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Sample records for accelerator neutrino physics

  1. Strategies for Future Accelerator Neutrino Physics

    Accelerator neutrino (ν) physics has come back to the forefront, with the discovery of ν transitions, our first and unique window beyond the standard model. The experimental program to provide a complete map of the ν mixing matrix, including its far reaching CP violation sector, and test its unitarity constraints is likely to extend over several future decades, as it has been for quark mixing. So far, conventional ν beams based on pion (π) decay have been used and more are already being planned, at higher power (superbeams), in Japan and the US, in conjunction with larger or novel detectors. Superbeams have limited potential, however. Novel very intense beams of ν parents, longer lived than π's, accelerated and then coasted in a decay storage ring replacing the π decay tunnel, promise the ultimate reach. R and D for muon decay ring (ν factory) and ion decay ring (betabeam) experiments is thus a decisive task today.

  2. European Strategy for Accelerator-Based Neutrino Physics

    Bertolucci, Sergio; Cervera, Anselmo; Donini, Andrea; Dracos, Marcos; Duchesneau, Dominique; Dufour, Fanny; Edgecock, Rob; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Gschwendtner, Edda; Kudenko, Yury; Long, Ken; Maalampi, Jukka; Mezzetto, Mauro; Pascoli, Silvia; Palladino, Vittorio; Rondio, Ewa; Rubbia, Andre; Rubbia, Carlo; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Thomas, Jenny; Wark, David; Wildner, Elena; Zito, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Massive neutrinos reveal physics beyond the Standard Model, which could have deep consequences for our understanding of the Universe. Their study should therefore receive the highest level of priority in the European Strategy. The discovery and study of leptonic CP violation and precision studies of the transitions between neutrino flavours require high intensity, high precision, long baseline accelerator neutrino experiments. The community of European neutrino physicists involved in oscillation experiments is strong enough to support a major neutrino long baseline project in Europe, and has an ambitious, competitive and coherent vision to propose. Following the 2006 European Strategy for Particle Physics (ESPP) recommendations, two complementary design studies have been carried out: LAGUNA/LBNO, focused on deep underground detector sites, and EUROnu, focused on high intensity neutrino facilities. LAGUNA LBNO recommends, as first step, a conventional neutrino beam CN2PY from a CERN SPS North Area Neutrino Fac...

  3. A Staged Muon Accelerator Facility For Neutrino and Collider Physics

    Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; Brice, Stephen; Bross, Alan David; Denisov, Dmitri; Eichten, Estia; Holmes, Stephen; Lipton, Ronald; Neuffer, David; Palmer, Mark Alan; Bogacz, S Alex; Huber, Patrick; Kaplan, Daniel M; Snopok, Pavel; Kirk, Harold G; Palmer, Robert B; Ryne, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    Muon-based facilities offer unique potential to provide capabilities at both the Intensity Frontier with Neutrino Factories and the Energy Frontier with Muon Colliders. They rely on a novel technology with challenging parameters, for which the feasibility is currently being evaluated by the Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). A realistic scenario for a complementary series of staged facilities with increasing complexity and significant physics potential at each stage has been developed. It takes advantage of and leverages the capabilities already planned for Fermilab, especially the strategy for long-term improvement of the accelerator complex being initiated with the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP-II) and the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF). Each stage is designed to provide an R&D platform to validate the technologies required for subsequent stages. The rationale and sequence of the staging process and the critical issues to be addressed at each stage, are presented.

  4. Neutrino physics

    The fundamental properties of neutrinos are reviewed in these lectures. The first part is focused on the basic characteristics of neutrinos in the Standard Model and how neutrinos are detected. Neutrino masses and oscillations are introduced and a summary of the most important experimental results on neutrino oscillations to date is provided. Then, present and future experimental proposals are discussed, including new precision reactor and accelerator experiments. Finally, different approaches for measuring the neutrino mass and the nature (Majorana or Dirac), of neutrinos are reviewed. The detection of neutrinos from supernovae explosions and the information that this measurement can provide are also summarized at the end. (author)

  5. Neutrino Physics

    Gil-Botella, I

    2013-01-01

    The fundamental properties of neutrinos are reviewed in these lectures. The first part is focused on the basic characteristics of neutrinos in the Standard Model and how neutrinos are detected. Neutrino masses and oscillations are introduced and a summary of the most important experimental results on neutrino oscillations to date is provided. Then, present and future experimental proposals are discussed, including new precision reactor and accelerator experiments. Finally, different approaches for measuring the neutrino mass and the nature (Majorana or Dirac) of neutrinos are reviewed. The detection of neutrinos from supernovae explosions and the information that this measurement can provide are also summarized at the end.

  6. Neutrino physics

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The field of neutrino physics has expanded greatly in recent years with the discovery that neutrinos change flavor and therefore have mass. Although there are many neutrino physics results since the last DIS workshop, these proceedings concentrate on recent neutrino physics results that either add to or depend on the understanding of Deep Inelastic Scattering. They also describe the short and longer term future of neutrino DIS experiments.

  7. Beta Beams: an accelerator based facility to explore Neutrino oscillation physics

    Wildner, E; Hansen, C; De Melo Mendonca, T; Stora, T; Payet, J; Chance, A; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Rasin, S; Sidorov, A; Skalyga, V; De Angelis, G; Prete, G; Cinausero, M; Kravchuk, VL; Gramegna, F; Marchi, T; Collazuol, G; De Rosa, G; Delbar, T; Loiselet, M; Keutgen, T; Mitrofanov, S; Lamy, T; Latrasse, L; Marie-Jeanne, M; Sortais, P; Thuillier, T; Debray, F; Trophime, C; Hass, M; Hirsh, T; Berkovits, D; Stahl, A

    2011-01-01

    The discovery that the neutrino changes flavor as it travels through space has implications for the Standard Model of particle physics (SM)[1]. To know the contribution of neutrinos to the SM, needs precise measurements of the parameters governing the neutrino oscillations. This will require a high intensity beam-based neutrino oscillation facility. The EURONu Design Study will review three currently accepted methods of realizing this facility (the so-called Super-Beams, Beta Beams and Neutrino Factories) and perform a cost assessment that, coupled with the physics performance, will give means to the European research authorities to make a decision on the layout and construction of the future European neutrino oscillation facility. ”Beta Beams” produce collimated pure electron neutrino and antineutrino beams by accelerating beta active ions to high energies and letting them decay in a race-track shaped storage ring. EURONu Beta Beams are based on CERNs infrastructure and the fact that some of the already ...

  8. Neutrino Physics

    Romanino, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    These lectures aim at providing a pedagogical overview of neutrino physics. We will mostly deal with standard neutrinos, the ones that are part of the Standard Model of particle physics, and with their standard dynamics, which is enough to understand in a coherent picture most of the rich data available. After introducing the basic theoretical framework, we will illustrate the experimental determination of the neutrino parameters and their theoretical implications, in particular for the origin of neutrino masses.

  9. Neutrino physics

    The basic concepts of neutrino physics are presented at a level appropriate for integration into elementary courses on quantum mechanics and/or modern physics. (c) 2000 American Association of Physics Teachers

  10. Neutrino physics and astrophysics

    The plenary reports of Neutrino '80 are presented by experts in neutrino physics and astrophysics. Their International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics was held in Erice (Italy), June 23 through 28, 1980. The proceedings include reviews of part research, the history of neutrino research and coverage of recent results and theoretical speculations. Topics include high- and low-energy neutrino astrophysics, weak charged and neutral currents, low and intermediate weak interactions, neutrino oscillations, and parity violation in atoms and nuclei conservation laws. Weak interactions in lepton-lepton and lepton-nucleon collisions, beam dump experiments, new theoretical ideas, and future developments in accelerators and detectors are also included. The topics are introduced by a historical perspective section and then grouped under the headings of neutrino astrophysics, weak charged currents, weak neutral currents, low and intermediate energy interactions, conservation laws, weak interactions in electron and hadron experiments, and a final section on future accelerator, new neutrino detection technology and concluding remarks

  11. European facilities for accelerator neutrino physics: perspectives for the decade to come

    Battiston, R; Migliozzi, P; Terranova, F

    2009-01-01

    Very soon a new generation of reactor and accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments - Double Chooz, Daya Bay, Reno and T2K - will seek for oscillation signals generated by the mixing parameter theta_13. The knowledge of this angle is a fundamental milestone to optimize further experiments aimed at detecting CP violation in the neutrino sector. Leptonic CP violation is a key phenomenon that has profound implications in particle physics and cosmology but it is clearly out of reach for the aforementioned experiments. Since late 90's, a world-wide activity is in progress to design facilities that can access CP violation in neutrino oscillation and perform high precision measurements of the lepton counterpart of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. In this paper the status of these studies will be summarized, focusing on the options that are best suited to exploit existing European facilities (firstly CERN and the INFN Gran Sasso Laboratories) or technologies where Europe has a world leadership. Similar consid...

  12. John Adams Lecture | Accelerator-Based Neutrino Physics: Past, Present and Future by Kenneth Long | 8 December

    2014-01-01

    John Adams Lecture: Accelerator-Based Neutrino Physics: Past, Present and Future by Dr. Kenneth Long (Imperial College London & STFC).   Monday, 8 December 2014 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at CERN ( 503-1-001 - Council Chamber ) Abstract: The study of the neutrino is the study of physics beyond the Standard Model. We now know that the neutrinos have mass and that neutrino mixing occurs causing neutrino flavour to oscillate as neutrinos propagate through space and time. Further, some measurements can be interpreted as hints for new particles known as sterile neutrinos. The measured values of the mixing parameters make it possible that the matter-antimatter (CP) symmetry may be violated through the mixing process. The consequences of observing CP-invariance violation in neutrinos would be profound. To discover CP-invariance violation will require measurements of exquisite precision. Accelerator-based neutrino sources are central to the future programme and advances in technique are required ...

  13. Solar neutrinos and neutrino physics

    Maltoni, Michele; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Solar neutrino studies triggered and largely motivated the major developments in neutrino physics in the last 50 years. The theory of neutrino propagation in different media with matter and fields has been elaborated. It includes oscillations in vacuum and matter, resonance flavor conversion and resonance oscillations, spin and spin-flavor precession, etc. LMA MSW has been established as the true solution of the solar neutrino problem. Parameters θ_{12} and Δ m 2 21 have been measured; θ_{13} extracted from the solar data is in agreement with results from reactor experiments. Solar neutrino studies provide a sensitive way to test theory of neutrino oscillations and conversion. Characterized by long baseline, huge fluxes and low energies they are a powerful set-up to search for new physics beyond the standard 3 ν paradigm: new neutrino states, sterile neutrinos, non-standard neutrino interactions, effects of violation of fundamental symmetries, new dynamics of neutrino propagation, probes of space and time. These searches allow us to get stringent, and in some cases unique bounds on new physics. We summarize the results on physics of propagation, neutrino properties and physics beyond the standard model obtained from studies of solar neutrinos.

  14. Neutrino Physics

    Lederman, L. M.

    1963-01-09

    The prediction and verification of the neutrino are reviewed, together with the V A theory for its interactions (particularly the difficulties with the apparent existence of two neutrinos and the high energy cross section). The Brookhaven experiment confirming the existence of two neutrinos and the cross section increase with momentum is then described, and future neutrino experiments are considered. (D.C.W.)

  15. Neutrino Physics

    Langacker, Paul; Erler, Jens; Peinado, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental bases of neutrino mass and mixing are reviewed. A brief chronological evolution of the weak interactions, the electroweak Standard Model, and neutrinos is presented. Dirac and Majorana mass terms are explained as well as models such as the seesaw mechanism. Schemes for two, three and four neutrino mixings are presented.

  16. Neutrino mass and mixing, and non-accelerator experiments

    We review the current status of experimental knowledge about neutrinos derived from kinematic mass measurements, neutrino oscillation searches at reactors and accelerators, solar neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and single and double beta decay. The solar neutrino results yield fairly strong and consistent indication that neutrino oscillations are occurring. Other evidence for new physics is less consistent and convincing

  17. Neutrino Physics with JUNO

    An, Fengpeng; An, Guangpeng; An, Qi; Antonelli, Vito; Baussan, Eric; Beacom, John; Bezrukov, Leonid; Blyth, Simon; Brugnera, Riccardo; Avanzini, Margherita Buizza; Busto, Jose; Cabrera, Anatael; Cai, Hao; Cai, Xiao; Cammi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy as a primary physics goal. It is also capable of observing neutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, as well as exotic searches such as nucleon decays, dark matter,...

  18. Accelerator Neutrino Programme at FERMILAB

    The accelerator neutrino programme in the USA consists primarily of the Fermilab neutrino programme. Currently, Fermilab operates two neutrino beamlines, the Booster neutrino beamline and the NuMI neutrino beamline and is the planning stages for a third neutrino beam to send neutrinos to DUSEL. The experiments in the Booster neutrino beamline are miniBooNE, SciBooNE and in the future microBooNE, whereas in the NuMI beamline we have MINOS, ArgoNut, MINERVA and coming soon NOA. The major experiment in the beamline to DUSEL will be LBNE. (author)

  19. Experimental Neutrino Physics

    Zuber, K.

    2008-01-01

    It's been a remarkable decade in neutrino physics. Ten years ago this summer, at the 1998 neutrino conference in Takayama, the Super-Kamiokande collaboration reported the observation of neutrinos changing flavor, thereby establishing the existence of neutrino mass. A few years later, the SNO experiment solved the long-standing solar neutrino problem demonstrating that it too was due to neutrino oscillation. Just a few years after that, these effects were confirmed and the oscillation paramete...

  20. Future short-baseline sterile neutrino searches with accelerators

    A number of experimental anomalies in neutrino oscillation physics point to the existence of at least one light sterile neutrino. This hypothesis can be precisely tested using neutrinos from reactors, radioactive isotopes, and particle accelerators. The focus of these proceedings is on future dedicated short-baseline sterile neutrino searches using accelerators

  1. Accelerator studies of neutrino oscillations

    Ereditato, A

    2000-01-01

    The question of whether the neutrino has a non-vanishing mass plays acrucial role in particle physics. A massive neutrino would unambiguously reveal the existence of new physics beyond the Standard Model. In addition, it could have profound implications on astrophysics and cosmology, with effects on the evolution of the Universe. Experiments aiming at direct neutrino-mass measurements based on kinematics have not been able, so far, to measure the very small neutrino mass. Indirect measurements can be performed by exploiting reactions which may only occur for massive neutrinos. Neutrino oscillation is one of those processes. The mass difference between neutrino mass-eigenstates can be inferred from a phase measurement. This feature allows for high sensitivity experiments. Neutrinos from different sources can be used to search for oscillations: solar neutrinos, neutrinos produced in the interaction of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and artificially produced neutrinos from nuclear reactors and particle accelera...

  2. Neutrino Physics with JUNO

    An, Fengpeng; An, Qi; Antonelli, Vito; Baussan, Eric; Beacom, John; Bezrukov, Leonid; Blyth, Simon; Brugnera, Riccardo; Avanzini, Margherita Buizza; Busto, Jose; Cabrera, Anatael; Cai, Hao; Cai, Xiao; Cammi, Antonio; Cao, Guofu; Cao, Jun; Chang, Yun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Yixue; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Clerbaux, Barbara; Conrad, Janet; D'Angelo, Davide; De Kerret, Herve; Deng, Zhi; Deng, Ziyan; Ding, Yayun; Djurcic, Zelimir; Dornic, Damien; Dracos, Marcos; Drapier, Olivier; Dusini, Stefano; Dye, Stephen; Enqvist, Timo; Fan, Donghua; Fang, Jian; Favart, Laurent; Ford, Richard; Goger-Neff, Marianne; Gan, Haonan; Garfagnini, Alberto; Giammarchi, Marco; Gonchar, Maxim; Gong, Guanghua; Gong, Hui; Gonin, Michel; Grassi, Marco; Grewing, Christian; Guan, Mengyun; Guarino, Vic; Guo, Gang; Guo, Wanlei; Guo, Xin-Heng; Hagner, Caren; Han, Ran; He, Miao; Heng, Yuekun; Hsiung, Yee; Hu, Jun; Hu, Shouyang; Hu, Tao; Huang, Hanxiong; Huang, Xingtao; Huo, Lei; Ioannisian, Ara; Jeitler, Manfred; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Jollet, Cecile; Kang, Li; Karagounis, Michael; Kazarian, Narine; Krumshteyn, Zinovy; Kruth, Andre; Kuusiniemi, Pasi; Lachenmaier, Tobias; Leitner, Rupert; Li, Chao; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Weidong; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xiaonan; Li, Yi; Li, Yufeng; Li, Zhi-Bing; Liang, Hao; Lin, Guey-Lin; Lin, Tao; Lin, Yen-Hsun; Ling, Jiajie; Lippi, Ivano; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Hongbang; Liu, Hu; Liu, Jianglai; Liu, Jianli; Liu, Jinchang; Liu, Qian; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Shulin; Lombardi, Paolo; Long, Yongbing; Lu, Haoqi; Lu, Jiashu; Lu, Jingbin; Lu, Junguang; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Ludhova, Livia; Luo, Shu; Lyashuk, Vladimir; Mollenberg, Randolph; Ma, Xubo; Mantovani, Fabio; Mao, Yajun; Mari, Stefano M; McDonough, William F; Meng, Guang; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Meroni, Emanuela; Mezzetto, Mauro; Miramonti, Lino; Mueller, Thomas; Naumov, Dmitry; Oberauer, Lothar; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Ortica, Fausto; Paoloni, Alessandro; Peng, Haiping; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Previtali, Ezio; Qi, Ming; Qian, Sen; Qian, Xin; Qian, Yongzhong; Qin, Zhonghua; Raffelt, Georg; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Ricci, Barbara; Robens, Markus; Romani, Aldo; Ruan, Xiangdong; Ruan, Xichao; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Shaevitz, Mike; Sinev, Valery; Sirignano, Chiara; Sisti, Monica; Smirnov, Oleg; Soiron, Michael; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Steinmann, Jochen; Sun, Xilei; Sun, Yongjie; Taichenachev, Dmitriy; Tang, Jian; Tkachev, Igor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw; van Waasen, Stefan; Volpe, Cristina; Vorobel, Vit; Votano, Lucia; Wang, Chung-Hsiang; Wang, Guoli; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Zhimin; Wei, Wei; Wen, Liangjian; Wiebusch, Christopher; Wonsak, Bjorn; Wu, Qun; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Wurm, Michael; Xi, Yufei; Xia, Dongmei; Xie, Yuguang; Xing, Zhi-zhong; Xu, Jilei; Yan, Baojun; Yang, Changgen; Yang, Chaowen; Yang, Guang; Yang, Lei; Yang, Yifan; Yao, Yu; Yegin, Ugur; Yermia, Frederic; You, Zhengyun; Yu, Boxiang; Yu, Chunxu; Yu, Zeyuan; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zhan, Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhang, Qingmin; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Zhenghua; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhong, Weili; Zhou, Guorong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Rong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Wenxiong; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yeling; Zhou, Yufeng; Zou, Jiaheng

    2015-01-01

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy as a primary physics goal. It is also capable of observing neutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, as well as exotic searches such as nucleon decays, dark matter, sterile neutrinos, etc. We present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. By detecting reactor antineutrinos from two power plants at 53-km distance, JUNO will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a 3-4 sigma significance with six years of running. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum will also lead to the precise determination of three out of the six oscillation parameters to an accuracy of better than 1\\%. Neutrino burst from a typical cor...

  3. Physics of Neutrino Oscillation

    Mondal, Spandan

    2015-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes neutrinos as massless, chargeless elementary particles that come in three different flavours. However, recent experiments indicate that neutrinos not only have mass, but also have multiple mass eigenstates that are not identical to the flavour states, thereby indicating mixing. As an evidence of mixing, neutrinos have been observed to change from one flavour to another during their propagation, a phenomenon called neutrino oscillation. We have studied the reasons and derived the probabilities of neutrino flavour change, both in vacuum and in matter. We have also studied the parameters affecting this probability. We have discussed the special case of two-neutrino oscillations. Lastly, we have discussed some basic properties of neutrinos that are reflected in the previous derivations and highlighted a few relevant open problems. To begin with, we have also studied the relevant topics in introductory High Energy Physics and Quantum Mechanics to familiarize with th...

  4. Introduction to neutrino physics

    Totsuka, Y

    2003-01-01

    An elementary particle 'neutrino' was born in Pauli's conjecture 70 years ago. Its study has made remarkable contributions to establishing the weak interactions and the electro-weak unification theory. Recently much interest has been directed to investigating the intrinsic properties of the neutrinos and important experimental results on their masses and mixings were obtained. This article introduces several experiments that have made breakthroughs in neutrino physics. Also presented is a personal view of what should be done in future to further develop neutrino physics. This article is devoted to Professor Koshiba's 2002 Nobel Prize in physics. (author)

  5. Neutrino physics with JUNO

    An, Fengpeng; An, Guangpeng; An, Qi; Antonelli, Vito; Baussan, Eric; Beacom, John; Bezrukov, Leonid; Blyth, Simon; Brugnera, Riccardo; Buizza Avanzini, Margherita; Busto, Jose; Cabrera, Anatael; Cai, Hao; Cai, Xiao; Cammi, Antonio; Cao, Guofu; Cao, Jun; Chang, Yun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Yixue; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Clerbaux, Barbara; Conrad, Janet; D'Angelo, Davide; De Kerret, Hervé; Deng, Zhi; Deng, Ziyan; Ding, Yayun; Djurcic, Zelimir; Dornic, Damien; Dracos, Marcos; Drapier, Olivier; Dusini, Stefano; Dye, Stephen; Enqvist, Timo; Fan, Donghua; Fang, Jian; Favart, Laurent; Ford, Richard; Göger-Neff, Marianne; Gan, Haonan; Garfagnini, Alberto; Giammarchi, Marco; Gonchar, Maxim; Gong, Guanghua; Gong, Hui; Gonin, Michel; Grassi, Marco; Grewing, Christian; Guan, Mengyun; Guarino, Vic; Guo, Gang; Guo, Wanlei; Guo, Xin-Heng; Hagner, Caren; Han, Ran; He, Miao; Heng, Yuekun; Hsiung, Yee; Hu, Jun; Hu, Shouyang; Hu, Tao; Huang, Hanxiong; Huang, Xingtao; Huo, Lei; Ioannisian, Ara; Jeitler, Manfred; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Jollet, Cécile; Kang, Li; Karagounis, Michael; Kazarian, Narine; Krumshteyn, Zinovy; Kruth, Andre; Kuusiniemi, Pasi; Lachenmaier, Tobias; Leitner, Rupert; Li, Chao; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Weidong; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xiaonan; Li, Yi; Li, Yufeng; Li, Zhi-Bing; Liang, Hao; Lin, Guey-Lin; Lin, Tao; Lin, Yen-Hsun; Ling, Jiajie; Lippi, Ivano; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Hongbang; Liu, Hu; Liu, Jianglai; Liu, Jianli; Liu, Jinchang; Liu, Qian; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Shulin; Lombardi, Paolo; Long, Yongbing; Lu, Haoqi; Lu, Jiashu; Lu, Jingbin; Lu, Junguang; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Ludhova, Livia; Luo, Shu; Lyashuk, Vladimir; Möllenberg, Randolph; Ma, Xubo; Mantovani, Fabio; Mao, Yajun; Mari, Stefano M.; McDonough, William F.; Meng, Guang; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Meroni, Emanuela; Mezzetto, Mauro; Miramonti, Lino; Mueller, Thomas; Naumov, Dmitry; Oberauer, Lothar; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Ortica, Fausto; Paoloni, Alessandro; Peng, Haiping; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Previtali, Ezio; Qi, Ming; Qian, Sen; Qian, Xin; Qian, Yongzhong; Qin, Zhonghua; Raffelt, Georg; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Ricci, Barbara; Robens, Markus; Romani, Aldo; Ruan, Xiangdong; Ruan, Xichao; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Shaevitz, Mike; Sinev, Valery; Sirignano, Chiara; Sisti, Monica; Smirnov, Oleg; Soiron, Michael; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Steinmann, Jochen; Sun, Xilei; Sun, Yongjie; Taichenachev, Dmitriy; Tang, Jian; Tkachev, Igor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw; van Waasen, Stefan; Volpe, Cristina; Vorobel, Vit; Votano, Lucia; Wang, Chung-Hsiang; Wang, Guoli; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Zhimin; Wei, Wei; Wen, Liangjian; Wiebusch, Christopher; Wonsak, Björn; Wu, Qun; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Wurm, Michael; Xi, Yufei; Xia, Dongmei; Xie, Yuguang; Xing, Zhi-zhong; Xu, Jilei; Yan, Baojun; Yang, Changgen; Yang, Chaowen; Yang, Guang; Yang, Lei; Yang, Yifan; Yao, Yu; Yegin, Ugur; Yermia, Frédéric; You, Zhengyun; Yu, Boxiang; Yu, Chunxu; Yu, Zeyuan; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zhan, Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhang, Qingmin; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Zhenghua; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhong, Weili; Zhou, Guorong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Rong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Wenxiong; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yeling; Zhou, Yufeng; Zou, Jiaheng

    2016-03-01

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH) as a primary physics goal. The excellent energy resolution and the large fiducial volume anticipated for the JUNO detector offer exciting opportunities for addressing many important topics in neutrino and astro-particle physics. In this document, we present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. Following an introduction summarizing the current status and open issues in neutrino physics, we discuss how the detection of antineutrinos generated by a cluster of nuclear power plants allows the determination of the neutrino MH at a 3-4σ significance with six years of running of JUNO. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum with excellent energy resolution will also lead to the precise determination of the neutrino oscillation parameters {{sin}}2{θ }12, {{Δ }}{m}212, and | {{Δ }}{m}{ee}2| to an accuracy of better than 1%, which will play a crucial role in the future unitarity test of the MNSP matrix. The JUNO detector is capable of observing not only antineutrinos from the power plants, but also neutrinos/antineutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and solar neutrinos. As a result of JUNO's large size, excellent energy resolution, and vertex reconstruction capability, interesting new data on these topics can be collected. For example, a neutrino burst from a typical core-collapse supernova at a distance of 10 kpc would lead to ˜5000 inverse-beta-decay events and ˜2000 all-flavor neutrino-proton ES events in JUNO, which are of crucial importance for understanding the mechanism of supernova explosion and for exploring novel phenomena such as collective neutrino oscillations

  6. Neutrino physics from Cosmology

    Hannestad, Steen

    2013-01-01

    In recent years precision cosmology has become an increasingly powerful probe of particle physics. Perhaps the prime example of this is the very stringent cosmological upper bound on the neutrino mass. However, other aspects of neutrino physics, such as their decoupling history and possible non-standard interactions, can also be probed using observations of cosmic structure. Here, I review the current status of cosmological bounds on neutrino properties and discuss the potential of future observations, for example by the recently approved EUCLID mission, to precisely measure neutrino properties.

