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Sample records for accelerating structure assemblies

  1. Assembly Test of Elastic Averaging Technique to Improve Mechanical Alignment for Accelerating Structure Assemblies in CLIC

    Huopana, J

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is being studied at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e- collider [1]. The manufacturing and assembly tolerances for the required RF-components are important for the final efficiency and for the operation of CLIC. The proper function of an accelerating structure is very sensitive to errors in shape and location of the accelerating cavity. This causes considerable issues in the field of mechanical design and manufacturing. Currently the design of the accelerating structures is a disk design. Alternatively it is possible to create the accelerating assembly from quadrants, which favour the mass manufacturing. The functional shape inside of the accelerating structure remains the same and a single assembly uses less parts. The alignment of these quadrants has been previously made kinematic by using steel pins or spheres to align the pieces together. This method proved to be a quite tedious and time consuming method of assembly. To limit the number of different error sources, a meth...

  2. Development of ultra-precision machining, assembling and measurement for accelerating structure

    Ultra-precision fabrication is required for making the accelerating structure for the next generation of the linear collider. Main components of the accelerating structure consists of approximately two hundred cells, each made of oxygen-free copper with an outer diameter and thickness of 80 mm and 9 mm, respectively. Firstly these cells are machined with sub-micron precision. Following steps to make a complete unit are firstly rinsing the cells, then assembling them precisely, and finally to bond them with keeping the initial precision. Here are described newly-developed effective techniques for machining, measurement, and assembly, which satisfy strict requirements for precision in the construction of the accelerating structure for the Japan Linear Collider (JLC) project. (author)

  3. Digital design for structure of cathode/grid assemblies in electron curtain accelerator

    The finite element method (FEM) is introduced to design a structure of cathode groupware for an electron curtain accelerator. An optimum structure of groupware and parameters of its heat source W wire have been designed. A uniform temperature distribution of 1400-1430 degree C on the narrow planar LaB6 cathode has been predicted, which is enough to emit sufficient electron beam. In order to insure exact thermal physical parameters (such as heat emissivity and heat conductivity) of all the materials, an additional iterative algorithm is adopted. It takes only four iterations to get the convergent result. The method makes analysis process more efficient and compact. Experiment has proved the validity. (authors)

  4. Structural assembly demonstration experiment

    Stokes, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The experiment is of an operational variety, designed to assess crew capability in Large Space System (LSS) assembly. The six Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment objectives include: (1) the establishment of a quantitative correlation between LSS neutral buoyancy simulation and on-orbit assembly operations in order to enhance the validity of those assembly simulations; (2) the quantitative study of the capabilities and mechanics of human assembly in an Extravehicular Activity environment; (3) the further corroboration of the LSS Assembly Analysis cost algorithm through the obtainment of hard data base information; (4) the verification of LSS assembly techniques and timeless, as well as the identification of crew imposed loads and assembly aid requirements and concepts; (5) verification of a Launch/Assembly Platform structure concept for other LSS missions; and (6) lastly, to advance thermal control concepts through a flexible heat pipe.

  5. The foxhole accelerating structure

    This report examines some properties of a new type of open accelerating structure. It consists of a series of rectangular cavities, which we call foxholes, joined by a beam channel. The power for accelerating the particles comes from an external radiation source and enters the cavities through their open upper surfaces. Analytic and computer calculations are presented showing that the foxhole is a suitable structure for accelerating relativistic electrons

  6. Pulsed neutron source based on accelerator-subcritical-assembly

    Inoue, Makoto; Noda, Akira; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Okamoto, Hiromi; Shirai, Toshiyuki [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. for Chemical Research

    1997-03-01

    A new pulsed neutron source which consists of a 300MeV proton linac and a nuclear fuel subcritical assembly is proposed. The proton linac produces pulsed spallation neutrons, which are multipied by the subcritical assembly. A prototype proton linac that accelerates protons up to 7MeV has been developed and a high energy section of a DAW structure is studied with a power model. Halo formations in high intensity beam are also being studied. (author)

  7. Accelerator structure development for NLC

    Hoag, H.A.; Deruyter, H.; Pearson, C.; Ruth, R.D.; Wang, J.W. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Schaefer, J. [Texas Instruments, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1993-04-01

    In the program of work directed towards the development of an X-Band Next Linear Collider accelerator structure, two different test accelerator sections have been completed, and a third is being fabricated. The first is a simple 30-cell constant-impedance section in which no special attention was given to surface finish, pumping, and alignment. The second is an 86-cell section in which the cells were precision diamond-turned by Texas Instruments Inc. The structure has internal water-cooling and vacuum pumping manifolds. Some design details are given for the third section, which is a 206-cell structure with cavities dimensioned to give a Gaussian distribution of dipole mode frequencies. It has conventional-machining surface finishes and external water and pumping manifolds. Component design, fabrication, and assembly brazing are described for the first two experimental sections.

  8. Accelerator structure development for NLC

    In the program of work directed towards the development of an X-Band Next Linear Collider accelerator structure, two different test accelerator sections have been completed, and a third is being fabricated. The first is a simple 30-cell constant-impedance section in which no special attention was given to surface finish, pumping, and alignment. The second is an 86-cell section in which the cells were precision diamond-turned by Texas Instruments Inc. The structure has internal water-cooling and vacuum pumping manifolds. Some design details are given for the third section, which is a 206-cell structure with cavities dimensioned to give a Gaussian distribution of dipole mode frequencies. It has conventional-machining surface finishes and external water and pumping manifolds. Component design, fabrication, and assembly brazing are described for the first two experimental sections

  9. Calculation of tolerances in accelerating structures

    A method is suggested for calculating tolerances for similar elements of an accelerating-focusing channel of a charged particle linac the particle dynamics in which is described by linear or non-linear equations. Tolerances for each drift tube of the accelerating structure with modified variable-phase focusing are determined with respect to tolerances for the output parameters of an accelerated beam at preset lengths of drift tubes. The tolerances obtained in supposition of equal effects, equal tolerances and those accounting for the cost of fabrication and assembling of the elements of the structure are compared. The algorithm suggested can also be used for calculating tolerances in structures with hard focusing

  10. Fuel assembly supporting structure

    For use in forming the core of a pressurized-water reactor, a fuel assembly supporting structure for holding a bundle of interspaced fuel rods, is formed by interspaced end pieces having holes in which the end portions of control rod guide tubes are inserted, fuel rod spacer grids being positioned by these guide tubes between the end pieces. The end pieces are fastened to the end portions of the guide tubes, to integrate the supporting structure, and in the case of at least one of the end pieces, this is done by means which releases that end piece from the guide tubes when the end pieces receive an abnormal thrust force directed towards each other and which would otherwise place the guide tubes under a compressive stress that would cause them to buckle. The spacer grids normally hold the fuel rods interspaced by distances determined by nuclear physics, and buckling of the control rod guide tubes can distort the fuel rod spacer grids with consequent dearrangement of the fuel rod interspacing. A sudden loss of pressure in a pressurized-water reactor pressure vessel can result in the pressurized coolant in the vessel discharging from the vessel at such high velocity as to result in the abnormal thrust force on the end pieces of each fuel assembly, which could cause buckling of the control rod guide tubes when the end pieces are fixed to them in the normal rigid and unyielding manner

  11. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas

  12. Important concepts in the assembly and early characterization of the PBFA II accelerator

    Some of the concepts for orchestrating large numbers of events associated with accelerator assembly and characterization include: (1) structuring of activity into smaller workable and trackable packages, with associated subelements assigned to each section of the accelerator. (2) establishing detailed assembly and characterization documentation to assist in component testing and subsystem integration. (3) structuring the project team for efficient communication, identification of responsibility, and capability for problem and conflict resolution. (4) developing technologies for receival, inventory, controlled storage, staging, and phased installation and testing of components and pieceparts. The application of these and other concepts to PBFA II, and the progress of accelerator assembly is discussed

  13. Important concepts in the assembly and early characterization of the PBFA 2 accelerator

    Goldstein, S. A.; Clevenger, R. J.; Donovan, G. L.; Holman, G. T.; Johnston, R. R.; Nations, D. R.

    Some of the concepts for orchestrating large numbers of events associated with accelerator assembly and characterization include: (1) structuring of activity into smaller workable and trackable packages, with associated subelements assigned to each section of the accelerator, (2) establishing detailed assembly and characterization documentation to assist in component testing and subsystem integration, (3) structuring the project team for efficient communication, identification of responsibility, and capability for problem and conflict resolution, and (4) developing technologies for receival, inventory, controlled storage, staging, and phased installation and testing of components and pieceparts. The application of these and other concepts to PBFA II, and the progress of accelerator assembly is discussed.

  14. Important concepts in the assembly and early characterization of the PBFA II accelerator

    Planning and efficient execution of the assembly and early characterization phases of a large, multi-module superpower generator like PBFA II require development of concepts frequently not found in either the pulsed power RandD community or in the pulsed power industry. To meet the constraints of performance, cost, and schedule of the PBFA II Project, special skills for assembly and characterization of large facilities are being established. These likely will become the technology for activating Sandia's future large accelerators. Some of the concepts for orchestrating large numbers of events associated with accelerator assembly and characterization include: structuring of activity into smaller workable and trackable packages, with associated subelements assigned to each section of the accelerator, and establishing detailed assembly and characterization documentation to assist in component testing and subsystem integration. The application of these and other concepts to FBFA II, and the progress of accelerator assembly are discussed

  15. Trapping of Hepatitis B Virus capsid assembly intermediates by phenylpropenamide assembly accelerators

    Katen, Sarah P.; Chirapu, Srinivas Reddy; Finn, M.G.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the biological self-assembly process of virus capsids is key to understanding the viral life cycle, as well as serving as a platform for the design of assembly-based antiviral drugs. Here we identify and characterize the phenylpropenamide family of small molecules, known to have antiviral activity in vivo, as assembly effectors of the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) capsid. We have found two representative phenylpropenamides to be assembly accelerators, increasing the rate of assembly w...

  16. Collimator assembly for an electron accelerator

    According to this invention, the collimator assembly comprises a collimator shielding block for blocking undesired x-rays and a bushing inserted into the shielding block. The bushing has a conical passage opening for transmitting x-rays therethrough and for defining the x-ray cone. There are provided means for easily interchanging the bushing in the collimator shielding block. Therefore, bushings of different cone-defining passage can be inserted readily into the shielding block. If a larger area is to be irradiated, a bushing will be used which has a passageway of a larger cone angle

  17. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    Cowan, Benjamin; Javanmard, Mehdi; Siemann, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optic...

  18. EM Structure Based and Vacuum Acceleration

    Colby, E.R.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    The importance of particle acceleration may be judged from the number of applications which require some sort of accelerated beam. In addition to accelerator-based high energy physics research, non-academic applications include medical imaging and treatment, structural biology by x-ray diffraction, pulse radiography, cargo inspection, material processing, food and medical instrument sterilization, and so on. Many of these applications are already well served by existing technologies and will profit only marginally from developments in accelerator technology. Other applications are poorly served, such as structural biology, which is conducted at synchrotron radiation facilities, and medical treatment using proton accelerators, the machines for which are rare because they are complex and costly. Developments in very compact, high brightness and high gradient accelerators will change how accelerators are used for such applications, and potentially enable new ones. Physical and technical issues governing structure-based and vacuum acceleration of charged particles are reviewed, with emphasis on practical aspects.

  19. High gradient experiments on NLCTA accelerator structures

    This paper presents new results of high-gradient studies performed on a 1.8 m traveling-wave accelerator section with detuned high-order deflecting modes. This structure was designed initially for studies of detuned structures and will be installed in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA). The paper describes the test set-up in the Accelerator Structure Test Area (ASTA) including electron gun, prebuncher, pre-accelerator, spectrometer, Faraday cups, 200 MW SLED-II power compression system, Magic-T type phase shifters and attenuators. Rf processing, detailed dark current analysis, radiation problems, and beam acceleration measurements are discussed

  20. RF kick in the ILC acceleration structure

    Solyak, N.; Gonin, I.; Latina, A.; Lunin, A.; Ranjan, K.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Detailed results of estimations and simulations for the RF kick caused by input and HOM couplers of the ILC acceleration structure are presented. Results of possible beam emittance dilution caused by RF kick are discussed for the main LINAC acceleration structure, and the RF structures of the ILC bunch compressors BC1 and BC2. Methods of the RF kick reduction are discussed.

  1. Traveling Wave Accelerating Structure for a Superconducting Accelerator

    Kanareykin, Alex; Solyak, Nikolay

    2005-01-01

    We are presenting a superconducting traveling wave accelerating structure (STWA) concept, which may prove to be of crucial importance to the International Linear Collider. Compared to the existing design of a TESLA cavity, the traveling wave structure can provide ~20-40% higher accelerating gradient for the same aperture and the same peak surface magnetic RF field. The recently achieved SC structure gradient of 35 MV/m can be increased up to ~50 MV/m with the new STWA structure design. The STWA structure is supposed to be installed into the superconducting resonance ring and is fed by the two couplers with appropriate phase advance to excite a traveling wave inside the structure. The system requires two independent tuners to be able to adjust the cavity and feedback waveguide frequencies and hence to reduce the unwanted backward wave. In this presentation we discuss the structure design, optimization of the parameters, tuning requirements and plans for further development.

  2. Phase gradients in acceleration structures

    Decker, F.J.; Jobe, R.K.

    1990-05-01

    In linear accelerators with two or more bunches the beam loading of one bunch will influence the energy and energy spread the following bunches. This can be corrected by quickly changing the phase of a travelling wave structure, so that each bunch recieves a slightly different net phase. At the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) three bunches, two (e{sup +},e{sup {minus}}) for the high energy collisions and one (e{sup {minus}}-scavenger) for producing positrons should sit at different phases, due to their different tasks. The two e{sup {minus}}-bunches are extracted from the damping ring at the same cycle time about 60 ns apart. Fast phase switching of the RF to the bunch length compressor in the Ring-To-Linac (RTL) section can produce the necessary advance of the scavenger bunch (about 6{degree} in phase). This allows a low energy spread of this third bunch at the e{sup +}-production region at 2/3 of the linac length, while the other bunches are not influenced. The principles and possible other applications of this fast phase switching as using it for multi-bunches, as well as the experimental layout for the actual RTL compressor are presented.

  3. Phase gradients in acceleration structures

    In linear accelerators with two or more bunches the beam loading of one bunch will influence the energy and energy spread the following bunches. This can be corrected by quickly changing the phase of a travelling wave structure, so that each bunch recieves a slightly different net phase. At the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) three bunches, two (e+,e-) for the high energy collisions and one (e--scavenger) for producing positrons should sit at different phases, due to their different tasks. The two e--bunches are extracted from the damping ring at the same cycle time about 60 ns apart. Fast phase switching of the RF to the bunch length compressor in the Ring-To-Linac (RTL) section can produce the necessary advance of the scavenger bunch (about 6 degree in phase). This allows a low energy spread of this third bunch at the e+-production region at 2/3 of the linac length, while the other bunches are not influenced. The principles and possible other applications of this fast phase switching as using it for multi-bunches, as well as the experimental layout for the actual RTL compressor are presented

  4. Development of S-band accelerating structure

    In Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) in Korea construction of XFEL (X-ray Free electron Lazar) institution is under construction aiming at the completion in 2014. Energy 10 GeV of the linac part of this institution and main frequency are planned in S-band (2856 MHz), and about 178 S-band 3m accelerating structures are due to be used for this linac. The oscillation of an X-ray laser requires very low emittance electron beam. On the other hand, since the accelerating structure which accelerates an electron beam has a feed port of microwave (iris), the electromagnetic field asymmetry of the microwave feeding device called coupler worsens the emittance of an electron beam. MHI manufactured two kinds of S-band accelerating structures with which the electromagnetic field asymmetry of coupler cavity was compensated for PALXFEL linac. We report these accelerating structures. (author)

  5. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  6. Nozzle and shroud assembly mounting structure

    Faulder, Leslie J.; Frey, deceased, Gary A.; Nielsen, Engward W.; Ridler, Kenneth J.

    1997-01-01

    The present nozzle and shroud assembly mounting structure configuration increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress between the mounting structure having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than that of the mounting structure. The mounting structure includes an outer sealing portion forming a cradling member in which an annular ring member is slidably positioned. The mounting structure further includes an inner mounting portion to which a hooked end of the nozzle and shroud assembly is attached. As the inner mounting portion expands and contracts, the nozzle and shroud assembly slidably moves within the outer sealing portion.

  7. Accelerating structure optimization and tolerance calculation

    The problem of optimizing the dynamics of a charged particle beam with high volumetric charge density in an accelerating structure with space-homogeneous quadrupole focusing (SHQF) is considered. The mathematical model of interacting particle dynamics is based on equations for beam envelopes. The optimization criterion (functional) is selected from the terms of obtaining a structure with an assigned length, beam energy at the accelerator outlet and the maximum particle capture for acceleration mode. A method for determining tolerance for the structure parameters based on optimization algorithm is proposed for the structure with SHQF. 4 refs.; 2 figs

  8. Low-velocity superconducting accelerating structures

    The present paper reviews the status of RF superconductivity as applied to low-velocity accelerating properties. Heavy-ion accelerators must accelerate efficiently particles which travel at a velocity much smaller than that of light particles, whose velocity changes along accelerator, and also different particles which have different velocity profiles. Heavy-ion superconducting accelerators operate at frequencies which are lower than high-energy superconducting accelerators. The present paper first discusses the basic features of heavy-ion superconducting structures and linacs. Design choices are then addressed focusing on structure geometry, materials, frequency, phase control, and focusing. The report also gives an outline of the status of superconducting booster projects currently under way at the Argonne National Laboratory, SUNY Stony Brook, Weizmann Institute, University of Washington, Florida State, Saclay, Kansas State, Daresbury, Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute, Legnaro, Bombay, Sao Paulo, ANU (Canberra), and Munich. Recent developments and future prospects are also described. (N.K.) 68 refs

  9. Laser Zone Annealing - Accelerated Route to Self-Assembled Nanostructures

    Majewski, Pawel; Yager, Kevin; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles

    We present Laser Zone Annealing - a novel technique of accelerated self-assembly of block copolymer thin films utilizing laser light. In our approach, the laser beam, focused to a narrow line, is rastered across the polymer film coated on the light-absorbing substrate, inducing rapid and highly localized temperature transients in the film. By coupling our method with soft-shear, we demonstrate monolithic alignment of various cylinder-forming block copolymers over extremely short timescales. We utilize the aligned block copolymer films as templates for inorganic nanomaterials pattering. After delivery of inorganic precursors via aqueous or gaseous route, the polymer matrix is ashed leading to extremely well-ordered arrays of inorganic, metallic or semiconducting nanowires. Subsequently, we demonstrate how more complex nanostructures can be created with LZA including multilayered nanomeshes with symmetries beyond the conventional motifs accessible by native block copolymers. We investigate a perspective use of the inorganic arrays as transparent conductors or chemical sensors and characterize their anisotropic electro-optical properties. Research carried out in part at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  10. ALECS: assembly language extensions and control structures

    ALECS is an assembly language preprocessor allowing the use of structured programming techniques in MACRO-11 code. Programs are written using standard control structures with normal MACRO-11 code embedded as needed. The ALECS task is used to translate the source to pure MACRO-11 source file which is then submitted to the assembler. ALECS also produces a structured source listing showing the true logical flow of code. ALECS has been used for short subroutines as well as RSX-11M I/0 drivers and an ACP

  11. Variable energy constant current accelerator structure

    Anderson, O.A.

    1988-07-13

    A variable energy, constant current ion beam accelerator structure is disclosed comprising an ion source capable of providing the desired ions, a pre-accelerator for establishing an initial energy level, a matching/pumping module having means for focusing means for maintaining the beam current, and at least one main accelerator module for continuing beam focus, with means capable of variably imparting acceleration to the beam so that a constant beam output current is maintained independent of the variable output energy. In a preferred embodiment, quadrupole electrodes are provided in both the matching/pumping module and the one or more accelerator modules, and are formed using four opposing cylinder electrodes which extend parallel to the beam axis and are spaced around the beam at 90/degree/ intervals with opposing electrodes maintained at the same potential. 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. CTF3 Drive Beam Accelerating Structures

    Jensen, E

    2002-01-01

    The 3 GHz drive beam accelerator of the CLIC Test Facility CTF3, currently under construction at CERN, will be equipped with 16 novel SICA (Slotted Iris – Constant Aperture) accelerating structures. The slotted irises couple out the potentially disruptive induced transverse HOM energy to integrated silicon carbide loads (dipole mode Q's below 20). The use of nose cones for detuning allows a constant inner aperture (34 mm). The structures will be 1.2 m long and consist of 34 cells. A first 6 cell prototype structure has been tested successfully up to power levels of 100 MW (nominal: 30 MW), corresponding to surface electric field levels of 180 MV/m.

  13. Arterivirus structural proteins and assembly

    This chapter reviews the structural characteristics of the Arteriviridae, including the basic molecular details of all of the proteins involved, the interactions of these proteins and where they occur, and further functional characterization. Most recent available literature has been focused on equi...

  14. New structure for accelerating heavy ions

    A new type of accelerating structure is described which is particular suited to heavy ions (high wavelength, high shunt impedance, small size). Its properties are analyzed and compared to those of other structures (more particularly the lines). It is shown that a mode of operation exists of which the shunt impedance in the station mode has 80 per cent of its value for the progressive mode. Finally results are given obtained with a small experimental apparatus which uses this structure. (author)

  15. Photonic crystal laser-driven accelerator structures

    Cowan, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs, including two- and three-dimensional planar structures and fibers. The discussion of 2D structures demonstrates guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in a photonic crystal lattice and reveals design considerations and trade-offs. With a three-dimensional lattice, we introduce a candidate geometry and discuss beam dynamics, coupling, and manufacturing techniques for that structure. In addition we discuss W-band scale tests of photonic crystal structures. The computational methods are also discussed.

  16. Accelerating structures pre-stripping section the milac heavy ion linear Accelerator MILAC

    Researches on development of new variants of accelerating structures for acceleration of the ions with A/q=20 in pre-stripping section PSS-20 are carried out. On an initial part of acceleration of ions from 6 up to 150 keV/u high capture in process of acceleration of the injected ions is provided interdigital (IH) accelerating structure with Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) focusing. On the second part of acceleration of ions from 150 keV/u up to 1 MeV/u the highest rate of acceleration is created interdigital (IH) accelerating structure with drift tubes with the modified radio-frequency focusing.

  17. Templated Self Assemble of Nano-Structures

    Suo, Zhigang [Harvard University

    2013-04-29

    This project will identify and model mechanisms that template the self-assembly of nanostructures. We focus on a class of systems involving a two-phase monolayer of molecules adsorbed on a solid surface. At a suitably elevated temperature, the molecules diffuse on the surface to reduce the combined free energy of mixing, phase boundary, elastic field, and electrostatic field. With no template, the phases may form a pattern of stripes or disks. The feature size is on the order of 1-100 nm, selected to compromise the phase boundary energy and the long-range elastic or electrostatic interaction. Both experimental observations and our theoretical simulations have shown that the pattern resembles a periodic lattice, but has abundant imperfections. To form a perfect periodic pattern, or a designed aperiodic pattern, one must introduce a template to guide the assembly. For example, a coarse-scale pattern, lithographically defined on the substrate, will guide the assembly of the nanoscale pattern. As another example, if the molecules on the substrate surface carry strong electric dipoles, a charged object, placed in the space above the monolayer, will guide the assembly of the molecular dipoles. In particular, the charged object can be a mask with a designed nanoscale topographic pattern. A serial process (e.g., e-beam lithography) is necessary to make the mask, but the pattern transfer to the molecules on the substrate is a parallel process. The technique is potentially a high throughput, low cost process to pattern a monolayer. The monolayer pattern itself may serve as a template to fabricate a functional structure. This project will model fundamental aspects of these processes, including thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, templated self-assembly, and self-assembly on unconventional substrates. It is envisioned that the theory will not only explain the available experimental observations, but also motivate new experiments.

