3 GHz gun produced a beam of 3 MeV/c which was accelerated to 40 MeV/c. This beam, passing a prototype CLIC (linear collider) structure, generated a sizeable amount of 30 GHz power. This paper describes the results and experience with the gun driven by a 8 ns long laser pulse and its CsI photo cathode, the beam behaviour, the beam diagnostics in particular with the bunch measurements by Cerenkov or transition radiation light and streak camera, the photo cathode research, and the beam dynamics studies on space charge effects. (Author)4 figs., tab., 6 refs

  9. Accelerated knowledge Acquisition Programme for Real Estate and Facilities Management

    B. Atkin

    2001-01-01

    Increased recognition of the importance of workplace strategies and other facility-related business decisions are preoccupying owners and academics alike. In Finland, the real estate sector has a pressing need to develop a new generation of industry-aware researchers to deal with and resolve matters of strategic value to real estate owners and occupiers. The approach being advocated is a programme of accelerated knowledge acquisition in which information and communications technology will pla...

  10. The target laboratory of the Pelletron Accelerator's facilities

    Ueta, Nobuko; Pereira Engel, Wanda Gabriel

    2013-05-01

    A short report on the activities developed in the Target Laboratory, since 1970, will be presented. Basic target laboratory facilities were provided to produce the necessary nuclear targets as well as the ion beam stripper foils. Vacuum evaporation units, a roller, a press and an analytical balance were installed in the Oscar Sala building. A brief historical report will be presented in commemoration of the 40th year of the Pelletron Accelerator.

  11. The target laboratory of the Pelletron Accelerator's facilities

    A short report on the activities developed in the Target Laboratory, since 1970, will be presented. Basic target laboratory facilities were provided to produce the necessary nuclear targets as well as the ion beam stripper foils. Vacuum evaporation units, a roller, a press and an analytical balance were installed in the Oscar Sala building. A brief historical report will be presented in commemoration of the 40th year of the Pelletron Accelerator.

  12. Superpower proton linear accelerators for neutron generators and electronuclear facilities

    The report is a review of projects on the superpower proton linear accelerators (SPLA) for neutron generators (NG) and electronuclear facilities, proposed in the recent years. The beam average output capacity in these projects reaches 100 MW. The basic parameters of certain operating NGs, as well as some projected NGs will the SPLA drivers are presented. The problems on application of superconducting resonators in the SPLA as well as the issues of the SPLA reliability and costs are discussed

  13. Engineering test facility design definition

    Bercaw, R. W.; Seikel, G. R.

    1980-06-01

    The Engineering Test Facility (ETF) is the major focus of the Department of Energy (DOE) Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Program to facilitate commercialization and to demonstrate the commercial operability of MHD/steam electric power. The ETF will be a fully integrated commercial prototype MHD power plant with a nominal output of 200 MW sub e. Performance of this plant is expected to meet or surpass existing utility standards for fuel, maintenance, and operating costs; plant availability; load following; safety; and durability. It is expected to meet all applicable environmental regulations. The current design concept conforming to the general definition, the basis for its selection, and the process which will be followed in further defining and updating the conceptual design.

  14. Status report of 14 UD pelletron accelerator facility

    The BARC- TIFR Pelletron Accelerator facility (PAF) has been working for the last eighteen years. Over the years performance has improved gradually. On an average sixty to seventy experiments of 3-5 days duration are carried out per year. In order to boost the energy of ion beam, a superconducting Linac project with eight modules each having four resonators was taken up. The project is nearing completion. Apart from basic research, accelerator is also being used for various applied programs. In order to keep machine time up various development programs have also been taken up. In this paper we will discuss in detail about present status of accelerator and in brief about future program. (author)

  15. A facility for accelerator research and education at Fermilab

    Church, Mike; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Fermilab is currently constructing the 'SRF Test Accelerator at the New Muon Lab' (NML). NML consists of a photo-emitted RF electron gun, followed by a bunch compressor, low energy test beamlines, SCRF accelerating structures, and high energy test beamlines. The initial primary purpose of NML will be to test superconducting RF accelerating modules for the ILC and for Fermilab's 'Project X' - a proposal for a high intensity proton source. The unique capability of NML will be to test these modules under conditions of high intensity electron beams with ILC-like beam parameters. In addition NML incorporates a photoinjector which offers significant tunability and especially the possibility to generate a bright electron beam with brightness comparable to state-of-the-art accelerators. This opens the exciting possibility of also using NML for fundamental beams research and tests of new concepts in beam manipulations and acceleration, instrumentation, and the applications of beams.

  16. Test Stand for Linear Induction Accelerator Optimization

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has designed and constructed a test stand to improve the voltage regulation in our Flash X-Ray (FXR) accelerator cell. The goal is to create a more mono-energetic electron beam that will create an x-ray source with a smaller spot size. Studying the interaction of the beam and pulse-power system with the accelerator cell will improve the design of high-current accelerators at Livermore and elsewhere. On the test stand, a standard FXR cell is driven by a flexible pulse-power system and the beam current is simulated with a switched center conductor. The test stand is fully instrumented with high-speed digitizers to document the effect of impedance mismatches when the cell is operated under various full-voltage conditions. A time-domain reflectometry technique was also developed to characterize the beam and cell interactions by measuring the impedance of the accelerator and pulse-power component. Computer models are being developed in parallel with the testing program to validate the measurements and evaluate different design changes. Both 3D transient electromagnetic and circuit models are being used

  17. Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility

    1999-01-01

    Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. This photograph shows a fully assembled solar thermal engine placed inside the vacuum chamber at the test facility prior to testing. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has a dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on the 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move theNation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  18. Database requirements for the Advanced Test Accelerator project

    The database requirements for the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) project are outlined. ATA is a state-of-the-art electron accelerator capable of producing energetic (50 million electron volt), high current (10,000 ampere), short pulse (70 billionths of a second) beams of electrons for a wide variety of applications. Databasing is required for two applications. First, the description of the configuration of facility itself requires an extended database. Second, experimental data gathered from the facility must be organized and managed to insure its full utilization. The two applications are intimately related since the acquisition and analysis of experimental data requires knowledge of the system configuration. This report reviews the needs of the ATA program and current implementation, intentions, and desires. These database applications have several unique aspects which are of interest and will be highlighted. The features desired in an ultimate database system are outlined. 3 references, 5 figures

  19. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 22-27, 1988, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The program included papers on facility plans, beam dynamics, and accelerator hardware. The parallel sessions were particularly lively with discussions of all facets of kaon factory design. The workshop provided an opportunity for communication among the staff involved in hadron facility planning from all the study groups presently active. The recommendations of the workshop include: the need to use h=1 RF in the compressor ring; the need to minimize foil hits in painting schemes for all rings; the need to consider single Coulomb scattering in injection beam los calculations; the need to study the effect of field inhomogeneity in the magnets on slow extraction for the 2.2 Tesla main ring of AHF; and agreement in principle with the design proposed for a joint Los Alamos/TRIUMF prototype main ring RF cavity

