WorldWideScience

Sample records for accelerator driven systems

  1. JAERI accelerator driven system project

    In Japan a national program called OMEGA was started in 1988 for research and development of new technologies for partitioning and transmutation of nuclear waste. Under this program JAERI is carrying out research and development for proton accelerator-driven transmutation, together with transmutation with fast burner reactor and advanced partitioning technology. Two types of accelerator driven transmutation systems are proposed: a solid system and a molten-salt system. An outline of the OMEGA program and the partitioning and transmutation studies at JAERI are presented in this report

  2. Weapon plutonium in accelerator driven power system

    Accelerator Driven Systems are planned to be developed for the use (or destruction) of dozens of tons of weapon-grade Plutonium (W-Pu) resulted from the reducing of nuclear weapons. In the paper are compared the parameters of various types of accelerators, the physical properties of various types of targets and blankets, and the results of fuel cycle simulation. Some economical aspects are also discussed

  3. IAEA activities on accelerator-driven systems

    A brief account is given of the following IAEA programmes and events: Special Scientific Programme on 'Use of High Energy Accelerators for Transmutation of Actinides and Power Production'; Status report on actinide and fission product transmutation studies; Accelerator-driven systems: energy generation and transmutation of nuclear waste (status report); Coordinated Research Programme on the Use of Thorium-based Fuel Cycle in Accelerator Driven Systems to Incinerate Plutonium and to Reduce Long-term Waste Toxicities; Technical Committee Meeting on 'Feasibility and Motivation for Hybrid Concepts for Nuclear Energy Generation and Transmutation'; Data-base on experimental facilities and computer codes for ADS related research and development; Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Safety, Environmental and Non-Proliferation Aspects of Partitioning and Transmutation of Actinides and Long-lived Fission Products. (P.A.)

  4. Accelerating Science Driven System Design With RAMP

    Wawrzynek, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Researchers from UC Berkeley, in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, are engaged in developing an Infrastructure for Synthesis with Integrated Simulation (ISIS). The ISIS Project was a cooperative effort for “application-driven hardware design” that engages application scientists in the early parts of the hardware design process for future generation supercomputing systems. This project served to foster development of computing systems that are better tuned to the application requirements of demanding scientific applications and result in more cost-effective and efficient HPC system designs. In order to overcome long conventional design-cycle times, we leveraged reconfigurable devices to aid in the design of high-efficiency systems, including conventional multi- and many-core systems. The resulting system emulation/prototyping environment, in conjunction with the appropriate intermediate abstractions, provided both a convenient user programming experience and retained flexibility, and thus efficiency, of a reconfigurable platform. We initially targeted the Berkeley RAMP system (Research Accelerator for Multiple Processors) as that hardware emulation environment to facilitate and ultimately accelerate the iterative process of science-driven system design. Our goal was to develop and demonstrate a design methodology for domain-optimized computer system architectures. The tangible outcome is a methodology and tools for rapid prototyping and design-space exploration, leading to highly optimized and efficient HPC systems.

  5. Accelerator-Driven System with Current Technology

    World needs a safer and cleaner nuclear power plant. A nuclear power plant that will not cause a disaster and that will produce radiotoxic nuclear waste as small as possible. At the moment, the closest system is the accelerator driven system (ADS) making use of the Thorium fuel. First of all, it is safer in a disaster such as an earthquake, because the deriving accelerator stops immediately by the earthquake. And, there won't be a Fukushima-like accident, because this Thorium ADS reactor uses air cooling. It also minimizes the nuclear waste problem by reducing the amount of the toxic waste and shortening their half lifetime to only a few hundred years. Finally, it solves the Uranium reserve problem. The Thorium reserve is much larger than that of Uranium. Although the idea of ADS was proposed long time ago, it has not been utilized yet first by technical difficulty of accelerator. The accelerator-based system needs 0.6-1 GeV and at least a few MW power proton beam, which is an unprecedentedly high power. The most powerful 1 GeV proton linear accelerator is the Spallation Neutron Source, USA, which operates now at the power of 1.5 MW with the length of 350 m. A conventional linear accelerator would need several hundred m length, which is highly costly particularly in Korea because of the high land cost. Another difficulty is reliability of accelerator operation. To be used as a power plant facility, accelerator should obviously operate such that the power plant may continuously generate electricity at least for months with no interruption. However, the reality is that a high power proton accelerator is hardly operated even a few hours without interruption, although very short interruptions are tolerable. Anyway, it will take a time to develop an accelerator sufficiently reliable to be used for power generation. Now the question is if it is possible to realize ADS with the current level of accelerator technology. This paper seeks the possibility

  6. Accelerator-Driven System with Current Technology

    Lee, Hee Seok; Lee, Tae Yeon [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    World needs a safer and cleaner nuclear power plant. A nuclear power plant that will not cause a disaster and that will produce radiotoxic nuclear waste as small as possible. At the moment, the closest system is the accelerator driven system (ADS) making use of the Thorium fuel. First of all, it is safer in a disaster such as an earthquake, because the deriving accelerator stops immediately by the earthquake. And, there won't be a Fukushima-like accident, because this Thorium ADS reactor uses air cooling. It also minimizes the nuclear waste problem by reducing the amount of the toxic waste and shortening their half lifetime to only a few hundred years. Finally, it solves the Uranium reserve problem. The Thorium reserve is much larger than that of Uranium. Although the idea of ADS was proposed long time ago, it has not been utilized yet first by technical difficulty of accelerator. The accelerator-based system needs 0.6-1 GeV and at least a few MW power proton beam, which is an unprecedentedly high power. The most powerful 1 GeV proton linear accelerator is the Spallation Neutron Source, USA, which operates now at the power of 1.5 MW with the length of 350 m. A conventional linear accelerator would need several hundred m length, which is highly costly particularly in Korea because of the high land cost. Another difficulty is reliability of accelerator operation. To be used as a power plant facility, accelerator should obviously operate such that the power plant may continuously generate electricity at least for months with no interruption. However, the reality is that a high power proton accelerator is hardly operated even a few hours without interruption, although very short interruptions are tolerable. Anyway, it will take a time to develop an accelerator sufficiently reliable to be used for power generation. Now the question is if it is possible to realize ADS with the current level of accelerator technology. This paper seeks the possibility.

  7. Uncertainty assessment for accelerator-driven systems

    The concept of a subcritical system driven by an external source of neutrons provided by an accelerator ADS (Accelerator Driver System) has been recently revived and is becoming more popular in the world technical community with active programs in Europe, Russia, Japan, and the U.S. A general consensus has been reached in adopting for the subcritical component a fast spectrum liquid metal cooled configuration. Both a lead-bismuth eutectic, sodium and gas are being considered as a coolant; each has advantages and disadvantages. The major expected advantage is that subcriticality avoids reactivity induced transients. The potentially large subcriticality margin also should allow for the introduction of very significant quantities of waste products (minor Actinides and Fission Products) which negatively impact the safety characteristics of standard cores. In the U.S. these arguments are the basis for the development of the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW), which has significant potential in reducing nuclear waste levels. Up to now, neutronic calculations have not attached uncertainties on the values of the main nuclear integral parameters that characterize the system. Many of these parameters (e.g., degree of subcriticality) are crucial to demonstrate the validity and feasibility of this concept. In this paper we will consider uncertainties related to nuclear data only. The present knowledge of the cross sections of many isotopes that are not usually utilized in existing reactors (like Bi, Pb-207, Pb-208, and also Minor Actinides and Fission Products) suggests that uncertainties in the integral parameters will be significantly larger than for conventional reactor systems, and this raises concerns on the neutronic performance of those systems

  8. Subcritical reactivity monitoring in accelerator driven systems

    In this paper, an absolute measurements technique for the subcriticality determination is presented. The development of accelerator driven systems (ADS) requires the development of methods to monitor and control the subcriticality of this kind of system, without interfering with its normal operation mode. This method is based on the stochastic neutron and photon transport theory that can be implemented by presently available neutron transport codes. As a by-product of the methodology a monitoring measurement technique has been developed and verified using two coupled Monte Carlo programs. The first one, LAHET, simulates the spallation collisions and the high energy transport and the other, MCNPDSP, is used to estimate the counting statistics from neutron ray counter in fissile system, and the transport for neutrons with energies less than 20 Mev. Through the analysis of the counter detectors it is possible to determine the kinetics parameters and the keff value. We present two different ways to obtain these parameters using the accelerator or using a Cf-252 source. A good agreement between theory and simulations has been obtained with both sources

  9. Small type accelerator. Try for accelerator driven system

    Mori, Y

    2003-01-01

    FFAG (Fixed-field alternating gradient) accelerator for accelerator driven subcritical reactor, which aims to change from long-lived radioactive waste to short-lived radioactivity, is introduced. It is ring accelerator. The performance needed is proton as accelerator particle, 10MW (total) beam power, about 1GeV beam energy, >30% power efficiency and continuous beam. The feature of FFAG accelerator is constant magnetic field. PoP (Proof-of-principle)-FFAG accelerator, radial type, was run at first in Japan in 2000. The excursion is about some ten cm. In principle, beam can be injected and extracted at any place of ring. The 'multi-fish' acceleration can accelerate beams to 100% duty by repeating acceleration. 150MeV-FFAG accelerator has been started since 2001. It tried to practical use, for example, treatment of cancer. (S.Y.)

  10. Accelerator driven radiation clean nuclear power system conceptual research symposium

    The R and D of ADS (Accelerators Driven Subcritical System) in China introduced. 31 theses are presented. It includes the basic principle of ADS, accelerators, sub-critical reactors, neutron physics, nuclear data, partitioning and transmutation

  11. Proliferation Potential of Accelerator-Driven Systems: Feasibility Calculations

    Accelerator-driven systems for fissile materials production have been proposed and studied since the early 1950s. Recent advances in beam power levels for small accelerators have raised the possibility that such use could be feasible for a potential proliferator. The objective of this study is to review the state of technology development for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources and subcritical reactors. Energy and power requirements were calculated for a proton accelerator-driven neutron spallation source and subcritical reactors to produce a significant amount of fissile material--plutonium

  12. High power radiation guiding systems for laser driven accelerators

    This paper reviews the main problems encountered in the design of an optical system for transmitting high fluence radiation in a laser driven accelerator. Particular attention is devoted to the analysis of mirror and waveguide systems. (orig.)

  13. Weapon plutonium in accelerator driven power system

    The purpose and problems of the research - creation of a safe and reliable ADS for processing of about 25 tons of weapons plutonium in 30 years on the basis of a proton-accelerator with energies 0.8-1.2 GeV and a current of 10-30 mA; liquid Pb/Bi eutectic targets; one-directionally coupled fast/thermal blanket with plutonium fuel. The approach to weapons-Pu utilization is based on the understanding of the unconditional priority of safety features of ADS over economic considerations and, accordingly, on the priority of subcritical systems over critical. The description of a variant of ADS from the point of view of possibilities of its realization in an acceptable period of time on the base of approbated technologies is presented here. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Neutronic parameters characterizing accelerator driven system (ADS)

    An hybrid system is a reactor where an external source of spallation neutrons is supplied to a subcritical multiplying medium. The neutronic parameters characterising such a system include, in addition to the multiplication factor which measures the sub-criticality level, another physics parameter measuring the 'importance' of the external source. The aim of this thesis is, on the one hand, to investigate basic neutronic phenomena taking place in fast sub- critical media in either steady-state or transient operation, and, on the other hand, to assess the performance of the ERANOS neutronic code package applied to the analysis of such systems. To this aim, the first part of the work is focused on the MUSE program and in particular the MUSE3 experiment, which consists of different sub-critical configurations driven by a 14-MeV neutron source. This study has been pursued in two directions : the first one was the interpretation of the calculation-experiment (C-E) discrepancies which lead to the development of original calculation methods for sensitivity studies ; the second one was the experimental analysis which allowed an extensive neutronic characterization of the sub-critical system. A correlation between the external source importance and some directly measurable parameters (i.e. fission rate) was derived. The second part of the thesis addresses representativity issues between an experimental facility and an actual power reactor. Important conclusions have been drawn with regard to the operation of an ADS. Finally, representativity studies lead to the recommendation that a demonstration reactor should be built before an industrial plant is constructed. (author)

  15. Accelerator-driven transmutation reactor analysis code system (ATRAS)

    Sasa, Toshinobu; Tsujimoto, Kazufumi; Takizuka, Takakazu; Takano, Hideki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-03-01

    JAERI is proceeding a design study of the hybrid type minor actinide transmutation system which mainly consist of an intense proton accelerator and a fast subcritical core. Neutronics and burnup characteristics of the accelerator-driven system is important from a view point of the maintenance of subcriticality and energy balance during the system operation. To determine those characteristics accurately, it is necessary to involve reactions at high-energy region, which are not treated on ordinary reactor analysis codes. The authors developed a code system named ATRAS to analyze the neutronics and burnup characteristics of accelerator-driven subcritical reactor systems. ATRAS has a function of burnup analysis taking account of the effect of spallation neutron source. ATRAS consists of a spallation analysis code, a neutron transport codes and a burnup analysis code. Utility programs for fuel exchange, pre-processing and post-processing are also incorporated. (author)

  16. Accelerator-driven transmutation reactor analysis code system (ATRAS)

    JAERI is proceeding a design study of the hybrid type minor actinide transmutation system which mainly consist of an intense proton accelerator and a fast subcritical core. Neutronics and burnup characteristics of the accelerator-driven system is important from a view point of the maintenance of subcriticality and energy balance during the system operation. To determine those characteristics accurately, it is necessary to involve reactions at high-energy region, which are not treated on ordinary reactor analysis codes. The authors developed a code system named ATRAS to analyze the neutronics and burnup characteristics of accelerator-driven subcritical reactor systems. ATRAS has a function of burnup analysis taking account of the effect of spallation neutron source. ATRAS consists of a spallation analysis code, a neutron transport codes and a burnup analysis code. Utility programs for fuel exchange, pre-processing and post-processing are also incorporated. (author)

  17. Introduction to Physical and Technical Analysis of Accelerator Driven System

    In the present paper the main elements of the accelerator driven system (ADS) are discussed. Describing the spallation source it is underlined that beside the well accepted theory of spallation, the spallation phenomena is not yet sufficiently investigated. Dealing with the sub-critical reactor as an energy amplifier of the primary spallation source a suggestion for the specific neutron spectrum is proposed to obtain optimal conditions for energy production, burn-up and transmutation. In the chapter devoted for the accelerators which accelerates the charged particles, the two accelerator principles are presented on the examples of working accelerators: the linear accelerator - LINAC and cyclotron. Finally, there is presented the project of accelerator driven system - MYRHA for research and development worked out by the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre - SCK-CEN and the conception of nuclear power station of RBMK-1000 type with spallation source together with analysis of the balance of energy worked out by the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia. (author)

  18. Ashing vs. electric generation in accelerator driven system

    Accelerator Driven Systems have been conceived as an alternative for the processing of the radioactive wastes contained in spent fuel elements from nuclear power plants. These systems are formed by the coupling of a nuclear reactor - preferably a subcritical reactor - with a particle accelerator providing particles with energy in the order of the GeV. The long-lived fission products and actinides of the spent fuels are transformed by nuclear reactions in stable isotopes or in short-lived radioisotopes. The basic parameters for the electric energy production of the different systems are analysed. (author)

  19. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation systems

    The research on safety of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems (ADS) at the department has been focused on: a) ADS core design and development of advanced nuclear fuel optimised for high transmutation rates and good safety features; b) analysis of ADS-dynamics c) computer code and nuclear data development relevant for simulation and optimization of ADS; d) participation in ADS experiments including 1 MW spallation target manufacturing, subcritical experiments MUSE (CEA-Cadarache). Moreover, during the reporting period the EU-project 'IABAT', co-ordinated by the department has been finished and 4 other projects have been initiated in the frame of the 5th European Framework Programme. Most of the research topics reported in this paper are referred to appendices, which have been published in the open literature. The topics, which are not yet published, are described here in more details

  20. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation systems

    Gudowski, W.; Wallenius, J.; Tucek, K.; Eriksson, Marcus; Carlsson, Johan; Seltborg, P.; Cetnar, J. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics

    2001-05-01

    The research on safety of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems (ADS) at the department has been focused on: a) ADS core design and development of advanced nuclear fuel optimised for high transmutation rates and good safety features; b) analysis of ADS-dynamics c) computer code and nuclear data development relevant for simulation and optimization of ADS; d) participation in ADS experiments including 1 MW spallation target manufacturing, subcritical experiments MUSE (CEA-Cadarache). Moreover, during the reporting period the EU-project 'IABAT', co-ordinated by the department has been finished and 4 other projects have been initiated in the frame of the 5th European Framework Programme. Most of the research topics reported in this paper are referred to appendices, which have been published in the open literature. The topics, which are not yet published, are described here in more details.

  1. Superpower linear proton accelerator for neutron generator and accelerator-driven system

    The perspectives of development of superpower linear proton accelerators for high-intensive neutron generators and accelerator-driven systems are discussed. The main technical characteristics of the projects on neutron generators based on linear accelerators are presented. These projects are developed in USA, Japan, Italy and Russia. The RFQ structures are used in all projects for the initial acceleration of protons up to 5-7 MeV. The different modifications of drift tubes are applied for acceleration up to 100 MeV. The main acceleration (up to 1 GeV) is supposed to perform in superconducting resonators

  2. Reactivity Monitoring of Accelerator-Driven Nuclear Reactor Systems

    Uyttenhove, W.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis provides a methodology and set-up of a reactivity monitoring tool for Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS). The reactivity monitoring tool should guarantee the operation of an ADS at a safe margin from criticality. Robustness is assured in different aspects of the monitoring tool: the choice of the measurement techniques, the evaluation methods to derive the reactivity from experimental data, and the detector type and positioning. In the first chapter of the work, the experience from ...

  3. A regulated power supply for accelerator driven system

    This paper discusses a regulated high voltage power supply (RHVPS) developed for accelerator driven systems to drive a klystron. The RHVPS uses a large no. of small voltage choppers. These choppers are switched in tandem by a novel technique to regulate output voltage. Various parts of the system are novel. The front end is a pair of transformer with 40 secondaries each. Each secondary feeds a switched power module (SPM) which has a rectifier-filter unit followed by an IGBT switch to get 1.3 kV. All 80 SPMs are connected in series. The final output is taken from the two end SPMs. A central controller uses voltage sample from each SPM and generates switching pulses for each IGBT switch. IGBTs of all SPMs are switched with a fixed phase lag from each other, resulting in purely constant voltage with ripple limited to one SPM voltage. The frequency of ripple is high and can be filtered out with a simpler filter. The system can turn off for protection of the load in less than 2 microseconds, the essential attribute for a power supply to be used with klystrons. The results of wire burn tests measure the low stored energy at fault turn off (less than10 J). The power supply (rated for 100 kV at 2.5 MW) will be used for a continuous duty with the klystron for accelerator driven system at BARC (India). A power supply giving 80 kV, 75A is being used with an accelerator system for extraction of beam along with a Neutral Beam Injector. This paper discusses the technology and experimental results of the system. It also discusses various other options with similar power supply. (author)

  4. A prototype Accelerator Driven System in Belgium: the Myrrha project

    The renewed interest in Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) world-wide, has given a new increased effort in several related research domains. The communications within the ICANS, ICENES and ADTT meetings have shown that all major research institutes are somehow conducting research in this new field. Within this research forum, most of the e proposed systems deal with spallation sources in the MW-range, addressing needs for accelerators and sub-critical facilities that are out of current reliability and sometimes even out of current technology range. The necessary research in several sub-domains has to be addressed once and will need prototype systems enabling the validation and test of calculational tools and technological items. At SCK.CEN, the Belgian nuclear research center, the Myrrha project has been started end of 1995. This project intends to design, develop and possibly realize a prototype accelerator driven system as advanced neutron source and with four main objectives. . research of ADS-development as an option for transmutation . in-core irradiation experiments as extension and continuing support in the field of reactor physics and technology and safety-related experiments; . medical and industrial applications (including radioisotope production, known as the ADONIS-project) . extension of current SCK.CEn-research and extensions into new fields based on the availability of performing in-core and neutron-beam experiments This paper will describe the current status of this project and planning og ongoing research as well the description of two specific applications, i. e. radioisotope production and transmutation studies. (Author) 10 refs

  5. The physics design of accelerator-driven transmutation systems

    Nuclear systems under study in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology program (ADTT) will allow the destruction of nuclear spent fuel and weapons-return plutonium, as well as the production of nuclear energy from the thorium cycle, without a long-lived radioactive waste stream. The subcritical systems proposed represent a radical departure from traditional nuclear concepts (reactors), yet the actual implementation of ADTT systems is based on modest extrapolations of existing technology. These systems strive to keep the best that the nuclear technology has developed over the years, within a sensible conservative design envelope and eventually manage to offer a safer, less expensive and more environmentally sound approach to nuclear power

  6. A regulated high voltage power supply for accelerator driven system; A regulated high voltage power supply for accelerator driven system

    This paper discusses a regulated high voltage power supply (RHVPS) developed for accelerator driven systems to drive a klystron. The RHVPS uses a large no. of small voltage choppers. These choppers are switched in tandem by a novel technique to regulate output voltage. Various parts of the system are novel. The front end is a pair of transformer with 40 secondaries each. Each secondary feeds a switched power module (SPM) which has a rectifier-filter unit followed by an IGBT switch to get 1.3 kV. All 80 SPMs are connected in series. The final output is taken from the two end SPMs. A central controller uses voltage sample from each SPM and generates switching pulses for each IGBT switch. IGBTs of all SPMs are switched with a fixed phase lag from each other, resulting in purely constant voltage with ripple limited to one SPM voltage. The frequency of ripple is high and can be filtered out with a simpler filter. The system can turn off for protection of the load in less than 2 μs, the essential attribute for a power supply to be used with klystrons. The results of wire burn tests measure the low stored energy at fault turn off (less than 10 J). The power supply (rated for 100 kV at 2.5 MW) will be used for a continuous duty with the klystron for accelerator driven system at BARC (India). A power supply giving 80 kV. 75 A is being used with an accelerator system for extraction of beam along with a Neutral Beam Injector. This paper discusses the technology and experimental results of the system. It also discusses various other options with similar power supply. (author)

  7. Alternative definitions of kinetic parameters for accelerator driven systems

    Highlights: ► New definition of kinetic parameters for accelerator driven systems. ► Difference between effective and average delayed neutron fraction. ► Difference between effective and average prompt neutron lifetime. ► Effect of the neutron source (Cf, D–D, D–T) on ksrc. ► Effect of the (n, xn) reactions and source energy-angle distribution on ksrc. - Abstract: This study introduces a new formulation of kinetic parameters for accelerator driven systems and it is structured into two parts. The first part is dedicated to the classic definition of the kinetic parameters and compares different calculation methodologies. The second part considers a new definition of the kinetic parameters for subcritical assemblies, with particular emphasis on the delayed neutron fraction and the prompt neutron lifetime. This new definition takes into account neutrons from the external neutron source and (n, xn) reactions, which increase the fraction of prompt neutrons. The developed theoretical framework has been applied by Monte Carlo and deterministic calculations to the YALINA Thermal subcritical assembly located in Belarus. This facility can be driven by californium, deuterium–deuterium (D–D), or deuterium–tritium (D–T) external neutron sources. For the D–T neutron source, (n, xn) reactions must be taken into account in order to produce accurate results because the average energy of D–T source neutrons is 14.1 MeV, a value which is much higher than the threshold energy of the (n, 2n) cross section of uranium isotopes.

  8. Thorium utilization in heavy water moderated Accelerator Driven Systems

    Research on Accelerator Driven Systems (ADSs) is being carried out around the world primarily with the objective of waste transmutation. Presently, the volume of waste in India is small and therefore there is little incentive to develop ADS based waste transmutation technology immediately. With limited indigenous U availability and the presence of large Th deposits in the country, there is a clear incentive to develop Th related technologies. India also has vast experience in design, construction and operation of heavy water moderated reactors. Heavy water moderated reactors employing solid Th fuels can be self sustaining, but the discharge burnups are too low to be economical. A possible way to improve the performance such reactors is to use an external neutron source as is done in ADS. This paper discusses our studies on Th utilization in heavy water moderated ADSs. The study is carried out at the lattice level. The time averaged k-infinity of the Th bundle from zero burnup up to the discharge burnup is taken to be the same as the core (ensemble) averaged k-infinity. For the purpose of the analysis we have chosen standard PHWR and AHWR assemblies. Variation of the pitch and coolant (H2O/D2O) are studied. Both, the once through cycle and the recycling option are studied. In the latter case the study is carried out for various enrichments (% 233U in Th) of the recycled Th fuel bundles. The code DTF as modified for lattice and burnup calculations (BURNTRAN) was used for carrying out the study. The once through cycle represents the most attractive ADS concept (Th burner ADS) possible for Th utilization. It avoids reprocessing of Th spent fuel and in the ideal situation the use of any fissile material either initially or for sustaining itself. The gain in this system is however rather low requiring a high power accelerator and a substantial fraction of the power generated to be fed back to the accelerator. The self sustaining Th-U cycle in a heavy moderated ADS is a

  9. Radiological Hazard of Spallation Products in Accelerator-Driven System

    The central issue underlying this paper is related to elucidating the hazard of radioactive spallation products that might be an important factor affecting the design option of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs). Hazard analysis based on the concept of Annual Limit on Intake identifies alpha-emitting isotopes of rare earths (REs) (dysprosium, gadolinium, and samarium) as the dominant contributors to the overall toxicity of traditional (W, Pb, Pb-Bi) targets. The matter is addressed from several points of view: code validation to simulate their yields, choice of material for the neutron producing targets, and challenging the beam type. The paper quantitatively determines the domain in which the toxicity of REs exceeds that of polonium activation products broadly discussed now in connection with advertising lead-bismuth technology for the needs of ADSs

  10. MYRRHA: a multipurpose accelerator driven system for research and development

    The development of a new nuclear installation that is able to fulfil the economical, social, environmental and technological demands, is a cornerstone for the future provision of sustainable energy. Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) can pave the way for a more environmentally safe and acceptable nuclear energy production. Fundamental and applied R and D are crucial in the development of ADS technologies and demand the availability of appropriate prototype installations. In answer to this need and in order to update its current irradiation potential, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK·CEN), in partnership with Ion Beam Applications s. a. (IBA), is launching the MYRRHA project. It is focussed on the design, development and realisation of a modular and flexible irradiation facility based on the ADS concept. This paper describes the concept, the applications foreseen in the MYRRHA installation and the accompanying design activities currently being performed at SCK·CEN and IBA. (authors)

  11. Accelerator driven systems from the radiological safety point of view

    P K Sarkar; Maitreyee Nandy

    2007-02-01

    In the proposed accelerator driven systems (ADS) the possible use of several milliamperes of protons of about 1 GeV incident on high mass targets like the molten lead–bismuth eutectic is anticipated to pose radiological problems that have so far not been encountered by the radiation protection community. Spallation reaction products like high energy gammas, neutrons, muons, pions and several radiotoxic nuclides including Po-210 complicate the situation. In the present paper, we discuss radiation safety measures like bulk shielding, containment of radiation leakage through ducts and penetration and induced activity in the structure to protect radiation workers as well as estimation of sky-shine, soil and ground water activation, release of toxic gases to the environment to protect public as per the stipulations of the regulatory authorities. We recommend the application of the probabilistic safety analysis technique by assessing the probability and criticality of different hazard-initiating events using HAZOP and FMECA.

