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Sample records for acceleration head injury

  1. Injury predictors for traumatic axonal injury in a rodent head impact acceleration model.

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Liying; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Zhou, Runzhou; Cavanaugh, John M

    2011-11-01

    A modified Marmarou impact acceleration injury model was developed to study the kinematics of the rat head to quantify traumatic axonal injury (TAI) in the corpus callosum (CC) and brainstem pyramidal tract (Py), to determine injury predictors and to establish injury thresholds for severe TAI. Thirty-one anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (392±13 grams) were impacted using a modified impact acceleration injury device from 2.25 m and 1.25 m heights. Beta-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunocytochemistry was used to assess and quantify axonal changes in CC and Py. Over 600 injury maps in CC and Py were constructed in the 31 impacted rats. TAI distribution along the rostro-caudal direction in CC and Py was determined. Linear and angular responses of the rat head were monitored and measured in vivo with an attached accelerometer and angular rate sensor, and were correlated to TAI data. Logistic regression analysis suggested that the occurrence of severe TAI in CC was best predicted by average linear acceleration, followed by power and time to surface righting. The combination of average linear acceleration and time to surface righting showed an improved predictive result. In Py, severe TAI was best predicted by time to surface righting, followed by peak and average angular velocity. When both CC and Py were combined, power was the best predictor, and the combined average linear acceleration and average angular velocity was also found to have good injury predictive ability. Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to assess the predictive power of individual and paired injury predictors. TAI tolerance curves were also proposed in this study. PMID:22869303

  2. Head Injuries

    ... Aid: Falls First Aid: Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Getting Help: Know the Numbers Concussions Stay Safe: ... Tips: Inline Skating Safety Tips: Skateboarding Dealing With Sports Injuries Concussions: What to Do Contact Us Print Resources ...

  3. Bicycle helmets are highly effective at preventing head injury during head impact: head-form accelerations and injury criteria for helmeted and unhelmeted impacts.

    Cripton, Peter A; Dressler, Daniel M; Stuart, Cameron A; Dennison, Christopher R; Richards, Darrin

    2014-09-01

    Cycling is a popular form of recreation and method of commuting with clear health benefits. However, cycling is not without risk. In Canada, cycling injuries are more common than in any other summer sport; and according to the US National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration, 52,000 cyclists were injured in the US in 2010. Head injuries account for approximately two-thirds of hospital admissions and three-quarters of fatal injuries among injured cyclists. In many jurisdictions and across all age levels, helmets have been adopted to mitigate risk of serious head injuries among cyclists and the majority of epidemiological literature suggests that helmets effectively reduce risk of injury. Critics have raised questions over the actual efficacy of helmets by pointing to weaknesses in existing helmet epidemiology including selection bias and lack of appropriate control for the type of impact sustained by the cyclist and the severity of the head impact. These criticisms demonstrate the difficulty in conducting epidemiology studies that will be regarded as definitive and the need for complementary biomechanical studies where confounding factors can be adequately controlled. In the bicycle helmet context, there is a paucity of biomechanical data comparing helmeted to unhelmeted head impacts and, to our knowledge, there is no data of this type available with contemporary helmets. In this research, our objective was to perform biomechanical testing of paired helmeted and unhelmeted head impacts using a validated anthropomorphic test headform and a range of drop heights between 0.5m and 3.0m, while measuring headform acceleration and Head Injury Criterion (HIC). In the 2m (6.3m/s) drops, the middle of our drop height range, the helmet reduced peak accelerations from 824g (unhelmeted) to 181g (helmeted) and HIC was reduced from 9667 (unhelmeted) to 1250 (helmeted). At realistic impact speeds of 5.4m/s (1.5m drop) and 6.3m/s (2.0m drop), bicycle helmets changed the

  4. Head injury.

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  5. Angular Impact Mitigation System for Bicycle Helmets to Reduce Head Acceleration and Risk of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M.; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (p < 0.001), a 34% reduction in peak angular acceleration (p < 0.001), and a 22% to 32% reduction in neck loading (p < 0.001). Computational results predicted that AIM helmets reduced the risk of concussion and DAI by 27% and 44%, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AIM technology could effectively improve impact mitigation compared to a contemporary expanded polystyrene-based bicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required. PMID:23770518

  6. Head injury - first aid

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000028.htm Head injury - first aid To use the sharing features on this page, ... a concussion can range from mild to severe. First Aid Learning to recognize a serious head injury and ...

  7. Overview of Head Injuries

    ... Children are admitted to the hospital for these reasons or if they were unconscious even briefly or had a seizure. Children are also admitted to the hospital if child abuse is suspected. Severe head injury If the injury ...

  8. Economics of head injuries

    Singh Manmohan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Head injuries account for significant proportion of neurosurgical admissions and bed occupancy. Patients with head injuries also consume significant proportions of neurosurgical resources. A prospective 6-month study has been carried out to evaluate the expenditure incurred on head injury patients in a modern neurosurgical center equipped with state of the art infrastructure. Costing areas included wages / salaries of health care personnel, cost of medicines / surgical items / crystalloids, general store items, stationary, all investigation charges, equipment cost, overhead building cost, maintenance cost, electricity and water charges and cost of medical gases, air conditioning and operation theatre expenses. Expenditure in each area was calculated and apportioned to each bed. The statistical analysis was done using X2 test. The cost of stay in ward was found to be Rs. 1062 / bed / day and in neurosurgical ICU Rs. 3082 / bed / day. The operation theatre cost for each surgery was Rs. 11948. The cost of hospital stay per day for minor, moderate and severe head injury group was found to be Rs. 1921, Rs. 2569 and Rs. 2713 respectively. The patients who developed complications, the cost of stay per day in the hospital were Rs. 2867. In the operative group, the cost of hospital stay per day was Rs. 3804. The total expenditure in minor head injury was Rs. 7800 per patient, in moderate head injury was Rs. 22172 per patient, whereas in severe head injury, it was found to be Rs. 32852 per patient. Patients who underwent surgery, the total cost incurred was Rs. 33100 per operated patient.

  9. Recreation-Related Head Injuries

    Recreation-Related Head Injuries American Association of Neurological Surgeons 5550 Meadowbrook Drive, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-3852  ... and follow instructions on product packaging. Top 15 Recreation/Leisure-Related Head Injuries by Product Product Category ...

  10. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  11. Serious head injury in sport.

    Lindsay, K W; McLatchie, G; Jennett, B

    1980-01-01

    Of 1900 head injuries serious enough to be admitted to the neurosurgical unit in Glasgow over a five year period, 52 (2.7%) were due to "sport." Golf, horse-riding, and Association football were the sports most commonly linked with serious head injury. Golfing injuries were all compound depressed fractures, and all these patients made a good recovery; horse-riding produced more severe injuries, three of the eight patients being left with residual disability. Much attention has been directed t...

  12. Chest injuries associated with head injury

    Wilfred Chukwuemeka Mezue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there have been significant advances in the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI, associated severe injuries, in particular chest injuries, remain a major challenge. This paper analyses the contribution of chest injuries to the outcome of head injuries in the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH and the Memfys Hospital for Neurosurgery (MHN in Enugu, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective review of the medical records, operative notes, and radiological findings of all patients admitted for head injury who had associated significant chest injuries in the MHN from 2002 to 2009 and the UNTH between 2007 and 2010. Patients with only head injury and other extracranial injury not affecting the chest were excluded. Patients who were inadequately investigated were also excluded. Results: Nineteen patients from the MHN and 11 patients from the UNTH were analyzed. Ages ranged from 9 to 65 years and the male:female ratio was 3:1. Injuries were most common between 30 and 50 years and road traffic accident accounted for 60%. Barotrauma from ventilation was documented in 2 patients. The commonest types of intrathoracic injuries are pneumothorax and hemothorax. Chest wall injuries are more common but carry less morbidity and mortality. Only 20% of patients presented within 48 hours of injury. Management of the associated chest trauma commenced in the referring hospitals only in 26.4% of the patients. All patients with hemo-pneumothorax had tube thoracostomy as did 96% of patients with pneumothorax. 10% of patients with haemothorax needed thoracotomy. Mortality is 43%, which is higher than for patients with only TBI with comparable Glasgow coma scale. Outcome is influenced by the time to admission and the GCS on admission. Conclusion: Associated chest injuries result in higher mortality from head injuries. This association is more likely in the young and more productive. All patients presenting with head and

  13. Surrogate Head Forms for the Evaluation of Head Injury Risk

    MacAlister, Anna

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the use of surrogate head forms in biomechanical research pertaining to head injury and, more specifically, mild traumatic brain injury. Because cadavers are limited and controlled studies of brain injury using live human subjects would be unethical, surrogate head forms are used to study the response of the human head to impact. Different head forms have been developed and optimized for different purposes. The Hybrid III 50th percentile male crash test dummy was develop...

  14. Intention tremor after head injury

    Eight cases of intention tremor as a late complication of head injury were investigated. The patients ranged in age from 3 to 24 years. All received severe head injuries and lapsed into coma immediately afterward (Glasgow Coma Scale scores ≤8). Six patients exhibited decerebration or decortication. Hemiparesis was present in six cases and oculomotor nerve palsy in four. In the chronic stage, all patients displayed some degree of impairment of higher cortical function and five had dysarthria and/or ataxia. Initial computed tomography (CT) scans within 3 hours after the injury were obtained in five cases, of which four showed a hemorrhagic lesion in the midbrain or its surroundings. Other CT findings were diffuse cerebral swelling (four cases), intraventricular hemorrhage (three), and multiple hemorrhagic lesions (two). In the chronic stage, generalized cortical atrophy or ventricular enlargement was noted in five cases. These clinical features and CT findings indicate diffuse brain damage as well as midbrain damage and may reflect shearing injury. (author)

  15. Bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia following mild head injury.

    Muthukumar, N; Veerarajkumar, N; Madeswaran, K

    2001-05-01

    A 7-year-old child presented with bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) following a trivial head injury. CT was normal. MRI revealed a pontine lesion. Two months after the injury the patient was neurologically normal. INO following head injury is rare. Rarer still is INO following mild head injury. To date, only four cases of INO had been reported following mild head injury; the present case is the fifth and the first in which the lesion was documented using MRI. The relevant literature is reviewed. PMID:11417420

  16. Management of head injuries in children.

    Conchie, Henry; Palmer, Sarah; Fernando, Katalin; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-07-01

    Head injury is the most common cause of injury-related death and permanent disability in children. Minor head trauma is common in childhood and does not require any medical treatment. Although deficits can occur even after mild to moderate head injury, they are markedly greater and become clinically evident following severe head injury. It is important that emergency department clinicians are aware of the signs and symptoms that indicate severe traumatic brain injury and triage for urgent intervention in those children who present with these signs and symptoms. Clinicians also need to know when children can be sent home with reassurance and information, and when they require admission or transfer to a neurosurgical unit. This article examines the literature on head injuries in children, describes assessment, management and treatment, and provides a simple management algorithm. PMID:27384805

  17. Development of Head Injury Assessment Reference Values Based on NASA Injury Modeling

    Somers, Jeffrey T.; Melvin, John W.; Tabiei, Ala; Lawrence, Charles; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Granderson, Bradley; Feiveson, Alan; Gernhardt, Michael; Patalak, John

    2011-01-01

    NASA is developing a new capsule-based, crewed vehicle that will land in the ocean, and the space agency desires to reduce the risk of injury from impact during these landings. Because landing impact occurs for each flight and the crew might need to perform egress tasks, current injury assessment reference values (IARV) were deemed insufficient. Because NASCAR occupant restraint systems are more effective than the systems used to determine the current IARVs and are similar to NASA s proposed restraint system, an analysis of NASCAR impacts was performed to develop new IARVs that may be more relevant to NASA s context of vehicle landing operations. Head IARVs associated with race car impacts were investigated by completing a detailed analysis of all of the 2002-2008 NASCAR impact data. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to select 4071 impacts from the 4015 recorder files provided (each file could contain multiple impact events). Of the 4071 accepted impacts, 274 were selected for numerical simulation using a custom NASCAR restraint system and Humanetics Hybrid-III 50th percentile numerical dummy model in LS-DYNA. Injury had occurred in 32 of the 274 selected impacts, and 27 of those injuries involved the head. A majority of the head injuries were mild concussions with or without brief loss of consciousness. The 242 non-injury impacts were randomly selected and representative of the range of crash dynamics present in the total set of 4071 impacts. Head dynamics data (head translational acceleration, translational change in velocity, rotational acceleration, rotational velocity, HIC-15, HIC-36, and the Head 3ms clip) were filtered according to SAE J211 specifications and then transformed to a log scale. The probability of head injury was estimated using a separate logistic regression analysis for each log-transformed predictor candidate. Using the log transformation constrains the estimated probability of injury to become negligible as IARVs approach

  18. NEUROENDOCRINE DISTURBANCES FOLLOWING HEAD INJURIES

    Vinayak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is one of the main causes of death and disability in young adults, with consequences ranging from physical disabilities to long - term cognitive, behavioural, psychological and social defects. Recently, c linical evidence has demonstrated that TBI may frequently cause hypothalamic – pituitary dysfunction, probably contributing to a delayed or hampered recovery from TBI. CASE REPORT: 32 year s old female presented with a history of fall from two wheeler on back hitting the head on occipital region with no history of vomiting, loss of consciousness, ENT bleed. Her GCS was 15/15. Patient was asymptomatic and was discharged from hospital on fifth day. Seven days after discharge patient again presented with heavine ss in her both breasts associated with pain and whitish discharge from both the nipples and mild fever since last two days. CONCLUSION: TBI is a public health problem that requires more effective strategies to improve the outcome and minimize disability of the affected patients. Changes in pituitary hormone secretion may be observed during the acute phase post - TBI, representing part of the acute adaptive response to the injury. Neuroendocrine disturbances, caused by damage to the pituitary and/or hypothalam us, is a frequent complication of TBI and may occur at any time after the acute event. Pituitary dysfunction presents more frequently as an isolated, and more rarely as a complete, deficiency.

  19. Remediation of attention deficits in head injury.

    Nag S; Rao S

    1999-01-01

    Head injury is associated with psychological sequelae which impair the patient′s psychosocial functioning. Information processing, attention and memory deficits are seen in head injuries of all severity. We attempted to improve deficits of focused, sustained and divided attention. The principle of overlapping sources of attention resource pools was utilised in devising the remediation programme. Tasks used simple inexpensive materials. Four head injured young adult males with post conc...

  20. Neuropsychological evaluation of mild head injury.

    Gentilini, M; Nichelli, P; Schoenhuber, R; Bortolotti, P.; Tonelli, L; Falasca, A; Merli, G A

    1985-01-01

    Neuropsychological deficits following mild head injury have been reported recently in the literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate this issue with a strict methodological approach. The neuropsychological performance of 50 mildly head injured patients was compared with that of 50 normal controls chosen with the case-control approach. No conclusive evidence was found that mild head injury causes cognitive impairment one month after the trauma.

  1. Head injuries: a study evaluating the impact of the NICE head injury guidelines

    Z. Hassan; Smith, M.; Littlewood, S; Bouamra, O; Hughes, D.; Biggin, C; Amos, K.; Mendelow, A; Lecky, F

    2005-01-01

    Background: The NICE head injury guidelines recommend a different approach in the management of head injury patients. It suggests that CT head scan should replace skull x ray (SXR) and observation/admission as the first investigation. We wished to determine the impact of NICE on SXR, CT scan, and admission on all patients with head injury presenting to the ED setting and estimate the cost effectiveness of these guidelines, which has not been quantified to date.

  2. Head motions while riding roller coasters: implications for brain injury.

    Pfister, Bryan J; Chickola, Larry; Smith, Douglas H

    2009-12-01

    The risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while riding roller coasters has received substantial attention. Case reports of TBI around the time of riding roller coasters have led many medical professionals to assert that the high gravitational forces (G-forces) induced by roller coasters pose a significant TBI risk. Head injury research, however, has shown that G-forces alone cannot predict TBI. Established head injury criterions and procedures were employed to compare the potential of TBI between daily activities and roller coaster riding. Three-dimensional head motions were measured during 3 different roller coaster rides, a pillow fight, and car crash simulations. Data was analyzed and compared with published data, using similar analyses of head motions. An 8.05 m/s car crash lead to the largest head injury criterion measure of 28.1 and head impact power of 3.41, over 6 times larger than the roller coaster rides of 4.1 and 0.36. Notably, the linear and rotational components of head acceleration during roller coaster rides were milder than those induced by many common activities. As such, there appears to be an extremely low risk of TBI due to the head motions induced by roller coaster rides. PMID:19901817

  3. Heading for a fall? Management of head injury in infants.

    Williamson, M

    2010-09-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest reasons for infants (< 1 year) to attend the Emergency Department (ED). Clinical management varies considerably and concern about non accidental injury results in a high admission rate in some hospitals. Information was obtained on 103 children under one year of age presenting to the ED with head injury in a prospective study. The average age was 6.7 months and 57% of patients were male. Twenty eight babies had skull x rays with 1 skull fracture diagnosed. None required CT brain scan. Ninety eight (94%) were discharged home from the ED. There were no unplanned returns, readmissions or adverse events. The incidence of traumatic brain injury in children under one year of age presenting with head injury is low and the majority can be safely discharged home.

  4. Analysis of finite element models for head injury investigation: reconstruction of four real-world impacts.

    Franklyn, Melanie; Fildes, Brian; Zhang, Liying; Yang, King; Sparke, Laurie

    2005-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that both excessive linear and rotational accelerations are the cause of head injuries. Although the head injury criterion has been beneficial as an indicator of head injury risk, it only considers linear acceleration, so there is a need to consider both types of motion in future safety standards. Advanced models of the head/brain complex have recently been developed to gain a better understanding of head injury biomechanics. While these models have been verified against laboratory experimental data, there is a lack of suitable real-world data available for validation. Hence, using two computer models of the head/brain, the objective of the current study was to reconstruct four real-world crashes with known head injury outcomes in a full-vehicle crash laboratory, simulate head/brain responses using kinematics obtained during these reconstructions, and to compare the results predicted by the models against the actual injuries sustained by the occupant. Cases where the occupant sustained no head injuries (AIS 0) and head injuries of severity AIS 4, AIS 5, and multiple head injuries were selected. Data collected from a 9-accelerometer skull were input into the Wayne State University Head Injury Model (WSUHIM) and the NHTSA Simulated Injury Monitor (SIMon). The results demonstrated that both models were able to predict varying injury severities consistent with the difference in AIS injury levels in the real-world cases. The WSUHIM predicted a slightly higher injury threshold than the SIMon, probably due to the finer mesh and different software used for the simulations, and could also determine regions of the brain which had been injured. With further validation, finite element models can be used to establish an injury criterion for each type of brain injury in the future. PMID:17096266

  5. Civilian firearm injuries in head and neck

    Sonkhya, Nishi; Singhal, Pawan; Srivastava, Subodh P.

    2005-01-01

    Firearm injuries to the head and neck contribute to substantial medical, medicolegal, economic as well as social problems. Internal wounds in the head and neck by firearms are usually complicated and are diagnostically and therapeutically challenging cases. Based on four cases of non-fatal firearm injuries, we discuss problems related to firearm wounds, their irregular path, final lodgment of the bullet and their diagnostic and therapeutic consequences. In the present study it was observed th...

  6. Skull X-Rays for Head Injury

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    The effect of abolishing skull X-rays on the rate of admission, use of computer tomography (CT), radiation dose per head injury, and detection of intracranial injuries was determined in patients, aged 1 to 14 years, presenting to the ED at Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh, UK.

  7. Skull X-Rays for Head Injury

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of abolishing skull X-rays on the rate of admission, use of computer tomography (CT, radiation dose per head injury, and detection of intracranial injuries was determined in patients, aged 1 to 14 years, presenting to the ED at Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh, UK.

  8. Study Links Severe Head Injury to Parkinson's Risk

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159811.html Study Links Severe Head Injury to Parkinson's Risk Researchers ... separate from the head injury itself." However, the study did not prove that a traumatic brain injury ...

  9. Head injury and risk for Parkinson disease

    Kenborg, Line; Rugbjerg, Kathrine; Lee, Pei-Chen;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between head injuries throughout life and the risk for Parkinson disease (PD) in an interview-based case-control study. METHODS: We identified 1,705 patients diagnosed with PD at 10 neurologic centers in Denmark in 1996-2009 and verified their diagnoses in...... medical records. Patients were matched to 1,785 controls randomly selected from the Danish Central Population Register on sex and year of birth. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: We observed no association between any head.......31; 95% CI 0.88, 1.95) and risk for PD. Application of a lag time of 10 years between head injury and first cardinal symptom resulted in similar risk estimates. CONCLUSIONS: The results do not support the hypothesis that head injury increases the risk for PD....

  10. Public Bicycle Share Programs and Head Injuries

    Pless, Barry; Moore, Lynne; Nathens, Avery B.; Hunte, Garth; Rivara, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the effect of North American public bicycle share programs (PBSPs), which typically do not offer helmets with rentals, on the occurrence of bicycle-related head injuries. Methods. We analyzed trauma center data for bicycle-related injuries from 5 cities with PBSPs and 5 comparison cities. We used logistic regression models to compare the odds that admission for a bicycle-related injury would involve a head injury 24 months before PBSP implementation and 12 months afterward. Results. In PBSP cities, the proportion of head injuries among bicycle-related injuries increased from 42.3% before PBSP implementation to 50.1% after (P < .01). This proportion in comparison cities remained similar before (38.2%) and after (35.9%) implementation (P = .23). Odds ratios for head injury were 1.30 (95% confidence interval = 1.13, 1.67) in PBSP cities and 0.94 (95% confidence interval = 0.79, 1.11) in control cities (adjusted for age and city) when we compared the period after implementation to the period before. Conclusions. Results suggest that steps should be taken to make helmets available with PBSPs. Helmet availability should be incorporated into PBSP planning and funding, not considered an afterthought following implementation. PMID:24922150

  11. Neck injury response to direct head impact.

    Ivancic, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    Previous in vivo studies have observed flexion of the upper or upper/middle cervical spine and extension at inferior spinal levels due to direct head impacts. These studies hypothesized that hyperflexion may contribute to injury of the upper or middle cervical spine during real-life head impact. Our objectives were to determine the cervical spine injury response to direct head impact, document injuries, and compare our results with previously reported in vivo data. Our model consisted of a human cadaver neck (n=6) mounted to the torso of a rear impact dummy and carrying a surrogate head. Rearward force was applied to the model's forehead using a cable and pulley system and free-falling mass of 3.6kg followed by 16.7kg. High-speed digital cameras tracked head, vertebral, and pelvic motions. Average peak spinal rotations observed during impact were statistically compared (P<0.05) to physiological ranges obtained from intact flexibility tests. Peak head impact force was 249 and 504N for the 3.6 and 16.7kg free-falling masses, respectively. Occipital condyle loads reached 205.3N posterior shear, 331.4N compression, and 7.4Nm extension moment. We observed significant increases in intervertebral extension peaks above physiologic at C6/7 (26.3° vs. 5.7°) and C7/T1 (29.7° vs. 4.6°) and macroscopic ligamentous and osseous injuries at C6 through T1 due to the 504N impacts. Our results indicate that a rearward head shear force causes complex neck loads of posterior shear, compression, and extension moment sufficient to injure the lower cervical spine. Real-life neck injuries due to motor vehicle crashes, sports impacts, or falls are likely due to combined loads transferred to the neck by direct head impact and torso inertial loads. PMID:22613632

  12. Preventing head injuries in children

    ... 2012:chap 50B. US Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Heads up. Facts for ... repair - discharge Epilepsy - children - discharge Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - ...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in head injury

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scan were compared to define their roles in the evaluation of head injured patients. MRI was found to be equal or inferior to CT scan in detection of extraparenchymatous lesions due to a failure of CT scan to indentify ultra-early hemorrhage. While, MRI was far superior to CT scan in regard to the indentification of the intraparenchymatous lesions in the acute stage of head injury. The lesions in the central structure suggesting diffuse axonal injury (DAI) were commonly found in the patients showing lower Glasgow Coma Scale score, though the degree of central structure damage shown in MRI was not correlated with the neurological grading and outcome. We concluded that DAI may play a major role in the severe head injury, but the severity of DAI is not predictable by using MRI. (author)

  14. [Severe head injuries during Judo practice].

    Nagahiro, Shinji; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Hondo, Hideki; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Kamitani, Takeshi; Shinbara, Yuzo; Nimura, Yuji; Tomatsu, Taisuke

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study is to elucidate the characteristic features of Judo head injuries and to propose safety measures and a reaction manual on how to prevent and to deal with such accidents in Japan. Thirty cases of severe head injuries suffered during Judo practice were enrolled in this study. They have made insurance claims for damage compensation and inquiries about Judo accidents attributed to the All Japan Judo Federation, from 2003 to 2010. The average age of the patients was 16.5 year old. The incidence of injury showed 2 peaks in different academic grade levels; one is in the first year of junior high-school (30.0%, n=9) and the other is in senior high school (26.7%, n=8). Around half of them were beginners. Four cases (13.3%) had past history of head trauma or headache and dizziness before a catastrophic accident, suggesting the presence of a second impact. Lucid interval was observed in 25 cases (83.3%). Most patients (93.3%) suffered acute subdural hematoma associated with avulsion of a cerebral bridging vein. Of patients who underwent emergency removal of the hematoma, 15 patients (50%) died and 7 patients (23.3%) entered a persistent vegetative state. Based on these findings, we propose an emergency manual with safety measures for effectively preventing and treating Judo head injuries in an appropriate manner. To reduce the disastrous head injuries in Judo, the safety measures and an optimal action manual should be reconsidered and widely spread and accepted by society. PMID:22128268

  15. Occult head injury: its incidence in spinal cord injury.

    Wilmot, C B; Cope, D N; Hall, K M; Acker, M

    1985-04-01

    This study investigated the suspicion that a significant proportion of individuals having spinal cord injury (SCI) also sustain a concomitant undiagnosed occult head injury during the trauma accident. The criteria for high risk of head injury included the following: (1) quadriplegia with high energy deceleration accident, (2) loss of consciousness at time of injury, (3) brainstem or cortical neurologic indicators, or (4) respiratory support required at time of injury. In this study, 67 patients admitted to the rehabilitation unit were given a neuropsychologic evaluation a median of 48 days after injury. Motor free scales used were the Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test (GOAT), Quick Test, Raven Progressive matrices, serial 7s, Shipley Hartford, Stroop Color/Word Interference, and the Wechsler Memory Scale Associate Learning Tests. Forty-three of the 67 patients (64%) scored mildly to profoundly impaired on the test battery. Evidence of poor premorbid academic history was present in 19 (44%) of those with impaired performance on the neurologic evaluation and in only three (13%) of those scoring unimpaired. Consequently, 56% (24/43) of the impaired had no previous record of scholastic difficulties, presumably acquiring cognitive impairment at the time of injury. The implications of this high incidence of impaired cognitive functioning for treatment of individuals with SCI are significant. PMID:3985774

  16. CT analysis of missile head injury

    Besenski, N. [Dept. of Radiology, Zagreb Univ. Hospital Rebro (Croatia); Jadro-Santel, D. [Dept. of Neuropathology, Zagreb Univ. Hospital Rebro (Croatia); Jelavic-Koic, F. [Dept. of Radiology, General Hospital Sveti Duh, Zagreb (Croatia); Pavic, D. [Dept. of Neuropathology, Zagreb Univ. Hospital Rebro (Croatia); Mikulic, D. [Zagreb School of Medicine (Croatia); Glavina, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Clinical Hospital, Osijek (Croatia); Maskovic, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Clinical Hospital, Split (Croatia)

    1995-04-01

    Between August 1991 and December 1992, CT was performed in 154 patients who had suffered missile head injury during the war in the Republic of Croatia. In 54% CT was performed 1-24 h after injury, and in 27% follow-up CT was also obtained. The wounds were penetrating, tangential or perforating (45%, 34% and 21%, respectively). Haemorrhage was the most frequent lesion in the brain (84%). Follow-up CT evolution of haemorrhage, oedema, cerebritis, abscess, secondary vascular lesions, necrosis, encephalomalacia and hydrocephalus. The most dynamic changes occurred 7-14 days after injury. In 14% of cases, deep cerebral lesions were found in the corpus callosum, septum pellucidum periventricular region and pons, although bone and shell fragments were in a different part of the brain parenchyma. Such lesions were found in penetrating injuries only. CT proved very useful for assessing the extent and type of lesions. Although different mechanisms of brain damage in missile head injury are known, here they are, to the best of our knowledge, shown for the first time by CT. (orig.)

  17. CT analysis of missile head injury

    Between August 1991 and December 1992, CT was performed in 154 patients who had suffered missile head injury during the war in the Republic of Croatia. In 54% CT was performed 1-24 h after injury, and in 27% follow-up CT was also obtained. The wounds were penetrating, tangential or perforating (45%, 34% and 21%, respectively). Haemorrhage was the most frequent lesion in the brain (84%). Follow-up CT evolution of haemorrhage, oedema, cerebritis, abscess, secondary vascular lesions, necrosis, encephalomalacia and hydrocephalus. The most dynamic changes occurred 7-14 days after injury. In 14% of cases, deep cerebral lesions were found in the corpus callosum, septum pellucidum periventricular region and pons, although bone and shell fragments were in a different part of the brain parenchyma. Such lesions were found in penetrating injuries only. CT proved very useful for assessing the extent and type of lesions. Although different mechanisms of brain damage in missile head injury are known, here they are, to the best of our knowledge, shown for the first time by CT. (orig.)