  20. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility

    The US Department of Energy's liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility is a research and demonstration facility available on a user-fee basis to private and public sector test and training sponsors concerned with safety aspects of hazardous chemicals. Though initially designed to accommodate large liquefied natural gas releases, the Spill Test Facility (STF) can also accommodate hazardous materials training and safety-related testing of most chemicals in commercial use. The STF is located at DOE's Nevada Test Site near Mercury, Nevada, USA. Utilization of the Spill Test Facility provides a unique opportunity for industry and other users to conduct hazardous materials testing and training. The Spill Test Facility is the only facility of its kind for either large- or small-scale testing of hazardous and toxic fluids including wind tunnel testing under controlled conditions. It is ideally suited for test sponsors to develop verified data on prevention, mitigation, clean-up, and environmental effects of toxic and hazardous gaseous liquids. The facility site also supports structured training for hazardous spills, mitigation, and clean-up. Since 1986, the Spill Test Facility has been utilized for releases to evaluate the patterns of dispersion, mitigation techniques, and combustion characteristics of select materials. Use of the facility can also aid users in developing emergency planning under US P.L 99-499, the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) and other regulations. The Spill Test Facility Program is managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy (FE) with the support and assistance of other divisions of US DOE and the US Government. DOE/FE serves as facilitator and business manager for the Spill Test Facility and site. This brief document is designed to acquaint a potential user of the Spill Test Facility with an outline of the procedures and policies associated with the use of the facility

  1. Radiation Shielding Analysis of Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    The objective of this technical report are to establish the radiation shielding technology of a high-energy electron accelerator to the facilities which utilize with electron beam. The technologies of electron beam irradiation(300 KeV -10 MeV) demand on the diverse areas of material processing, surface treatment, treatments on foods or food processing, improvement of metal properties, semiconductors, and ceramics, sterilization of medical goods and equipment, treatment and control of contamination and pollution, and so on. In order to acquire safety design for the protection of personnel from the radiations produced by electron beam accelerators, it is important to develop the radiation shielding analysis technology. The shielding analysis are carried out by which define source term, calculation modelling and computer calculations for 2 MeV and 10 MeV accelerators. And the shielding analysis for irradiation dump shield with 10 MeV accelerators are also performed by solving the complex 3-D geometry and long computer run time problem. The technology development of shielding analysis will be contributed to extend the further high energy accelerator development

  2. Effective flow-accelerated corrosion programs in nuclear facilities

    Piping Flow-Accelerated Corrosion Programs in nuclear power generation facilities are classically comprised of the selection of inspection locations with the assistance of a predictive methodology such as the Electric Power Research Institute computer codes CHECMATE or CHECWORKS, performing inspections, conducting structural evaluations on the inspected components, and implementing the appropriate sample expansion and corrective actions. Performing such a sequence of steps can be effective in identifying thinned components and implementing appropriate short term and long term actions necessary to resolve flow-accelerated corrosion related problems. A maximally effective flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) program requires an understanding of many programmatic details. These include the procedural control of the program, effective use of historical information, managing the activities performed during a limited duration outage, allocating resources based on risk allocation, having an acute awareness of how the plant is operated, investigating components removed from the plant, and several others. This paper will describe such details and methods that will lead to a flow-accelerated corrosion program that effectively minimizes the risk of failure due to flow-accelerated corrosion and provide full and complete documentation of the program. (author)

  3. Manufacturing and Testing of Accelerator Superconducting Magnets

    Rossi, L

    2014-01-01

    Manufacturing of superconducting magnet for accelerators is a quite complex process that is not yet fully industrialized. In this paper, after a short history of the evolution of the magnet design and construction, we review the main characteristics of the accelerator magnets having an impact on the construction technology. We put in evidence how the design and component quality impact on construction and why the final product calls for a total-quality approach. LHC experience is widely discussed and main lessons are spelled out. Then the new Nb3Sn technology, under development for the next generation magnet construction, is outlined. Finally, we briefly review the testing procedure of accelerator superconducting magnets, underlining the close connection with the design validation and with the manufacturing process.

  4. Test Particles with Acceleration-Dependent Lagrangian

    Toller, M

    2006-01-01

    We consider a classical test particle subject to electromagnetic and gravitational fields, described by a Lagrangian depending on the acceleration and on a fundamental length. We associate to the particle a moving local reference frame and we study its trajectory in the principal fibre bundle of all the Lorentz frames. We discuss in this framework the general form of the Lagrange equations and the connection between symmetries and conservation laws (Noether theorem). We apply these results to a model, already discussed by other authors, which implies an upper bound to the proper acceleration and to another new model in which a similar quantity, called ``pseudo-acceleration'', is bounded. With some simple choices of the fields, we illustrate some other interesting properties of the models and we show that unwanted features may appear, as instable run-away solutions and unphysical values of the energy-momentum or of the velocity.

  5. CHARM Facility Test Area Radiation Field Description

    Thornton, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Specification document summarising the radiation field of the CHARM facility test area. This will act as a guide to any potential users of the facility as to what they can expect in terms of radiation, given in the form of radiation spectra information and fluence for each test position, along with general radiation maps for the test area and Montrac test location.

  6. Successful start for new CLIC test facility

    2004-01-01

    A new test facility is being built to study key feasibility issues for a possible future linear collider called CLIC. Commissioning of the first part of the facility began in June 2003 and nominal beam parameters have been achieved already.

  7. An Asset Test of the CLIC Accelerating Structure

    Transverse wakefield suppression in the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) multibunch accelerating structure, called the TDS (Tapered Damped Structure), is achieved primarily through heavy damping. In order to verify the performance of the TDS design and the validity of the theoretical tools used to model it, a 15 GHz version of the TDS has been constructed and tested in the ASSET facility at SLAC. The test has directly demonstrated transverse wakefield suppression of over a factor 100, with an excellent agreement between the measured and the calculated wakefield

  8. SNS Accelerator Facility Target Safety and Non-Safety Control Systems

    The SNS is a proton accelerator facility that generates neutrons for scientific researchers by spallation of neutrons from a mercury target. The SNS became operational on April 28, 2006 with first beam on target at approximately 200 watts. The SNS accelerator, target, and conventional facilities controls are integrated by standardized hardware and software throughout the facility and were designed and fabricated to SNS conventions to ensure compatibility of systems with Experimental Physics Integrated Control System (EPICS). ControlLogix PLCs interface to instruments and actuators, and EPICS performs the high-level integration of the PLCs such that all operator control can be accomplished from the Central Control room using EPICS graphical screens that pass process variables to and from the PLCs. Three active safety systems were designed to industry standards ISA S84.01 and IEEE 603 to meet the desired reliability for these safety systems. The safety systems protect facility workers and the environment from mercury vapor, mercury radiation, and proton beam radiation. The facility operators operated many of the systems prior to beam on target and developed the operating procedures. The safety and non-safety control systems were tested extensively prior to beam on target. This testing was crucial to identify wiring and software errors and failed components, the result of which was few problems during operation with beam on target. The SNS has continued beam on target since April to increase beam power, check out the scientific instruments, and continue testing the operation of facility subsystems