  12. Two-stage fuel cycles with accelerator-driven systems

    As part of ongoing efforts to assess nuclear fuel cycle options, four fuel cycle options based on the same two reactor technologies have been studied. All four options are composed of two stages, one which contains pressurized-water reactors (PWRs), and the other, fast spectrum accelerator-driven systems (ADS). The performance characteristics and material mass flows have been determined for the fuel cycle options considered, and compared. The three major difficulties encountered when modeling and analyzing these fuel cycle options have been to maintain the PWR fuel temperature reactivity coefficient negative when multi-recycling MOX fuel, to design the ADS core to be a breeder, and to achieve a high enough keff in the ADS to avoid the accelerator power consumption to be larger than the power generated by the ADS core. The differences observed in the performance characteristics and mass flows between the four fuel cycle options analyzed are discussed in this paper. Overall it is found that despite the four fuel cycle options being based on the same reactor technologies and seemingly similar at first sight, they perform differently and offer different features: resource utilization, need for uranium enrichment, required reprocessing capacity, and material type to be stored. (author)

  13. Status of Accelerator Driven Systems Research and Technology Development

    One of the greatest challenges for nuclear energy is how to properly manage the highly radioactive waste generated during irradiation in nuclear reactors. In order for nuclear power to exploit its full potential as a major sustainable energy source, there needs to be a safe and effective way to deal with this waste. Since 1995, several scenario studies have been conducted on different advanced nuclear fuel cycle and waste management options in various countries. Examples include the collaborative projects under “Global sustainable nuclear energy scenarios for long term development and deployment of nuclear energy” of the IAEA International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) initiative, and the scenario studies conducted under the auspices of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the Euratom research project PATEROS — Partitioning and Transmutation European Roadmap for Sustainable Nuclear Energy. Some of the proposed long term nuclear fuel cycles include an innovative concept of a hybrid system for the transmutation of long lived radioisotopes. This is usually the called accelerator driven system (ADS) — or accelerator driven transmutation of waste (ATW) — and consists of a high power proton accelerator, a heavy metal spallation target that produces neutrons when bombarded by the high power beam, and a subcritical core that is neutronically coupled to the spallation target. The ADS, which has been developed in different countries for more than 40 years, is claimed to offer new prospects and advantages for the transmutation of high level radioactive waste. The ADS would convert highly radioactive material to non-radioactive material or material with a much shorter half-life. In addition, these hybrid systems can generate electricity during the conversion of transuranic waste. In 1997, under the guidance of its Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), the IAEA published IAEA-TECDOC-985, Accelerator Driven Systems: Energy

  14. Computer codes and methods for simulating accelerator driven systems

    A large set of computer codes and associated data libraries have been developed by nuclear research and industry over the past half century. A large number of them are in the public domain and can be obtained under agreed conditions from different Information Centres. The areas covered comprise: basic nuclear data and models, reactor spectra and cell calculations, static and dynamic reactor analysis, criticality, radiation shielding, dosimetry and material damage, fuel behaviour, safety and hazard analysis, heat conduction and fluid flow in reactor systems, spent fuel and waste management (handling, transportation, and storage), economics of fuel cycles, impact on the environment of nuclear activities etc. These codes and models have been developed mostly for critical systems used for research or power generation and other technological applications. Many of them have not been designed for accelerator driven systems (ADS), but with competent use, they can be used for studying such systems or can form the basis for adapting existing methods to the specific needs of ADS's. The present paper describes the types of methods, codes and associated data available and their role in the applications. It provides Web addresses for facilitating searches for such tools. Some indications are given on the effect of non appropriate or 'blind' use of existing tools to ADS. Reference is made to available experimental data that can be used for validating the methods use. Finally, some international activities linked to the different computational aspects are described briefly. (author)

  15. Parametric study of the accelerator-driven transmutation system

    A couple of parametric studies were performed for an accelerator-driven transmutation system in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). For the analysis, LAHET code system developed by LANL was employed. Molten salt fuel was adopted with its chemical composition of 64NaCl3-1Pu-35MA(Minor Actinide)Cl3. The isotope compositions of Pu and Ma were determined based on the composition in the 10-year cooled spent fuel having 3.2 W% initial enrichment and 33GWD/MTU discharge burnup. Proton beam of 20 mA, 1 GeV was assumed for the neutron production by the spallation reaction with the fuel. The fuel was designed to perform multifunction such as target, coolant. From the calculation results, one proton was believed to produce about 27 neutrons and the neutron multiplication factor was found to be 0.95 for the given system condition. For the beam of 20 mA, 1 GeV, the neutron flux reached up to 1.26x1015 n/cm2 and the corresponding total thermal power was 773 MWth. It was believed that the proposed system could transmute 502 kg of MA a year. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  16. MYRRHA: a multipurpose accelerator driven system for research and development

    SCK-CEN, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, and IBA s.a., Ion Beam Application, a world leader in accelerator technology, want to fulfil a prominent role in the Accelerator Driven Systems field and are designing an ADS prototype, the MYRRHA Project, and conducting an associated R and D programme. The partners are foreseeing MYRRHA as a first step towards the European ADS-Demo facility. The project focuses primarily on ADS related research, i.e. structural materials and nuclear fuel research, liquid metals and associated aspects, sub-critical reactor physics and subsequently on applications such as waste transmutation, radioisotope production and safety research on sub-critical systems. In this respect, the MYRRHA system should become a new major research infrastructure for the European partners presently involved in the ADS Demo development, supporting and enabling the international R and D programs. Ion Beam Applications, the Belgium world leader in particle accelerators, had joined the MYRRHA Project to perform the accelerator development. Currently the study and preliminary conceptual design of the MYRRHA system is going on and an intensive R and D programme is conducted to assess the most risky points of the present design. This study will define the final choice of the characteristics of the facility depending on the selected fields of application to be achieved. The MYRRHA concept, as it is today, is based on the coupling of an upgraded commercial proton accelerator with a spallation target surrounded by a subcritical neutron-multiplying medium. Its design is determined by the versatility m applications that should be made possible. Further technical and/or strategic developments of the project might change the concept. A cyclotron, based on positive ion acceleration technology brings the protons up to an energy level of 350 MeV. The nominal current is 5 mA of protons. The spallation target system consists in a circuit with, at the upper part, a free

  17. Advanced Computational Models for Accelerator-Driven Systems

    In the nuclear engineering scientific community, Accelerator Driven Systems (ADSs) have been proposed and investigated for the transmutation of nuclear waste, especially plutonium and minor actinides. These fuels have a quite low effective delayed neutron fraction relative to uranium fuel, therefore the subcriticality of the core offers a unique safety feature with respect to critical reactors. The intrinsic safety of ADS allows the elimination of the operational control rods, hence the reactivity excess during burnup can be managed by the intensity of the proton beam, fuel shuffling, and eventually by burnable poisons. However, the intrinsic safety of a subcritical system does not guarantee that ADSs are immune from severe accidents (core melting), since the decay heat of an ADS is very similar to the one of a critical system. Normally, ADSs operate with an effective multiplication factor between 0.98 and 0.92, which means that the spallation neutron source contributes little to the neutron population. In addition, for 1 GeV incident protons and lead-bismuth target, about 50% of the spallation neutrons has energy below 1 MeV and only 15% of spallation neutrons has energies above 3 MeV. In the light of these remarks, the transmutation performances of ADS are very close to those of critical reactors.

  18. Macroscopic multigroup constants for accelerator driven system core calculation

    The high-level wastes stored in facilities above ground or shallow repositories, in close connection with its nuclear power plant, can take almost 106 years before the radiotoxicity became of the order of the background. While the disposal issue is not urgent from a technical viewpoint, it is recognized that extended storage in the facilities is not acceptable since these ones cannot provide sufficient isolation in the long term and neither is it ethical to leave the waste problem to future generations. A technique to diminish this time is to transmute these long-lived elements into short-lived elements. The approach is to use an Accelerator Driven System (ADS), a sub-critical arrangement which uses a Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), after separation the minor actinides and the long-lived fission products (LLFP), to convert them to short-lived isotopes. As an advanced reactor fuel, still today, there is a few data around these type of core systems. In this paper we generate macroscopic multigroup constants for use in calculations of a typical ADS fuel, take into consideration, the ENDF/BVI data file. Four energy groups are chosen to collapse the data from ENDF/B-VI data file by PREPRO code. A typical MOX fuel cell is used to validate the methodology. The results are used to calculate one typical subcritical ADS core. (author)

  19. Transmutation of nuclear waste in accelerator-driven systems

    Herrera-Martínez, A

    2004-01-01

    Today more than ever energy is not only a cornerstone of human development, but also a key to the environmental sustainability of economic activity. In this context, the role of nuclear power may be emphasized in the years to come. Nevertheless, the problems of nuclear waste, safety and proliferation still remain to be solved. It is believed that the use of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs) for nuclear waste transmutation and energy production would address these problems in a simple, clean and economically viable, and therefore sustainable, manner. This thesis covers the major nuclear physics aspects of ADSs, in particular the spallation process and the core neutronics specific to this type of systems. The need for accurate nuclear data is described, together with a detailed analysis of the specific isotopes and energy ranges in which this data needs to be improved and the impact of their uncertainty. Preliminary experimental results for some of these isotopes, produced by the Neutron Time-of-Flight (n_TOF) ...

  20. Thorium fuel cycle concept for KAERI's accelerator driven system project

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been carrying out accelerator driven system related research and development called HYPER for transmutation and energy production. HYPER program is aiming to develop the elemental technologies for the subcritical system by 2001 and build a small bench scale test facility (∼5MW(th)) by the year 2006. Some major features of HYPER have been developed and employed, which are on-power fueling concepts, a hollow cylinder-type metal fuel, and Pb-Bi as a coolant and spallation target material. Another fuel cycle concept for HYPER has been also studied to utilize thorium as a molten salt form to produce electricity as well as to transmute TRU elements. At the early stage of the fuel cycle, fissile plutonium isotopes in TRU will be incinerated to produce energy and to breed 233U from thorium. Preliminary calculation showed that periodic removal of fission products and small amount of TRU addition could maintain the criticality without separation of 233Pa. At the end of the fuel cycle, the composition of fissile plutonium isotopes in TRU was significantly reduced from about 60% to 18%, which is not attractive any more for the diversion of plutonium. Thorium molten salt fuel cycle may be one of the alternative fuel cycles for the transmutation of TRU. The TRU remained at the end of fuel cycle can be incinerated in HYPER having fast neutron spectrums. (author)

  1. Disposition of Nuclear Waste Using Subcritical Accelerator-Driven Systems

    Doolen, G.D.; Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.A.; Houts, M.; Lawrence, G.

    1998-06-27

    ATW destroys virtually all the plutonium and higher actinides without reprocessing the spent fuel in a way that could lead to weapons material diversion. An ATW facility consists of three major elements: (1) a high-power proton linear accelerator; (2) a pyrochemical spent fuel treatment i waste cleanup system; (3) a liquid lead-bismuth cooled burner that produces and utilizes an intense source-driven neutron flux for transmutation in a heterogeneous (solid fuel) core. The concept is the result of many years of development at LANL as well as other major international research centers. Once demonstrated and developed, ATW could be an essential part of a global non-proliferation strategy for countries that could build up large quantities of plutonium from their commercial reactor waste. ATW technology, initially proposed in the US, has received wide and rapidly increasing attention abroad, especially in Europe and the Far East with major programs now being planned, organized and tided. Substantial convergence presently exists on the technology choices among the programs, opening the possibility of a strong and effective international collaboration on the phased development of the ATW technology.

  2. Advanced fuel developments for an industrial accelerator driven system prototype

    Delage, Fabienne; Ottaviani, Jean Pierre [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique CEA (France); Fernandez-Carretero, Asuncion; Staicu, Dragos [JRC-ITU (Germany); Boccaccini, Claudia-Matzerath; Chen, Xue-Nong; Mascheck, Werner; Rineiski, Andrei [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe - FZK (Germany); D' Agata, Elio [JRC-IE (Netherlands); Klaassen, Frodo [NRG, PO Box 25, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Sobolev, Vitaly [SCK-CEN (Belgium); Wallenius, Janne [KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden); Abram, T. [National Nuclear Laboratory - NNL (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    Fuel to be used in an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) for transmutation in a fast spectrum, can be described as a highly innovative concept in comparison with fuels used in critical cores. ADS fuel is not fertile, so as to improve the transmutation performance. It necessarily contains a high concentration ({approx}50%) of minor actinides and plutonium. This unusual fuel composition results in high gamma and neutron emissions during its fabrication, as well as degraded core performance. So, an optimal ADS fuel is based on finding the best compromise between thermal, mechanical, chemical, neutronic and technological constraints. CERCER and CERMET composite fuels consisting of particles of (Pu,MA)O{sub 2} phases dispersed in a magnesia or molybdenum matrix are under investigation within the frame of the ongoing European Integrated Project EUROTRANS (European Research programme for Transmutation) which aims at performing a conceptual design of a 400 MWth transmuter: the European Facility for Industrial Transmutation (EFIT). Performances and safety of EFIT cores loaded with CERCER and CERMET fuels have been evaluated. Out-of-pile and in-pile experiments are carried out to gain knowledge on the properties and the behaviour of these fuels. The current paper gives an overview of the work progress. (authors)

  3. Thermal hydraulics of accelerator driven system windowless targets

    Bruno ePanella

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of the fluid dynamics of the windowless spallation target of an Accelerator Driven System (ADS is presented. Several target mockup configurations have been investigated: the first one was a symmetrical target, that was made by two concentric cylinders, the other configurations are not symmetrical. In the experiments water has been used as hydraulic equivalent to lead-bismuth eutectic fluid. The experiments have been carried out at room temperature and flow rate up to 24 kg/s. The fluid velocity components have been measured by an ultrasound technique. The velocity field of the liquid within the target region either for the approximately axial-symmetrical configuration or for the not symmetrical ones as a function of the flow rate and the initial liquid level is presented. A comparison of experimental data with the prediction of the finite volume FLUENT code is also presented. Moreover the results of a 2D-3D numerical analysis that investigates the effect on the steady state thermal and flow fields due to the insertion of guide vanes in the windowless target unit of the EFIT project ADS nuclear reactor are presented, by analysing both the cold flow case (absence of power generation and the hot flow case (nominal power generation inside the target unit.

  4. Fuel cycle aspects of accelerator-driven energy systems

    The proposal by Carlo Rubbia and his associates at CERN for a particular variety of accelerator-driven system as an 'Energy Amplifier' is discussed. The paper is concerned with the fuel cycle and its implications. Using thorium is a secondary aspect of the CERN proposal, but important, and less fully established than may be supposed. The necessary processes have yet to be proved consistently reliable, tolerably inexpensive, and safe under all credible conditions to the satisfaction of regulatory bodies. This presents difficulties. Reasons for preferring thorium to uranium are often taken to be self-evidently sound, whereas the underlying assumptions are themselves questionable. The following conclusions have been arrived at. The attractions of accelerator-driven systems have prompted a great deal of interest in the physics and engineering of the basic system, considerably less in the fuel cycle needed to sustain it. In order to minimise avoidable risks on the development path, a conventional uranium or uranium-plutonium fuel would be more appropriate in the first instance than the thorium-based type postulated in the original 'energy amplifier' proposal and subject to greater problems of industrial innovation than appear to have been generally recognised. Apart from a possible capability for higher burn-up, and reactivity-flattening properties that might usefully diminish variations in the energy amplification factor, the advantages of thorium over uranium relate chiefly to its producing little of the transuranic elements and therefore being better suited to incinerating those already in existence. How far this is a feasible and worth-while objective needs to be critically examined. Difficulties are to be expected particularly in reprocessing the fuel and in separating long-lived radionuclides from present or future nuclear wastes, including those from thorium itself, where methods developed experimentally or for specialised purposes may not be readily or

  5. Thermal-hydraulics of lead bismuth for accelerator driven systems

    Full text of publication follows: Lead bismuth has been selected as one of the most suitable coolants to be used in accelerator driven systems (ADS) for transmutation of minor actinides. It serves both, as a target material of the spallation source to balance the neutron economy, and as a coolant with high thermal inertia to provide a safe and reliable heat transfer to the secondary power cycle. With the aim to develop the required technologies to enable the later design of such ADS systems, the Karlsruhe Lead bismuth LAboratory KALLA, consisting of three test loops, has been built and set into operation at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe since 2000, keeping more than 45 t of PbBi in operation at temperatures up to 550 deg. C. The test program includes oxygen control systems, heat flux simulation tools, electro-magnetic and mechanical pump technologies, heat transfer and flow measurements, reliability and corrosion tests. In a first test campaign, a technology loop called THESYS was built to develop measurement technologies for the acquisition of scalar quantities, like pressures, temperatures, concentrations, and flow rates, as well as velocity fields, which are required for both operational and scientific purposes. THESYS also allowed to perform generic turbulent heat transfer experiments necessary to provide liquid metal adapted turbulent heat transfer models for ADS design analyses. The second loop, the thermalhydraulic loop THEADES with an installed power of 2.5 MW, has been built to conduct prototypical component experiments for beam windows (e.g. MEGAPIE or MYHRRA) or fuel rod configurations. First test results will be reported. The experimental team is supported by a numerical team who studied the thermal hydraulics of the tested components in order to enable a later transfer of the results to industrial systems. Three different types of codes are being improved: lumped parameter codes (e.g. ATHLET) to perform system analyses for lead bismuth in loops

  6. Accelerator driven systems for energy production and waste incineration: Physics, design and related nuclear data

    This volume contains the notes of lectures given at the workshops 'Hybrid Nuclear Systems for Energy Production, Utilisation of Actinides and Transmutation of Long-lived Radioactive Waste' and 'Nuclear Data for Science and Technology: Accelerator Driven Waste Incineration', held at the Abdus Salam ICTP in September 2001. The subject of the first workshop was focused on the so-called Accelerator Driven Systems, and covered the most important physics and technological aspects of this innovative field. The second workshop was devoted to an exhaustive survey on the acquisition, evaluation, retrieval and validation of the nuclear data relevant to the design of Accelerator Driven Systems

  7. Transmutation of fission products in reactors and accelerator-driven systems

    Energy flows and mass flows in several scenarios are considered. Economical and safety aspects of the transmutation scenarios are compared. It is difficult to find a sound motivation for the transmutation of fission products with accelerator-driven systems. If there would be any hesitation in transmuting fission products in nuclear reactors, there would be an even stronger hesitation to use accelerator-driven systems, mainly because of their lower energy efficiency and their poor cost effectiveness. The use of accelerator-driven systems could become a 'meaningful' option only if nuclear energy would be banished completely. (orig./HP)

  8. Analytical benchmarks for the kinetics of accelerator-driven systems

    The work presented in this paper illustrates the analytical benchmark philosophy with applications to subcritical source-driven system dynamics. Results for different complexity problems are presented in the frame of multigroup diffusion theory. The analysis performed on systems having physical characteristics typical of the Yalina Booster experiment are presented. The comparisons with the results of numerical calculations enlighten the convergence trend of discretized schemes and the limits of applicability to the analysis of experiments. (authors)

  9. Disposition of nuclear waste using subcritical accelerator-driven systems

    Spent fuel from nuclear power plants contains large quantities of Pu, other actinides, and fission products (FP). This creates challenges for permanent disposal because of the long half-lives of some isotopes and the potential for diversion of the fissile material. Two issues of concern for the US repository concept are: (1) long-term radiological risk peaking tens-of-thousands of years in the future; and (2) short-term thermal loading (decay heat) that limits capacity. An accelerator-driven neutron source can destroy actinides through fission, and can convert long-lived fission products to shorter-lived or stable isotopes. Studies over the past decade have established that accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) can have a major beneficial impact on the nuclear waste problem. Specifically, the ATW concept the authors are evaluating: (1) destroys over 99.9% of the actinides; (2) destroys over 99.9% of the Tc and I; (3) separates Sr-90 and Cs-137; (4) separates uranium from the spent fuel; (5) produces electric power

  10. Disposition of nuclear waste using subcritical accelerator-driven systems

    Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.; Houts, M.; Lawrence, G.

    1998-12-31

    Spent fuel from nuclear power plants contains large quantities of Pu, other actinides, and fission products (FP). This creates challenges for permanent disposal because of the long half-lives of some isotopes and the potential for diversion of the fissile material. Two issues of concern for the US repository concept are: (1) long-term radiological risk peaking tens-of-thousands of years in the future; and (2) short-term thermal loading (decay heat) that limits capacity. An accelerator-driven neutron source can destroy actinides through fission, and can convert long-lived fission products to shorter-lived or stable isotopes. Studies over the past decade have established that accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) can have a major beneficial impact on the nuclear waste problem. Specifically, the ATW concept the authors are evaluating: (1) destroys over 99.9% of the actinides; (2) destroys over 99.9% of the Tc and I; (3) separates Sr-90 and Cs-137; (4) separates uranium from the spent fuel; (5) produces electric power.

  11. Dynamic response of an accelerator driven system to accelerator beam interruptions for criticality

    Subcritical nuclear reactors driven by intense neutron sources can be very suitable tools for nuclear waste transmutation, particularly in the case of minor actinides with very low fractions of delayed neutrons. A proper control of these systems needs to know at every time the absolute value of the reactor subcriticality (negative reactivity), which must be measured by fully reliable methods, usually conveying a short interruption of the accelerator beam in order to assess the neutron flux reduction. Those interruptions should be very short in time, for not disturbing too much the thermal magnitudes of the reactor. Otherwise, the cladding and the fuel would suffer from thermal fatigue produced by those perturbations, and the mechanical integrity of the reactor would be jeopardized. It is shown in this paper that beam interruptions of the order of 400 μs repeated every second would not disturb significantly the reactor thermal features, while enabling for an adequate measurement of the negative reactivity

  12. Accelerator driven systems (ADS): A principal neutronics and transmutation potential

    An accelerator-based system using a beam of high energy protons to produce supplementary neutrons as a result of spallation processes in a target is investigated. The spallation neutrons are successively used to feed a subcritical blanket where they create a neutron surplus available for incineration of those long-lived toxic nuclei which require neutrons (long-lived fission products and minor actinides), and enhance the deterministic safety features for reactivity-type of accidents

  13. An overview of U.S. activities in fast reactors and accelerator driven systems

    This report reviews the activities of Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), describes EBR-II spent fuel treatment. Advanced accelerator applications were related to research and development of fuel cycle, namely system studies, fuels, separations, physics, materials. The work on Accelerator Driven Test Facility design has been stopped

  14. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation systems. Annual report 1999

    In 1996, SKB commenced funding of the project 'System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation systems and development of a spallation target'. The aim of the project was stated as: Development of a complete code for simulation of transmutation processes in an accelerator driven system. Application of the code for analysis of neutron flux, transmutation rates, reactivity changes, toxicity and radiation damages in the transmutation core. Build up of competence regarding issues related to spallation targets, development of research activities regarding relevant material issues. Performing of basic experiments in order to investigate the adequacy of using the spallation. target as a neutron source for a transmutation system, and participation in the planning and implementation of an international demonstration experiment. In the present report, activities within and related to the framework of the project, performed at the department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics at the Royal Institute of Technology during 1999, are accounted for

  15. OECD/Nea benchmark calculations for accelerator driven systems

    In order to evaluate the performances of the codes and the nuclear data, the Nuclear Science Committee of the OECD/NEA organised in July 1999 a benchmark exercise on a lead-bismuth cooled sub-critical system driven by a beam of 1 GeV protons. The benchmark model is based on the ALMR reference design and is optimised to burn minor actinides using a 'double strata' fuel cycle strategy. Seven organisations (ANL, CIEMAT, KAERI, JAERI, PSI/CEA, RIT and SCK-CEN) have contributed to this exercise using different basic data libraries (ENDF/B-VI, JEF-2.2 and JENDL-3.2) and various reactor calculation methods. Significant discrepancies are observed in important neutronic parameters, such as keff, reactivity swing with burn-up and neutron flux distributions. (author)

  16. Research progress for accelerator driven sub-critical Transmutation system (ADS)

    The minimization of the nuclear waste is the key problem for the long term and sustainable nuclear energy development. Accelerator driven system (ADS) is a kind of high efficient nuclear waste transmutation machine (or incinerator), which is the key technique to solve the nuclear water problem. The basic theory of ADS and driven influence of ADS and driven influence of ADS on the advanced accelerator, advanced cooling technique, etc are introduced. Mean while the present research situations of ADS in some countries are compared. At last, the key problem of the ADS development and the relationship between ADS and the development of nuclear energy in China is discussed. (authors)

  17. Study on design of superconducting proton linac for accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system

    Yu Qi; Xu Tao Guang

    2002-01-01

    As a prior option of the next generation of energy source, the accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system (ADS) can use efficiently the uranium and thorium resource, transmute the high-level long-lived radioactive wastes and raise nuclear safety. The ADS accelerator should provide the proton beam with tens megawatts. The superconducting linac (SCL) is a good selection of ADS accelerator because of its high efficiency and low beam loss rate. It is constitute by a series of the superconducting accelerating cavities. The cavity geometry is determined by means of the electromagnetic field computation. The SCL main parameters are determined by the particle dynamics computation

  18. Study on design of superconducting proton linac for accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system

    As a prior option of the next generation of energy source, the accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system (ADS) can use efficiently the uranium and thorium resource, transmute the high-level long-lived radioactive wastes and raise nuclear safety. The ADS accelerator should provide the proton beam with tens megawatts. The superconducting linac (SCL) is a good selection of ADS accelerator because of its high efficiency and low beam loss rate. It is constitute by a series of the superconducting accelerating cavities. The cavity geometry is determined by means of the electromagnetic field computation. The SCL main parameters are determined by the particle dynamics computation

  19. A European roadmap for developing accelerator driven systems (ADS) for nuclear waste incineration. Executive summary

    In 1998 the Research Ministers of France, Italy and Spain, set up a Ministers' Advisors Group on the use of accelerator driven systems (ADS) for nuclear waste transmutation. This led to the establishing of a technical working group under the chairmanship of Prof. Carlo Rubbia to identify the critical technical issues and to prepare a 'Roadmap' for a demonstration programme to be performed within 12 years. In the following Roadmap, the technical working group (consisting of representatives from Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the JRC) has identified the steps necessary to start the construction of an experimental accelerator driven system towards the end of the decade. This is considered as an essential prerequisite to assess the safe and efficient behaviour of such systems for a large-scale deployment for transmutation purposes in the first half of this century. The development and deployment of accelerator driven systems requires three steps: a comprehensive mid- and long-term R and D program, to develop the single elements and components of the system. This includes development of new fuels and fuel cycle systems; planning, design, construction and operation of an Experimental Accelerator Driven System for the demonstration of the concept; planning, design, construction and operation of a large size prototype accelerator driven systems with subsequent large-scale deployment. Following a first phase of R and D focused on the understanding of the basic principles of ADS (already partly underway), the programmes should be streamlined and focused on a practical demonstration of the key issues. These demonstrations should cover high intensity proton accelerators (beam currents in the range 1-20 mA), spallation targets of high power (of power in excess of 1 megawatt), and their effective coupling with a sub-critical core. Cost estimates are taken into account as well as the ADS activities in Japan and USA

  20. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation systems. Annual report 1998

    Wallenius, J.; Gudowski, W.; Carlsson, Johan; Eriksson, Marcus; Tucek, K. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics

    1998-12-01

    This annual report describes the accelerator-driven transmutation project conducted at the Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics at the Royal Institute of Technology. The main results are: development of the simulation tools for accelerator-driven transmutation calculations including an integrated Monte-Carlo burnup module and improvements of neutron energy fission yield simulations, processing of the evacuated nuclear data files including preparation of the temperature dependent neutron cross-sections, development of nuclear data for a medium energy range for some isotopes, development of the models and codes for radiation damage simulations, system studies for the spent fuel transmuter, based on heavy metal coolant and advanced nuclear fuel, contribution to the spallation target design being manufactured in IPPE, Obninsk, and accelerator reliability studies. Moreover a lot of efforts were put to further develop existing international collaboration with the most active research groups in the world together with educational activities in Sweden including a number of meetings and workshops and a graduate course in transmutation. This project has been conducted in close collaboration with the EU-project `Impact of the accelerator based technologies on nuclear fission safety` - IABAT and in bilateral cooperation with different foreign research groups 31 refs, 23 figs

  1. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation systems. Annual report 1998

    This annual report describes the accelerator-driven transmutation project conducted at the Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics at the Royal Institute of Technology. The main results are: development of the simulation tools for accelerator-driven transmutation calculations including an integrated Monte-Carlo burnup module and improvements of neutron energy fission yield simulations, processing of the evacuated nuclear data files including preparation of the temperature dependent neutron cross-sections, development of nuclear data for a medium energy range for some isotopes, development of the models and codes for radiation damage simulations, system studies for the spent fuel transmuter, based on heavy metal coolant and advanced nuclear fuel, contribution to the spallation target design being manufactured in IPPE, Obninsk, and accelerator reliability studies. Moreover a lot of efforts were put to further develop existing international collaboration with the most active research groups in the world together with educational activities in Sweden including a number of meetings and workshops and a graduate course in transmutation. This project has been conducted in close collaboration with the EU-project 'Impact of the accelerator based technologies on nuclear fission safety' - IABAT and in bilateral cooperation with different foreign research groups

  2. On the use of WIMS-7 for calculations on accelerator-driven systems

    De Kruijff, W.J.M.; Freudenreich, W.J.M

    1998-02-01

    The WIMS-7 code package has successfully been applied for a simple benchmark of a lead-cooled accelerator-driven system (ADS). With WIMS-7 it is possible to model a fixed source and to calculate the multiplication in a subcritical system. The calculations have shown that WIMS-7 is capable of treating this benchmark of a homogenized lead-cooled system with a fast neutron spectrum. The results described in this report are very promising and stimulate further investigation of WIMS-7 to study ADS-applications and lead-cooled reactor cores. It is useful to have a more extensive validation of WIMS-7 for lead-cooled ADS. In this report we have only considered a simple homogenized system. In the near future the application of WIMS-7 will be twofold. First, WIMS-7 can be applied to calculate the neutron spectrum in an accelerator-driven system in order to perform transmutation studies with a burnup code. Second, WIMS-7 can be used to study in more detail the neutronics of accelerator-driven systems. This is useful in order to learn more about the physics of accelerator-driven systems. 6 refs.

  3. On the use of WIMS-7 for calculations on accelerator-driven systems

    The WIMS-7 code package has successfully been applied for a simple benchmark of a lead-cooled accelerator-driven system (ADS). With WIMS-7 it is possible to model a fixed source and to calculate the multiplication in a subcritical system. The calculations have shown that WIMS-7 is capable of treating this benchmark of a homogenized lead-cooled system with a fast neutron spectrum. The results described in this report are very promising and stimulate further investigation of WIMS-7 to study ADS-applications and lead-cooled reactor cores. It is useful to have a more extensive validation of WIMS-7 for lead-cooled ADS. In this report we have only considered a simple homogenized system. In the near future the application of WIMS-7 will be twofold. First, WIMS-7 can be applied to calculate the neutron spectrum in an accelerator-driven system in order to perform transmutation studies with a burnup code. Second, WIMS-7 can be used to study in more detail the neutronics of accelerator-driven systems. This is useful in order to learn more about the physics of accelerator-driven systems. 6 refs

  4. Physical aspects of neutron generation in the target of an accelerator driven system

    In order to choose the optimal target parameters in the accelerator-driven systems, some nuclear physics aspects of target processes should be investigated. The spallation, fragmentation and fission cross sections, the yields of residual nuclei and neutrons for massive targets and the simulation of hadron-nucleus interaction at intermediate energies are discussed

  5. Accelerator-driven sub-critical reactor system (ADS) for nuclear energy generation

    S S Kapoor

    2002-12-01

    In this talk we present an overview of accelerator-driven sub-critical reactor systems (ADS), and bring out their attractive features for the elimination of troublesome long-lived components of the spent fuel, as well as for nuclear energy generation utilizing thorium as fuel. In India, there is an interest in the programmes of development of high-energy and high-current accelerators due to the potential of ADS in utilizing the vast resources of thorium in the country for nuclear power generation. The accelerator related activities planned in this direction will be outlined.