  7. Neutrino physics from Cosmology

    In recent years precision cosmology has become an increasingly powerful probe of particle physics. Perhaps the prime example of this is the very stringent cosmological upper bound on the neutrino mass. However, other aspects of neutrino physics, such as their decoupling history and possible non-standard interactions, can also be probed using observations of cosmic structure. Here, I review the current status of cosmological bounds on neutrino properties and discuss the potential of future observations, for example by the recently approved EUCLID mission, to precisely measure neutrino properties.

  8. Physics at neutrino factories

    Peach, Kenneth J

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing interest in using intense neutrino beams from a high-energy muon storage ring-the Neutrino Factory-to make precise measurements of the lepton mixing matrix, including the T-violating phase, as well as a diverse programme of other physics.

  9. Summary: Neutrinos and nonaccelerator physics

    This paper contains brief synopsis of the following major topics discussed in the neutrino and nonaccelerator parallel sessions: dark matter; neutrino oscillations at accelerators and reactors; gamma-ray astronomy; double beta decay; solar neutrinos; and the possible existence of a 17-KeV neutrino

  10. Neutrino physics: tomorrow's directions

    Full text: Over the last few years there has been a spurt of development in neutrino physics. New experimental results have challenged existing theories. What are the puzzles today and what might be their solutions? First, we take a quick tour of some of the experimental results. Then we turn to the theoretical attempts to address these. In the end, we discuss some of the open issues and the planned experiments with special focus on the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) project

  11. Highlights on experimental neutrino physics

    Full text: In the last years a remarkable progress was achieved in a deeper understanding of neutrino sector. Nowadays we know all mixing angles and mass splits which govern the neutrino oscillation phenomena. The parameters of neutrino mixing were measured by combining results of different experimental approaches including accelerator beams, nuclear reactors, radiative decays and astrophysical neutrinos. Nevertheless, there are open questions which can be viewed as key points to consolidate our knowledge on the intrinsic properties of neutrinos such as mass hierarchy and the existence of a CP violation in leptonic sector. To answer these questions and also to improve the precision of the already known mixing parameters, a series of huge experimental efforts are being set up, even in a world-wide scale in some cases. In this presentation I will review the current knowledge of the fundamental properties of neutrinos and the experimental scenario in which we expect, in a time frame of a decade, to find missing pieces in the leptonic sector. The findings can strengthen the foundations of the Standard Model as well as open very interesting paths for new physics. (author)

  12. Neutrinos and physics beyond the desert

    Valle, José W F

    1997-01-01

    I review the observational status of neutrino physics, including the present hints for neutrino mass and the ways to reconcile the solar and atmospheric neutrino data with the existence of a hot dark matter component, and the possible hints from LSND. I also briefly discuss the electroweak symmetry breaking sector of the Standard Model (SM), focussing on supersymmetric models with broken R-parity and spontaneously broken lepton number. I discuss some of the signals expected at future accelerators such as LEP II and LHC. They serve to illustrate how neutrino mass effects may be testable not only at underground and nuclear physics installations but also at high energy collider experiments.

  13. Searching for Physics beyond the Standard Model with Accelerator Neutrino Experiments

    Louis, William C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab was designed to test the LSND evidence for {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations . The first MiniBooNE oscillation result in neutrino mode shows no significant excess of events at higher energies (E{sub {nu}} > 475 MeV), although a sizeable excess is observed at lower energies (E{sub {nu}}< 475 MeV). The lack of a significant excess at higher energies allows MiniBooNE to rule out simple 2 - {nu} oscillations as an explanation of the LSND signal. However, the low-energy excess is presently unexplained. Additional antineutrino data and NuMI data may allow the collaboration to determine whether the excess is due, for example, to a neutrino neutral-current radiative interaction or to neutrino oscillations involving sterile neutrinos. If the excess is consistent with being due to sterile neutrinos, then future experiments at FNAL (BooNE) or ORNL (OscSNS) could prove their existence.

  14. Current trends in non-accelerator particle physics: 1, Neutrino mass and oscillation. 2, High energy neutrino astrophysics. 3, Detection of dark matter. 4, Search for strange quark matter. 5, Magnetic monopole searches

    This report is a compilation of papers reflecting current trends in non-accelerator particle physics, corresponding to talks that its author was invited to present at the Workshop on Tibet Cosmic Ray Experiment and Related Physics Topics held in Beijing, China, April 4--13, 1995. The papers are entitled 'Neutrino Mass and Oscillation', 'High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics', 'Detection of Dark Matter', 'Search for Strange Quark Matter', and 'Magnetic Monopole Searches'. The report is introduced by a survey of the field and a brief description of each of the author's papers

  15. Current trends in non-accelerator particle physics: 1, Neutrino mass and oscillation. 2, High energy neutrino astrophysics. 3, Detection of dark matter. 4, Search for strange quark matter. 5, Magnetic monopole searches

    He, Yudong [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    This report is a compilation of papers reflecting current trends in non-accelerator particle physics, corresponding to talks that its author was invited to present at the Workshop on Tibet Cosmic Ray Experiment and Related Physics Topics held in Beijing, China, April 4--13, 1995. The papers are entitled `Neutrino Mass and Oscillation`, `High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics`, `Detection of Dark Matter`, `Search for Strange Quark Matter`, and `Magnetic Monopole Searches`. The report is introduced by a survey of the field and a brief description of each of the author`s papers.

  16. Neutrino physics at reactors

    Reviewing experiments with neutrinos from reactors seems at first to be a simple task, since there were only few. But almost all of them address fundamental questions in particle physics and are of great relevance. This paper reports on these experiments which made use of some of the most sophisticated techniques available at the time they were designed. In these two respects new proposed experiments re in the tradition of the older ones

  17. Theoretical Aspects of Neutrino Physics

    Recent years have seen an extraordinary breakthrough in neutrino physics. Compelling experimental evidence indicates that, contrary to earlier believes, this fundamental particles have non zero masses and mix. Such properties are manifested in the oscillation phenomena in neutrino fluxes produced within the Sun, by cosmic rays, and in nuclear plants on the Earth, among other astrophysical and terrestrial sources. In these lecture we provide a short introduction to neutrino properties, mainly intended to give some basic elements of the physics of neutrino oscillations for beginners. We also discuss some of the theoretical questions raised on particle physics by the discovery of neutrino masses and mixings

  18. Eighty years of neutrino physics

    This is a pedagogical overview of neutrino physics from the invention of neutrino by Pauli in 1930 to the precise measurement of neutrino mass and mixing parameters via neutrino oscillation experiments in recent years. I have tried to pitch it at the level of undergraduate students, occasionally cutting corners to avoid the use of advanced mathematical tools. I hope it will be useful in introducing this exciting field to a broad group of young physicists. (author)

  19. Neutrinos in particle physics, astronomy and cosmology

    ''Neutrinos in Particle Physics, Astronomy and Cosmology'' provides a comprehensive and up-to-date introduction to neutrino physics, neutrino astronomy and neutrino cosmology. The intrinsic properties and fundamental interactions of neutrinos are described, as is the phenomenology of lepton flavor mixing, seesaw mechanisms and neutrino oscillations. The cosmic neutrino background, stellar neutrinos, supernova neutrinos and ultrahigh-energy cosmic neutrinos, together with the cosmological matter-antimatter asymmetry and other roles of massive neutrinos in cosmology, are discussed in detail. This book is intended for researchers and graduate students in the fields of particle physics, particle astrophysics and cosmology. (orig.)

  20. Working group report: Neutrino and astroparticle physics

    Raj Gandhi; Kamales Kar; S Uma Sankar; Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Rahul Basu; Pijushpani Bhattacharjee; Biswajoy Brahmachari; Debrupa Chakraborti; M Chaudhury; J Chaudhury; Sandhya Choubey; E J Chun; Atri Desmukhya; Anindya Datta; Gautam Dutta; Sukanta Dutta; Raj Gandhi; Anjan Giri; Sourendu Gupta; Srubabati Goswami; Kamales Kar; Namit Mahajan; H S Mani; A Mukherjee; Biswarup Mukhopadhyaya; S N Nayak; M Randhawa; Subhendu Rakshit; Asim K Ray; Amitava Raychaudhuri; D P Roy; Probir Roy; Suryadeep Roy; Shiv Sethi; G Sigl; Arunansu Sil; N Nimai Singh; S Uma Sankar; Mark Vagins; Urjit Yagnik

    2003-02-01

    This is the report of neutrino and astroparticle physics working group at WHEPP-7. Discussions and work on CP violation in long baseline neutrino experiments, ultra high energy neutrinos, supernova neutrinos and water Cerenkov detectors are discussed.

  1. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    McKeown, R D

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  2. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    McKeown, Bob [bmck@jlab.org

    2015-06-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  3. Subpanel on accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    Neutrinos are among nature's fundamental constituents, and they are also the ones about which we know least. Their role in the universe is widespread, ranging from the radioactive decay of a single atom to the explosions of supernovae and the formation of ordinary matter. Neutrinos might exhibit a striking property that has not yet been observed. Like the back-and-forth swing of a pendulum, neutrinos can oscillate to-and-from among their three types (or flavors) if nature provides certain conditions. These conditions include neutrinos having mass and a property called open-quotes mixing.close quotes The phenomenon is referred to as neutrino oscillations. The questions of the origin of neutrino mass and mixing among the neutrino flavors are unsolved problems for which the Standard Model of particle physics holds few clues. It is likely that the next critical step in answering these questions will result from the experimental observation of neutrino oscillations. The High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) Subpanel on Accelerator-Based Neutrino Oscillation Experiments was charged to review the status and discovery potential of ongoing and proposed accelerator experiments on neutrino oscillations, to evaluate the opportunities for the U.S. in this area of physics, and to recommend a cost-effective plan for pursuing this physics, as appropriate. The complete charge is provided in Appendix A. The Subpanel studied these issues over several months and reviewed all the relevant and available information on the subject. In particular, the Subpanel reviewed the two proposed neutrino oscillation programs at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The conclusions of this review are enumerated in detail in Chapter 7 of this report. The recommendations given in Chapter 7 are also reproduced in this summary

  4. Neutrino phenomenology and unparticle physics

    Barranco, J; Miranda, O G; Moura, C A; Rashba, T I

    2009-01-01

    We show how neutrino data can be used in order to constrain the free parameters of possible extensions to the standard model of elementary particles (SM). For definiteness, we focus in the recently proposed unparticle scenario. We show that neutrino data, in particular the MUNU experiment, can set stronger bounds than previous reported limits in the scale dimension parameter for certain region (d > 1.5). We compute the sensitivity of future neutrino experiments to unparticle physics such as future neutrino-electron scattering detectors, coherent neutrino-nuclei scattering as well as the ILC . In particular, we show that the measurement of coherent reactor neutrino scattering off nuclei provide a good sensitivity to the couplings of unparticle interaction with neutrinos and quarks.Finally our results are compared with the current astrophysical limits.

  5. Sterile Neutrino and Accelerating Universe

    Hung, P. Q.

    2000-01-01

    If all three neutrino oscillation data were to be confirmed in the near future, it is probable that one might need a sterile neutrino, in addition to the three active ones. This sterile neutrino, nu_S, would be very light with mass m_{nu_S} less than or equal to 1 eV or even with m_{\

  6. Research in Neutrino Physics

    Busenitz, Jerome [The University of Alabama

    2014-09-30

    Research in Neutrino Physics We describe here the recent activities of our two groups over the first year of this award (effectively November 2010 through January 2012) and our proposed activities and associated budgets for the coming grant year. Both of our groups are collaborating on the Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment and are playing major roles in calibration and analysis. A major milestone was reached recently: the collaboration obtained the first result on the search for 13 based on 100 days of data from the far detector. Our data indicates that 13 is not zero; specifically the best fit of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis to our data gives sin2 (2 13) = 0.086 ± 0.041 (stat) ± 0.030 (syst) The null oscillation hypothesis is excluded at the 94.6% C.L. This result1 has been submitted to Physical Review Letters. As we continue to take data with the far detector in the coming year, in parallel with completing the construction of the near lab and installing the near detector, we expect the precision of our measurement to improve as we gather significantly more statistics, gain better control of backgrounds through use of partial power data and improved event selection, and better understand the detector energy scale and detection efficiency from calibration data. With both detectors taking data starting in the second half of 2013, we expect to further drive down the uncertainty on our measurement of sin2 (2 13) to less than 0.02. Stancu’s group is also collaborating on the MiniBooNE experiment. Data taking is scheduled to continue through April, by which time 1.18 × 1021 POT is projected. The UA group is playing a leading role in the measurement of antineutrino cross sections, which should be the subject of a publication later this year as well as of Ranjan Dharmapalan’s Ph.D. thesis, which he is expected to defend by the end of this year. It is time to begin working on projects which will eventually succeed Double Chooz and MiniBooNE as the main

  7. Non-accelerator neutrino mass searches

    Zuber, K.

    2000-01-01

    The current status of non-accelerator based searches for effects of a non-vanishing neutrino mass is reviewed. Beside the direct kinematical methods this includes searches for magnetic moments and a discussion of the solar neutrino problem. Double beta decay is not included.

  8. New phenomena in neutrino physics

    Kopp, Joachim

    2009-04-15

    In this thesis, we discuss two new concepts in neutrino physics: The neutrino Moessbauer effect and non-standard neutrino interactions. We show that neutrinos emitted and absorbed in recoil-free processes (Moessbauer neutrinos) can oscillate in spite of their near monochromaticity. We support this statement by quantum mechanical wave packet arguments and by a quantum field theoretical (QFT) calculation of the combined rate of Moessbauer neutrino emission, propagation and absorption. The QFT approach does not require any a priori assumptions on the neutrino wave function, and it allows us to include a realistic treatment of the different mechanisms leading to broadening of the emission and absorption lines. In the second part of this work, we study the phenomenology of non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI). We classifying the allowed NSI operators according to their impact on future oscillation experiments and present numerical results for the NSI sensitivities of reactor, superbeam and neutrino factory experiments. We point out that NSI could mimic standard oscillation effects, and might therefore lead to incorrect fit values for the oscillation parameters. For the case of the neutrino factory, we perform a detailed optimisation study to determine the optimum muon energy and detector configuration. (orig.)

  9. New phenomena in neutrino physics

    In this thesis, we discuss two new concepts in neutrino physics: The neutrino Moessbauer effect and non-standard neutrino interactions. We show that neutrinos emitted and absorbed in recoil-free processes (Moessbauer neutrinos) can oscillate in spite of their near monochromaticity. We support this statement by quantum mechanical wave packet arguments and by a quantum field theoretical (QFT) calculation of the combined rate of Moessbauer neutrino emission, propagation and absorption. The QFT approach does not require any a priori assumptions on the neutrino wave function, and it allows us to include a realistic treatment of the different mechanisms leading to broadening of the emission and absorption lines. In the second part of this work, we study the phenomenology of non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI). We classifying the allowed NSI operators according to their impact on future oscillation experiments and present numerical results for the NSI sensitivities of reactor, superbeam and neutrino factory experiments. We point out that NSI could mimic standard oscillation effects, and might therefore lead to incorrect fit values for the oscillation parameters. For the case of the neutrino factory, we perform a detailed optimisation study to determine the optimum muon energy and detector configuration. (orig.)

  10. Neutrino Physics (theory)

    Langacker, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Nonzero neutrino masses are the first definitive need to extend the standard model. After reviewing the basic framework, I describe the status of some of the major issues, including tests of the basic framework of neutrino masses and mixings; the question of Majorana vs. Dirac; the spectrum, mixings, and number of neutrinos; models, with special emphasis on constraints from typical superstring constructions (which are not consistent with popular bottom-up assumptions); and other implications.

  11. Proposal of the next global accelerator neutrino facility for Europe to build or help build

    Blondel, A.

    2012-01-01

    European Strategy for accelerator-based Neutrino Physics Prepared by the program committee of the European Neutrino “Town Meeting” Massive neutrinos reveal physics beyond the Standard Model, which could have deep consequences for our understanding of the Universe. Their study should therefore receive the highest level of priority in the European Strategy. Among the many neutrino questions that experiments in different physics domains can answer, the discovery and study of leptonic CP violatio...

  12. Lepton physics versus neutrino mass

    The relationship between the strength of lepton flavour violating processes and the magnitude of the neutrino mass is rather model dependent. I review this question within different neutrino mixing models including superstring inspired models. Processes such as μ→e+γ, μ→3e, μ-e conversion in nuclei, etc. as well as lepton flavour violating Z0 decays can occur even if the physical neutrinos are strictly massless. As a result, the corresponding rates are unconstrained by bounds on the neutrino mass that follow from laboratory, astrophysics and cosmology and can therefore be large. Leptonic CP violation may also occur even when the physical neutrinos are strictly massless. (orig.)

  13. The physics of relic neutrinos

    We report on the main results presented at the workshop on the Physics of Relic Neutrinos. The study of relic neutrinos involves a broad spectrum of problems in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. Features of baryogenesis and leptogenesis could be imprinted in the properties of the relic neutrino sea. Relic neutrinos played a crucial role in the big bang nucleosynthesis. Being the hot component of the dark matter, they have participated in the structure formation in the universe. Although the direct detection of the sea seems impossible at this stage, there could be various indirect manifestations of these neutrinos which would allow us to study the properties of the sea both in the past and at the present epoch. (author)

  14. Solar Neutrino Physics

    With its heavy water target, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) offers the unique opportunity to measure both the 8B flux of electron neutrinos from the Sun and, independently, the flux of all active neutrino species reaching the Earth. A model-independent test of the hypothesis that neutrino oscillations are responsible for the observed solar neutrino deficit can be made by comparing the charged-current (CC) and neutral-current (NC) rates. This LDRD proposal supported the research and development necessary for an assessment of backgrounds and performance of the SNO detector and the ability to extract the NC/CC-Ratio. Particular emphasis is put upon the criteria for deployment and signal extraction from a discrete NC detector array based upon ultra-low background 3He proportional counters

  15. Solar Neutrino Physics

    Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Esch, E.-I.; Fowler, M.M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hime, A.; McGirt, F.; Miller, G.G.; Thornewell, P.M.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Wouters, J.M.

    1999-07-15

    With its heavy water target, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) offers the unique opportunity to measure both the 8B flux of electron neutrinos from the Sun and, independently, the flux of all active neutrino species reaching the Earth. A model-independent test of the hypothesis that neutrino oscillations are responsible for the observed solar neutrino deficit can be made by comparing the charged-current (CC) and neutral-current (NC) rates. This LDRD proposal supported the research and development necessary for an assessment of backgrounds and performance of the SNO detector and the ability to extract the NC/CC-Ratio. Particular emphasis is put upon the criteria for deployment and signal extraction from a discrete NC detector array based upon ultra-low background 3He proportional counters.

  16. Accelerator Design Concept for Future Neutrino Facilities

    ISS Accelerator Working Group; Zisman, Michael S; Berg, J. S.; Blondel, A.; Brooks, S.; Campagne, J.-E.; Caspar, D.; Cevata, C.; Chimenti, P.; Cobb, J.; Dracos, M.; Edgecock, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Fernow, R.; Filthaut, F.; Gallardo, J.; Garoby, R.; Geer, S.; Gerigk, F.; Hanson, G.; Johnson, R.; Johnstone, C.; Kaplan, D.; Keil, E.; Kirk, H.; Klier, A.; Kurup, A.; Lettry, J.; Long, K.; Machida, S.; McDonald, K.; Meot, F.; Mori, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R.; Paul, K.; Poklonskiy, A.; Popovic, M.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rossi, C.; Rovelli, T.; Sandstrom, R.; Sevior, R.; Sievers, P.; Simos, N.; Torun, Y.; Vretenar, M.; Yoshimura, K.; Zisman, Michael S

    2008-02-03

    This document summarizes the findings of the Accelerator Working Group (AWG) of the International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Future Neutrino Factory and Superbeam Facility. The work of the group took place at three plenary meetings along with three workshops, and an oral summary report was presented at the NuFact06 workshop held at UC-Irvine in August, 2006. The goal was to reach consensus on a baseline design for a Neutrino Factory complex. One aspect of this endeavor was to examine critically the advantages and disadvantages of the various Neutrino Factory schemes that have been proposed in recent years.

  17. Accelerator design concept for future neutrino facilities

    Apollonio, M; Blondel, A; Bogacz, A; Brooks, S; Campagne, Jean-Eric; Caspar, D; Cavata, C; Chimenti, P; Cobb, J; Dracos, M; Edgecock, R; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fabich, A; Fernow, R; Filthaut, F; Gallardo, J; Garoby, R; Geer, S; Gerigk, F; Hanson, G; Johnson, R; Johnstone, C; Kaplan, D; Keil, E; Kirk, H; Klier, A; Kurup, A; Lettry, J; Long, K; Machida, S; McDonald, K; Méot, F; Mori, Y; Neuffer, D; Palladino, V; Palmer, R; Paul, K; Poklonskiy, A; Popovic, M; Prior, C; Rees, G; Rossi, C; Rovelli, T; Sandström, R; Sevior, R; Sievers, P; Simos, N; Torun, Y; Vretenar, M; Yoshimura, K; Zisman, M S

    2009-01-01

    This document summarizes the findings of the Accelerator Working Group (AWG) of the International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Future Neutrino Factory and super-beam Facility. The work of the group took place at three plenary meetings along with three workshops, and an oral summary report was presented at the NuFact06 workshop held at UC-Irvine in August, 2006. The goal was to reach consensus on a baseline design for a Neutrino Factory complex. One aspect of this endeavor was to examine critically the advantages and disadvantages of the various Neutrino Factory schemes that have been proposed in recent years.

  18. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Neutrino oscillations were first discovered by experiments looking at neutrinos coming from extra-terrestrial sources, namely the sun and the atmosphere, but we will be depending on earth-based sources to take many of the next steps in this field. This article describes what has been learned so far from accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, and then describe very generally what the next accelerator-based steps are. In section 2 the article discusses how one uses an accelerator to make a neutrino beam, in particular, one made from decays in flight of charged pions. There are several different neutrino detection methods currently in use, or under development. In section 3 these are presented, with a description of the general concept, an example of such a detector, and then a brief discussion of the outstanding issues associated with this detection technique. Finally, section 4 describes how the measurements of oscillation probabilities are made. This includes a description of the near detector technique and how it can be used to make the most precise measurements of neutrino oscillations.

  19. Luminescent Bolometer and Neutrino Physics

    Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis

    1997-01-01

    The luminescent bolometer, proposed in 1988, is now seriously considered for several applications in nuclear and particle physics: dark matter searches, double beta decays, low energy neutrino physics, heavy ion physics... It is also a very promising device for basic condensed-matter physics and chemistry experiments, and may lead to astrophysical applications. The luminescent bolometer is based on the simultaneous detection of light and phonons, allowing for particle identification and for a...

  20. Neutrino Physics at DPF 2013

    Harris, Deborah A

    2013-01-01

    The field of neutrino physics was covered at DPF 2013 in 32 talks, including three on theoretical advances and the remainder on experiments that spanned at least 17 different detectors. This summary of those talks cannot do justice to the wealth of information presented, but will provide links to other material where possible. There were allso two plenary session contributions on neutrino physics at this meeting: the current status of what we know about neutrino (oscillation) physics was outlined by Huber, and the next steps in long baseline oscillation expeirments were described by Fleming. This article covers a subset of the topics discussed at the meeting, with emphasis given to those talks that showed data or new results.