  9. Tests of compressed geometry acceleration tubes in the Oak Ridge 25URC tandem accelerator

    In an effort to further improve voltage performance of the Oak Ridge 25URC accelerator, the original acceleration tubes will be replaced with NEC compressed geometry acceleration tubes. In this paper, we report on tests in the 25URC accelerator of two prototype compressed geometry acceleration tube designs. One of the designs utilizes a novel aperture which provides enhanced electron and ion trapping

  10. Technical issues of accelerator-driven transmutation and a research facility

    In the late 1980s, Japan launched an ambitious long-term program on partitioning and transmutation (P-T), called OMEGA, aiming at development of the technology to improve efficiency and safety in the final disposal of high-level waste (HLW) and to recover useful elements from HLW. This paper describes the concept of double stratum nuclear fuel cycle and the concept of accelerator-driven transmutation systems, which are proposed by JAERI as the most efficient strategy and system for the deployment of P-T. Technical issues of accelerator-driven transmutation and a research facility plan under reviewing are summarized. More detail descriptions of technical issues and research facility plan are presented in the successive two companion papers. National and international R and D activities on accelerator-based transmutation are overviewed with emphasis placed on engineering experiment and demonstration test part of programs. (author)

  11. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    Xu, Y.; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, T. N.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Johnson, G. W.; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-01

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.

  12. Importance of tests in nuclear facilities

    In nuclear facilities, safety related systems and equipments are subject, along their whole service-life, to numerous tests. This paper analyses the role of tests in the successive stages of design, construction, exploitation of a nuclear facility. It examines several aspects of test quality control: definition of needs, test planning, intrinsic quality of each test, control of interfaces (test are both the end and the starting point of many actions concerned by quality) and the application

  13. Test Particles with Acceleration-Dependent Lagrangian

    Toller, M.

    2005-01-01

    We consider a classical test particle subject to electromagnetic and gravitational fields, described by a Lagrangian depending on the acceleration and on a fundamental length. We associate to the particle a moving local reference frame and we study its trajectory in the principal fibre bundle of all the Lorentz frames. We discuss in this framework the general form of the Lagrange equations and the connection between symmetries and conservation laws (Noether theorem). We apply these results to...

  14. Shielding aspects of accelerators, targets and irradiation facilities

    Particle accelerators have evolved over the last half-century from simple devices to powerful machines, and will continue to have an important impact on research, technology and lifestyle. Today they cover a wide range of applications, from television and computer displays in households to the investigation of the origin and structure of matter. It has become common practice to use them for material science and medical applications. In recent years, requirements from new technological and research applications have emerged: increased particle beams intensities, higher flexibility, etc., giving rise to new radiation shielding aspects and problems. These Proceedings review newer accelerator facilities, identify problematic aspects concerning radiation shielding that need to be solved, and indicate areas where international co-operation and co-ordination are highly desirable. (authors). 480 refs., 200 figs., 48 tabs

  15. CERN accelerator school: Antiprotons for colliding beam facilities

    This is a specialized course which addresses a wide spectrum of theoretical and technological problems confronting the designer of an antiproton facility for high-energy-physics research. A broad and profound basis is provided by the lecturers' substantial experience gained over many years with CERN's unique equipment. Topics include beam optics, special lattices for antiproton accumulation and storage rings, antiproton production, stochastic cooling, acceleration and storage, r.f. noise, r.f. beam manipulations, beam-beam interaction, beam stability due to ion accumulation, and diagnostics. The SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) panti p collider, LEAR (the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN), antiprotons in the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings), the new antiproton collector (ACOL) and gas jet targets are also discussed. A table is included listing the parameters of all CERN's accelerators and storage rings. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  16. Vacuum system for Advanced Test Accelerator

    Denhoy, B.S.

    1981-09-03

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a pulsed linear electron beam accelerator designed to study charged particle beam propagation. ATA is designed to produce a 10,000 amp 50 MeV, 70 ns electron beam. The electron beam acceleration is accomplished in ferrite loaded cells. Each cell is capable of maintaining a 70 ns 250 kV voltage pulse across a 1 inch gap. The electron beam is contained in a 5 inch diameter, 300 foot long tube. Cryopumps turbomolecular pumps, and mechanical pumps are used to maintain a base pressure of 2 x 10/sup -6/ torr in the beam tube. The accelerator will be installed in an underground tunnel. Due to the radiation environment in the tunnel, the controlling and monitoring of the vacuum equipment, pressures and temperatures will be done from the control room through a computer interface. This paper describes the vacuum system design, the type of vacuum pumps specified, the reasons behind the selection of the pumps and the techniques used for computer interfacing.

  17. Vacuum system for Advanced Test Accelerator

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a pulsed linear electron beam accelerator designed to study charged particle beam propagation. ATA is designed to produce a 10,000 amp 50 MeV, 70 ns electron beam. The electron beam acceleration is accomplished in ferrite loaded cells. Each cell is capable of maintaining a 70 ns 250 kV voltage pulse across a 1 inch gap. The electron beam is contained in a 5 inch diameter, 300 foot long tube. Cryopumps turbomolecular pumps, and mechanical pumps are used to maintain a base pressure of 2 x 10-6 torr in the beam tube. The accelerator will be installed in an underground tunnel. Due to the radiation environment in the tunnel, the controlling and monitoring of the vacuum equipment, pressures and temperatures will be done from the control room through a computer interface. This paper describes the vacuum system design, the type of vacuum pumps specified, the reasons behind the selection of the pumps and the techniques used for computer interfacing

  18. Physics at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Lawrence Cardman

    2005-10-22

    The CEBAF accelerator at JLab is fulfilling its scientific mission to understand how hadrons are constructed from the quarks and gluons of QCD, to understand the QCD basis for the nucleon-nucleon force, and to explore the transition from the nucleon-meson to a QCD description. Its success is based on the firm foundation of experimental and theoretical techniques developed world-wide over the past few decades, on complementary data provided by essential lower-energy facilities, such as MAMI, and on the many insights provided by the scientists we are gathered here to honor.