  6. Design of an accelerator-driven system for the destruction of nuclear waste

    Progress in particle accelerator technology makes it possible to use a proton accelerator to produce energy and to destroy nuclear waste efficiently. The Energy Amplifier (EA) proposed by Carlo Rubbia and his group is a sub-critical fast neutron system driven by a proton accelerator. It is particularly attractive for destroying, through fission, transuranic elements produced by present nuclear reactors. The EA could also transform efficiently and at minimal cost long-lived fission fragments using the concept of Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) recently tested at CERN with the TARC experiment. (author)

  7. Simulator for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Day, Christy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Determan, John C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-14

    LANL has developed a process to generate a progressive family of system models for a fissile solution system. This family includes a dynamic system simulation comprised of coupled nonlinear differential equations describing the time evolution of the system. Neutron kinetics, radiolytic gas generation and transport, and core thermal hydraulics are included in the DSS. Extensions to explicit operation of cooling loops and radiolytic gas handling are embedded in these systems as is a stability model. The DSS may then be converted to an implementation in Visual Studio to provide a design team the ability to rapidly estimate system performance impacts from a variety of design decisions. This provides a method to assist in optimization of the system design. Once design has been generated in some detail the C++ version of the system model may then be implemented in a LabVIEW user interface to evaluate operator controls and instrumentation and operator recognition and response to off-normal events. Taken as a set of system models the DSS, Visual Studio, and LabVIEW progression provides a comprehensive set of design support tools.

  8. The GUINEVERE project for Accelerator Driven System physics

    Billebaud, A.; Baylac, M.; Bondoux, D.; Bouvier, J.; Chabod, S.; De Conto, J.M.; Nuttin, A. [LPSC-CNRS-IN2P3/UJF/INPG, 53 Avenue des Martyrs. 38026 Grenoble cedex (France); Baeten, P.; Ait Abderrahim, H.; Bergmans, G.; Chetnitkov, A.; Kochetkov, A.; Vandeplassche, D.; Vermeersch, F.; Vittiglio, G. [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Ban, G.; Gautier, J.M.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecouey, J.L.; Marie, N.; Merrer, Y.; Steckmeyer, J.C. [LPC Caen, ENSICAEN/Universite de Caen/CNRS-IN2P3, 14050 Caen (France); Dessagne, P.; Gaudiot, G.; Heitz, G.; Kerveno, M. [IPHC-DRS/UdS/CNRS-IN2P3, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Granget, G.; Mellier, F. [CEA-Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Laune, B.; Reynet, D. [IPNO, CNRS-IN2P3/UPS, 91406 Orsay (France)

    2009-06-15

    The GUINEVERE project is part of the EUROTRANS Integrated Project of the 6. EURATOM Framework Programme. It is mainly devoted to ADS on-line reactivity monitoring validation, subcriticality determination and operational procedures (loading, start-up, shut-down,..) in follow-up of the MUSE experiments. The project consists in coupling a fast lead core, set-up in the VENUS reactor at SCK.CEN Mol (B), with a GENEPI neutron source under construction by CNRS. To accommodate the accelerator in a vertical coupling configuration, the VENUS building is being heightened. The fast core will be loaded with enriched Uranium and will be moderated and reflected with solid lead (zero power experiment). For the purpose of the experimental programme, the neutron source has to be operated not only in pulsed mode but also in continuous mode to investigate the current-to-flux reactivity indicator in representative conditions of a powerful ADS. In this latter mode it is also required to make short beam interruptions to have access to the neutron population decrease as a function of time: from this spectrum it will be possible to apply different analysis techniques such as 'prompt decay' fitting techniques and 'source jerk' techniques. Beam interruptions will be repeated at a programmable frequency to improve time spectra statistics. Different sub-criticality levels (k{sub eff}=0.99, 0.97, 0.95,..) will be investigated in order to obtain a full set of data points for the final overall validation of the methodology. This paper describes the status of the experimental facility assembling, and the foreseen experimental programme to be started. (authors)

  9. Conceptual study of high power proton linac for accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system

    Yu Qi; Ouyang Hua Fu; Xu Tao Guang

    2001-01-01

    As a prior option of the next generation of energy source, the accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system (ADS) can use efficiently the uranium and thorium resource, transmute the high-level long-lived radioactive wastes and raise nuclear safety. The ADS accelerator should provide the proton beam with tens megawatts. The superconducting linac is a good selection of ADS accelerator because of its high efficiency and low beam loss rate. The ADS accelerator presented by the consists of a 5 MeV radio-frequency quadrupole, a 100 MeV independently phased superconducting cavity linac and a 1 GeV elliptical superconducting cavity linac. The accelerating structures and main parameters are determined and the research and development plan is considered

  10. Temperature Profile of the Solution Vessel of an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    Dynamic System Simulation (DSS) models of fissile solution systems have been developed and verified against a variety of historical configurations. DSS techniques have been applied specifically to subcritical accelerator-driven systems using fissile solution fuels of uranium. Initial DSS models were developed in DESIRE, a specialized simulation scripting language. In order to tailor the DSS models to specifically meet needs of system designers they were converted to a Visual Studio implementation, and one of these subsequently to National Instrument's LabVIEW for human factors engineering and operator training. Specific operational characteristics of subcritical accelerator-driven systems have been examined using a DSS model tailored to this particular class using fissile fuel.

  11. Temperature Profile of the Solution Vessel of an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Determan, John C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-14

    Dynamic System Simulation (DSS) models of fissile solution systems have been developed and verified against a variety of historical configurations. DSS techniques have been applied specifically to subcritical accelerator-driven systems using fissile solution fuels of uranium. Initial DSS models were developed in DESIRE, a specialized simulation scripting language. In order to tailor the DSS models to specifically meet needs of system designers they were converted to a Visual Studio implementation, and one of these subsequently to National Instrument’s LabVIEW for human factors engineering and operator training. Specific operational characteristics of subcritical accelerator-driven systems have been examined using a DSS model tailored to this particular class using fissile fuel.

  12. Inherent Safety Features and Passive Prevention Approaches for Pb/Bi-cooled Accelerator-Driven Systems

    CARLSSON Johan

    2003-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of passivesafety and inherent features of subcritical nucleartransmutation systems - accelerator-driven systems. The generalobjective of this research has been to improve the safetyperformance and avoid elevated coolant temperatures inworst-case scenarios like unprotected loss-of-ow accidents,loss-of-heat-sink accidents, and a combination of both theseaccident initiators. The specific topics covered are emergencydecay heat removal by reactor vessel ...

  13. Reliability studies of a high-power proton accelerator for accelerator-driven system applications for nuclear waste transmutation

    The main effort of the present study is to analyze the availability and reliability of a high-performance linac (linear accelerator) conceived for Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS) purpose and to suggest recommendations, in order both to meet the high operability goals and to satisfy the safety requirements dictated by the reactor system. Reliability Block Diagrams (RBD) approach has been considered for system modelling, according to the present level of definition of the design: component failure modes are assessed in terms of Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) and Mean Time To Repair (MTTR), reliability and availability figures are derived, applying the current reliability algorithms. The lack of a well-established component database has been pointed out as the main issue related to the accelerator reliability assessment. The results, affected by the conservative character of the study, show a high margin for the improvement in terms of accelerator reliability and availability figures prediction. The paper outlines the viable path towards the accelerator reliability and availability enhancement process and delineates the most proper strategies. The improvement in the reliability characteristics along this path is shown as well

  14. Ability to burn plutonium and minor actinides. Interest of accelerator driven system compared to critical reactor

    In the frame of the French Act of December 1991, EDF is presently assessing the interest of Acceleration Driven System (ADS) for the Transmutation of the Plutonium and Minor Actinides (MA) produced by its park of nuclear reactors. The studies presented here assess the efficiency of ADS and critical reactors to incinerate Pu and MA (Minor Actinides) and the potential interest of ADS for that purpose. (author)

  15. Neutronic and burnup studies of accelerator-driven systems dedicated to nuclear waste transmutation

    Tucek, Kamil

    2004-01-01

    Partitioning and transmutation of plutonium, americium, and curium is inevitable if the radiotoxic inventory of spent nuclear fuel is to be reduced by more than a factor of 100. But, admixing minor actinides into the fuel severely degrades system safety parameters, particularly coolant void reactivity, Doppler effect, and (effective) delayed neutron fractions. The incineration process is therefore envisioned to be carried out in dedicated, accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS). Howev...

  16. Estimation of acceptable beam-trip frequencies of accelerators for accelerator-driven systems and comparison with existing performance data

    Frequent beam trips as experienced in the existing high-power proton accelerators may cause thermal fatigue in accelerator-driven system (ADS) components, which may lead to degradation of their structural integrity and reduction of their lifetime. In this study, acceptable beam-trip frequencies of the ADS accelerator were evaluated and compared with the performance of the ADS accelerator, which was estimated based on the operational data on existing accelerators. Thermal transient analyses were performed to investigate the effects of beam trips on the reactor components, with the objective of determining the feasibility of engineering the ADS and the reliability of the accelerator. These analyses were based on the thermal responses of the following reactor components: the beam window, the fuel cladding, the inner barrel and the reactor vessel. Assuming that the annual plant availability was 70%, our results indicated three acceptable beam-trip frequencies, depending on the beam-trip duration, τb: 2 x 104 times per year for 0 ≤ τb ≤ 10 s; 2 x 103 times per year for 10 s b ≤ 5 min; and 42 times per year for τb > 5 min. In order to consider methods to reduce beam-trip frequency, we compared the acceptable beam-trip frequency with the performance of the ADS accelerator, which was estimated based on the operational data on existing accelerators. The comparison showed that for beam trips with a duration of 10 s or less, the beam-trip frequency was acceptable. On the other hand, for beam trips with durations of 10 s b ≤ 5 min and τb > 5 min, it was necessary to reduce the beam-trip frequencies to about 1/6 and 1/35, respectively. (author)

  17. Accelerator driven systems for transmutation and energy production: challenges and dangers

    Accelerator driven systems (ADS) are an old technological idea: relativistic proton accelerators deliver their beams onto massive heavy element targets, thus producing abundant neutron fluences. Placing this target into sub-critical nuclear fission assemblies is yielding substantial fission reactions, thus additional fission energy (Rubbia called such a system ''energy amplifier''). This technology has recently attracted considerable attention due to advances in the construction of powerful accelerators. It allows the safe and cheap production of nuclear energy simultaneously with the destruction (transmutation) of long lived radioactive waste, in particular plutonium and other minor actinides (neptunium and americium). The principles and the present-state-of-the-art are described, including first experiments to transmute plutonium this way. This technology needs, however, many more years of further ''research and development'' before large scale ADS's can be constructed. It may be even necessary to investigate the question, if all basic physics phenomena of this technology are already sufficiently well understood. (orig.)

  18. Developing an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) based on electron accelerators and heavy water

    An ADS based on electron accelerators has been developed specifically for energy generation and medical applications. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed using FLUKA code to design a hybrid electron target and the core components. The composition, geometry of conversion targets and the coolant system have been optimized for electron beam energies of 20 to 100 MeV . Furthermore, the photon and photoneutron energy spectra, distribution and energy deposition for various incoming electron beam powers have been studied. Light-heavy water of various mixtures have been used as heat removal for the targets, as γ−n converters and as neutron moderators. We have shown that an electron LINAC, as a neutron production driver for ADSs, is capable of producing a neutron output of > 3.5 × 1014 (n/s/mA). Accordingly, the feasibility of an electron-based ADS employing the designed features is promising for energy generation and high intense neutron production which have various applications such as medical therapies

  19. Developing an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) based on electron accelerators and heavy water

    Feizi, H.; Ranjbar, A. H.

    2016-02-01

    An ADS based on electron accelerators has been developed specifically for energy generation and medical applications. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed using FLUKA code to design a hybrid electron target and the core components. The composition, geometry of conversion targets and the coolant system have been optimized for electron beam energies of 20 to 100 MeV . Furthermore, the photon and photoneutron energy spectra, distribution and energy deposition for various incoming electron beam powers have been studied. Light-heavy water of various mixtures have been used as heat removal for the targets, as γ-n converters and as neutron moderators. We have shown that an electron LINAC, as a neutron production driver for ADSs, is capable of producing a neutron output of > 3.5 × 1014 (n/s/mA). Accordingly, the feasibility of an electron-based ADS employing the designed features is promising for energy generation and high intense neutron production which have various applications such as medical therapies.

  20. Nuclear data requirements for accelerator driven sub-critical systems – A roadmap in the Indian context

    S Ganesan

    2007-02-01

    The development of accelerator driven sub-critical systems (ADSS) require significant amount of new nuclear data in extended energy regions as well as for a variety of new materials. This paper reviews these perspectives in the Indian context.

  1. Accelerator-driven system design concept for disposing of spent nuclear fuels

    At present, the US SNF (Spent Nuclear Fuel) inventory is growing by about 2,000 metric tonnes (MT) per year from the current operating nuclear power plants to reach about 70,000 MT by 2015. This SNF inventory contains about 1% transuranics (700 MT), which has about 115 MT of minor actinides. Accelerator-driven systems utilising proton accelerators with neutron spallation targets and subcritical blankets can be utilised for transmuting these transuranics, simultaneously generating carbon free energy, and significantly reducing the capacity of the required geological repository storage facility for the spent nuclear fuels. A fraction of the SNF plutonium can be used as a MOX fuel in the current/future thermal power reactors and as a starting fuel for future fast power reactors. The uranium of the spent nuclear fuel can be recycled for use in future nuclear power plants. This paper shows that only four to five accelerator-driven systems operating for less than 33 full power years can dispose of the US SNF inventory expected by 2015. In addition, a significant fraction of the long-lived fission products will be transmuted at the same time. Each system consists of a proton accelerator with a neutron spallation target and a subcritical assembly. The accelerator beam parameters are 1 GeV protons and 25 MW beam power, which produce 3 GWt in the subcritical assembly. A liquid metal (lead or lead-bismuth eutectic) spallation target is selected because of design advantages. This target is located at the centre of the subcritical assembly to maximise the utilisation of spallation neutrons. Because of the high power density in the target material, the target has its own coolant loop, which is independent of the subcritical assembly coolant loop. Mobile fuel forms with transuranic materials without uranium are considered in this work with liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic as fuel carrier

  2. Current status of research and development of reactor noise analysis for accelerator-driven subcritical system

    This report presents a current status of the research and development of reactor noise analyses applicable to accelerator-driven subcritical reactor system. These research activities have been concentrated on the Feynman-α neutron correlation analysis on time domain and the power spectral analysis on frequency domain. At present, the latter power spectral analysis is of greater advantage than the former Feynman-α one, for periodic and pulsed neutron source. While Feynman-α formula for pulsed neutron source is too complicated to be fitted directly to variance-to-mean ratio data, the power spectral analysis has a simpler formula based on the first-order reactor transfer function. The Feynman-α should be improved to consider spatial effect of deeply subcritical system and instability of accelerator operation. Further subject of reactor noise analyses is an improvement for high power operation. (author)

  3. Investigation of Lead Target Nuclei Used on Accelerator-Driven Systems for Tritium Production

    Tel, E.; Aydin, A.

    2012-02-01

    High-current proton accelerators are being researched at Los Alamos National Laboratory and other laboratories for accelerator production of tritium, transmuting long-lived radioactive waste into shorter-lived products, converting excess plutonium, and producing energy. These technologies make use of spallation neutrons produced in ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions on high-Z targets. Through ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions, neutrons are produced and are moderated by heavy water. These moderated neutrons are subsequently captured on 3He to produce tritium via the ( n,p) reaction. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial fusion power plant. Rubbia succeeded in a proposal of a full scale demonstration plant of the Energy Amplifier. This plant is to be known the accelerator-driven system (ADS). The ADS can be used for production of neutrons in spallation neutron source and they can act as an intense neutron source in accelerator-driven subcritical reactors, capable of incinerating nuclear waste and of producing energy. Thorium and Uranium are nuclear fuels and Lead, Bismuth, Tungsten are the target nuclei in these reactor systems. The spallation targets can be Pb, Bi, W, etc. isotopes and these target material can be liquid or solid. Naturally Lead includes the 204Pb (%1.42), 206Pb (%24.1), 207Pb (%22.1) and 208Pb (%52.3) isotopes. The design of ADS systems and also a fusion-fission hybrid reactor systems require the knowledge of a wide range of better data. In this study, by using Hartree-Fock method with an effective nucleon-nucleon Skyrme interactions rms nuclear charge radii, rms nuclear mass radii, rms nuclear proton, neutron radii and neutron skin thickness were calculated for the 204, 206, 208Pb isotopes . The calculated results have been compared with those of the compiled experimental and theoretical values of other studies.

  4. Neutronic studies in support of accelerator-driven systems: The MUSE experiments in the MASURCA facility

    Soule, R.; Assal, W.; Chaussonnet, P.; Destouches, C.; Domergue, C.; Jammes, C.; Laurens, J.-M.; Lebrat, J.-F.; Mellier, F.; Perret, G.; Rimpault, G.; Servière, H.; Imel, G.; M. Thomas, G.; VILLAMARIN D.

    2004-01-01

    The MUSE program (multiplication with an external source) is in progress at the MASURCA critical facility at the Cadarache Research Center of the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique in France. The program is dedicated to the physics studies of accelerator-driven systems in support of transmutation studies of minor actinides and long-lived fission products. It began in 1995 with the coupling of a Cf source in MASURCA and was followed by a commercial (d,T) source. In 2001, a specially constructed...

  5. MYRRHA project: a Multipurpose Accelerator Driven System (ADS) for R and D

    The objective of the MYRRHA project is to develop a multipurpose neutron source for research and development applications on the basis of an Accelerator Driven System (ADS). Current activities in this area focus on (1) the continuation and the extension towards ADS of the ongoing programmes at SCK-CEN in the field of reactor materials, fuel and reactor physics research; (2) the enhancement and the triggering of new R and D activities such as nuclear waste transmutation, ADS technology, liquid metal embrittlement; (3) the initiation of medical applications, for example proton therapy and PET production, or proton Based irradiation programmes. Main achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  6. Thermal response of the multiplier of an accelerator-driven system to beam interruptions

    Thermal response of the multiplier of an accelerator-driven system to beam trips has been calculated for sodium cooled and lead-bismuth cooled multipliers. The temperature transients caused by a beam trip lead to thermal fatigue in structural components, and restoring the beam causes an additional temperature transient that adds to thermal fatigue. Design lifetimes for various multiplier components are calculated, based on the frequency of beam interruptions and on the thermal fatigue per interruption. Mitigation strategies to increase design lifetimes are discussed. (author)

  7. Thermal response of the multiplier of an accelerator driven system to beam interruptions

    Thermal response of the multiplier of an accelerator driven system to beam trips has been calculated for sodium cooled and lead-bismuth cooled multipliers. The temperature transients caused by a beam trip lead to thermal fatigue in structural components, and restoring the beam causes an additional temperature transient that adds to thermal fatigue. Design lifetimes for various multiplier components are calculated, based on the frequency of beam interruptions and on the thermal fatigue per interruption. Mitigation strategies to increase design lifetimes are discussed

  8. Design study on side-coupled cavity linac in accelerator-driven energy system

    In the normal conductive project of high beam in density proton linac in accelerator-driven energy system, the high energy section uses side-coupled cavity linac(CCL)structure, its frequency is 700 MHz, and operates on π/2 mode. CCL section accelerates the 30 mA, 80 MeV proton beam from the coupled-cavity drift tube linac(CCDTL) to 1 GeV. The total length of CCL is 1064 m, the focusing lattice is FODO, the focusing period is 8βλ. Bore radii of the cavities are 2.00, 2.25 and 2.50 cm, respectively. The cavities are optimized with SUPERFISH code. The calculation results of the cavities and energy gain are presented

  9. The Italian R and D and industrial programme for an accelerator driven system experimental plant

    Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), coupling an accelerator with a target and a sub-critical reactor, could simultaneously burn minor actinides and transmute long-lived fission products, while producing a consistent amount of electrical energy. A team of Italian R and D organizations and industries has set up a network of coordinated programs addressed to study the design issues of an 80 MWth Experimental Facility. The present memo focalizes the attention on some results obtained by the R and D activities and by the on-going industrial short term activities aiming at the preparation of the proposed preliminary design, leaving the deal to define the details of the subsequent medium term activities to the expected common program in the European context. (author)

  10. Hindas a european nuclear data programme for accelerator-driven systems

    In the HINDAS programme, nuclear data in the 20-2000 MeV range are evaluated by means of a combination of nuclear models and well-selected intermediate and high-energy experiments. A panoply of European accelerators is utilised to provide complete sets of experimental data for iron, lead and uranium over a large energy range. Nuclear model codes are being improved and validated against these new experimental data. This should result in enhanced ENDF-formatted data libraries up to 200 MeV, and cross-sections for high-energy transport codes above 200 MeV. The impact of the new data libraries and high-energy models will be directly tested on some important parameters of an accelerator-driven system (ADS). Here, we report the recent progress of the various experimental and theoretical activities in HINDAS. (author)

  11. Laser driven particle acceleration

    This dissertation summarizes the last ten years of research at the Laboratory of Applied Optics on laser-plasma based electron acceleration. The main result consists of the development and study of a relativistic electron source with unique properties: high energy (100-300 MeV) in short distances (few millimeters), mono-energetic, ultra-short (few fs), stable and tunable. The manuscript describes the steps that led to understanding the physics, and then mastering it in order to produce this new electron source. Non linear propagation of the laser pulse in the plasma is first presented, with phenomena such as non linear wakefield excitation, relativistic and ponderomotive self-focusing in the short pulse regime, self-compression. Acceleration and injection of electrons are then reviewed from a theoretical perspective. Experimental demonstrations of self-injection in the bubble regime and then colliding pulse injection are then presented. These experiments were among the first to produce monoenergetic, high quality, stable and tunable electron beams from a laser-plasma accelerator. The last two chapters are dedicated to the characterization of the electron beam using transition radiation and to its applications to gamma radiography and radiotherapy. Finally, the perspectives of this research are presented in the conclusion. Scaling laws are used to determine the parameters that the electron beams will reach using peta-watt laser systems currently under construction. (author)

  12. Selected works of basic research on the physics and technology of accelerator driven clean nuclear power system

    38 theses are presented in this selected works of basic research on the physics and technology of accelerator driven clean nuclear power system. It includes reactor physics and experiment, accelerators physics and technology, nuclear physics, material research and partitioning. 13 abstracts, which has been presented on magazines home and abroad, are collected in the appendix

  13. Physics design of a CW high-power proton Linac for accelerator-driven system

    Rajni Pande; Shweta Roy; S V L S Rao; P Singh; S Kailas

    2012-02-01

    Accelerator-driven systems (ADS) have evoked lot of interest the world over because of their capability to incinerate the MA (minor actinides) and LLFP (long-lived fission products) radiotoxic waste and their ability to utilize thorium as an alternative nuclear fuel. One of the main subsystems of ADS is a high energy (∼1 GeV) and high current (∼30 mA) CW proton Linac. The accelerator for ADS should have high efficiency and reliability and very low beam losses to allow hands-on maintenance. With these criteria, the beam dynamics simulations for a 1 GeV, 30 mA proton Linac has been done. The Linac consists of normal-conducting radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), drift tube linac (DTL) and coupled cavity drift tube Linac (CCDTL) structures that accelerate the beam to about 100 MeV followed by superconducting (SC) elliptical cavities, which accelerate the beam from 100 MeV to 1 GeV. The details of the design are presented in this paper.

  14. Simulation study of an accelerator driven as a transmutation and energy generation system

    In twenty first century world is facing two issues of future concern, generation of clean energy and the protection of the environment. Oil price is soaring to a level of jeopardizing world economy and on the other hand burning fossil fuel is reaching to a point of endangering life of all creatures. The sole solution to compete the energy shortage is exploiting nuclear energy and other clean energy sources. The main concern of nuclear energy is long term radioactive waste. In principle, any nuclear reactor is able to burn and transmute minor actinides, but reactors with fast neutron spectrum must be preferred, as they allow a positive neutron gain throughout the burning process. A core dedicated to the transmutation of the minor actinides should be designed in order to minimize its self-production of actinides. A possible solution to these problems is represented by a subcritical system driven by an accelerator, which is able to safely bum and/or transmute actinides and long lived fission products, as it does not rely on delayed neutrons for control or power change and the reactivity feedbacks have only limited importance during transient response. In this study, an accelerator driven system based on Japanese design was simulated using MCNPX code to calculate neutron spectrum flux level, core sub-criticality and peaking factor

  15. Startup transients in accelerator driven systems using CINESP-ADS code

    Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) are subcritical nuclear reactor cores driven by spallation neutron source. These spallation neutrons are provided from the bombardment of a liquid metal flowing in a central region of the core, by a proton beam coming from a linear accelerator. Since neutron source dominates the neutronic of the ADS, its control usually is not related to the delayed neutron fractions as in the critical systems. In this way, ADS kinetics diverges from the former ones. This work presents some results of transients in ADS. Since ADS is to work in a pulsed regime, with time duration of pulse, a parametric result is showed to point out that different pulse durations should be studied in conjunction with pulse intensity, to maintain the ADS power stable. In addition, before generating these results, some transients were used to validate the CINESP-ADS code. It solves numerically the kinetic equations based on the multigroup diffusion theory, in one- or two-dimensional, in the Cartesian or Cylindrical geometries, and for any energy and delayed neutron groups. Three-dimensional simulation is possible using a reactor transversal buckling. The numerical solution is obtained via finite differences for the spatial discretization, using the so-called box integration, and with the use of Alternating Direction Explicit (ADE) methods, for the time discretization. The code application to some transients due to source neutron variations demonstrates its efficiency and accuracy, when compared with analytical techniques, such as one that uses expansion in series of Helmholtz eigenfunctions. (author)

  16. Sustained nuclear energy without weapons or reprocessing using accelerator-driven systems

    Accelerator-driven thermal-spectrum molten-salt nuclear technology can greatly simplify nuclear energy technology by eliminating reprocessing and greatly enhancing once-through burn-up. In effect the accelerator may be employed as a substitute for frequent reprocessing and recycle. The accelerator makes possible reduction in plutonium and minor actinides from current LWRs by a factor of more than ten without reprocessing while converting the plutonium remnant to a non-weapons-useful isotopic composition. The accelerator also enhances the once-through energy production from fertile material by a factor of ten without reprocessing compared to once-through LWR technology. This technology would eliminate the need to deploy plutonium production indefinitely, and reprocessing and recycle for at least several hundred years. The energy production technology proposed here operates primarily on the Th-U cycle with a minor contribution from the U-Pu cycle to eliminate the weapons-usefulness of 233U. There are two key innovations in addition to the accelerator. One is the use of liquid fuel flowing once through a pool of material undergoing fission thereby allowing high burn-up concurrently with continuous removal of fission product without reprocessing. The second is the unanticipated low capture cross section of fission product nuclides which substantially enhances the neutron economy in this type of system. The supplement of neutrons from the accelerator, the reduced fission product neutron capture, and the continuously flowing fuel are the enablers for the performance described here. This technology allows an essentially complete decoupling of nuclear energy from nuclear weapons (orig.)

  17. Development of accelerator driven transmutation system concept and related R and D activities at JAERI

    JAERI has carried out R and D on transmutation of long-lived nuclides with a special emphasis placed on accelerator-driven systems (ADS) under the Japanese OMEGA Program. The ADS is designed to be introduced as a dedicated transmutation system into the second stratum of a double-strata nuclear fuel cycle concept. Early ADS concepts employed sodium coolant and solid tungsten target. A chloride molten-salt system and a molten-alloy system were investigated as advanced options to pursue the possibility of taking full advantages of liquid fuel systems. The current reference ADS design employs eutectic lead-bismuth as spallation target material and coolant. The fuel for the subcritical core is minor-actinide mononitride. The system consists of a 1.5-GeV, 14-mA proton accelerator and an 800-MWt subcritical core with an effective neutron multiplication factor of 0.95. The design incorporates salient features that the coolant inventory is large due to the tank-type configuration, the temperature rise through the core is relatively low, and the power conversion is operated on a saturated steam turbine cycle. These features help mitigate the problems of plant transient during beam interruptions. ADS related R and D is underway in various fields such as scenario study, lead-bismuth technology development, nitride fuel and fuel cycle technology development, nuclear data development, and high-intensity accelerator development. Construction of ADS experimental facilities is planned under the JAERI-KEK Joint Project of a high-power proton accelerator. (author)

  18. Application of variance reduction technique to nuclear transmutation system driven by accelerator

    Sasa, Toshinobu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In Japan, it is the basic policy to dispose the high level radioactive waste arising from spent nuclear fuel in stable deep strata after glass solidification. If the useful elements in the waste can be separated and utilized, resources are effectively used, and it can be expected to guarantee high economical efficiency and safety in the disposal in strata. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute proposed the hybrid type transmutation system, in which high intensity proton accelerator and subcritical fast core are combined, or the nuclear reactor which is optimized for the exclusive use for transmutation. The tungsten target, minor actinide nitride fuel transmutation system and the melted minor actinide chloride salt target fuel transmutation system are outlined. The conceptual figures of both systems are shown. As the method of analysis, Version 2.70 of Lahet Code System which was developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory in USA was adopted. In case of carrying out the analysis of accelerator-driven subcritical core in the energy range below 20 MeV, variance reduction technique must be applied. (K.I.)

