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Sample records for accelerator target facilities

  1. The target laboratory of the Pelletron Accelerator's facilities

    Ueta, Nobuko; Pereira Engel, Wanda Gabriel

    2013-05-01

    A short report on the activities developed in the Target Laboratory, since 1970, will be presented. Basic target laboratory facilities were provided to produce the necessary nuclear targets as well as the ion beam stripper foils. Vacuum evaporation units, a roller, a press and an analytical balance were installed in the Oscar Sala building. A brief historical report will be presented in commemoration of the 40th year of the Pelletron Accelerator.

  2. The target laboratory of the Pelletron Accelerator's facilities

    A short report on the activities developed in the Target Laboratory, since 1970, will be presented. Basic target laboratory facilities were provided to produce the necessary nuclear targets as well as the ion beam stripper foils. Vacuum evaporation units, a roller, a press and an analytical balance were installed in the Oscar Sala building. A brief historical report will be presented in commemoration of the 40th year of the Pelletron Accelerator.

  3. Shielding aspects of accelerators, targets and irradiation facilities

    Particle accelerators have evolved over the last half-century from simple devices to powerful machines, and will continue to have an important impact on research, technology and lifestyle. Today they cover a wide range of applications, from television and computer displays in households to the investigation of the origin and structure of matter. It has become common practice to use them for material science and medical applications. In recent years, requirements from new technological and research applications have emerged: increased particle beams intensities, higher flexibility, etc., giving rise to new radiation shielding aspects and problems. These Proceedings review newer accelerator facilities, identify problematic aspects concerning radiation shielding that need to be solved, and indicate areas where international co-operation and co-ordination are highly desirable. (authors). 480 refs., 200 figs., 48 tabs

  4. SNS Accelerator Facility Target Safety and Non-Safety Control Systems

    The SNS is a proton accelerator facility that generates neutrons for scientific researchers by spallation of neutrons from a mercury target. The SNS became operational on April 28, 2006 with first beam on target at approximately 200 watts. The SNS accelerator, target, and conventional facilities controls are integrated by standardized hardware and software throughout the facility and were designed and fabricated to SNS conventions to ensure compatibility of systems with Experimental Physics Integrated Control System (EPICS). ControlLogix PLCs interface to instruments and actuators, and EPICS performs the high-level integration of the PLCs such that all operator control can be accomplished from the Central Control room using EPICS graphical screens that pass process variables to and from the PLCs. Three active safety systems were designed to industry standards ISA S84.01 and IEEE 603 to meet the desired reliability for these safety systems. The safety systems protect facility workers and the environment from mercury vapor, mercury radiation, and proton beam radiation. The facility operators operated many of the systems prior to beam on target and developed the operating procedures. The safety and non-safety control systems were tested extensively prior to beam on target. This testing was crucial to identify wiring and software errors and failed components, the result of which was few problems during operation with beam on target. The SNS has continued beam on target since April to increase beam power, check out the scientific instruments, and continue testing the operation of facility subsystems

  5. The target laboratory of the Pelletron Accelerator's facilities

    Ueta, Nobuko; Pereira Engel, Wanda Gabriel [Nuclear Physics Department - University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    A short report on the activities developed in the Target Laboratory, since 1970, will be presented. Basic target laboratory facilities were provided to produce the necessary nuclear targets as well as the ion beam stripper foils. Vacuum evaporation units, a roller, a press and an analytical balance were installed in the Oscar Sala building. A brief historical report will be presented in commemoration of the 40{sup th} year of the Pelletron Accelerator.

  6. Spallation Neutron Source Accelerator Facility Target Safety and Non-safety Control Systems

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a proton accelerator facility that generates neutrons for scientific researchers by spallation of neutrons from a mercury target. The SNS became operational on April 28, 2006, with first beam on target at approximately 200 W. The SNS accelerator, target, and conventional facilities controls are integrated by standardized hardware and software throughout the facility and were designed and fabricated to SNS conventions to ensure compatibility of systems with Experimental Physics Integrated Control System (EPICS). ControlLogix Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) interface to instruments and actuators, and EPICS performs the high-level integration of the PLCs such that all operator control can be accomplished from the Central Control room using EPICS graphical screens that pass process variables to and from the PLCs. Three active safety systems were designed to industry standards ISA S84.01 and IEEE 603 to meet the desired reliability for these safety systems. The safety systems protect facility workers and the environment from mercury vapor, mercury radiation, and proton beam radiation. The facility operators operated many of the systems prior to beam on target and developed the operating procedures. The safety and non-safety control systems were tested extensively prior to beam on target. This testing was crucial to identify wiring and software errors and failed components, the result of which was few problems during operation with beam on target. The SNS has continued beam on target since April to increase beam power, check out the scientific instruments, and continue testing the operation of facility subsystems

  7. Shielding Aspects of Accelerators, Targets and Irradiation Facilities - SATIF-11 Workshop Proceedings Report

    Particle accelerators have evolved over the last decades from simple devices to powerful machines. In recent years, new technological and research applications have helped to define requirements while the number of accelerator facilities in operation, being commissioned, designed or planned has grown significantly. Their parameters, which include the beam energy, currents and intensities, and target composition, can vary widely, giving rise to new radiation shielding issues and challenges. Particle accelerators must be operated in safe ways to protect operators, the public and the environment. As the design and use of these facilities evolve, so must the analytical methods used in the safety analyses. These workshop proceedings review the state of the art in radiation shielding of accelerator facilities and irradiation targets. They also evaluate progress in the development of modelling methods used to assess the effectiveness of such shielding as part of safety analyses. The transport of radiation through shielding materials is a major consideration in the safety design studies of nuclear power plants, and the modelling techniques used may be applied to many other types of scientific and technological facilities. Accelerator and irradiation facilities represent a key capability in R and D, medical and industrial infrastructures, and they can be used in a wide range of scientific, medical and industrial applications. High-energy ion accelerators, for example, are now used not only in fundamental research, such as the search for new super-heavy nuclei, but also for therapy as part of cancer treatment. While the energy of the incident particles on the shielding of these facilities may be much higher than those found in nuclear power plants, much of the physics associated with the behaviour of the secondary particles produced is similar, as are the computer modelling techniques used to quantify key safety design parameters, such as radiation dose and activation levels

  8. Overview of progress on the improvement projects for the LANSCE accelerator and target facilities

    Three projects have been initiated since 1994 to improve the performance of the accelerator and target facilities for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The LANSCE Reliability Improvement Project (LRIP) was separated into two phases. Phase 1, completed in 1995, targeted near-term improvements to beam reliability and availability that could be completed in one-year's time. Phase 2, now underway and scheduled for completion in May 1998, consists of two projects: (a) implementation of direct H-injection for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) and (b) an upgrade of the target/moderator system for the short pulse spallation neutron (SPSS) source. The latter will reduce the target change-out time from about 10 months to about three weeks. The third project, the SPSS Enhancement Project, is aimed at increasing the PSR output beam current to 200 microA at 30 Hz and providing up to seven new neutron scattering instruments

  9. Lead-bismuth spallation target design of the accelerator-driven test facility (ADTF)

    A design methodology for the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) spallation target has been developed and applied for the accelerator-driven test facility (ADTF) target. This methodology includes the target interface with the subcritical multiplier (SCM) of the ADTF and the different engineering aspects of the target design, physics, heat-transfer, hydraulics, structural, radiological, and safety analyses. Several design constrains were defined and utilised for the target design process to satisfy different engineering requirements and to minimise the time and the cost of the design development. Interface requirements with the subcritical multiplier were defined based on target performance parameters and material damage issues to enhance the lifetime of the target structure. Different structural materials were considered to define the most promising candidate based on the current database including radiation effects. The developed target design has a coaxial geometrical configuration to minimise the target footprint and it is installed vertically along the SCM axis. LBE is the target material and the target coolant with ferritic steel (HT-9 Alloy) structural material. The proton beam has 8.33 mA current uniformly distributed and 8.14 cm beam radius resulting in a current density of 40 μA/cm2. The beam power is 5 MW and the proton energy is 600 MeV. The beam tube has 10 cm radius to accommodate the halo current. A hemi-spherical geometry is used for the target window, which is connected to the beam tube. The beam tube is enclosed inside two coaxial tubes to provide inlet and outlet manifolds for the LBE coolant. The inlet and the outlet coolant manifolds and the proton beam are entered from the top above the SCM. The paper describes the design criteria, engineering constraints, and the developed target design for the ADTF. (authors)

  10. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also

  11. Accelerator target

    Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Koehler, Conrad (Miller Place, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression.

  12. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    This paper describes many of the nuclear physics heavy-ion accelerator facilities in the US and the research programs being conducted. The accelerators described are: Argonne National Laboratory--ATLAS; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) (Proposed); Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--Bevalac; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--88-Inch Cyclotron; Los Alamos National Laboratory--Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF); Massachusetts Institute of Technology--Bates Linear Accelerator Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center--Nuclear Physics Injector; Texas AandM University--Texas AandM Cyclotron; Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL); University of Washington--Tandem/Superconducting Booster; and Yale University--Tandem Van de Graaff

  13. Lessons from shielding retrofits at the LAMPF/LANSCE/PSR accelerator, beam lines and target facilities

    The experience in the past 7 years to improve the shielding and radiation control systems at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) provides important lessons for the design of radiation control systems at future, high beam power proton accelerator facilities. Major issues confronted and insight gained in developing shielding criteria and in the use of radiation interlocks are discussed. For accelerators and beam lines requiring hands-on-maintenance, our experience suggests that shielding criteria based on accident scenarios will be more demanding than criteria based on routinely encountered beam losses. Specification and analysis of the appropriate design basis accident become all important. Mitigation by active protection systems of the consequences of potential, but severe, prompt radiation accidents has been advocated as an alternate choice to shielding retrofits for risk management at both facilities. Acceptance of active protection systems has proven elusive primarily because of the difficulty in providing convincing proof that failure of active systems (to mitigate the accident) is incredible. Results from extensive shielding assessment studies are presented including data from experimental beam spill tests, comparisons with model estimates, and evidence bearing on the limitations of line-of-sight attenuation models in complex geometries. The scope and significant characteristics of major shielding retrofit projects at the LAMPF site are illustrated by the project to improve the shielding beneath a road over a multiuse, high-intensity beam line (Line D)

  14. Nuclear Physics accelerator facilities

    The Nuclear Physics program requires the existence and effective operation of large and complex accelerator facilities. These facilities provide the variety of projectile beams upon which virtually all experimental nuclear research depends. Their capability determine which experiments can be performed and which cannot. Seven existing accelerator facilities are operated by the Nuclear Physics program as national facilities. These are made available to all the Nation's scientists on the basis of scientific merit and technical feasibility of proposals. The national facilities are the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory; the Bates Linear Accelerator Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Bevalac at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory; the ATLAS facility at Argonne National Laboratory; the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Nuclear Physics Injector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) enables the SLAC facility to provide a limited amount of beam time for nuclear physics research on the same basis as the other national facilities. To complement the national facilities, the Nuclear Physics program supports on-campus accelerators at Duke University, Texas A and M University, the University of Washington, and Yale University. The facility at Duke University, called the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), is jointly staffed by Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina. These accelerators are operated primarily for the research use of the local university faculty, junior scientists, and graduate students

  15. Estimation of neutron backgrounds at neutron target room in JAERI 20 MV Tandem Accelerator Facility

    Two-dimensional discrete-ordinates codes have been used to calculate neutron backgrounds in the neutron target room and dose-equivalent rate outside of the JAERI 20 MV Tandem Accelerator building. The energy range of source neutrons used for the calculations was from 10 to 40 MeV. It is shown that the background neutrons at the position of the neutron detector in the target room are mainly composed of the floor-scattered neutrons, and with increase of the energy of source neutrons it becomes difficult to shield the neutron detector against the floor-scattered neutrons. It is also shown that the thickness of the concrete wall of the building is sufficient to reduce the dose-equivalent rate outside of the building. (author)

  16. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    Brief descriptions are given of DOE and Nuclear Physics program operated and sponsored accelerator facilities. Specific facilities covered are the Argonne Tandem/Linac Accelerator System, the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the proposed Continuous Beam Accelerator at Newport News, Virginia, the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory at Duke University, the Bevalac and the SuperHILAC at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Bates Linear Accelerator Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Nuclear Physics Injector at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the Texas A and M Cyclotrons, the Tandem/Superconducting Booster Accelerator at the University of Washington and the Tandem Van de Graaff at the A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory of Yale University. Included are acquisition cost, research programs, program accomplishments, future directions, and operating parameters of each facility

  17. Electron Accelerator Facilities

    Lecture presents main aspects of progress in development of industrial accelerators: adaptation of accelerators primary built for scientific experiments, electron energy and beam power increase in certain accelerator constructions, computer control system managing accelerator start-up, routine operation and technological process, maintenance (diagnostics), accelerator technology perfection (electrical efficiency, operation cost), compact and more efficient accelerator constructions, reliability improvement according to industrial standards, accelerators for MW power levels and accelerators tailored for specific use

  18. Target Assembly Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  19. A nanosecond pulsed accelerator facility

    The operation and performance of a 3-MeV pulsed electrostatic generator producing 1-ns (10-9 s) pulses is described. The system employs terminal pulsing and post-acceleration time-compression to achieve short pulses and high average current. The specifications for this system were based on the following considerations. A 10-μA average beam current represents a reasonable limit based on the ability of a target to dissipate beam power, the 1-ns pulse-length was consistent with other factors such as detector response, energy homogeneity, etc. which determine over-all time resolution, and a repetition rate of 1 MHz/s gives a duty factor consistent with the current capabilities of existing accelerator ion sources. The system consists of a terminal pulsing component which produces pulses of 10 ns in duration by sweeping a beam over an aperture located at the entrance to an accelerator tube. An average output of a current of 10 μA requires a source capable of producing 1 mA of atomic ions. After acceleration this pulse is compressed to 1 ns by the scheme suggested by Mobley. This involves sweeping the beam with proper synchronization across the aperture of a 90o doubly-focusing deflection magnet so that the early portion of the pulse travels through a longer trajectory thani the later portions, thus achieving time compression when the beam is brought to a focus on a suitable target. The radius of beam curvature in the compression magnet is 30 in and the over-all beam divergence at the target is 5o. The choice of these parameters and the effect of the deflection scheme in the beam-energy homogeneity will be discussed. Using existing nanosecond detector techniques, this system has produced over-all system resolutions of 1 ns full-width at half-maximum for both gamma rays and neutrons. It is not yet known what component or components of the system determine the limits on the time resolution of the system. As a facility for investigating neutron inelastic scattering and

  20. The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), presently under construction at Brookhaven National laboratory, is described. It consists of a 50-MeV electron beam synchronizable to a high-peak power CO2 laser. The interaction of electrons with the laser field will be probed, with some emphasis on exploring laser-based acceleration techniques. 5 refs., 2 figs

  1. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Joseph Grames, Douglas Higinbotham, Hugh Montgomery

    2010-09-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

  2. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Fifteen different experiments were run during these 12 months, approximately the same as the previous two years. Brief summaries of each experiment are included. Accelerator usage is summarized and development activities are discussed. 7 refs., 4 tabs

  3. Sequencer for n accelerator facilities

    Operation of machines like telescopes and accelerators requires the efficient and reproducible execution of many different types of procedures. These machines consist of different sub-systems whose operation entail the execution of many tasks with strict compulsion on the order and duration of the execution. To improve operational reliability and efficiency, automated execution of procedures is required. Creation of a single robust sequencing application permits the streamlining of this process and offers many benefits. At the same time, a drive for greater efficiency, a tendency for more complex accelerator operations and a need to reduce the risk of 'operator error' have rendered these tools essential. This paper presents the design of Sequencer tool for Indian Accelerator facility. It sites an examples of such tools used at different international accelerator facilities. The features considered desirable in a good sequencer and a description of the tools created to aid in sequence construction and diagnosis are discussed. (author)

  4. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    The Department of Energy's Nuclear Physics program is a comprehensive program of interdependent experimental and theoretical investigation of atomic nuclei. Long range goals are an understanding of the interactions, properties, and structures of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter at the most elementary level possible and an understanding of the fundamental forces of nature by using nuclei as a proving ground. Basic ingredients of the program are talented and imaginative scientists and a diversity of facilities to provide the variety of probes, instruments, and computational equipment needed for modern nuclear research. Approximately 80% of the total Federal support of basic nuclear research is provided through the Nuclear Physics program; almost all of the remaining 20% is provided by the National Science Foundation. Thus, the Department of Energy (DOE) has a unique responsibility for this important area of basic science and its role in high technology. Experimental and theoretical investigations are leading us to conclude that a new level of understanding of atomic nuclei is achievable. This optimism arises from evidence that: (1) the mesons, protons, and neutrons which are inside nuclei are themselves composed of quarks and gluons and (2) quantum chromodynamics can be developed into a theory which both describes correctly the interaction among quarks and gluons and is also an exact theory of the strong nuclear force. These concepts are important drivers of the Nuclear Physics program

  5. Recent US target-physics-related research in heavy-ion inertial fusion: simulations for tamped targets and for disk experiments in accelerator test facilities

    Calculations suggest that experiments relating to disk heating, as well as beam deposition, focusing and transport can be performed within the context of current design proposals for accelerator test-facilities. Since the test-facilities have lower ion kinetic energy and beam pulse power as compared to reactor drivers, we achieve high-beam intensities at the focal spot by using short focal distance and properly designed beam optics. In this regard, the low beam emittance of suggested multi-beam designs are very useful. Possibly even higher focal spot brightness could be obtained by plasma lenses which involve external fields on the beam which is stripped to a higher charge state by passing through a plasma cell. Preliminary results suggest that intensities approx. 1013 - 1014 W/cm2 are achievable. Given these intensities, deposition experiments with heating of disks to greater than a million degrees Kelvin (100 eV) are expected

  6. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Brief summaries of research experiments are included. Accelerator usage is summarized and development activities are discussed. 8 refs., 8 tabs

  7. Radiation control in accelerator facilities

    In view of radiation control, particle accelerator facilities have posed various problems involving radiation (mainly neutron) leakage, occupational exposure, environmental aspects in the surrounding area, and waste management. The intent of the workshop was to discuss these problems. This report contains nine topics that were presented and discussed: (1) Radiation safety system for the AVF cyclotron and the cyclotron cascade project at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University; (2) Calculation for the shielding design in the RIKEN Ring Cyclotron Facility; (3) Shielding design method for high-energy protons in the National Laboratory for High-energy Physics (KEK); (4) Radiation safety programme for the uses of medical accelerators in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences; (5) Development of the new stack air monitor; (6) Environmental radiation monitoring in the vicinity of the intense 14 Mev neutron source facility; (7) Radiation control around the KEK-proton synchroton; (8) Radiation safety control system for the RIKEN Ring Cyclotron; (9) Evaluation of radioactivity and skyshine induced by neutron production in an accelerator facility. (Namekawa, K.)

  8. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described.

  9. Fixed-Target Electron Accelerators

    A tremendous amount of scientific insight has been garnered over the past half-century by using particle accelerators to study physical systems of sub-atomic dimensions. These giant instruments begin with particles at rest, then greatly increase their energy of motion, forming a narrow trajectory or beam of particles. In fixed-target accelerators, the particle beam impacts upon a stationary sample or target which contains or produces the sub-atomic system being studied. This is in distinction to colliders, where two beams are produced and are steered into each other so that their constituent particles can collide. The acceleration process always relies on the particle being accelerated having an electric charge; however, both the details of producing the beam and the classes of scientific investigations possible vary widely with the specific type of particle being accelerated. This article discusses fixed-target accelerators which produce beams of electrons, the lightest charged particle. As detailed in the report, the beam energy has a close connection with the size of the physical system studied. Here a useful unit of energy is a GeV, i.e., a giga electron-volt. (ne GeV, the energy an electron would have if accelerated through a billion volts, is equal to 1.6 x 10-10 joules.) To study systems on a distance scale much smaller than an atomic nucleus requires beam energies ranging from a few GeV up to hundreds of GeV and more

  10. Simulation of the neutron spectrum from the 7Li(p,n) reaction with a liquid-lithium target at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility

    The 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction has been used for the last 25 years to produce quasi-Maxwellian neutrons in order to measure Maxwellian-Averaged Cross-Sections in the relevant temperatures for stellar nucleosynthesis. A liquid-lithium target at the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility is expected to allow us to perform such measurements at higher neutron intensities. Here we describe a Monte Carlo tool, SimLiT, developed to evaluate neutron spectra, intensities and angular distributions resulting from this reaction. We also demonstrate the feasibility to couple SimLiT with an advanced transport code, resulting in a powerful tool for planning and analysis of experiments using the 7Li(p,n) reaction as a neutron source.

  11. Future accelerators and experimental facilities at GSI

    During the last years GSI developed plans for future accelerators and experimental facilities with the intention to extend heavy ion research in a wide scope to higher energies and into new fields of research using novel techniques for acceleration, accumulation, storage and phase space density increase of heavy ion beams up to 238U. The prime goals of this development plan using as a first step a synchrotron acceleration ring connected with an accumulator-, storage-, cooling- and experimental ring are the following: 1. Provide completely stripped heavy ion beams up to U92+ with the highest possible phase space densities using various cooling techniques in a storage ring. 2. Provide radioactive heavy ion beams by accumulation, storage and cooling of fragmentation or fission products from beams of the synchrotron. 3. Provide facilities for internal target experiments using simultaneously cooled circulating beams. 4. Provide two merging beams in the storage ring with well defineable collision energies up to the Coulomb barrier of the heaviest ions like U92+ in order to study atomic collision processes in high Coulomb fields with both nuclei highly ionized. 5. Provide a beam of heavy ions up to U92+ with best phase space density for further acceleration and collisions in superconducting collider rings at very high c.m. energies (> 20 GeV/u) and as high as possible luminosities. (orig.)

  12. Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility (formerly LOASIS) develops advanced accelerators and radiation sources. High gradient (1-100 GV/m) laser-plasma...