  19. Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility (VATF): User Test Planning Guide

    Fantasia, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the VATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  20. Antenna Test Facility (ATF): User Test Planning Guide

    Lin, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  1. Test Facility for SMART Reactor Flow Distribution

    A Reactor Flow Distribution Test Facilities for SMART, named SCOP (SMART Core Flow and Pressure Test Facility), were designed in order to simulate the distributions of (1) core flow and (2) reactor sectional flow resistance and flow rates. SCOP facility was designed based on the linear scaling law in order to preserve the flow characteristics of the prototype system, which are distributions of flow rate and pressure drop. The reduced scale was selected as a 1/5 of prototype length scale. The nominal flow condition was designed to be similar based on the velocity as that of the SMART reactor, which can minimize the flow distortion in the reduced scale of test facility by maintaining high Re number flow. Test facility includes fluid system, control/instrumentation system, data acquisition system, power system, which were designed to meet the requirement for each system. This report describes the details of the scaling and design features for the test facility

  2. Health physics manual of good practices for accelerator facilities

    It is hoped that this manual will serve both as a teaching aid as well as a useful adjunct for program development. In the context of application, this manual addresses good practices that should be observed by management, staff, and designers since the achievement of a good radiation program indeed involves a combined effort. Ultimately, radiation safety and good work practices become the personal responsibility of the individual. The practices presented in this manual are not to be construed as mandatory rather they are to be used as appropriate for the specific case in the interest of radiation safety. As experience is accrued and new data obtained in the application of this document, ONS will update the guidance to assure that at any given time the guidance reflects optimum performance consistent with current technology and practice.The intent of this guide therefore is to: define common health physics problems at accelerators; recommend suitable methods of identifying, evaluating, and managing accelerator health physics problems; set out the established safety practices at DOE accelerators that have been arrived at by consensus and, where consensus has not yet been reached, give examples of safe practices; introduce the technical literature in the accelerator health physics field; and supplement the regulatory documents listed in Appendix D. Many accelerator health physics problems are no different than those at other kinds of facilities, e.g., ALARA philosophy, instrument calibration, etc. These problems are touched on very lightly or not at all. Similarly, this document does not cover other hazards such as electrical shock, toxic materials, etc. This does not in any way imply that these problems are not serious. 160 refs

  3. High current electron linacs (advanced test accelerator/experimental test accelerator)

    The high current induction accelerator development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is described. The ATA facility is designed for 10 kA peak currents, 50 nsec pulse lengths and 50 MeV energies. At this time, half of the design current has been accelerated through the entire machine to particle energies of about 45 MeV. Current problem areas and operational experience to date will be discussed. Several key technical areas required development for the ATA machine; this report will survey these developments. The control of transverse beam instabilities required an accelerating cavity design with very low Q. Electron sources capable of 10 kA operation at high rep rates were developed using a plasma sparkboard approach. The pulse power systems on ATA, using the same type of spark gap switches as ETA, have exhibited excellent operational reliability

  4. Klystron pulse modulator of linear electron accelerator: test results

    Z. Zimek

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to describe Klystron pulse modulator of linear electron accelerator.Design/methodology/approach: TH-2158 klystron modulator experimental model is based on semiconductor switch HTS 181-160 FI (acceptable current load 1600 A, and voltage up to 18 kV. The results of test measurements carried out during modulator starting up period are presented in this work. TH-2158 klystron was used as a load. The klystron was connected to the second winding of the pulse HV transformer with 1:10 windings turn ratio. The examined modulator is equipped with safety shutdown circuitry for protection against current overload that may appear at IGBT switch in the case of short-circuiting happened in klystron and waveguide system.Findings: Linear electron accelerator type LAE 10/15 with electron energy 10 MeV and beam power up to 15 kW was designed and completed at Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. This accelerator was installed in facility for radiation sterilization single use medical devices, implants and tissue grafts. The standing wave accelerating section was selected. Microwave energy used for accelerating process is provided by klystron type TH-2158 working at frequency 2856 MHz.Practical implications: Described HV pulse modulator which designed and constructed for klystron TH-2158 was preliminary tested to evaluate the quality of the klystron HV and load current pulses and optimized selected component parameters. Obtained experimental results are better than those which were predicted by computer simulation method.Originality/value: Description of Klystron pulse modulator of linear electron accelerator.

  5. Sophisticated test facility to detect land mines

    Jong, W. de; Lensen, H.A.; Janssen, Y.H.L.

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of the Dutch government humanitarian demining project 'HOM-2000', an outdoor test facility has been realized to test, improve and develop detection equipment for land mines. This sophisticated facility, allows us to access and compare the performance of the individual and of a combi

  6. Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program: Annual report

    A computerized data base of LLW leaching data has been developed. Long-term tests on portland cement, bitumen and vinyl ester-styrene (VES) polymer waste forms containing simulated wastes are underway which are designed to identify and evaluate factors that accelerate leaching without changing the mechanisms

  7. Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program: Annual report

    Dougherty, D.R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1986-09-01

    A computerized data base of LLW leaching data has been developed. Long-term tests on portland cement, bitumen and vinyl ester-styrene (VES) polymer waste forms containing simulated wastes are underway which are designed to identify and evaluate factors that accelerate leaching without changing the mechanisms.

  8. Lead Coolant Test Facility Development Workshop

    Paul A. Demkowicz

    2005-06-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on May 25, 2005, to discuss the development of a next generation lead or lead-alloy coolant test facility. Attendees included representatives from the Generation IV lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) program, Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, and several universities. Several participants gave presentations on coolant technology, existing experimental facilities for lead and lead-alloy research, the current LFR design concept, and a design by Argonne National Laboratory for an integral heavy liquid metal test facility. Discussions were focused on the critical research and development requirements for deployment of an LFR demonstration test reactor, the experimental scope of the proposed coolant test facility, a review of the Argonne National Laboratory test facility design, and a brief assessment of the necessary path forward and schedule for the initial stages of this development project. This report provides a summary of the presentations and roundtable discussions.

  9. Stripline kicker for integrable optics test accelerator

    Antipov, Sergey A.; Didenko, Alexander; Lebedev, Valeri; Valishev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present a design of a stripline kicker for Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). For its experimental program IOTA needs two full-aperture kickers, capable to create an arbitrary controllable kick in 2D. For that reason their strengths are variable in a wide range of amplitudes up to 16 mrad, and the pulse length 100 ns is less than a revolution period for electrons. In addition, the kicker should have a physical aperture of 40 mm for a proposed operation with proton beam, and an oute...

  10. Construction and commissioning test report of the CEDM test facility

    The test facility for performance verification of the control element drive mechanism (CEDM) of next generation power plant was installed at the site of KAERI. The CEDM was featured a mechanism consisting of complicated mechanical parts and electromagnetic control system. Thus, a new CEDM design should go through performance verification tests prior to it's application in a reactor. The test facility can simulate the reactor operating conditions such as temperature, pressure and water quality and is equipped with a test chamber to accomodate a CEDM as installed in the power plant. This test facility can be used for the following tests; endurance test, coil cooling test, power measurement and reactivity rod drop test. The commissioning tests for the test facility were performed up to the CEDM test conditions of 320 C and 150 bar, and required water chemistry was obtained by operating the on-line water treatment system

  11. Laboratory Test of Newton's Second Law for Small Accelerations

    We have tested the proportionality of force and acceleration in Newton's second law, F=ma, in the limit of small forces and accelerations. Our tests reach well below the acceleration scales relevant to understanding several current astrophysical puzzles such as the flatness of galactic rotation curves, the Pioneer anomaly, and the Hubble acceleration. We find good agreement with Newton's second law at accelerations as small as 5x10-14 m/s2

  12. Photovoltaic Systems Test Facilities: Existing capabilities compilation

    Volkmer, K.