  1. Neutrino physics at LAMPF

    There are three neutrino experiments at LAMPF in various stages of completion or development. E225, the study of electron-neutrino electron scattering, which completed data taking in December 1986 and has just about completed all its analysis. E645, a search for /bar /nu///sub μ/ → /bar /nu///sub e/ oscillation, is in its third and final year of data taking. The Large Cerenkov Detector (LCD), associated with E1015, has undergone extensive scientific and technical review and we are presently trying to obtain the necessary funds to build the detector, beam line, and target. In the following, each of these experiments will be briefly discussed. Before doing so, it is useful to show the characteristics of the neutrino spectrum resulting from the decay of π+ at rest. It is also useful to realize that, on average, an 800-MeV proton from LAMPF produces about 0.1 π+ decaying at rest. 16 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Neutrino physics at Gran Sasso Laboratory

    Bettini, A

    2001-01-01

    Experiments in underground laboratories have shown strong evidence of physics beyond the standard model. The anomalies observed in electron-neutrinos from the Sun and muon-neutrinos from cosmic rays interactions in the atmosphere can be explained if neutrino oscillate and are massive. The physics program at the Gran Sasso Laboratory that we are defining will be focussed on the next phase of neutrino physics with a complementary set of experiments on the muon-neutrino beam from CERN (CNGS project), on solar neutrinos, on atmospheric neutrinos and on neutrinos from supernova explosion. The relevant thermonuclear cross-sections will be measured. The Majorana vs. Dirac nature of electron neutrinos will be explored with the search for neutrino-less double beta decays in different isotopes. (13 refs).

  3. Neutrino physics in the spotlight

    2009-01-01

    Following on from the Council recommendation made in Lisbon in 2006 and responding to the needs of a large community of scientists, CERN will organize the European Strategy for Future Neutrino Physics workshop on 1-3 October. One of the main goals of the workshop is to start establishing a roadmap for the coherent participation of Europe in neutrino physics."The format of the workshop will consist of invited talks to present the current situation and future possibilities; unlike other workshops, 30% of the time will be reserved for discussion", explains Ewa Rondio from the organising committee. "Resources for future neutrino experiments will be difficult to acquire. A coordinated approach and the participation of a large community of interested scientists are undoubtedly crucial factors". The workshop will be the opportunity to highlight the areas where substantial research and development activities are required in order to design the facilities of the next decade. "The w...

  4. The future of neutrino physics

    2009-01-01

    On 1-3 October, CERN held the first workshop to discuss the strategy that Europe should follow in the field of neutrino physics. Many members of the neutrino physics community from all over the world participated in the workshop, demonstrating the vitality and interest of this research field. The European Strategy for Future Neutrino Physics workshop is the second of a series of workshops organized by CERN to coordinate efforts and define strategies for the future of physics research in Europe. The first workshop was organized in May; it outlined the best projects that have excellent scientific goals and for which CERN’s facilities are unique. Currently, these projects are being discussed within the community and in the CERN scientific committees. The same bottom-up approach was taken for the organisation of this second workshop that focussed on neutrino physics. More than 250 people participated and 44 posters were presented in a separate session. Unlike in the first workshop, the focus was not on specif...

  5. Hadron production measurements to constrain accelerator neutrino beams

    Korzenev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A precise prediction of expected neutrino fluxes is required for a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The flux is used to measure neutrino cross sections at the near detector, while at the far detector it provides an estimate of the expected signal for the study of neutrino oscillations. In the talk several approaches to constrain the neutrino flux are presented. The first is the traditional one when an interaction chain for the neutrino parent hadrons is stored to be weighted lat...

  6. Physics Potential of Solar Neutrino Experiments

    Balantekin, A. B.; Yuksel, H.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the physics potential of the solar neutrino experiments i) To explore the parameter space of neutrino mass and mixings; ii) To probe the physics of the Sun; iii) To explore nuclear physics of the neutrino-target interactions. Examples are given for these three classes.

  7. Low-energy neutrino physics and neutrino mass

    Boehm, F.; Vogel, P.

    1984-01-01

    Among the principal concerns in neutrino physics today are the questions of whether neutrinos are massive and, if so, whether the neutrinos emitted in a weak decay are pure or mixed quantum states. The concept of mixed neutrinos has been with us for more than 20 years, having first been introduced by Maki et al (1) and by Pontecorvo (2) following demonstration in 1962 that more than one type (flavor) of neutrino existed. After having been dormant for some time, the interest in these issues wa...

  8. Recent developments in neutrino physics

    I shall attempt to summarize recent developments in the experimental situation in neutrino physics. The paper will deal with recent results, drawing on either published work or research that has been presented in preprint form, as there is an adequate supply of interesting and controversial data restricting oneself to these generally more reliable sources. The discussion of the theoretical implication of these experimental results will be presented in the following paper by Boris Kayser. The topics to be covered in this presentation are: direct measurements of bar νe mass via beta endpoint studies; status of solar neutrino observations; status of ''17-keV neutrino'' reports; and the use of νp elastic scattering to determine the ''strange quark'' content of the proton. 2 refs., 15 figs., 9 tabs

  9. Neutrino oscillations, seesaw mechanism and the quest for new physics

    Miranda, O G

    2016-01-01

    The historical discovery of neutrino oscillations using solar and atmospheric neutrinos, and subsequent accelerator and reactor studies, have brought neutrino physics to the precision era. Apart from dedicated leptonic CP violation studies, upcoming experiments should probe the unitarity of the lepton mixing matrix. These will shed light on the scale of new physics, such as the seesaw scale, and thereby guide us towards what could be the next step in particle physics. Moreover these efforts may also bring the key to elucidate some of the current cosmological puzzles.

  10. Working group report: Astroparticle and neutrino physics

    Raj Gandhi; Subhendra Mohanty; Tarun Souradeep; S Agarwalla; K Bhattacharya; B Brahmachari; R Crittenden; S Goswami; P Ghoshal; M Lindner; H S Mani; S Mitra; S Pascoli; S Panda; R Rangarajan; S Ray; T Roy Choudhury; R Saha; S Sarkar; A Srivastava; R Sheth; S Uma Sankar; U Yajnik

    2006-10-01

    The working group on astroparticle and neutrino physics at WHEPP-9 covered a wide range of topics. The main topics were neutrino physics at INO, neutrino astronomy and recent constraints on dark energy coming from cosmological observations of large scale structure and CMB anisotropy.

  11. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  12. Neutrino physics with IceCube

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is an ice Cherenkov detector under construction at the South Pole, Antarctica. When completed, the physical volume of the detector will be approximately one km3. The Observatory will be sensitive to a number of topics in fundamental neutrino physics, such as neutrino oscillations and decay, by virtue of its ability to distinguish neutrino flavours over a wide range of neutrino energies. We present the status of the construction of the Observatory, some recent analysis results, a brief discussion of its sensitivity to fundamental neutrino parameters and planning currently underway for low and high energy extensions to the baseline array

  13. Neutrinos, a window on new physics

    van Holten, J W

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews some aspects of the physics of neutrinos, in particular neutrino masses and the issue of Dirac versus Majorana neutrinos. The see-saw mechanism is described and it is argued that the Majorana nature of neutrinos can be tested by measuring the invisible decays of the Higgs particle, as its decay into neutrinos is determined by their Yukawa couplings, i.e. the Dirac masses, rather than the physical Majorana masses. The measurement would allow us to probe the scale M of the large Majorana masses for right-handed singlet neutrinos. The optimal machine for performing such a measurement would be a future electron-positron collider.

  14. The neutrino factory and related accelerator R and D

    A muon-based neutrino factory, encompassing high power proton accelerators, innovations in rapid acceleration techniques for unstable particles, and initiatives such as ionisation cooling, provides a rich and varied source of high-energy R and D. Over the last ten years, the UK has played a leading role in progress towards a large-scale neutrino facility, both at national and international level, and now seeks to move to the next phase with preparation of an International Design Study report for publication in 2010. The basic principles of the project are outlined here, with emphasis on the major problems still to be overcome. Much of the development work relates to other areas of accelerator science - such as spallation neutron sources, used for research in condensed matter physics - and the way in which such projects interact and benefit from each other is also described

  15. Physics Needs for Future Accelerators

    Lykken, J D

    2000-01-01

    Contents: 1. Prologomena to any meta future physics 1.1 Physics needs for building future accelerators 1.2 Physics needs for funding future accelerators 2. Physics questions for future accelerators 2.1 Crimes and misapprehensions 2.1.1 Organized religion 2.1.2 Feudalism 2.1.3 Trotsky was right 2.2 The Standard Model as an effective field theory 2.3 What is the scale of new physics? 2.4 What could be out there? 2.5 Model-independent conclusions 3. Future accelerators 3.1 What is the physics driving the LHC? 3.2 What is the physics driving the LC? 3.2.1 Higgs physics is golden 3.2.2 LHC won't be sufficient to unravel the new physics as the TeV scale 3.2.3 LC precision measurements can pin down new physics scales 3.3 Why a Neutrino Factory? 3.4 Pushing the energy frontier

  16. Neutrino physics with an intense \

    Henning, R

    2010-01-01

    We study some of the physics potential of an intense $1\\,\\mathrm{MCi}$ $^{51}\\mathrm{Cr}$ source combined with the {\\sc Majorana Demonstrator} enriched germanium detector array. The {\\sc Demonstrator} will consist of detectors with ultra-low radioactive backgrounds and extremely low energy thresholds of~$\\sim 400\\,\\mathrm{eV}$. We show that it can improve the current limit on the neutrino magnetic dipole moment. We briefly discuss physics applications of the charged-current reaction of the $^{51}\\mathrm{Cr} neutrino with the $^{73}\\mathrm{Ge} isotope. Finally, we argue that the rate from a realistic, intense tritium source is below the detectable limit of even a tonne-scale HPGe experiment

  17. Muon Acceleration Concepts for Future Neutrino Factory

    Bogacz, Slawomir Alex [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Here, we summarize current state of concept for muon acceleration aimed at future Neutrino Factory. The main thrust of these studies was to reduce the overall cost while maintaining performance through exploring interplay between complexity of the cooling systems and the acceptance of the accelerator complex. To ensure adequate survival of the short-lived muons, acceleration must occur at high average gradient. The need for large transverse and longitudinal acceptances drives the design of the acceleration system to initially low RF frequency, e.g. 325 MHz, and then increased to 650 MHz, as the transverse size shrinks with increasing energy. High-gradient normal conducting RF cavities at these frequencies require extremely high peak-power RF sources. Hence superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are chosen. Here, we considered two cost effective schemes for accelerating muon beams for a stagable Neutrino Factory: Exploration of the so-called 'dual-use' linac concept, where the same linac structure is used for acceleration of both H- and muons and alternatively, the SRF efficient design based on multi-pass (4.5) 'dogbone' RLA, extendable to multi-pass FFAG-like arcs.

  18. PREFACE: Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics

    Bergström, Lars; Botner, Olga; Carlson, Per; Hulth, Per Olof; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics was held at Haga Slott in Enköping, Sweden during August 19 24, 2004. Invited to the symposium were around 40 globally leading researchers in the field of neutrino physics, both experimental and theoretical. In addition to these participants, some 30 local researchers and graduate students participated in the symposium. The dominant theme of the lectures was neutrino oscillations, which after several years were recently verified by results from the Super-Kamiokande detector in Kamioka, Japan and the SNO detector in Sudbury, Canada. Discussion focused especially on effects of neutrino oscillations derived from the presence of matter and the fact that three different neutrinos exist. Since neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have mass, this is the first experimental observation that fundamentally deviates from the standard model of particle physics. This is a challenge to both theoretical and experimental physics. The various oscillation parameters will be determined with increased precision in new, specially designed experiments. Theoretical physics is working intensively to insert the knowledge that neutrinos have mass into the theoretical models that describe particle physics. It will probably turn out that the discovery of neutrino oscillations signifies a breakthrough in the description of the very smallest constituents of matter. The lectures provided a very good description of the intensive situation in the field right now. The topics discussed also included mass models for neutrinos, neutrinos in extra dimensions as well as the `seesaw mechanism', which provides a good description of why neutrino masses are so small. Also discussed, besides neutrino oscillations, was the new field of neutrino astronomy. Among the questions that neutrino astronomy hopes to answer are what the dark matter in the Universe consists of and where cosmic radiation at extremely high energies comes from. For this purpose, large neutrino

  19. Neutrino physics with nuclear reactors

    This is a lecture given at the Gif Summer School held in 1992 in Montpellier. It contains three chapters. These are devoted to neutrino oscillations, to the nuclear reactors used as neutrino sources, and to the experiments performed with neutrinos from nuclear reactors, respectively. The first chapter offers a theoretical frame, the second discusses the investigation capabilities of nuclear reactors as neutrino sources while the last one describes the experimental aspects. These aspects are related to the neutrino flux measurement and the flavor oscillation, the search for neutrino oscillation, the neutrino scattering on electrons, the neutrino decay, the coherent neutrino scattering on nuclei and the electron neutrino-electron antineutrino oscillations implied by the Majorana nature of neutrinos. In concluding the author points to the possible ways of refining these extremely subtle experiments, which will be approached in the near future. 117 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs

  20. Particle physics confronts the solar neutrino problem

    This review has four parts. In Part I, we describe the reactions that produce neutrinos in the sun and the expected flux of those neutrinos on the earth. We then discuss the detection of these neutrinos, and how the results obtained differ from the theoretical expectations, leading to what is known as the solar neutrino problem. In Part II, we show how neutrino oscillations can provide a solution to the solar neutrino problem. This includes vacuum oscillations, as well as matter enhanced oscillations. In Part III, we discuss the possibility of time variation of the neutrino flux and how a magnetic moment of the neutrino can solve the problem. WE also discuss particle physics models which can give rise to the required values of magnetic moments. In Part IV, we present some concluding remarks and outlook for the recent future

  1. On the physics of massive neutrinos

    Zuber, K.

    1998-01-01

    Massive neutrinos open up the possibility for a variety of new physical phenomena. Among them are oscillations and double beta decay. Furthermore they influence several fields from particle physics to cosmology. In this article the concept of massive neutrinos is given and the current status of experimental research is extensively reviewed. This includes astrophysical studies of solar, supernova and very high energy neutrinos. Future perspectives are also outlined.

  2. Neutrino Factory: Physics and R and D Status

    In recent years exciting experimental discoveries have shown that neutrino flavors oscillate, and hence that neutrinos have nonzero masses and mixings. The Standard Model needs to be modified to accommodate neutrino mass terms, which require either the existence of right-handed neutrinos to create Dirac mass terms, and/or a violation of lepton number conservation to create Majorana mass terms. The observation that neutrino masses and mass-splittings are tiny compared to the masses of any of the other fundamental fermions suggests radically new physics, which perhaps originates at the GUT or Planck Scale, or perhaps indicates the existence of new spatial dimensions. Whatever the origin of the observed neutrino masses and mixings is, it will certainly require a profound extension to our picture of the physical world. The first step towards understanding this new physics is to pin down the measurable parameters, and address the first round of basic questions: (1) Are there only three neutrino flavors, or do light sterile neutrinos exist? Are there any other deviations to three-flavor mixing? (2) There is one angle θ13 in the mixing matrix which is unmeasured. Is it non-zero? (3) We don't know the mass-ordering of the neutrino mass eigenstates. There are two possibilities, the so-called ''normal'' or ''inverted'' hierarchies. Which is right? (4) There is one complex phase (delta) in the mixing matrix which is accessible to neutrino oscillation measurements. If both θ13 and sin (delta) are non-zero there will be CP Violation in the lepton sector. Is sin (delta) non-zero? (5) What precisely is the value of the lightest neutrino mass and are neutrino masses generated by Majorana mass terms, Dirac mass terms, or both? All of these questions, with the exception of the last one, can in principle be addressed by accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments. However, getting all of the answers will not be easy, and will require the right experimental tools. A Neutrino

  3. A measurement of hadron production cross sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in the delta m**2 about equals 1-eV**2 region

    Schmitz, David W.; /Columbia U.

    2008-01-01

    A measurement of hadron production cross-sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the {Delta}m{sup 2} {approx} 1 eV{sup 2} region. This dissertation presents measurements from two different high energy physics experiments with a very strong connection: the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment located at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, and the Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (Mini-BooNE) located at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois.

  4. PREFACE: Neutrino physics at spallation neutron sources

    Avignone, F. T.; Chatterjee, L.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Strayer, M.

    2003-11-01

    Unique because of their super-light masses and tiny interaction cross sections, neutrinos combine fundamental physics on the scale of the miniscule with macroscopic physics on the scale of the cosmos. Starting from the ignition of the primal p-p chain of stellar and solar fusion reactions that signal star-birth, these elementary leptons (neutrinos) are also critical players in the life-cycles and explosive deaths of massive stars and the production and disbursement of heavy elements. Stepping beyond their importance in solar, stellar and supernova astrophysics, neutrino interactions and properties influence the evolution, dynamics and symmetries of the cosmos as a whole. Further, they serve as valuable probes of its material content at various levels of structure from atoms and nuclei to valence and sea quarks. In the light of the multitude of physics phenomena that neutrinos influence, it is imperative to enhance our understanding of neutrino interactions and properties to the maximum. This is accentuated by the recent evidence of finite neutrino mass and flavour mixing between generations that reverberates on the plethora of physics that neutrinos influence. Laboratory experiments using intense neutrino fluxes would allow precision measurements and determination of important neutrino reaction rates. These can then complement atmospheric, solar and reactor experiments that have enriched so valuably our understanding of the neutrino and its repertoire of physics applications. In particular, intermediate energy neutrino experiments can provide critical information on stellar and solar astrophysical processes, along with advancing our knowledge of nuclear structure, sub-nuclear physics and fundamental symmetries. So where should we look for such intense neutrino sources? Spallation neutron facilities by their design are sources of intense neutrino pulses that are produced as a by-product of neutron spallation. These neutrino sources could serve as unique laboratories

  5. Neutrinos: The Big Question and Physics Opportunities

    Strauss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article summarises a talk given at the 2014 Palermo workshop on Astrophysics. It covers a short review on the neutrino physics status and the potential physics opportunities of future experiments. During the last year our knowledge on the neutrino oscillation parameter $\\sin^2\\theta_{13}$ improved dramatically, and the large value opened the way to oscillation experiments sensitive to possible CP-violation. The first high-energetic neutrinos in the TeV range were detected in the IceCube experiment, while the Planck collaboration set further limits on the number of active neutrinos from cosmological constraints. Over the next years the Katrin will investigate the beta decay of Tritium to study the absolute neutrino mass scale, while new experiments will investigate the potential sterile neutrino scenario which could explain the event excess of the MiniBooNE and LSND experiment.

  6. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also

  7. Academic Training: Neutrino Physics, Present and Future

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 27, 28, 29, 30 November, 1st December, from 11:00 to 12:00 - TH Auditorium, bldg 4 - 3 - 006 Neutrino Physics, Present and Future B. KAYSER / Fermilab, USA Our understanding of neutrinos has been revolutionized by the discovery that they have nonzero masses and very large mixing. We will explain the phenomenology of massive neutrinos, including neutrino oscillation in vacuum and in matter, and the physics of neutrinos that are their own antiparticles. We will review the evidence for neutrino masses and mixing, and summarize what has been learned about the neutrinos so far. Identifying the very interesting open questions raised by the discovery of neutrino mass, we will discuss how these questions may be answered through future experiments. Finally, we will consider the possibility that CP violation by neutrinos is the key to understanding the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe, and discuss the see-saw theory of why neutrino masses are so tiny....

  8. Academic Training: Neutrino Physics, Present and Future

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 27, 28, 29, 30 November, 1st December, from 11:00 to 12:00 - TH Auditorium, bldg 4 - 3 - 006 Neutrino Physics, Present and Future B. KAYSER, Fermilab, USA Our understanding of neutrinos has been revolutionized by the discovery that they have nonzero masses and very large mixing. We will explain the phenomenology of massive neutrinos, including neutrino oscillation in vacuum and in matter, and the physics of neutrinos that are their own antiparticles. We will review the evidence for neutrino masses and mixing, and summarize what has been learned about the neutrinos so far. Identifying the very interesting open questions raised by the discovery of neutrino mass, we will discuss how these questions may be answered through future experiments. Finally, we will consider the possibility that CP violation by neutrinos is the key to understanding the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe, and discuss the see-saw theory of why neutrino masses are so tiny....

  9. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    This paper describes many of the nuclear physics heavy-ion accelerator facilities in the US and the research programs being conducted. The accelerators described are: Argonne National Laboratory--ATLAS; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) (Proposed); Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--Bevalac; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--88-Inch Cyclotron; Los Alamos National Laboratory--Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF); Massachusetts Institute of Technology--Bates Linear Accelerator Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center--Nuclear Physics Injector; Texas AandM University--Texas AandM Cyclotron; Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL); University of Washington--Tandem/Superconducting Booster; and Yale University--Tandem Van de Graaff

  10. Neutrinos and Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    Valle, José W F

    1997-01-01

    A brief sketch is made of the present observational status of neutrino physics, with emphasis on the hints that follow from solar and atmospheric neutrino observations, as well as cosmological data on the amplitude of primordial density fluctuations. I also briefly review the ways to account for the observed anomalies and some of their implications.

  11. Neutrino Interactions Importance for Nuclear Physics

    Amaro, J. E.; Maieron, C.; Valverde, M.; Nieves, J.; Barbaro, M. B.; Caballero, J. A.; Donnelly, T. W.; Udias, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    We review the general interplay between Nuclear Physics and neutrino-nucleus cross sections at intermediate and high energies. The effects of different reaction mechanisms over the neutrino observables are illustrated with examples in calculations using several nuclear models and ingredients.

  12. Neutrino physics at a muon collider

    This paper gives an overview of the neutrino physics possibilities at a future muon storage ring, which can be either a muon collider ring or a ring dedicated to neutrino physics that uses muon collider technology to store large muon currents. After a general characterization of the neutrino beam and its interactions, some crude quantitative estimates are given for the physics performance of a muon ring neutrino experiment (MURINE) consisting of a high rate, high performance neutrino detector at a 250 GeV muon collider storage ring. The paper is organized as follows. The next section describes neutrino production from a muon storage rings and gives expressions for event rates in general purpose and long baseline detectors. This is followed by a section outlining a serious design constraint for muon storage rings: the need to limit the radiation levels produced by the neutrino beam. The following two sections describe a general purpose detector and the experimental reconstruction of interactions in the neutrino target then, finally, the physics capabilities of a MURINE are surveyed

  13. Dimensional deconstruction and neutrino physics

    We present a simple observation for neutrino mixings and masses which arise naturally in dimensional deconstruction models. There are two essential ingredients of such models: (i) the presence of a symmetry mediated by the link fields which results in the neutrino mixings to be maximal; and (ii) a large deconstruction scale which gives rise to a small neutrino mass, similar in feature to the seesaw mechanism

  14. Dimensional Deconstruction and Neutrino Physics

    Balaji, K R S

    2005-01-01

    We present a simple observation for neutrino mixings and masses which arises naturally in dimensional deconstruction models. There are two essential ingredients of such models: (i) the presence of a symmetry mediated by the link fields which results in the neutrino mixings to be maximal; and (ii) a deconstruction scale which for large values gives rise to a small neutrino mass, similar in feature to the seesaw mechanism.

  15. Physics Potential of Very Intense Conventional Neutrino Beams

    Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Burguet-Castell, J; Casper, David William; DOnega, M; Gilardoni, S S; Hernández, Pilar; Mezzetto, Mauro

    2001-01-01

    The physics potential of high intensity conventional beams is explored. We consider a low energy super beam which could be produced by a proposed new accelerator at CERN, the Super Proton Linac. Water Cherenkov and liquid oil scintillator detectors are studied as possible candidates for a neutrino oscillation experiment which could improve our current knowledge of the atmospheric parameters and measure or severely constrain the parameter connecting the atmospheric and solar realms. It is also shown that a very large water detector could eventually observe leptonic CP violation. The reach of such an experiment to the neutrino mixing parameters would lie in-between the next generation of neutrino experiments (MINOS, OPERA, etc) and a future neutrino factory.