  13. Development and utilization of various target assemblies for proton beam irradiation setup at 14 UD BARC-TIFR pelletron accelerator facility

    Drift space above analyzing magnet is modified to accommodate a proton beam setup at 6 meter level of 14UD BARC-TIFR Pelletron Accelerator Facility. This setup is capable of delivering proton beam in the energy range of 2 MeV to 26 MeV and current in μA range. The shielding at this level is such that radiation is within permissible limit when high proton beam current is accelerated. (author)

  14. The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies

  15. Required performance to the concrete structure of the accelerator facilities

    As for the accelerator facility, there is many a thing which is constructed as underground concrete structure from viewpoint such as cover of radiation and stability of the structure. Required performance to the concrete structure of the accelerator facility is the same as the general social infrastructure, but it has been possessed the feature where target performance differs largely. As for the body sentence, expressing the difference of the performance which is required from the concrete structure of the social infrastructure and the accelerator facility, construction management of the concrete structure which it plans from order of the accelerator engineering works facility, reaches to the design, supervision and operation it is something which expresses the method of thinking. In addition, in the future of material structural analysis of the concrete which uses the neutron accelerator concerning view it showed. (author)

  16. Availability of enriched isotopic material for accelerator targets

    The electromagnetic isotope enrichment facility at ORNL provides a broad spectrum of highly enriched stable isotopes to the worldwide scientific community. The continued timely availability of these materials is of vital importance in many areas of basic research and, in particular, as source material for the fabrication of accelerator targets. A brief description of the facility and its capabilities and limitations is presented

  17. Radiation safety training for accelerator facilities

    In November 1992, a working group was formed within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) accelerator facilities to develop a generic safety training program to meet the basic requirements for individuals working in accelerator facilities. This training, by necessity, includes sections for inserting facility-specific information. The resulting course materials were issued by DOE as a handbook under its technical standards in 1996. Because experimenters may be at a facility for only a short time and often at odd times during the day, the working group felt that computer-based training would be useful. To that end, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) together have developed a computer-based safety training program for accelerator facilities. This interactive course not only enables trainees to receive facility- specific information, but time the training to their schedule and tailor it to their level of expertise

  18. Fixed target facility at the SSC

    The question of whether a facility for fixed target physics should be provided at the SSC must be answered before the final technical design of the SSC can be completed, particularly if the eventual form of extraction would influence the magnet design. To this end, an enthusiastic group of experimentalists, theoreticians and accelerator specialists have studied this point. The accelerator physics issues were addressed by a group led by E. Colton whose report is contained in these proceedings. The physics addressable by fixed target was considered by many of the Physics area working groups and in particular by the Structure Function Group. This report is the summary of the working group which considered various SSC fixed target experiments and determined which types of beams and detectors would be required. 13 references, 5 figures

  19. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  20. Accelerator technical design report for high-intensity proton accelerator facility project, J-PARC

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    This report presents the detail of the technical design of the accelerators for the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility Project, J-PARC. The accelerator complex comprises a 400-MeV room-temperature linac (600-MeV superconducting linac), 3-GeV rapid-cycling synchrotron (RCS), and a 50-GeV synchrotron (MR). The 400-MeV beam is injected to the RCS, being accelerated to 3 GEV. The 1-MW beam thus produced is guided to the Materials Life Science Experimental Facility, with both the pulsed spallation neutron source and muon source. A part of the beam is transported to the MR, which provides the 0.75-MW beam to either the Nuclear and Fundamental Particle Experimental Facility or the Neutrino Production Target. On the other hand, the beam accelerated to 600 MeV by the superconducting linac is used for the Nuclear Waster Transmutation Experiment. In this way, this facility is unique, being multipurpose one, including many new inventions and Research and Development Results. This report is based upon the accomplishments made by the Accelerator Group and others of the Project Team, which is organized on the basis of the Agreement between JAERI and KEK on the Construction and Research and Development of the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility. (author)

  1. Accelerator technical design report for high-intensity proton accelerator facility project, J-PARC

    This report presents the detail of the technical design of the accelerators for the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility Project, J-PARC. The accelerator complex comprises a 400-MeV room-temperature linac (600-MeV superconducting linac), 3-GeV rapid-cycling synchrotron (RCS), and a 50-GeV synchrotron (MR). The 400-MeV beam is injected to the RCS, being accelerated to 3 GEV. The 1-MW beam thus produced is guided to the Materials Life Science Experimental Facility, with both the pulsed spallation neutron source and muon source. A part of the beam is transported to the MR, which provides the 0.75-MW beam to either the Nuclear and Fundamental Particle Experimental Facility or the Neutrino Production Target. On the other hand, the beam accelerated to 600 MeV by the superconducting linac is used for the Nuclear Waster Transmutation Experiment. In this way, this facility is unique, being multipurpose one, including many new inventions and Research and Development Results. This report is based upon the accomplishments made by the Accelerator Group and others of the Project Team, which is organized on the basis of the Agreement between JAERI and KEK on the Construction and Research and Development of the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility. (author)

  2. Above scaling short-pulse ion acceleration from flat foil and ``Pizza-top Cone'' targets at the Trident laser facility

    Flippo, Kirk; Hegelich, B. Manuel; Cort Gautier, D.; Johnson, J. Randy; Kline, John L.; Shimada, Tsutomu; Fernández, Juan C.; Gaillard, Sandrine; Rassuchine, Jennifer; Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Cowan, Thomas E.; Malekos, Steve; Korgan, Grant

    2006-10-01

    Ion-driven Fast Ignition (IFI) has certain advantages over electron-driven FI due to a possible large reduction in the amount of energy required. Recent experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident facility have yielded ion energies and efficiencies many times in excess of recent published scaling laws, leading to even more potential advantages of IFI. Proton energies in excess of 35 MeV have been observed from targets produced by the University of Nevada, Reno - dubbed ``Pizza-top Cone'' targets - at intensities of only 1x10^19 W/cm^2 with 20 joules in 600 fs. Energies in excess of 24 MeV were observed from simple flat foil targets as well. The observed energies, above any published scaling laws, are attributed to target production, preparation, and shot to shot monitoring of many laser parameters, especially the laser ASE prepulse level and laser pulse duration. The laser parameters are monitored in real-time to keep the laser in optimal condition throughout the run providing high quality, reproducible shots.

  3. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities of the world

    this report is intended to provide a convenient summary of the world's major nuclear physics accelerator facility with emphasis on those facilities supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Previous editions of this report have contained only DOE facilities. However, as the extent of global collaborations in nuclear physics grows, gathering summary information on the world's nuclear physics accelerator facilities in one place is useful. Therefore, the present report adds facilities operated by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as well as the leading foreign facilities, with emphasis on foreign facilities that have significant outside user programs. The principal motivation for building and operating these facilities is, of course, basic research in nuclear physics. The scientific objectives for this research were recently reviewed by the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee, who developed a long range plan, Nuclei, Nucleons, and Quarks -- Nuclear Science in the 1990's. Their report begins as follows: The central thrust of nuclear science is the study of strongly interacting matter and of the forces that govern its structure and dynamics; this agenda ranges from large- scale collective nuclear behavior through the motions of individual nucleons and mesons, atomic nuclei, to the underlying distribution of quarks and gluons. It extends to conditions at the extremes of temperature and density which are of significance to astrophysics and cosmology and are conducive to the creation of new forms of strongly interacting matter; and another important focus is on the study of the electroweak force, which plays an important role in nuclear stability, and on precision tests of fundamental interactions. The present report provides brief descriptions of the accelerator facilities available for carrying out this agenda and their research programs

  4. Conceptual study of transmutation experimental facility. (2) Study on ADS target test facility

    To perform the research and development for accelerator-driven system (ADS), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) plans to build a Transmutation Experimental Facility within the JAERI-KEK joint J-PARC program. Transmutation Experimental Facility consists of two buildings, Transmutation Physics Experimental Facility to make reactor physics experiment with subcritical core, and ADS Target Test Facility for the preparation of irradiation database for various structural materials. In this report, purpose to build, experimental schedule, and design study of the ADS Target Test Facility with drawer type spallation target are summarized. (author)

  5. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility control system

    Described is the VAX/CAMAC-based control system for Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility, a laser/linac research complex. Details of hardware and software configurations are presented along with experiences of using Vsystem, a commercial control system package

  6. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This

  7. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was

  8. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    On February 13, 1987, construction started on the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility - a 4-GeV, 200-μA, continuous beam, electron accelerator facility designed for nuclear physics research. The machine has a racetrack configuration with two antiparallel, 500-MeV, superconducting linac segments connected by beam lines to allow four passes of recirculation. The accelerating structure consists of 1500-MHz, five-cell niobium cavities developed at Cornell University. A liquid helium cryogenic system cools the cavities to an operating temperature of 2 K. Beam extraction after any three of the four passes allows simultaneous delivery of up to three beams of independently variable currents and different, but correlated, energies to the three experimental areas. Beam breakup thresholds exceed the design current by nearly two orders of magnitude. Project completion and the start of physics operations are scheduled for 1993. The total estimated cost is $255 million

  9. Enhancing proton acceleration by using composite targets

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-07-10

    Efficient laser ion acceleration requires high laser intensities, which can only be obtained by tightly focusing laser radiation. In the radiation pressure acceleration regime, where the tightly focused laser driver leads to the appearance of the fundamental limit for the maximum attainable ion energy, this limit corresponds to the laser pulse group velocity as well as to another limit connected with the transverse expansion of the accelerated foil and consequent onset of the foil transparency. These limits can be relaxed by using composite targets, consisting of a thin foil followed by a near critical density slab. Such targets provide guiding of a laser pulse inside a self-generated channel and background electrons, being snowplowed by the pulse, compensate for the transverse expansion. The use of composite targets results in a significant increase in maximum ion energy, compared to a single foil target case.

  10. Ion acceleration enhanced by target ablation

    Laser proton acceleration can be enhanced by using target ablation, due to the energetic electrons generated in the ablation preplasma. When the ablation pulse matches main pulse, the enhancement gets optimized because the electrons' energy density is highest. A scaling law between the ablation pulse and main pulse is confirmed by the simulation, showing that for given CPA pulse and target, proton energy improvement can be achieved several times by adjusting the target ablation

  11. BNL ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY CONTROL SYSTEM UPGRADE.

    MALONE,R.; BEN-ZVI,I.; WANG,X.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    2001-06-18

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) has embarked on a complete upgrade of its decade old computer system. The planned improvements affect every major component: processors (Intel Pentium replaces VAXes), operating system (Linux/Real-Time Linux supplants OpenVMS), and data acquisition equipment (fast Ethernet equipment replaces CAMAC serial highway.) This paper summarizes the strategies and progress of the upgrade along with plans for future expansion.

  12. Improving the energy efficiency of accelerator facilities

    Seidel, M.; E., Jensen; R., Gehring; J., Stadlmann; P., Spiller; Parker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    New particle accelerator based research facilities tend to be much more productive, but often in coincidence with higher energy consumption. The total energy consumption of mankind is steeply rising and this is mainly caused by quickly developing countries. Some European countries decided to terminate nuclear power generation and to switch to sustainable energy production. Also the CO2 problem gives rise to new approaches for energy production and in all strategies the efficiency of utilizati...

  13. SINP MSU accelerator facility and applied research

    Full text: SINP accelerator facility includes 120 cm cyclotron, electrostatic generator with the upper voltage 3.0 MeV, electrostatic generator with the upper voltage 2.5 MeV, Cocroft -Walton generator with the upper voltage 500 keV, 150 keV accelerator for solid microparticles. A new generation of electron beam accelerators has been developed during the last decade. The SINP accelerator facility will be shortly described in the report. A wide range of basic research in nuclear and atomic physics, physics of ion-beam interactions with condensed matter is currently carried out. SINP activity in the applied research is concentrated in the following areas of materials science: - Materials diagnostics with the Rutherford backscattering techniques (RBS) and channeling of ions (RBS/C). A large number of surface ad-layers and multilayer systems for advanced micro- and nano-electronic technology have been investigated. A selected series of examples will be illustrated. - Concentration depth profiles of hydrogen by the elastic recoils detection techniques (ERD). Primarily, the hydrogen depth profiles in perspective materials for thermonuclear reactors have been investigated. - Lattice site locations of hydrogen by a combination of ERD and channeling techniques. This is a new technique which was successfully applied for investigation of hydrogen and hydrogen-defect complexes in silicon for the smart-cut technology. - Light element diagnostics by RBS and nuclear backscattering techniques (NBS). The technique is illustrated by applications for nitrogen concentration profiling in steels. Nitrogen take-up and release, nitrides precipitate formation will be illustrated. - New medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) facility and applications. Ultra-high vacuum and superior energy resolution electrostatic toroidal analyzer is designed to be applied for characterization of composition and structure of several upper atomic layers of materials

  14. Spallation neutron source: description of accelerator and target

    An updated description is given and the relevant parameters examined for the Spallation Neutron Souce, currently under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, in two chapters entitled: (1) The 800 MeV Synchrotron (synchrotron design and parameters, beam instabilities, radio frequency shielding and beam collectors, acceleration system, magnet system, magnet power supplies, vacuum system, the 70MeV injector, injection into the SNS, extraction system, extracted proton beam, control system) and (2) Target Station (target and its services, the target assembly and services, bulk shield and shutter system, the remote handling facility). (U.K.)

  15. Accelerator Design Concept for Future Neutrino Facilities

    ISS Accelerator Working Group; Zisman, Michael S; Berg, J. S.; Blondel, A.; Brooks, S.; Campagne, J.-E.; Caspar, D.; Cevata, C.; Chimenti, P.; Cobb, J.; Dracos, M.; Edgecock, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Fernow, R.; Filthaut, F.; Gallardo, J.; Garoby, R.; Geer, S.; Gerigk, F.; Hanson, G.; Johnson, R.; Johnstone, C.; Kaplan, D.; Keil, E.; Kirk, H.; Klier, A.; Kurup, A.; Lettry, J.; Long, K.; Machida, S.; McDonald, K.; Meot, F.; Mori, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R.; Paul, K.; Poklonskiy, A.; Popovic, M.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rossi, C.; Rovelli, T.; Sandstrom, R.; Sevior, R.; Sievers, P.; Simos, N.; Torun, Y.; Vretenar, M.; Yoshimura, K.; Zisman, Michael S

    2008-02-03

    This document summarizes the findings of the Accelerator Working Group (AWG) of the International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Future Neutrino Factory and Superbeam Facility. The work of the group took place at three plenary meetings along with three workshops, and an oral summary report was presented at the NuFact06 workshop held at UC-Irvine in August, 2006. The goal was to reach consensus on a baseline design for a Neutrino Factory complex. One aspect of this endeavor was to examine critically the advantages and disadvantages of the various Neutrino Factory schemes that have been proposed in recent years.

  16. Accelerator design concept for future neutrino facilities

    Apollonio, M; Blondel, A; Bogacz, A; Brooks, S; Campagne, Jean-Eric; Caspar, D; Cavata, C; Chimenti, P; Cobb, J; Dracos, M; Edgecock, R; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fabich, A; Fernow, R; Filthaut, F; Gallardo, J; Garoby, R; Geer, S; Gerigk, F; Hanson, G; Johnson, R; Johnstone, C; Kaplan, D; Keil, E; Kirk, H; Klier, A; Kurup, A; Lettry, J; Long, K; Machida, S; McDonald, K; Méot, F; Mori, Y; Neuffer, D; Palladino, V; Palmer, R; Paul, K; Poklonskiy, A; Popovic, M; Prior, C; Rees, G; Rossi, C; Rovelli, T; Sandström, R; Sevior, R; Sievers, P; Simos, N; Torun, Y; Vretenar, M; Yoshimura, K; Zisman, M S

    2009-01-01

    This document summarizes the findings of the Accelerator Working Group (AWG) of the International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Future Neutrino Factory and super-beam Facility. The work of the group took place at three plenary meetings along with three workshops, and an oral summary report was presented at the NuFact06 workshop held at UC-Irvine in August, 2006. The goal was to reach consensus on a baseline design for a Neutrino Factory complex. One aspect of this endeavor was to examine critically the advantages and disadvantages of the various Neutrino Factory schemes that have been proposed in recent years.

  17. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    Xu, Y.; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, T. N.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Johnson, G. W.; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-01

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.

  18. A laser strain gauge for accelerator targets

    Multi megawatt accelerators can deliver sufficient power to a target to destroy it in a few pulses. In order to look at the response of solid and liquid targets under these high power pulses, we are developing optical methods of measuring surface deformations with time resolutions limited by laser pulse lengths. These methods can be used to examine the surfaces of solids and liquids during elastic deformation and unstable hydrodynamic flows. We present preliminary results of a system designed for target tests using the Brookhaven AGS and the Argonne CHM linac

  19. Recent developments in the target facilities at Argonne National Laboratory

    A description is given of recent developments in the target facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Highlights include equipment upgrades which enables us to provide enhanced capabilities for support of the Argonne Heavy-Ion ATLAS Accelerator Project. Also future plans and additional equipment acquisitions will be discussed. 3 refs., 3 tabs

  20. Description of the Argonne National Laboratory target making facility

    A description is given to some recent developments in the target facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Highlights include equipment upgrades which enable us to provide enhanced capabilities for support of the Argonne Heavy-Ion ATLAS Accelerator Program. Work currently in progress is described and future prospects discussed. 8 refs

  1. Thermomechanical design of a static gas target for electron accelerators

    Brajuskovic, B; Holt, R J; Reneker, J; Meekin, D; Solvignon, P

    2013-01-01

    Gas targets are often used at accelerator facilities. A design of high-pressure gas cells that are suitable for hydrogen and helium isotopes at relatively high electron beam currents is presented. In particular, we consider rare gas targets, $^3$H$_2$ and $^3$He. In the design, heat transfer and mechanical integrity of the target cell are emphasized. ANSYS 12 was used for the thermo-mechanical studies of the target cell. Since the ultimate goal in this study was to design a gas target for use at the Jefferson Laboratory (JLab), particular attention is given to the typical operating conditions found there. It is demonstrated that an aluminum alloy cell can meet the required design goals.

  2. Stanford Linear Accelerator Center pulsed x-ray facility

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) operates a high-energy (up to 33 GeV) linear accelerator delivering pulses up to a few microseconds wide. The pulsed nature of the electron beam creates problems in the detection and measurement of radiation both from the accelerator beam and the klystrons that provide the radio-frequency power for the accelerator. Hence, a pulsed x-ray facility has been built at SLAC mainly for testing the response of different radiation detection instruments to pulsed radiation fields. The x-ray tube consists of an electron gun with a control grid. This provides a stream of pulsed electrons that can be accelerated towards a confined target window. The window consists of Al 0.051 cm (20 mils) thick, plated on the vacuum side with a layer of Au 0.0006 cm (1/4 mil) thick. The frequency of electron pulses can be varied by an internal pulser from 60 to 360 pulses per second with pulse widths of 360 ns to 5 microseconds. The pulse amplitude can be varied over a wide range of currents. An external pulser can be used to obtain other frequencies or special pulse shapes. The voltage across the gun can be varied from 0 to 100 kV. The maximum absorbed dose rate obtained at 6.35 cm below the target window as measured by an ionization chamber is 258 Gy/h. The major part of the x-ray tube is enclosed in a large walk-in cabinet made of 1.9-cm-thick (3/4-inch-thick) plywood and lined with 0.32-cm-thick (1/8-inch-thick) Pb to make a very versatile facility

  3. Operation of the Brookhaven national laboratory accelerator test facility

    Early operation of the 50 MeV high brightness electron linac of the Accelerator Test Facility is described along with experimental data. This facility is designed to study new linear acceleration techniques and new radiation sources based on linacs in combination with free electron lasers. The accelerator utilizes a photo-excited, metal cathode, radio frequency electron gun followed by two travelling wave accelerating sections and an Experimental Hall for the study program. (Author) 5 refs., 4 figs., tab

  4. Operation of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    Early operation of the 50 MeV high brightness electron linac of the Accelerator Test Facility is described along with experimental data. This facility is designed to study new linear acceleration techniques and new radiation sources based on linacs in combination with free electron lasers. The accelerator utilizes a photo-excited, metal cathode, radio frequency electron gun followed by two travelling wave accelerating sections and an Experimental Hall for the study program

  5. Accelerator breeder with uranium, thorium target

    An accelerator breeder, that uses a low-enriched fuel as the target material, can produce substantial amounts of fissile material and electric power. A study of H2O- and D2O-cooled, UO2, U, (depleted U), or thorium indicates that U-metal fuel produces a good fissile production rate and electrical power of about 60% higher than UO2 fuel. Thorium fuel has the same order of magnitude as UO2 fuel for fissile-fuel production, but the generating electric power is substantially lower than in a UO2 reactor. Enriched UO2 fuel increases the generating electric power but not the fissile-material production rate. The Na-cooled breeder target has many advantages over the H2O-cooled breeder target

  6. CERN accelerator school: Antiprotons for colliding beam facilities

    This is a specialized course which addresses a wide spectrum of theoretical and technological problems confronting the designer of an antiproton facility for high-energy-physics research. A broad and profound basis is provided by the lecturers' substantial experience gained over many years with CERN's unique equipment. Topics include beam optics, special lattices for antiproton accumulation and storage rings, antiproton production, stochastic cooling, acceleration and storage, r.f. noise, r.f. beam manipulations, beam-beam interaction, beam stability due to ion accumulation, and diagnostics. The SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) panti p collider, LEAR (the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN), antiprotons in the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings), the new antiproton collector (ACOL) and gas jet targets are also discussed. A table is included listing the parameters of all CERN's accelerators and storage rings. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  7. Accelerator mass spectrometry programme at Mumbai pelletron accelerator facility

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) programme and the related developments based on the Mumbai Pelletron accelerator are described. The initial results of the measurement of the ratio, 36Cl / Cl in water samples are presented. (author)

  8. Folded tandem ion accelerator facility at Trombay

    P Singh

    2001-08-01

    The folded tandem ion accelerator (FOTIA) project at BARC has been commissioned. The analysed carbon beams of 40 nA(3+) and 25 nA(4+), at terminal voltage of 2.5 MV with N2 + CO2 as insulating gas, were obtained. The beams were characterized by performing the Rutherford back scattering (RBS) on gold, tin and iron targets. The beam energy of 12.5 MeV for 12C4+ was consistent with the terminal voltage of 2.5 MV. The N2 + CO2 mixture is being replaced by SF6 gas in order to achieve 6 MV on the terminal. In this paper, some of the salient features of the FOTIA and its present status are discussed.

  9. Possible upgrade of an existing tandem accelerator facility to an ISOL facility for neutron rich rare isotope beams

    Worldwide, many existing accelerator facilities were upgraded to RIB facilities in the past decade including two tandem accelerator facilities at HRIBF,ORNL and LNS, Catania. However, both these tandems are folded tandems with the injector at ground level. In this paper, we explore the feasibility of using aerosol He-jet technique to transport RIBs from driver accelerator to the SNICS ion source. As a test case, we take a 50 MeV, 100- k watt commercial electron accelerator as driver accelerator and the existing Tandem+SC linac at IUAC as post accelerator. In this scheme, RIBs can be produced in Uranium target using Bremsstrahlung photons generated by the de-accelerated electrons. In a broad sense, two main difference in implementing this scheme compared to will be the high power target and a skimmer ion source operable at high throughput of aerosol loaded He. A multijet target system capable of containing few dozen target had been developed and tested for efficiency and cooling at HRIBF,ORNL. A skimmer ion source, operable at 6 std. 1pm flow is still needed to be developed. If this development is carried out, negative ion scheme is feasible and could possibly be implemented in a short period of time with modest investment. (author)

  10. High proton energies from cone targets: electron acceleration mechanisms

    Recent experiments in the Trident laser facility (Los Alamos National Laboratory) have shown that hollow conical targets with a flat top at the tip can enhance the maximum energy of proton beams created during the interaction of an ultra-intense short laser pulse with the target (Gaillard S A et al 2011 Phys. Plasmas 18 056710). The proton energies that have been seen in these experiments are the highest energies observed so far in laser-driven proton acceleration. This is attributed to a new acceleration mechanism, direct light pressure acceleration of electrons (DLLPA), which increases the number and energy of hot electrons that drive the proton acceleration. This acceleration process of protons due to a two-temperature sheath formed at the flat-top rear side is very robust and produces a large number of protons per shot, similar to what is regularly observed in target normal sheath acceleration (Hatchett S P et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 2076, Maksimchuk A et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 4108, Snavely R A et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 2945) with flat foils. In this paper, we investigate the electron kinetics during DLLPA, showing that they are governed by two mechanisms, both of which lead to continuous electron acceleration along the inner cone wall. Based on our model, we predict the scaling of the hot electron temperature and ion maximum energy with both laser and target geometrical parameters. The scaling of T=mec02a02/4 with the laser strength parameter a0 leads to an ion energy scaling that surpasses that of some recently proposed acceleration mechanisms such as radiation pressure acceleration (RPA), while in addition the maximum electron energy is found to scale linearly with the length of the cone neck. We find that when optimizing parameters, high proton energies suitable for applications can be reached using compact short-pulse laser systems with pulse durations of only a few tens to hundreds of laser periods. (paper)

  11. High-current electrostatic accelerator-tandem for the neutron therapy facility

    Original 2.5 MeV, 50 mA proton tandem accelerator for the neutron therapy facility is described. The main idea of tandem usage is providing high rate acceleration of high current hydrogen negative ions by special geometry of potential electrodes with vacuum insulation and one strongly focusing lens. Pulse 1 MeV vacuum insulation tandem accelerator experimental results are presented. Steady-state 100 kW 1.25 MV sectioned rectifier is a high voltage source. The rectifier is a part of the industrial ELV-8 electron accelerator developed at BINP and widely used. Accelerating voltage is stabilized with accuracy of 0.1 %. Various charge-exchange targets are considered. Namely, targets are gas target with outward pumping, gas target with pumping inside of high-voltage electrode, and liquid lithium stream target. Problems of development of steady-state 50 - 100 mA source of hydrogen negative ions are discussed. (author)

  12. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    Tsakanov, V. M.; Amatuni, G. A.; Amirkhanyan, Z. G.; Aslyan, L. V.; Avagyan, V. Sh.; Danielyan, V. A.; Davtyan, H. D.; Dekhtiarov, V. S.; Gevorgyan, K. L.; Ghazaryan, N. G.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Hakobyan, L. S.; Haroutiunian, S. G.; Ivanyan, M. I.; Khachatryan, V. G.; Laziev, E. M.; Manukyan, P. S.; Margaryan, I. N.; Markosyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, N. V.; Mehrabyan, Sh. A.; Mkrtchyan, T. H.; Muradyan, L. Kh.; Nikogosyan, G. H.; Petrosyan, V. H.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Sargsyan, A. A.; Simonyan, A. S.; Toneyan, H. A.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Vardanyan, T. L.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.; Zanyan, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  13. New Accelerator Projects: Rare Isotope Facilities and Electron Ion Colliders

    Roser, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Presently there are two major areas of new accelerator projects in particle physics: a next generation of Rare Isotope facilities in the field of Nuclear Structure Physics and high luminosity Electron Ion Colliders as next generation QCD faciliies in the field of Hadron Physics. This paper presents a review of the present and future facilities and the required novel accelerator technologies for these two types of accelerator projects.