    1982-01-01

    A general description of photovoltaic systems test facilities (PV-STFs) operated under the U.S. Department of Energy's photovoltaics program is given. Descriptions of a number of privately operated facilities having test capabilities appropriate to photovoltaic hardware development are given. A summary of specific, representative test capabilities at the system and subsystem level is presented for each listed facility. The range of system and subsystem test capabilities available to serve the needs of both the photovoltaics program and the private sector photovoltaics industry is given.

  13. Results from DR and Instrumentation Test Facilities

    Urakawa, Junji

    2005-01-01

    The KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) is a 1.3GeV storage ring capable of producing ultra-low emittance electron beams and has a beam extraction line for ILC R&D. The ATF has proven to be an ideal place for researches with small, stable beams. 2x1010 single bunch and low current 20 bunch-train with 2.8nsec bunch spacing have been extracted to develop Nano-Cavity BPM’s, FONT, Nano Beam Orbit handling (FEATHER), Optical Diffraction Radiation (ODR) monitor, a precision multi-bunch laser-based beam profile monitor and polarized positron beam generation via backward-Compton scattering by the international collaboration. A set of three cavity BPM's is installed in the ATF extraction line on a set of extremely stiff supports. The KEK group installed another set of three BPM's, with their own support mechanism. The full set of 6 will prove extremely useful. In the DR (Damping Ring), we are researching the fast ion instability, micro-wave instability with four sets of damping wiggler and developing pul...

  14. CryoModule Test Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CMTFis able to test complete SRF cryomodules at cryogenic operating temperatures and with RF Power. CMTF will house the PIP-II Injector Experiment allowing test of...

  15. Naval Aerodynamics Test Facility (NATF)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NATF specializes in Aerodynamics testing of scaled and fullsized Naval models, research into flow physics found on US Navy planes and ships, aerosol testing and...

  16. Induction accelerator test module for HIF

    An induction linac test module suitable for investigating the drive requirements and the longitudinal coupling impedance of a high-power ion induction linac has been constructed by the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) group at LBL. The induction linac heavy ion driver for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) as presently envisioned uses multiple parallel beams which are transported in separate focusing channels but accelerated together in the induction modules. The resulting induction modules consequently have large beam apertures-1--2 meters in diameter- and correspondingly large outside diameters. The module geometry is related to a low-frequency ''gap capacity'' and high-frequency structural resonances, which are affected by the magnetic core loading and the module pulser impedance. A description of the test module and preliminary results are presented. 3 figs

  17. Present status of the Kyushu University accelerator facility

    Mitarai, Shiro; Maeda, Toyokazu; Koga, Yoshihiro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)] (and others)

    2001-02-01

    A large diameter gas stripper was developed and incorporated to a terminal port of the tandem accelerator and test operation was performed. The permeability of low-energy carbon beams in the tandem was remarkably improved with the gas stripper. A recoiled-nuclei mass spectrometer was also developed and facilitated for accurate measurement of the cross sections of {sup 12}C({sup 4}He, {gamma}) {sup 16}O in cosmic nuclear reactions. Test operation was made for reduction of background due to the injection beams. The plasma-sputtering type ion source was introduced and the beams will be injected into the tandem. (H. Yokoo)

  18. Present status of the Kyushu University accelerator facility

    A large diameter gas stripper was developed and incorporated to a terminal port of the tandem accelerator and test operation was performed. The permeability of low-energy carbon beams in the tandem was remarkably improved with the gas stripper. A recoiled-nuclei mass spectrometer was also developed and facilitated for accurate measurement of the cross sections of 12C(4He, γ) 16O in cosmic nuclear reactions. Test operation was made for reduction of background due to the injection beams. The plasma-sputtering type ion source was introduced and the beams will be injected into the tandem. (H. Yokoo)

  19. Improvement in performance and operational experience of 14 UD Pelletron Accelerator Facility, BARC–TIFR

    P V Bhagwat

    2002-11-01

    14 UD Pelletron Accelerator Facility at Mumbai has been operational since 1989. The project MEHIA (medium energy heavy ion accelerator) started in 1982 and was formally inaugurated on 30th December 1988. Since then the accelerator has been working round the clock. Improvement in accelerator performance and operational experience are described.

  20. A post accelerator for the U.S. rare isotope accelerator facility

    The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Facility includes a post-accelerator for rare isotopes (RIB linac) which must produce high-quality beams of radioactive ions over the full mass range, including uranium, at energies above the coulomb barrier, and have high transmission and efficiency. The latter requires the RIB linac to accept at injection ions in the 1+ charge state. A concept for such a post accelerator suitable for ions up to mass 132 has been previously described [1]. This paper presents a modified concept which extends the mass range to uranium. A high resolution separator for purifying beams at the isobaric level precedes the RIB linac. The mass filtering process will provide high purity beams while preserving transmission. For most cases a resolution of about m/Δm=20,000 is adequate at mass A=100 to obtain a separation between isobars of mass excess difference of 5 MeV. The design for a device capable of purifying beams at the isobaric level included calculations up to 5th order. The RIB linac will utilize existing superconducting heavy-ion linac technology for all but a small portion of the accelerator system. The exceptional piece, a very-low-charge-state injector, section needed for just the first few MV of the RIB accelerator, consists of a pre-buncher followed by several sections of cw, normally-conducting RFQ. Two stages of charge stripping are provided: helium gas stripping at energies of a few keV/u, and additional foil stripping at ∼680 keV/u for the heavier ions. In extending the mass range to uranium, however, for best efficiency the helium gas stripping must be performed at different energies for different mass ions. We present numerical simulations of the beam dynamics of a design for the complete RIB linac which provides for several stripping options and uses cost-effective solenoid focusing elements in the drift-tube linac

  1. A post-accelerator for the US rare isotope accelerator facility

    The proposed rare isotope accelerator (RIA) facility includes a post-accelerator for rare isotopes (RIB linac) which must produce high-quality beams of radioactive ions over the full mass range, including uranium, at energies above the Coulomb barrier, and have high transmission and efficiency. The latter requires the RIB linac to accept at injection ions in the 1+ charge state. A concept for such a post accelerator suitable for ions up to mass 132 has been previously described . This paper presents a modified concept which extends the mass range to uranium. A high resolution separator for purifying beams at the isobaric level precedes the RIB linac. The mass filtering process will provide high purity beams while preserving transmission. For most cases a resolution of about m/Δm=20 000 is adequate at mass A=100 to obtain a separation between isobars of mass excess difference of 5 MeV. The design for a device capable of purifying beams at the isobaric level includes calculations up to fifth order. The RIB linac will utilize existing superconducting heavy-ion linac technology for all but a small portion of the accelerator system. The exceptional piece, a very-low-charge-state injector section needed for just the first few MV of the RIB accelerator, consists of a pre-buncher followed by several sections of cw, normally-conducting RFQ. Two stages of charge stripping are provided: helium gas stripping at energies of a few keV/u, and additional foil stripping at ∼680 keV/u for the heavier ions. In extending the mass range to uranium, however, for best efficiency the helium gas stripping must be performed at different energies for different mass ions. We present numerical simulations of the beam dynamics of a design for the complete RIB linac which provides for several stripping options and uses cost-effective solenoid focusing elements in the drift-tube linac