  16. Neutrinos

    de Gouvea, A; Scholberg, K; Zeller, G P; Alonso, J; Bernstein, A; Bishai, M; Elliott, S; Heeger, K; Hoffman, K; Huber, P; Kaufman, L J; Kayser, B; Link, J; Lunardini, C; Monreal, B; Morfin, J G; Robertson, H; Tayloe, R; Tolich, N; Abazajian, K; Akiri, T; Albright, C; Asaadi, J; Babu, K S; Balantekin, A B; Barbeau, P; Bass, M; Blake, A; Blondel, A; Blucher, E; Bowden, N; Brice, S J; Bross, A; Carls, B; Cavanna, F; Choudhary, B; Coloma, P; Connolly, A; Conrad, J; Convery, M; Cooper, R L; Cowen, D; da Motta, H; de Young, T; Di Lodovico, F; Diwan, M; Djurcic, Z; Dracos, M; Dodelson, S; Efremenko, Y; Ekelof, T; Feng, J L; Fleming, B; Formaggio, J; Friedland, A; Fuller, G; Gallagher, H; Geer, S; Gilchriese, M; Goodman, M; Grant, D; Gratta, G; Hall, C; Halzen, F; Harris, D; Heffner, M; Henning, R; Hewett, J L; Hill, R; Himmel, A; Horton-Smith, G; Karle, A; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Kettell, S; Klein, J; Kim, Y; Kim, Y K; Kolomensky, Yu; Kordosky, M; Kudenko, Yu; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lande, K; Lang, K; Lanza, R; Lau, K; Lee, H; Li, Z; Littlejohn, B R; Lin, C J; Liu, D; Liu, H; Long, K; Louis, W; Luk, K B; Marciano, W; Mariani, C; Marshak, M; Mauger, C; McDonald, K T; McFarland, K; McKeown, R; Messier, M; Mishra, S R; Mosel, U; Mumm, P; Nakaya, T; Nelson, J K; Nygren, D; Gann, G D Orebi; Osta, J; Palamara, O; Paley, J; Papadimitriou, V; Parke, S; Parsa, Z; Patterson, R; Piepke, A; Plunkett, R; Poon, A; Qian, X; Raaf, J; Rameika, R; Ramsey-Musolf, M; Rebel, B; Roser, R; Rosner, J; Rott, C; Rybka, G; Sahoo, H; Sangiorgio, S; Schmitz, D; Shrock, R; Shaevitz, M; Smith, N; Smy, M; Sobel, H; Sorensen, P; Sousa, A; Spitz, J; Strauss, T; Svoboda, R; Tanaka, H A; Thomas, J; Tian, X; Tschirhart, R; Tully, C; Van Bibber, K; Van de Water, R G; Vahle, P; Vogel, P; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M; Webber, D; Weerts, H; White, C; White, H; Whitehead, L; Wilson, R J; Winslow, L; Wongjirad, T; Worcester, E; Yokoyama, M; Yoo, J; Zimmerman, E D

    2013-01-01

    This document represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of neutrino physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of neutrinos and for addressing important physics and astrophysics questions with neutrinos.

  17. Physics prospects of future neutrino oscillation experiments in Asia

    Hagiwara, K

    2004-01-01

    The three neutrino model has 9 physical parameters, 3 neutrino masses, 3 mixing angles and 3 CP violating phases. Among them, neutrino oscillation experiments can probe 6 parameters: 2 mass squared differences, 3 mixing angles, and 1 CP phase. The experiments performed so far determined the magnitudes of the two mass squared differences, the sign of the smaller mass squared difference, the magnitudes of two of the three mixing angles, and the upper bound on the third mixing angle. The sign of the larger mass squared difference (the neutrino mass hierarchy pattern), the magnitude of the third mixing angle and the CP violating phase, and a two-fold ambiguity in the mixing angle that dictates the atmospheric neutrino oscillation should be determined by future oscillation experiments. In this talk, I introduce a few ideas of future long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments which make use of the super neutrino beams from J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) in Tokai village. We examine the poten...

  18. Neutrino physics and precision cosmology

    Hannestad, Steen

    2016-01-01

    I review the current status of structure formation bounds on neutrino properties such as mass and energy density. I also discuss future cosmological bounds as well as a variety of different scenarios for reconciling cosmology with the presence of light sterile neutrinos....

  19. Reactor Neutrino Physics -- An Update

    Boehm, Felix

    1999-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Long baseline oscillation experiments at Palo Verde and Chooz have provided limits for the oscillation parameters while the recently proposed Kamland experiment at a baseline of more than 100km is now in the planning stage. We also describe the status of neutrino magnetic moment experiments at reactors.

  20. Neutrino physics and precision cosmology

    Hannestad, Steen

    2016-01-01

    I review the current status of structure formation bounds on neutrino properties such as mass and energy density. I also discuss future cosmological bounds as well as a variety of different scenarios for reconciling cosmology with the presence of light sterile neutrinos.

  1. Evidence and Search for Sterile Neutrinos at Accelerators

    W. C. Louis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The LSND short-baseline neutrino experiment has published evidence for antineutrino oscillations at a mass scale of ~1 eV2. The MiniBooNE experiment, designed to test this evidence for oscillations at an order of magnitude higher neutrino energy and distance, observes excesses of events in both neutrino mode and antineutrino mode. While the MiniBooNE neutrino excess has a neutrino energy spectrum that is softer than expected from LSND, the MiniBooNE antineutrino excess is consistent with neutrino oscillations and with the LSND oscillation signal. When combined with oscillation measurements at the solar and atmospheric mass scales, assuming that the LSND and MiniBooNE signals are due to neutrino oscillations, these experiments imply the existence of more than three neutrino mass states and, therefore, one or more sterile neutrinos. Such sterile neutrinos, if proven to exist, would have a big impact on particle physics, nuclear physics, and astrophysics and would contribute to the dark matter of the universe. Future experiments under construction or proposed at Fermilab, ORNL, CERN, and in Japan will provide a definitive test of short-baseline neutrino oscillations and will have the capability of proving the existence of sterile neutrinos.

  2. Working group report: Neutrino and astroparticle physics

    Srubabati Goswami; Raghavan Rangarajan; K Agashe; A Bandyopadhyay; K Bhattacharya; B Brahmachari; C Burgess; E J Chun; D Choudhury; P K Das; A Dighe; A Godbole; S Goswami; N Gupta; M Kaplinghat; D Indumathi; J Forshaw; Y Y Keum; B Layek; D Majumdar; N Mahajan; P Mehta; R N Mohapatra; N Mondal; S More; N Nir; S Pakvasa; M K Parida; M Ravikumar; G Rajasekaran; P Ramadevi; R Rangarajan; S D Rindani; D P Roy; P Roy; N Sahu; A samanta; Y Shadmi; A M Srivastava; S Uma Sankar; R Vaidya; U Yajnik

    2004-12-01

    This is the report of neutrino and astroparticle physics working group at WHEPP-8. We present the discussions carried out during the workshop on selected topics in the above fields and also indicate progress made subsequently. The neutrino physics subgroup studied the possibilities of constraining neutrino masses, mixing and CPT violation in lepton sector from future experiments. Neutrino mass models in the context of Abelian horizontal symmetries, warped extra dimensions and in the presence of triplet Higgs were studied. Effect of threshold corrections on radiative magnification of mixing angles was investigated. The astroparticle physics subgroup focused on how various particle physics inputs affect the CMBR fluctuation spectrum, and on brane cosmology. This report also contains an introduction on how to use the publicly available code CMBFAST to calculate the CMBR fluctuations.

  3. Accelerator and radiation physics

    Basu, Samita; Nandy, Maitreyee

    2013-01-01

    "Accelerator and radiation physics" encompasses radiation shielding design and strategies for hadron therapy accelerators, neutron facilities and laser based accelerators. A fascinating article describes detailed transport theory and its application to radiation transport. Detailed information on planning and design of a very high energy proton accelerator can be obtained from the article on radiological safety of J-PARC. Besides safety for proton accelerators, the book provides information on radiological safety issues for electron synchrotron and prevention and preparedness for radiological emergencies. Different methods for neutron dosimetry including LET based monitoring, time of flight spectrometry, track detectors are documented alongwith newly measured experimental data on radiation interaction with dyes, polymers, bones and other materials. Design of deuteron accelerator, shielding in beam line hutches in synchrotron and 14 MeV neutron generator, various radiation detection methods, their characteriza...

  4. Accelerator physics and technology research toward future multi-MW proton accelerators

    Shiltsev, V; Romanenko, A; Valishev, A; Zwaska, R

    2015-01-01

    Recent P5 report indicated the accelerator-based neutrino and rare decay physics research as a centrepiece of the US domestic HEP program. Operation, upgrade and development of the accelerators for the near-term and longer-term particle physics program at the Intensity Frontier face formidable challenges. Here we discuss accelerator physics and technology research toward future multi-MW proton accelerators.

  5. JUNO: a General Purpose Experiment for Neutrino Physics

    Grassi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    JUNO is a 20 kt Liquid Scintillator Antineutrino Detector currently under construction in the south of China. This report reviews JUNO's physics programme related to all neutrino sources but reactor antineutrinos, namely neutrinos from supernova burst, solar neutrinos and geoneutrinos.

  6. Neutrino discoveries lead to precision measurements

    Altmann, M

    2002-01-01

    The science of neutrino physics has reached a watershed, with discovery giving way to precision measurements. The author reports from the XXth International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics. Topics covered are low-energy neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, long-baseline experiments, accelerator experiments, neutrino properties, neutrinos in astrophysics and cosmology, dark matter and neutrino telescopes.

  7. An Experimental Program in Neutrinos, Nucleon Decay and Astroparticle Physics Enabled by the Fermilab Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility

    Diwan, Milind; Elbnf Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A Letter of Intent has been submitted by a new International Team to pursue an accelerator-based long-baseline neutrino experiment, as well as neutrino astrophysics and nucleon decay, with an approximately 40-kt (fiducial) modular liquid argon TPC (LAr-TPC) detector located deep underground and a high-resolution near detector. Several independent worldwide efforts, developed through years of detailed studies, are converging around the opportunity provided by the megawatt neutrino beam facility planned at Fermilab and by the new significant expansion with improved access at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, 1,300 km from Fermilab. The principle goals of this experiment are: a comprehensive investigation of neutrino oscillations to test CP violation in the lepton sector, determine the ordering of the neutrino masses, and test the three-neutrino paradigm; to perform a broad set of neutrino scattering measurements with the near detector; and to exploit the large, high-resolution, underground far detector for non-accelerator physics topics including atmospheric neutrino measurements, searches for nucleon decay, and measurement of astrophysical neutrinos especially those from a core-collapse supernova.

  8. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    Brief descriptions are given of DOE and Nuclear Physics program operated and sponsored accelerator facilities. Specific facilities covered are the Argonne Tandem/Linac Accelerator System, the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the proposed Continuous Beam Accelerator at Newport News, Virginia, the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory at Duke University, the Bevalac and the SuperHILAC at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Bates Linear Accelerator Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Nuclear Physics Injector at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the Texas A and M Cyclotrons, the Tandem/Superconducting Booster Accelerator at the University of Washington and the Tandem Van de Graaff at the A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory of Yale University. Included are acquisition cost, research programs, program accomplishments, future directions, and operating parameters of each facility

  9. Nuclear Physics accelerator facilities

    The Nuclear Physics program requires the existence and effective operation of large and complex accelerator facilities. These facilities provide the variety of projectile beams upon which virtually all experimental nuclear research depends. Their capability determine which experiments can be performed and which cannot. Seven existing accelerator facilities are operated by the Nuclear Physics program as national facilities. These are made available to all the Nation's scientists on the basis of scientific merit and technical feasibility of proposals. The national facilities are the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory; the Bates Linear Accelerator Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Bevalac at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory; the ATLAS facility at Argonne National Laboratory; the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Nuclear Physics Injector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) enables the SLAC facility to provide a limited amount of beam time for nuclear physics research on the same basis as the other national facilities. To complement the national facilities, the Nuclear Physics program supports on-campus accelerators at Duke University, Texas A and M University, the University of Washington, and Yale University. The facility at Duke University, called the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), is jointly staffed by Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina. These accelerators are operated primarily for the research use of the local university faculty, junior scientists, and graduate students

  10. Neutrino factory and beta beam: accelerator options for future neutrino experiments

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2012-06-03

    Two accelerator options for producing intense neutrino beams a Neutrino Factory based on stored muon beams and a Beta Beam facility based on stored beams of beta unstable ions are described. Technical challenges for each are described and current R&D efforts aimed at mitigating these challenges are indicated. Progress is being made in the design of both types of facility, each of which would extend the state-of-the-art in accelerator science.

  11. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters

  12. Physics prospects of future neutrino oscillation experiments in Asia

    Hagiwara, Kaoru [Theory Division, KEK, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2004-12-15

    The three neutrino model has 9 physical parameters, 3 neutrino masses, 3 mixing angles and 3 CP violating phases. Among them, neutrino oscillation experiments can probe 6 neutrino parameters: 2 mass squared differences, 3 mixing angles, and 1 CP phase. The experiments performed so far determined the magnitudes of the two mass squared differences, the sign of the smaller mass squared difference, the magnitudes of two of the three mixing angles, and the upper bound on the third mixing angle. The sign of the larger mass squared difference (the neutrino mass hierarchy pattern), the magnitude of the third mixing angle and the CP violating phase, and a two-fold ambiguity in the mixing angle that dictates the atmospheric neutrino oscillation should be determined by future oscillation experiments. In this talk, I introduce a few ideas of future long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments which make use of the super neutrino beams from J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) in Tokai village. We examine the potential of HyperKamiokande (HK), the proposed 1 Mega-ton water Cerenkov detector, and then study the fate and possible detection of the off-axis beam from J-PARC in Korea, which is available free throughout the period of the T2K (Tokai-to-SuperKamiokande) and the possible T-to-HK projects. Although the CP violating phase can be measured accurately by studying {nu}{sub {mu}}->{nu}{sub e} and {nu}-bar {sub {mu}}->{nu}-bar {sub e} oscillations at HK, there appear multiple solution ambiguities which can be solved only by determining the neutrino mass hierarchy and the twofold ambiguity in the mixing angle. We show that very long baseline experiments with higher energy beams from J-PARC and a possible huge Water Cerenkov Calorimeter detector proposed in Beijing can resolve the neutrino mass hierarchy. If such a detector can be built in China, future experiments with a muon storage ring neutrino factory at J-PARC will be able to lift all the degeneracies in the

  13. Physics prospects of future neutrino oscillation experiments in Asia

    The three neutrino model has 9 physical parameters, 3 neutrino masses, 3 mixing angles and 3 CP violating phases. Among them, neutrino oscillation experiments can probe 6 neutrino parameters: 2 mass squared differences, 3 mixing angles, and 1 CP phase. The experiments performed so far determined the magnitudes of the two mass squared differences, the sign of the smaller mass squared difference, the magnitudes of two of the three mixing angles, and the upper bound on the third mixing angle. The sign of the larger mass squared difference (the neutrino mass hierarchy pattern), the magnitude of the third mixing angle and the CP violating phase, and a two-fold ambiguity in the mixing angle that dictates the atmospheric neutrino oscillation should be determined by future oscillation experiments. In this talk, I introduce a few ideas of future long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments which make use of the super neutrino beams from J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) in Tokai village. We examine the potential of HyperKamiokande (HK), the proposed 1 Mega-ton water Cerenkov detector, and then study the fate and possible detection of the off-axis beam from J-PARC in Korea, which is available free throughout the period of the T2K (Tokai-to-SuperKamiokande) and the possible T-to-HK projects. Although the CP violating phase can be measured accurately by studying νμ->νe and ν-bar μ->ν-bar e oscillations at HK, there appear multiple solution ambiguities which can be solved only by determining the neutrino mass hierarchy and the twofold ambiguity in the mixing angle. We show that very long baseline experiments with higher energy beams from J-PARC and a possible huge Water Cerenkov Calorimeter detector proposed in Beijing can resolve the neutrino mass hierarchy. If such a detector can be built in China, future experiments with a muon storage ring neutrino factory at J-PARC will be able to lift all the degeneracies in the three neutrino model parameters

  14. Physics prospects of future neutrino oscillation experiments in Asia

    Hagiwara, Kaoru

    2004-12-01

    The three neutrino model has 9 physical parameters, 3 neutrino masses, 3 mixing angles and 3 CP violating phases. Among them, neutrino oscillation experiments can probe 6 neutrino parameters: 2 mass squared differences, 3 mixing angles, and 1 CP phase. The experiments performed so far determined the magnitudes of the two mass squared differences, the sign of the smaller mass squared difference, the magnitudes of two of the three mixing angles, and the upper bound on the third mixing angle. The sign of the larger mass squared difference (the neutrino mass hierarchy pattern), the magnitude of the third mixing angle and the CP violating phase, and a two-fold ambiguity in the mixing angle that dictates the atmospheric neutrino oscillation should be determined by future oscillation experiments. In this talk, I introduce a few ideas of future long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments which make use of the super neutrino beams from J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) in Tokai village. We examine the potential of HyperKamiokande (HK), the proposed 1 Mega-ton water Čerenkov detector, and then study the fate and possible detection of the off-axis beam from J-PARC in Korea, which is available free throughout the period of the T2K (Tokai-to-SuperKamiokande) and the possible T-to-HK projects. Although the CP violating phase can be measured accurately by studying ν→ν and ν→ν oscillations at HK, there appear multiple solution ambiguities which can be solved only by determining the neutrino mass hierarchy and the twofold ambiguity in the mixing angle. We show that very long baseline experiments with higher energy beams from J-PARC and a possible huge Water Čerenkov Calorimeter detector proposed in Beijing can resolve the neutrino mass hierarchy. If such a detector can be built in China, future experiments with a muon storage ring neutrino factory at J-PARC will be able to lift all the degeneracies in the three neutrino model parameters.

  15. Flavor physics: kaons, charm, beauty, taus and neutrinos

    The summary of the presentations at the workshop on Heavy Flavor Physics, Part II at the International Lecture and Workshop Series: ''Frontiers in Contemporary Physics: Fundamental Particles and Interactions'' should include a wide variety of topics in flavor physics. This paper provides a brief selection from each presentation to give a flavor of the session. Results on the production and decays of taus, kaons, charm and beauty particles are reported. The results from several experiments that have looked for neutrino oscillations at accelerator based experiments are also discussed, including new results from LSND using neutrinos produced in pion decay in flight. Projections and plans for several ongoing and future experiments in flavor physics are discussed

  16. Long baseline accelerator neutrino experiments present and future

    Rubbia, André

    2000-01-01

    A nu /sub mu / disappearance effect has been seen in atmospheric neutrino experiments. This has led to the "evidence for neutrino oscillations". The next problem in neutrino physics is to perform the right experiment(s) to elucidate in a comprehensive way the pattern of neutrino masses and mixings. The long baseline experiments will play a fundamental role at settling definitively the question of flavor oscillation and at measuring with good precision the oscillation parameters. The CERN-NGS beam coupled with the proposed ICANOE and OPERA detectors is the only programme capable of sensitive tau and electron appearance searches. (14 refs).

  17. Collection and acceleration of muons for the neutrino factory project

    The neutrino factory project is an international cooperation project of a complex of accelerators aimed at the production of an intense flow of neutrinos from the decay of a muon beam. After an introduction to this project and a general presentation of the accelerator complex, this research thesis reports transmission investigations performed on a quadric-polar muon collecting canal, recalls the concepts of dynamic beam in a circular accelerator, and describes and comments the different types of Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerators considered for the acceleration of muons. It discusses the development of the Zgoubi's corpuscular optics code in terms of trajectory tracing method for FFAG accelerators. Finally, it reports and comments results of a numerical simulation of beam dynamics performed on muon FFAG accelerators

  18. Non-accelerator particle physics

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are currently engaged in construction of the MACRO detector, an Italian-American collaborative research instrument with a total particle acceptance of 10,000 m2sr, which will perform a sensitive search for magnetic monopoles using excitation-ionization methods. Other major objective of the MACRO experiment are to search for astrophysical high energy neutrinos expected to be emitted by such objects as Vela X-1, LMC X-4 and SN-1987A and to search for low energy neutrino bursts from gravitational stellar collapse. We are also working on BOREX, a liquid scintillation solar neutrino experiment and GRANDE, a proposed very large area surface detector for astrophysical neutrinos, and on the development of new techniques for liquid scintillation detection

  19. Solar neutrino physics in the nineties

    Wilkerson, J.F.

    1990-12-31

    The decade of the 1990`s should prove to be landmark period for the study of solar neutrino physics. Current observations show 2--3 times fewer neutrinos coming from the sun than are theoretically expected. As we enter the decade, new experiments are poised to attempt and discover whether this deficit is a problem with our understanding of how the sun works, is a hint of new neutrino properties beyond those predicted by the standard model of particle physics, or perhaps a combination of both. This paper will briefly review the current status of the field and point out how future measurements should help solve this interesting puzzle. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Pulsar acceleration by asymmetric emission of sterile neutrinos

    Nardi, E; Nardi, Enrico; Zuluaga, Jorge I.

    2001-01-01

    A convincing explanation for the observed pulsar large peculiar velocities is still missing. We argue that any viable particle physics solution would most likely involve the resonant production of a non-interacting neutrino $\

  1. Physics of neutrino flavor transformation through matter-neutrino resonances

    Wu, Meng-Ru; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    In astrophysical environments such as core-collapse supernovae and neutron star-neutron star or neutron star-black hole mergers where dense neutrino media are present, matter-neutrino resonances (MNRs) can occur when the neutrino propagation potentials due to neutrino-electron and neutrino-neutrino forward scattering nearly cancel each other. We show that neutrino flavor transformation through MNRs can be explained by multiple adiabatic solutions similar to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein mechanism. We find that for the normal neutrino mass hierarchy, neutrino flavor evolution through MNRs can be sensitive to the shape of neutrino spectra and the adiabaticity of the system, but such sensitivity is absent for the inverted hierarchy.

  2. Neutrino physics at very high energies

    Sciulli, F.; Barish, B.; Ford, W.; Oddone, P.; Peck, C.; /Caltech; Maschke, A.; /Fermilab; Barish, B.; /Caltech

    1970-06-01

    NAL presents the opportunity to expand our knowledge of neutrino interactions from energies of less than 10 GeV up to more than 300 GeV. We propose an exploratory experiment which is designed to emphasize the physics of very high energy interactions ({approx}300 GeV).

  3. Selected Topics in Majorana Neutrino Physics

    Maiani, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Starting from the original Majorana's article of 1937, the see-saw mechanism is illustrated, first for one and later for three neutrino generations, and neutrinoless double beta decay is considered. Neutrino mixing and oscillations in three flavors are described. The Yukawa couplings to the Higgs field of quarks and leptons are considered, their transformation properties under the corresponding flavor groups are spelled and the principle of Minimal Flavor Violation is illustrated, in connection with possible new physics beyond the Standard Theory. The idea that the Yukawa couplings may be the vacuum expectation value of some new fields is introduced and natural extrema of potentials which are invariant under quark and lepton flavor groups are characterized. A recent result indicating large mixing of almost degenerate neutrinos is derived from the heavy lepton invariance under flavor ${\\cal O}(3)$.

  4. Probing Exotic Physics With Supernova Neutrinos

    Kelso, Chris; Hooper, Dan

    2010-09-01

    Future galactic supernovae will provide an extremely long baseline for studying the properties and interactions of neutrinos. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of using such an event to constrain (or discover) the effects of exotic physics in scenarios that are not currently constrained and are not accessible with reactor or solar neutrino experiments. In particular, we focus on the cases of neutrino decay and quantum decoherence. We calculate the expected signal from a core-collapse supernova in both current and future water Cerenkov, scintillating, and liquid argon detectors, and find that such observations will be capable of distinguishing between many of these scenarios. Additionally, future detectors will be capable of making strong, model-independent conclusions by examining events associated with a galactic supernova's neutronization burst.

  5. Heavy neutrinos in particle physics and cosmology

    Drewes, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos are the only particles in the Standard Model of particle physics that have only been observed with left handed chirality to date. If right handed neutrinos exist, they would not only explain the observed neutrino oscillations, but could also be responsible for several phenomena in cosmology, including the baryon asymmetry of the universe, dark matter and dark radiation. A crucial parameter in this context is their Majorana mass, which in principle could lie anywhere between the eV scale and GUT scale. The implications for experiments and cosmology strongly depend on the choice of the mass scale. We review recent progress in the phenomenology of right handed neutrinos with different masses, focusing on scenarios in which the mass is at least a keV. We emphasise the possibility to discover heavy neutrinos that are responsible for the baryon asymmetry of the universe via low scale leptogenesis in near future experiments, such as LHC, BELLE II, SHiP, FCC-ee or CEPC.

  6. Hadron production measurements to constrain accelerator neutrino beams

    Korzenev, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    A precise prediction of expected neutrino fluxes is required for a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The flux is used to measure neutrino cross sections at the near detector, while at the far detector it provides an estimate of the expected signal for the study of neutrino oscillations. In the talk several approaches to constrain the ν flux are presented. The first is the traditional one when an interaction chain for the neutrino parent hadrons is stored to be weighted later with real measurements. In this approach differential hadron cross sections are used which, in turn, are measured in ancillary hadron production experiments. The approach is certainly model dependent because it requires an extrapolation to different incident nucleon momenta assuming xF scaling as well as extrapolation between materials having different atomic numbers. In the second approach one uses a hadron production yields off a real target exploited in the neutrino beamline. Yields of neutrino parent hadrons are parametrized at the surface of the target, thus one avoids to trace the particle interaction history inside the target. As in the case of the first approach, a dedicated ancillary experiment is mandatory. Recent results from the hadron production experiments - NA61/SHINE at CERN (measurements for T2K) and MIPP at Fermilab (measurements for NuMI) - are reviewed.