  18. Predicting brain acceleration during heading of soccer ball

    Taha, Zahari; Hasnun Arif Hassan, Mohd; Azri Aris, Mohd; Anuar, Zulfika

    2013-12-01

    There has been a long debate whether purposeful heading could cause harm to the brain. Studies have shown that repetitive heading could lead to degeneration of brain cells, which is similarly found in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. A two-degree of freedom linear mathematical model was developed to study the impact of soccer ball to the brain during ball-to-head impact in soccer. From the model, the acceleration of the brain upon impact can be obtained. The model is a mass-spring-damper system, in which the skull is modelled as a mass and the neck is modelled as a spring-damper system. The brain is a mass with suspension characteristics that are also defined by a spring and a damper. The model was validated by experiment, in which a ball was dropped from different heights onto an instrumented dummy skull. The validation shows that the results obtained from the model are in a good agreement with the brain acceleration measured from the experiment. This findings show that a simple linear mathematical model can be useful in giving a preliminary insight on what human brain endures during a ball-to-head impact.

  19. Right thalamic infarction after closed head injury

    We reported a case of right thalamic infarction after a closed head injury. A 12-year-old boy was hit by an autotruck. He was semi-comatose, with left temporal scalp swelling and excoriation in the left lower limb. Three days after the accident, he exhibited left hemiparesis. CT scans on the day of the accident showed no abnormality, but on the following day, right thalamic infarction appeared. Right carotid angiography showed only an irregular vascular shadow in the cisternal segment of the right internal carotid artery. Vascular obstruction after closed head injury is rare, especially in the intracranial vessels, and several pathogeneses may be postulated. The right thalamic infarction in this case was supposed to be due to the damage of the perforators from the right posterior communicating artery and the right posterior cerebral artery, which were struck as a contre-coup by the force from the left side. (author)

  20. Delayed epidural hematoma after mild head injury

    Radulović Danilo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Traumatic delayed epidural hematoma (DEH can be defined as insignificant or not seen on the initial CT scan performed after a trauma but seen on the subsequent CT scan as a “massive” epidural bleeding. Case report. We presented two cases of traumatic DEH after mild head injury. Both patients were conscious and without neurological deficit on the admission. Initial CT scan did not reveal intracranial hematoma. Repeated CT scan, that was performed after neurological deterioration, revealed epidural hematoma in both cases. The patients were operated with a favorable surgical outcome. Conclusion. Traumatic DEH could occur in the patients with head injuries who were conscious on the admission with a normal initial CT scan finding. Early detection of DEH and an urgent surgical evacuation were essential for a good outcome.

  1. The epidemiology of head injury in Cantabria.

    Vázquez-Barquero, A; Vázquez-Barquero, J L; Austin, O; Pascual, J; Gaite, L; Herrera, S

    1992-11-01

    The epidemiology of head injury was studied in Cantabria, Spain, using a methodological design consisting of a cross-selectional analysis of one year of duration and an additional one year follow-up of all the patients included in the initial sample. The 477 cases identified represent a rate of 91/100,000, with males showing a head injury rate 2.7 times higher that than for females. Sixty per cent of all cases involved traffic accidents, falls accounted for 24% and industrial accidents were the cause in 8%. The annual age-adjusted mortality rate was 19.7/100,000. Over 92% of all deaths occurred prior to hospital admission. The presence of alcohol intoxication was evaluated in 211 cases by determining the osmolar gap. It was found that 51% of all the cases examined presented clear evidence of acute alcohol intoxication. PMID:1294388

  2. A Review of Sport-Related Head Injuries.

    Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Nagahiro, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    We review current topics in sport-related head injuries including acute subdural hematoma (ASDH), traumatic cerebrovascular disease, cerebral concussion, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Sports-related ASDH is a leading cause of death and severe morbidity in popular contact sports like American football and Japanese judo. Rotational acceleration can cause either cerebral concussion or ASDH due to rupture of a parasagittal bridging vein. Although rare, approximately 80% of patients with cerebral infarction due to sport participation are diagnosed with ischemia or infarction due to arterial dissection. Computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and ultrasound are useful for diagnosing arterial dissection; ultrasound is particularly useful for detecting dissection of the common and internal carotid arteries. Repeated sports head injuries increase the risks of future concussion, cerebral swelling, ASDH, and CTE. To avoid fatal consequences of CTE, it is essential to understand the criteria for safe post-concussion sports participation. Once diagnosed with a concussion, an athlete should not be allowed to return to play on the same day and should not resume sports before the concussion symptoms have completely resolved. Information about the risks and management of head injuries in different sports should be widely disseminated in educational institutions and by sport organization public relations campaigns. PMID:27182494

  3. A Review of Sport-Related Head Injuries

    Nagahiro, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    We review current topics in sport-related head injuries including acute subdural hematoma (ASDH), traumatic cerebrovascular disease, cerebral concussion, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Sports-related ASDH is a leading cause of death and severe morbidity in popular contact sports like American football and Japanese judo. Rotational acceleration can cause either cerebral concussion or ASDH due to rupture of a parasagittal bridging vein. Although rare, approximately 80% of patients with cerebral infarction due to sport participation are diagnosed with ischemia or infarction due to arterial dissection. Computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and ultrasound are useful for diagnosing arterial dissection; ultrasound is particularly useful for detecting dissection of the common and internal carotid arteries. Repeated sports head injuries increase the risks of future concussion, cerebral swelling, ASDH, and CTE. To avoid fatal consequences of CTE, it is essential to understand the criteria for safe post-concussion sports participation. Once diagnosed with a concussion, an athlete should not be allowed to return to play on the same day and should not resume sports before the concussion symptoms have completely resolved. Information about the risks and management of head injuries in different sports should be widely disseminated in educational institutions and by sport organization public relations campaigns.

  4. Head injury management guidelines for general practitioners

    Jeremy C Ganz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A complete examination of a head injured patient in the hospital requires a number of instruments. These include a stethoscope, sphygmomanometer, ophthalmoscope, otoscope, cotton wool, safety pin, tuning fork, reflex hammer and a small key to test the plantar response. Few of these are required at the accident scene. This is because, in the hospital, the aim is optimal definitive treatment. At the accident scene, the aim is prevention of secondary injury, rapid recording of the most important findings and safe efficient transport to the hospital. This short paper reviews how the local doctor should undertake a neurosurgical assessment of traumatic brain injury patients. Moreover, the primary management at accident scenes is described and the rationale behind the approach is outlined

  5. Brain SPECT in severs traumatic head injury

    The aim of this work was to compare the results of the early brain scintigraphy in traumatic brain injury to the long term neuropsychological behavior. Twenty four patients had an ECD-Tc99m SPECT, within one month after the trauma; scintigraphic abnormalities were evaluated according to a semi-quantitative analysis. The neuropsychological clinical investigation was interpreted by a synthetic approach to evaluate abnormalities related to residual motor deficit, frontal behavior, memory and language disorders. Fourteen patients (58%) had sequela symptoms. SPECT revealed 80 abnormalities and CT scan only 31. Statistical analysis of uptake values showed significantly lower uptake in left basal ganglia and brain stem in patients with sequela memory disorders. We conclude that the brain perfusion scintigraphy is able to detect more lesions than CT and that it could really help to predict the neuropsychological behavior after severe head injury. Traumatology could become in the future a widely accepted indication of perfusion SPECT. (authors)

  6. Monitoring of head injury by myotatic reflex evaluation

    Cozens, J; Miller, S; Chambers, I.; Mendelow, A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—(1) To establish the feasibility of myotatic reflex measurement in patients with head injury. (2) To test the hypothesis that cerebral dysfunction after head injury causes myotatic reflex abnormalities through disordered descending control. These objectives arise from a proposal to use reflex measurements in monitoring patients with head injury.
METHODS—The phasic stretch reflex of biceps brachii was elicited by a servo-positioned tendon hammer. Antagonist i...

  7. Which CT features help predict outcome after head injury?

    Wardlaw, J.; Easton, V; Statham, P.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Information collected at baseline can be useful in predicting patient outcome after head injury. The appearance of the CT brain scan may add useful baseline information. The aim of this study was to evaluate which features on the admission CT scan might add significantly to other baseline clinical information for predicting survival in patients with head injury.

  8. Subtle Symptoms Associated with Self-Reported Mild Head Injury.

    Segalowitz, Sidney J.; Lawson, Sheila

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 1,345 high school students and 2,321 university students found that 30-37% reported having experienced a head injury, with 12-15% reporting loss of consciousness. Significant relationships were found between mild head injury incidence and gender; sleep difficulties; social difficulties; handedness pattern; and diagnoses of attention…

  9. Alcohol, head injury, and pulmonary complications.

    Christensen, M A; Janson, S; Seago, J A

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the difference in rates of pulmonary complications (e.g., aspiration, pneumonia) in head-injured patients with and without concomitant alcohol intoxication. The records of 98 consecutive patients admitted over a 1-year period to a Level I Trauma Center were reviewed. The patients were grouped into three subsets: acutely intoxicated (n = 26), acutely intoxicated with a diagnosis of chronic alcoholism (n = 14), and non-intoxicated (n = 58). Alcohol intoxication was defined as a blood alcohol level (BAL) > or = 0.08 mg/dl. Admission BALs and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores were tabulated at admission. Frequency of arterial blood gas (ABG) measurements, need for an artificial airway/mechanical ventilation, and length of stay (LOS) were analyzed by using one-way analysis of variance. Intergroup differences in breath sounds were compared by using the nonparametric Kruskall-Wallis technique. We found no statistical difference between groups in terms of pulmonary sequelae despite the remarkably high BALs observed in the study groups. Similarly, there was no statistically greater LOS in the groups with alcohol intoxication than in alcohol-free cohorts. Despite a great deal of BAL science research to support our hypothesis, we failed to demonstrate a significantly higher rate of pulmonary problems in inebriated individuals with head injuries. We found that our strict exclusion criteria (no concomitant chest, abdominal, or pelvic trauma) limited the sample to only those patients without significant intracranial bleeding, whereas most complications in blood alcohol neuroscience research have been associated with much larger mass lesions (e.g., epidural or subdural hematomas). In addition, we found the characterizations of patients as chronically alcoholic were cumbersome and inaccurate in many cases. Future research should allow for a greater range of concomitant injuries that might suggest a positive or negative relationship to acute

  10. Premorbid prevalence of poor academic performance in severe head injury.

    Haas, J F; Cope, D. N.; Hall, K.

    1987-01-01

    A study of 80 head injured patients revealed poor premorbid academic performance in up to 50% of the sample. Poor academic performance, as defined by diagnosis of learning disability, multiple failed academic subjects, or school dropout during secondary education, is not a previously cited risk factor for head injury. These findings have important implications in the identification of a high risk population and in the subsequent ability to reduce the incidence of head injury.

  11. Acute arterial infarcts in patients with severe head injuries

    Deepak Agrawal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To study the incidence, demographic profile, and outcome of patients with severe closed head injuries who develop acute arterial infarcts. Materials and Methods: Patients with severe head injury (Glasgow coma score (GCS ≤8 presenting within 8 h of injury in the Department of Neurosurgery over a period of 5 months were enrolled in the study. Patients with penetrating head injury, infarct due to herniation and iatrogenic arterial injuries were excluded from the study. Only arterial infarcts developing within 8 h of injury were included in the study. A computed tomography (CT head was done on all patients within 8 h of injury and repeated if necessary. Arterial infarct was defined as well-demarcated wedge-shaped hypodensity corresponding to an arterial territory on plain CT of the head. Outcome was assessed using Glasgow outcome score (GOS at 1 month post-injury or at death (whichever came earlier. Results: Forty-four patients of severe head injury were included in the study during the above period. Of these, four patients (9.1% had arterial infarcts on the initial CT scan. The male:female ratio was 1:3. The mean age was 54 years (range 3-85 years. Two patients had infarcts in the middle cerebral artery distribution and two in the superior cerebellar artery distribution. Poor outcome (GOS 1-3 was seen in 100% of the patients with arterial infarct compared to 52.5% (n=21 in patients with severe head injury without arterial infarct. Conclusions: A significant percentage of patients with severe head injury have arterial infarcts on admission, which may imply arterial injury. Our study shows that these patients have a poorer prognosis vis-a-vis patient without these findings.

  12. Head motions while riding roller coasters: Implications for brain injury

    Pfister, Bryan J.; Chickola, Larry; Smith, Douglas H.

    2009-01-01

    The risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while riding roller coasters has received substantial attention. Case reports of TBI around the time of riding roller coasters have led many medical professionals to assert that the high gravitational forces (G-forces) induced by roller coasters pose a significant TBI risk. Head injury research, however, has shown that G-forces alone cannot predict TBI. Established head injury criterions and procedures were employed to compare the potential of TBI betw...

  13. Venous injury in abusive head trauma

    Choudhary, Arabinda K. [Nemours A. I. duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Wilmington, DE (United States); Bradford, Ray; Thamburaj, K.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Dias, Mark S. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of serious brain injury in infants and young children who have characteristic clinical and imaging findings that are discordant with the clinical history provided. Recent attention has focused on abnormalities of the cranial venous sinuses and cortical veins, both on MRI and at autopsy. Although many have interpreted these to be secondary to the AHT, some have recently argued that these venous abnormalities represent primary cortical sinus and venous thrombosis that leads secondarily to subdural hemorrhage and secondary brain injury. Direct trauma to the veins and sinuses has been reported at autopsy in AHT, but there has been no systematic study of venous abnormalities in cases of AHT. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence and characteristics of venous and sinus abnormalities in AHT. We included all children <36 months of age who were diagnosed with abusive head trauma between 2001 and 2012 and who had MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) venography as part of their diagnostic workup. We analyzed age, gender and clinical findings. MRI and MR venography were analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists with a focus on abnormalities involving the intracranial veins and venous sinuses. A total of 45 children were included. The median age was 3 months (range 15 days to 31 months) and 28 were boys (62%). Clinical findings included retinal hemorrhage in 71% and extracranial fractures in 55%. CT or MRI demonstrated subdural hemorrhage in 41 (91%); none had subdural effusions. In 31 cases (69%) MR venography demonstrated mass effect on the venous sinuses or cortical draining veins, with either displacement or partial or complete effacement of the venous structures from an adjacent subdural hematoma or brain swelling. We also describe the lollipop sign, which represents direct trauma to the cortical bridging veins and was present in 20/45 (44%) children. Evidence of displacement or compression of cortical veins

  14. Venous injury in abusive head trauma

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of serious brain injury in infants and young children who have characteristic clinical and imaging findings that are discordant with the clinical history provided. Recent attention has focused on abnormalities of the cranial venous sinuses and cortical veins, both on MRI and at autopsy. Although many have interpreted these to be secondary to the AHT, some have recently argued that these venous abnormalities represent primary cortical sinus and venous thrombosis that leads secondarily to subdural hemorrhage and secondary brain injury. Direct trauma to the veins and sinuses has been reported at autopsy in AHT, but there has been no systematic study of venous abnormalities in cases of AHT. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence and characteristics of venous and sinus abnormalities in AHT. We included all children <36 months of age who were diagnosed with abusive head trauma between 2001 and 2012 and who had MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) venography as part of their diagnostic workup. We analyzed age, gender and clinical findings. MRI and MR venography were analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists with a focus on abnormalities involving the intracranial veins and venous sinuses. A total of 45 children were included. The median age was 3 months (range 15 days to 31 months) and 28 were boys (62%). Clinical findings included retinal hemorrhage in 71% and extracranial fractures in 55%. CT or MRI demonstrated subdural hemorrhage in 41 (91%); none had subdural effusions. In 31 cases (69%) MR venography demonstrated mass effect on the venous sinuses or cortical draining veins, with either displacement or partial or complete effacement of the venous structures from an adjacent subdural hematoma or brain swelling. We also describe the lollipop sign, which represents direct trauma to the cortical bridging veins and was present in 20/45 (44%) children. Evidence of displacement or compression of cortical veins

  15. Brain and head injury in infancy and childhood

    This article describes typical head injuries in infants and children. In comparison with adults there are distinct differences in the etiology of trauma and in the kind of reaction of the skull and brain. In infants and children there are three different types of trauma: birth trauma, accidental and non-accidental injury. The typical injuries in these three groups are described. (orig.)

  16. Brain injury biomechanics in closed-head impact : Studies on injury epidemiology, tolerance criteria, biomechanics and traffic injury prevention

    Viano, David

    1997-01-01

    Permanent disability from traumatic brain injury is a devastating consequence of traffic crashes. Injury prevention is a fruitful approach to reduce the incidence and severity of disabling brain injury. However, the development of effective prevention techniques requires better knowledge on the mechanisms and biomechanics of brain injury in closed-head impact. The overall aim of this study is focused on brain injury mechanisms, biomechanics, and tolerances in closed-head ...

  17. Head Injury as Risk Factor for Psychiatric Disorders

    Orlovska, Sonja; Pedersen, Michael Skaarup; Benros, Michael Eriksen;

    2014-01-01

    and adjusted for gender, age, calendar year, presence of a psychiatric family history, epilepsy, infections, autoimmune diseases, and fractures not involving the skull or spine. RESULTS: Head injury was associated with a higher risk of schizophrenia (incidence rate ratio [IRR]=1.65, 95% CI=1...... a psychiatric family history. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest study to date investigating head injury and subsequent mental illness. The authors demonstrated an increase in risk for all psychiatric outcomes after head injury. The effect did not seem to be solely due to accident proneness, and the...... added risk was not more pronounced in persons with a psychiatric family history....

  18. Injuries to the head and neck in Homer's Odyssey.

    Stathopoulos, Panagiotis; Ghaly, Ghaly Adly; Azari, Afroditi

    2016-07-01

    The Odyssey and the Iliad are the most prominent works of ancient Greek epic poetry, and we have retrieved injuries to the head and neck mentioned in the Odyssey. We studied the texts both in ancient Greek and the translations in modern Greek and English and searched for references to trauma to the head and neck. We recorded the injuries, the attacker and defender, the weapons used, the site, and the result. There were 11 injuries of the head and neck, nine of which were fatal. PMID:26586491

  19. Why do woodpeckers resist head impact injury: a biomechanical investigation.

    Lizhen Wang

    Full Text Available Head injury is a leading cause of morbidity and death in both industrialized and developing countries. It is estimated that brain injuries account for 15% of the burden of fatalities and disabilities, and represent the leading cause of death in young adults. Brain injury may be caused by an impact or a sudden change in the linear and/or angular velocity of the head. However, the woodpecker does not experience any head injury at the high speed of 6-7 m/s with a deceleration of 1000 g when it drums a tree trunk. It is still not known how woodpeckers protect their brain from impact injury. In order to investigate this, two synchronous high-speed video systems were used to observe the pecking process, and the force sensor was used to measure the peck force. The mechanical properties and macro/micro morphological structure in woodpecker's head were investigated using a mechanical testing system and micro-CT scanning. Finite element (FE models of the woodpecker's head were established to study the dynamic intracranial responses. The result showed that macro/micro morphology of cranial bone and beak can be recognized as a major contributor to non-impact-injuries. This biomechanical analysis makes it possible to visualize events during woodpecker pecking and may inspire new approaches to prevention and treatment of human head injury.

  20. Television tip-over head injuries in children

    Samson Sujit Kumar; Nair Pratheesh; Baldia Manish; Joseph Mathew

    2010-01-01

    Head injuries caused by television (TV) sets falling on small children are becoming frequent in India with increasing sales of TV sets. This report describes television tip-over injuries in eight children aged 14 months to 6 years. Symptoms and findings were varied, from only swelling of the eyes to coma. Head computerized tomography scan findings were also diverse and included fractures (most common), intracranial hematomas and infarcts. Six of the eight children were successfully managed co...

  1. Risk of Parkinson's disease after hospital contact for head injury

    Rugbjerg, Kathrine; Ritz, Beate; Korbo, Lise;

    2008-01-01

    hospital register during 1986-2006, each matched on age and sex to five population controls selected at random from inhabitants in Denmark alive at the date of the patient's diagnosis (n=68 445). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Hospital contacts for head injuries ascertained from hospital register; frequency of...... a head injury during the months preceding the date at which Parkinson's disease was first recorded is a consequence of the evolving movement disorder rather than its cause Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  2. PEDIATRIC HEAD INJURIES, MECHANISM TO MANAGEMENT: EXPERIENCE OF A SINGLE CENTER

    Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Head injury is very common in modern life. Patients of any age group may have head injury however mechanism of head injury, pathophysiology and outcome of head injury is quite different in adults as compared to children. Road traffic accident is a common mode of head injury in adults while fall from height and household abuse is common mode in children. In Western countries, there is a separate registry system for pediatric head injury but there is no such system exist in india. Our present study is focused on pediatric head injury and evaluation of factors that affect the final outcome in pediatric patients.

  3. Head Injury, from Men to Model

    W.A. van den Brink (Willem Aart)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn well developed countries, injury is the leading cause of death and disability among young adults. In less developed countries the incidence of injury is high and rapidly increasing, but the relative mortality due to injuries is overshadowed by other causes, such as infections and maln

  4. Head injury: audit of a clinical guideline to justify head CT

    Head injury causes significant morbidity and mortality, and there is contention about which patients to scan. The UK National Health Service Clinical Guideline (CG) 56 provides criteria for selecting patients with clinically important brain injury who may benefit from a head CT scan, while minimising the radiation and economic burden of scanning patients without significant injury. This study aims to audit the documentation of the use of these guidelines in a busy UK trauma hospital and discusses the comparison with an Australian (New South Wales (NSW) ) head injury guideline. A retrospective cohort study of 480 patients presenting with head injury to the emergency department over 2 months was performed. The patient notes were assessed for documentation of each aspect of the clinical guidelines. Criteria were established to assess the utilisation of the CG 56. A database of clinical data was amalgamated with the head CT scan results for each patient. For the UK CG 56, 73% of the criteria were documented, with the least documented being 'signs of basal skull fracture' and 'amnesia of events'. Thirty-two per cent of patients received head CT and of these, 24% (37 patients) were reported to have pathology. Twenty-four patients underwent head CT without clinical justification being documented, none of which had reported pathology on CT. The study shows that the head injury guidelines are not being fully utilised at a major UK trauma hospital, resulting in 5% of patients being exposed to ionising radiation without apparent documented clinical justification. The NSW guideline has distinct differences to the CG 56, with a more complex algorithm and an absence of specific time frames for head CT completion. The results suggest a need for further education and awareness of head injury clinical guidelines.

  5. Nail Gun Induced Open Head Injury: A Case Report

    Oh, Hyun Ho; Kim, Young; Park, Sung Choon; Ha, Young Soo; Lee, Kyu Chang

    2014-01-01

    Increasing use of the nail gun has led to higher injury rates from the use of tools with sequential actuation. Nail gun injury can occur to various parts of the body. Very deep penetration in the brain can have fatal results. A 46-year-old male fired shots from a nail gun into his brain in a suicide attempt. This case demonstrated successful surgical management of the resultant open head injury.

  6. Nail Gun Induced Open Head Injury: A Case Report.

    Oh, Hyun Ho; Kim, Young; Park, Sung Choon; Ha, Young Soo; Lee, Kyu Chang

    2014-10-01

    Increasing use of the nail gun has led to higher injury rates from the use of tools with sequential actuation. Nail gun injury can occur to various parts of the body. Very deep penetration in the brain can have fatal results. A 46-year-old male fired shots from a nail gun into his brain in a suicide attempt. This case demonstrated successful surgical management of the resultant open head injury. PMID:27169051

  7. Untangling the Effect of Head Acceleration on Brain Responses to Blast Waves.

    Mao, Haojie; Unnikrishnan, Ginu; Rakesh, Vineet; Reifman, Jaques

    2015-12-01

    Multiple injury-causing mechanisms, such as wave propagation, skull flexure, cavitation, and head acceleration, have been proposed to explain blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). An accurate, quantitative description of the individual contribution of each of these mechanisms may be necessary to develop preventive strategies against bTBI. However, to date, despite numerous experimental and computational studies of bTBI, this question remains elusive. In this study, using a two-dimensional (2D) rat head model, we quantified the contribution of head acceleration to the biomechanical response of brain tissues when exposed to blast waves in a shock tube. We compared brain pressure at the coup, middle, and contre-coup regions between a 2D rat head model capable of simulating all mechanisms (i.e., the all-effects model) and an acceleration-only model. From our simulations, we determined that head acceleration contributed 36-45% of the maximum brain pressure at the coup region, had a negligible effect on the pressure at the middle region, and was responsible for the low pressure at the contre-coup region. Our findings also demonstrate that the current practice of measuring rat brain pressures close to the center of the brain would record only two-thirds of the maximum pressure observed at the coup region. Therefore, to accurately capture the effects of acceleration in experiments, we recommend placing a pressure sensor near the coup region, especially when investigating the acceleration mechanism using different experimental setups. PMID:26458125

  8. Penetrating head injury from angle grinder: A cautionary tale

    S Senthilkumaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Penetrating cranial injury is a potentially life-threatening condition. Injuries resulting from the use of angle grinders are numerous and cause high-velocity penetrating cranial injuries. We present a series of two penetrating head injuries associated with improper use of angle grinder, which resulted in shattering of disc into high velocity missiles with reference to management and prevention. One of those hit on the forehead of the operator and the other on the occipital region of the co-worker at a distance of five meters. The pathophysiological consequence of penetrating head injuries depends on the kinetic energy and trajectory of the object. In the nearby healthcare center the impacted broken disc was removed without realising the consequences and the wound was packed. As the conscious level declined in both, they were referred. CT brain revealed fracture in skull and changes in the brain in both. Expeditious removal of the penetrating foreign body and focal debridement of the scalp, skull, dura, and involved parenchyma and Watertight dural closure were carried out. The most important thing is not to remove the impacted foreign body at the site of accident. Craniectomy around the foreign body, debridement and removal of foreign body without zigzag motion are needed. Removal should be done following original direction of projectile injury. The neurological sequelae following the non missile penetrating head injuries are determined by the severity and location of initial injury as well as the rapidity of the exploration and fastidious debridement.

  9. Head CT scan in Iranian minor head injury patients: evaluating current decision rules.

    Sadegh, Robab; Karimialavijeh, Ehsan; Shirani, Farzaneh; Payandemehr, Pooya; Bahramimotlagh, Hooman; Ramezani, Mahtab

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to select one of the seven available clinical decision rules for minor head injury, for managing Iranian patients. This was a prospective cohort study evaluating medium- or high-risk minor head injury patients presenting to the Emergency Department. Patients with minor head trauma who were eligible for brain imaging based on seven available clinical decision rules (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS)-II, Neurotraumatology Committee of the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (NCWFNS), New Orleans, American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) Guideline, Scandinavian, and Canadian computed tomography (CT) head rule) were selected. Subjects were underwent a non-contrast axial spiral head CT scan. The outcome was defined as abnormal and normal head CT scan. Univariate analysis and stepwise linear regression were applied to show the best combination of risk factors for detecting CT scan abnormalities. Five hundred patients with minor head trauma were underwent brain CT scan. The following criteria were derived by stepwise linear regression: Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) less than 15, confusion, signs of basal skull fracture, drug history of warfarin, vomiting more than once, loss of consciousness, focal neurologic deficit, and age over 65 years. This model has 86.15 % (75.33-93.45 %) sensitivity and 46.44 % (46.67-51.25 %) specificity in detecting minor head injury patients with CT scan abnormalities (95 % confidence interval). Of seven decision rules, only the Canadian CT Head Rule possesses seven of the eight high-risk factors associated with abnormal head CT results which were identified by this study. This study underlines the Canadian CT Head Rule's utility in Iranian minor head injury patients. Our study encourages researchers to evaluate available guidelines in different communities. PMID:26407978

  10. Neurobehavioral Outcome after Early Childhood Head Injury

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-01-01

    Neurobehavioral function following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a school-aged population, recovery over a period of 30 months post-injury, and predictors of outcome were studied in three groups of children treated at University of Melbourne, Royal Children’s Hospital, Australia.

  11. Spinal cord injury and its association with blunt head trauma

    Paiva WS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Wellingson S Paiva, Arthur MP Oliveira, Almir F Andrade, Robson LO Amorim, Leonardo JO Lourenço, Manoel J TeixeiraDivision of Neurosurgery, University of São Paulo, BrazilBackground: Severe and moderate head injury can cause misdiagnosis of a spinal cord injury, leading to devastating long-term consequences. The objective of this study is to identify risk factors involving spine trauma and moderate-to-severe brain injury.Methods: A prospective study involving 1617 patients admitted in the emergency unit was carried out. Of these patients, 180 with moderate or severe head injury were enrolled. All patients were submitted to three-view spine series X-ray and thin cut axial CT scans for spine trauma investigations.Results: 112 male patients and 78 female patients, whose ages ranged from 11 to 76 years (mean age, 34 years. The most common causes of brain trauma were pedestrians struck by motor vehicles (31.1%, car crashes (27.7%, and falls (25%. Systemic lesions were present in 80 (44.4% patients and the most common were fractures, and lung and spleen injuries. 52.8% had severe and 47.2% moderate head trauma. Fourteen patients (7.8% suffered spinal cord injury (12 in cervical spine, one in lumbar, and one thoracic spine. In elderly patients, the presence of associated lesions and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS < 9 were statistically significant as risk factors (P < 0.05 for spine injury.Conclusion: Spinal cord injury related to moderate and severe brain trauma usually affects the cervical spine. The incidence of spinal lesions and GCS < 9 points were related to greater incidence of spinal cord injury.Keywords: head injury, spine trauma, risk factors

  12. Costs and benefits of skull radiography for head injury

    Over a period of 10 weeks, nine accident-and-emergency units in England, Wales, and Scotland took part in an investigation into the use of skull radiography in the management of patients with head injury. The yield of potentially important radiological findings in 4829 patients with uncomplicated head injury was 2 basal, 1 frontal, and 64 vault fractures. In 4 of these patients intracranial haematomas developed, of which 3 would have been suspected clinically and the patients admitted for observation even if skull radiography had not been available. At best, skull radiography could have contributed to the detection of only 1 of the 4 intracranial haematomas. The incidence of unsuspected intracranial haematoma with skull fracture among patients with uncomplicated head injury currently radiographed in the United Kingdom is therefore 1 in 4800. The radiological cost of identifying this 1 patient in our series was Pound43,200. (author)

  13. Child abuse. Non-accidental head injury

    Knowledge of the radiological appearances that are the result of child abuse is an integral part of prevention of further, potentially life-threatening, injury. Radiologists must have un understanding of typical injury patterns of the skeletal system, visceral and intra-cranial structures, which should ideally be ordered chronologically. Necessary radiological investigations follow guidelines with specific criteria that are pointed out in this review. In equivocal cases of abuse, the opinion of a second (paediatric) radiologist should be sought. (orig.)