  19. ADS-Lib/V1.0. A test library for Accelerator Driven Systems. Summary documentation

    The report describes the generation of a test library for a number of code systems used in the analysis of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS). The generation of the ADS library was undertaken by IAEA-NDS and the data files are available to users at http://wwwnds. iaea.org/ads/ and also as CD-ROM (upon request).The source of the evaluated nuclear data was the JEFF-3.1 library. Processing was carried out using NJOY-99.90 with the local updates at IAEA-NDS. The resulting processed files are available in ACE format for MCNP and in MATXS format for multi-group transport calculations. (author)

  20. Numerical Simulation of Fluid Flow in the Target of Accelerator-driven Subcritical System

    2001-01-01

    The beam window, which separates the vaccum beam tube and the spallation target, is one of the most crucial components in a liquid metal target of the accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADS). The major difficulties in the window design are the protection against radiation damage and heat removal. It is a challenge to cool down the beam window sufficiently due to its high heat load.Numerical simulations of the fluid flow are performed by using the PHOENICS code for the proposed spallation target of ADS. The main objectives of the study are to investigate the flow behavior in the target systems, especially around the beam window, and to make contribution to the

  1. Proceedings of the international symposium on acceleration-driven transmutation systems and Asia ADS network initiative

    An International Symposium on 'Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems and Asia ADS Network Initiative' was held on March 24 and 25, 2003 at Gakushi-Kaikan, Tokyo, hosted by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka University, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization and Tokyo Institute of Technology. The objectives of this symposium are to make participants acquainted with the current status and future plans for research and development (R and D) of ADS in the world and to enhance the initiation of an international collaborative network for ADS in Asia. This report records the papers and the materials of 15 presentations in the symposium. On the first day of the symposium, current activities for R and D of ADS were presented from United States, Europe, Japan, Korea, and China. On the second day, R and D activities in the fields of accelerator and nuclear physics were presented. After these presentations, a panel discussion was organized with regard to the prospective international collaboration and multidisciplinary synergy effect, which are essential to manage various technological issues encountered in R and D stage of ADS. Through the discussion, common understanding was promoted concerning the importance of establishing international network. It was agreed to establish the international network for scientific information exchange among Asian countries including Japan, Korea, China, and Vietnam in view of the future international collaboration in R and D of ADS. (author)

  2. MYRRHA, a multipurpose accelerator driven system for research and development. February 2003 Progress status

    SCK-CEN in partnership with IBA s.a. is designing a 40 MWth multipurpose ADS (Accelerator Driven System) for R and D applications - MYRRHA - driven by a proton accelerator delivering a 1.75 MW beam (350 MeV x 5 mA). The spallation target is made of liquid Pb-Bi with a windowless concept in an isolated circuit from the sub-critical core coolant circuit. The sub-critical core is made out of typical fast reactor MOX fuel with a total Pu content limited to 30% in weight. The primary coolant chosen for the core is also liquid Pb-Bi. SCK CEN is conducting an associated R and D support programme for alleviating the most demanding topics as regards to the proposed design. In the first stage, the project focuses mainly on demonstration of the ADS concept and safety research on sub-critical hybrid systems. In a later stage, the device will also be used as an irradiation facility for research on structural materials, nuclear fuel, liquid metals and associated aspects and on sub-critical reactor physics. Subsequently, it will be used for research on applications such as nuclear waste transmutation and radioisotope production. The MYRRHA system is expected to become a major research infrastructure for the European partners involved in the ADS Demo development. The preliminary conceptual design of MYRRHA will be completed at the fall of 2003 and an intensive R and D programme is established. In this paper we will be presenting the MYRRHA concept and will report on the status of the MYRRHA project at the end of 2002 and on the methods and results of the R and D support programme presently conducted at SCK-CEN with a series of partners. (author)

  3. Monte-Carlo Simulation of the Features of Bi-Reactior Accelerator Driven Systems

    Bznuni, S A; Khudaverdian, A G; Barashenkov, V S; Sosnin, A N; Polyanskii, A A

    2002-01-01

    Parameters of accelerator-driven systems containing two "cascade" subcritical assemblies (liquid metal fast reactor, used as a neutron booster, and a thermal reactor, where main heat production is taking place) are investigated. Three main reactor cores analogous to VVER-1000, MSBR-1000 and CANDU-6 reactors are considered. Functioning in a safe mode (k_{eff}=0.94-0.98) these systems under consideration demonstrate much larger capacity in the wide range of k_{eff} in comparison with analogous systems without intermediate fast booster reactor and simultaneously having the density of thermal neutron flux equal to Phi^{max}=10^{14} cm^{-2}c^{-1} and operating with the fast and thermal zones they are capable to transmute the whole scope of nuclear waste reducing the requirements on the beam current of the accelerator by one order of magnitude. It seems to be the most important in case when molten salt thermal breeder reactor cores are considered as a main heat generating zone.

  4. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation. Annual Report 2001

    Gudowski, W.; Wallenius, J.; Tucek, K.; Eriksson, Marcus; Carlsson, Johan; Seltborg, P.; Cetnar, J.; Chakarova, R.; Westlen, D. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics

    2002-03-01

    The research on safety of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems (ADS) at the Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics has been focused in year 2001 on: a) ADS core design and development of advanced nuclear fuel optimised for high transmutation rates and good safety features; b) analysis of ADS-dynamics; c) computer code and nuclear data development relevant for simulation and optimization of ADS; d) participation in ADS experiments including 1 MW spallation target manufacturing, subcritical experiments MUSE (CEA-Cadarache) and YALINA experiment in Minsk. The Dept. is very actively participating in many European projects in the 5th Framework Programme of the European Community. Most of the research topics reported in this paper are referred to by appendices, which have been published in the open literature. The topics, which are not yet published, are described here in more details.

  5. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation. Annual Report 2001

    The research on safety of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems (ADS) at the Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics has been focused in year 2001 on: a) ADS core design and development of advanced nuclear fuel optimised for high transmutation rates and good safety features; b) analysis of ADS-dynamics; c) computer code and nuclear data development relevant for simulation and optimization of ADS; d) participation in ADS experiments including 1 MW spallation target manufacturing, subcritical experiments MUSE (CEA-Cadarache) and YALINA experiment in Minsk. The Dept. is very actively participating in many European projects in the 5th Framework Programme of the European Community. Most of the research topics reported in this paper are referred to by appendices, which have been published in the open literature. The topics, which are not yet published, are described here in more details

  6. Estimation for effect of JENDL-3.3 on neutronics characteristics of accelerator-driven system

    The latest version of Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL-3.3) was released in last year. Primary purpose of this study was to estimate an effect of a revision of nuclear data library on neutronics characteristics of accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADS). The burnup calculations using both JENDL-3.3 and JENDL-3.2 were performed for JAERI proposed ADS. The detailed contribution of each nuclide and reaction on the difference of the calculation results, such as effective multiplication factor and burnup swing, were investigated. Moreover, to validate the nuclear data of actinides, the burnup analysis for the actinides samples irradiated at the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor were carried out. (author)

  7. Investigation of subcritical multiplication parameters in TRIGA Mark II accelerator driven system

    Highlights: • TRIGA ADS neutron external source was numerically investigated. • Source target material, radius, position, and incident beam energy were studied. • Maximum neutron yield for W, Pb, and W–Cu targets are at radii 3.25, 3.5 and 7 cm. • Maximum source efficiency for targets at the given core is achieved at the center. • Maximum source efficiency is achieved at 40 MeV incident electron beam energy. - Abstract: The accelerator driven system (ADS) is a very interesting option to improve the safety of nuclear power reactor and for transmutation of spent fuel. The Texas phase of the reactor–accelerator coupling experiment (RACE), completed in March 2006, demonstrated the feasibility of operating a training research isotopes general atomic (TRIGA) research reactor in a subcritical configuration driven to a significant power by an electron LINAC neutron source (photoneutron). In the present study, the effects of changing the source cylindrical target material, radius, position and the electron beam energy on the final neutron production, fission probability, and the subcritical system multiplication of TRIGA Mark II research reactor, have been numerically investigated. Three target materials are used: Tungsten, Lead and Tungsten–Copper alloy, while varying the target radius from 2 to 8 cm, the source position at three locations, and the beam energy from 10 to 55 MeV. The investigation is based on the numerical calculation of the subcritical multiplication factor and the external source efficiency using Monte Carlo MCNPX code. Through the comparison of the studied cases results, the favorable target material and radius, source position, and beam energy can be obtained

  8. Inherent Safety Features and Passive Prevention Approaches for Pb/Bi-cooled Accelerator-Driven Systems

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of passive safety and inherent features of subcritical nuclear transmutation systems - accelerator-driven systems. The general objective of this research has been to improve the safety performance and avoid elevated coolant temperatures in worst-case scenarios like unprotected loss-of-flow accidents, loss-of-heat-sink accidents, and a combination of both these accident initiators. The specific topics covered are emergency decay heat removal by reactor vessel auxiliary cooling systems, beam shut-off by a melt-rupture disc, safety aspects from locating heat-exchangers in the riser of a pool-type reactor system, and reduction of pressure resistance in the primary circuit by employing bypass routes. The initial part of the research was focused on reactor vessel auxiliary cooling systems. It was shown that an 80 MWth Pb/Bi-cooled accelerator-driven system of 8 m height and 6 m diameter vessel can be well cooled in the case of loss-of-flow accidents in which the accelerator proton beam is not switched off. After a loss-of-heat-sink accident the proton beam has to be interrupted within 40 minutes in order to avoid fast creep of the vessel. If a melt-rupture disc is included in the wall of the beam pipe, which breaks at 150 K above the normal core outlet temperature, the grace period until the beam has to be shut off is increased to 6 hours. For the same vessel geometry, but an operating power of 250 MWth the structural materials can still avoid fast creep in case the proton beam is shut off immediately. If beam shut-off is delayed, additional cooling methods are needed to increase the heat removal. Investigations were made on the filling of the gap between the guard and the reactor vessel with liquid metal coolant and using water spray cooling on the guard vessel surface. The second part of the thesis presents examinations regarding an accelerator-driven system also cooled with Pb/Bi but with heat-exchangers located in the

  9. IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on 'Analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems'

    In December 2005, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has started a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems'. The overall objective of the CRP, performed within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWGFR) of IAEA's Nuclear Energy Department, is to increase the capability of interested Member States in developing and applying advanced reactor technologies in the area of long-lived radioactive waste utilization and transmutation. The specific objective of the CRP is to improve the present understanding of the coupling of an external neutron source (e.g. spallation source) with a multiplicative sub-critical core. The participants are performing computational and experimental benchmark analyses using integrated calculation schemes and simulation methods. The CRP aims at integrating some of the planned experimental demonstration projects of the coupling between a sub-critical core and an external neutron source (e.g. YALINA Booster in Belarus, and Kyoto University's Critical Assembly (KUCA)). The objective of these experimental programs is to validate computational methods, obtain high energy nuclear data, characterize the performance of sub-critical assemblies driven by external sources, and to develop and improve techniques for sub-criticality monitoring. The paper summarizes preliminary results obtained to-date for some of the CRP benchmarks. (authors)

  10. A neutron booster for spallation sources—application to accelerator driven systems and isotope production

    Galy, J.; Magill, J.; Van Dam, H.; Valko, J.

    2002-06-01

    One can design a critical system with fissile material in the form of a thin layer on the inner surface of a cylindrical neutron moderator such as graphite or beryllium. Recently, we have investigated the properties of critical and near critical systems based on the use of thin actinide layers of uranium, plutonium and americium. The thickness of the required fissile layer depends on the type of fissile material, its concentration in the layer and on the geometrical arrangement, but is typically in the μm-mm range. The resulting total mass of fissile material can be as low as 100 g. Thin fissile layers have a variety of applications in nuclear technology—for example in the design neutron amplifiers for medical applications and "fast" islands in thermal reactors for waste incineration. In the present paper, we investigate the properties of a neutron booster unit for spallation sources and isotope production. In those applications a layer of fissile material surrounds the spallation source. Such a module could be developed for spallation targets foreseen in the MYRRHA (L. Van Den Durpel, H. Aı̈t Abderrahim, P. D'hondt, G. Minsart, J.L. Bellefontaine, S. Bodart, B. Ponsard, F. Vermeersch, W. Wacquier. A prototype accelerator driven system in Belgium: the Myrrha project, Technical Committee Meeting on Feasibility and Motivation for Hybrid concepts for Nuclear Energy generation and Transmutation, Madrid, Spain, September 17-19, 1997 [1]). or MEGAPIE (M. Salvatores, G.S. Bauer, G. Heusener. The MEGAPIE initiative: executive outline and status as per November 1999, MPO-1-GB-6/0_GB, 1999 [2]) projects. With a neutron multiplication factor of the booster unit in the range 10-20 (i.e. with a keff of 0.9-0.95), considerably less powerful accelerators would be required to obtain the desired neutron flux. Instead of the powerful accelerators with proton energies of 1 GeV and currents of 10 mA foreseen for accelerator driven systems, similar neutron fluxes can be obtained

  11. Preliminary design of a gas-cooled accelerator driven system demonstrator

    At the present time, nuclear power appears to be the best solution for producing a large amount of electricity from both economical and ecological viewpoints, provided that acceptable answers to the nuclear waste concern are found. In France, this is the subject of the law 91-1381 (December 30th , 1991). The transmutation of most of the long-lived radioactive wastes is a promising solution which could play a substantial role for the safety of the fuel cycle. Sub-critical Accelerator Driven System (ADS), coupling an ion accelerator and a sub-critical reactor, seems to have a high capacity for the fission of minor actinides and transmutation of long life fission products. The practicality on an industrial scale of partitioning and transmutation through ADS for reducing the amount of long life radio-nuclides has to be evaluated. It was recognised that the most efficient way, in terms of cost and planning, to conclusively assess the potential and the feasibility of a full scale industrial programme on ADS was to design and operate an ADS Demonstrator. The main ADS DF characteristics, defined within a joint working group, and reactor design features are described and justified. Then, main issues which call for research and development support are identified. (authors)

  12. Accelerator driven systems: Energy generation and transmutation of nuclear waste. Status report

    The report includes 31 individual contributions by experts from six countries and two international organizations in different areas of the accelerator driven transmutation technology intended to be applied for the treatment of highly radioactive waste and power generation. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper

  13. Assessment of the transmutation capability an accelerator driven system cooled by lead bismuth eutectic alloy

    1. PURPOSE The reduction of long-lived fission products (LLFP) and minor actinides (MA) is a key point for the public acceptability and economy of nuclear energy. In principle, any nuclear fast reactor is able to burn and transmute MA, but the amount of MA content has to be limited a few percent, having unfavourable consequences on the coolant void reactivity, Doppler effect, and delayed neutron fraction, and therefore on the dynamic behaviour and control. Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) are instead able to safely burn and/or transmute a large quantity of actinides and LLFP, as they do not rely on delayed neutrons for control or power change and the reactivity feedbacks have very little importance during accidents. Such systems are very innovative being based on the coupling of an accelerator with a subcritical system by means of a target system, where the neutronic source needed to maintain the neutron reaction chain is produced by spallation reactions. To this end the PDS-XADS (Preliminary Design Studies on an experimental Accelerator Driven System) project was funded by the European Community in the 5th Framework Program in order both to demonstrate the feasibility of the coupling between an accelerator and a sub-critical core loaded with standard MOX fuel and to investigate the transmutation capability in order to achieve values suitable for an Industrial Scale Transmuter. This paper summarizes and compares the results of neutronic calculations aimed at evaluating the transmutation capability of cores cooled by Lead-Bismuth Eutectic alloy and loaded with assemblies based on (Pu, Am, Cm) oxide dispersed in a molybdenum metal (CERMET) or magnesia (CERCER) matrices. It also describes the constraints considered in the design of such cores and describes the thermo-mechanical behaviour of these innovative fuels along the cycle. 2. DESCRIPTION OF THE WORK: The U-free composite fuels (CERMET and CERCER) were selected for this study, being considered at European level

  14. MCNPX simulations of fast neutron diagnostics for accelerator-driven systems

    In accelerator-driven systems, the neutron spectrum will extend all the way up to the incident beam energy, i.e., several hundred MeV or even up to GeV energies. The high neutron energy allows novel diagnostics with a set of measurement techniques that can be used in a sub-critical reactor environment. Such measurements are primarily connected to system safety and validation. This report shows that in-core fast-neutron diagnostics can be employed to monitor changes in the position of incidence of the primary proton beam onto the neutron production target. It has also been shown that fast neutrons can be used to detect temperature-dependent density changes in a liquid lead-bismuth target. Fast neutrons can escape the system via the beam pipe for the incident proton beam. Out-of-core monitoring of these so called back-streaming neutrons could potentially be used to monitor beam changes if the target has a suitable shape. Moreover, diagnostics of back-streaming neutrons might be used for validation of the system design

  15. Accelerator-driven systems (ADS) and fast reactors (FR) in advanced nuclear fuel cycles

    The long-term hazard of radioactive waste arising from nuclear energy production is a matter of continued discussion and public concern in many countries. Through partitioning and transmutation (P and T) of the actinides and some of the long-lived fission products, the radiotoxicity of high-level waste (HLW) can be reduced by a factor of 100 compared with the current once-through fuel cycle. This requires very effective reactor and fuel cycle strategies, including fast reactors (FR) and/or accelerator-driven, sub-critical systems (ADS). The present study compares FR- and ADS-based actinide transmutation systems with respect to reactor properties, fuel cycle requirements, safety, economic aspects and (R and D) needs. Several advanced fuel cycle strategies are analysed in a consistent manner to provide insight into the essential differences between the various systems in which the role of ADS is emphasised. The report includes a summary aimed at policy makers and research managers as well as a detailed technical section for experts in this domain. (authors)

  16. Comparative Calculational Study Of The Transient Behaviour Of LBE- And Gas-Cooled Experimental Accelerator-Driven Systems

    A comparison of transient calculations is given for two 80-MWt MOX-fuelled Experimental Accelerator-Driven Systems (XADS), one cooled by lead-bismuth eutectic and the other by helium. Results obtained with the TRAC/AAA code are presented for protected and unprotected transient overpower, spurious beam trip, loss of flow, and loss of coolant accidents. (author)

  17. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation. Annual Report 2003

    The research on safety of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems (ADS) at the Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics reported here has been focused on different aspects of safety of the Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems and on Transmutation research in more general terms. An overview of the topics of our research is given in the Summary which is followed by detailed reports as separate chapters or subchapters. Some of the research topics reported in this report are referred to appendices, which have been published in the open literature. Topics, which are not yet published, are described with more details in the main part of this report. Main focus has been, as before, largely determined by the programme of the European projects of the 5th Framework Programme in which KTH is actively participating. In particular: a) ADS core design and development of advanced nuclear fuel optimised for high transmutation rates and good safety features. This activity includes even computer modeling of nuclear fuel production. Three different ADS-core concept are being investigated: Conceptual design of Pb-Bi cooled core with nitride fuel so called Sing-Sing Core developed at KTH; Pb-Bi cooled core with oxide fuel so called ANSALDO design for the European Project PDS-XADS; Gas cooled core with oxide fuel a design investigated for the European Project PDS-XADS. b) analysis of potential of advance fuels, in particular nitrides with high content of minor actinides; c) analysis of ADS-dynamics and assessment of major reactivity feedbacks; d) emergency heat removal from ADS; e) participation in ADS: MUSE (CEA-Cadarache), YALINA subcritical experiment in Minsk and designing of the subcritical experiment SAD in Dubna; f) theoretical and simulation studies of radiation damage in high neutron (and/or proton) fluxes; g) computer code and nuclear data development relevant for simulation and optimization of ADS, validation of the MCB code and sensitivity analysis; h) studies of

  18. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation. Annual Report 2003

    Gudowski, Waclaw; Wallenius, Jan; Tucek, Kamil [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics] [and others

    2004-12-01

    The research on safety of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems (ADS) at the Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics reported here has been focused on different aspects of safety of the Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems and on Transmutation research in more general terms. An overview of the topics of our research is given in the Summary which is followed by detailed reports as separate chapters or subchapters. Some of the research topics reported in this report are referred to appendices, which have been published in the open literature. Topics, which are not yet published, are described with more details in the main part of this report. Main focus has been, as before, largely determined by the programme of the European projects of the 5th Framework Programme in which KTH is actively participating. In particular: a) ADS core design and development of advanced nuclear fuel optimised for high transmutation rates and good safety features. This activity includes even computer modeling of nuclear fuel production. Three different ADS-core concept are being investigated: Conceptual design of Pb-Bi cooled core with nitride fuel so called Sing-Sing Core developed at KTH; Pb-Bi cooled core with oxide fuel so called ANSALDO design for the European Project PDS-XADS; Gas cooled core with oxide fuel a design investigated for the European Project PDS-XADS. b) analysis of potential of advance fuels, in particular nitrides with high content of minor actinides; c) analysis of ADS-dynamics and assessment of major reactivity feedbacks; d) emergency heat removal from ADS; e) participation in ADS: MUSE (CEA-Cadarache), YALINA subcritical experiment in Minsk and designing of the subcritical experiment SAD in Dubna; f) theoretical and simulation studies of radiation damage in high neutron (and/or proton) fluxes; g) computer code and nuclear data development relevant for simulation and optimization of ADS, validation of the MCB code and sensitivity analysis; h) studies of

  19. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation. Annual Report 2005

    The results of the research activities on System and Safety of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation (ADS) at the Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics are described in this report followed by the Appendices of the relevant scientific papers published in 2005. PhD and Licentiate dissertations of Marcus Ericsson, Per Seltborg, Christina Lagerstedt and Daniel Westlen (see Appendices) reflect the research mainstream of 2005. Year 2005 was also very rich in international activities with ADS in focus. Summary of conferences, seminars and lecturing activities is given in Chapter 9 Research activities of 2005 have been focused on several areas: system and safety studies of ADS; subcritical experiments; ADS source efficiency studies; nuclear fuel cycle analysis; potential of reactor based transmutation; ADS fuel development; simulation of radiation damage; and development of codes and methods. Large part of the research activities has been well integrated with the European projects of the 5th and 6th Framework Programmes of the European Commission in which KTH is actively participating. In particular European projects: RED-IMPACT, CONFIRM, FUTURE, EUROTRANS and NURESIM

  20. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation Annual Report 2005

    Gudowski, Waclaw; Wallenius, Jan; Arzhanov, Vasily; Jolkkonen, Mikael; Eriksson, Marcus; Seltborg, Per; Westlen, Daniel; Lagerstedt, Christina; Isaksson, Patrick; Persson, Carl-Magnus; Aalander, Alexandra [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics

    2006-11-15

    The results of the research activities on System and Safety of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation (ADS) at the Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics are described in this report followed by the Appendices of the relevant scientific papers published in 2005. PhD and Licentiate dissertations of Marcus Ericsson, Per Seltborg, Christina Lagerstedt and Daniel Westlen (see Appendices) reflect the research mainstream of 2005. Year 2005 was also very rich in international activities with ADS in focus. Summary of conferences, seminars and lecturing activities is given in Chapter 9 Research activities of 2005 have been focused on several areas: system and safety studies of ADS; subcritical experiments; ADS source efficiency studies; nuclear fuel cycle analysis; potential of reactor based transmutation; ADS fuel development; simulation of radiation damage; and development of codes and methods. Large part of the research activities has been well integrated with the European projects of the 5th and 6th Framework Programmes of the European Commission in which KTH is actively participating. In particular European projects: RED-IMPACT, CONFIRM, FUTURE, EUROTRANS and NURESIM.

  1. Design calculations of the thermal-spectrum accelerator-driven system for LWR waste destruction

    A number of nuclear physics design issues concerning Accelerator Driven-salt Reactor based on the so called ATW concept proposed by Los Alamos are discussed. General description of concept using internal moderation with graphite block is presented. Burn-up, salt processing and safety criteria (reactivity temperature coefficients and kinetics parameters) are presented for different spectra (graphite to salt ratio) and an optimal variant of the blanket with non-positive temperature reactivity coefficients is provided and results are discussed. (Authors)

  2. Application of gas-cooled Accelerator Driven System (ADS) transmutation devices to sustainable nuclear energy development

    Abánades, A.; Garcia Hernandez, Carlos Rafael; GARCÍA FAJARDO, LAURA; Escrivá, A.; Pérez-Navarro Gómez, Ángel; Rosales, J.

    2011-01-01

    The conceptual design of a pebble bed gas-cooled transmutation device is shown with the aim to evaluate its potential for its deployment in the context of the sustainable nuclear energy development, which considers high temperature reactors for their operation in cogeneration mode, producing electricity, heat and Hydrogen. As differential characteristics our device operates in subcritical mode, driven by a neutron source activated by an accelerator that adds clear safety advantages and fuel f...

  3. Application of gas-cooled Accelerator Driven System (ADS) transmutation devices to sustainable nuclear energy development

    Abánades Velasco, Alberto; C. García; García, L.; Escrivá, A.; Pérez-Navarro, A.; Rosales, J.

    2011-01-01

    The conceptual design of a pebble bed gas-cooled transmutation device is shown with the aim to evaluate its potential for its deployment in the context of the sustainable nuclear energy development, which considers high temperature reactors for their operation in cogeneration mode, producing electricity, heat and Hydrogen. As differential characteristics our device operates in subcritical mode, driven by a neutron source activated by an accelerator that adds clear safety advantages and fu...

  4. The status of fast reactor technology development and accelerator driven subcritical system researches in China

    Since last May in mainland China there are two nuclear power plants with total capacity of 2.1 GWe in operation and four NPPs in construction. It is envisaged that the total nuclear power capacity will be about 8.5 GWe in the year 2005. Recently the Government is considering four other new NPPs with a total capacity of about 4 GWe and starting their construction during 'tenth five years Plan' (2001-2005). The three new nuclear systems, FBR, ADS and Hybrid, have started to be developed with a rather moderate project and are all still in the early stage. For fast reactor engineering development, the China Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR) of 65 MWt is the first step. After some additional accidents analysis, especially sodium spray fire accident analysis, the reactor building construction will be continued. The main components including of the reactor block, primary and secondary circuits, fuel handling system have been ordered. It is foreseen to have CEFR reaching first criticality at the end of 2005. The second step 300 MWe Modular Fast Reactor (MPFR) is under consideration, which will be a prototype for large size fast reactor. Based on the size of MPFR, the role of MA transmutation has been evaluated. For the Accelerator Driven Subcritical System (ADS), we are making great efforts to accomplish the research tasks worked out in the first phase program (1998-2002) with emphasis on the system optimization, reactor physics and technology, accelerator physics and technology and nuclear and material data base, and are enthusiastically preparing to step to the second phase program which is marked by ADS concept verification study (2000-2007). As to the Fusion-Fission Hybrid System, in near-term the emphasis will be put on the experiments on two big testing facilities HL-1M and HT-7 on one hand, and on the other hand, we will determine the targets of medium-term and long-term development for Hybrid system and work out relative development program

  5. Pre-design of MYRRHA, A Multipurpose Accelerator Driven System for Research and Development

    One of the main SCKCEN research facility, namely BR2, is nowadays arriving at an age of 40 years just like the major materials testing reactors (MTR) in the world and in Europe (i.e. BR2 (B-Mol), HFR (EU-Petten), OSIRIS (F-Saclay), R2 (S-Studsvik)). The MYRRHA facility in planning has been conceived as potentially replacing BR2 and to be a fast spectrum facility complementary to the thermal spectrum RJH (Reacteur Jules Horowitz) facility, in planning in France. This situation would give Europe a full research capability in terms of nuclear R and D. Furthermore, the disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from industrial nuclear energy production has still to find a fully satisfactory solution, especially in terms of environmental and social acceptability. Scientists are looking for ways to drastically reduce (by a factor of 100 or more) the radio-toxicity of the High Level Waste (HLW) to be stored in a deep geological repository. This can be achieved via burning of minor actinides (MA) and to a less extent of long-lived fission products (LLFP) in Accelerator Driven Systems. The MYRRHA project contribution will be in helping to demonstrate the ADS concept at reasonable power level and the demonstration of the technological feasibility of MA and LLFP transmutation under real conditions

  6. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of LBE spallation target for accelerator-driven systems

    Aniseh Ahmed Atef Abdalla; Jiyang Yu; Yongwel Yang

    2013-01-01

    In an accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADS), a high-performance spallation neutron source is used to feed the subcritical reactor. Neutron generation depends on the proton beam intensity. If the beam intensity is increased by a given factor, the number of generated neutrons will increase. The mechanism yielding a high rate of neutron production per energy is the spallation process, and this mechanism produces very high-energy deposition in the spallation target material. Producing a high rate of neutrons is accompanied by creation of problems of decay heat cooling and radiological protection. As a first step in designing a full-scale industrial ADS, a small-scale experimental ADS, which is similar to the European experimental ADS (XADS) is analysed. The analysis presented in this paper is based on lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled XADS-type experimental reactors, designed during the European experimental (PDS-XADS) project. Computational fluid dynamics analysis has been carried out for the spallation target. Steady-state behaviour and shear stress transport turbulence model with the automatic wall treatment were applied in the present analysis.

  7. Absolute reactivity calibration of accelerator-driven systems after RACE-T experiments

    The RACE-T experiments that were held in november 2005 in the ENEA-Casaccia research center near Rome allowed us to improve our knowledge of the experimental techniques for absolute reactivity calibration at either startup or shutdown phases of accelerator-driven systems. Various experimental techniques for assessing a subcritical level were inter-compared through three different subcritical configurations SC0, SC2 and SC3, about -0.5, -3 and -6 dollars, respectively. The area-ratio method based of the use of a pulsed neutron source appears as the most performing. When the reactivity estimate is expressed in dollar unit, the uncertainties obtained with the area-ratio method were less than 1% for any subcritical configuration. The sensitivity to measurement location was about slightly more than 1% and always less than 4%. Finally, it is noteworthy that the source jerk technique using a transient caused by the pulsed neutron source shutdown provides results in good agreement with those obtained from the area-ratio technique. (authors)

  8. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of burnup reactivity for an accelerator-driven system

    A burnup calculation is carried out for an accelerator-driven system (ADS) proposed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) with the fourth version of JENDL, JENDL-4.0 and the previous one, JENDL-3.3. Considerable differences are seen in burnup reactivity between the nuclear data libraries for an initial phase (first burnup cycle) and an equilibrium phase (tenth burnup cycle). The differences in these values are investigated using two methods: a method by replacing a nuclear data library by nuclide and a sensitivity analysis technique. Among many contributors to them for the both phases, we identify major ones; (1) the initial phase: fission cross section and fission neutron multiplicity of 238Pu, capture cross section of 241Am, and (2) the equilibrium phase: capture cross section of 244Cm and 241Am, and inelastic scattering cross section of 206,207Pb. The uncertainty analysis shows that uncertainties in the burnup reactivity deduced from the JENDL-4.0 covariance data are comparable in magnitude to the differences between the nuclear data libraries, and are dominated by nuclear data parameters of 238Pu. Finally, we show the necessity of uncertainty evaluation of the branching ratio of 241Am capture reaction. (author)

  9. Optimisation of composite metallic fuel for minor actinide transmutation in an accelerator-driven system

    Uyttenhove, W.; Sobolev, V.; Maschek, W.