  7. Hadron production measurements to constrain accelerator neutrino beams

    A precise prediction of expected neutrino fluxes is required for a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The flux is used to measure neutrino cross sections at the near detector, while at the far detector it provides an estimate of the expected signal for the study of neutrino oscillations. In the talk several approaches to constrain the ν flux are presented. The first is the traditional one when an interaction chain for the neutrino parent hadrons is stored to be weighted later with real measurements. In this approach differential hadron cross sections are used which, in turn, are measured in ancillary hadron production experiments. The approach is certainly model dependent because it requires an extrapolation to different incident nucleon momenta assuming xF scaling as well as extrapolation between materials having different atomic numbers. In the second approach one uses a hadron production yields off a real target exploited in the neutrino beamline. Yields of neutrino parent hadrons are parametrized at the surface of the target, thus one avoids to trace the particle interaction history inside the target. As in the case of the first approach, a dedicated ancillary experiment is mandatory. Recent results from the hadron production experiments – NA61/SHINE at CERN (measurements for T2K) and MIPP at Fermilab (measurements for NuMI) – are reviewed

  8. Pionic Photons and Neutrinos from Cosmic Ray Accelerators

    Halzen, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the accelerators that produce the Galactic and extragalactic cosmic rays has been a priority mission of several generations of high energy gamma ray and neutrino telescopes; success has been elusive so far. Detecting the gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes associated with cosmic rays reaches a new watershed with the completion of IceCube, the first neutrino detector with sensitivity to the anticipated fluxes, and the construction of CTA, a ground-based gamma ray detector that will map and study candidate sources with unprecedented precision. In this paper, we revisit the prospects for revealing the sources of the cosmic rays by a multiwavelength approach; after reviewing the methods, we discuss supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, active galaxies and GZK neutrinos in some detail.

  9. Neutrino Experiments and Their Implications

    Balantekin, A. B.

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments in solar, reactor, and accelerator neutrino physics are reviewed. Implications for neutrino physics, solar physics, nuclear two-body physics, and r-process nucleosynthesis are briefly discussed.

  10. Neutrino oscillation study in the muon neutrino → electron neutrino channel at the Brookhaven accelerator

    The E816 experiment described in this thesis is devoted to a neutrino oscillation search at the Brookhaven AGS. The method used here is to look with a fine grained calorimeter for the appearence of electron neutrino in a muon neutrino beam. After recalling the theoretical treatment of the neutrino mass problem, the experimental phenomenology of massive neutrinos and more specifically neutrino oscillations is reviewed. The experiment itself is then extensively described, both on the technical side (detector, beam, simulation) and on the analysis side. In particular the statistical separation of the electromagnetic showers from electrons - our signal - and from photons - our background - treated in detail. The present analysis is based on 2/3 of the final statistics and it leads to the - preliminary - observation of an electron excess in the neutrino interactions yielding 19 ± 15.6 (stat) ± 7 (syst)

  11. VLHC accelerator physics

    Michael Blaskiewicz et al.

    2001-11-01

    A six-month design study for a future high energy hadron collider was initiated by the Fermilab director in October 2000. The request was to study a staged approach where a large circumference tunnel is built that initially would house a low field ({approx}2 T) collider with center-of-mass energy greater than 30 TeV and a peak (initial) luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The tunnel was to be scoped, however, to support a future upgrade to a center-of-mass energy greater than 150 TeV with a peak luminosity of 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} using high field ({approx} 10 T) superconducting magnet technology. In a collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a report of the Design Study was produced by Fermilab in June 2001. 1 The Design Study focused on a Stage 1, 20 x 20 TeV collider using a 2-in-1 transmission line magnet and leads to a Stage 2, 87.5 x 87.5 TeV collider using 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet technology. The article that follows is a compilation of accelerator physics designs and computational results which contributed to the Design Study. Many of the parameters found in this report evolved during the study, and thus slight differences between this text and the Design Study report can be found. The present text, however, presents the major accelerator physics issues of the Very Large Hadron Collider as examined by the Design Study collaboration and provides a basis for discussion and further studies of VLHC accelerator parameters and design philosophies.

  12. Non-accelerator particle physics

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are working on the MACRO experiment, which employs a large area underground detector to search for grand unification magnetic monopoles and dark matter candidates and to study cosmic ray muons as well as low and high energy neutrinos: the νIMB project, which seeks to refurbish and upgrade the IMB water Cerenkov detector to perform an improved proton decay search together with a long baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiment using a kiloton liquid scintillator (the Perry experiment); and development of technology for improved liquid scintillators and for very low background materials in support of the MACRO and Perry experiments and for new solar neutrino experiments. 21 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs

  13. Physics of neutrino flavor transformation through matter–neutrino resonances

    Meng-Ru Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In astrophysical environments such as core-collapse supernovae and neutron star–neutron star or neutron star–black hole mergers where dense neutrino media are present, matter–neutrino resonances (MNRs can occur when the neutrino propagation potentials due to neutrino–electron and neutrino–neutrino forward scattering nearly cancel each other. We show that neutrino flavor transformation through MNRs can be explained by multiple adiabatic solutions similar to the Mikheyev–Smirnov–Wolfenstein mechanism. We find that for the normal neutrino mass hierarchy, neutrino flavor evolution through MNRs can be sensitive to the shape of neutrino spectra and the adiabaticity of the system, but such sensitivity is absent for the inverted hierarchy.

  14. Physics Needs for Future Accelerators

    Lykken, Joseph D.

    2000-01-01

    Contents: 1. Prologomena to any meta future physics 1.1 Physics needs for building future accelerators 1.2 Physics needs for funding future accelerators 2. Physics questions for future accelerators 2.1 Crimes and misapprehensions 2.1.1 Organized religion 2.1.2 Feudalism 2.1.3 Trotsky was right 2.2 The Standard Model as an effective field theory 2.3 What is the scale of new physics? 2.4 What could be out there? 2.5 Model-independent conclusions 3. Future accelerators 3.1 What is the physics dr...

  15. Post-acceleration study for neutrino super-beam at CSNS

    WU Yang; TANG Jing-Yu

    2013-01-01

    A post-acceleration system based on the accelerators at CSNS (China Spallation Neutron Source) is proposed to build a super-beam facility for neutrino physics.Two post-acceleration schemes,one using superconducting dipole magnets in the main ring and the other using room temperature magnets,have been studied,both to achieve the final proton energy of 128 GeV and the beam power of 4 MW by taking 10% of the CSNS beam from the neutron source.The main design features and the comparison for the two schemes are presented.The CSNS super-beam facility will be very competitive in long-baseline neutrino physics studies,compared with other super-beam facilities proposed in the world.

  16. Childhood and youth of neutrino physics: some reminiscences

    History of neutrino physics, which is devided into four periods is presented briefly. The first period (1896-1930)- neutrino physics origin. The second period (1930 - the beginning of 1050tth) - childhood of neurino physics. The third period (1941-1959) - youth of neutrino physics. The fourth period(1960 - the beginning of 1980th) - maturity of neutrino physics. The following achievements are considered in detail: the neutrino prediction by W.Pauli; the development of the theory of beta decay by E.Fermi and the problem of the real neutrality of electrically neutral fermions by E.Majorana. The problem of neutrino detection by means of chlorine-argon method is discussed. Some data, obtained in physics of high-energy neutrinos are described

  17. Cosmic neutrinos as a probe of TeV-scale physics

    Ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos are versatile probes of astrophysics, astronomy, and particle physics. They represent the messengers of hadronic processes in cosmic accelerators and survive the propagation through the interstellar medium practically unscathed. We investigate the neutrino fluxes associated with optically thin proton sources which provide a diagnostic of the transition between galactic and extragalactic cosmic rays. The center of mass energies in collisions of these cosmic neutrinos with atomic nuclei in the atmosphere or the Earth's interior easily exceed those so far reached in man-made accelerators. We discuss the prospects of observing supersymmetric neutrino interactions with Cherenkov telescopes and speculate about a neutrino component in extremely high energy cosmic rays from exotic interactions in the atmosphere. (orig.)

  18. Workshop on low energy neutrino physics

    The main topics of the workshop are: the determination of the neutrino mixing angle theta-13, the experiments concerning the monitoring of reactors based on the measurement of neutrino spectra, solar neutrinos, supernovae neutrinos, geo-neutrinos, neutrino properties, neutrinoless double beta decay and future low energy neutrino detectors. This document gathers together the program of the workshop, the slides of the presentations, some abstracts and some posters

  19. Neutrino and Z gauge boson physics

    Larios, F. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, CINVESTAV-Merida, A.P. 73, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Perez, M. A. [Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV, A.P. 14-740, 07000, Mexico D.F (Mexico)

    2013-06-12

    We present a short review of the physics of neutrino-photon interactions and the rare decays of the Z and Z Prime gauge bosons. In particular, we emphasize on processes induced by the anomalous trilinear and quartic vertices VVV and VVVV, where V=Z,Z Prime or a photon, within the Standard Model (SM), the 331 model and some extensions of the SM. We also include the phenomenological and experimental limits reported for these couplings.

  20. Physics potential of a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment using a J-PARC neutrino beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Blondel, Alain; Bravar, Alessandro; Haegel, Leïla; Haesler, Alexis; Karadzhov, Yordan Ivanov; Korzenev, Alexander; Martin Mari, Carlos; Noah Messomo, Etam Albert; Ravonel Salzgeber, Melody; Rayner, Mark; Scantamburlo, Enrico; Collaboration,, , CMS

    2015-01-01

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this paper, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the...

  1. Accelerator Challenges and Opportunities for Future Neutrino Experiments

    There are three types of future neutrino facilities currently under study, one based on decays of stored beta-unstable ion beams (Beta Beams), one based on decays of stored muon beams (Neutrino Factory), and one based on the decays of an intense pion beam (Superbeam). In this paper we discuss the challenges each design team must face and the R and D being carried out to turn those challenges into technical opportunities. A new program, the Muon Accelerator Program, has begun in the U.S. to carry out the R D for muon-based facilities, including both the Neutrino Factory and, as its ultimate goal, a Muon Collider. The goals of this program will be briefly described.

  2. Accelerator Challenges and Opportunities for Future Neutrino Experiments

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-12-24

    There are three types of future neutrino facilities currently under study, one based on decays of stored beta-unstable ion beams (?Beta Beams?), one based on decays of stored muon beams (?Neutrino Factory?), and one based on the decays of an intense pion beam (?Superbeam?). In this paper we discuss the challenges each design team must face and the R&D being carried out to turn those challenges into technical opportunities. A new program, the Muon Accelerator Program, has begun in the U.S. to carry out the R&D for muon-based facilities, including both the Neutrino Factory and, as its ultimate goal, a Muon Collider. The goals of this program will be briefly described.

  3. Magnetic micro-calorimeters for neutrino physics

    Metallic magnetic micro-calorimeters are energy dispersive detectors operated at temperatures below 0.1 Kelvin. Their resolving power E/ ΔE approaching 5000, the intrinsic response time well below 1 μs and the excellent linearity make magnetic micro-calorimeters very attractive for numerous experiments. With such detectors we have performed the first high resolution calorimetric measurements of the 163Ho electron capture spectrum. The achieved performance motivated the formation of the international collaboration ECHo (Electron Capture in 163Ho) to investigate the electron neutrino mass in the sub-eV range using the 163Ho. For the search of neutrinoless double beta decay in 100Mo with scintillating crystals, we have developed photon and phonon detectors based on metallic magnetic calorimeters to be used in the experiments AMoRE and LUMINEU. In this talk, the ECHo experiment as well as the other applications of metallic magnetic calorimeters for neutrino physics will be discussed.

  4. Connecting neutrino physics with dark matter

    The origin of neutrino masses and the nature of dark matter are two in most pressing open questions in modern astro-particle physics. We consider here the possibility that these two problems are related, and review some theoretical scenarios which offer common solutions. A simple possibility is that the dark matter particle emerges in minimal realizations of the seesaw mechanism, as in the majoron and sterile neutrino scenarios. We present the theoretical motivation for both models and discuss their phenomenology, confronting the predictions of these scenarios with cosmological and astrophysical observations. Finally, we discuss the possibility that the stability of dark matter originates from a flavor symmetry of the leptonic sector. We review a proposal based on an A4 flavor symmetry. (paper)

  5. Gamma Rays and Neutrinos from a Powerful Cosmic Accelerator

    Mannheim, K

    1993-01-01

    Recent measurements of gamma rays from the powerful quasar 3C273 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory show that a powerful cosmic accelerator must be operating. In this paper the evidence for proton acceleration is collected with the result that (i) the gamma ray spectrum should flatten slightly above a few GeV and that (ii) high energy neutrinos from the decay of photomesons are difficult to observe, although the power carried by these particles is as large as the gamma ray power. However, the power is concentrated at energies in the EeV range, whereas in the TeV-PeV range neutrinos from pp and p$\\alpha$ collisions dominate due to their steeper spectrum. Consequently, the flux of cosmic neutrinos from flat spectrum radio sources such as 3C273 in the energy range relevant for proposed underwater or underice detectors could be much lower than inferred from assuming the same spectrum for gamma rays and neutrinos.

  6. Neutrinos from Cosmic Accelerators including Magnetic Field and Flavor Effects

    Walter Winter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the particle physics ingredients affecting the normalization, shape, and flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos fluxes, such as different production modes, magnetic field effects on the secondaries (muons, pions, and kaons, and flavor mixing, where we focus on pγ interactions. We also discuss the interplay with neutrino propagation and detection, including the possibility to detect flavor and its application in particle physics, and the use of the Glashow resonance to discriminate pγ from pp interactions in the source. We illustrate the implications on fluxes and flavor composition with two different models: (1 the target photon spectrum is dominated by synchrotron emission of coaccelerated electrons and (2 the target photon spectrum follows the observed photon spectrum of gamma-ray bursts. In the latter case, the multimessenger extrapolation from the gamma-ray fluence to the expected neutrino flux is highlighted.

  7. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Adams, C; Ankowski, A M; Asaadi, J A; Ashenfelter, J; Axani, S N; Babu, K; Backhouse, C; Band, H R; Barbeau, P S; Barros, N; Bernstein, A; Betancourt, M; Bishai, M; Blucher, E; Bouffard, J; Bowden, N; Brice, S; Bryan, C; Camilleri, L; Cao, J; Carlson, J; Carr, R E; Chatterjee, A; Chen, M; Chen, S; Chiu, M; Church, E D; Collar, J I; Collin, G; Conrad, J M; Convery, M R; Cooper, R L; Cowen, D; Davoudiasl, H; De Gouvea, A; Dean, D J; Deichert, G; Descamps, F; DeYoung, T; Diwan, M V; Djurcic, Z; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Donnelly, B; Dwyer, D A; Dytman, S; Efremenko, Y; Everett, L L; Fava, A; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fleming, B; Friedland, A; Fujikawa, B K; Gaisser, T K; Galeazzi, M; Galehouse, D C; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Garvey, G T; Gautam, S; Gilje, K E; Gonzalez-Garcia, M; Goodman, M C; Gordon, H; Gramellini, E; Green, M P; Guglielmi, A; Hackenburg, R W; Hackenburg, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hans, S; Harris, D; Heeger, K M; Herman, M; Hill, R; Holin, A; Huber, P; Jaffe, D E; Johnson, R A; Joshi, J; Karagiorgi, G; Kaufman, L J; Kayser, B; Kettell, S H; Kirby, B J; Klein, J R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kriske, R M; Lane, C E; Langford, T J; Lankford, A; Lau, K; Learned, J G; Ling, J; Link, J M; Lissauer, D; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Lockwitz, S; Lokajicek, M; Louis, W C; Luk, K; Lykken, J; Marciano, W J; Maricic, J; Markoff, D M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Mauger, C; Mavrokoridis, K; McCluskey, E; McKeen, D; McKeown, R; Mills, G; Mocioiu, I; Monreal, B; Mooney, M R; Morfin, J G; Mumm, P; Napolitano, J; Neilson, R; Nelson, J K; Nessi, M; Norcini, D; Nova, F; Nygren, D R; Gann, G D Orebi; Palamara, O; Parsa, Z; Patterson, R; Paul, P; Pocar, A; Qian, X; Raaf, J L; Rameika, R; Ranucci, G; Ray, H; Reyna, D; Rich, G C; Rodrigues, P; Romero, E Romero; Rosero, R; Rountree, S D; Rybolt, B; Sanchez, M C; Santucci, G; Schmitz, D; Scholberg, K; Seckel, D; Shaevitz, M; Shrock, R; Smy, M B; Soderberg, M; Sonzogni, A; Sousa, A B; Spitz, J; John, J M St; Stewart, J; Strait, J B; Sullivan, G; Svoboda, R; Szelc, A M; Tayloe, R; Thomson, M A; Toups, M; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Van de Water, R G; Vogelaar, R B; Weber, M; Weng, W; Wetstein, M; White, C; White, B R; Whitehead, L; Whittington, D W; Wilking, M J; Wilson, R J; Wilson, P; Winklehner, D; Winn, D R; Worcester, E; Yang, L; Yeh, M; Yokley, Z W; Yoo, J; Yu, B; Yu, J; Zhang, C

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  8. Particle Physics Meets Cosmology -- The Search for Decaying Neutrinos.

    Henry, Richard C.

    1982-01-01

    Detection of neutrino decay may have profound consequences for both particle physics and cosmology, providing a deep connection between physics of the very large and physics of the very small. Describes this link and discusses the nature and status of the search for decaying neutrinos. (Author/JN)

  9. Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics of Neutrino Oscillations

    Balantekin, A B

    2016-01-01

    For a long time very little experimental information was available about neutrino properties, even though a minute neutrino mass has intriguing cosmological and astrophysical implications. This situation has changed in recent decades: intense experimental activity to measure many neutrino properties took place. Some of these developments and their implications for astrophysics and cosmology are briefly reviewed with a particular emphasis on neutrino magnetic moments and collective neutrino oscillations

  10. Accelerator-based Short-baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    Gollapinni, Sowjanya

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, several experiments have reported anomalous results that could be hinting at the exciting possibility of sterile neutrino states in the $eV^{2}$ mass scale. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) are a particularly promising technology to explore this physics due to their fine-grained tracking and exceptional calorimetric capabilities. The MicroBooNE experiment, a 170 ton LArTPC scheduled to start taking data very soon with Fermilab's Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), will combine LArTPC development with the main physics goal of understanding the low-energy electromagnetic anomaly seen by the MiniBooNE experiment. Looking towards the future, MicroBooNE will become a part of the \\textit{short-baseline neutrino} program which expands the physics capabilities of the BNB in many important ways by adding additional LArTPC detectors to search for light sterile neutrinos and bring a definitive resolution to the set of existing experimental anomalies. This paper will give an overview of...

  11. Effects of Beyond Standard Model Physics on GRB Neutrinos

    Moharana, Reetanjali

    2013-01-01

    The nondetection of neutrinos coming from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) by the IceCube experiment has raised serious questions on our understanding of GRB's and the mechanism of neutrino flux production in them. Motivated by this and the need for a precise calculation for GRB neutrino flux, here we study the effects of beyond standard model physics on the GRB neutrino flux. In the internal shock model of GRB, high energy neutrinos are expected from muon, pion and kaon decays. Using the latest best fit neutrino oscillation parameters, we compute the expected flux on earth for standard as well as non-standard oscillation scenarios. Among the non-standard scenarios, we consider neutrino decay, pseudo-dirac nature of neutrinos and presence of one eV scale light sterile neutrino. Incorporating other experimental bounds on these new physics scenarios, we show that neutrino decay scenario can significantly alter the neutrino flux on earth from the expected ones whereas the corresponding changes for pseudo-dirac and steril...

  12. Physics Projects for a Future CERN-LNGS Neutrino Programme

    Picchi, P

    1999-01-01

    We present an overview of the future projects concerning the neutrino oscillation physics in Europe. Recently a joint CERN-LNGS scientific committee has reviewed several proposals both for the study of atmospheric neutrinos and for long (LBL) and short baseline (SBL) neutrino oscillation experiments. The committee has indicated the priority that the European high energy physics community should follows in the field of neutrino physics, namely a new massive, atmospheric neutrino detector and a nu_tau appearance campaign exploiting the new CERN-LNGS Neutrino Facility (NGS), freshly approved by CERN and INFN. The sensitivity and the discovery potential of the whole experimental program in the Super-Kamiokande allowed region are discussed.

  13. Accelerator science in medical physics

    Peach, K.; Wilson, P.; Jones, B

    2011-01-01

    The use of cyclotrons and synchrotrons to accelerate charged particles in hospital settings for the purpose of cancer therapy is increasing. Consequently, there is a growing demand from medical physicists, radiographers, physicians and oncologists for articles that explain the basic physical concepts of these technologies. There are unique advantages and disadvantages to all methods of acceleration. Several promising alternative methods of accelerating particles also have to be considered sin...

  14. Current and future constraints on neutrino physics from cosmology

    In recent years precision cosmology has become an increasingly powerful probe of particle physics. Perhaps the prime example of this is the very stringent cosmological upper bound on the neutrino mass. However, other aspects of neutrino physics, such as their decoupling history and possible non-standard interactions, can also be probed using observations of cosmic structure. Here, we review the current status of cosmological bounds on neutrino properties and discuss the potential of future observations, for example by the recently approved EUCLID mission, to precisely measure neutrino properties

  15. Future accelerators (?)

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made

  16. Future accelerators (?)

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  17. Particle accelerator physics

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    This book by Helmut Wiedemann is a well-established, classic text, providing an in-depth and comprehensive introduction to the field of high-energy particle acceleration and beam dynamics. The present 4th edition has been significantly revised, updated and expanded. The newly conceived Part I is an elementary introduction to the subject matter for undergraduate students. Part II gathers the basic tools in preparation of a more advanced treatment, summarizing the essentials of electrostatics and electrodynamics as well as of particle dynamics in electromagnetic fields. Part III is an extensive primer in beam dynamics, followed, in Part IV, by an introduction and description of the main beam parameters and including a new chapter on beam emittance and lattice design. Part V is devoted to the treatment of perturbations in beam dynamics. Part VI then discusses the details of charged particle acceleration. Parts VII and VIII introduce the more advanced topics of coupled beam dynamics and describe very intense bea...

  18. Planck-scale physics and neutrino masses

    We discuss gravitationally induced masses and mass splittings of Majorana, Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud and Dirac neutrinos. Among other implications, these effects can provide a solution of the solar neutrino puzzle. In particular, we show how this may work in the 17 keV neutrino picture. (author). 18 refs

  19. Neutrino and astroparticle physics: Working group report

    S Mohanty; U A Yajnik

    2000-07-01

    The contributions made to the Working Group activities on neutrinos and astrophysics are summarized in this article. The topics discussed were inflationary models in Raman–Sundrum scenarios, ultra high energy cosmic rays and neutrino oscillations in 4 flavour and decaying neutrino models

  20. Physics prospects of future neutrino oscillation experiments in Asia

    Hagiwara, Kaoru

    2004-01-01

    The three neutrino model has 9 physical parameters, 3 neutrino masses, 3 mixing angles and 3 CP violating phases. Among them, neutrino oscillation experiments can probe 6 parameters: 2 mass squared differences, 3 mixing angles, and 1 CP phase. The experiments performed so far determined the magnitudes of the two mass squared differences, the sign of the smaller mass squared difference, the magnitudes of two of the three mixing angles, and the upper bound on the third mixing angle. The sign of...

  1. Physics from solar neutrinos in dark matter direct detection experiments

    David G. Cerdeño; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Jubb, Thomas; Machado, Pedro A. N.; Vincent, Aaron C.; Boehm, Céline

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of dark matter direct detection experiments will be sensitive to both coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron scattering. This will enable them to explore aspects of solar physics, perform the lowest energy measurement of the weak angle to date, and probe contributions from new theories with light mediators. In this article, we compute the projected nuclear and electron recoil rates expected in several dark matter direct detection experiments due to solar neutrinos...

  2. The Standard Model of Particle Physics. Neutrino Oscillations

    Giacomelli, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    The Standard Model (SM) of Particle Physics was tested to great precision by experiments at the highest energy colliders (LEP, Hera, Tevatron, SLAC). The only missing particle is the Higgs boson, which will be the first particle to be searched for at the new Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The SM anticipated that there are 3 types of left handed neutrinos. Experiments on atmospheric and solar neutrinos (made in Japan, Italy, Canada, Russia and the US) have shown the existence of neutrino...