  18. Design of the detuned accelerator structure

    This is a summary of the design procedure for the detuned accelerator structure for SLAC's Next Linear Collider (NLC) program. The 11.424 GHz accelerating mode of each cavity must be synchronous with the beam. The distribution of the disk thicknesses and lowest synchronous dipole mode frequencies of the cavities in the structure is Gaussian in order to reduce the effect of wake fields. The finite element field solver YAP calculated the accelerating mode frequency and the lowest synchronous dipole mode frequency for various cavity diameters, aperture diameters and disk thicknesses. Polynomial 3-parameter fits are used to calculate the dimensions for a 1.8 m detuned structure. The program SUPERFISH was used to calculate the shunt impedances, quality factors and group velocities. The RF parameters of the section like filling time, attenuation factor, accelerating gradient and maximum surface field along the section are evaluated. Error estimates will be discussed and comparisons with conventional constant gradient and constant impedance structures will be presented

  19. Wakefield monitor development for CLIC accelerating structure

    Peauger, F; Girardot, P; Andersson, A; Riddone, G; Samoshkin, A; Solodko, A; Zennaro, R; Ruber, R

    2010-01-01

    Abstract To achieve high luminosity in CLIC, the accelerating structures must be aligned to an accuracy of 5 μm with respect to the beam trajectory. Position detectors called Wakefield Monitors (WFM) are integrated to the structure for a beam based alignment. This paper describes the requirements of such monitors. Detailed RF design and electromagnetic simulations of the WFM itself are presented. In particular, time domain computations are performed and an evaluation of the resolution is done for two higher order modes at 18 and 24 GHz. The mechanical design of a prototype accelerating structure with WFM is also presented as well as the fabrication status of three complete structures. The objective is to implement two of them in CTF3 at CERN for a feasibility demonstration with beam and high power rf.

  20. An Rf Focused Interdigital Ion Accelerating Structure

    An Rf Focused Interdigital (RFI) ion accelerating structure will be described. It represents an effective combination of the Wideroee (or interdigital) linac structure, used for many low frequency, heavy ion applications, and the rf electric quadrupole focusing used in the RFQ and RFD linac structures. As in the RFD linac structure, rf focusing is introduced into the RFI linac structure by configuring the drift tubes as two independent pieces operating at different electrical potentials as determined by the rf fields of the linac structure. Each piece (or electrode) of the RFI drift tube supports two fingers pointed inwards towards the opposite end of the drift tube forming a four-finger geometry that produces an rf quadrupole field along the axis of the linac for focusing the beam. However, because of the differences in the rf field configuration along the axis, the scheme for introducing rf focusing into the interdigital linac structure is quite different from that adopted for the RFD linac structure. The RFI linac structure promises to have significant size, efficiency, performance, and cost advantages over existing linac structures for the acceleration of low energy ion beams of all masses (light to heavy). These advantages will be reviewed. A 'cold model' of this new linac structure has been fabricated and the results of rf cavity measurements on this cold model will be presented

  1. Rectangular Diamond-Lined Accelerator Structure

    Wang, Changbiao; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P

    2005-01-01

    For high frequency accelerators with normal-conducting structures studied by the NLC/GLC collaboration and the CLIC group, rf breakdown is the main gradient limitation. In this paper, a Ka-band rectangular dielectric-lined structure is described as an attempt to increase accelerating gradient beyond the limits suitable for metallic structures. The structure is based on amorphous dielectrics that are known to exhibit high breakdown limits (~ GV/m). An example is artificial diamond that has already been successfully used on an industrial basis for large-diameter output windows of high power gyrotrons, and is produced industrially in increasing quantities. Artificial diamond has low loss tangent, moderate dielectric constant and high breakdown limit of ~2 GV/m. In the proposed structure diamond-slabs are employed to support high-gradient acceleration fields. Interposition of vacuum gaps between the dielectric slabs and the side walls is shown to reduce Ohmic losses substantially, leading to an increase in shunt ...

  2. Validation of the transient Structural Response of a Threaded Assembly

    Doebling, S. W. (Scott W.); Hemez, F. M. (François M.); Schultze, J. F. (John F.)

    2002-01-01

    This paper will demonstrate the application of model validation techniques to a transient structural dynamics problem. The problem of interest is the propagation of an explosive shock through a complex threaded joint that is a surrogate model of a system assembly. The objective is to validate the computational modeling of the key mechanical phenomena in the assembly, so that the component can be represented with adequate fidelity in the system-level model. A set of experiments was conducted on the threaded assembly where the acceleration and strain responses to an explosive load were measured on mass-simulators representing payloads. A significantly detailed computational model of the threaded assembly was also created. Numerical features that represent the important characteristics of the response were defined and calculated for both the experimental and computational data. Each step of the model validation process will be described as applied to this problem. Fundamental issues regarding the nature of model validation and the role of model validation in the engineering analysis process will also be discussed.

  3. Research program for the 660 MeV proton accelerator driven MOX-plutonium subcritical assembly

    Barashenkov, V. S.; Buttsev, V. S.; Buttseva, G. L.; Dudarev, S. Ju.; Polanski, A.; Puzynin, I. V.; Sissakian, A. N.

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents the research program of the Experimental Accelerator Driven System (ADS), which employs a subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator operating in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna. Mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel (25% PuO2+75% UO2) designed for the BN-600 reactor use will be adopted for the core of the assembly. The present conceptual design of the experimental subcritical assembly is based on a core nominal unit capacity of 15 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient keff=0.945, energetic gain G=30, and accelerator beam power of 0.5 kW.

  4. Latest Insights on Adenovirus Structure and Assembly

    Carmen San Martín

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (AdV capsid organization is considerably complex, not only because of its large size (~950 Å and triangulation number (pseudo T = 25, but also because it contains four types of minor proteins in specialized locations modulating the quasi-equivalent icosahedral interactions. Up until 2009, only its major components (hexon, penton, and fiber had separately been described in atomic detail. Their relationships within the virion, and the location of minor coat proteins, were inferred from combining the known crystal structures with increasingly more detailed cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM maps. There was no structural information on assembly intermediates. Later on that year, two reports described the structural differences between the mature and immature adenoviral particle, starting to shed light on the different stages of viral assembly, and giving further insights into the roles of core and minor coat proteins during morphogenesis [1,2]. Finally, in 2010, two papers describing the atomic resolution structure of the complete virion appeared [3,4]. These reports represent a veritable tour de force for two structural biology techniques: X-ray crystallography and cryoEM, as this is the largest macromolecular complex solved at high resolution by either of them. In particular, the cryoEM analysis provided an unprecedented clear picture of the complex protein networks shaping the icosahedral shell. Here I review these latest developments in the field of AdV structural studies.

  5. Transport synthetic acceleration for long-characteristics assembly-level transport problems

    Zika, M.R.; Adams, M.L.

    2000-02-01

    The authors apply the transport synthetic acceleration (TSA) scheme to the long-characteristics spatial discretization for the two-dimensional assembly-level transport problem. This synthetic method employs a simplified transport operator as its low-order approximation. Thus, in the acceleration step, the authors take advantage of features of the long-characteristics discretization that make it particularly well suited to assembly-level transport problems. The main contribution is to address difficulties unique to the long-characteristics discretization and produce a computationally efficient acceleration scheme. The combination of the long-characteristics discretization, opposing reflecting boundary conditions (which are present in assembly-level transport problems), and TSA presents several challenges. The authors devise methods for overcoming each of them in a computationally efficient way. Since the boundary angular data exist on different grids in the high- and low-order problems, they define restriction and prolongation operations specific to the method of long characteristics to map between the two grids. They implement the conjugate gradient (CG) method in the presence of opposing reflection boundary conditions to solve the TSA low-order equations. The CG iteration may be applied only to symmetric positive definite (SPD) matrices; they prove that the long-characteristics discretization yields an SPD matrix. They present results of the acceleration scheme on a simple test problem, a typical pressurized water reactor assembly, and a typical boiling water reactor assembly.

  6. Transport synthetic acceleration for long-characteristics assembly-level transport problems

    The authors apply the transport synthetic acceleration (TSA) scheme to the long-characteristics spatial discretization for the two-dimensional assembly-level transport problem. This synthetic method employs a simplified transport operator as its low-order approximation. Thus, in the acceleration step, the authors take advantage of features of the long-characteristics discretization that make it particularly well suited to assembly-level transport problems. The main contribution is to address difficulties unique to the long-characteristics discretization and produce a computationally efficient acceleration scheme. The combination of the long-characteristics discretization, opposing reflecting boundary conditions (which are present in assembly-level transport problems), and TSA presents several challenges. The authors devise methods for overcoming each of them in a computationally efficient way. Since the boundary angular data exist on different grids in the high- and low-order problems, they define restriction and prolongation operations specific to the method of long characteristics to map between the two grids. They implement the conjugate gradient (CG) method in the presence of opposing reflection boundary conditions to solve the TSA low-order equations. The CG iteration may be applied only to symmetric positive definite (SPD) matrices; they prove that the long-characteristics discretization yields an SPD matrix. They present results of the acceleration scheme on a simple test problem, a typical pressurized water reactor assembly, and a typical boiling water reactor assembly

  7. Transport Synthetic Acceleration for Long-Characteristics Assembly-Level Transport Problems

    We apply the transport synthetic acceleration (TSA) scheme to the long-characteristics spatial discretization for the two-dimensional assembly-level transport problem. This synthetic method employs a simplified transport operator as its low-order approximation. Thus, in the acceleration step, we take advantage of features of the long-characteristics discretization that make it particularly well suited to assembly-level transport problems. Our main contribution is to address difficulties unique to the long-characteristics discretization and produce a computationally efficient acceleration scheme.The combination of the long-characteristics discretization, opposing reflecting boundary conditions (which are present in assembly-level transport problems), and TSA presents several challenges. We devise methods for overcoming each of them in a computationally efficient way. Since the boundary angular data exist on different grids in the high- and low-order problems, we define restriction and prolongation operations specific to the method of long characteristics to map between the two grids. We implement the conjugate gradient (CG) method in the presence of opposing reflection boundary conditions to solve the TSA low-order equations. The CG iteration may be applied only to symmetric positive definite (SPD) matrices; we prove that the long-characteristics discretization yields an SPD matrix. We present results of our acceleration scheme on a simple test problem, a typical pressurized water reactor assembly, and a typical boiling water reactor assembly

  8. Beam shaping assembly optimization for 7Li(p,n)7Be accelerator based BNCT

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30 mA at about 2.5 MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors. - Highlights: • A Beam Shaping Assembly for accelerator based BNCT has been designed. • A conical port for easy patient positioning and the cooling system are included. • Several configurations can deliver tumor doses greater than 55 RBEGy. • Good tumor doses can be obtained in less than 60 min of irradiation time

  9. Modeling accelerator structures and RF components

    Computer modeling has become an integral part of the design and analysis of accelerator structures RF components. Sophisticated 3D codes, powerful workstations and timely theory support all contributed to this development. We will describe our modeling experience with these resources and discuss their impact on ongoing work at SLAC. Specific examples from R ampersand D on a future linear collide and a proposed e+e- storage ring will be included

  10. Modeling accelerator structures and RF components

    Ko, K., Ng, C.K.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1993-03-01

    Computer modeling has become an integral part of the design and analysis of accelerator structures RF components. Sophisticated 3D codes, powerful workstations and timely theory support all contributed to this development. We will describe our modeling experience with these resources and discuss their impact on ongoing work at SLAC. Specific examples from R&D on a future linear collide and a proposed e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} storage ring will be included.

  11. Accelerating Structure design and fabrication For KIPT and PAL XFEL

    Hou, Mi; Pei, Shilun

    2014-01-01

    ANL and the National Science Center "Kharkov Institute of Physics Technology" (NSC KIPT, Kharkov, Ukraine) jointly proposed to design and build a 100MeV/100KW linear accelerator which will be used to drive the neutron source subcritical assembly. Now the linac was almost assembled in KIPT by the team from Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP, Beijing, China). The design and measurement result of the accelerating system of the linac will be described in this paper.

  12. Possibility of ion acceleration at the higher modes of a reciprocal-bar accelerating structure

    The aim of the paper is to study a possibility of increasing the heavy ion energy in a new linear accelerator of multicharged ions (MCI). The accelerator is based on using a reciprocal-bar accelerating structure (RBAS). It is shown experimentally that it is possible to achieve more high energies of MCI when their accelerating by the higher modes of RBAS

  13. Development of ultra-precision machining and measurement. Application to manufacturing of accelerating structures

    Manufacturing of the X-band accelerating structure is under development for the main components of the JLC, which is the next electron-positron linear collider project. The main body of the X-band accelerating structure is composed of approximately two hundred cells, and requires precision machining, measurement, assembly and bonding. Machining the cells with ultra-precision lathe, requires sub-micron precision, so is an important area for development. Various factors of the influence on precision were considered, and techniques developed for ultra-precision machining. In 1998 to 1999, DDS3 and RDDS structures were fabricated by assembling and bonding cells. The high power testing structures were fabricated by machining, assembling and bonding the cells in 2000 to 2001. (author)

  14. Structure investigations on assembled astaxanthin molecules

    Köpsel, Christian; Möltgen, Holger; Schuch, Horst; Auweter, Helmut; Kleinermanns, Karl; Martin, Hans-Dieter; Bettermann, Hans

    2005-08-01

    The carotenoid r, r-astaxanthin (3 R,3' R-dihydroxy-4,4'-diketo-β-carotene) forms different types of aggregates in acetone-water mixtures. H-type aggregates were found in mixtures with a high part of water (e.g. 1:9 acetone-water mixture) whereas two different types of J-aggregates were identified in mixtures with a lower part of water (3:7 acetone-water mixture). These aggregates were characterized by recording UV/vis-absorption spectra, CD-spectra and fluorescence emissions. The sizes of the molecular assemblies were determined by dynamic light scattering experiments. The hydrodynamic diameter of the assemblies amounts 40 nm in 1:9 acetone-water mixtures and exceeds up to 1 μm in 3:7 acetone-water mixtures. Scanning tunneling microscopy monitored astaxanthin aggregates on graphite surfaces. The structure of the H-aggregate was obtained by molecular modeling calculations. The structure was confirmed by calculating the electronic absorption spectrum and the CD-spectrum where the molecular modeling structure was used as input.

  15. Advanced accelerator and mm-wave structure research at LANL

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-22

    This document outlines acceleration projects and mm-wave structure research performed at LANL. The motivation for PBG research is described first, with reference to couplers for superconducting accelerators and structures for room-temperature accelerators and W-band TWTs. These topics are then taken up in greater detail: PBG structures and the MIT PBG accelerator; SRF PBG cavities at LANL; X-band PBG cavities at LANL; and W-band PBG TWT at LANL. The presentation concludes by describing other advanced accelerator projects: beam shaping with an Emittance Exchanger, diamond field emitter array cathodes, and additive manufacturing of novel accelerator structures.

  16. Studies on HF quadrupole accelerator structures

    The present thesis had the aim to elaborate advantages and disadvantages of existing high frequency resonators in the MHz range regarding their use as RFQ power supply structures and to limit their application ranges. After a short survey over potential and field distributions in the RFQ suitable criteria for the valuation of RFQ resonators are indicated. For the experimentally studied resonators equivalent circuits are presented, in some cases these are theoretically analyzed. Finally the construction of the GSI/Frankfurt proton model as well experiments with the accelerated proton beams are described. (orig.)

  17. On-Orbit Assembly of Flexible Space Structures with SWARM

    Mohan, Swati; Katz, Jacob G.; Miller, David W.

    2010-01-01

    On-orbit assembly is an enabling technology for many space applications. However, current methods of human assisted assembly are high in cost and risk to the crew, motivating a desire to automate the on-orbit assembly process using robotic technology. Construction of large space structures will likely involve the manipulation of flexible elements such as trusses or solar panels, and automation for assembly of flexible structures has significant challenges, particularly in control systems. Thi...

  18. THE MECHANICAL AND SHIELDING DESIGN OF A PORTABLE SPECTROMETER AND BEAM DUMP ASSEMBLY AT BNLS ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY

    A portable assembly containing a vertical-bend dipole magnet has been designed and installed immediately down-beam of the Compton electron-laser interaction chamber on beamline 1 of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The water-cooled magnet designed with field strength of up to 0.7 Tesla will be used as a spectrometer in the Thompson scattering and vacuum acceleration experiments, where field-dependent electron scattering, beam focusing and energy spread will be analyzed. This magnet will deflect the ATF's 60 MeV electron-beam 90o downward, as a vertical beam dump for the Compton scattering experiment. The dipole magnet assembly is portable, and can be relocated to other beamlines at the ATF or other accelerator facilities to be used as a spectrometer or a beam dump. The mechanical and shielding calculations are presented in this paper. The structural rigidity and stability of the assembly were studied. A square lead shield surrounding the assembly's Faraday Cup was designed to attenuate the radiation emerging from the 1 inch-copper beam stop. All photons produced were assumed to be sufficiently energetic to generate photoneutrons. A safety evaluation of groundwater tritium contamination due to the thermal neutron capturing by the deuterium in water was performed, using updated Monte Carlo neutron-photon coupled transport code (MCNP). High-energy neutron spallation, which is a potential source to directly generate radioactive tritium and sodium-22 in soil, was conservatively assessed in verifying personal and environmental safety

  19. Rapid Electromagnetic Analysis of Entire Accelerator Structures

    Cooke, Simon

    2005-01-01

    We present results of a new method for fast, accurate calculation, in 3-D, of the electromagnetic mode spectrum of long, tapered accelerator structures. Instead of discretizing the entire structure directly and solving a huge matrix eigenvalue problem, we use a new two-step technique that scales much better to long, multi-cavity structures. In the first step we compute a small number of eigenmodes of individual cavities, achieving 0.05% frequency accuracy using a new second-order finite-element code. In the second step we use these 3-D mode solutions as field basis functions to obtain a reduced matrix representation of Maxwell's equations for the complete structure. Solving the reduced system takes just a few minutes on a desktop PC even with more than 100 non-identical cavities, and gives the complete mode spectrum in the first few bands of the structure. By judicious choice of the basis modes, we retain 0.05% frequency accuracy for these global solutions, and can reconstruct the complete 3-D field of each m...

  20. Assembly and installation of the 2 MeV FMIT accelerator

    The front end of the 35-MeV Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility accelerator is being assembled and installed at Los Alamos. The machine ultimately will produce a 500-kW continuous-duty beam at 5 MeV, although only the first 2 MeV will be installed this year. The 2-MeV system will include the most-powerful radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) in existence. The assembly and installation of the hardware are described, along with the unique problems arising from the large size and high power of the components involved

  1. Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.

    Ren, Jianhua (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Russell, Scott (California State University, Stanislaus, Turlock, CA); Morishetti, Kiran (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kent, Michael Stuart (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-02-01

    Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

  2. Studies on high-precision machining and assembly of CLIC RF structures

    Huopana, J; Riddone, G; Österberg, K

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is currently under development at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e– collider. The manufacturing and assembly tolerances for the required RF components are essential for the final efficiency and for the operation of CLIC. The proper function of an accelerating structure is sensitive to mechanical errors in the shape and the alignment of the accelerating cavity. The current tolerances are in the micron range. This raises challenges in the field of mechanical design and demands special manufacturing technologies and processes. Currently the mechanical design of the accelerating structures is based on a disk design. Alternatively, it is possible to create the accelerating assembly from quadrants, which has the potential to be favoured for the mass production due to simplicity and cost. In this case, the functional shape inside of the accelerating structure remains the same and a single assembly uses less parts. This paper focuses on the development work done in design and sim...

  3. A hybrid dielectric and iris loaded periodic accelerating structure

    One disadvantage of conventional iris-loaded accelerating structures is the high ratio of the peak surface electric field to the peak axial electric field useful for accelerating a beam. Typically this ratio Es/Ea ≥ 2. The high surface electric field relative to the accelerating gradient may prove to be a limitation for realizing technologies for very high gradient accelerators. In this paper, we present a scheme that uses a hybrid dielectric and iris loaded periodic structure to reduce Es/Ea to near unity, while the shunt impedance per unit length r and the quality factor Q compare favorably with conventional metallic structures. The analysis based on MAFIA simulations of such structures shows that we can lower the peak surface electric field close to the accelerating gradient while maintaining high acceleration efficiency as measured by r/Q. Numerical examples of X-band hybrid accelerating structures are given

  4. Hybrid dielectric and iris-loaded periodic accelerating structure

    One disadvantage of conventional iris-loaded accelerating structures is the high ratio of the peak surface electric field to the peak axial electric field useful for accelerating a beam. Typically this ratio Es/Ea≥2. The high surface electric field relative to the accelerating gradient may prove to be a limitation for realizing technologies for very high gradient accelerators. In this article, we present a scheme that uses a hybrid dielectric and iris-loaded periodic structure to reduce Es/Ea to near unity, while the shunt impedance per unit length r and the quality factor Q compare favorably with conventional metallic structures. The analysis based on MAFIA simulations of such structures shows that we can lower the peak surface electric field close to the accelerating gradient while maintaining high acceleration efficiency as measured by r/Q. Numerical examples of X-band hybrid accelerating structures are given. copyright 2001 American Institute of Physics

  5. Structural analyses and integrated design of the MITICA Injector assembly

    Highlights: ► Seismic design has been carried out on PRIMA building. ► Three-dimensional FE models have been developed the vessel and TL device. ► Three bellows stiffness have been considered to evaluate maximum TL displacements. -- Abstract: In the framework of the activities foreseen for PRIMA (Padova Research on Injector Megavolt Accelerated) the MITICA neutral beam injector plays the role of main experiment, aiming to build, operate, test and optimize a full power and full scale prototype of the ITER Heating Neutral Beam Injector [1–3]. The entire MITICA system will be housed in special buildings, suitably designed to provide all the necessary supports, interfaces and shielding walls for nuclear radiation safety. Therefore an integrated design of the MITICA system and relevant buildings shall be developed and verified carefully, considering all the different configurations, operational modes and load combinations. This paper presents the numerical models and the results of MITICA assembly integrated analyses. The model takes into account properly constraints to ground and surrounding buildings, to study and verify the static and seismic response of the whole assembly. The load cases are defined and the numerical analyses described. Load definition and analyses have been performed considering the requirements of both the ASME [4] and the National Standard NTC2008 [5] for the seismic verification of structures subject to design response spectra. The obtained results are finally shown in detail and discussed, also comparing some different design options for design optimization

  6. Research Programme for the 660 Mev Proton Accelerator Driven MOX-Plutonium Subcritical Assembly

    Barashenkov, V S; Buttseva, G L; Dudarev, S Yu; Polanski, A; Puzynin, I V; Sissakian, A N

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents a research programme of the Experimental Acclerator Driven System (ADS), which employs a subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton acceletator operating at the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems of the JINR, Dubna. MOX fuel (25% PuO_2 + 75% UO_2) designed for the BN-600 reactor use will be adopted for the core of the assembly. The present conceptual design of the experimental subcritical assembly is based on a core of a nominal unit capacity of 15 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient k_eff = 0.945, energetic gain G = 30 and the accelerator beam power 0.5 kW.

  7. Molecular Component Structures Mediated Formation of Self-assemblies

    2001-01-01

    Molecular recognition directed self-assemblies from complementary molecular components, melamine and barbituric acid derivatives were studied by means of NMR, fluorescence, and TEM. It was found that both the process of the self-assembly and the morphologies of the result ed self-assemblies could be mediated by modifying the structures of the molecular components used. The effect of the structures of the molecular components on the formation of the self-as semblies was discussed in terms of intermolecular interactions.

  8. Brazing techniques for side-coupled electron accelerator structures

    The collaboration between the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), started in 1979, has led to the development of an advanced c-w microtron accelerator design. The four 2380-MHz NBS accelerating structures, containing a total of 184 accelerating cavities, have been fabricated and delivered. New fabrication methods, coupled with refinements of hydrogen-furnace brazing techniques described in this paper, allow efficient production of side-coupled structures. Success with the NBS RTM led to Los Alamos efforts on similar 2450-MHz accelerators for the microtron accelerator operated by the Nuclear Physics Department of the University of Illinois. Two accelerators (each with 17 cavities) have been fabricated; in 1986, a 45-cavity accelerator is being fabricated by private industry with some assistance from Los Alamos. Further private industry experience and refinement of the described fabrication techniques may allow future accelerators of this type to be completely fabricated by private industry

  9. The fabrication of millimeter-wavelength accelerating structures

    There is a growing interest in the development of high gradient (≥ 1 GeV/m) accelerating structures. The need for high gradient acceleration based on current microwave technology requires the structures to be operated in the millimeter wavelength. Fabrication of accelerating structures at millimeter scale with sub-micron tolerances poses great challenges. The accelerating structures impose strict requirements on surface smoothness and finish to suppress field emission and multipactor effects. Various fabrication techniques based on conventional machining and micromachining have been evaluated and tested. These will be discussed and measurement results presented

  10. Grid structure for nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    Described is a nuclear fuel element support system comprising an egg-crate-type grid made up of slotted vertical portions interconnected at right angles to each other, the vertical portions being interconnected by means of cross straps which are dimpled midway between their ends to engage fuel elements disposed within openings formed in the egg-crate assembly. The cross straps are disposed at an angle, other than a right angle, to the vertical portions of the assembly whereby their lengths are increased for a given span, and the total elastic deflection capability of the cell is increased. The assembly is particularly adapted for computer design and automated machine tool fabrication

  11. On the structure of acceleration in turbulence

    Liberzon, A.; Lüthi, B.; Holzner, M.; Ott, Søren; Berg, Jacob; Mann, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration and spatial velocity gradients are obtained simultaneously in an isotropic turbulent flow via three dimensional particle tracking velocimetry. We observe two distinct populations of intense acceleration events: one in flow regions of strong strain and another in regions of strong...... vorticity. Geometrical alignments with respect to vorticity vector and to the strain eigenvectors, curvature of Lagrangian trajectories and of streamlines for total acceleration, and for its convective part, , are studied in detail. We discriminate the alignment features of total and convective acceleration...... statistics, which are genuine features of turbulent nature from those of kinematic nature. We find pronounced alignment of acceleration with vorticity. Similarly, and especially are predominantly aligned at 45°with the most stretching and compressing eigenvectors of the rate of the strain tensor, , and...