    2011-09-01

    A potential option for neutralization of minor actinides (MA) accumulated in spent nuclear fuel of light water reactors (LWRs) is their transmutation in dedicated accelerator-driven systems (ADS). A promising fuel candidate dedicated to MA transmutation is a CERMET composite with Mo metal matrix and (Pu, Np, Am, Cm)O 2-x fuel particles. Results of optimisation studies of the CERMET fuel targeting to increasing the MA transmutation efficiency of the EFIT (European Facility for Industrial Transmutation) core are presented. In the adopted strategy of MA burning the plutonium (Pu) balance of the core is minimized, allowing a reduction in the reactivity swing and the peak power form-factor deviation and an extension of the cycle duration. The MA/Pu ratio is used as a variable for the fuel optimisation studies. The efficiency of MA transmutation is close to the foreseen theoretical value of 42 kg TW -1 h -1 when level of Pu in the actinide mixture is about 40 wt.%. The obtained results are compared with the reference case of the EFIT core loaded with the composite CERCER fuel, where fuel particles are incorporated in a ceramic magnesia matrix. The results of this study offer additional information for the EFIT fuel selection.

  10. Monte Carlo studies in accelerator-driven systems for transmutation of high-level nuclear waste

    A spallation neutron source was modeled using a high energy proton accelerator. The aim of the core design is to optimise the core parameters for maximizing the minor actinides and fission products transmutation rates, which is created from the operation of nuclear power reactors for the production of electricity, while maintaining the structural material damage and decay heat as low as possible. The transmutation system is composed of a natural lead target, beam window, subcritical core, reflector, and structural material. The neutrons are produced by the spallation reaction of protons from a high intensity linear accelerator in the spallation target, and the fission reaction in the core. It is used a hexagonal lattice for the waste and fuel assemblies. The system is driven by a 1 GeV proton beam incident on a natural lead cylindrical target, 20 cm radius, 70 cm height , and entering the target through a 5.3 cm radius hole. The protons were uniformly distributed across the beam of radius 2 cm. The core is cylindrical assembly, 2.3 m radius, 4.6 m high. The wall thickness of the main vessel is 2 cm. The main vessel surrounded by a reflector made of graphite, 40 cm thick. The axes of proton beam and target are concentric with the main vessel axis. The structural walls and beam window are made of the same material, stainless steel, HT9. All dimensions of systems are results of target and core optimization that keeps most of the spallation neutrons within the lead target and transmutes the largest fraction of the long-lived waste. We investigated the following neutronics parameters with presence and absence of fissile materials: o spallation neutron and other particles such as proton, pions and muons yields (per one incident proton) from the spallation target, - spatial and energy distribution of the spallation neutrons, and protons in target, - heat deposition distribution in the spallation target, - heat deposition in beam window, core, reflector and structural

  11. Diagnostics for laser-driven plasma accelerators

    When generating relativistic plasmas with high power laser systems small-scale particle accelerators can be realized producing particle pulses which exhibit parameters complementary to conventional accelerators. To be able to resolve the physical processes underlying the acceleration mechanisms diagnostics well-suited for this plasma environment need to be designed and realized. In this presentation, several techniques are introduced, and recent results are discussed. They have lead to the first time-resolved visualization of the plasma wave necessary for laser-driven electron acceleration, its non-linear evolution and the actual breaking of the plasma wave. Furthermore, diagnostic techniques relevant for laser-driven ion acceleration based on optical and particle probing are presented.

  12. Study on variance-to-mean method as subcriticality monitor for accelerator driven system operated with pulse-mode

    Two types of the variance-to-mean methods for the subcritical system that was driven by the periodic and pulsed neutron source were developed and their experimental examination was performed with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly and a pulsed neutron generator. As a result, it was demonstrated that the prompt neutron decay constant could be measured by these methods. From this fact, it was concluded that the present variance-to-mean methods had potential for being used in the subcriticality monitor for the future accelerator driven system operated with the pulse-mode. (author)

  13. High energy nuclear reactions ('Spallation') and their application in calculation of the Acceleration Driven Systems (ADS)

    This work presents a study of high energy nuclear reactions which are fundamental to dene the source term in accelerator driven systems. These nuclear reactions, also known as spallation, consist in the interaction of high energetic hadrons with nucleons in the atomic nucleus. The phenomenology of these reactions consist in two step. In the rst, the proton interacts through multiple scattering in a process called intra-nuclear cascade. It is followed by a step in which the excited nucleus, coming from the intranuclear cascade, could either, evaporates particles to achieve a moderate energy state or fission. This process is known as competition between evaporation and fission. In this work the main nuclear models, Bertini and Cugnon are reviewed, since these models are fundamental for design purposes of the source term in ADS, due to lack of evaluated nuclear data for these reactions. The implementation and validation of the calculation methods for the design of the source is carried out to implement the methodology of source design using the program MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended), devoted to calculation of transport of these particles and the validation performed by an international cooperation together with a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency and available jobs, in order to qualify the calculations on nuclear reactions and the de-excitation channels involved, providing a state of the art of design and methodology for calculating external sources of spallation for source driven systems. The CRISP, is a brazilian code for the phenomenological description of the reactions involved and the models implemented in the code were reviewed and improved to continue the qualification process. Due to failure of the main models in describing the production of light nuclides, the multifragmentation reaction model was studied. Because the discrepancies in the calculations of production of these nuclides are attributes to the

  14. Radiological properties of heavy liquid metal targets of accelerator driven systems

    The long-lived radioactivity of lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) inside the targets of the accelerator driven systems (ADS) is estimated. It is determined by both spallation and fission products of lead and bismuth nuclides. Based on US safety standards the radiotoxicity of targets was calculated for different cooling down periods. In order to estimate the total radioactivity of 1-MW power target circuit (TC), which is developing now at IPPE, the contribution of its main components are preliminarily analyzed. The following conclusions were made: (1) Preliminary analysis has shown that 2 years after the stop of the ADS operation its coolant radiotoxicity in comparison with that of reactor installations is higher in the all cooling interval in question and reaches the radiotoxicity of natural uranium only in approximately 300 years. (2) Under effect of accelerator proton beam with energy Ep = 800 MeV, as a result of nuclear reactions in the LBC volume of the TC of 1-MW power, a wide spectrum of radionuclides is formed and accumulated. The total specific coolant activity to the end of operation time under nominal power proved to be as much as about 500 Ci/kg and reduces to 2.7 Ci/kg in 5 years. (3) The most dangerous are gaseous and volatile radionuclides, that due to thermal diffusion and evaporation partly are transmitting from the lead-bismuth mirror of volume compensator into protective gas system (helium). Among them there are noble gases krypton and xenon, radionuclides of polonium, mercury, cesium, iodine, bromine, and rubidium. (4) Only nuclides with half-lives no lower than 10 hours were included in the calculations. The short-lived nuclides were not taken into account as structurally the TC is installed in a hermetic container under biological shielding. Even in case of break of the membrane (the window of the target active part) with coolant leakage into the container volume and its further freezing, any direct danger for operation personal is fully excluded

  15. Development of Three-dimensional Reactor Analysis Code System for Accelerator-Driven System, ADS3D

    To investigate an Accelerator-Driven System (ADS) with sub-criticality control mechanism such as control rods or burnable poison, the ADS3D code has been developed on MARBLE which is a next generation reactor analysis code system developed by JAEA. In the past neutronics calculation for the ADS, JAEA employed RZ calculation models to realize efficient investigations. However, it was very difficult to model sub-criticality control mechanisms in RZ calculation models. The ADS3D code system is able to calculate the transportation of protons and neutrons, the burn-up calculation and the fuel exchange in three-dimensional calculation models. It means this code system can treat ADS concepts with sub-criticality control mechanism and makes it possible to investigate a new concept of ADS. (author)

  16. Neutronic Studies in Support of Accelerator-Driven Systems: The MUSE Experiments in the MASURCA Facility

    The MUSE program (multiplication with an external source) is in progress at the MASURCA critical facility at the Cadarache Research Center of the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique in France. The program is dedicated to the physics studies of accelerator-driven systems in support of transmutation studies of minor actinides and long-lived fission products. It began in 1995 with the coupling of a Cf source in MASURCA and was followed by a commercial (d,T) source. In 2001, a specially constructed (d,D)/(d,T) neutron generator (GENEPI) was placed in MASURCA and the MUSE-4 program commenced.We describe the first phases of the MUSE-4 program, with data presented that were obtained up to about the summer of 2002. We present some results from the 'reference' configuration, which can operate at critical. We present traverses of measured fission reaction rates, with comparison to calculations. Also in the reference configuration, we performed activation foil measurements and present these results compared to calculations.Because a major objective of the MUSE program is to test and qualify methods of subcritical reactivity measurement, we have devoted a major portion of our studies to this area. We have used classical methods (rod drop, source multiplication) to attempt to measure the subcritical level. In these early phases we studied core configurations of around keff = 0.995. Deeper subcriticality (keff = 0.96) was achieved by inserting a safety rod.In addition to the methods mentioned above, we have devoted a lot of effort to pulse neutron source, fluctuation (Rossi-α and Feynman-α), and transfer function methods (e.g., cross-power spectral density). We present our preliminary results of all the methods, with some discussion regarding cross comparison

  17. Purification of Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Used in Accelerator Driven Systems

    MYRRHA is an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) under development at Mol, Belgium. With the development of such ADS and also with the development of some GEN IV type reactors, new problematic waste types occur, needing a different waste treatment approach during operation and/or during decommissioning. One of the problems to be solved during the operation of the ADS MYRRHA is the removal of Polonium from the lead-bismuth eutectic. This paper gives an overview of an exhaustive literature study concerning the Polonium removal techniques from a lead-bismuth eutectic melt that will be used as target and reactor coolant in the MYRRHA reactor. Five extraction techniques have recently been investigated: distillation, Polonium hydride stripping, alkaline extraction, rare-earth filtration and electrodeposition. None of these techniques has yet been applied at large scale. A detailed description of each extraction process is given. It shows that there is no ideal solution to the problem. The Polonium hydride stripping and electrodeposition methods can already be ruled out, the former for obvious safety reasons, the latter because no convincing results could be provided to date. The distillation process is rather simple and could also be coupled to the removal of Hg-194 from the gas plenum, but a pilot scale investigation would require working with Polonium. The other main drawbacks of the method are that it necessitates a large transfer area and that high temperatures are required. The alkaline extraction method represents the most extensively studied technique because of the possibility to develop it with Tellurium as Polonium surrogate. The main challenge of the technique will be to find a material that could adequately cope with the high temperature and the corrosivity of the alkali melt. The rare-earth filtration represents the most elegant technology but would still require a lot of research and development efforts since a broad expertise is needed in many fields. (authors)

  18. Accelerator-driven transmutation technologies

    The basic principles of accelerator-driven transmutation technologies (ADTT) are outlined and their assets highlighted. Current designs of ADTT facilities pursue 3 basic objectives: (i) Systems designed to generate power and convert nuclear wastes produced by conventional nuclear reactors into long-lived radioisotopes by transmutation. Such isotopes will be separated from molten salts by centrifugal separation. A single subcritical assembly will 'burn' wastes produced by several conventional NPPs. (ii) Systems for power generation using thorium fuel. Such systems are not designed for transmutation of nuclear wastes. The amount of transuranium elements produced by the thorium cycle is minimal, whereby the problem of storage of very long lived isotopes is virtually eliminated. (iii) Systems for transmutation of plutonium reclaimed from nuclear weapons. As to the future of ADTT in comparison with nuclear fusion, an asset of the former is that there remain no unsolved principal physical problems that would preclude its implementation. What has to be solved is materials and technological problems and, in particular, the financial problem. Implementation of ADTT is impossible in any way other than on the basis of a wide international cooperation. There exists a group of people dealing with ADTT in the Czech Republic, joining academic and industrial experts; this group is fostering contacts with the Los Alamos National Laboratory, U.S.A. The Institute of Nuclear Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, has set up an ADTT Documentation Center, which is accessible to any person interested in this promising field of science and technology. (P.A.). 3 figs

  19. Impact of criticality level on safety of accelerator driven systems with conventional Mox and advanced fertile free fuels

    Two types of Accelerator Driven Systems are currently investigated in Europe: with conventional MOX fuel (of e.g. Superphenix type) for demonstration and experimental purposes; and with Advanced Fertile Free Fuels for nuclear waste burning. Usually a similar subcriticality level is assumed acceptable in the both cases: with keff being around 0,95 - 0,97. In the paper, analyses of protected and unprotected (i.e. with and without accelerator shutdown) transients are performed for a wider range of initial (at the beginning of the transient) keff values to assess corresponding advantages and disadvantages (from the safety point of view) for the both types of ADS. (authors)

  20. Activity report of working party on reactor physics of accelerator-driven system. July 1999 to March 2001

    Under the Research Committee on Reactor Physics, the Working Party on Reactor Physics of Accelerator-Driven System (ADS-WP) was set in July 1999 to review and investigate special subjects related to reactor physics research for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical System (ADS). The ADS-WP, at the first meeting, discussed a guideline of its activity for two years and decided to concentrate upon three subjects: (1) neutron transport calculations in high energy range, (2) static and kinetic (safety-related) characteristics of subcritical system, and (3) system design including ADS concepts and elemental technology developments required. The activity of ADS-WP continued from July 1999 to March 2001. In this duration, the members of ADS-WP met together four times and discussed the above subjects. In addition, the ADS-WP conducted a questionnaire on requests and proposals for the plan of Transmutation Physics Experimental Facility in the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project, which is a joint project between JAERI and KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization). This report summarizes the results obtained by the above ADS-WP activity. (author)

  1. Technology and Components of Accelerator-driven Systems. Second International Workshop Proceedings, Nantes, France, 21-23 May 2013

    The accelerator-driven system (ADS) is a potential transmutation system option as part of partitioning and transmutation strategies for radioactive waste in advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Following the success of the workshop series on the utilisation and reliability of the High Power Proton Accelerators (HPPA), the scope of this new workshop series on Technology and Components of Accelerator-driven Systems has been extended to cover subcritical systems as well as the use of neutron sources. The workshop organised by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency provided experts with a forum to present and discuss state-of-the-art developments in the field of ADS and neutron sources. A total of 40 papers were presented during the oral and poster sessions. Four technical sessions were organised addressing ADS experiments and test facilities, accelerators, simulation, safety, data, neutron sources that were opportunity to present the status of projects like the MYRRHA facility, the MEGAPIE target, FREYA and GUINEVERE experiments, the KIPT neutron source, and the FAIR linac. These proceedings include all the papers presented at the workshop

  2. Conceptual design of minor actinides burner with an accelerator-driven subcritical system.

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-11-04

    In the environmental impact study of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, the limit of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for disposal is assessed at 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM), among which 63,000 MTHM are the projected SNF discharge from U.S. commercial nuclear power plants though 2011. Within the 70,000 MTHM of SNF in storage, approximately 115 tons would be minor actinides (MAs) and 585 tons would be plutonium. This study describes the conceptual design of an accelerator-driven subcritical (ADS) system intended to utilize (burn) the 115 tons of MAs. The ADS system consists of a subcritical fission blanket where the MAs fuel will be burned, a spallation neutron source to drive the fission blanket, and a radiation shield to reduce the radiation dose to an acceptable level. The spallation neutrons are generated from the interaction of a 1 GeV proton beam with a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) or liquid lead target. In this concept, the fission blanket consists of a liquid mobile fuel and the fuel carrier can be LBE, liquid lead, or molten salt. The actinide fuel materials are dissolved, mixed, or suspended in the liquid fuel carrier. Therefore, fresh fuel can be fed into the fission blanket to adjust its reactivity and to control system power during operation. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to determine the overall parameters of an ADS system utilizing LBE as an example. Steady-state Monte Carlo simulations were studied for three fission blanket configurations that are similar except that the loaded amount of actinide fuel in the LBE is either 5, 7, or 10% of the total volume of the blanket, respectively. The neutron multiplication factor values of the three configurations are all approximately 0.98 and the MA initial inventories are each approximately 10 tons. Monte Carlo burnup simulations using the MCB5 code were performed to analyze the performance of the three conceptual ADS systems. Preliminary burnup analysis shows that all three conceptual ADS

  3. ZZ ADS-LIB/V1.0, test library for Accelerator Driven Systems

    1 - Description: This test library can be used for a number of code systems in the analysis of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS). The library is restricted to those materials needed for benchmarking efforts linked to short and mid-term ADS experimental results and design concepts. The 30 materials selected and the upper energy limit of the evaluation of each of them is given in parentheses. Format: ENDF-6. Number of groups: continuous energy for ACE library, 421 neutron groups for MATXS library. Nuclides: H1 (150), O16 (150), Al27 (150), Ti46 (20), Ti47 (20), Ti48 (20), Ti49 (20), Ti50 (20), Cr50 (20), Cr52 (20), Cr53 (20), Cr54 (20), Mn55 (20), Fe54 (200), Fe56 (200), Fe57 (200), Fe58 (200), Ni58 (20), Ni60 (20), Ni61 (150), Ni62 (150), Ni64 (150), Pb204 (200), Pb206 (200), Pb207 (200), Pb208 (200), Th232 (20), U234 (20), U235 (20), U238 (30). Thermal scattering: Thermal scattering Data for Hydrogen bound in water, 293.6 K, 323.6 K, 373.6 K, 423.6 K, 473.6 K, 523.6 K, 573.6 K, 623.6 K. Temperatures: for H1: [293.6, 323.6, 373.6, 423.6, 473.6, 523.6, 573.6, 623.6 K]; for Actinides and O-16: [293.6, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900, 1200 K]; and for the rest of materials: [293.6, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 K]. Origin: JEFF3.1. Neutron weighting spectrum: standard PWR spectrum included in the GROUPR module of NJOY, modified in such a way that follows the 1/E shape from 4.0 eV to 9.811 KeV and from 10 to 20 MeV. Background scattering: sigma-0, between 5 and 10, depending on the nuclide in the range 1-10 E10. Legendre order: P-6 for transport correction to P-5. 2 - Methods: Processing was carried out using NJOY-99.90 with the local updates at IAEA-NDS. The resulting processed files are available in ACE format for Monte Carlo transport calculations and in MATXS format for deterministic transport calculations

  4. EC-FP7 ARCAS: technical and economical comparison of Fast Reactors and Accelerator Driven Systems for transmutation of Minor Actinides

    The ARCAS project aims to compare, on a technological and economical basis, Accelerator Driven Systems and Fast Reactors as Minor Actinide burners. It is split in five work packages: the reference scenario definition, the fast reactor system definition, the accelerator driven system definition, the fuel reprocessing and fabrication facilities definition and the economical comparison. This paper summarizes the status of the project and its five work packages. (author)

  5. Status of the EC-FP7 Project ARCAS: Comparing the economics of accelerator-driven systems and fast reactors as minor actinide burners

    The ARCAS Project aims to compare, on a technological and economical basis, accelerator-driven systems and fast reactors as minor actinide burners. It is split into five work packages: the reference scenario definition, the fast reactor system definition, the accelerator-driven system definition, the fuel reprocessing and fabrication facilities definition and the economical comparison. This paper summarises the status of the project and its five work packages. (authors)

  6. Terahertz-driven linear electron acceleration

    Nanni, Emilio Alessandro; Ravi, Koustuban; Fallahi, Arya; Moriena, Gustavo; Miller, R J Dwayne; Kärtner, Franz X

    2014-01-01

    The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators is dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency (RF) accelerating structures operate with 30-50 MeV/m gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional RF structures. However, laser-driven electron accelerators require intense sources and suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here, we demonstrate the first linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically-generated terahertz (THz) pulses. THz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron accelerators with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. Increasing the operational frequency of accelerators into the THz band allows for greatly increased accelerating ...

  7. Transmutation of transuranium elements in a gas-cooled accelerator-driven system

    The peaceful usage of nuclear energy by light and boiling water reactors is connected with a buildup of long-lived high-level radioactive waste. Compared to the direct disposal, partitioning and transmutation (P and T) is considered as an effective way to reduce this waste in its quantity by converting it into short-lived radio nuclides. By that the long term radiotoxicity is reduced compared to direct disposal. Subcritical systems, which are powered by spallation processes for free neutron production to maintain the nuclear chain reaction, allow a target-oriented transmutation. As a subcritical system a gas-cooled accelerator driven system (ADS) for transmutation of transuranic elements has been modeled in this thesis to evaluate the reduction of the radio toxicity by P and T. The simulation of neutron-physical processes is based on the Monte Carlo computer program MCNPX. The development of an equilibrium core made it possible to study the transmutation and operating behavior for several fuel variations in a magnesium oxide matrix and develop a simplified burnup method. Americium as part of the fuel has a stabilizing effect on the neutron multiplication due to its conversion into plutonium during the operation. Thorium was investigated as an alternative matrix for the fuel in order to replicate the stabilizing effect of americium by the conversion of thorium in 233U. By that a consistent operating cycle in the later P and T-process is ensured. Calculation of the nuclide composition at the end of a P and T-process leads to an expansion of the mathematical description of the mass reduction (transmutation efficiency) by the material located in the reactor. The achieved transmutation efficiency with the investigated ADS is 98.8 %. The transmutation time was examined with different operating strategies regarding the number, size and thermal power of use of transmutation facilities to determine the effort for the P and T-process depending on efficiency. It turns out

  8. Software design for a database driven system for accelerator magnet measurements

    Measurements of more than 1000 new magnets are needed for the Main Injector Project at Fermilab. In order to achieve efficiency and accuracy in measurements, we chose a database driven design for control of the measurement system. We will use a relational database to describe the measurement subjects and equipment. A logbook system defined in the database will provide for prescription of measurements to be carried out, description of measurements as they are carried out, and a comment database for less structured information. The operator interface will be built on X-windows. This paper will describe our system design. 2 refs

  9. The Tasse concept (thorium based accelerator driven system with simplified fuel cycle for long term energy production)

    Berthou, V. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Slessarev, I.; Salvatores, M. [IRI, TU Delft (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    Within the framework of the nuclear waste management studies, the ''one-component''. concept has to be considered as an attractive option in the long-term perspective. This paper proposes a new system called TASSE (''Thorium based Accelerator driven System with Simplified fuel cycle for long term Energy production''.), destined to the current French park renewal. The main idea of the TASSE concept is to simplify both the front and the back end of the fuel cycle, and his major goals are to provide electricity with low waste production, and with an economical competitiveness. (author)

  10. The Tasse concept (thorium based accelerator driven system with simplified fuel cycle for long term energy production)

    Within the framework of the nuclear waste management studies, the ''one-component''. concept has to be considered as an attractive option in the long-term perspective. This paper proposes a new system called TASSE (''Thorium based Accelerator driven System with Simplified fuel cycle for long term Energy production''.), destined to the current French park renewal. The main idea of the TASSE concept is to simplify both the front and the back end of the fuel cycle, and his major goals are to provide electricity with low waste production, and with an economical competitiveness. (author)

  11. Scientific-technical problems on creation of accelerator driven systems for transmutation of long-lived radioactive waste and simultaneously for production of energy (Russian experience)

    The scientific base of nuclear transmutation for long-lived radioactive waste of atomic industry with application of Accelerator Driven system is considered in current review. The problems on creation of facilities of such kind were analysed. The results of conceptual investigations for different versions of Accelerator Driven system carried out in Russian nuclear centres are presented. The main directions of research and development on grounding of installation's design and creation of demonstration facility are considered

  12. Transmutation of high level nuclear waste in an accelerator driven system: towards a demonstration device of industrial interest (EUROTRANS)

    The Integrated Project EUROTRANS (EURopean Research Programme for the TRANSmutation of High Level Nuclear Waste in an Accelerator Driven System) within the ongoing EURATOM 6th Framework Programme (FP6) is devoted to the study of transmutation of high-level waste from nuclear power plants. The work is focused on transmutation in an Accelerator Driven System (ADS). The objective of EUROTRANS is the assessment of the design and the feasibility of an industrial ADS prototype dedicated to transmutation. The necessary R and D results in the areas of accelerator components, fuel development, structural materials, thermal-hydraulics, heavy liquid metal technology and nuclear data will be made available, together with the experimental demonstration of the ADS component coupling. The outcome of this work will allow to provide a reasonably reliable assessment of technological feasibility and a cost estimate for ADS based transmutation, and to possibly decide on the detailed design of an experimental ADS and its construction in the future. EUROTRANS is integrating activities of 51 participants from 16 countries, within the industry (10 participants), the national research centres (20) and 17 universities. 16 universities are collectively represented by ENEN (European Nuclear Education Network). EUROTRANS is the continuation of the three FP5 Clusters FUETRA, BASTRA and TESTRA together with the PDS-XADS Project. It is a five-year project which started in April 2005

  13. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation. Annual Report 2002

    Gudowski, W.; Wallenius, J.; Tucek, K.; Eriksson, Marcus; Carlsson, Johan; Seltborg, P.; Cetnar, J.; Chakarova, R.; Jollkonen, Mikael; Westlen, D. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics

    2003-06-01

    The research on safety of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems (ADS) at the Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics has been largely determined by the program of the European projects of the the 5th Framework Programme. In particular: a) ADS core design and development of advanced nuclear fuel optimized for high transmutation rates and good safety features. This activity includes computer modeling of nuclear fuel production. Three different ADS-core concept are being investigated: Conceptual design of Pb-Bi cooled core with nitride fuel - so called Sing-Sing Core; Pb-Bi cooled core with oxide fuel; Gas cooled core with oxide fuel - both designs investigated for the European Project PDS-XADS; b) analysis of ADS-dynamics and assessment of major reactivity feedbacks; c) emergency heat removal from ADS; d) participation in ADS experiments including 1 MW spallation target manufacturing, subcritical experiments MUSE, YALINA subcritical experiment in Minsk and designing of the subcritical experiment SAD in Dubna; e) material studies for ADS, in particular theoretical and simulation studies of radiation damage in high neutron (or proton) fluxes; f) computer code and nuclear data development relevant for simulation and optimization of ADS, special efforts were put in the frame of the European Project PDS-XADS to perform sensitivity studies of the different nuclear data libraries; g) studies of transmutation potential of critical reactors in particular High Temp Gas Cooled Reactor. Most important finding and conclusions from our studies: A strong positive void coefficient was found for lead/bismuth cooled cores. This considerable void effect is attributed to a high fraction of americium (60%) in the fuel. It was found that void reactivity insertion rates increases with P/D; in response to the beam overpower accident the Pb/Bi-cooled core featured the twice longer grace time compared to the sodium-cooled core; an important safety issue is the high void worth that could

  14. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation. Annual Report 2002

    The research on safety of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems (ADS) at the Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics has been largely determined by the program of the European projects of the the 5th Framework Programme. In particular: a) ADS core design and development of advanced nuclear fuel optimized for high transmutation rates and good safety features. This activity includes computer modeling of nuclear fuel production. Three different ADS-core concept are being investigated: Conceptual design of Pb-Bi cooled core with nitride fuel - so called Sing-Sing Core; Pb-Bi cooled core with oxide fuel; Gas cooled core with oxide fuel - both designs investigated for the European Project PDS-XADS; b) analysis of ADS-dynamics and assessment of major reactivity feedbacks; c) emergency heat removal from ADS; d) participation in ADS experiments including 1 MW spallation target manufacturing, subcritical experiments MUSE, YALINA subcritical experiment in Minsk and designing of the subcritical experiment SAD in Dubna; e) material studies for ADS, in particular theoretical and simulation studies of radiation damage in high neutron (or proton) fluxes; f) computer code and nuclear data development relevant for simulation and optimization of ADS, special efforts were put in the frame of the European Project PDS-XADS to perform sensitivity studies of the different nuclear data libraries; g) studies of transmutation potential of critical reactors in particular High Temp Gas Cooled Reactor. Most important finding and conclusions from our studies: A strong positive void coefficient was found for lead/bismuth cooled cores. This considerable void effect is attributed to a high fraction of americium (60%) in the fuel. It was found that void reactivity insertion rates increases with P/D; in response to the beam overpower accident the Pb/Bi-cooled core featured the twice longer grace time compared to the sodium-cooled core; an important safety issue is the high void worth that could

  15. Proliferation protection of MOX fuel by means of accelerator-driven system

    Fresh fuel assemblies (FA) containing MOX-fuel have a high attractiveness for thieves and then require appropriate protective measures. It may be, for instance, preliminary neutron irradiation to accumulate radioactive fission products (FP) in FA, i.e. to create an inherent radiation barrier. One of the ways to creating such a protective barrier is a short-term irradiation of FA containing MOX-fuel in an accelerator-driven facility (ADF). Basic advantages of ADF are a sub-criticality of the ADF blanket that excludes reactivity accidents in principle and a possibility to organize practically continuous FA reloading. Evaluations of efficiency in creating the inherent radiation protective barrier in MOX-fuel by neutron irradiation in dedicated ADFs allow us to make the following conclusions: 1) Increase of FA lattice pitch and application of coolants with different moderating properties inside and outside FA irradiated in the ADF blanket, leads to shifting the FP accumulation rate towards FA periphery. The shift effect is particularly pronounced in FA containing MOX-fuel as compared with FA with pure uranium dioxide fuel. 2) The effect of shifting the FP accumulation rate towards FA periphery insignificantly reduces RED from irradiated FA but substantially decreases power generated by FA, thus allowing relaxing requirements to parameters of accelerator. 3) After short-term irradiation of MOX FA in the ADF blanket with wide FA lattice, RED from irradiated FA exceeds adopted level of proliferation-protection for 2 years. If insignificant quantity of 232 U is added to MOX-fuel during fabrication, time of proliferation-protection can be substantially prolonged (up to 40 years and more). 3) The most effective option among analyzed variants is a wide FA lattice with application of heavy water as an internal coolant of FA. 4) One dedicated ADF with advanced proton accelerator is able to service about 10 power LWRs via production of proliferation-protected (at level of

  16. Developments in laser-driven plasma accelerators

    Hooker, Simon Martin

    2014-01-01

    Laser-driven plasma accelerators provide acceleration gradients three orders of magnitude greater than conventional machines, offering the potential to shrink the length of accelerators by the same factor. To date, laser-acceleration of electron beams to particle energies comparable to those offered by synchrotron light sources has been demonstrated with plasma acceleration stages only a few centimetres long. This article describes the principles of operation of laser-driven plasma accelerators, and reviews their development from their proposal in 1979 to recent demonstrations. The potential applications of plasma accelerators are described and the challenges which must be overcome before they can become a practical tool are discussed.