  3. Physics Potential of a Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Using J-PARC Neutrino Beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    Abe, K; Andreopoulos, C; Anghel, I; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Asfandiyarov, R; Askins, M; Back, J J; Ballett, P; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bay, F; Beltrame, P; Berardi, V; Bergevin, M; Berkman, S; Berry, T; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Boyd, S B; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Cafagna, F S; Carminati, G; Cartwright, S L; Catanesi, M G; Choi, K; Choi, J H; Collazuol, G; Cowan, G; Cremonesi, L; Davies, G; De Rosa, G; Densham, C; Detwiler, J; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Fernández, P; Feusels, T; Finch, A; Fitton, M; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Fukuda, D; Galymov, V; Ganezer, K; Gonin, M; Gumplinger, P; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haesler, A; Haga, Y; Hartfiel, B; Hartz, M; Hayato, Y; Hierholzer, M; Hill, J; Himmel, A; Hirota, S; Horiuchi, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Iijima, T; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Inoue, K; Insler, J; Intonti, R A; Irvine, T; Ishida, T; Ishino, H; Ishitsuka, M; Itow, Y; Izmaylov, A; Jamieson, B; Jang, H I; Jiang, M; Joo, K K; Jung, C K; Kaboth, A; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Karadhzov, Y; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kim, J Y; Kim, S B; Kishimoto, Y; Kobayashi, T; Koga, M; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W R; Kudenko, Y; Kutter, T; Kuze, M; Labarga, L; Lagoda, J; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Learned, J G; Lim, I T; Lindner, T; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Ma, W; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Mariani, C; Marti, L; Martin, J F; Martin, C; Martins, P P J; Mazzucato, E; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mezzetto, M; Minakata, H; Minamino, A; Mine, S; Mineev, O; Miura, M; Monroe, J; Mori, T; Moriyama, S; Mueller, T; Muheim, F; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakaya, T; Nakayama, S; Needham, M; Nicholls, T; Nirkko, M; Nishimura, Y; Noah, E; Nowak, J; Nunokawa, H; O'Keeffe, H M; Okajima, Y; Okumura, K; Oser, S M; O'Sullivan, E; Ovsiannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Pérez, J; Pac, M Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Pistillo, C; Playfer, S; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Quilain, B; Quinto, M; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A; Redij, A; Retiere, F; Riccio, C; Richard, E; Rondio, E; Rose, H J; Ross-Lonergan, M; Rott, C; Rountree, S D; Rubbia, A; Sacco, R; Sakuda, M; Sanchez, M C; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Shaikhiev, A; Shimizu, I; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Sinnis, G; Smy, M B; Sobczyk, J; Sobel, H W; Stewart, T; Stone, J L; Suda, Y; Suzuki, Y; Suzuki, A T; Svoboda, R; Tacik, R; Takeda, A; Taketa, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, H K M; Tanaka, H; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorpe, M; Tobayama, S; Tolich, N; Tomura, T; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vagins, M R; Vasseur, G; Vogelaar, R B; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilson, J R; Xin, T; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Zito, M

    2015-01-01

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this paper, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis uses the framework and systematic uncertainties derived from the ongoing T2K experiment. With a total exposure of 7.5 MW $\\times$ 10$^7$ sec integrated proton beam power (corresponding to $1.56\\times10^{22}$ protons on target with a 30 GeV proton beam) to a $2.5$-degree off-axis neutrino beam, it is expected that the leptonic $CP$ phase $\\delta_{CP}$ can be determined to better than 19 degrees for all possible values of $\\delta_{CP}$, and $CP$ violation can be establis...

  4. Invisible Higgs decays and neutrino physics

    A wide class of neutrino physics motivated models are characterized by the spontaneous violation of a global U(1) lepton number symmetry at or below the electroweak scale by an SU(2)xU(1) singlet vacuum expectation value < or ∼O(1) TeV. In all these models the main Higgs decay channel is likely to be 'invisible', e.g. h→JJ, where J denotes the associated weakly interacting pseudoscalar Goldstone boson - the majoron. This leads to events with large missing energy that could be observable at LEP and affect the Higgs mass bounds obtained, as well as lead to novel ways to search for Higgs bosons and high-energy supercolliders such as the LHC/SSC. (orig.)

  5. Workshop: Neutrino telescopes

    Despite being the most elusive of the known particles, neutrinos provide vital new physics insights. Most neutrino knowledge so far has come from studies using beams from reactors and accelerators, but in recent years important new contributions have resulted from investigation of natural neutrinos from cosmic rays, nearby stars (the sun), or distant sources, such as the 1987 supernova. The supernova observations marked the start of a new era in neutrino astronomy, but neutrino telescopes were anyway assured of an important ongoing role

  6. Neutrino Oscillation Physics Potential of the T2K Experiment

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Rodr'iguez, J Caravaca; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Johnson, S; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; King, S; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mefodiev, A; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Ovsyannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Guerra, E S Pinzon; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riccio, C; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; S'anchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shaker, F; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Zmuda, J

    2014-01-01

    The observation of the recent electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam and the high-precision measurement of the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ have led to a re-evaluation of the physics potential of the T2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. Sensitivities are explored for CP violation in neutrinos, non-maximal $\\sin^22\\theta_{23}$, the octant of $\\theta_{23}$, and the mass hierarchy, in addition to the measurements of $\\delta_{CP}$, $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}$, and $\\Delta m^2_{32}$, for various combinations of $\

  7. The Nuclear Physics of Solar and Supernova Neutrino Detection

    Haxton, W. C.

    1999-01-01

    This talk provides a basic introduction for students interested in the responses of detectors to solar, supernova, and other low-energy neutrino sources. Some of the nuclear physics is then applied in a discussion of nucleosynthesis within a Type II supernova, including the r-process and the neutrino process.

  8. Future perspectives in neutrino physics: The Laguna-LBNO case

    Buizza Avanzini, M

    2013-01-01

    LAGUNA-LBNO is a Design Study funded by the European Commission to develop the de- sign of a deep underground neutrino observatory; its physics program involves the study of neutrino oscillations at long baselines, the investigation of the Grand Unication of elemen- tary forces and the detection of neutrinos from known and unknown astrophysical sources. Building on the successful format and on the ndings of the previous LAGUNA Design Study, LAGUNA-LBNO is more focused and is specically considering Long Baseline Neutrino Oscil- lations (LBNO) with neutrino beams from CERN. Two sites, Frejus (in France at 130 km) and Pyhasalmi (in Finland at 2300 km), are being considered. Three dierent detector technolo- gies are being studied: Water Cherenkov, Liquid Scintillator and Liquid Argon. Recently the LAGUNA-LBNO consortium has submitted an Expression of Interest for a very long baseline neutrino experiment, selecting as a rst priority the option of a Liquid Argon detector at Pyhasalmi.

  9. Particle Physics Seminar: Towards 3+1 Neutrino Mixing

    Geneva University

    2011-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday  12 October  2011 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium “Towards 3+1 Neutrino Mixing” Par Prof. Carlo Giunti, INFN Torino I will review the recent experimental indications in favor of  short-baseline neutrino oscillations. I will discuss their interpretation in the framework of neutrino mixing schemes with one or more sterile neutrinos which have masses around the eV scale. Taking into account also cosmological constraints, I will present arguments in favor of 3+1 neutrino mixing with one sterile neutrino at the eV scale. Information : http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer : G. Pasztor

  10. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    The Department of Energy's Nuclear Physics program is a comprehensive program of interdependent experimental and theoretical investigation of atomic nuclei. Long range goals are an understanding of the interactions, properties, and structures of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter at the most elementary level possible and an understanding of the fundamental forces of nature by using nuclei as a proving ground. Basic ingredients of the program are talented and imaginative scientists and a diversity of facilities to provide the variety of probes, instruments, and computational equipment needed for modern nuclear research. Approximately 80% of the total Federal support of basic nuclear research is provided through the Nuclear Physics program; almost all of the remaining 20% is provided by the National Science Foundation. Thus, the Department of Energy (DOE) has a unique responsibility for this important area of basic science and its role in high technology. Experimental and theoretical investigations are leading us to conclude that a new level of understanding of atomic nuclei is achievable. This optimism arises from evidence that: (1) the mesons, protons, and neutrons which are inside nuclei are themselves composed of quarks and gluons and (2) quantum chromodynamics can be developed into a theory which both describes correctly the interaction among quarks and gluons and is also an exact theory of the strong nuclear force. These concepts are important drivers of the Nuclear Physics program

  11. An Absence of Neutrinos Associated with Cosmic Ray Acceleration in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Besson, D Bertrand D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carson, M; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Degner, T; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, B; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hülβ, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Smith, M W E; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Stüer, M; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as a leading candidate for acceleration of ultra high-energy cosmic rays, which would be accompanied by emission of TeV neutrinos produced in proton-photon interactions during acceleration in the GRB fireball. Two analyses using data from two years of the IceCube detector produced no evidence for this neutrino emission, placing strong constraints on models of neutrino and cosmic-ray production in these sources.

  12. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings

  13. Solar neutrino physics with Borexino I

    Ludhova, L; Benziger, J; Bick, D; Bonfini, G; Bravo, D; Avanzini, M Buizza; Caccianiga, B; Cadonati, L; Calaprice, F; Carraro, C; Cavalcante, P; Chavarria, A; D'Angelo, D; Davini, S; Derbin, A; Etenko, A; Fomenko, K; Franco, D; Galbiati, C; Gazzana, S; Ghiano, C; Giammarchi, M; Goeger-Nef, M; Goretti, A; Grandi, L; Guardincerri, E; Hardy, S; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kayunov, A; Kobychev, V; Korablev, D; Korga, G; Koshio, Y; Kryn, D; Laubenstein, M; Lewke, T; Litvinovich, E; Loer, B; Lombardi, F; Lombardi, P; Machulin, I; Manecki, S; Maneschg, W; Manuzio, G; Meindl, Q; Meroni, E; Miramonti, L; Misiaszek, M; Montanari, D; Mosteiro, P; Muratova, V; Oberauer, L; Obolenksy, M; Ortica, F; Otis, K; Pallavicini, M; Papp, L; Perasso, L; Perasso, S; Pocar, A; Raghavan, R S; Ranucci, G; Razeto, A; Re, A; Romani, P A; Sabelnikov, A; Saldanha, R; Salvo, C; Schoenert, S; Simgen, H; Skorokhvatov, M; Smirnov, O; Sotnikov, A; Sukhotin, S; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Testera, G; Vignaud, D; Vogelaar, R B; Von Feilitzsch, F; Winter, J; Wojcik, M; Wright, A; Wurm, M; Xu, J; Zaimidoroga, O; Zavatarelli, S; Zuzel, G

    2012-01-01

    Borexino is a large-volume liquid scintillator detector installed in the underground halls of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. After several years of construction, data taking started in May 2007. The Borexino phase I ended after about three years of data taking. Borexino provided the first real time measurement of the $^{7}$Be solar neutrino interaction rate with accuracy better than 5% and confirmed the absence of its day-night asymmetry with 1.4% precision. This latter Borexino results alone rejects the LOW region of solar neutrino oscillation parameters at more than 8.5 $\\sigma$ C.L. Combined with the other solar neutrino data, Borexino measurements isolate the MSW-LMA solution of neutrino oscillations without assuming CPT invariance in the neutrino sector. Borexino has also directly observed solar neutrinos in the 1.0-1.5 MeV energy range, leading to the first direct evidence of the $pep$ solar neutrino signal and the strongest constraint of the CNO solar neutrino flux up to date. Borexi...

  14. A theoretical perspective on neutrino physics

    A survey of sin2 θW, ρ, CKM matrix, and axial-isoscalar neutral current measurements via neutrino scattering is presented. Loop effects due to heavy top or a fourth generation are described. Neutrino oscillations are discussed in a three generation mixing framework and some motivation for νμ → ντ oscillation searches is given. 15 refs., 1 tab

  15. Mass of neutrino and particle physics

    Yanagida, T

    2003-01-01

    We give a brief review on the seesaw mechanism in a grand unified theory which predicts small neutrino masses. In the seesaw mechanism the lepton-number conservation is broken and neutrinos have Majorana type masses. We also explain why the lepton-number nonconservation can be an origin of the baryon-number asymmetry in the present universe. (author)

  16. Physics possibilities at India-based Neutrino Observatory

    S Uma Sankar; INO Collaboration

    2006-10-01

    In this talk I review the physics possible at India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). I discuss the improvement in the precision of currently known quantities and the possibility measuring the presently unknown quantities.

  17. The GENIE Neutrino Monte Carlo Generator: Physics and User Manual

    Andreopoulos, Costas [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL). Particle Physics Dept.; Barry, Christopher [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Dytman, Steve [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Gallagher, Hugh [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Golan, Tomasz [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Hatcher, Robert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Perdue, Gabriel [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yarba, Julia [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-10-20

    GENIE is a suite of products for the experimental neutrino physics community. This suite includes i) a modern software framework for implementing neutrino event generators, a state-of-the-art comprehensive physics model and tools to support neutrino interaction simulation for realistic experimental setups (the Generator product), ii) extensive archives of neutrino, charged-lepton and hadron scattering data and software to produce a comprehensive set of data/MC comparisons (the Comparisons product), and iii) a generator tuning framework and fitting applications (the Tuning product). This book provides the definite guide for the GENIE Generator: It presents the software architecture and a detailed description of its physics model and official tunes. In addition, it provides a rich set of data/MC comparisons that characterise the physics performance of GENIE. Detailed step-by-step instructions on how to install and configure the Generator, run its applications and analyze its outputs are also included.

  18. The GENIE Neutrino Monte Carlo Generator: Physics and User Manual

    Andreopoulos, Costas; Dytman, Steve; Gallagher, Hugh; Golan, Tomasz; Hatcher, Robert; Perdue, Gabriel; Yarba, Julia

    2015-01-01

    GENIE is a suite of products for the experimental neutrino physics community. This suite includes i) a modern software framework for implementing neutrino event generators, a state-of-the-art comprehensive physics model and tools to support neutrino interaction simulation for realistic experimental setups (the Generator product), ii) extensive archives of neutrino, charged-lepton and hadron scattering data and software to produce a comprehensive set of data/MC comparisons (the Comparisons product), and iii) a generator tuning framework and fitting applications (the Tuning product). This book provides the definite guide for the GENIE Generator: It presents the software architecture and a detailed description of its physics model and official tunes. In addition, it provides a rich set of data/MC comparisons that characterise the physics performance of GENIE. Detailed step-by-step instructions on how to install and configure the Generator, run its applications and analyze its outputs are also included.

  19. Accelerator science in medical physics.

    Peach, K; Wilson, P; Jones, B

    2011-12-01

    The use of cyclotrons and synchrotrons to accelerate charged particles in hospital settings for the purpose of cancer therapy is increasing. Consequently, there is a growing demand from medical physicists, radiographers, physicians and oncologists for articles that explain the basic physical concepts of these technologies. There are unique advantages and disadvantages to all methods of acceleration. Several promising alternative methods of accelerating particles also have to be considered since they will become increasingly available with time; however, there are still many technical problems with these that require solving. This article serves as an introduction to this complex area of physics, and will be of benefit to those engaged in cancer therapy, or who intend to acquire such technologies in the future. PMID:22374548

  20. ACCELERATION PHYSICS CODE WEB REPOSITORY.

    WEI, J.

    2006-06-26

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  1. PREFACE: 1st Franco-Algerian Workshop on Neutrino Physics

    Mebarki, N.; Mimouni, J.; Vanucci, F.; Aissaoui, H.

    2015-04-01

    The first Franco-Algerian workshop on neutrino physics was held on 22-23 October 2013 at the University of Mentouri, Constantine, Algeria. It was jointly organized by the Laboratory of Mathematical and Subatomic Physics (LPMS) and the Direction of Scientific Research (DGRSTD) for the Algerian side, and for the French part by the IN2P3, CNRS and CEA IRFU. It is one of a series of international scientific meetings organized every two years by the LPMS at Constantine on high energy physics (theoretical, nuclear physics, classical and quantum cosmology, astrophysics, mathematical physics and quantum computing etc...) to maintain a high quality in scientific research and education at Algerian universities. This specific meeting brought together experts in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology from France and Algeria. It touched upon several theoretical, phenomenological as well as experimental aspects of the neutrinos. The workshop participants were mostly young researchers from many universities and research institutes in Algeria. The physics of neutrinos is a very active field in particle physics, hence the importance for the High Energy community in Algeria to gain expertise in this ''strategic'' area at the intersection of various topics in theoretical physics and high energy astrophysics (SM physics, CP violation, in general, SNe explosions, baryogenesis...). The neutrino proposed by Pauli back in 1930 as a ''desperate remedy'' to save the law of energy conservation in beta decay had a bright early history. Discovered in 1956 in the Cowan-Reines experiment despite all odds, this elusive particle which enabled us to understand the chiral nature of the weak interactions which later lead to the electro-weak unification finally appears to hold a key role in understanding subatomic physics as well as the structure and structuration of the Universe. It is also, after the discovery of the Higgs particle at the LHC in 2012, the only grey area left today in the

  2. A silicon detector for neutrino physics

    Kokkonen, J

    2002-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting future muon neutrino - tau neutrino oscillation searches using a high-resolution, large-area silicon microstrip detector, the Silicon TARget (STAR) detector was built. STAR was installed in the NOMAD short baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at the CERN SPS neutrino beam, where it recorded approximately 10000 neutrino interactions during the operation of the detector in the period 1997-98. It consists of five layers of silicon detectors interleaved with four layers of passive boron carbide as the target. The target mass is 45 kg, while the total silicon surface area is 1.14 square-meters and contains 32000 readout channels. The individual modules have a length of 72 cm, the longest built to date. The detection of tau particles, produced in tau neutrino charged-current interactions, would require a tracking detector with a precision of a few tens of microns in order to measure the position of the neutrino interaction vertex as well as the impact parame...

  3. Megaton Modular Multi-Purpose Neutrino Detector for a Program of Physics in the Homestake DUSEL

    Diwan, M V; Marciano, W; Viren, B; Svoboda, R; Frati, W; Lande, K; Mann, A K; Van Berg, R; Klein, J R

    2003-01-01

    This is a preliminary version of a formal proposal by the 3M collaboration to construct a megaton, modular, multipurpose (3M) neutrino detector for a program of experiments in neutrino physics. The detector components will be located in chambers approximately 7000 ft below the Earth's surface in the Homestake Mine at Lead, South Dakota, to carry out experiments on neutrino oscillations directed toward the principal experimental goal of the program, viz., the issue of CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector of elementary particles, an issue that has been the subject of study in the quark sector for several decades. The principal physics goal of this program also requires a moderately intense neutrino beam from an accelerator located a long distance from the detector array, such as the 2540 km distance of BNL from Homestake. The construction plan for that neutrino beam is at http://nwg.phy.bnl.gov/. Other experimental searches that do not require the accelerator-generated beam can be carried out with the 3...

  4. Neutrino Factory

    Bogomilov, M; Tsenov, R; Dracos, M; Bonesini, M; Palladino, V; Tortora, L; Mori, Y; Planche, T; Lagrange, J  B; Kuno, Y; Benedetto, E; Efthymiopoulos, I; Garoby, R; Gilardoini, S; Martini, M; Wildner, E; Prior, G; Blondel, A; Karadzhow, Y; Ellis, M; Kyberd, P; Bayes, R; Laing, A; Soler, F  J  P; Alekou, A; Apollonio, M; Aslaninejad, M; Bontoiu, C; Jenner, L  J; Kurup, A; Long, K; Pasternak, J; Zarrebini, A; Poslimski, J; Blackmore, V; Cobb, J; Tunnell, C; Andreopoulos, C; Bennett, J  R  J; Brooks, S; Caretta, O; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Edgecock, T  R; Fitton, M; Kelliher, D; Loveridge, P; McFarland, A; Machida, S; Prior, C; Rees, G; Rogers, C; Rooney, M; Thomason, J; Wilcox, D; Booth, C; Skoro, G; Back, J  J; Harrison, P; Berg, J  S; Fernow, R; Gallardo, J  C; Gupta, R; Kirk, H; Simos, N; Stratakis, D; Souchlas, N; Witte, H; Bross, A; Geer, S; Johnstone, C; Mokhov, N; Neuffer, D; Popovic, M; Strait, J; Striganov, S; Morfín, J  G; Wands, R; Snopok, P; Bogacz, S  A; Morozov, V; Roblin, Y; Cline, D; Ding, X; Bromberg, C; Hart, T; Abrams, R  J; Ankenbrandt, C  M; Beard, K  B; Cummings, M  A  C; Flanagan, G; Johnson, R  P; Roberts, T  J; Yoshikawa, C  Y; Graves, V  B; McDonald, K  T; Coney, L; Hanson, G

    2014-01-01

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that $\\theta_{13} > 0$. The measured value of $\\theta_{13}$ is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti)neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO$\

  5. Theoretical and Phenomenological Status of Neutrino Physics: A Brief Review

    We present an overview of recent progress in the theoretical and phenomenological studies of neutrino masses, lepton avor mixing, and CP violation. Firstly, We discuss the status of neutrino mass with in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. Then the possible ways in which neutrino mass terms can be included in the SM are discussed. The inclusion of new physics beyond the SM inevitably brings new parameters which are not constrained by the present experimental data on neutrino masses and mixing angles and, thus, are free parameters of the theory. We, also, discuss various theoretically motivated phenomenological approaches which can be used to reduce the number of free parameters and, thus, provide an excellent tool to understand the underlying physics of neutrino masses and mixings. Current experimental constraints on the neutrino mass spectrum and the lepton avor mixing parameters, including the recent observation of nonzero θ13, have been summarized. Finally, We discuss the renewed interest in the possible existence of one or more sterile neutrinos and their phenomenology

  6. Light Sterile Neutrinos in Particle Physics: Experimental Status

    Lasserre, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Most of the neutrino oscillation results can be explained by the three-neutrino paradigm. However several anomalies in short baseline oscillation data could be interpreted by invoking a hypothetical fourth neutrino, separated from the three standard neutrinos by a squared mass difference of more than 0.1 eV$^2$. This new neutrino, often called sterile, would not feel standard model interactions but mix with the others. Such a scenario calling for new physics beyond the standard model has to be either ruled out or confirmed with new data. After a brief review of the anomalous oscillation results we discuss the world-wide experimental proposal aiming to clarify the situation.

  7. Metal-loaded organic scintillators for neutrino physics

    Buck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in many neutrino physics experiments of the past and present. In particular for low energy neutrinos when realtime and energy information are required, liquid scintillators have several advantages compared to other technologies. In many cases the organic liquid needs to be loaded with metal to enhance the neutrino signal over background events. Several metal loaded scintillators of the past suffered from chemical and optical instabilities, limiting the performance of these neutrino detectors. Different ways of metal loading are described in the article with a focus on recent techniques providing metal loaded scintillators that can be used under stable conditions for many years even in ton scale experiments. Applications of metal loaded scintillators in neutrino experiments are reviewed and the performance as well as the prospects of different scintillator types are compared.

  8. Neutrino mass in elementary-particle physics and in big bang cosmology

    Some theoretical aspects of a nonzero value for the neutrino rest mass and its possible implications for physics are discussed. The nature of the neutrino mass is analyzed, as well as the physical consequences that may derive from the existence of new helicity states for the neutrino or from lepton charge nonconservation if the mass is of Dirac or Majorana character, respectively. Massive neutrinos are examined in the context of grand unified theories combining the weak, strong, and electromagnetic interactions. Searches for neutrino-mass effects in β decay and for neutrino oscillations are reviewed. Several astrophysical effects of the neutrino mass are described: solar-neutrino oscillations, the decay of primordial neutrinos, the feasibility of detecting massive primordial neutrinos experimentally. The predictions of big bang theory regarding the neutrino number density in the universe are analyzed, and a discussion is given of the influence neutrino oscillations might have on the neutrino density and on cosmological nucleosynthesis

  9. Constraints on New Physics from Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    Honda, Minako; Kao, Yee; Okamura, Naotoshi; Pronin, Alexey; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2007-01-01

    New physics beyond the Standard Model can lead to extra matter effects on neutrino oscillation if the new interactions distinguish among the three flavors of neutrino. In a previous paper, we argued that a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in which the Fermilab-NUMI beam in its high-energy mode is aimed at the planned Hyper-Kamiokande detector would be capable of constraining the size of those extra effects, provided the vacuum value of \\sin^2 2\\theta_{23} is not too close to one....

  10. Infancy and youth of neutrino physics: some recollections

    The lecture on the history of neutrino physics is given. It is a collection of a few short, stories. Two of these, about Pauli and Fermi. A story about Ma orana work on Majorana fermions, which is following, has been covered much less extensively. There follow a few recollections, related to the experimental and theoretical work of the author in proposing and developing the Cl-A method of neutrino detection, in establishing the notion of weak processes and in proposing a new type of weak interaction investigations - high energy neutrino experiments

  11. Compensation Techniques in Accelerator Physics

    Sayed, Hisham Kamal [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Accelerator physics is one of the most diverse multidisciplinary fields of physics, wherein the dynamics of particle beams is studied. It takes more than the understanding of basic electromagnetic interactions to be able to predict the beam dynamics, and to be able to develop new techniques to produce, maintain, and deliver high quality beams for different applications. In this work, some basic theory regarding particle beam dynamics in accelerators will be presented. This basic theory, along with applying state of the art techniques in beam dynamics will be used in this dissertation to study and solve accelerator physics problems. Two problems involving compensation are studied in the context of the MEIC (Medium Energy Electron Ion Collider) project at Jefferson Laboratory. Several chromaticity (the energy dependence of the particle tune) compensation methods are evaluated numerically and deployed in a figure eight ring designed for the electrons in the collider. Furthermore, transverse coupling optics have been developed to compensate the coupling introduced by the spin rotators in the MEIC electron ring design.

  12. The physics of neutrino cross sections: theoretical studies

    Alvarez-Ruso, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The present status of neutrino cross section physics is reviewed focusing on the recent theoretical developments in quasielastic scattering, multi-nucleon contributions to the inclusive scattering and pion production on nucleons and nuclei. A good understanding of these processes is crucial to meet the precision needs of neutrino oscillation experiments. Some of the challenges that arise in the consistent description of MiniBooNE and MINERvA recent data are discussed.