  12. Required performance to the concrete structure of the accelerator facilities

    As for the accelerator facility, there is many a thing which is constructed as underground concrete structure from viewpoint such as cover of radiation and stability of the structure. Required performance to the concrete structure of the accelerator facility is the same as the general social infrastructure, but it has been possessed the feature where target performance differs largely. As for the body sentence, expressing the difference of the performance which is required from the concrete structure of the social infrastructure and the accelerator facility, construction management of the concrete structure which it plans from order of the accelerator engineering works facility, reaches to the design, supervision and operation it is something which expresses the method of thinking. In addition, in the future of material structural analysis of the concrete which uses the neutron accelerator concerning view it showed. (author)

  13. Coupler tuning for constant gradient travelling wave accelerating structures

    The method of the coupler tuning for the constant gradient traveling wave accelerating structure was described and the formula of coupling coefficient p was deduced on the basis of analyzing the existing methods for the constant impedance traveling wave accelerating structures and coupling-cavity chain equivalent circuits. The method and formula were validated by the simulation result by CST and experiment data. (authors)

  14. Assembly Based Modular Ray Tracing and CMFD Acceleration for BWR Cores with Different Fuel Lattices

    The geometry module of the DeCART direct whole core calculation code has been extended in order to analyze BWR cores which might have a mixed loading of different fuel types. First, an assembly based modular ray tracing scheme was implemented for the Method of Characteristic (MOC) calculation, and a CMFD formulation applicable for unaligned mesh conditions was then developed for acceleration the MOC calculation. The new calculation feature has been validated by comparing DeCART BWR assembly calculations with the MCU Monte Carlo calculations. A good agreement identified by the maximum eigenvalue difference of 120 pcm and the maximum pin power error of about 1% has been achieved. The CMFD scheme is shown to reduce the number of MOC iterations by factors of 12-25 without loss of accuracy. (authors)

  15. Travelling wave accelerating structure design for TESLA positron injector linac

    Jin, K; Zhou, F; Flöttmann, K

    2000-01-01

    A modified cup-like TW accelerating structure for TESLA Positron Pre-Accelerator (PPA) is designed by optimizing the structure geometry and by changing the iris thickness cell by cell in a section . This structure has high shunt-impedance and a large iris radius to meet with the requirements of high gradient and large transverse acceptance. The beam dynamics in the structure with the optimum solenoid focus field are studied. A satisfactory positron beam transmission and the beam performance at the PPA output have been obtained. In this paper the accelerating structure design is described in detail and the results are presented.

  16. Compact Couplers for Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    Photonic crystal waveguides are promising candidates for laser-driven accelerator structures because of their ability to confine a speed-of-light mode in an all-dielectric structure. Because of the difference between the group velocity of the waveguide mode and the particle bunch velocity, fields must be coupled into the accelerating waveguide at frequent intervals. Therefore efficient, compact couplers are critical to overall accelerator efficiency. We present designs and simulations of high-efficiency coupling to the accelerating mode in a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide from a waveguide adjoining it at 90o. We discuss details of the computation and the resulting transmission. We include some background on the accelerator structure and photonic crystal-based optical acceleration in general.

  17. Manifold damping of the NLC detuned accelerating structure

    In order to investigate the reappearance of the HOM wakefield of a detuned accelerator structure and relax tolerance requirements, we propose to provide low level damping by coupling all cavities to several identical and symmetrically located waveguides (manifolds) which run parallel to each accelerator structure and are terminated at each end by matched loads. The waveguides are designed such that all modes which couple to the acceleration mode are non-propagating at the acceleration mode frequency. Hence the coupling irises can be designed to provide large coupling to higher frequency modes without damping the acceleration mode. Because the higher order modes are detuned, they are localized and have a broad spectrum of phase velocities of both signs. They are therefore capable of coupling effectively to all propagating modes in the waveguides. Methods of analyzing and results obtained for the very complex system of modes in the accelerating structure and manifolds are presented

  18. Simulation studies of crystal-photodetector assemblies for the Turkish accelerator center particle factory electromagnetic calorimeter

    Kocak, F.

    2015-07-01

    The Turkish Accelerator Center Particle Factory detector will be constructed for the detection of the produced particles from the collision of a 1 GeV electron beam against a 3.6 GeV positron beam. PbWO4 and CsI(Tl) crystals are considered for the construction of the electromagnetic calorimeter part of the detector. The generated optical photons in these crystals are detected by avalanche or PIN photodiodes. Geant4 simulation code has been used to estimate the energy resolution of the calorimeter for these crystal-photodiode assemblies.

  19. Simulation studies of crystal-photodetector assemblies for the Turkish accelerator center particle factory electromagnetic calorimeter

    Kocak, F., E-mail: fkocak@uludag.edu.tr

    2015-07-01

    The Turkish Accelerator Center Particle Factory detector will be constructed for the detection of the produced particles from the collision of a 1 GeV electron beam against a 3.6 GeV positron beam. PbWO{sub 4} and CsI(Tl) crystals are considered for the construction of the electromagnetic calorimeter part of the detector. The generated optical photons in these crystals are detected by avalanche or PIN photodiodes. Geant4 simulation code has been used to estimate the energy resolution of the calorimeter for these crystal–photodiode assemblies.

  20. Simulation studies of crystal-photodetector assemblies for the Turkish accelerator center particle factory electromagnetic calorimeter

    The Turkish Accelerator Center Particle Factory detector will be constructed for the detection of the produced particles from the collision of a 1 GeV electron beam against a 3.6 GeV positron beam. PbWO4 and CsI(Tl) crystals are considered for the construction of the electromagnetic calorimeter part of the detector. The generated optical photons in these crystals are detected by avalanche or PIN photodiodes. Geant4 simulation code has been used to estimate the energy resolution of the calorimeter for these crystal–photodiode assemblies

  1. High frequency single mode traveling wave structure for particle acceleration

    Ivanyan, M. I.; Danielyan, V. A.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Tsakanov, V. M.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of the new high frequency slow traveling wave structures is one of the promising directions in accomplishment of charged particles high acceleration gradient. The disc and dielectric loaded structures are the most known structures with slowly propagating modes. In this paper a large aperture high frequency metallic two-layer accelerating structure is studied. The electrodynamical properties of the slowly propagating TM01 mode in a metallic tube with internally coated low conductive thin layer are examined.

  2. Welding device for nuclear fuel assembly structure elements

    The device has two parallel assembling positions next to each other. The welding robot is carried by a carriage with displacement parallel to the guide tubes and has enough degrees of freedom to move from one assembling position to the other and have access to the structural elements

  3. Investigation of IFMIF target assembly structure design

    In the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), the back-wall of target assembly is the part suffered the highest neutron-flux. The back-wall and the assembly are designed to have lips for cutting/welding at the back-wall replacement. To reduce thermal stress and deformation of the back-wall under neutron irradiation, contact pressure between the back-wall and the assembly is one of dominant factors. Therefore, an investigation was performed for feasible clamping pressure of a mechanical clamp set in limited space around the back-wall. It was clarified that the clamp can give a pressure difference up to 0.4 MPa between the contact pressure and atmosphere pressure in the test cell room. Also a research was performed for the dissimilar metal welding in the back-wall. Use of 309 steel was found adequate as the intermediate filler metal through the research of previous welding. Maintaining a temperature of the target assembly so as to avoid a freezing of liquid lithium is needed at the lithium charge into the loop before the beam injection. The assembly is covered with thermal insulation. Therefore, a research and an investigation were performed for compact and light thermal-insulation effective even under helium (i.e. high heat-conduction) condition of the test cell room. The result was as follows; in the case that a thermal conductivity 0.008 W/m·K of one of found insulation materials is available in the temperature range up to 300degC of the IFMIF target assembly, needed thickness and weight of the insulation were respectively only 8.2 mm and 32 kg. Also a research was performed for high-heat-density heaters to maintain temperature of the back-wall which can not be cover with insulation due to limited space. A heater made of silicon-nitride was found to be adequate. Total heat of 8.4 kW on the back-wall was found to be achievable through an investigations of heater arrange. Also an investigation was performed for remote-handling device to

  4. Structural design of neptunium-bearing assembly for transmutation research

    To study the irradiation performance of the long-life nuclide and to lay a foundation for the 'separation-transmutation' advanced fuel cycle technology, an experimental neptunium-bearing assembly is designed on the basis of the standard fuel assembly of CEFR. In this paper, design principles and structure of the experimental neptunium-bearing assembly are explained in detail. The design analysis and validation are briefly introduced. The design of the experimental assembly can meet the demand of irradiation test. Up to now, the out-of-pile hydraulic test is under way and the manufacture of the assembly is nearly completed. It is to be irradiated in the first row of stainless steel reflector assemblies for about 240 effective full power days. (authors)

  5. Fuel assembly support structure for reactor

    Purpose: To restrict a part or whole of injected molten fuel within a predetermined area by constructing interior surfaces of walls and bottom of a molten fuel container with high-melting materials, fixing at an upper opening a fuel assembly support cover, and forming a thru-hole in the bottom. Constitution: A plurality of cover-fitted support elements for fuel assemblies are mounted and fixed on the supports in the reactor container, with leg pipes inserted in insert holes. Fuel assemblies are fitted in insert holes of the support elements to make up the core. If the power increases due to an accident, causing failure of fuel cans installed in bundle in the assemblies, most of the molten fuel falls to the bottom of the container. As the bottom is graded down from center to periphery, the molten fuel settles much in the peripheral area, but the part is lined with high-melting material so that the part will not be melted. (Yoshihara, H.)

  6. Multipactor Physics, Acceleration, and Breakdown in Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures

    Fischer, Richard P. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Gold, Steven H. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this 3-year program is to study the physics issues associated with rf acceleration in dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures, with a focus on the key issue of multipactor loading, which has been found to cause very significant rf power loss in DLA structures whenever the rf pulsewidth exceeds the multipactor risetime (~10 ns). The experiments are carried out in the X-band magnicon laboratory at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Euclid Techlabs LLC, who develop the test structures with support from the DoE SBIR program. There are two main elements in the research program: (1) high-power tests of DLA structures using the magnicon output (20 MW @11.4 GHz), and (2) tests of electron acceleration in DLA structures using relativistic electrons from a compact X-band accelerator. The work during this period has focused on a study of the use of an axial magnetic field to suppress multipactor in DLA structures, with several new high power tests carried out at NRL, and on preparation of the accelerator for the electron acceleration experiments.

  7. Atomic structures of peptide self-assembly mimics

    Makabe, Koki; McElheny, Dan; Tereshko, Valentia; Hilyard, Aaron; Gawlak, Grzegorz; Yan, Shude; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei

    2006-01-01

    Although the β-rich self-assemblies are a major structural class for polypeptides and the focus of intense research, little is known about their atomic structures and dynamics due to their insoluble and noncrystalline nature. We developed a protein engineering strategy that captures a self-assembly segment in a water-soluble molecule. A predefined number of self-assembling peptide units are linked, and the β-sheet ends are capped to prevent aggregation, which yields a mono-dispersed soluble p...

  8. A compact accelerating structure for stacked isochronous cyclotrons

    Meitzler, C. R.; Byeon, J.; McIntyre, P. M.; Rogers, Bob; Sattarov, A.

    2003-03-01

    An accelerator-driven thorium cycle power reactor is being developed, based on a flux-coupled stack of isochronous cyclotrons. (IC) The stack consists of seven independent accelerators (total beam power 15 MW at 1 GeV), stacked on a spacing ˜ 20 cm. The close spacing poses unique problems for the design of the accelerating cavities. We have invented a 4-bar RF dipole structure for the purpose. We have built a cold model and are studying its operating characteristics. The structure will be described. We present measurements of the resonant frequency, parasitic capacitances, and electric and magnetic field distributions in the structure.

  9. Force Feedback for Assembly of Aircraft Structures

    Jonsson, Marie; Murray, Tom; Robertsson, Anders; Stolt, Andreas; Ossbahr, Gilbert; Nilsson, Klas

    2010-01-01

    Variability in composite manufacture and the limitations in positional accuracy of common industrial robots have hampered automation of assembly tasks within aircraft manufacturing. One way to handle geometry variations and robot compliancy is to use force control. Force control technology utilizes a sensor mounted on the robot to feedback force data to the controller system so instead of being position driven, i.e. programmed to achieve a certain position with the tool, the robot can be prog...

  10. Allophycocyanin and phycocyanin crystal structures reveal facets of phycobilisome assembly.

    Marx, Ailie; Adir, Noam

    2013-03-01

    X-ray crystal structures of the isolated phycobiliprotein components of the phycobilisome have provided high resolution details to the description of this light harvesting complex at different levels of complexity and detail. The linker-independent assembly of trimers into hexamers in crystal lattices of previously determined structures has been observed in almost all of the phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC) structures available in the Protein Data Bank. In this paper we describe the X-ray crystal structures of PC and APC from Synechococcus elongatus sp. PCC 7942, PC from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and PC from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus crystallized in the presence of urea. All five structures are highly similar to other PC and APC structures on the levels of subunits, monomers and trimers. The Synechococcus APC forms a unique loose hexamer that may show the structural requirements for core assembly and rod attachment. While the Synechococcus PC assembles into the canonical hexamer, it does not further assemble into rods. Unlike most PC structures, the Synechocystis PC fails to form hexamers. Addition of low concentrations of urea to T. vulcanus PC inhibits this proteins propensity to form hexamers, resulting in a crystal lattice composed of trimers. The molecular source of these differences in assembly and their relevance to the phycobilisome structure is discussed. PMID:23201474

  11. X-band coaxial standing-wave linear accelerator structure

    A new high efficiency X-Band, standing-wave linear accelerator cavity structure has been developed. It utilizes a shaped coaxial cavity as the coupling cavity between accelerating cavities for π/2 mode operation, hence the overall diameter is extremely small while maintaining a very high shunt impedance. The coupling cavity and accelerating cavity are easily machined on opposite sides of a single cell, eliminating any subassembly steps. Cavity geometries were developed using the computer codes LACC and LALA. Prototype 1.5 MeV and 4.0 MeV, 20 cm long accelerators are now under development. The accelerators employ a stepped field focusing technique to keep the beam focused at low field levels. The beam dynamics code PARMELA was used to optimize the longitudinal bunching and transverse beam characteristics. The accelerator design parameters, as well as experimental results, are presented

  12. Two-beam detuned-cavity electron accelerator structure

    Progress has been made in the theory, development, cavity design and optimization, beam dynamics study, beam transport design, and hardware construction for studies of a detuned two-beam electron accelerator structure.

  13. High energy accelerating structures for high gradient proton linac applications

    The high-energy part of a proton linac, following a drift tube section, accelerates protons and H- ions of energies above 150 MeV. High efficiency and high gradients in the accelerating structure considered for this part of a proton linac are studied. Several known and improved structures working at 1350 MHz were optimized for maximum shunt impedance. The study was performed with the extensive use of a computer code--SUPERFISH. The theoretical results of this study are presented

  14. Spaced Seed Data Structures for De Novo Assembly

    Inanç Birol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available De novo assembly of the genome of a species is essential in the absence of a reference genome sequence. Many scalable assembly algorithms use the de Bruijn graph (DBG paradigm to reconstruct genomes, where a table of subsequences of a certain length is derived from the reads, and their overlaps are analyzed to assemble sequences. Despite longer subsequences unlocking longer genomic features for assembly, associated increase in compute resources limits the practicability of DBG over other assembly archetypes already designed for longer reads. Here, we revisit the DBG paradigm to adapt it to the changing sequencing technology landscape and introduce three data structure designs for spaced seeds in the form of paired subsequences. These data structures address memory and run time constraints imposed by longer reads. We observe that when a fixed distance separates seed pairs, it provides increased sequence specificity with increased gap length. Further, we note that Bloom filters would be suitable to implicitly store spaced seeds and be tolerant to sequencing errors. Building on this concept, we describe a data structure for tracking the frequencies of observed spaced seeds. These data structure designs will have applications in genome, transcriptome and metagenome assemblies, and read error correction.

  15. Spaced Seed Data Structures for De Novo Assembly.

    Birol, Inanç; Chu, Justin; Mohamadi, Hamid; Jackman, Shaun D; Raghavan, Karthika; Vandervalk, Benjamin P; Raymond, Anthony; Warren, René L

    2015-01-01

    De novo assembly of the genome of a species is essential in the absence of a reference genome sequence. Many scalable assembly algorithms use the de Bruijn graph (DBG) paradigm to reconstruct genomes, where a table of subsequences of a certain length is derived from the reads, and their overlaps are analyzed to assemble sequences. Despite longer subsequences unlocking longer genomic features for assembly, associated increase in compute resources limits the practicability of DBG over other assembly archetypes already designed for longer reads. Here, we revisit the DBG paradigm to adapt it to the changing sequencing technology landscape and introduce three data structure designs for spaced seeds in the form of paired subsequences. These data structures address memory and run time constraints imposed by longer reads. We observe that when a fixed distance separates seed pairs, it provides increased sequence specificity with increased gap length. Further, we note that Bloom filters would be suitable to implicitly store spaced seeds and be tolerant to sequencing errors. Building on this concept, we describe a data structure for tracking the frequencies of observed spaced seeds. These data structure designs will have applications in genome, transcriptome and metagenome assemblies, and read error correction. PMID:26539459

  16. New linear accelerator (Linac) design based on C-band accelerating structures for SXFEL facility

    ZHANG Meng; GU Qiang

    2011-01-01

    A C-band accelerator structure is one promising technique for a compact XFEL facility.It is also attractive in beam dynamics in maintaining a high quality electron beam,which is an important factor in the performance of a free electron laser.In this paper,a comparison between traditional S-band and C-band accelerating structures is made based on the linac configuration of a Shanghai Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser (SXFEL) facility.Throughout the comprehensive simulation,we conclude that the C-band structure is much more competitive.

  17. Structural Assembly for Cold Plate Cooling

    Zaffetti, Mark A. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A device including a structural member having a heat spreader and an electronic device mounted directly to a first surface of the heat spreader of the structural member. The device also includes a cold plate mounted directly to the first surface of the heat spreader of the structural member.

  18. Extensive set of macros for structured programing in OS/360 assembly language (STRCMACS)

    Barth, C. W.

    1975-01-01

    Development of consistent assembly language structured programming techniques has been enhanced by use of assembly macros developed for structured programing. Set of macros was written for IBM OS/360 Assembly language.

  19. The tobacco mosaic virus particle: structure and assembly.

    Klug, A

    1999-01-01

    A short account is given of the physical and chemical studies that have led to an understanding of the structure of the tobacco mosaic virus particle and how it is assembled from its constituent coat protein and RNA. The assembly is a much more complex process than might have been expected from the simplicity of the helical design of the particle. The protein forms an obligatory intermediate (a cylindrical disk composed of two layers of protein units), which recognizes a specific RNA hairpin ...

  20. Fabrication and Characterization of Woodpile Structures for Direct Laser Acceleration

    McGuinness, C.; Colby, E.; England, R.J.; Ng, J.; Noble, R.J.; /SLAC; Peralta, E.; Soong, K.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.; Spencer, J.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.

    2010-08-26

    An eight and nine layer three dimensional photonic crystal with a defect designed specifically for accelerator applications has been fabricated. The structures were fabricated using a combination of nanofabrication techniques, including low pressure chemical vapor deposition, optical lithography, and chemical mechanical polishing. Limits imposed by the optical lithography set the minimum feature size to 400 nm, corresponding to a structure with a bandgap centered at 4.26 {micro}m. Reflection spectroscopy reveal a peak in reflectivity about the predicted region, and good agreement with simulation is shown. The eight and nine layer structures will be aligned and bonded together to form the complete seventeen layer woodpile accelerator structure.

  1. An optimized neutron-beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT

    Different materials and proton beam energies have been studied in order to search for an optimized neutron production target and beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT. The solution proposed in this work consists of successive stacks of Al, polytetrafluoroethylene, commercially known as Teflon[reg ], and LiF as moderator and neutron absorber, and Pb as reflector. This assembly is easy to build and its cost is relatively low. An exhaustive Monte Carlo simulation study has been performed evaluating the doses delivered to a Snyder model head phantom by a neutron production Li-metal target based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction for proton bombarding energies of 1.92, 2.0, 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. Three moderator thicknesses have been studied and the figures of merit show the advantage of irradiating with near-resonance-energy protons (2.3 MeV) because of the relatively high neutron yield at this energy, which at the same time keeps the fast neutron healthy tissue dose limited and leads to the lowest treatment times. A moderator of 34 cm length has shown the best performance among the studied cases

  2. Design and construction of the clean room for proton beam accelerator assembly

    The objective of this report is to design, construction and evaluation of clean room for proton beam accelerator assembly. The design conditions o Class : 1,000(1,000 ea ft3), o Flow Rate : 200 m3/h m2, o Temperature : 22 deg C±2, o Humidity : 55%±5. The main design results are summarized as follows: o Air-handling unit : Cooling Capacity : 13,500 kcal/h, Heating Capacity : 10,300 kcal/h, Humidity Capacity : 4 kg/h, Flow Rate : 150 CMM o Air Shower : Flow Rate : 35 CMM, Size : 1500 x 1000 x 2200, Material : In-steel, Out-SUS304, Filter : PRE + HEPA, AIR Velocity : 25 m/s o Relief Damper : Size : Φ250, Casing : SS41, Blade : AL, Shaft : SUS304, Weight Ring : SS41, Grill : AL o HEPA Filter Box : Filter Box Size : 670 x 670 x 630, Filter Size : 610 x 610 x 150, Frame: Poly Wood, Media : Glass Fiber, Filter Efficiency : 0.3μm, 99.97%, Separator : AL, Flow Rate : 17 CMM, Damper Size : Φ300 Following this report will be used important data for the design, construction, operation and maintenance of the clean room, for high precision apparatus assembly laboratory

  3. Structural simulation and modeling for assembly in real space

    FIESTA (Finite Element Structural analysis for Assembly) is a large scale simulation, which concerns a simulation space to bring real world in digital space, such as so named either virtual reality or virtual facility. In order to establish a huge and complex object like nuclear facilities of a real world, there are lack of methodology and technology for reproducing facilities in digital space. FIESTA attempts to realize an assembly structural analysis for supplying one of the methodologies to reproduce facilities in digital space. The first attempt of the structural analysis for assembly is accomplished by finite element analysis by integrating parts of facilities. Since the structural analysis for assembly requests massive calculation, parallel and distributed computing was applied for the computational environment. It has been practiced numerical experiments for a test reactor driven by JAEA. The structural analysis for assembly by finite element method is confirmed to be able to analyze a huge and complex facility and show results of numerical experiment by applying to a test reactor driven by JAEA. (author)

  4. Structural Diversity of DNA-Coated Particle Assemblies

    Starr, Francis W.

    2012-02-01

    Custom designed nanoparticles (NP) or colloids with specific recognition offer the possibility to control the phase behavior and structure of particle assemblies for a range of applications. One approach to realize these new materials is by attaching DNA to a core particle; the hybridization of double-stranded DNA between particles results in the spontaneous assembly of higher-order structures. Control of the assembled state can be achieved by adjusting several parameters, including sequence selectivity, DNA link orientation, DNA length and flexibility, and the balance between the length of links and non-specific repulsive interactions. I will discuss the results of a coarse-grained molecular model for DNA-linked nanoparticles that helps to rationalize experimental findings and demonstrate new routes to control the assembled structure. We examine how the number and orientation of strands affects the structure, phase behavior, and dynamics. We show that it is possible to realize unusual phase diagrams with many thermodynamically distinct phases, both amorphous and crystal. We further examine the parameters that control the pathways of assembly, which are critical to avoid kinetic bottlenecks. Finally, we discuss strategies to create highly anisoptropic structures using both isotropic and anisotropic core units.