  17. Technical committee on review of national programmes on fast reactors and accelerator driven systems (ADS). Working material

    The objectives of the meeting were: to exchange information on the national programmes on fast reactors (FR) and accelerator driven systems (ADS); to review the progress since the previous IWG-FR meeting, including the status of the actions; to consider meeting arrangements for 2001 and 2002; to review the Agency co-ordinated research activities in the field of FR and ADS, as well as so-ordination of the TWG-FR activities with their organisations. This report covers the reports presented on the relevant activities in Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Republic of Korea, Russia, Sweden, United Kingdom and USA

  18. Study of particle transport in a high power spallation target for an accelerator-driven transmutation system

    AGATE is a project envisaged to demonstrate the feasibility of transmutation in a gas (helium) cooled accelerator-driven system using solid spallation target. Development of the spallation target module and assessing its safety aspects are studied in this work. According to the AGATE concept parameters, 600 MeV protons are delivered on to the segmented tungsten spallation target. The Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4 has been used in the simulation of particle transport. Binary cascade is used to simulate intra-nuclear cascades, along with the G4NDL neutron data library for low energy neutrons (<20 MeV).

  19. Study of particle transport in a high power spallation target for an accelerator-driven transmutation system

    Shetty, Nikhil Vittal

    2013-01-31

    AGATE is a project envisaged to demonstrate the feasibility of transmutation in a gas (helium) cooled accelerator-driven system using solid spallation target. Development of the spallation target module and assessing its safety aspects are studied in this work. According to the AGATE concept parameters, 600 MeV protons are delivered on to the segmented tungsten spallation target. The Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4 has been used in the simulation of particle transport. Binary cascade is used to simulate intra-nuclear cascades, along with the G4NDL neutron data library for low energy neutrons (<20 MeV).

  20. High quality proton beams from hybrid integrated laser-driven ion acceleration systems

    We consider a hybrid acceleration scheme for protons where the laser generated beam is selected in energy and angle and injected into a compact linac, which raises the energy from 30 to 60 MeV. The laser acceleration regime is TNSA and the energy spectrum is determined by the cutoff energy and proton temperature. The dependence of the spectrum on the target properties and the incidence angle is investigated with 2D PIC simulations. We base our work on widely available technologies and on laser with a short pulse, having in mind a facility whose cost is approximately 15M€. Using a recent experiment as the reference, we choose the laser pulse and target so that the energy spectrum obtained from the 3D PIC simulation is close to the one observed, whose cutoff energy was estimated to be over 50 MeV. Laser accelerated protons in the TNSA regime have wide energy spectrum and broad divergence. In this paper we compare three transport lines, designed to perform energy selection and beam collimation. They are based on a solenoid, a quadruplet of permanent magnetic quadrupoles and a chicane. To increase the maximum available energy, which is actually seen as an upper limit due to laser properties and available targets, we propose to inject protons into a small linac for post-acceleration. The number of selected and injected protons is the highest with the solenoid and lower by one and two orders of magnitude with the quadrupoles and the chicane respectively. Even though only the solenoid enables achieving to reach a final intensity at the threshold required for therapy with the highest beam quality, the other systems will be very likely used in the first experiments. Realistic start-to-end simulations, as the ones reported here, are relevant for the design of such experiments

  1. High quality proton beams from hybrid integrated laser-driven ion acceleration systems

    Sinigardi, Stefano; Turchetti, Giorgio; Rossi, Francesco; Londrillo, Pasquale; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo; Bolton, Paul R.

    2014-03-01

    We consider a hybrid acceleration scheme for protons where the laser generated beam is selected in energy and angle and injected into a compact linac, which raises the energy from 30 to 60 MeV. The laser acceleration regime is TNSA and the energy spectrum is determined by the cutoff energy and proton temperature. The dependence of the spectrum on the target properties and the incidence angle is investigated with 2D PIC simulations. We base our work on widely available technologies and on laser with a short pulse, having in mind a facility whose cost is approximately 15 M €. Using a recent experiment as the reference, we choose the laser pulse and target so that the energy spectrum obtained from the 3D PIC simulation is close to the one observed, whose cutoff energy was estimated to be over 50 MeV. Laser accelerated protons in the TNSA regime have wide energy spectrum and broad divergence. In this paper we compare three transport lines, designed to perform energy selection and beam collimation. They are based on a solenoid, a quadruplet of permanent magnetic quadrupoles and a chicane. To increase the maximum available energy, which is actually seen as an upper limit due to laser properties and available targets, we propose to inject protons into a small linac for post-acceleration. The number of selected and injected protons is the highest with the solenoid and lower by one and two orders of magnitude with the quadrupoles and the chicane respectively. Even though only the solenoid enables achieving to reach a final intensity at the threshold required for therapy with the highest beam quality, the other systems will be very likely used in the first experiments. Realistic start-to-end simulations, as the ones reported here, are relevant for the design of such experiments.

  2. Technical meeting to 'Review of national programmes on fast reactors and accelerator driven systems (ADS)'. Working material

    36th Annual Meeting of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors, the IAEA Technical Meeting (TM) on 'Review of National Programmes on Fast Reactors and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS)', hosted by the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) was attended by TWG-FR Members and Advisers from the following Member States (MS) and International Organizations: Brazil, France, Germany, India, Japan, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, and the OECD/NEA. The objectives of the meeting were to: 1) exchange information on the national programmes on Fast Reactors (FR) and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); 2) review the progress since the 35th TWG-FR Annual Meeting, including the status of the actions; 3) consider meeting arrangements for 2003 and 2004; 4) review the Agency's co-ordinated research activities in the field of FRs and ADS, as well as co-ordination of the TWG-FR's activities with other organizations. The participants made presentations on the status of the respective national programmes on FR and ADS development. A summary of the highlights for the period since the 35th TWG-FR Annual Meeting

  3. Consequences of return to power after a beam interruption in the blanket of an accelerator driven system

    A sudden drop in power after a beam interruption leads to thermal fatigue effects in structural components in the blanket of an accelerator driven system. These thermal fatigue effects limit component lifetimes. A sudden return to power after a beam interruption can contribute significant additional thermal fatigue and greatly reduce component lifetimes. One obvious solution is a gradual return to power after a beam interruption. There are two potential problems with this solution. One problem involves interruptions that are longer than the thermal time constants of thin structural members but shorter than the time constants of thick structural members. In such a case, a gradual return to power reduces the additional thermal fatigue in the thin structural members but increases the thermal fatigue in thick structural members. Some compromise is necessary. The other problem is that for thick components with long thermal time constants a long, gradual return to power is required to minimize additional thermal fatigue. Such a slow return to power can reduce the utilization or the effective load factor of the system. Specific examples of beam interruptions with various assumptions on return to power are provided for a preliminary design for the blanket of the Accelerator Driven Test Facility. Also, mitigation options to increase component lifetime are discussed. These mitigation options include improving beam reliability and modifying the blanket design to better tolerate beam interruptions

  4. Proton-driven plasma acceleration at CERN

    Plasma-based acceleration methods have seen important progress over the last years. Recently, it has been proposed to experimentally study plasma acceleration driven by proton beams, in addition to the established research directions of electron and laser-driven plasmas. This talk presents the planned experiment and the research efforts carried out at CERN.

  5. Fatigue analysis of the spallation module of a high power accelerator-driven demonstrator system

    In the framework of the study of a hybrid demonstrator system dedicated to waste transmutation, close attention has been paid to the mechanical design of the beam window plunging in the liquid metal target, since it ensures a critical function of confinement. First, the risk of fatigue induced by thermal cycling due to frequent beam trips of the accelerator has been assessed for an unirradiated T91 martensitic steel. This study has shown that the risk of fatigue will not be a limiting factor for the lifetime of the component even under severe operating conditions. A similar study has also been performed, with the help of adapted design rules, considering a T91 steel irradiated at 3.5 DPA. A similar conclusion has been found, which should, however, be confirmed by further studies at dose and temperature levels closer to the expected irradiation conditions of the window. (authors)

  6. IAEA workshop on 'Technology and applications of accelerator driven systems (ADS)'. Working material

    The objective of this workshop was to familiarize the students with the status of the R and D activities in the areas of: General Concept and System Studies, Accelerator, Target, Sub-Critical Core, Fuel Development, Fuel Cycle Studies. Participants were given a review of ADS designs presently under consideration. Participants studied the theoretical foundation of ADS design work, identified the most problematic areas as well as the limitations of the simulation methods. Based on the discussion of the impact of the present uncertainties on the performance of the ADS, the needs for data and methods development and validation work were identified. Eighteen participants from 13 different countries namely (Argentina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Belarus, Croatia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Kazakhstan, Russian Federation, Sudan, Slovakia and Turkey) took part in the Workshop

  7. Consequences of Return to Power after a Beam Interruption in the Blanket of an Accelerator Driven System

    sudden drop in power after a beam interruption leads to thermal fatigue effects in structural components in the blanket of an accelerator driven system. These thermal fatigue effects limit component lifetimes. A sudden return to power after a beam interruption can contribute significant additional thermal fatigue and greatly reduce component lifetimes. One obvious solution is a gradual return to power after a beam interruption. There are two potential problems with this solution. One problem involves interruptions that are longer than the thermal time constants of thin structural members but shorter than the time constants of thick structural members. In such a case, a gradual return to power reduces the additional thermal fatigue in the thin structural members but increases the thermal fatigue in thick structural members. Some compromise is necessary. The other problem is that for thick components with long thermal time constants a long, gradual return to power is required to minimize additional thermal fatigue. Such a slow return to power can reduce the utilization or the effective load factor of the system. Specific examples of beam interruptions with various assumptions on return to power are provided for a preliminary design for the blanket of the Accelerator Driven Test Facility. Also, mitigation options to increase component lifetime are discussed. These mitigation options include improving beam reliability and modifying the blanket design to better tolerate beam interruptions. The return to power after a beam interruption can add significantly to thermal fatigue and can reduce component lifetimes significantly. There is no one return to power scheme that provides optimum protection for all structural components. Furthermore, any return to power scheme that minimizes additional thermal fatigue in thick structural components, such as the IHX upper tube sheet rim, requires a slow return to power over a period of hours in case of a long beam interruption. Such

  8. Terahertz-driven linear electron acceleration

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Huang, Wenqian R.; Hong, Kyung-Han; Ravi, Koustuban; Fallahi, Arya; Moriena, Gustavo; Dwayne Miller, R. J.; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2015-10-01

    The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators are dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency accelerating structures operate with 30-50 MeV m-1 gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional radio-frequency structures. However, laser-driven wakefield accelerators require intense femtosecond sources and direct laser-driven accelerators suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here we demonstrate linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically generated terahertz pulses. Terahertz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron/proton accelerators with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. These ultra-compact terahertz accelerators with extremely short electron bunches hold great potential to have a transformative impact for free electron lasers, linear colliders, ultrafast electron diffraction, X-ray science and medical therapy with X-rays and electron beams.

  9. Laser driven proton acceleration and beam shaping

    Sinigardi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    In the race to obtain protons with higher energies, using more compact systems at the same time, laser-driven plasma accelerators are becoming an interesting possibility. But for now, only beams with extremely broad energy spectra and high divergence have been produced. The driving line of this PhD thesis was the study and design of a compact system to extract a high quality beam out of the initial bunch of protons produced by the interaction of a laser pulse with a thin solid target, usi...

  10. Monte Carlo studies of accelerator driven systems energy and spatial distribution of neutrons in multiplying and non-multiplying media

    Hashemi-Nezhad, S R; Brandt, R; Krivopustov, M I; Kulakov, B A; Odoj, R; Sosnin, A N; Wan, J S; Westmeier, W

    2002-01-01

    The LAHET code system is used to study the behaviour of the spallation neutrons resulting from the interaction of 2.5 GeV/c protons with a massive lead target within a large (approx 32 m sup 3) lead and graphite moderating environments. The spatial and energy distribution of the neutrons with presence and absence of a fissile material in Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) are investigated. It is shown that the energy spectra of the neutrons in graphite and lead moderators are very different and such difference is expected to result in noticeable differences in the nuclear waste transmutation abilities of the ADSs that use graphite and lead for neutron moderation and storage.

  11. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented

  12. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac

    Wu, Q., E-mail: wuq@impcas.ac.cn; Ma, H. Y.; Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhao, H. Y.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W. [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented.

  13. Monte Carlo studies of accelerator driven systems: energy and spatial distribution of neutrons in multiplying and non-multiplying media

    The LAHET code system is used to study the behaviour of the spallation neutrons resulting from the interaction of 2.5 GeV/c protons with a massive lead target within a large (∼32 m3) lead and graphite moderating environments. The spatial and energy distribution of the neutrons with presence and absence of a fissile material in Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) are investigated. It is shown that the energy spectra of the neutrons in graphite and lead moderators are very different and such difference is expected to result in noticeable differences in the nuclear waste transmutation abilities of the ADSs that use graphite and lead for neutron moderation and storage

  14. The consequences of a sharp temperature change in the fuel pins of an accelerator-driven subcritical system

    The effect of temperature changes and in particular those that are accompanied by strong gradients was extensively investigated for fast reactors. Subcritical systems designed for their transmutation ability are to some extent similar to critical power reactors in their subassembly structure. However, they differ in two main aspects. First, the coolant in a subcritical system is lead or lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and not sodium, and second, the main cause for steep temperature gradients in a fast power reactor is sudden control rod insertion, or scram, whereas in subcritical systems shutdown of the accelerator and its proton beam is the main cause for temperature gradients. Furthermore, the increased probability of operational interruptions in an accelerator driven system is largely due to the instability of the accelerator generating the proton beam. This study uses the knowledge gained from fast reactors as a preliminary reference and concentrates further on the unique features of the proposed subcritical systems. In particular, the effect of beam trips on the fuel pin integrity is evaluated as a function of the temperature gradients and the duration of the beam trips. It seems, however, that the largest hazard to the fuel pin integrity is due to the lead (or LBE) coolant. In particular, the stability of the protective oxide layer built on the clad surface with the lead coolant appears quite sensitive to sudden temperature changes. In the second part of this study, several available experimental results show that even very moderate temperature changes are sufficient to cause crack formation in the oxide layer thereby exposing the clad surface to enhanced LBE corrosion. In the worst case, complete exfoliation of the magnetite outer layer is observed. As a consequence, clad failure probability due to corrosion is considerably increased. (authors)

  15. Laser-driven electron accelerators

    The following possibilities are discussed: inverse free electron laser (wiggler accelerator); inverse Cerenkov effect; plasma accelerator; dielectric tube; and grating linac. Of these, the grating acceleraton is considered the most attractive alternative

  16. Towards standardized calculation tools for the Accelerator-Driven Systems and their application to various scenarios for nuclear waste transmutation

    This thesis discusses the question of partitioning and transmutation of actinides and some long-lived fission products as a way of reducing the mass and radio-toxicity of wastes from nuclear power facilities. Numerical benchmarking and computational exercises carried out in related projects are discussed and the quantitative assessment of the advantages and drawbacks of various transmutation strategies are discussed, as is the role of Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS) and Advanced Fast Reactors (FR) in advanced nuclear fuel cycles. According to the author, the study allows three main options in nuclear waste management - open cycle, plutonium recycling and the recycling of all actinides - to be compared. The last part of the dissertation is dedicated to two phase-out schemes employing either ASDs or critical reactors

  17. Technical meeting to 'Review of national programmes on fast reactors and accelerator driven systems (ADS)'. Working material

    The 35th Annual Meeting of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors TWG-FR, previously International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWG-FR, created in 1967), was hosted by the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK) and was attended by TWG-FR members and advisers from the following Member States: Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Japan, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, and the United States of America. The objectives of the meeting were: to exchange information on the national programmes on Fast Reactors (FR) and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); to review the progress since the 34th TWG-FR Annual Meeting, including the status of the actions; to consider meeting arrangements for 2002 and 2003; to review the Agency's co-ordinated research activities in the field of FRs and ADS, as well as co-ordination of the TWG-FR's activities with other organizations

  18. Development of a coupled dynamics code with transport theory capability and application to accelerator driven systems transients

    The VARIANT-K and DIF3D-K nodal spatial kinetics computer codes have been coupled to the SAS4A and SASSYS-1 liquid metal reactor accident and systems analysis codes. SAS4A and SASSYS-1 have been extended with the addition of heavy liquid metal (Pb and Pb-Bi) thermophysical properties, heat transfer correlations, and fluid dynamics correlations. The coupling methodology and heavy liquid metal modeling additions are described. The new computer code suite has been applied to analysis of neutron source and thermal-hydraulics transients in a model of an accelerator-driven minor actinide burner design proposed in an OECD/NEA/NSC benchmark specification. Modeling assumptions and input data generation procedures are described. Results of transient analyses are reported, with emphasis on comparison of P1 and P3 variational nodal transport theory results with nodal diffusion theory results, and on significance of spatial kinetics effects

  19. European research programme for the transmutation of high-level nuclear waste in an accelerator-driven system: Eurotrans

    The EUROTRANS (European Research Programme for the Transmutation of High-level Nuclear Waste in an Accelerator-driven System) Integrated Project within the ongoing EURATOM 6. European Commission Framework Programme (FP6) is devoted to the study of transmutation of high-level waste from nuclear power plants. The work is focused on transmutation in an accelerator-driven system (ADS). The objective of EUROTRANS is the assessment of the design and the feasibility of an industrial ADS prototype dedicated to transmutation. The necessary R and D results in the areas of fuel development, structural materials, thermal-hydraulics, heavy liquid metal technology and nuclear data will be made available, together with the experimental demonstration of the ADS component coupling. The outcome of this work will allow to provide a reasonably reliable assessment of technological feasibility and a cost estimate for ADS-based transmutation, and to possibly decide on the detailed design of an experimental ADS and its construction in the future. EUROTRANS is integrating critical masses of resources (23 M euros contribution, 43 M euros total eligible costs) and activities of 29 partners from 14 countries, within industry (10 partners), national research centres (18 partners) and 17 universities in Europe. The universities are collectively represented by one partner, the European Nuclear Engineering Network (ENEN). EUROTRANS is the logical continuation of the three FP5 Clusters FUETRA, BASTRA and TESTRA together with the PDS-XADS Project. It takes credit from the Road-map on ADS of the Technical Working Group. EUROTRANS strengthens and consolidates the European research and development activities with regard to transmutation. The involvement of universities strengthens education and training in nuclear technologies. The involvement of industry assures a market-oriented and economic design development and an effective dissemination of the results. The four-year project started in April 2005

  20. Accelerator-induced transients in Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors

    Achieving higher particles energies and beam powers have long been the main focus of research in accelerator technology. Since Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors (ADSRs) have become the subject of increasing interest, accelerator reliability and modes of operation have become important matters that require further research and development in order to accommodate the engineering and economic needs of ADSRs. This paper focuses on neutronic and thermo-mechanical analyses of accelerator-induced transients in an ADSR. Such transients fall into three main categories: beam interruptions (trips), pulsed-beam operation, and beam overpower. The concept of a multiple-target ADSR is shown to increase system reliability and to mitigate the negative effects of beam interruptions, such as thermal cyclic fatigue in the fuel cladding and the huge financial cost of total power loss. This work also demonstrates the effectiveness of the temperature-to-reactivity feedback mechanisms in ADSRs. A comparison of shutdown mechanisms using control rods and beam cut-off highlights the intrinsic safety features of ADSRs. It is evident that the presence of control rods is crucial in an industrial-scale ADSR. This paper also proposes a method to monitor core reactivity online using the repetitive pattern of beam current fluctuations in a pulsed-beam operation mode. Results were produced using PTS-ADS, a computer code developed specifically to study the dynamic neutronic and thermal responses to beam transients in subcritical reactor systems.

  1. Design studies of a high-current radiofrequency quadrupole for accelerator-driven systems programme

    S V L S Rao; P Singh

    2010-02-01

    A 3 MeV, 30 mA radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed for the low-energy high-intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA) project at BARC, India. The beam and cavity dynamics studies were performed using the computer codes LIDOS, TOUTATIS, SUPERFISH and CST microwave studio. We have followed the conventional design technique with slight modifications and compared that with the equipartitioned (EP) type of design. The sensitivity of the RFQ to the variation of input beam Twiss–Courant parameters and emittance has also been studied. In this article we discuss both design strategies and the details of the 3D cavity simulation studies.

  2. Progress of Laser-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    There is a great interest worldwide in plasma accelerators driven by ultra-intense lasers which make it possible to generate ultra-high gradient acceleration and high quality particle beams in a much more compact size compared with conventional accelerators. A frontier research on laser and plasma accelerators is focused on high energy electron acceleration and ultra-short X-ray and Tera Hertz radiations as their applications. These achievements will provide not only a wide range of sciences with benefits of a table-top accelerator but also a basic science with a tool of ultrahigh energy accelerators probing an unknown extremely microscopic world.Harnessing the recent advance of ultra-intense ultra-short pulse lasers, the worldwide research has made a tremendous breakthrough in demonstrating high-energy high-quality particle beams in a compact scale, so called ''dream beams on a table top'', which represents monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators and GeV acceleration by capillary plasma-channel laser wakefield accelerators. This lecture reviews recent progress of results on laser-driven plasma based accelerator experiments to quest for particle acceleration physics in intense laser-plasma interactions and to present new outlook for the GeV-range high-energy laser plasma accelerators

  3. The IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator-driven Systems'

    Document in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Since December 2005, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been conducting the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator-driven Systems' within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR). The overall objective of the CRP is to increase the capability of interested member states in developing and applying advanced reactor technologies in the area of long-lived radioactive waste utilisation and transmutation. The specific objective of the CRP is to improve the present understanding of the coupling of an external neutron source (e.g. spallation source) with a multiplicative subcritical core. The participants are performing computational and experimental benchmark analyses using integrated calculation schemes and simulation methods. The CRP aims at integrating some of the planned experimental demonstration projects of the coupling between a subcritical core and an external neutron source [e.g. YALINA Booster in Belarus, and Kyoto University's Critical Assembly (KUCA)]. The objective of these experimental programmes is to validate computational methods, to obtain high-energy nuclear data, to characterise the performance of subcritical assemblies driven by external sources, and to develop and improve techniques for subcriticality monitoring. With the CRP in its final year, the paper summarises, on behalf of all the participants, the status of work and preliminary CRP benchmarks results. (authors)

  4. Neutron cross-sections above 20 MeV for design and modeling of accelerator driven systems

    J Blomgren

    2007-02-01

    One of the outstanding new developments in the field of partitioning and transmutation (P&T) concerns accelerator-driven systems (ADS) which consist of a combination of a high-power, high-energy accelerator, a spallation target for neutron production and a sub-critical reactor core. The development of the commercial critical reactors of today motivated a large effort on nuclear data up to about 20 MeV, and presently several million data points can be found in various data libraries. At higher energies, data are scarce or even non-existent. With the development of nuclear techniques based on neutrons at higher energies, nowadays there is a need also for higher-energy nuclear data. To provide alternative to this lack of data, a wide program on neutron-induced data related to ADS for P&T is running at the 20–180 MeV neutron beam facility at `The Svedberg Laboratory' (TSL), Uppsala. The programme encompasses studies of elastic scattering, inelastic neutron production, i.e., (, ′) reactions, light-ion production, fission and production of heavy residues. Recent results are presented and future program of development is outlined.

  5. The Los Alamos accelerator driven transmutation of nuclear waste (ATW) concept development of the ATW target/blanket system

    The studies carried out in the frame of the Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) program developed at Los Alamos in order to solve the nuclear waste problem and to build a new generation of safer and non-proliferant nuclear power plants, are presented

  6. Review of national accelerator driven system programmes for partitioning and transmutation. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    One of the current important issues of nuclear power is the long lived radioactive waste toxicity problem. The sharpness of this problem could be considerably reduced if, during energy production, there was the possibility to incinerate at least the most toxic radioactive isotopes (long lived fission products and minor actinides). The combination of external intensive neutron sources with facilities containing nuclear fuel, so-called hybrid systems, are under investigation in several countries. The surplus of neutrons in such systems may be used to convert most of the long lived radioactive nuclides into isotopes having a shorter lifetime. Currently, an increasing number of groups are entering this field of research. There is clearly a need for co-originated their efforts, and also for the exchange of information from nationally or internationally co-ordinated activities. Consideration of the advantages of hybrid systems, and the wide field of interdisciplinary areas of research involved, show the need for an international co-operation in this novel R and D area. The International Atomic Energy Agency has maintained an active interest in advanced nuclear technology related to accelerator driven systems (ADS), and related activities have been carried out within the framework of its programme on emerging nuclear energy systems. After thorough analyses of the outcomes of several international forums and recommendations of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Feasibility and Motivation for Hybrid Concepts for Nuclear Energy Generation and Transmutation (Madrid, Spain, 1997), the IAEA conducted an Advisory Group Meeting on Review of National Accelerator Driven System Programmes in Taejon, Republic of Korea, from 1 to 4 November 1999. The scope of the meeting included review of the current R and D programmes in the Member States and the assessment of the progress in the development of hybrid concepts. The programme of the AGM included the following topics

  7. Design Study of Full Scale Accelerator Driven System (ADS, for Transmuting High Level Waste of MA/Pu

    Marsodi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The ADS system used in this study consisting of a high intensity proton linear accelerator, a spallation target, and a sub-critical reactor core. The Pb-Bi spallation target is bombarded by high intensity protons coming from the accelerator. The fast neutrons generated from the spallation reaction were used to drive the sub-critical reactor core. In this ADS system, the neutron source is in the center of reactor core region, so that the neutron distribution was concentrated in the center of core region. In this case, the B/T of MA/Pu could be performed effectively in the center of core region. The neutron energy in the outer region of reactor core was decreased due to the moderation of fuel and coolant materials. Such condition gives a chance to perform Burning and/or Transmutation of LLFPs.The basic parameters of this system are shown in the form of neutronic design, neutron spectrum and B/T rate, including other aspects related to the safety operation system. Furthermore, the analysis of the ADS system was accomplished using ATRAS computer code of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, JAERI[1]. Due to the complexity of the reactor calculation codes, the author has carried out only those calculations needed for analyzing the neutronics system and some parameters related to the safety system. Design study of the transmutation system was a full-scale power level system of 657.53 MWt sub-critical reactor for an accelerator-driven transmutation system. The liquid Pb-Bi was used together as the spallation target materials and coolant of the system, because of some advantages of Pb-Bi in the system concerning the comparison with the sodium coolant. Moreover, they have a possibility to achieve a hard neutron energy spectrum, avoid a positive void reactivity coefficient, allow much lower system operating temperatures, and are favorable for safety in the event of coolant leakage. The multiplication factor of sub-critical core design was adjusted

  8. Technology of magnetically driven accelerators

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability. 8 figs., 1 tab

  9. Monitoring method for neutron flux for a spallation target in an accelerator driven sub-critical system

    Zhao, Qiang, He, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Cui, Wen-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Hu-Shan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study a monitoring method for neutron flux for the spallation target used in an accelerator driven sub-critical (ADS) system, where a spallation target located vertically at the centre of a sub-critical core is bombarded vertically by high-energy protons from an accelerator. First, by considering the characteristics in the spatial variation of neutron flux from the spallation target, we propose a multi-point measurement technique, i.e. the spallation neutron flux should be measured at multiple vertical locations. To explain why the flux should be measured at multiple locations, we have studied neutron production from a tungsten target bombarded by a 250 MeV-proton beam with Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results indicate that the neutron flux at the central location is up to three orders of magnitude higher than the flux at lower locations. Secondly, we have developed an effective technique in order to measure the spallation neutron flux with a fission chamber (FC), by establishing the relation between the fission rate measured by FC and the spallation neutron flux. Since this relation is linear for a FC, a constant calibration factor is used to derive the neutron flux from the measured fission rate. This calibration factor can be extracted from the energy spectra of spallation neutrons. Finally, we have evaluated the proposed calibration method for a FC in the environment of an ADS system. The results indicate that the proposed method functions very well. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03010000 and XDA03030000) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China(91426301).