  2. Flame Acceleration Tests with Hydrogen Combustions

    According to the domestic and foreign regulations, a detonation or DDT (deflagration to detonation transition) by a hydrogen combustion should be prohibited to occur in a containment of a nuclear power plant. A hydrogen control in the IRWST(Incontainment Refueling Water Storage Tank) under a severe accident still remains a debatable issue to be solved in APR1400. The characteristics of the hydrogen flame in the IRWST expected during the station black-out (SBO) and total loss of feed water (LOFW) accidents have been evaluated based on a sigma-lambda criteria from the simulation results by the numerical codes such as GASFLOW. And it was found that hydrogen mixture was non-flammable most of the accident time when the non-condensed steam was released into the free volume of the IRWST, but there existed a small period of time with a high possibility of a flame acceleration during the SBO accident because most of the steam discharged from sparger was well condensed. Therefore, detail analysis and experiment of the hydrogen flame should be required to fix a DDT possibility by the hydrogen combustion in the IRWST of the APR1400. Most experiments on the hydrogen combustion have been limited only to straight pipes or channels. However, the hydrogen flame acceleration phenomena in the IRWST with a closed annular path may be different from those in the straight path in respect to a centrifugal force and degree of freedom in flame propagation etc. So, an experiment of hydrogen combustion in a closed annular chamber is needed to find out the geometrical effect on the flame propagation and to validate the numerical results. KAERI has been performing the experiments of the hydrogen combustion in the IRWST. As the fist stage, flame acceleration tests with the hydrogen combustions are studied preliminarily for a circular straight pipe to confirm the characteristics hydrogen flame propagation, and to evaluate flame detection systems

  3. Ballast Water Treatment Test Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides functionality for the full-scale testing and controlled simulation of ship ballasting operations for assessment of aquatic nuisance species (ANS)...

  4. Battery Post-Test Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Post-test diagnostics of aged batteries can provide additional information regarding the cause of performance degradation, which, previously, could be only inferred...

  5. An accelerator facility within a mineral research establishment

    The importance of the minerals industry in Australia is evident from its share of about 40% of the country's export earnings. Its economic success is due in no small measure to the industry's ability to keep abreast with technological innovations and scientific developments, often through collaborations with federal Governments research laboratories such as the CSIRO. In this context, the CSIRO Division of Mineral Physics recently commissioned a laboratory, known as HIAF - the Heavy Ion Analytical Facility - based on a General Ionex 3 MV Tandetron, a tandem electrostatic accelerator. The Laboratory was designed to facilitate the development of the applications of a host of ion-beam techniques to problems in the geosciences, extending or complementing established methods. Flow-on to the minerals industry is anticipated, with varying degrees of immediacy dependent on the particular technique. The first stage operational at the commissioning provides RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) and NRA (nuclear reaction analysis) measurements, and includes the development of a beam microprobe. An ultra-sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system is planned for the second stage, to permit studies of chronology based on radio cosmogenic isotopes and ultra-traces in mineral samples. (orig.)

  6. Accelerator system for the Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    Accelerator system for Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility that consists of 50MeV electron S-band linac, 1.2GeV full energy booster synchrotron and 1.2GeV storage ring, has been constructed. Eight 1.4T bending magnets and four 5T superconducting magnet with compact refrigerator system provide beam lines. For top-up operation, the 1ns single bunch electron beam from 50MeV injector linac is injected by on-axis injection scheme and accelerated up to 1.2GeV at booster synchrotron. The timing system is designed for injection from booster ring is possible for any bunch position of storage ring. To improve efficiency of booster injection, the electron gun trigger and RF frequency of 2856MHz is synchronized with storage ring frequency of 499.654MHz. The EPICS control system is used with timing control system for linac, pulse magnet and also for booster pattern memory system. The beam commissioning for 1.2GeV storage ring has been progressing. (author)

  7. Environmental assessment: Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia

    This Environmental Assessment has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to fulfill its obligations pursuant to Sect. 102 of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (Public Law 91-190). The proposed federal action addressed in this document is DOE's funding of a Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Newport News, Virginia. DOE intends to contract with the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) for operation of CEBAF, a continuous wave (CW) linear accelerator system (linac) capable of providing high-duty-factor beams throughout the energy range from 0.5 to 4.0 GeV. CEBAF will be the first of its kind worldwide and will offer a multi-GeV energy, high-intensity, high-duty-factor electron beam for use by the US nuclear physics community in research on the states of nuclear matter and the short-distance behavior of nuclei. The CEBAF project is largely in the conceptual design stage, with some components in the preliminary design stage. Construction is anticipated to begin in 1987 and be completed by 1992

  8. Design Study of Beijing XFEL Test Facility

    Dai, J P

    2005-01-01

    As R&D of X-ray Free Electron Laser facility in China, the construction of Beijing XFEL Test Facility (BTF) has been proposed. And the start to end simulation of BTF was made with codes PARMELA, ELEGANT and TDA. This paper presents the motivation, the scheme and the simulation results of BTF.

  9. Accelerated Strength Testing of Thermoplastic Composites

    Reeder, J. R.; Allen, D. H.; Bradley, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    Constant ramp strength tests on unidirectional thermoplastic composite specimens oriented in the 90 deg. direction were conducted at constant temperatures ranging from 149 C to 232 C. Ramp rates spanning 5 orders of magnitude were tested so that failures occurred in the range from 0.5 sec. to 24 hrs. (0.5 to 100,000 MPa/sec). Below 204 C, time-temperature superposition held allowing strength at longer times to be estimated from strength tests at shorter times but higher temperatures. The data indicated that a 50% drop in strength might be expected for this material when the test time is increased by 9 orders of magnitude. The shift factors derived from compliance data applied well to the strength results. To explain the link between compliance and strength, a viscoelastic fracture model was investigated. The model, which used compliance as input, was found to fit the strength data only if the critical fracture energy was allowed to vary with temperature reduced stress rate. This variation in the critical parameter severely limits its use in developing a robust time-dependent strength model. The significance of this research is therefore seen as providing both the indication that a more versatile acceleration method for strength can be developed and the evidence that such a method is needed.