  5. Electrostatic Force Microscopy of Self Assembled Peptide Structures

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Dimaki, Maria; Pantagos, Spyros P.;

    2011-01-01

    In this report electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) is used to study different peptide self-assembled structures, such as tubes and particles. It is shown that not only geometrical information can be obtained using EFM, but also information about the composition of different structures. In...

  6. Simulation and design of the photonic crystal microwave accelerating structure

    The authors have derived the global band gaps for general two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal microwave accelerating structures formed by square or triangular arrays of metal posts. A coordinate-space, finite-difference code was used to calculate the complete dispersion curves for the lattices. The fundamental and higher frequency global photonic band gaps were determined numerically. The structure formed by triangular arrays of metal posts with a missing rod at the center has advantages of higher-order-modes (HOM) suppression and main mode restriction under the condition of a/b<0.2. The relationship between the RF properties and the geometrical parameters have been studied for the 9.37 GHz photonic crystal accelerating structure. The Rs, Q, Rs/Q of the new structure may be comparable to the disk-loaded accelerating structure. (authors)

  7. Design and fabrication of a continuous wave electron accelerating structure

    The Physics Institute of Sao Paulo University, SP, Brazil is fabricating a 31 MeV cw racetrack microtron (RTM) designed for nuclear physics research. This is a two-stage microtron that includes a 1.93 MeV injector linac feeding a five-turn microtron booster. After 28 turns, the main microtron delivers a 31 MeV continuous electron beam. The objective of this work is the development and fabrication of an advanced, beta=l, cw accelerating structure for the main microtron. The accelerating structure will be a side-coupled structure (SCS). We have chosen this kind of cavity, because it presents good vacuum properties, allows operation at higher accelerating electric fields and has a shunt impedance better than 81 MQ/m, with a high coupling factor ( 3 - 5%). The engineering design is the Los Alamos one. There will be two tuning plungers placed at both ends of the accelerating structure. They automatically and quickly compensate for the variation in the resonance frequency caused by changes in the structure temperature. Our design represents an advanced accelerating structure with the optimum SCS properties coexisting with the plunger's good tuning properties. (author)

  8. Experimental demonstration of dielectric structure based two beam acceleration.

    Gai, W.; Conde, M. E.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Schoessow, P.; Sun, X.; Zou, P.

    2000-11-28

    We report on the experimental results of the dielectric based two beam accelerator (step-up transformer). By using a single high charge beam, we have generated and extracted a high power RF pulse from a 7.8 GHz primary dielectric structure and then subsequently transferred to a second accelerating structure with higher dielectric constant and smaller transverse dimensions. We have measured the energy change of a second (witness) beam passing through the acceleration stage. The measured gradient is >4 times the deceleration gradient. The detailed experiment of set-up and results of the measurements are dimmed. Future plans for the development of a 100 MeV demonstration accelerator based on this technique is presented.

  9. Accelerated probabilistic inference of RNA structure evolution

    Holmes Ian

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pairwise stochastic context-free grammars (Pair SCFGs are powerful tools for evolutionary analysis of RNA, including simultaneous RNA sequence alignment and secondary structure prediction, but the associated algorithms are intensive in both CPU and memory usage. The same problem is faced by other RNA alignment-and-folding algorithms based on Sankoff's 1985 algorithm. It is therefore desirable to constrain such algorithms, by pre-processing the sequences and using this first pass to limit the range of structures and/or alignments that can be considered. Results We demonstrate how flexible classes of constraint can be imposed, greatly reducing the computational costs while maintaining a high quality of structural homology prediction. Any score-attributed context-free grammar (e.g. energy-based scoring schemes, or conditionally normalized Pair SCFGs is amenable to this treatment. It is now possible to combine independent structural and alignment constraints of unprecedented general flexibility in Pair SCFG alignment algorithms. We outline several applications to the bioinformatics of RNA sequence and structure, including Waterman-Eggert N-best alignments and progressive multiple alignment. We evaluate the performance of the algorithm on test examples from the RFAM database. Conclusion A program, Stemloc, that implements these algorithms for efficient RNA sequence alignment and structure prediction is available under the GNU General Public License.

  10. Induced activity in accelerator structures, air and water

    Stevenson, Graham Roger

    2001-01-01

    A summary is given of several 'rules of thumb' which can be used to predict the formation and decay of radionuclides in the structure of accelerators together with the dose rates from the induced radioactivity. Models are also given for the activation of gases (air of the accelerator vault) and liquids (in particular cooling water), together with their transport front the activation region to the release point. (18 refs).

  11. Accelerating the design and testing of LEU fuel assemblies for conversion of Russian-designed research reactors outside Russia

    This paper identifies proposed geometries and loading specifications of LEU tube-type and pin-type test assemblies that would be suitable for accelerating the conversion of Russian-designed research reactors outside of Russia if these fuels are manufactured, qualified by irradiation testing, and made commercially available in Russia. (author)

  12. In-Space Structural Assembly: Applications and Technology

    Belvin, W. Keith; Doggett, Bill R.; Watson, Judith J.; Dorsey, John T.; Warren, Jay; Jones, Thomas C.; Komendera, Erik E.; Mann, Troy O.; Bowman, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    As NASA exploration moves beyond earth's orbit, the need exists for long duration space systems that are resilient to events that compromise safety and performance. Fortunately, technology advances in autonomy, robotic manipulators, and modular plug-and-play architectures over the past two decades have made in-space vehicle assembly and servicing possible at acceptable cost and risk. This study evaluates future space systems needed to support scientific observatories and human/robotic Mars exploration to assess key structural design considerations. The impact of in-space assembly is discussed to identify gaps in structural technology and opportunities for new vehicle designs to support NASA's future long duration missions.

  13. Design and construction of standing wave accelerating structures at TUE

    Two standing wave accelerating structures have been built for the operation of two AVF racetrack microtrons (RTM). For the first RTM a 3 cell 1.3 GHz on axis coupled standing wave structure has been designed to accelerate a 50 A peak current beam in 9 steps from the injection energy of 6 MeV to a final energy of 25 MeV. The beam will be used as drive beam for the free electron laser TEUFEL. The second structure accelerates a 7.5 mA beam in 13 steps from the injection energy of 10 MeV, to a maximum energy of 75 MeV. This 9 cell on-axis coupled structure operates at 3 GHz and was designed with a relatively large aperture radius (8 mm) in order to avoid limitations on the RTM's acceptance. Design, fabrication and testing of the structures have been done in house. For the design of the structures the combination of the codes Superfish and Mafia has been used. Low and high power tests proved that the structures live up to the demands. With the experiences gained a design for the accelerating structure of the H- linac of the ESS project has been made. The design of the cells as well as a novel type of single cell bridge coupler will be presented. (author)

  14. ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF CLUSTER ASSEMBLED Al12C (Si) SOLID

    QUAN HONG-JUN; GONG XIN-GAO

    2000-01-01

    The electronic structures of the cluster-assembled solid Al12C (Si) are studied by the ab initio method. We find that Al12C (Si) can solidify into a van der Waals solid. The electronic band structures show very weak dispersion. The main features in the electronic structure of cluster are retained in the solid, and an energy gap up to about 1.5 eV is observed for Al12C and Al12Si solids.

  15. Monte Carlo Modeling of Fast Sub-critical Assembly with MOX Fuel for Research of Accelerator-Driven Systems

    Polanski, A.; Barashenkov, V.; Puzynin, I.; Rakhno, I.; Sissakian, A.

    It is considered a sub-critical assembly driven with existing 660 MeV JINR proton accelerator. The assembly consists of a central cylindrical lead target surrounded with a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel (PuO2 + UO2) and with reflector made of beryllium. Dependence of the energetic gain on the proton energy, the neutron multiplication coefficient, and the neutron energetic spectra have been calculated. It is shown that for subcritical assembly with a mixed-oxide (MOX) BN-600 fuel (28%PuO 2 + 72%UO2) with effective density of fuel material equal to 9 g/cm 3 , the multiplication coefficient keff is equal to 0.945, the energetic gain is equal to 27, and the neutron flux density is 1012 cm˜2 s˜x for the protons with energy of 660 MeV and accelerator beam current of 1 uA.

  16. Design of a beam shaping assembly and preliminary modelling of a treatment room for accelerator-based BNCT at CNEA

    This work reports on the characterisation of a neutron beam shaping assembly (BSA) prototype and on the preliminary modelling of a treatment room for BNCT within the framework of a research programme for the development and construction of an accelerator-based BNCT irradiation facility in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The BSA prototype constructed has been characterised by means of MCNP simulations as well as a set of experimental measurements performed at the Tandar accelerator at the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. - Highlights: ► Characterisation of a neutron beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT. ► Measurements: total and epi-cadmium neutron fluxes and beam homogeneity. ► Calculations: Monte Carlo simulations with the MCNP code. ► Measured and calculated figure-of-merit parameters in agreement with those of IAEA. ► Initial MCNP dose calculations for a treatment room to define future design actions.

  17. Modified PARMILA code for new accelerating structures

    The PARMILA code was originally developed as a numerical tool to design and simulate the beam performance of the drift-tube linac (DTL). The authors have extended PARMILA to the design of both the coupled-cavity linac (CCL) and the coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL). They describe the new design and simulation features associated with these linac structures and improvements to the code that facilitate a seamless linac design process

  18. Design, Fabrication and Measurement of the First Rounded Damped Detuned Accelerator Structure (RDDS1)

    As a joint effort in the JLC/NLC research program, the authors have developed a new type of damped detuned accelerator structure with optimized round-shaped cavities (RDDS). This paper discusses some important R and D aspects of the first structure in this series (RDDS1). The design aspects covered are the cell design with sub-MHz precision, HOM detuning, coupling and damping technique and wakefield simulation. The fabrication issues covered are ultra-precision cell machining with micron accuracy, assembly and diffusion bonding technologies to satisfactorily meet bookshelf, straightness and cell rotational alignment requirements. The measurements described are the RF properties of single cavities and complete accelerator section, as well as wakefields from the ASSET tests at SLAC. Finally, future improvements are also discussed

  19. Highly Compact Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Assembly for Medical and Industrial Applications

    A novel, highly compact, fusion neutron source (CNS) based on a coaxial electrostatic accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This source is designed to generate up to ∼1012 D-D n/s. This source intensity is an order of magnitude too small for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) applications. The objective of this project is to assess the feasibility of using a small, safe and inexpensive subcritical fission assembly to multiply the fusion neutrons by a factor of (ge)30. The overall design objective is to get a treatment time for deep seated rain tumors that does not significantly increase beyond one hour when the effective multiplication factor of the SCM is keff = 0.98. There are two major parts to this study: the optimization of the Sub-Critical Multiplier (SCM) and the optimization of the Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA), including the reflector for both subsystems. The SCM optimization objective is to maximize the current of neutrons that leak out from the SCM in the direction of the patient, without exceeding the maximum permissible keff. Minimizing the required uranium inventory is another objective. SCM design variables considered include the uranium enrichment level in the range not exceeding 20% 235U (for proliferation concerns), SCM geometry and dimensions, fuel thickness and moderator thickness. The objective of the BSA optimization is to maximize the tumor dose rate using the optimal SCM while maintaining a tumor-to-normal tissue dose ratio of at least 20 to 12.5 (corresponding to the tumor control dose and to the healthy tissue dose limit). The BSA design variables include its shape, dimensions and composition. The reflector optimization is, in fact, an integral part of the SCM optimization and of the BSA optimization. The reflector design variables are composition and thickness. The study concludes that it is not quite feasible to achieve the project objective. Nevertheless, it appears feasible to develop a

  20. Assembly and Structural Evolution of Micelleplexes

    Jiang, Yaming; Sprouse, Dustin; Laaser, Jennifer; Reineke, Theresa; Lodge, Timothy

    Cationic micelles complex with DNA to form micelleplexes, which are attractive vehicles for gene delivery. We investigate the formation and structural evolution of micelleplexes in buffered solutions. The micelles are composed of poly((2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(n-butyl methacrylate). The formation of the micelleplexes is monitored via turbidimetric titration. With DNA oligomers, solutions of the complexes are homogeneous until near the charge neutral point, at which point the complexes precipitate. With plasmid DNA, more than a stoichiometric amount of DNA is needed to reach the inhomogeneous region, which suggests that binding is partially inhibited. This inhibition is not fully relieved when the plasmid DNA is linearized, suggesting that the stiffness of the DNA is the main source of the inhibition. With micelles in excess, the micelleplexes formed at low ionic strength exhibit bimodal size distributions and remain stable in solution. With DNA in excess, soluble micelleplexes aggregate over time and precipitate. We explain the structural evolution of the micelleplexes as an interplay between kinetic trapping and thermodynamic equilibrium, and compare the results for DNA with those for a flexible polyanion.

  1. Verification Test of Automated Robotic Assembly of Space Truss Structures

    Rhodes, Marvin D.; Will, Ralph W.; Quach, Cuong C.

    1995-01-01

    A multidisciplinary program has been conducted at the Langley Research Center to develop operational procedures for supervised autonomous assembly of truss structures suitable for large-aperture antennas. The hardware and operations required to assemble a 102-member tetrahedral truss and attach 12 hexagonal panels were developed and evaluated. A brute-force automation approach was used to develop baseline assembly hardware and software techniques. However, as the system matured and operations were proven, upgrades were incorporated and assessed against the baseline test results. These upgrades included the use of distributed microprocessors to control dedicated end-effector operations, machine vision guidance for strut installation, and the use of an expert system-based executive-control program. This paper summarizes the developmental phases of the program, the results of several assembly tests, and a series of proposed enhancements. No problems that would preclude automated in-space assembly or truss structures have been encountered. The test system was developed at a breadboard level and continued development at an enhanced level is warranted.

  2. Structure and Assembly Mechanism for Heteromeric Kainate Receptors

    Kumar, Janesh; Schuck, Peter; Mayer, Mark L. (NIH)

    2012-10-25

    Native glutamate receptor ion channels are tetrameric assemblies containing two or more different subunits. NMDA receptors are obligate heteromers formed by coassembly of two or three divergent gene families. While some AMPA and kainate receptors can form functional homomeric ion channels, the KA1 and KA2 subunits are obligate heteromers which function only in combination with GluR57. The mechanisms controlling glutamate receptor assembly involve an initial step in which the amino terminal domains (ATD) assemble as dimers. Here, we establish by sedimentation velocity that the ATDs of GluR6 and KA2 coassemble as a heterodimer of K{sub d} 11 nM, 32,000-fold lower than the K{sub d} for homodimer formation by KA2; we solve crystal structures for the GluR6/KA2 ATD heterodimer and heterotetramer assemblies. Using these structures as a guide, we perform a mutant cycle analysis to probe the energetics of assembly and show that high-affinity ATD interactions are required for biosynthesis of functional heteromeric receptors.

  3. Laser fields in dynamically ionized plasma structures for coherent acceleration

    Luu-Thanh, Ph.; Pukhov, A.; Kostyukov, I.

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of the CAN (Coherent Amplification Network) laser technology, a new scheme for direct particle acceleration in periodic plasma structures has been proposed. By using our full electromagnetic relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code equipped with ionisation module, we simulate the laser fields dynamics in the periodic structures of different materials. We study how the dynamic ionization influences the field structure.

  4. From coordination polymers to hierarchical self-assembled structures

    Yan, Y.; Keizer, de A.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Besseling, N.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review, novel hierarchical self-assembled structures based on reversible organo-metallic supramolecular polymers are discussed. Firstly, we discuss recent advances in the field of coordination polymers, considering cases in which transition metal ions and bis- or multiligands are used to bui

  5. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    2010-07-01

    ... Transportation Officials (AASHTO) and other organizations. (See 23 CFR 625.4). Many of these incorporated..., Div. II, § 3.2.1, 15th edition, 1992, which FHWA incorporates by reference in 23 CFR 625.4). FHWA also... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754...

  6. High-Throughput Analysis of RNA Structure and Ribonucleoprotein Assembly

    McGinnis, Jennifer L.; Duncan, Caia D. S.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    RNA folds to form complex structures vital to many cellular functions. Proteins facilitate RNA folding at both the secondary and tertiary structure levels. An absolute prerequisite for understanding RNA folding and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly reactions is a complete understanding of the RNA structure at each stage of the folding or assembly process. Here we provide a guide for comprehensive and high-throughput analysis of RNA secondary and tertiary structure using SHAPE and hydroxyl radical footprinting. As an example of the strong and sometimes surprising conclusions that can emerge from high-throughput analysis of RNA folding and RNP assembly, we summarize the structure of the bI3 group I intron RNA in four distinct states. Dramatic structural rearrangements occur in both secondary and tertiary structure as the RNA folds from the free state to the active, six-component, RNP complex. As high-throughput and high-resolution approaches are applied broadly to large protein-RNA complexes, other proteins previously viewed as making simple contributions to RNA folding are also likely to be found to exert multifaceted, long-range, cooperative, and non-additive effects on RNA folding. These protein-induced contributions add another level of control, and potential regulatory function, in RNP complexes. PMID:20946765

  7. Fabrication of the CERN/PSI/ST X-Band accelerating structures

    Dehler, Micha; Gudkov, Dmitry; Lebet, Serge; Riddone, Germana; Shi, Jiaru; Citterio, Alessandro; Zennaro, Riccardo; D'Auria, Gerardo; Serpico, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    In a collaboration between CERN, PSI and Sincrotrone Trieste (ST), a multi- purpose X-band accelerating structure has been designed and fabricated, used for high gradients tests in the CLIC structure testing program and in the FEL projects of PSI and ST. The structure has 72 cells with a phase advance of 5 pi/6 and includes upstream and down-stream wakefield monitors to measure the beam alignment. The SLAC mode launcher design is used to feed it with RF power. Following the CERN fabrication procedures for high-gradient structure, diffusion bonding and brazing in hydrogen atmosphere is used to assemble the cells. After tuning, a vacuum bakeout is required before the feedthroughs for the wake field monitors are welded in as a last step. We describe the experiences gained in finishing the first two structures out of a series of four and present the results from the RF tuning and low level RF tests.

  8. Welding machine and welding process for nuclear fuel assembly structures

    The welding device comprises a mounting jig which receives the guide tubes and the assembly supporting structures in the desired spatial orientation. It also comprises a welding head which can travel on rails along the length of the guide tubes and has at least a welding spring chuck movable in two axes and rotatable relative to the welding machine; the spring chuck can pass between two adjacent tube rows and takes a tubes where a weld is necessary. The welding spring chuck can apply spot-welding pulses. This is used for the assembly of guide tubes and bundles for water-cooled nuclear reactors

  9. Degradation on a PTFE/Nafion membrane electrode assembly with accelerating degradation technique

    Jao, Ting-Chu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, No. 135, Yuandong Rd., Zhongli City, Taoyuan County 320 (China); Ke, Shih-Tsung [Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, No. 135, Yuandong Rd., Zhongli City, Taoyuan County 320 (China); Chi, Pei-Hung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Lee-Ming Institute of Technology, No. 2-2, Lee Zhuan Road, Taishan Township, Taipei Country 243 (China); Jung, Guo-Bin; Chan, Shih-Hung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, No. 135, Yuandong Rd., Zhongli City, Taoyuan County 320 (China); Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, No. 135, Yuandong Rd., Zhongli City, Taoyuan County 320 (China)

    2010-07-15

    Cost and durability are the main issues of Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) commercializing. This study uses the accelerate degradation technique to analyze the durability of low cost PTFE/Nafion membrane electrode assembly (MEA). Before the MEA degradation experiment, the MEA must be activated at 65 C until the performance is stable. Then increase the operation temperature to 80 C. The experimental process for MEA degradation contains three steps in one cycle. The first step is to open circuit voltage (OCV) for 30 s under R.H. 100%. Then, set 0.6V for 150 s under R.H. 100%. The final step is to set 0.6V for 120 s under R.H. 0%. These three steps take around 5 min to complete. This MEA degradation experiment process includes the OCV, potential cycles, and R.H. cycles. This study uses the polarization curve, AC impedance, cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), equations and equivalent circuit to analyze state of the MEA. At less than 160 experiment cycles, the result show that catalyst degradation is the main reason for the decay of MEA. After 280 cycles, the MEA begins to exhibit creep deformation due to the R.H. cycle. Electrochemical surface area and high frequency resistance can be used to estimate the degree of MEA degradation approximately. (author)

  10. RF impedance measurements on the DARHT-II accelerator intercell assembly

    Fawley, William M.; Eylon, Shmuel; Briggs, Richard

    2003-05-05

    We report upon recent experimental measurements made of RF properties of the intercell assembly of the second axis accelerator[1] of Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility at LANL. The intercells provide both pumping and diagnostic access to the main DARHT-II beamline. Their design includes a pumping plenum separated from the main beam pipe by return current rods together with RF shielding provided by a copper-coated stainless steel mesh. Measurements using the twin lead technique (see Ref. [2]) at low frequencies (f < 200 MHz) suggest a constant value for the ratio h of the radial and azimuthal magnetic field components to which the transverse impedance is linearly related. We find that these results compare favorably to predictions from a simple analytic, lumped circuit model which includes the effects of the mesh and return current rods. We also present RF loop-to-loop frequency scans above beam pipe cutoff ({approx}600 MHz) showing the existence of many RF modes with relatively high Q's.

  11. Vacuum arc localization in CLIC prototype radio frequency accelerating structures

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091976; Koivunen, Visa

    2016-04-04

    A future linear collider capable of reaching TeV collision energies should support accelerating gradients beyond 100 MV/m. At such high fields, the occurrence of vacuum arcs have to be mitigated through conditioning, during which an accelerating structure’s resilience against breakdowns is slowly increased through repeated radio frequency pulsing. Conditioning is very time and resource consuming, which is why developing more efficient procedures is desirable. At CERN, conditioning related research is conducted at the CLIC high-power X-band test stands. Breakdown localization is an important diagnostic tool of accelerating structure tests. Abnormal position distributions highlight issues in structure design, manufacturing or operation and may consequently help improve these processes. Additionally, positioning can provide insight into the physics of vacuum arcs. In this work, two established positioning methods based on the time-difference-ofarrival of radio frequency waves are extended. The first method i...

  12. Cosmic Ray Acceleration during Large Scale Structure Formation

    Blasi, P

    2004-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are storage rooms of cosmic rays. They confine the hadronic component of cosmic rays over cosmological time scales due to diffusion, and the electron component due to energy losses. Hadronic cosmic rays can be accelerated during the process of structure formation, because of the supersonic motion of gas in the potential wells created by dark matter. At the shock waves that result from this motion, charged particles can be energized through the first order Fermi process. After discussing the most important evidences for non-thermal phenomena in large scale structures, we describe in some detail the main issues related to the acceleration of particles at these shock waves, emphasizing the possible role of the dynamical backreaction of the accelerated particles on the plasmas involved.

  13. Acceleration of stable interface structure searching using a kriging approach

    Kiyohara, Shin; Oda, Hiromi; Tsuda, Koji; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2016-04-01

    Crystalline interfaces have a tremendous impact on the properties of materials. Determination of the atomic structure of the interface is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of the interface properties. Despite this importance, extensive calculation is necessary to determine even one interface structure. In this study, we apply a technique called kriging, borrowed from geostatistics, to accelerate the determination of the interface structure. The atomic structure of simplified coincidence-site lattice interfaces were determined using the kriging approach. Our approach successfully determined the most stable interface structure with an efficiency almost 2 orders of magnitude better than the traditional “brute force” approach.

