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Sample records for accelerated wound healing

  1. Electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing

    Gaurav Thakral

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several applications of electrical stimulation described in medical literature to accelerate wound healing and improve cutaneous perfusion. This is a simple technique that could be incorporated as an adjunctive therapy in plastic surgery. The objective of this review was to evaluate the results of randomized clinical trials that use electrical stimulation for wound healing. Method: We identified 21 randomized clinical trials that used electrical stimulation for wound healing. We did not include five studies with treatment groups with less than eight subjects. Results: Electrical stimulation was associated with faster wound area reduction or a higher proportion of wounds that healed in 14 out of 16 wound randomized clinical trials. The type of electrical stimulation, waveform, and duration of therapy vary in the literature. Conclusion: Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate wound healing and increase cutaneous perfusion in human studies. Electrical stimulation is an adjunctive therapy that is underutilized in plastic surgery and could improve flap and graft survival, accelerate postoperative recovery, and decrease necrosis following foot reconstruction.

  2. Microbial Symbionts Accelerate Wound Healing via the Neuropeptide Hormone Oxytocin

    Theofilos Poutahidis; Kearney, Sean M.; Tatiana Levkovich; Peimin Qi; Varian, Bernard J.; Lakritz, Jessica R; Ibrahim, Yassin M.; Antonis Chatzigiagkos; Eric J Alm; Erdman, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing capability is inextricably linked with diverse aspects of physical fitness ranging from recovery after minor injuries and surgery to diabetes and some types of cancer. Impact of the microbiome upon the mammalian wound healing process is poorly understood. We discover that supplementing the gut microbiome with lactic acid microbes in drinking water accelerates the wound-healing process to occur in half the time required for matched control animals. Further, we find that Lactobaci...

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates cutaneous wound healing in mice.

    Anna Grochot-Przeczek

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, a cytoprotective, pro-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory enzyme, is strongly induced in injured tissues. Our aim was to clarify its role in cutaneous wound healing. In wild type mice, maximal expression of HO-1 in the skin was observed on the 2(nd and 3(rd days after wounding. Inhibition of HO-1 by tin protoporphyrin-IX resulted in retardation of wound closure. Healing was also delayed in HO-1 deficient mice, where lack of HO-1 could lead to complete suppression of reepithelialization and to formation of extensive skin lesions, accompanied by impaired neovascularization. Experiments performed in transgenic mice bearing HO-1 under control of keratin 14 promoter showed that increased level of HO-1 in keratinocytes is enough to improve the neovascularization and hasten the closure of wounds. Importantly, induction of HO-1 in wounded skin was relatively weak and delayed in diabetic (db/db mice, in which also angiogenesis and wound closure were impaired. In such animals local delivery of HO-1 transgene using adenoviral vectors accelerated the wound healing and increased the vascularization. In summary, induction of HO-1 is necessary for efficient wound closure and neovascularization. Impaired wound healing in diabetic mice may be associated with delayed HO-1 upregulation and can be improved by HO-1 gene transfer.

  4. Microbial symbionts accelerate wound healing via the neuropeptide hormone oxytocin.

    Theofilos Poutahidis

    Full Text Available Wound healing capability is inextricably linked with diverse aspects of physical fitness ranging from recovery after minor injuries and surgery to diabetes and some types of cancer. Impact of the microbiome upon the mammalian wound healing process is poorly understood. We discover that supplementing the gut microbiome with lactic acid microbes in drinking water accelerates the wound-healing process to occur in half the time required for matched control animals. Further, we find that Lactobacillus reuteri enhances wound-healing properties through up-regulation of the neuropeptide hormone oxytocin, a factor integral in social bonding and reproduction, by a vagus nerve-mediated pathway. Bacteria-triggered oxytocin serves to activate host CD4+Foxp3+CD25+ immune T regulatory cells conveying transplantable wound healing capacity to naive Rag2-deficient animals. This study determined oxytocin to be a novel component of a multi-directional gut microbe-brain-immune axis, with wound-healing capability as a previously unrecognized output of this axis. We also provide experimental evidence to support long-standing medical traditions associating diet, social practices, and the immune system with efficient recovery after injury, sustained good health, and longevity.

  5. Hyaluronidase modulates inflammatory response and accelerates the cutaneous wound healing.

    Fronza, Marcio; Caetano, Guilherme F; Leite, Marcel N; Bitencourt, Claudia S; Paula-Silva, Francisco W G; Andrade, Thiago A M; Frade, Marco A C; Merfort, Irmgard; Faccioli, Lúcia H

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronidases are enzymes that degrade hyaluronan an important constituent of the extracellular matrix. They have been used as a spreading agent, improving the absorption of drugs and facilitating the subcutaneous infusion of fluids. Here, we investigated the influence of bovine testes hyaluronidase (HYAL) during cutaneous wound healing in in vitro and in vivo assays. We demonstrated in the wound scratch assay that HYAL increased the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts in vitro at low concentration, e.g. 0.1 U HYAL enhanced the cell number by 20%. HYAL presented faster and higher reepithelialization in in vivo full-thickness excisional wounds generated on adult Wistar rats back skin already in the early phase at 2nd day post operatory compared to vehicle-control group. Wound closured area observed in the 16 U and 32 U HYAL treated rats reached 38% and 46% compared to 19% in the controls, respectively. Histological and biochemical analyses supported the clinical observations and showed that HYAL treated wounds exhibited increased granulation tissue, diminished edema formation and regulated the inflammatory response by modulating the release of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines, growth factor and eicosanoids mediators. Moreover, HYAL increased gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) γ and PPAR β/δ, the collagen content in the early stages of healing processes as well as angiogenesis. Altogether these data revealed that HYAL accelerates wound healing processes and might be beneficial for treating wound disorders. PMID:25393024

  6. Recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor accelerates wound healing.

    McGee, G S; Davidson, J M; Buckley, A; Sommer, A; Woodward, S C; Aquino, A M; Barbour, R; Demetriou, A A

    1988-07-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) stimulates extracellular matrix metabolism, growth, and movement of mesodermally derived cells. We have previously shown that collagen content in polyvinyl alcohol sponges increased after bFGF treatment. We hypothesized that bFGF-treated incisional wounds would heal more rapidly. After intraperitoneal pentobarbital anesthesia, male, 200- to 250-g, Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 27) each underwent two sets of paired, transverse, dorsal incisions closed with steel sutures. On Day 3 postwounding, 0.4 ml of bFGF (recombinant, 400 ng. Synergen) or normal saline was injected into one of each paired incisions. Animals were killed with ether on postwounding Days 5, 6, and 7 and their dorsal pelts were excised. Fresh or formalin-fixed wound strips were subjected to tensile strength measurements using a tensiometer. Breaking energy was calculated. Wound collagen content (hydroxyproline) was measured in wound-edge samples following hydrolysis using high-performance liquid chromatography. There was an overall significant increase in fresh wound tensile strength (13.7 +/- 1.06 vs 19.1 +/- 1.99 g/mm, P less than 0.01) and wound breaking energy (476 +/- 47 vs 747 +/- 76 mm2, P less than 0.001) in bFGF-treated incisions. There was an increase in wound collagen content which was not statistically significant and there was no difference in fixed incisional tensile strength. Histologic examination showed better organization and maturation in bFGF wounds. Recombinant bFGF accelerates normal rat wound healing. This may be due to earlier accumulation of collagen and fibroblasts and/or to greater collagen crosslinking in bFGF-treated wounds. PMID:3392988

  7. Topical 5-azacytidine accelerates skin wound healing in rats.

    Gomes, Fabiana S; de-Souza, Gabriela F; Nascimento, Lucas F; Arantes, Eva L; Pedro, Rafael M; Vitorino, Daniele C; Nunez, Carla E; Melo Lima, Maria H; Velloso, Lício A; Araújo, Eliana P

    2014-01-01

    The development of new methods to improve skin wound healing may affect the outcomes of a number of medical conditions. Here, we evaluate the molecular and clinical effects of topical 5-azacytidine on wound healing in rats. 5-Azacytidine decreases the expression of follistatin-1, which negatively regulates activins. Activins, in turn, promote cell growth in different tissues, including the skin. Eight-week-old male Wistar rats were submitted to 8.0-mm punch-wounding in the dorsal region. After 3 days, rats were randomly assigned to receive either a control treatment or the topical application of a solution containing 5-azacytidine (10 mM) once per day. Photo documentation and sample collection were performed on days 5, 9, and 15. Overall, 5-azacytidine promoted a significant acceleration of complete wound healing (99.7% ± 0.7.0 vs. 71.2% ± 2.8 on day 15; n = 10; p < 0.01), accompanied by up to threefold reduction in follistatin expression. Histological examination of the skin revealed efficient reepithelization and cell proliferation, as evaluated by the BrdU incorporation method. 5-Azacytidine treatment also resulted in increased gene expression of transforming growth factor-beta and the keratinocyte markers involucrin and cytokeratin, as well as decreased expression of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-10. Lastly, when recombinant follistatin was applied to the skin in parallel with topical 5-azacytidine, most of the beneficial effects of the drug were lost. Thus, 5-azacytidine acts, at least in part through the follistatin/activin pathway, to improve skin wound healing in rodents. PMID:25039304

  8. Engineered human vascularized constructs accelerate diabetic wound healing.

    Shen, Yu-I; Cho, Hongkwan; Papa, Arianne E; Burke, Jacqueline A; Chan, Xin Yi; Duh, Elia J; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    Stem cell-based therapy is emerging as a promising approach for chronic diabetic wounds, but strategies for optimizing both cellular differentiation and delivery remain as major obstacles. Here, we study bioengineered vascularized constructs as a therapeutic modality for diabetic wound healing. We developed a wound model in immunodeficient rodent and treated it with engineered vascularized constructs from endothelial progenitors or early vascular cells-derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) reprogrammed either from healthy donor or type-1 diabetic patient. We found that all vascularized constructs expedited wound closure and reperfusion, with endothelial progenitor constructs having the earliest maximum closure rate followed closely by healthy and diabetic hiPSC-derivative constructs. This was accompanied by rapid granulation layer formation and regression in all vascularized construct groups. Macrophage infiltration into the hydrogel matrix occurred during early stages of healing, seeming to facilitate rapid neovascularization of the wound that could then better persist in the vascularized constructs. Blood perfusion of the human vasculature could be detected after three days, indicating rapid integration with the host vasculature. Overall, we propose a potential therapeutic strategy using allograft or autologous vascularized constructs to treat type-1 diabetic wounds. This approach highlights the unprecedented prospects of designing patient-specific stem cell therapy. PMID:27328431

  9. Wound Healing Is Accelerated by Agonists of Adenosine A2 (Gα s-linked) Receptors

    Montesinos, M. Carmen; Gadangi, Pratap; Longaker, Michael; Sung, Joanne; Levine, Jamie; Nilsen, Diana; Reibman, Joan; Min LI; Jiang, Chuan-Kui; Hirschhorn, Rochelle; Recht, Phoebe A.; Ostad, Edward; Levin, Richard I.; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    1997-01-01

    The complete healing of wounds is the final step in a highly regulated response to injury. Although many of the molecular mediators and cellular events of healing are known, their manipulation for the enhancement and acceleration of wound closure has not proven practical as yet. We and others have established that adenosine is a potent regulator of the inflammatory response, which is a component of wound healing. We now report that ligation of the Gαs-linked adenosine receptors on the cells o...

  10. Biafine topical emulsion accelerates excisional and burn wound healing in mice.

    Krausz, Aimee E; Adler, Brandon L; Landriscina, Angelo; Rosen, Jamie M; Musaev, Tagai; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Friedman, Adam J

    2015-09-01

    Macrophages play a fundamental role in wound healing; therefore, employing a strategy that enhances macrophage recruitment would be ideal. It was previously suggested that the mechanism by which Biafine topical emulsion improves wound healing is via enhanced macrophage infiltration into the wound bed. The purpose of this study was to confirm this observation through gross and histologic assessments of wound healing using murine full-thickness excisional and burn wound models, and compare to common standards, Vaseline and silver sulfadiazine (SSD). Full-thickness excisional and burn wounds were created on two groups of 60 mice. In the excisional arm, mice were divided into untreated control, Biafine, and Vaseline groups. In the burn arm, mice were divided into untreated control, Biafine, and SSD groups. Daily treatments were administered and healing was measured over time. Wound tissue was excised and stained to appropriately visualize morphology, collagen, macrophages, and neutrophils. Collagen deposition was measured and cell counts were performed. Biafine enhanced wound healing in murine full-thickness excisional and burn wounds compared to control, and surpassed Vaseline and SSD in respective wound types. Biafine treatment accelerated wound closure clinically, with greater epidermal/dermal maturity, granulation tissue formation, and collagen quality and arrangement compared to other groups histologically. Biafine application was associated with greater macrophage and lower neutrophil infiltration at earlier stages of healing when compared to other study groups. In conclusion, Biafine can be considered an alternative topical therapy for full-thickness excisional and burn wounds, owing to its advantageous biologically based wound healing properties. PMID:25794496

  11. Acceleration of skin wound healing with tragacanth (Astragalus preparation: an experimental pilot study in rats.

    Ehsan Fayazzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gum tragacanth is a natural complex mixture of polysaccharides and alkaline minerals extracted from species of Astragalus plant, which is found widely in arid regions of the Middle East. In a pilot experimental study we examined the effects of its topical application on wound healing in ten albino adult male rats. Two similar parasagittal elliptical full-thickness wounds (control vs. test samples were created on the dorsum of each animal. Test group samples were fully covered by a thin layer of gum tragacanth daily. The extent of wound healing was evaluated by planimetric analysis on multiple occasions during the 10-day study period. On the 7th day of the study, the percent of wound closure was significantly higher in gum tragacanth-treated specimens compared to the control samples (87%±2% vs. 70%±4%, P<0.001. The majority of wounds in the test group were completely closed by the 10th day of the study. The difference in wound healing index measured by histological examination on day 10 of the study was also statistically meaningful between the two groups (0.624±0.097 vs. 0.255±0.063, P<0.05. The results of this study clearly showed the useful effects of topical application of gum tragacanth in acceleration of skin wound contraction and healing. More studies are encouraged to identify the implicating agents and precisely understand the mechanism by which they exert their wound healing effects.

  12. Carcinogenic Parasite Secretes Growth Factor That Accelerates Wound Healing and Potentially Promotes Neoplasia.

    Smout, Michael J; Sotillo, Javier; Laha, Thewarach; Papatpremsiri, Atiroch; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Pimenta, Rafael N; Chan, Lai Yue; Johnson, Michael S; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Giacomin, Paul R; Moran, Corey S; Golledge, Jonathan; Daly, Norelle; Sripa, Banchob; Mulvenna, Jason P; Brindley, Paul J; Loukas, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Infection with the human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini induces cancer of the bile ducts, cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Injury from feeding activities of this parasite within the human biliary tree causes extensive lesions, wounds that undergo protracted cycles of healing, and re-injury over years of chronic infection. We show that O. viverrini secreted proteins accelerated wound resolution in human cholangiocytes, an outcome that was compromised following silencing of expression of the fluke-derived gene encoding the granulin-like growth factor, Ov-GRN-1. Recombinant Ov-GRN-1 induced angiogenesis and accelerated mouse wound healing. Ov-GRN-1 was internalized by human cholangiocytes and induced gene and protein expression changes associated with wound healing and cancer pathways. Given the notable but seemingly paradoxical properties of liver fluke granulin in promoting not only wound healing but also a carcinogenic microenvironment, Ov-GRN-1 likely holds marked potential as a therapeutic wound-healing agent and as a vaccine against an infection-induced cancer of major public health significance in the developing world. PMID:26485648

  13. Combination of low level light therapy and nitrosyl-cobinamide accelerates wound healing.

    Spitler, Ryan; Ho, Hsiang; Norpetlian, Frederique; Kong, Xiangduo; Jiang, Jingjing; Yokomori, Kyoko; Andersen, Bogi; Boss, Gerry R; Berns, Michael W

    2015-05-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has numerous therapeutic benefits, including improving wound healing, but the precise mechanisms involved are not well established; in particular, the underlying role of cytochrome C oxidase (C-ox) as the primary photoacceptor and the associated biochemical mechanisms still require further investigation. We previously showed the nitric oxide (NO) donating drug nitrosyl-cobinamide (NO-Cbi) enhances wound healing through a cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase/ERK1/2 mechanism. Here, we show that the combination of LLLT and NO-Cbi markedly improves wound healing compared to either treatment alone. LLLT-enhanced wound healing proceeded through an electron transport chain-C-ox-dependent mechanism with a reduction of reactive oxygen species and increased adenosine triphosphate production. C-ox was validated as the primary photoacceptor by three observations: increased oxygen consumption, reduced wound healing in the presence of sodium azide, and disassociation of cyanide, a known C-ox ligand, following LLLT. We conclude that LLLT and NO-Cbi accelerate wound healing through two independent mechanisms, the electron transport chain-C-ox pathway and cGMP signaling, respectively, with both resulting in ERK1/2 activation. PMID:25562608

  14. Combination of low level light therapy and nitrosyl-cobinamide accelerates wound healing

    Spitler, Ryan; Ho, Hsiang; Norpetlian, Frederique; Kong, Xiangduo; Jiang, Jingjing; Yokomori, Kyoko; Andersen, Bogi; Boss, Gerry R.; Berns, Michael W.

    2015-05-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has numerous therapeutic benefits, including improving wound healing, but the precise mechanisms involved are not well established; in particular, the underlying role of cytochrome C oxidase (C-ox) as the primary photoacceptor and the associated biochemical mechanisms still require further investigation. We previously showed the nitric oxide (NO) donating drug nitrosyl-cobinamide (NO-Cbi) enhances wound healing through a cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase/ERK1/2 mechanism. Here, we show that the combination of LLLT and NO-Cbi markedly improves wound healing compared to either treatment alone. LLLT-enhanced wound healing proceeded through an electron transport chain-C-ox-dependent mechanism with a reduction of reactive oxygen species and increased adenosine triphosphate production. C-ox was validated as the primary photoacceptor by three observations: increased oxygen consumption, reduced wound healing in the presence of sodium azide, and disassociation of cyanide, a known C-ox ligand, following LLLT. We conclude that LLLT and NO-Cbi accelerate wound healing through two independent mechanisms, the electron transport chain-C-ox pathway and cGMP signaling, respectively, with both resulting in ERK1/2 activation.

  15. An electrospun scaffold loaded with anti-androgen receptor compound for accelerating wound healing

    Cassandra Chong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Current dermal regenerative scaffolds provide wound coverage, and structural support and guidance for tissue repair, but usually lack enough bio-signals needed for speeding up skin cell growth, migration, wound closure, and skin regeneration. In this study, an androgen receptor (AR inhibitor called ASC-J9 is used to demonstrate the concept and feasibility of fabricating drug-loaded scaffolds via electrospinning. Inhibition of androgen is known to promote skin wound healing. The novel ASC-J9 - loaded porous scaffold was fabricated for skin wound repair using electrospun fibers of collagen and polycaprolactone (PCL blend. Our preliminary results indicated that ASC-J9 - loaded scaffolds facilitated more efficient attachment and ingrowth of dermal fibroblasts, compared to the control collagen-PCL scaffold. A significant increase of cell proliferation was observed with the drug-loaded scaffold over a 28-day period. The drug-loaded scaffold also accelerated keratinocyte migration and wound closure in a contraction-inhibited mouse wound model over 21 days. The data indicated a sustained release of ASC-J9 from the scaffold and its potential to accelerate wound healing by promoting cell proliferation and migration over an extended period of time. More importantly, our results proved the concept and feasibility of fabricating drug-releasing or bioactive dermal scaffolds for more effective wound healing.

  16. Promotion of accelerated repair in a radiation impaired wound healing model in murine skin

    therapeutic modalities investigated were unable to counteract any radiation damage and promote acceleration of repair in this impaired wound healing model. (author)

  17. Adipose-derived Stromal Cells Overexpressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Accelerate Mouse Excisional Wound Healing

    Nauta, Allison; Seidel, Catharina; Deveza, Lorenzo; Montoro, Daniel; Grova, Monica; Ko, Sae Hee; Hyun, Jeong; Geoffrey C Gurtner; Longaker, Michael T.; Yang, Fan

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential to wound repair, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent factor to stimulate angiogenesis. Here, we examine the potential of VEGF-overexpressing adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) for accelerating wound healing using nonviral, biodegradable polymeric vectors. Mouse ASCs were transfected with DNA plasmid encoding VEGF or green fluorescent protein (GFP) using biodegradable poly (β-amino) esters (PBAE). Cells transfected using Lipofectamine 2000, a c...

  18. Combination of adrenomedullin with its binding protein accelerates cutaneous wound healing.

    Juan-Pablo Idrovo

    Full Text Available Cutaneous wound continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality in the setting of diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Despite advances in wound care management, there is still an unmet medical need exists for efficient therapy for cutaneous wound. Combined treatment of adrenomedullin (AM and its binding protein-1 (AMBP-1 is protective in various disease conditions. To examine the effect of the combination treatment of AM and AMBP-1 on cutaneous wound healing, full-thickness 2.0-cm diameter circular excision wounds were surgically created on the dorsum of rats, saline (vehicle or AM/AMBP-1 (96/320 μg kg BW was topically applied to the wound daily and wound size measured. At days 3, 7, and 14, skin samples were collected from the wound sites. AM/AMBP-1 treated group had significantly smaller wound surface area than the vehicle group over the 14-day time course. At day 3, AM/AMBP-1 promoted neutrophil infiltration (MPO, increased cytokine levels (IL-6 and TNF-α, angiogenesis (CD31, VEGF and TGFβ-1 and cell proliferation (Ki67. By day 7 and 14, AM/AMBP-1 treatment decreased MPO, followed by a rapid resolution of inflammation characterized by a decrease in cytokines. At the matured stage, AM/AMBP-1 treatment increased the alpha smooth muscle actin expression (mature blood vessels and Masson-Trichrome staining (collagen deposition along the granulation area, and increased MMP-9 and decreased MMP-2 mRNA expressions. TGFβ-1 mRNA levels in AM/AMBP-1 group were 5.3 times lower than those in the vehicle group. AM/AMBP-1 accelerated wound healing by promoting angiogenesis, collagen deposition and remodeling. Treatment also shortened the days to reach plateau for wound closure. Thus, AM/AMBP-1 may be further developed as a therapeutic for cutaneous wound healing.

  19. Young coconut juice can accelerate the healing process of cutaneous wounds

    Radenahmad Nisaudah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen has been reported to accelerate cutaneous wound healing. This research studies the effect of young coconut juice (YCJ, presumably containing estrogen-like substances, on cutaneous wound healing in ovairectomized rats. Methods Four groups of female rats (6 in each group were included in this study. These included sham-operated, ovariectomized (ovx, ovx receiving estradiol benzoate (EB injections intraperitoneally, and ovx receiving YCJ orally. Two equidistant 1-cm full-thickness skin incisional wounds were made two weeks after ovariectomy. The rats were sacrificed at the end of the third and the fourth week of the study, and their serum estradiol (E2 level was measured by chemiluminescent immunoassay. The skin was excised and examined in histological sections stained with H&E, and immunostained using anti-estrogen receptor (ER-α an ER-β antibodies. Results Wound healing was accelerated in ovx rats receiving YCJ, as compared to controls. This was associated with significantly higher density of immunostaining for ER-α an ER-β in keratinocytes, fibroblasts, white blood cells, fat cells, sebaceous gland, skeletal muscles, and hair shafts and follicles. This was also associated with thicker epidermis and dermis, but with thinner hypodermis. In addition, the number and size of immunoreactive hair follicles for both ER-α and ER-β were the highest in the ovx+YCJ group, as compared to the ovx+EB group. Conclusions This study demonstrates that YCJ has estrogen-like characteristics, which in turn seem to have beneficial effects on cutaneous wound healing.

  20. Sliver nanoparticles accelerate skin wound healing in mice (Mus musculus through suppression of innate immune system

    Mohammad Saeed Heydarnejad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: This study aimed to find the effects of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs (40 nm on skin wound healing in mice Mus musculus when innate immune system has been suppressed.   Materials and Methods: A group of 50 BALB/c mice of about 8 weeks (weighting 24.2±3.0 g were randomly divided into two groups: Ag-NPs and control group, each with 25 mice. Once a day at the same time, a volume of 50 microliters from the nanosilver solution (10ppm was applied to the wound bed in the Ag-NPs group while in the untreated (control group no nanosilver solution was used but the wound area was washed by a physiological solution. The experiment lasted for 14. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β, complement component C3, and two other immune system factors involving in inflammation, namely C-reactive protein (CRP and rheumatoid factor (RF in sera of both groups were assessed and then confirmed by complement CH50 level of the blood. Results: The results show that wound healing is a complex process involving coordinated interactions between diverse immunological and biological systems and that Ag-NPs significantly accelerated wound healing and reduce scar appearance through suppression of immune system as indicated by decreasing levels of all inflammatory factors measured in this study. Conclusion: Exposure of mice to Ag-NPs can result in significant changes in innate immune function at the molecular levels. The study improves our understanding of nanoparticle interaction with components of the immune system and suggests that Ag-NPs have strong anti-inflammatory effects on skin wound healing and reduce scarring.

  1. Expectation-induced placebo responses fail to accelerate wound healing in healthy volunteers: results from a prospective controlled experimental trial.