  10. A post-accelerator for the US rare isotope accelerator facility

    Ostroumov, P N; Kolomiets, A A; Nolen, J A; Portillo, M; Shepard, K W; Vinogradov, N E

    2003-01-01

    The proposed rare isotope accelerator (RIA) facility includes a post-accelerator for rare isotopes (RIB linac) which must produce high-quality beams of radioactive ions over the full mass range, including uranium, at energies above the Coulomb barrier, and have high transmission and efficiency. The latter requires the RIB linac to accept at injection ions in the 1+ charge state. A concept for such a post accelerator suitable for ions up to mass 132 has been previously described . This paper presents a modified concept which extends the mass range to uranium. A high resolution separator for purifying beams at the isobaric level precedes the RIB linac. The mass filtering process will provide high purity beams while preserving transmission. For most cases a resolution of about m/DELTA m=20 000 is adequate at mass A=100 to obtain a separation between isobars of mass excess difference of 5 MeV. The design for a device capable of purifying beams at the isobaric level includes calculations up to fifth order. The RIB...

  11. Ground test facility for nuclear testing of space reactor subsystems

    Two major reactor facilities at the INEL have been identified as easily adaptable for supporting the nuclear testing of the SP-100 reactor subsystem. They are the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) and the Loss of Fluid Test Reactor (LOFT). In addition, there are machine shops, analytical laboratories, hot cells, and the supporting services (fire protection, safety, security, medical, waste management, etc.) necessary to conducting a nuclear test program. This paper presents the conceptual approach for modifying these reactor facilities for the ground engineering test facility for the SP-100 nuclear subsystem. 4 figs

  12. Stripline kicker for integrable optics test accelerator

    Antipov, Sergey A.; Didenko, Alexander; Lebedev, Valeri; Valishev, Alexander

    2016-06-30

    We present a design of a stripline kicker for Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). For its experimental program IOTA needs two full-aperture kickers, capable to create an arbitrary controllable kick in 2D. For that reason their strengths are variable in a wide range of amplitudes up to 16 mrad, and the pulse length 100 ns is less than a revolution period for electrons. In addition, the kicker should have a physical aperture of 40 mm for a proposed operation with proton beam, and an outer size of 70 mm to fit inside existing quadrupole magnets to save space in the ring. Computer simulations using CST Microwave Studio show high field uniformity and wave impedance close to 50 {\\Omega}.

  13. Planck scale gravity test with accelerators

    Gharibyan, Vahagn

    2012-07-15

    Quantum or torsion gravity models predict unusual properties of space-time at very short distances. In particular, near the Planck length, around 10{sup -35} m, empty space may behave as a crystal, singly or doubly refractive. However, this hypothesis remains uncheckable for any direct measurement since the smallest distance accessible in experiment is about 10{sup -19} m at the LHC. Here I propose a laboratory test to measure the space refractivity and birefringence induced by gravity. A sensitivity from 10{sup -31} m down to the Planck length could be reached at existent GeV and future TeV energy lepton accelerators using laser Compton scattering. There are already experimental hints for gravity signature at distances approaching the Planck length by 5-7 orders of magnitude, derived from SLC and HERA data.

  14. Stripline kicker for integrable optics test accelerator

    Antipov, Sergey A; Lebedev, Valeri; Valishev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present a design of a stripline kicker for Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). For its experimental program IOTA needs two full-aperture kickers, capable to create an arbitrary controllable kick in 2D. For that reason their strengths are variable in a wide range of amplitudes up to 16 mrad, and the pulse length 100 ns is less than a revolution period for electrons. In addition, the kicker should have a physical aperture of 40 mm for a proposed operation with proton beam, and an outer size of 70 mm to fit inside existing quadrupole magnets to save space in the ring. Computer simulations using CST Microwave Studio show high field uniformity and wave impedance close to 50 {\\Omega}.

  15. Planck scale gravity test with accelerators

    Quantum or torsion gravity models predict unusual properties of space-time at very short distances. In particular, near the Planck length, around 10-35 m, empty space may behave as a crystal, singly or doubly refractive. However, this hypothesis remains uncheckable for any direct measurement since the smallest distance accessible in experiment is about 10-19 m at the LHC. Here I propose a laboratory test to measure the space refractivity and birefringence induced by gravity. A sensitivity from 10-31 m down to the Planck length could be reached at existent GeV and future TeV energy lepton accelerators using laser Compton scattering. There are already experimental hints for gravity signature at distances approaching the Planck length by 5-7 orders of magnitude, derived from SLC and HERA data.

  16. Spallation Neutron Source Accelerator Facility Target Safety and Non-safety Control Systems

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a proton accelerator facility that generates neutrons for scientific researchers by spallation of neutrons from a mercury target. The SNS became operational on April 28, 2006, with first beam on target at approximately 200 W. The SNS accelerator, target, and conventional facilities controls are integrated by standardized hardware and software throughout the facility and were designed and fabricated to SNS conventions to ensure compatibility of systems with Experimental Physics Integrated Control System (EPICS). ControlLogix Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) interface to instruments and actuators, and EPICS performs the high-level integration of the PLCs such that all operator control can be accomplished from the Central Control room using EPICS graphical screens that pass process variables to and from the PLCs. Three active safety systems were designed to industry standards ISA S84.01 and IEEE 603 to meet the desired reliability for these safety systems. The safety systems protect facility workers and the environment from mercury vapor, mercury radiation, and proton beam radiation. The facility operators operated many of the systems prior to beam on target and developed the operating procedures. The safety and non-safety control systems were tested extensively prior to beam on target. This testing was crucial to identify wiring and software errors and failed components, the result of which was few problems during operation with beam on target. The SNS has continued beam on target since April to increase beam power, check out the scientific instruments, and continue testing the operation of facility subsystems

  17. Advanced Control Test Operation (ACTO) facility

    The Advanced Control Test Operation (ACTO) project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), is being developed to enable the latest modern technology, automation, and advanced control methods to be incorporated into nuclear power plants. The facility is proposed as a national multi-user center for advanced control development and testing to be completed in 1991. The facility will support a wide variety of reactor concepts, and will be used by researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), plus scientists and engineers from industry, other national laboratories, universities, and utilities. ACTO will also include telecommunication facilities for remote users

  18. Plans for an ERL Test Facility at CERN

    Jensen, Erik [CERN; Bruning, O S [CERN; Calaga, Buchi Rama Rao [CERN; Schirm, Karl-Martin [CERN; Torres-Sanchez, R [CERN; Valloni, Alessandra [CERN; Aulenbacher, Kurt [Mainz; Bogacz, Slawomir [JLAB; Hutton, Andrew [JLAB; Klein, M [University of Liverpool

    2014-12-01

    The baseline electron accelerator for LHeC and one option for FCC-he is an Energy Recovery Linac. To prepare and study the necessary key technologies, CERNhas started – in collaboration with JLAB and Mainz University – the conceptual design of an ERL Test Facility (ERL-TF). Staged construction will allow the study under different conditions with up to 3 passes, beam energies of up to about 1 GeV and currents of up to 50 mA. The design and development of superconducting cavity modules, including coupler and HOM damper designs, are also of central importance for other existing and future accelerators and their tests are at the heart of the current ERL-TF goals. However, the ERL-TF could also provide a unique infrastructure for several applications that go beyond developing and testing the ERL technology at CERN. In addition to experimental studies of beam dynamics, operational and reliability issues in an ERL, it could equally serve for quench tests of superconducting magnets, as physics experimental facility on its own right or as test stand for detector developments. This contribution will describe the goals and the concept of the facility and the status of the R&D.