  14. Monitoring of head injury by myotatic reflex evaluation

    Cozens, J; Miller, S.; Chambers, I.; Mendelow, A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—(1) To establish the feasibility of myotatic reflex measurement in patients with head injury. (2) To test the hypothesis that cerebral dysfunction after head injury causes myotatic reflex abnormalities through disordered descending control. These objectives arise from a proposal to use reflex measurements in monitoring patients with head injury.
METHODS—The phasic stretch reflex of biceps brachii was elicited by a servo-positioned tendon hammer. Antagonist inhibition was evoked by vibration to the triceps. Using surface EMG, the amplitude of the unconditioned biceps reflex and percentage antagonist inhibition were measured. After standardisation in 16 normal adult subjects, the technique was applied to 36 patients with head injury across the range of severity. Objective (1) was addressed by attempting a measurement on each patient without therapeutic paralysis; three patients were also measured under partial paralysis. Objective (2) was addressed by preceding each of the 36 unparalysed measurements with an assessment of cerebral function using the Glasgow coma scale (GCS); rank correlation was employed to test a null hypothesis that GCS and reflex indices are unrelated.
RESULTS—In normal subjects, unconditioned reflex amplitude exhibited a positive skew requiring logarithmic transformation. Antagonist inhibition had a prolonged time course suggesting presynaptic mechanisms; subsequent measurements were standardised at 80 ms conditioning test interval (index termed "TI80").
 Measurements were obtained on all patients, even under therapeutic paralysis (objective (1)). The unconditioned reflex was absent in most patients with GCS less than 5; otherwise it varied little across the patient group. TI80 fell progressively with lower GCS, although patients' individual GCS could not be inferred from single measurements. Both reflex indices correlated with GCS (p<0.01), thereby dismissing the null hypothesis (objective (2)).

  15. The profile of head injuries and traumatic brain injury deaths in Kashmir

    Tabish Amin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was conducted on patients of head injury admitted through Accident & Emergency Department of Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences during the year 2004 to determine the number of head injury patients, nature of head injuries, condition at presentation, treatment given in hospital and the outcome of intervention. Traumatic brain injury (TBI deaths were also studied retrospectively for a period of eight years (1996 to 2003. The traumatic brain injury deaths showed a steady increase in number from year 1996 to 2003 except for 1999 that showed decline in TBI deaths. TBI deaths were highest in age group of 21–30 years (18.8%, followed by 11–20 years age group (17.8% and 31–40 years (14.3%. The TBI death was more common in males. Maximum number of traumatic brain injury deaths was from rural areas as compared to urban areas. To minimize the morbidity and mortality resulting from head injury there is a need for better maintenance of roads, improvement of road visibility and lighting, proper mechanical maintenance of automobile and other vehicles, rigid enforcement of traffic rules, compulsory wearing of crash helmets by motor cyclist and scooterists and shoulder belt in cars and imparting compulsory road safety education to school children from primary education level. Moreover, appropriate medical care facilities (including trauma centres need to be established at district level, sub-divisional and block levels to provide prompt and quality care to head injury patients

  16. Severe Traumatic Head Injury Affects Systemic Cytokine Expression

    LaPar, Damien J; Rosenberger, Laura H; Walters, Dustin M; Hedrick, Traci L; Swenson, Brian R; Young, Jeffrey S; Dossett, Lesly A; May, Addison K; Sawyer, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    Background The neuroimmunologic effect of traumatic head injury remains ill-defined. This study aimed to characterize systemic cytokine profiles among traumatically injured patients to assess the effect of traumatic head injury on the systemic inflammatory response. Study Design Over five years, 1,022 patients were evaluated from a multi-institutional trauma immunomodulatory database (TIMD). Patients were stratified by presence of severe head injury (SHI, Head ISS ≥ 4, n=335) versus non-severe head injury (NHI, Head ISS ≤ 3, n=687). Systemic cytokine expression was quantified by ELISA within 72 hours of admission. Patient factors, outcomes, and cytokine profiles were compared by univariate analyses. Results SHI patients were more severely injured with higher mortality despite similar ICU infection and ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) rates. Expression of early pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 (p<0.001) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (p=0.02), were higher among NHI patients, while expression of immunomodulatory cytokines, interferon-γ (p=0.01) and IL-12 (p=0.003), was higher in SHI patients. High TNF-α levels in NHI patients were associated with mortality (p=0.01), increased mechanical ventilation (p=0.02), and development of VAP (p=0.01). Alternatively, among SHI patients, high IL-2 levels were associated with survival, decreased mechanical ventilation, and absence of VAP. Conclusions The presence of severe traumatic head injury significantly alters systemic cytokine expression and exerts an immunomodulatory effect. Early recognition of these profiles may allow for targeted intervention to reduce patient morbidity and mortality. PMID:22342787

  17. Prehospital determination of tracheal tube placement in severe head injury

    Grmec, S; Mally, S

    2004-01-01

    Methods: All adult patients (>18 years) with severe head injury, maxillofacial injury with need of protection of airway, or polytrauma were intubated by an emergency physician in the field. Tube position was initially evaluated by auscultation. Then, capnometry and capnography was performed (infrared method). Emergency physicians evaluated capnogram and partial pressure of end tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) in millimetres of mercury. Determination of final tube placement was performed by a seco...

  18. Injury Risk Assessment of Non-Lethal Projectile Head Impacts

    Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports ...

  19. Computed tomographic study of the complication of head injury

    Computed tomography (CT) is quite effective in the diagnosis of traumatic intracranial hemorrhage and cerebral contusion. Two hundred and nine consecutive patients with head injury were admitted to the hospital and studied by CT in the year from 1977 to 1980. Fourty-sevenof 209 patients had the complications of head injury, including 6 patients with carotidcavernous fistula (CCF), 6 with traumatic aneurysm, 10 with pneumocephalus, 4 with intracranial foreign body, 15 with optic nerve injury, and 14 with other cranial nerve palsy. Five patients with CCF had abnormal finding on CT. Two traumatic aneurysms of the superficial temporal artery were visualized on CT after injection of contrast material, but all traumatic aneurysms of the carotid siphon were not seven on CT. CT in all 10 patients with pneumocephalus and in all 4 patients with intracranial foreign body was of diagnostic value: On CT in two patients even small air bubbles were seen in details. In the CT examination of 29 patients who presented with cranial nerve injury, we could not find out any abnormality on CT. We emphasize that CT is much less effective in the diagnosis of vascular complication of head injury and traumatic cranial nerve injury. (author)

  20. Computed tomographic study of the complication of head injury

    Kojima, T.; Waga, S. (Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is quite effective in the diagnosis of traumatic intracranial hemorrhage and cerebral contusion. Two hundred and nine consecutive patients with head injury were admitted to the hospital and studied by CT in the year from 1977 to 1980. Fourty-seven of 209 patients had the complications of head injury, including 6 patients with carotidcavernous fistula (CCF), 6 with traumatic aneurysm, 10 with pneumocephalus, 4 with intracranial foreign body, 15 with optic nerve injury, and 14 with other cranial nerve palsy. Five patients with CCF had abnormal finding on CT. Two traumatic aneurysms of the superficial temporal artery were visualized on CT after injection of contrast material, but all traumatic aneurysms of the carotid siphon were not seen on CT. CT in all 10 patients with pneumocephalus and in all 4 patients with intracranial foreign body was of diagnostic value: On CT in two patients even small air bubbles were seen in details. In the CT examination of 29 patients who presented with cranial nerve injury, we could not find out any abnormality on CT. We emphasize that CT is much less effective in the diagnosis of vascular complication of head injury and traumatic cranial nerve injury.

  1. The Use of Ophthalmic Ultrasonography to Identify Retinal Injuries Associated With Abusive Head Trauma.

    Riggs, Becky J; Trimboli-Heidler, Carmelina; Spaeder, Michael C; Miller, Marijean M; Dean, Nathan P; Cohen, Joanna S

    2016-05-01

    Abusive head trauma includes any nonaccidental injury inflicted to a child's head and body. It is often characterized by, but not limited to, the repetitive acceleration-deceleration forces with or without blunt head impact. It has a mortality rate of 30%, and 80% of survivors experience permanent neurologic damage. In this case series, we hypothesize that bedside ultrasonography can be useful in the identification of retinal injuries that are consistent with abusive head trauma. Ocular manifestations of abusive head trauma are identified by dilated ophthalmic examination showing retinal hemorrhages that are too numerous to count, multilayered, and extending to the periphery. Traumatic retinoschisis, splitting of the retinal layers with or without blood accumulating in the intervening space, is exclusive for abusive head trauma in infants without a history of significant cerebral crush injury. Direct visualization of intraocular structures is difficult when the eyelids are swollen shut or when dilatation must be delayed. We present a series of 11 patients with brain injuries who underwent ophthalmic point-of-care ultrasonography that revealed traumatic retinoschisis on average 60 hours earlier than direct ophthalmic visualization. Dilated ophthalmic examinations and autopsy reports confirmed retinoschisis and other forms of retinal hemorrhages that were too numerous to count, multilayered, and extending to the periphery in all 11 patients. One patient did not have a dilated ophthalmic examination; however, traumatic retinoschisis and retinal hemorrhages were confirmed on autopsy. Ocular point-of-care ultrasonography is a promising tool to investigate abusive head trauma through the identification of traumatic retinoschisis and retinal hemorrhages when pupillary dilatation and direct ophthalmic examination is delayed. PMID:26481265

  2. Development/global validation of a 6-month-old pediatric head finite element model and application in investigation of drop-induced infant head injury.

    Li, Zhigang; Luo, Xiao; Zhang, Jinhuan

    2013-12-01

    Drop is a frequent cause for infant head injury. To date, finite element (FE) modeling was gradually used to investigate child head dynamic response under drop impact conditions, however, two shortages still exist on this topic: (1) due to ethical reasons, none of developed 6-month-old (6MO) head FE model was found to be quantitatively validated against child cadaver tests at similar age group; (2) drop height and impact surface stiffness effects on infant head responses were not comprehensively investigated. In this study, motivated by the recently published material properties of soft tissues (skull and suture, etc.) and reported pediatric head global cadaver tests, a 6MO child head FE model was developed and simulated results compared with the child cadaver experimental data under compression and drop conditions. Comparison of results indicated that the FE model showed a fairly good biofidelic behavior in most dynamic responses. The validated FE model was further used to investigate effects of different drop heights and impact surface stiffness on the head dynamic responses. Numerical results show that the pediatric head mechanical parameters (peak acceleration, HIC, maximal vonMises stress and maximal first principal strain of skull) keep increasing with the increase in drop height, and exhibit "logarithmic function" shapes at "fast-slow" trends with increase in impact surface stiffness. Based on above analysis, the regressions were conducted to describe the relationship between drop height and impact surface stiffness and head global injury predictors (head peak acceleration, HIC, etc.). This paper provides a fundamental study of child head injury mechanism and protection under drop conditions. PMID:24008251

  3. Automatic annotation of head velocity and acceleration in Anvil

    Jongejan, Bart

    2012-01-01

    We describe an automatic face tracker plugin for the ANVIL annotation tool. The face tracker produces data for velocity and for acceleration in two dimensions. We compare the annotations generated by the face tracking algorithm with independently made manual annotations for head movements. The...

  4. Finite element analysis of occupant head injuries: parametric effects of the side curtain airbag deployment interaction with a dummy head in a side impact crash.

    Deng, Xingqiao; Potula, S; Grewal, H; Solanki, K N; Tschopp, M A; Horstemeyer, M F

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we investigated and assessed the dependence of dummy head injury mitigation on the side curtain airbag and occupant distance under a side impact of a Dodge Neon. Full-scale finite element vehicle simulations of a Dodge Neon with a side curtain airbag were performed to simulate the side impact. Owing to the wide range of parameters, an optimal matrix of finite element calculations was generated using the design method of experiments (DOE); the DOE method was performed to independently screen the finite element results and yield the desired parametric influences as outputs. Also, analysis of variance (ANOVA) techniques were used to analyze the finite element results data. The results clearly show that the influence of moving deformable barrier (MDB) strike velocity was the strongest influence parameter on both cases for the head injury criteria (HIC36) and the peak head acceleration, followed by the initial airbag inlet temperature. Interestingly, the initial airbag inlet temperature was only a ~30% smaller influence than the MDB velocity; also, the trigger time was a ~54% smaller influence than the MDB velocity when considering the peak head accelerations. Considering the wide range in MDB velocities used in this study, results of the study present an opportunity for design optimization using the different parameters to help mitigate occupant injury. As such, the initial airbag inlet temperature, the trigger time, and the airbag pressure should be incorporated into vehicular design process when optimizing for the head injury criteria. PMID:23567214

  5. Anticipatory behaviour deficits in closed head injury.

    Freedman, P E; Bleiberg, J; Freedland, K.

    1987-01-01

    Closed head injured patients demonstrated greater anticipatory behaviour deficit than cerebral vascular accident patients on a shuttlebox-analog avoidance task, even though these two groups did not differ on escape behaviour and on performance on the individual tests of the Halstead-Reitan Battery and Wechsler scales. Neither clarification of instructions, additional trials, nor enhancement of the warning cue appeared to improve the anticipatory behaviour deficit. It was concluded that antici...

  6. [Reflection around the return home of a head injury patient].

    Mouling, Virginie; Lambert, Marie; Charlier, Nathalie; Fonseca, Dolores

    2016-05-01

    The rehabilitation of people having suffered a head injury requires an inter-disciplinary perspective. Understanding the family dynamics as well as assessing the patient's resources and limits help professionals organise the necessary support to guide the patient and their family towards social reintegration. PMID:27155279

  7. Cortical deafness following head injury —a case report

    Singh, Mangal; Ahluwalia, Hemant; Lal, K. K.; Chauhan, S. P. S.

    1997-01-01

    Cortical deafness is a rare entity. Only few case reports are available. In this paper, a case of right fronto-temporal contusion following head injury causing bilateral cortical deafness has been reported. Most of the cases reported in the past were because of cerebral infarcts due to arterial occlusion.

  8. Accidental and Nonaccidental Head Injuries in Infants: Distinguishing Characteristics

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available One hundred fifty infants hospitalized with head injury over a 3-year period, 57 (38% due to child abuse, were studied prospectively at the Departments of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Neuro-ophthalmology, and Legal Medicine, CHRU de Lille, France.

  9. Non-accidental head injury - the evidence

    A postmortem examination and the CT scan documented the above injuries (neuropathology showed acute but with foci of older subdural bleeding) and indicated that in addition there were five recent rib fractures (left ribs 3-5 posteriorly and right ribs 6-7 posteriorly), a large perimacular retinal fold in the left retina, and subscalp bruising in the area of the anterior fontanelle and the occipital area. Family proceedings were commenced in order to protect the 2-year-old girl. Expert forensic, neuro- and eye pathologists instructed on behalf of the girl's father were of the view that the baby's injuries were likely to have resulted from the fall from the bed to the carpet, or alternatively from the step-father's efforts to revive the infant; other possibilities being apnoea and cerebral anoxia and cardiac arrest resulting from gastrooesophageal reflux or overly rough rocking of the baby in a baby rocker by the 2-year-old girl, the scalp bruising allegedly being the result of palpation of the baby's fontanelle by the treating paediatricians. The rib fractures were attributed to cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. This short review looks at the type of evidence that might help one to distinguish between the differing opinions offered as to the cause of this child's injuries. (orig.)

  10. Non-accidental head injury - the evidence

    David, Timothy J. [University of Manchester, Blackley, Department of Child Health, Booth Hall Children' s Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    A postmortem examination and the CT scan documented the above injuries (neuropathology showed acute but with foci of older subdural bleeding) and indicated that in addition there were five recent rib fractures (left ribs 3-5 posteriorly and right ribs 6-7 posteriorly), a large perimacular retinal fold in the left retina, and subscalp bruising in the area of the anterior fontanelle and the occipital area. Family proceedings were commenced in order to protect the 2-year-old girl. Expert forensic, neuro- and eye pathologists instructed on behalf of the girl's father were of the view that the baby's injuries were likely to have resulted from the fall from the bed to the carpet, or alternatively from the step-father's efforts to revive the infant; other possibilities being apnoea and cerebral anoxia and cardiac arrest resulting from gastrooesophageal reflux or overly rough rocking of the baby in a baby rocker by the 2-year-old girl, the scalp bruising allegedly being the result of palpation of the baby's fontanelle by the treating paediatricians. The rib fractures were attributed to cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. This short review looks at the type of evidence that might help one to distinguish between the differing opinions offered as to the cause of this child's injuries. (orig.)

  11. CRANIOROFACIAL AND HEAD INJURY MANAGEMENT :A RESIDENTS PERSPECTIVE

    MOHAMMAD AKHEEL

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Everyday, men, women and children suffer head injuries. A car accident, a fall from height or sports injury can range in severity from concussion to coma. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI can be fatal,dangerous and survivors, can show persistent problems that significantly affect their livelihood and well-being. India has rather unenviable distinction of having the highest rate of head injury in the world. In India, more than 100,000 lives are lost every year with over 1 million suffering from serious head injuries, to be addressed by a handful number of craniofacial and neurosurgeons , as craniofacial neurosciences in India is new and rapidly expanding discipline and one has to be competent and razor sharp in applying its cognitive base and principles, and residency as is always described as an island in shades of grey, and in India it means higher pressure, higher stress loads, lesser patience, and longer quantum of time spent at work with sleepless nights and merciless bosses.

  12. Severe head injury caused by motorcycle traffic accident

    李钢

    1999-01-01

    Objective To explore the characteristic and treatment of the severe head injury due to motorcycle accident.Methods Review and analysis of 27 motorcycle traffic trauma cases who were admitted to our hospital from Oct.1995 to Sep.1997.Results Young men were the main composition of these patients.Multiple injuries associated with brain ste or diffuse axonal injury were common,which were the main factors influencing the consciousness and prognosis of the patients.The wound was usually severely contaminated.Evacuation of hematomas,decompression by depleting skull flap,hypotheymia and artificial hibernation were conducted in this series.Among them,14 cases were cured ,3 cases were seriously disabled,10 cases died.Conclusions Motorcycle's weight is light so it easily loses its balance.The riders and the passengers are exposed and lack protection.Driving against traffic regulations is frquently seen.All these are the reasons why the motorcycle traffic accidents often take place. When the traffic accident happens,the patients' head generally is thrown a long distance and dashed against the barrier or the ground.The psture nd mechanism of injury were complicated and varied.The decelerated injury and rolling injury occurred frequently and they were the main reasons for brain stem or diffuse axonal injury.The patients who have surgical indication should be operated upon as soon as possible.Hibernation and low temoerature therapy are conducive to the protection of the brain function at the early stage of postinjury or postoperation.A careful epluchage is essential to reduce infection of the open injury.

  13. Social recovery during the year following severe head injury.

    Oddy, M; Humphrey, M

    1980-01-01

    A group of 54 patients who had suffered severe closed head injury (PTA >24 hours) were followed from the time of their injury for a period of two years. Relatives were interviewed within the first four weeks to assess the patient's previous personality and social adjustment. Patients and relatives were then assessed personally six and 12 months later and by postal questionnaires after two years. Only six patients were still not back at work after two years but more had not resumed all their l...

  14. Indications for computed tomography in patients with mild head injury

    The factors affecting outcome were analyzed in 1,064 patients, 621 males and 443 females aged 10 to 104 years (mean 46±23 years), with mild head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score≥14) but no neurological signs presenting within 6 hours after injury. Intracranial lesion was found in 4.7% (50/1,064), and 0.66% (7/1,064) required surgical treatment. The Japan Coma Scale (JCS) and GCS assessments were well correlated (r=0.797). Multivariate analysis revealed significant correlations between computed tomography (CT) abnormality and age≥60 years, male sex, JCS score≥1, alcohol consumption, headache, nausea/vomiting, and transient loss of consciousness (LOC)/amnesia. Univariate analysis revealed that pedestrian in a motor vehicle accident, falling from height, and mechanisms of injuries except blows were correlated to intracranial injury. No significant correlations were found between craniofacial soft tissue injury and intracranial injury. Patients with occipital impact, nonfrontal impact, or skull fracture were more likely have intracranial lesions. Bleeding tendency was not correlated with CT abnormality. The following indications were proposed for CT: JCS score>0, presence of accessory symptoms (headache, nausea/vomiting, LOC/amnesia), and age≥60 years. These criteria would reduce the frequency of CT by 29% (309/1,064). Applying these indications to subsequent patients with GCS scores 14-15, 114 of 168 patients required CT, and intracranial lesions were found in 13. Two refused CT. Fifty-four of the 168 patients did not need CT according to the indications, but 38 of the 54 patients actually underwent CT because of social reasons (n=21) or patient request (n=17). These indications for CT including JCS may be useful in the management of patients with mild head injury. (author)

  15. Minimizing Liability Risks of Head and Neck Injuries in Football

    Heck, Jonathan F.; Weis, Michael P.; Gartland, James M.; Weis, Craig R.

    1994-01-01

    Although catastrophic head and neck injuries in football occur infrequently, their occurrence is almost always followed by litigation. The athletic trainer has to be sure he/she has adequate liability insurance to cover the costs of a defense and a possible judgment. General claims filed against athletic staffs usually deal with instruction, equipment, matching of participants, supervision, and/or postinjury care. The defenses to these claims include: statutory immunity, assumption of risk, r...

  16. Towards a new criterion for head injury prediction

    Jiroušek, Ondřej; Jírová, Jitka; Brichtová, E.

    Prague : CTU, 2007 - (Kubát, B.; Jírová, J.; Jarura, M.), s. 83-84 ISBN 978-80-01-03699-0. [300 let ČVUT. Praha (CZ), 17.04.2007-19.04.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : head injury criteria * finite element method * computed tomography * sport accident Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics

  17. Chronic post-traumatic headache after mild head injury

    Kjeldgaard, Dorte; Forchhammer, Hysse; Teasdale, Tom;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aetiology behind chronic post-traumatic headache (CPTH) after mild head injury is unclear and management is complicated. In order to optimize treatment strategies we aimed to characterize a CPTH population. METHODS: Ninety patients with CPTH and 45 patients with chronic primary he...... levels of disability for the CPTH patients suggests directions for further research into what important factors are embedded in the patients' PTSD symptoms and might explain their prolonged illness....

  18. Head Injury Criteria Assessment Through Finite Element Modelling

    Jiroušek, Ondřej; Jíra, J.

    Praha : ÚTAM, 2006 - (Náprstek, J.; Fisher, C.), s. 140-141 ISBN 80-86246-27-2. [Engineering Mechanics 2006. Svratka (CZ), 15.05.2006-18.05.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/05/1020 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : FEM * Injury Criteria * Human Head Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  19. Sigmoid sinus thrombosis after closed head injury in children.

    Taha, J M; Crone, K R; Berger, T S; Becket, W W; Prenger, E C

    1993-04-01

    In the literature, clinical descriptions of sigmoid sinus thrombosis occurring after closed head injury in children are rare. One to 5 days after trauma to the back of the head, five children (aged 1 to 7 yr) presented with gait ataxia, vomiting, and headache. Trauma was mild in four children. Computed tomography of all the children, performed within 5 days after the injury, showed focal hyperdensity in the region of the left sigmoid sinus. Four children had extra-axial hyperdense collections along the left transverse sinus, and three had skull fractures adjacent to the left sigmoid sinus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of all the children, performed 2 to 6 days after injury, showed left sigmoid-sinus thrombosis and decreased flow or thrombosis within the lateral third of the left transverse sinus. All the children had MRI scans 4 to 6 weeks after their diagnosis and were followed up for 1 to 12 months. In four children whose symptoms subsided completely within 2 to 10 weeks, MRI showed recanalization of the sigmoid sinus within 4 to 6 weeks after injury. In one child whose symptoms resolved after 6 months, sigmoid-sinus thrombosis persisted with the formation of collateral flow. We conclude that traumatic sigmoid-sinus thrombosis should be suspected when a child has persistent or delayed gait ataxia and vomiting after injury to the back of the head. Computed tomography characteristically demonstrated focal hyperdensity within the sigmoid sinus that we term the dense sigmoid-sinus sign. Because the sinus recanalized and the symptoms subsided in most children within 6 weeks, we conclude that prophylactic medical or surgical intervention is not indicated. PMID:8474644

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in mild and moderate head injuries

    Yokota, Hiroyuki; Nakazawa, Shozo; Okada, Takurou; Kobayashi, Shiro; Yajima, Kouzo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)); Tsuji, Yukihide

    1991-02-01

    One hundred and fifty-nine patients admitted for mild or moderate head injuries were studied in order to establish the advantage of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over computerized tomography (CT) in the acute stage. One hundred and twenty-three lesions were demonstrated by MRI in 106 patients. In contrast, CT demonstrated only 74 lesions in 76 patients. The advantage of MRI over CT in the imaging of these lesions was remarkable in cases of basal skull fractures or lesions in the cerebral parenchyma, especially in case of non-hemorrhagic contusions or focal brain edemas. MRI was superior to CT in demonstrating these lesions in 64 patients of our series. However, in 6 cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage located in the Sylvian fissure, CT was superior to MRI. It was thought that lesions were less commonly demonstrated by CT in cases of mild or moderate head injuries. However, many lesions were confirmed by MRI in these cases. MRI was thus found to be far superior to CT in demonstrating intracranial lesions in mild or moderate head injuries. (author).

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in mild and moderate head injuries

    One hundred and fifty-nine patients admitted for mild or moderate head injuries were studied in order to establish the advantage of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over computerized tomography (CT) in the acute stage. One hundred and twenty-three lesions were demonstrated by MRI in 106 patients. In contrast, CT demonstrated only 74 lesions in 76 patients. The advantage of MRI over CT in the imaging of these lesions was remarkable in cases of basal skull fractures or lesions in the cerebral parenchyma, especially in case of non-hemorrhagic contusions or focal brain edemas. MRI was superior to CT in demonstrating these lesions in 64 patients of our series. However, in 6 cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage located in the Sylvian fissure, CT was superior to MRI. It was thought that lesions were less commonly demonstrated by CT in cases of mild or moderate head injuries. However, many lesions were confirmed by MRI in these cases. MRI was thus found to be far superior to CT in demonstrating intracranial lesions in mild or moderate head injuries. (author)

  2. Injury risk assessment of non-lethal projectile head impacts.

    Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports may not be appropriate. Therefore, there is a need of a specific approach to assess the lethality of these projectiles. In this framework, some recent research data referred in this article as "force wall approach" suggest the use of three lesional thresholds (unconsciousness, meningeal damages and bone damages) that depend on the intracranial pressure. Three corresponding critical impact forces are determined for a reference projectile. Based on the principle that equal rigid wall maximal impact forces will produce equal damage on the head, these limits can be determined for any other projectile. In order to validate the consistence of this innovative method, it is necessary to compare the results with other existing assessment methods. This paper proposes a comparison between the "force wall approach" and two different head models. The first one is a numerical model (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model-SUFEHM) from Strasbourg University; the second one is a mechanical surrogate (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform-BLSH) from Biokinetics. PMID:25400712

  3. Relationship between hyperventilation and intracranial pressure in patients with severe head injury

    2001-01-01

    @@With high fatality rate and disability rate, the pathophysiologic changes of severe head injury are complicated. But the method of lowering intracranial pressure (ICP) through artificial hyperventilation is called in question recently. To understand the related changes of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in artery (PaCO2) and the ICP at the acute period of severe head injury, a total of 64 patients with severe head injury were monitored and analyzed on the 3rd day after injury.

  4. Is the Canadian CT head rule for minor head injury applicable for patients in Germany?

    Purpose: to evaluate the applicability of the Canadian CT head rule (CCHR) on head trauma patients in a German university hospital. Methods: 122 patients (m = 74; f = 48; 40 ± 19 years) were examined with cranial CT due to minor head trauma. The need for cranial CT according to the CCHR was evaluated retrospectively. Results: with a sensitivity of 98.9% and a specificity of 46.6% all patients with the need for neurosurgical intervention were detected by applying the major criteria of the CCHR. Also, every patient with severe brain injury was detected by the extended criteria with a sensitivity of 99.6% and a specificity of 34.1%. This would have led to a reduction in the rate of cranial CT examinations by 45.1% for the major and 22.1% for the extended criteria. No patient with severe brain injury would have been missed by application of the criteria. Conclusion: the Canadian CT head rule for patients with minor head trauma is applicable with a very high sensitivity and the potential of significantly reducing the rate of cranial CT examinations in these patients. (orig.)

  5. Head and Tibial Acceleration as a Function of Stride Frequency and Visual Feedback during Running.

    Michael A Busa

    Full Text Available Individuals regulate the transmission of shock to the head during running at different stride frequencies although the consequences of this on head-gaze stability remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine if providing individuals with visual feedback of their head-gaze orientation impacts tibial and head accelerations, shock attenuation and head-gaze motion during preferred speed running at different stride frequencies. Fifteen strides from twelve recreational runners running on a treadmill at their preferred speed were collected during five stride frequencies (preferred, ±10% and ±20% of preferred in two visual task conditions (with and without real-time visual feedback of head-gaze orientation. The main outcome measures were tibial and head peak accelerations assessed in the time and frequency domains, shock attenuation from tibia to head, and the magnitude and velocity of head-gaze motion. Decreasing stride frequency resulted in greater vertical accelerations of the tibia (p<0.01 during early stance and at the head (p<0.01 during early and late stance; however, for the impact portion the increase in head acceleration was only observed for the slowest stride frequency condition. Visual feedback resulted in reduced head acceleration magnitude (p<0.01 and integrated power spectral density in the frequency domain (p<0.01 in late stance, as well as overall of head-gaze motion (p<0.01. When running at preferred speed individuals were able to stabilize head acceleration within a wide range of stride frequencies; only at a stride frequency 20% below preferred did head acceleration increase. Furthermore, impact accelerations of the head and tibia appear to be solely a function of stride frequency as no differences were observed between feedback conditions. Increased visual task demands through head gaze feedback resulted in reductions in head accelerations in the active portion of stance and increased head-gaze stability.