    Vits, Sabine; Dissemond, Joachim; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kriegler, Lisa; Körber, Andreas; Schedlowski, Manfred; Cesko, Elvir

    2015-12-01

    Placebo responses have been shown to affect the symptomatology of skin diseases. However, expectation-induced placebo effects on wound healing processes have not been investigated yet. We analysed whether subjects' expectation of receiving an active drug accelerates the healing process of experimentally induced wounds. In 22 healthy men (experimental group, n = 11; control group, n = 11) wounds were induced by ablative laser on both thighs. Using a deceptive paradigm, participants in the experimental group were informed that an innovative 'wound gel' was applied on one of the two wounds, whereas a 'non-active gel' was applied on the wound of the other thigh. In fact, both gels were identical hydrogels without any active components. A control group was informed to receive a non-active gel on both wounds. Progress in wound healing was documented via planimetry on days 1, 4 and 7 after wound induction. From day 9 onwards wound inspections were performed daily accompanied by a change of the dressing and a new application of the gel. No significant differences could be observed with regard to duration or process of wound healing, either by intraindividual or by interindividual comparisons. These data document no expectation-induced placebo effect on the healing process of experimentally induced wounds in healthy volunteers. PMID:24373522

  2. Drug loaded composite oxidized pectin and gelatin networks for accelerated wound healing.

    Tummalapalli, Mythili; Berthet, Morgane; Verrier, Bernard; Deopura, B L; Alam, M S; Gupta, Bhuvanesh

    2016-05-30

    Biocomposite interactive wound dressings have been designed and fabricated using oxidized pectin (OP), gelatin and nonwoven cotton fabric. Due to their inherent virtues of antimicrobial activity and cytocompatibility, these composite structures are capable of redirecting the healing cascade and influencing cell attachment and proliferation. A novel in situ reduction process has been followed to synthesize oxidized pectin-gelatin-nanosilver (OP-Gel-NS) flower like nanohydrocolloids. This encapsulation technology controls the diffusion and permeation of nanosilver into the surrounding biological tissues. Ciprofloxacin hydrochloride has also been incorporated into the OP-Gel matrix to produce OP-Gel-Cipro dressings. While OP-Gel-NS dressings exhibited 100% antimicrobial activity at extremely low loadings of 3.75μg/cm(2), OP-Gel-Cipro dressings were highly antimicrobial at 1% drug loading. While NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts proliferated remarkably well when cultured with OP-Gel and OP-Gel-Cipro dressings, OP-Gel-NS hindered cell growth and Bactigras(®) induced complete lysis. Full thickness excisional wounds were created on C57BL/6J mice and the wound healing potential of the OP-Gel-NS dressings led to accelerated healing within 12days, while OP-Gel-Cipro dressings healed wounds at a rate similar to that of Bactigras(®). Histological examination revealed that OP-Gel-NS and OP-Gel-Cipro treatment led to organized collagen deposition, neovascularization and nuclei migration, unlike Bactigras(®). Therefore, the OP-Gel-NS and OP-Gel-Cipro biocomposite dressings exhibiting good hydrophilicity, sustained antimicrobial nature, promote cell growth and proliferation, and lead to rapid healing, can be considered viable candidates for effective management. PMID:27063849

  3. Manganese superoxide dismutase expression in endothelial progenitor cells accelerates wound healing in diabetic mice

    Marrotte, Eric J.; Chen, Dan-Dan; Hakim, Jeffrey S.; Chen, Alex F.

    2010-01-01

    Amputation as a result of impaired wound healing is a serious complication of diabetes. Inadequate angiogenesis contributes to poor wound healing in diabetic patients. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) normally augment angiogenesis and wound repair but are functionally impaired in diabetics. Here we report that decreased expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in EPCs contributes to impaired would healing in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes. A decreased frequency of circulating...

  4. Electrospun tilapia collagen nanofibers accelerating wound healing via inducing keratinocytes proliferation and differentiation.

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Nanping; Xue, Yang; Ding, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Mo, Xiumei; Sun, Jiao

    2016-07-01

    The development of biomaterials with the ability to induce skin wound healing is a great challenge in biomedicine. In this study, tilapia skin collagen sponge and electrospun nanofibers were developed for wound dressing. The collagen sponge was composed of at least two α-peptides. It did not change the number of spleen-derived lymphocytes in BALB/c mice, the ratio of CD4(+)/CD8(+) lymphocytes, and the level of IgG or IgM in Sprague-Dawley rats. The tensile strength and contact angle of collagen nanofibers were 6.72±0.44MPa and 26.71±4.88°, respectively. They also had good thermal stability and swelling property. Furthermore, the nanofibers could significantly promote the proliferation of human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and stimulate epidermal differentiation through the up-regulated gene expression of involucrin, filaggrin, and type I transglutaminase in HaCaTs. The collagen nanofibers could also facilitate rat skin regeneration. In the present study, electrospun biomimetic tilapia skin collagen nanofibers were succesfully prepared, were proved to have good bioactivity and could accelerate rat wound healing rapidly and effectively. These biological effects might be attributed to the biomimic extracellular matrix structure and the multiple amino acids of the collagen nanofibers. Therefore, the cost-efficient tilapia collagen nanofibers could be used as novel wound dressing, meanwhile effectively avoiding the risk of transmitting animal disease in the future clinical apllication. PMID:27037778

  5. Effects of a low level laser on the acceleration of wound healing in rabbits

    Adel J Hussein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Tissue healing is a complex process that involves local and systemic responses. The use of low level laser therapy for wound healing has been shown to be effective in modulating both local and systemic response. Aim: The aim of this study was to accelerate and facilitate wound healing and reduce scar formation and wound contraction of an open wound by a low level laser. Materials & Methods: Twenty adult male rabbits, lepus cuniculus demostica, were brought from a Basrah local market and raised under proper management conditions in Basrah Veterinary Medicine College. The age of these rabbits ranged between 8-10 months and their body weight was 1.5-2 Kg. The rabbits were divided into two groups, group I (Control and group II (Treated. General anesthesia was provided by a mixture of Xylazine and Ketamine at a ratio of 1:0.5m intramuscularly. Selected sites were shaved, cleaned and disinfected. A wound of 4-cm length and 3-cm depth was made on the gluteal region; six hours later, the wound was treated with gallium aluminum and an arsenide diode laser with a power output of 10m at a wavelength of 890nm in pulsed nods, with a frequency of 20 KLTZ. The wound exposure to the laser was once a day at 890 nm wavelength for 5 minutes over a 7-day period. Histopathological study was obtained regarding the wound depth and edge of the skin on the 3 rd , 7 th and 14 th days. Results : The histopathological finding of group I at three days postoperative showed hemorrhage with inflammatory cell infiltration, mainly neutrophils as well as congested blood vessels in the gap. At seven days, the gap contained necrotized neutrophils together with hemolysis and granulation tissue under the dermis tissue. Hemolysis was seen between the muscle fibers. At 14 days, there was irregular fibrous connective tissue proliferation with congested blood vessels seen in the gap with mononuclear cell infiltration. In group II at three days postoperative, severe

  6. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    Guo, S; DiPietro, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutane...

  7. How wounds heal

    ... PA: Mosby Elsevier; 2010: chap. 7. Richardson M. Acute wounds: an overview of the physiological healing process. Nursing Times . 2004; 100(4): 50. Von Der Heyde RL, Evans RB. Wound classification ...

  8. Rapid Recruitment and Activation of Macrophages by Anti-Gal/α-Gal Liposome Interaction Accelerates Wound Healing

    Wigglesworth, Kim M.; Racki, Waldemar J.; Mishra, Rabinarayan; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva; Dale L Greiner; Galili, Uri

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages are pivotal in promoting wound healing. We hypothesized that topical application of liposomes with glycolipids that carry Gala1-3Galb1-4GlcNAc-R epitopes (α-gal liposomes) on wounds may accelerate the healing process by rapid recruitment and activation of macrophages in wounds. Immune complexes of the natural anti-Gal Ab (constituting ~1% of Ig in humans) bound to its ligand, the α-gal epitope on α-gal liposomes would induce local activation of complement and generation of complem...

  9. Diabetes and wound healing

    Svendsen, Rikke; Irakunda, Gloire; Knudsen List, Karoline Cecilie; Sønderstup-Jensen, Marie; Hölmich Rosca, Mette Maria

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a disease where the glucose level in the blood is high, due to either insulin resistance, impaired insulin sensitivity or no insulin production. The high glucose level causes several complications, one of them being an impaired wound healing process, which might lead to chronic wounds, ulcers. Several factors play a role in the development of ulcers, and recent research indicates that microRNA might play a significant role in skin development and wound healing. The purpose of this...

  10. Topical Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis Miller) Extract Does Not Accelerate the Oral Wound Healing in Rats.

    Coelho, Fernanda Hack; Salvadori, Gabriela; Rados, Pantelis Varvaki; Magnusson, Alessandra; Danilevicz, Chris Krebs; Meurer, Luise; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-07-01

    The effect of topical application of Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis Miller) extract was assessed on the healing of rat oral wounds in an in vivo model using 72 male Wistar rats divided into three groups (n = 24): control, placebo and Aloe Vera (0.5% extract hydroalcoholic). Traumatic ulcers were caused in the dorsum of the tongue using a 3-mm punch tool. The Aloe Vera and placebo group received two daily applications. The animals were sacrificed after 1, 5, 10 and 14 days. Clinical analysis (ulcer area and percentage of repair) and histopathological analysis (degree of re-epithelialization and inflammation) were performed. The comparison of the differences between scores based on group and experimental period, both in quantitative and semi-quantitative analyses, was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. The significance level was 5%. On day 1, all groups showed predominantly acute inflammatory infiltrate. On day 5, there was partial epithelialization and chronic inflammatory infiltrate. On the days 10 and 14 total repair of ulcers was observed. There was no significant difference between groups in the repair of mouth ulcers. It is concluded that treatment using Aloe Vera as an herbal formulation did not accelerate oral wound healing in rats. PMID:25891093

  11. Topical Application of Sadat-Habdan Mesenchymal Stimulating Peptide (SHMSP Accelerates Wound Healing in Diabetic Rabbits

    Abdulmohsen H. Al-Elq

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Diminished wound healing is a common problem in diabetic patients due to diminished angiogenesis. SHMSP was found to promote angiogenesis. The present study was carried out to examine the effect of this peptide in healing of wounds in diabetic rabbits. Materials and Methods. Twenty male New Zealand rabbits were used in this study. Diabetes mellitus was induced and the rabbits were randomly divided into two equal groups: control group and peptide group. A-full thickness punch biopsy was made to create a wound of about 10 mm on the right ears of all rabbits. Every day, the wound was cleaned with saline in control groups. In the peptide group, 15 mg of SHMSP was applied after cleaning. On day 15th, all animals were sacrificed, and the wounds were excised with a rim of 5 mm of normal surrounding tissue. Histo-pathological assessment of wound healing, inflammatory cell infiltration, blood vessel proliferation, and collagen deposition was performed. Results. There were no deaths among the groups. There was significant increase in wound healing, blood vessel proliferation and collagen deposition, and significant decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration in the peptide group compared to the control group. Conclusion. Topical application of SHMSP improves wound healing in diabetic rabbits.

  12. Cold plasma on full-thickness cutaneous wound accelerates healing through promoting inflammation, re-epithelialization and wound contraction

    Nasruddin; Nakajima, Yukari; Mukai, Kanae; Rahayu, Heni Setyowati Esti; NUR, MUHAMMAD; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Enomoto, Hiroshi; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Sugama, Junko; Nakatani, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    We investigated cold plasma effects on acute wounds of mice. The mice were classified into experimental and control groups. In the former, wounds were treated using cold plasma once daily for 1 min, and then covered with hydrocolloid dressing; wounds in the control were left to heal under hydrocolloid dressing. Daily evaluation was conducted for 15 days. General and specific staining was applied to evaluate re-epithelialization, neutrophil, macrophage, myofibroblast and transforming growth fa...

  13. Stress and Wound Healing

    Christian, Lisa M.; Graham, Jennifer E.; Padgett, David A.; Glaser, Ronald; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade it has become clear that stress can significantly slow wound healing: stressors ranging in magnitude and duration impair healing in humans and animals. For example, in humans, the chronic stress of caregiving as well as the relatively brief stress of academic examinations impedes healing. Similarly, restraint stress slows healing in mice. The interactive effects of glucocorticoids (e.g. cortisol and corticosterone) and proinflammatory cytokines [e.g. interleukin-1β (IL-1β...

  14. Combination of low level light therapy and nitrosyl-cobinamide accelerates wound healing

    Spitler, Ryan; Ho, Hsiang; Norpetlian, Frederique; Kong, Xiangduo; Jiang, Jingjing; Yokomori, Kyoko; Andersen, Bogi; Boss, Gerry R.; Berns, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has numerous therapeutic benefits, including improving wound healing, but the precise mechanisms involved are not well established; in particular, the underlying role of cytochrome C oxidase (C-ox) as the primary photoacceptor and the associated biochemical mechanisms still require further investigation. We previously showed the nitric oxide (NO) donating drug nitrosyl-cobinamide (NO-Cbi) enhances wound healing through a cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase/ERK1/2...

  15. Topical Application of Sadat-Habdan Mesenchymal Stimulating Peptide (SHMSP) Accelerates Wound Healing in Diabetic Rabbits

    Abdulmohsen H Al-Elq; Mir Sadat-Ali; Mohamed Elsharawy; Ibrahim Al-Habdan; Fatin Othman Al-Aqeel; Naim, Magda M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Diminished wound healing is a common problem in diabetic patients due to diminished angiogenesis. SHMSP was found to promote angiogenesis. The present study was carried out to examine the effect of this peptide in healing of wounds in diabetic rabbits. Materials and Methods. Twenty male New Zealand rabbits were used in this study. Diabetes mellitus was induced and the rabbits were randomly divided into two equal groups: control group and peptide group. A-full thickness punch biopsy...

  16. An electrospun scaffold loaded with anti-androgen receptor compound for accelerating wound healing

    Cassandra Chong; Yiwei Wang; Peter K. M. Maitz; Ulla Simanainen; Zhe Li

    2013-01-01

    Current dermal regenerative scaffolds provide wound coverage, and structural support and guidance for tissue repair, but usually lack enough bio-signals needed for speeding up skin cell growth, migration, wound closure, and skin regeneration. In this study, an androgen receptor (AR) inhibitor called ASC-J9 is used to demonstrate the concept and feasibility of fabricating drug-loaded scaffolds via electrospinning. Inhibition of androgen is known to promote skin wound healing. The novel ASC-J9 ...

  17. HGF Accelerates Wound Healing by Promoting the Dedifferentiation of Epidermal Cells through β1-Integrin/ILK Pathway

    Jin-Feng Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin wound healing is a critical and complex biological process after trauma. This process is activated by signaling pathways of both epithelial and nonepithelial cells, which release a myriad of different cytokines and growth factors. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF is a cytokine known to play multiple roles during the various stages of wound healing. This study evaluated the benefits of HGF on reepithelialization during wound healing and investigated its mechanisms of action. Gross and histological results showed that HGF significantly accelerated reepithelialization in diabetic (DB rats. HGF increased the expressions of the cell adhesion molecules β1-integrin and the cytoskeleton remodeling protein integrin-linked kinase (ILK in epidermal cells in vivo and in vitro. Silencing of ILK gene expression by RNA interference reduced expression of β1-integrin, ILK, and c-met in epidermal cells, concomitantly decreasing the proliferation and migration ability of epidermal cells. β1-Integrin can be an important maker of poorly differentiated epidermal cells. Therefore, these data demonstrate that epidermal cells become poorly differentiated state and regained some characteristics of epidermal stem cells under the role of HGF after wound. Taken together, the results provide evidence that HGF can accelerate reepithelialization in skin wound healing by dedifferentiation of epidermal cells in a manner related to the β1-integrin/ILK pathway.

  18. Exosomes derived from human adipose mensenchymal stem cells accelerates cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts.

    Hu, Li; Wang, Juan; Zhou, Xin; Xiong, Zehuan; Zhao, Jiajia; Yu, Ran; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Handong; Chen, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged healing and scar formation are two major challenges in the treatment of soft tissue trauma. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) play an important role in tissue regeneration, and recent studies have suggested that exosomes secreted by stem cells may contribute to paracrine signaling. In this study, we investigated the roles of ASCs-derived exosomes (ASCs-Exos) in cutaneous wound healing. We found that ASCs-Exos could be taken up and internalized by fibroblasts to stimulate cell migration, proliferation and collagen synthesis in a dose-dependent manner, with increased genes expression of N-cadherin, cyclin-1, PCNA and collagen I, III. In vivo tracing experiments demonstrated that ASCs-Exos can be recruited to soft tissue wound area in a mouse skin incision model and significantly accelerated cutaneous wound healing. Histological analysis showed increased collagen I and III production by systemic administration of exosomes in the early stage of wound healing, while in the late stage, exosomes might inhibit collagen expression to reduce scar formation. Collectively, our findings indicate that ASCs-Exos can facilitate cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts. Our results provide a new perspective and therapeutic strategy for the use of ASCs-Exos in soft tissue repair. PMID:27615560

  19. Human fibrocyte-derived exosomes accelerate wound healing in genetically diabetic mice.

    Geiger, Adolf; Walker, Audrey; Nissen, Erwin

    2015-11-13

    Diabetic ulcers represent a substantial societal and healthcare burden worldwide and scarcely respond to current treatment strategies. This study was addressed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of exosomes secreted by human circulating fibrocytes, a population of mesenchymal progenitors involved in normal wound healing via paracrine signaling. The exosomes released from cells sequentially stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor-β1, in the presence of fibroblast growth factor 2, did not show potential immunogenicity. These exosomes exhibited in-vitro proangiogenic properties, activated diabetic dermal fibroblasts, induced the migration and proliferation of diabetic keratinocytes, and accelerated wound closure in diabetic mice in vivo. Important components of the exosomal cargo were heat shock protein-90α, total and activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, proangiogenic (miR-126, miR-130a, miR-132) and anti-inflammatory (miR124a, miR-125b) microRNAs, and a microRNA regulating collagen deposition (miR-21). This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of the use of fibrocytes-derived exosomes for the treatment of diabetic ulcers. PMID:26454169

  20. A novel dimeric thymosin beta 4 with enhanced activities accelerates the rate of wound healing

    Xu TJ

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tian-Jiao Xu,1,2,* Qi Wang,1,* Xiao-Wen Ma,1 Zhen Zhang,3 Wei Zhang,1 Xiao-Chang Xue,1 Cun Zhang,1 Qiang Hao,1 Wei-Na Li,1 Ying-Qi Zhang,1 Meng Li11State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Biotechnology Center, School of Pharmacy, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China; 2The Institute of Medicine, Qiqihar Medical University, Qiqihar, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4 is a peptide with 43 amino acids that is critical for repair and remodeling tissues on the skin, eye, heart, and neural system following injury. To fully realize its utility as a treatment for disease caused by injury, the authors constructed a cost-effective novel Tβ4 dimer and demonstrated that it was better able to accelerate tissue repair than native Tβ4.Methods: A prokaryotic vector harboring two complete Tβ4 genes with a short linker was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. A pilot-scale fermentation (10 L was performed to produce engineered bacteria and the Tβ4 dimer was purified by one-step hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The activities of the Tβ4 dimer to promote endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and sprouting were assessed by tetramethylbenzidine (methylthiazol tetrazolium, trans-well, scratch, and tube formation assays. The ability to accelerate dermal healing was assessed on rats.Results: After fermentation, the Tβ4 dimer accounted for about 30% of all the bacteria proteins. The purity of the Tβ4 dimer reached 98% after hydrophobic interaction chromatography purification. An average of 562.4 mg/L Tβ4 dimer was acquired using a 10 L fermenter. In each assay, the dimeric Tβ4 exhibited enhanced activities compared with native Tβ4. Notably, the ability of the dimeric Tβ4 to promote cell migration was almost two times higher

  1. Moderate intensity physical training accelerates healing of full-thickness wounds in mice

    F.G. Zogaib

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical training influences the cells and mediators involved in skin wound healing. The objective of this study was to determine the changes induced by different intensities of physical training in mouse skin wound healing. Ninety male C57BL6 mice (8 weeks old, 20-25 g were randomized into three physical training groups: moderate (70% VO2max, high (80% VO2max, and strenuous intensity (90% VO2max. Animals trained on a motorized treadmill for 8 weeks (Elesion: physical training until the day of excisional lesion, N = 10 or 10 weeks (Eeuthan: physical training for 2 additional weeks after excisional lesion until euthanasia, N = 10, five times/week, for 45 min. Control groups (CG trained on the treadmill three times/week only for 5 min (N = 10. In the 8th week, mice were anesthetized, submitted to a dorsal full-thickness excisional wound of 1 cm², and sacrificed 14 days after wounding. Wound areas were measured 4, 7, and 14 days after wounding to evaluate contraction (d4, d7 and d14 and re-epithelialization (d14. Fragments of lesion and adjacent skin were processed and submitted to routine histological staining. Immunohistochemistry against alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA was performed. Moderate-intensity training (M until lesion (M/Elesion led to better wound closure 7 days after wounding compared to controls and M/Eeuthan (P < 0.05, and both moderate-intensity groups showed better re-epithelialization rates than controls (M/Elesion = 85.9%, M/Eeuthan = 96.4% and M/CG = 79.9%; P < 0.05. Sections of M/Elesion and M/Eeuthan groups stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Picrosirius red and α-SMA showed the most mature granulation tissues among all trained groups and controls. Thus, moderate-intensity physical training improves skin wound healing.

  2. Progress in corneal wound healing.

    Ljubimov, Alexander V; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2015-11-01

    Corneal wound healing is a complex process involving cell death, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Many similarities are observed in the healing processes of corneal epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells, as well as cell-specific differences. Corneal epithelial healing largely depends on limbal stem cells and remodeling of the basement membrane. During stromal healing, keratocytes get transformed to motile and contractile myofibroblasts largely due to activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) system. Endothelial cells heal mostly by migration and spreading, with cell proliferation playing a secondary role. In the last decade, many aspects of wound healing process in different parts of the cornea have been elucidated, and some new therapeutic approaches have emerged. The concept of limbal stem cells received rigorous experimental corroboration, with new markers uncovered and new treatment options including gene and microRNA therapy tested in experimental systems. Transplantation of limbal stem cell-enriched cultures for efficient re-epithelialization in stem cell deficiency and corneal injuries has become reality in clinical setting. Mediators and course of events during stromal healing have been detailed, and new treatment regimens including gene (decorin) and stem cell therapy for excessive healing have been designed. This is a very important advance given the popularity of various refractive surgeries entailing stromal wound healing. Successful surgical ways of replacing the diseased endothelium have been clinically tested, and new approaches to accelerate endothelial healing and suppress endothelial-mesenchymal transformation have been proposed including Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor eye drops and gene therapy to activate TGF-β inhibitor SMAD7. Promising new technologies with potential for corneal wound healing manipulation including microRNA, induced pluripotent stem cells to generate corneal

  3. Novel advancements in wound healing

    reza Ghaderi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining skin integrity is vital in humans and animals to protect the organisms against dehydration, bleeding, and ingress of microorganisms. In order to do this, in Man and other evolved animals a sophisticated mechanism of wound healing occurs. At first the gap is quickly filled with a thin layer of fibrinous exudate, re-epithelialized, and rapidly replaced by new matrix. It is obvious that the speed of wound healing depends upon many factors such as the size of the wound, blood supply to the area, presence or absence of foreign bodies and microorganisms, age, health and nutritional status of the patient of the patient. Acute and chronic wounds care has extremely changed in recent years. Recenly, some traditional medications honey and other herbal medications( and new procedures are available that can be used to accelerate the healing of skin wounds.In the present article the most novel advances made in wound care and management in recent years were reviewed.

  4. Phytochemicals in Wound Healing

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Sharad, Shashwat; Radha K. Maheshwari

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Traditional therapies, including the use of dietary components for wound healing and skin regeneration, are very common in Asian countries such as China and India. The increasing evidence of health-protective benefits of phytochemicals, components derived from plants is generating a lot of interest, warranting further scientific evaluation and mechanistic studies.

  5. Curcuma purpurascens BI. rhizome accelerates rat excisional wound healing: involvement of Hsp70/Bax proteins, antioxidant defense, and angiogenesis activity

    Rouhollahi E

    2015-10-01

    by downregulating Bax and upregulating Hsp70 protein at the wound site. The formation of new blood vessel was observed in Masson’s trichrome staining of wounds treated with HECP (100 and 200 mg/kg. In addition, HECP administration caused a significant surge in enzymatic antioxidant activities and a decline in lipid peroxidation.Conclusion: These findings suggested that HECP accelerated wound-healing process in rats via antioxidant activity, angiogenesis effect and anti-inflammatory responses involving Hsp70/Bax. Keywords: Zingiberaceae, wound closure, immunohistochemistry, antioxidant enzyme activity, inflammatory cells

  6. Propranolol attenuates hemorrhage and accelerates wound healing in severely burned adults

    Ali, Arham; Herndon, David N; Mamachen, Ashish; Hasan, Samir; Andersen, Clark R.; Grogans, Ro-Jon; Brewer, Jordan L.; Lee, Jong O; Heffernan, Jamie; Oscar E Suman; Finnerty, Celeste C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Propranolol, a nonselective β-blocker, exerts an indirect effect on the vasculature by leaving α-adrenergic receptors unopposed, resulting in peripheral vasoconstriction. We have previously shown that propranolol diminishes peripheral blood following burn injury by increasing vascular resistance. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether wound healing and perioperative hemodynamics are affected by propranolol administration in severely burned adults. Methods Sixty-nine...

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium accelerates skin wound healing: An in vitro study of fibroblast and keratinocyte scratch assays

    We have used in vitro scratch assays to examine the relative contribution of dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes in the wound repair process and to test the influence of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) secreted factors on both skin cell types. Scratch assays were established using single cell and co-cultures of L929 fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes, with wound closure monitored via time-lapse microscopy. Both in serum supplemented and serum free conditions, wound closure was faster in L929 fibroblast than HaCaT keratinocyte scratch assays, and in co-culture the L929 fibroblasts lead the way in closing the scratches. MSC-CM generated under serum free conditions significantly enhanced the wound closure rate of both skin cell types separately and in co-culture, whereas conditioned medium from L929 or HaCaT cultures had no significant effect. This enhancement of wound closure in the presence of MSC-CM was due to accelerated cell migration rather than increased cell proliferation. A number of wound healing mediators were identified in MSC-CM, including TGF-β1, the chemokines IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES, and collagen type I, fibronectin, SPARC and IGFBP-7. This study suggests that the trophic activity of MSC may play a role in skin wound closure by affecting both dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte migration, along with a contribution to the formation of extracellular matrix.

  8. Cell Therapy for Wound Healing

    You, Hi-Jin; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    In covering wounds, efforts should include utilization of the safest and least invasive methods with goals of achieving optimal functional and cosmetic outcome. The recent development of advanced wound healing technology has triggered the use of cells to improve wound healing conditions. The purpose of this review is to provide information on clinically available cell-based treatment options for healing of acute and chronic wounds. Compared with a variety of conventional methods, such as skin...