  14. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  15. Dielectric-Lined High-Gradient Accelerator Structure

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-04-24

    Rectangular particle accelerator structures with internal planar dielectric elements have been studied, with a view towards devising structures with lower surface fields for a given accelerating field, as compared with structures without dielectrics. Success with this concept is expected to allow operation at higher accelerating gradients than otherwise on account of reduced breakdown probabilities. The project involves studies of RF breakdown on amorphous dielectrics in test cavities that could enable high-gradient structures to be built for a future multi-TeV collider. The aim is to determine what the limits are for RF fields at the surfaces of selected dielectrics, and the resulting acceleration gradient that could be achieved in a working structure. The dielectric of principal interest in this study is artificial CVD diamond, on account of its advertised high breakdown field ({approx}2 GV/m for dc), low loss tangent, and high thermal conductivity. Experimental studies at mm-wavelengths on materials and structures for achieving high acceleration gradient were based on the availability of the 34.3 GHz third-harmonic magnicon amplifier developed by Omega-P, and installed at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory. Peak power from the magnicon was measured to be about 20 MW in 0.5 {micro}s pulses, with a gain of 54 dB. Experiments for studying RF high-field effects on CVD diamond samples failed to show any evidence after more than 10{sup 5} RF pulses of RF breakdown up to a tangential surface field strength of 153 MV/m; studies at higher fields were not possible due to a degradation in magnicon performance. A rebuild of the tube is underway at this writing. Computed performance for a dielectric-loaded rectangular accelerator structure (DLA) shows highly competitive properties, as compared with an existing all-metal structure. For example, comparisons were made of a DLA structure having two planar CVD diamond elements with a all-metal CERN structure HDS

  16. Dielectric-Lined High-Gradient Accelerator Structure

    Rectangular particle accelerator structures with internal planar dielectric elements have been studied, with a view towards devising structures with lower surface fields for a given accelerating field, as compared with structures without dielectrics. Success with this concept is expected to allow operation at higher accelerating gradients than otherwise on account of reduced breakdown probabilities. The project involves studies of RF breakdown on amorphous dielectrics in test cavities that could enable high-gradient structures to be built for a future multi-TeV collider. The aim is to determine what the limits are for RF fields at the surfaces of selected dielectrics, and the resulting acceleration gradient that could be achieved in a working structure. The dielectric of principal interest in this study is artificial CVD diamond, on account of its advertised high breakdown field (∼2 GV/m for dc), low loss tangent, and high thermal conductivity. Experimental studies at mm-wavelengths on materials and structures for achieving high acceleration gradient were based on the availability of the 34.3 GHz third-harmonic magnicon amplifier developed by Omega-P, and installed at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory. Peak power from the magnicon was measured to be about 20 MW in 0.5 (micro)s pulses, with a gain of 54 dB. Experiments for studying RF high-field effects on CVD diamond samples failed to show any evidence after more than 105 RF pulses of RF breakdown up to a tangential surface field strength of 153 MV/m; studies at higher fields were not possible due to a degradation in magnicon performance. A rebuild of the tube is underway at this writing. Computed performance for a dielectric-loaded rectangular accelerator structure (DLA) shows highly competitive properties, as compared with an existing all-metal structure. For example, comparisons were made of a DLA structure having two planar CVD diamond elements with a all-metal CERN structure HDS operating at 30 GHz

  17. Self-assembly protocol design for periodic multicomponent structures.

    Jacobs, William M; Frenkel, Daan

    2015-12-14

    Assembling molecular superstructures with many distinct components will allow unprecedented control over morphology at the nanoscale. Recently, this approach has been used to assemble periodic structures with precisely defined features, such as repeating arrays of pores and channels, using a large number of building blocks. Here we propose a predictive tool that allows us to optimize the nucleation and growth of unbounded, ordered structures. In what follows, we call these structures 'crystals', even though they may only be periodic in one or two dimensions. We find that the nucleation barriers and growth pathways for crystals consisting of many components exhibit generic features that are very different from those of simple crystals. To illustrate the very non-classical nature of the nucleation and growth of such structures, we study the formation of one and two-dimensional crystals with multicomponent unit cells. We find that, whilst the boundaries in the non-periodic dimensions significantly affect the stabilities of these crystals, the nucleation barriers are largely determined by the local connectivity of the associated bulk crystal and are independent of the number of distinct components in the unit cell. We predict that the self-assembly of crystals with complex morphologies can be made to follow specific pathways toward the target structure that successively incorporate key features of the three-dimensional target structure. In contrast with simple crystals, it is possible to tune the kinetics of nucleation and growth separately, thus minimizing defect formation. We show how control over self-assembly pathways can be used to optimize the kinetics of formation of extended structures with arbitrary nanoscale patterns. PMID:26404794

  18. Photonic Band Gap structures: A new approach to accelerator cavities

    Kroll, N. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Smith, D.R.; Schultz, S. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-12-31

    We introduce a new accelerator cavity design based on Photonic Band Gap (PGB) structures. The PGB cavity consists of a two-dimensional periodic array of high dielectric, low loss cylinders with a single removal defect, bounded on top and bottom by conducting sheets. We present the results of both numerical simulations and experimental measurements on the PGB cavity.

  19. Photonic Band Gap structures: A new approach to accelerator cavities

    We introduce a new accelerator cavity design based on Photonic Band Gap (PGB) structures. The PGB cavity consists of a two-dimensional periodic array of high dielectric, low loss cylinders with a single removal defect, bounded on top and bottom by conducting sheets. We present the results of both numerical simulations and experimental measurements on the PGB cavity

  20. Status of the Fatigue Studies on the CLIC Accelerating Structures

    Calatroni, S; Neupert, H; Wuensch, Walter; CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    The need for high accelerating gradients for the future multi-TeV e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) imposes considerable constraints on the materials of the accelerating structures. The surfaces exposed to high pulsed RF (Radio Frequency) currents are subject to cyclic thermal stresses which are expected to induce surface break up by fatigue. Since no fatigue data exists in the literature up to very large numbers of cycles and for the particular stress pattern present in RF cavities, a comprehensive study of copper alloys in this parameter range has been initiated. Fatigue data for selected copper alloys in different states are presented

  1. H-Mode Accelerating Structures with PMQ Beam Focusing

    Kurennoy, Sergey S; O'Hara, James F; Olivas, Eric R; Wangler, Thomas P

    2011-01-01

    We have developed high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures by combining H-mode resonator cavities and a transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of inter-digital H-mode (IH-PMQ) structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. Results of the combined 3-D modeling - electromagnetic computations, multi-particle beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis - for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. Measurements of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank show a good agreement with the calculations. H-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or ...

  2. Passive tailoring of laser-accelerated ion beam cut-off energy by using double foil assembly

    A double foil assembly is shown to be effective in tailoring the maximum energy produced by a laser-accelerated proton beam. The measurements compare favorably with adiabatic expansion simulations, and particle-in-cell simulations. The arrangement proposed here offers for some applications a simple and passive way to utilize simultaneously highest irradiance lasers that have best laser-to-ion conversion efficiency while avoiding the production of undesired high-energy ions

  3. Inhomogeneous structure formation may alleviate need for accelerating universe

    Hansson, Johan

    2009-01-01

    When taking the real, inhomogeneous and anisotropic matter distribution in the semi-local universe into account, there may be no need to postulate an accelerating expansion of the universe despite recent type Ia supernova data. Local curvatures must be integrated (over all space) to obtain the global curvature of the universe, which seems to be very close to zero from cosmic microwave background data. As gravitational structure formation creates bound regions of positive curvature, the regions in between become negatively curved in order to comply with a vanishing global curvature. The actual dynamics of the universe is altered due to the self-induced inhomogeneities, again more prominently so as structure formation progresses. Furthermore, this negative curvature will increase as a function of time as structure formation proceeds, which mimics the effect of "dark energy" with negative pressure. Hence, the "acceleration" may be merely a mirage. We make a qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis, using newto...

  4. Comparison of the conditioning of High Gradient Accelerating Structures

    Degiovanni, Alberto; Giner Navarro, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MV/m, at very low breakdown rates, have been successfully achieved in numerous CLIC prototype accelerating structures. The conditioning and operational histories of several structures, tested at KEK and CERN, have been compared and there is clear evidence that the conditioning progresses with the number of RF pulses and not the number of breakdowns. This observation opens the possibility that the optimum conditioning strategy, which minimizes the total number of breakdowns the structure is subject to without increasing conditioning time, may be to never exceed the breakdown rate target for operation. The result is also likely to have a strong impact on efforts to understand the physical mechanism underlying conditioning and may lead to preparation procedures which reduce conditioning time.

  5. Wakefield Monitor Experiments with X-Band Accelerating Structures

    Lillestøl, Reidar; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Malina, Lukas; Pfingstner, Juergen; Wuensch, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The accelerating structures for CLIC must be aligned with a precision of a few um with respect to the beam trajectory in order to mitigate emittance growth due to transverse wake fields. We report on first results from wake field monitor tests in an X-band structure, with a probe beam at the CLIC Test Facility. The monitors are currently installed in the CLIC Two-Beam Module. In order to fully demonstrate the feasibility of using wakefield monitors for CLIC, the precision of the monitors must be verified using a probe beam while simultaneously filling the structure with high power rf used to drive the accelerating mode. We outline plans to perform such a demonstration in the CLIC Test Facility.

  6. Gravitational energy as dark energy: Cosmic structure and apparent acceleration

    Wiltshire, David L

    2011-01-01

    Below scales of about 100/h Mpc our universe displays a complex inhomogeneous structure dominated by voids, with clusters of galaxies in sheets and filaments. The coincidence that cosmic expansion appears to start accelerating at the epoch when such structures form has prompted a number of researchers to question whether dark energy is a signature of a failure of the standard cosmology to properly account, on average, for the distribution of matter we observe. Here I discuss the timescape scenario, in which cosmic acceleration is understood as an apparent effect, due to gravitational energy gradients that grow when spatial curvature gradients become significant with the nonlinear growth of cosmic structure. I discuss conceptual issues related to the averaging problem, and their impact on the calibration of local geometry to the solutions of the volume-average evolution equations corrected by backreaction, and the question of nonbaryonic dark matter in the timescape framework. I further discuss recent work on ...

  7. Simulations of relativistic collisionless shocks: shock structure and particle acceleration

    Spitkovsky, A

    2006-01-01

    We discuss 3D simulations of relativistic collisionless shocks in electron-positron pair plasmas using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The shock structure is mainly controlled by the shock's magnetization ("sigma" parameter). We demonstrate how the structure of the shock varies as a function of sigma for perpendicular shocks. At low magnetizations the shock is mediated mainly by the Weibel instability which generates transient magnetic fields that can exceed the initial field. At larger magnetizations the shock is dominated by magnetic reflections. We demonstrate where the transition occurs and argue that it is impossible to have very low magnetization collisionless shocks in nature (in more than one spatial dimension). We further discuss the acceleration properties of these shocks, and show that higher magnetization perpendicular shocks do not efficiently accelerate nonthermal particles in 3D. Among other astrophysical applications, this may pose a restriction on the structure and composition of gamma-ray...

  8. Performance testing of the LUEhR-40M structure with an accelerated beam

    The results of experimental investigation of the prototype of the accelerating structure of the therapeutic linear accelerator of the LUEhR-40M model with an accelerating beam are presented. The accelerating structure is the standing wave biperiodic structure with inner coupling cells of 1.6 m length. The design energy of accelerated electrons equalling 20 MeV (during single electron beam passage through an accelerating structure) is obtained. 60 % of accelerated particles are accumulated in the energy interval of (20±1) MeV at 20 mA pulse current and at 3.6 MW SHF-power at the structure input

  9. Assembly and phylogenetic structure of Neotropical palm communities

    Eiserhardt, Wolf L.; Svenning, J.-C.; Balslev, Henrik

    Diversity, composition and dynamics of Neotropical palm communities are receiving an increasing amount of attention due to their economic importance, but also because their high species richness and functional diversity render them valuable model systems for overall forest biodiversity. However, to...... better understand these palm communities, it is crucial to gain insight into the mechanisms responsible for their assembly. These can be dispersal limitation, environmental filtering, or biotic interactions. If the degree of niche conservatism is known for a group of organisms, patterns of community...... phylogenetic structure can be directly traced back to mechanisms of community assembly. We aim to examine this for Neotropical palm communities. Phylogenetic structure will be inferred on different spatial scales and for different community definitions (plot-based and environment-based). To overcome an...

  10. Prospects for using self-assembled nucleic acid structures.

    Rudchenko, M N; Zamyatnin, A A

    2015-04-01

    According to the central dogma in molecular biology, nucleic acids are assigned with key functions on storing and executing genetic information in any living cell. However, features of nucleic acids are not limited only with properties providing template-dependent biosynthetic processes. Studies of DNA and RNA unveiled unique features of these polymers able to make various self-assembled three-dimensional structures that, among other things, use the complementarity principle. Here, we review various self-assembled nucleic acid structures as well as application of DNA and RNA to develop nanomaterials, molecular automata, and nanodevices. It can be expected that in the near future results of these developments will allow designing novel next-generation diagnostic systems and medicinal drugs. PMID:25869355

  11. FIRST STEP blanket structure and fuel assembly design

    FIRST STEP (Fusion, Inertial, Reduced Requirement Systems Test for Special Nuclear Material, Tritium, and Energy Production) is an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) plant designed to produce tritium, SNM, and energy using near-term technology. It is an integrated facility that will serve as a test bed for fusion power plant technology. The design of the blanket structure and blanket fuel assembly for wetted-wall FIRST STEP reactors is presented here

  12. The Effects of Gramicidin on the Structure of Phospholipid Assemblies

    Szule, J. A.; Rand, R. P.

    2003-01-01

    Gramicidin is an antibiotic peptide that can be incorporated into the monolayers of cell membranes. Dimerization through hydrogen bonding between gramicidin monomers in opposing leaflets of the membrane results in the formation of an iontophoretic channel. Surrounding phospholipids influence the gating properties of this channel. Conversely, gramicidin incorporation has been shown to affect the structure of spontaneously formed lipid assemblies. Using small-angle x-ray diffraction and model s...

  13. Development of X-band accelerating structures for high gradients

    S. Bini; M. G. Grimaldi; L. Romano; F. Ruffino; R. Parodi; V. Chimenti; A. Marcelli; L. Palumbo; B. Spataro; V. A. Dolgashev; S. Tantawi; A.D. Yeremian; Y. Higashi

    2012-01-01

    Short copper standing wave (SW) structures operating at an X-band frequency have been recently designed and manufactured at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) using the vacuum brazing technique.High power tests of the structures have been performed at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.In this manuscript we report the results of these tests and the activity in progress to enhance the high gradient performance of the next generation of structures,particularly the technological characterization of high performance coatings obtained via molybdenum sputtering.

  14. Engineering Design of a Multipurpose X-band Accelerating Structure

    Gudkov, Dmitry; Samoshkin, Alexander; Zennaro, Riccardo; Dehler, Micha; Raguin, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01

    Both FEL projects, SwissFEL and Fermi-Elettra each require an X-band RF accelerating structure for optimal bunch compression at the respective injectors. As the CLIC project is pursuing a program for producing and testing the X-band high-gradient RF structures, a collaboration between PSI, Elettra and CERN has been established to build a multipurpose X-band accelerating structure. This paper focuses on its engineering design, which is based on the disked cells jointed together by diffusion bonding. Vacuum brazing and laser beam welding is used for auxiliary components. The accelerating structure consists of two coupler subassemblies, 73 disks and includes a wakefield monitor and diagnostic waveguides. The engineering study includes the external cooling system, consisting of two parallel cooling circuits and an RF tuning system, which allows phase advance tuning of the cell by deforming the outer wall. The engineering solution for the installation and sealing of the wake field monitor feed-through devices that...

  15. Experimental and Simulated Characterization of a Beam Shaping Assembly for Accelerator- Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    In the frame of the construction of a Tandem Electrostatic Quadrupole Accelerator facility devoted to the Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a Beam Shaping Assembly has been characterized by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and measurements. The neutrons were generated via the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction by irradiating a thick LiF target with a 2.3 MeV proton beam delivered by the TANDAR accelerator at CNEA. The emerging neutron flux was measured by means of activation foils while the beam quality and directionality was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The parameters show compliance with those suggested by IAEA. Finally, an improvement adding a beam collimator has been evaluated.

  16. Material studies in the frame of CLIC Accelerating structures production conducted within the Mechanics program together with Metso Oy

    Nurminen, Janne

    2012-01-01

    MeChanICs (Marie Curie Linking Industry to CERN) is an Industry to Academia Partnership and Pathways (IAPP) platform for precision manufacturing knowledge exchange bringing together five Finnish manufacturing companies with Helsinki Insitute of Physics (HIP) and CERN. The scientific objective of MeChanICs project is to contribute to the manufacturing RTD of CLIC enabling technologies. The focus is on the design, materials, machining, brazing and assembly of A CLIC accelerating structure. This study deals with the materials work package of the program and wants to explore the following items: 1) producing copper accelerating structures for CLIC from raw copper powder by near net shape hot isostatic pressing (HIP). 2) The feasibility to use HIP diffusion bonding of the accelerator structures as a function of surface quality and applied temperature and pressure. 3) Brazing for CLIC AS auxiliary systems, like water cooling or damping manifolds, to the disc stack by coating one of the brazing partners with an enab...

  17. Self-assembled manganese oxide structures through direct oxidation

    Zhao, Chao

    2012-12-01

    The morphology and phase of self-assembled manganese oxides during different stages of thermal oxidation were studied. Very interesting morphological patterns of Mn oxide films were observed. At the initial oxidation stage, the surface was characterized by the formation of ring-shaped patterns. As the oxidation proceeded to the intermediate stage, concentric plates formed to relax the compressive stress. Our experimental results gave a clear picture of the evolution of the structures. We also examined the properties of the structures. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Design of input and output couplers for linear accelerator structures

    The input and output couplers for 2m-long S-band linear-accelerator structures for the KEKB linac upgrade have been designed and tested. The dimensions of the coupler cavities were estimated by a simulation of the Kyhl method using the MAFIA code, and determined by low-power tests using the Kyhl method. It has been shown that the coupler dimensions can be predicted with precision to be less than 0.5 mm. The asymmetry of the electromagnetic field (amplitude and phase) in the couplers has been corrected by a crescent-shaped cut on the opposite side of the iris. The total performance of the accelerator structures with these couplers is also described. (author)

  19. Research and Development for Ultra-High Gradient Accelerator Structures

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Dolgashev, Valery; Higashi, Yasuo; Spataro, Bruno

    2010-11-01

    Research on the basic physics of high-gradient, high frequency accelerator structures and the associated RF/microwave technology are essential for the future of discovery science, medicine and biology, energy and environment, and national security. We will review the state-of-the-art for the development of high gradient linear accelerators. We will present the research activities aimed at exploring the basic physics phenomenon of RF breakdown. We present the experimental results of a true systematic study in which the surface processing, geometry, and materials of the structures have been varied, one parameter at a time. The breakdown rate or alternatively, the probability of breakdown/pulse/meter has been recorded for different operating parameters. These statistical data reveal a strong dependence of breakdown probability on surface magnetic field, or alternatively on surface pulsed heating. This is in contrast to the classical view of electric field dependence.

  20. Enhanced Ion Acceleration from Micro-tube Structured Targets

    Snyder, Joseph; Ji, Liangliang; Akli, Kramer

    2015-11-01

    We present an enhanced ion acceleration method that leverages recent advancements in 3D printing for target fabrication. Using the three-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulation code Virtual Laser-Plasma Lab (VLPL), we model the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with a micro-tube plasma (MTP) structured target. When compared to flat foils, the MTP target enhances the maximum proton energy by a factor of about 4. The ion enhancement is attributed to two main factors: high energy electrons extracted from the tube structure enhancing the accelerating field and light intensification within the MTP target increasing the laser intensity at the location of the foil. We also present results on ion energy scaling with micro-tube diameter and incident laser pulse intensity. This work was supported by the AFOSR under contract No. FA9550-14-1-0085.

  1. Ordered patterns and structures via interfacial self-assembly: superlattices, honeycomb structures and coffee rings.

    Ma, Hongmin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2011-11-01

    Self-assembly is now being intensively studied in chemistry, physics, biology, and materials engineering and has become an important "bottom-up" approach to create intriguing structures for different applications. Self-assembly is not only a practical approach for creating a variety of nanostructures, but also shows great superiority in building hierarchical structures with orders on different length scales. The early work in self-assembly focused on molecular self-assembly in bulk solution, including the resultant dye aggregates, liposomes, vesicles, liquid crystals, gels and so on. Interfacial self-assembly has been a great concern over the last two decades, largely because of the unique and ingenious roles of this method for constructing materials at interfaces, such as self-assembled monolayers, Langmuir-Blodgett films, and capsules. Nanocrystal superlattices, honeycomb films and coffee rings are intriguing structural materials with more complex features and can be prepared by interfacial self-assembly on different length scales. In this critical review, we outline the recent development in the preparation and application of colloidal nanocrystal superlattices, honeycomb-patterned macroporous structures by the breath figure method, and coffee-ring-like patterns (247 references). PMID:21792458

  2. Technical infra-structure for accelerators in Brazil

    A minimal technical support infra-structura for, operation, maintenance and development suitable to a multi-user laboratory is presented. The costs of this infra-structure are 1.300 MCr$ in equipment and 700 MCr$ in people. A coordinated utilization of a particle accelerator network existing in the country and its corresponding costs are shown. Considerations in relation to the local of the sinchrotron radiation laboratory implantation are done. (L.C.)

  3. Assembly of nothing: equilibrium fluids with designed structured porosity.

    Lindquist, Beth A; Jadrich, Ryan B; Truskett, Thomas M

    2016-03-14

    Controlled micro- to meso-scale porosity is a common materials design goal with possible applications ranging from molecular gas adsorption to particle size selective permeability or solubility. Here, we use inverse methods of statistical mechanics to design an isotropic pair interaction that, in the absence of an external field, assembles particles into an inhomogeneous fluid matrix surrounding pores of prescribed size ordered in a lattice morphology. The pore size can be tuned via modification of temperature or particle concentration. Moreover, modulating density reveals a rich series of microphase-separated morphologies including pore- or particle-based lattices, pore- or particle-based columns, and bicontinuous or lamellar structures. Sensitivity of pore assembly to the form of the designed interaction potential is explored. PMID:26883309

  4. Accelerating VASP electronic structure calculations using graphic processing units

    Hacene, Mohamed

    2012-08-20

    We present a way to improve the performance of the electronic structure Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) program. We show that high-performance computers equipped with graphics processing units (GPUs) as accelerators may reduce drastically the computation time when offloading these sections to the graphic chips. The procedure consists of (i) profiling the performance of the code to isolate the time-consuming parts, (ii) rewriting these so that the algorithms become better-suited for the chosen graphic accelerator, and (iii) optimizing memory traffic between the host computer and the GPU accelerator. We chose to accelerate VASP with NVIDIA GPU using CUDA. We compare the GPU and original versions of VASP by evaluating the Davidson and RMM-DIIS algorithms on chemical systems of up to 1100 atoms. In these tests, the total time is reduced by a factor between 3 and 8 when running on n (CPU core + GPU) compared to n CPU cores only, without any accuracy loss. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Electromagnetic simulation study of dielectric wall accelerator structures

    ZHAO Quan-Tang; ZHANG Zi-Min; YUAN Ping; CAO Shu-Chun; SHEN Xiao-Kang; JING Yi; LIU Ming; ZHAO Hong-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Two types of dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) structures,a bi-polar Blumlein line and zero integral pulse line (ZIP) structures were investigated.The high gradient insulator simulated by the particle in cell code confirms that it has little influence on the axial electric field.The results of simulations using CST microwave studio indicate how the axial electric field is formed,and the electric field waveforms agree with the theoretical one very well.The influence of layer-to-layer coupling in a ZIP structure is much smaller and the electric field waveform is much better.The axial of the Blumlein structure's electric field has better axial stability.From both of the above,it found that for a shorter pulse width,the axial electric field is much higher and the pulse stability and fidelity are much better.The CST simulation is very helpful for designing DWA structures.

  6. An Asset Test of the CLIC Accelerating Structure

    Transverse wakefield suppression in the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) multibunch accelerating structure, called the TDS (Tapered Damped Structure), is achieved primarily through heavy damping. In order to verify the performance of the TDS design and the validity of the theoretical tools used to model it, a 15 GHz version of the TDS has been constructed and tested in the ASSET facility at SLAC. The test has directly demonstrated transverse wakefield suppression of over a factor 100, with an excellent agreement between the measured and the calculated wakefield

  7. Simulations and Vacuum Tests of a CLIC Accelerating Structure

    Garion, C

    2011-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider, under study, is based on room temperature high gradient structures. The vacuum specificities of these cavities are low conductance, large surface areas and a non-baked system. The main issue is to reach UHV conditions (typically 10-7 Pa) in a system where the residual vacuum is driven by water outgassing. A finite element model based on an analogy thermal/vacuum has been built to estimate the vacuum profile in an accelerating structure. Vacuum tests are carried out in a dedicated set-up, the vacuum performances of different configurations are presented and compared with the predictions.

  8. H-Mode Accelerating Structures with PMQ Beam Focusing

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Eric R.; Wangler, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures by combining H-mode resonator cavities and a transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of inter-digital H-mode (IH-PMQ) structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. Results of the combined 3-D modeling - electromagnetic c...