  14. Establishment of nuclear data system - Feasibility study for neutron-beam= facility at pohang accelerator laboratory

    Nam Kung, Won; Koh, In Soo; Cho, Moo Hyun; Kim, Kui Nyun; Kwang, Hung Sik; Park, Sung Joo [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Nuclear data which have been produced by a few developed countries in the= past are essential elements to many disciplines, especially to nuclear engineering. As we promote our nuclear industry further to the level of advanced countries, we also have to establish the Nuclear Data System to produce and evaluate nuclear data independently. We have studied the possibility to build a neutron-beam facility utilizing accelerator facilities, technologies and man powers at pohang Accelerator Laboratory. We found specific parameters for the PAL 100-MeV electron linac based on the existing klystron, modulator, accelerating tubes and other facilities in the PAL; the beam energy is 60-100 MeV, the beam current for the short pulse (10 ns) is 2 A and for the long pulse is 500 mA and the pulse repetition rate is 60 Hz. We propose a neutron-beam facility using PAL 100-MeV electron linac where we can use a Ta-target for the neutron generation and three different time-of-flight beam lines (10 m, 20 m, and 100 m). One may find that the proposed neutron-beam facility is comparable with other operating neutron facilities in the world. We conclude that the proposed neutron-beam facility utilizing the existing accelerator facility in the PAL would be an excellent facility for neutron data production in combination with the ` Hanaro` facility in KAERI. 8 refs., 11 tabs., 12 figs. (author)

  15. Plasma wakefield acceleration at CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory

    Xia, G.; Nie, Y.; Mete, O.; Hanahoe, K.; Dover, M.; Wigram, M.; Wright, J.; Zhang, J.; Smith, J.; Pacey, T.; Li, Y.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.

    2016-09-01

    A plasma accelerator research station (PARS) has been proposed to study the key issues in electron driven plasma wakefield acceleration at CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory. In this paper, the quasi-nonlinear regime of beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration is analysed. The wakefield excited by various CLARA beam settings are simulated by using a 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) code. For a single drive beam, an accelerating gradient up to 3 GV/m can be achieved. For a two bunch acceleration scenario, simulation shows that a witness bunch can achieve a significant energy gain in a 10-50 cm long plasma cell.

  16. Target Visualization at the National Ignition Facility

    Potter, Daniel Abraham [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the targets used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure target surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. Using these techniques we are able to produce a detailed view of the shell surface, which in turn allows us to refine target manufacturing and cleaning processes. However, the volume of data produced limits the methods by which this data can be effectively viewed by a user. This paper introduces an image-based visualization system for data exploration of target shells at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It aims to combine multiple image sets into a single visualization to provide a method of navigating the data in ways that are not possible with existing tools.

  17. Flayer target acceleration and energy transfer at its collision with massive targets

    Investigations of efficiency of macroparticle acceleration and crater creation processes for the two wavelengths of the PALS (Prague Asterix Laser System) facility laser beam: λ1=1.315 μm and λ3=0.438 μm, and two types of targets made of Al: single massive target and double target consisting of a foil (thickness of 6 and 11 μm) placed before the massive target at the distance of 200-500 μm are presented. Targets were irradiated by the iodine laser beam: EL=120-240 J, the focal spot diameter of 250 μm, and the pulse duration of 0.4 ns. Velocities of the accelerated macroparticles as well as electron density distributions of plasma stream were determined by means of a 3-frame interferometry. Shape and volume of craters were obtained employing crater replica technology and microscopy measurement. Experimental results were analyzed and interpreted by means of two-dimensional theoretical and numerical simulations. Energy transfer as well as two- dimensional shock wave generation and crater formation at the collision of laser-driven macroparticle with massive target have been described. The values of laser energy absorption coefficient, ablation loading efficiency and efficiency of energy transfer at the laser-driven macroparticle impact have been obtained at the different wavelength of laser radiation by crater volume measurement data. (author)

  18. Report of the Fixed-Target Proton-Accelerator Group

    The fixed target proton accelerator group divided itself into two roughly equal parts. One sub-group concentrated on a high intensity (1014 protons/sec) moderate energy (30 GeV) machine while the other worked on a moderate intensity (5 x 1011 protons/sec) very high energy (20 TeV) machine. For experiments where the total available energy is adequate, the fixed target option added to a anti p p 20 TeV collider ring has several attractive features: (1) high luminosity afforded by intense beams striking thick solid targets; (2) secondary beams of hadrons, photons, and leptons; and (3) the versatility of a fixed target facility, where many experiments can be performed independently. The proposed experiments considered by the subgroup, including neutrino, photon, hadron, and very short lived particle beams were based both on scaled up versions of similar experiments proposed for Tevatron II at Fermilab and on the 400 GeV fixed target programs at Fermilab and CERN

  19. A linear electron accelerator radiation processing facility

    A description is given of the operations of a contract radiation processing facility. The radiation sources are medium energy linacs. Provision is being made for the installation of a cobalt 60 processing facility. A list is given of the radiation processing programmes presently being undertaken. The dosimetry system is described. (U.K.)

  20. MALT accelerator facility; characteristic of ion sources

    Nakano, Chuichiro; Kobayashi, Koichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Sunohara, Yoko [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    A tandem accelerator has been operated since 1995 with a continual effort to increase the accuracy and reliability of the measurement. In the present paper, after a brief discussion on a cesium sputter ion source incorporated in the MALT accelerator, basic characteristics such as temperature of cesium reservoir, and ioniser plate cathode potential. Production of negative ions in the ion source proceed in two step. The first step is generation of positive ions due to the surface ionization on a hot Ta plate, and the second step, electron detachment on a cathode. (M. Tanaka)

  1. Research on accelerator-driven transmutation and studies of experimental facilities

    Takizuka, Takakazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    JAERI is carrying out R and Ds on accelerator-driven transmutation systems under the national OMEGA Program that aims at development of the technology to improve efficiency and safety in the final disposal of radioactive waste. Research facilities for accelerator-driven transmutation experiments are proposed to construct within the framework of the planned JAERI Neutron Science Project. This paper describes the features of the proposed accelerator-driven transmutation systems and their technical issues to be solved. A research facility plan under examination is presented. The plan is divided in two phases. In the second phase, technical feasibility of accelerator-driven systems will be demonstrated with a 30-60 MW experimental integrated system and with a 7 MW high-power target facility. (author)

  2. The PSI/ETH tandem accelerator facility

    Synal, H.A.; Doebeli, M.; Fuhrmann, H.; Kubik, P.W.; Nebiker, P.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    The 1996 operation of the PSI/ETH tandem accelerator at ETH Hoenggerberg is summarised with a detailed compilation of the beam time statistics and the statistics of AMS samples for the different radioisotopes and for the major fields of research. (author) 2 tab.

  3. High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility (HIAF) in China

    HIAF (High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility), a new facility planned in China for heavy ion related researches, consists of two ion sources, a high intensity Heavy Ion Superconducting Linac (HISCL), a 45 Tm Accumulation and Booster Ring (ABR-45) and a multifunction storage ring system. The key features of HIAF are unprecedented high pulse beam intensity and versatile operation mode. The HIAF project aims to expand nuclear and related researches into presently unreachable region and give scientists possibilities to conduct cutting-edge researches in these fields. The general description of the facility is given in this article with a focus on the accelerator design

  4. Investigation on target normal sheath acceleration through measurements of ions energy distribution

    Tudisco, S., E-mail: tudisco@lns.infn.it; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Mascali, D.; Schillaci, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Altana, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna “Kore,” Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Muoio, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Brandi, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Cristoforetti, G.; Ferrara, P.; Fulgentini, L.; Koester, P. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Labate, L.; Gizzi, L. A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); and others

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming at investigating the ion acceleration mechanisms through laser-matter interaction in femtosecond domain has been carried out at the Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory facility with a laser intensity of up to 2 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. A Thomson parabola spectrometer was used to obtain the spectra of the ions of the different species accelerated. Here, we show the energy spectra of light-ions and we discuss their dependence on structural characteristics of the target and the role of surface and target bulk in the acceleration process.

  5. Investigation on target normal sheath acceleration through measurements of ions energy distribution

    An experimental campaign aiming at investigating the ion acceleration mechanisms through laser-matter interaction in femtosecond domain has been carried out at the Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory facility with a laser intensity of up to 2 × 1019 W/cm2. A Thomson parabola spectrometer was used to obtain the spectra of the ions of the different species accelerated. Here, we show the energy spectra of light-ions and we discuss their dependence on structural characteristics of the target and the role of surface and target bulk in the acceleration process

  6. Antiquark Flavor Asymmetry with New Accelerator Facilities

    Kumano, S.

    1997-01-01

    Flavor asymmetry in light antiquark distributions is discussed. In particular, recent progress on the u-bar/d-bar asymmetry is explained. Then, we discuss possible future experimental studies. 1. Introduction 2. Present situation 3. Future u-bar/d-bar asymmetry studies 3.1 Drell-Yan process 3.2 Charged-hadron production 3.3 W charge asymmetry 3.4 Deuteron acceleration at HERA

  7. BNL ACCELERATOR-BASED RADIOBIOLOGY FACILITIES

    LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    2000-05-28

    For the past several years, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) has provided ions of iron, silicon and gold, at energies from 600 MeV/nucleon to 10 GeV/nucleon, for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) radiobiology research program. NASA has recently funded the construction of a new dedicated ion facility, the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The Booster synchrotron will supply ion beams ranging from protons to gold, in an energy range from 40--3,000 MeV/nucleon with maximum beam intensities of 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 11} ions per pulse. The BAF Project is described and the future AGS and BAF operation plans are presented.

  8. Accelerating sustainability in large-scale facilities

    Marina Giampietro

    2011-01-01

    Scientific research centres and large-scale facilities are intrinsically energy intensive, but how can big science improve its energy management and eventually contribute to the environmental cause with new cleantech? CERN’s commitment to providing tangible answers to these questions was sealed in the first workshop on energy management for large scale scientific infrastructures held in Lund, Sweden, on the 13-14 October.   Participants at the energy management for large scale scientific infrastructures workshop. The workshop, co-organised with the European Spallation Source (ESS) and  the European Association of National Research Facilities (ERF), tackled a recognised need for addressing energy issues in relation with science and technology policies. It brought together more than 150 representatives of Research Infrastrutures (RIs) and energy experts from Europe and North America. “Without compromising our scientific projects, we can ...

  9. Implementation of a solid target production facility

    Tochon-Danguy, H. J.; Poniger, S. S.; Sachinidis, J. I.; Panopoulos, H. P.; Scott, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    The desire to utilize long-lived PET isotopes in Australia has significantly increased over the years and several research projects for labelling of peptides, proteins and biomolecules, including labelling of recombinant antibodies has been restricted due to the limited availability of suitable isotopes. This need has led to the recent installation and commissioning of a new facility dedicated to fully automated solid target isotope production, including 24I, 64Cu, 89Zr and 86Y at the Austin Health Centre for PET.

  10. Laser Ion Acceleration from Mass-Limited Targets with Preplasma

    Lezhnin, K V; Esirkepov, T Zh; Bulanov, S V; Klimo, O; Weber, S; Korn, G

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of high intensity laser radiation with mass-limited target exhibits significant enhancement of the ion acceleration when the target is surrounded by an underdense plasma corona, as seen in numerical simulations. The self-generated quasistatic magnetic field squeezes the corona causing the intensification of a subsequent Coulomb explosion of the target. The electric field intensification at the target edges and plasma resonance effects result in the generation of characteristic density holes and further contributes to the ion acceleration.The interaction of high intensity laser radiation with mass-limited target exhibits significant enhancement of the ion acceleration when the target is surrounded by an underdense plasma corona, as seen in numerical simulations. The self-generated quasistatic magnetic field squeezes the corona causing the intensification of a subsequent Coulomb explosion of the target. The electric field intensification at the target edges and plasma resonance effects result in...

  11. Peking university superconducting accelerator facility for free electron laser

    Peking University Superconducting Accelerator Facility (PKU-SCAF) is to generate high-quality electron beams with high average current. It is mainly composed of a DC-SC photocathode injector and a superconducting accelerator. It will operate in CW mode. The energy of the electrons is 20-35 MeV and the emittance is <15 π mm mrad. PKU-SCAF will be used for Free Electron Lasers

  12. IFMIF accelerator facility RAMI analyses in the engineering design phase

    Bargalló Font, Enric

    2014-01-01

    The planned International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has the mission to test and qualify materials for future fusion reactors. IFMIF will employ the deuteron-lithium stripping reaction to irradiate the test samples with a high-energy neutron flux. IFMIF will consist mainly of two linear deuteron accelerators, a liquid lithium loop and a test cell. Accelerated deuterons will collide with the lithium producing a high-energy neutron flux that will irradiate the material sample...

  13. Radiation Safety of Accelerator Facility with Regard to Regulation

    The radiation safety of accelerator facility and the status of the facilities according to licensee in Indonesia as well as lesson learned from the accidents are described. The atomic energy Act No. 10 of 1997 enacted by the Government of Indonesia which is implemented in Radiation Safety Government Regulation No. 63 and 64 as well as practice-specific model regulation for licensing request are discussed. (author)

  14. CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] design report

    This book describes the conceptual design of, and the planning for, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), which will be a high-intensity, continuous-wave electron linear accelerator (linac) for nuclear physics. Its principal scientific goal is to understand the quark structure, behavior, and clustering of individual nucleons in the nuclear medium, and simultaneously to understand the forces governing this behavior. The linac will consist of 1 GeV of accelerating structure, split into two antiparallel 0.5-GeV segments. The segments will be connected by a beam transport system to circulate the electron beams from one segment to the other for up to four complete passes of acceleration. The maximum beam energy will be 4 GeV at a design current of 200 microamperes. The accelerator complex will also include systems to extract three continuous beams from the linac and to deliver them to three experimental halls equipped with detectors and instrumentation for nuclear physics research. The accelerating structure will be kept superconducting within insulated cryostats filled with liquid helium produced at a central helium refrigerator and distributed to the cryostats via insulated transfer lines. An injector, instrumentation and controls for the accelerator, radio-frequency power systems, and several support facilities will also be provided. A cost estimate based on the Work Breakdown Structure has been completed. Assuming a five-year construction schedule starting early in FY 1987, the total estimated cost is $236 million (actual year dollars), including contingency

  15. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range. PMID:27435449

  16. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range.

  17. Reliability Considerations for the Operation of Large Accelerator User Facilities

    Willeke, F J

    2016-01-01

    The lecture provides an overview of considerations relevant for achieving highly reliable operation of accelerator based user facilities. The article starts with an overview of statistical reliability formalism which is followed by high reliability design considerations with examples. The article closes with operational aspects of high reliability such as preventive maintenance and spares inventory.

  18. Cable systems for experimental facilities in JAERI TANDEM ACCELERATOR BUILDING

    Measuring cable systems for experimental facilities in JAERI TANDEM ACCELERATOR BUILDING were completed recently. Measures are taken to prevent penetration of noises into the measuring systems. The cable systems are described in detail, including power supplies and grounding for the measuring systems. (author)

  19. New heavy-ion accelerator facility at Oak Ridge

    Funds were obtained to establish a new national heavy-ion facility to be located at Oak Ridge. The principal component of this facility is a 25-MW tandem designed specifically for good heavy-ion acceleration, which will provide high quality beams of medium weight ions for nuclear research by itself. The tandem beams will also be injected into ORIC for additional energy gain, so that usable beams for nuclear physics research can be extended to about A = 160. A notable feature of the tandem is that it will be of the ''folded'' type, in which both the negative and positive accelerating tubes are contained in the same column. The accelerator system, the experimental lay-out, and the time schedule for the project are discussed

  20. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high gradient acceleration and state of the art free electron lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 to 100 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps Nd:YAG laser and a 100 mJ, 10 ps CO2 laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high brightness electron beams. The AFT's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the High power laser will begin operation this year. 28 refs., 4 figs

  1. Hardware availability calculations and results of the IFMIF accelerator facility

    Highlights: • IFMIF accelerator facility hardware availability analyses methodology is described. • Results of the individual hardware availability analyses are shown for the reference design. • Accelerator design improvements are proposed for each system. • Availability results are evaluated and compared with the requirements. - Abstract: Hardware availability calculations have been done individually for each system of the deuteron accelerators of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). The principal goal of these analyses is to estimate the availability of the systems, compare it with the challenging IFMIF requirements and find new paths to improve availability performances. Major unavailability contributors are highlighted and possible design changes are proposed in order to achieve the hardware availability requirements established for each system. In this paper, such possible improvements are implemented in fault tree models and the availability results are evaluated. The parallel activity on the design and construction of the linear IFMIF prototype accelerator (LIPAc) provides detailed design information for the RAMI (reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability) analyses and allows finding out the improvements that the final accelerator could have. Because of the R and D behavior of the LIPAc, RAMI improvements could be the major differences between the prototype and the IFMIF accelerator design

  2. A Staged Muon Accelerator Facility For Neutrino and Collider Physics

    Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; Brice, Stephen; Bross, Alan David; Denisov, Dmitri; Eichten, Estia; Holmes, Stephen; Lipton, Ronald; Neuffer, David; Palmer, Mark Alan; Bogacz, S Alex; Huber, Patrick; Kaplan, Daniel M; Snopok, Pavel; Kirk, Harold G; Palmer, Robert B; Ryne, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    Muon-based facilities offer unique potential to provide capabilities at both the Intensity Frontier with Neutrino Factories and the Energy Frontier with Muon Colliders. They rely on a novel technology with challenging parameters, for which the feasibility is currently being evaluated by the Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). A realistic scenario for a complementary series of staged facilities with increasing complexity and significant physics potential at each stage has been developed. It takes advantage of and leverages the capabilities already planned for Fermilab, especially the strategy for long-term improvement of the accelerator complex being initiated with the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP-II) and the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF). Each stage is designed to provide an R&D platform to validate the technologies required for subsequent stages. The rationale and sequence of the staging process and the critical issues to be addressed at each stage, are presented.

  3. European accelerator facilities for single event effects testing

    Adams, L.; Nickson, R.; Harboe-Sorensen, R. [ESA-ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Hajdas, W.; Berger, G.

    1997-03-01

    Single event effects are an important hazard to spacecraft and payloads. The advances in component technology, with shrinking dimensions and increasing complexity will give even more importance to single event effects in the future. The ground test facilities are complex and expensive and the complexities of installing a facility are compounded by the requirement that maximum control is to be exercised by users largely unfamiliar with accelerator technology. The PIF and the HIF are the result of experience gained in the field of single event effects testing and represent a unique collaboration between space technology and accelerator experts. Both facilities form an essential part of the European infrastructure supporting space projects. (J.P.N.)

  4. Target spot localization at neutron producing accelerators

    In the application of neutron producing accelerators it is required to know the actual position and the homogeneity of distribution of the emitted neutrons. Solid state nuclear track detectors offer a good possibility to get precise information on these without any disturbing influence on them. LR 115 2 type cellulose nitrate Kodak-Pathe Foils were irradiated with fast neutrons. When track density is higher than about 104 tracks cm-2 the damaged area can be observed with the naked eye, too. To get quantitative information the track densities were counted with manual technique. (author)

  5. New linear accelerator (Linac) design based on C-band accelerating structures for SXFEL facility

    ZHANG Meng; GU Qiang

    2011-01-01

    A C-band accelerator structure is one promising technique for a compact XFEL facility.It is also attractive in beam dynamics in maintaining a high quality electron beam,which is an important factor in the performance of a free electron laser.In this paper,a comparison between traditional S-band and C-band accelerating structures is made based on the linac configuration of a Shanghai Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser (SXFEL) facility.Throughout the comprehensive simulation,we conclude that the C-band structure is much more competitive.

  6. National Ignition Facility Target Design and Fabrication

    Cook, R C; Kozioziemski, B J; Nikroo, A; Wilkens, H L; Bhandarkar, S; Forsman, A C; Haan, S W; Hoppe, M L; Huang, H; Mapoles, E; Moody, J D; Sater, J D; Seugling, R M; Stephens, R B; Takagi, M; Xu, H W

    2007-12-10

    The current capsule target design for the first ignition experiments at the NIF Facility beginning in 2009 will be a copper-doped beryllium capsule, roughly 2 mm in diameter with 160-{micro}m walls. The capsule will have a 75-{micro}m layer of solid DT on the inside surface, and the capsule will driven with x-rays generated from a gold/uranium cocktail hohlraum. The design specifications are extremely rigorous, particularly with respect to interfaces, which must be very smooth to inhibit Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth. This paper outlines the current design, and focuses on the challenges and advances in capsule fabrication and characterization; hohlraum fabrication, and D-T layering and characterization.

  7. Construction Management for Conventional Facilities of Proton Accelerator

    Proton Engineering Frontier Project, puts its aim to building 100MeV 20mA linear proton accelerator which is national facility for NT, BT, IT, and future technologies, expected to boost up the national industry competitiveness. This R and D, Construction Management is in charge of the supportive works such as site selection, architecture and engineering of conventional facilities, and overall construction management. The major goals of this work are as follows: At first, architecture and engineering of conventional facilities. Second, construction management, supervision and inspection on construction of conventional facilities. Lastly, cooperation with the project host organization, Gyeongju city, for adjusting technically interrelated work during construction. In this research, We completed the basic, detail, and field changed design of conventional facilities. Acquisition of necessary construction and atomic license, radiation safety analysis, site improvement, access road construction were successfully done as well. Also, we participated in the project host related work as follows: Project host organization and site selection, construction technical work for project host organization and procedure management, etc. Consequently, we so fulfilled all of the own goals which were set up in the beginning of this construction project that we could made contribution for installing and running PEFP's developed 100MeV 20mA linear accelerator

  8. A new electron accelerator facility for commercial and educational uses

    Uribe, R. M.; Vargas-Aburto, C.

    2001-07-01

    A 5 MeV 150 kW electron accelerator facility (NEO Beam Alliance Inc.) has recently initiated operations in Ohio. NEO Beam is the result of a "partnership" between Kent State University (KSU) and a local plastics company (Mercury Plastics, Inc.). The accelerator will be used for electron beam processing, and for educational activities. KSU has created a university-wide Program on Electron Beam Technology (EBT) to address both instructional (including workforce training and development) and research opportunities. In this work, a description is made of the facility and its genesis. Present curricular initiatives are described. Preliminary dosimetry measurements performed with radiochromic (RC) dye films, calorimeters, and alanine pellets are presented and discussed.

  9. Development of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    We describe the present status of an ongoing project to develop a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based (AB)-BNCT. The project final goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.4 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. The machine currently being constructed is a folded TESQ with a high-voltage terminal at 0.6 MV. We report here on the progress achieved in a number of different areas.