  9. Radiotherapy and wound healing.

    Devalia, Haresh L; Mansfield, Lucy

    2008-03-01

    This review article discusses basic radiation physics and effects of radiation on wounds. It examines various postulated hypothesis on the role of circulatory decrease and radiation-induced direct cellular damage. The new concept related to the radiation pathogenesis proposes that there is a cascade of cytokines initiated immediately after the radiation. Sustained activation of myofibroblasts in the wound accounts for its chronicity. Recent advances highlight that transforming growth factor beta1 is the master switch in pathogenesis of radiation fibrosis. This articles overviews its role and summarises the available evidences related to radiation damage. The goal of this article was to provide its modern understanding, as future research will concentrate on antagonising the effects of cytokines to promote wound healing. PMID:18081782

  10. Physics of Wound Healing I: Energy Considerations

    Apell, S Peter; Papazoglou, Elisabeth S; Pizziconi, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process with many components and interrelated processes on a microscopic level. This paper addresses a macroscopic view on wound healing based on an energy conservation argument coupled with a general scaling of the metabolic rate with body mass M as M^{\\gamma} where 0 <{\\gamma}<1. Our three main findings are 1) the wound healing rate peaks at a value determined by {\\gamma} alone, suggesting a concept of wound acceleration to monitor the status of a wound. 2) We find that the time-scale for wound healing is a factor 1/(1 -{\\gamma}) longer than the average internal timescale for producing new material filling the wound cavity in corresondence with that it usually takes weeks rather than days to heal a wound. 3) The model gives a prediction for the maximum wound mass which can be generated in terms of measurable quantities related to wound status. We compare our model predictions to experimental results for a range of different wound conditions (healthy, lean, diabetic and obses...

  11. PEDF promotes self-renewal of limbal stem cell and accelerates corneal epithelial wound healing.

    Ho, Tsung-Chuan; Chen, Show-Li; Wu, Ju-Yun; Ho, Mei-Ying; Chen, Lee-Jen; Hsieh, Jui-Wen; Cheng, Huey-Chuan; Tsao, Yeou-Ping

    2013-09-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cell (LSC) transplantation is a prevalent therapeutic method for patients with LSC deficiency. The maintenance of stem cell characteristics in the process of culture expansion is critical for the success of ocular surface reconstruction. Pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF) increased the numbers of holoclone in LSC monolayer culture and preserved the stemness of LSC in suspension culture by evidence of ΔNp63α, Bmi-1, and ABCG2 expression. BrdU pulse-labeling assay also demonstrated that PEDF stimulated LSCs proliferation. In air-lift culture of limbal equivalent, PEDF was capable of increasing the numbers of ΔNp63α-positive cells. The mitogenic effect of PEDF was found to be mediated by the phosphorylations of p38 MAPK and STAT3 in LSCs. Synthetic 44-mer PEDF (residues 78-121) was as effective as the full length PEDF in LSC expansion in suspension culture and limbal equivalent formation, as well as the activation of p38 MAPK and STAT3. In mice subjecting to mechanical removal of cornea epithelium, 44-mer PEDF facilitated corneal wound healing. Microscopically, 44-mer PEDF advanced the early proliferative response in limbus, increased the proliferation of ΔNp63α-positive cells both in limbus and in epithelial healing front, and assisted the repopulation of limbus in the late phase of wound healing. In conclusion, the capability of expanding LSC in cell culture and in animal indicates the potential of PEDF and its fragment (e.g., 44-mer PEDF) in ameliorating limbal stem cell deficiency; and their uses as therapeutics for treating corneal wound. PMID:23553951

  12. Inhibition of pathogenic bacterial growth on excision wound by green synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles leads to accelerated wound healing activity in Wistar Albino rats.

    Sankar, Renu; Baskaran, Athmanathan; Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian; Ravikumar, Vilwanathan

    2015-07-01

    An impaired wound healing is one of the major health related problem in diabetic and non-diabetic patients around the globe. The pathogenic bacteria play a predominant role in delayed wound healing, owing to interaction in the wound area. In our previous work we developed green chemistry mediated copper oxide nanoparticles using Ficus religiosa leaf extract. In the present study we make an attempt to evaluate the anti-bacterial, and wound healing activity of green synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles in male Wistar Albino rats. The agar well diffusion assay revealed copper oxide nanoparticles have substantial inhibition activity against human pathogenic strains such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella dysenteriae, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli, which were responsible for delayed wound healing process. Furthermore, the analyses results of wound closure, histopathology and protein profiling confirmed that the F. religiosa leaf extract tailored copper oxide nanoparticles have enhanced wound healing activity in Wistar Albino rats. PMID:26194977

  13. [Translation medicine in wound healing: successful cases and personal deliberation].

    Fu, Xiaobing

    2014-02-01

    Local wound care is the key step in wound management, and it is affected by many factors. The innovation and translation application of some new theories and skills may help accelerate local wound healing velocity and improve wound healing quality. In this paper, the translation medicine in wound healing, such as debridement, dressings, and tissue engineering products, are reviewed. In the meantime, personal consideration concerning their successful and future development is given. PMID:24684981

  14. WOUND HEALING IN DIABETIC ULCER

    Ida Bagus Putra Pramana; Ketut Putu Yasa

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of wound healing is a complex mechanism and involves a variety of cells. Injury is defined as a disruption of normal structure and function. Various types of growth factors and cytokines such as platelet derived growth factor and transforming growth factor beta involved in the mechanism of wound healing. There are four phases of wound healing mechanisms : hemostasis, inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling. Diabetic ulcers is one major complication, occurring in 15% of patie...

  15. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model.

    Tamaki, Naofumi; Orihuela-Campos, Rita Cristina; Fukui, Makoto; Ito, Hiro-O

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A circular excisional wound was created in the oral palatal region, and the wound healing process was observed. The rats were divided into two experimental groups in which either hydrogen-rich water or distilled water was consumed. In the drinking hydrogen-rich water, the palatal wound healing process was accelerated compared to that in the control group. As molecular hydrogen upregulated the Nrf2 pathway, systemic oxidative stresses were decreased by the activation of antioxidant activity. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich water intake reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoted the expression of healing-associated factors in rat palatal tissue. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich water intake exhibited multiple beneficial effects through activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oral administration of hydrogen-rich water benefits the wound healing process by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. PMID:26798423

  16. The acceleration of garlic (Allium sativum L ethanolic extract on gingival wound healing process in Wistar rats

    Indra Bramanti Ngatidjan Setyo Purwono

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum L is a medicinal plant traditionally used to relieve pain. Garlic’s active constituents, allicin and triacremonone, have been proven to have antibacterial and antiinflammatory activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of garlic ethanolic extract gel in gingival wound healing process of rats. Thirty male Wistar rats aged 10 weeks with with body weight 200-250 g were subjected in this study. Rats were divided randomly into five groups with six rats in each group. Group I as negative control was given sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (Na CMC base gel. Group II as positive control was given Benzydamine® gel and Group IV-V were given garlic ethanolic extract gel at dose of 20, 40 and 80%, respectively. Each group was subdivided into two sub groups of three rats according to the decapitation period which were 5th (D-5 and 7th (D-7 day after the garlic extract gel application. Excisional wounds using punch biopsy, 2.5 mm in diameter, were created at the mandibular labial gingiva between right and left incisor teeth of the rats. The garlic extract gel of each preparation dose was then applied on the wound three times a day, starting at 0 day until 7th day. The decapitation was conducted on the D-5 and D-7. Histological slides of wounded tissue were prepared. Epithelial thickness, new blood vessel, and number of fibroblast were examined. The results showed that the epithelial thickness of garlic ethanolic extract gel groups was significantly higher than control group (p<0.05, especially after 5thday application. However, the number of new blood vessels and the amount of fibroblast of those groups were not significantly higher than control group (p>0.05. In conclusion, topical application of garlic ethanolic extract gel accelerates the gingival wound healing process in rats by increasing epithelial thickness.     Keywords: garlic ethanolic extract - gingival wound healing - epithelium thickness

  17. Accelerated wound healing and anti-inflammatory effects of physically cross linked polyvinyl alcohol-chitosan hydrogel containing honey bee venom in diabetic rats.

    Amin, Mohamed A; Abdel-Raheem, Ihab T

    2014-08-01

    Diabetes is one of the leading causes of impaired wound healing. The objective of this study was to develop a bee venom-loaded wound dressing with an enhanced healing and anti-inflammatory effects to be examined in diabetic rats. Different preparations of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), chitosan (Chit) hydrogel matrix-based wound dressing containing bee venom (BV) were developed using freeze-thawing method. The mechanical properties such as gel fraction, swelling ratio, tensile strength, percentage of elongation and surface pH were determined. The pharmacological activities including wound healing and anti-inflammatory effects in addition to primary skin irritation and microbial penetration tests were evaluated. Moreover, hydroxyproline, glutathione and IL-6 levels were measured in the wound tissues of diabetic rats. The bee venom-loaded wound dressing composed of 10 % PVA, 0.6 % Chit and 4 % BV was more swellable, flexible and elastic than other formulations. Pharmacologically, the bee venom-loaded wound dressing that has the same previous composition showed accelerated healing of wounds made in diabetic rats compared to the control. Moreover, this bee venom-loaded wound dressing exhibited anti-inflammatory effect that is comparable to that of diclofenac gel, the standard anti-inflammatory drug. Simultaneously, wound tissues covered with this preparation displayed higher hydroxyproline and glutathione levels and lower IL-6 levels compared to control. Thus, the bee venom-loaded hydrogel composed of 10 % PVA, 0.6 % Chit and 4 % BV is a promising wound dressing with excellent forming and enhanced wound healing as well as anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:24293065

  18. Wound Healing Devices Brief Vignettes

    Anderson, Caesar A.; Hare, Marc A.; Perdrizet, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The demand for wound care therapies is increasing. New wound care products and devices are marketed at a dizzying rate. Practitioners must make informed decisions about the use of medical devices for wound healing therapy. This paper provides updated evidence and recommendations based on a review of recent publications.

  19. Hierarchically micro-patterned nanofibrous scaffolds with a nanosized bio-glass surface for accelerating wound healing

    Xu, He; Lv, Fang; Zhang, Yali; Yi, Zhengfang; Ke, Qinfei; Wu, Chengtie; Liu, Mingyao; Chang, Jiang

    2015-11-01

    A composite scaffold with a controlled micro-pattern, nano-sized fiber matrix and surface-modified nanobioglass component was successfully prepared for skin wound healing by combining the patterning electrospinning with pulsed laser deposition strategies, and the hierarchical micro/nano structures and nano-sized bioglass in the scaffolds could synergistically improve the efficiency and re-epithelialization of wound healing.A composite scaffold with a controlled micro-pattern, nano-sized fiber matrix and surface-modified nanobioglass component was successfully prepared for skin wound healing by combining the patterning electrospinning with pulsed laser deposition strategies, and the hierarchical micro/nano structures and nano-sized bioglass in the scaffolds could synergistically improve the efficiency and re-epithelialization of wound healing. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04802h

  20. Chemokines and diabetic wound healing.

    Ochoa, Oscar; Torres, Francis M; Shireman, Paula K

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines are critical for white blood cell recruitment to injured tissues and play an important role in normal wound healing processes. In contrast, impaired wound healing in diabetic patients is accompanied by decreased early inflammatory cell infiltration but persistence of neutrophils and macrophages in the chronic, nonhealing wounds. These changes in inflammatory cell recruitment occur in conjunction with alterations in chemokine and growth factor expression. In addition to leukocyte trafficking, many different cell types, including endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and keratinocytes, produce and respond to chemokines, and these interactions are altered in diabetic wounds. Thus, the chemokine system may have both direct and inflammatory-mediated effects on many different aspects of diabetic wound healing. The potential roles of chemokines and inflammatory or immune cells in nonhealing diabetic wounds, including impairments in growth factor expression, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix formation, and reepithelialization, are examined. PMID:18053419

  1. Loss of CAR promotes migration and proliferation of HaCaT cells, and accelerates wound healing in rats via Src-p38 MAPK pathway

    Su, Linlin; Fu, Lanqing; Li, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yue; Li, Zhenzhen; Wu, Xue; Li, Yan; Bai, Xiaozhi; Hu, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule mostly localized to cell-cell contacts in epithelial and endothelial cells. CAR is known to regulate tumor progression, however, its physiological role in keratinocyte migration and proliferation, two essential steps in re-epithelialization during wound healing, has less been investigated. Here we showed that CAR was predominantly expressed in the epidermis of human skin, CAR knockdown by RNAi significantly accelerated HaCaT cell migration and proliferation. In addition, knockdown of CAR in vitro increased p-Src, p-p38, and p-JNK protein levels; however, Src inhibitor PP2 prevented the increase of p-Src and p-p38 induced by CAR RNAi, but not p-JNK, and decelerated cell migration and proliferation. More intriguingly, in vivo CAR RNAi on the skin area surrounding the wounds on rat back visually accelerated wound healing and re-epithelialization process, while treatment with PP2 or p38 inhibitor SB203580 obviously inhibited these effects. By contrast, overexpressing CAR in HaCaT cells significantly decelerated cell migration and proliferation. Above results demonstrate that suppression of CAR could accelerate HaCaT cell migration and proliferation, and promote wound healing in rat skin, probably via Src-p38 MAPK pathway. CAR thus might serve as a novel therapeutic target for facilitating wound healing. PMID:26804208

  2. Chitosan Dermal Substitute and Chitosan Skin Substitute Contribute to Accelerated Full-Thickness Wound Healing in Irradiated Rats

    Abu Bakar Mohd Hilmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wounds with full-thickness skin loss are commonly managed by skin grafting. In the absence of a graft, reepithelialization is imperfect and leads to increased scar formation. Biomaterials can alter wound healing so that it produces more regenerative tissue and fewer scars. This current study use the new chitosan based biomaterial in full-thickness wound with impaired healing on rat model. Wounds were evaluated after being treated with a chitosan dermal substitute, a chitosan skin substitute, or duoderm CGF. Wounds treated with the chitosan skin substitute showed the most re-epithelialization (33.2 ± 2.8%, longest epithelial tongue (1.62 ± 0.13 mm, and shortest migratory tongue distance (7.11 ± 0.25 mm. The scar size of wounds treated with the chitosan dermal substitute (0.13 ± 0.02 cm and chitosan skin substitute (0.16 ± 0.05 cm were significantly decreased (P<0.05 compared with duoderm (0.45 ± 0.11 cm. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA expression on days 7, 14, and 21 revealed the presence of human hair follicle stem cells and fibroblasts that were incorporated into and surviving in the irradiated wound. We have proven that a chitosan dermal substitute and chitosan skin substitute are suitable for wound healing in full-thickness wounds that are impaired due to radiation.

  3. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Giles T. S. Kirby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials.

  4. What is New in Wound Healing?

    Kumar, Senthil; WONG, Peng Foo; LEAPER, David John

    2004-01-01

    Wound biology is complex. Wounds which were until recently seen only as defects in tissues are now increasingly interpreted in cellular and molecular terms. Growth factors, cytokines, proteases and adhesion molecules which participate in wound healing are discussed in this article. From a clinical perspective, conceptual shifts of importance, including moist wound healing, wound bed preparation and wound assessment, are presented. The frontiers of therapeutics employed in wound healing contin...

  5. Hemostatic and Wound Healing Properties of Chromolaena odorata Leaf Extract

    Seung Joon Baek; Wandee Gritsanapan; Kyung-Won Min; Jason Liggett; Xiaobo Zhang; Hataichanok Pandith

    2013-01-01

    Chromolaena odorata (L.) King and Robinson (Siam weed) extract has been used to stop bleeding and in wound healing in many tropical countries. However, its detailed mechanisms have not been elucidated. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanisms by which Siam weed extract (SWE) affected hemostatic and wound healing activities. SWE promoted Balb/c 3T3 fibroblast cell migration and proliferation. Subsequently, we found that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the accelerating wound healing enzyme,...

  6. Wound Healing Activity of Elaeis guineensis Leaf Extract Ointment

    Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Elaeis guineensis of the Arecaceae family is widely used in the traditional medicine of societies in West Africa for treating various ailments. To validate the ethnotherapeutic claims of the plant in skin diseases, wound healing activity was studied. The results showed that E. guineensis leaf extract had potent wound healing capacity as evident from the better wound closure (P < 0.05, improved tissue regeneration at the wound site, and supporting histopathological parameters pertaining to wound healing. Matrix metalloproteinases expression correlated well with the results thus confirming efficacy of E. guineensis in the treatment of the wound. E. guineensis accelerated wound healing in rats, thus supporting its traditional use. The result of this study suggested that, used efficiently, oil palm leaf extract is a renewable resource with wound healing properties.

  7. The Efficacy of Gelam Honey Dressing towards Excisional Wound Healing

    Mui Koon Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Honey is one of the oldest substances used in wound management. Efficacy of Gelam honey in wound healing was evaluated in this paper. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups of 24 rats each (untreated group, saline group, Intrasite Gel group, and Gelam honey group with 2 cm by 2 cm full thickness, excisional wound created on neck area. Wounds were dressed topically according to groups. Rats were sacrificed on days 1, 5, 10, and 15 of treatments. Wounds were then processed for macroscopic and histological observations. Gelam-honey-dressed wounds healed earlier (day 13 than untreated and saline treated groups, as did wounds treated with Intrasite Gel. Honey-treated wounds exhibited less scab and only thin scar formations. Histological features demonstrated positive effects of Gelam honey on the wounds. This paper showed that Gelam honey dressing on excisional wound accelerated the process of wound healing.

  8. Accelerated healing of diabetic wound using artificial dermis constructed with adipose stem cells and poly(L-glutamic acid)/chitosan scaffold

    SHEN Ting; PAN Zhi-gang; ZHOU Xiao; HONG Chao-yang

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetic wound is one of the most serious complications of diabetes mellitus.There are no significantly effective therapies for chronic non-healing diabetes ulcer so far.This study aimed to explore the feasibility of healing impaired wound using artificial dermis constructed with human adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) and poly(L-glutamic acid)/chitosan (PLGA/CS) scaffold in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.Methods ASCs were isolated from fresh human lipoaspirates and expanded ex vivo for three passages,and then cells were seeded onto PLGA/CS scaffold to form artificial dermis.Expression of VEGF and TGFβ1 by ASCs presented in artificial dermis was determined.The artificial dermis was transplanted to treat the 20 mm × 20 mm full-thickness cutaneous wound created on the back of diabetic mice.Wound treated with scaffold alone and without treatment,and wound in normal non-diabetic mice served as control.Results Cells growing within scaffold showed great proliferation potential,depositing abundant collagen matrix.Meanwhile,expression of VEGF and TGF-β1 by seeded ASCs maintained at a consistent high level.After treated with ASC based artificial dermis,diabetic wounds exhibited significantly higher healing rate compared with wounds treated with scaffold alone or without treatment.Histological examination also demonstrated an improvement in cutaneous restoration with matrix deposition and organization.Further quantitative analysis showed that there was a significant increase in dermis thickness and collagen content on artificial dermis treated wounds.Conclusion ASC/PLGA artificial dermis can effectively accelerate diabetic wound healing by promoting angiogenic growth factors and dermal collagen synthesis.

  9. Vasculogenic Cytokines in Wound Healing

    Victor W. Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds represent a growing healthcare burden that particularly afflicts aged, diabetic, vasculopathic, and obese patients. Studies have shown that nonhealing wounds are characterized by dysregulated cytokine networks that impair blood vessel formation. Two distinct forms of neovascularization have been described: vasculogenesis (driven by bone-marrow-derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells and angiogenesis (local endothelial cell sprouting from existing vasculature. Researchers have traditionally focused on angiogenesis but defects in vasculogenesis are increasingly recognized to impact diseases including wound healing. A more comprehensive understanding of vasculogenic cytokine networks may facilitate the development of novel strategies to treat recalcitrant wounds. Further, the clinical success of endothelial progenitor cell-based therapies will depend not only on the delivery of the cells themselves but also on the appropriate cytokine milieu to promote tissue regeneration. This paper will highlight major cytokines involved in vasculogenesis within the context of cutaneous wound healing.

  10. Current concepts in wound management and wound healing products.

    Davidson, Jacqueline R

    2015-05-01

    Current concepts in wound management are summarized. The emphasis is on selection of the contact layer of the bandage to promote a moist wound environment. Selection of an appropriate contact layer is based on the stage of wound healing and the amount of wound exudate. The contact layer can be used to promote autolytic debridement and enhance wound healing. PMID:25744144

  11. Polysaccharides-Rich Extract of Ganoderma lucidum (M.A. Curtis:Fr. P. Karst Accelerates Wound Healing in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Poh-Guat Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ganoderma lucidum (M.A. Curtis:Fr. P. Karst is a popular medicinal mushroom. Scientific reports had shown that the wound healing effects of G. lucidum were partly attributed to its rich polysaccharides. However, little attention has been paid to its potential effects on wounds associated with diabetes mellitus. In this study, we evaluated the wound healing activity of the hot aqueous extract of G. lucidum in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The extract of G. lucidum was standardised based on chemical contents (w/w of total polysaccharides (25.1%, ganoderic acid A (0.45%, and adenosine (0.069%. Six groups of six rats were experimentally wounded in the posterior neck region. Intrasite gel was used as a positive control and aqueous cream as the placebo. Topical application with 10% (w/w of mushroom extract-incorporated aqueous cream was more effective than that with Intrasite gel in terms of wound closure. The antioxidant activity in serum of rats treated with aqueous extract of G. lucidum was significantly higher; whereas the oxidative protein products and lipid damage were lower when compared to those of the controls. These findings strongly support the beneficial effects of standardised aqueous extract of G. lucidum in accelerating wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

  12. Polysaccharides-Rich Extract of Ganoderma lucidum (M.A. Curtis:Fr.) P. Karst Accelerates Wound Healing in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    Cheng, Poh-Guat; Phan, Chia-Wei; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2013-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (M.A. Curtis:Fr.) P. Karst is a popular medicinal mushroom. Scientific reports had shown that the wound healing effects of G. lucidum were partly attributed to its rich polysaccharides. However, little attention has been paid to its potential effects on wounds associated with diabetes mellitus. In this study, we evaluated the wound healing activity of the hot aqueous extract of G. lucidum in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The extract of G. lucidum was standardised based on chemical contents (w/w) of total polysaccharides (25.1%), ganoderic acid A (0.45%), and adenosine (0.069%). Six groups of six rats were experimentally wounded in the posterior neck region. Intrasite gel was used as a positive control and aqueous cream as the placebo. Topical application with 10% (w/w) of mushroom extract-incorporated aqueous cream was more effective than that with Intrasite gel in terms of wound closure. The antioxidant activity in serum of rats treated with aqueous extract of G. lucidum was significantly higher; whereas the oxidative protein products and lipid damage were lower when compared to those of the controls. These findings strongly support the beneficial effects of standardised aqueous extract of G. lucidum in accelerating wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. PMID:24348715

  13. Mesenchymal stromal cells form vascular tubes when placed in fibrin sealant and accelerate wound healing in vivo.

    Mendez, Julio J; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Sivarapatna, Amogh; Dimitrievska, Sashka; Shao, Zhen; Osuji, Chinedum O; Steinbacher, Derek M; Leffell, David J; Niklason, Laura E

    2015-02-01

    Non-healing, chronic wounds are a growing public health problem and may stem from insufficient angiogenesis in affected sites. Here, we have developed a fibrin formulation that allows adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ADSCs) to form tubular structures in vitro. The tubular structures express markers of endothelium, including CD31 and VE-Cadherin, as well as the pericyte marker NG2. The ability for the MSCs to form tubular structures within the fibrin gels was directly dependent on the stoichiometric ratios of thrombin and fibrinogen and the resulting gel concentration, as well as on the presence of bFGF. Fibrin gel formulations that varied in stiffness were tested. ADSCs that are embedded in a stiff fibrin formulation express VE-cadherin and CD31 as shown by PCR, FACS and immunostaining. Confocal imaging analysis demonstrated that tubular structures formed, containing visible lumens, in the stiff fibrin gels in vitro. There was also a difference in the amounts of bFGF secreted by ADSCs grown in the stiffer gels as compared to softer gels. Additionally, hAT-MSCs gave rise to perfusable vessels that were VE-cadherin positive after subcutaneous injection into mice, whereas the softer fibrin formulation containing ADSCs did not. The application of ADSCs delivered in the stiff fibrin gels allowed for the wounds to heal more quickly, as assessed by wound size, amount of granulation tissue and collagen content. Interestingly, following 5 days of healing, the ADSCs remained within the fibrin gel and did not integrate into the granulation tissue of healing wounds in vivo. These data show that ADSCs are able to form tubular structures within fibrin gels, and may also contribute to faster wound healing, as compared with no treatment or to wounds treated with fibrin gels devoid of ADSCs. PMID:25433608

  14. Ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and accelerates corneal epithelial wound healing.

    Zhou, Qingjun; Chen, Peng; Di, Guohu; Zhang, Yangyang; Wang, Yao; Qi, Xia; Duan, Haoyun; Xie, Lixin

    2015-05-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a well-known neuroprotective cytokine, has been found to play an important role in neurogenesis and functional regulations of neural stem cells. As one of the most innervated tissue, however, the role of CNTF in cornea epithelium remains unclear. This study was to explore the roles and mechanisms of CNTF in the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and wound healing of both normal and diabetic mouse corneal epithelium. In mice subjecting to mechanical removal of corneal epithelium, the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing were promoted by exogenous CNTF application, while delayed by CNTF neutralizing antibody. In cultured corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells, CNTF enhanced the colony-forming efficiency, stimulated the mitogenic proliferation, and upregulated the expression levels of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell-associated transcription factors. Furthermore, the promotion of CNTF on the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing was mediated by the activation of STAT3. Moreover, in diabetic mice, the content of CNTF in corneal epithelium decreased significantly when compared with that of normal mice, and the supplement of CNTF promoted the diabetic corneal epithelial wound healing, accompanied with the advanced activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and the regeneration of corneal nerve fibers. Thus, the capability of expanding corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and promoting corneal epithelial wound healing and nerve regeneration indicates the potential application of CNTF in ameliorating limbal stem cell deficiency and treating diabetic keratopathy. PMID:25546438

  15. Chemokine Regulation of Angiogenesis During Wound Healing

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Angiogenesis plays a critical role in wound healing. A defect in the formation of a neovasculature induces ulcer formation. One of the challenges faced by the clinician when devising strategies to promote healing of chronic wounds is the initiation of angiogenesis and the formation of a stable vasculature to support tissue regeneration. Understanding the molecular factors regulating angiogenesis during wound healing will lead to better therapies for healing chronic wounds.