  9. Precise fabrication of X-band accelerating structure

    An accelerating structure with a/λ=0.16 is being fabricated to study a precise fabrication method. A frequency control of each cell better than 10-4 level is required to realize a detuned structure. The present machining level is nearly 1 MHz/11.4 GHz in relative frequency error, which just satisfies the above requirement. To keep this machining precision, the diffusion bonding technique is found preferable to join the cells. Various diffusion conditions were tried. The frequency change can be less than 1 MHz/11.4 GHz and it can be controlled well better than that. (author)

  10. A fast sequence assembly method based on compressed data structures.

    Liang, Peifeng; Zhang, Yancong; Lin, Kui; Hu, Jinglu

    2014-01-01

    Assembling a large genome using next generation sequencing reads requires large computer memory and a long execution time. To reduce these requirements, a memory and time efficient assembler is presented from applying FM-index in JR-Assembler, called FMJ-Assembler, where FM stand for FMR-index derived from the FM-index and BWT and J for jumping extension. The FMJ-Assembler uses expanded FM-index and BWT to compress data of reads to save memory and jumping extension method make it faster in CPU time. An extensive comparison of the FMJ-Assembler with current assemblers shows that the FMJ-Assembler achieves a better or comparable overall assembly quality and requires lower memory use and less CPU time. All these advantages of the FMJ-Assembler indicate that the FMJ-Assembler will be an efficient assembly method in next generation sequencing technology. PMID:25569963

  11. Accelerator

    The invention claims equipment for stabilizing the position of the front covers of the accelerator chamber in cyclic accelerators which significantly increases accelerator reliability. For stabilizing, it uses hydraulic cushions placed between the electromagnet pole pieces and the front chamber covers. The top and the bottom cushions are hydraulically connected. The cushions are disconnected and removed from the hydraulic line using valves. (J.P.)

  12. Superconducting Accelerating Structure with Gradient as 2 Times Higher as TESLA Structure

    Avrakhov, P V

    2004-01-01

    A proposed new accelerating structure for TESLA is assumed to have an effective gradient 2 times more than existing 9-cell cavity. This structure is an interlaced combination of two side-cavity-coupled standing wave substructures with λ/4 cells length. Intercell coupling provides side-coupled cavities made from a special shape waveguide section. The high accelerating gradient is accomplished by 4 factors: The shortened accelerating cells have transit time factor 0.9 instead of 0.64 for conventional standing wave cells with λ/2 length. The side magnetic coupling has made it possible to reduce the cells beam aperture that reduce relation between the maximum surface field and the acceleration gradient. Stronger intercell coupling allows extending the accelerating cavity and improving a duty factor of linac. Availability of the side coupling elements enables to use them for power input and HOM-couplers. It reduces intercavity distance and enhances duty factor too.

  13. Problems in understanding the structure and assembly of viruses

    King, J. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Though viruses infect the cells of all groups of animals, plants, and microorganisms, their structures follow a limited number of general themes; spherical or cylindrical shells built of hundreds of repeated protein subunits enclosing a nucleic acid - DNA or RNA - genome. Since the 1960s it has been known that the protein shells of spherical viruses in fact conform to icosahedral symmetry or to subtle deviations from icosahedral symmetry. The construction of the shell lattices and the transformations they go through in the different stages of the viral life cycle are not fully understood. The shells contain the nucleic in a highly condensed state, of unknown coiling/organization. Features of the well studied bacterial viruses will be reviewed, with examples from adenoviruses, herpesviruses, poliovirus, and HIV. The emergence of new viral disease has led to increased interest in the development of agents which interfere with virus reproduction at the level of the assembly or function of the organized particle. Recently computational approaches to the problem of virus assembly have made important contributions to clarifying shell assembly processes. 1 ref.

  14. Design of Accelerator Online Simulator Server Using Structured Data

    Shen, Guobao; /Brookhaven; Chu, Chungming; /SLAC; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC; Kraimer, Martin; /Argonne

    2012-07-06

    Model based control plays an important role for a modern accelerator during beam commissioning, beam study, and even daily operation. With a realistic model, beam behaviour can be predicted and therefore effectively controlled. The approach used by most current high level application environments is to use a built-in simulation engine and feed a realistic model into that simulation engine. Instead of this traditional monolithic structure, a new approach using a client-server architecture is under development. An on-line simulator server is accessed via network accessible structured data. With this approach, a user can easily access multiple simulation codes. This paper describes the design, implementation, and current status of PVData, which defines the structured data, and PVAccess, which provides network access to the structured data.

  15. A tuning method for nonuniform traveling-wave accelerating structures

    The tuning method of uniform traveling-wave structures based on non-resonant perturbation field distribution measurement has been widely used in tuning both constant-impedance and constant-gradient structures. In this paper, the method of tuning nonuniform structures is proposed on the basis of the above theory. The internal reflection coefficient of each cell is obtained from analyzing the normalized voltage distribution. A numerical simulation of tuning process according to the coupled cavity chain theory has been done and the result shows each cell is in right phase advance after tuning. The method will be used in the tuning of a disk-loaded traveling-wave structure being developed at the Accelerator Laboratory, Tsinghua University. (authors)

  16. Design of Accelerator Online Simulator Server Using Structured Data

    Model based control plays an important role for a modern accelerator during beam commissioning, beam study, and even daily operation. With a realistic model, beam behaviour can be predicted and therefore effectively controlled. The approach used by most current high level application environments is to use a built-in simulation engine and feed a realistic model into that simulation engine. Instead of this traditional monolithic structure, a new approach using a client-server architecture is under development. An on-line simulator server is accessed via network accessible structured data. With this approach, a user can easily access multiple simulation codes. This paper describes the design, implementation, and current status of PVData, which defines the structured data, and PVAccess, which provides network access to the structured data.

  17. Fabrication Technologies of the High Gradient Accelerator Structures at 100MV/m Range

    Wang, Juwen; Van Pelt, John; Yoneda, Charles; Gudkov, D; Riddone, Germana; Higo, Toshiyasu; Takatomi, Toshikazu

    2010-01-01

    A CERN-SLAC-KEK collaboration on high gradient X-band structure research has been established in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC baseline design for the main linac stably operating at more than 100 MV/m loaded accelerating gradient. Several prototype CLIC structures were successfully fabricated and high power tested. They operated at 105 MV/m with a breakdown rate that meets the CLIC linear collider specifications of <5×10-7/pulse/m. This paper summarizes the fabrication technologies including the mechanical design, precision machining, chemical cleaning, diffusion bonding as well as vacuum baking and all related assembly technologies. Also, the tolerances control, tuning and RF characterization will be discussed

  18. Structure of self - assembled two-dimensional spherical crystals

    Bausch, Andreas R.

    2004-03-01

    Dense spherical particles on a flat surface usually pack into a simple triangular lattice, similar to billiard balls at the start of a game. The minimum energy configuration for interacting particles on the curved surface of a sphere, however, presents special difficulties, as recognized already by J.J. Thomson. We describe experimental investigations of the structure of two-dimensional spherical crystals. The crystals, formed by beads self-assembled on water droplets in oil, serve as model systems for exploring very general theories about the minimum energy configurations of particles with arbitrary repulsive interactions on curved surfaces. Above a critical system size we find that crystals develop distinctive high-angle grain boundaries or "scars" not found in planar crystals. The number of excess defects in a scar is shown to grow linearly with the dimensionless system size. First experiments where the melting of the crystal structure was observable will be discussed. Dynamic triangulation methods allow the analysis of the dynamics of the defects. Possible modifications towards mechanically stabilized self assembly structures result in so called Colloidosomes, which are promising for many different encapsulation purposes.

  19. Mesoscopic structure prediction of nanoparticle assembly and coassembly: Theoretical foundation

    Hur, Kahyun

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we present a theoretical framework that unifies polymer field theory and density functional theory in order to efficiently predict ordered nanostructure formation of systems having considerable complexity in terms of molecular structures and interactions. We validate our approach by comparing its predictions with previous simulation results for model systems. We illustrate the flexibility of our approach by applying it to hybrid systems composed of block copolymers and ligand coated nanoparticles. We expect that our approach will enable the treatment of multicomponent self-assembly with a level of molecular complexity that approaches experimental systems. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  20. An optimized slab-symmetric dielectric-based laser accelerator structure

    A slab-symmetric, partially dielectric filled, laser excited structure which maybe used to accelerate charged particles is analyzed theoretically and computationally. The fields associated with the accelerating mode are calculated, as are aspects of the resonant filling and impedance matching of the structure to the exciting laser. It is shown through computer simulation that the accelerating mode in this structure can be excited resonantly and with large quality factor Q. Practical aspects of implementing this structure as an accelerator are discussed

  1. Summary Report of Working Group 3: High Gradient and Laser-Structure Based Acceleration

    The charge for the working group on high gradient and laser-structure based acceleration was to assess the current challenges involved in developing an advanced accelerator based on electromagnetic structures, and survey state-of-the-art methods to address those challenges. The topics of more than 50 presentations in the working group covered a very broad range of issues, from ideas, theoretical models and simulations, to design and manufacturing of accelerating structures and, finally, experimental results on obtaining extremely high accelerating gradients in structures from conventional microwave frequency range up to THz and laser frequencies. Workshop discussion topics included advances in the understanding of the physics of breakdown and other phenomena, limiting high gradient performance of accelerating structures. New results presented in this workshop demonstrated significant progress in the fields of conventional vacuum structure-based acceleration, dielectric wakefield acceleration, and laser-structure acceleration.

  2. Assembling method for large-sized steel structure

    A plurality of batholiths each having substantially the same size as a large-sized steel structure are disposed, and supports which can increase the height corresponding to the height of the large-sized steel structure are disposed at the periphery of the batholiths. An attachable/detachable cover which covers the large-sized steel structure and can be used also as a suspending jig is disposed on the supports such that the cover can disposed on any of the supports. Since the cover which can increase the height as the height of the large-sized steel structure increases and has a function of a suspending jig, this provides a roof, so that operational circumstances upon assembling the large-sized steel structure are improved under the cover. When structural members are carried in, the cover is placed on a support disposed on the other batholiths and the height of the support is increased corresponding to the height of the member, then the cover is disposed again. Additional provision of an area for disposing a suspending jig within a crane reach is not necessary, and a scaffold for operation can be disposed to the support between the large-sized steel structure. (N.H.)

  3. Macromolecularly crowded in vitro microenvironments accelerate the production of extracellular matrix-rich supramolecular assemblies

    Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Fan, Xingliang; Rodriguez, Brian J.; et al

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies based on the principles of tissue engineering by self-assembly put forward the notion that functional regeneration can be achieved by utilising the inherent capacity of cells to create highly sophisticated supramolecular assemblies. However, in dilute ex vivo microenvironments, prolonged culture time is required to develop an extracellular matrix-rich implantable device. Herein, we assessed the influence of macromolecular crowding, a biophysical phenomenon that regulate...

  4. Multipactor discharge in a dielectric-loaded accelerating structure

    Wu, L.; Ang, L. K.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a Monte-Carlo model to explain the multipactor discharge and its high-power absorption in a dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structure reported recently [J. G. Power et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 164801 (2004)]. Susceptibility diagrams are constructed. Dynamic calculations for beam loading and its power absorption by the multipactor discharge are performed. It is found that the fraction of power absorbed by multipactor discharge at saturation is much larger than the case of a simple rf window, and it is sensitive to the incident power, which confirms the prior experimental results. This enhanced power absorption is due to the fact that the length of a DLA structure is much larger than the radius of the structure. A resonant condition of a maximum growth region has also been determined numerically and analytically. The difference between the resonant condition and saturation (due to beam loading) is clarified.

  5. Sequence Planning for On-Orbit Assembly of Large Space Truss Structures in a Multirobot Environment

    GUO Jifeng; WANG Ping; CUI Naigang

    2006-01-01

    An approach to sequence planning for on-orbit assembly of large space truss structures in a multirobot environment is presented. A hierarchical representation of large space truss structures at the structural volume element level and strut level is adopted. The representation of connectivity matrix and directed graph is respectively presented at the strut level and SVE level. The multirobot environment that consists of autonomous space robots and struts is supposed. Then the multirobot serial assembly strategy, assembly states, assembly tasks and assembly sequences are described. The assembly sequence planning algorithms at the strut level and SVE level are respectively discussed. The results of the simulations show that this approach is feasible and efficient. Two extensions of this approach include more accurate assessment of the efficiency representation and improvements in planning algorithm. In the future, the assembly sequence planning of more large space truss structures and complex multirobot environments and assembly tasks will be considered.

  6. Numerical studies of multipactor in dielectric-loaded accelerator structures

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Multipactor (MP) is known as the avalanche growth of the number of secondary electrons emitted from a solid surface exposed to an rf electric field under vacuum conditions. MP may occur in various microwave and rf systems such as microwave tubes, rf windows and launchers, accelerating structures, and rf satellite payloads. In this work we present results of MP analysis in dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) structures. The starting point of our work was experimental and theoretical studies of DLA structures jointly done by Argonne National Laboratory and Naval Research Laboratory (J. G. Power et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 164801 (2004); J. G. Power et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 877, 362 (2006)). In the theoretical model developed during those studies the space-charge field due to the total number of particles is taken into account as a parameter. We perform our studies using a self-consistent approach with the help of time-dependent two-dimensional code developed at the University of Maryland (O. V. Sinitsyn et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 073102 (2009)). Results include analysis of MP evolution at an early stage, detailed studies of individual electron trajectories, analysis of MP onset time under various conditions and comparison of some results with the experimental data.

  7. Accelerating Dynamic Cardiac MR Imaging Using Structured Sparse Representation

    Nian Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing (CS has produced promising results on dynamic cardiac MR imaging by exploiting the sparsity in image series. In this paper, we propose a new method to improve the CS reconstruction for dynamic cardiac MRI based on the theory of structured sparse representation. The proposed method user the PCA subdictionaries for adaptive sparse representation and suppresses the sparse coding noise to obtain good reconstructions. An accelerated iterative shrinkage algorithm is used to solve the optimization problem and achieve a fast convergence rate. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method improves the reconstruction quality of dynamic cardiac cine MRI over the state-of-the-art CS method.

  8. Structural Insights into KCTD Protein Assembly and Cullin3 Recognition.

    Ji, Alan X; Chu, Anh; Nielsen, Tine Kragh; Benlekbir, Samir; Rubinstein, John L; Privé, Gilbert G

    2016-01-16

    Cullin3 (Cul3)-based ubiquitin E3 ligase complexes catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 enzyme to target substrate proteins. In these assemblies, the C-terminal region of Cul3 binds Rbx1/E2-ubiquitin, while the N-terminal region interacts with various BTB (bric-à-brac, tramtrack, broad complex) domain proteins that serve as substrate adaptors. Previous crystal structures of the homodimeric BTB proteins KLHL3, KLHL11 and SPOP in complex with the N-terminal domain of Cul3 revealed the features required for Cul3 recognition in these proteins. A second class of BTB-domain-containing proteins, the KCTD proteins, is also Cul3 substrate adaptors, but these do not share many of the previously identified determinants for Cul3 binding. We report the pentameric crystal structures of the KCTD1 and KCTD9 BTB domains and identify plasticity in the KCTD1 rings. We find that the KCTD proteins 5, 6, 9 and 17 bind to Cul3 with high affinity, while the KCTD proteins 1 and 16 do not have detectable binding. Finally, we confirm the 5:5 assembly of KCTD9/Cul3 complexes by cryo-electron microscopy and provide a molecular rationale for BTB-mediated Cul3 binding specificity in the KCTD family. PMID:26334369

  9. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    Munroe, Brian J.; Zhang, JieXi; Xu, Haoran; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG) structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox) input and output cells, with input power of up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM01 mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.19 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90 MV /m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.09 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.

  10. The Structural Basis of Ribozyme-Catalyzed RNA Assembly

    Robertson, M.P.; Scott, W.G.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-07-12

    Life originated, according to the RNA World hypothesis, from self-replicating ribozymes that catalyzed ligation of RNA fragments. We have solved the 2.6 angstrom crystal structure of a ligase ribozyme that catalyzes regiospecific formation of a 5' to 3' phosphodiester bond between the 5'-triphosphate and the 3'-hydroxyl termini of two RNA fragments. Invariant residues form tertiary contacts that stabilize a flexible stem of the ribozyme at the ligation site, where an essential magnesium ion coordinates three phosphates. The structure of the active site permits us to suggest how transition-state stabilization and a general base may catalyze the ligation reaction required for prebiotic RNA assembly.

  11. A small scale accelerator driven subcritical assembly development and demonstration experiment at LAMPF

    A small scale experiment designed to demonstrate many of the aspects of accelerator-driven transmutation technology is described. The experiment uses the high-power proton beam from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility accelerator to produce neutrons with a molten Lead target. The target is surrounded by a molten salt and graphite moderator blanket. Fissionable material can be added to the molten salt to demonstrate Plutonium burning or transmutation of commercial spent fuel or energy production from Thorium

  12. Further finite element structural analysis of FAST Load Assembly

    The FAST (Fusion Advanced Study Torus) machine is a compact high magnetic field tokamak, that will allow to study in an integrated way the main operational issues relating to plasma-wall interaction, plasma operation and burning plasma physics in conditions relevant for ITER and DEMO. The present work deals with the structural analysis of the machine Load Assembly for a proposed new plasma scenario (10 MA – 8.5 T), aimed to increase the operational limits of the machine. A previous paper has dealt with an integrated set of finite element models (regarding a former reference scenario: 6.5 MA – 7.5 T) of the load assembly, including the Toroidal and Poloidal Field Coils and the supporting structure. This set of models has regarded the evaluation of magnetic field values, the evaluation of the electromagnetic forces and the temperatures in all the current-carrying conductors: these analysis have been a preparatory step for the evaluation of the stresses of the main structural components. The previous models have been analyzed further on and improved in some details, including the computation of the out-of-plane electromagnetic forces coming from the interaction between the poloidal magnetic field and the current flowing in the toroidal magnets. After this updating, the structural analysis has been executed, where all forces and temperatures, coming from the formerly mentioned most demanding scenario (10 MA – 8.5 T) and acting on the tokamak's main components, have been considered. The two sets of analysis regarding the reference scenario and the extreme one have been executed and a useful comparison has been carried on. The analyses were carried out by using the FEM code Ansys rel. 13

  13. The Research of a Novel SW Accelerating Structure with Small Beam Spot

    Yang, X; Chen, Y; Jin, X; Li, Maozhen; Lü, H; Xu, Z

    2004-01-01

    A new kind of on-axis coupled biperiodic standing-wave (SW) accelerating structure has been built for a 9 MeV accelerator. The research progress was introduced in this paper, it includes the choice of the accelerating structure, the analysis of electron beam dynamics, the tuning of the cavity, the measurement of the accelerating tube and the powered test. The small beam spot is the most interesting feature of this accelerating structure, the diameter of the beam spot is 1.4 mm. This accelerator has been used for the x photons generation and the x-ray dose rate is about 3400 rad/min/m.

  14. Studying Radiation Damage in Structural Materials by Using Ion Accelerators

    Hosemann, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Radiation damage in structural materials is of major concern and a limiting factor for a wide range of engineering and scientific applications, including nuclear power production, medical applications, or components for scientific radiation sources. The usefulness of these applications is largely limited by the damage a material can sustain in the extreme environments of radiation, temperature, stress, and fatigue, over long periods of time. Although a wide range of materials has been extensively studied in nuclear reactors and neutron spallation sources since the beginning of the nuclear age, ion beam irradiations using particle accelerators are a more cost-effective alternative to study radiation damage in materials in a rather short period of time, allowing researchers to gain fundamental insights into the damage processes and to estimate the property changes due to irradiation. However, the comparison of results gained from ion beam irradiation, large-scale neutron irradiation, and a variety of experimental setups is not straightforward, and several effects have to be taken into account. It is the intention of this article to introduce the reader to the basic phenomena taking place and to point out the differences between classic reactor irradiations and ion irradiations. It will also provide an assessment of how accelerator-based ion beam irradiation is used today to gain insight into the damage in structural materials for large-scale engineering applications.

  15. Protein GB1 Folding and Assembly from Structural Elements

    Sara Linse

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Folding of the Protein G B1 domain (PGB1 shifts with increasing salt concentration from a cooperative assembly of inherently unstructured subdomains to an assembly of partly pre-folded structures. The salt-dependence of pre-folding contributes to the stability minimum observed at physiological salt conditions. Our conclusions are based on a study in which the reconstitution of PGB1 from two fragments was studied as a function of salt concentrations and temperature using circular dichroism spectroscopy. Salt was found to induce an increase in β-hairpin structure for the C-terminal fragment (residues 41 – 56, whereas no major salt effect on structure was observed for the isolated N-terminal fragment (residues 1 – 41. In line with the increasing evidence on the interrelation between fragment complementation and stability of the corresponding intact protein, we also find that salt effects on reconstitution can be predicted from salt dependence of the stability of the intact protein. Our data show that our variant (which has the mutations T2Q, N8D, N37D and reconstitutes in a manner similar to the wild type displays the lowest equilibrium association constant around physiological salt concentration, with higher affinity observed both at lower and higher salt concentration. This corroborates the salt effects on the stability towards denaturation of the intact protein, for which the stability at physiological salt is lower compared to both lower and higher salt concentrations. Hence we conclude that reconstitution reports on molecular factors that govern the native states of proteins.

  16. Structural Mechanisms in NLR Inflammasome Assembly and Signaling.

    Hu, Zehan; Chai, Jijie

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multimeric protein complexes that mediate the activation of inflammatory caspases. One central component of inflammasomes is nucleotide-binding domain (NBD)- and leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing proteins (NLRs) that can function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). In resting cells, NLR proteins exist in an auto-inhibited, monomeric, and ADP-bound state. Perception of microbial or damage-associated signals results in NLR oligomerization, thus recruiting inflammatory caspases directly or through the adaptor molecule apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC). The assembled NLR inflammasomes serve as dedicated machinery to facilitate the activation of the inflammatory caspases. Here, we review current understanding of the structures of NLR inflammasomes with an emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of their assembly and activation. We also discuss implications of the self-propagation model derived from the NAIP-NLRC4 inflammasomes for the activation of other NLR inflammasomes and a potential role of the C-terminal LRR domain in the activation of an NLR protein. PMID:27460803

  17. Assembly History and Structure of Galactic Cold Dark Matter Halos

    Wang, Jie; Frenk, C S; White, S D M; Springel, V; Jenkins, A; Helmi, A; Ludlow, A; Vogelsberger, M

    2010-01-01

    We use the Aquarius simulation series to study the imprint of assembly history on the structure of Galaxy-mass cold dark matter halos. Our results confirm earlier work regarding the influence of mergers on the mass density profile and the inside-out growth of halos. The inner regions that contain the visible galaxies are stable since early times and are significantly affected only by major mergers. Particles accreted diffusely or in minor mergers are found predominantly in the outskirts of halos. Our analysis reveals trends that run counter to current perceptions of hierarchical halo assembly. For example, major mergers (i.e. those with progenitor mass ratios greater than 1:10) contribute little to the total mass growth of a halo, on average less than 20 per cent for our six Aquarius halos. The bulk is contributed roughly equally by minor mergers and by "diffuse" material which is not resolved into individual objects. This is consistent with modeling based on excursion-set theory which suggests that about hal...

  18. Structural Diversity of Self-Assembled Iridescent Arthropod Biophotonic Nanostructures

    Saranathan, Vinod Kumar; Prum, Richard O.

    2015-03-01

    Many organisms, especially arthropods, produce vivid interference colors using diverse mesoscopic (100-350 nm) integumentary biophotonic nanostructures that are increasingly being investigated for technological applications. Despite a century of interest, we lack precise structural knowledge of many biophotonic nanostructures and mechanisms controlling their development, when such knowledge can open novel biomimetic routes to facilely self-assemble tunable, multi-functional materials. Here, we use synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy to characterize the photonic nanostructure of 140 iridescent integumentary scales and setae from 127 species of terrestrial arthropods in 85 genera from 5 orders. We report a rich nanostructural diversity, including triply-periodic bicontinuous networks, close-packed spheres, inverse columnar, perforated lamellar, and disordered sponge-like morphologies, commonly observed as stable phases of amphiphilic surfactants, block copolymer, and lyotropic lipid-water systems. Diverse arthropod lineages appear to have independently evolved to utilize the self-assembly of infolding bilayer membranes to develop biophotonic nanostructures that span the phase-space of amphiphilic morphologies, but at optical length scales.