  6. Working toward exposure thresholds for blast-induced traumatic brain injury: thoracic and acceleration mechanisms

    Courtney, Michael; 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.05.025

    2011-01-01

    Research in blast-induced lung injury resulted in exposure thresholds that are useful in understanding and protecting humans from such injury. Because traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to blast exposure has become a prominent medical and military problem, similar thresholds should be identified that can put available research results in context and guide future research toward protecting warfighters as well as diagnosis and treatment. At least three mechanical mechanisms by which the blast wave may result in brain injury have been proposed - a thoracic mechanism, head acceleration and direct cranial transmission. These mechanisms need not be mutually exclusive. In this study, likely regions of interest for the first two mechanisms based on blast characteristics (positive pulse duration and peak effective overpressure) are developed using available data from blast experiments and related studies, including behind-armor blunt trauma and ballistic pressure wave studies. These related studies are appropriate to in...

  7. Isolated traumatic head injury in children: Analysis of 276 observations

    Bahloul Mabrouk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : To determine predictive factors of mortality among children after isolated traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods : In this retrospective study, we included all consecutive children with isolated traumatic brain injury admitted to the 22-bed intensive care unit (ICU of Habib Bourguiba University Hospital (Sfax, Tunisia. Basic demographic, clinical, biochemical, and radiological data were recorded on admission and during ICU stay. Results : There were 276 patients with 196 boys (71% and 80 girls, with a mean age of 6.7 ± 3.8 years. The main cause of trauma was road traffic accident (58.3%. Mean Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 ± 2, Mean Injury Severity Score (ISS was 23.3 ± 5.9, Mean Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS was 4.8 ± 2.3, and Mean Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM was 10.8 ± 8. A total of 259 children required mechanical ventilation. Forty-eight children (17.4% died. Multivariate analysis showed that factors associated with a poor prognosis were PRISM > 24 (OR: 10.98, neurovegetative disorder (OR: 7.1, meningeal hemorrhage (OR: 2.74, and lesion type VI according to Marshall tomographic grading (OR: 13.26. Conclusion : In Tunisia, head injury is a frequent cause of hospital admission and is most often due to road traffic injuries. Short-term prognosis is influenced by demographic, clinical, radiological, and biochemical factors. The need to put preventive measures in place is underscored.

  8. Collateral damage--penetrating head injury and orbital injury: a case report.

    Deyle, Simone; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K; Kneubuehl, Beat P; Buck, Ursula; Thali, Michael J; Voisard, Matthias X

    2011-09-01

    We report a case of an accidental death or potential suicide by revolver with subsequent injury of another person. A 44-year-old man shot himself in the head while manipulating his .38 caliber special revolver in the kitchen in the presence of his wife, standing approximately 1.5 m next to him. After passing through the husband's head, the lead round-nose bullet entered the region underneath his wife's left eye. When the bullet left the man's head, it retained the energy to penetrate the soft tissue at this distance, including the skin and thin bone plates like the orbital wall. Owing to the low energy of the projectile, the entry wound was of atypical in shape and without loss of tissue. Only a small line--resembling a cut--was externally visible. The man died in the hospital from his injuries; his wife suffered visual loss of her left eye. PMID:21540723

  9. Bicycle accident-related head injuries in India

    Munivenkatappa, Ashok; Devi, Bhagavatula Indira; Gregor, Thomas Issac; Bhat, Dhananjay I.; Kumarsamy, Akhil Deepika; Shukla, Dhaval P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the epidemiology of head injuries sustained due to bicycle accidents in India. Materials and Methods: Data were retrospectively collected over a period of six months (15 May 2011 to 15 November 2011). Demography of patients, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), clinical and imaging findings, and mortality and outcome using Glasgow outcome scale (GOS), Rivermead post-concussion symptom questionnaire (RPCSQ) and Rivermead head injury follow-up questionnaire (RHFUQ), were analyzed. Outcome was assessed by telephonic interview. Results: There were 108 patients (100 males) with mean age of 27.7 years. Seventy-four (68.5%) were from rural areas. Accidents due to vehicular collision accounted for 60 (55.6%) cases. None wore a helmet. The admission GCS was 14-15 in 68.5% cases, 13-3 in 31.5%. The risk of moderate to severe injuries was increased among working laborers (OR = 5), and patients with loss of consciousness (OR = 4). Sixty-three (49%) patients had abnormal computed tomography (CT) findings; most common finding was skull fracture 25 (23.1%). Four patients needed surgery. The GOS assessment at three to six months revealed favorable outcome in 66 patients (61.1%) and death in 8 (7.4%). The common post-concussion symptoms were headache, fatigue, and poor concentration. Conclusion: The majority of hospitalized cyclists were from a rural background and of the lower income group. After three months the majority of patients had good recovery with few persistent concussion symptoms. PMID:24250156

  10. Effects of external helmet accessories on biomechanical measures of head injury risk: An ATD study using the HYBRIDIII headform.

    Butz, Robert C; Knowles, Brooklynn M; Newman, James A; Dennison, Christopher R

    2015-11-01

    Competitive cycling is a popular activity in North America for which injuries to the head account for the majority of hospitalizations and fatalities. In cycling, use of helmet accessories (e.g. cameras) has become widespread. As a consequence, standards organizations and the popular media are discussing the role these accessories could play in altering helmet efficacy and head injury risk. We conducted impacts to a helmeted anthropomorphic headform, with and without camera accessories, at speeds of 4m/s and 6m/s, and measured head accelerations, forces on the head-form skull, and used the Simulated Injury Monitor to estimate brain tissue strain. The presence of the camera reduced peak linear head acceleration (51% - 4m/s impacts, 61% - 6m/s, p0.05) as were velocities (77%, p0.05) in 6m/s impacts with the camera accessory. Based on CSDM-25 for 4m/s tests, the risk of severe concussion was reduced (p0.05) from 18% (no camera) to 58% (camera). PMID:26477409

  11. Motorcycle helmet type and the risk of head injury and neck injury during motorcycle collisions in California.

    Erhardt, Taryn; Rice, Thomas; Troszak, Lara; Zhu, Motao

    2016-01-01

    The use of novelty motorcycle helmets is often prompted by beliefs that wearing a standard helmet can contribute to neck injury during traffic collisions. The goal of this analysis was to examine the association between helmet type and neck injury risk and the association between helmet type and head injury. Data were collected during the investigation of motorcycle collisions of any injury severity by the California Highway Patrol (CHP) and 83 local law enforcement agencies in California between June 2012 and July 2013. We estimated head injury and neck injury risk ratios from data on 7051 collision-involved motorcyclists using log-binomial regression. Helmet type was strongly associated with head injury occurrence but was not associated with the occurrence of neck injury. Rider age, rider alcohol use, and motorcycle speed were strong, positive predictors of both head and neck injury. Interventions to improve motorcycle helmet choice and to counteract misplaced concerns surrounding neck injury risk are likely to lead to reductions in head injury, brain injury, and death. PMID:26496484

  12. Ischemic Retinopathy and Neovascular Proliferation Secondary to Severe Head Injury

    Muge Coban-Karatas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case with severe head trauma and perforating globe injury in one eye and ischemic retinopathy and neovascular proliferation in the other eye. A 37-year-old male was brought to the emergency department after a motor vehicle accident with severe maxillofacial trauma. Ophthalmic examination revealed hematoma of the left eyelids as well as traumatic rupture and disorganization of the left globe. On the right eye, anterior segment and fundoscopic examination were normal. Primary globe repair was performed. At postoperative one-month visit, the right eye revealed no pathology of the optic disc and macula but severe neovascularization in the temporal peripheral retina. The patient was diagnosed as ischemic retinopathy and neovascular proliferation due to head trauma.

  13. [The German guideline "legal evaluation after closed head injury"].

    Wallesch, C W; Fries, W; Marx, P; du Mesnil de Rochemont, R; Roschmann, R; Schmidt, R; Schwerdtfeger, K; Tegenthoff, M; Widder, B

    2013-09-01

    In 2005, the "Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurowissenschaftliche Begutachtung" (German Society for Neuroscientific Legal Evaluation) together with other Societies published a guideline for the legal evaluation of patients with closed head injuries. Meanwhile, not only scientific progress in imaging techniques but also in other fields such as neuropsychology has necessitated a revision, which is presented here. In the mean time, the handling of guidelines has been systematised in Germany so that a registration with the Cooperation of German Medical Learned Societies is applied for and publication in the German Guideline Registry is expected. PMID:23986459

  14. Computerized tomography and prognosis in paediatric head injury

    The authors have analysed the computerized tomography (CT) findings and their correlation with the clinical state, early and late outcome in children and adolescents with head injuries (HI). This study represents clinical and CT data of 82 consecutive HI patients under 18 years of age. Among them 51 (62%) were boys and 31 (38 %) girls. The application of CT to the evaluation of the morphologic manifestations of HI in children has shown some differences in forms and mechanisms of injury and in outcome compared to adults. In the paediatric HI the most frequent finding was diffuse brain swelling with CT evidence of ventricular and cisternal compression or obliteration. Prognostically the most unfavourable findings were shearing injury, intracerebral and subdural haematomas combined with brain swelling and parenchymal damage. According to the Lidcombe impairment scale, outcome from severe paediatric HI was determined in the 3rd and 6th months, one year and 2 years after the injury. The outcome two years after severe HI varied to a great extent and was better in children than in adults. Although there was long-term disruption of the patient's quality of life, our data show that as there are no predictors of individual outcomes in child HI, no child should be excluded from early and long-term rehabilitation. (author)

  15. Indications for brain CT scan in patients with minor head injury

    M Saboori; J Ahmadi

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Minor head injury is the most common type of head injury. Despite its high prevalence and a lot of studies, there is much controversies about the management of these patients. We performed this study to find indications for brain CT scan according to clinical signs and symptoms. METHODS: We did this prospective cohort study in two university hospitals (Alzahra and Kashani) for one year enrolling 682 consecutive patients with minor head injury (GCS = 15) and recording all clin...

  16. Head, Neck, Face, and Shoulder Injuries in Female and Male Rugby Players.

    Havkins, Sabina B.

    1986-01-01

    Injuries to 150 players in the Southern California Rugby Football Union were studied in order to compare head, neck, face, and shoulder injury rates for female and male players. While overall rates did not differ significantly, women received fewer disabling injuries. Ways to decrease injuries are recommended. (Author/MT)

  17. MR imaging observations in head injury and their importance in understanding the pathophysiology of head trauma

    Forty-five patients were imaged with a General Electric 1.5-T Signa MR imager following significant head injury. Seventeen of them had acute head injury (within 10 days of trauma). In none of the acute cases, despite significant alterations in the level of consciousness, was there diffuse cerebral edema (diffuse high intensity on long repetition time [TR], long echo time [TE] images). CT and MR imaging, in some cases, demonstrated what was interpreted as a diffusely swollen brain with loss of normal sulci. These findings suggest that increased blood volume with concomitant loss of cerebral autoregulation, rather than vasogenic edema, is responsible for the diffusely swollen brain imaged with CT or MR. Treatment based on these MR findings should be aimed at decreasing the cerebral blood volume rather than treating of nonexistent diffuse cerebral edema. In 13 patients with longitudinal MR images, improvement was noted in some patients in initially diagnosed diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The focal regions of high intensity on long TR, long TE representing the DAI reverted to isointensity on subsequent images

  18. Bicycle accident-related head injuries in India

    Ashok Munivenkatappa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the epidemiology of head injuries sustained due to bicycle accidents in India. Materials and Methods: Data were retrospectively collected over a period of six months (15 May 2011 to 15 November 2011. Demography of patients, Glasgow coma scale (GCS, clinical and imaging findings, and mortality and outcome using Glasgow outcome scale (GOS, Rivermead post-concussion symptom questionnaire (RPCSQ and Rivermead head injury follow-up questionnaire (RHFUQ, were analyzed. Outcome was assessed by telephonic interview. Results: There were 108 patients (100 males with mean age of 27.7 years. Seventy-four (68.5% were from rural areas. Accidents due to vehicular collision accounted for 60 (55.6% cases. None wore a helmet. The admission GCS was 14-15 in 68.5% cases, 13-3 in 31.5%. The risk of moderate to severe injuries was increased among working laborers (OR = 5, and patients with loss of consciousness (OR = 4. Sixty-three (49% patients had abnormal computed tomography (CT findings; most common finding was skull fracture 25 (23.1%. Four patients needed surgery. The GOS assessment at three to six months revealed favorable outcome in 66 patients (61.1% and death in 8 (7.4%. The common post-concussion symptoms were headache, fatigue, and poor concentration. Conclusion: The majority of hospitalized cyclists were from a rural background and of the lower income group. After three months the majority of patients had good recovery with few persistent concussion symptoms.

  19. Functional brain study of chronic traumatic head injury

    Explosive aggressive behaviour is a significant clinical and medico-legal problem in patients suffering from head injury. However, experts in neuropsychiatry have proposed a specific category for this disorder: the organic aggressive syndrome:. The basic reason for proposing this diagnosis is that it describes the specificity of the violent conduct secondary to 'brain damage' with greater precision. Early diagnosis and treatment of the injury is critical. The impact of hnetium-99m-hexamethylpropuleneamine oxime (HMPAO) was examined for measuring brain damage in correlation to neuropsychological performance in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We thus report the case of a twelve-year-old child with a history of CET, who presents with serious episodes of heteroaggressiveness and suggest the usefulness of single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) to establish the validity of this psychiatric diagnosis. The appearance of modern functional neuro-image techniques (SPECT) may help to increase the validity of clinical diagnoses in the field of psychiatry in general and of forensic psychiatry in particularly, as the related findings may be used as demarcation criteria to establish syndromic diagnoses (Au)

  20. Influence of impact speed on head and brain injury outcome in vulnerable road user impacts to the car hood.

    Fredriksson, Rikard; Zhang, Liying; Boström, Ola; Yang, King

    2007-10-01

    EuroNCAP and regulations in Europe and Japan evaluate the pedestrian protection performance of cars. The test methods are similar and they all have requirements for the passive protection of the hood area at a pedestrian to car impact speed of 40 km/h. In Europe, a proposal for a second phase of the regulation mandates a brake-assist system along with passive requirements. The system assists the driver in optimizing the braking performance during panic braking, resulting in activation only when the driver brakes sufficiently. In a European study this was estimated to occur in about 50% of pedestrian accidents. A future system for brake assistance will likely include automatic braking, in response to a pre-crash sensor, to avoid or mitigate injuries of vulnerable road users. An important question is whether these systems will provide sufficient protection, or if a parallel, passive pedestrian protection system will be necessary. This study investigated the influence of impact speed on head and brain injury risk, in impacts to the carhood. One car model was chosen and a rigid adjustable plate was mounted under the hood. Free-flying headform impacts were carried out at 20 and 30 km/h head impact velocities at different under-hood distances, 20 to 100 mm; and were compared to earlier tests at 40 km/h. The EEVC WG17 adult pedestrian headform was used for non-rotating tests and a Hybrid III adult 50th percentile head was used for rotational tests where linear and rotational acceleration was measured. Data from the rotational tests was used as input to a validated finite element model of the human head, the Wayne State University Head Injury Model (WSUHIM). The model was utilized to assess brain injury risk and potential injury mechanism in a pedestrian-hood impact. Although this study showed that it was not necessarily true that a lower HIC value reduced the risk for brain injury, it appeared, for the tested car model, under-hood distances of 60 mm in 20 km/h and 80 mm

  1. Missile injuries in head — neck and maxillo-facial region — an experience in eastern nepal

    Wakode, P. T.; Ghimire, Anand; Acharya, Roshan

    2008-01-01

    Ballistic injuries to head-neck and maxillofacial region is quite common problem nowadays. Most of the time the injuries seem to be dreadful but the mechanism of the injuries caused by ballistics and the anatomical conditions of maxillofacial and head-neck region mitigate the severity of the injuries. Proper primary management followed by reconstruction and management of associated injuries decreases the mortality and morbidity of missile injuries in head-neck and maxillofacial region. Eleven...

  2. Demographic Profile and Pathological Patterns of Head Injury in Albania

    Sabri Hoxha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Head injury (HI is a serious morbid state caused by structural changes of the scalp, skull, and/or its contents, due to mechanical forces. Generally, the most frequent cause of HI is road traffic accident (RTA, followed by homicidal and falling injuries. The aim of present study is to assess epidemiology data, causes and patterns responsible for HI among Albanian subjects. Methodology: All HI cases (1000 are collected by the Forensic Institute of Albania, based on medical and forensic records of traumatized subjects between 2007- 2012. The prospectively-collected and descriptive information is focused on demographic data, responsible factors, type and level of cranial and brain injury, as well as their outcome. Results: The majority of HI victims were male (84% of age range of 15yrs -35yrs (70%. RTA was the HI cause in 88%, followed by homicides (3.8%, falling (3% etc. With respect to injury mechanisms, extra-dural hematoma was found in 93% of cases, followed by cerebral edema (61%, cerebral contusion (37%, skull bone fractures (35%, etc. Severe alteration of the consciousness was observed in 57% of the cases, while amnesia lasted longer than 4 weeks in 44% of the subjects included in our study. Discussion: This survey demonstrates that the majority of HI victims' is young and middle age males target group exposed to RTA. The increase of vehicles' use in placecountry-regionAlbania is more evident than RTA-related HI, indicating that driving newer vehicles with safer technology or helmets use while motorcycling can potentially decline the fatal outcome.

  3. Head Injury Secondary to Suspected Child Maltreatment: Results of a Prospective Canadian National Surveillance Program

    Bennett, Susan; Ward, Michelle; Moreau, Katherine; Fortin, Gilles; King, Jim; MacKay, Morag; Plint, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the incidence, clinical features, and demographic profile of head injury secondary to suspected child maltreatment (abuse or neglect) in Canada to help inform the development and evaluation of prevention programs for abusive head injuries. Methods: From March 1, 2005 to February 28, 2008, an average of 2,545…

  4. The Relationship of Intimate Partner Aggression to Head Injury, Executive Functioning, and Intelligence

    Walling, Sherry M.; Meehan, Jeffrey C.; Marshall, Amy D.; Holtzworth-Munroe, Amy; Taft, Casey T.

    2012-01-01

    Measures of head injury, executive functioning, and intelligence were given to a community sample composed of 102 male perpetrators of intimate partner aggression (IPA) and 62 nonaggressive men. A history of head injury and lower mean score on a measure of verbal intelligence were associated with the frequency of male-perpetrated physical IPA as…

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in radial head fractures: most associated injuries are not clinically relevant

    L. Kaas; R.P. van Riet; J.L. Turkenburg; J.P.A.M. Vroemen; C.N. van Dijk; D. Eygendaal

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recent studies report that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows a high incidence of associated injuries in patients with a radial head fracture. This retrospective study describes the clinical relevance of these injuries. Materials and methods: Forty patients with 42 radial head fractu

  6. Head injury predictors in sports trauma--a state-of-the-art review.

    Fernandes, Fábio A O; de Sousa, Ricardo J Alves

    2015-08-01

    Head injuries occur in a great variety of sports. Many of these have been associated with neurological injuries, affecting the central nervous system. Some examples are motorsports, cycling, skiing, horse riding, mountaineering and most contact sports such as football, ice and field hockey, soccer, lacrosse, etc. The outcome of head impacts in these sports can be very severe. The worst-case scenarios of permanent disability or even death are possibilities. Over recent decades, many In recent decades, a great number of head injury criteria and respective thresholds have been proposed. However, the available information is much dispersed and a consensus has still not been achieved regarding the best injury criteria or even their thresholds. This review paper gives a thorough overview of the work carried out by the scientific community in the field of impact biomechanics about head injuries sustained during sports activity. The main goal is to review the head injury criteria, as well as their thresholds. Several are reviewed, from the predictors based on kinematics to the ones based on human tissue thresholds. In this work, we start to briefly introduce the head injuries and their mechanisms commonly seen as a result of head trauma in sports. Then, we present and summarize the head injury criteria and their respective thresholds. PMID:26238791

  7. Accelerated radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer

    The purpose of the study is to present the reasons for introducing concomitant boost accelerated radiotherapy (CBAR) and its practical aspects at advanced head and neck carcinomas (HNC). Accelerated clonogenic repopulation of the tumor during radiotherapy necessitates its termination within the shortest possible term. The differentiated effect of the fractionated dose on both early and late response of tissues requires the use of several smaller daily fractions with an interval between exceeding six hours during all the time of radiotherapy or a part of it. If there is no data about earlier kinetics of the tumor cells, schemes with total dose 69-72 Gy are given preference. The practical aspects of CBAR also are presented: 1. specificity of the clinical target volume (ICRU 50) considering the requirements for beam and fields; 2. irradiation techniques most frequently used and 3. the method of patient immobilization. The characteristic features of CBAR are also discussed: 1. The primary tumor and its subclinical diffusion are irradiated in standard fields or in such with exclusion of the spinal cord at dose up to 54 in 30 fractions for 5.5 weeks. During the first two days, two daily fractions at six-hours interval are delivered with partial exclusion of the spinal cord. The primary tumor is given during the last 2.5 weeks up to total dose 69-72 Gy with a second daily fraction of 1.5 Gy six hours after the first one; 2. The current concepts for spinal cord radiation tolerance and very high risk of transverse myelitis in some accelerated radiotherapeutical schemes are also discussed. The therapeutic approach described is based on the experience got from the conventional fractionation; 3. Without neglecting enhanced acute toxicity CBAR is recommended as a well tolerated radiotherapeutical method

  8. Paediatric head injuries treated in a children's emergency department from Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

    Rus, Diana; Chereches, Razvan Mircea; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Marton-Vasarhely, Emanuela Oana; Oprescu, Florin; Brinzaniuc, Alexandra; Mocean, Floarea

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to describe paediatric head injuries and identify factors that led to advanced care. Incident cases of head injuries that sought care from December 2008 to October 2010 at Children's Emergency Hospital Cluj-Napoca were evaluated. The main outcome was transfer or admission to advanced care. From a total of 3053 children treated for an injury, 1541 (50.4%) presented with head injury. A total of 960 (62.3%) of the children with a head injury required advanced care treatment. Young children were more likely to suffer a head injury than older children, but a higher proportion of older children required advanced care (70.3%). Children who suffered a head injury as a consequence of road traffic were almost five times more likely to require advanced care (OR: 4.97; 3.09-8.06) than being released. Our results suggest that data on injuries provide evidence-based information on the nature of injuries children are prone to, and what activity, type, and mechanism of injury impact Romanian children. PMID:24479864

  9. Variations in the presentation of aphasia in patients with closed head injuries.

    Kavanagh, Dara Oliver

    2012-01-31

    Impairments of speech and language are important consequences of head injury as they compromise interaction between the patient and others. A large spectrum of communication deficits can occur. There are few reports in the literature of aphasia following closed head injury despite the common presentation of closed head injury. Herein we report two cases of closed head injuries with differing forms of aphasia. We discuss their management and rehabilitation and present a detailed literature review on the topic. In a busy acute surgical unit one can dismiss aphasia following head injury as behaviour related to intoxication. Early recognition with prolonged and intensive speech and language rehabilitation therapy yields a favourable outcome as highlighted in our experience. These may serve as a reference for clinicians faced with this unusual outcome.

  10. Can an abnormal CT scan be predicted from common symptoms after mild head injury in children?

    Ashok Munivenkatappa; Akhil Deepika; Vasuki Prathyusha; Indira Devi; Dhaval Shukla

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Children have non specific symptoms after mild head injury (MHI). It is difficult to define indication of CT scan among them. We aimed at identification of predictors of CT scan findings after MHI. Materials and Methods: Children aged ≤12 years with GCS 13-15 after head injury were retrospectively evaluated for their clinical and CT scan findings during January to March 2010. The variables used for detection of abnormal (positive) CT scan were age, gender, cause of injury (road ...

  11. Epidemiological features of 1 281 patients with head injuries arising from the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

    YANG Chao-hua

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To analyze the epidemiologi-cal features of patients with head injuries in the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Methods: Medical records of patients with head inju-ries who were admitted to 14 hospitals in Deyang, Mianyang and Chengdu cities after the earthquake were retrospec-tively analyzed. The patients’ age, gender, cause of injury, diagnosis, and outcome were analyzed retrospectively. Results: A total of 1 281 patients with 807 males and 474 females were included. According to Glasgow Coma Scale score at admission, 1 029 patients presented with mild injury, 161 moderate injury and 91 severe injury. The major cause of injuries (83% was bruise by collapsed buildings. Open head injuries accounted for 60.8%. A total of 720 pa-tients underwent surgical treatment. Good recovery was achieved in 1 056 patients, moderate disability in 106, se-vere disability in 71, coma in 29 and death in 19. Conclusions: In this series, male patients were more than female patients. The main cause of injury was hit by falling objects due to building collapse. Minor and open craniocerebral injuries were most common. The epidemio-logical features of head injuries in Wenchuan earthquake may be helpful to preparation for future rescue. Key words: Brain injuries; Epidemiology; Earthquakes; Rescue work

  12. Urban–rural differences in pediatric traumatic head injuries: A prospective nationwide study

    Jonas G Halldorsson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Jonas G Halldorsson1, Kjell M Flekkoy2, Kristinn R Gudmundsson3, Gudmundur B Arnkelsson4, Eirikur Orn Arnarson1,51Psychological Health Services, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; 2Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; 3Department of Neurosurgery, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; 4Faculty of Social Science, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; 5Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, IcelandAims: To estimate differences in the incidence of recorded traumatic head injuries by gender, age, severity, and geographical area.Methods: The study was prospective and nationwide. Data were collected from all hospitals, emergency units and healthcare centers in Iceland regarding all Icelandic children and adolescents 0–19 years old consecutively diagnosed with traumatic head injuries (N = 550 during a one-year period.Results: Annual incidence of minimal, mild, moderate/severe, and fatal head injuries (ICD-9 850–854 was 6.41 per 1000, with 95% confi dence interval (CI 5.9, 7.0. Annual incidence of minimal head injuries (ICD-9 850 treated at emergency units was 4.65 (CI 4.2, 5.1 per 1000, mild head injuries admitted to hospital (ICD-9 850 was 1.50 (CI 1.3, 1.8 per 1000, and moderate/severe nonfatal injuries (ICD-9 851–854 was 0.21 (CI 0.1, 0.3 per 1000. Death rate was 0.05 (CI 0.0, 0.1 per 1000. Young children were at greater risk of sustaining minimal head injuries than older ones. Boys were at greater risk than girls were. In rural areas, incidence of recorded minimal head injuries was low.Conclusions: Use of nationwide estimate of the incidence of pediatric head injury shows important differences between urban and rural areas as well as between different age groups.Keywords: incidence, nationwide, pediatric, prospective, traumatic head injuries, urban-rural differences

  13. Leakage pattern of linear accelerator treatment heads from multiple vendors

    Full text: Patient life expectancy post-radiotherapy is becoming longer. Therefore, secondary cancers caused by radiotherapy treatment have more time to develop. Increasing attention is being given to out-of-field dose resulting from scatter and accelerator head leakage. Dose leakage from equivalent positions on Varian600C, Varian21-X, Siemens Primus and Elekta Synergy-II linacs were measured with TLD 100H dosimeter chips and compared. Treatment parameters such as field size and beam energy were altered. Leakage doses are presented as a percentage of the dose to isocentre (5 Gy). Results illustrate significant variations in leakage dose between linac models where no model emits consistently lower amounts of radiation leakage for all treatment parameters. Results are shown below. Leakage through the collimator assembly in different units is varying as a function of location and unit design by more than a factor of 10. Differences are more pronounced in comparing Varian or Elekta models, which are fitted with an additional collimator separate from the MLC leaves, to the Siemens model, which uses MLC leaves as its only secondary collimator. Further measurements are currently being taken at the patient plane with a directional detector system to determine the spatial distribution of high leakage sources.

  14. Epidemiological features of 1281 patients with head injuries arising from the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

    YANG Chao-hua; LI Qiang; LAN Zhi-gang; LIU Jia-gang

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the epidemiological features of patients with head injuries in the 2008Wenchuan earthquake.Methods: Medical records of patients with head injuries who were admitted to 14 hospitals in Deyang,Mianyang and Chengdu cities after the earthquake were retrospectively analyzed.The patients' age,gender,cause of injury,diagnosis,and outcome were analyzed retrospectively.Results: A total of 1 281 patients with 807 males and 474 females were included.According to Glasgow Coma Scale score at admission,1 029 patients presented with mild injury,161 moderate injury and 91 severe injury.The major cause of injuries (83%) was bruise by collapsed buildings.Open head injuries accounted for 60.8%.A total of 720 patients underwent surgical treatment.Good recovery was achieved in 1 056 patients,moderate disability in 106,severe disability in 71,coma in 29 and death in 19.Conclusions: In this series,male patients were more than female patients.The main cause of injury was hit by falling objects due to building collapse.Minor and open craniocerebral injuries were most common.The epidemiological features of head injuries in Wenchuan earthquake may be helpful to preparation for future rescue.

  15. Microwave Hematoma Detector for the Rapid Assessment of Head Injuries

    Hadded, W.; Chang, J.; Rosenbury, T.; Dallum, G.; Welsch, P.; Scott, D.; Duarte, D.; Acevedo-Bolton, V.