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen and wound healing

    Sourabh Bhutani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is the use of 100% oxygen at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure. Today several approved applications and indications exist for HBOT. HBOT has been successfully used as adjunctive therapy for wound healing. Non-healing wounds such as diabetic and vascular insufficiency ulcers have been one major area of study for hyperbaric physicians where use of HBOT as an adjunct has been approved for use by way of various studies and trials. HBOT is also indicated for infected wounds like clostridial myonecrosis, necrotising soft tissue infections, Fournier′s gangrene, as also for traumatic wounds, crush injury, compartment syndrome, compromised skin grafts and flaps and thermal burns. Another major area of application of HBOT is radiation-induced wounds, specifically osteoradionecrosis of mandible, radiation cystitis and radiation proctitis. With the increase in availability of chambers across the country, and with increasing number of studies proving the benefits of adjunctive use for various kinds of wounds and other indications, HBOT should be considered in these situations as an essential part of the overall management strategy for the treating surgeon.

  17. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing. PMID:26611923

  18. An Immunomodulatory Protein (Ling Zhi-8 from a Ganoderma lucidum Induced Acceleration of Wound Healing in Rat Liver Tissues after Monopolar Electrosurgery

    Hao-Jan Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an immunomodulatory protein (Ling Zhi-8, LZ-8 on wound healing in rat liver tissues after monopolar electrosurgery. Animals were sacrificed for evaluations at 0, 3, 7, and 28 days postoperatively. It was found that the wound with the LZ-8 treatment significantly increases wound healing. Western blot analysis clearly indicated that the expression of NF-κB was decreased at 3, 7, and 28 days when liver tissues were treated with LZ-8. Moreover, caspase-3 activity of the liver tissue also significantly decreases at 7 and 28 days, respectively. DAPI staining and TUNEL assays revealed that only a minimal dispersion of NF-κB was found on the liver tissue treated with LZ-8 at day 7 as compared with day 3 and tissues without LZ-8 treatment. Similarly, apoptosis was decreased on liver tissues treated with LZ-8 at 7 days when compared to the control (monopolar electrosurgery tissues. Therefore, the analytical results demonstrated that LZ-8 induced acceleration of wound healing in rat liver tissues after monopolar electrosurgery.

  19. Treatment of diabetic mice with undenatured whey protein accelerates the wound healing process by enhancing the expression of MIP-1α, MIP-2, KC, CX3CL1 and TGF-β in wounded tissue

    Badr Gamal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuous diabetes-associated complications are a major source of immune system exhaustion and an increased incidence of infection. Diabetes can cause poor circulation in the feet, increasing the likelihood of ulcers forming when the skin is damaged and slowing the healing of the ulcers. Whey proteins (WPs enhance immunity during childhood and have a protective effect on some immune disorders. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of camel WP on the healing and closure of diabetic wounds in a streptozotocin (STZ-induced type I diabetic mouse model. Results Diabetic mice exhibited delayed wound closure characterized by a significant decrease in an anti-inflammatory cytokine (namely, IL-10 and a prolonged elevation of the levels of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in wound tissue. Moreover, aberrant expression of chemokines that regulate wound healing (MIP-1α, MIP-2, KC and CX3CL1 and growth factors (TGF-β were observed in the wound tissue of diabetic mice compared with control nondiabetic mice. Interestingly, compared with untreated diabetic mice, supplementation with WP significantly accelerated the closure of diabetic wounds by limiting inflammatory stimuli via the restoration of normal IL-10, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels. Most importantly, the supplementation of diabetic mice with WP significantly modulated the expression of MIP-1α, MIP-2, KC, CX3CL1 and TGF-β in wound tissue compared with untreated diabetic mice. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the benefits of WP supplementation for improving the healing and closure of diabetic wounds and restoring the immune response in diabetic mice.

  20. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers. PMID:26979353

  1. Advances in Wound Healing: A Review of Current Wound Healing Products

    Murphy, Patrick S.; Gregory R.D. Evans

    2012-01-01

    Successful wound care involves optimizing patient local and systemic conditions in conjunction with an ideal wound healing environment. Many different products have been developed to influence this wound environment to provide a pathogen-free, protected, and moist area for healing to occur. Newer products are currently being used to replace or augment various substrates in the wound healing cascade. This review of the current state of the art in wound-healing products looks at the latest appl...

  2. New trends in healing chronic wounds

    KREJSKOVÁ, Kamila

    2013-01-01

    Basic theoretical bases As a chronic wound is called a secondarily healing wound which despite adequate therapy does not tend to heal for a period of 6-9 weeks. The cause of the chronic wound occurrence and its transformation into an acute wound can be infection, influence of associated diseases, skin top layer microtraumatization or skin necrosis cavity. Among the most frequent types of chronic wounds there are aligned venous ulcerations, arterial rodent ulcers, decubitus ulcers and neuropat...

  3. Topical Insulin Accelerates Wound Healing in Diabetes by Enhancing the AKT and ERK Pathways: A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Maria H M Lima; Caricilli, Andréa M.; Lélia L de Abreu; Araújo, Eliana P.; Pelegrinelli, Fabiana F.; Thirone, Ana C. P.; Daniela M Tsukumo; Pessoa, Ana Flávia M.; dos Santos, Marinilce F.; de Moraes, Maria A.; Carvalheira, José B. C.; Velloso, Lício A.; Saad, Mario J. A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Wound healing is impaired in diabetes mellitus, but the mechanisms involved in this process are virtually unknown. Proteins belonging to the insulin signaling pathway respond to insulin in the skin of rats. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the regulation of the insulin signaling pathway in wound healing and skin repair of normal and diabetic rats, and, in parallel, the effect of a topical insulin cream on wound healing and on the activation of this pathway. ...

  4. Cryptotanshinone downregulates the profibrotic activities of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts and accelerates wound healing: A potential therapy for the reduction of skin scarring.

    Li, Yan; Shi, Shan; Gao, Jianxin; Han, Shichao; Wu, Xue; Jia, Yanhui; Su, Linlin; Shi, Jihong; Hu, Dahai

    2016-05-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HS) is a skin fibrotic disease that causes major clinically problematic symptoms. Cryptotanshinone (CT) is an important ingredient of Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge extract) that has been used to treat cardio-cerebral vascular diseases. Its clinical efficacy in HS remains unclear. To investigate whether CT can inhibit HS fibrosis, HS-derived fibroblastic cells (HSFs) were established and treated with or without CT. Type-collagen-I (Col1), type-collagen-III (Col3) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression were measured by western blot and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. HSFs migration and contraction were assessed with the scratch assay and the fibroblast-populated collagen lattice (FPCL) contraction assay, respectively. Wound healing in CT-treated Balb/c mice was assessed by immunohistochemical analysis of collagen expression and Masson's trichrome staining analysis of collagen deposition. CT treatment of HSFs down-regulated Col1, Col3 and α-SMA mRNA and protein expression, HSFs migration, and HSFs contraction, and improved FPCL architecture. In mice, CT treatment accelerated wound healing: the scar margins were narrow and there was less collagen deposition in the regenerated tissue. Thus, CT promotes wound healing and decreases excessive deposition of extracellular matrix components. CT may help to prevent and reduce scarring. PMID:27133042

  5. Chitosan as a starting material for wound healing applications.

    Patrulea, V; Ostafe, V; Borchard, G; Jordan, O

    2015-11-01

    Chitosan and its derivatives have attracted great attention due to their properties beneficial for application to wound healing. The main focus of the present review is to summarize studies involving chitosan and its derivatives, especially N,N,N-trimethyl-chitosan (TMC), N,O-carboxymethyl-chitosan (CMC) and O-carboxymethyl-N,N,N-trimethyl-chitosan (CMTMC), used to accelerate wound healing. Moreover, formulation strategies for chitosan and its derivatives, as well as their in vitro, in vivo and clinical applications in wound healing are described. PMID:26614560

  6. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    Kenneth C Klein; Somes Chandra Guha

    2014-01-01

    A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care. [1] It is a snapshot of a patient′s total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors. [2...

  7. Wound Healing Activity of Carallia brachiata Bark.

    Krishnaveni, B; Neeharika, V; Venkatesh, S; Padmavathy, R; Reddy, B Madhava

    2009-09-01

    The stem bark of Carallia brachiata was studied for wound healing activity. The bark was extracted with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol successively. All the extracts were screened for wound healing activity by excision and incision models in Wistar rats. The ethyl acetate and methanol extracts were found to possess significant wound healing activity. The extracts revealed the presence of sterols or triterpenoids, flavonoids, phenols, tannins, carbohydrates, fixed oils and fats. PMID:20502583

  8. Wound Healing Activity of Carallia brachiata Bark

    Krishnaveni, B.; V Neeharika; Venkatesh, S; R Padmavathy; Reddy, B. Madhava

    2009-01-01

    The stem bark of Carallia brachiata was studied for wound healing activity. The bark was extracted with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol successively. All the extracts were screened for wound healing activity by excision and incision models in Wistar rats. The ethyl acetate and methanol extracts were found to possess significant wound healing activity. The extracts revealed the presence of sterols or triterpenoids, flavonoids, phenols, tannins, carbohydrates, fixed oils and fats.

  9. Wound healing activity of Carallia brachiata bark

    Krishnaveni B

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The stem bark of Carallia brachiata was studied for wound healing activity. The bark was extracted with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol successively. All the extracts were screened for wound healing activity by excision and incision models in Wistar rats. The ethyl acetate and methanol extracts were found to possess significant wound healing activity. The extracts revealed the presence of sterols or triterpenoids, flavonoids, phenols, tannins, carbohydrates, fixed oils and fats.

  10. Bioelectrical Impedance Assessment of Wound Healing

    Lukaski, Henry C.; Moore, Micheal

    2012-01-01

    Objective assessment of wound healing is fundamental to evaluate therapeutic and nutritional interventions and to identify complications. Despite availability of many techniques to monitor wounds, there is a need for a safe, practical, accurate, and effective method. A new method is localized bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) that noninvasively provides information describing cellular changes that occur during healing and signal complications to wound healing. This article describes the ...

  11. Acceleration of wound healing in acute full-thickness skin wounds using a collagen-binding peptide with an affinity for MSCs

    Huili Wang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been accepted as a promising cell source in tissue repair and regeneration. However, the inability to enrich MSCs in target areas limits their wide application. As a result, it has been a major goal to induce MSCs to be abundantly and specifically recruited to the injury site. In this study, a peptide with a specific affinity for MSCs (E7 peptide was immobilized to a collagen scaffold via a collagen-binding domain (CBD to construct a functional collagen scaffold. In addition, the hypothesis that this method could recruit MSCs specifically was evaluated in a porcine model. In vivo investigations indicated that due to the immunoreaction, the CBD-MSC-peptide collagen scaffold enhanced MSC adhesion and infiltration and promoted wound healing. At day 7 after surgery, we found more infiltrating cells and capillaries in the Collagen/CBD-E7 peptide group compared to the Scaffold group. At day 14, 21 and 28, a faster healing process was observed in the Collagen/CBD-E7 peptide group, with significant differences compared with the other groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01. The results demonstrate the potential use of targeted therapy to rapidly heal skin wounds.

  12. Chitosan as a starting material for wound healing applications

    Patrulea, Viorica; Ostafe, V.; Borchard, Gerrit; Jordan, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan and its derivatives have attracted great attention due to their properties beneficial for application to wound healing. The main focus of the present review is to summarize studies involving chitosan and its derivatives, especially N,N,N-trimethyl-chitosan (TMC), N,O-carboxymethyl-chitosan (CMC) and O-carboxymethyl-N,N,N-trimethyl-chitosan (CMTMC), used to accelerate wound healing. Moreover, formulation strategies for chitosan and its derivatives, as well as their in vitro, in vivo a...

  13. Innate Defense Regulator Peptide 1018 in Wound Healing and Wound Infection

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Hirsch, Tobias; Schulte, Matthias;

    2012-01-01

    -1018 in vitro. Further, we investigated the efficacy of IDR-1018 in diabetic and non-diabetic wound healing models. In all experiments, IDR-1018 was compared to the human HDP LL-37 and HDP-derived wound healing peptide HB-107. IDR-1018 was significantly less cytotoxic in vitro as compared to either LL......-37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However, no...... significant differences in bacterial colonization were observed. Our investigation demonstrates that in addition to previously reported immunomodulatory activities IDR-1018 promotes wound healing independent of direct antibacterial activity. Interestingly, these effects were not observed in diabetic wounds...

  14. Current management of wound healing

    Gottrup, F; Karlsmark, T

    2009-01-01

    While the understanding of wound pathophysiology has progressed considerably over the past decades the improvements in clinical treatment has occurred to a minor degree. During the last years, however, new trends and initiatives have been launched, and we will continue to attain new information in...... the next decade. It is the hope that increasing parts of the new knowledge from basic wound healing research will be implemented in daily clinical practice. The development of new treatment products will also continue, and especially new technologies with combined types of dressing materials or...... dressing containing active substances will be accentuated. Further developments in the management structure and education will also continue and consensus of treatment guidelines, recommendations and organization models will hopefully be achieved....

  15. The effects of locally applied procaine on wound healing

    Arzu Akcal

    2015-02-01

    Materials and Methods: Thirty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing between 250 and 350 g were used. Two full thickness defects were made on two sides of the midline 1 cm away from midline. The skin wound areas were approxi- mately 1.5 cm and times; 1.5 cm. The animals were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1 (control group, n = 8, Group 2 (injection directly into the base of wound, n = 8, and Group 3 (injection into healthy skin around the peripheral margins of the wound, n = 8. Mechanical analyses of wound tensile strength of were evaluated in all groups. Results: Wound closure was first seen in Group 3 on day 14. Mean wound healing times were 18.25 days, 16.25 days, and 15.62 days, and mean tensile strength was 777.13 cN, 988.25 cN, and 1068.25 cN in the Groups 1, 2, and 3 respectively. Conclusions: Procaine did not cause any necrosis around the wound, did not retard wound healing, did not cause circu- lation deficiency, and did not reduce the breaking strength of the wound. Therefore, it can be safely used to reduce pain around the wound and to accelerate the healing process of slow-to-heal wounds. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(1.000: 41-45

  16. Polysaccharides-Rich Extract of Ganoderma lucidum (M.A. Curtis:Fr.) P. Karst Accelerates Wound Healing in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Poh-Guat Cheng; Chia-Wei Phan; Vikineswary Sabaratnam; Noorlidah Abdullah; Mahmood Ameen Abdulla; Umah Rani Kuppusamy

    2013-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (M.A. Curtis:Fr.) P. Karst is a popular medicinal mushroom. Scientific reports had shown that the wound healing effects of G. lucidum were partly attributed to its rich polysaccharides. However, little attention has been paid to its potential effects on wounds associated with diabetes mellitus. In this study, we evaluated the wound healing activity of the hot aqueous extract of G. lucidum in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The extract of G. lucidum was standardised bas...

  17. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model

    Naofumi Tamaki; Rita Cristina Orihuela-Campos; Makoto Fukui; Hiro-O Ito

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A cir...

  18. Wound healing and infection in surgery

    Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2012-01-01

    : The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved.......: The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved....

  19. Fibromodulin Enhances Angiogenesis during Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Zhong Zheng, PhD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Altogether, we demonstrated that in addition to reducing scar formation, FMOD also promotes angiogenesis. As blood vessels organize and regulate wound healing, its potent angiogenic properties will further expand the clinical application of FMOD for cutaneous healing of poorly vascularized wounds.

  20. Ultraviolet light and hyperpigmentation in healing wounds

    The concept of permanent hyperpigmentation in wounds following ultraviolet light exposure during the postoperative period has found a place in plastic surgical literature but has not been documented. This study evaluates the effect of ultraviolet light on healing wounds in paraplegics. It failed to confirm permanent alteration in pigmentation response to ultraviolet exposure and suggests that other factors are of greater importance in the development of hyperpigmentation in the healing wound

  1. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Giles T. S. Kirby; Stuart J. Mills; Cowin, Allison J.; Smith, Louise E.

    2015-01-01

    Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase...

  2. The external microenvironment of healing skin wounds

    Kruse, Carla R; Nuutila, Kristo; Lee, Cameron Cy;

    2015-01-01

    The skin wound microenvironment can be divided into two main components that influence healing: the external wound microenvironment, which is outside the wound surface; and the internal wound microenvironment, underneath the surface, to which the cells within the wound are exposed. Treatment...... methods that directly alter the features of the external wound microenvironment indirectly affect the internal wound microenvironment due to the exchange between the two compartments. In this review, we focus on the effects of temperature, pressure (positive and negative), hydration, gases (oxygen and...

  3. Biomarkers for wound healing and their evaluation.

    Patel, S; Maheshwari, A; Chandra, A

    2016-01-01

    A biological marker (biomarker) is a substance used as an indicator of biological state. Advances in genomics, proteomics and molecular pathology have generated many candidate biomarkers with potential clinical value. Research has identified several cellular events and mediators associated with wound healing that can serve as biomarkers. Macrophages, neutrophils, fibroblasts and platelets release cytokines molecules including TNF-α, interleukins (ILs) and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) holds the greatest importance. As a result, various white cells and connective tissue cells release both matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Studies have demonstrated that IL-1, IL-6, and MMPs, levels above normal, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio are often present in non-healing wounds. Clinical examination of wounds for these mediators could predict which wounds will heal and which will not, suggesting use of these chemicals as biomarkers of wound healing. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will alleviate the recuperating process of chronic, non-healing wounds. Finding a specific biomarker for wound healing status would be a breakthrough in this field and helping treat impaired wound healing. PMID:26762498

  4. NeutroPhase® in chronic non-healing wounds

    Crew, John; Varilla, Randell; Rocas, Thomas Allandale; Debabov, Dmitri; Wang, Lu; Najafi, Azar; Rani, Suriani Abdul; Najafi, Ramin (Ron); Anderson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds, such as venous stasis ulcers, diabetic ulcers, and pressure ulcers are serious unmet medical needs that affect a patient’s morbidity and mortality. Common pathogens observed in chronic non-healing wounds are Staphylococcus including MRSA, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Stenotrophomonas, and Serratia spp. Topical and systemically administered antibiotics do not adequately decrease the level of bacteria or the associated biofilm in chronic granulating wounds and the use of sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics can lead to resistant phenotypes. Furthermore, topical antiseptics may not be fully effective and can actually impede wound healing. We show 5 representative examples from our more than 30 clinical case studies using NeutroPhase® as an irrigation solution with chronic non-healing wounds with and without the technique of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). NeutroPhase® is pure 0.01% hypochlorous acid (i.e. >97% relative molar distribution of active chlorine species as HOCl) in a 0.9% saline solution at pH 4-5 and is stored in glass containers. NovaBay has three FDA cleared 510(k)s. Patients showed a profound improvement and marked accelerated rates of wound healing using NeutroPhase® with and without NPWT. NeutroPhase® was non-toxic to living tissues. PMID:23272294

  5. NeutroPhase(®) in chronic non-healing wounds.

    Crew, John; Varilla, Randell; Rocas, Thomas Allandale; Debabov, Dmitri; Wang, Lu; Najafi, Azar; Rani, Suriani Abdul; Najafi, Ramin Ron; Anderson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds, such as venous stasis ulcers, diabetic ulcers, and pressure ulcers are serious unmet medical needs that affect a patient's morbidity and mortality. Common pathogens observed in chronic non-healing wounds are Staphylococcus including MRSA, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Stenotrophomonas, and Serratia spp. Topical and systemically administered antibiotics do not adequately decrease the level of bacteria or the associated biofilm in chronic granulating wounds and the use of sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics can lead to resistant phenotypes. Furthermore, topical antiseptics may not be fully effective and can actually impede wound healing. We show 5 representative examples from our more than 30 clinical case studies using NeutroPhase(®) as an irrigation solution with chronic non-healing wounds with and without the technique of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). NeutroPhase(®) is pure 0.01% hypochlorous acid (i.e. >97% relative molar distribution of active chlorine species as HOCl) in a 0.9% saline solution at pH 4-5 and is stored in glass containers. NovaBay has three FDA cleared 510(k)s. Patients showed a profound improvement and marked accelerated rates of wound healing using NeutroPhase(®) with and without NPWT. NeutroPhase(®) was non-toxic to living tissues. PMID:23272294

  6. General concept of wound healing, revisited

    Theddeus O.H. Prasetyono

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a transition of processes which is also recognized as one of the most complex processes in human physiology. Complex series of reactions and interactions among cells and mediators take place in the healing process of wound involving cellular and molecular events. The inflammatory phase is naturally intended to remove devitalized tissue and prevent invasive infection. The proliferative phase is characterized by the formation of granulation tissue within the wound bed, composed of new capillary network, fibroblast, and macrophages in a loose arrangement of supporting structure. This second phase lasts from day 8 to 21 after the injury is also the phase for epithelialisation. The natural period of proliferative phase is a reflection for us in treating wound to reach the goal which ultimately defines as closed wound. The final maturation phase is also characterized by the balancing between deposition of collagen and its degradation. There are at least three prerequisites which are ideal local conditions for the nature of wound to go on a normal process of healing i.e. 1 all tissue involved in the wound and surrounding should be vital, 2 no foreign bodies in the wound, and 3 free from excessive contamination/infection. The author formulated a step ladder of thinking in regards of healing intentions covering all acute and chronic wounds. Regarding the “hierarchy” of healing intention, the fi rst and ideal choice to heal wounds is by primary intention followed by tertiary intention and lastly the secondary intention. (Med J Indones 2009;18:206-14Key words: inflammatory mediator, epithelialisation, growth factor, wound healing

  7. Mast Cells Regulate Wound Healing in Diabetes.

    Tellechea, Ana; Leal, Ermelindo C; Kafanas, Antonios; Auster, Michael E; Kuchibhotla, Sarada; Ostrovsky, Yana; Tecilazich, Francesco; Baltzis, Dimitrios; Zheng, Yongjun; Carvalho, Eugénia; Zabolotny, Janice M; Weng, Zuyi; Petra, Anastasia; Patel, Arti; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; Theoharides, Theoharis C; Veves, Aristidis

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a severe complication of diabetes that lacks effective treatment. Mast cells (MCs) contribute to wound healing, but their role in diabetes skin complications is poorly understood. Here we show that the number of degranulated MCs is increased in unwounded forearm and foot skin of patients with diabetes and in unwounded dorsal skin of diabetic mice (P diabetic mice. Pretreatment with the MC degranulation inhibitor disodium cromoglycate rescues diabetes-associated wound-healing impairment in mice and shifts macrophages to the regenerative M2 phenotype (P diabetic mice deficient in MCs have delayed wound healing compared with their wild-type (WT) controls, implying that some MC mediator is needed for proper healing. MCs are a major source of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mouse skin, but the level of VEGF is reduced in diabetic mouse skin, and its release from human MCs is reduced in hyperglycemic conditions. Topical treatment with the MC trigger substance P does not affect wound healing in MC-deficient mice, but improves it in WT mice. In conclusion, the presence of nondegranulated MCs in unwounded skin is required for proper wound healing, and therapies inhibiting MC degranulation could improve wound healing in diabetes. PMID:27207516

  8. Wound healing of intestinal epithelial cells

    Shiho Konno

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelial cells (IECs form a selective permeability barrier separating luminal content from underlying tissues. Upon injury, the intestinal epithelium undergoes a wound healing process. Intestinal wound healing is dependent on the balance of three cellular events; restitution, proliferation, and differentiation of epithelial cells adjacent to the wounded area. Previous studies have shown that various regulatory peptides, including growth factors and cytokines, modulate intestinal epithelial wound healing. Recent studies have revealed that novel factors, which include toll-like receptors (TLRs, regulatory peptides, particular dietary factors, and some gastroprotective agents, also modulate intestinal epithelial wound repair. Among these factors, the activation of TLRs by commensal bacteria is suggested to play an essential role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis. Recent studies suggest that mutations and dysregulation of TLRs could be major contributing factors in the predisposition and perpetuation of inflammatory bowel disease. Additionally, studies have shown that specific signaling pathways are involved in IEC wound repair. In this review, we summarize the function of IECs, the process of intestinal epithelial wound healing, and the functions and mechanisms of the various factors that contribute to gut homeostasis and intestinal epithelial wound healing.

  9. Foxo1 Inhibits Diabetic Mucosal Wound Healing but Enhances Healing of Normoglycemic Wounds

    Xu, Fanxing; Othman, Badr; Lim, Jason; Batres, Angelika; Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Zhang, Chenying; Yi, Leah; Liu, Jian; Tian, Chen; Hameedaldeen, Alhassan; Alsadun, Sarah; Tarapore, Rohinton; Graves, Dana T.

    2014-01-01

    Re-epithelialization is an important part in mucosal wound healing. Surprisingly little is known about the impact of diabetes on the molecular events of mucosal healing. We examined the role of the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (Foxo1) in oral wounds of diabetic and normoglycemic mice with keratinocyte-specific Foxo1 deletion. Diabetic mucosal wounds had significantly delayed healing with reduced cell migration and proliferation. Foxo1 deletion rescued the negative impact of diabetes o...

  10. Cellular events and biomarkers of wound healing

    Shah Jumaat Mohd. Yussof

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have identified several of the cellular events associated with wound healing. Platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts primarily contribute to the process. They release cytokines including interleukins (ILs and TNF-α, and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF is perhaps the most important. The cytokines and growth factors manipulate the inflammatory phase of healing. Cytokines are chemotactic for white cells and fibroblasts, while the growth factors initiate fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation. Inflammation is followed by the proliferation of fibroblasts, which lay down the extracellular matrix. Simultaneously, various white cells and other connective tissue cells release both the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and the tissue inhibitors of these metalloproteinases (TIMPs. MMPs remove damaged structural proteins such as collagen, while the fibroblasts lay down fresh extracellular matrix proteins. Fluid collected from acute, healing wounds contains growth factors, and stimulates fibroblast proliferation, but fluid collected from chronic, nonhealing wounds does not. Fibroblasts from chronic wounds do not respond to chronic wound fluid, probably because the fibroblasts of these wounds have lost the receptors that respond to cytokines and growth factors. Nonhealing wounds contain high levels of IL1, IL6, and MMPs, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio. Clinical examination of wounds inconsistently predicts which wounds will heal when procedures like secondary closure are planned. Surgeons therefore hope that these chemicals can be used as biomarkers of wounds which have impaired ability to heal. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will help the healing of chronic, nonhealing wounds.