  10. Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility photocathode gun and transport beamline

    We present an analysis of the electron beam emitted from a laser driven photocathode injector (Gun, operating at 2856 MHZ), through a Transport beamline, to the LINAC entrance for the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The beam parameters including beam energy, and emittance are calculated. Some of our results, are tabulated and the phase plots of the beam parameters, from Cathode, through the Transport line elements, to the LINAC entrance, are shown

  11. Optical fiber feasibility study in Accelerated Pavement Testing facility

    Bueche, N.; Rychen, P.; Dumont, A.-G.; Santagata, E.

    2009-01-01

    The presented research has been carried out within the European project Intelligent Roads (INTRO). The major objective followed was to assess the potential of optical fiber for pavement monitoring in comparison with classical strain gauges. Thus, both measurement devices have been tested under the same conditions in a full scale Accelerated Pavement Testing (APT) at LAVOC. This facility allows the user to control different parameters such as loading configuration and temperature and, as a mat...

  12. Accelerated knowledge Acquisition Programme for Real Estate and Facilities Management

    B. Atkin

    2001-01-01

    Increased recognition of the importance of workplace strategies and other facility-related business decisions are preoccupying owners and academics alike. In Finland, the real estate sector has a pressing need to develop a new generation of industry-aware researchers to deal with and resolve matters of strategic value to real estate owners and occupiers. The approach being advocated is a programme of accelerated knowledge acquisition in which information and communications technology will pla...

  13. Superpower proton linear accelerators for neutron generators and electronuclear facilities

    The report is a review of projects on the superpower proton linear accelerators (SPLA) for neutron generators (NG) and electronuclear facilities, proposed in the recent years. The beam average output capacity in these projects reaches 100 MW. The basic parameters of certain operating NGs, as well as some projected NGs will the SPLA drivers are presented. The problems on application of superconducting resonators in the SPLA as well as the issues of the SPLA reliability and costs are discussed

  14. Status report of 14 UD pelletron accelerator facility

    The BARC- TIFR Pelletron Accelerator facility (PAF) has been working for the last eighteen years. Over the years performance has improved gradually. On an average sixty to seventy experiments of 3-5 days duration are carried out per year. In order to boost the energy of ion beam, a superconducting Linac project with eight modules each having four resonators was taken up. The project is nearing completion. Apart from basic research, accelerator is also being used for various applied programs. In order to keep machine time up various development programs have also been taken up. In this paper we will discuss in detail about present status of accelerator and in brief about future program. (author)

  15. Ion acceleration from relativistic laser nano-target

    Jung, Daniel

    2012-01-06

    Laser-ion acceleration has been of particular interest over the last decade for fundamental as well as applied sciences. Remarkable progress has been made in realizing laser-driven accelerators that are cheap and very compact compared with conventional rf-accelerators. Proton and ion beams have been produced with particle energies of up to 50 MeV and several MeV/u, respectively, with outstanding properties in terms of transverse emittance and current. These beams typically exhibit an exponentially decaying energy distribution, but almost all advanced applications, such as oncology, proton imaging or fast ignition, require quasimonoenergetic beams with a low energy spread. The majority of the experiments investigated ion acceleration in the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) regime with comparably thick targets in the {mu}m range. In this thesis ion acceleration is investigated from nm-scaled targets, which are partially produced at the University of Munich with thickness as low as 3 nm. Experiments have been carried out at LANL's Trident high-power and high-contrast laser (80 J, 500 fs, {lambda}=1054 nm), where ion acceleration with these nano-targets occurs during the relativistic transparency of the target, in the so-called Breakout afterburner (BOA) regime. With a novel high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola and ion wide angle spectrometer, thickness dependencies of the ions angular distribution, particle number, average and maximum energy have been measured. Carbon C{sup 6+} energies reached 650 MeV and 1 GeV for unheated and heated targets, respectively, and proton energies peaked at 75 MeV and 120 MeV for diamond and CH{sub 2} targets. Experimental data is presented, where the conversion efficiency into carbon C{sup 6+} (protons) is investigated and found to have an up to 10fold (5fold) increase over the TNSA regime. With circularly polarized laser light, quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions have been generated from the same nm-scaled foil

  16. Ion acceleration from relativistic laser nano-target interaction

    Laser-ion acceleration has been of particular interest over the last decade for fundamental as well as applied sciences. Remarkable progress has been made in realizing laser-driven accelerators that are cheap and very compact compared with conventional rf-accelerators. Proton and ion beams have been produced with particle energies of up to 50 MeV and several MeV/u, respectively, with outstanding properties in terms of transverse emittance and current. These beams typically exhibit an exponentially decaying energy distribution, but almost all advanced applications, such as oncology, proton imaging or fast ignition, require quasimonoenergetic beams with a low energy spread. The majority of the experiments investigated ion acceleration in the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) regime with comparably thick targets in the μm range. In this thesis ion acceleration is investigated from nm-scaled targets, which are partially produced at the University of Munich with thickness as low as 3 nm. Experiments have been carried out at LANL's Trident high-power and high-contrast laser (80 J, 500 fs, λ=1054 nm), where ion acceleration with these nano-targets occurs during the relativistic transparency of the target, in the so-called Breakout afterburner (BOA) regime. With a novel high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola and ion wide angle spectrometer, thickness dependencies of the ions angular distribution, particle number, average and maximum energy have been measured. Carbon C6+ energies reached 650 MeV and 1 GeV for unheated and heated targets, respectively, and proton energies peaked at 75 MeV and 120 MeV for diamond and CH2 targets. Experimental data is presented, where the conversion efficiency into carbon C6+ (protons) is investigated and found to have an up to 10fold (5fold) increase over the TNSA regime. With circularly polarized laser light, quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions have been generated from the same nm-scaled foil targets at Trident with an

  17. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 22-27, 1988, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The program included papers on facility plans, beam dynamics, and accelerator hardware. The parallel sessions were particularly lively with discussions of all facets of kaon factory design. The workshop provided an opportunity for communication among the staff involved in hadron facility planning from all the study groups presently active. The recommendations of the workshop include: the need to use h=1 RF in the compressor ring; the need to minimize foil hits in painting schemes for all rings; the need to consider single Coulomb scattering in injection beam los calculations; the need to study the effect of field inhomogeneity in the magnets on slow extraction for the 2.2 Tesla main ring of AHF; and agreement in principle with the design proposed for a joint Los Alamos/TRIUMF prototype main ring RF cavity

  18. Radiation Shielding Analysis of Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    The objective of this technical report are to establish the radiation shielding technology of a high-energy electron accelerator to the facilities which utilize with electron beam. The technologies of electron beam irradiation(300 KeV -10 MeV) demand on the diverse areas of material processing, surface treatment, treatments on foods or food processing, improvement of metal properties, semiconductors, and ceramics, sterilization of medical goods and equipment, treatment and control of contamination and pollution, and so on. In order to acquire safety design for the protection of personnel from the radiations produced by electron beam accelerators, it is important to develop the radiation shielding analysis technology. The shielding analysis are carried out by which define source term, calculation modelling and computer calculations for 2 MeV and 10 MeV accelerators. And the shielding analysis for irradiation dump shield with 10 MeV accelerators are also performed by solving the complex 3-D geometry and long computer run time problem. The technology development of shielding analysis will be contributed to extend the further high energy accelerator development

  19. Effective flow-accelerated corrosion programs in nuclear facilities

    Piping Flow-Accelerated Corrosion Programs in nuclear power generation facilities are classically comprised of the selection of inspection locations with the assistance of a predictive methodology such as the Electric Power Research Institute computer codes CHECMATE or CHECWORKS, performing inspections, conducting structural evaluations on the inspected components, and implementing the appropriate sample expansion and corrective actions. Performing such a sequence of steps can be effective in identifying thinned components and implementing appropriate short term and long term actions necessary to resolve flow-accelerated corrosion related problems. A maximally effective flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) program requires an understanding of many programmatic details. These include the procedural control of the program, effective use of historical information, managing the activities performed during a limited duration outage, allocating resources based on risk allocation, having an acute awareness of how the plant is operated, investigating components removed from the plant, and several others. This paper will describe such details and methods that will lead to a flow-accelerated corrosion program that effectively minimizes the risk of failure due to flow-accelerated corrosion and provide full and complete documentation of the program. (author)

  20. Enhanced Ion Acceleration from Micro-tube Structured Targets

    Snyder, Joseph; Ji, Liangliang; Akli, Kramer

    2015-11-01

    We present an enhanced ion acceleration method that leverages recent advancements in 3D printing for target fabrication. Using the three-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulation code Virtual Laser-Plasma Lab (VLPL), we model the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with a micro-tube plasma (MTP) structured target. When compared to flat foils, the MTP target enhances the maximum proton energy by a factor of about 4. The ion enhancement is attributed to two main factors: high energy electrons extracted from the tube structure enhancing the accelerating field and light intensification within the MTP target increasing the laser intensity at the location of the foil. We also present results on ion energy scaling with micro-tube diameter and incident laser pulse intensity. This work was supported by the AFOSR under contract No. FA9550-14-1-0085.

  1. SIRIUS: A Proposal for an accelerated Radioactive Beams Facility at ISIS

    A Proposal for a future Radioactive Beams Facility has been developed based on ISIS, the world's brightest pulsed neutron source. Radioactive ions are produced by the spallation process driven by a 100 μA, 800 MeV proton beam delivered from the ISIS synchrotron accelerator. This is ten times more powerful than currently available in the world today, and follows on from the successful work performed by the RIST project to develop a high power radioactive beam target for such a facility. The proposed design provides for both low (200 keV), and high energy (10 MeV/A) radioactive beams with high to medium mass resolution. A flexible facility layout allows the maximum simultaneous and independent use of the radioactive beams by a number of different users. An overview of the proposed facility is presented

  2. Target shape effects on monoenergetic GeV proton acceleration

    Chen, Min; Pukhov, Alexander; Sheng, Zheng-Ming

    2009-01-01

    When a circularly polarized laser pulse interacts with a foil target, there are three stages: pre-hole-boring, hole-boring and the light sail acceleration. We study the electron and ion dynamics in the first stage and find the minimum foil thickness requirement for a given laser intensity. Based on this analysis, we propose to use a shaped foil for ion acceleration, whose thickness varies transversely to match the laser intensity. Then, the target evolves into three regions: the acceleration, transparency and deformation regions. In the acceleration region, the target can be uniformly accelerated producing a mono-energetic and spatially collimated ion beam. Detailed numerical simulations are performed to check the feasibility and robustness of this scheme, such as the influence of shape factors and surface roughness. A GeV mono-energetic proton beam is observed in the three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations when a laser pulse with the focus intensity of 1022W=cm2 is used. The energy conversion efficien...

  3. Evaluation of medical isotope production with the accelerator production of tritium (APT) facility

    The accelerator production of tritium (APT) facility, with its high beam current and high beam energy, would be an ideal supplier of radioisotopes for medical research, imaging, and therapy. By-product radioisotopes will be produced in the APT window and target cooling systems and in the tungsten target through spallation, neutron, and proton interactions. High intensity proton fluxes are potentially available at three different energies for the production of proton- rich radioisotopes. Isotope production targets can be inserted into the blanket for production of neutron-rich isotopes. Currently, the major production sources of radioisotopes are either aging or abroad, or both. The use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine is growing and changing, both in terms of the number of nuclear medicine procedures being performed and in the rapidly expanding range of procedures and radioisotopes used. A large and varied demand is forecast, and the APT would be an ideal facility to satisfy that demand

  4. Evaluation of medical isotope production with the accelerator production of tritium (APT) facility

    Benjamin, R.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Frey, G.D.; McLean, D.C., Jr; Spicer, K.M.; Davis, S.E.; Baron, S.; Frysinger, J.R. [Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Blanpied, G.; Adcock, D. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States)

    1997-07-10

    The accelerator production of tritium (APT) facility, with its high beam current and high beam energy, would be an ideal supplier of radioisotopes for medical research, imaging, and therapy. By-product radioisotopes will be produced in the APT window and target cooling systems and in the tungsten target through spallation, neutron, and proton interactions. High intensity proton fluxes are potentially available at three different energies for the production of proton- rich radioisotopes. Isotope production targets can be inserted into the blanket for production of neutron-rich isotopes. Currently, the major production sources of radioisotopes are either aging or abroad, or both. The use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine is growing and changing, both in terms of the number of nuclear medicine procedures being performed and in the rapidly expanding range of procedures and radioisotopes used. A large and varied demand is forecast, and the APT would be an ideal facility to satisfy that demand.

  5. Physics at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Lawrence Cardman

    2005-10-22

    The CEBAF accelerator at JLab is fulfilling its scientific mission to understand how hadrons are constructed from the quarks and gluons of QCD, to understand the QCD basis for the nucleon-nucleon force, and to explore the transition from the nucleon-meson to a QCD description. Its success is based on the firm foundation of experimental and theoretical techniques developed world-wide over the past few decades, on complementary data provided by essential lower-energy facilities, such as MAMI, and on the many insights provided by the scientists we are gathered here to honor.

  6. Towards the final BSA modeling for the accelerator-driven BNCT facility at INFN LNL

    Some remarkable advances have been made in the last years on the SPES-BNCT project of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) towards the development of the accelerator-driven thermal neutron beam facility at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL), aimed at the BNCT experimental treatment of extended skin melanoma. The compact neutron source will be produced via the 9Be(p,xn) reactions using the 5 MeV, 30 mA beam driven by the RFQ accelerator, whose modules construction has been recently completed, into a thick beryllium target prototype already available. The Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) final modeling, using both neutron converter and the new, detailed, Be(p,xn) neutron yield spectra at 5 MeV energy recently measured at the CN Van de Graaff accelerator at LNL, is summarized here.

  7. Towards the final BSA modeling for the accelerator-driven BNCT facility at INFN LNL

    Ceballos, C. [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnlogicas y Desarrollo Nuclear, 5ta y30, Miramar, Playa, Ciudad Habana (Cuba); Esposito, J., E-mail: juan.esposito@lnl.infn.it [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), via dell' Universita, 2, I-35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Agosteo, S. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)] [INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Colautti, P.; Conte, V.; Moro, D. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), via dell' Universita, 2, I-35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Pola, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)] [INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    Some remarkable advances have been made in the last years on the SPES-BNCT project of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) towards the development of the accelerator-driven thermal neutron beam facility at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL), aimed at the BNCT experimental treatment of extended skin melanoma. The compact neutron source will be produced via the {sup 9}Be(p,xn) reactions using the 5 MeV, 30 mA beam driven by the RFQ accelerator, whose modules construction has been recently completed, into a thick beryllium target prototype already available. The Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) final modeling, using both neutron converter and the new, detailed, Be(p,xn) neutron yield spectra at 5 MeV energy recently measured at the CN Van de Graaff accelerator at LNL, is summarized here.

  8. Optimum target source term estimation for high energy electron accelerators

    Nayak, M. K.; Sahu, T. K.; Nair, Haridas G.; Nandedkar, R. V.; Bandyopadhyay, Tapas; Tripathi, R. M.; Hannurkar, P. R.

    2016-05-01

    Optimum target for bremsstrahlung emission is defined as the thickness of the target material, which produces maximum bremsstrahlung yield, on interaction of electron with the target. The bremsstrahlung dose rate per unit electron beam power at a distance of 1 m from the target material gives the optimum target source term. In the present work, simulations were performed for three different electron energies, 450, 1000 and 2500 MeV using EGSnrc Monte-Carlo code to determine the optimum thickness. An empirical relation for optimum target as a function of electron energy and atomic number of the target materials is found out from results. Using the simulated optimum target thickness, experiments are conducted to determine the optimum target source term. For the experimental determination, two available electron energies, 450 MeV and 550 MeV from booster synchrotron of Indus facility is used. The optimum target source term for these two energies are also simulated. The experimental and simulated source term are found to be in very good agreement within ±3%. Based on the agreement of the simulated source term with the experimental source term at 450 MeV and 550 MeV, the same simulation methodology is used to simulate optimum target source term up to 2500 MeV. The paper describes the simulations and experiments carried out on optimum target bremsstrahlung source term and the results obtained.

  9. Health physics manual of good practices for accelerator facilities

    It is hoped that this manual will serve both as a teaching aid as well as a useful adjunct for program development. In the context of application, this manual addresses good practices that should be observed by management, staff, and designers since the achievement of a good radiation program indeed involves a combined effort. Ultimately, radiation safety and good work practices become the personal responsibility of the individual. The practices presented in this manual are not to be construed as mandatory rather they are to be used as appropriate for the specific case in the interest of radiation safety. As experience is accrued and new data obtained in the application of this document, ONS will update the guidance to assure that at any given time the guidance reflects optimum performance consistent with current technology and practice.The intent of this guide therefore is to: define common health physics problems at accelerators; recommend suitable methods of identifying, evaluating, and managing accelerator health physics problems; set out the established safety practices at DOE accelerators that have been arrived at by consensus and, where consensus has not yet been reached, give examples of safe practices; introduce the technical literature in the accelerator health physics field; and supplement the regulatory documents listed in Appendix D. Many accelerator health physics problems are no different than those at other kinds of facilities, e.g., ALARA philosophy, instrument calibration, etc. These problems are touched on very lightly or not at all. Similarly, this document does not cover other hazards such as electrical shock, toxic materials, etc. This does not in any way imply that these problems are not serious. 160 refs

  10. Ignition target design for the National Ignition Facility

    Haan, S.W.; Pollaine, S.M.; Lindl, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    The goal of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is to produce significant thermonuclear burn from a target driven with a laser or ion beam. To achieve that goal, the national ICF Program has proposed a laser capable of producing ignition and intermediate gain. The facility is called the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This article describes ignition targets designed for the NIF and their modeling. Although the baseline NIF target design, described herein, is indirect drive, the facility will also be capable of doing direct-drive ignition targets - currently being developed at the University of Rochester.

  11. Damage situation by the Great East Japan Earthquake and post-quake reconstruction project of the Tandem Accelerator Facility at the University of Tsukuba

    The 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator at the University of Tsukuba suffered serious damage from the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011. On the day, the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator was in operation at 8 MV. The electricity supply went out during the earthquake. Fortunately, there were no causalties by the earthquake in the facility. However, all high voltage accelerating columns fell down in the accelerator tank. We decided to shut down the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator. At present, we have a plan to install a new middle-sized tandem accelerator instead of the broken 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator at the 2nd target room connecting the beam line to existing facilities at the 1st target room. The construction of the new accelerator system will be completed by spring 2014. (author)

  12. Los Alamos High-Brightness Accelerator FEL (HIBAF) facility

    This paper reports that the 10-μm Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) facility is being upgraded. The conventional electron gun and bunchers have been replaced with a much more compact 6-MeV photoinjector accelerator. By adding existing parts from previous experiments, the primary beam energy will be doubled to 40 MeV. With the existing 1-m wiggler (λw = 2.7 cm) and resonator, the facility can produce photons with wavelengths from 3 to 10 μm when lasing on the fundamental mode and produce photons in the visible spectrum with short-period wigglers or harmonic operation. After installation of a 150 degrees bend, a second wiggler will be added as an amplifier. The installation of laser transport tubes between the accelerator vault and an upstairs laboratory will provide experimenters with a radiation-free environment for experiments. At the time of writing (Jan. 1990), the injector plus one additional tank has been installed and tested with beam to an energy of 17 MeV

  13. An accelerator facility for WDM, HEDP, and HIF investigations in Nazarbayev University

    Kaikanov, M.; Baigarin, K.; Tikhonov, A.; Urazbayev, A.; Kwan, J. W.; Henestroza, E.; Remnev, G.; Shubin, B.; Stepanov, A.; Shamanin, V.; Waldron, W. L.

    2016-05-01

    Nazarbayev University (NU) in Astana, Kazakhstan, is planning to build a new multi-MV, ∼10 to several hundred GW/cm2 ion accelerator facility which will be used in studies of material properties at extreme conditions relevant to ion-beam-driven inertial fusion energy, and other applications. Two design options have been considered. The first option is a 1.2 MV induction linac similar to the NDCX-II at LBNL, but with modifications, capable of heating a 1 mm spot size thin targets to a few eV temperature. The second option is a 2 - 3 MV, ∼200 kA, single-gap-diode proton accelerator powered by an inductive voltage adder. The high current proton beam can be focused to ∼1 cm spot size to obtain power densities of several hundred GW/cm2, capable of heating thick targets to temperatures of tens of eV. In both cases, a common requirement to achieving high beam intensity on target and pulse length compression is to utilize beam neutralization at the final stage of beam focusing. Initial experiments on pulsed ion beam neutralization have been carried out on a 0.3 MV, 1.5 GW single-gap ion accelerator at Tomsk Polytechnic University with the goal of creating a plasma region in front of a target at densities exceeding ∼1012 cm-3.

  14. Introduction: the changing face of accelerator target physics and chemistry

    The explosive growth of the small accelerator industry, an offshoot of the expansion of both clinical and research PET imaging, is driving a changing perspective in the field of accelerator targetry. To meet the new demands placed on targetry by the increasingly active and demanding PET institutions it has become necessary to design targets capable of producing large amounts of the four common positron-emitting radionuclides (15O, 13N, 11C, 18F) with unfailing reliability and simplicity. The economic clinical and research survival of PET absolutely relies upon these capabilities. In response to this perceived need, the lion's share of the effort in the field of target physics and chemistry is being directed toward the profuse production of these four common radioisotopes. (author)

  15. Powder Metallurgy Fabrication of Molybdenum Accelerator Target Disks

    Lowden, Richard Andrew [ORNL; Kiggans Jr, James O [ORNL; Bryan, Chris [ORNL; Nunn, Stephen D [ORNL; Parten, Randy J [ORNL

    2015-12-01

    Powder metallurgy approaches for the fabrication of accelerator target disks are being examined to support the development of Mo-99 production by NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC. An advantage of powder metallurgy is that very little material is wasted and at present, dense, quality parts are routinely produced from molybdenum powder. The proposed targets, however, are thin wafers, 29 mm in diameter with a thickness of 0.5 mm, with very stringent dimensional tolerances. Although tooling can be machined to very high tolerance levels, the operations of powder feed, pressing and sintering involve complicated mechanisms, each of which affects green density and shrinkage, and therefore the dimensions and shape of the final product. Combinations of powder morphology, lubricants and pressing technique have been explored to produce target disks with minimal variations in thickness and little or no distortion. In addition, sintering conditions that produce densities for optimum target dissolvability are being determined.

  16. Linear Accelerator Test Facility at LNF Conceptual Design Report

    Valente, Paolo; Bolli, Bruno; Buonomo, Bruno; Cantarella, Sergio; Ceccarelli, Riccardo; Cecchinelli, Alberto; Cerafogli, Oreste; Clementi, Renato; Di Giulio, Claudio; Esposito, Adolfo; Frasciello, Oscar; Foggetta, Luca; Ghigo, Andrea; Incremona, Simona; Iungo, Franco; Mascio, Roberto; Martelli, Stefano; Piermarini, Graziano; Sabbatini, Lucia; Sardone, Franco; Sensolini, Giancarlo; Ricci, Ruggero; Rossi, Luis Antonio; Rotundo, Ugo; Stella, Angelo; Strabioli, Serena; Zarlenga, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Test beam and irradiation facilities are the key enabling infrastructures for research in high energy physics (HEP) and astro-particles. In the last 11 years the Beam-Test Facility (BTF) of the DA{\\Phi}NE accelerator complex in the Frascati laboratory has gained an important role in the European infrastructures devoted to the development and testing of particle detectors. At the same time the BTF operation has been largely shadowed, in terms of resources, by the running of the DA{\\Phi}NE electron-positron collider. The present proposal is aimed at improving the present performance of the facility from two different points of view: extending the range of application for the LINAC beam extracted to the BTF lines, in particular in the (in some sense opposite) directions of hosting fundamental physics and providing electron irradiation also for industrial users; extending the life of the LINAC beyond or independently from its use as injector of the DA{\\Phi}NE collider, as it is also a key element of the electron/...