    2000-02-11

    A non-invasive microwave device for the detection of epi/subdural hemorrhaging (hematoma) is under current development. The final device will be highly portable and allow real time assessment of head injuries, thereby satisfying early detection needs of the field technician as well as providing a tool for repetitious monitoring of high-risk individuals. The device will adopt the advanced technology of micropower impulse radar (MIR) which is a state of the art low cost ultra wide band (UWB) microwave radar developed here at LLNL. It will consist of a MIR transmitting and receiving module, a computer based signal processing module, and a device-to-patient signal coupling module--the UWB antenna. The prototype design is being guided by the needs of the patient and the practitioner along with the prerequisites of the technology including issues such as the specificity of the device, efficacy of diagnosis, accuracy, robustness, and patient comfort. The prototype development follows a concurrent approach which .includes experiments designed to evaluate requirements of the radar and antenna design, phantom development to facilitate laboratory investigations, and investigation into the limits of adapting pre-existing non-medical MIR devices to medical applications. This report will present the accomplishments and project highlights to date in the fiscal year 1999. Future project projections will also be discussed.

  16. Demographics, Velocity Distributions, and Impact Type as Predictors of AIS 4+ Head Injuries in Motor Vehicle Crashes.

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Fitzharris, Michael; Pintar, Frank A; Stemper, Brian D; Rinaldi, James; Maiman, Dennis J; Fildes, Brian N

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine differences between the United States-based NASS and CIREN and Australia-based ANCIS databases in occupant-, crash-, and vehicle-related parameters for AIS 4+ head injuries in motor vehicle crashes. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine roles of the change in velocity (DV), crash type (frontal, far-side, nearside, rear impact), seatbelt use, and occupant position, gender, age, stature, and body mass in cranial traumas. Belted and unbelted non-ejected occupant (age >16 years) data from 1997-2006 were used for the NASS and CIREN datasets, and 2000-2010 for ANCIS. Vehicle model year, and occupant position and demographics including body mass index (BMI) data were obtained. Injuries were coded using AIS 1990-1998 update. Similarities were apparent across all databases: mean demographics were close to the mid-size anthropometry, mean BMI was in the normal to overweight range, and representations of extreme variations were uncommon. Side impacts contributed to over one-half of the ensemble, implying susceptibility to head trauma in this mode. Odds of sustaining head injury increased by 4% per unit increase in DV (OR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.03-1.04, poccupants (OR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.37-0.61, poccupant-related outcomes from the two continents indicate a worldwide need to revise the translation acceleration-based head injury criterion to include the angular component in an appropriate format for improved injury assessment and mitigation. PMID:22105402

  17. Pseudoaneurysm of the occipital artery: an unusual cause of persisting headache after minor head injury.

    Aquilina, K

    2012-02-03

    Post-traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the extracranial arteries in the scalp are uncommon sequelae of head injury. We report on a patient who presented four weeks after a minor head injury with a tender, pulsating and enlarging mass in the course of the left occipital artery. There was associated headache radiating to the vertex. Computed tomographic angiography confirmed the lesion to be a pseudoaneurysm of the occipital artery. The lump was resected with complete resolution of symptoms.

  18. Head injuries in accident and emergency departments. How different are children from adults?

    Brookes, M; MacMillan, R.; Cully, S; E. Anderson; S. Murray; Mendelow, A D; Jennett, B

    1990-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim of the study was to examine the differences between child and adult patients attending accident and emergency departments after recent head injuries. DESIGN AND SETTING--A retrospective survey based on existing case records from 23 Scottish accident and emergency departments for 1985 was compared with prospective data from one hospital over 9 months in 1984. PATIENTS--3838 children under 15 and 4775 adults attended hospital with head injuries during the period analyse...

  19. Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome following Head Injury in a Child Managed Successfully with Fludrocortisone

    Chaudhary, Nagendra; Pathak, Santosh; Gupta, Murli Manohar; Agrawal, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral salt wasting (CSW) syndrome is an important cause of hyponatremia in head injuries apart from syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). Proper diagnosis and differentiation between these two entities are necessary for management as the treatment is quite opposite in both conditions. Fludrocortisone can help in managing CSW where alone saline infusion does not work. We report a 17-month-old female child with head injury managed successfully with saline infusion and fludrocortisone.

  20. Salvage surgery after radical accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant boost technique for head and neck carcinomas

    Taussky, Daniel; Dulguerov, Pavel; Allal, Abdelkarim Said

    2005-01-01

    Definitive radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer is increasingly used to preserve organ function, whereas surgery is reserved for treatment failure. However, data are sparse regarding the feasibility of salvage surgery, particularly for unselected patients after accelerated RT.

  1. Post-traumatic syndrome after minor head injury cannot be predicted by neurological investigations.

    Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Schreck, Jochen; Weser, Jürgen; Lehmkuhl, Gerhard

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate predictive factors of post-traumatic syndrome in children with minor head injury. Prospective neurological, electroencephalographic and psychological investigations were performed in 98 children aged 3-13 years within 24 h after the trauma and 4-6 weeks later. Inclusion criteria for mild head injury were unconsciousness concussion and 64 of 98 showed abnormal EEG findings. After 4-6 weeks, 23 of 98 still exhibited post-traumatic complaints with headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, anxiety and affect instability. Such post-traumatic symptoms did not correlate with somatic, neurological or electroencephalographic findings observed immediately after the injury or at the follow-up investigation. As opposed to the situation in more severe head trauma, post-traumatic syndrome after minor head injury in children is apparently not due to central nervous injury detectable by neurological examination or electroencephalography. Irrespective of the necessity of neuroradiological investigations and repeated EEGs in more severe and complicated head trauma, we discourage the routine EEG examination in very slight head injury and instead rather recommend parent and patient counselling. PMID:15036430

  2. A semi-automatic method of generating subject-specific pediatric head finite element models for impact dynamic responses to head injury.

    Li, Zhigang; Han, Xiaoqiang; Ge, Hao; Ma, Chunsheng

    2016-07-01

    To account for the effects of head realistic morphological feature variation on the impact dynamic responses to head injury, it is necessary to develop multiple subject-specific pediatric head finite element (FE) models based on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. However, traditional manual model development is very time-consuming. In this study, a new automatic method was developed to extract anatomical points from pediatric head CT scans to represent pediatric head morphological features (head size/shape, skull thickness, and suture/fontanel width). Subsequently, a geometry-adaptive mesh morphing method based on radial basis function was developed that can automatically morph a baseline pediatric head FE model into target FE models with geometries corresponding to the extracted head morphological features. In the end, five subject-specific head FE models of approximately 6-month-old (6MO) were automatically generated using the developed method. These validated models were employed to investigate differences in the head dynamic responses among subjects with different head morphologies. The results show that variations in head morphological features have a relatively large effect on pediatric head dynamic response. The results of this study indicate that pediatric head morphological variation had better be taken into account when reconstructing pediatric head injury due to traffic/fall accidents or child abuses using computational models as well as predicting head injury risk for children with obvious difference in head size and morphologies. PMID:27058003

  3. Constructional apraxia in patients with closed head injury

    Pavlović Dragan M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Constructional apraxia is a disorder characterized by an inability to join the elements into a unity. It has not been studied much in patients with closed head injury (CHI. Methods. Forty-one patients with CHI were examined, of which 11 (26.83% were with the right-sided, 12 (29.27% with the left-sided, and 18 (43.90% with bilateral lesion using the Wechsler Individual Intelligence Test (VITI - Serbian version, Rey Complex Figure (RCF test, Trail Making Test - TMT A and B, and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST. Results. Intelligence quotient (IQ was significantly higher in the patients with the right-sided (95.27 and bilateral cerebral lesions (87.56 than in the left-sided (84.42. RCF scores did not show any significant difference regarding the side of the lesion, but was numerically the lowest scores were in patients with bilateral brain damage. Patients with left-sided lesions had the score of 30.63, right-sided of 28.68, and bilateral of 27.39. TMT B showed a significantly lower result in patients with the left-sided (196.50 seconds and bilateral lesions (192.07 seconds compared to the right-sided (140.14 seconds. WCST scores were not significantly different regarding the side of the lesion, but the absolute value of the categories was less than expected. Conclusion. Constructional apraxia was more frequently present in the patients with CHI than it was previously considered. The use of sensitive tests can show the presence of the disorder mainly in bilateral, but also in unilateral lesions.

  4. Injury risks of heading in young football players

    Lukášek, Miloš; Kalichová, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the research is to contribute to findings concerning increasingly acute problems connected with heading in football. Unlike most of available studies where heading with adults is dealt with, our study focuses primarily on heading with children. 16 children aged 10, weighing 36.2 ± 4.7 kg took part in the research. Each tested person executed headings of a ball dropped from 0 m (3.13 m/s), 1 m (4.43 m/s) and 1,5 m (5.43 m/s) ie. 3 headings in total. The total number of tests was 48....

  5. Cognitive dysfunction in young men following head injury in childhood and adolescence: a population study

    Teasdale, T W; Engberg, A W

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction among young men who had suffered a head injury during childhood or adolescence, in particular focusing upon the effects of age and the severity of the injury. METHODS: By cross linkage of Danish national registers for hospital...

  6. A Novel Closed-Head Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using Focal Primary Overpressure Blast to the Cranium in Mice.

    Guley, Natalie H; Rogers, Joshua T; Del Mar, Nobel A; Deng, Yunping; Islam, Rafiqul M; D'Surney, Lauren; Ferrell, Jessica; Deng, Bowei; Hines-Beard, Jessica; Bu, Wei; Ren, Huiling; Elberger, Andrea J; Marchetta, Jeffrey G; Rex, Tonia S; Honig, Marcia G; Reiner, Anton

    2016-02-15

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) from focal head impact is the most common form of TBI in humans. Animal models, however, typically use direct impact to the exposed dura or skull, or blast to the entire head. We present a detailed characterization of a novel overpressure blast system to create focal closed-head mild TBI in mice. A high-pressure air pulse limited to a 7.5 mm diameter area on the left side of the head overlying the forebrain is delivered to anesthetized mice. The mouse eyes and ears are shielded, and its head and body are cushioned to minimize movement. This approach creates mild TBI by a pressure wave that acts on the brain, with minimal accompanying head acceleration-deceleration. A single 20-psi blast yields no functional deficits or brain injury, while a single 25-40 psi blast yields only slight motor deficits and brain damage. By contrast, a single 50-60 psi blast produces significant visual, motor, and neuropsychiatric impairments and axonal damage and microglial activation in major fiber tracts, but no contusive brain injury. This model thus reproduces the widespread axonal injury and functional impairments characteristic of closed-head mild TBI, without the complications of systemic or ocular blast effects or head acceleration that typically occur in other blast or impact models of closed-skull mild TBI. Accordingly, our model provides a simple way to examine the biomechanics, pathophysiology, and functional deficits that result from TBI and can serve as a reliable platform for testing therapies that reduce brain pathology and deficits. PMID:26414413

  7. Impaired Cerebral Autoregulation during Head Up Tilt in Patients with Severe Brain Injury

    Riberholt, Christian Gunge; Olesen, Niels Damkjær; Thing, Mira; Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Mehlsen, Jesper; Petersen, Tue Hvass

    2016-01-01

    Early mobilization is of importance for improving long-term outcome for patients after severe acquired brain injury. A limiting factor for early mobilization by head-up tilt is orthostatic intolerance. The purpose of the present study was to examine cerebral autoregulation in patients with severe acquired brain injury and a low level of consciousness. Fourteen patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance and fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled. Blood pressure wa...

  8. HIGH BLOOD LEVELS PROCALCITONIN AS SYSTEMIC IMFLAMATORY RESPONSE SYNDROME PREDICTOR IN SEVERE AND MODERATE HEAD INJURY

    B. Sinaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNumerous studies have shown that procalcitonin (PCT was not related to degree of trauma. High PCT serum levels have been found in patients with bacterial or fungal infection and also in acute phase of trauma. Currently, there has been no research discussed about changes in serum levels of PCT in particular head injuries and severe head injuries. Moderate and severe head injuries were common trauma cases in Emergency Room (ER and had high mortality rate. Based on Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, moderate and severe head injuries were scored between 3 and 13. This research aim to determine whether high blood levels PCT can be used as a predictor of the occurrence of SIRS. Method: A cohort prospective study was applied in this research to determine high blood levels of PCT as a predictor for SIRS in moderate and severe head injury. This study was conducted from June 2013 - August 2013 at Sanglah General Hospital with 40 research subjects. Data was presented in tables and analyzed with Chi Square test at 95% CI and p <0.05% was considered significant. Results: From the 40 samples, there were 34 males (85% and 6 females (15%, 18 samples (45% had moderate head injury and 22 samples (65% had severe head injury. One sample (2.5 % was 0-10 years old, 15 samples (37.5% were 10-20 years old, 13 samples (32.5% were 20-40 years old, 7 samples (17.5% were 40-60 years old and 4 samples (10% were>60 years old. PCT levels in the blood obtained on day first were normal in 6 samples (15% and elevated in 34 samples (85%, SIRS (+ were found in 35 samples (87.5% and 5 samples (12.5% were SIRS (-. Using bivariate analysis between PCT levels and SIRS showed p = 0.000 (p < 0.05, and multivariate analysis of the control variables showed no significant correlation between variables with PCT levels. Conclusion: From 40 samples moderate head injury and severe head injury, there were 34 samples (85% with elevated PCT level on the first day, while 35 samples (87.5% had SIRS

  9. Three head injuries: the Biblical account of the deaths of Sisera, Abimelech and Goliath.

    Feinsod, M

    1997-12-01

    Three head injuries are described in the Bible: the death of Sisera at the hands of Jael, the skull fractures inflicted on Abimelech near the walls of Thebez, and the slaying of Goliath by David. The various attempts to understand the mechanisms of these head injuries are reviewed. We shall try to identify the site of the mortal blow on Sisera's head, to understand why Abimelech, still conscious, asked to die, and to clarify whether the Philistine giant from Gat was a rugged warrior or just an endocrinological cripple. PMID:11619867

  10. Microstructural brain injury in post-concussion syndrome after minor head injury

    Smits, Marion; Wielopolski, Piotr A.; Vernooij, Meike W.; Lugt, Aad van der [Erasmus MC-University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Department of Radiology (Hs-224), PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Houston, Gavin C. [Applied Science Lab, GE Healthcare, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Dippel, Diederik W.J.; Koudstaal, Peter J. [Erasmus MC-University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Department of Neurology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hunink, M.G.M. [Erasmus MC-University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Department of Radiology (Hs-224), PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC-University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Department of Epidemiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    After minor head injury (MHI), post-concussive symptoms commonly occur. The purpose of this study was to correlate the severity of post-concussive symptoms in MHI patients with MRI measures of microstructural brain injury, namely mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA), as well as the presence of microhaemorrhages. Twenty MHI patients and 12 healthy controls were scanned at 3 T using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high-resolution gradient recalled echo (HRGRE) T2*-weighted sequences. One patient was excluded from the analysis because of bilateral subdural haematomas. DTI data were preprocessed using Tract Based Spatial Statistics. The resulting MD and FA images were correlated with the severity of post-concussive symptoms evaluated with the Rivermead Postconcussion Symptoms Questionnaire. The number and location of microhaemorrhages were assessed on the HRGRE T2*-weighted images. Comparing patients with controls, there were no differences in MD. FA was decreased in the right temporal subcortical white matter. MD was increased in association with the severity of post-concussive symptoms in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), the inferior longitudinal fasciculus and the superior longitudinal fasciculus. FA was reduced in association with the severity of post-concussive symptoms in the uncinate fasciculus, the IFO, the internal capsule and the corpus callosum, as well as in the parietal and frontal subcortical white matter. Microhaemorrhages were observed in one patient only. The severity of post-concussive symptoms after MHI was significantly correlated with a reduction of white matter integrity, providing evidence of microstructural brain injury as a neuropathological substrate of the post-concussion syndrome. (orig.)

  11. Microstructural brain injury in post-concussion syndrome after minor head injury

    After minor head injury (MHI), post-concussive symptoms commonly occur. The purpose of this study was to correlate the severity of post-concussive symptoms in MHI patients with MRI measures of microstructural brain injury, namely mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA), as well as the presence of microhaemorrhages. Twenty MHI patients and 12 healthy controls were scanned at 3 T using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high-resolution gradient recalled echo (HRGRE) T2*-weighted sequences. One patient was excluded from the analysis because of bilateral subdural haematomas. DTI data were preprocessed using Tract Based Spatial Statistics. The resulting MD and FA images were correlated with the severity of post-concussive symptoms evaluated with the Rivermead Postconcussion Symptoms Questionnaire. The number and location of microhaemorrhages were assessed on the HRGRE T2*-weighted images. Comparing patients with controls, there were no differences in MD. FA was decreased in the right temporal subcortical white matter. MD was increased in association with the severity of post-concussive symptoms in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), the inferior longitudinal fasciculus and the superior longitudinal fasciculus. FA was reduced in association with the severity of post-concussive symptoms in the uncinate fasciculus, the IFO, the internal capsule and the corpus callosum, as well as in the parietal and frontal subcortical white matter. Microhaemorrhages were observed in one patient only. The severity of post-concussive symptoms after MHI was significantly correlated with a reduction of white matter integrity, providing evidence of microstructural brain injury as a neuropathological substrate of the post-concussion syndrome. (orig.)

  12. Feasibility and early results of accelerated radiotherapy for head and neck carcinoma in the elderly

    Allal, Abdelkarim Said; Maire, Daphne Isabel; Becker, Minerva; Dulguerov, Pavel

    2000-01-01

    Accelerated radiotherapy (RT) represents a promising method with which to improve the treatment outcome in patients with head and neck carcinoma. However, its applicability to elderly patients has not been well established. This study assessed treatment toxicities, patient compliance, and oncologic results in patients age >/= 70 years who were treated with an accelerated concomitant boost RT schedule.

  13. Intracranial traumatic lesion risk factors in elderly patients with minor head injury

    The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of the risk factors of intracranial traumatic lesions in elderly patients with minor head injury. Sixty-nine elderly patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 13-15 after head injury who had presented within 24 hours of trauma and admitted to hospital were included in this study. The indications for admission were a GCS score of 13 or 14 on presentation, loss of consciousness, retrograde or posttraumatic amnesia, local neurological deficit, severe headache and vomiting, dangerous mechanism of injury, skull fracture and abnormal CT findings. The relationship between the clinical findings and intracranial traumatic lesions was analized by univariate and multivariate analysis. The relationship between the clinical findings and surgical intervention was also analized by the same methods in those who had intracranial traumatic lesions. The mean and median age of patients were 81.1 and 83 years, respectively. Of 69 patients, 41 had intracranial traumatic lesions present on their CT scan. Of these, 6 needed surgical intervention. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 13 and a loss of consciousness at injury were identified as independent risk factors of intracranial traumatic lesions in elderly patients with minor head injury and a dangerous mechanism of injury was identified as an independent risk factor of surgical intervention in those who had traumatic intracranial lesions. Our results offer useful information for evaluating patients with minor head injury in Japan's aging society. (author)

  14. Clinical features of the head injury caused by child abuse in infants

    The diagnosis and managements of the head injury in battered children are greatly complicated by medical history and the mechanisms of injury. In the present study, we evaluated the clinical features of the head injury in battered children. Clinical signs and symptoms, the mechanisms of injury, intracranial pathology, and prognosis of 25 battered children with head injury treated between 1984 and 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. The age of 25 children was between 1 month and 2 years old. The average of the ages was 7 months old. In 68% of 25 patients, the age was 6 months or less. The medical history of head injury was unclear in 16 children. The chief complains were disturbance of consciousness, convulsion, vomiting and hypothermia. Retinal hemorrhages were recognized in 88% of the patients and these were bilateral in 68%. Acute subdural hematomas (19 cases) and chronic subdural hematomas (6 cases) were shown on CTs or MRIs. In four cases, cerebral contusions were complicated as intracranial pathology. In 44% of the patients, the hypoxic-ischemic injury was confirmed on CTs or MRIs. Fractures of limbs and ribs were recognized on skeletal survey in 40% of the patients. 71% of 17 survival cases had moderate or severe psychomotor disabilities at the end of follow-up periods. In children under 2 years of age with subdural hematomas, clinical investigations other than CT and MRI, included ophthalmoscopy by ophthalmologist and skeletal survey, are crucial and mandatory for early diagnosis of the child abuse. (author)

  15. Outcomes of a questionnaire survey on intracranial hypotension following minor head injury

    Intracranial hypotension (IH) is a rare condition caused by leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recently, a small number of clinicians have proposed a new concept about IH following minor head injury. They suggest that many of their patients with IH can be successfully treated with epidural blood patch therapy. They also argue that some patients with post-traumatic cervical syndrome and general fatigue syndrome suffer from IH following minor head injury. Consequently, IH following minor head injury was widely recognized and dealt with as a social problem in Japan. On the other hand, pathophysiological aspects of the condition as well as the provisional criteria to describe this clinical entity remain to be elucidated. In 2006, the Japan Society of Neurotraumatology performed a questionnaire survey asking 44 hospitals belonging to trustees of this society about IH following minor head injury. This paper provides a report of the outcomes of this survey. The response rate to this questionnaire was 57% (25/44). Fifty-six percent of respondents did not have experience of IH following minor head injury. Moreover, respondents' criteria for describing this disease differed greatly, especially in the radiological examinations and symptoms for the diagnosis of this entity which showed significant variation. These problems might originate from the general features of this disease. With the exception of postural headache, the symptoms of this disease varied enormously. This wide range of symptoms confused with the pathophysiolosies of a great many similar conditions. As such, clarifications of the pathophysiological characteristics of IH following minor head injury, together with consensus on specific criteria to describe the condition, are required. In conclusion, the results of this survey revealed many serious scientific and social problems associated with the diagnosis and treatment of intracranial hypotension following minor head injury. Scientific study including the

  16. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf.

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0-15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and severity of injury, and functional outcomes. Seventy percent of the children sustained a TBI from a fall. We also found that playing golf was associated with 40% of the TBIs, with three (30%) children being unrestrained passengers in a moving golf cart and another one (10%) was struck by a golf club. Injury awareness could have benefited or prevented most injuries, and school nurses are in the best position to provide preventative practice education. In golf-centric communities, prevention of golf-related injuries should include education within the schools. PMID:25899097

  17. [Acute head injuries in primary health care--internet survey conducted with general practitioners].

    Luoto, Teemu M; Artsola, Minna; Helminen, Mika; Liimatainen, Suvi; Kosunen, Elise; Ohman, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Patients with head injury constitute a large population treated in primary health care. It is essential to recognize patients with traumatic brain injury among this notable population to determine the need for more specific evaluation. General practitioners (n=331) in Pirkanmaa hospital district in Finland received an email link to answer the survey. The response rate was 54.1% (n=179). Mean survey score was 20.5 points (max. 25). Only acquaintance with the national traumatic brain injury practice guidelines was associated with greater survey scores. The general practitioners' level of knowledge in managing head injuries was good. Deficiencies were found in the questions dealt with post-traumatic amnesia and the definition of traumatic brain injury. PMID:23786110

  18. Role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in severe head injury in children

    Advait Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A brain injury results in a temporary or permanent impairment of cognitive, emotional, and/or physical function. Predicting the outcome of pediatric brain injury is difficult. Prognostic instruments are not precise enough to reliably predict individual patient′s mortality and long-term functional status. The purpose of this article is to provide a guide to the strengths and limitations of the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT in treating pediatric patients with severe brain injury. Materials and Methods: We studied total 56 patients of head injury. Out of them 28 received HBOT. Only cases with severe head injury [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS < 8] with no other associated injury were included in the study group. After an initial period of resuscitation and conservative management (10-12 days, all were subjected to three sessions of HBOT at 1-week interval. This study group was compared with a control group of similar severity of head injury (GCS < 8. Results: The study and control groups were compared in terms of duration of hospitalization, GCS, disability reduction,and social behavior. Patients who received HBOT were significantly better than the control group on all the parameters with decreased hospital stay, better GCS, and drastic reduction in disability. Conclusion: In children with traumatic brain injury, the addition of HBOT significantly improved outcome and quality of life and reduced the risk of complications.

  19. ‘Studying Injured Minds’ - The Vietnam Head Injury Study and 40 years of brain injury research

    Vanessa Raymont

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of those who have sustained traumatic brain injuries (TBI during military conflicts has greatly facilitated research in the fields of neuropsychology, neurosurgery, psychiatry, neurology and neuroimaging. The Vietnam Head Injury Study (VHIS is a prospective, long-term follow-up study of a cohort of 1,221 Vietnam veterans with mostly penetrating brain injuries, which has stretched over more than 40 years. The scope of this study, both in terms of the types of injury and fields of examination, has been extremely broad. It has been instrumental in extending the field of TBI research and in exposing pressing medical and social issues that affect those who suffer such injuries. This review summarizes the history of conflict-related TBI research and the VHIS to date, as well as the vast range of important findings the VHIS has established.

  20. A prospective observational study to assess the diagnostic accuracy of clinical decision rules for children presenting to emergency departments after head injuries (protocol): the Australasian Paediatric Head Injury Rules Study (APHIRST)

    Babl, Franz E; Lyttle, Mark D; Bressan, Silvia; Borland, Meredith; Phillips, Natalie; Kochar, Amit; Stuart R Dalziel; Dalton, Sarah; Cheek, John A; Furyk, Jeremy; Gilhotra, Yuri; Neutze, Jocelyn; Ward, Brenton; Donath, Susan; Jachno, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Background Head injuries in children are responsible for a large number of emergency department visits. Failure to identify a clinically significant intracranial injury in a timely fashion may result in long term neurodisability and death. Whilst cranial computed tomography (CT) provides rapid and definitive identification of intracranial injuries, it is resource intensive and associated with radiation induced cancer. Evidence based head injury clinical decision rules have been derived to aid...

  1. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0-15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and…

  2. Cognitive contributions to theory of mind ability in children with a traumatic head injury.

    Levy, Naomi Kahana; Milgram, Noach

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the current study is to examine the contribution of intellectual abilities, executive functions (EF), and facial emotion recognition to difficulties in Theory of Mind (ToM) abilities in children with a traumatic head injury. Israeli children with a traumatic head injury were compared with their non-injured counterparts. Each group included 18 children (12 males) ages 7-13. Measurements included reading the mind in the eyes, facial emotion recognition, reasoning the other's characteristics based on motive and outcome, Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices, similarities and digit span (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Revised 95 subscales), verbal fluency, and the Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Functions. Non-injured children performed significantly better on ToM, abstract reasoning, and EF measures compared with children with a traumatic head injury. However, differences in ToM abilities between the groups were no longer significant after controlling for abstract reasoning, working memory, verbal fluency, or facial emotion recognition. Impaired ToM recognition and reasoning abilities after a head injury may result from other cognitive impairments. In children with mild and moderate head injury, poorer performance on ToM tasks may reflect poorer abstract reasoning, a general tendency to concretize stimuli, working memory and verbal fluency deficits, and difficulties in facial emotion recognition, rather than deficits in the ability to understand the other's thoughts and emotions. ToM impairments may be secondary to a range of cognitive deficits in determining social outcomes in this population. PMID:25495376

  3. Impaired Cerebral Autoregulation during Head Up Tilt in Patients with Severe Brain Injury

    Riberholt, Christian Gunge; Olesen, Niels Damkjær; Thing, Mira; Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Mehlsen, Jesper; Petersen, Tue Hvass

    2016-01-01

    Early mobilization is of importance for improving long-term outcome for patients after severe acquired brain injury. A limiting factor for early mobilization by head-up tilt is orthostatic intolerance. The purpose of the present study was to examine cerebral autoregulation in patients with severe acquired brain injury and a low level of consciousness. Fourteen patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance and fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled. Blood pressure was evaluated by pulse contour analysis, heart rate and RR-intervals were determined by electrocardiography, middle cerebral artery velocity was evaluated by transcranial Doppler, and near-infrared spectroscopy determined frontal lobe oxygenation in the supine position and during head-up tilt. Cerebral autoregulation was evaluated as the mean flow index calculated as the ratio between middle cerebral artery mean velocity and estimated cerebral perfusion pressure. Patients with acquired brain injury presented an increase in mean flow index during head-up tilt indicating impaired autoregulation (P < 0.001). Spectral analysis of heart rate variability in the frequency domain revealed lower magnitudes of ~0.1 Hz spectral power in patients compared to healthy controls suggesting baroreflex dysfunction. In conclusion, patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance during head-up tilt have impaired cerebral autoregulation more than one month after brain injury. PMID:27168188

  4. Motorcycle helmet use and the risk of head, neck, and fatal injury: Revisiting the Hurt Study.

    Rice, Thomas M; Troszak, Lara; Ouellet, James V; Erhardt, Taryn; Smith, Gordon S; Tsai, Bor-Wen

    2016-06-01

    Most studies find strong evidence that motorcycle helmets protect against injury, but a small number of controversial studies have reported a positive association between helmet use and neck injury. The most commonly cited paper is that of Goldstein (1986). Goldstein obtained and reanalyzed data from the Hurt Study, a prospective, on-scene investigation of 900 motorcycle collisions in the city of Los Angeles. The Goldstein results have been adopted by the anti-helmet community to justify resistance to compulsory motorcycle helmet use on the grounds that helmets may cause neck injuries due to their mass. In the current study, we replicated Goldstein's models to understand how he obtained his unexpected results, and we then applied modern statistical methods to estimate the association of motorcycle helmet use with head injury, fatal injury, and neck injury among collision-involved motorcyclists. We found Goldstein's analysis to be critically flawed due to improper data imputation, modeling of extremely sparse data, and misinterpretation of model coefficients. Our new analysis showed that motorcycle helmets were associated with markedly lower risk of head injury (RR 0.40, 95% CI 0.31-0.52) and fatal injury (RR 0.44, 95% CI 0.26-0.74) and with moderately lower but statistically significant risk of neck injury (RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.40-0.99), after controlling for multiple potential confounders. PMID:26998593

  5. Mild head injury in preschool children: evidence that it can be associated with a persisting cognitive defect.

    Wrightson, P; McGinn, V; Gronwall, D

    1995-01-01

    This study describes the effect of mild head injury in preschool children on aspects of their cognitive performance in the year after injury and at the age of 6.5 years, with particular reference to the development of reading skills. Mild head injury was defined by diagnosis at a hospital emergency department of a head injury which was not severe enough to need admission for observation. Seventy eight such children were compared with a group of 86 with a minor injury elsewhere. The groups had...