  11. Wound healing following radiation therapy: a review

    Radiation therapy may interrupt normal wound healing mechanisms. Changes in vasculature, effects on fibroblasts, and varying levels of regulatory growth factors result in the potential for altered wound healing whether radiation is given before or after surgery. Surgical factors, such as incision size, as well as radiation parameters, including dose and fractionation, are important considerations in developing overall treatment plans. Experience suggests that certain practical measures may diminish the risk of morbidity, and investigations are ongoing

  12. Mechanism of wound healing in annelids

    M Grdisa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available All animals possess some type of tissue repair mechanism. In some species, the capacity to repair tissues is limited to the healing of wounds, but others posses a striking repair capability to replace the entire organs. It has been reported that some mechanisms, namely extracellular matrix remodeling, appear to occur in most repair processes. However, it remains unclear to what extent the process of wound healing is similar to organ regeneration.

  13. Therapeutic touch for healing acute wounds

    O'Mathuna, Donal; Ashford, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Background Therapeutic Touch (TT) is an alternative therapy that has gained popularity over the past two decades for helping wounds to heal. Practitioners enter ameditative state and pass their hands above the patient’s body to find and correct any imbalances in the patient’s ’life energy’ or chi. Scientific instruments have been unable to detect this energy. The effect of TT on wound healing has been expounded in anecdotal publications. Objectives To identify and review all relevant...

  14. Innate defense regulator peptide 1018 in wound healing and wound infection.

    Lars Steinstraesser

    Full Text Available Innate defense regulators (IDRs are synthetic immunomodulatory versions of natural host defense peptides (HDP. IDRs mediate protection against bacterial challenge in the absence of direct antimicrobial activity, representing a novel approach to anti-infective and anti-inflammatory therapy. Previously, we reported that IDR-1018 selectively induced chemokine responses and suppressed pro-inflammatory responses. As there has been an increasing appreciation for the ability of HDPs to modulate complex immune processes, including wound healing, we characterized the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 in vitro. Further, we investigated the efficacy of IDR-1018 in diabetic and non-diabetic wound healing models. In all experiments, IDR-1018 was compared to the human HDP LL-37 and HDP-derived wound healing peptide HB-107. IDR-1018 was significantly less cytotoxic in vitro as compared to either LL-37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However, no significant differences in bacterial colonization were observed. Our investigation demonstrates that in addition to previously reported immunomodulatory activities IDR-1018 promotes wound healing independent of direct antibacterial activity. Interestingly, these effects were not observed in diabetic wounds. It is anticipated that the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 can be attributed to modulation of host immune pathways that are suppressed in diabetic wounds and provide further evidence of the multiple immunomodulatory activities of IDR-1018.

  15. Accelerated Wound Healing Device Using Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) Biostimulation to Support Long Term Human Exploration of Space Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Several cases of minor cuts in microgravity have been reported not being able to heal until return to Earth. While the exact cause for the slow healing in space...

  16. Non-healing wounds: the geriatric approach.

    Jaul, Efraim

    2009-01-01

    The most common types of non-healing wounds are four types: pressure ulcers, diabetic ulcers, ischemic ulcers and venous ulcers. Many of those wounds develop among the elderly, becoming non-healing to the extent that the patient may live with them all of his life, or even die because of them. Not enough attention is paid to the underlying contributing problems specific to the elderly patient. Those factors are physiologic (aging skin, immune state and atherosclerosis) and pathologic situation (diabetic disease, ischemia of leg). Therefore, the geriatric approach to a non-healing wound is comprehensive and multidisciplinary. Those including: patient's co-morbidities, functional state as measured by the activities of daily living (ADL) scale, nutritional status, social support, ethical beliefs and quality of life and not only the wound itself. Each discipline (the nursing staff, physician, dietitian, occupational, physical therapists and social worker) has its own task in preventing and treating such wounds. The ultimate goal therefore has been altered from healing of the wounds to symptom control, prevention of complications and to contribute to the patient's overall wellbeing. This review discusses all those items in a geriatric point of view, and how to deal with the non-healing wounds as a geriatric syndrome. PMID:18838182

  17. Curcumin as a wound healing agent.

    Akbik, Dania; Ghadiri, Maliheh; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Rohanizadeh, Ramin

    2014-10-22

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a popular Indian spice that has been used for centuries in herbal medicines for the treatment of a variety of ailments such as rheumatism, diabetic ulcers, anorexia, cough and sinusitis. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is the main curcuminoid present in turmeric and responsible for its yellow color. Curcumin has been shown to possess significant anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-mutagenic, anti-coagulant and anti-infective effects. Curcumin has also been shown to have significant wound healing properties. It acts on various stages of the natural wound healing process to hasten healing. This review summarizes and discusses recently published papers on the effects of curcumin on skin wound healing. The highlighted studies in the review provide evidence of the ability of curcumin to reduce the body's natural response to cutaneous wounds such as inflammation and oxidation. The recent literature on the wound healing properties of curcumin also provides evidence for its ability to enhance granulation tissue formation, collagen deposition, tissue remodeling and wound contraction. It has become evident that optimizing the topical application of curcumin through altering its formulation is essential to ensure the maximum therapeutical effects of curcumin on skin wounds. PMID:25200875

  18. Ephrin-B2 is differentially expressed in the intestinal epithelium in Crohn's disease and contributes to accelerated epithelial wound healing in vitro

    Christian Hafner; Michael Landthaler; Thomas Vogt; Stefanie Meyer; Thomas Langmann; Gerd Schmitz; Frauke Bataille; Ilja Hagen; Bernd Becker; Alexander Roesch; Gerhard Rogler

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their membrane bound receptor-like ligands, the ephrins, represent a bi-directional cell-cell contact signaling system that directs epithelial movements in development. The meaning of this system in the adult human gut is unknown. We investigated the Eph/ephrin mRNA expression in the intestinal epithelium of healthy controls and patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).METHODS: mRNA expression profiles of all Eph/ephrin family members in normal small intestine and colon were established by real-time RT-PCR. In addition, differential expression in IBD was investigated by cDNA array technology, and validated by both real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Potential effects of enhanced EphB/ephrin-B signaling were analyzed in an in vitro IEC-6 cell scratch wound model.RESULTS: Human adult intestinal mucosa exhibits a complex pattern of Eph receptors and ephrins. Beside the known prominent co-expression of EphA2 and ephrinA1,we found abundantly co-expressed EphB2 and ephrin-B1/2.Interestingly, cDNA array data, validated by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, showed upregulation of ephrin-B2 in both perilesional and lesional intestinal epithelial cells of IBD patients, suggesting a role in epithelial homeostasis. Stimulation of ephrin-B signaling in ephrinB1/2 expressing rat IEC-6-cells with recombinant EphB1Fc resulted in a significant dose-dependent acceleration of wound closure. Furthermore, fluorescence microscopy showed that EphB1-Fc induced coordinated migration of wound edge cells is associated with enhanced formation of lamellipodial protrusions into the wound, increased actin stress fiber assembly and production of laminin at the wound edge.CONCLUSION: EphB/ephrin-B signaling might represent a novel protective mechanism that promotes intestinal epithelial wound healing, with potential impact on epithelial restitution in IBD.

  19. Mechanoregulation of Wound Healing and Skin Homeostasis

    Joanna Rosińczuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic and clinical studies on mechanobiology of cells and tissues point to the importance of mechanical forces in the process of skin regeneration and wound healing. These studies result in the development of new therapies that use mechanical force which supports effective healing. A better understanding of mechanobiology will make it possible to develop biomaterials with appropriate physical and chemical properties used to treat poorly healing wounds. In addition, it will make it possible to design devices precisely controlling wound mechanics and to individualize a therapy depending on the type, size, and anatomical location of the wound in specific patients, which will increase the clinical efficiency of the therapy. Linking mechanobiology with the science of biomaterials and nanotechnology will enable in the near future precise interference in abnormal cell signaling responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and restoration of the biological balance. The objective of this study is to point to the importance of mechanobiology in regeneration of skin damage and wound healing. The study describes the influence of rigidity of extracellular matrix and special restrictions on cell physiology. The study also defines how and what mechanical changes influence tissue regeneration and wound healing. The influence of mechanical signals in the process of proliferation, differentiation, and skin regeneration is tagged in the study.

  20. Trends in Surgical Wound Healing

    Gottrup, F.

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of acute and chronic wound pathophysiology has progressed considerably over the past decades. Unfortunately, improvement in clinical practice has not followed suit, although new trends and developments have improved the outcome of wound treatment in many ways. This review focuses...... on promising clinical development in major wound problems in general and on postoperative infections in particular Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  1. Gallic Acid Promotes Wound Healing in Normal and Hyperglucidic Conditions.

    Yang, Dong Joo; Moh, Sang Hyun; Son, Dong Hwee; You, Seunghoon; Kinyua, Ann W; Ko, Chang Mann; Song, Miyoung; Yeo, Jinhee; Choi, Yun-Hee; Kim, Ki Woo

    2016-01-01

    Skin is the outermost layer of the human body that is constantly exposed to environmental stressors, such as UV radiation and toxic chemicals, and is susceptible to mechanical wounding and injury. The ability of the skin to repair injuries is paramount for survival and it is disrupted in a spectrum of disorders leading to skin pathologies. Diabetic patients often suffer from chronic, impaired wound healing, which facilitate bacterial infections and necessitate amputation. Here, we studied the effects of gallic acid (GA, 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid; a plant-derived polyphenolic compound) on would healing in normal and hyperglucidic conditions, to mimic diabetes, in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Our study reveals that GA is a potential antioxidant that directly upregulates the expression of antioxidant genes. In addition, GA accelerated cell migration of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in both normal and hyperglucidic conditions. Further, GA treatment activated factors known to be hallmarks of wound healing, such as focal adhesion kinases (FAK), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk), underpinning the beneficial role of GA in wound repair. Therefore, our results demonstrate that GA might be a viable wound healing agent and a potential intervention to treat wounds resulting from metabolic complications. PMID:27399667

  2. Gender affects skin wound healing in plasminogen deficient mice.

    Birgitte Rønø

    Full Text Available The fibrinolytic activity of plasmin plays a fundamental role in resolution of blood clots and clearance of extravascular deposited fibrin in damaged tissues. These vital functions of plasmin are exploited by malignant cells to accelerate tumor growth and facilitate metastases. Mice lacking functional plasmin thus display decreased tumor growth in a variety of cancer models. Interestingly, this role of plasmin has, in regard to skin cancer, been shown to be restricted to male mice. It remains to be clarified whether gender also affects other phenotypic characteristics of plasmin deficiency or if this gender effect is restricted to skin cancer. To investigate this, we tested the effect of gender on plasmin dependent immune cell migration, accumulation of hepatic fibrin depositions, skin composition, and skin wound healing. Gender did not affect immune cell migration or hepatic fibrin accumulation in neither wildtype nor plasmin deficient mice, and the existing differences in skin composition between males and females were unaffected by plasmin deficiency. In contrast, gender had a marked effect on the ability of plasmin deficient mice to heal skin wounds, which was seen as an accelerated wound closure in female versus male plasmin deficient mice. Further studies showed that this gender effect could not be reversed by ovariectomy, suggesting that female sex-hormones did not mediate the accelerated skin wound healing in plasmin deficient female mice. Histological examination of healed wounds revealed larger amounts of fibrotic scars in the provisional matrix of plasmin deficient male mice compared to female mice. These fibrotic scars correlated to an obstruction of cell infiltration of the granulation tissue, which is a prerequisite for wound healing. In conclusion, the presented data show that the gender dependent effect of plasmin deficiency is tissue specific and may be secondary to already established differences between genders, such as skin

  3. Nutrient support of the healing wound.

    Meyer, N A; Muller, M J; Herndon, D N

    1994-05-01

    Wound healing is a series of complex physicochemical interactions that require various micronutrients at every step. In the critically ill or severely injured patient, wound healing is impaired by the protein-catabolic, hypermetabolic response to stress. The hypothalamus responds to cytokine stimulation by increasing the thermoregulatory set-point and by augmenting elaboration of stress hormones (catecholamines, cortisol, and glucagon). In turn, the stress hormones induce thermogenic futile substrate cycling, lipolysis, and proteolysis. Increased glucose production results at the expense of skeletal muscle degradation, producing amino acid substrate for hepatic gluconeogenesis. Nutritional support of the hypermetabolic state is an essential part of ensuring efficient wound healing in these patients. Protein catabolism cannot be reversed by increased amino acid availability alone, due partly to a defect in amino acid transport. This defect can be reversed by anabolic agents, such as growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1. Growth hormone treatment dramatically improves wound healing in severely burned children. Supplementation with protein and vitamins, specifically arginine and vitamins A, B, and C, provides optimum nutrient support of the healing wound. PMID:7922445

  4. Vasculogenic Cytokines in Wound Healing

    Wong, Victor W.; Crawford, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wounds represent a growing healthcare burden that particularly afflicts aged, diabetic, vasculopathic, and obese patients. Studies have shown that nonhealing wounds are characterized by dysregulated cytokine networks that impair blood vessel formation. Two distinct forms of neovascularization have been described: vasculogenesis (driven by bone-marrow-derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells) and angiogenesis (local endothelial cell sprouting from existing vasculature). Researc...

  5. Augmentation of cutaneous wound healing by pharmacologic mobilization of endogenous bone marrow stem cells.

    Tolar, Jakub; McGrath, John A

    2014-09-01

    Novel therapeutic tools to accelerate wound healing would have a major impact on the overall burden of skin disease. Lin et al. demonstrate in mice that endogenous bone marrow stem cell mobilization, produced by a pharmacologic combination of AMD3100 and tacrolimus, leads to faster and better-quality wound healing, findings that have exciting potential for clinical translation. PMID:25120149

  6. “Sugar-coating wound repair: A review of FGF-10 and dermatan sulfate in wound healing and their potential application in burn wounds”

    Plichta, Jennifer K.; Katherine A Radek

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of patients suffer from burn injuries each year, yet few therapies have been developed to accelerate the wound healing process. Most fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) have been extensively evaluated, but only a few have been found to participate in wound healing. In particular, FGF-10 is robustly increased in the wound microenvironment following injury and has demonstrated some ability to promote wound healing in vitro and in vivo. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear carbohydrates t...

  7. Corneal wound healing after laser vision correction.

    Spadea, Leopoldo; Giammaria, Daniele; Trabucco, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Any trauma can trigger a cascade of responses in tissues, with the purpose of safeguarding the integrity of the organ affected by the trauma and of preventing possible damage to nearby organs. Subsequently, the body tries to restore the function of the organ affected. The introduction of the excimer laser for keratorefractive surgery has changed the treatment landscape for correcting refractive errors, such as myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. In recent years, with the increased understanding of the basic science of refractive errors, higher-order aberrations, biomechanics, and the biology of corneal wound healing, a reduction in the surgical complications of keratorefractive surgery has been achieved. The understanding of the cascade of events involved in the corneal wound healing process and the examination of how corneal wound healing influences corneal biomechanics and optics are crucial to improving the efficacy and safety of laser vision correction. PMID:26405102

  8. Hemostatic and Wound Healing Properties of Chromolaena odorata Leaf Extract.

    Pandith, Hataichanok; Zhang, Xiaobo; Liggett, Jason; Min, Kyung-Won; Gritsanapan, Wandee; Baek, Seung Joon

    2013-01-01

    Chromolaena odorata (L.) King and Robinson (Siam weed) extract has been used to stop bleeding and in wound healing in many tropical countries. However, its detailed mechanisms have not been elucidated. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanisms by which Siam weed extract (SWE) affected hemostatic and wound healing activities. SWE promoted Balb/c 3T3 fibroblast cell migration and proliferation. Subsequently, we found that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the accelerating wound healing enzyme, was increased at the transcriptional and translational levels by SWE treatments. The HO-1 promoter analyzed with luciferase assay was also increased by treatment of SWE in a dose-dependent manner. This induction may be mediated by several kinase pathways including MEK, p38MAPK, AKT, and JNK. Quantitative real-time PCR using undifferentiated promonocytic cell lines revealed that thromboxane synthase (TXS), a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet aggregator, was increased and MMP-9, an anti platelet aggregator, was decreased in the presence of SWE. Our studies presented that SWE accelerated hemostatic and wound healing activities by altering the expression of genes, including HO-1, TXS, and MMP-9. PMID:23984087

  9. Negative pressure wound therapy promotes vessel destabilization and maturation at various stages of wound healing and thus influences wound prognosis

    Ma, Zhanjun; SHOU, KANGQUAN; LI, ZONGHUAN; Jian, Chao; QI, BAIWEN; Yu, Aixi

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been observed to accelerate the wound healing process in humans through promoting angiogenesis. However, the potential biological effect and relevant molecular mechanisms, including microvessel destabilization, regression and endothelial cell proliferation in the early stage (1–3 days), and the neovascular stabilization and maturation in the later stage (7–15 days), have yet to be fully elucidated. The current study aimed to research the potential ef...

  10. Endogenous N-acyl taurines regulate skin wound healing.

    Sasso, Oscar; Pontis, Silvia; Armirotti, Andrea; Cardinali, Giorgia; Kovacs, Daniela; Migliore, Marco; Summa, Maria; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Picardo, Mauro; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-07-26

    The intracellular serine amidase, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), degrades a heterogeneous family of lipid-derived bioactive molecules that include amides of long-chain fatty acids with taurine [N-acyl-taurines (NATs)]. The physiological functions of the NATs are unknown. Here we show that genetic or pharmacological disruption of FAAH activity accelerates skin wound healing in mice and stimulates motogenesis of human keratinocytes and differentiation of human fibroblasts in primary cultures. Using untargeted and targeted lipidomics strategies, we identify two long-chain saturated NATs-N-tetracosanoyl-taurine [NAT(24:0)] and N-eicosanoyl-taurine [NAT(20:0)]-as primary substrates for FAAH in mouse skin, and show that the levels of these substances sharply decrease at the margins of a freshly inflicted wound to increase again as healing begins. Additionally, we demonstrate that local administration of synthetic NATs accelerates wound closure in mice and stimulates repair-associated responses in primary cultures of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, through a mechanism that involves tyrosine phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and an increase in intracellular calcium levels, under the permissive control of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 receptors. The results point to FAAH-regulated NAT signaling as an unprecedented lipid-based mechanism of wound-healing control in mammalian skin, which might be targeted for chronic wound therapy. PMID:27412859

  11. DIABETIC WOUND HEALING MANAGEMENT- A PEER REVIEW

    Harshavardhan Pathapati; T.E. Gopala Krishna Murthy; B. Ramanaiah; Davu Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder mainly impairs the body glucose utilization capacity due to this perforcely repressing the immuno-dysfunction (decreases chemotaxis, phagocytosis and intracellular killing actions) and collagen synthesis which are essential in wound debridement management of diabetic patients. Delayed wound healing is considered as one of the most repulsive disabling and costly complication of diabetes. People with diabetes have extenuated circulation, poor resista...

  12. Roles of Antioxidative Enzymes in Wound Healing

    Toshihiro Kurahashi; Junichi Fujii

    2015-01-01

    Since skin is the first barrier separating the body from the external environment, impaired wound healing can be life threatening to living organisms. Delayed healing processes are observed in animals under certain circumstances, such as advanced age, diabetes, and immunosuppression, but the underlying mechanisms of the abnormality remain elusive. Redox homeostasis is defined as the balance between the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants in which antioxidative enzymes pla...

  13. Cellular events and biomarkers of wound healing

    Shah Jumaat Mohd Yussof; Effat Omar; Pai, Dinker R.; Suneet Sood

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have identified several of the cellular events associated with wound healing. Platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts primarily contribute to the process. They release cytokines including interleukins (ILs) and TNF-α, and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is perhaps the most important. The cytokines and growth factors manipulate the inflammatory phase of healing. Cytokines are chemotactic for white cells and fibroblasts, while the growth f...

  14. [Enhance the connotation of establishment of wound healing department].

    Lu, Shu-liang

    2012-02-01

    Following the development of social economy, the acceleration of aging problem, and the changes in disease spectrum, the incidence of various chronic wound diseases increased significantly, and it has become one of the most frequently encountered diseases that affect the people's health. The contradiction between the increase of medical need of wound diseases and the insufficiency of the medical service in our country is becoming increasingly conspicuous. Wound healing department, as a new cross subject that has emerged as the times require, needs to be perfected in its diagnostic and treatment strategies and methods. At present time, how to explore the new theory and pathologic mechanism of various chronic wounds, in order to establish the clinical guidelines in diagnosis and treatment that conform to national conditions of our country, and to establish efficient clinical pathway and medical-seeking model have become serious challenges to the establishment of wound healing department in our country. Thus, it is imperative for us to enhance the connotation of establishment of wound healing department. For this purpose, this article mainly elaborates on three aspects, including "enriching traditional diagnostic system with new theory and new technology", "improving treatment effect by ameliorating traditional methods and absorbing new technology from relating subspecialty", "establishing a new medical-seeking model by applying digital technology and vertically integrating medical resources". PMID:22490530

  15. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    Kenneth C Klein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care. [1] It is a snapshot of a patient′s total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors. [2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT, as used at our institution (CAMC, and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society may vary widely from country to country and payment system. [3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons. [1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise.

  16. Alpha-Lipoic acid supplementation inhibits oxidative damage, accelerating chronic wound healing in patients undergoing hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    Alleva, R.; Nasole, E.; Di Donato, F.; Borghi, B.; Neužil, Jiří; Tomasetti, M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 333, č. 2 (2005), s. 404-410. ISSN 0006-291X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : alpha-lipoic acid * chronic wound * ROS Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.000, year: 2005

  17. Cold Temperature Delays Wound Healing in Postharvest Sugarbeet Roots.

    Fugate, Karen K; Ribeiro, Wellington S; Lulai, Edward C; Deckard, Edward L; Finger, Fernando L

    2016-01-01

    Storage temperature affects the rate and extent of wound-healing in a number of root and tuber crops. The effect of storage temperature on wound-healing in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots, however, is largely unknown. Wound-healing of sugarbeet roots was investigated using surface-abraded roots stored at 6 and 12°C for 28 days. Surface abrasions are common injuries of stored roots, and the storage temperatures used are typical of freshly harvested or rapidly cooled roots. Transpiration rate from the wounded surface and root weight loss were used to quantify wound healing. At 12°C, transpiration rate from the wounded surface declined within 14 days and wounded roots lost weight at a rate similar to unwounded controls. At 6°C, transpiration rate from the wounded surface did not decline in the 28 days after injury, and wounded roots lost 44% more weight than controls after 28 days storage. Melanin formation, lignification, and suberization occurred more rapidly at 12°C than at 6°C, and a continuous layer of lignified and suberized cells developed at 12°C, but not at 6°C. Examination of enzyme activities involved in melanin, lignin, and suberin formation indicated that differences in melanin formation at 6 and 12°C were related to differences in polyphenol oxidase activity, although no relationships between suberin or lignin formation and phenylalanine ammonia lyase or peroxidase activity were evident. Wound-induced respiration was initially greater at 12°C than at 6°C. However, with continued storage, respiration rate of wounded roots declined more rapidly at 12°C, and over 28 days, the increase in respiration due to injury was 52% greater in roots stored at 6°C than in roots stored at 12°C. The data indicate that storage at 6°C severely slowed and impaired wound-healing of surface-abraded sugarbeet roots relative to roots stored at 12°C and suggest that postharvest losses may be accelerated if freshly harvested roots are cooled too quickly. PMID

  18. Wound healing and hyper-hydration - a counter intuitive model

    Ousey, Karen; Cutting, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Winters seminal work in the 1960s relating to providing an optimal level of moisture to aid wound healing (granulation and re-epithelialisation) has been the single most effective advance in wound care over many decades. As such the development of advanced wound dressings that manage the fluidic wound environment have provided significant benefits in terms of healing to both patient and clinician. Although moist wound healing provides the guiding management principle confusion may arise betwe...

  19. Wound healing property of paroxetine in immunosuppressed albino rats

    Dwajani S; Ranjana Gurumurthy

    2013-01-01

    Background: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the wound healing activity of Paroxetine in different wound models in wistar rats and to study its effects on dexamethasone suppressed wound healing. Methods: For assessment of wound healing activity, excision and incision wound models were used. Group I was assigned as control, orally, Group II received Paroxetine, i.p, Group III received Dexamethasone intramuscularly (i.m) and Group IV received Dexamethasone i.m and Paroxetine, i....

  20. Cold temperature delays wound healing in postharvest sugarbeet roots

    Storage temperature affects the rate and extent of wound-healing in a number of root and tuber crops. The effect of storage temperature on wound-healing in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots, however, is largely unknown. Wound-healing of sugarbeet roots was investigated using surface-abraded roots s...