  19. DNA/Fusogenic Lipid Nanocarrier Assembly: Millisecond Structural Dynamics.

    Angelov, Borislav; Angelova, Angelina; Filippov, Sergey K; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Drechsler, Markus; Štěpánek, Petr; Couvreur, Patrick; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2013-06-01

    Structural changes occurring on a millisecond time scale during uptake of DNA by cationic lipid nanocarriers are monitored by time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) coupled to a rapid-mixing stopped-flow technique. Nanoparticles (NPs) of nanochannel organization are formed by PEGylation, hydration, and dispersion of a lipid film of the fusogenic lipid monoolein in a mixture with positively charged (DOMA) and PEGylated (DOPE-PEG2000) amphiphiles and are characterized by the inner cubic structure of very large nanochannels favorable for DNA upload. Ultrafast structural dynamics of complexation and assembly of these cubosome particles with neurotrophic plasmid DNA (pDNA) is revealed thanks to the high brightness of the employed synchrotron X-ray beam. The rate constant of the pDNA/lipid NP complexation is estimated from dynamic roentgenograms recorded at 4 ms time resolution. pDNA upload into the vastly hydrated channels of the cubosome carriers leads to a fast nanoparticle-nanoparticle structural transition and lipoplex formation involving tightly packed pDNA. PMID:26283134

  20. Self-assembled hierarchically structured organic-inorganic composite systems.

    Tritschler, Ulrich; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Designing bio-inspired, multifunctional organic-inorganic composite materials is one of the most popular current research objectives. Due to the high complexity of biocomposite structures found in nacre and bone, for example, a one-pot scalable and versatile synthesis approach addressing structural key features of biominerals and affording bio-inspired, multifunctional organic-inorganic composites with advanced physical properties is highly challenging. This article reviews recent progress in synthesizing organic-inorganic composite materials via various self-assembly techniques and in this context highlights a recently developed bio-inspired synthesis concept for the fabrication of hierarchically structured, organic-inorganic composite materials. This one-step self-organization concept based on simultaneous liquid crystal formation of anisotropic inorganic nanoparticles and a functional liquid crystalline polymer turned out to be simple, fast, scalable and versatile, leading to various (multi-)functional composite materials, which exhibit hierarchical structuring over several length scales. Consequently, this synthesis approach is relevant for further progress and scientific breakthrough in the research field of bio-inspired and biomimetic materials. PMID:27175790

  1. Synthetic melanin films: Assembling mechanisms, scaling behavior, and structural properties

    Lorite, Gabriela S.; Coluci, Vitor R.; da Silva, Maria Ivonete N.; Dezidério, Shirlei N.; Graeff, Carlos Frederico O.; Galva~O, Douglas S.; Cotta, Mônica A.

    2006-06-01

    In this work we report on the surface characterization of melanin thin films prepared using both water-based and organic solvent-based melanin syntheses. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of these films suggests that the organic solvent synthesis provides relatively planar basic melanin structures; these basic structures generate surface steps with height in the range of 2-3 nm and small tendency to form larger aggregates. The scaling properties obtained from the AFM data were used to infer the assembling mechanisms of these thin films which depend on the solvent used for melanin synthesis. The behavior observed in organic solvent-based melanin suggests a diffusion-limited aggregation process. Thus films with good adhesion to the substrate and smoother morphologies than water-prepared melanin films are obtained. Electronic structure calculations using a conductorlike screening model were also performed in order to elucidate the microscopic processes of thin film formation. Our results suggest that the agglomerates observed in hydrated samples originate from reaction with water at specific locations on the surface most likely defects on the planar structure.

  2. The assembly and structure of self-assembling peptides: molecular to supramolecular

    Morris, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembling molecules are central to a plethora of processes found in nature, biotechnology and even disease. The importance of the non-covalent interaction of monomers to the formation of fibrillar assemblies is evident in the repeated use of this mechanism throughout nature, from essential cellular processes such as the formation of the cytoskeleton to the production of silk. Further, it has been recognised in the last two decades that a self-assembly mechanism, that is t...

  3. Printable semiconductor structures and related methods of making and assembling

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang; , Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao; Ko, Heung Cho; Mack, Shawn

    2013-03-12

    The present invention provides a high yield pathway for the fabrication, transfer and assembly of high quality printable semiconductor elements having selected physical dimensions, shapes, compositions and spatial orientations. The compositions and methods of the present invention provide high precision registered transfer and integration of arrays of microsized and/or nanosized semiconductor structures onto substrates, including large area substrates and/or flexible substrates. In addition, the present invention provides methods of making printable semiconductor elements from low cost bulk materials, such as bulk silicon wafers, and smart-materials processing strategies that enable a versatile and commercially attractive printing-based fabrication platform for making a broad range of functional semiconductor devices.

  4. Assembly and structure of protein phosphatase 2A

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) represents a conserved family of important protein serine/threonine phosphatases in species ranging from yeast to human. The PP2A core enzyme comprises a scaffold subunit and a catalytic subunit. The heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme consists of the core enzyme and a variable regulatory subunit. The catalytic subunit of PP2A is subject to reversible methylation, medi-ated by two conserved enzymes. Both the PP2A core and holoenzymes are regulated through interac-tion with a large number of cellular cofactors. Recent biochemical and structural investigation reveals critical insights into the assembly and function of the PP2A core enzyme as well as two families of holoenzyme. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms revealed by these latest advances.

  5. Assembly and structure of protein phosphatase 2A

    SHI YiGong

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) represents a conserved family of important protein serinetthreonine phosphatases in species ranging from yeast to human. The PP2A core enzyme comprises a scaffold subunit and a catalytic subunit. The heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme consists of the core enzyme and a variable regulatory subunit. The catalytic subunit of PP2A is subject to reversible methylation, mediated by two conserved enzymes. Both the PP2A core and holoenzymes are regulated through interaction with a large number of cellular cofactors. Recent biochemical and structural investigation reveals critical insights into the assembly and function of the PP2A core enzyme as well as two families of holoenzyme. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms revealed by these latest advances.

  6. RF properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders

    With the advent of the SLAC electron-positron linear collider (SLC) in the 100 GeV center-of-mass energy range, research and development work on even higher energy machines of this type has started in several laboratories in the United States, Europe, the Soviet Union and Japan. These linear colliders appear to provide the only promising approach to studying e+e- physics at center-of-mass energies approaching 1 TeV. This thesis concerns itself with the study of radio frequency properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders and their interaction with bunched beams. The topics that have been investigated are: experimental measurements of the energy loss of single bunches to longitudinal modes in two types of structures, using an equivalent signal on a coaxial wire to simulate the beam; a method of canceling the energy spread created within a single bunch by longitudinal wakefields, through appropriate shaping of the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch; derivation of the complete transient beam-loading equation for a train of bunches passing through a constant-gradient accelerator section, with application to the calculation and minimization of multi-bunch energy spread; detailed study of field emission and radio frequency breakdown in disk-loaded structures at S-, C- and X-band frequencies under extremely high-gradient conditions, with special attention to thermal effects, radiation, sparking, emission of gases, surface damage through explosive emission and its possible control through RF-gas processing. 53 refs., 49 figs., 9 tabs

  7. RF-thermal-structural-RF coupled analysis on a travelling wave disk-loaded accelerating structure

    The travelling wave (TW) disk-loaded accelerating structure is one of the key components in normal conducting (NC) linear accelerators, and has been studied for many years. In the design process, usually after the dimensions of each cell and the two couplers are finalized, the structure is fabricated and tuned, and then the whole structure RF characteristics are measured by using a vector network analyzer. Before fabrication, the whole structure characteristics (including RF, thermal and structural ones) are less simulated due to the limited capability of currently available computers. In this paper, we described a method for performing RF-thermal-structural-RF coupled analysis on a TW disk-loaded structure using only one PC. In order to validate our method, we first analyzed and compared our RF simulation results on the 3 m long BEPC Ⅱ structure with the corresponding experimental results, which shows very good consistency. Finally, the RF-thermal-structure-RF coupled analysis results on the 1.35 m long NSC KIPT linac accelerating structure are presented. (authors)

  8. Towards a molecular description of intermediate filament structure and assembly

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) represent one of the prominent cytoskeletal elements of metazoan cells. Their constituent proteins are coded by a multigene family, whose members are expressed in complex patterns that are controlled by developmental programs of differentiation. Hence, IF proteins found in epidermis differ significantly from those in muscle or neuronal tissues. Due to their fibrous nature, which stems from a fairly conserved central α-helical coiled-coil rod domain, IF proteins have long resisted crystallization and thus determination of their atomic structure. Since they represent the primary structural elements that determine the shape of the nucleus and the cell more generally, a major challenge is to arrive at a more rational understanding of how their nanomechanical properties effect the stability and plasticity of cells and tissues. Here, we review recent structural results of the coiled-coil dimer, assembly intermediates and growing filaments that have been obtained by a hybrid methods approach involving a rigorous combination of X-ray crystallography, small angle X-ray scattering, cryo-electron tomography, computational analysis and molecular modeling

  9. Lipid self-assembled structures for reactivity control in food.

    Sagalowicz, L; Moccand, C; Davidek, T; Ghanbari, R; Martiel, I; Negrini, R; Mezzenga, R; Leser, M E; Blank, I; Michel, M

    2016-07-28

    Lipid self-assembled structures (SASs) have recently gained considerable interest for their potential applications, especially for sustained nutrient release and protein crystallization. An additional property, which is underexploited, is their ability to control chemical reactions in food products. Here, we concentrate on SASs formed by phospholipids (PLs) and monoglycerides (MGs), those compounds being the most natural surfactants and therefore, the best compatible with food products, in view of providing new functionalities through the formation of SASs. In this work, the phase behaviour of these amphiphiles when mixed with oil and water is described and compared. Subsequently, we address the influence of these structures to the oxidation and Maillard-type reactions. Finally, we show that SASs formed by MGs can strongly increase the yield of key aroma impact compounds generated by Maillard-type reactions when compared with the reaction performed in aqueous precursor solutions. Various SASs are compared. In particular, addition of oil to a reversed bicontinuous structure formed by MG leads to a reversed microemulsion, which, considering its low viscosity, is particularly suitable for food products and act as a very efficient reactor system. The influence of oil and precursors on phase behaviour is discussed and related to the efficiency of the Maillard reactions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298441

  10. Structure and Order of Phosphonic Acid-Based Self-Assembled Based Self-Assembled

    Dubey, M.; Weidner, T; Gamble, L; Castner, D

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphonic acid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on oxide surfaces have recently seen increased use in electrical and biological sensor applications. The reliability and reproducibility of these sensors require good molecular organization in these SAMs. In this regard, packing, order, and alignment in the SAMs is important, as it influences the electron transport measurements. In this study, we examine the order of hydroxyl- and methyl-terminated phosphonate films deposited onto silicon oxide surfaces by the tethering by aggregation and growth method using complementary, state-of-art surface characterization tools. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy are used to study the order of the phosphonate SAMs in vacuum and under aqueous conditions, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry results show that these samples form chemically intact monolayer phosphonate films. NEXAFS and SFG spectroscopy showed that molecular order exists in the octadecylphosphonic acid and 11-hydroxyundecylphosphonic acid SAMs. The chain tilt angles in these SAMs were approximately 37{sup o} and 45{sup o}, respectively.

  11. A Lot of Work or a Work of Art: How the Structure of a Customized Assembly Task Determines the Utility Derived from Assembly Effort

    Eva C. Buechel; Chris Janiszewski

    2014-01-01

    Customized assembly occurs when a consumer makes customization decisions and participates in the construction or modification of a product. While customization increases satisfaction with the end-product, less is known about the utility derived from the assembly effort. Three studies show that the structure of the customized assembly task determines whether consumers derive negative or positive utility from the assembly effort. When customization decisions and assembly processes are segregate...

  12. A small scale accelerator driven subcritical assembly development and demonstration experiment at LAMPF

    A small scale experiment is described that will demonstrate many of the aspects of accelerator-driven transmutation technology. This experiment uses the high-power proton beam from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility accelerator and will be located in the Area-A experimental hall. Beam currents of up to 1 mA will be used to produce neutrons with a molten lead target. The target is surrounded by a molten salt and graphite moderator blanket. Fissionable material can be added to the molten salt to demonstrate plutonium burning or transmutation of commercial spent fuel or energy production from thorium. The experiment will be operated at power levels up to 5 MWt

  13. Design and RF measurements of an X-band accelerating structure for linearizing the longitudinal emittance at SPARC

    Alesini, D.; Falone, A.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palpini, F.; Palumbo, L.; Spataro, B.

    2005-12-01

    The paper presents the design of an X-band accelerating section for linearizing the longitudinal phase space in the Frascati Linac Coherent Light Source (SPARC). The nine cells structure, operating on the π standing wave mode, is fed by a central coupler and has been designed to obtain a 42 MV/m accelerating gradient. The two-dimensional (2D) profile has been obtained using the electromagnetic codes Superfish and Oscar-2D while the coupler has been designed using HFSS. Bead-pull measurements made on a copper prototype have been performed and the results are illustrated and compared with the numerical predictions. Mechanical details of the realized prototype and RF properties of the structure as a function of the assembly characteristics are also discussed.

  14. TRIM5alpha disrupts the structure of assembled HIV-1 capsid complexes in vitro.

    Black, Lesa R; Aiken, Christopher

    2010-07-01

    The host restriction factor TRIM5alpha provides intrinsic defense against retroviral infections in mammalian cells. TRIM5alpha blocks infection by targeting the viral capsid after entry but prior to completion of reverse transcription, but whether this interaction directly alters the structure of the viral capsid is unknown. A previous study reported that rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha protein stably associates with cylindrical complexes formed by assembly of recombinant HIV-1 CA-NC protein in vitro and that restriction leads to accelerated HIV-1 uncoating in target cells. To gain further insight into the mechanism of TRIM5alpha-dependent restriction, we examined the structural effects of TRIM5 proteins on preassembled CA-NC complexes by electron microscopy. Incubation of assembled complexes with lysate of cells expressing the restrictive rhesus TRIM5alpha protein resulted in marked disruption of the normal cylindrical structure of the complexes. In contrast, incubation with lysate of control cells or cells expressing comparable levels of the nonrestrictive human TRIM5alpha protein had little effect on the complexes. Incubation with lysate of cells expressing the TRIMCyp restriction factor also disrupted the cylinders. The effect of TRIMCyp was prevented by the addition of cyclosporine, which inhibits binding of TRIMCyp to the HIV-1 capsid. Thus, disruption of CA-NC cylinders by TRIM5alpha and TRIMCyp was correlated with the specificity of restriction. Collectively, these results suggest that TRIM5alpha-dependent restriction of HIV-1 infection results from structural perturbation of the viral capsid leading to aberrant HIV-1 uncoating in target cells. PMID:20410272

  15. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN PLASMOID EJECTIONS DERIVED FROM RADIO DRIFTING PULSATING STRUCTURES

    Nishizuka, N. [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1, Nukui-Kitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan); Karlický, M.; Bárta, M. [Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Janvier, M., E-mail: nishizuka.naoto@nict.go.jp [Department of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    We report observations of slowly drifting pulsating structures (DPSs) in the 0.8-4.5 GHz frequency range of the RT4 and RT5 radio spectrographs at Ondřejov Observatory, between 2002 and 2012. We found 106 events of DPSs, which we classified into four cases: (I) single events with a constant frequency drift (12 events), (II) multiple events occurring in the same flare with constant frequency drifts (11 events), (III) single or multiple events with increasing or decreasing frequency drift rates (52 events), and (IV) complex events containing multiple events occurring at the same time in a different frequency range (31 events). Many DPSs are associated with hard X-ray (HXR) bursts (15-25 keV) and soft X-ray (SXR) gradient peaks, as they typically occurred at the beginning of HXR peaks. This indicates that DPS events are related to the processes of fast energy release and particle acceleration. Furthermore, interpreting DPSs as signatures of plasmoids, we measured their ejection velocity, their width, and their height from the DPS spectra, from which we also estimated the reconnection rate and the plasma beta. In this interpretation, constant frequency drift indicates a constant velocity of a plasmoid, and an increasing/decreasing frequency drift indicates a deceleration/acceleration of a plasmoid ejection. The reconnection rate shows a good positive correlation with the plasmoid velocity. Finally we confirmed that some DPS events show plasmoid counterparts in Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images.

  16. Characteristics of a standing wave accelerating structure for common-series medical electron linacs

    Calculated and experimental RF-parameters of the accelerating structure of the LUEhR-40 linear electron accelerator designed for radiotherapy application are presented. A standing wave accelerating structure with a two-fold beam aceleration in opposite directions is used in the accelerator. The accelerating structure length makes up 1.6 m. At 2.5 MW SHF-power at the structure inlet and 20 keV electron injection energy the accelerated electron energy obtained made up 16.2 MeV at 20 μA current which agrees with the calculated values within the limits of measurement accuracy. Electron beam diameter after a one-turn acceleration did not exceed 2 mm

  17. Protein structure prediction: assembly of secondary structure elements by basin-hopping.

    Hoffmann, Falk; Vancea, Ioan; Kamat, Sanjay G; Strodel, Birgit

    2014-10-20

    The prediction of protein tertiary structure from primary structure remains a challenging task. One possible approach to this problem is the application of basin-hopping global optimization combined with an all-atom force field. In this work, the efficiency of basin-hopping is improved by introducing an approach that derives tertiary structures from the secondary structure assignments of individual residues. This approach is termed secondary-to-tertiary basin-hopping and benchmarked for three miniproteins: trpzip, trp-cage and ER-10. For each of the three miniproteins, the secondary-to-tertiary basin-hopping approach successfully and reliably predicts their three-dimensional structure. When it is applied to larger proteins, correctly folded structures are obtained. It can be concluded that the assembly of secondary structure elements using basin-hopping is a promising tool for de novo protein structure prediction. PMID:25056272

  18. Hierarchical assembly may be a way to make large information-rich structures

    Whitelam, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly in the laboratory can now yield `information-rich' nanostructures in which each component is of a distinct type and has a defined spatial position. Ensuring the thermodynamic stability of such structures requires inter-component interaction energies to increase logarithmically with structure size, in order to counter the entropy gained upon mixing component types in solution. However, self-assembly in the presence of strong interactions results in general in kinetic trapping, so suggesting a limit to the size of an (equilibrium) structure that can be self-assembled from distinguishable components. Here we study numerically a two-dimensional hierarchical assembly scheme already considered in experiment. We show that this scheme is immune to the kinetic traps associated with strong `native' interactions (interactions designed to stabilize the intended structure), and so, in principle, offers a way to make large information-rich structures. In this scheme the size of an assembled structure scales e...

  19. Cell wall assembly and intracellular trafficking in plant cells are directly affected by changes in the magnitude of gravitational acceleration.

    Youssef Chebli

    Full Text Available Plants are able to sense the magnitude and direction of gravity. This capacity is thought to reside in selected cell types within the plant body that are equipped with specialized organelles called statoliths. However, most plant cells do not possess statoliths, yet they respond to changes in gravitational acceleration. To understand the effect of gravity on the metabolism and cellular functioning of non-specialized plant cells, we investigated a rapidly growing plant cell devoid of known statoliths and without gravitropic behavior, the pollen tube. The effects of hyper-gravity and omnidirectional exposure to gravity on intracellular trafficking and on cell wall assembly were assessed in Camellia pollen tubes, a model system with highly reproducible growth behavior in vitro. Using an epi-fluorescence microscope mounted on the Large Diameter Centrifuge at the European Space Agency, we were able to demonstrate that vesicular trafficking is reduced under hyper-gravity conditions. Immuno-cytochemistry confirmed that both in hyper and omnidirectional gravity conditions, the characteristic spatial profiles of cellulose and callose distribution in the pollen tube wall were altered, in accordance with a dose-dependent effect on pollen tube diameter. Our findings suggest that in response to gravity induced stress, the pollen tube responds by modifying cell wall assembly to compensate for the altered mechanical load. The effect was reversible within few minutes demonstrating that the pollen tube is able to quickly adapt to changing stress conditions.

  20. Autonomous Assembly of Modular Structures in Space and on Extraterrestrial Locations

    Alhorn, Dean C.

    2005-02-01

    The new U.S. National Vision for Space Exploration requires many new enabling technologies to accomplish the goals of space commercialization and returning humans to the moon and extraterrestrial environments. Traditionally, flight elements are complete sub-systems requiring humans to complete the integration and assembly. These bulky structures also require the use of heavy launch vehicles to send the units to a desired location. This philosophy necessitates a high degree of safety, numerous space walks at a significant cost. Future space mission costs must be reduced and safety increased to reasonably achieve exploration goals. One proposed concept is the autonomous assembly of space structures. This concept is an affordable, reliable solution to in-space and extraterrestrial assembly. Assembly is autonomously performed when two components join after determining that specifications are correct. Local sensors continue monitor joint integrity post assembly, which is critical for safety and structural reliability. Achieving this concept requires a change in space structure design philosophy and the development of innovative technologies to perform autonomous assembly. Assembly of large space structures will require significant numbers of integrity sensors. Thus simple, low-cost sensors are integral to the success of this concept. This paper addresses these issues and proposes a novel concept for assembling space structures autonomously. Core technologies required to achieve in space assembly are presented. These core technologies are critical to the goal of utilizing space in a cost efficient and safe manner. Additionally, these novel technologies can be applied to other systems both on earth and extraterrestrial environments.

  1. Integrated quality assurance for assembly and testing of complex structures

    von Kopylow, Christoph; Bothe, Thorsten; Elandaloussi, Frank; Kalms, Michael; Jüptner, Werner

    2005-11-01

    Modern production processes are directed by properties of the components to be manufactured. These components have different sizes, functionalities, high assembly complexity and high security requirements. The increasing requirements during the manufacturing of complex products like cars and aircrafts demand new solutions for the quality assurance - especially for the production at different places. The main focus is to find a measurement strategy that is cost effective, flexible and adaptive. That means a clear definition of the measurement problem, the measurement with adapted resolution, the data preparation and evaluation and support during measurement and utilisation of the results directly in the production. In this paper we describe flexible measurement devices on example of three different techniques: fringe projection, fringe reflection and shearography. These techniques allow the detection of surface and subsurface defects like bumps, dents and delaminations with high resolution. The defects can be optically mapped onto the object's surface. Results are demonstrated with big components taken from automotive and aircraft production. We will point out the most important adaptations of the systems to realize miniaturized, robust and mobile devices for the quality assurance in an industrial environment. Additionally the implementation into a Mobile Maintenance and Control structure is demonstrated.

  2. Experimental Studies Of W-band Accelerator Structures At High Field

    Hill, M E

    2001-01-01

    A high-gradient electron accelerator is desired for high- energy physics research, where frequency scalings of breakdown and trapping of itinerant beamline particles dictates operation of the accelerator at short wavelengths. The first results of design and test of a high-gradient mm-wave linac with an operating frequency at 91.392 GHz (W-band) are presented. A novel approach to particle acceleration is presented employing a planar, dielectric lined waveguide used for particle acceleration. The traveling wave fields in the planar dielectric accelerator (PDA) are analyzed for an idealized structure, along with a circuit equivalent model used for understanding the structure as a microwave circuit. Along with the W-band accelerator structures, other components designed and tested are high power rf windows, high power attenuators, and a high power squeeze-type phase shifter. The design of the accelerator and its components where eased with the aide of numerical simulations using a finite-difference electromagneti...

  3. Effect of supporting structure stiffness on the drive train assembly of an induced draft cooling tower under seismic effects

    In a nuclear power project an induced draft cooling tower, as a safety-related structure and part of the main cooling system, has to perform satisfactorily under designated seismic effects. While the structural elements can be designed by conventional methods to ensure adequate safety, the seismic qualification of the mechanical components poses a challenge. The paper describes a methodology adopted for the seismic qualification of a typical Drive Train Assembly for the axial flow fan of an induced draft cooling tower, to ensure the structural integrity and functional operability of the assembly during Operating Base Earthquake and Safe Shutdown Earthquake conditions. This is achieved by performing a detailed finite element analysis of the rotating equipment assembly consisting of the electric motor, gear box and fan along with the drive shaft between the motor and the gear box. The various components are modeled using beam elements, plate elements and spring elements to idealize the flexible connections and supports. The floor response spectra derived from a dynamic analysis of the overall structure under stipulated seismic acceleration spectra are the main excitation inputs into the system. The results validate the adequacy of gaps for movement and the strengths of the couplings and bolts to withstand the applied loads. The assumed modeling and analysis methodology are seen to be acceptable procedures for seismic qualification of important components of the cooling tower. (authors)

  4. Design study of double-layer beam trajectory accelerator based on the Rhodotron structure

    Jabbari, Iraj; Poursaleh, Ali Mohammad; Khalafi, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the conceptual design of a new structure of industrial electron accelerator based on the Rhodotron accelerator is presented and its properties are compared with those of Rhodotron-TT200 accelerator. The main goal of this study was to reduce the power of RF system of accelerator at the same output electron beam energy. The main difference between the new accelerator structure with the Rhodotron accelerator is the length of the coaxial cavity that is equal to the wavelength at the resonant frequency. Also two sets of bending magnets were used around the acceleration cavity in two layers. In the new structure, the beam crosses several times in the coaxial cavity by the bending magnets around the cavity at the first layer and then is transferred to the second layer using the central bending magnet. The acceleration process in the second layer is similar to the first layer. Hence, the energy of the electron beam will be doubled. The electrical power consumption of the RF system and magnet system were calculated and simulated for the new accelerator structure and TT200. Comparing the calculated and simulated results of the TT200 with those of experimental results revealed good agreement. The results showed that the overall electrical power consumption of the new accelerator structure was less than that of the TT200 at the same energy and power of the electron beam. As such, the electrical efficiency of the new structure was improved.