  6. Head Injury in Children and Adolescents (Beyond the Basics)

    ... high speed, heavy, or sharp object (eg, baseball bat, golf club, bullet, knife) ● Inflicted injury (abuse), such ... as expressly permitted in this Agreement, any copying, distribution or modification of the Licensed Materials is strictly ...

  7. Sigmoid and transverse sinus thrombosis after closed head injury presenting with unilateral hearing loss

    Sinus thrombosis has rarely been associated with closed head injury; more often, thrombosis of the sigmoid or transverse sinus is caused by otogenic inflammations or tumours, or occurs during pregnancy. Symptoms are frequently vague, while untreated thrombus progression may be fatal due to venous congestion and infarction. We report a 32-year-old man presenting with right hearing loss, tinnitus and headache 2 days after a closed head injury. Neurological examination showed no additional abnormality. The EEG showed focal bifrontal slowing. CT revealed a fracture of the occipital bone. MRI and MRA demonstrated complete thrombosis of the right sigmoid and transverse sinuses. After 2 weeks of intravenous heparin therapy followed by warfarin, the patient's hearing improved and MRI and MRA showed complete recanalisation of the sigmoid and transverse sinuses. Venous sinus thrombosis can be an undetected sequel to head injury. Appropriate imaging studies should be carried out to enable therapy to be started as soon as possible. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in head injury; Comparative study with CT scan

    Ogawa, Takeki; Katabami, Tsuyoshi; Ozawa, Tomoko (Saint Marianna Univ., Yokohama (Japan). Yokohama City Seibu Hospital) (and others)

    1991-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scan were compared to define their roles in the evaluation of head injured patients. MRI was found to be equal or inferior to CT scan in detection of extraparenchymatous lesions due to a failure of CT scan to indentify ultra-early hemorrhage. While, MRI was far superior to CT scan in regard to the indentification of the intraparenchymatous lesions in the acute stage of head injury. The lesions in the central structure suggesting diffuse axonal injury (DAI) were commonly found in the patients showing lower Glasgow Coma Scale score, though the degree of central structure damage shown in MRI was not correlated with the neurological grading and outcome. We concluded that DAI may play a major role in the severe head injury, but the severity of DAI is not predictable by using MRI. (author).

  9. Sigmoid and transverse sinus thrombosis after closed head injury presenting with unilateral hearing loss

    Brors, D. [Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head- and Neck-Surgery; Dept. of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Head, Neck and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Fulda (Germany); Schaefers, M. [Dept. of Neurology, University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany); Schick, B.; Draf, W. [Dept. of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Head, Neck and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Fulda (Germany); Dazert, S. [Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head- and Neck-Surgery; Kahle, G. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Fulda (Germany)

    2001-02-01

    Sinus thrombosis has rarely been associated with closed head injury; more often, thrombosis of the sigmoid or transverse sinus is caused by otogenic inflammations or tumours, or occurs during pregnancy. Symptoms are frequently vague, while untreated thrombus progression may be fatal due to venous congestion and infarction. We report a 32-year-old man presenting with right hearing loss, tinnitus and headache 2 days after a closed head injury. Neurological examination showed no additional abnormality. The EEG showed focal bifrontal slowing. CT revealed a fracture of the occipital bone. MRI and MRA demonstrated complete thrombosis of the right sigmoid and transverse sinuses. After 2 weeks of intravenous heparin therapy followed by warfarin, the patient's hearing improved and MRI and MRA showed complete recanalisation of the sigmoid and transverse sinuses. Venous sinus thrombosis can be an undetected sequel to head injury. Appropriate imaging studies should be carried out to enable therapy to be started as soon as possible. (orig.)

  10. Neurotrauma in infants. Shaken impact syndrome (inflicted head injury).

    Wallis, W H; Goodman, G

    2000-12-01

    In summary, inflicted cerebral trauma is a devastating but ultimately preventable brain injury caused by unique physiologic mechanisms that result in a distinctive pattern of injury. Nurses in a variety of settings, from the clinic and emergency room to the pediatric intensive care unit, play a major role in the identification, documentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of ICT. The nurse's unique training also promotes prevention education and nonjudgmental support of the family. PMID:11855252

  11. Establishment of a head injury by club model in rabbits and experimental conditions

    Objective: To establish an animal model to replicate the injury by club in forensic medicine. Methods: Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were divided into control group (n=4), minor injury group (n=10), and severe injury group (n=10). Based on the BIM-Ⅱ Horizontal Bio-impact Machine, a self-designed iron bar was used to produce head injury by club. Six hours after injury, all the rabbits were subjected to a CT examination and dissected to observe the injury morphology and undergo routine pathological examination. Four control, six minor and severe rabbits were given moisture content examination. Results: Varying degrees of positive signs of the nervous system were observed in all the injured rabbits within 6 hours. The mortality rate was 1/10 in the minor injury group and 6/10 in the severe injury group. The morphological changes consisted of different levels of scalp hematoma, skull fracture, epidural hematoma, subdural hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage and brain injury. The difference in moisture content between the three groups was of statistical significance. Conclusion: Under the rigidly-controlled experimental condition, this animal model produces good reproducibility and stable results. Meanwhile, it can simulate the morphology of injury by club and be used to study the mechanism of injury by club in forensic medicine. (authors)

  12. Pathophysiology of repetitive head injury in sports. Prevention against catastrophic brain damage

    The most common head injury in sports is concussion and experiencing multiple concussions in a short period of time sometimes can cause severe brain damage. In this paper, we investigate severe brain damage due to repeated head injury in sports and discuss the pathophysiology of repeated sports injury. The majority of these severe cases are usually male adolescents or young adults that suffer a second head injury before they have recovered from the first head injury. All cases that could be confirmed by brain CT scan after the second injury revealed brain swelling associated with a thin subdural hematoma. We suggested that the existence of subdural hematoma is one of the major causes of brain swelling after repeated head injury in sports. Since repeated concussions occurring within a short period may have a risk for severe brain damage, the diagnosis for initial cerebral concussion should be done appropriately. To prevent catastrophic brain damage, the player who suffered from concussion should not engage in any sports before recovery. The american Academy of Neurology and Colorado Medical Society set a guideline to return to play after cerebral concussion. An international conference on concussion in sports was held at Prague in 2004. The summary and agreement of this meeting was published and the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) was introduced to treat sports-related concussion. In addition, a number of computerized cognitive assessment tests and test batteries have been developed to allow athletes to return to play. It is important that coaches, as well as players and trainers, understand the medical issues involved in concussion. (author)

  13. Impaired Cerebral Autoregulation during Head Up Tilt in Patients with Severe Brain Injury

    Riberholt, Christian Gunge; Olesen, Niels Damkjær; Thing, Mira;

    2016-01-01

    Early mobilization is of importance for improving long-term outcome for patients after severe acquired brain injury. A limiting factor for early mobilization by head-up tilt is orthostatic intolerance. The purpose of the present study was to examine cerebral autoregulation in patients with severe...... acquired brain injury and a low level of consciousness. Fourteen patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance and fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled. Blood pressure was evaluated by pulse contour analysis, heart rate and RR-intervals were determined by electrocardiography...... mean velocity and estimated cerebral perfusion pressure. Patients with acquired brain injury presented an increase in mean flow index during head-up tilt indicating impaired autoregulation (P < 0.001). Spectral analysis of heart rate variability in the frequency domain revealed lower magnitudes of ~0...

  14. Epidemiologic features of lethal head injury caused by highway traffic accidents

    1999-01-01

    Objective:To study the epidemiologic features of highway traffic accidents by analyzing the clinical data of the patients died of head injury.Methods:The reatures of the cases' age,occupation,status of head injury and complications.and the rescue procedures were retrospectively analyzed based on the data of 214 patients died of head injury.Results:The main victime were adults(78%)and peasants(52.8%).And the ost common head injuries were severe cerebral contusion with intracranial hematomas(73.4%).The mean arrival time from the accident spots to hospitals was(2.2±1.9)h.And the mean interval time between the arrival and operation was(1.9±0.9)h.Primary and secondary brainstem damage were the main causes of early death.Yet pulmonary infection and multiple organs failure were the common reasons for late death.Conclusions:Enhancing the propaganda for traffic regulations,establishing perfect pre-hospital and in-hospital EMS(emergency medical service)system,catching the opportunity of operation,and preventing complications are essential to reduce the mortality of traffic accidents induced head trauma.

  15. Risk of maltreatment-related injury: a cross-sectional study of children under five years old admitted to hospital with a head or neck injury or fracture.

    Joseph Jonathan Lee

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the predictive value and sensitivity of demographic features and injuries (indicators for maltreatment-related codes in hospital discharge records of children admitted with a head or neck injury or fracture. METHODS: STUDY DESIGN: Population-based, cross sectional study. SETTING: NHS hospitals in England. SUBJECTS: Children under five years old admitted acutely to hospital with head or neck injury or fracture. DATA SOURCE: Hospital Episodes Statistics, 1997 to 2009. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Maltreatment-related injury admissions, defined by ICD10 codes, were used to calculate for each indicator (demographic feature and/or type of injury: i the predictive value (proportion of injury admissions that were maltreatment-related; ii sensitivity (proportion of all maltreatment-related injury admissions with the indicator. RESULTS: Of 260,294 childhood admissions for fracture or head or neck injury, 3.2% (8,337 were maltreatment-related. With increasing age of the child, the predictive value for maltreatment-related injury declined but sensitivity increased. Half of the maltreatment-related admissions occurred in children older than one year, and 63% occurred in children with head injuries without fractures or intracranial injury. CONCLUSIONS: Highly predictive injuries accounted for very few maltreatment-related admissions. Protocols that focus on high-risk injuries may miss the majority of maltreated children.

  16. Toppled television sets and head injuries in the pediatric population: a framework for prevention.

    Cusimano, Michael D; Parker, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to children caused by falling televisions have become more frequent during the last decade. These injuries can be severe and even fatal and are likely to become even more common in the future as TVs increase in size and become more affordable. To formulate guidelines for the prevention of these injuries, the authors systematically reviewed the literature on injuries related to toppling televisions. The authors searched MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Scopus, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar according to the Cochrane guidelines for all studies involving children 0-18 years of age who were injured by toppled TVs. Factors contributing to injury were categorized using Haddon's Matrix, and the public health approach was used as a framework for developing strategies to prevent these injuries. The vast majority (84%) of the injuries occurred in homes and more than three-fourths were unwitnessed by adult caregivers. The TVs were most commonly large and elevated off the ground. Dressers and other furniture not designed to support TVs were commonly involved in the TV-toppling incident. The case fatality rate varies widely, but almost all deaths reported (96%) were due to brain injuries. Toddlers between the ages of 1 and 3 years most frequently suffer injuries to the head and neck, and they are most likely to suffer severe injuries. Many of these injuries require brain imaging and neurosurgical intervention. Prevention of these injuries will require changes in TV design and legislation as well as increases in public education and awareness. Television-toppling injuries can be easily prevented; however, the rates of injury do not reflect a sufficient level of awareness, nor do they reflect an acceptable effort from an injury prevention perspective. PMID:26416669

  17. Vehicle Related Factors that Influence Injury Outcome in Head-On Collisions

    Blum, Jeremy J.; Scullion, Paul; Morgan, Richard M.; Digges, Kennerly; Kan, Cing-Dao; Park, Shinhee; Bae, Hanil

    2008-01-01

    This study specifically investigated a range of vehicle-related factors that are associated with a lower risk of serious or fatal injury to a belted driver in a head-on collision. This analysis investigated a range of structural characteristics, quantities that describes the physical features of a passenger vehicle, e.g., stiffness or frontal geometry. The study used a data-mining approach (classification tree algorithm) to find the most significant relationships between injury outcome and th...

  18. A mouse model of weight-drop closed head injury: emphasis on cognitive and neurological deficiency

    Igor Khalin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in individuals worldwide. Producing a clinically relevant TBI model in small-sized animals remains fairly challenging. For good screening of potential therapeutics, which are effective in the treatment of TBI, animal models of TBI should be established and standardized. In this study, we established mouse models of closed head injury using the Shohami weight-drop method with some modifications concerning cognitive deficiency assessment and provided a detailed description of the severe TBI animal model. We found that 250 g falling weight from 2 cm height produced severe closed head injury in C57BL/6 male mice. Cognitive disorders in mice with severe closed head injury could be detected using passive avoidance test on day 7 after injury. Findings from this study indicate that weight-drop injury animal models are suitable for further screening of brain neuroprotectants and potentially are similar to those seen in human TBI.

  19. Diffuse Axonal Injury-A Distinct Clinicopathological Entity in Closed Head Injuries.

    Davceva, Natasha; Basheska, Neli; Balazic, Joze

    2015-09-01

    The knowledge about the diffuse axonal injury (DAI) as a clinicopathological entity has matured in the last 30 years. It has been defined clinically (immediate and prolonged unconsciousness leading to death or severe disability) and pathologically (the triad of DAI specific changes). In terms of its biomechanics, DAI is occurring as a result of acceleration forces of longer duration and has been fully reproduced experimentally.In the process of diagnosing DAI, the performance of a complete forensic neuropathological examination is essential and the immunohistochemistry method using antibodies against β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) has been proved to be highly sensitive and specific, selectively targeting the damaged axons.In this review, we are pointing to the significant characteristics of DAI as a distinct clinicopathological entity that can cause severe impairment of the brain function, and in the forensic medicine setting, it can be found as the concrete cause of death. We are discussing not only its pathological feature, its mechanism of occurrence, and the events on a cellular level but also the dilemmas about DAI that still exist in science: (1) regarding the strict criteria for its diagnosis and (2) regarding its biomechanical significance, which can be of a big medicolegal importance. PMID:26010053

  20. Memory disorder related to coma duration after head injury.

    Vilkki, J; Poropudas, K; Servo, A

    1988-01-01

    The relationship of memory and intelligence test performances to coma duration was studied in 51 head injured patients who had not been operated on for intracranial haematoma. Memory defect was related to coma duration, and was not secondary to impaired perceptual or conceptual analysis of the material to be remembered.

  1. Comparison of risk factors for cervical spine, head, serious, and fatal injury in rollover crashes.

    Funk, James R; Cormier, Joseph M; Manoogian, Sarah J

    2012-03-01

    Previous epidemiological studies of rollover crashes have focused primarily on serious and fatal injuries in general, while rollover crash testing has focused almost exclusively on cervical spine injury. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the risk factors for cervical spine, head, serious, and fatal injury in real world rollover crashes. Rollover crashes from 1995-2008 in the National Automotive Sampling System-Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) were investigated. A large data set of 6015 raw cases (2.5 million weighted) was generated. Nonparametric univariate analyses, univariate logistic regression, and multivariate logistic regression were conducted. Complete or partial ejection, a lack of seatbelt use, a greater number of roof inversions, and older occupant age significantly increased the risk of all types of injuries studied (phead, and cervical spine injury (pinjury in general. Higher BMI was associated with an increased risk of fatal, serious, and cervical spine injury (phead injury. Greater roof crush was associated with a higher rate of fatal and cervical spine injury (poccupant height, and occupant gender had inconsistent and generally non-significant effects on injury. This study demonstrates both common and unique risk factors for different types of injuries in rollover crashes. PMID:22269486

  2. Relations of blood pressure and head injury to regional cerebral blood flow.

    Kisser, Jason E; Allen, Allyssa J; Katzel, Leslie I; Wendell, Carrington R; Siegel, Eliot L; Lefkowitz, David; Waldstein, Shari R

    2016-06-15

    Hypertension confers increased risk for cognitive decline, dementia, and cerebrovascular disease. These associations have been attributed, in part, to cerebral hypoperfusion. Here we posit that relations of higher blood pressure to lower levels of cerebral perfusion may be potentiated by a prior head injury. Participants were 87 community-dwelling older adults - 69% men, 90% white, mean age=66.9years, 27.6% with a history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) defined as a loss of consciousness ≤30min resulting from an injury to the head, and free of major medical (other than hypertension), neurological or psychiatric comorbidities. All engaged in clinical assessment of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Computerized coding of the SPECT images yielded relative ratios of blood flow in left and right cortical and select subcortical regions. Cerebellum served as the denominator. Sex-stratified multiple regression analyses, adjusted for age, education, race, alcohol consumption, smoking status, and depressive symptomatology, revealed significant interactions of blood pressure and head injury to cerebral blood flow in men only. Specifically, among men with a history of head injury, higher systolic blood pressure was associated with lower levels of perfusion in the left orbital (β=-3.21, p=0.024) and left dorsolateral (β=-2.61, p=0.042) prefrontal cortex, and left temporal cortex (β=-3.36, p=0.014); higher diastolic blood pressure was marginally associated with lower levels of perfusion in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (β=-2.79, p=0.051). Results indicate that men with a history of head injury may be particularly vulnerable to the impact of higher blood pressure on cerebral perfusion in left anterior cortical regions, thus potentially enhancing risk for adverse brain and neurocognitive outcomes. PMID:27206865

  3. Risks of Brain Injury after Blunt Head Trauma

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The association of loss of consciousness (LOC and/or amnesia with traumatic brain injury (TBI identified on CT and TBI requiring acute intervention was evaluated in 2043 children <18 years old enrolled prospectively in a level 1 trauma center ED at University of California, Davis School of Medicine, CA.

  4. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in Concussive Head Injuries in Sports

    Vállez Garcia, David; Otte, Andreas; Glaudemans, Andor WJM; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Gielen, Jan LMA; Zwerver, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Concussions in sports and during recreational activities are a major source of traumatic brain injury in our society. This is mainly relevant in adolescence and young adulthood, where the annual rate of diagnosed concussions is increasing from year to year. Contact sports (e.g., ice hockey, American

  5. Resultant linear acceleration of an instrumented head form does not differ between junior and collegiate taekwondo athletes’ kicks

    David O’Sullivan; Gabriel P. Fife; Willy Pieter; Taehee Lim; Insik Shin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of various taekwondo kicks and age (school level) in absolute terms and relative body mass on the resultant linear acceleration (RLA) of an instrumented head form. Methods: Forty-eight male (middle school: 16; high school: 16; university: 16) taekwondo athletes were recruited for this study. Subjects performed 10 turning, 10 jump spinning hook, and 10 jump back kicks on a Hybrid II head mounted on a height-adjustable frame. Results: A 2-way (School × Kick) MANOVA was used to determine the differences in RLA between schools (age groups) by type of kick. There was no univariate School main effect for absolute RLA (η2=0.06) and RLA relative to body mass (η2=0.06). No univariate Kick main effects were found for absolute (η2=0.06) and relative RLA (η2=0.06). Conclusion: It is of concern that RLA did not significantly differ between school levels, implying that young taekwondo athletes generate similar forces to their adult counterparts, possibly exposing young athletes to an increased risk for head injuries.

  6. Long term bicycle related head injury trends for New South Wales, Australia following mandatory helmet legislation.

    Olivier, Jake; Walter, Scott R; Grzebieta, Raphael H

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1991 enactment of mandatory helmet legislation (MHL) for cyclists in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, there has been extensive debate as to its effect on head injury rates at a population level. Many previous studies have focused on the impact of MHL around the time of enactment, while little has been done to examine the ongoing effects. We aimed to extend prior work by investigating long-term trends in cyclist head and arm injuries over the period 1991-2010. The counts of cyclists hospitalised with head or arm injuries were jointly modelled with log-linear regression. The simultaneous modelling of related injury mechanisms avoids the need for actual exposure data and accounts for the effects of changes in the cycling environment, cycling behaviour and general safety improvements. Models were run separately with population counts, bicycle imports, the average weekday counts of cyclists in Sydney CBD and cycling estimates from survey data as proxy exposures. Overall, arm injuries were higher than head injuries throughout the study period, consistent with previous post-MHL observations. The trends in the two injury groups also significantly diverged, such that the gap between rates increased with time. The results suggest that the initial observed benefit of MHL has been maintained over the ensuing decades. There is a notable additional safety benefit after 2006 that is associated with an increase in cycling infrastructure spending. This implies that the effect of MHL is ongoing and progress in cycling safety in NSW has and will continue to benefit from focusing on broader issues such as increasing cycling infrastructure. PMID:23026203

  7. Field Marshal Erwin Rommel: the head injury that may have prolonged the Second World War.

    Fuhrman, Heather A; Mullin, Jeffrey P; Sloffer, Chris A

    2016-07-01

    War-related head injury, indeed neurological injury in general, has been a part of the history of humankind for as long as there has been warfare. Such injuries can result in the removal of the individual from combat, thus eliminating any subsequent contribution that he or she might have made to the battle. However, at times, the injuries can have more wide-reaching effects. In the case of commanders or leaders, the impact of their injuries may include the loss of their influence, planning, and leadership, and thus have a disproportionate effect on the battle, or indeed the war. Field Marshal Erwin Rommel was a talented military strategist and leader who was respected by friends and foes alike. He held an honored reputation by the German people and the military leadership. His head injury on July 17, 1944, resulted in his being removed from the field of battle in northern France, but also meant that he was not able to lend his stature to the assassination attempt of Adolph Hitler on July 20. It is possible that, had he been able to lend his stature to the events, Hitler's hold on the nation's government might have been loosened, and the war might have been brought to an end a year earlier. The authors review Rommel's career, his injury, the subsequent medical treatment, and his subsequent death. PMID:27364261

  8. Head Injury by Pneumatic Nail Gun: A Case Report

    Kim, Tae Woo; Shim, Yu Shik; Oh, Se Yang; Hyun, Dong Keun; Park, Hyeon Seon; Kim, Eun Young

    2014-01-01

    A 56-year-old man had five nail gun-shots on his skull due to attempted suicide and was transferred to the emergency room. Because the nail head played a role as a brake, the launched nail made a hole in the skull but did not entirely pass through it. If major artery or sinuses are not involved, cautious retrieval after a small scalp incision can be performed and prophylactic antibiotics be administered for treatment.

  9. Maternal reporting of behaviour following very severe blunt head injury.

    Kinsella, G.; Packer, S.; Olver, J.

    1991-01-01

    Mothers of 40 very severely head injured male subjects rated their son's behaviour on the Current Behaviour Scale and their ratings were compared with mothers' ratings of 40 control male subjects. The scale was able to discriminate the two groups, by utilising two factors--loss of emotional control and loss of motivation. The mothers' level of emotional distress was closely related to their reporting of loss of emotional control in their sons, but reporting of loss of motivation, or lowered a...

  10. CT scan in severe diffuse head injury: physiological and clinical correlations.

    Teasdale, E; Cardoso, E.; Galbraith, S; Teasdale, G.

    1984-01-01

    CT scan findings, clinical features and intracranial pressure were studied in patients with severe diffuse head injury. Compression of the 3rd ventricle and basal cisterns closely correlated with an intracranial pressure greater than 20 mmHg, with clinical signs of midbrain dysfunctions and worse prognosis. These CT scan findings can indicate whether intracranial pressure monitoring is appropriate.

  11. Clinical Utility of '99mTc-HMPAO Brain SPECT Findings in Chronic Head Injury

    Minima deterioration of cerebral perfusion or microanatomical changes were undetectable on conventional Brain CT or MRI. So evaluation of focal functional changes of the brain parenchyme is essential in chronic head injury patients, who did not show focal anatomical changes on these radiological studies. However, the patients who had longstanding neurologic sequelae following head injury, there had been no available imaging modalities for evaluating these patients precisely. Therefore we tried to detect the focal functional changes on the brain parenchyme using 99mTc-HMPAO Brain SPECT on the patients of chronic head injuries. Twenty three patients who had suffered from headache, memory dysfunction, personality change and insomnia lasting more than six months following head injury were included in our cases, which showed no anatomical abnormalities on Brain CT or MRI. At first they underwent psychological test whether the symptoms were organic or not. Also we were able to evaluate the cerebral perfusion changes with 99mTc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in 22 patients among the 23, which five patients were focal and 17 patients were nonfocally diffuse perfusion changes. Thus we can predict the perfusion changes such as local vascular deterioration or functional defects using 99mTc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in the patients who had suffered from post-traumatic sequelae, which changes were undetectable on Brain CT or MRI.

  12. A mathematical outcome prediction model in severe head injury : a pilot study.

    Mukherjee K

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available 103 patients of head injury, with a Glasgow coma scale (GCS score of 8 or less, were studied prospectively. GCS score, brain stem reflexes, motor score, reaction level scale, and Glasgow Liege scale were evaluated as prognostic variables. Linear logistic regression analysis was used to obtain coefficients of these variables and mathematical formulae developed to predict outcome in individual patients.

  13. Referential Cohesion and Logical Coherence of Narration after Closed Head Injury

    Davis, G. Albyn; Coelho, Carl A.

    2004-01-01

    A group with closed head injury was compared to neurologically intact controls regarding the referential cohesion and logical coherence of narrative production. A sample of six stories was obtained with tasks of cartoon-elicited story-telling and auditory-oral retelling. We found deficits in the clinical group with respect to referential cohesion,…

  14. Hemiplegia Following Mild Head Injury in a Child with Sturge-Weber Syndrome - A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    Ahmed, Shameem; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-08-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a neurocutaneous disorder with skin, eye, and brain involvement. Hemiplegia in children with SWS after a mild head injury is known to occur in up to one-fifth of cases. A3-year male child presented with a sudden onset hemiplegia following a mild head injury. He was known to have seizure disorder and was being treated with sodium valproate. CTscan of the brain showed contusion. He was admitted for neurological observations and the patient made complete recovery with conservative treatment. MRI scan of the brain done 5 days later which showed venous malformation of choroid plexus on the left side. These changes were considered to be consistent with a preexisting cerebral lesion which coincidentally got detected at neuroimaging done after the mild head injury. There is need for good seizure control as it is likely to be associated with better neurological outcome. The case emphasizes the need for clinical correlation with findings at neuroimaging in children with SWS presenting with head injuries. PMID:27539768

  15. Proposed diagnosis criteria for inflicted head injury of children younger than two years of age

    It is difficult to distinguish whether children's head injuries are due to physical abuse or unintentional accidents. However, in the literature, medical findings specific to infant physical abuse were identified. Thus, we developed diagnostic criteria for inflicted head injury (IHI) and assessed its validity. Subjects were collected from all patients who were less than two years old when they visited National Center for Child Health (NCCHD) and Development and underwent head CT scan to assess head trauma from March 1, 2002 to December 31, 2005. Diagnostic criteria for IHI were developed based on definitions of Duhaime et al (1992) and Reece et al (2001). Validity of diagnosis criteria was assessed by comparing the official report to the Child Guidance Center (CGC) from NCCHD to the disposition decided by the CGC. Two-hundred and sixty cases were collected and diagnosed. There was a 86.5% match of the number of cases which were diagnosed as IHI or non-IHI using the IHI diagnostic criteria with official reports to CGC from NCCHD. Among the cases which were diagnosed as presumptive IHI and also reported to the CGC, 20 cases (83.3%) were regarded as abused cases by the CGC. The diagnostic criteria for IHI were valid and would be useful for pediatricians not to condone inflicted head injury. (author)

  16. Vehicle related factors that influence injury outcome in head-on collisions.

    Blum, Jeremy J; Scullion, Paul; Morgan, Richard M; Digges, Kennerly; Kan, Cing-Dao; Park, Shinhee; Bae, Hanil

    2008-10-01

    This study specifically investigated a range of vehicle-related factors that are associated with a lower risk of serious or fatal injury to a belted driver in a head-on collision. This analysis investigated a range of structural characteristics, quantities that describes the physical features of a passenger vehicle, e.g., stiffness or frontal geometry. The study used a data-mining approach (classification tree algorithm) to find the most significant relationships between injury outcome and the structural variables. The algorithm was applied to 120,000 real-world, head-on collisions, from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA's) State Crash data files, that were linked to structural attributes derived from frontal crash tests performed as part of the USA New Car Assessment Program. As with previous literature, the analysis found that the heavier vehicles were correlated with lower injury risk to their drivers. This analysis also found a new and significant correlation between the vehicle's stiffness and injury risk. When an airbag deployed, the vehicle's stiffness has the most statistically significant correlation with injury risk. These results suggest that in severe collisions, lower intrusion in the occupant cabin associated with higher stiffness is at least as important to occupant protection as vehicle weight for self-protection of the occupant. Consequently, the safety community might better improve self-protection by a renewed focus on increasing vehicle stiffness in order to improve crashworthiness in head-on collisions. PMID:19026230

  17. Radiobiological modeling of interplay between accelerated repopulation and altered fractionation schedules in head and neck cancer

    Marcu Loredana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancer represents a challenge for radiation oncologists due to accelerated repopulation of cancer cells during treatment. This study aims to simulate, using Monte Carlo methods, the response of a virtual head and neck tumor to both conventional and altered fractionation schedules in radiotherapy when accelerated repopulation is considered. Although clinical trials are indispensable for evaluation of novel therapeutic techniques, they are time-consuming processes which involve many complex and variable factors for success. Models can overcome some of the limitations encountered by trials as they are able to simulate in less complex environment tumor cell kinetics and dynamics, interaction processes between cells and ionizing radiation and their outcome. Conventional, hyperfractionated and accelerated treatment schedules have been implemented in a previously developed tumor growth model which also incorporates tumor repopulation during treatment. This study focuses on the influence of three main treatment-related parameters, dose per fraction, inter fraction interval and length of treatment gap and gap timing based on RTOG trial data on head and neck cancer, on tumor control. The model has shown that conventionally fractionated radiotherapy is not able to eradicate the stem population of the tumor. Therefore, new techniques such as hyperfractionated/ accelerated radiotherapy schedules should be employed. Furthermore, the correct selection of schedule-related parameters (dose per fraction, time between fractions, treatment gap scheduling is crucial in overcoming accelerated repopulation. Modeling of treatment regimens and their input parameters can offer better understanding of the radiobiological interactions and also treatment outcome.