  1. Mucopolysaccharides from psyllium involved in wound healing.

    Westerhof, W; Das, P K; Middelkoop, E; Verschoor, J; Storey, L; Regnier, C

    2001-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharides derived from the husk of psyllium (Plantago ovata) have properties beneficial for wound cleansing and wound healing. Recent studies indicate that these mucopolysaccharides also limit scar formation. Our in vitro and in vivo studies aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved, e.g., fluid absorption, bacterial adherence and in vitro stimulatory effects on macrophages, which are pivotal in wound healing. The mucopolysaccharides contained in a sachet (Askina Cavity) or in a hydrocolloid mixture (Askina Hydro) were found to have a gradual and sustained absorbency over a period of 7 days, amounting to 4-6 times their weight in water. The swelling index was 9 mm after 312 h. Adherence of wound bacteria to the mucopolysaccharides started after 2 h and was more pronounced after 3 h. Semiquantitative measurements of bacterial adherence used centrifugation and subsequent optical density determinations of supernatant. These confirmed the strong adherence potential of psyllium particles. Lactic acid dehydrogenase staining of pretreated cultured human skin explants did not reveal toxicity of the mucopolysaccharides derived from psyllium husk. Langerhans' cell migration from the epidermis was negligible and interleukin-1 beta expression in the explants was not significant, supporting the very low allergenic potential of psyllium. The characteristics of mucopolysaccharide granulate derived from psyllium husk in Askina Cavity and Askina Hydro related to fluid absorption, bacterial adherence, biocompatibility, stimulation of macrophages, irritancy response and allergenicity showed an optimal profile, supporting the good clinical performance of wound healing products containing psyllium husk. PMID:11951574

  2. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    Nastuta, Andrei Vasile; Topala, Ionut; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Bd. Carol No. 11, 700506, Iasi (Romania); Grigoras, Constantin, E-mail: andrei.nastuta@uaic.ro [Physiopathology Department, Grigore T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115, Iasi (Romania)

    2011-03-16

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  3. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  4. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    Vasile Nastuta, Andrei; Topala, Ionut; Grigoras, Constantin; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe

    2011-03-01

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  5. The Role of Neuromediators and Innervation in Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    Ashrafi, Mohammed; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2016-06-15

    The skin is densely innervated with an intricate network of cutaneous nerves, neuromediators and specific receptors which influence a variety of physiological and disease processes. There is emerging evidence that cutaneous innervation may play an important role in mediating wound healing. This review aims to comprehensively examine the evidence that signifies the role of innervation during the overlapping stages of cutaneous wound healing. Numerous neuropeptides that are secreted by the sensory and autonomic nerve fibres play an essential part during the distinct phases of wound healing. Delayed wound healing in diabetes and fetal cutaneous regeneration following wounding further highlights the pivotal role skin innervation and its associated neuromediators play in wound healing. Understanding the mechanisms via which cutaneous innervation modulates wound healing in both the adult and fetus will provide opportunities to develop therapeutic devices which could manipulate skin innervation to aid wound healing. PMID:26676806

  6. The effects of Ankaferd, a hemostatic agent, on wound healing

    Sevgi Özbaysar Sezgin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: There have been a lot of topical and systemic agents to provide an ideal scar formation and to decrease the periods of wound healing process by affecting the factors of healing (inflammatory cells, thrombocytes, extracellular matrix etc.. In this study, we investigated the effects of Ankaferd on wound healing. Materials and Methods: Wounds were created with 8 mm punch biopsy knots on the back of 32 rats which were separated into 4 groups of 9 rats. No treatment was done in group D which was the control group while group A received topical Ankaferd treatment twice a day; group B treated with silver sulfadiazine twice a day, and group C put on base cream, which did not include any active agent, twice a day. The rats were followed for 15 days macroscopically and examined histopathologically on days 0., 3., 7., and 15. by taking biopsy specimens. Result: At the end of our study, it was detected that Ankaferd accelerated the healing process in comparison to control and base cream groups according to the macroscopic and histopathologic results. Additionally, similar to this situation, it was observed that the healing process in silver sulfadiazine group was faster than in control and base cream groups. Conclusion: More experimental and clinical studies in larger populations are needed to prove and confirm its efficacy.

  7. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing.

    Salamone, Joseph C; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E

    2016-06-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by Rochal Industries. The scientists/engineers at Rochal have participated in commercializing products in the field of ophthalmology, including rigid gas permeable contact lenses, soft hydrogel contact lenses, silicone hydrogel contact lenses, contact lens care solutions and cleaners, intraocular lens materials, intraocular controlled drug delivery, topical/intraocular anesthesia, and in the field of wound care, as non-stinging, spray-on liquid bandages to protect skin from moisture and body fluids and medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Current areas of entrepreneurial activity at Rochal Industries pertain to the development of new classes of biomaterials for wound healing, primarily in regard to microbial infection, chronic wound care, burn injuries and surgical procedures, with emphasis on innovation in product creation, which include cell-compatible substrates/scaffolds for wound healing, antimicrobial materials for opportunistic pathogens and biofilm reduction, necrotic wound debridement, scar remediation, treatment of diabetic ulcers, amelioration of pressure ulcers, amelioration of neuropathic pain and adjuvants for skin tissue substitutes. PMID:27047680

  8. A comprehensive review of advanced biopolymeric wound healing systems.

    Mayet, Naeema; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Lomas K; Tyagi, Charu; Du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2014-08-01

    Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process that involves the mediation of many initiators effective during the healing process such as cytokines, macrophages and fibroblasts. In addition, the defence mechanism of the body undergoes a step-by-step but continuous process known as the wound healing cascade to ensure optimal healing. Thus, when designing a wound healing system or dressing, it is pivotal that key factors such as optimal gaseous exchange, a moist wound environment, prevention of microbial activity and absorption of exudates are considered. A variety of wound dressings are available, however, not all meet the specific requirements of an ideal wound healing system to consider every aspect within the wound healing cascade. Recent research has focussed on the development of smart polymeric materials. Combining biopolymers that are crucial for wound healing may provide opportunities to synthesise matrices that are inductive to cells and that stimulate and trigger target cell responses crucial to the wound healing process. This review therefore outlines the processes involved in skin regeneration, optimal management and care required for wound treatment. It also assimilates, explores and discusses wound healing drug-delivery systems and nanotechnologies utilised for enhanced wound healing applications. PMID:24985412

  9. Water-filtered infrared A (wIRA) for the improvement of wound healing

    Hoffmann, Gerd

    2006-01-01

    Water-filtered infrared A (wIRA), a special form of heat radiation with a high tissue penetration and with a low thermal load to the skin surface, is able, through thermal and non-thermal effects, to essentially improve even energetically specific factors of the wound healing. This has been proven by measurements. wIRA can considerably alleviate the pain and accelerate the wound healing or improve a stagnating wound healing and diminish an elevated wound secretion and inflammation both in acu...

  10. Effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on healing of wound combined with local radiation injury

    Objective: To explore the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on healing of wounds combined with local skin irradiation injury. Methods: MSC were injected into the wound combined with local skin irradiation injury. Light and electron microscopy, fibroblast and capillary vessel counts, detection of hydroxyproline content in the wound and demonstration of MSC distribution by fluorescence examination were carried out. Results: MSC could accelerate the speed of wound healing. The number of fibroblasts and capillary vessels increased obviously during 5 to 20 days after wounding. Granular tissues were abundant in the wound, and the content of hydroxyproline increased in the MSC-treated groups. The fluorescence labelling showed that MSC could be found during 1 to 20 days after injection. Conclusion: MSC can remain alive in the wound for a long time and surely promote wound healing

  11. Wound healing Agents from Medicinal Plants:A Review

    ShivaniRawat; Ramandeep Singh; Preeti Thakur; SatinderKaur; AlokSemwal

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a review of plants identified from various ethno botanical surveys and folklore medicinal survey with Wound healing activity. Wound is defined as the disruption of the cellular and anatomic continuity of a tissue. Wound may be produced by physical, chemical, thermal, microbial or immunological insult to the tissues. The process of wound healing consists of integrated cellular and biochemical events leading to re-establishment of structural and functional integrity with regain of strength in injured tissues.This review discuss about Wound healing potential of plants, its botanicalname, Common name, family, part used and references, which are helpful for researcher to development new Wound healing formulations for human use.

  12. Muscle wound healing in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Schmidt, Jacob Günther; Andersen, Elisabeth Wreford; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær;

    2016-01-01

    We followed the progression of healing of deep excisional biopsy punch wounds over the course of 365 days in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by monitoring visual wound healing and gene expression in the healing muscle at regular intervals (1, 3, 7, 14, 38 and 100 days post-wounding). In...... until at least 100 days post-wounding. The gene expression patterns and histology reveal limited capacity for muscle regeneration in rainbow trout, and muscle texture analyses one year after wound infliction confirm that wounds heal with fibrosis. At 100 dpw epidermis had fully regenerated, and dermis...

  13. Quantifying cell behaviors during embryonic wound healing

    Mashburn, David; Ma, Xiaoyan; Crews, Sarah; Lynch, Holley; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2011-03-01

    During embryogenesis, internal forces induce motions in cells leading to widespread motion in tissues. We previously developed laser hole-drilling as a consistent, repeatable way to probe such epithelial mechanics. The initial recoil (less than 30s) gives information about physical properties (elasticity, force) of cells surrounding the wound, but the long-term healing process (tens of minutes) shows how cells adjust their behavior in response to stimuli. To study this biofeedback in many cells through time, we developed tools to quantify statistics of individual cells. By combining watershed segmentation with a powerful and efficient user interaction system, we overcome problems that arise in any automatic segmentation from poor image quality. We analyzed cell area, perimeter, aspect ratio, and orientation relative to wound for a wide variety of laser cuts in dorsal closure. We quantified statistics for different regions as well, i.e. cells near to and distant from the wound. Regional differences give a distribution of wound-induced changes, whose spatial localization provides clues into the physical/chemical signals that modulate the wound healing response. Supported by the Human Frontier Science Program (RGP0021/2007 C).

  14. Biologic Therapeutics and Molecular Profiling to Optimize Wound Healing

    Menke, Marie N.; Menke, Nathan B.; Boardman, Cecelia H.; Diegelmann, Robert F

    2008-01-01

    Non-healing wounds represent a significant cause of morbidity and mortality for a large portion of the adult population. Wounds that fail to heal are entrapped in a self-sustaining cycle of chronic inflammation leading to the destruction of the extracellular matrix. Among cancer patients, malnutrition, radiation, physical dehabilitation, chemotherapy, and the malignancy itself increase the likelihood of chronic wound formation, and these co-morbidity factors inhibit the normal wound healing p...

  15. Wound Healing Potential of Formulated Extract from Hibiscus Sabdariffa Calyx

    P F Builders; Kabele-Toge, B.; M Builders; Chindo, B. A.; Patricia A Anwunobi; Yetunde C Isimi

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing agents support the natural healing process, reduce trauma and likelihood of secondary infections and hasten wound closure. The wound healing activities of water in oil cream of the methanol extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae) was evaluated in rats with superficial skin excision wounds. Antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Echerichia coli were determined. The total flavonoid content, antioxidant properties and thin layer chr...

  16. Effect of Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation on Early Inflammatory Responses during Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Na-Young Park

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory response is considered the most important period that regulates the entire healing process. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, a class of linoleic acid positional and geometric isomers, is well known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that dietary CLA supplementation accelerates cutaneous wound healing by regulating antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. To investigate wound closure rates and inflammatory responses, we used a full-thickness excisional wound model after 2-week treatments with control, 0.5%, or 1% CLA-supplemented diet. Mice fed dietary CLA supplementation had reduced levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers. Moreover, the wound closure rate was improved significantly in mice fed a 1% CLA-supplemented diet during early stage of wound healing (inflammatory stage. We conclude that dietary CLA supplementation enhances the early stage of cutaneous wound healing as a result of modulating oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

  17. A REVIEW OF GENE AND STEM CELL THERAPY IN CUTANEOUS WOUND HEALING

    Branski, Ludwik K.; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2008-01-01

    Different therapies that modulate wound repair have been proposed over the last few decades. This article reviews the two emerging fields of gene and stem cell therapy in wound healing. Gene therapy, initially developed for treatment of congenital defects, is a new option for enhancing wound repair. In order to accelerate wound closure, genes encoding for growth factors or cytokines have showed the most potential. The majority of gene delivery systems are based on viral transfection, naked DN...

  18. Effect of Topical Rambutan Honey Pharmaceutical Grade on Oral Mucosa Wound Healing Based on Tissue Wound Closure and Fibroblasts Proliferation in vivo

    E.R. Yuslianti; B.M. Bachtiar; D.F. Suniarti; A.B. Sutjiatmo; Euis Reni Yuslianti; Boy M. Bachtiar; Dewi F. Suniarti; Afifah B. Sutjiatmo

    2015-01-01

    Rambutan honey often used for topical treatment sores in the oral, because it has a good taste and fragrant. The use of rambutan honey empirically efficacious in wound healing has been scientifically proven yet, as a product or stimulant that serves to accelerate oral mucosa wound healing is still very limited. This study aimed to analyze topical Rambutan Honey Pharmaceuticals Grades (RHPG) in influencing wound closure and stimulation of the fibroblasts proliferation in the oral mucosa wound ...

  19. Matrix metalloproteinases in impaired wound healing

    auf dem Keller, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Fabio Sabino, Ulrich auf dem Keller Institute of Molecular Health Sciences, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland Abstract: Cutaneous wound healing is a complex tissue response that requires a coordinated interplay of multiple cells in orchestrated biological processes to finally re-establish the skin's barrier function upon injury. Proteolytic enzymes and in particular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to all phas...

  20. Using Light to Treat Mucositis and Help Wounds Heal

    Ignatius, Robert W.; Martin, Todd S.; Kirk, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development is focusing on the use of controlled illumination by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to treat mucositis and to accelerate healing of wounds. The basic idea is to illuminate the affected area of a patient with light of an intensity, duration, and wavelength (or combination of wavelengths) chosen to produce a therapeutic effect while generating only a minimal amount of heat. This method of treatment was originally intended for treating the mucositis that is a common complication of chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer. It is now also under consideration as a means to accelerate the healing of wounds and possibly also to treat exposure to chemical and radioactive warfare agents. Radiation therapy and many chemotherapeutic drugs often damage the mucosal linings of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract, leading to mouth ulcers (oral mucositis), nausea, and diarrhea. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy is currently the standard of care for ischemic, hypoxic, infected, and otherwise slowlyhealing problem wounds, including those of oral mucositis. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy increases such cellular activities as collagen production and angiogenesis, leading to an increased rate of healing. Biostimulation by use of laser light has also been found to be effective in treating mucositis. For hyperbaricoxygen treatment, a patient must remain inside a hyperbaric chamber for an extended time. Laser treatment is limited by laser-wavelength capabilities and by narrowness of laser beams, and usually entails the generation of significant amounts of heat.

  1. Wound healing properties of Hylocereus undatus on diabetic rats.

    Perez G, R M; Vargas S, R; Ortiz H, Y D

    2005-08-01

    Aqueous extracts of leaves, rind, fruit pulp and flowers of Hylocereus undatus were studied for their wound healing properties. Wound healing effects were studied on incision (skin breaking strength), excision (percent wound contraction) and the nature of wound granulation tissues, which were removed on day 7 and the collagen, hexosamine, total proteins and DNA contents were determined, in addition to the rates of wound contraction and the period of epithelialization. In streptozotocin diabetic rats, where healing is delayed, topical applications of H. undatus produced increases in hydroxyproline, tensile strength, total proteins, DNA collagen content and better epithelization thereby facilitating healing. H. undatus had no hypoglycemic activity. PMID:16177967

  2. Evaluation of wound healing activity of Tecomaria capensis leaves

    Saini NK; Singhal M; Srivastava B

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential wound healing activity of Tecomaria capensis leaves extract (TCLE) using different models in rats.(a) Excision wound model,(b) Incision wound model and (c) Dead space wound model.TCLE (100,300,1 000 and 2 000 mg.kg-1) was given to rats to observe acute toxicity.No toxicity was found in animals till 14 days.TCLE 5% and 10% ointment were applied topically in excision wound model and incision wound model.TCLE 200 and 400 mg·kg-1 were given orally in dead space wound model.It improved healing in excision wound model,increased breaking strength of tissue in incision wound model,and increased granuloma breaking strength and hydroxyproline content in dead space wound model.These results showed that TCLE presents significant wound healing activity.

  3. Crosstalk between platelets and PBMC: New evidence in wound healing.

    Nami, Niccolò; Feci, Luca; Napoliello, Luca; Giordano, Antonio; Lorenzini, Sauro; Galeazzi, Mauro; Rubegni, Pietro; Fimiani, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-derived products have proven useful in accelerating healing processes and tissue regeneration. However, despite their widespread use in clinical practice, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been completely clarified. Recent studies show that interaction between platelet gel (PG) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) can result in activation of PBMC and production of several cytokines involved in wound healing and tissue repair. The aim of our study was to analyze whether crosstalk between platelets and PBMC can influence wound healing by modulating release of VEGF, bFGF and IL-10 by PBMC. Cultures of PBMC alone and co-cultures with autologous PG of 24 healthy volunteers were incubated under normoxia for 24 h. VEGF, bFGF and IL-10 concentration and expression were then analyzed in supernatants by ELISA and by real-time RT-PCR. We observed a down-regulation of VEGF and bFGF release and an up-regulation of IL-10 release in co-cultures of PBMC and PG. Platelets are not only important in the early stages of the healing process (clot formation, direct release of growth factors), but also can influence the whole process of tissue regeneration by modulating synthesis and release of VEGF, bFGF and IL-10 by PBMC. These effects could give platelets a new key role in the control of healing processes and provide insights into the clinical success of platelet-derived products in many medical fields. PMID:26030799

  4. Understanding the role of nutrition and wound healing.

    Stechmiller, Joyce K

    2010-02-01

    Optimal wound healing requires adequate nutrition. Nutrition deficiencies impede the normal processes that allow progression through stages of wound healing. Malnutrition has also been related to decreased wound tensile strength and increased infection rates. Malnourished patients can develop pressure ulcers, infections, and delayed wound healing that result in chronic nonhealing wounds. Chronic wounds are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality for many patients and therefore constitute a serious clinical concern. Because most patients with chronic skin ulcers suffer micronutrient status alterations and malnutrition to some degree, current nutrition therapies are aimed at correcting nutrition deficiencies responsible for delayed wound healing. This review provides current information on nutrition management for simple acute wounds and complex nonhealing wounds and offers some insights into innovative future treatments. PMID:20130158

  5. In vitro electrical-stimulated wound-healing chip for studying electric field-assisted wound-healing process

    Sun, Yung-Shin; Peng, Shih-Wei; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2012-01-01

    The wound-healing assay is an easy and economical way to quantify cell migration under diverse stimuli. Traditional assays such as scratch assays and barrier assays are widely and commonly used, but neither of them can represent the complicated condition when a wound occurs. It has been suggested that wound-healing is related to electric fields, which were found to regulate wound re-epithelialization. As a wound occurs, the disruption of epithelial barrier short-circuits the trans-epithelial ...

  6. Autologous keratinocyte suspension in platelet concentrate accelerates and enhances wound healing – a prospective randomized clinical trial on skin graft donor sites: platelet concentrate and keratinocytes on donor sites

    Guerid S.; Darwiche S.E.; Berger M.M.; Applegate L.A.; Benathan M.; Raffoul W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Wound healing involves complex mechanisms, which, if properly chaperoned, can enhance patient recovery. The abilities of platelets and keratinocytes may be harnessed in order to stimulate wound healing through the formation of platelet clots, the release of several growth factors and cytokines, and cell proliferation. The aim of the study was to test whether autologous keratinocyte suspensions in platelet concentrate would improve wound healing. The study was conducted at the Laus...

  7. The Four-Herb Chinese Medicine Formula Tuo-Li-Xiao-Du-San Accelerates Cutaneous Wound Healing in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats through Reducing Inflammation and Increasing Angiogenesis

    Xiao-na Zhang; Ze-jun Ma; Ying Wang; Yu-zhu Li; Bei Sun; Xin Guo; Cong-qing Pan; Li-ming Chen

    2015-01-01

    Impaired wound healing in diabetic patients is a serious complication that often leads to amputation or even death with limited effective treatments. Tuo-Li-Xiao-Du-San (TLXDS), a traditional Chinese medicine formula for refractory wounds, has been prescribed for nearly 400 years in China and shows good efficacy in promoting healing. In this study, we explored the effect of TLXDS on healing of diabetic wounds and investigated underlying mechanisms. Four weeks after intravenous injection of st...

  8. Additive enhancement of wound healing in diabetic mice by low level light and topical CoQ10

    Zhigang Mao; Wu, Jeffrey H.; Tingting Dong; Wu, Mei X.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes, a highly prevalent disease that affects 9.3% of Americans, often leads to severe complications and slow wound healing. Preclinical studies have suggested that low level light therapy (LLLT) can accelerate wound healing in diabetic subjects, but significant improvements must be made to overcome the absence of persuasive evidence for its clinical use. We demonstrate here that LLLT can be combined with topical Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) to heal wounds in diabetic mice significantly faster th...

  9. A Bilayer Engineered Skin Substitute for Wound Repair in an Irradiation-Impeded Healing Model on Rat

    Mohd Hilmi, A.B.; Hassan, Asma; Halim, Ahmad Sukari

    2015-01-01

    Objective: An engineered skin substitute is produced to accelerate wound healing by increasing the mechanical strength of the skin wound via high production of collagen bundles. During the remodeling stage of wound healing, collagen deposition is the most important event. The collagen deposition process may be altered by nutritional deficiency, diabetes mellitus, microbial infection, or radiation exposure, leading to impaired healing. This study describes the fabrication of an engineered bila...

  10. Effects of genistein on early-stage cutaneous wound healing

    Highlights: → We examine the effect of genistein on cutaneous wound healing. → Genistein enhanced wound closure during the early stage of wound healing. → These genistein effects on wound closure were induced by reduction of oxidative stress through increasing antioxidant capacity and modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. -- Abstract: Wound healing occurs in three sequential phases: hemostasis and inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Inflammation, the earliest phase, is considered a critical period for wound healing because immune cells remove damaged tissues, foreign debris, and remaining dead tissue. Wound healing would be delayed without inflammation, and this phase is affected by antioxidation capacity. Therefore, we hypothesized that genistein, which has an antioxidant effect, might modulate the wound healing process by altering the inflammatory response. After three days of acclimation, mice were divided into three groups: control, 0.025% genistein, and 0.1% genistein. After two weeks of an experimental diet, skin wounds were induced. Wounded skin areas were imaged, and the healing rate calculated. To measure lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme expression and activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, skin and liver tissues were harvested at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Genistein did not affect body weight. The rate of wound closure in mice fed genistein was significantly faster than in the control group during the early stage of wound healing, especially in first three days. Cu, Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expression in wound skin tissue in the 0.1% genistein group was lower than in the control group. However, CAT expression did not differ among groups. We also found that genistein modulated NF-κB and TNF-α expression during the early stage of wound healing. The genistein group had significantly lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the control group. These results suggest that genistein

  11. Effects of genistein on early-stage cutaneous wound healing

    Park, Eunkyo [Department of Home Economics Education, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Min [Research Institute of Health Sciences, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, In-Kyung [Department of Home Economics Education, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yunsook [Department of Foods and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Hyun, E-mail: jjhkim@cau.ac.kr [Department of Home Economics Education, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine the effect of genistein on cutaneous wound healing. {yields} Genistein enhanced wound closure during the early stage of wound healing. {yields} These genistein effects on wound closure were induced by reduction of oxidative stress through increasing antioxidant capacity and modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. -- Abstract: Wound healing occurs in three sequential phases: hemostasis and inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Inflammation, the earliest phase, is considered a critical period for wound healing because immune cells remove damaged tissues, foreign debris, and remaining dead tissue. Wound healing would be delayed without inflammation, and this phase is affected by antioxidation capacity. Therefore, we hypothesized that genistein, which has an antioxidant effect, might modulate the wound healing process by altering the inflammatory response. After three days of acclimation, mice were divided into three groups: control, 0.025% genistein, and 0.1% genistein. After two weeks of an experimental diet, skin wounds were induced. Wounded skin areas were imaged, and the healing rate calculated. To measure lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme expression and activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, skin and liver tissues were harvested at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Genistein did not affect body weight. The rate of wound closure in mice fed genistein was significantly faster than in the control group during the early stage of wound healing, especially in first three days. Cu, Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expression in wound skin tissue in the 0.1% genistein group was lower than in the control group. However, CAT expression did not differ among groups. We also found that genistein modulated NF-{kappa}B and TNF-{alpha} expression during the early stage of wound healing. The genistein group had significantly lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the control group. These results

  12. Complements and the Wound Healing Cascade: An Updated Review

    Hani Sinno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a complex pathway of regulated reactions and cellular infiltrates. The mechanisms at play have been thoroughly studied but there is much still to learn. The health care system in the USA alone spends on average 9 billion dollars annually on treating of wounds. To help reduce patient morbidity and mortality related to abnormal or prolonged skin healing, an updated review and understanding of wound healing is essential. Recent works have helped shape the multistep process in wound healing and introduced various growth factors that can augment this process. The complement cascade has been shown to have a role in inflammation and has only recently been shown to augment wound healing. In this review, we have outlined the biology of wound healing and discussed the use of growth factors and the role of complements in this intricate pathway.

  13. Tumors: Wounds that do not heal--Redux

    Dvorak, Harold F.

    2015-01-01

    Similarities between tumors and the inflammatory response associated with wound healing have been recognized for more than 150 years and continue to intrigue. Some years ago, based on our then recent discovery of vascular permeability factor (VPF)/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), I suggested that tumors behaved as wounds that do not heal. More particularly, I proposed that tumors co-opted the wound healing response in order to induce the stroma they required for maintenance and grow...

  14. Stem cells in skin wound healing: are we there yet?

    Cerqueira, M. T.; Pirraco, Rogério P.; Marques, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Cutaneous wound healing is a serious problem worldwide that affects patients with various wound types, resulting from burns, traumatic injuries, and diabetes. Despite the wide range of clinically available skin substitutes and the different therapeutic alternatives, delayed healing and scarring are often observed. Recent Advances: Stem cells have arisen as powerful tools to improve skin wound healing, due to features such as effective secretome, self-renewal, low immunogenicity,...

  15. Inflammation and Neuropeptides: The Connection in Diabetic Wound Healing

    Pradhan, Leena; Nabzdyk, Christoph; Andersen, Nicholas D.; LoGerfo, Frank W; Veves, Aristidis

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the interaction between neuropeptides and inflammatory mediators as it pertains to diabetic wound healing. Abnormal wound healing is a major complication of both type I and type II diabetes and is the most frequent cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputation. Wound healing requires the orchestrated integration of complex biological and molecular events. Inflammation, proliferation and migration of cells followed by angiogenesis and re-epithelization ...

  16. Substance P combined with epidermal stem cells promotes wound healing and nerve regeneration in diabetes mellitus

    Fei-bin Zhu; Xiang-jing Fang; De-wu Liu; Ying Shao; Hong-yan Zhang; Yan Peng; Qing-ling Zhong; Yong-tie Li; De-ming Liu

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous substance P accelerates wound healing in diabetes, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we established a rat model by intraperitoneally injecting streptozotocin. Four wounds (1.8 cm diameter) were drilled using a self-made punch onto the back, bilateral to the vertebral column, and then treated using amniotic membrane with epidermal stem cells and/or substance P around and in the middle of the wounds. With the combined treatment the wound-healing rate was 100% at 14 da...

  17. Regenerative Medicine: Charting a New Course in Wound Healing

    Geoffrey C Gurtner; Chapman, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Chronic wounds are a prevalent and costly problem in the United States. Improved treatments are needed to heal these wounds and prevent serious complications such as infection and amputation.