  17. Nanodiamond targets for accelerator X-ray experiments

    Lobko, A., E-mail: lobko@inp.bsu.by [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Golubeva, E. [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Prosp., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Kuzhir, P.; Maksimenko, S. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Ryazan State RadioEngineering University, 59/1 Gagarina Street, Ryazan 390005 (Russian Federation); Paddubskaya, A. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Shenderova, O. [International Technology Center, 8100 Brownleigh Dr., S. 120, Raleigh, NC 27617 (United States); Uglov, V. [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Prosp., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Valynets, N. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus)

    2015-07-15

    Results of fabrication of a nanodiamond target for accelerator X-ray experiments are reported. Nanodiamond film with dimensions 5 × 7 mm and thickness of 500 nm has been made of the high pressure high temperature nanodiamonds using a filtration method. The average crystallite size of primary nanodiamond particles varies around 100 nm. Source nanodiamonds and fabricated nanodiamond film were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. Preliminary results show that targets made of nanodiamonds are perspective in generating crystal-assisted radiation by the relativistic charged particles, such as parametric X-rays, diffracted transition radiation, diffracted Bremsstrahlung, etc.

  18. CACAO facility. Radioactive targets at Orsay

    CACAO, Chimie des Actinides et Cibles radioActives a Orsay (actinide chemistry and radioactive targets at Orsay), is a new laboratory dedicated to the fabrication and characterization of radioactive targets. It is supported by the radiochemistry group and the stable target service of the IPNO. The recurring needs of physicists working in the nuclear fuel cycle physics and the growing difficulties to obtain radioactive targets elsewhere were the main motivating factors behind the construction of this new laboratory. The first targets of 235,238U and 232Th have already been prepared although the full operating licenses still need to be obtained. In this paper, the installation and the equipment of CACAO will be described. An extensive study of a U test target fabricated by the CACAO laboratory has been performed and results are reported here. The different techniques used to characterize the deposit are presented and the outcome is discussed. (author)

  19. Benchmark calculations on neutrons streaming through mazes at proton accelerator facilities

    In accelerator shielding designs one of the important issues is to estimate radiation streaming through mazes and ducts. In order to validate the accuracy of the calculation methods concerning such neutron streaming, benchmark analyses were carried out using two kinds of benchmark problems based on past experiments. The analyses showed that the design methods were applicable to neutron streaming calculations of proton accelerator facilities with an uncertainty within a factor of two. In the analyses, relative comparisons were conducted using a radiation source generated by GeV energy protons, and absolute comparisons were conducted using a low-energy neutron source of a few tens of MeV. A radiation streaming experiment was planned and carried out at KEK using a radiation source produced by a thin copper target irradiated by 12 GeV protons. The preliminary experimental analysis is presented below. In addition, the authors propose to compile benchmark problems on radiation streaming for accelerator facilities and to search for possible new streaming experiments at other facilities. (authors)

  20. Polarized target physics at the Bonn electron accelerators

    At the BONN 2.5 GeV electron synchrotron experiments with polarized nucleon targets have a long tradition. Starting with measurements of the target asymmetry in single pion photoproduction off polarized protons, resp. neutrons, the experiments have been concentrated on photodisintegration measurements of polarized deuterons. Parallel to these activities a considerable progress in the field of the target technology, e.g. cryogenics and target materials, has been made, by which all the measurements have profitted enormously. Especially the development of the new target material ammonia has allowed the first use of a polarized deuteron (ND3) target in an intense electron beam. The construction of a frozen spin target, which will be used in combination with a tagged polarized photon beam, makes a new generation of polarized target experiments in photon induced reactions possible. Together with electron scattering off polarized deuterons and neutrons they will be a main activity in the physics program at the new stretcher accelerator ELSA in BONN. (orig.)

  1. Investigation of efficient shock acceleration of ions using high energy lasers in low density targets

    Antici, P.; Gauthier, M.; D'Humieres, E.; Albertazzi, B.; Beaucourt, C.; Böker, J.; Chen, S.; Dervieux, V.; Feugeas, J. L.; Glesser, M.; Levy, A.; Nicolai, P.; Romagnani, L.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Pepin, H.; Fuchs, J.

    2012-10-01

    Intense research is being conducted on sources of laser-accelerated ions and their applications that have the potential of becoming novel particle sources. In most experiments, a high intensity and short laser pulse interacts with a solid density target. It was recently shown that a promising way to accelerate ions to higher energies and in a collimated beam is to use under-dense or near-critical density targets instead of solid ones. In these conditions, simulations have revealed that protons are predicted to be accelerated by a collisionless shock mechanism that significantly increases their energy. We present recent experiments performed on the 100 TW LULI laser (France) and the TITAN facility at LLNL, USA. The near critical density plasma was prepared by exploding thin solid foils by a long laser pulse. The plasma density profile was controlled by varying the target thickness and the delay between the long and the short laser pulse. When exploding the target, we obtained proton energies that are comparable if not higher than what was obtained under similar laser conditions, but with solid targets which make them a promising candidate for an efficient proton source.

  2. Defocusing beam line design for an irradiation facility at the TAEA SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility

    Gencer, A.; Demirköz, B.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Yiğitoğlu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic components must be tested to ensure reliable performance in high radiation environments such as Hi-Limu LHC and space. We propose a defocusing beam line to perform proton irradiation tests in Turkey. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility was inaugurated in May 2012 for radioisotope production. The facility has also an R&D room for research purposes. The accelerator produces protons with 30 MeV kinetic energy and the beam current is variable between 10 μA and 1.2 mA. The beam kinetic energy is suitable for irradiation tests, however the beam current is high and therefore the flux must be lowered. We plan to build a defocusing beam line (DBL) in order to enlarge the beam size, reduce the flux to match the required specifications for the irradiation tests. Current design includes the beam transport and the final focusing magnets to blow up the beam. Scattering foils and a collimator is placed for the reduction of the beam flux. The DBL is designed to provide fluxes between 107 p /cm2 / s and 109 p /cm2 / s for performing irradiation tests in an area of 15.4 cm × 21.5 cm. The facility will be the first irradiation facility of its kind in Turkey.

  3. Improvement in performance and operational experience of 14 UD Pelletron Accelerator Facility, BARC–TIFR

    P V Bhagwat

    2002-11-01

    14 UD Pelletron Accelerator Facility at Mumbai has been operational since 1989. The project MEHIA (medium energy heavy ion accelerator) started in 1982 and was formally inaugurated on 30th December 1988. Since then the accelerator has been working round the clock. Improvement in accelerator performance and operational experience are described.

  4. Accelerator-based fusion with a low temperature target

    Neutron generators are in use in a number of scientific and commercial endeavors. They function by triggering fusion reactions between accelerated ions (usually deuterons) and a stationary cold target (e.g., containing tritium). This setup has the potential to generate energy. It has been shown that if the energy transfer between injected ions and target electrons is sufficiently small, net energy gain can be achieved. Three possible avenues are: (a) a hot target with high electron temperature, (b) a cold non-neutral target with an electron deficiency, or (c) a cold target with a high Fermi energy. A study of the third possibility is reported in light of recent research that points to a new phase of hydrogen, which is hypothesized to be related to metallic hydrogen. As such, the target is considered to be composed of nuclei and delocalized electrons. The electrons are treated as conduction electrons, with the average minimum excitation energy being approximately equal to 40% of the Fermi energy. The Fermi energy is directly related to the electron density. Preliminary results indicate that if the claimed electron densities in the new phase of hydrogen were achieved in a target, the energy transfer to electrons would be small enough to allow net energy gain.

  5. A post accelerator for the U.S. rare isotope accelerator facility

    The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Facility includes a post-accelerator for rare isotopes (RIB linac) which must produce high-quality beams of radioactive ions over the full mass range, including uranium, at energies above the coulomb barrier, and have high transmission and efficiency. The latter requires the RIB linac to accept at injection ions in the 1+ charge state. A concept for such a post accelerator suitable for ions up to mass 132 has been previously described [1]. This paper presents a modified concept which extends the mass range to uranium. A high resolution separator for purifying beams at the isobaric level precedes the RIB linac. The mass filtering process will provide high purity beams while preserving transmission. For most cases a resolution of about m/Δm=20,000 is adequate at mass A=100 to obtain a separation between isobars of mass excess difference of 5 MeV. The design for a device capable of purifying beams at the isobaric level included calculations up to 5th order. The RIB linac will utilize existing superconducting heavy-ion linac technology for all but a small portion of the accelerator system. The exceptional piece, a very-low-charge-state injector, section needed for just the first few MV of the RIB accelerator, consists of a pre-buncher followed by several sections of cw, normally-conducting RFQ. Two stages of charge stripping are provided: helium gas stripping at energies of a few keV/u, and additional foil stripping at ∼680 keV/u for the heavier ions. In extending the mass range to uranium, however, for best efficiency the helium gas stripping must be performed at different energies for different mass ions. We present numerical simulations of the beam dynamics of a design for the complete RIB linac which provides for several stripping options and uses cost-effective solenoid focusing elements in the drift-tube linac

  6. A post-accelerator for the US rare isotope accelerator facility

    The proposed rare isotope accelerator (RIA) facility includes a post-accelerator for rare isotopes (RIB linac) which must produce high-quality beams of radioactive ions over the full mass range, including uranium, at energies above the Coulomb barrier, and have high transmission and efficiency. The latter requires the RIB linac to accept at injection ions in the 1+ charge state. A concept for such a post accelerator suitable for ions up to mass 132 has been previously described . This paper presents a modified concept which extends the mass range to uranium. A high resolution separator for purifying beams at the isobaric level precedes the RIB linac. The mass filtering process will provide high purity beams while preserving transmission. For most cases a resolution of about m/Δm=20 000 is adequate at mass A=100 to obtain a separation between isobars of mass excess difference of 5 MeV. The design for a device capable of purifying beams at the isobaric level includes calculations up to fifth order. The RIB linac will utilize existing superconducting heavy-ion linac technology for all but a small portion of the accelerator system. The exceptional piece, a very-low-charge-state injector section needed for just the first few MV of the RIB accelerator, consists of a pre-buncher followed by several sections of cw, normally-conducting RFQ. Two stages of charge stripping are provided: helium gas stripping at energies of a few keV/u, and additional foil stripping at ∼680 keV/u for the heavier ions. In extending the mass range to uranium, however, for best efficiency the helium gas stripping must be performed at different energies for different mass ions. We present numerical simulations of the beam dynamics of a design for the complete RIB linac which provides for several stripping options and uses cost-effective solenoid focusing elements in the drift-tube linac

  7. Beam line shielding calculations for an Electron Accelerator Mo-99 production facility

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-03

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the photon and neutron fields in and around the latest beam line design for the Mo-99 production facility. The radiation dose to the beam line components (quadrupoles, dipoles, beam stops and the linear accelerator) are calculated in the present report. The beam line design assumes placement of two cameras: infra red (IR) and optical transition radiation (OTR) for continuous monitoring of the beam spot on target during irradiation. The cameras will be placed off the beam axis offset in vertical direction. We explored typical shielding arrangements for the cameras and report the resulting neutron and photon dose fields.

  8. Target conception for the Munich fission fragment accelerator

    For the new high-flux reactor FRM II, the fission fragment accelerator MAFF is under design. MAFF will supply intense mass-separated radioactive ion beams of very neutron-rich nuclei with energies around the Coulomb barrier. A central part of this accelerator is the ion source with the fission target, which is operated at a neutron flux of 1.5x1014 cm-2 s-1. The target consists of typically 1 g of 235U dispersed in a cylindrical graphite matrix, which is encapsulated in a Re container. To enable diffusion and extraction of the fission products, the target has to be maintained at a temperature of up to 2400 deg. C during operation. It has to stand this temperature for at least one reactor cycle of 1250 h. Comprehensive tests are required to study the long-term behaviour of the involved materials at these conditions prior to operation in the reactor. The present paper gives details of the target conception and the projected tests

  9. An accelerator facility within a mineral research establishment

    The importance of the minerals industry in Australia is evident from its share of about 40% of the country's export earnings. Its economic success is due in no small measure to the industry's ability to keep abreast with technological innovations and scientific developments, often through collaborations with federal Governments research laboratories such as the CSIRO. In this context, the CSIRO Division of Mineral Physics recently commissioned a laboratory, known as HIAF - the Heavy Ion Analytical Facility - based on a General Ionex 3 MV Tandetron, a tandem electrostatic accelerator. The Laboratory was designed to facilitate the development of the applications of a host of ion-beam techniques to problems in the geosciences, extending or complementing established methods. Flow-on to the minerals industry is anticipated, with varying degrees of immediacy dependent on the particular technique. The first stage operational at the commissioning provides RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) and NRA (nuclear reaction analysis) measurements, and includes the development of a beam microprobe. An ultra-sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system is planned for the second stage, to permit studies of chronology based on radio cosmogenic isotopes and ultra-traces in mineral samples. (orig.)

  10. Accelerator system for the Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    Accelerator system for Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility that consists of 50MeV electron S-band linac, 1.2GeV full energy booster synchrotron and 1.2GeV storage ring, has been constructed. Eight 1.4T bending magnets and four 5T superconducting magnet with compact refrigerator system provide beam lines. For top-up operation, the 1ns single bunch electron beam from 50MeV injector linac is injected by on-axis injection scheme and accelerated up to 1.2GeV at booster synchrotron. The timing system is designed for injection from booster ring is possible for any bunch position of storage ring. To improve efficiency of booster injection, the electron gun trigger and RF frequency of 2856MHz is synchronized with storage ring frequency of 499.654MHz. The EPICS control system is used with timing control system for linac, pulse magnet and also for booster pattern memory system. The beam commissioning for 1.2GeV storage ring has been progressing. (author)

  11. Environmental assessment: Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia

    This Environmental Assessment has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to fulfill its obligations pursuant to Sect. 102 of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (Public Law 91-190). The proposed federal action addressed in this document is DOE's funding of a Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Newport News, Virginia. DOE intends to contract with the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) for operation of CEBAF, a continuous wave (CW) linear accelerator system (linac) capable of providing high-duty-factor beams throughout the energy range from 0.5 to 4.0 GeV. CEBAF will be the first of its kind worldwide and will offer a multi-GeV energy, high-intensity, high-duty-factor electron beam for use by the US nuclear physics community in research on the states of nuclear matter and the short-distance behavior of nuclei. The CEBAF project is largely in the conceptual design stage, with some components in the preliminary design stage. Construction is anticipated to begin in 1987 and be completed by 1992

  12. A post-accelerator for the US rare isotope accelerator facility

    Ostroumov, P N; Kolomiets, A A; Nolen, J A; Portillo, M; Shepard, K W; Vinogradov, N E

    2003-01-01

    The proposed rare isotope accelerator (RIA) facility includes a post-accelerator for rare isotopes (RIB linac) which must produce high-quality beams of radioactive ions over the full mass range, including uranium, at energies above the Coulomb barrier, and have high transmission and efficiency. The latter requires the RIB linac to accept at injection ions in the 1+ charge state. A concept for such a post accelerator suitable for ions up to mass 132 has been previously described . This paper presents a modified concept which extends the mass range to uranium. A high resolution separator for purifying beams at the isobaric level precedes the RIB linac. The mass filtering process will provide high purity beams while preserving transmission. For most cases a resolution of about m/DELTA m=20 000 is adequate at mass A=100 to obtain a separation between isobars of mass excess difference of 5 MeV. The design for a device capable of purifying beams at the isobaric level includes calculations up to fifth order. The RIB...

  13. Thermal hydraulics of accelerator driven system windowless targets

    Bruno ePanella

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of the fluid dynamics of the windowless spallation target of an Accelerator Driven System (ADS is presented. Several target mockup configurations have been investigated: the first one was a symmetrical target, that was made by two concentric cylinders, the other configurations are not symmetrical. In the experiments water has been used as hydraulic equivalent to lead-bismuth eutectic fluid. The experiments have been carried out at room temperature and flow rate up to 24 kg/s. The fluid velocity components have been measured by an ultrasound technique. The velocity field of the liquid within the target region either for the approximately axial-symmetrical configuration or for the not symmetrical ones as a function of the flow rate and the initial liquid level is presented. A comparison of experimental data with the prediction of the finite volume FLUENT code is also presented. Moreover the results of a 2D-3D numerical analysis that investigates the effect on the steady state thermal and flow fields due to the insertion of guide vanes in the windowless target unit of the EFIT project ADS nuclear reactor are presented, by analysing both the cold flow case (absence of power generation and the hot flow case (nominal power generation inside the target unit.

  14. Optimized ion acceleration using high repetition rate, variable thickness liquid crystal targets

    Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Cochran, Ginevra; Andereck, C. David; Schumacher, Douglass

    2015-11-01

    Laser-based ion acceleration is a widely studied plasma physics topic for its applications to secondary radiation sources, advanced imaging, and cancer therapy. Recent work has centered on investigating new acceleration mechanisms that promise improved ion energy and spectrum. While the physics of these mechanisms is not yet fully understood, it has been observed to dominate for certain ranges of target thickness, where the optimum thickness depends on laser conditions including energy, pulse width, and contrast. The study of these phenomena is uniquely facilitated by the use of variable-thickness liquid crystal films, first introduced in P. L. Poole et al. PoP21, 063109 (2014). Control of the formation parameters of these freely suspended films such as volume, temperature, and draw speed allows on-demand thickness variability between 10 nanometers and several 10s of microns, fully encompassing the currently studied thickness regimes with a single target material. The low vapor pressure of liquid crystal enables in-situ film formation and unlimited vacuum use of these targets. Details on the selection and optimization of ion acceleration mechanism with target thickness will be presented, including recent experiments on the Scarlet laser facility and others. This work was performed with support from the DARPA PULSE program through a grant from AMRDEC and by the NNSA under contract DE-NA0001976.

  15. Development of an accelerator based BNCT facility. Following the Ibaraki BNCT project development process

    An accelerator-based BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) facility is being constructed at the Ibaraki Neutron Medical Research Center. It consists of a proton linac (8 MeV energy and 10 mA average current), a beryllium target, and a moderator system to provide an epi-thermal neutron flux for patient treatment. The technology choices for this present system were driven by the need to site the facility in a hospital and where low residual activity is essential. The maximum neutron energy produced from an 8 MeV-proton is 6 MeV, which is below the threshold energy of the main nuclear reactions which produce radioactive products. The down side of this technology choice is that it produces a high density heat load on the target so that cooling and hydrogen blistering amelioration prevent sever challenges requiring successful R and D progress. The latest design of the target and moderator system shows that a flux of 2.5x109 epi-thermal neutrons/cm2/sec can be obtained. This is two times higher than the flux from the existing nuclear reactor based BNCT facility at JAEA (JRR-4). (author)

  16. Measurement of neutron equivalent dose in a pelletron accelerator facility

    Neutron equivalent dose at various locations of the accelerator room and in the beam hall of the pelletron accelerator at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneshwar, is measured using Kodak NTA film and CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector. The detectors were exposed for 20 hours and 6 hours respectively to neutron field produced due to the bombardment of 5 MeV and 4 MeV protons, obtained from a cesium sputtered SNICS ion source, on the LiBr2 target. The calculated neutron fluence rate is of the order of 106 n.cm-2.s-1 and the measured neutron equivalent dose is given. The measured neutron fluence rate behind the shielding wall in both the halls is less than 5 n.cm-2.s-1 which is much lower than maximum recommended value based on 30 mSv/y by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, taking 40 working hours a week and flux to dose conversion factor as 3.13 x 10-8 rem/n/cm2. (author). 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  17. A proposal of reactor physics research of accelerator drive system using transmutation physics experimental Facility

    Reactor physics section of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) recognizes an accelerator driven system (ADS) as the next generation reactor and to promote researches using it. History of this section activity on ADS, outline of Transmutation Physics Experimental Facility in the 'High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project', a proposal of reactor physics section to the project and future actions of this section are explained. The Transmutation Physics Experimental Facility consists of a fast neutron subcritical system and a nuclear spallation neutron source. The contents of experiments are evaluation of nuclear properties of fast neutron subcritical system driven by nuclear spallation source, verification of operation and control of accelerator driven hybrid system and evaluation of nuclear transmutation characteristics of MA (Minor Actinides) and LLFP (Long-Lived Fission Product). Themes of R and D of ADS contain operation control of ADS, critical control of subcritical system, properties of reactor with nuclear spallation neutron source and nuclear transmutation characteristics. The experimental items are measurement of dynamic characteristics of reactor at beam change, R and D of method of output control and stop, R and D of contentious monitoring method of subcritical multiplication, measurement of dynamic characteristics of behaviors of reactivity, effects on reactor characteristics of high energy neutron, effects on reactor physics of beam duct and large target, nuclear transmutation efficiency and simulation of nuclear transmutation reactor core. (S.Y.)

  18. Report of summer maintenance of electrostatic accelerator facilities

    At the yearly summer maintenance of the facilities, 2010's work gave priority to micro-particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) beam line since 11 years had passed from the introduction of the accelerator in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). This report describes the first renewal of its cooling system of water recycling, arrangement of micro-PIXE power source unit and maintenance status of peripheral parts. The cooling system was renewed to the type of TCA-0000AW-E, power supply 3phi 200V 22.3 KVA, cooling capacity 30,960 kcal/hr at 20 deg. C (old one, 22,000 kcal/hr), breaker 75A (60 A), water tank 70 L (40 L) and size W 700 x D 1850 x H 2200 mm (700 x 1500 x 2190), particularly resulting in increased cooling capacity, flow rate (100 vs 24 L/min) and safety stoppage mechanic by abnormalities of water level, temperature, gas and recycling water pressures. For micro-PIXE, manufactured was a unit of rack-mount loading systems of the power supply 230 V and of vacuum involving their controlling circuits. The circuit for the interlock to preserve vacuum systems was also setup. The hose for rotary vacuum pump was renewed by KF25 bellows, and valves connected with turbo-pump for beam opening, by manual ones for vacuum use. As well, inspection and repair were performed on the cooling lines and telemeter. An overhaul of the accelerator itself is necessary several years later. (T.T.)

  19. Remote-handling concept for target/blanket modules in the accelerator production of tritium

    The accelerator production of tritium (APT) has been proposed as the source of tritium for the United States in the next century. The APT will accelerate protons that will strike replaceable tungsten target modules. The tungsten target modules generate neutrons that pass through blanket modules and other modules where He gas is turned into tritium. The target and blanket modules are predicted to require replacement every 1 to 10 yr, depending on their location. The target modules may weigh as much as 78.8 tonnes (85 t) each. All of the modules will be contained in a target/blanket vessel, which is in a shielded facility. The spent modules will be very radioactive so that remote replacement is required. A proposed concept is to use a remotely operated bridge crane and a remotely operated, bridge-mounted manipulator to perform the entire replacement operation. This will require removing/replacing the vessel lid, installing/removing temporary water cooling, closing/opening valves on manifolds and modules, draining of jumpers, removing/replacing jumpers, removing/replacing shielding keys, and removing/replacing the modules. This application is unique because of the size and weight of the modules, the precision required, the type of connectors required, and the complexity of the entire operation. A three-dimensional simulation of the entire module replacement operation has been developed to help understand, communicate, and refine the concepts

  20. Development of an accelerator-based BNCT facility at the Berkeley Lab

    An accelerator-based BNCT facility is under construction at the Berkeley Lab. An electrostatic-quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator is under development for the production of neutrons via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction at proton energies between 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. A novel type of power supply, an air-core coupled transformer power supply, is being built for the acceleration of beam currents exceeding 50 mA. A metallic lithium target has been developed for handling such high beam currents. Moderator, reflector and neutron beam delimiter have extensively been modeled and designs have been identified which produce epithermal neutron spectra sharply peaked between 10 and 20 keV. These. neutron beams are predicted to deliver significantly higher doses to deep seated brain tumors, up to 50% more near the midline of the brain than is possible with currently available reactor beams. The accelerator neutron source will be suitable for future installation at hospitals

  1. Laser ablation and target acceleration under the strong magnetic field

    Nagatomo, H.; Matsuo, K.; Breil, J.; Nicolai, P.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Asahina, T.; Sunahara, A.; Johzaki, T.; Fujioka, S.; Sano, T.; Mima, K.