  18. Two cases of 16th century head injuries managed in royal European families.

    Dowling, Kamilah A; Goodrich, James Tait

    2016-07-01

    In Europe, during the 16th century, there were a number of prominent general surgeons adventurous enough to consider operating on the brain for head injuries. From the time of Hippocrates, operating on the skull and brain was considered both treacherous and too dangerous to be undertaken except on rare occasions. Operating on a member of a royal court was considered even more exceptional because if the outcome was poor, the surgeon could lose a hand or limb, or, even worse, be beheaded. The authors present two interesting cases of royal family members who underwent surgery for head injuries that were quite severe. The surgeons involved, Ambroise Paré, Andreas Vesalius, and Berengario da Carpi, were among the most prominent surgeons in Europe. Despite very challenging political situations, all were willing to undertake a complex surgical intervention on the member of a prominent royal family. The individuals involved, both royal and medical, plus the neurosurgical injuries are discussed. PMID:27364255

  19. Skull fracture and hemorrhage pattern among fatal and nonfatal head injury assault victims - a critical analysis

    Chandrabhal Tripathi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The global incidence of fatal head injuries as the result of assault is greater than the number of non-fatal cases. The important factors that determine the outcome in terms of survival of such head injury cases include the type of weapon used, type and site of skull fracture, intra cranial hemorrhage and the brain injury. The present study aims to highlight the role of skull fractures as an indirect indicator of force of impact and the intra cranial hemorrhage by a comparative study of assault victims with fatal and nonfatal head injuries. METHODS: 91 head injury cases resulting from assault were studied in the Department of Forensic Medicine, IMS, BHU Varanasi over a period of 2 years from which 18 patients survived and 73 cases had a lethal outcome. Details of the fatal cases were obtained from the police inquest and an autopsy while examination of the surviving patients was done after obtaining an informed consent. The data so obtained were analyzed and presented in the study. RESULTS: Assault with firearms often led to fatality whereas with assault involving blunt weapons the survival rate was higher. Multiple cranial bones were involved in 69.3% cases while comminuted fracture of the skull was common among the fatal cases. Fracture of the base of the skull was noted only in the fatal cases and a combination of subdural and subarachnoid haemorrhage was found in the majority of the fatal cases. CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows skull fractures to be an important indicator of severity of trauma in attacks to the head. Multiple bone fracture, comminuted fracture and base fractures may be considered as high risk factors in attempted homicide cases.

  20. Therapeutic effect of mild hypothermia on severe traumatic head injury

    裘五四; 刘伟国; 沈宏; 王卫民; 章志量; 张瑛; 江素君; 杨小锋

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effect of mild hypothermia on severe traumatic brain injury.Methods: Eighty-six in-patients with severe traumatic brain injury treated ordinarily were consecutively randomized into two groups: a hypothermia group (n=43) and a normothermia group (the control group, n=43). In the hypothermia group, the core temperature (i.e., nasopharyngeal or brain temperature) of the patient was reduced to and maintained at 33-35℃ with a systemic cooling blanket. Natural rewarming began after 3-5 days (mean: 4.3 days) of hypothermia treatment. In the control group, the patient received no hypothermia treatment. The vital sign, extradural pressure and serum superoxide dismutase were observed and measured during treatment, and the complications as well as the Glasgow outcome scale were evaluated at 2 years after injury.Results: The mean extradural pressure in the hypothermia group (27.38 mm Hg±4.88 mm Hg at 24 hours, 29.40 mm Hg±4.50 mm Hg at 48 hours and 26.40 mm Hg±4.13 mm Hg at 72 hours after injury) was much lower than that in the control group (32.63 mm Hg±3.00 mm Hg, 34.80 mm Hg±6.00 mm Hg and 31.81 mm Hg±4.50 mm Hg respectively at 24, 48 and 72 hours, P<0.05). The mean serum superoxide dismutase levels in the hypothermia group on days 3 and 7 (583.7 μg/L±99.6 μg/L and 699.4 μg/L±217.3 μg/L, respectively) were much higher than those in the control group at the same time period (446.6 μg/L±79.5 μg/L and 497.1 μg/L±101.2 μg/L, respectively, P<0.01). The recovery rates at 2 years after injury were 65.1% in the hypothermia group and 37.2% in the control group (P<0.05). The mortality rates were 25.6% in the hypothermia group and 51.2% in the control group (P<0.05). The complications, including pulmonary infections, thrombocytopenia (platelet count <100×109/L), hemorrhage in the digestive tract, electrolyte disorders and renal malfunction, were managed without severe sequelae .Conclusions: Mild hypothermia is a safe and

  1. Unilateral hypoxic-ischemic injury in young children from abusive head trauma, lacking craniocervical vascular dissection or cord injury

    McKinney, Alexander M.; Thompson, Linda R.; Truwit, Charles L.; Velders, Scott; Karagulle, Ayse; Kiragu, Andrew [University of Minnesota Medical School, Department of Radiology, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) in young children usually has a severe outcome when associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), which is best characterized by MRI in the acute or subacute phase utilizing diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). HIE in this setting has been hypothesized to result from stretching of the spinal cord, brainstem, or vasculature. To provide clinical correlation in patients with unilateral HIE and to postulate a mechanism in the setting of suspected AHT. IRB approval was obtained. Over a 5-year period, the medical records and images were reviewed of the 53 children {<=}3 years of age who presented with acute head trauma according to the hospital registry. The children were subselected in order to determine how many suffered either HIE or AHT, and to detect those with unilateral HIE. In 11 of the 53 children, the etiology of the head trauma was highly suspicious for abuse. In 38 the head trauma was accidental and in 4 the trauma was of unknown etiology and at the time of this report was unresolved legally. Of the 53, 4 suffered HIE confirmed by CT or MRI. In three of these four with HIE the trauma was considered highly suspicious for AHT. Two of these three were the only patients with unilateral HIE, and both (7 months and 14 months of age) presented with early subacute phase HIE seen on DW MRI (range 4-7 days) and are described in detail with clinical correlation. The third child with AHT and HIE had bilateral findings. In the fourth patient the HIE was bilateral and was considered accidental. The work-up for both patients with unilateral HIE included head CT, craniocervical MRI, and craniocervical MR angiography (MRA). In both, there was mostly unilateral, deep white matter restricted diffusion, with subdural hematomas that were small compared to the extent of hypoxic-ischemic insult, and no skull fracture. Craniocervical MRA and axial thin-section fat-saturation images were negative for dissection, brainstem, or cord injury. Legal

  2. Unilateral hypoxic-ischemic injury in young children from abusive head trauma, lacking craniocervical vascular dissection or cord injury

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) in young children usually has a severe outcome when associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), which is best characterized by MRI in the acute or subacute phase utilizing diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). HIE in this setting has been hypothesized to result from stretching of the spinal cord, brainstem, or vasculature. To provide clinical correlation in patients with unilateral HIE and to postulate a mechanism in the setting of suspected AHT. IRB approval was obtained. Over a 5-year period, the medical records and images were reviewed of the 53 children ≤3 years of age who presented with acute head trauma according to the hospital registry. The children were subselected in order to determine how many suffered either HIE or AHT, and to detect those with unilateral HIE. In 11 of the 53 children, the etiology of the head trauma was highly suspicious for abuse. In 38 the head trauma was accidental and in 4 the trauma was of unknown etiology and at the time of this report was unresolved legally. Of the 53, 4 suffered HIE confirmed by CT or MRI. In three of these four with HIE the trauma was considered highly suspicious for AHT. Two of these three were the only patients with unilateral HIE, and both (7 months and 14 months of age) presented with early subacute phase HIE seen on DW MRI (range 4-7 days) and are described in detail with clinical correlation. The third child with AHT and HIE had bilateral findings. In the fourth patient the HIE was bilateral and was considered accidental. The work-up for both patients with unilateral HIE included head CT, craniocervical MRI, and craniocervical MR angiography (MRA). In both, there was mostly unilateral, deep white matter restricted diffusion, with subdural hematomas that were small compared to the extent of hypoxic-ischemic insult, and no skull fracture. Craniocervical MRA and axial thin-section fat-saturation images were negative for dissection, brainstem, or cord injury. Legal

  3. Diffuse optical monitoring of hemodynamic changes in piglet brain with closed head injury

    Zhou, Chao; Eucker, Stephanie A.; Durduran, Turgut; Yu, Guoqiang; Ralston, Jill; Friess, Stuart H.; Ichord, Rebecca N.; Margulies, Susan S.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2009-05-01

    We used a nonimpact inertial rotational model of a closed head injury in neonatal piglets to simulate the conditions following traumatic brain injury in infants. Diffuse optical techniques, including diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), were used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation and blood flow continuously and noninvasively before injury and up to 6 h after the injury. The DCS measurements of relative cerebral blood flow were validated against the fluorescent microsphere method. A strong linear correlation was observed between the two techniques (R=0.89, pheart rate. Finally, the diffuse optical techniques demonstrated sensitivity to dynamic physiological events, such as apnea, cardiac arrest, and hypertonic saline infusion. In total, the investigation corraborates potential of the optical methods for bedside monitoring of pediatric and adult human patients in the neurointensive care unit.

  4. Prognosis in children with head injury: An analysis of 340 patients

    Suresh H

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The outcome in children with head injury is distinctive because of the different biophysical properties of the child's skull and brain, and their reaction to injury. Methods: In this retrospective study of three hundred and forty children with head injury, managed from January 1993 to December 1998, at NIMHANS, the factors influencing outcome were analyzed. Results: On admission there were 40 children in GCS 3-5, 55 children in GCS 6-8, 96 in GCS 9-12 and 152 children in GCS 13-15. Eleven patients were under 2 years of age, 53 were between 3-5 years, 140 were between 6-10 years and 156 were between 11-15 years of age. The prognosis in various intracranial pathologies due to head injury was evaluated and outcome assessed at discharge. There were 95 children with EDH and 8.4% had poor outcome (vegetative state or death. There were 85 patients with contusion and poor outcome was noted in 18.8%. One hundred patients had diffuse cerebral oedema on CT scan and outcome was poor in 25% of these patients. The clinical features associated with poor prognosis were, absence of ocular movements (50%, abnormal pupillary size and reaction (49% and age less than 2 years (27%.

  5. Parkinson's syndrome after closed head injury: a single case report.

    Doder, M; Jahanshahi, M; Turjanski, N; Moseley, I F; Lees, A J

    1999-03-01

    A 36 year old man, who sustained a skull fracture in 1984, was unconscious for 24 hours, and developed signs of Parkinson's syndrome 6 weeks after the injury. When assessed in 1995, neuroimaging disclosed a cerebral infarction due to trauma involving the left caudate and lenticular nucleus. Parkinson's syndrome was predominantly right sided, slowly progressive, and unresponsive to levodopa therapy. Reaction time tests showed slowness of movement initiation and execution with both hands, particularly the right. Recording of movement related cortical potentials suggested bilateral deficits in movement preparation. Neuropsychological assessment disclosed no evidence of major deficits on tests assessing executive function or working memory, with the exception of selective impairments on the Stroop and on a test of self ordered random number sequences. There was evidence of abulia. The results are discussed in relation to previous literature on basal ganglia lesions and the effects of damage to different points of the frontostriatal circuits. PMID:10084539

  6. [Therapy of head injuries caused by animal slaughter guns].

    Crevenna, Richard; Klintschar, Michael; Weger, Martin; Weger, Wolfgang; Quittan, Michael; Fialka-Moser, Veronika; Homann, Carl N

    2003-01-01

    Slaughterer's guns ("humane killers") are powder-activated cattle skull impacting tools. Today mechanical stunning is typical for country like regions, because in the municipal slaughter-houses electrical stunning of pigs and ruminants is preferred. In rare cases these weapons are used for suicide. They then cause penetrating brain lesions and if the victim survives the brain-damage, an encephalitis caused by the impacted material results. The neurosurgical treatment is to revise the gunshot canal and to remove impacted fragments of bone and contaminated skin (imprimat) under antibiotic cover. A psychiatric treatment of the mostly underlying depression and a rehabilitative treatment should complete therapy. So treatment of slaughterer's gun injury should have a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:12621690

  7. Head and Maxillofacial Injuries in Child and Adolescent Victims of Automotive Accidents

    Alessandro Leite Cavalcanti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Victims of motor vehicle accidents may suffer multiple lesions, including maxillofacial injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with head, facial, and maxillofacial injuries in child and adolescent victims of automobile accidents. A cross-sectional study was carried out with analysis of forensic medical reports from the Legal Medical Institute of Campina Grande, Brazil, between January 2008 and December 2011. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis was conducted using the chi-square test (α = 0.05. From 1613 medical reports analyzed, the sample is composed 232 (14.4% reports referring to child and adolescent victims of automobile accidents aged 0–19 years of both sexes. Victims were mostly adolescents aged from 15 to 19 years (64.2%, males (73.7%, and motorcyclists (51.3%. More than half of the victims had single lesions (54.3% located in the head (20.7% and face (21.6%. Head injuries occurred more frequently in children aged 0–4 years (53.8%, PR = 5.065, 95% CI = 1.617–5.870 and pedestrians (30.4%, PR = 2.039, 95% CI = 1.024–4.061, while facial and maxillofacial injuries occurred in higher proportion among females (31.1%, PR = 0.489, 95% CI = 0.251–0.954. Our findings suggest that accidents involving motorcyclists are the most prevalent, affecting male adolescents aged from 15 to 19 years, resulting in a high frequency of injuries in the head and face regions.

  8. [Headache as the consequence of brain concussion and contusion in closed head injuries in children].

    Lemka, M

    1999-01-01

    The most frequent type of head injury in children is closed head trauma with brain concussion or contusion, and headache is the dominant complaint of early and late postinjury period. Because of scant number of studies on the problem of occurrence, characteristics and persistence of posttraumatic headache this study was undertaken in a group of 100 children (29 girls and 71 boys), aged 3-14 years old, 90 after brain concussion and 10 after contusion. Children with a history of injuries, central nervous system infections, with headaches before injury and chronic diseases were excluded. In 9 cases linear skull fracture was present after injury. The material was examined within one week after trauma, and then after 3, 6, and 12 months. After 3 months EEG was performed and repeated after 6 and 12 months in children with persistent headache or those without headache but with abnormal EEG results in the first examination. According to the additional diagnostic examinations, I excluded other causes of headache, besides head injury. In my observation 83% of children had headache after brain concussion and contusion. The majority--56%--had acute posttraumatic headache, but 27% of children complained of chronic headache, mainly tension type headache. Only 3% had migraine. In 21% of all group of 100 children, I noticed the headache persisting during the whole year of my observation. The important risk factor for the occurrence of posttraumatic headache were the age of child at the moment injury and the period of unconsciousness. The electroencephalographic recording still remains the important additional examination of posttraumatic consequences. PMID:10719686

  9. Characteristics of associated craniofacial trauma in patients with head injuries: An experience with 100 cases

    Rajendra Prasad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Facial fractures and concomitant cranial injuries carry the significant potential for mortality and neurological morbidity mainly in young adults. Aims and Objectives: To analyze the characteristics of head injuries and associated facial injuries, the management options and outcome following cranio-facial trauma. Methods: This retrospective review was performed at Justice K. S. Hegde Charitable Hospital, and associated A. B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore. Following Ethical Committee approval, hospital charts and radiographs of 100 consecutive patients of cranio-facial trauma managed at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Neurosurgery between January 2004 and December 2004 were reviewed. Results: Majority of the patients were in the 2nd to 4th decade (79% with a male to female ratio of -8.09:1. Road traffic accidents were the common cause of craniofacial trauma in present study (54% followed by fall from height (30%. Loss of consciousness was the most common clinical symptom (62% followed by headache (33%. Zygoma was the most commonly fractured facial bone 48.2% (alone 21.2%, in combination 27.2%. Majority of patients had mild head injury and managed conservatively in present series. Causes of surgical intervention for intracranial lesions were compound depressed fracture, contusion and intracranial hematoma. Operative indications for facial fractures were displaced facial bone fractures. Major causes of mortality were associated systemic injuries. Conclusion: Adult males are the most common victims in craniofacial trauma, and road traffic accidents were responsible for the majority. Most of the patients sustained mild head injuries and were managed conservatively. Open reduction and internal fixation with miniplates was used for displaced facial bone fractures.

  10. Acute severe head injury resulted from road traffic accidents:a report on 231 cases

    刘敬业; 张赛; 等

    1999-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the epidemiology and clinical outcome of acute severe head injurey induced by road traffic accidents.Methods:The data of 231 patients with acute severe head injury induced by road traffic accidents were retrospectively studied.Results:The major victim-maker was automobiles (98.8%).The first three common types of traffic accidents were automobiles crashing into automobiles,automobiles crashing into bicycles(42.9%),and automobiles crashing pedestrians(40.3%).Eighty-seven patients out of 231 died,with the mortality of 37.7%.Conclusions:It suggests tat improving traffic administration and traffic safety consciousness may significantly reduce traffic trauma.

  11. Prediction of time trends in recovery of cognitive function after mild head injury

    Müller, Kay; Ingebrigtsen, Tor; Wilsgaard, Tom;

    2009-01-01

    . There was significant improvement of performance after 6 months. APOE-epsilon4 genotype was the only independent factor significantly predicting less improvement. CONCLUSION: The presence of the APOE-epsilon4 allele predicts less recovery of cognitive function after mild head injury....... change. RESULTS: A Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 15, traumatic brain injury demonstrated with computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and serum S-100B greater than 0.14 microg/L predicted impaired cognitive performance both at baseline and after 6 months; APOE genotype did not...

  12. Injury-induced asymmetric cell death as a driving force for head regeneration in Hydra.

    Galliot, Brigitte

    2013-03-01

    The freshwater Hydra polyp provides a unique model system to decipher the mechanisms underlying adult regeneration. Indeed, a single cut initiates two distinct regenerative processes, foot regeneration on one side and head regeneration on the other side, the latter relying on the rapid formation of a local head organizer. Two aspects are discussed here: the asymmetric cellular remodeling induced by mid-gastric bisection and the signaling events that trigger head organizer formation. In head-regenerating tips (but not in foot ones), a wave of cell death takes place immediately, leading the apoptotic cells to transiently release Wnt3 and activate the β-catenin pathway in the neighboring cycling cells to push them through mitosis. This process, which mimics the apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation process deciphered in Drosophila larvae regenerating their discs, likely corresponds to an evolutionarily conserved mechanism, also at work in Xenopus tadpoles regenerating their tail or mice regenerating their skin or liver. How is this process generated in Hydra? Several studies pointed to the necessary activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1-2 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways during early head regeneration. Indeed inhibition of ERK 1-2 or knockdown of RSK, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and CREB-binding protein (CBP) prevent injury-induced apoptosis and head regeneration. The current scenario involves an asymmetric activation of the MAPK/CREB pathway to trigger injury-induced apoptosis in the interstitial cells and in the epithelial cells a CREB/CBP-dependent transcriptional activation of early genes essential for head-organizing activity as wnt3, HyBra1, and prdl-a. The question now is how bisection in the rather uniform central region of the polyp can generate this immediately asymmetric signaling. PMID:22833103

  13. Cross-correlation between head acceleration and stabilograms in humans in orthostatic posture.

    Teixeira, Felipe G; Jesus, Igor R T; Mello, Roger G T; Nadal, Jurandir

    2012-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the role of the vestibular system in the postural sway control using the cross correlation function. A sample of 19 young, healthy male adults was monitored with a three axial accelerometer placed over the head during a stabilometric test, standing on a force platform during 3 min in four conditions: eyes closed and open, and feet apart and together. The normalized cross correlation (NCCF) function and the Monte Carlo simulation were used to correlate changes in body sway with head accelerations. Significant NCCF was rarely observed in conditions with opened eyes, and occurred in six subjects with eyes closed and reduced support basis. These results are inconclusive. As no delayed response was observed, the classical negative feedback appears to be absent, and either phasic displacements of the center of pressure and the head or anticipatory control could be occurring. PMID:23366680

  14. PATTERN OF HEAD INJURIES IN FATAL ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN INDORE REGION, M. P.

    Chaturvedi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic accident is the leading cause of serious injuries with associated head trauma especially in youth and middle age persons. Head injury is the most common cause of mortality and major health problem all over the world The Incidence of RTAs was higher in males and in 3rd to 4th decade of life owing to increase risk exposure to males due to more outdoor activities. Incidence of deaths due to RTAs was maximum (45.67% in two wheeler riders followed by pedestrians in 33.33% cases. The present study was conducted on dead bodies, died of accidents involving two wheeler, four wheeler and bicycle. The rate of incidence is higher in India because of bad traffic patterns and possibly the lack of awareness about traffic rules and also lack of good hospital services to our victims of RTAs

  15. Outcome of patients with traumatic head injury in infants: An institutional experience at level 1 trauma center

    Gaurang Vaghani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic head injury is a common cause of mortality and acquired disability in infants and children. However, patterns and outcome of head injury in infants are different from other age groups. Aims and Objectives: Aim of our study was to find out epidemiological factors, characteristics of injury, and outcome in infants with traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study from March 2009 through Feb 2012, at JPNATC, AIIMS, New Delhi. The clinical records of all patients, admitted with head injury were evaluated. Twenty-nine infants with traumatic brain injury were followed up and outcome was analyzed. Results: Twenty-nine infants with traumatic brain injury were included in the study. Of these 17 (59% were boys and 12 (41% were girls. Fall from height was recorded in 27 (93% patients and road traffic accident was the mode of injury in 2 (7%. Mild head injury (GCS 14-15 was found in 18 (62% patients, moderate in 4 (14% patients (GCS 9-13, severe (GCS 3-8 in 7 (24% patients. SDH was the most common injury in 8 (27% patients. Out of these 4 (14% were immediately operated, 25 (86% were managed conservatively. Overall mortality was 11% (3 patients. Glasgow Outcome Scale was 5 in 20 (69% patients and 3 (10.3% patients each had GOS 3 or 4. Conclusion: Infants suffered significant brain injury due to fall. Traumatic brain injury in infants generally carries good outcome. Severe head injury was observed to be a predictor of poor outcome.

  16. Imaging of spinal injury in abusive head trauma: a retrospective study

    Spinal imaging has been a neglected part of abusive head trauma (AHT) imaging. As most of the radiographs and CT spine are negative in AHT in infants, the cervical spine is assumed to be normal. There is increasing evidence in the role of injury to brainstem and cervical cord in the pathogenesis of AHT. In addition, in courts of law, there is fierce debate about AHT, its mimics and other disparate nontraumatic diagnoses explaining the neuroradiological and skeletal findings. However, this discussion ignores the evidence and significance of spinal injury. We sought to study the cervical spine in an AHT cohort to understand the true prevalence of spinal injuries in AHT and contrast it with cohorts of accidental and nontraumatic groups to give the clinicians a robust diagnostic tool in evaluating AHT. The purpose of this study is to compare the relative incidence of spinal ligamentous and soft-tissue abnormalities on spinal MRI among three groups of children ages < 48 months: (1) those with AHT, (2) those with accidental trauma, and (3) those with nontraumatic conditions. This comparative study included 183 children who underwent spine MRI: 67 with AHT, 46 with accidental trauma and a clinical suspicion of spinal injury, and 70 with nontraumatic conditions. Clinical and radiographic findings were collected in all cases and were analyzed retrospectively to identify MRI evidence of traumatic spinal injuries. The incidence of spinal injuries among the three groups was compared. The incidence of spinal ligamentous injuries was calculated for those with and without radiographic evidence of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. All comparisons were performed using Fisher exact test with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Cervical spine ligamentous injuries (predominantly the nuchal, atlanto-occipital and atlanto-axial ligaments) were present in 78% of the AHT group, 46% of the accidental trauma group and 1% of the nontraumatic group; all of these differences were

  17. Imaging of spinal injury in abusive head trauma: a retrospective study

    Choudhary, Arabinda K. [Nemours A.I. DuPont Children Hospital, Department of Radiology, Wilmington, DE (United States); Ishak, Ramsay; Zacharia, Thomas T. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Dias, Mark S. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Spinal imaging has been a neglected part of abusive head trauma (AHT) imaging. As most of the radiographs and CT spine are negative in AHT in infants, the cervical spine is assumed to be normal. There is increasing evidence in the role of injury to brainstem and cervical cord in the pathogenesis of AHT. In addition, in courts of law, there is fierce debate about AHT, its mimics and other disparate nontraumatic diagnoses explaining the neuroradiological and skeletal findings. However, this discussion ignores the evidence and significance of spinal injury. We sought to study the cervical spine in an AHT cohort to understand the true prevalence of spinal injuries in AHT and contrast it with cohorts of accidental and nontraumatic groups to give the clinicians a robust diagnostic tool in evaluating AHT. The purpose of this study is to compare the relative incidence of spinal ligamentous and soft-tissue abnormalities on spinal MRI among three groups of children ages < 48 months: (1) those with AHT, (2) those with accidental trauma, and (3) those with nontraumatic conditions. This comparative study included 183 children who underwent spine MRI: 67 with AHT, 46 with accidental trauma and a clinical suspicion of spinal injury, and 70 with nontraumatic conditions. Clinical and radiographic findings were collected in all cases and were analyzed retrospectively to identify MRI evidence of traumatic spinal injuries. The incidence of spinal injuries among the three groups was compared. The incidence of spinal ligamentous injuries was calculated for those with and without radiographic evidence of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. All comparisons were performed using Fisher exact test with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Cervical spine ligamentous injuries (predominantly the nuchal, atlanto-occipital and atlanto-axial ligaments) were present in 78% of the AHT group, 46% of the accidental trauma group and 1% of the nontraumatic group; all of these differences were

  18. VMC++ versus BEAMnrc: A comparison of simulated linear accelerator heads for photon beams

    BEAMnrc, a code for simulating medical linear accelerators based on EGSnrc, has been benchmarked and used extensively in the scientific literature and is therefore often considered to be the gold standard for Monte Carlo simulations for radiotherapy applications. However, its long computation times make it too slow for the clinical routine and often even for research purposes without a large investment in computing resources. VMC++ is a much faster code thanks to the intensive use of variance reduction techniques and a much faster implementation of the condensed history technique for charged particle transport. A research version of this code is also capable of simulating the full head of linear accelerators operated in photon mode (excluding multileaf collimators, hard and dynamic wedges). In this work, a validation of the full head simulation at 6 and 18 MV is performed, simulating with VMC++ and BEAMnrc the addition of one head component at a time and comparing the resulting phase space files. For the comparison, photon and electron fluence, photon energy fluence, mean energy, and photon spectra are considered. The largest absolute differences are found in the energy fluences. For all the simulations of the different head components, a very good agreement (differences in energy fluences between VMC++ and BEAMnrc <1%) is obtained. Only a particular case at 6 MV shows a somewhat larger energy fluence difference of 1.4%. Dosimetrically, these phase space differences imply an agreement between both codes at the <1% level, making VMC++ head module suitable for full head simulations with considerable gain in efficiency and without loss of accuracy

  19. Risks of acute traumatic intracranial haematoma in children and adults: implications for managing head injuries.

    Teasdale, G M; Murray, G.; E. Anderson; Mendelow, A D; MacMillan, R.; Jennett, B; Brookes, M

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the factors influencing the risk of an acute traumatic intracranial haematoma in children and adults with a recent head injury. DESIGN--Prospective study of incidence of risk factors in samples of patients attending accident and emergency departments and in all patients having an acute traumatic intracranial haematoma evacuated in one regional neurosurgical unit during 11 years. SETTING--Accident and emergency departments in Scotland or Teesside and regional neurosurgi...

  20. An audit of distribution and use of guidelines for management of head injury.

    Madhok, R; Thomson, R G; Mordue, A.; Mendelow, A D; Barker, J

    1993-01-01

    Ensuring effective distribution of guidelines is an important step towards their implementation. To examine the effectiveness of dissemination of a guidelines card on management of head injury and determine its usefulness to senior house officers (SHOs), a questionnaire survey was performed in May 1990, after distribution of the cards in induction packs for new doctors and at postgraduate lectures and displaying the guidelines in accident and emergency departments and wards. A further survey,...

  1. Pathophysiological changes detected by MRI within 24 hours after head injury

    This report concerns the evaluation of the usefulness of high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with head injuries. For this purpose we compared the CT and MRI results obtained on 48 such patients. MRI of all cases was taken within 24 hours after head injury using a 1.5-Tesla unit. The sensitivity of the two modalities in the detection of small traumatic lesions was compared. Traumatic lesions of 23 patients (47.9%) were not detected by CT, but they were demonstrated on MRI. Overall, MRI was significantly more sensitive than CT in detecting early and/or subtle traumatic changes of the brain parenchyma (P1-WI and T2-WI. (B) Corpus callosum lesions with hyperintensity on T2-WI were in fact hemorrhagic contusions by signal changes on sequential MRI. The follow-up of chronological changes of a given corpus callosum lesion was essential for confirmation of its pathology. (C) In one case, scratch-like lesions with strong hypointensity on T1-WI and hyperintensity on T2-WI were clearly demonstrated in the white matter. These observations appeared to indicate axonal damages. (D) Even if initial GCS score is low (2-WI and subsequently disappeared completely. We conclude that performing MRI in the early stage of a head injury is of utility for the understanding of pertinent pathophysiological changes and for predicting outcome. (author)

  2. [Sequential changes in acute phase reactant proteins and complement activation in patients with acute head injuries].