  18. Case 5: non-healing traumatic wound colonised with MRSA.

    Simon, Deborah

    2016-03-01

    A traumatic wound colonised with MRSA failed to respond to topical antimicrobial dressings. Following the combined use of octenilin Wound Gel and octenilin Wound Irrigation Solution, the MRSA was removed in 4 weeks, the necrotic tissue was debrided and the wound started healing. PMID:26949849

  19. SKIN-SET, WOUND-HEALING AND RELATED DEFECTS

    The physiology and biochemistry of resistance and susceptibility to tuber skinning/excoriation wounds, wound-healing and wound-related defects are of global importance because of the magnitude of the resulting food and financial losses. Wound related losses are difficult to determine because of the...

  20. Platelet-Rich Plasma Combined With Skin Substitute for Chronic Wound Healing: A Case Report

    Knox, Rebecca L.; Hunt, Allen R.; Collins, John C.; DeSmet, Marie; Barnes, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Contemporary management of chronic wounds focuses on improving natural healing and individualization of treatment. Incorporating multiple therapies has become increasingly common. Of interest are autologous growth factors, which are especially important in chronic wound healing and may contribute to tissue formation and epithelialization. Autologous platelet concentrate or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a concentration of at least five autologous growth factors and has been shown to accelerate...

  1. Chitin, Chitosan, and Its Derivatives for Wound Healing: Old and New Materials

    Kazuo Azuma; Ryotaro Izumi; Tomohiro Osaki; Shinsuke Ifuku; Minoru Morimoto; Hiroyuki Saimoto; Saburo Minami; Yoshiharu Okamoto

    2015-01-01

    Chitin (β-(1-4)-poly-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine) is widely distributed in nature and is the second most abundant polysaccharide after cellulose. It is often converted to its more deacetylated derivative, chitosan. Previously, many reports have indicated the accelerating effects of chitin, chitosan, and its derivatives on wound healing. More recently, chemically modified or nano-fibrous chitin and chitosan have been developed, and their effects on wound healing have been evaluated. In this review,...

  2. Effect of Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation on Early Inflammatory Responses during Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Yunsook Lim; Na-Young Park; Giuseppe Valacchi

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory response is considered the most important period that regulates the entire healing process. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a class of linoleic acid positional and geometric isomers, is well known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that dietary CLA supplementation accelerates cutaneous wound healing by regulating antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. To investigate wound closure rates and inflammatory responses, we used a full-thickness e...

  3. Stem Cell-Based Therapeutics to Improve Wound Healing

    Hu, Michael S.; Tripp Leavitt; Samir Malhotra; Dominik Duscher; Pollhammer, Michael S.; Walmsley, Graham G.; Zeshaan N. Maan; Alexander T. M. Cheung; Manfred Schmidt; Georg M. Huemer; Longaker, Michael T.; Peter Lorenz, H.

    2015-01-01

    Issues surrounding wound healing have garnered deep scientific interest as well as booming financial markets invested in novel wound therapies. Much progress has been made in the field, but it is unsurprising to find that recent successes reveal new challenges to be addressed. With regard to wound healing, large tissue deficits, recalcitrant wounds, and pathological scar formation remain but a few of our most pressing challenges. Stem cell-based therapies have been heralded as a promising mea...

  4. Wound Healing Activity of Elaeis guineensis Leaf Extract Ointment

    Sreenivasan Sasidharan; Lachimanan Yoga Latha; Selvarasoo Logeswaran

    2011-01-01

    Elaeis guineensis of the Arecaceae family is widely used in the traditional medicine of societies in West Africa for treating various ailments. To validate the ethnotherapeutic claims of the plant in skin diseases, wound healing activity was studied. The results showed that E. guineensis leaf extract had potent wound healing capacity as evident from the better wound closure (P < 0.05), improved tissue regeneration at the wound site, and supporting histopathological parameters pertaining to...

  5. Wound Healing in Patients With Impaired Kidney Function

    Maroz, Natallia; Simman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Renal impairment has long been known to affect wound healing. However, information on differences in the spectrum of wound healing depending on the type of renal insufficiency is limited. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may be observed with different wound types. On one hand, it follows acute traumatic conditions such as crush injury, burns, and post-surgical wounds, and on the other hand, it arises as simultaneous targeting of skin and kidneys by autoimmune-mediated vasculitis. Chronic kidney dise...

  6. Investigating the role of acellular skin substitutes in wound healing

    Greaves, Nicholas Stuart

    2015-01-01

    After cutaneous injury, wound healing is an essential process that restores barrier and homeostatic function to the skin. Tissue restoration is classically grouped into four phases, involving the dynamic, regulated and sequential interaction of multiple cells types, effector molecules and extracellular matrix components. While most wounds heal in a timely fashion, local and systemic factors can prevent wound resolution resulting in chronic wound formation. Examples include diabetic and venous...

  7. Platelet gel for healing cutaneous chronic wounds.

    Crovetti, Giovanni; Martinelli, Giovanna; Issi, Marwan; Barone, Marilde; Guizzardi, Marco; Campanati, Barbara; Moroni, Marco; Carabelli, Angelo

    2004-04-01

    Wound healing is a specific host immune response for restoration of tissue integrity. Experimental studies demonstrated an alteration of growth factors activity due to their reduced synthesis, increased degradation and inactivation. In wound healing platelets play an essential role since they are rich of alpha-granules growth factors (platelet derived growth factor--PDGF; transforming growth factor-beta--TGF-beta; vascular endothelial growth factor--VEGF). Topical use of platelet gel (PG), hemocomponent obtained from mix of activated platelets and cryoprecipitate, gives the exogenous and in situ adding of growth factors (GF). The hemocomponents are of autologous or homologous origin. We performed a technique based on: multicomponent apheretic procedure to obtain plasma rich platelet and cryoprecipitate; manual processing in an open system, in sterile environment, for gel activation. Every step of the gel synthesis was checked by a quality control programme. The therapeutic protocol consists of the once-weekly application of PG. Progressive reduction of the wound size, granulation tissue forming, wound bed detersion, regression and absence of infective processes were considered for evaluating clinical response to hemotherapy. 24 patients were enrolled. They had single or multiple cutaneous ulcers with different ethiopathogenesis. Only 3 patients could perform autologous withdrawal; in the others homologous hemocomponent were used, always considering suitability and traceability criteria for transfusional use of blood. Complete response was observed in 9 patients, 2 were subjected to cutaneous graft, 4 stopped treatment, 9 had partial response and are still receiving the treatment. In each case granulation tissue forming increased following to the first PG applications, while complete re-epithelization was obtained later. Pain was reduced in every treated patient. Topical haemotherapy with PG may be considered as an adjuvant treatment of a multidisciplinary process

  8. Healing effect of bioactive glass ointment on full-thickness skin wounds

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of bioactive glasses on cutaneous wound healing in both normal rats and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Bioactive glass ointments, prepared by mixing the sol–gel bioactive glass 58S (SGBG-58S), nanobioactive glass (NBG-58S) and the melt-derived 45S5 bioactive glass (45S5) powder with Vaseline (V) at 18% weight percentage, were used to heal full thickness excision wounds. Pure V was used as control in this study. Compared to SGBG-58S, NBG-58S consists of relatively dispersible nanoparticles with smaller size. The analysis of wound healing rate and wound healing time showed that bioactive glasses promoted wound healing. The ointments containing SGBG-58S and NBG-58S healed the wounds more quickly and efficiently than the ointment containing 45S5. Histological examination indicated that bioactive glasses promoted the proliferation of fibroblasts and growth of granulation tissue. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the production of two growth factors, VEGF and FGF2, which are beneficial to wound healing, was also stimulated during the healing process. Transmission electron microscope observations showed that fibroblasts in wounds treated with bioactive glasses contained more rough endoplasmic reticula and had formed new capillary microvessels by the seventh day. The effects of SGBG-58S and NBG-58S were better than those of 45S5. All results suggest that bioactive glasses, especially SGBG-58S and NBG-58S, can accelerate the recovery of skin wounds in both normal and diabetes-impaired healing models and have a great potential for use in wound repair in the future. (paper)

  9. Wound Healing Potential of Elaeis guineensis Jacq Leaves in an Infected Albino Rat Model

    Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethnopharmacological relevance:Elaeis guineensisJacq (Arecaceae is one of the plants that are central to the lives of traditional societies in West Africa. It has been reported as a traditional folkloric medicine for a variety of ailments. The plant leaves are also used in some parts of Africa for wound healing, but there are no scientific reports on any wound healing activity of the plant. Aim of the study:To investigate the effects of E. guineensis leaf on wound healing activity in rats. Methods: A phytochemical screening was done to determine the major phytochemicals in the extract. The antimicrobial activity of the extract was examined using the disk diffusion technique and broth dilution method. The wound healing activity of leaves of E. guineensiswas studied by incorporating the methanolic extract in yellow soft paraffin in concentration of 10% (w/w. Wound healing activity was studied by determining the percentage of wound closure, microbial examination of granulated skin tissue and histological analysis in the control and extract treated groups. Results: Phytochemical screening reveals the presence of tannins, alkaloids, steroids, saponins, terpenoids, and flavonoids in the extract. The extract showed significant activity against Candida albicans with an MIC value of 6.25 mg/mL. The results show that the E. guineensis extract has potent wound healing capacity, as evident from better wound closure, improved tissue regeneration at the wound site, and supporting histopathological parameters pertaining to wound healing. Assessment of granulation tissue every fourth day showed a significant reduction in microbial count. Conclusions: E. guineensis accelerated wound healing in rats, thus supporting this traditional use.

  10. Conditioned Media From Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Accelerates Healing in 3-Dimensional Skin Cultures.

    Collawn, Sherry S; Mobley, James A; Banerjee, N Sanjib; Chow, Louise T

    2016-04-01

    Wound healing involves a number of factors that results in the production of a "closed" wound. Studies have shown, in animal models, acceleration of wound healing with the addition of adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSC). The cause for the positive effect which these cells have on wound healing has not been elucidated. We have previously shown that addition of ADSC to the dermal equivalent in 3-dimensional skin cultures accelerates reepithelialization. We now demonstrate that conditioned media (CM) from cultured ADSC produced a similar rate of healing. This result suggests that a feedback from the 3-dimensional epithelial cultures to ADSC was not necessary to effect the accelerated reepithelialization. Mass spectrometry of CM from ADSC and primary human fibroblasts revealed differences in secretomes, some of which might have roles in the accelerating wound healing. Thus, the use of CM has provided some preliminary information on a possible mode of action. PMID:26954733

  11. Wound healing properties and kill kinetics of Clerodendron splendens G. Don, a Ghanaian wound healing plant

    Stephen Y Gbedema

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of our general objective of investigating indigenous plants used in wound healing in Ghana, we hereby report our findings from some in vitro and in vivo studies related to wound healing activities of Clerodendron splendens G. Don (Verbanaceae. Methanolic extract of the aerial parts of the plant was tested for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis, Micrococcus flavus, as well as resistant strains of Staph. aureus SA1199B, RN4220 and XU212, Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteous mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Candida albicans using the micro-well dilution method. Survivor-time studies of the microorganisms, radical scavenging activity using 2,2′-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH and various in vivo wound healing activity studies were also conducted on the extract. The extract exhibited biostatic action against all the test microorganisms with a Minimum Inhibition Concentration (MIC ranging between 64 and 512 μg/ml and a free radical scavenging property with an IC 50 value of 103.2 μg/ml. The results of the in vivo wound healing tests showed that upon application of C. splendens ointment, there was a reduction in the epithelization period from 26.7 days (control to 13.6 days along with a marked decrease in the scar area from 54.2 mm 2 (control to 25.2 mm 2 . Significant increase in the tensile strength and hydroxyproline content were also observed as compared to the control and was comparable to nitrofurazone. The above results appear to justify the traditional use of C. splendens in wound healing and treatment of skin infections in Ghana.

  12. Traditional Therapies for Skin Wound Healing

    Pereira, Rúben F.; Bártolo, Paulo J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The regeneration of healthy and functional skin remains a huge challenge due to its multilayer structure and the presence of different cell types within the extracellular matrix in an organized way. Despite recent advances in wound care products, traditional therapies based on natural origin compounds, such as plant extracts, honey, and larvae, are interesting alternatives. These therapies offer new possibilities for the treatment of skin diseases, enhancing the access to the healthcare, and allowing overcoming some limitations associated to the modern products and therapies, such as the high costs, the long manufacturing times, and the increase in the bacterial resistance. This article gives a general overview about the recent advances in traditional therapies for skin wound healing, focusing on the therapeutic activity, action mechanisms, and clinical trials of the most commonly used natural compounds. New insights in the combination of traditional products with modern treatments and future challenges in the field are also highlighted. Recent Advances: Natural compounds have been used in skin wound care for many years due to their therapeutic activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and cell-stimulating properties. The clinical efficacy of these compounds has been investigated through in vitro and in vivo trials using both animal models and humans. Besides the important progress regarding the development of novel extraction methods, purification procedures, quality control assessment, and treatment protocols, the exact mechanisms of action, side effects, and safety of these compounds need further research. Critical Issues: The repair of skin lesions is one of the most complex biological processes in humans, occurring throughout an orchestrated cascade of overlapping biochemical and cellular events. To stimulate the regeneration process and prevent the wound to fail the healing, traditional therapies and natural products have been used

  13. A small peptide with potential ability to promote wound healing.

    Jing Tang

    Full Text Available Wound-healing represents a major health burden, such as diabetes-induced skin ulcers and burning. Many works are being tried to find ideal clinical wound-healing biomaterials. Especially, small molecules with low cost and function to promote production of endogenous wound healing agents (i.e. transforming growth factor beta, TGF-β are excellent candidates. In this study, a small peptide (tiger17, c[WCKPKPKPRCH-NH2] containing only 11 amino acid residues was designed and proved to be a potent wound healer. It showed strong wound healing-promoting activity in a murine model of full thickness dermal wound. Tiger17 exerted significant effects on three stages of wound healing progresses including (1 the induction of macrophages recruitment to wound site at inflammatory reaction stage; (2 the promotion of the migration and proliferation both keratinocytes and fibroblasts, leading to reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation; and (3 tissue remodeling phase, by promoting the release of transforming TGF-β1 and interleukin 6 (IL-6 in murine macrophages and activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK signaling pathways. Considering its easy production, store and transfer and function to promote production of endogenous wound healing agents (TGF-β, tiger17 might be an exciting biomaterial or template for the development of novel wound-healing agents.

  14. Antimycotic ciclopirox olamine in the diabetic environment promotes angiogenesis and enhances wound healing.

    Sae Hee Ko

    Full Text Available Diabetic wounds remain a major medical challenge with often disappointing outcomes despite the best available care. An impaired response to tissue hypoxia and insufficient angiogenesis are major factors responsible for poor healing in diabetic wounds. Here we show that the antimycotic drug ciclopirox olamine (CPX can induce therapeutic angiogenesis in diabetic wounds. Treatment with CPX in vitro led to upregulation of multiple angiogenic genes and increased availability of HIF-1α. Using an excisional wound splinting model in diabetic mice, we showed that serial topical treatment with CPX enhanced wound healing compared to vehicle control treatment, with significantly accelerated wound closure, increased angiogenesis, and increased dermal cellularity. These findings offer a promising new topical pharmacologic therapy for the treatment of diabetic wounds.

  15. Advanced Therapeutic Dressings for Effective Wound Healing--A Review.

    Boateng, Joshua; Catanzano, Ovidio

    2015-11-01

    Advanced therapeutic dressings that take active part in wound healing to achieve rapid and complete healing of chronic wounds is of current research interest. There is a desire for novel strategies to achieve expeditious wound healing because of the enormous financial burden worldwide. This paper reviews the current state of wound healing and wound management products, with emphasis on the demand for more advanced forms of wound therapy and some of the current challenges and driving forces behind this demand. The paper reviews information mainly from peer-reviewed literature and other publicly available sources such as the US FDA. A major focus is the treatment of chronic wounds including amputations, diabetic and leg ulcers, pressure sores, and surgical and traumatic wounds (e.g., accidents and burns) where patient immunity is low and the risk of infections and complications are high. The main dressings include medicated moist dressings, tissue-engineered substitutes, biomaterials-based biological dressings, biological and naturally derived dressings, medicated sutures, and various combinations of the above classes. Finally, the review briefly discusses possible prospects of advanced wound healing including some of the emerging physical approaches such as hyperbaric oxygen, negative pressure wound therapy and laser wound healing, in routine clinical care. PMID:26308473

  16. Influence of Helium-Neon Laser Photostimulation on Excision Wound Healing in Wistar Rats

    B. S. Nayak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of laser photostimulation is now accepted generally but the laser light facilitates wound healing and tissue repair remains poorly understood. So we have examined the hypothesis that the laser photo stimulation can enhances the collagen production in excision wounds using excision wound model in Wister rat model. The circular wounds were created on the dorsum of the back of the animals. The animals were divided into two groups. The experimental group (n = 12 wound was treated with 632.8 nm He-Ne laser at a dose of 2.1J cm-2 for five days a week until the complete healing. The control group was sham irradiated. The parameters studied were wound area, period of epithelization and hydroxyproline. Significant increase in the hydroxyproline content (p<0.001 and reduction in the wound size (p<0.001 was observed in study group when compared to controls. The significant epithelization (p<0.001 was noticed. The experimental wounds were, on average, fully healed by the 15th day, whereas the control group healed, on average by 22nd day. Wound contraction together with the hydroxyproline and experimental observations suggested that low intensity Helium-Neon laser photo stimulation facilitates the tissue repair process by accelerating collagen production in chronic wounds.

  17. Diabetes medications: Impact on inflammation and wound healing.

    Salazar, Jay J; Ennis, William J; Koh, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a common complication in patients with diabetes that often lead to amputation. These non-healing wounds are described as being stuck in a persistent inflammatory state characterized by accumulation of pro-inflammatory macrophages, cytokines and proteases. Some medications approved for management of type 2 diabetes have demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties independent of their marketed insulinotropic effects and thus have underappreciated potential to promote wound healing. In this review, the potential for insulin, metformin, specific sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors to promote healing is evaluated by reviewing human and animal studies on inflammation and wound healing. The available evidence indicates that diabetic medications have potential to prevent wounds from becoming arrested in the inflammatory stage of healing and to promote wound healing by downregulating pro-inflammatory cytokines, upregulating growth factors, lowering matrix metalloproteinases, stimulating angiogenesis, and increasing epithelization. However, no clinical recommendations currently exist on the potential for specific diabetic medications to impact healing of chronic wounds. Thus, we encourage further research that may guide physicians on providing personalized diabetes treatments that achieve glycemic goals while promoting healing in patients with chronic wounds. PMID:26796432

  18. Stem Cells in Skin Wound Healing: Are We There Yet?

    Cerqueira, Mariana Teixeira; Pirraco, Rogério Pedro; Marques, Alexandra Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Cutaneous wound healing is a serious problem worldwide that affects patients with various wound types, resulting from burns, traumatic injuries, and diabetes. Despite the wide range of clinically available skin substitutes and the different therapeutic alternatives, delayed healing and scarring are often observed.

  19. Effects of the Four-Herb Compound ANBP on Wound Healing Promotion in Diabetic Mice.

    Hou, Qian; He, Wen-Jun; Chen, Li; Hao, Hao-Jie; Liu, Jie-Jie; Dong, Liang; Tong, Chuan; Li, Mei-Rong; Zhou, Zhong-Zhi; Han, Wei-Dong; Fu, Xiao-Bing

    2015-12-01

    Wound healing is a troublesome problem in diabetic patients. Besides, there is also an increased risk of postsurgical wound complications for diabetic patient. It has been revealed that traditional Chinese medicine may promote healing and inhibit scar formation, while the changes of morphology and physiology of wounds on such medicine treatment still remain elusive. In this study, we first used the ultralow temperature preparation method to produce mixed superfine powder from Agrimonia pilosa (A), Nelumbo nucifera (N), Boswellia carteri (B), and Pollen typhae (P), named as ANBP. Applying ANBP on 40 streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice (4-6 weeks, 20 ± 2 g), we observed that the wound healing process was accelerated and the wound healing time was shortened (14 days, P Sirius red staining showed that, at the early stage of trauma, the expressions of Col I and Col III, especially Col III, were increased in the ANBP group (P < .05). Studies in vitro demonstrated that tubular formation was significantly increased after ANBP treatment on human vascular endothelial cells in a dose-dependent way. Taken together, our studies revealed that ANBP treatment could accelerate wound healing, promote vascularization, and inhibit inflammation, suggesting the potential clinic application of ANBP for diabetes mellitus and refractory wounds. PMID:25795279

  20. Connexins in wound healing; perspectives in diabetic patients.

    Becker, D. L.; Thrasivoulou, C.; Phillips, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Skin lesions are common events and we have evolved to rapidly heal them in order to maintain homeostasis and prevent infection and sepsis. Most acute wounds heal without issue, but as we get older our bodies become compromised by poor blood circulation and conditions such as diabetes, leading to slower healing. This can result in stalled or hard-to-heal chronic wounds. Currently about 2% of the Western population develop a chronic wound and this figure will rise as the population ages and dia...

  1. Effects of low-level laser therapy on wound healing

    Fabiana do Socorro da Silva Dias Andrade

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To gather and clarify the actual effects of low-level laser therapy on wound healing and its most effective ways of application in human and veterinary medicine. METHODS: We searched original articles published in journals between the years 2000 and 2011, in Spanish, English, French and Portuguese languages, belonging to the following databases: Lilacs, Medline, PubMed and Bireme; Tey should contain the methodological description of the experimental design and parameters used. RESULTS: doses ranging from 3 to 6 J/cm2 appear to be more effective and doses 10 above J/cm2 are associated with deleterious effects. The wavelengths ranging from 632.8 to 1000 nm remain as those that provide more satisfactory results in the wound healing process. CONCLUSION: Low-level laser can be safely applied to accelerate the resolution of cutaneous wounds, although this fact is closely related to the election of parameters such as dose, time of exposure and wavelength.

  2. Otostegia persica extraction on healing process of burn wounds

    Amin Ganjali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate if the methanolic extract of the Otostegia persica can accelerating healing process of burn wound because of its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. METHODS:Forty eight male Wistar rats were randomized into three study groups of 16 rats each. Burn wounds were created on dorsal part of shaved rats using a metal rod. In group I the burn wound was left without any treatment. Group was treated with topical silver sulfadiazine pomade. In group III, ointment containing the OP extract was administered. Skin biopsies were harvested from burn area on the 3rd, 5th, 14th and 21st days after burn and examined histologically. RESULTS: Re-epithelialization in the control group and in group II was lower than in group III. Re-epithelialization in groups II and III was significantly different from that in the control group. On the 5th day of the experiment, we assessed lower inflammation in the burn area compared to control group. This means that the inflammation was suppressed by methanolic extract of OP. From day 5 to 14; the fibroblast proliferation peaked and was associated with increased collagen accumulation. It was obvious that angiogenesis improved more in the groups II and III, which facilitated re-epithelialisation. CONCLUSION:Methanolic extract of Otostegia persica exhibited significant healing activity when topically applied on rats. OP is an effective treatment for saving the burn site.

  3. A Novel Three-Dimensional Wound Healing Model

    Zhuo J. Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a well-orchestrated process, with various cells and growth factors coming into the wound bed at a specific time to influence the healing. Understanding the wound healing process is essential to generating wound healing products that help with hard-to-heal acute wounds and chronic wounds. The 2D scratch assay whereby a wound is created by scratching a confluent layer of cells on a 2D substrate is well established and used extensively but it has a major limitation—it lacks the complexity of the 3D wound healing environment. Established 3D wound healing models also have many limitations. In this paper, we present a novel 3D wound healing model that closely mimics the skin wound environment to study the cell migration of fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Three major components that exist in the wound environment are introduced in this new model: collagen, fibrin, and human foreskin fibroblasts. The novel 3D model consists of a defect, representing the actual wound, created by using a biopsy punch in a 3D collagen construct. The defect is then filled with collagen or with various solutions of fibrinogen and thrombin that polymerize into a 3D fibrin clot. Fibroblasts are then added on top of the collagen and their migration into the fibrin—or collagen—filled defect is followed for nine days. Our data clearly shows that fibroblasts migrate on both collagen and fibrin defects, though slightly faster on collagen defects than on fibrin defects. This paper shows the visibility of the model by introducing a defect filled with fibrin in a 3D collagen construct, thus mimicking a wound. Ongoing work examines keratinocyte migration on the defects of a 3D construct, which consists of collagen-containing fibroblasts. The model is also used to determine the effects of various growth factors, delivered in the wound defects, on fibroblasts’ and keratinocytes’ migration into the defects. Thus this novel 3D wound healing model provides a more

  4. Cellular and genetic analysis of wound healing in Drosophila larvae.

    Michael J Galko

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available To establish a genetic system to study postembryonic wound healing, we characterized epidermal wound healing in Drosophila larvae. Following puncture wounding, larvae begin to bleed but within an hour a plug forms in the wound gap. Over the next couple of hours the outer part of the plug melanizes to form a scab, and epidermal cells surrounding the plug orient toward it and then fuse to form a syncytium. Subsequently, more-peripheral cells orient toward and fuse with the central syncytium. During this time, the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK pathway is activated in a gradient emanating out from the wound, and the epidermal cells spread along or through the wound plug to reestablish a continuous epithelium and its basal lamina and apical cuticle lining. Inactivation of the JNK pathway inhibits epidermal spreading and reepithelialization but does not affect scab formation or other wound healing responses. Conversely, mutations that block scab formation, and a scabless wounding procedure, provide evidence that the scab stabilizes the wound site but is not required to initiate other wound responses. However, in the absence of a scab, the JNK pathway is hyperinduced, reepithelialization initiates but is not always completed, and a chronic wound ensues. The results demonstrate that the cellular responses of wound healing are under separate genetic control, and that the responses are coordinated by multiple signals emanating from the wound site, including a negative feedback signal between scab formation and the JNK pathway. Cell biological and molecular parallels to vertebrate wound healing lead us to speculate that wound healing is an ancient response that has diversified during evolution.

  5. Healing times and prediction of wound healing in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers: a prospective study.