    2015-11-01

    Various discussion and experiments have been made about the laser plasma phenomena under the strong magnetic field recently. One of the advantage is guiding electron beam for heating core plasma in last phase of Fast Ignition scheme. However, the implosion dynamics in FI is influenced by the magnetic field due to the anisotropic of electron heat conduction. Some simple experiments where target is accelerated by laser driven ablation under the strong magnetic field were conducted to benchmark the simulation code. Related to the experiment, we focus on the early stage of the acceleration in this study. 2-D radiative MHD code (PINOCO-MHD) is used for the simulation. In the simulation magnetic field transport, diffusion and Braginskii coefficient for electron heat conduction are taken account. In preliminary simulation result suggests that the magnetic pressure may have an influence on the target surface and/or ablated plasma at very early phase. The effect of the magnetic pressure is very sensitive to the vacuum, initial and boundary conditions, and they should be treated carefully. These numerical conditions will be discussed as well. This study was partially supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 26400532.

  2. A new AMS facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi

    Kumar, Pankaj; Chopra, S.; Pattanaik, J. K.; Ojha, S.; Gargari, S.; Joshi, R.; Kanjilal, D.

    2015-10-01

    Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), a national facility of government of India, is having a 15UD Pelletron accelerator for multidisciplinary ion beam based research programs. Recently, a new accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) facility has been developed after incorporating many changes in the existing 15UD Pelletron accelerator. A clean chemistry laboratory for 10Be and 26Al with all the modern facilities has also been developed for the chemical processing of samples. 10Be measurements on sediment samples, inter laboratory comparison results and 26Al measurements on standard samples are presented in this paper. In addition to the 10Be and 26Al AMS facilities, a new 14C AMS facility based on a dedicated 500 kV tandem ion accelerator with two cesium sputter ion sources, is also being setup at IUAC.

  3. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    Geddes, Cameron G. R.

    2010-01-01

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, a...

  4. Beryllium Target for Accelerator - Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    This work is part of a project for developing Accelerator Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB- BNCT) for which the generation of neutrons through nuclear reactions like 9Be(d,n) is necessary. In this paper first results of the design and development of such neutron production targets are presented. For this purpose, the neutron production target has to be able to withstand the mechanical and thermal stresses produced by intense beams of deuterons (of 1.4 MeV with a total current of about 30mA). In particular, the target should be able to dissipate an energy density of up to 1 kW/cm2 and preserve its physical and mechanical properties for a sufficient length of time under irradiation conditions and hydrogen damage. The target is proposed to consist of a thin Be deposit (neutron producing material) on a thin W or Mo layer to stop the beam and a Cu backing to help carry away the heat load. To achieve the adhesion of the Be films on W, Mo and Cu substrates, a powder blasting technique was applied with quartz and alumina microspheres. On the other hand, Ag deposits were made on some of the substrates previously blasted to favor the chemical affinity between Beryllium and the substrate thus improving adhesion. Be deposits were characterized by means of different techniques including Electron Microscopy (Sem) and Xr Diffraction. Roughness and thickness measurements were also made. To satisfy the power dissipation requirements for the neutron production target, a microchannel system model is proposed. The simulation based on this model permits to determine the geometric parameters of the prototype complying with the requirements of a microchannel system. Results were compared with those in several publications and discrepancies lower than 10% were found in all cases. A prototype for model validation is designed here for which simulations of fluid and structural mechanics were carried out and discussed

  5. First results of laser-proton acceleration with cryogenic hydrogen targets at the POLARIS laser

    Becker, Georg Alexander; Polz, Jens; Kloepfel, Diethard; Ziegler, Wolfgang; Keppler, Sebastian; Liebetrau, Hartmut; Hellwing, Marco [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kalinin, Anton; Costa Fraga, Rui; Grisenti, Robert [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Robinson, Alexander [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon., OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Kessler, Alexander; Schorcht, Frank; Hornung, Marco [Helmholtz Institut Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kaluza, Malte Christoph [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    For the first time on the POLARIS laser system, a laser-driven proton acceleration experiment with cryogenic hydrogen droplets and filaments has been performed. Most laser-driven proton acceleration experiments use target materials including metals, plastics or diamond-like carbon. Due to the multitude of ion species accelerated from such targets, understanding the acceleration processes becomes quite complicated. The use of liquid or frozen hydrogen targets reduces the accelerated species to protons only and additionally produces, due to the mass limited droplets or filaments, a higher acceleration field. The experimental setup and results, including isolated monoenergetic peaks in the high energy range of the proton spectra, are discussed.

  6. Laser acceleration of protons from near critical density targets for application to radiation therapy

    Bulanov, S S; Pirozhkov, A S; Thomas, A G R; Willingale, L; Krushelnick, K; Maksimchuk, A

    2010-01-01

    Laser accelerated protons can be a complimentary source for treatment of oncological diseases to the existing hadron therapy facilities. We demonstrate how the protons, accelerated from near-critical density plasmas by laser pulses having relatively small power, reach energies which may be of interest for medical applications. When an intense laser pulse interacts with near-critical density plasma it makes a channel both in the electron and then in the ion density. The propagation of a laser pulse through such a self-generated channel is connected with the acceleration of electrons in the wake of a laser pulse and generation of strong moving electric and magnetic fields in the propagation channel. Upon exiting the plasma the magnetic field generates a quasi-static electric field that accelerates and collimates ions from a thin filament formed in the propagation channel. Two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations show that a 100 TW laser pulse tightly focused on a near-critical density target is able to acce...

  7. The physics of sub-critical lattices in accelerator driven hybrid systems: The MUSE experiments in the MASURCA facility

    Since 1991, the CEA has studied the physics of hybrid systems, involving a sub-critical reactor coupled with an accelerator. These studies have provided information on the potential of hybrid systems to transmute actinides and, long lived fission products. The potential of such a system remains to be proven, specifically in terms of the physical understanding of the different phenomena involved and their modelling, as well as in terms of experimental validation of coupled systems, sub-critical environment/accelerator. This validation must be achieved through mock-up studies of the sub-critical environments coupled to a source of external neutrons. The MUSE-4 mock-up experiment is planed at the MASURCA facility and will use an accelerator coupled to a tritium target. The great step between the generator used in the past and the accelerator will allow to increase the knowledge in hybrid physic and to decrease the experimental biases and the measurement uncertainties

  8. Status and Plans for an SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    Church, M; Nagaitsev, S

    2012-01-01

    A superconducting RF accelerator test facility is currently under construction at Fermilab. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, 40 MeV injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, and multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and performing beam experiments. With 3 cryomodules installed this facility will initially be capable of generating an 810 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. The facility can accommodate up to 6 cryomodules for a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. This facility will be used to test SRF cryomodules under high intensity beam conditions, RF power equipment, instrumentation, and LLRF and controls systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  9. Status and Plans for an SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-29

    A superconducting RF accelerator test facility is currently under construction at Fermilab. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, 40 MeV injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, and multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and performing beam experiments. With 3 cryomodules installed this facility will initially be capable of generating an 810 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. The facility can accommodate up to 6 cryomodules for a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. This facility will be used to test SRF cryomodules under high intensity beam conditions, RF power equipment, instrumentation, and LLRF and controls systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  10. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry at the tandem facility of university of Tokyo

    The tandem Van de Graaff accelerator at the Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology (RCNST), University of Tokyo, has been adapted for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of long-lived radioisotopes, and at present, three isotopes, Be-10, C-14 and Al-26 are routinely measured. The present report gives an outline of the AMS system and some results on the nuclear reaction cross sections such as N-14(n, x)Be-10, Al-27(n, 2n)Al-27, O-16(γ, x)Be-10. Measurements of neutron-induced cross sections are first presented and discussed. The experiments consist of irradiation of targets with semi-monoenergetic neutrons at the INS SF cyclotron and subsequent measurements of the produced radioisotopes with AMS at the RCNST tandem accelerator facility. Photon-induced reactions are studied on light fragment emission. The measurements of photon-induced production yield seem to suggest that the Be-10/Be-7 ratio is higher in photon-induced reaction. (N.K.)

  11. Tritium and ignition target management at the National Ignition Facility.

    Draggoo, Vaughn

    2013-06-01

    Isotopic mixtures of hydrogen constitute the basic fuel for fusion targets of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A typical NIF fusion target shot requires approximately 0.5 mmoles of hydrogen gas and as much as 750 GBq (20 Ci) of 3H. Isotopic mix ratios are specified according to the experimental shot/test plan and the associated test objectives. The hydrogen isotopic concentrations, absolute amounts, gas purity, configuration of the target, and the physical configuration of the NIF facility are all parameters and conditions that must be managed to ensure the quality and safety of operations. An essential and key step in the preparation of an ignition target is the formation of a ~60 μm thick hydrogen "ice" layer on the inner surface of the target capsule. The Cryogenic Target Positioning System (Cryo-Tarpos) provides gas handling, cyro-cooling, x-ray imaging systems, and related instrumentation to control the volumes and temperatures of the multiphase (solid, liquid, and gas) hydrogen as the gas is condensed to liquid, admitted to the capsule, and frozen as a single spherical crystal of hydrogen in the capsule. The hydrogen fuel gas is prepared in discrete 1.7 cc aliquots in the LLNL Tritium Facility for each ignition shot. Post-shot hydrogen gas is recovered in the NIF Tritium Processing System (TPS). Gas handling systems, instrumentation and analytic equipment, material accounting information systems, and the shot planning systems must work together to ensure that operational and safety requirements are met. PMID:23629062

  12. Development of a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator facility for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    There is a generalized perception that the availability of suitable particle accelerators installed in hospitals, as neutron sources, may be crucial for the advancement of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). An ongoing project to develop a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based (AB)-BNCT is described here. The project goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.4-2.5 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction slightly beyond its resonance at 2.25 MeV. A folded tandem, with 1.20-1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an ESQ chain is being designed and constructed. This machine is conceptually shown to be capable of accelerating a 30 mA proton beam to 2.5 MeV. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep-seated tumors in less than an hour. This electrostatic machine is one of the technologically simplest and cheapest solutions for optimized AB-BNCT. At present there is no BNCT facility in the world with the characteristics presented in this work. For the accelerator, results on its design, construction and beam transport calculations are discussed. Taking into account the peculiarities of the expected irradiation field, the project also considers a specific study of the treatment room. This study aims at the design of the treatment room emphasizing aspects related to patient, personnel and public radiation protection; dose monitoring; patient positioning and room construction. The design considers both thermal (for the treatment of shallow tumors) and epithermal (for deep-seated tumors) neutron beams entering the room through a port connected to the accelerator via a moderation and neutron beam shaping assembly. Preliminary results of dose calculations for the treatment room design, using the MCNP program, are presented

  13. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1994-04-01

    This document begins with a general description of the facility to include historical and up-to-date aspects of design and operation. A user`s guide and a review of research using the facility follows. Next the accelerator utilization and operation and the development of the facilities is given. Personnel currently working at the facility are listed. Lastly, recent publications and literature cited are presented.

  14. Accelerator-Based Biological Irradiation Facility Simulating Neutron Exposure from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C; Marino, Stephen A; Geard, Charles R; Brenner, David J; Garty, Guy

    2015-10-01

    We describe here an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility, intended to expose blood or small animals to neutron fields mimicking those from an improvised nuclear device at relevant distances from the epicenter. Neutrons are generated by a mixed proton/deuteron beam on a thick beryllium target, generating a broad spectrum of neutron energies that match those estimated for the Hiroshima bomb at 1.5 km from ground zero. This spectrum, dominated by neutron energies between 0.2 and 9 MeV, is significantly different from the standard reactor fission spectrum, as the initial bomb spectrum changes when the neutrons are transported through air. The neutron and gamma dose rates were measured using a custom tissue-equivalent gas ionization chamber and a compensated Geiger-Mueller dosimeter, respectively. Neutron spectra were evaluated by unfolding measurements using a proton-recoil proportional counter and a liquid scintillator detector. As an illustration of the potential use of this facility we present micronucleus yields in single divided, cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral lymphocytes up to 1.5 Gy demonstrating 3- to 5-fold enhancement over equivalent X-ray doses. This facility is currently in routine use, irradiating both mice and human blood samples for evaluation of neutron-specific biodosimetry assays. Future studies will focus on dose reconstruction in realistic mixed neutron/photon fields. PMID:26414507

  15. Status report of the multi-tandem accelerator facility at the University of Tsukuba

    The University of Tsukuba, Tandem Accelerator Complex (UTTAC) has two accelerators, the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator and the 1 MV Tandetron accelerator. The 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator was installed at the UTTAC in 1975. A maximum terminal voltage of 12 MV is available for various ion beam applications. The multi-tandem accelerator facility has been used for University's inter-department education research. Also, we have actively advanced collaborative researches with other research institutes and industrial users. Since the Open Advanced Facilities Initiative for Innovation by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology started in 2007, total 17 industrial experiments have been carried out at the UTTAC. By the big earthquake on March 11, 2011, the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator suffered serious damages. 3 ion sources installed at the 9th floor have been broken. In addition, the high voltage accelerating column fell down in the accelerator tank. Fortunately, 1 MV Tandetron accelerator does not have any serious damage and it works properly now. At present, the UTTAC tries to install a new middle-sized tandem accelerator instead of the broken 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator since it is difficult to repair the previous one due to some boundaries in the building construction. The present status of the UTTAC is reported in this paper. (author)

  16. Operational status of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    Initial design parameters and early operational results of a 50 MeV high brightness electron linear accelerator are described. The system utilizes a radio frequency electron gun operating at a frequency of 2.856 GHz and a nominal output energy of 4.5 MeV followed by two, 2π/3 mode, disc loaded, traveling wave accelerating sections. The gun cathode is photo excited with short (6 psec) laser pulses giving design peak currents of a few hundred amperes. The system will be utilized to carry out infra-red FEL studies and investigation of new high gradient accelerating structures

  17. Role of laser contrast and foil thickness in target normal sheath acceleration

    Gizzi, L. A.; Altana, C.; Brandi, F.; Cirrone, P.; Cristoforetti, G.; Fazzi, A.; Ferrara, P.; Fulgentini, L.; Giove, D.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Lanzalone, G.; Londrillo, P.; Mascali, D.; Muoio, A.; Palla, D.; Schillaci, F.; Sinigardi, S.; Tudisco, S.; Turchetti, G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present an experimental investigation of laser driven light-ion acceleration using the ILIL laser at an intensity of 2×1019 W/cm2. In the experiment we focused our attention on the identification of the role of target thickness and resistivity in the fast electron transport and in the acceleration process. Here we describe the experimental results concerning the effect of laser contrast in the laser-target interaction regime. We also show preliminary results on ion acceleration which provide information about the role of bulk target ions and surface ions and target dielectric properties in the acceleration process.

  18. Concept for a lead-ion accelerating facility at CERN

    After the successful acceleration of deuterons, alpha particles and in more recent years of oxygen and sulphur ions, interest arose for even heavier particles. This paper describes the problems associated with heavy ions. A proposal is made for a scenario which allows the CERN accelerators to cope with ions heavier than sulphur, e.g. lead. Discussed are the different options for the injector and the necessary upgrading for the circular machines. (orig.)

  19. Accelerated search for materials with targeted properties by adaptive design

    Xue, Dezhen; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Hogden, John; Theiler, James; Xue, Deqing; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-01

    Finding new materials with targeted properties has traditionally been guided by intuition, and trial and error. With increasing chemical complexity, the combinatorial possibilities are too large for an Edisonian approach to be practical. Here we show how an adaptive design strategy, tightly coupled with experiments, can accelerate the discovery process by sequentially identifying the next experiments or calculations, to effectively navigate the complex search space. Our strategy uses inference and global optimization to balance the trade-off between exploitation and exploration of the search space. We demonstrate this by finding very low thermal hysteresis (ΔT) NiTi-based shape memory alloys, with Ti50.0Ni46.7Cu0.8Fe2.3Pd0.2 possessing the smallest ΔT (1.84 K). We synthesize and characterize 36 predicted compositions (9 feedback loops) from a potential space of ~800,000 compositions. Of these, 14 had smaller ΔT than any of the 22 in the original data set.

  20. Electrostatic design and beam transport for a folded tandem electrostatic quadrupole accelerator facility for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    Within the frame of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT), we discuss here the electrostatic design of the machine, including the accelerator tubes with electrostatic quadrupoles and the simulations for the transport and acceleration of a high intensity beam.

  1. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  2. A proposal of particle beam engineering in some 100 MeV energy field used beam line of accelerator-driven transmutation experimental facility

    To develop the researches of particle beam engineering in the middle energy field, construction of 'particle beam engineering experimental device' in the nuclear transmutation physics experimental facility of the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility was investigated and proposed. The basis of proposal is experiments using short pulse proton beam (<1ns) produced by laser charge exchange method and construction of two targets: one is the low power target (10 W) for proton beam experiments and other the high power target (1kW) for neutron induced reaction experiments. This facility consists of target chamber, target exchange device, beam dump, some neutron TOF lines. This facility pressed forward the important experiments in the middle energy field such as basic data of proton and neutron in the nuclear transmutation physics and engineering, effects and elementary process of cosmic radiation, basic test of application of particle beam to medical treatment and development and characteristics test of detector. (S.Y.)

  3. The target cooling system for the Laser Megajoule Facility

    The cryogenic targets of the Laser Megajoule Facility (LMJ) are hollow spheres. Their internal wall is covered by a solid cryogenic fuel layer. One issue of inertial confinement fusion experiments is to guarantee the quality of the geometry of fuel layer. Cryogenic targets must be cooled at a temperature near the triple point (19 K) with a very good stability (0.2 mK) for a long time (many hours). This period is used to position the target with accuracy at the centre of an experimental vacuum vessel of 10 m diameter where the laser beams are focused. A complex cryogenic infrastructure has been imagined to insure the continuity of the cryogenic chain from the filling station located in Valduc in Burgundy to the experimental chamber installed close to Bordeaux. The design of the target and a succinct description of the infrastructure are presented. A first prototype of cryogenic grip has been built and characterised. Some experimental results are given

  4. Ion beams and material science facilities using high current low energy 3.0 MV particle accelerator at NCAR, Bilaspur

    The national facility for interdisciplinary research using ion beams based on 3.0 MV Pelletron accelerator (9SDH, NEC) with high current TORVIS (for H, He ions) and SNICS (for heavy ions) sources, and two beam lines for ion beam analysis (IBA) and ion implantation/irradiation have been successfully commissioned at NCAR, Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya, Bilaspur. The accelerator conditioning was done over a period of time to achieve desired level of terminal voltage and vacuum in the accelerator tank, 3.0 MV terminal voltage was achieved with chain currents 120 A and an applied charging voltage of 13 kV. The vacuum without beam acceleration was lower 10-8 torr on both sides of the Pelletron tank. Finally, the first beam demonstration was achieved when a proton beam accelerated with terminal potential of 0.965 MV was seen at the Au target in Ion Beam analysis (IBA) chamber, the energy at the Faraday cup (FC) just before the chamber was 0.5 eA. Details of the facilities tested and the results obtained so far will be discussed in the paper

  5. The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility for education and advanced diagnostics development for OMEGA, Z and the NIF

    Petrasso, R.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Armstrong, E.; Han, H. W.; Kabadi, N.; Lahmann, B.; Orozco, D.; Rojas Herrera, J.; Sio, H.; Sutcliffe, G.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Leeper, R.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility utilizes a 135-keV linear electrostatic ion accelerator, a D-T neutron source and two x-ray sources for development and characterization of nuclear diagnostics for OMEGA, Z, and the NIF. The ion accelerator generates D-D and D-3He fusion products through acceleration of D ions onto a 3He-doped Erbium-Deuteride target. Fusion reaction rates around 106 s-1 are routinely achieved, and fluence and energy of the fusion products have been accurately characterized. The D-T neutron source generates up to 6 × 108 neutrons/s. The two x-ray generators produce spectra with peak energies of 35 keV and 225 keV and maximum dose rates of 0.5 Gy/min and 12 Gy/min, respectively. Diagnostics developed and calibrated at this facility include CR-39 based charged-particle spectrometers, neutron detectors, and the particle Time-Of-Flight (pTOF) and Magnetic PTOF CVD-diamond-based bang time detectors. The accelerator is also a vital tool in the education of graduate and undergraduate students at MIT. This work was supported in part by SNL, DOE, LLE and LLNL.

  6. Optimization of flat-cone targets for enhanced laser-acceleration of protons

    We have analyzed the acceleration of laser-generated protons, produced at the rear surface of flat-cone targets irradiated by an ultra-intense (I∼5x1019 W/cm2) short (400 fs) laser pulse. We used different target sizes and shapes in order to find the optimum target layout. We find that for targets with a too narrow cone structure, the production of the hot electrons, driving the proton acceleration, is located prior to the accelerating rear surface of the target, resulting in a reduced maximum proton energy.

  7. A facility for accelerator research and education at Fermilab

    Church, Mike; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Fermilab is currently constructing the 'SRF Test Accelerator at the New Muon Lab' (NML). NML consists of a photo-emitted RF electron gun, followed by a bunch compressor, low energy test beamlines, SCRF accelerating structures, and high energy test beamlines. The initial primary purpose of NML will be to test superconducting RF accelerating modules for the ILC and for Fermilab's 'Project X' - a proposal for a high intensity proton source. The unique capability of NML will be to test these modules under conditions of high intensity electron beams with ILC-like beam parameters. In addition NML incorporates a photoinjector which offers significant tunability and especially the possibility to generate a bright electron beam with brightness comparable to state-of-the-art accelerators. This opens the exciting possibility of also using NML for fundamental beams research and tests of new concepts in beam manipulations and acceleration, instrumentation, and the applications of beams.

  8. Tungsten Divertor Target Technology and Test Facilities Development

    Full text: Tungsten divertor target technology development is in progress at IPR for water-cooled divertors of ITER-like tokamak. Test mock-ups are fabricated using tungsten materials in macro-brush as well as mono-block fashion. Vacuum brazing technique is used for macro-brush fabrication whereas high pressure high temperature diffusion bonding technique is used for mono-block fabrication. Experimental facilities are also being set-up at IPR for Non-destructive testing and high heat flux testing of divertor targets. Present paper describes recent results on high heat flux testing of the test mock-ups and briefly mention about some of the experimental test facilities being set-up at IPR. (author)

  9. A multiple sampling ionization chamber for the External Target Facility

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber used as a particle identification device for high energy heavy ions has been developed for the External Target Facility. The performance of this detector was tested with a 239Pu α source and RI beams. A Z resolution (FWHM) of 0.4–0.6 was achieved for nuclear fragments of 18O at 400 AMeV

  10. Economic and education impact of building the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) was built in Newport News, Virginia, between 1987 and 1995 and is a new basic research laboratory christened the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). Jefferson Lab's science and technology mission has major economic and educational benefits: basic research discoveries, improvement and application of key technologies associated with the accelerator and the experiments, extensive subcontracting with industry, and diverse employment and educational opportunities. The $600 million invested by federal, state, local and international partners to build Jefferson Lab has had substantial economic and educational benefits locally, as well as significant benefits distributed among industries and universities throughout the United States

  11. Activation studies of the light ion beam target development facility

    Biological dose calculations have been performed for the target chamber of the Target Development Facility (TDF). Placement of an neutron moderator structure in the interior of the target chamber for the moderation of the high energy neutrons has been investigated as a viable option for lowering the biological dose rates of the chamber wall materials, Al6061-T6 and 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel. Two moderator materials are considered, one made of H-451 graphite and the other of titanium hydride. In particular, a 40% porosity, 1 m thick graphite structure within the aluminum wall reduces the dose rate at the chamber wall outer surface to 13.1 mrem/h at 1 week after shutdown as compared to 1.29 rem/h without the moderator. A suitable maintenance schedule based on the 40% porosity graphite moderator design and on the allowable average dose of 1.25 rem per quarter is presented. (orig.)