  19. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin

  20. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-03-01

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of

  1. Automation of electromagnetic compatability (EMC) test facilities

    Harrison, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    Efforts to automate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center are discussed. The present facility is used to accomplish a battery of nine standard tests (with limited variations) deigned to certify EMC of Shuttle payload equipment. Prior to this project, some EMC tests were partially automated, but others were performed manually. Software was developed to integrate all testing by means of a desk-top computer-controller. Near real-time data reduction and onboard graphics capabilities permit immediate assessment of test results. Provisions for disk storage of test data permit computer production of the test engineer's certification report. Software flexibility permits variation in the tests procedure, the ability to examine more closely those frequency bands which indicate compatibility problems, and the capability to incorporate additional test procedures.

  2. Directory of transport packaging test facilities

    Radioactive materials are transported in packagings or containers which have to withstand certain tests depending on whether they are Type A or Type B packagings. In answer to a request by the International Atomic Energy Agency, 13 Member States have provided information on the test facilities and services existing in their country which can be made available for use by other states by arrangement for testing different kinds of packagings. The directory gives the technical information on the facilities, the services, the tests that can be done and in some cases even the financial arrangement is included

  3. The integral test facility Karlstein - INKA

    The INKA (INtegral Test Facility KArlstein) test facility was designed and erected to test and demonstrate performance of the passive safety systems of KERENA™, the new AREVA Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) design. The experimental program within the KERENA™ development program included single component/system tests of the Emergency Condenser, the Containment Cooling Condenser and the Passive Core Flooding System. Integral system tests will be performed to simulate transients and LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) scenarios at the INKA test facility. These tests will test and demonstrate the interaction between the passive components/systems and demonstrate their ability to perform their design function. For the integral tests, the Passive Pressure Pulse Transmitter will be included. The INKA test facility represents the KERENA™ Containment with a volume scaling of 1:24. Component heights and levels are full scale in order to match the driving forces for natural circulation. The reactor pressure vessel is simulated by the accumulator vessel of the large valve test facility of Karlstein - a vessel with a design pressure of 11 MPa and a storage capacity of 125 m3. The vessel is fed by a benson boiler with a maximum power supply of 22 MW. The drywell of the INKA containment is divided into two compartments and connected to the wetwell (Pressure Suppression System) via a full scale vent pipe. Therefore, the INKA pressure suppression system meets the requirements of modern and existing BWR designs. As a result of the large power supply at the facility, INKA is capable of simulating various accident scenarios starting with the initiating event - for example pipe rupture. At INKA a full train of passive safety systems is available. INKA is also able to simulate the functions of active safety system such as containment heat removal. Therefore accident scenarios relevant to modern Gen III as well as for operating Gen II design can be simulated in order to validate system and

  4. 40 CFR 160.43 - Test system care facilities.

    2010-07-01

    ... GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Facilities § 160.43 Test system care facilities. (a) A testing... testing facility shall have a number of animal rooms or other test system areas separate from those... sanitary storage of waste before removal from the testing facility. Disposal facilities shall be...

  5. Status of Wakefield Monitor Experiments at the CLIC Test Facility

    Lillestøl, Reidar; Aftab, Namra; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Grudiev, Alexej; Javeed, Sumera; Pfingstner, Juergen; Wuensch, Walter

    2016-01-01

    For the very low emittance beams in CLIC, it is vital to mitigate emittance growth which leads to reduced luminosity in the detectors. One factor that leads to emittance growth is transverse wakefields in the accelerating structures. In order to combat this the structures must be aligned with a precision of a few um. For achieving this tolerance, accelerating structures are equipped with wakefield monitors that measure higher-order dipole modes excited by the beam when offset from the structure axis. We report on such measurements, performed using prototype CLIC accelerating structures which are part of the module installed in the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. Measurements with and without the drive beam that feeds rf power to the structures are compared. Improvements to the experimental setup are discussed, and finally remaining measurements that should be performed before the completion of the program are summarized.

  6. Report of summer maintenance of electrostatic accelerator facilities

    At the yearly summer maintenance of the facilities, 2010's work gave priority to micro-particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) beam line since 11 years had passed from the introduction of the accelerator in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). This report describes the first renewal of its cooling system of water recycling, arrangement of micro-PIXE power source unit and maintenance status of peripheral parts. The cooling system was renewed to the type of TCA-0000AW-E, power supply 3phi 200V 22.3 KVA, cooling capacity 30,960 kcal/hr at 20 deg. C (old one, 22,000 kcal/hr), breaker 75A (60 A), water tank 70 L (40 L) and size W 700 x D 1850 x H 2200 mm (700 x 1500 x 2190), particularly resulting in increased cooling capacity, flow rate (100 vs 24 L/min) and safety stoppage mechanic by abnormalities of water level, temperature, gas and recycling water pressures. For micro-PIXE, manufactured was a unit of rack-mount loading systems of the power supply 230 V and of vacuum involving their controlling circuits. The circuit for the interlock to preserve vacuum systems was also setup. The hose for rotary vacuum pump was renewed by KF25 bellows, and valves connected with turbo-pump for beam opening, by manual ones for vacuum use. As well, inspection and repair were performed on the cooling lines and telemeter. An overhaul of the accelerator itself is necessary several years later. (T.T.)

  7. Repetitively pulsed material testing facility

    A continuously operated, 1 pps, dense-plasma-focus device capable of delivering a minimum of 1015 neutrons per pulse for material testing purposes is described. Moderate scaling from existing results is sufficient to provide 2 x 1013 n/cm2.s to a suitable target. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue as a result of the energy crisis, is analyzed with respect to other plasma devices and is shown to be highly favorable. A novel approach to the capacitor bank and switch design allowing repetitive operation is discussed. (U.S.)

  8. Detector development and test facility

    Following the ideas presented in the proposal to the DoE, we have begun to acquire the equipment needed to design, develop construct and test the electronic and mechanical features of detectors used in High Energy Physics Experiments. A guiding principle for the effort is to achieve integrated electronic and mechanical designs which meet the demanding specifications of the modern hadron collider environment yet minimize costs. This requires state of the art simulation of signal processing as well as detailed calculations of heat transfer and finite element analysis of structural integrity

  9. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavities have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducting and superconducting accelerating cavities and components

  10. Current state of X-band accelerating structure high gradient test. Be held at high energy accelerator organization on April 15, 2005

    XTF (X-band Test Facility, Old name is GLCTA) is the high gradient test facility for X-band acceleration. We have installed an X-band 60cm structure (KX01) in the April 2004 and have been processing it for more than 10 months. Now it is under test on long-term operation. We report here the high gradient test result to date. (author)