  13. Physics from solar neutrinos in dark matter direct detection experiments

    Cerdeño, David G.; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Jubb, Thomas; Machado, Pedro A. N.; Vincent, Aaron C.; Bœhm, Céline

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of dark matter direct detection experiments will be sensitive to both coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron scattering. This will enable them to explore aspects of solar physics, perform the lowest energy measurement of the weak angle sin2θWto date, and probe contributions from new theories with light mediators. In this article, we compute the projected nuclear and electron recoil rates expected in several dark matter direct detection experiments due to solar neu...

  14. The Acceleration Scale, Modified Newtonian Dynamics and Sterile Neutrinos

    Diaferio, Antonaldo; Angus, Garry W.

    General relativity is able to describe the dynamics of galaxies and larger cosmic structures only if most of the matter in the universe is dark, namely, it does not emit any electromagnetic radiation. Intriguingly, on the scale of galaxies, there is strong observational evidence that the presence of dark matter appears to be necessary only when the gravitational field inferred from the distribution of the luminous matter falls below an acceleration of the order of 10^{-10} m s^{-2}. In the standard model, which combines Newtonian gravity with dark matter, the origin of this acceleration scale is challenging and remains unsolved. On the contrary, the full set of observations can be neatly described, and were partly predicted, by a modification of Newtonian dynamics, dubbed MOND, that does not resort to the existence of dark matter. On the scale of galaxy clusters and beyond, however, MOND is not as successful as on the scale of galaxies, and the existence of some dark matter appears unavoidable. A model combining MOND with hot dark matter made of sterile neutrinos seems to be able to describe most of the astrophysical phenomenology, from the power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies to the dynamics of dwarf galaxies. Whether there exists a yet unknown covariant theory that contains general relativity and Newtonian gravity in the weak field limit and MOND as the ultra-weak field limit is still an open question.

  15. Neutrino scattering physics with the SHiP Experiment

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083090

    2015-01-01

    SHiP (Search for Hidden Particles) is a new general purpose fixed target facility, proposed at the CERN SPS accelerator. In its initial phase the 400 GeV protons beam will be dumped on a heavy target with the aim of integrating 2 × 1020 pot in five years. A dedicated detector downstream the target will allow to probe a variety of models with the light long-lived exotic particles and masses below O(10) GeV/c2. Another dedicated detector will allow the study of active neutrino cross-sections and angular distributions. In particular, the neutrino deep-inelastic cross-sections will be performed with a statistics 1000 times larger than currently available, with the extraction of the F4 and F5 structure functions, never measured so far. Tau neutrinos will be distinguished by anti-neutrinos, thus providing the first observation of the tau anti-neutrino. With muon neutrinos it will be possible to study the strangeness content of the nucleon.

  16. Neutrino scattering physics with the SHiP Experiment

    Di Crescenzo, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    SHiP (Search for Hidden Particles) is a new general purpose fixed target facility, proposed at the CERN SPS accelerator. In its initial phase the 400 GeV protons beam will be dumped on a heavy target with the aim of integrating $2 \\times 10^{20}$ pot in five years. A dedicated detector downstream the target will allow to probe a variety of models with the light long-lived exotic particles and masses below O(10) GeV/c2. Another dedicated detector will allow the study of active neutrino cross-sections and angular distributions. In particular, the neutrino deep-inelastic cross-sections will be performed with a statistics 1000 times larger than currently available, with the extraction of the F4 and F5 structure functions, never measured so far. Tau neutrinos will be distinguished by anti-neutrinos, thus providing the first observation of the tau anti-neutrino. With muon neutrinos it will be possible to study the strangeness content of the nucleon.

  17. Particle physics meets cosmology - The search for decaying neutrinos

    Henry, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental physical implications of the possible detection of massive neutrinos are discussed, with an emphasis on the Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) of matter. The Newtonian and general-relativistic pictures of the fundamental forces are compared, and the reduction of electromagnetic and weak forces to one force in the GUTs is explained. The cosmological consequences of the curved-spacetime gravitation concept are considered. Quarks, leptons, and neutrinos are characterized in a general treatment of elementary quantum mechanics. The universe is described in terms of quantized fields, the noninteractive 'particle' fields and the force fields, and cosmology becomes the study of the interaction of gravitation with the other fields, of the 'freezing out' of successive fields with the expansion and cooling of the universe. While the visible universe is the result of the clustering of the quark and electron fields, the distribution of the large number of quanta in neutrino field, like the mass of the neutrino, are unknown. Cosmological models which attribute anomalies in the observed motions of galaxies and stars to clusters or shells of massive neutrinos are shown to be consistent with a small but nonzero neutrino mass and a universe near the open/closed transition point, but direct detection of the presence of massive neutrinos by the UV emission of their decay is required to verify these hypotheses.

  18. Project X and its connection to neutrino physics

    Project X is a new high intensity proton source that is being planned at Fermilab to usher in a new era of high intensity physics. The high intensity frontier can provide a wealth of new measurements--the most voracious consumer of protons is the long baseline neutrino program, but with the proton source upgrades being planned there are even more protons available than current neutrino targets can withstand. Those protons can provide a rich program on their own of muon physics and neutrino scattering physics that is complimentary to the long baseline program. In this article we discuss the physics motivation for Project X that comes from these short baseline experiments, and also the status of the design of this new source and what it will take to move forward on that design

  19. Project X and its connection to neutrino physics

    Harris, Deborah; Jansson, Andreas; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Project X is a new high intensity proton source that is being planned at Fermilab to usher in a new era of high intensity physics. The high intensity frontier can provide a wealth of new measurements--the most voracious consumer of protons is the long baseline neutrino program, but with the proton source upgrades being planned there are even more protons available than current neutrino targets can withstand. Those protons can provide a rich program on their own of muon physics and neutrino scattering physics that is complimentary to the long baseline program. In this article we discuss the physics motivation for Project X that comes from these short baseline experiments, and also the status of the design of this new source and what it will take to move forward on that design.

  20. Neutrino physics and the mirror world: how exact parity symmetry explains the solar neutrino deficit, the atmospheric neutrino anomaly and the LSND experiment

    Evidence for ν-barμ → ν-bare oscillations has been reported at LAMPF using the LSND detector. Further evidence for neutrino mixing comes from the solar neutrino deficit and the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. All of these anomalies require new physics. It is shown that all of these anomalies can be explained if the standard model is enlarged so that an unbroken parity symmetry can be defined. This explanation holds independently of the actual model for neutrino masses. Thus, it is argued that parity symmetry is not only a beautiful candidate for a symmetry beyond the standard model, but it can also explain the known neutrino physics anomalies. 41 refs

  1. Neutrino physics and the mirror world: How exact parity symmetry explains the solar neutrino deficit, the atmospheric neutrino anomaly, and the LSND experiment

    Important evidence for neutrino oscillations comes from the solar neutrino deficit and the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. Further evidence for bar νμ→ bar νe oscillations has been reported at LAMPF using the LSND detector. All of these anomalies require new physics. We show that all of these anomalies can be explained if the standard model is enlarged so that an unbroken parity symmetry can be defined. This explanation holds independently of the actual model for neutrino masses. Thus, we argue that parity symmetry is not only a beautiful candidate for a symmetry beyond the standard model, but it can also explain the known neutrino physics anomalies

  2. Analytical tools in accelerator physics

    Litvinenko, V.N.

    2010-09-01

    This paper is a sub-set of my lectures presented in the Accelerator Physics course (USPAS, Santa Rosa, California, January 14-25, 2008). It is based on my notes I wrote during period from 1976 to 1979 in Novosibirsk. Only few copies (in Russian) were distributed to my colleagues in Novosibirsk Institute of Nuclear Physics. The goal of these notes is a complete description starting from the arbitrary reference orbit, explicit expressions for 4-potential and accelerator Hamiltonian and finishing with parameterization with action and angle variables. To a large degree follow logic developed in Theory of Cyclic Particle Accelerators by A.A.Kolmensky and A.N.Lebedev [Kolomensky], but going beyond the book in a number of directions. One of unusual feature is these notes use of matrix function and Sylvester formula for calculating matrices of arbitrary elements. Teaching the USPAS course motivated me to translate significant part of my notes into the English. I also included some introductory materials following Classical Theory of Fields by L.D. Landau and E.M. Liftsitz [Landau]. A large number of short notes covering various techniques are placed in the Appendices.

  3. Physics from solar neutrinos in dark matter direct detection experiments

    Cerdeño, David G; Jubb, Thomas; Machado, Pedro A N; Vincent, Aaron C; hm, Céline Bøe

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of dark matter direct detection experiments will be sensitive to both coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron scattering. This will enable them to explore aspects of solar physics, perform the lowest energy measurement of the weak angle to date, and probe contributions from new theories with light mediators. In this article, we compute the projected nuclear and electron recoil rates expected in several dark matter direct detection experiments due to solar neutrinos, and use these estimates to infer errors on future measurements of the neutrino fluxes, weak mixing angle and solar observables, as well as to constrain new physics in the neutrino sector. The combined rates of solar neutrino events in second generation experiments (SuperCDMS and LZ) can yield a measurement of the pp flux to 2.5% accuracy via electron recoil, and slightly improve the boron-8 flux determination. Assuming a low-mass argon phase, projected tonne-scale experiments like DARWIN can reduce the uncertainty on bo...

  4. 182th International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi" : Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics

    Ludhova, L

    2012-01-01

    This book contains chapters based on 9 of the lectures delivered at the Enrico Fermi School of Physics "Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics", held from 25 of July to 5 August 2011. The event was organized by the Italian Physical Society (SIF) jointly with the International School of Astro-particle Physics (ISAPP), a network whose aim is to build up an astro-particle community of both astrophysicists and particle physicists. Included are chapters on Neutrino oscillation physics (B. Kayser); Double-beta decay (E. Fiorini); Light neutrinos in cosmology (S. Pastor); Neutrinos and the stars (G.G. Raffelt); High energy neutrinos and cosmic rays (G. Sigl); Methods and problems in low-energy neutrino experiments (G. Ranucci); Methods and problems in neutrino observatories (M. Ribordy); New technologies in neutrino physics (L. Oberauer); and Perspectives of underground physics (A. Bettini). These are a followed by a section on the results presented in the form of posters by the Ph.D. students attending the school. The b...

  5. Computer programs in accelerator physics

    Three areas of accelerator physics are discussed in which computer programs have been applied with much success: i) single-particle beam dynamics in circular machines, i.e. the design and matching of machine lattices; ii) computations of electromagnetic fields in RF cavities and similar objects, useful for the design of RF cavities and for the calculation of wake fields; iii) simulation of betatron and synchrotron oscillations in a machine with non-linear elements, e.g. sextupoles, and of bunch lengthening due to longitudinal wake fields. (orig.)

  6. Health physics practices at research accelerators

    A review is given of the uses of particle accelerators in health physics, the text being a short course given at the Health Physics Society Ninth Midyear Topical Symposium in February, 1976. Topics discussed include: (1) the radiation environment of high energy accelerators; (2) dosimetry at research accelerators; (3) shielding; (4) induced activity; (5) environmental impact of high energy accelerators; (6) population dose equivalent calculation; and (7) the application of the ''as low as practicable concept'' at accelerators

  7. What do solar neutrino experiments teach us about physics?

    The predictions of the standard model (solar and electroweak) for solar neutrino experiments will be described, with special emphasis on quantitative estimates of the uncertainties in the predictions. An argument--which uses detailed Monte Carlo studies of the solar-model-predictions--will be presented which demonstrates that the existing solar neutrino experiments cannot be reconciled unless new weak interaction physics changes the shape of the 8Be neutrino energy spectrum. Additional arguments that suggest that new physics is required will be summarized. The predictions for next-generation experiments that are independent of details of solar models will be highlighted. An urgent appeal will be made for performing a measurement of the p(7Be, γ)8B reaction using a radioactive beam of 7Be

  8. The micro-physics of neutrino transport at extreme density

    Reddy, S. (Sanjay)

    2004-01-01

    Production and propagation of neutrinos in hot and dense matter plays an important role in the thermal evolution of neutron stars. In this article we review the micro-physics that influences weak interaction rates in dense matter containing nucleons, leptons and or quarks. We show that these rates depend sensitively on the strong and electromagnetic correlations between baryons. We present new results, obtained using molecular dynamics, for the response of dense plasma of heavy ions. Neutrino rates are also shown to be sensitive to the phase structure of matter at extreme density. We highlight recent calculations of neutrino rates in dense color superconducting phases of quark matter. We present a brief discussion of how these differences may affect the early evolution of a neutron star. Neutrinos play an important role in stellar evolution. By virtue of their weak interactions with matter neutrinos provide a mechanism for energy loss from the dense stellar interiors. In neutron stars, neutrino emission is the dominant cooling mechanism from the their birth in a supernova explosion until several thousand years of subsequent evolution. In this talk, we present an overview of some of the nuclear/particle physics issues that play a role in understanding the rate of propagation and production of neutrinos inside neutron stars. The calculation of these rates are of current interest since several research groups are embarking on large scale numerical simulations of supernova and neutron star evolution. Even moderate changes in the nuclear microphysics associated with the weak interaction rates at high density can impact macroscopic features that are observable.

  9. CP asymmetry in Neutrino Oscillations and New Physics1

    The CP asymmetry in neutrino oscillations, assuming new physics at production and/or detection processes, is analyzed. We compute this CP asymmetry using the standard quantum field theory within a general new physics scenario that may generate new sources of CP and flavor violation. Well known results for the CP asymmetry are reproduced in the case of V-A operators, and additional contributions from new physics operators are derived.

  10. CERN Accelerator School: Registration open for Advanced Accelerator Physics course

    2015-01-01

    Registration is now open for the CERN Accelerator School’s Advanced Accelerator Physics course to be held in Warsaw, Poland from 27 September to 9 October 2015.   The course will be of interest to physicists and engineers who wish to extend their knowledge of accelerator physics. The programme offers core lectures on accelerator physics in the mornings and a practical course with hands-on tuition in the afternoons.  Further information can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/Poland2015/Warsaw-advert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/361988/

  11. CERN Accelerator School: Registration open for Advanced Accelerator Physics course

    2015-01-01

    Registration is now open for the CERN Accelerator School’s Advanced Accelerator Physics course to be held in Warsaw, Poland from 27 September to 9 October 2015.   The course will be of interest to physicists and engineers who wish to extend their knowledge of Accelerator Physics. The programme offers core lectures on accelerator physics in the mornings and a practical course with hands-on tuition in the afternoons.  Further information can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/Poland2015/Warsaw-advert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/361988/

  12. Acceleration and propagation of cosmic radiation. Production, oscillation and detection of neutrinos

    In recent years, the old problem of cosmic-ray acceleration and propagation has become alive again, with the discovery of the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism, and with the first measurements of the cosmic-ray antiproton flux, which appears to be higher than expected. I have shown that the new acceleration mechanism was slow and I have calculated the maximum energy that can be reached by particles accelerated in various astrophysical sites. I have also studied in detail a cosmic-ray propagation model which takes into account the antiproton measurements. Neutrino astronomy is a field much more recent and in rapid expansion, thanks to a convergence of interests between astrophysicists and elementary particle physicists. Several large neutrino detectors already exist; really huge ones are in project. I have studied the possible impact of the high energy (> 1 TeV) neutrino astronomy on models of cosmic-ray sources such as Cygnus X3. Comparing the low energy (∼ 10 MeV) cosmic-ray antineutrinos with other sources of neutrinos and antineutrinos (sun, supernova, earth...), I have pointed out that the antineutrino background resulting from all the nuclear power-stations of the planet was sizeable. This background is a nuisance for some astrophysical applications but could be useful for studies on vacuum or matter neutrino oscillations (MSW effect). I have also examined the MSW effect in another context: the travel through the earth of neutrinos from the supernova explosion SN1987a

  13. Implications of a new light gauge boson for neutrino physics

    Boehm, Celine

    2004-01-01

    We study the impact of light gauge bosons on neutrino physics. We show that they can explain the NuTeV anomaly and also escape the constraints from neutrino experiments if they are very weakly coupled and have a mass of a few GeV. Lighter gauge bosons with stronger couplings could explain both the NuTeV anomaly and the positive anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. However, in the simple model we consider in this paper (say a purely vectorial extra U(1) current), they appear to be in conflic...

  14. NDM06: 2. symposium on neutrinos and dark matter in nuclear physics

    This second symposium on neutrinos and dark matter is aimed at discussing research frontiers and perspectives on currently developing subjects. It has been organized around 6 topics: 1) double beta decays, theory and experiments (particularly: GERDA, MOON, SuperNEMO, CUORE, CANDLES, EXO, and DCBA), 2) neutrinos and nuclear physics, 3) single beta decays and nu-responses, 4) neutrino astrophysics, 5) solar neutrino review, and 6) neutrino oscillations. This document is made up of the slides of the presentations

  15. NDM06: 2. symposium on neutrinos and dark matter in nuclear physics

    Akerib, D.; Arnold, R.; Balantekin, A.; Barabash, A.; Barnabe, H.; Baroni, S.; Baussan, E.; Bellini, F.; Bobisut, F.; Bongrand, M.; Brofferio, Ch.; Capolupo, A.; Carrara Enrico; Caurier, E.; Cermak, P.; Chardin, G.; Civitarese, O.; Couchot, F.; Kerret, H. de; Heros, C. de los; Detwiler, J.; Dracos, M.; Drexlin, G.; Efremenko, Y.; Ejiri, H.; Falchini, E.; Fatemi-Ghomi, N.; Finger, M.Ch.; Finger Miroslav, Ch.; Fiorillo, G.; Fiorini, E.; Fracasso, S.; Frekers, D.; Fushimi, K.I.; Gascon, J.; Genest, M.H.; Georgadze, A.; Giuliani, A.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Greenfield, M.; H de Jesus, J.; Hallin, A.; Hannestad, St.; Hirai, Sh.; Hoessl, J.; Ianni, A.; Ieva, M.B.; Ishihara, N.; Jullian, S.; Kaim, S.; Kajino, T.; Kayser, B.; Kochetov, O.; Kopylov, A.; Kortelainen, M.; Kroeninger, K.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lalanne, D.; Lanfranchi, J.C.; Lazauskas, R.; Lemrani, A.R.; Li, J.; Mansoulie, B.; Marquet, Ch.; Martinez, J.; Mirizzi, A.; Morfin Jorge, G.; Motz, H.; Murphy, A.; Navas, S.; Niedermeier, L.; Nishiura, H.; Nomachi, M.; Nones, C.; Ogawa, H.; Ogawa, I.; Ohsumi, H.; Palladino, V.; Paniccia, M.; Perotto, L.; Petcov, S.; Pfister, S.; Piquemal, F.; Poves, A.; Praet, Ch.; Raffelt, G.; Ramberg, E.; Rashba, T.; Regnault, N.; Ricol, J.St.; Rodejohann, W.; Rodin, V.; Ruz, J.; Sander, Ch.; Sarazin, X.; Scholberg, K.; Sigl, G.; Simkovic, F.; Sousa, A.; Stanev, T.; Strolger, L.; Suekane, F.; Thomas, J.; Titov, N.; Toivanen, J.; Torrente-Lujan, E.; Tytler, D.; Vala, L.; Vignaud, D.; Vitiello, G.; Vogel, P.; Volkov, G.; Volpe, C.; Wong, H.; Yilmazer, A

    2006-07-01

    This second symposium on neutrinos and dark matter is aimed at discussing research frontiers and perspectives on currently developing subjects. It has been organized around 6 topics: 1) double beta decays, theory and experiments (particularly: GERDA, MOON, SuperNEMO, CUORE, CANDLES, EXO, and DCBA), 2) neutrinos and nuclear physics, 3) single beta decays and nu-responses, 4) neutrino astrophysics, 5) solar neutrino review, and 6) neutrino oscillations. This document is made up of the slides of the presentations.

  16. Proceedings of the summer school on physics with neutrinos

    Locher, M.P. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    The Summer School on physics with neutrinos concentrated on a particularly rewarding topic on the intersection between particle and astrophysics. Although the neutrino has been postulated as early as 1930 in the famous letter by Pauli the intriguing particle poses challenging problems to the present day. The speakers did not spare any effort in creating an atmosphere of stimulating scientific exchange. The participating young and old enjoyed the presence of Jack Steinberger who presented a talk on the history of the neutrino and contributed in many other ways to the meeting. Apart from the lectures and seminars that are mostly reflected in these proceedings there were also a number of extra seminars on topics ranging from special nuclear reactions to the extinction of life in the universe, adding to the breadth of the presentations. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  17. Proceedings of the summer school on physics with neutrinos

    The Summer School on physics with neutrinos concentrated on a particularly rewarding topic on the intersection between particle and astrophysics. Although the neutrino has been postulated as early as 1930 in the famous letter by Pauli the intriguing particle poses challenging problems to the present day. The speakers did not spare any effort in creating an atmosphere of stimulating scientific exchange. The participating young and old enjoyed the presence of Jack Steinberger who presented a talk on the history of the neutrino and contributed in many other ways to the meeting. Apart from the lectures and seminars that are mostly reflected in these proceedings there were also a number of extra seminars on topics ranging from special nuclear reactions to the extinction of life in the universe, adding to the breadth of the presentations. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  18. Special Issue on "Neutrino Oscillations: Celebrating the Nobel Prize in Physics 2015" in Nuclear Physics B

    Ohlsson, Tommy

    2016-07-01

    In 2015, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded jointly to Takaaki Kajita from the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration and Arthur B. McDonald from the SNO Collaboration "for the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which shows that neutrinos have mass". Furthermore, the Daya Bay, K2K and T2K, KamLAND, SNO, and Super-Kamiokande Collaborations shared the Fundamental Physics Breakthrough Prize the same year. In order to celebrate this successful and fruitful year for neutrino oscillations, the editors and the publisher of Nuclear Physics B decided to publish a Special Issue on neutrino oscillations. We invited prominent scientists in the area of neutrino physics that relates to neutrino oscillations to write contributions for this Special Issue, which was open to both original research articles as well as review articles. The authors of this Special Issue consist of e.g. the two Nobel Laureates, International Participants of the Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics at Haga Slott in Enköping, Sweden (August 19-24, 2004), selected active researchers, and members from large experimental collaborations with major results in the last ten years. In total, this Special Issue consists of 28 contributions. Please note that the cover of this Special Issue contains a figure from each of the 26 contributions that have figures included.

  19. Neutrino Physics with Non-Standard Interactions at INO

    Choubey, Sandhya; Ohlsson, Tommy; Tiwari, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) involved in neutrino propagation inside Earth matter could potentially alter atmospheric neutrino fluxes. In this work, we look at the impact of these NSI on the signal at the ICAL detector to be built at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We show how the sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy of ICAL changes in the presence of NSI. The mass hierarchy sensitivity is shown to be rather sensitive to the NSI parameters $\\epsilon_{e\\mu}$ and $\\epsilon_{e\\tau}$, while the dependence on $\\epsilon_{\\mu\\tau}$ and $\\epsilon_{\\tau\\tau}$ is seen to be very mild, once the $\\chi^2$ is marginalised over oscillation and NSI parameters. If the NSI are large enough, the event spectrum at ICAL is expected to be altered and this can be used to discover new physics. We calculate the lower limit on NSI parameters above which ICAL could discover NSI at a given C.L. from 10 years of data. If NSI were too small, the null signal at ICAL can constrain the NSI parameters. We give up...

  20. Unifying physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma

    Seryi, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Unifying Physics of Accelerators, Lasers and Plasma introduces the physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma in tandem with the industrial methodology of inventiveness, a technique that teaches that similar problems and solutions appear again and again in seemingly dissimilar disciplines. This unique approach builds bridges and enhances connections between the three aforementioned areas of physics that are essential for developing the next generation of accelerators.

  1. Hawking Radiation of Weyl Neutrinos in a Rectilinearly Non-uniformly Accelerating Kinnersley Black Hole

    Wu, S Q; Xu, Cai

    2002-01-01

    Quantum thermal effect of Weyl neutrinos in a rectilinearly non-uniformly accelerating Kinnersley black hole is investigated by using the generalized tortoise coordinate transformation. The equation that determines the location, the Hawking temperature of the event horizon and the thermal radiation spectrum of neutrinos are derived. Our results show that the location and the temperature of the event horizon depend not only on the time but also on the angle.

  2. Hawking radiation of Weyl neutrinos in a rectilinearly non-uniformly accelerating Kinnersley black hole

    吴双清; 蔡勖

    2002-01-01

    The quantum thermal effect of Weyl neutrinos in a rectilinearly non-uniformly accelerating Kinnersley black holeis investigated using the generalized tortoise coordinate transformation. The equations that determine the location, theHawking temperature of the event horizon and the thermal radiation spectrum of neutrinos are derived. Our resultsshow that the location and the temperature of the event horizon depend not only on the time but also on the angle.