  12. Increased laser-accelerated proton energies via direct laser-light-pressure acceleration of electrons in microcone targets

    We present experimental results showing a laser-accelerated proton beam maximum energy cutoff of 67.5 MeV, with more than 5 x 106 protons per MeV at that energy, using flat-top hollow microcone targets. This result was obtained with a modest laser energy of ∼80 J, on the high-contrast Trident laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory. From 2D particle-in-cell simulations, we attribute the source of these enhanced proton energies to direct laser-light-pressure acceleration of electrons along the inner cone wall surface, where the laser light wave accelerates electrons just outside the surface critical density, in a potential well created by a shift of the electrostatic field maximum with respect to that of the magnetic field maximum. Simulations show that for an increasing acceleration length, the continuous loading of electrons into the accelerating phase of the laser field yields an increase in high-energy electrons.

  13. A multipurpose accelerator facility for Kharkov National Scientific Center

    Bulyak, E.; Dolbnya, A.; Gladkikh, P.; Karnaukhov, I.; Kononenko, S.; Kozin, V.; Lapshin, V.; Mytsykov, A.; Peev, F.; Shcherbakov, A. E-mail: shcherbakov@kipt.kharkov.ua; Tarasenko, A.; Telegin, Yu.; Zelinsky, A

    2000-06-21

    The project of the multifunctional accelerator storage ring complex with electron energy of up to 2 GeV is described. The lattice of the complex was chosen taking into account of the existing equipment, layout of the buildings, and infrastructure of the 2 GeV electron linear accelerator, the necessity of obtaining precise parameters of photon and electron beams, and the economic efficiency. The principle parameters of the storage ring are the circumference of 91 m, the energy range 0.3-2.0 GeV, the natural beam emittance 25 nm and the stored beam current 0.5 A. This complex are provided with photon beams (6-7 beam lines at first stage, up to 20 later on) and CW electron beams (energy region 0.3-0.5 GeV) for scientific and industrial application.

  14. The timing master for the FAIR accelerator facility

    One central design feature of the FAIR accelerator complex is a high level of parallel beam operation, imposing ambitious demands on the timing and management of accelerator cycles. Several linear accelerators, synchrotrons, storage rings and beam lines have to be controlled and reconfigured for each beam production chain on a pulse-to-pulse basis, with cycle lengths ranging from 20 ms to several hours. This implies initialization, synchronization of equipment on the time scale down to the ns level, inter-dependencies, multiple paths and contingency actions like emergency beam dump scenarios. The FAIR timing system will be based on White Rabbit (WR) network technology, implementing a central Timing Master (TM) unit to orchestrate all machines. The TM is subdivided into separate functional blocks: the Clock Master, which deals with time and clock sources and their distribution over WR, the Management Master, which administrates all WR timing receivers, and the Data Master, which schedules and coordinates machine instructions and broadcasts them over the WR network. The TM triggers equipment actions based on the transmitted execution time. Since latencies in the low μs range are required, this paper investigates the possibilities of parallelization in programmable hardware and discusses the benefits to either a distributed or monolithic timing master architecture. The proposed FPGA based TM will meet said timing requirements while providing fast reaction to interlocks and internal events and offers parallel processing of multiple signals and state machines. (authors)

  15. Uniform laser ablative acceleration of targets at 1014 W/cm2

    We present the first detailed investigations of the ablative acceleration of planar targets while simultaneously using high irradiance (1014 W/cm2), large focal diameters (1 mm) and long laser pulse duration (3 nsec). Included are measurements of target preheat, ablation pressures and uniformity achieved under these conditions. Targets were accelerated to high velocities with velocity profile uniformity approaching that required for high gain pellet implosions

  16. 2 MeV, 60 kW dual-beam type electron accelerator irradiation facility

    The specification of new irradiation facility which has been constructed from 1978 through 1981 as the replacement of 1st Accelerator of JAERI, TRCRE are described. The accelerator is the Cockcroft-Walton type and both vertical and horizontal accelerating tubes are arranged on a single high voltage generator. Transferring of the high voltage to the horizontal accelerating tube is performed with the high voltage changing system in the pressure vessel. The output ratings of the accelerator are 2 MV of acceleration voltage and 30 mA of beam current. By providing the dual beam system, two irradiation rooms, one for vertical and the other for horizontal beam, are independently operationable. Persons can enter the horizontal irradiation room for experimental setting even when the vertical irradiation room is in operation. The specification of the buildings, the exhaust air treatment system, the irradiation conveyor and the safety observation system are also described. (author)

  17. Target diagnostic system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    A review of recent progress on the design of a diagnostic system proposed for ignition target experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be presented. This diagnostic package contains an extensive suite of optical, x-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron diagnostics that enable measurements of the performance of both direct and indirect driven NIF targets. The philosophy used in designing all of the diagnostics in the set has emphasized redundant and independent measurement of fundamental physical quantities relevant to the operation of the NIF target. A unique feature of these diagnostics is that they are being designed to be capable of operating, in the high radiation, EMP, and debris backgrounds expected on the NIF facility. The diagnostic system proposed can be categorized into three broad areas: laser characterization, hohlraum characterization, and capsule performance diagnostics. The operating principles of a representative instrument from each class of diagnostic employed in this package will be summarized and illustrated with data obtained in recent prototype diagnostic tests

  18. Present status of the Kyushu University accelerator facility

    Mitarai, Shiro; Maeda, Toyokazu; Koga, Yoshihiro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)] (and others)

    2001-02-01

    A large diameter gas stripper was developed and incorporated to a terminal port of the tandem accelerator and test operation was performed. The permeability of low-energy carbon beams in the tandem was remarkably improved with the gas stripper. A recoiled-nuclei mass spectrometer was also developed and facilitated for accurate measurement of the cross sections of {sup 12}C({sup 4}He, {gamma}) {sup 16}O in cosmic nuclear reactions. Test operation was made for reduction of background due to the injection beams. The plasma-sputtering type ion source was introduced and the beams will be injected into the tandem. (H. Yokoo)

  19. Present status of the Kyushu University accelerator facility

    A large diameter gas stripper was developed and incorporated to a terminal port of the tandem accelerator and test operation was performed. The permeability of low-energy carbon beams in the tandem was remarkably improved with the gas stripper. A recoiled-nuclei mass spectrometer was also developed and facilitated for accurate measurement of the cross sections of 12C(4He, γ) 16O in cosmic nuclear reactions. Test operation was made for reduction of background due to the injection beams. The plasma-sputtering type ion source was introduced and the beams will be injected into the tandem. (H. Yokoo)

  20. CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] scientific program

    The principal scientific mission of the Continuous Electron Beam Facility (CEBAF) is to study collective phenomena in cold (or normal) nucler matter in order to understand the structure and behavior of macroscopic systems constructed from nuclei. This document discusses in broad popular terms those issues which the CEBAF experimental and theoretical program are designed to address. Specific experimental programs currently planned for CEBAF are also reivewed. 35 refs., 19 figs

  1. Physical processes at work in sub-30 fs, PW laser pulse-driven plasma accelerators: Towards GeV electron acceleration experiments at CILEX facility

    Optimal regimes and physical processes at work are identified for the first round of laser wakefield acceleration experiments proposed at a future CILEX facility. The Apollon-10P CILEX laser, delivering fully compressed, near-PW-power pulses of sub-25 fs duration, is well suited for driving electron density wakes in the blowout regime in cm-length gas targets. Early destruction of the pulse (partly due to energy depletion) prevents electrons from reaching dephasing, limiting the energy gain to about 3 GeV. However, the optimal operating regimes, found with reduced and full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, show high energy efficiency, with about 10% of incident pulse energy transferred to 3 GeV electron bunches with sub-5% energy spread, half-nC charge, and absolutely no low-energy background. This optimal acceleration occurs in 2 cm length plasmas of electron density below 1018 cm−3. Due to their high charge and low phase space volume, these multi-GeV bunches are tailor-made for staged acceleration planned in the framework of the CILEX project. The hallmarks of the optimal regime are electron self-injection at the early stage of laser pulse propagation, stable self-guiding of the pulse through the entire acceleration process, and no need for an external plasma channel. With the initial focal spot closely matched for the nonlinear self-guiding, the laser pulse stabilizes transversely within two Rayleigh lengths, preventing subsequent evolution of the accelerating bucket. This dynamics prevents continuous self-injection of background electrons, preserving low phase space volume of the bunch through the plasma. Near the end of propagation, an optical shock builds up in the pulse tail. This neither disrupts pulse propagation nor produces any noticeable low-energy background in the electron spectra, which is in striking contrast with most of existing GeV-scale acceleration experiments

  2. Radiation protection program at an accelerator facility complex

    Broad aspects of Radiation Protection Program at the Tyco Healthcare/Mallinckrodt Inc. will be presented with emphasis on Occupational dose, Public dose and ALARA program. Regulatory requirements, compliance and radio nuclides of concern for external exposure and internal contamination will be discussed. The facility is subject to in depth annual inspections by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to ensure compliance with regulations and operating license requirements. The facility is required to have an emergency contingency plan in place. A simulated emergency drill scenario is witnessed and graded by the NRC and state inspectors, with full participation by the fire department and the local hospital. Radiation Safety Officer (RSO) is in charge of all radiological aspects of the facility, and reports to the plant manager directly. The RSO or any of his staff has the authority to stop a job if there is a radiological concern. The Radiation protection organization interfaces with Production, QA and Engineering and ensures there is no conflict with Industrial Safety, OSHA and FDA requirements. Any employee has the right to call the regulatory officials if he/she has a concern. Operational aspects of Radiation protection program such as radiological survey, contamination control and limits, air sample survey, radio active waste processing and record retention requirements are per plant procedures and regulatory requirements. Shielding and administrative requirements for designing a modification to an existing design or a new lab/hot cell is subject to in-depth review and approval by Radiation Safety Committee. Each department has a Dose Reduction Subcommittee which meets periodically to discuss if any changes in procedures or facility can be made to decrease the dose. The subcommittee also trends the dose to ensure it is trending downward. Even though 99Mo/99mTC generators are manufactured at the facility, majority of the dose is from cyclotron maintenance. Total

  3. Change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility and Free Electron Laser, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia

    In this environmental assessment (EA), the US Department of Energy (DOE) reports the results of an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from a proposed change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), and operation of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility beyond the initial demonstration period. With this proposal, DOE intends to increase CEBAF operating range from its current operating maximum beam energy of 4.0 GeV [giga-(billion) electron volts] to 8.0 GeV at a beam power of no greater than 1,000 kW [1 megawatt (MW)], its maximum attainable level, based on current technology and knowledge, without significant, costly equipment modifications. DOE has prepared an EA for this action to determine the potential for adverse impacts from operation of CEBAF and the FEL at the proposed levels. Changing the operating parameters of CEBAF would require no new major construction and minor modifications to the accelerator, its support systems, the FEL, and onsite utility systems. Modifications and performance improvements would be made to (1) the accelerator housed in the underground tunnels, (2) its support systems located in the above ground service buildings, and (3) the water and equipment cooling systems both in the tunnel and at the ground surface. All work would be performed on previously disturbed land and in, on, or adjacent to existing buildings, structures, and equipment. With the proposed action, the recently constructed FEL facility at the Jefferson Lab would operate in concert with CEBAF beyond its demonstration period and up to its maximum effective electron beam power level of 210 kW. In this EA, DOE evaluates the impacts of the no-action alternative and the proposed action alternative. Alternatives considered, but dismissed from further evaluation, were the use of another accelerator facility and the use of another technology

  4. Proton acceleration by high-intensity UV laser irradiation with thin foil targets

    Proton acceleration experiments by irradiation of intense ultra-violet lasers with thin foil targets were conducted. Energies and efficiencies of the accelerated protons were investigated over the target thickness from several μm to 50 nm using various materials. In order to irradiate the very thin foil targets, the discharge pre-amplifier in the previous system was removed to reduce amplified spontaneous emission which disturbed the main pulse interactions. A Thomson parabola ion spectrometer with CR39 plastic nuclear track detectors were used to observe spectra of the accelerated protons. The maximum energies and efficiencies of accelerated protons increased with decreasing the target thickness rather than the product of the density and thickness of the targets. These results were explained by a geometrical effect on hot electron recycling. (author)

  5. Laser ion acceleration using a solid target coupled with a low density layer

    Sgattoni, Andrea; Macchi, Andrea; Passoni, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    We investigate by particle-in-cell simulations in two and three dimensions the laser-plasma interaction and the proton acceleration in multilayer targets where a low density "near-critical" layer of a few micron thickness is added on the illuminated side of a thin, high density layer. This target design can be obtained by depositing a "foam" layer on a thin metallic foil. The presence of the near-critical plasma strongly increases both the conversion efficiency and the energy of electrons and leads to enhanced acceleration of proton from a rear side layer via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism. The electrons of the foam are strongly accelerated in the forward direction and propagate on the rear side of the target building up a high electric field with a relatively flat longitudinal profile. In these conditions the maximum proton energy is up to three times higher than in the case of the bare solid target.

  6. Performance of the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility and initial experimental results

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility has begun its experimental program. This unique facility is designed to address advanced acceleration research which requires very short, intense electron bunches. The facility incorporates two photo-cathode based electron sources. One produces up to 100 nC, multi-kiloamp 'drive' bunches which are used to excite wakefields in dielectric loaded structures and in plasma. The second source produces much lower intensity 'witness' pulses which are used to probe the fields produced by the drive. The drive and witness pulses can be precisely timed as well as laterally positioned with respect to each other. We discuss commissioning, initial experiments, and outline plans for a proposed 1 GeV demonstration accelerator. (author)

  7. Spallation target design and integration into an accelerator-based transmutation system

    Spallation target design and system integration is critical for the success of accelerator-based transmutation systems. Issues which must be considered in the design of spallation targets are identified, and representative parametric studies on the system integration of a sample target are given. The results illustrate the importance of a systems-driven target design approach due to the large effects that the target design can have on both the economics and physics performance of the system

  8. A design for a high intensity slow positron facility using forward scattered radiation from an electron linear accelerator

    A tungsten moderator will be placed behind the target of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to convert gamma radiation to slow positrons. These will be extracted and led through evacuated solenoids to an experiment room. A Penning trap will be used to extend the slow positron pulses to achieve duty factors of 10% or greater. The facility will be used for atomic and molecular physics studies, positron microscopy, and materials research. Operations will be inexpensive and will not interfere with the normal function of ORELA, the measurement of neutron cross sections by flight-time spectrometry. (orig.)

  9. A Thermal/Hydraulic Safety Assessment of the Blanket Conceptual Design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium Facility

    In support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, safety analyses for the blanket system have been performed based on the conceptual design for the Target/Blanket (T/B) Facility. During mitigated event sequences safety engineered features, such as the residual heat removal (RHR) and cavity flood systems, provide sufficient protection for maintaining the structural integrity of the blanket system and its components. During unmitigated (with beam shutdown only) event sequences, passive features such as natural circulation, thermal inertia, and boil-off provide significant time for corrective measures to be taken

  10. The JAERI-KEK joint project on high intensity proton accelerator and overview of nuclear transmutation experimental facilities

    A status of the JAERI/KEK joint project on High Intensity Proton Accelerator is overviewed. It is highlighted that Experimental facilities for development of the accelerator driven system (ADS) for nuclear transmutation technology is proposed under the project. (author)

  11. Proposal of experimental facilities for studies of nuclear data and radiation engineering in the intense proton accelerator project

    A proposal is given on the facilities an experiments in the Intense Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC) relevant to the nuclear data and radiation engineering, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear transmutation, accelerator technology and space technology and so on. (author)

  12. Enhanced target normal sheath acceleration of protons from intense laser interaction with a cone-tube target

    Laser driven proton acceleration is proposed to be greatly enhanced by using a cone-tube target, which can be easily manufactured by current 3D-print technology. It is observed that energetic electron bunches are generated along the tube and accelerated to a much higher temperature by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal electric field which is induced by the optical confinement of the laser field. As a result, a localized and enhanced sheath field is produced at the rear of the target and the maximum proton energy is about three-fold increased based on the two-dimentional particle-in-cell simulation results. It is demonstrated that by employing this advanced target scheme, the scaling of the proton energy versus the laser intensity is much beyond the normal target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) case

  13. Enhanced target normal sheath acceleration of protons from intense laser interaction with a cone-tube target

    K. D. Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser driven proton acceleration is proposed to be greatly enhanced by using a cone-tube target, which can be easily manufactured by current 3D-print technology. It is observed that energetic electron bunches are generated along the tube and accelerated to a much higher temperature by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal electric field which is induced by the optical confinement of the laser field. As a result, a localized and enhanced sheath field is produced at the rear of the target and the maximum proton energy is about three-fold increased based on the two-dimentional particle-in-cell simulation results. It is demonstrated that by employing this advanced target scheme, the scaling of the proton energy versus the laser intensity is much beyond the normal target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA case.

  14. Enhanced target normal sheath acceleration of protons from intense laser interaction with a cone-tube target

    Xiao, K. D.; Huang, T. W. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhou, C. T., E-mail: zcangtao@iapcm.ac.cn [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); College of Electronic Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Qiao, B., E-mail: bqiao@pku.edu.cn [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, 030006 (China); Wu, S. Z. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Ruan, S. C. [College of Electronic Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); He, X. T. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Laser driven proton acceleration is proposed to be greatly enhanced by using a cone-tube target, which can be easily manufactured by current 3D-print technology. It is observed that energetic electron bunches are generated along the tube and accelerated to a much higher temperature by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal electric field which is induced by the optical confinement of the laser field. As a result, a localized and enhanced sheath field is produced at the rear of the target and the maximum proton energy is about three-fold increased based on the two-dimentional particle-in-cell simulation results. It is demonstrated that by employing this advanced target scheme, the scaling of the proton energy versus the laser intensity is much beyond the normal target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) case.

  15. Enhanced target normal sheath acceleration of protons from intense laser interaction with a cone-tube target

    Xiao, K. D.; Huang, T. W.; Zhou, C. T.; Qiao, B.; Wu, S. Z.; Ruan, S. C.; He, X. T.

    2016-01-01

    Laser driven proton acceleration is proposed to be greatly enhanced by using a cone-tube target, which can be easily manufactured by current 3D-print technology. It is observed that energetic electron bunches are generated along the tube and accelerated to a much higher temperature by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal electric field which is induced by the optical confinement of the laser field. As a result, a localized and enhanced sheath field is produced at the rear of the target and the maximum proton energy is about three-fold increased based on the two-dimentional particle-in-cell simulation results. It is demonstrated that by employing this advanced target scheme, the scaling of the proton energy versus the laser intensity is much beyond the normal target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) case.

  16. Generation of heavy ion beams using femtosecond laser pulses in the target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration regimes

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from sub-micron gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the time history of the laser pulse is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity 3 × 10 21 W / cm 2 , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 μm, and energy 27 J, the calculated reflection, transmission, and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80%, 5%, and 15%, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8%. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon, and flux 2 × 10 11 ions / sr . An analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the radiation pressure acceleration regime and the onset of the target normal sheath acceleration regime. The numerical simulations and analytical model point to at least four technical challenges hindering the heavy ion acceleration: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration, and high reflectivity of the plasma. Finally, a regime suitable for heavy ion acceleration has been identified in an alternative approach by analyzing the energy absorption and distribution among participating species and scaling of conversion efficiency, maximum energy, and flux with laser intensity.

  17. Physical aspects of neutron generation in the target of an accelerator driven system

    In order to choose the optimal target parameters in the accelerator-driven systems, some nuclear physics aspects of target processes should be investigated. The spallation, fragmentation and fission cross sections, the yields of residual nuclei and neutrons for massive targets and the simulation of hadron-nucleus interaction at intermediate energies are discussed

  18. Targets for ion sources for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is based on the use of the well-known on-line isotope separator (ISOL) technique in which radioactive nuclei are produced by fusion type reactions in selectively chosen target materials by high-energy proton, deuteron, or He ion beams from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). Among several major challenges posed by generating and accelerating adequate intensities of radioactive ion beams (RIBs), selection of the most appropriate target material for production of the species of interest is, perhaps, the most difficult. In this report, we briefly review present efforts to select target materials and to design composite target matrix/heat-sink systems that simultaneously incorporate the short diffusion lengths, high permeabilities, and controllable temperatures required to effect maximum diffusion release rates of the short-lived species that can be realized at the temperature limits of specific target materials. We also describe the performance characteristics for a selected number of target ion sources that will be employed for initial use at the HRIBF as well as prototype ion sources that show promise for future use for RIB applications

  19. Near monochromatic 20 Me V proton acceleration using fs laser irradiating Au foils in target normal sheath acceleration regime

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Ceccio, G.; Cannavò, A.; Batani, D.; Boutoux, G.; Jakubowska, K.; Ducret, J. E.

    2016-04-01

    A 200 mJ laser pulse energy, 39 fs-pulse duration, 10 μm focal spot, p-polarized radiation has been employed to irradiate thin Au foils to produce proton acceleration in the forward direction. Gold foils were employed to produce high density relativistic electrons emission in the forward direction to generate a high electric field driving the ion acceleration. Measurements were performed by changing the focal position in respect of the target surface. Proton acceleration was monitored using fast SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. A high proton energy, up to about 20 Me V, with a narrow energy distribution, was obtained in particular conditions depending on the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions, and a target optimization.

  20. Shielding design for a proton medical accelerator facility

    Source terms and attenuation lengths for neutrons produced by 250 MeV protons on iron, copper and soft tissue, calculated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, were used for the shielding calculations (walls, ceilings, and floors) for the National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy to be built in Italy. Appropriate hypotheses on the proton current, beam loss factors, duty factors, occupancy factors and use factors of the shields were adopted. A dose equivalent limit of 1 mSv per year in the areas where the public has access and of 2 mSv per year for facility personnel were assumed. Shielding requirements vary from 1.5 m to about 4 m of ordinary concrete. The results agree with Monte Carlo simulations of the complete geometry of the facility obtained in a previous work. The access mazes to the treatment rooms were designed by the LCS Monte Carlo code by optimizing the length and section of their legs and their wall thicknesses with the dose equivalent limit of 2 mSv per year, fixed in the areas accessed by personnel. The resulting annual neutron dose equivalent at the maze mouth is 0.6 mSv

  1. Optimization of the combined proton acceleration regime with a target composition scheme

    A target composition scheme to optimize the combined proton acceleration regime is presented and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations by using an ultra-intense circularly polarized (CP) laser pulse irradiating an overdense hydrocarbon (CH) target, instead of a pure hydrogen (H) one. The combined acceleration regime is a two-stage proton acceleration scheme combining the radiation pressure dominated acceleration (RPDA) stage and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) stage sequentially together. Protons get pre-accelerated in the first stage when an ultra-intense CP laser pulse irradiating an overdense CH target. The wakefield is driven by the laser pulse after penetrating through the overdense CH target and propagating in the underdense tritium plasma gas. With the pre-accelerate stage, protons can now get trapped in the wakefield and accelerated to much higher energy by LWFA. Finally, protons with higher energies (from about 20 GeV up to about 30 GeV) and lower energy spreads (from about 18% down to about 5% in full-width at half-maximum, or FWHM) are generated, as compared to the use of a pure H target. It is because protons can be more stably pre-accelerated in the first RPDA stage when using CH targets. With the increase of the carbon-to-hydrogen density ratio, the energy spread is lower and the maximum proton energy is higher. It also shows that for the same laser intensity around 1022 W cm−2, using the CH target will lead to a higher proton energy, as compared to the use of a pure H target. Additionally, proton energy can be further increased by employing a longitudinally negative gradient of a background plasma density

  2. Optimization of the combined proton acceleration regime with a target composition scheme

    Yao, W. P. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Graduate School, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing 100088 (China); Li, B. W., E-mail: li-baiwen@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Zheng, C. Y.; Liu, Z. J. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Yan, X. Q. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Qiao, B. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China)

    2016-01-15

    A target composition scheme to optimize the combined proton acceleration regime is presented and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations by using an ultra-intense circularly polarized (CP) laser pulse irradiating an overdense hydrocarbon (CH) target, instead of a pure hydrogen (H) one. The combined acceleration regime is a two-stage proton acceleration scheme combining the radiation pressure dominated acceleration (RPDA) stage and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) stage sequentially together. Protons get pre-accelerated in the first stage when an ultra-intense CP laser pulse irradiating an overdense CH target. The wakefield is driven by the laser pulse after penetrating through the overdense CH target and propagating in the underdense tritium plasma gas. With the pre-accelerate stage, protons can now get trapped in the wakefield and accelerated to much higher energy by LWFA. Finally, protons with higher energies (from about 20 GeV up to about 30 GeV) and lower energy spreads (from about 18% down to about 5% in full-width at half-maximum, or FWHM) are generated, as compared to the use of a pure H target. It is because protons can be more stably pre-accelerated in the first RPDA stage when using CH targets. With the increase of the carbon-to-hydrogen density ratio, the energy spread is lower and the maximum proton energy is higher. It also shows that for the same laser intensity around 10{sup 22} W cm{sup −2}, using the CH target will lead to a higher proton energy, as compared to the use of a pure H target. Additionally, proton energy can be further increased by employing a longitudinally negative gradient of a background plasma density.