  5. Assembly, Structure and Properties of DNA Programmable Nanoclusters

    Chi, Cheng

    Finite size nanoclusters can be viewed as a nanoscale analogue of molecules. Just as molecules, synthesized from atoms, give access to new properties, clusters composed of nanoparticles modulate of their functional properties of nanoparticles. In contrast to synthetic chemistry which is a mature field, the creation of nanoscale clusters with well-defined architectures is a new and challenging area of research. My work explores how to assemble model systems of nanoclusters using DNA-programmable interparticle linkages. The simplest clusters of two particles, dimers, allow one to investigate fundamental effects in these systems. Such clusters serve as a versatile platform to understand DNA-mediated interactions, especially in the non-trivial regime where the nanoparticle and DNA chains are comparable in size. I systematically studied a few fundamental questions as follows: Firstly, we examined the structure of nanoparticle dimers in detail by a combination of X-ray scattering experiments and molecular simulations. We found that, for a given DNA length, the interparticle separation within the dimer is controlled primarily by the number of linking DNA. We summarized our findings in a simple model that captures the interplay of the number of DNA bridges, their length, the particle's curvature and the excluded volume effects. We demonstrated the applicability of the model to our results, without any free parameters. As a consequence, the increase of dimer separation with increasing temperature can be understood as a result of changing the number of connecting DNA. Later, we investigated the self-assembly process of DNA-functionalized particles in the presence of various lengths of the DNA linkage strands using 3 different pathways. We observed a high yield of dimer formation when significantly long linkers were applied. Small Angle X-ray Scattering revealed two configurations of the small clusters by different pathways. In one case, the interparticle distance increases

  6. Horizon structure of rotating Bardeen black hole and particle acceleration

    Ghosh, Sushant G. [Jamia Millia Islamia, Centre for Theoretical Physics, New Delhi (India); University of KwaZulu-Natal, Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, Durban (South Africa); Amir, Muhammed [Jamia Millia Islamia, Centre for Theoretical Physics, New Delhi (India)

    2015-11-15

    We investigate the horizon structure and ergosphere in a rotating Bardeen regular black hole, which has an additional parameter (g) due to the magnetic charge, apart from the mass (M) and the rotation parameter (a). Interestingly, for each value of the parameter g, there exists a critical rotation parameter (a = a{sub E}), which corresponds to an extremal black hole with degenerate horizons, while for a < a{sub E} it describes a non-extremal black hole with two horizons, and no black hole for a > a{sub E}. We find that the extremal value a{sub E} is also influenced by the parameter g, and so is the ergosphere. While the value of a{sub E} remarkably decreases when compared with the Kerr black hole, the ergosphere becomes thicker with the increase in g.We also study the collision of two equal mass particles near the horizon of this black hole, and explicitly show the effect of the parameter g. The center-of-mass energy (E{sub CM}) not only depend on the rotation parameter a, but also on the parameter g. It is demonstrated that the E{sub CM} could be arbitrarily high in the extremal cases when one of the colliding particles has a critical angular momentum, thereby suggesting that the rotating Bardeen regular black hole can act as a particle accelerator. (orig.)

  7. Horizon structure of rotating Bardeen black hole and particle acceleration

    We investigate the horizon structure and ergosphere in a rotating Bardeen regular black hole, which has an additional parameter (g) due to the magnetic charge, apart from the mass (M) and the rotation parameter (a). Interestingly, for each value of the parameter g, there exists a critical rotation parameter (a = aE), which corresponds to an extremal black hole with degenerate horizons, while for a < aE it describes a non-extremal black hole with two horizons, and no black hole for a > aE. We find that the extremal value aE is also influenced by the parameter g, and so is the ergosphere. While the value of aE remarkably decreases when compared with the Kerr black hole, the ergosphere becomes thicker with the increase in g.We also study the collision of two equal mass particles near the horizon of this black hole, and explicitly show the effect of the parameter g. The center-of-mass energy (ECM) not only depend on the rotation parameter a, but also on the parameter g. It is demonstrated that the ECM could be arbitrarily high in the extremal cases when one of the colliding particles has a critical angular momentum, thereby suggesting that the rotating Bardeen regular black hole can act as a particle accelerator. (orig.)

  8. Structural Aspects of Bacterial Outer Membrane Protein Assembly.

    Calmettes, Charles; Judd, Andrew; Moraes, Trevor F

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is predominantly populated by β-Barrel proteins and lipid anchored proteins that serve a variety of biological functions. The proper folding and assembly of these proteins is essential for bacterial viability and often plays a critical role in virulence and pathogenesis. The β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) complex is responsible for the proper assembly of β-barrels into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) system is required for proper targeting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane. PMID:26621472

  9. Software design for automated assembly of truss structures

    Herstrom, Catherine L.; Grantham, Carolyn; Allen, Cheryl L.; Doggett, William R.; Will, Ralph W.

    1992-01-01

    Concern over the limited intravehicular activity time has increased the interest in performing in-space assembly and construction operations with automated robotic systems. A technique being considered at LaRC is a supervised-autonomy approach, which can be monitored by an Earth-based supervisor that intervenes only when the automated system encounters a problem. A test-bed to support evaluation of the hardware and software requirements for supervised-autonomy assembly methods was developed. This report describes the design of the software system necessary to support the assembly process. The software is hierarchical and supports both automated assembly operations and supervisor error-recovery procedures, including the capability to pause and reverse any operation. The software design serves as a model for the development of software for more sophisticated automated systems and as a test-bed for evaluation of new concepts and hardware components.

  10. Development of High-Gradient Dielectric Laser-Driven Particle Accelerator Structures

    Byer, Robert L.

    2013-11-07

    The thrust of Stanford's program is to conduct research on high-gradient dielectric accelerator structures driven with high repetition-rate, tabletop infrared lasers. The close collaboration between Stanford and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) is critical to the success of this project, because it provides a unique environment where prototype dielectric accelerator structures can be rapidly fabricated and tested with a relativistic electron beam.

  11. X-band Dielectric Loaded Rf Driven Accelerator Structures Theoretical And Experimental Investigations

    Zou, P

    2001-01-01

    An important area of application of high-power radio frequency (RF) and microwave sources is particle acceleration. A major challenge for the current worldwide research and development effort in linear accelerator is the search for a compact and affordable very-high-energy accelerator technology for the next generation supercolliders. It has been recognized for sometime that dielectric loaded accelerator structures are attractive candidates for the next generation very-high-energy linear accelerators, because they possess several distinct advantages over conventional metallic iris- loaded accelerator structures. However, some fundamental issues, such as RF breakdown in the dielectric, Joule heating, and vacuum properties of dielectric materials, are still the subjects of intense investigation, requiring the validation by experiments conducted at high power levels. An X-band traveling-wave accelerator based on dielectric-lined waveguide has been designed and constructed. Numerical calculation, bench measuremen...

  12. Self-assembly of PEGylated gold nanoparticles with satellite structures as seeds.

    Bachelet, Marie; Chen, Rongjun

    2016-07-21

    We report a very simple method for the self-assembly of spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), coated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), through a slow evaporation process at room temperature. Clusters of particles forming satellite structures may act as seeds for the self-assembly in a crystallization-like process. Based on the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images obtained a mechanism for the self-assembly was suggested. PMID:27384086

  13. Electrophoretic dynamics of self-assembling branched DNA structures

    Heuer, Daniel Milton

    This study advances our understanding of the electrophoretic dynamics of branched biopolymers and explores technologies designed to exploit their unique properties. New self-assembly techniques were developed to create branched DNA for visualization via fluorescence microscopy. Experiments in fixed gel networks reveal a distinct trapping behavior, in contrast with linear topologies. The finding that detection can be achieved by introducing a branch point contributes significantly to the field of separation science and can be exploited to develop new applications. Results obtained in polymer solutions point to identical mobilities for branched and linear topologies, despite large differences in their dynamics. This finding led to a new description of electrophoresis based on non-Newtonian viscoelastic effects in the electric double layer surrounding a charged object. This new theoretical framework presents a new outlook important not only to the electrophoretic physics of nucleic acids, but all charged objects including proteins, colloids, and nanoparticles. To study the behavior of smaller biopolymers, such as restriction fragments and recombination intermediates, a library of symmetrically branched DNA was synthesized followed by characterization in gels. The experimental results contribute a large body of information relating molecular architecture and the dynamics of rigid structures in an electric field. The findings allow us to create new separation technologies based on topology. These contributions can also be utilized in a number of different applications including the study of recombination intermediates and the separation of proteins according to structure. To demonstrate the importance of these findings, a sequence and mutation detection technique was envisioned and applied for genetic analysis. Restriction fragments from mutation "hotspots" in the p53 tumor suppressor gene, known to play a role in cancer development, were analyzed with this technique

  14. Autonomous Assembly of Modular Structures in Space and on Extraterrestrial Locations

    Alhorn, Dean C.

    2005-01-01

    The fulfillment of the new US. National Vision for Space Exploration requires many new enabling technologies to accomplish the goal of utilizing space for commercial activities and for returning humans to the moon and extraterrestrial environments. Traditionally, flight structures are manufactured as complete systems and require humans to complete the integration and assembly in orbit. These structures are bulky and require the use of heavy launch vehicles to send the units to the desired location, e.g. International Space Station (ISS). This method requires a high degree of safety, numerous space walks and significant cost for the humans to perform the assembly in orbit. For example, for assembly and maintenance of the ISS, 52 Extravehicular Activities (EVA's) have been performed so far with a total EVA time of approximately 322 hours. Sixteen (16) shuttle flights haw been to the ISS to perform these activities with an approximate cost of $450M per mission. For future space missions, costs have to be reduced to reasonably achieve the exploration goals. One concept that has been proposed is the autonomous assembly of space structures. This concept is an affordable, reliable solution to in-space and extraterrestrial assembly operations. Assembly is autonomously performed when two components containing onboard electronics join after recognizing that the joint is appropriate and in the precise position and orientation required for assembly. The mechanism only activates when the specifications are correct and m a nominal range. After assembly, local sensors and electronics monitor the integrity of the joint for feedback to a master controller. To achieve this concept will require a shift in the methods for designing space structures. In addition, innovative techniques will be required to perform the assembly autonomously. Monitoring of the assembled joint will be necessary for safety and structural integrity. If a very large structure is to be assembled in orbit, then

  15. Structural Consequences of Anionic Host-Cationic Guest Interactions in a Supramolecular Assembly

    Pluth, Michael D.; Johnson, Darren W.; Szigethy, Geza; Davis, Anna V.; Teat, Simon J.; Oliver, Allen G.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-07-09

    The molecular structure of the self-assembled supramolecular assembly [M{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} has been explored with different metals (M = Ga{sup III}, Fe{sup III}, Ti{sup IV}) and different encapsulated guests (NEt{sub 4}{sup +}, BnNMe{sub 3}{sup +}, Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +}, Cp*{sub 2}Co{sup +}) by X-ray crystallography. While the identity of the metal ions at the vertices of the M{sub 4}L{sub 6} structure is found to have little effect on the assembly structure, encapsulated guests significantly distort the size and shape of the interior cavity of the assembly. Cations on the exterior of the assembly are found to interact with the assembly through either {pi}-{pi}, cation-{pi}, or CH-{pi} interactions. In some cases, the exterior guests interact with only one assembly, but cations with the ability to form multiple {pi}-{pi} interactions are able to interact with adjacent assemblies in the crystal lattice. The solvent accessible cavity of the assembly is modeled using the rolling probe method and found to range from 253-434 {angstrom}{sup 3}, depending on the encapsulated guest. Based on the volume of the guest and the volume of the cavity, the packing coefficient for each host-guest complex is found to range from 0.47-0.67.

  16. The structure of heart rate asymmetry: deceleration and acceleration runs

    A family of new heart rate asymmetry measures is introduced, namely deceleration and acceleration runs, as well as entropic measures summarizing their distribution. We introduce the theoretical run distribution for shuffled data and use it as a reference for interpreting the results. The measures defined in the paper are applied to actual 24 h Holter ECG recordings from 87 healthy people, and it is demonstrated that the patterns of accelerations are different from those of decelerations. Acceleration runs are longer and more numerous: all runs of accelerations, with the exception of lengths 3 and 4, are more numerous than those of decelerations. These findings are reflected in the difference between the entropic measures for acceleration and deceleration runs: for 74 subjects the acceleration-related entropic parameter is greater than that of decelerations (p < 0.001). For shuffled data there is no difference in the above parameters, and there are more short runs and fewer long runs than in physiological data. The influence of the measuring equipment resolution is also discussed

  17. Dielectric laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons at a photonic structure

    This thesis reports on the observation of dielectric laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons via the inverse Smith-Purcell effect in the optical regime. Evanescent modes in the vicinity of a periodic grating structure can travel at the same velocity as the electrons along the grating surface. A longitudinal electric field component is used to continuously impart momentum onto the electrons. This is only possible in the near-field of a suitable photonic structure, which means that the electron beam has to pass the structure within about one wavelength. In our experiment we exploit the third spatial harmonic of a single fused silica grating excited by laser pulses derived from a Titanium:sapphire oscillator and accelerate non-relativistic 28 keV electrons. We measure a maximum energy gain of 280 eV, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 25 MeV/m, already comparable with state-of-the-art radio-frequency linear accelerators. To experience this acceleration gradient the electrons approach the grating closer than 100 nm. We present the theory behind grating-based particle acceleration and discuss simulation results of dielectric laser acceleration in the near-field of photonic grating structures, which is excited by near-infrared laser light. Our measurements show excellent agreement with our simulation results and therefore confirm the direct acceleration with the light field. We further discuss the acceleration inside double grating structures, dephasing effects of non-relativistic electrons as well as the space charge effect, which can limit the attainable peak currents of these novel accelerator structures. The photonic structures described in this work can be readily concatenated and therefore represent a scalable realization of dielectric laser acceleration. Furthermore, our structures are directly compatible with the microstructures used for the acceleration of relativistic electrons demonstrated in parallel to this work by our collaborators in

  18. Dielectric laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons at a photonic structure

    Breuer, John

    2013-08-29

    This thesis reports on the observation of dielectric laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons via the inverse Smith-Purcell effect in the optical regime. Evanescent modes in the vicinity of a periodic grating structure can travel at the same velocity as the electrons along the grating surface. A longitudinal electric field component is used to continuously impart momentum onto the electrons. This is only possible in the near-field of a suitable photonic structure, which means that the electron beam has to pass the structure within about one wavelength. In our experiment we exploit the third spatial harmonic of a single fused silica grating excited by laser pulses derived from a Titanium:sapphire oscillator and accelerate non-relativistic 28 keV electrons. We measure a maximum energy gain of 280 eV, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 25 MeV/m, already comparable with state-of-the-art radio-frequency linear accelerators. To experience this acceleration gradient the electrons approach the grating closer than 100 nm. We present the theory behind grating-based particle acceleration and discuss simulation results of dielectric laser acceleration in the near-field of photonic grating structures, which is excited by near-infrared laser light. Our measurements show excellent agreement with our simulation results and therefore confirm the direct acceleration with the light field. We further discuss the acceleration inside double grating structures, dephasing effects of non-relativistic electrons as well as the space charge effect, which can limit the attainable peak currents of these novel accelerator structures. The photonic structures described in this work can be readily concatenated and therefore represent a scalable realization of dielectric laser acceleration. Furthermore, our structures are directly compatible with the microstructures used for the acceleration of relativistic electrons demonstrated in parallel to this work by our collaborators in

  19. The assembly of large structures in space. [radio astronomy telescope and microwave antenna

    Smith, G. W.; Brodie, S. B.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques developed for orbital assembly of the support structure for a 1000 meter diameter microwave power transmission system antenna are described. The operation is performed in two phases using the shuttle remote manipulator system in low earth orbit, and a mobile assembler in geosynchronous orbit.

  20. Structural integrity assessment and stress measurement of CHASNUPP-1 fuel assembly

    Waseem; Murtaza Ghulam; Siddiqui Ashfaq Ahmad; Akhtar Syed Waseem

    2016-01-01

    Fuel assembly of the PWR nuclear power plant is a long and flexible structure. This study has been made in an attempt to find the structural integrity of the fuel assembly (FA) of Chashma Nuclear Power Plant-1 (CHASNUPP-1) at room temperature in air. The non-linear contact and structural tensile analysis have been performed using ANSYS 13.0, in order to determine the fuel assembly (FA) elongation behaviour as well as the location and values of the stress intensity and stresses developed in ax...

  1. Structural simulations of nanomaterials self-assembled from ionic macrocycles.

    van Swol, Frank B.; Medforth, Craig John (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-01

    Recent research at Sandia has discovered a new class of organic binary ionic solids with tunable optical, electronic, and photochemical properties. These nanomaterials, consisting of a novel class of organic binary ionic solids, are currently being developed at Sandia for applications in batteries, supercapacitors, and solar energy technologies. They are composed of self-assembled oligomeric arrays of very large anions and large cations, but their crucial internal arrangement is thus far unknown. This report describes (a) the development of a relevant model of nonconvex particles decorated with ions interacting through short-ranged Yukawa potentials, and (b) the results of initial Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly binary ionic solids.

  2. Development of laboratory acceleration test method for service life prediction of concrete structures

    Service life prediction of nuclear power plants depends on the application of history of structures, field inspection and test, the development of laboratory acceleration tests, their analysis method and predictive model. In this study, laboratory acceleration test method for service life prediction of concrete structures and application of experimental test results are introduced. This study is concerned with environmental condition of concrete structures and is to develop the acceleration test method for durability factors of concrete structures e.g. carbonation, sulfate attack, freeze-thaw cycles and shrinkage-expansion etc

  3. Fabrication and tuning techniques for side-coupled electron accelerator structures

    Beginning in 1979, Los Alamos entered into a collaboration with the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) to develop an advanced cw microtron accelerator. The accelerating structures (one 0.9-m-long, one 2.7-m-long, and two 4.0-m-long) containing a total of 184 accelerating cavities have been fabricated and tuned to the 2380-MHz operating frequency. New methods simplified the fabrication of these structures and eliminated several furnace-brazing steps. These fabrication methods, lathe-mounted tuning fixtures, and streamlined tuning techniques were developed to allow efficient production of side-coupled structures. These techniques are now being applied to the 2450-MHz racetrack microtron accelerator structures being fabricated at Los Alamos for the Nuclear Physics Department of the University of Illinois. Refinements of the described techniques will allow future accelerators of this type to be fabricated by private industry

  4. ON FABRICATION AND BRAZING OF 15A, 120 keV CONTINUOUS DUTY ACCELERATOR GRID ASSEMBLIES

    Biagi, L.A.; Koehler, G.W.; Paterson, J.A.

    1980-05-01

    The development of high intensity neutral beam injectors at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has progressed from relatively low duty cycle, low energy devices to the next generation of continuous duty high energy units. The earlier pulsed versions were designed with edge cooled grid structures described ·in a previous publication. The prerequisites set by the higher duty cycle devices no longer allow the edge cooling methods to be employed. Hollow molybdenum grid rails with deionized cooling water flowing at pressures of approximately 1.73 x 10{sup 6}Pa (250 PSI) at from 1.135 to 1.89 liters per minute (.3 to .5 GPM) are brazed to Type 304L stainless steel rail holders.

  5. Molybdenum sputtering film characterization for high gradient accelerating structures

    S.Bini; B.Spataro; A.Marcelli; S.Sarti; V.A.Dolgashev; S.Tantawi; A.D.Yeremian

    2013-01-01

    Technological advancements are strongly required to fulfill the demands of new accelerator devices with the highest accelerating gradients and operation reliability for the future colliders.To this purpose an extensive R&D regarding molybdenum coatings on copper is in progress.In this contribution we describe chemical composition,deposition quality and resistivity properties of different molybdenum coatings obtained via sputtering.The deposited films are thick metallic disorder layers with different resistivity values above and below the molibdenum dioxide reference value.Chemical and electrical properties of these sputtered coatings have been characterized by Rutherford backscattering,XANES and photoemission spectroscopy.We will also consider multiple cells standing wave section coated by a molybdenum layer designed to improve the performance of X-Band accelerating systems.

  6. Confinement and internal structure of radiatively accelerated quasar clouds

    Weymann, R.

    1976-09-01

    The equation of transfer for Lyman ..cap alpha.. and the Lyman continuum is solved for plane-parallel slabs of hydrogen with optical depths up to 25,000 in the line center to find the radiative acceleration as a function of position in the slab. The distribution of gas pressure and density which yields a constant acceleration and which matches the prescribed external pressure on the boundaries is then found. For optical depths less than about 36, solutions are obtained for arbitrarily low ratios of external pressure to incident radiation pressure. For optical depths larger than this, solutions are possible only if this ratio exceeds a critical value, and the acceleration of the cloud goes to zero and the column density to infinity as this critical value is approached. (AIP)

  7. Confinement and internal structure of radiatively accelerated quasar clouds

    The equation of transfer for Lyman α and the Lyman continuum is solved for plane-parallel slabs of hydrogen with optical depths up to 25,000 in the line center to find the radiative acceleration as a function of position in the slab. The distribution of gas pressure and density which yields a constant acceleration and which matches the prescribed external pressure on the boundaries is then found. For optical depths less than about 36, solutions are obtained for arbitrarily low ratios of external pressure to incident radiation pressure. For optical depths larger than this, solutions are possible only if this ratio exceeds a critical value, and the acceleration of the cloud goes to zero and the column density to infinity as this critical value is approached

  8. Accelerate!

    Kotter, John P

    2012-11-01

    The old ways of setting and implementing strategy are failing us, writes the author of Leading Change, in part because we can no longer keep up with the pace of change. Organizational leaders are torn between trying to stay ahead of increasingly fierce competition and needing to deliver this year's results. Although traditional hierarchies and managerial processes--the components of a company's "operating system"--can meet the daily demands of running an enterprise, they are rarely equipped to identify important hazards quickly, formulate creative strategic initiatives nimbly, and implement them speedily. The solution Kotter offers is a second system--an agile, networklike structure--that operates in concert with the first to create a dual operating system. In such a system the hierarchy can hand off the pursuit of big strategic initiatives to the strategy network, freeing itself to focus on incremental changes to improve efficiency. The network is populated by employees from all levels of the organization, giving it organizational knowledge, relationships, credibility, and influence. It can Liberate information from silos with ease. It has a dynamic structure free of bureaucratic layers, permitting a level of individualism, creativity, and innovation beyond the reach of any hierarchy. The network's core is a guiding coalition that represents each level and department in the hierarchy, with a broad range of skills. Its drivers are members of a "volunteer army" who are energized by and committed to the coalition's vividly formulated, high-stakes vision and strategy. Kotter has helped eight organizations, public and private, build dual operating systems over the past three years. He predicts that such systems will lead to long-term success in the 21st century--for shareholders, customers, employees, and companies themselves. PMID:23155997

  9. Summary report: Working Group 3 on 'Novel Structure-Based Acceleration Concepts'

    The Working Group 3 papers were divided into two general categories, those related to laser-based schemes and those based on microwave technology. In the laser-based area highlights include ongoing theoretical and experimental efforts to demonstrate electron acceleration in vacuum based either on ponderomotive or nonponderomotive mechanisms. Papers on advanced issues such as staging the laser acceleration process, compensating for space charge effects, improving inverse bremsstrahlung acceleration, and possible laser linear collider designs were also presented. In the microwave area, noteworthy contributions were reviewed on slow-wave accelerating structures employing dielectric loading; smooth-wall, fast-wave structures with a helical wiggler for inverse FEL acceleration; multistaging of smooth-wall, fast-wave structures with an axial magnetic field for increased energy cyclotron autoresonance acceleration; and technological approaches for fabrication and diamond coating of W-band structures to achieve high acceleration gradients. Dielectric-loaded structures to support multimode, multibunch wakefield excitations for trailing bunch acceleration were also discussed

  10. Development and verification testing of automation and robotics for assembly of space structures

    Rhodes, Marvin D.; Will, Ralph W.; Quach, Cuong C.

    1993-01-01

    A program was initiated within the past several years to develop operational procedures for automated assembly of truss structures suitable for large-aperture antennas. The assembly operations require the use of a robotic manipulator and are based on the principle of supervised autonomy to minimize crew resources. A hardware testbed was established to support development and evaluation testing. A brute-force automation approach was used to develop the baseline assembly hardware and software techniques. As the system matured and an operation was proven, upgrades were incorprated and assessed against the baseline test results. This paper summarizes the developmental phases of the program, the results of several assembly tests, the current status, and a series of proposed developments for additional hardware and software control capability. No problems that would preclude automated in-space assembly of truss structures have been encountered. The current system was developed at a breadboard level and continued development at an enhanced level is warranted.