  10. System for Nuclear Waste Transmutation Driven by Target-Distributed Accelerators

    Blanovsky, A

    2004-01-01

    A design concept and characteristics for an epithermal breeder controlled by variable feedback and external neutron source intensity are presented. By replacing the control rods with neutron sources, we could improve safety and perform radioactive waste burning in high flux subcritical reactors (HFSR). To increase neutron source intensity the HFSR is divided into two zones: a booster and a blanket operating with solid and liquid fuels. Use of a liquid actinide fuel permits transport of the delayed-neutron emitters from the blanket to the booster where they can provide additional neutrons or all the necessary excitation. With blanket and booster multiplication factors of k=0.95 and 0.98, respectively, an external photoneutron source rate of at least 10.sup.15 n/s (electron beam power 2.5MW) is needed to control the HFSR that produces 300MWt. An inexpensive method of obtaining large neutron fluxes is target-distributed accelerators (TDA), in which a fission electrical cell (FEC) compensates for lost beam energy...

  11. Studies of niobium and development of niobium resonant RF cavities for accelerator driven system

    The present approach for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is to roll and deep draw sheets of polycrystalline high-purity niobium. Jefferson Laboratory pioneered the use of large-grain/single-crystal Nb directly sliced from an ingot for the fabrication of single-crystal high-purity Nb SRF cavities. The large grain/single crystal niobium has several potential advantages over the polycrystalline niobium and has become a viable alternative to the standard fine grain (ASTM grain size>6 μm), high purity (RRR ≥ 250 ) niobium for the fabrication of high-performance SRF cavities for particle accelerators. The present study includes the prototype single cell low beta cavity design, fabrication, EB welding and low temperature RF test at 2K. In this study also the medium field Q-Slope has been analyzed with the help of an added non linear term in Heabel's analytical model and a linear increase of surface resistance Rs with the magnetic field

  12. Design, safety and fuel developments for the EFIT accelerator-driven system with CERCER and CERMET cores

    European R and D for ADS design, fuel and general technology development is driven in the 6. FP of the EU by the EUROTRANS programme. In EUROTRANS, two ADS design routes are followed, the XT-ADS and the EFIT. The XT-ADS is designed to provide the experimental demonstration of transmutation in an accelerator-driven System. The longer-term EFIT development, the European Facility for Industrial Transmutation, with which this paper is deals, aims at a generic conceptual design of a full transmuter. The EUROTRANS Domain DM1 (DESIGN) developed the conceptual reference design of the EFIT, a 400 MWth ADT, loaded with a CERCER, U-free fuel based on an MgO matrix. The Domain DM3 (AFTRA), responsible for fuel development within EUROTRANS, in parallel developed a core loaded with a Mo-92 CERMET matrix-based fuel. In both cores for the cladding, the 9Cr1MoVNb T91 steel has been chosen. The core coolant is pure lead with inlet and outlet temperatures of 673 K and 753 K. The windowless target for the 800 MeV proton beam also contains pure lead. The EFIT concept was intended to be optimised towards: a good transmutation efficiency, high burn-up, low reactivity swing, low power peaking, adequate subcriticality, reasonable beam requirements and a high level of safety. In the current paper the two designs are reported and discussed. For the project, detailed design calculations have been performed both with deterministic and Monte Carlo methods. An extensive safety study is currently under way for the CERCER reference core. For the CERMET core the most important safety analyses have already been performed, sufficient for a preliminary safety assessment. The status of the design work and fuel development for the CERCER and CERMET cores is presented. In addition the results of the CERMET safety analyses are given. (authors)

  13. Performances on actinide transmutation based accelerator-driven systems (ADS) at CIEMAT

    The FACET group at CIEMAT is studying the properties and potentialities of several liquid metal-cooled ADS designs for actinide and fission product transmutation. The main characteristics of these systems are the use of lead or lead-bismuth eutectic as primary coolant and moderator and fuels made by transuranics. The program has two main research lines. The first one is dedicated to the development of concepts, designs, operation models and computer simulation tools characteristics of this kind of systems. The second line includes the participation and the data analysis of the most advanced experiments in the field and international benchmarks. (authors)

  14. Fission of 209Bi, natPb and 197Au in the particle field of a fast accelerator driven system

    Highlights: ► Fission rates of Bi, Pb and Au were measured in a particle field similar to that of fast ADS. ► The experimental results on fission rates are in agreement with MCNPX calculations. ► The most up to date fission cross-sections and related parameterizations were used. ► New parameterizations were produced from the published cross-section data. - Abstract: Accelerator driven systems (ADS) are expected to have particle spectra of significantly greater energy range than that of current power reactors. The Energy plus Transmutation (EpT) set-up of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia, is designed to emulate the neutron spectrum in a fast ADS through the use of a spallation target surrounded by a blanket of natural uranium. The spectrum is further modified by a reflective layer of polyethylene and an internal absorbing layer of cadmium. The spallation target of EpT was irradiated with a beam of 4 GeV deuterons, and the fission rates of bismuth, lead and gold samples, placed in the target-blanket region were recorded using a fission track detector technique. The fission rates were also calculated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code with the INCL4 cascade model and cross sections for nucleon induced fission obtained from literature. Agreement between the measured and calculated results indicates the model’s ability to predict the particle spectra and spatial distribution

  15. TRIGA Accelerator Driven Experiment (TRADE)

    This short report is derivated from the TRADE FINAL FEASIBILITY REPORT (March 2002) that is the result of the collective effort of a Working Group composed by ENEA, CEA, CERN, ANSALDO under Carlo Rubbia (ENEA) and Massimo Salvatores (CEA) supervision. The TRADE experiment, to be performed in the TRIGA reactor of the ENEA Casaccia Centre consists in the coupling of an external proton accelerator to a target to be installed in the Central thimble of the reactor scrammed to sub-criticality. This pilot experiment, aimed at a global demonstration of the ADS concept, is based on an original idea of Carlo Rubbia, presented at CEA in October 2000. (author)

  16. Noise method for monitoring the sub-criticality in accelerator driven systems

    In this paper, an absolute measurements technique for the sub-criticality determination is presented. The development of ADS, requires of methods to monitor and control the sub-criticality of this kind of systems, without interfering it's normal operation mode. This method is based on the Stochastic Neutron and Photon Transport Theory developed by Munoz-Cobo et al., and which can be implemented in presently available neutron transport codes. As a by-product of the methodology a monitoring measurement technique has been developed and verified using two coupled Monte Carlo programs. The spallation collisions and the high-energy transport are simulated with LAHET. The neutrons transports with energies less than 20 MeV and the estimation of the count statistics for neutron and/or gamma ray counters in fissile systems, is simulated with MCNP-DSP. It is possible to get the kinetics parameters and the keff value of the sub-critical system through the analysis of the counter detectors. (author)

  17. Noise method for monitoring the subcriticality in accelerator-driven systems

    In this paper, an absolute measurement technique for the subcriticality determination is presented. The development of A.D.S., requires of methods to monitor and control the subcriticality of this kind of systems, without interfering its normal operation mode. This method is based on the Stochastic Neutron and Photon Transport Theory developed by Munoz-Cobo et al, and which can be implemented in presently available neutron transport codes. As a by-product of the methodology a monitoring measurement technique has been developed and verified using two coupled Monte Carlo programs. The first one LAHET simulates the spallation collisions and the high energy transport and the other MCNP-DSP is used to estimate the counting statistics from neutron ray counter in fissile system, and the transport for neutrons with energies less than 20 MeV. With the coupling LAHET+MCNP-DSP has been checked that a subcriticality monitoring system, is feasible. Through the analysis of the counter detectors is possible to get the kinetics parameters and the Keff value. (orig.)

  18. Concept of the thorium fuelled accelerator driven subcritical system for both energy production and TRU incineration - 'TASSE'

    The TASSE is the concept of the subcritical accelerator driven system with 'TRU-free' fuel cycle and the continuous Th-feed regime. The tightness of Th neutronics call inevitably the subcritical mode of work. Two types of neutron spectra are recommended: fast and super-thermal (well thermalized) ones. TASSE fuel cycle could have the following options: (i) without any fuel recycling and reprocessing (once-through fuel cycle option) for maximum fuel cycle simplicity. However, subcriticality level (1- Keff) is essential and it requires high power accelerators; (ii) with the partial or, eventually, full U recycling 'on line' including the separation (U + Pa + Th) component from TRU + FP component which can be considered as wastes. Relatively small mass of fuel have to be reprocessed. Moreover, the requirement to separation is very soft. In this case, recycling allows to minimise subcriticality and smaller accelerators can be acceptable. The TASSE is oriented on 'clean' nuclear energy production and TRU burning with the following attractive features: (1) For the long term perspective, TASSEs have a rather limited mass of long-lived radioactive wastes, consisting mostly of Th, U and Pa nuclides. One can see the considerable reduction of waste toxicity by the factor of 1000 (or even more) in the magnitude regarding current PWR's and by the factor of 10-100 regarding (PWR's + dedicated burners) scenario. (2) Relatively low amounts of Th would have to be mined: approximately a factor of 100 lower than the U mined for PWR's. With TASSEs, nuclear power has practically inexhaustible (for a long future) and cheap fuel resources, taking into account that Thorium reserves exceed Uranium PWR fuel reserves by factor of 103. (3) TASSEs are able to burnout all previously accumulated transuraniums as well as weapons grade materials during PWR's replacement over a period of approximately 50 years. No actinide fuel waste is foreseen for this period of time. There is no need to develop

  19. A neutron booster for spallation sources--application to accelerator driven systems and isotope production

    Galy, J; Van Dam, H; Valko, J

    2002-01-01

    One can design a critical system with fissile material in the form of a thin layer on the inner surface of a cylindrical neutron moderator such as graphite or beryllium. Recently, we have investigated the properties of critical and near critical systems based on the use of thin actinide layers of uranium, plutonium and americium. The thickness of the required fissile layer depends on the type of fissile material, its concentration in the layer and on the geometrical arrangement, but is typically in the mu m-mm range. The resulting total mass of fissile material can be as low as 100 g. Thin fissile layers have a variety of applications in nuclear technology--for example in the design neutron amplifiers for medical applications and 'fast' islands in thermal reactors for waste incineration. In the present paper, we investigate the properties of a neutron booster unit for spallation sources and isotope production. In those applications a layer of fissile material surrounds the spallation source. Such a module cou...

  20. Proton-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration

    Caldwell, Allen; Pukhov, Alexander; Simon, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Plasmas excited by laser beams or bunches of relativistic electrons have been used to produce electric fields of 10–100 GV m$^{-1}$. This has opened up the possibility of building compact particle accelerators at the gigaelectronvolt scale. However, it is not obvious how to scale these approaches to the energy frontier of particle physics—the teraelectronvolt regime. Here, we introduce the possibility of proton-bunch-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration, and demonstrate through numerical simulations that this energy regime could be reached in a single accelerating stage.

  1. Assessment of americium and curium transmutation in magnesia based targets in different spectral zones of an experimental accelerator driven system

    Haeck, W.; Malambu, E.; Sobolev, V. P.; Aït Abderrahim, H.

    2006-06-01

    The potential to incinerate minor actinides (MA) in a sub-critical accelerator-driven system (ADS) is a subject of study in several countries where nuclear power plants are present. The performance of the MYRRHA experimental ADS, as to the transmutation of Am and Cm in the inert matrix fuel (IMF) samples consisting of 40 vol.% (Cm0.1Am0.5Pu0.4)O1.88 fuel and 60 vol.% MgO matrix with a density of 6.077 g cm-3 in three various spectrum regions, were analysed at the belgian nuclear research centre SCK · CEN. The irradiation period of 810 effective full power days (EFPD) followed by a storage period of 2 years was considered. The ALEPH code system currently under development at SCK · CEN was used to carry out this study. The total amount of MA is shown to decrease in all three considered cases. For Am, the decrease is the largest in the reflector (89% decrease) but at the cost of a net Cm production (92% increase). In the two other positions (inside the core region), 20-30% of Am has disappeared but with a lower production of Cm (between 7% and 11%). In the reflector, a significant build-up of long-lived 245Cm, 246Cm, 247Cm and 248Cm was also observed while the production of these isotopes is 10-1000 times smaller in the core. The reduction of the Pu content is also the highest in the reflector position (41%). In the other positions the incinerated amount of Pu is much smaller: 1-5%.

  2. Advances in conceptual design of a gas-cooled accelerator driven system (ADS) transmutation devices to sustainable nuclear energy development

    The possibilities of a nuclear energy development are considerably increasing with the world energetic demand increment. However, the management of nuclear waste from conventional nuclear power plants and its inventory minimization are the most important issues that should be addressed. Fast reactors and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) are the main options to reduce the long-lived radioactive waste inventory. Pebble Bed Very High Temperature advanced systems have great perspectives to assume the future nuclear energy development challenges. The conceptual design of a Transmutation Advanced Device for Sustainable Energy Applications (TADSEA) has been made in preliminary studies. The TADSEA is an ADS cooled by helium and moderated by graphite that uses as fuel small amounts of transuranic elements in the form of TRISO particles, confined in 3 cm radius graphite pebbles forming a pebble bed configuration. It would be used for nuclear waste transmutation and energy production. In this paper, the results of a method for calculating the number of whole pebbles fitting in a volume according to its size are showed. From these results, the packing fraction influence on the TADSEAs main work parameters is studied. In addition, a redesign of the previous configuration, according to the established conditions in the preliminary design, i.e. the exit thermal power, is made. On the other hand, the heterogeneity of the TRISO particles inside the pebbles can not be negligible. In this paper, a study of the power density distribution inside the pebbles by means of a detailed simulation of the TRISO fuel particles and using an homogeneous composition of the fuel is addressed. (author)

  3. Efficiency of the sulfur–iodine thermochemical water splitting process for hydrogen production based on ADS (accelerator driven system)

    The current hydrogen production is based on fossil fuels; they have a huge contribution to the atmosphere's pollution. Thermochemical water splitting cycles don't present this issue because the required process heat is obtained from nuclear energy and therefore, the environmental impact is smaller than using conventional fuels. Although, solar hydrogen production could be also used for practical applications because it's lower environmental impact. One of the promising approaches to produce large quantities of hydrogen in an efficient way using nuclear energy is the sulfur–iodine (S–I) thermochemical water splitting cycle. The nuclear source proposed in this paper is a pebble bed gas cooled transmutation facility. Pebble bed very high temperature advanced systems have great perspectives to assume the future nuclear energy. Softwares based on CPS (chemical process simulation) can be used to simulate the thermochemical water splitting sulfur-iodine cycle for hydrogen production. In this paper, a model for analyzing the sulfur-iodine process sensibility respect to the thermodynamics parameters: temperature, pressure and mass flow is developed. Efficiency is also calculated and the influence of different parameters on this value. The behavior of the proposed model for different values of initial reactant's flow, is analyzed. - Highlights: • Chemical Process Simulation (CPS) of the complete sulfur iodine cycle. • Conceptual design of an accelerator driven system for hydrogen production. • Radial and axial temperature profile for the end of stationary cycle (EOC). • Thermal stability of the sulfuric and hydriodic acid sections determination. • Sulfur iodine cycle efficiency analyses for different heat flow from the ADS

  4. The physics of sub-critical lattices in accelerator driven hybrid systems: The MUSE experiments in the MASURCA facility

    Since 1991, the CEA has studied the physics of hybrid systems, involving a sub-critical reactor coupled with an accelerator. These studies have provided information on the potential of hybrid systems to transmute actinides and, long lived fission products. The potential of such a system remains to be proven, specifically in terms of the physical understanding of the different phenomena involved and their modelling, as well as in terms of experimental validation of coupled systems, sub-critical environment/accelerator. This validation must be achieved through mock-up studies of the sub-critical environments coupled to a source of external neutrons. The MUSE-4 mock-up experiment is planed at the MASURCA facility and will use an accelerator coupled to a tritium target. The great step between the generator used in the past and the accelerator will allow to increase the knowledge in hybrid physic and to decrease the experimental biases and the measurement uncertainties

  5. Accelerator-driven Transmutation of Waste

    Venneri, Francesco

    1998-04-01

    Nuclear waste from commercial power plants contains large quantities of plutonium, other fissionable actinides, and long-lived fission products that are potential proliferation concerns and create challenges for the long-term storage. Different strategies for dealing with nuclear waste are being followed by various countries because of their geologic situations and their views on nuclear energy, reprocessing and non-proliferation. The current United States policy is to store unprocessed spent reactor fuel in a geologic repository. Other countries are opting for treatment of nuclear waste, including partial utilization of the fissile material contained in the spent fuel, prior to geologic storage. Long-term uncertainties are hampering the acceptability and eventual licensing of a geologic repository for nuclear spent fuel in the US, and driving up its cost. The greatest concerns are with the potential for radiation release and exposure from the spent fuel for tens of thousands of years and the possible diversion and use of the actinides contained in the waste for weapons construction. Taking advantage of the recent breakthroughs in accelerator technology and of the natural flexibility of subcritical systems, the Accelerator-driven Transmutation of Waste (ATW) concept offers the United States and other countries the possibility to greatly reduce plutonium, higher actinides and environmentally hazardous fission products from the waste stream destined for permanent storage. ATW does not eliminate the need for, but instead enhances the viability of permanent waste repositories. Far from being limited to waste destruction, the ATW concept also brings to the table new technologies that could be relevant for next-generation power producing reactors. In the ATW concept, spent fuel would be shipped to the ATW site where the plutonium, transuranics and selected long-lived fission products would be destroyed by fission or transmutation in their first and only pass through the

  6. Monte Carlo Modeling of Fast Sub-critical Assembly with MOX Fuel for Research of Accelerator-Driven Systems

    Polanski, A.; Barashenkov, V.; Puzynin, I.; Rakhno, I.; Sissakian, A.

    It is considered a sub-critical assembly driven with existing 660 MeV JINR proton accelerator. The assembly consists of a central cylindrical lead target surrounded with a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel (PuO2 + UO2) and with reflector made of beryllium. Dependence of the energetic gain on the proton energy, the neutron multiplication coefficient, and the neutron energetic spectra have been calculated. It is shown that for subcritical assembly with a mixed-oxide (MOX) BN-600 fuel (28%PuO 2 + 72%UO2) with effective density of fuel material equal to 9 g/cm 3 , the multiplication coefficient keff is equal to 0.945, the energetic gain is equal to 27, and the neutron flux density is 1012 cm˜2 s˜x for the protons with energy of 660 MeV and accelerator beam current of 1 uA.

  7. The impact of the core configuration on safety and transmutation behavior in an accelerator driven system; Auswirkung der Brennstoffwahl auf das Transmutationsverhalten in einem beschleunigergetriebenen System

    Biss, K.; Nabbi, R.; Thomauske, B. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Nuklearen Brennstoffkreislauf (INBK)

    2012-11-01

    For the reduction of the long-term hazards of high-level wastes transmutation is one of the candidate techniques. For an effective conversion of transuranic elements, esp. minor actinides, the use of accelerator driven systems (ADS) is the favored concept. The subcritical system AGATE (advanced gas-cooled accelerator driven transmutation experiment)is a 100 MW(th) facility using a proton beam to produce the required spallation neutrons. The fuel zone includes 120 uniform fuel elements with hexagonal structure (each one with 91 fuel rods) in an annular configuration around the spallation target. Neutron flux and energy spectra are determined and averaged for each zone allowing a fast calculation of fuel element variants and geometry variations. For modeling the Monte Carlo code MCNPX 2.7 is used. The transmutation rate for pure PuMA fuel show high values for americium, but the isotope analysis shows that the largest fraction is transmuted to plutonium. The use of thorium as matrix material reduces the transmutation rate of transuranic elements but allows a long-term burnup cycle without required fuel element replacement.

  8. Cosmic acceleration driven by mirage inhomogeneities

    A cosmological model based on an inhomogeneous D3-brane moving in an AdS5 x S5 bulk is introduced. Although there are no special points in the bulk, the brane universe has a centre and is isotropic around it. The model has an accelerating expansion and its effective cosmological constant is inversely proportional to the distance from the centre, giving a possible geometrical origin for the smallness of a present-day cosmological constant. Besides, if our model is considered as an alternative of early-time acceleration, it is shown that the early stage accelerating phase ends in a dust-dominated FRW homogeneous universe. Mirage-driven acceleration thus provides a dark matter component for the brane universe final state. We finally show that the model fulfils the current constraints on inhomogeneities

  9. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  10. Update on Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    Xia, G; Lotov, K; Pukhov, A; Kumar, N; An, W; Lu, W; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Huang, C; Muggli, P; Assmann, R; Zimmermann, F

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the update of proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PDPWA) is given. After a brief introduction to the scheme of PDPWA, a future demonstration experiment is discussed. The particle-in-cell simulation results based on the realistic proton beams from the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) are presented, followed by a simulation study of proton bunch compression. Presented at AAC’10, 13-19 June 2010, Annapolis, MD, USA

  11. Designing of the laser driven dielectric accelerator

    A phase-modulation-masked-type laser-driven dielectric accelerator was studied. Although the preliminary analysis made a conclusion that a grating period and an electron speed must satisfy the matching condition of LG=λ=v=c, a deformation of a wavefront in a transmission grating relaxed the matching condition and enabled the slow electron to be accelerated. The simulation results by using the FDTD code, Meep, showed that the low energy electron of 20 keV felt the acceleration field strength of 20 MV/m and gradually felt higher field as the speed was increased. The ultra relativistic electron felt the field strength of 600 MV/m. The Meep code also showed that a length of the accelerator to get energy of 1 MeV was 3.8 mm, the required laser power and energy were 11 GW and 350 mJ, respectively. Restrictions on the laser was eased by adopting sequential laser pulses. If the accelerator is illuminated by sequential N pulses, the pulse power, pulse width and the pulse energy are reduced to 1=N, 1=N and 1=N2, respectively. The required laser power per pulse is estimated to be 2.2 GW when ten pairs of sequential laser pulse is irradiated. (author)

  12. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  13. Research coordination meeting of the coordinated research project on analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems. Working material

    The Technical Meeting hosted at the Belarus National Academy of Sciences in Minsk by the Joint Institute of Power Engineering and Nuclear Research 'SOSNY' from 5-9 December 2005 was the kick-off Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS)'. The CRP had received proposals for research agreements and contracts from scientists representing the following 25 institutions: Centro Atomico Bariloche, SCK CEN Mol, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares Sao Paulo, Joint Institute of Power Engineering and Nuclear Research SOSNY Minsk, China Institute of Atomic Energy, CEA Cadarache, CNRS Paris, FZ Rossendorf, FZ Karlsruhe, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG) Petten, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, AGH-University of Science and Technology Krakow, Institute of Atomic Energy Otwock/Swierk, ITEP Moscow, MEPHI Moscow, Kurchatov Institute, JINR Dubna, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, CIEMAT Madrid, Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, National Science Center 'Kharkov Institute and Technology', and Argonne National Laboratory). These institutions represent 18 IAEA Member States (i.e., Argentina, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, China, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Pakistan, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine, USA), and one International Organization (JINR Dubna). The overall objective of the CRP is contributing to the generic R and D efforts in various fields common to innovative fast neutron system development, i.e., heavy liquid metal thermal hydraulics, dedicated transmutation fuels and associated core designs, theoretical nuclear reaction models, measurement and evaluation of nuclear data for transmutation, and development and validation of calculational methods and codes. Ultimately, the CRP

  14. Conceptual design of a commercial accelerator driven thorium reactor

    This paper describes the substantial work done in underpinning and developing the concept design for a commercial 600 MWe, accelerator driven, thorium fuelled, lead cooled, power producing, fast reactor. The Accelerator Driven Thorium Reactor (ADTR TM) has been derived from original work by Carlo Rubbia. Over the period 2007 to 2009 Aker Solutions commissioned this concept design work and, in close collaboration with Rubbia, developed the physics, engineering and business model. Much has been published about the Energy Amplifier concept and accelerator driven systems. This paper concentrates on the unique physics developed during the concept study of the ADTR TM power station and the progress made in engineering and design of the system. Particular attention is paid to where the concept design has moved significantly beyond published material. Description of challenges presented for the engineering and safety of a commercial system and how they will be addressed is included. This covers the defining system parameters, accelerator sizing, core and fuel design issues and, perhaps most importantly, reactivity control. The paper concludes that the work undertaken supports the technical viability of the ADTR TM power station. Several unique features of the reactor mean that it can be deployed in countries with aspirations to gain benefit from nuclear power and, at 600 MWe, it fits a size gap for less mature grid systems. It can provide a useful complement to Generation III, III+ and IV systems through its ability to consume actinides whilst at the same time providing useful power. (authors)

  15. Reduction of the Radiotoxicity of Spent Nuclear Fuel Using a Two-Tiered System Comprising Light Water Reactors and Accelerator-Driven Systems

    Two main issues regarding the disposal of spent nuclear fuel from nuclear reactors in the United States in the geological repository Yucca Mountain are: (1) Yucca Mountain is not designed to hold the amount of fuel that has been and is proposed to be generated in the next few decades, and (2) the radiotoxicity (i.e., biological hazard) of the waste (particularly the actinides) does not decrease below that of natural uranium ore for hundreds of thousands of years. One solution to these problems may be to use transmutation to convert the nuclides in spent nuclear fuel to ones with shorter half-lives. Both reactor and accelerator-based systems have been examined in the past for transmutation; there are advantages and disadvantages associated with each. By using existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) to burn a majority of the plutonium in spent nuclear fuel and Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADSs) to transmute the remainder of the actinides, the benefits of each type of system can be realized. The transmutation process then becomes more efficient and less expensive. This research searched for the best combination of LWRs with multiple recycling of plutonium and ADSs to transmute spent nuclear fuel from past and projected nuclear activities (assuming little growth of nuclear energy). The neutronic design of each system is examined in detail although thermal hydraulic performance would have to be considered before a final system is designed. The results are obtained using the Monte Carlo burnup code Monteburns, which has been successfully benchmarked for MOX fuel irradiation and compared to other codes for ADS calculations. The best combination of systems found in this research includes 41 LWRs burning mixed oxide fuel with two recycles of plutonium (∼40 years operation each) and 53 ADSs to transmute the remainder of the actinides from spent nuclear fuel over the course of 60 years of operation

  16. Reduction of the Radiotoxicity of Spent Nuclear Fuel Using a Two-Tiered System Comprising Light Water Reactors and Accelerator-Driven Systems

    H.R. Trellue

    2003-06-01

    Two main issues regarding the disposal of spent nuclear fuel from nuclear reactors in the United States in the geological repository Yucca Mountain are: (1) Yucca Mountain is not designed to hold the amount of fuel that has been and is proposed to be generated in the next few decades, and (2) the radiotoxicity (i.e., biological hazard) of the waste (particularly the actinides) does not decrease below that of natural uranium ore for hundreds of thousands of years. One solution to these problems may be to use transmutation to convert the nuclides in spent nuclear fuel to ones with shorter half-lives. Both reactor and accelerator-based systems have been examined in the past for transmutation; there are advantages and disadvantages associated with each. By using existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) to burn a majority of the plutonium in spent nuclear fuel and Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADSs) to transmute the remainder of the actinides, the benefits of each type of system can be realized. The transmutation process then becomes more efficient and less expensive. This research searched for the best combination of LWRs with multiple recycling of plutonium and ADSs to transmute spent nuclear fuel from past and projected nuclear activities (assuming little growth of nuclear energy). The neutronic design of each system is examined in detail although thermal hydraulic performance would have to be considered before a final system is designed. The results are obtained using the Monte Carlo burnup code Monteburns, which has been successfully benchmarked for MOX fuel irradiation and compared to other codes for ADS calculations. The best combination of systems found in this research includes 41 LWRs burning mixed oxide fuel with two recycles of plutonium ({approx}40 years operation each) and 53 ADSs to transmute the remainder of the actinides from spent nuclear fuel over the course of 60 years of operation.

  17. Redesign of a pilot international online course on accelerator driven systems for nuclear transmutation to implement a massive open online course

    Alonso-Ramos, M.; Fernandez-Luna, A. J.; Gonzalez-Romero, E. M.; Sanchez-Elvira, A.; Castro, M.; Ogando, F.; Sanz, J.; Martin, S.