  3. Probing BSM Neutrino Physics with Flavor and Spectral Distortions: Prospects for Future High-Energy Neutrino Telescopes

    Shoemaker, Ian M

    2015-01-01

    The flavor of cosmic neutrinos may help unveil their sources and could reveal the presence of new physics in the neutrino sector. We consider the impacts of next-generation neutrino detectors, including the planned upgrade to neutrino detector--IceCube-Gen2, which is well-positioned to make dramatic improvements in both flavor and spectral measurements. We show that various models in neutrino physics beyond the Standard Model, such as neutrino decay, pseudo-Dirac states, and neutrino self-scattering, may be found or strongly constrained at IceCube-Gen2 and KM3NeT. We find that the additional flavor discriminants given by Glashow resonance events and so-called "double-bang" topologies improve the ability to access the flavor of the cosmic high-energy neutrinos and probe the BSM physics. In addition, although the details depend on source properties, Glashow resonance events have the additional feature of being able to inform us of the relative strengths of neutrino and antineutrino emission, which may help us d...

  4. High Energy Neutrinos as a Probe for New Physics and Astrophysics

    Bugaev, E. V.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the recent achievements in high energy neutrino physics and, partly, neutrino astrophysics is presented. It is argued that experiments with high energy neutrinos of natural origin can be used for a search of new physics effects beyond the electroweak scale.

  5. Physics potential of the CERN-MEMPHYS neutrino oscillation project

    We consider the physics potential of CERN based neutrino oscillation experiments consisting of a Beta Beam (βB) and a Super Beam (SPL) sending neutrinos to MEMPHYS, a 440 kt water Cerenkov detector at Frejus, at a distance of 130 km from CERN. The θ13 discovery reach and the sensitivity to CP violation are investigated, including a detailed discussion of parameter degeneracies and systematical errors. For βB and SPL sensitivities similar to the ones of the phase II of the T2K experiment (T2HK) are obtained, where the results for the CERN-MEMPHYS experiments are less affected by systematical uncertainties. We point out that by a combination of data from βB and SPL a measurement with antineutrinos is not necessary and hence the same physics results can be obtained within about half of the measurement time compared to one single experiment. Furthermore, it is shown how including data from atmospheric neutrinos in the MEMPHYS detector allows to resolve parameter degeneracies and, in particular, provides sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy and the octant of θ23. (author)

  6. Future Accelerator Challenges in Support of High-Energy Physics

    Zisman, Michael S.; Zisman, M.S.

    2008-05-03

    Historically, progress in high-energy physics has largely been determined by development of more capable particle accelerators. This trend continues today with the imminent commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and the worldwide development effort toward the International Linear Collider. Looking ahead, there are two scientific areas ripe for further exploration--the energy frontier and the precision frontier. To explore the energy frontier, two approaches toward multi-TeV beams are being studied, an electron-positron linear collider based on a novel two-beam powering system (CLIC), and a Muon Collider. Work on the precision frontier involves accelerators with very high intensity, including a Super-BFactory and a muon-based Neutrino Factory. Without question, one of the most promising approaches is the development of muon-beam accelerators. Such machines have very high scientific potential, and would substantially advance the state-of-the-art in accelerator design. The challenges of the new generation of accelerators, and how these can be accommodated in the accelerator design, are described. To reap their scientific benefits, all of these frontier accelerators will require sophisticated instrumentation to characterize the beam and control it with unprecedented precision.

  7. Short-Baseline Neutrino Physics using the NOvA Near Detector and the Booster Neutrino Beam

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan

    2016-03-01

    The NOvA Near Detector (ND) is a low Z, nearly-fully active tracking detector, capable of 3D reconstruction of neutrino-induced interactions, situated at Fermilab, about 1 km from the NuMI neutrino beam target. Due to its positioning 14.6 mrad off the beam axis, the detector samples a narrow-band neutrino beam peaked at 2 GeV. NOvA's ND L/E greatly overlaps with the L/E range of the recent MiniBooNE experiment on the Booster neutrino beamline at Fermilab, thus making the NOvA ND an ideal tool to test a sterile neutrino hypothesis in this L/E regime and to study the low-energy excess reported by MiniBooNE. Due to the large off-axis angle (160 mrad) with respect to the Booster neutrino beamline, the NOvA ND will also observe high energy (1.4 GeV) kaon decay-in-flight neutrinos from the Booster neutrino beamline, at about 800 meters from the target. In addition, this unique `two beams in one detector' setup enables a cross-check of the energy calibration and of the measurement of neutrino cross sections at different neutrino energies in the same detector. We discuss physics capabilities and present sensitivity studies within such an experimental setup.

  8. Evidence for new physics in high energy neutrino collisions

    For many years it has been recognised that neutrinos are a rather unique tool for studying particle interactions at very high energies. The neutrino is a simple point-like particle that only interacts weakly and thus provides the opportunity to investigate 'new' phenomena in weak interaction at high energies. New and as yet undiscovered particles may be produced by neutrinos and may be observed in high energy collisons, for example W-bosons or heavy leptons. If the target consists of hadrons these collisions may yield basic information about the structure of hadrons. Experimental work at Caltech Fermilab is described, the object of which is a search for new phenomena arising from neutrino investigations. A class of neutrino interactions has been discovered involving two muons in the final state, not readily explainable, although so far most results tend to fit the predictions of a simple quark-parton model. The main purpose here is to comment on this work. The most striking features are that both muons are relatively energetic, the two muons are of opposite sign, the μ-is more energetic than the μ+, and the energy observed in the interaction is very large. It has been established that both muons are prompt, and the question is discussed as to whether matters can be explained by decays of known short-lived particles yielding leptons - this is found to be untenable. The most likely explanation seems to be the production of a new particle. One possibility is that something new in the weak interaction is produced, for example, a new heavy lepton. Another possibility is that a new state is formed in the hadron system, and it is thought that a new hadronic state of mass 2 to 4 GeV is responsible. It is concluded that recent observations of 2μ events induced by neutrinos definitely imply new and as yet unexplained physics. (U.K.)

  9. Accelerator and Technical Sector Seminar: Future neutrino facilities: the neutrino factory

    2012-01-01

    Thursday 19.January 2012 at 14:15  -  IT Auditorium (bldg. 31 3-004) Future neutrino facilities: the neutrino factory by Gersende Prior / University of Geneva and CERN EN/MEF The neutrino factory is one of the proposed designs for a future intense neutrino beam facility. In its current layout, a high-power proton beam impinges on an Hg jet target producing pions, decaying in turn into muons. In order to reduce the particle beam emittance, the muon transverse momentum is reduced through ionization cooling by a technically demanding set-up made of closely-packed RF cavities alternating with absorbers. In this talk I will present the motivation for building an intense neutrino beam and some of the proposed neutrino facilities' design. I will discuss the challenges inherent to the cooling of muons, possible optimization of the current baseline and the on-going R&D. ________________ ATS Seminars Organisers: H. Burkhardt (BE), S. Sgobba (EN), G. deRijk (TE)

  10. CAS CERN Accelerator School: Advanced accelerator physics. Proceedings. Vol. 2

    This advanced course on general accelerator physics is the second of the biennial series given by the CERN Accelerator School and follows on from the first basic course given at Gif-sur-Yvette, Paris, in 1984. Stress is placed on the mathematical tools of Hamiltonian mechanics and the Vlasov and Fokker-Planck equations, which are widely used in accelerator theory. The main topics treated in this present work include: nonlinear resonances, chromaticity, motion in longitudinal phase space, growth and control of longitudinal and transverse beam emittance, space-charge effects and polarization. The seminar programme treats some specific accelerator techniques, devices, projects and future possibilities. (orig.)

  11. CAS CERN Accelerator School: Advanced accelerator physics. Proceedings. Vol. 1

    This advanced course on general accelerator physics is the second of the biennial series given by the CERN Accelerator School and follows on from the first basic course given at Gif-sur-Yvette, Paris, in 1984. Stress is placed on the mathematical tools of Hamiltonian mechanics and the Vlasov and Fokker-Planck equations, which are widely used in accelerator theory. The main topics treated in this present work include: nonlinear resonances, chromaticity, motion in longitudinal phase space, growth and control of longitudinal and transverse beam emittance, space-charge effects and polarization. The seminar programme treats some specific accelerator techniques, devices, projects and future possibilities. (orig.)

  12. Acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays. Production, oscillation and detection of neutrinos

    This thesis is devoted to studies on cosmic rays and neutrinos, particles astrophysically relevant. In recent years, the old problem of cosmic-ray acceleration and propagation has become alive again, with the discovery of the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism, and with the first measurements of the cosmic-ray antiproton flux, which appears to be higher than expected. I have shown that the new acceleration mechanism was slow and I have calculated the maximum energy that can be reached by particles accelerated in various astrophysical sites. I have also studied in detail a cosmic-ray propagation model which takes into account the antiproton measurements. Neutrino astronomy is a field much more recent and in rapid expansion, thanks to a convergence of interests between astrophysicists and elementary particle physicists. Several large neutrino detectors already exist; really huge ones are in project. I have studied the possible impact of the high energy (> 1 TeV) neutrino astronomy on models of cosmic-ray sources such as Cygnus X3. Comparing the low energy (∼ 10 MeV) cosmic-ray antineutrinos with other sources of neutrinos and antineutrinos (sun, supernova, earth ...), I have pointed out that the antineutrino background resulting from all the nuclear power-stations of the planet was sizeable. This background is a nuisance for some astrophysical applications but could be useful for studies on vacuum or matter neutrino oscillations (MSW effect). I have also examined the MSW effect in another context: the travel through the earth of neutrinos from the supernova explosion SN1987a

  13. CAS CERN Accelerator School: Second general accelerator physics course

    The course on general accelerator physics given at Aarhus is basically a repeat of that organised by the CERN Accelerator School at Gif-sur-Yvette, Paris in September 1984 and whose proceedings were published as CERN Yellow Report 85-19 (1985). However, the opportunity was taken to improve or extend certain subjects while introducing new ones and it is these which are included in the present proceedings. The lectures treated here include accelerator optics, insertions, image and space charge forces, neutralisation, diagnostics and intra-beam scattering while the seminar programme includes a number of specialised accelerator topics. Reports on a separate series of seminars organised by the University of Aarhus, Denmark, and devoted to advanced technology arising from general accelerator physics are also included, as well as errata to CERN 85-19. (orig.)

  14. The program in muon and neutrino physics: Superbeams, cold muon beams, neutrino factory and the muon collider

    R. Raja et al.

    2001-08-08

    The concept of a Muon Collider was first proposed by Budker [10] and by Skrinsky [11] in the 60s and early 70s. However, there was little substance to the concept until the idea of ionization cooling was developed by Skrinsky and Parkhomchuk [12]. The ionization cooling approach was expanded by Neufer [13] and then by Palmer [14], whose work led to the formation of the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) [3] in 1995. The concept of a neutrino source based on a pion storage ring was originally considered by Koshkarev [18]. However, the intensity of the muons created within the ring from pion decay was too low to provide a useful neutrino source. The Muon Collider concept provided a way to produce a very intense muon source. The physics potential of neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings was investigated by Geer in 1997 at a Fermilab workshop [19, 20] where it became evident that the neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings needed for the muon collider were exciting on their own merit. The neutrino factory concept quickly captured the imagination of the particle physics community, driven in large part by the exciting atmospheric neutrino deficit results from the SuperKamiokande experiment. As a result, the MC realized that a Neutrino Factory could be an important first step toward a Muon Collider and the physics that could be addressed by a Neutrino Factory was interesting in its own right. With this in mind, the MC has shifted its primary emphasis toward the issues relevant to a Neutrino Factory. There is also considerable international activity on Neutrino Factories, with international conferences held at Lyon in 1999, Monterey in 2000 [21], Tsukuba in 2001 [22], and another planned for London in 2002.

  15. Experimental Results on Neutrino Oscillations Using Atmospheric, Solar and Accelerator Beams

    The innermost secrets of the mysterious neutrino are being revealed in underground detectors. Recent data on atmospheric neutrinos, primarily from the Super-Kamiokande experiment, confirm the neutrino flavor mixing and non-zero masses. The high precision measurement of angular distribution allows to determine the value of Δm2 between 0.0013 eV2 and 0.0054 eV2 at 90% c.l. Studies of up-down asymmetries in different event samples indicate that νμ↔ντ oscillations are more likely explanation of the data than νμ↔νs. The deficit of the observed solar neutrino flux compared to the predictions of the standard solar model, often interpreted by neutrino oscillations, is further studied in the SuperKamiokande detector. The energy spectrum is measured above 5.5 MeV for the Sun's positions above and below the horizon. A day-night effect is observed at a statistical significance of 2 σ. The K2K (KEK to Kamioka) is the first long-baseline neutrino-oscillation experiment. During runs in 1999 the first 3 events were observed in the SuperKamiokande detector caused by neutrinos produced at the KEK accelerator at a distance of 250 km. The predicted number of events without any oscillations is 12.3+1.7-1.9. (author)

  16. Probing new physics with underground accelerators and radioactive sources

    New light, weakly coupled particles can be efficiently produced at existing and future high-intensity accelerators and radioactive sources in deep underground laboratories. Once produced, these particles can scatter or decay in large neutrino detectors (e.g. Super-K and Borexino) housed in the same facilities. We discuss the production of weakly coupled scalars ϕ via nuclear de-excitation of an excited element into the ground state in two viable concrete reactions: the decay of the 0+ excited state of 16O populated via a (p,α) reaction on fluorine and from radioactive 144Ce decay where the scalar is produced in the de-excitation of 144Nd⁎, which occurs along the decay chain. Subsequent scattering on electrons, e(ϕ,γ)e, yields a mono-energetic signal that is observable in neutrino detectors. We show that this proposed experimental setup can cover new territory for masses 250 keV≤mϕ≤2me and couplings to protons and electrons, 10−11≤gegp≤10−7. This parameter space is motivated by explanations of the “proton charge radius puzzle”, thus this strategy adds a viable new physics component to the neutrino and nuclear astrophysics programs at underground facilities

  17. Detecting non-relativistic cosmic neutrinos by capture on tritium: phenomenology and physics potential

    Long, Andrew J; Sabancilar, Eray

    2014-01-01

    We study the physics potential of the detection of the Cosmic Neutrino Background via neutrino capture on tritium, taking the proposed PTOLEMY experiment as a case study. With the projected energy resolution of $\\Delta \\sim$ 0.15 eV, the experiment will be sensitive to neutrino masses with degenerate spectrum, $m_1 \\simeq m_2 \\simeq m_3 = m_\

  18. Terascale Physics Opportunities at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment: NuSOnG

    Adams, T; Bugel, L; Camilleri, L; Conrad, J M; De Gouvêa, A; Fisher, P H; Formaggio, J A; Jenkins, J; Karagiorgi, G; Kobilarcik, T R; Kopp, S; Kyle, G; Loinaz, W A; Mason, D A; Milner, R; Moore, R; Morfín, J G; Nakamura, M; Naples, D; Nienaber, P; Olness, F I; Owens, J F; Pate, S F; Pronin, A; Seligman, W G; Shaevitz, M H; Schellman, H; Schienbein, I; Syphers, M J; Tait, T M P; Takeuchi, T; Tan, C Y; Van de Water, R G; Yamamoto, R K; Yu, J Y

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering experiment, NuSOnG (Neutrino Scattering on Glass). This experiment uses a Tevatron-based neutrino beam to obtain over an order of magnitude higher statistics than presently available for the purely weak processes $\

  19. Element-Loaded Organic Scintillators For Neutrino Physics

    Full text: Plastic and liquid scintillators are widely used for different fundamental and engineering applications. The interest to these materials is connected with their advantages as compared with inorganic scintillators: - ast response; - high stability to different actions (radiation resistance, photo resistance, thermo resistance, moisture resistance); - relative simplicity of construction of detectors of any shape and configuration; - possibility of large-scale detectors construction; - relatively low cost; - possibility of using of simple methods of decreasing of radioactive impurities concentrations. The element composition of scintillation material defines its registration efficiency. The molecular nature of luminescence of organic scintillators discovers the possibilities for creating on their base the wide spectrum of detecting systems suitable for solving different physical problems. The present review is devoted to material science of organic scintillators containing metals of III-rd group of Periodic Table, such as indium, itterbium, gadolinium and neodymium. These scintillators are interesting for different brunches of neutrino physics: search for double ?-decay, search for neutrino oscillations, registration of Solar neutrinos. The common approaches and different examples of design and production of such scintillators are discussed in present work. The special consideration is given to interrelation of composition and properties of organic scintillators. (authors)

  20. Physics potential of the CERN-MEMPHYS neutrino oscillation project

    Campagne, J E; Mezzetto, Mauro; Schwetz, T

    2007-01-01

    We consider the physics potential of CERN based neutrino oscillation experiments consisting of a Beta Beam (BB) and a Super Beam (SPL) sending neutrinos to MEMPHYS, a 440 kt water Cerenkov detector at Frejus, at a distance of 130 km from CERN. The $\\theta_{13}$ discovery reach and the sensitivity to CP violation are investigated, including a detailed discussion of parameter degeneracies and systematical errors. For BB and SPL sensitivities similar to the ones of the phase II of the T2K experiment (T2HK) are obtained, where the results for the CERN-MEMPHYS experiments are less affected by systematical uncertainties. We point out that by a combination of data from BB and SPL a measurement with antineutrinos is not necessary and hence the same physics results can be obtained within about half of the measurement time compared to one single experiment. Furthermore, it is shown how including data from atmospheric neutrinos in the MEMPHYS detector allows to resolve parameter degeneracies and, in particular, provides...

  1. Applied Anti-neutrino Physics 2013

    2013-01-01

    This year, the 9th annual Applied Antineutrino Physics Workshop will be hosted by Sejong University, at the COEX conference center in Seoul South Korea. The workshop will be held on November 1(Friday) - 2(Saturday), 2013. Conveniently for many travelers, it takes place directly after and at the same venue as the 2013 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium (http://www.nss-mic.org/2013/NSSMain.asp) Applied Antineutrino Physics describes an ensemble of experimental and theoretical efforts which aim to use the antineutrino signal from nuclear reactors, and from the Earth itself, in order to address practical problems in nonproliferation and geology respectively. Since the 2004 inception of these workshops, groups worldwide have made considerable advances in defining and expanding the field, garnering interest from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which administers the worlds most important nonproliferation regime, and from the geology/geophysics community. This meeting will focus on the current activi...

  2. Constraints on New Physics from Various Neutrino Experiments

    Pronin, Alexey

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we consider a number of past, present, and future neutrino experiments designed to test physics beyond the Standard Model. First, we analyze potential new physics explanations of the NuTeV anomaly and check their compatibility with the most recent experimental data. The models we consider are: gauged Lmu-Ltau, gauged B-3Lmu, and S1, S3, V1, V3 leptoquarks. We find that only the triplet leptoquark models can explain NuTeV and be compatible with the data from other experiments a...

  3. Higgs Effects in Neutrino Physics and Heavy Quark Systems

    Rashed, Ahmed Mohammed Mostafa

    This work presents a study of the effects of multi-Higgs doublets on the properties of neutrino sector and heavy quark systems. The phenomenological implications of multi-Higgs models, which contain multi-Higgs doublets, in the neutrino and quark sector are discussed in this dissertation. The two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM), in which two Higgs doublets are introduced, is the simplest extension to the scalar sector of the standard model (SM). A new boson state was recently seen in the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) and ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus) experiments at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). We investigate the multi-Higgs models contributions in understanding various phenomena in the neutrino sector. Introducing a model to explain the neutrino oscillation phenomenon within the framework of multi-Higgs doublets is considered. We introduce different flavor symmetries in the lepton sector and study the phenomenological consequences in both the scalar and lepton sectors. The leptonic mixing in the symmetric limit can be, among other structures, the bi-maximal (BM) or the tri-bimaximal (TBM) mixing. We find that a mixing model with 2-3 flavor symmetry can explain the nonzero θ13 measurements. In our study, neutrino masses were proposed where its smallness is not due to the seesaw mechanism, i.e. not inversely proportional to some large mass scale. It comes from a one-loop mechanism with dark matter in the loop consisting of singlet Majorana fermions within a model with A4 flavor symmetry. A relevant point of interest in the neutrino sector is the study of the nonstandered interactions and its implications to neutrino oscillation. Here, we introduce the nonstandard interaction effects at the detectors of neutrino oscillation experiments and the impact of extracting the neutrino mixing angles is studied. The extractions of the atmospheric mixing angle θ23 rely on the standard model cross sections for nutau + N → tau- + X in nu tau appearance experiments. Corrections

  4. Neutrinos herald possible new physics in Japan

    2011-01-01

    There’s an embarrassment of choice for my message this week. Firstly, it was great to see a press release from the Japanese T2K (Tokai to Kamioka) experiment on 15 June, signalling not only potentially great physics, but also that the Japanese physics community is getting back on its feet after the earthquake and tsunami. Back home, the LHC is running beautifully...    Crossing the inverse femtobarn threshold so early into this years run is wonderful achievement, and augurs well for the summer conferences. We’ve now reached the stage where a single LHC fill is delivering as much data as the entire 2010 run. And finally, when Council met this week, I was pleased to announce that CERN has received formal confirmation from all five applicants for membership, opening the way to CERN welcoming new members soon. A busy two weeks, then, but what I’d like to focus on is the new result from Japan.   Simply stated, the T2K result shows the first indication of...

  5. Present and future neutrino physics research at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    The Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility is currently the site of two neutrino experiments. A measurement of elastic scattering of electron-neutrinos on electrons is providing confirmation of the destructive interference between the weak neutral and charged currents predicted in the standard electroweak theory. A search for the appearance of /bar/ν//sub e/ is being carried out at the LAMPF beam stop, as well. The status of this experiment is described. A major new initiative is being undertaken to measure neutrino-electron scattering in a large water Cerenkov detector. This meaurement will be precise enough to provide, in combination with the meaurements to be performed at the new generation of high-energy electron-positron colliers, the first experimental study of the standard electrowak theory at the level of one-loop radiative corrections. The detector will also be a vehicle for neutrino-oscillation searches, measurement of neutrinos from supernovae, and other fundamental physics. The apparatus will consist of a neutrino production target and shield surrounded by a water Cerenkov detector. The fiducial volume of water will be approximately 7000 tons, viewed by approximately 13000 20 cm diameter photomultiplier tubes. 11 refs., 6 figs

  6. New accelerators in high-energy physics

    First, I should like to mention a few new ideas that have appeared during the last few years in the accelerator field. A couple are of importance in the design of injectors, usually linear accelerators, for high-energy machines. Then I shall review some of the somewhat sensational accelerator projects, now in operation, under construction or just being proposed. Finally, I propose to mention a few applications of high-energy accelerators in fields other than high-energy physics. I realize that this is a digression from my title but I hope that you will find it interesting

  7. Requirements for a new detector at the South Pole receiving an accelerator neutrino beam

    Tang, Jian; Winter, Walter

    2012-01-01

    There are recent considerations to increase the photomultiplier density in the IceCube detector array beyond that of DeepCore, which will lead to a lower detection threshold and a huge fiducial mass for the neutrino detection. This initiative is known as "Phased IceCube Next Generation Upgrade" (PINGU). We discuss the possibility to send a neutrino beam from one of the major accelerator laboratories in the Northern hemisphere to such a detector. Such an experiment would be unique in the sense...

  8. Accelerator Physics Branch annual technical report, 1989

    The report describes, in a series of separate articles, the achievements of the Accelerator Physics Branch for the calendar year 1989. Work in basic problems of accelerator physics including ion sources, high-duty-factor rf quadrupoles, coupling effects in standing wave linacs and laser acceleration is outlined. A proposal for a synchrotron light source for Canada is described. Other articles cover the principal design features of the IMPELA industrial electron linac prototype, the cavities developed for the HERA complex at DESY, Hamburg, West Germany, and further machine projects that have been completed

  9. CAS CERN Accelerator School second advanced accelerator physics course

    The advanced course on general accelerator physics given in West Berlin closely followed that organised by the CERN Accelerator School at Oxford in September 1985 and whose proceedings were published as CERN Yellow Report 87-03 (1987). However, certain subjects were treated in a different way, improved or extended, while some new ones were introduced and it is all of these which are included in the present proceedings. The lectures include particle-photon interactions, high-brilliance lattices and single/multiple Touschek effect, while the seminars are on the major accelerators presently under construction or proposed for the near future, applications of synchrotron radiation, free-electron lasers, cosmic accelerators and crystal beams. Also included are errata, and addenda to some of the lectures, of CERN 87-03. (orig.)

  10. CAS CERN Accelerator School. Third advanced accelerator physics course

    The third version of the CERN Accelerator School's (CAS) advanced course on General Accelerator Physics was given at Uppsala University from 18-29 September, 1989. Its syllabus was based on the previous courses held in Oxford, 1985 and Berlin, 1987 whose proceedings were published as CERN Yellow Reports 87-03 and 89-01 respectively. However, the opportunity was taken to emphasize the physics of small accelerators and storage rings, to present some topics in new ways, and to introduce new seminars. Thus the lectures contained in the present volume include chromaticity, dynamic aperture, kinetic theory, Landau damping, ion-trapping, Schottky noise, laser cooling and small ring lattice problems while the seminars include interpretation of numerical tracking, internal targets and living with radiation. (orig.)