    Ikeda, Y; Matsuura, H; Nakazawa, S

    1987-12-01

    The role of immunological mechanisms in head injury is not clearly defined. In this study we investigated the immunological function in patients with acute head injuries. Serum acute phase reactant proteins (APRP), complement activation and immunoglobulines as immunological parameters were studied. APRP are produced in the liver and increase in cancer patients as well as those with acute and chronic inflammations, trauma and autoimmune diseases. APRP are known to be one of the immunosuppressive factors in the serum. Forty patients with acute head injuries were studied. Thirty-four patients were male and six patients were female, ages ranged from 12 to 81 years. Serial blood samples were obtained during the first seven days of trauma. The Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) were recorded at the time of admission for all patients. Clinical outcome was assessed at the time of discharge according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale. The "good" group consisted of patients with good recovery or moderate disability. The "bad" group consisted of patients with severe disability, persistent vegetative state and death. The concentrations of immunoglobulines (IgG, IgM, IgA) were within normal range and humoral immunity was not affected. Complement activation at the time of admission was closely related to GCS (p less than 0.01), but the levels of C4, C3, and C3 activator except for these of CH50 were within normal range.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2451531

  3. Serious head and neck injury as a predictor of occupant position in fatal rollover crashes.

    Freeman, M D; Dobbertin, K; Kohles, S S; Uhrenholt, L; Eriksson, A

    2012-10-10

    Serious head and neck injuries are a common finding in fatalities associated with rollover crashes. In some fatal rollover crashes, particularly when ejection occurs, the determination of which occupant was driving at the time of the crash may be uncertain. In the present investigation, we describe the analysis of rollover crash data from the National Automotive Sampling System-Crashworthiness Data System for the years 1997 through 2007 in which we examined the relationship between a serious head and neck injury in an occupant and a specified degree of roof deformation at the occupant's seating position. We found 960 occupants who qualified for the analysis, with 142 deaths among the subjects. Using a ranked composite head and neck injury score (the HNISS) we found a strong relationship between HNISS and the degree of roof crush. As a result of the analysis, we arrived at a predictive model, in which each additional unit increase in HNISS equated to an increased odds of roof crush as follows: for ≥8 cm of roof crush compared with occupant position in a rollover crash-related fatality. PMID:22742739

  4. Usefulness of MRI detection of cervical spine and brain injuries in the evaluation of abusive head trauma

    Kadom, Nadja [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Khademian, Zarir; Vezina, Gilbert; Shalaby-Rana, Eglal [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Rice, Amy [Independent Consultant (Biostatistics), Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Hinds, Tanya [Children' s National Medical Center, Child and Adolescent Protection Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-07-15

    In the evaluation of children younger than 3 years with intracranial hemorrhage it can be difficult to determine whether the cause of hemorrhage was traumatic, and if so, whether abusive head trauma (AHT) is a possibility. Cervical spine MRI is not a routine part of the nationally recommended imaging workup for children with suspected abusive head trauma. There is increasing evidence that spinal injuries are found at autopsy or MRI in abused children. However the prevalence of cervical spine injuries in children evaluated for abusive head trauma is unknown. We sought to determine both the incidence and the spectrum of cervical spine and brain injuries in children being evaluated for possible abusive head trauma. We also examined the relationship between cervical and brain MRI findings and selected study outcome categories. This study is a 3-year retrospective review of children evaluated for abusive head trauma. Inclusion criteria were: children with head trauma seen at our institution between 2008 and 2010, age younger than 36 months, availability of diagnostic-quality brain and cervical spine MRI, and child abuse team involvement because abusive head trauma was a possibility. A child abuse pediatrician and pediatric radiologists, all with board certification, were involved in data collection, image interpretation and data analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata v12.1. The study included 74 children (43 boys, 31 girls) with a mean age of 164 days (range, 20-679 days). Study outcomes were categorized as: n = 26 children with accidental head trauma, n = 38 with abusive head trauma (n = 18 presumptive AHT, n = 20 suspicious for AHT), and n = 10 with undefined head trauma. We found cervical spine injuries in 27/74 (36%) children. Most cervical spine injuries were ligamentous injuries. One child had intrathecal spinal blood and two had spinal cord edema; all three of these children had ligamentous injury. MRI signs of cervical injury did not show a

  5. Usefulness of MRI detection of cervical spine and brain injuries in the evaluation of abusive head trauma

    In the evaluation of children younger than 3 years with intracranial hemorrhage it can be difficult to determine whether the cause of hemorrhage was traumatic, and if so, whether abusive head trauma (AHT) is a possibility. Cervical spine MRI is not a routine part of the nationally recommended imaging workup for children with suspected abusive head trauma. There is increasing evidence that spinal injuries are found at autopsy or MRI in abused children. However the prevalence of cervical spine injuries in children evaluated for abusive head trauma is unknown. We sought to determine both the incidence and the spectrum of cervical spine and brain injuries in children being evaluated for possible abusive head trauma. We also examined the relationship between cervical and brain MRI findings and selected study outcome categories. This study is a 3-year retrospective review of children evaluated for abusive head trauma. Inclusion criteria were: children with head trauma seen at our institution between 2008 and 2010, age younger than 36 months, availability of diagnostic-quality brain and cervical spine MRI, and child abuse team involvement because abusive head trauma was a possibility. A child abuse pediatrician and pediatric radiologists, all with board certification, were involved in data collection, image interpretation and data analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata v12.1. The study included 74 children (43 boys, 31 girls) with a mean age of 164 days (range, 20-679 days). Study outcomes were categorized as: n = 26 children with accidental head trauma, n = 38 with abusive head trauma (n = 18 presumptive AHT, n = 20 suspicious for AHT), and n = 10 with undefined head trauma. We found cervical spine injuries in 27/74 (36%) children. Most cervical spine injuries were ligamentous injuries. One child had intrathecal spinal blood and two had spinal cord edema; all three of these children had ligamentous injury. MRI signs of cervical injury did not show a

  6. Improvement of SNR and acquisition acceleration using a 32-channel head coil compared to a 12-channel head coil at 3T

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques continue to improve in manifold ways. Besides field strength and sequence optimization, technical advances in coil design and sensitivity yield to increase the signal detection and therefore improve image quality. Purpose: To evaluate the performance of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and parallel acquisition technique (PAT) acceleration of a dedicated 32-channel head coil compared with a standard 12-channel head coil. Material and Methods: In a clinical 3T setting, spatial resolved SNR values for unaccelerated imaging and PAT with acceleration factors of 2-6 of a 32-channel head coil were evaluated in relation to a 12-channel head coil. SNR was determined quantitatively using proton-density-weighted in-vivo examinations in five healthy volunteers. Quantitative SNR maps for unaccelerated and PAT imaging were calculated using unfiltered MR raw data. Results: Up to three-fold higher SNR values were achieved with the 32-channel head coil, which diminished towards the center to an increase of 40 % compared with the 12-channel head coil. When using PAT, the 32-channel head coil resulted in a lower spatial-dependent quantitative noise enhancement, varying between 0 % at R = 2 and 33 % at R = 5. Conclusion: The 32-channel head coil provided superior SNR both with and without PAT compared with a 12-channel head coil, especially close to the brain surface. Using PAT, the unavoidable noise enhancement is diminished up to acceleration factors of 6 for the 32-channel head coil. Therefore, the 32-channel head coil is considered as a preferable tool for high-resolution neuroradiological imaging

  7. Intention tremor after head injury. Clinical features and computed tomographic findings

    Iwadate, Yasuo; Saeki, Naokatsu; Namba, Hiroki; Odaki, Masaru; Oka, Nobuo.

    1989-02-01

    Eight cases of intention tremor as a late complication of head injury were investigated. The patients ranged in age from 3 to 24 years. All received severe head injuries and lapsed into coma immediately afterward (Glasgow Coma Scale scores /le/8). Six patients exhibited decerebration or decortication. Hemiparesis was present in six cases and oculomotor nerve palsy in four. In the chronic stage, all patients displayed some degree of impairment of higher cortical function and five had dysarthria and/or ataxia. Initial computed tomography (CT) scans within 3 hours after the injury were obtained in five cases, of which four showed a hemorrhagic lesion in the midbrain or its surroundings. Other CT findings were diffuse cerebral swelling (four cases), intraventricular hemorrhage (three), and multiple hemorrhagic lesions (two). In the chronic stage, generalized cortical atrophy or ventricular enlargement was noted in five cases. These clinical features and CT findings indicate diffuse brain damage as well as midbrain damage and may reflect shearing injury. (author).

  8. Brain and head injury in infancy and childhood; Schaedel- und Hirntrauma im Kindesalter

    Struffert, T. [Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Radiologische Klinik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg, Saar (Germany); Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Radiologische Klinik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, 66421, Homburg, Saar (Germany); Grunwald, I.; Reith, W. [Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Radiologische Klinik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg, Saar (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    This article describes typical head injuries in infants and children. In comparison with adults there are distinct differences in the etiology of trauma and in the kind of reaction of the skull and brain. In infants and children there are three different types of trauma: birth trauma, accidental and non-accidental injury. The typical injuries in these three groups are described. (orig.) [German] In diesem Beitrag werden die typischen Schaedel- und Hirnverletzungen bei Kindern zusammengefasst. Bei diesen bestehen im Vergleich zu Erwachsenen deutliche Unterschiede in der Aetiologie und der Reaktion der Kalotte und des Gehirns auf ein Trauma. Bezueglich der Aetiologie kann unterschieden werden in Geburtstrauma, akzidentelles und nichtakzidentelles Trauma. Die typischen Verletzungen dieser 3 Gruppen werden ausfuehrlich beschrieben. (orig.)

  9. Effect of guidelines on management of head injury on record keeping and decision making in accident and emergency departments.

    Thomson, R.; Gray, J; Madhok, R; Mordue, A.; Mendelow, A D

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare record keeping and decision making in accident and emergency departments before and after distribution of guidelines on head injury management as indices of implementation. DESIGN--Before (1987) and after (1990) study of accident and emergency medical records. SETTING--Two accident and emergency departments in England. PATIENTS--1144 adult patients with head injury in department 1 (533 in 1987, 613 in 1990) and 734 in department 2 (370, 364 respectively). MAIN MEASURES--...

  10. Hyperfractionated or accelerated radiotherapy in head and neck cancer: a meta-analysis

    Bourhis, J.; Overgaard, Jens; Audry, H.;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several trials have studied the role of unconventional fractionated radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, but the effect of such treatment on survival is not clear. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess whether this type of radiotherapy could improve survival......-specified categories: hyperfractionated, accelerated, and accelerated with total dose reduction. FINDINGS: 15 trials with 6515 patients were included. The median follow-up was 6 years. Tumours sites were mostly oropharynx and larynx; 5221 (74%) patients had stage III-IV disease (International Union Against Cancer...... radiotherapy (2% with accelerated fractionation without total dose reduction and 1.7% with total dose reduction at 5 years, p=0.02). There was a benefit on locoregional control in favour of altered fractionation versus conventional radiotherapy (6.4% at 5 years; p<0.0001), which was particularly efficient in...

  11. Can glasgow score at discharge represent final outcome in severe head injury?

    Deepak Agrawal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with head injury continue to improve over time and a minimum follow-up of six months is considered necessary to evaluate outcome. However, this may be difficult to assess due to lack of follow-up. It is also well known that operated patients who return for cranioplasty usually have the best outcome. Aims and Objectives: To assess the outcome following severe head injury using cranioplasty as a surrogate marker for good outcome. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study carried out from January 2009 to December 2010. All patients with severe head injury who underwent decompressive craniectomy (DC in the study period were included. Patients who came back for cranioplasty in the same period were also included. Case records, imaging and follow up visit data from all patients were reviewed. Glasgow Coma Score (GCS on admission and Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS at discharge were assessed. Observations and Results: Of the 273 patients, 84.25% (n=230 were males and 15.75% (n= 43 were females. The mean age was 34.3 years (range 2-81 years, SD 16.817. The mean GCS on admission was 5.615 (range 3-8, SD 1.438. The in-hospital mortality was 54% (n=149. Good outcome (GOS of 4 or 5 at discharge was attained in 22% (n=60 patients. Sixty five patients returned for cranioplasty (with a GOS of 4 or 5 during the study period. There was no statistical difference in the number of patients discharged with good outcome and those coming back for cranioplasty in the study period (P>0.5. Patients who came back for cranioplasty were younger in age (mean age 28.815 years SD 13.396 with better admission GCS prior to DC (mean GCS 6.32 SD1.39. Conclusions: In operated severe head injury patients significant number of patients (24% in our study have excellent outcome. However, insignificant number of patients had further improvement to GOS 4 or 5 (good outcome from the time of initial discharge. This suggests that due to lack of intensive

  12. Role of brain CT scan in the diagnosis of patients with minor head injury in trauma emergency center

    Ali Mousavi Jafarabad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a large burden of hospital admissions is related to minor head trauma and its related imaging studies. One of the challenging issues for emergency physicians is brain computed tomography scan. Sensible use of computed tomography studies could minimize unnecessary radiation exposure and resource use. On the other hand, it can result in delayed or missed early treatment of intracranial injury. The aim of this review is to evaluate and summarize the costs and benefits of using diagnostic measurements in minor head trauma with particular focus on computed tomography scan and the advances and limitations of available guidelines. We studied different issues related to the current approach to minor head trauma in emergency departments. Altogether, it seems using brain computed tomography scan in the setting of emergency is a cost-effective method for the selected patients with minor head injury. However, concerning considerable costs of caring for patients with head injury and high sensitivity of brain computed tomography in terms of minor head injury, it seems reasonable to use brain computed tomography scan for a wider range of patients with minor head injury.

  13. Nonuse of bicycle helmets and risk of fatal head injury: a proportional mortality, case–control study

    Persaud, Navindra; Coleman, Emily; Zwolakowski, Dorothy; Lauwers, Bert; Cass, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Background: The effectiveness of helmets at preventing cycling fatalities, a leading cause of death among young adults worldwide, is controversial, and safety regulations for cycling vary by jurisdiction. We sought to determine whether nonuse of helmets is associated with an increased risk of fatal head injury. Methods: We used a case–control design involving 129 fatalities using data from a coroner’s review of cycling deaths in Ontario, Canada, between 2006 and 2010. We defined cases as cyclists who died as a result of head injuries; we defined controls as cyclists who died as a result of other injuries. The exposure variable was nonuse of a bicycle helmet. Results: Not wearing a helmet while cycling was associated with an increased risk of dying as a result of sustaining a head injury (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–7.3). We saw the same relationship when we excluded people younger than 18 years from the analysis (adjusted OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.4–8.5) and when we used a more stringent case definition (i.e., only a head injury with no other substantial injuries; adjusted OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.2–10.2). Interpretation: Not wearing a helmet while cycling is associated with an increased risk of sustaining a fatal head injury. Policy changes and educational programs that increase the use of helmets while cycling may prevent deaths. PMID:23071369

  14. Alcohol consumption, blood alcohol concentration level and guideline compliance in hospital referred patients with minimal, mild and moderate head injuries

    Harr, Marianne Efskind; Heskestad, Ben; Ingebrigtsen, Tor;

    2011-01-01

    In 2000 the Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee published guidelines for safe and cost-effective management of minimal, mild and moderate head injured patients.The aims of this study were to investigate to what extent the head injury population is under the influence of alcohol, and to evaluate...... whether the physicians' compliance to the guidelines is affected when patients are influenced by alcohol....

  15. Alcohol consumption, blood alcohol concentration level and guideline compliance in hospital referred patients with minimal, mild and moderate head injuries

    Harr, Marianne Efskind; Heskestad, Ben; Ingebrigtsen, Tor;

    2011-01-01

    In 2000 the Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee published guidelines for safe and cost-effective management of minimal, mild and moderate head injured patients.The aims of this study were to investigate to what extent the head injury population is under the influence of alcohol, and to evaluate wh...

  16. Charges associated with pediatric head injuries: A five-year retrospective review of 41 pediatric hospitals in the US.

    Charles Edward McConnel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain injuries are a significant public health problem, particularly among the pediatric population. Brain injuries account for a significant portion of pediatric injury deaths, and are the highest contributor to morbidity and mortality in the pediatric and young adult populations. Several studies focus on particular mechanisms of brain injury and the cost of treating brain injuries, but few studies exist in the literature examining the highest contributing mechanisms to pediatric brain injury and the billed charges associated with them. METHODS: Data were extracted from the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS from member hospitals on all patients admitted with diagnosed head injuries and comparisons were made between ICU and non-ICU admissions. Collected data included demographic information, injury information, total billed charges, and patient outcome. RESULTS: Motor vehicle collisions, falls, and assaults/abuse are the three highest contributors to brain injury in terms of total numbers and total billed charges. These three mechanisms of injury account for almost $1 billion in total charges across the five-year period, and account for almost half of the total charges in this dataset over that time period. CONCLUSION: Research focusing on brain injury should be tailored to the areas of the most pressing need and the highest contributing factors. While this study is focused on a select number of pediatric hospitals located throughout the country, it identifies significant contributors to head injuries, and the costs associated with treating them.

  17. The efficacy of sequential compression devices in multiple trauma patients with severe head injury.

    Gersin, K; Grindlinger, G A; Lee, V; Dennis, R C; Wedel, S K; Cachecho, R

    1994-08-01

    Thirty-two multiple trauma patients with severe head injury and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 8 or less were prospectively studied to assess the occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). All patients required mechanical ventilation. A sequential compression device (SCD) was used in 14 patients and 18 patients received no prophylaxis for thromboembolism. Bilateral lower extremity technetium venoscans and ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) lung scans were performed within 6 days of admission and every week for 1 month or until the patient developed DVT or PE or was discharged from the SICU. Deep venous thrombosis occurred in two patients (6%) at 16 and 28 days following trauma. Twenty-five patients had normal or low probability V/Q scans. Six had high probability V/Q scans confirmed by pulmonary arteriograms (PAGs) at 12.5 +/- 4 days. Clinical signs of PE were absent in all patients with a positive PAG. There were no differences in age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), GCS Score, APACHE II Score, or Trauma Score between the patients who developed DVT or PE and those who did not. A SCD was used in four of the eight patients with DVT or PE. All but one patient with DVT or PE underwent placement of a vena caval filter. Multiple trauma patients with severe head injury (GCS score < or = 8) are at high risk for thromboembolism. The available means of prevention and diagnosis of DVT or PE in multiple trauma patients with severe head injury are not entirely effective. PMID:8064917

  18. Predicting clearing of post-traumatic amnesia following closed-head injury.

    Saneda, D L; Corrigan, J D

    1992-01-01

    The ability to predict the resolution of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) early in the course of acute rehabilitation was studied in a sample of 98 closed-head injury (CHI) patients admitted for acute rehabilitation. The subjects' age, length of coma, time post-injury and Orientation Group Monitoring System (OGMS) subscale and aggregate scores were evaluated for the ability to predict if and when a patient would clear PTA. The results indicated that the combination of time post-injury and week one OGMS aggregate score provided the best prediction of whether and when PTA would clear. A shorter time from injury to acute rehabilitation was a positive prognostic indicator, accounting for more variance than either age or duration of coma. Whereas the aggregate OGMS score was a better indicator than any of the subscale scores, the results also suggested that specific aspects of cognition have differential predictive power, which may derive from different types of injury to the brain. Although the prediction model was statistically significant, its practical significance was limited. In particular, the high base rate for clearing PTA, 83.7%, attenuated the potential for differential prediction. Finally, this study provided additional support for the construct validity of the OGMS as a measure of cognitive function during the acute phase of recovery from CHI. PMID:1571721

  19. A Weighted Logistic Regression Analysis for Predicting the Odds of Head/Face and Neck Injuries During Rollover Crashes

    Hu, Jingwen; Chou, Clifford C.; Yang, King H.; King, Albert I.

    2007-01-01

    A weighted logistic regression with careful selection of crash, vehicle, occupant and injury data and sequentially adjusting the covariants, was used to investigate the predictors of the odds of head/face and neck (HFN) injuries during rollovers. The results show that unbelted occupants have statistically significant higher HFN injury risks than belted occupants. Age, number of quarter-turns, rollover initiation type, maximum lateral deformation adjacent to the occupant, A-pillar and B-pillar...

  20. Disability in young people and adults after head injury: 12-14 year follow up of a prospective cohort

    McMillan, T.; Teasdale, G; Stewart, Van E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is a need to establish how long term outcome evolves after head injury (HI) and factors related to this, to inform opportunities for intervention. Objective: To determine late outcome in adults 12-14 years after hospital admission for HI and to examine relationships between injury, early and late factors and disability. Methods: A prospective cohort with HI, whose outcome was reported previously at 1 and 5-7 years after injury were followed up after 12-14 years. P...

  1. Clinical manifestations that predict abnormal brain computed tomography (CT in children with minor head injury

    Nesrin Alharthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Computed tomography (CT used in pediatric pediatrics brain injury (TBI to ascertain neurological manifestations. Nevertheless, this practice is associated with adverse effects. Reports in the literature suggest incidents of morbidity and mortality in children due to exposure to radiation. Hence, it is found imperative to search for a reliable alternative. Objectives: The aim of this study is to find a reliable clinical alternative to detect an intracranial injury without resorting to the CT. Materials and Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study was undertaken in patients (1-14 years with blunt head injury and having a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS of 13-15 who had CT performed on them. Using statistical analysis, the correlation between clinical examination and positive CT manifestation is analyzed for different age-groups and various mechanisms of injury. Results: No statistically significant association between parameteres such as Loss of Consciousness, ′fall′ as mechanism of injury, motor vehicle accidents (MVA, more than two discrete episodes of vomiting and the CT finding of intracranial injury could be noted. Analyzed data have led to believe that GCS of 13 at presentation is the only important clinical predictor of intracranial injury. Conclusion: Retrospective data, small sample size and limited number of factors for assessing clinical manifestation might present constraints on the predictive rule that was derived from this review. Such limitations notwithstanding, the decision to determine which patients should undergo neuroimaging is encouraged to be based on clinical judgments. Further analysis with higher sample sizes may be required to authenticate and validate findings.

  2. Simulative investigation on head injuries of electric self-balancing scooter riders subject to ground impact.

    Xu, Jun; Shang, Shi; Qi, Hongsheng; Yu, Guizhen; Wang, Yunpeng; Chen, Peng

    2016-04-01

    The safety performance of an electric self-balancing scooter (ESS) has recently become a main concern in preventing its further wide application as a major candidate for green transportation. Scooter riders may suffer severe brain injuries in possible vehicle crash accidents not only from contact with a windshield or bonnet but also from secondary contact with the ground. In this paper, virtual vehicle-ESS crash scenarios combined with finite element (FE) car models and multi-body scooter/human models are set up. Post-impact kinematic gestures of scooter riders under various contact conditions, such as different vehicle impact speeds, ESS moving speeds, impact angles or positions, and different human sizes, are classified and analyzed. Furthermore, head-ground impact processes are reconstructed using validated FE head models, and important parameters of contusion and laceration (e.g., coup or contrecoup pressures and Von Mises stress and the maximum shear stress) are extracted and analyzed to assess the severity of regional contusion from head-ground contact. Results show that the brain injury risk increases with vehicle speeds and ESS moving speeds and may provide fundamental knowledge to popularize the use of a helmet and the vehicle-fitted safety systems, and lay a strong foundation for the reconstruction of ESS-involved accidents. There is scope to improve safety for the use of ESS in public roads according to the analysis and conclusions. PMID:26866282

  3. Role of vestibular sensor on body sway control: coherence between head acceleration and stabilogram.

    Teixeira, Felipe G; Jesus, Igor R T; Mello, Roger G T; Nadal, Jurandir

    2012-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the role of the vestibular system in the postural sway control using the coherence function. A sample of 19 young, healthy male adults was monitored with a three axial accelerometer placed over the head during a stabilometric test, standing on a force platform during 3 min in four conditions: eyes closed and open, and feet apart and together. The magnitude squared coherence (MSC) function and Monte Carlo simulation was used to correlate changes in body sway with head accelerations. Significant MSC values were found in the frequency range 0.1-0.5 Hz, mainly in conditions of larger oscillations: eyes closed and feet together. These results may be related to utricular otoliths responses and ankle strategy. PMID:23367028

  4. Can an abnormal CT scan be predicted from common symptoms after mild head injury in children?

    Ashok Munivenkatappa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children have non specific symptoms after mild head injury (MHI. It is difficult to define indication of CT scan among them. We aimed at identification of predictors of CT scan findings after MHI. Materials and Methods: Children aged ≤12 years with GCS 13-15 after head injury were retrospectively evaluated for their clinical and CT scan findings during January to March 2010. The variables used for detection of abnormal (positive CT scan were age, gender, cause of injury (road traffic accident, fall, and assault, loss of consciousness, vomiting, ear or nose bleed, seizure, and GCS score. Results: A total of 133 children were included in study. Sixty nine (51.9% children had abnormal CT findings. There was no statistical difference in patients with normal vs abnormal CT scan for presence of any of the variables evaluated. Conclusion: An abnormal CT scan cannot be reliably ruled out in a child with MHI based on symptoms; hence a policy of liberal CT scan based on clinical acumen is advisable.

  5. Radiological diagnosis in patients with head injury alone or in combination with multiple trauma

    Purpose. Head injury alone or in combination with multiple trauma is the main cause of death and severe disability in individuals under 45 years old. This review is intended to describe the relevant imaging modalities, to analyze their specific value and limitations and to illustrate the most important radiologic findings. The indications for diagnostic imaging within the context of an interdisciplinary linkage of diagnostic and therapeutic measures are discussed.Material and methods. Recent publications are analyzed and compared to the experiences of our own hospital. In terms of a critical synoptic assessment the currently best standard of care is described in consideration of an interdisciplinary care concept.Results. Radiologic imaging modalities crucially contribute to the complete injury assessment and provide an indispensable basis for any therapeutic decision. Comprehensive neuromonitoring and reliable demonstration of delayed or secondary brain damage is impossible without modern imaging technology. Computed tomography (CT) further continues to be the most important imaging modality, while magnetic resonance imaging despite it's partly superior diagnostic informations remains reserved to particular diagnostic problems.Conclusions. Suitable constructive prerequisites, an interdisciplinary care concept and integration of the radiologist in hospital-adapted diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms significantly improves the outcome of patients with acute head injury. Beside the correct diagnosis itself the time to establish a diagnosis above all has a crucial impact on successful management and good outcome of these patients. (orig.)

  6. Linear fractures invisible on routine axial computed tomography. A pitfall at radiological screening for minor head injury

    Computed tomography (CT) is now widely used as the only screening method for fractures in patients with head injury. However, clear depiction of a fracture requires a discontinuity in the skull, so linear fractures parallel to the CT slice may not be visualized. We retrospectively evaluated 302 patients with minor head injuries aged from 0 to 91 years, who had undergone routine skull radiography (anteroposterior and lateral views) and head CT to study these types of fracture and discuss the risk of nondetection. Three patients had linear fractures (0.99%) that were invisible on bone window axial CT but detected on skull radiography, which all ran parallel to the scan slice. Two patients developed acute epidural hematoma or traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Evaluation of head injury by only axial CT may miss such fractures and result in sequelae, so diagnosticians should be alert to the possible presence of this type of fracture. (author)

  7. Diabetes does not accelerate neuronal loss following nerve injury

    Severinsen, Kaare; Jakobsen, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    To determine the resistance of neuronal dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells in experimental diabetes, we studied the neuronal cell loss after severe axonal injury in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats with unilateral transection of the L5 spinal nerve for 12 weeks. Fifty 18-week-old inbred male Wist...

  8. Spillway-induced salmon head injury triggers the generation of brain alphaII-spectrin breakdown product biomarkers similar to mammalian traumatic brain injury.

    Ann Miracle

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biomedical research have resulted in the development of specific biomarkers for diagnostic testing of disease condition or physiological risk. Of specific interest are alphaII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs, which are produced by proteolytic events in traumatic brain injury and have been used as biomarkers to predict the severity of injury in humans and other mammalian brain injury models. This study describes and demonstrates the successful use of antibody-based mammalian SBDP biomarkers to detect head injury in migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that have been injured during passage through high-energy hydraulic environments present in spillways under different operational configurations. Mortality and injury assessment techniques currently measure only near-term direct mortality and easily observable acute injury. Injury-based biomarkers may serve as a quantitative indicator of subacute physical injury and recovery, and aid hydropower operators in evaluation of safest passage configuration and operation actions for migrating juvenile salmonids. We describe a novel application of SBDP biomarkers for head injury for migrating salmon. To our knowledge, this is the first documented cross-over use of a human molecular biomarker in a wildlife and operational risk management scenario.

  9. Primary oculomotor nerve palsy due to mild head injury. Report of two cases

    Two patients with primary oculomotor nerve palsy due to direct mild head injury are reported. They presented with internal ophthalmoplegia, dilated nonreactive pupils, and very mild disturbance in consciousness. Except for the persistent oculomotor nerve palsy, both the patients recovered fully within one week. Neither demonstrated a history that was suggestive of a cause for their oculomotor nerve palsy. Initial CT scans demonstrated localized subarachnoid hemorrhage around the brain stem. One of the patients had sustained a fracture of the anterior clinoid process. As the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism underlying the oculomotor nerve palsy we suspected mild injury to the pupillomotor fibers at the anterior petroclinoidal ligament and that of the pupillary fibers at the posterior petroclinoidal ligament. We speculate that these perforating fibers at the anterior petroclinoidal ligament acted as a fulcrum due to downward displacement of the brainstem at the time of impact. (author)

  10. Injuries of the head from backface deformation of ballistic protective helmets under ballistic impact.

    Rafaels, Karin A; Cutcliffe, Hattie C; Salzar, Robert S; Davis, Martin; Boggess, Brian; Bush, Bryan; Harris, Robert; Rountree, Mark Steve; Sanderson, Ellory; Campman, Steven; Koch, Spencer; Dale Bass, Cameron R

    2015-01-01

    Modern ballistic helmets defeat penetrating bullets by energy transfer from the projectile to the helmet, producing helmet deformation. This deformation may cause severe injuries without completely perforating the helmet, termed "behind armor blunt trauma" (BABT). As helmets become lighter, the likelihood of larger helmet backface deformation under ballistic impact increases. To characterize the potential for BABT, seven postmortem human head/neck specimens wearing a ballistic protective helmet were exposed to nonperforating impact, using a 9 mm, full metal jacket, 124 grain bullet with velocities of 400-460 m/s. An increasing trend of injury severity was observed, ranging from simple linear fractures to combinations of linear and depressed fractures. Overall, the ability to identify skull fractures resulting from BABT can be used in forensic investigations. Our results demonstrate a high risk of skull fracture due to BABT and necessitate the prevention of BABT as a design factor in future generations of protective gear. PMID:25039407