    2014-07-01

    In April 2013, a full-distance international pilot course on ADS (Accelerator Driven Systems) for advanced nuclear waste transmutation was taught by UNED-CIEMAT within FP7 ENEN-III project. The experience ran with 10 trainees from the project, using UNED virtual learning platform a LF. Video classes, web-conferences and recorded simulations of case studies were the main learning materials. Asynchronous and synchronous communication tools were used for tutoring purposes, and a final examination for online submission and a final survey were included. (Author)

  18. Redesign of a pilot international online course on accelerator driven systems for nuclear transmutation to implement a massive open online course

    In April 2013, a full-distance international pilot course on ADS (Accelerator Driven Systems) for advanced nuclear waste transmutation was taught by UNED-CIEMAT within FP7 ENEN-III project. The experience ran with 10 trainees from the project, using UNED virtual learning platform a LF. Video classes, web-conferences and recorded simulations of case studies were the main learning materials. Asynchronous and synchronous communication tools were used for tutoring purposes, and a final examination for online submission and a final survey were included. (Author)

  19. Separations technology development to support accelerator-driven transmutation concepts

    This is the final report of a one-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project investigated separations technology development needed for accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) concepts, particularly those associated with plutonium disposition (accelerator-based conversion, ABC) and high-level radioactive waste transmutation (accelerator transmutation of waste, ATW). Specific focus areas included separations needed for preparation of feeds to ABC and ATW systems, for example from spent reactor fuel sources, those required within an ABC/ATW system for material recycle and recovery of key long-lived radionuclides for further transmutation, and those required for reuse and cleanup of molten fluoride salts. The project also featured beginning experimental development in areas associated with a small molten-salt test loop and exploratory centrifugal separations systems

  20. Basic concept for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be used as a long-pulse neutron source for Condensed Matter research

    A model for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be operated as a source of cold neutrons for Condensed Matter research is developed at the conceptual level. Its baseline layout relies upon proven accelerator, spalattion target and fuel array technologies, and consists in a proton accelerator able to deliver some 67.5 mA of proton beam with kinetic energy 0.6 GeV, a pulse length of 2.86 ms, and repetition rate of 14 Hz. The particle beam hits a target of conventional design that is surrounded by a multiplicative core made of fissile/fertile material, composed by a subcritical array of fuel bars made of aluminium Cermet cooled by light water poisoned with boric acid. Relatively low enriched uranium is chosen as fissile material. An optimisation of several parameters is carried out, using as components of the objective function several characteristics pertaining the cold neutron pulse. The results show that the optimal device will deliver up to 80% of the cold neutron flux expected for some of the ongoing projects using a significantly lower proton beam power than that managed in such projects. The total power developed within the core rises up to 22.8 MW, and the criticality range shifts to a final keff value of around 0.9 after the 50 days cycle

  1. Basic concept for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be used as a long-pulse neutron source for Condensed Matter research

    Vivanco, R., E-mail: raul.vivanco.sanchez@gmail.com [ESS-BILBAO, Parque Tecnológico Bizkaia, Laida Bidea, Edificio 207 B Planta Baja, 48160 Derio (Spain); Instituto de Fusión Nuclear - UPM, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, C/ José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid Spain (Spain); Ghiglino, A.; Vicente, J.P. de; Sordo, F.; Terrón, S.; Magán, M. [ESS-BILBAO, Parque Tecnológico Bizkaia, Laida Bidea, Edificio 207 B Planta Baja, 48160 Derio (Spain); Instituto de Fusión Nuclear - UPM, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, C/ José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid Spain (Spain); Perlado, J.M. [Instituto de Fusión Nuclear - UPM, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, C/ José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid Spain (Spain); Bermejo, F.J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-12-11

    A model for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be operated as a source of cold neutrons for Condensed Matter research is developed at the conceptual level. Its baseline layout relies upon proven accelerator, spalattion target and fuel array technologies, and consists in a proton accelerator able to deliver some 67.5 mA of proton beam with kinetic energy 0.6 GeV, a pulse length of 2.86 ms, and repetition rate of 14 Hz. The particle beam hits a target of conventional design that is surrounded by a multiplicative core made of fissile/fertile material, composed by a subcritical array of fuel bars made of aluminium Cermet cooled by light water poisoned with boric acid. Relatively low enriched uranium is chosen as fissile material. An optimisation of several parameters is carried out, using as components of the objective function several characteristics pertaining the cold neutron pulse. The results show that the optimal device will deliver up to 80% of the cold neutron flux expected for some of the ongoing projects using a significantly lower proton beam power than that managed in such projects. The total power developed within the core rises up to 22.8 MW, and the criticality range shifts to a final k{sub eff} value of around 0.9 after the 50 days cycle.

  2. Experimental study on neutronics in bombardment of thick targets by high energy proton beams for accelerator-driven sub-critical system

    The experimental study on neutronics in the target region of accelerator-driven sub-critical system is carried out by using the high energy accelerator in Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia. The experiments with targets U(Pb), Pb and Hg bombarded by 0.533, 1.0, 3.7 and 7.4 GeV proton beams show that the neutron yield ratio of U(Pb) to Hg and Pb to Hg targets is (2.10 +- 0.10) and (1.76 +- 0.33), respectively. Hg target is disadvantageous to U(Pb) and Pb targets to get more neutrons. Neutron yield drops along 20 cm thick targets as the thickness penetrated by protons increases. The lower the energy of protons, the steeper the neutron yield drops. In order to get more uniform field of neutrons in the targets, the energy of protons from accelerators should not be lower than 1 GeV. The spectra of secondary neutrons produced by different energies of protons are similar, but the proportion of neutrons with higher energy gradually increases as the proton energy increases

  3. A New Type of Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Driven by Magnetowaves

    Chen, Pisin(Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, 10617, Taipei, Taiwan); Chang, Feng-Yin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Noble, Robert J.; Sydora, Richard

    2008-01-01

    We present a new concept for a plasma wakefield accelerator driven by magnetowaves (MPWA). This concept was originally proposed as a viable mechanism for the "cosmic accelerator" that would accelerate cosmic particles to ultra high energies in the astrophysical setting. Unlike the more familiar Plasma Wakefield Accelerator (PWFA) and the Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) where the drivers, the charged-particle beam and the laser, are independently existing entities, MPWA invokes the high-fre...

  4. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  5. YALINA facility a sub-critical Accelerator- Driven System (ADS) for nuclear energy research facility description and an overview of the research program (1997-2008).

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-04-28

    The YALINA facility is a zero-power, sub-critical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was conceived, constructed, and put into operation at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus located in Minsk-Sosny, Belarus. This facility was conceived for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems, and to serve as a neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinide nuclei. This report provides a detailed description of this facility and documents the progress of research carried out there during a period of approximately a decade since the facility was conceived and built until the end of 2008. During its history of development and operation to date (1997-2008), the YALINA facility has hosted several foreign groups that worked with the resident staff as collaborators. The participation of Argonne National Laboratory in the YALINA research programs commenced in 2005. For obvious reasons, special emphasis is placed in this report on the work at YALINA facility that has involved Argonne's participation. Attention is given here to the experimental program at YALINA facility as well as to analytical investigations aimed at validating codes and computational procedures and at providing a better understanding of the physics and operational behavior of the YALINA facility in particular, and ADS systems in general, during the period 1997-2008.

  6. YALINA facility a sub-critical Accelerator-Driven System (ADS) for nuclear energy research facility description and an overview of the research program (1997-2008)

    The YALINA facility is a zero-power, sub-critical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was conceived, constructed, and put into operation at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus located in Minsk-Sosny, Belarus. This facility was conceived for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems, and to serve as a neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinide nuclei. This report provides a detailed description of this facility and documents the progress of research carried out there during a period of approximately a decade since the facility was conceived and built until the end of 2008. During its history of development and operation to date (1997-2008), the YALINA facility has hosted several foreign groups that worked with the resident staff as collaborators. The participation of Argonne National Laboratory in the YALINA research programs commenced in 2005. For obvious reasons, special emphasis is placed in this report on the work at YALINA facility that has involved Argonne's participation. Attention is given here to the experimental program at YALINA facility as well as to analytical investigations aimed at validating codes and computational procedures and at providing a better understanding of the physics and operational behavior of the YALINA facility in particular, and ADS systems in general, during the period 1997-2008.

  7. Subcritical Multiplication Parameters of the Accelerator-Driven System with 100 MeV Protons at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    Jae-Yong Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic experiments on the accelerator-driven system (ADS at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly are carried out by combining a solid-moderated and -reflected core with the fixed-field alternating gradient accelerator. The reaction rates are measured by the foil activation method to obtain the subcritical multiplication parameters. The numerical calculations are conducted with the use of MCNPX and JENDL/HE-2007 to evaluate the reaction rates of activation foils set in the core region and at the location of the target. Here, a comparison between the measured and calculated eigenvalues reveals a relative difference of around 10% in C/E values. A special mention is made of the fact that the reaction rate analyses in the subcritical systems demonstrate apparently the actual effect of moving the tungsten target into the core on neutron multiplication. A series of further ADS experiments with 100 MeV protons needs to be carried out to evaluate the accuracy of subcritical multiplication parameters.

  8. First order Fermi acceleration driven by magnetic reconnection

    Drury, Luke O'C

    2012-01-01

    A box model is used to study first order Fermi acceleration driven by magnetic reconnection. It is shown, at least in this simple model, that the spectral index of the accelerated particles is related to the total compression in the same way as in diffusive shock acceleration and is not, as has been suggested, a universal $E^{-5/2}$ spectrum. The acceleration time-scale is estimated and some comments made about the applicability of the process.

  9. Thermal hydraulic studies of spallation target for one-way coupled Indian accelerator driven systems with low energy proton beam

    V Mantha; A K Mohanty; P Satyamurthy

    2007-02-01

    BARC has recently proposed a one-way coupled ADS reactor. This reactor requires typically ∼ 1 GeV proton beam with 2 mA of current. Approximately 8 kW of heat is deposited in the window of the target. Circulating liquid metal target (lead/lead-bismuth-eutectic) has to extract this heat and this is a critical R&D problem to be solved. At present there are very few accelerators, which can give few mA and high-energy proton beam. However, accelerators with low energy and hundreds of micro-ampere current are commercially available. In view of this, it is proposed in this paper to simulate beam window heating of ∼ 8 kW in the target with low-energy proton beam. Detailed thermal analysis in the spallation and window region has been carried out to study the capability of heat extraction by circulating LBE for a typical target loop with a proton beam of 30 MeV energy and current of 0.267 mA. The heat deposition study is carried out using FLUKA code and flow analysis by CFD code. The detailed analysis of this work is presented in this paper.

  10. Influence of Laser Prepulse in Ultra-short Laser-Driven Proton Acceleration

    2011-01-01

    Influence of laser prepulse in ultra-short laser-driven proton acceleration was investigated by the differences in spatial distribution and energy spectrum between different foil-targets. The laser system produced pulses having energies of up to

  11. Research on accelerator-driven transmutation and studies of experimental facilities

    Takizuka, Takakazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    JAERI is carrying out R and Ds on accelerator-driven transmutation systems under the national OMEGA Program that aims at development of the technology to improve efficiency and safety in the final disposal of radioactive waste. Research facilities for accelerator-driven transmutation experiments are proposed to construct within the framework of the planned JAERI Neutron Science Project. This paper describes the features of the proposed accelerator-driven transmutation systems and their technical issues to be solved. A research facility plan under examination is presented. The plan is divided in two phases. In the second phase, technical feasibility of accelerator-driven systems will be demonstrated with a 30-60 MW experimental integrated system and with a 7 MW high-power target facility. (author)

  12. Advanced approaches to high intensity laser-driven ion acceleration

    Since the pioneering work that was carried out 10 years ago, the generation of highly energetic ion beams from laser-plasma interactions has been investigated in much detail in the regime of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA). Creation of ion beams with small longitudinal and transverse emittance and energies extending up to tens of MeV fueled visions of compact, laser-driven ion sources for applications such as ion beam therapy of tumors or fast ignition inertial con finement fusion. However, new pathways are of crucial importance to push the current limits of laser-generated ion beams further towards parameters necessary for those applications. The presented PhD work was intended to develop and explore advanced approaches to high intensity laser-driven ion acceleration that reach beyond TNSA. In this spirit, ion acceleration from two novel target systems was investigated, namely mass-limited microspheres and nm-thin, free-standing diamond-like carbon (DLC) foils. Using such ultrathin foils, a new regime of ion acceleration was found where the laser transfers energy to all electrons located within the focal volume. While for TNSA the accelerating electric field is stationary and ion acceleration is spatially separated from laser absorption into electrons, now a localized longitudinal field enhancement is present that co-propagates with the ions as the accompanying laser pulse pushes the electrons forward. Unprecedented maximum ion energies were obtained, reaching beyond 0.5 GeV for carbon C6+ and thus exceeding previous TNSA results by about one order of magnitude. When changing the laser polarization to circular, electron heating and expansion were shown to be efficiently suppressed, resulting for the first time in a phase-stable acceleration that is dominated by the laser radiation pressure which led to the observation of a peaked C6+ spectrum. Compared to quasi-monoenergetic ion beam generation within the TNSA regime, a more than 40 times increase in

  13. Advanced approaches to high intensity laser-driven ion acceleration

    Henig, Andreas

    2010-04-26

    Since the pioneering work that was carried out 10 years ago, the generation of highly energetic ion beams from laser-plasma interactions has been investigated in much detail in the regime of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA). Creation of ion beams with small longitudinal and transverse emittance and energies extending up to tens of MeV fueled visions of compact, laser-driven ion sources for applications such as ion beam therapy of tumors or fast ignition inertial con finement fusion. However, new pathways are of crucial importance to push the current limits of laser-generated ion beams further towards parameters necessary for those applications. The presented PhD work was intended to develop and explore advanced approaches to high intensity laser-driven ion acceleration that reach beyond TNSA. In this spirit, ion acceleration from two novel target systems was investigated, namely mass-limited microspheres and nm-thin, free-standing diamond-like carbon (DLC) foils. Using such ultrathin foils, a new regime of ion acceleration was found where the laser transfers energy to all electrons located within the focal volume. While for TNSA the accelerating electric field is stationary and ion acceleration is spatially separated from laser absorption into electrons, now a localized longitudinal field enhancement is present that co-propagates with the ions as the accompanying laser pulse pushes the electrons forward. Unprecedented maximum ion energies were obtained, reaching beyond 0.5 GeV for carbon C{sup 6+} and thus exceeding previous TNSA results by about one order of magnitude. When changing the laser polarization to circular, electron heating and expansion were shown to be efficiently suppressed, resulting for the first time in a phase-stable acceleration that is dominated by the laser radiation pressure which led to the observation of a peaked C{sup 6+} spectrum. Compared to quasi-monoenergetic ion beam generation within the TNSA regime, a more than 40 times

  14. High intensity laser-driven ion acceleration

    Ion acceleration by intense laser-plasma interactions is a very active field of research whose development can be traced in a large number of publications over the last few years. Past studies were mostly performed irradiating thin foils where protons are predominantly accelerated to energies up to 60 MeV in an exponentially decaying spectrum by a mechanism named target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA). We present our latest experimental advances on acceleration schemes away from TNSA, such as shock acceleration, ion beam generation from relativistically transparent targets and radiation-pressure acceleration. These results are a major step towards highly energetic, mono-chromatic ion beams generated at high conversion efficiencies as demanded by many potential applications. Those include fast ignition inertial confinement fusion (ICF) as well as oncology and radiation therapy of tumors.

  15. 2nd RCM of the CRP on Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) and Technical Meeting on Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel Utilization in Accelerator Driven Sub-critical Systems. Working Material

    The overall objective of the CRP is contributing to the generic R&D efforts in various fields common to innovative fast neutron system development, i.e., heavy liquid metal thermal hydraulics, dedicated transmutation fuels and associated core designs, theoretical nuclear reaction models, measurement and evaluation of nuclear data for transmutation, and development and validation of calculational methods and codes. Ultimately, the CRP’s overall objective is to make contributions towards the realization of a transmutation demonstration facility

  16. Choosing the optimal parameters of subcritical reactors driven by accelerators

    Physical aspects of a subcritical Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) driven by proton accelerators are considered. Estimated theoretical calculations are made for subcritical regimes of various types of reactors. It was shown that the creation of the quite effective explosion-safe NPP is real at an existing level of the accelerator technique by using available reactor units (including the serial ones). (author)

  17. Beam-driven, Plasma-based Particle Accelerators

    Muggli, P

    2016-01-01

    We briefly give some of the characteristics of the beam-driven, plasma-based particle accelerator known as the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA). We also mention some of the major results that have been obtained since the birth of the concept. We focus on high-energy particle beams where possible.

  18. A DC arc plasma beam source for thermal hydraulic simulation of target - proton beam interaction for accelerator driven sub critical systems

    Studies on accelerator driven sub critical (ADS) nuclear reactors have taken a new dimension due to their extremely high safety level and incredible potential in terms of both thorium utilization as well as nuclear waste transmutation. This paper presents the design and operational data of the plasma source including V-I characteristics, electro thermal efficiency and the heat source spatial distribution on the target

  19. Laser-driven wakefield electron acceleration and associated radiation sources

    The first part of this research thesis introduces the basic concepts needed for the understanding of the laser-driven wakefield acceleration. It describes the properties of the used laser beams and plasmas, presents some notions about laser-plasma interactions for a better understanding of the physics of laser-driven acceleration. The second part deals with the numerical modelling and the presentation of simulation tools needed for the investigation of laser-induced wakefield acceleration. The last part deals with the optical control of the injection, a technique analogous to the impulsion collision scheme

  20. Study of a multi-beam accelerator driven thorium reactor

    The primary advantages that accelerator driven systems have over critical reactors are: (1) Greater flexibility regarding the composition and placement of fissile, fertile, or fission product waste within the blanket surrounding the target, and (2) Potentially enhanced safety brought about by operating at a sufficiently low value of the multiplication factor to preclude reactivity induced events. The control of the power production can be achieved by vary the accelerator beam current. Furthermore, once the beam is shut off the system shuts down. The primary difference between the operation of an accelerator driven system and a critical system is the issue of beam interruptions of the accelerator. These beam interruptions impose thermo-mechanical loads on the fuel and mechanical components not found in critical systems. Studies have been performed to estimate an acceptable number of trips, and the value is significantly less stringent than had been previously estimated. The number of acceptable beam interruptions is a function of the length of the interruption and the mission of the system. Thus, for demonstration type systems and interruption durations of 1sec 5mins 2500/yr and 50/yr are deemed acceptable. However, for industrial scale power generation without energy storage type systems and interruption durations of t 5mins, the acceptable number of interruptions are 25000, 2500, 250, and 3 respectively. However, it has also been concluded that further development is required to reduce the number of trips. It is with this in mind that the following study was undertaken. The primary focus of this study will be the merit of a multi-beam target system, which allows for multiple spallation sources within the target/blanket assembly. In this manner it is possible to ameliorate the effects of sudden accelerator beam interruption on the surrounding reactor, since the remaining beams will still be supplying source neutrons. The proton beam will be assumed to have an

  1. Design of a molten heavy-metal coolant and target for fast-thermal accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS)

    Accelerator Driven sub-critical Systems (ADS) have evoked considerable interest in recent years. The Energy Amplifier concept developed by C. Rubbia and others at CERN incorporates a buoyancy driven, lead-coolant primary system for extracting the heat generated in the fast reactor as well as that in neutron spallation target. In earlier publications, our BARC group has proposed a one-way coupled booster reactor system which could be operated at proton beam currents as low as 1-2 mA for a power output of 750 MWth. Here, the basic idea is to have a fast booster reactor zone of low power (- 100 MWth) which is separated by a large gap from the main thermal reactor zone. In this arrangement, the spallation neutron source feeds neutrons to the fast reactor zone where neutrons are further multiplied. Further in this system, the neutrons from the booster region enter the main reactor but very few neutrons from main reactor return to booster, thus ensuring one-way coupling. In earlier work, several possible configurations of the booster and thermal regions were presented. In the present work, we describe an engineering design particularly with respect to thermal hydraulics of lead/lead-bismuth eutectic coolant also acting as spallation neutron source. This hybrid ADS reactor consists of fast and thermal reactor zones producing about 100 MWth and 650 MWth respectively. The scheme of the system is shown. The fast core consists of 48 hexagonal fuel bundles each containing 169 fuel pins of 8.2 mm diameter arranged in 11.4 mm triangular array pitch. The average thermal power per fuel pin is about 13.46 kw. However, due to neutron flux peaking effect, the maximum fuel pin power can be up to 2.5 times this average power. The thermal reactor consists of heavy water as moderator and coolant similar to a typical CANDU type Indian PHWR except for fuel composition. Though the gap between fast and thermal zones essentially provides one way coupling of neutron flux, a thermal neutron

  2. Modelling the behaviour of oxide fuels containing minor actinides with urania, thoria and zirconia matrices in an accelerator-driven system

    Sobolev, V.; Lemehov, S.; Messaoudi, N.; Van Uffelen, P.; Aı̈t Abderrahim, H.

    2003-06-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK • CEN, is currently working on the pre-design of the multipurpose accelerator-driven system (ADS) MYRRHA. A demonstration of the possibility of transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products with a realistic design of experimental fuel targets and prognosis of their behaviour under typical ADS conditions is an important task in the MYRRHA project. In the present article, the irradiation behaviour of three different oxide fuel mixtures, containing americium and plutonium - (Am,Pu,U)O 2- x with urania matrix, (Am,Pu,Th)O 2- x with thoria matrix and (Am,Y,Pu,Zr)O 2- x with inert zirconia matrix stabilised by yttria - were simulated with the new fuel performance code MACROS, which is under development and testing at the SCK • CEN. All the fuel rods were considered to be of the same design and sizes: annular fuel pellets, helium bounded with the stainless steel cladding, and a large gas plenum. The liquid lead-bismuth eutectic was used as coolant. Typical irradiation conditions of the hottest fuel assembly of the MYRRHA subcritical core were pre-calculated with the MCNPX code and used in the following calculations as the input data. The results of prediction of the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the designed rods with the considered fuels during three irradiation cycles of 90 EFPD are presented and discussed.

  3. FMIT accelerator vacuum system

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility accelerator is being designed to continuously accelerate 100-mA deuterons to 25 MeV. High vacuum pumping of the accelerator structure and beam lines will be done by ion pumps and titanium sublimation pumps. The design of the roughing system includes a Roots blower/mechanical pump package. For economy the size of the system has been designed to operate at 10-6 torr, where beam particle scattering on residual gases is negligible. For minimum maintenance in this neutron factory, the FMIT vacuum system is designed from the point of view of simplicity and reliability

  4. Comparative study of accelerator driven system (ADS) of different transmutation scenarios for actinides in advanced nuclear fuel cycles

    The full text follows. In recent years transmutation has raised as a complementary option to solve the problem of the long-lived radioactive waste produced in nuclear power plants. The main advantages expected from transmutation are the reduction in volume of the high level waste and a significant decrease in the long-term radiotoxicity inventory, with a probable impact in the final costs and potential risks of the geological repository. This paper will describe the evaluation of different systems proposed for actinide transmutation, their integration in the waste management process, their viability, performances and limitations. Particular attention is taking of comparing transmutation scenarios where the actinides are transmuted inside fertile (U, Th) or inert matrix. This study has been supported by ENRESA inside the CIEMAT-ENRESA collaboration for the study of long-lived isotope transmutation. (authors)

  5. Study of the fuel behavior, safety characteristics and transmutation performance of a gas cooled accelerator driven system (ADS)

    The neutronic behavior of an ADS system based on gas cooling is examined in this work by using the simulation tools MCNPX and ORIGEN. The main character of the MCNPX code is the use of the Monte-Carlo method allowing a high dimensional simulation of the physical processes. The whole model of the core is represented in 3 dimensional zones including the target structure, which provides the initial spallation neutrons for the chain reaction in the fuel zone. At the beginning, MOX fuel with 19.5 wt. Pu/(Pu+U) is loaded in order to investigate the technical feasibility of a test facility. The fuel assemblies are replaced step by step with Plutonium and minor actinides (PuMa) uranium free fuel according to a loading and shuffling pattern. The designed test facility consists of 120 fuel assemblies each 91 fuel rods which are arranged around the spallation target. For a thermal power of 100 MW the burn-up and transmutation rate is studied. The first results for the MOX and partially PuMa fuel loaded core are presented in this paper. For the PuMa fuel two compositions are investigated. Both fuel types chosen for the analysis demonstrate the capability of the incineration of americium. The simulations show that the initial composition has significant influence on the transmutation rate. The deployment of MOX type fuel in the ADS core causes a considerable consumption of Pu but also a significant generation of americium

  6. Comparative analysis of the efficiency of minor actinide burning in the accelerator-driven system and critical reactors within various scenarios for closing the nuclear fuel cycle

    The choice of efficient types of systems for the utilization of long-lived radioactive wastes (RW) of nuclear power is one of the highest priority concerns in nuclear sphere. The accelerator-driven systems (ADS) with heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC) and fast neutron spectrum are considered among the most efficient nuclear devices for burning minor actinides (MA). Results of numerical studies for the optimization of characteristics of an ADS-system with lead-bismuth coolant for burning minor actinides produced in the open fuel cycle of thermal reactors have been summarized. Criteria of efficiency of MA burning have been determined (time of transmutation, etc.). It has been shown that neutronic characteristics ensuring nuclear safety in an analogous critical reactor - MA burner - are significantly inferior vs. fast critical reactor with UO2 fuel. In order to define whether or not it is justified to use ADS in different scenarios for the nuclear fuel cycle closure, a comparative study has been fulfilled on radiation and technological characteristics of spent fuel from subcritical reactor ADS and on fuel from other nuclear facilities. The VVER-1000 reactor and the variant of fast reactor with lead-bismuth coolant were chosen for the comparison. SVBR-100 reactor can be considered as a prototype of the latter facility. Two options of closing the fuel cycle have been analyzed: the variant with recycling U,Pu without MA, the variant with total recycling of U and all transuranic isotopes (Pu, Np, Am, Cm). The differences have been defined in terms of specific values of radioactivity, residual heat release, intensity of sources of neutrons and gamma-radiation of spent fuel. (author)

  7. Neutronic Description of Accelerator Driven Systems: Coupling if MC High Energy Particles Interaction and Sn Low Energy Neutron Codes as Applied to Myrrha

    The Myrrha project (1) at SCK-CEN, the Belgian nuclear research centre, intends to design and develop a prototype accelerator driven system. Such a system will enable, next to other application fields (Technological demonstration, integral experiments validation,...), the benchmarking of the codes applied to assess the performances of the ADS. In the present situation we coupled, at SCK.CEN, the high energy Monte Carlo code HETC to the DORT/TORT S-N Neutron transport codes to perform the neutronic calculations of the Myrrha project. The HETC code is used to compute the space and energy distribution of the primary spallation neutron source, also including all other particles involved. The high energy cascade is calculated down to 20 MeV neutrons. Whereas the neutrons below this energy limit are stored as primary particles (without any interaction in the spallation medium) in a multigroup energy structure and will be treated as a fixed neutron source in the S-N transport code. The neutron interaction cross-section library used in this step is based on the ENDF/B-IV nuclear data. It is a 27 energy group with 7 groups below the thermal cut-off and allowing the up-scattering and the anisotropic scattering up to P3. The neutron transport calculations of the sub-critical assembly are performed using the DORT code either in Keff or fixed source with multiplication modes. Quadrature sets of S8 and S16 were used during these calculations. This calculational scheme was validated on basis of Monte Carlo calculational results and experimental data. In this paper we present the global calculational scheme as we applied it to Myrrh a and the corresponding results. (Author) 14 refs

  8. Dynamics of electron acceleration in laser-driven wakefields. Acceleration limits and asymmetric plasma waves

    The experiments presented in this thesis study several aspects of electron acceleration in a laser-driven plasma wave. High-intensity lasers can efficiently drive a plasma wave that sustains electric fields on the order of 100 GV/m. Electrons that are trapped in this plasma wave can be accelerated to GeV-scale energies. As the accelerating fields in this scheme are 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than in conventional radio-frequency accelerators, the necessary acceleration distance can be reduced by the same factor, turning laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA) into a promising compact, and potentially cheaper, alternative. However, laser-accelerated electron bunches have not yet reached the parameter standards of conventional accelerators. This work will help to gain better insight into the acceleration process and to optimize the electron bunch properties. The 25 fs, 1.8 J-pulses of the ATLAS laser at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics were focused into a steady-state flow gas cell. This very reproducible and turbulence-free gas target allows for stable acceleration of electron bunches. Thus the sensitivity of electron parameters to subtle changes of the experimental setup could be determined with meaningful statistics. At optimized experimental parameters, electron bunches of ∼50 pC total charge were accelerated to energies up to 450 MeV with a divergence of ∼2 mrad FWHM. As, in a new design of the gas cell, its length can be varied from 2 to 14 mm, the electron bunch energy could be evaluated after different acceleration distances, at two different electron densities. From this evolution important acceleration parameters could be extracted. At an electron density of 6.43. 1018 cm-3 the maximum electric field strength in the plasma wave was determined to be ∼160 GV/m. The length after which the relativistic electrons outrun the accelerating phase of the electric field and are decelerated again, the so-called dephasing length, was found to be 4.9 mm

  9. Dynamics of electron acceleration in laser-driven wakefields. Acceleration limits and asymmetric plasma waves

    Popp, Antonia

    2011-12-16

    The experiments presented in this thesis study several aspects of electron acceleration in a laser-driven plasma wave. High-intensity lasers can efficiently drive a plasma wave that sustains electric fields on the order of 100 GV/m. Electrons that are trapped in this plasma wave can be accelerated to GeV-scale energies. As the accelerating fields in this scheme are 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than in conventional radio-frequency accelerators, the necessary acceleration distance can be reduced by the same factor, turning laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA) into a promising compact, and potentially cheaper, alternative. However, laser-accelerated electron bunches have not yet reached the parameter standards of conventional accelerators. This work will help to gain better insight into the acceleration process and to optimize the electron bunch properties. The 25 fs, 1.8 J-pulses of the ATLAS laser at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics were focused into a steady-state flow gas cell. This very reproducible and turbulence-free gas target allows for stable acceleration of electron bunches. Thus the sensitivity of electron parameters to subtle changes of the experimental setup could be determined with meaningful statistics. At optimized experimental parameters, electron bunches of {approx}50 pC total charge were accelerated to energies up to 450 MeV with a divergence of {approx}2 mrad FWHM. As, in a new design of the gas cell, its length can be varied from 2 to 14 mm, the electron bunch energy could be evaluated after different acceleration distances, at two different electron densities. From this evolution important acceleration parameters could be extracted. At an electron density of 6.43. 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} the maximum electric field strength in the plasma wave was determined to be {approx}160 GV/m. The length after which the relativistic electrons outrun the accelerating phase of the electric field and are decelerated again, the so-called dephasing length

  10. Burnup calculations using serpent code in accelerator driven thorium reactors

    In this study, burnup calculations have been performed for a sodium cooled Accelerator Driven Thorium Reactor (ADTR) using the Serpent 1.1.16 Monte Carlo code. The ADTR has been designed for burning minor actinides, mixed 232Th and mixed 233U fuels. A solid Pb-Bi spallation target in the center of the core is used and sodium as coolant. The system is designed for a heating power of 2 000 MW and for an operation time of 600 days. For burnup calculations the Advanced Matrix Exponential Method CRAM (Chebyshev Rational Approximation Method) and different nuclear data libraries (ENDF7, JEF2.2, JEFF3.1.1) were used. The effective multiplication factor change from 0.93 to 0.97 for different nuclear data libraries during the reactor operation period. (orig.)