  3. Target/Blanket Design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium Plant

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium Target/Blanket (T/B) system is comprised of an assembly of tritium-producing modules supported by safety, heat removal, shielding, and retargeting systems. The T/B assembly produces tritium using a high-energy proton beam, a tungsten/lead spallation neutron source and 3He gas as the tritium-producing feedstock. The supporting heat removal systems remove the heat deposited by the proton beam during both normal and off-normal conditions. The shielding protects workers from ionizing radiation, and the retargeting systems remove and replace components that have reached their end of life. All systems reside within the T/B building, which is located at the end of a linear accelerator. For the nominal production mode, protons are accelerated to an energy of 1030 MeV at a current of 100 mA and are directed onto the T/B assembly. The protons are expanded to a 0.19- x 1.9-m beam spot before striking a centrally located tungsten neutron source. A surrounding lead blanket produces additional neutrons from scattered high-energy particles. A total of 27 neutrons are produced per incident proton. Tritium is produced by neutron capture in 3He gas that is contained in aluminum tubes throughout the blanket. The 3He/tritium mixture is removed on a semi-continuous basis for purification in an adjacent Tritium Separation Facility. Systems and components are designed with safety as a primary consideration to minimize risk to the workers and the public. Materials and component designs were chosen based on the experiences of operating spallation neutron sources that have been designed and built for the neutron science community. An extensive engineering development and demonstration program provides detailed information for the completion of the design

  4. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    Leibfritz, J; Baffes, C M; Carlson, K; Chase, B; Church, M D; Harms, E R; Klebaner, A L; Kucera, M; Martinez, A; Nagaitsev, S; Nobrega, L E; Piot, P; Reid, J; Wendt, M; Wesseln, S J

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Acccelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beamlines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750-MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5-GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF a...

  5. AIRIX: an induction accelerator facility developed at CEA for flash radiography in detonics

    Cavailler, Claude

    1999-06-01

    AIRIX is an induction linear accelerator which will be used for flash radiography in CEA/DAM. Designed to produce an X-ray dose of more than 500 Rads at 1 meter with an X-ray focal spot size diameter of less than 2 mm (LANL-CEA DAM definition), this facility consists in a 4 MeV/3.5 kA pulsed electron injector and 16 MeV induction accelerator powered by 32 high voltage generators. A prototype of this accelerator, called PIVAIR, has been studied and realized in CEA CESTA near Bordeaux. PIVAIR is a validation step for AIRIX at 8 MeV. It includes an injector (4 MeV, 3.5 kA, 60 ns) and 16 inductor cells supplied by 8 high voltage generators (250 kV, 70 ns). Two different technologies of induction cells have been tested (rexolite insulator or ferrite under vacuum). We have chosen ferrite under vacuum cells technology after comparison of results on beam transport and reliability tests. A focusing experiment at 7.2 MeV of the electron beam as been achieved during summer 1997. We have begun to produce X-rays in October 1997. A dose level of 50 Rad at 1 meter has been achieved with an X-ray spot size diameter of 3.5 to 4 mm (LANL-CEA DAM definition). Static flash radiography of very dense object have been achieved from November 97 until February 98. We have been able to test in situ new kinds of very high sensitive X- ray detectors and to check they had reached our very ambitious goals: (1) quantum efficiency at 5 MeV greater than 50% instead of 1% for luminous screens and film; (2) sensitivity less than 10 (mu) Rad (100 time more sensitive than radiographic luminous screens and films); (3) dynamic range greater than 100; (4) resolution less than 2 mm. We will present in this communication brand new kinds of detection systems, called high stopping power detectors, such as: (1) (gamma) camera with segmented thick crystal of BGO and MCP image intensifier; (2) multistep parallel plate avalanche chamber; (3) pixellized CdTe MeV photoconductor matrix. AIRIX accelerator is being

  6. Design study of Be-target for proton accelerator based neutron source with 13MeV cyclotron

    There is a cyclotron named KIRAMS-13 in Pusan National University, Busan, Korea, which has the proton energy of 13MeV and the beam current of 0.05mA. Originally, it was developed for producing medical radioisotopes and nuclear physics research. To improve the utilization of the facility, we are considering the possibilities of installing a neutron generation target in it. The Beryllium target has been considered and neutrons can be generated by 9Be(p,n)9B reaction above the threshold proton energy of 2.057MeV. In this presentation, we suggest candidate materials and structures, thicknesses, metal layers and cooling systems of target, which is optimal for the KIRAMS-13. We chose the Beryllium material of 1.14mm thick, which is calculated by stopping power of Beryllium, based on PSTAR, NIST. As for the cooling system, we chose to use water as a coolant, which will also act as a moderator. As protons pass through the target, hydrogen ions continue to pile up in the material and this makes the material brittle. To solve this problem, we chose Vanadium material because it has high hydrogen diffusion coefficient and short half-life isotope after being activated by neutrons. We simulated the neutron characteristics by the Monte Carlo simulation code, Geant4, CERN and performed thermal analysis on the target. The design of target system is very important to produce neutrons for the desired purposes. There are several other existing facilities in Korea, in addition to the cyclotron facility considered in this study, where new neutron target system can be installed and neutrons can be generated. Two prominent facilities are KOMAC, Gyeongju and RFT-30, Jeongeup and we are planning to do study on the possibilities of utilizing the accelerators for neutron generation.

  7. Status of the visible Free-Electron Laser at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    The 500 nm Free-Electron Laser (ATF) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory is reviewed. We present an overview of the ATF, a high-brightness, 50-MeV, electron accelerator and laser complex which is a users' facility for accelerator and beam physics. A number of laser acceleration and FEL experiments are under construction at the ATF. The visible FEL experiment is based on a novel superferric 8.8 mm period undulator. The electron beam parameters, the undulator, the optical resonator, optical and electron beam diagnostics are discussed. The operational status of the experiment is presented. 22 refs., 7 figs

  8. A 3 MV tandem accelerator at Seville. The first IBA facility in Spain

    The first Spanish tandem accelerator, of the Pelletron type, has recently been installed at the University of Seville. The laboratory has been created with the aim to fulfill the increasing demand for ion beam analysis existing in Spain. The facility mainly consists of a 3 MV accelerator with two ion sources and a capacity of seven beam lines, which will be used for interdisciplinary studies such as material research and modification, arts, archaeology, biology, medicine, environmental sciences and so on. The laboratory and the first tests of the accelerator performance are described. (author)

  9. Proposals and demands for High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facilities (background and process). Summary of a join project of four sections of AESJ

    Four sections (reactor physics, radiation engineering, accelerator beam science and nuclear data) of Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) discussed proposals and demands for a High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facilities. This report summarized the background, the process of discussion, relation among four sections and proposals of themes. Four proposals were offered as follows; 1) construction of device in the neutron beam line for matter and life science experimental facility, 2) utilization of T0 beam line in the nuclear and elementary particles experimental facility, 3) foundation of experimental beam line in the nuclear transmutation experimental facility and 4) demands for reactor physics experimental device in the nuclear transmutation experimental facility. The objects of the mater and life science experimental facility are synthesis of elements and transmutation study of long-lived nuclide using from epithermal to some hundred keV neutron. By the nuclear transmutation experimental facility, the fundamental data of nuclear transmutation physics and engineering on proton and neutron, elementary process and effects of cosmic radioactive ray and research of medical technology of beam are studied by from a few MeV to about 600 MeV neutron or proton beam. ADS target engineering, shielding of accelerator and interaction between high-energy cosmic rays are researched with some GeV neutron, proton and π meson by the nuclear and elementary particle experimental facility. (S.Y.)

  10. The Dust Accelerator Facility of the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies

    The NASA Lunar Institute's Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies has recently completed the construction of a new experimental facility to study hypervelocity dust impacts. The installation includes a 3 MV Pelletron, accelerating small particles in the size range of 0.1 to few microns to velocities in the range of 1 to 100 km/s. Here we report the capabilities of our facility, and the results of our first experiments.

  11. Upgrade of accelerator beam facilities and revitalization of the utilization

    Through this project, the quality of the research with the proton accelerator could be improved due to the construction of the sample radiation measurement system which monitor the radiation after proton beam irradiation and the optical properties analysis system which is necessary for the irradiated samples. The semiconductor ion implanter was moved to Gyungju PEFP from Daejeon and set up. The ion beam service was performed 95 times from August to November 30. Blue sapphire was made by the metal ion implanter so that the possibility for the mass production and the industrial application was certified. In addition, PCB drill durability enhancement research was performed in the various condition, which helps other research for the industrial parts, and the light catalyst research was also effective to the real products. The number of paper submission and acceptance exceeds the original plan and three patent are processing. The semiconductor ion implanter can provide the various metal ion beam, which is evaluated as a big outcome. We are planing to activate the use of the metal ion implanter, to increase the available metal ion beam after obtaining a budget, to collect some fee for ion beam service, to commercialize the blue and yellow sapphire, to apply the metal ion implanter for other sapphire coloring, to transfer the light catalyst technology to company after additional researches. For PCB drill which some companies notice about, we endeavor the possibility of commerce by evaluating the mass production and economic advantage

  12. Combined techniques for network measurements at accelerator facilities

    Usually network measurements at GSi (Gesellschaft fur Schwerionen forschung) are carried out by employing the Leica tachymeter TC2002K etc. Due to time constraints and the fact that GSi possesses only one of these selected, high precision total-stations, it was suddenly necessary to think about employing a Laser tracker as the major instrument for a reference network measurement. The idea was to compare the different instruments and to proof if it is possible at all to carry out a precise network measurement using a laser tracker. In the end the SMX Tracker4500 combined with Leica NA3000 for network measurements at GSi, Darmstadt and at BESSY Il, Berlin (both located in Germany) was applied. A few results are shown in the following chapters. A new technology in 3D metrology came up. Some ideas of applying these new tools in the field of accelerator measurements are given. Finally aspects of calibration and checking the performance of the employed high precision instrument are pointed out in this paper. (author)

  13. Facilities for preparing actinide or fission product-based targets

    Sors, M

    1999-01-01

    Research and development work is currently in progress in France on the feasibility of transmutation of very long-lived radionuclides such as americium, blended with an inert medium such as magnesium oxide and pelletized for irradiation in a fast neutron reactor. The process is primarily designed to produce ceramics for nuclear reactors, but could also be used to produce targets for accelerators. The Actinide Development Laboratory is part of the ATALANTE complex at Marcoule, where the CEA investigates reprocessing, liquid and solid waste treatment and vitrification processes. The laboratory produces radioactive sources; after use, their constituents are recycled, notably through R and D programs requiring such materials. Recovered americium is purified, characterized and transformed for an experiment known as ECRIX, designed to demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating americium-based ceramics and to determine the reactor transmutation coefficients.

  14. Waste zone labelling at the Lure accelerator facility

    This document describes the method used to compute the activation of the structure components near the electron-positron converter of the Lure accelerator (Orsay). Activation comes from photon and neutron reactions on nuclei belonging to the concrete structure. Only radio-nuclides with a half-life greater than 200 days are considered penalizing for dismantling operations. The main photonuclear reactions produce the following nuclides: Na22, Cl36, Mn54, Nb92, Ba133, Co57 and Co60. The main neutron reaction generate the following nuclides: H3, C14, Cl36, K40, Co60, Ni63, Zn65, Se79, Zr93, Ag108, Ag110, Ba133, Cs134, Eu152, Eu154, Fe55, Ca41, Na22, Mn54, Cs137, Nb92 and Ti204. The MCNPX code has been used to compute the values of the photon and neutron fluxes received by the structure components, the activation has been computed with the Cinder code from the flux values. The main contributors for radioactivity on long term basis appear to be Ca41 and Ni63. Calculations have been compared with the measurement of activities of 3 concrete samples drilled out from the structure. The results of the comparison are given for Co60, Cs134, Eu152 and Eu154. The computed values appear to be greater by a factor varying from 2 to 5 which is consistent with the method used that naturally overestimates the activation. These results are considered as satisfactory for performing waste zone labelling. (A.C.)

  15. Investigation of longitudinal proton acceleration in exploded targets irradiated by intense short-pulse laser

    Gauthier, M. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France); Lévy, A. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC, Paris 06, CNRS, INSP, UMR 7588, F-75005, Paris (France); D' Humières, E.; Beaucourt, C.; Breil, J.; Feugeas, J. L.; Nicolaï, P.; Tikhonchuk, V. [Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, UMR 5107, F-33400 Talence (France); Glesser, M. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); INRS-EMT, Varennes, PQ J3X 1S2 (Canada); Albertazzi, B. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, UMR 5107, F-33400 Talence (France); Chen, S. N.; Dervieux, V.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Pépin, H. [INRS-EMT, Varennes, PQ J3X 1S2 (Canada); Antici, P. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); INRS-EMT, Varennes, PQ J3X 1S2 (Canada); Dipartimento SBAI, Universita di Roma “Sapienza,” Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    It was recently shown that a promising way to accelerate protons in the forward direction to high energies is to use under-dense or near-critical density targets instead of solids. Simulations have revealed that the acceleration process depends on the density gradients of the plasma target. Indeed, under certain conditions, the most energetic protons are predicted to be accelerated by a collisionless shock mechanism that significantly increases their energy. We report here the results of a recent experiment dedicated to the study of longitudinal ion acceleration in partially exploded foils using a high intensity (∼5 × 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) picosecond laser pulse. We show that protons accelerated using targets having moderate front and rear plasma gradients (up to ∼8 μm gradient length) exhibit similar maximum proton energy and number compared to proton beams that are produced, in similar laser conditions, from solid targets, in the well-known target normal sheath acceleration regime. Particle-In-Cell simulations, performed in the same conditions as the experiment and consistent with the measurements, allow laying a path for further improvement of this acceleration scheme.

  16. Closed loop spray cooling apparatus. [for particle accelerator targets

    Alger, D. L.; Schwab, W. B.; Furman, E. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A closed loop apparatus for spraying coolant against the back of a radiation target is described. The coolant was circulated through a closed loop with a bubble of inert gas being maintained around the spray. Mesh material was disposed between the bubble and the surface of the liquid coolant which was below the bubble at a predetermined level. In a second embodiment, no inert gas was used, the bubble consisting of a vapor produced when the coolant was sprayed against the target.

  17. A tritium gas target for neutron production at HI-13 tandem accelerator

    A tritium gas target was built and employed in neutron physics experiment at HI-13 tandem accelerator. The gas target consists of a helium gas cell and a tritium gas cell. The entrance foils are 10 μm thick molybdenum ones. The target is intended as a neutron source using T(d,n)4He and T(p,n)3He reactions. Details of the target design and performance are given

  18. A tritium gas target for neutron production at HI-13 tandem accelerator

    A tritium gas target has been built and employed in neutron physics experiments at HI-13 tandem accelerator. The gas target consists of a helium gas cell and a tritium gas cell. The entrance foils are 10 μm thick molybdenum ones. The target is intended as a neutron source using T(d,n)4He and T(p,n)3He reactions. Details of the target design and performance are given

  19. Radiological Research Accelerator Facility. Progress report, April 1, 1984-March 31, 1985

    The aim of the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) was to provide a source of monoenergetic neutrons for studies in radiation biology, dosimetry and microdosimetry. The research has provided insight into the biological action of radiation and its relation to energy distribution in the cell as described by the theory of dual radiation action. This status report on the facility includes descriptions of the capabilities and layout, staffing, radiation safety, and a chronological account of the development and use of the facilities. 5 references, 2 figures

  20. Concept, implementation and commissioning of the automation system for the accelerator module test facility AMTF

    The European XFEL project launched on June 5, 2007 will require about 103 accelerator modules as a main part of the XFEL linear accelerator. All superconducting components constituting the accelerator module like cavities and magnets have to be tested before the assembly. For the tests of the individual cavities and the complete modules an XFEL Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF) has been erected at DESY. The process control system EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used to control and operate the cryogenic plant and all its subcomponents. A complementary component of EPICS is the Open Source software suit CSS (Control System Studio). CSS is an integrated engineering, maintenance and operating tool for EPICS. CSS enables local and remote operating and monitoring of the complete system and thus represents the human machine interface. More than 250 PROFIBUS nodes work at the accelerator module test facility. DESY installed an extensive diagnostic and condition monitoring system. With these diagnostic tools it is possible to examine the correct installation and configuration of all PROFIBUS nodes in real time. The condition monitoring system based on FDT/DTM technology shows the state of the PROFIBUS devices at a glance. This information can be used for preventive maintenance which is mandatory for continuous operation of the AMTF facility. The poster will describe all steps form engineering to implementation and commissioning

  1. SINBAD-The accelerator R&D facility under construction at DESY

    Dorda, U.; Assmann, R.; Brinkmann, R.; Flöttmann, K.; Hartl, I.; Hüning, M.; Kärtner, F.; Fallahi, A.; Marchetti, B.; Nie, Y.; Osterhoff, J.; Schlarb, H.; Zhu, J.; Maier, A. R.

    2016-09-01

    The SINBAD facility (Short INnovative Bunches and Accelerators at DESY) is a long-term dedicated accelerator research and development facility currently under construction at DESY. It will be located in the premises of the old DORIS accelerator complex and host multiple independent experiments cost-effectively accessing the same central infrastructure like a central high power laser. With the removal of the old DORIS accelerator being completed, the refurbishment of the technical infrastructure is currently starting up. The presently ongoing conversion of the area into the SINBAD facility and the currently foreseen layout is described. The first experiment will use a compact S-band linac for the production of ultra-short bunches at hundred MeV. Once established, one of the main usages will be to externally inject electrons into a laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerator to boost the energy to GeV-level while maintaining a usable beam quality, ultimately aiming to drive an FEL. The second experiment already under planning is the setup of an attosecond radiation source with advanced technology. Further usage of the available space and infrastructure is revised and national and international collaborations are being established.

  2. Report of the Panel on Electron Accelerator Facilities, DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    This Panel finds that the highest priority for new accelerator construction in the US nuclear physics program is for an electron accelerator of high duty factor capable of producing beams at any energy in the range from 500 to 4000 MeV. After detailed study and consideration of the proposals for such facilities submitted to it, the Panel recommends: that the proposal submitted by the Southeastern University Research Association (SURA) be accepted and funded for the construction of a new National Electron Accelerator Laboratory (NEAL) centering on a 4 GeV linear accelerator-stretcher ring system capable of delivering intense, high duty factor, electron beams in the energy range from 500 to 4000 MeV. Additional recommendations relating to this principal one are to be found in the body of this report. As modified by the Panel consequent to its own studies and analyses, the estimated cost (in 1983 dollars) of the accelerator complex is 111.8 million dollars; of the entire laboratory is 146.8 million dollars; and the operating cost averaged over the first five years of operation is 18.1 million dollars per year. The projected 15 year total cost of the project is 418.3 million dollars. The construction period is estimated to be 4.5 years. The NEAL Laboratory, from the outset will be constructed and managed as a national rather than a regional facility and will provide the United States with a truly unique facility for research in electromagnetic physics

  3. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    Prost, Lionel R

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  4. CEBAF/SURA [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility]/[Southeastern Universities Research Association] 1987 summer workshop

    This report contains papers from the CEBAF accelerator facility summer workshop. Some topics covered are: baryon-baryon interactions, deuteron form factors; neutron detection; high resolution spectrometers; nuclear strangeness; parity violation; photon-deuteron interactions; chemical reactions in ion sources; quantum chromodynamics; hypernuclear magnetic moments; and photoproduction of π+ from 14N

  5. Complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities

    Bilski, P; D'Errico, F; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernàndez, F; Fuchs, A; Golnik, N; Lacoste, V; Leuschner, A; Sandri, S; Silari, M; Spurny, F; Wiegel, B; Wright, P

    2006-01-01

    This report outlines the research needs and research activities within Europe to develop new and improved methods and techniques for the characterization of complex radiation fields at workplaces around high-energy accelerators and the next generation of thermonuclear fusion facilities under the auspices of the COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry (CONRAD) project funded by the European Commission.

  6. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    Prost, L. R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-02-17

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  7. High resolution electron scattering facility at the Darmstadt linear accelerator (DALINAC). Pt. 3

    The multichannel detector system of the energy-loss electron scattering facility at the Darmstadt linear accelerator is described. The system consists of 36 overlapping plastic scintillators backed up by a large Cherenkov counter. Fast logic circuitry (300 MHz) is used to form a pattern of coincidence and antocoincidence bins definig 69 momentum channels. (orig.)

  8. CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] design overview and project status

    This paper discusses the design and specifications of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. Beam performance objectives are discussed, as well as the recirculating linac concept, the injector, cavities, cryogenic system, beam transport and optics, rf system and construction progress. 19 refs., 10 figs

  9. Availability simulation software adaptation to the IFMIF accelerator facility RAMI analyses

    Highlights: • The reason why IFMIF RAMI analyses needs a simulation is explained. • Changes, modifications and software validations done to AvailSim are described. • First IFMIF RAMI results obtained with AvailSim 2.0 are shown. • Implications of AvailSim 2.0 in IFMIF RAMI analyses are evaluated. - Abstract: Several problems were found when using generic reliability tools to perform RAMI (Reliability Availability Maintainability Inspectability) studies for the IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) accelerator. A dedicated simulation tool was necessary to model properly the complexity of the accelerator facility. AvailSim, the availability simulation software used for the International Linear Collider (ILC) became an excellent option to fulfill RAMI analyses needs. Nevertheless, this software needed to be adapted and modified to simulate the IFMIF accelerator facility in a useful way for the RAMI analyses in the current design phase. Furthermore, some improvements and new features have been added to the software. This software has become a great tool to simulate the peculiarities of the IFMIF accelerator facility allowing obtaining a realistic availability simulation. Degraded operation simulation and maintenance strategies are the main relevant features. In this paper, the necessity of this software, main modifications to improve it and its adaptation to IFMIF RAMI analysis are described. Moreover, first results obtained with AvailSim 2.0 and a comparison with previous results is shown

  10. Proton acceleration with high intensity lasers interacting on micro-cone targets

    D'Humieres, Emmanuel; Cowan, Tom; Gaillard, Sandrine; Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Rassuchine, Jennifer; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2006-10-01

    In the last few years, intense research has been conducted on laser-accelerated ion sources and their applications [1,2]. Proton beams accelerated from solid planar targets have exceptional properties that open new opportunities for ion beam generation and control. Experiments conducted at LANL and LULI have shown that high intensity lasers interacting on micro-cone targets can produce proton beams more collimated and more energetic than with planar targets. These micro-cone targets are composed of a curved cone attached to a micro-table. 2D PIC simulations were performed to understand the experiments and separate the effect of the cone from the effect of the micro-table. These new targets could help increase the laser-accelerated protons maximum energy to the 100 MeV range. [1] J. Fuchs et al., Nature Physics 2, 48 (2006). [2] T.Toncian et al., Science Vol. 312, 21 April 2006, p.410-413.