    Zimny, S; Pfohl, M

    2005-02-01

    Time line of wound healing and prediction of healing times in diabetic foot ulcers is an important issue. Usually, the percentage of wounds healed within a defined period is used for characterization of wound healing. R=sqrtA/pi (R, radius; A, planimetric wound area; pi, constant 3.14), and the wound radius reduction was 0.39 mm/week which was previously established. The initial average wound area was 96.9+/-13.1 mm2 (mean+/-SEM), and 3.61+/-1.6 mm 2 after ten weeks with an average healing time of 75.9 (95 %-CI 71-81) days. Using the equation mentioned above and the calculated weekly wound radius reduction, the predicted healing time in the test group was 86.9 (95 %-CI 73-101) days. The predicted and the observed healing times were significantly correlated with each other (r=0.55, p=0.0002). Providing standard care, the time needed for wound healing can reliably be predicted in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers. This may be a useful tool in daily clinical practice to predict wound healing and recognize ulcers who do not respond adequately to the treatment. PMID:15772900

  6. Secretome of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Enhances Wound Healing

    Mildner, Michael; Hacker, Stefan; Haider, Thomas; Gschwandtner, Maria; Werba, Gregor; Barresi, Caterina; Zimmermann, Matthias; Golabi, Bahar; Tschachler, Erwin; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2013-01-01

    Non-healing skin ulcers are often resistant to most common therapies. Treatment with growth factors has been demonstrated to improve closure of chronic wounds. Here we investigate whether lyophilized culture supernatant of freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is able to enhance wound healing. PBMC from healthy human individuals were prepared and cultured for 24 hours. Supernatants were collected, dialyzed and lyophilized (SECPBMC). Six mm punch biopsy wounds were set on ...

  7. Electrical Stimulation and Cutaneous Wound Healing: A Review of Clinical Evidence

    Sara Ud-Din

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation (ES has been shown to have beneficial effects in wound healing. It is important to assess the effects of ES on cutaneous wound healing in order to ensure optimization for clinical practice. Several different applications as well as modalities of ES have been described, including direct current (DC, alternating current (AC, high-voltage pulsed current (HVPC, low-intensity direct current (LIDC and electrobiofeedback ES. However, no one method has been advocated as the most optimal for the treatment of cutaneous wound healing. Therefore, this review aims to examine the level of evidence (LOE for the application of different types of ES to enhance cutaneous wound healing in the skin. An extensive search was conducted to identify relevant clinical studies utilising ES for cutaneous wound healing since 1980 using PubMed, Medline and EMBASE. A total of 48 studies were evaluated and assigned LOE. All types of ES demonstrated positive effects on cutaneous wound healing in the majority of studies. However, the reported studies demonstrate contrasting differences in the parameters and types of ES application, leading to an inability to generate sufficient evidence to support any one standard therapeutic approach. Despite variations in the type of current, duration, and dosing of ES, the majority of studies showed a significant improvement in wound area reduction or accelerated wound healing compared to the standard of care or sham therapy as well as improved local perfusion. The limited number of LOE-1 trials for investigating the effects of ES in wound healing make critical evaluation and assessment somewhat difficult. Further, better-designed clinical trials are needed to improve our understanding of the optimal dosing, timing and type of ES to be used.

  8. Topically Applied Connective Tissue Growth Factor/CCN2 Improves Diabetic Preclinical Cutaneous Wound Healing: Potential Role for CTGF in Human Diabetic Foot Ulcer Healing

    F. R. Henshaw

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims/Hypothesis. Topical application of CTGF/CCN2 to rodent diabetic and control wounds was examined. In parallel research, correlation of CTGF wound fluid levels with healing rate in human diabetic foot ulcers was undertaken. Methods. Full thickness cutaneous wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic control rats were treated topically with 1 μg rhCTGF or vehicle alone, on 2 consecutive days. Wound healing rate was observed on day 14 and wound sites were examined for breaking strength and granulation tissue. In the human study across 32 subjects, serial CTGF regulation was analyzed longitudinally in postdebridement diabetic wound fluid. Results. CTGF treated diabetic wounds had an accelerated closure rate compared with vehicle treated diabetic wounds. Healed skin withstood more strain before breaking in CTGF treated rat wounds. Granulation tissue from CTGF treatment in diabetic wounds showed collagen IV accumulation compared with nondiabetic animals. Wound α-smooth muscle actin was increased in CTGF treated diabetic wounds compared with untreated diabetic wounds, as was macrophage infiltration. Endogenous wound fluid CTGF protein rate of increase in human diabetic foot ulcers correlated positively with foot ulcer healing rate (r=0.406; P<0.001. Conclusions/Interpretation. These data collectively increasingly substantiate a functional role for CTGF in human diabetic foot ulcers.

  9. Effect of Wound Dressing with Fresh Kiwifruit on healing of Cutaneous Wound in Rats

    Iran Goudarzi; Taghi Lashkarbolouki; Mahdi Khorshidi; Mohammad Taghi Ghorbanian

    2015-01-01

    Background: The kiwi fruit is known to have dramatic antibacterial, debridement, wound contracture, and angiogenic effects. We propose that kiwifruit is an ideal candidate to enhance the process of wound healing. The present study assessed the effects of wound kiwifruit dressing on cutaneous wound healing in rat. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 2 groups of control and kiwifruit group. A full-thickness dermal incision (35mm l...

  10. 830 nm light-emitting diode low level light therapy (LED-LLLT) enhances wound healing: a preliminary study

    Min, Pok Kee; Goo, Boncheol Leo

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: The application of light-emitting diodes in a number of clinical fields is expanding rapidly since the development in the late 1990s of the NASA LED. Wound healing is one field where low level light therapy with LEDs (LED-LLLT) has attracted attention for both accelerating wound healing and controlling sequelae. The present study evaluated LED-LLLT in 5 wounds of various etiologies.

  11. Assessment of the effect of diode laser therapy on incisional wound healing and expression of iNOS and eNOS on rat oral tissue

    Parichehr Ghalayani

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Histological findings showed that diode laser needs several repeated irradiations for the acceleration of wound healing. The iNOS amount showed that increases are associated with better healing.

  12. Kruppel-like factor KLF4 facilitates cutaneous wound healing by promoting fibrocyte generation from myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Ou, Lingling; Shi, Ying; Dong, Wenqi; Liu, Chunming; Schmidt, Thomas J; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Fan, Daping; Ai, Walden

    2015-05-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are serious skin injuries whereby the wound healing process is frequently stalled in the inflammatory phase. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulate as a result of inflammation and promote cutaneous wound healing by mechanisms that are not fully understood. Recently, MDSCs have been shown to differentiate into fibrocytes, which serve as emerging effector cells that enhance cell proliferation in wound healing. We postulate that in wound healing MDSCs not only execute their immunosuppressive function to regulate inflammation but also stimulate cell proliferation once they differentiate into fibrocytes. In the current study, by using full-thickness and PU mouse models, we found that Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) deficiency resulted in decreased accumulation of MDSCs and fibrocytes, and wound healing was significantly delayed. Conversely, KLF4 activation by the plant-derived product Mexicanin I increased the number of MDSCs and fibrocytes and accelerated the wound healing. Collectively, our study revealed a previously unreported function of MDSCs in cutaneous wound healing and identified Mexicanin I as a potential agent to accelerate PU wound healing. PMID:25581502

  13. TOPICAL ESTROGEN IN WOUND HEALING: A DOUBLE BLIND RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL ON YOUNG HEALTHY PEOPLE

    A ASILIAN

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acceleration of wounf healing is intrested because of decreasing the risk of wound complication and infections as well as reducing the cost of treatment. In animal models, it has been proved that estrogen can accelerate wound healing. It has been also suggested that topical estrogen can eliminate effect of aging on wound healing and can increase the speed of wound healing in old people. Methods: We selected 16 young healthy people who developed symmetrical and ulcers (regarding size and depths after dermabrasion, shave and electrocoagulouzon and CO2 laser. Primary lesions of patients were benign and noninfective. Identical and symmetrical lesions of each patient were randomly divided into two groups (A and B. Topical estrogen with concentration of 0.625 mg/g in the base of silver sulfadiazine cream was applied to A ulcers and silver sulfadiazine cream alone was applied on B ulcers. Ulcers were dressed by Telfa gauzes. The A ulcers of each patients were compared to counterpart B ulcers in regard of redness, size, depth, general appearance of ulcers and wound healing duration at three days intervals by a physician. Results: Average time of healing was 10.8 days and 8.5 days for B (n=29 and A (n=29 ulcers, respectively (P < 0.001. In 78 percent of cases, the A ulcers were judged better than B ulcers by physician (P < 0.01. Discussion: It seems that estrogen not only accelerate healing of acute ulcers but also it is efficient in young healthy people who don"t have any hormonal or wound healing problems.

  14. The Effect of Nitric Oxide Donor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    N Dashti; Ansari, M.; M. Shabani; S Vardasti; Mirsalehian, A.; MH Noori Mughehi; Hatmi ZN

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by a nitric oxide deficiency at the wound site. Diabetes is a factor that influences all stages of wound healing. In animals with acute experimental diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ), the early inflammatory responses after wounding is impaired, fibroblast and endothelial cell proliferation is reduced as well as accumulation of reparative collagen and gain in wound breaking strenght. This study investigated whether exogenous nitric oxide supplimentation with ni...

  15. Correction of MFG-E8 Resolves Inflammation and Promotes Cutaneous Wound Healing in Diabetes.

    Das, Amitava; Ghatak, Subhadip; Sinha, Mithun; Chaffee, Scott; Ahmed, Noha S; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Wohleb, Eric S; Sheridan, John F; Sen, Chandan K; Roy, Sashwati

    2016-06-15

    Milk fat globule epidermal growth factor-factor 8 (MFG-E8) is a peripheral glycoprotein that acts as a bridging molecule between the macrophage and apoptotic cells, thus executing a pivotal role in the scavenging of apoptotic cells from affected tissue. We have previously reported that apoptotic cell clearance activity or efferocytosis is compromised in diabetic wound macrophages. In this work, we test the hypothesis that MFG-E8 helps resolve inflammation, supports angiogenesis, and accelerates wound closure. MFG-E8(-/-) mice displayed impaired efferocytosis associated with exaggerated inflammatory response, poor angiogenesis, and wound closure. Wound macrophage-derived MFG-E8 was recognized as a critical driver of wound angiogenesis. Transplantation of MFG-E8(-/-) bone marrow to MFG-E8(+/+) mice resulted in impaired wound closure and compromised wound vascularization. In contrast, MFG-E8(-/-) mice that received wild-type bone marrow showed improved wound closure and improved wound vascularization. Hyperglycemia and exposure to advanced glycated end products inactivated MFG-E8, recognizing a key mechanism that complicates diabetic wound healing. Diabetic db/db mice suffered from impaired efferocytosis accompanied with persistent inflammation and slow wound closure. Topical recombinant MFG-E8 induced resolution of wound inflammation, improvements in angiogenesis, and acceleration of closure, upholding the potential of MFG-E8-directed therapeutics in diabetic wound care. PMID:27194784

  16. Gene expression profiling of cutaneous wound healing

    Wang Ena

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the sequence of events leading to wound repair has been described at the cellular and, to a limited extent, at the protein level this process has yet to be fully elucidated. Genome wide transcriptional analysis tools promise to further define the global picture of this complex progression of events. Study Design This study was part of a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial in which basal cell carcinomas were treated topically with an immunomodifier – toll-like receptor 7 agonist: imiquimod. The fourteen patients with basal cell carcinoma in the placebo arm of the trial received placebo treatment consisting solely of vehicle cream. A skin punch biopsy was obtained immediately before treatment and at the end of the placebo treatment (after 2, 4 or 8 days. 17.5K cDNA microarrays were utilized to profile the biopsy material. Results Four gene signatures whose expression changed relative to baseline (before wound induction by the pre-treatment biopsy were identified. The largest group was comprised predominantly of inflammatory genes whose expression was increased throughout the study. Two additional signatures were observed which included preferentially pro-inflammatory genes in the early post-treatment biopsies (2 days after pre-treatment biopsies and repair and angiogenesis genes in the later (4 to 8 days biopsies. The fourth and smallest set of genes was down-regulated throughout the study. Early in wound healing the expression of markers of both M1 and M2 macrophages were increased, but later M2 markers predominated. Conclusion The initial response to a cutaneous wound induces powerful transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory stimuli which may alert the host defense. Subsequently and in the absence of infection, inflammation subsides and it is replaced by angiogenesis and remodeling. Understanding this transition which may be driven by a change from a mixed macrophage population to predominately M2

  17. Advances in research on mechanisms of the effect of negative pressure wound treatment in wound healing

    Li, Lei(Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing, 102617, People's Republic of China); Kai-yang LV; Wu, Guo-Sheng; Zhu, Shi-hui

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound treatment (NPWT) refers to apply a highly porous material between the wound and a semipermeable membrane, and it is then connected to a suction apparatus, leading to a minimal deformation of wound, resulting in promoting cell proliferation and wound repair. These devices may significantly expedite wound healing, facilitate the formation of granulation tissue, and reduce the complexity of subsequent reconstructive operations. In recent years, along with wide clinical us...

  18. Application of Antrodia camphorata Promotes Rat’s Wound Healing In Vivo and Facilitates Fibroblast Cell Proliferation In Vitro

    Zahra A. Amin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antrodia camphorata is a parasitic fungus from Taiwan, it has been documented to possess a variety of pharmacological and biological activities. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of Antrodia camphorata ethanol extract to accelerate the rate of wound healing closure and histology of wound area in experimental rats. The safety of Antrodia camphorata was determined in vivo by the acute toxicity test and in vitro by fibroblast cell proliferation assay. The scratch assay was used to evaluate the in vitro wound healing in fibroblast cells and the excision model of wound healing was tested in vivo using four groups of adult Sprague Dawley rats. Our results showed that wound treated with Antrodia camphorata extract and intrasite gel significantly accelerates the rate of wound healing closure than those treated with the vehicle. Wounds dressed with Antrodia camphorata extract showed remarkably less scar width at wound closure and granulation tissue contained less inflammatory cell and more fibroblast compared to wounds treated with the vehicle. Masson’s trichrom stain showed granulation tissue containing more collagen and less inflammatory cell in Antrodia camphorata treated wounds. In conclusion, Antrodia camphorata extract significantly enhanced the rate of the wound enclosure in rats and promotes the in vitro healing through fibroblast cell proliferation.

  19. Wound Healing Potential of Formulated Extract from Hibiscus Sabdariffa Calyx

    P F Builders

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing agents support the natural healing process, reduce trauma and likelihood of secondary infections and hasten wound closure. The wound healing activities of water in oil cream of the methanol extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae was evaluated in rats with superficial skin excision wounds. Antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Echerichia coli were determined. The total flavonoid content, antioxidant properties and thin layer chromatographic fingerprints of the extract were also evaluated. The extract demonstrated antioxidant properties with a total flavonoid content of 12.30±0.09 mg/g. Six reproducible spots were obtained using methanol:water (95:5 as the mobile phase. The extract showed no antimicrobial activity on the selected microorganisms, which are known to infect and retard wound healing. Creams containing H. sabdariffa extract showed significant (P<0.05 and concentration dependent wound healing activities. There was also evidence of synergism with creams containing a combination of gentamicin and H. sabdariffa extract. This study, thus, provides evidence of the wound healing potentials of the formulated extract of the calyces of H. sabdariffa and synergism when co-formulated with gentamicin.

  20. Plasminogen is a critical regulator of cutaneous wound healing.

    Sulniute, Rima; Shen, Yue; Guo, Yong-Zhi; Fallah, Mahsa; Ahlskog, Nina; Ny, Lina; Rakhimova, Olena; Broden, Jessica; Boija, Hege; Moghaddam, Aliyeh; Li, Jinan; Wilczynska, Malgorzata; Ny, Tor

    2016-05-01

    Wound healing is a complicated biological process that consist of partially overlapping inflammatory, proliferation and tissue remodelling phases. A successful wound healing depends on a proper activation and subsequent termination of the inflammatory phase. The failure to terminate the inflammation halts the completion of wound healing and is a known reason for formation of chronic wounds. Previous studies have shown that wound closure is delayed in plasminogen-deficient mice, and a role for plasminogen in dissection of extracellular matrix was suggested. However, our finding that plasminogen is transported to the wound by inflammatory cells early during the healing process, where it potentiates inflammation, indicates that plasminogen may also have other roles in the wound healing process. Here we report that plasminogen-deficient mice have extensive fibrin and neutrophil depositions in the wounded area long after re-epithelialisation, indicating inefficient debridement and chronic inflammation. Delayed formation of granulation tissue suggests that fibroblast function is impaired in the absence of plasminogen. Therefore, in addition to its role in the activation of inflammation, plasminogen is also crucial for subsequent steps, including resolution of inflammation and activation of the proliferation phase. Importantly, supplementation of plasminogen-deficient mice with human plasminogen leads to a restored healing process that is comparable to that in wild-type mice. Besides of being an activator of the inflammatory phase during wound healing, plasminogen is also required for the subsequent termination of inflammation. Based on these results, we propose that plasminogen may be an important future therapeutic agent for wound treatment. PMID:26791370

  1. New Guar Biopolymer Silver Nanocomposites for Wound Healing Applications

    Runa Ghosh Auddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is an innate physiological response that helps restore cellular and anatomic continuity of a tissue. Selective biodegradable and biocompatible polymer materials have provided useful scaffolds for wound healing and assisted cellular messaging. In the present study, guar gum, a polymeric galactomannan, was intrinsically modified to a new cationic biopolymer guar gum alkylamine (GGAA for wound healing applications. Biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (Agnp were further impregnated in GGAA for extended evaluations in punch wound models in rodents. SEM studies showed silver nanoparticles well dispersed in the new guar matrix with a particle size of ~18 nm. In wound healing experiments, faster healing and improved cosmetic appearance were observed in the new nanobiomaterial treated group compared to commercially available silver alginate cream. The total protein, DNA, and hydroxyproline contents of the wound tissues were also significantly higher in the treated group as compared with the silver alginate cream (P<0.05. Silver nanoparticles exerted positive effects because of their antimicrobial properties. The nanobiomaterial was observed to promote wound closure by inducing proliferation and migration of the keratinocytes at the wound site. The derivatized guar gum matrix additionally provided a hydrated surface necessary for cell proliferation.

  2. Muscle wound healing in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Schmidt, J G; Andersen, E W; Ersbøll, B K; Nielsen, M E

    2016-01-01

    We followed the progression of healing of deep excisional biopsy punch wounds over the course of 365 days in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by monitoring visual wound healing and gene expression in the healing muscle at regular intervals (1, 3, 7, 14, 38 and 100 days post-wounding). In addition, we performed muscle texture analysis one year after wound infliction. The selected genes have all previously been investigated in relation to vertebrate wound healing, but only few specifically in fish. The selected genes were interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and -β3, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -9 and -13, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), fibronectin (FN), tenascin-C (TN-C), prolyl 4-hydroxylase α1-chain (P4Hα1), lysyl oxidase (LOX), collagen type I α1-chain (ColIα1), CD41 and CD163. Wound healing progressed slowly in the presented study, which is at least partially due to the low temperature of about 8.5 °C during the first 100 days. The inflammation phase lasted more than 14 days, and the genes relating to production and remodeling of new extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibited a delayed but prolonged upregulation starting 1-2 weeks post-wounding and lasting until at least 100 days post-wounding. The gene expression patterns and histology reveal limited capacity for muscle regeneration in rainbow trout, and muscle texture analyses one year after wound infliction confirm that wounds heal with fibrosis. At 100 dpw epidermis had fully regenerated, and dermis partially regenerated. Scales had not regenerated even after one year. CD163 is a marker of "wound healing"-type M2c macrophages in mammals. M2 macrophage markers are as yet poorly described in fish. The pattern of CD163 expression in the present study is consistent with the expected timing of presence of M2c macrophages in the wound. CD163 may thus potentially prove a valuable marker of M2 macrophages - or a subset hereof - in fish. We subjected a group of fish to

  3. Chemical Composition and Anti-Candidiasis Mediated Wound Healing Property of Cymbopogon nardus Essential Oil on Chronic Diabetic Wounds.

    Kandimalla, Raghuram; Kalita, Sanjeeb; Choudhury, Bhaswati; Dash, Suvakanta; Kalita, Kasturi; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-01-01

    Poor wound healing is one of the major complication of diabetic patients which arises due to different factors like hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, vascular insufficiency and microbial infections. Candidiasis of diabetic wounds is a difficult to treat condition and potentially can lead to organ amputation. There are a few number of medications available in market to treat this chronic condition; which demands for alternative treatment options. In traditional system of medicine like Ayurveda, essential oil extracted from leaves of Cymbopogon nardus L. (Poaceae) has been using for the treatment of microbial infections, inflammation and pain. In this regard, we have evaluated anti-Candida and anti-inflammatory activity mediated wound healing property of C. nardus essential oil (EO-CN) on candidiasis of diabetic wounds. EO-CN was obtained through hydro-distillation and subjected to Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis for chemical profiling. Anti-Candida activity of EO-CN was tested against Candida albicans, C. glabrata and C. tropicalis by in vitro zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays. Anti-candidiasis ability of EO-CN was evaluated on C. albicans infected diabetic wounds of mice through measuring candida load on the 7th, 14th, and 21st day of treatment. Further progression in wound healing was confirmed by measuring the inflammatory marker levels and histopathology of wounded tissues on last day of EO-CN treatment. A total of 95 compounds were identified through GC-MS analysis, with major compounds like citral, 2,6-octadienal-, 3,7-dimethyl-, geranyl acetate, citronellal, geraniol, and citronellol. In vitro test results demonstrated strong anti-Candida activity of EO-CN with a MIC value of 25 μg/ml against C. albicans, 50 μg/ml against C. glabrata and C. tropicalis. EO-CN treatment resulted in significant reduction of candida load on diabetic wounds. Acceleration in wound healing was indicated by declined levels of

  4. Chemical Composition and Anti-Candidiasis Mediated Wound Healing Property of Cymbopogon nardus Essential Oil on Chronic Diabetic Wounds

    Kandimalla, Raghuram; Kalita, Sanjeeb; Choudhury, Bhaswati; Dash, Suvakanta; Kalita, Kasturi; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-01-01

    Poor wound healing is one of the major complication of diabetic patients which arises due to different factors like hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, vascular insufficiency and microbial infections. Candidiasis of diabetic wounds is a difficult to treat condition and potentially can lead to organ amputation. There are a few number of medications available in market to treat this chronic condition; which demands for alternative treatment options. In traditional system of medicine like Ayurveda, essential oil extracted from leaves of Cymbopogon nardus L. (Poaceae) has been using for the treatment of microbial infections, inflammation and pain. In this regard, we have evaluated anti-Candida and anti-inflammatory activity mediated wound healing property of C. nardus essential oil (EO-CN) on candidiasis of diabetic wounds. EO-CN was obtained through hydro-distillation and subjected to Gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy (GC–MS) analysis for chemical profiling. Anti-Candida activity of EO-CN was tested against Candida albicans, C. glabrata and C. tropicalis by in vitro zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays. Anti-candidiasis ability of EO-CN was evaluated on C. albicans infected diabetic wounds of mice through measuring candida load on the 7th, 14th, and 21st day of treatment. Further progression in wound healing was confirmed by measuring the inflammatory marker levels and histopathology of wounded tissues on last day of EO-CN treatment. A total of 95 compounds were identified through GC–MS analysis, with major compounds like citral, 2,6-octadienal-, 3,7-dimethyl-, geranyl acetate, citronellal, geraniol, and citronellol. In vitro test results demonstrated strong anti-Candida activity of EO-CN with a MIC value of 25 μg/ml against C. albicans, 50 μg/ml against C. glabrata and C. tropicalis. EO-CN treatment resulted in significant reduction of candida load on diabetic wounds. Acceleration in wound healing was indicated by declined

  5. Wound healing activity of Abroma augusta in Wistar rats

    Shanbhag T; Dattachaudhuri A; Shenoy S; Bairy KL

    2009-01-01

    Objective:The study was undertaken to evaluate the wound healing profile of alcoholic extract of Abroma au-gusta and its effect on dexamethasone suppressed wound healing in Wistar rats.Methods:An alcoholic extract of Abroma augusta was prepared.Three models were used -incision,excision and dead space wound models. Four groups of animals were used for each model.They were administered 2% gum acacia (orally),alcoholic extract of Abroma augusta (orally),dexamethasone (intramuscularly)and combination of Abroma augusta (o-rally)with dexamethasone (intramuscularly)respectively.The parameters studied included breaking strength of incision wound,period of epithelization and wound contraction rate in the excision wound,breaking strength,dry weight and hydroxyproline content of granulation tissue in dead space wound.Results:The breaking strength of incision wound of Abroma augusta treated group was significantly increased (P <0.001) while that of dexamethasone treated animals was significantly decreased (P <0.001)as compared to control. Coadministration of dexamethasone and Abroma augusta significantly reversed the dexamethasone suppressed wound healing in incision wound model (P <0.001).Animals treated with both dexamethasone and Abroma augusta also showed significant (P <0.004)increase in the breaking strength of granulation tissue in the dead space wound and a significant (P <0.011)reduction in the period of epithelization in the excision wound as compared to rats treated with dexamethasone alone.The rate of wound contraction was not significantly altered in any of the groups.Conclusion:The alcoholic extract of Abroma augusta was found to reverse dexametha-sone suppressed wound healing.

  6. Therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in cutaneous wound healing

    Jerry S Chen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in wound care, many wounds never heal and become chronic problems that result in significant morbidity and mortality to the patient. Cellular therapy for cutaneous wounds has recently come under investigation as a potential treatment modality for impaired wound healing. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a promising source of adult progenitor cells for cytotherapy as they are easy to isolate and expand and have been shown to differentiate into various cell lineages. Early studies have demonstrated that MSCs may enhance epithelialization, granulation tissue formation, and neovascularization resulting in accelerated wound closure. It is currently unclear if these effects are mediated through cellular differentiation or by secretion of cytokines and growth factors. This review discusses the proposed biological contributions of MSCs to cutaneous repair and their clinical potential in cell-based therapies.

  7. MicroRNAs as regulators of cutaneous wound healing

    Wing-Fu Lai; Parco M Siu

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, and have displayed important roles in areas spanning from embryonic development to skin physiology. Despite this, till now little is known about the significance of miRNAs in cutaneous wound healing. In this mini-review, we discuss the existing evidence on the roles of miRNAs in physiological processes relevant to cutaneous wound healing, followed by a highlight of the prospects and challenges of future development of miRNA-based wound therapies. With existing technologies of nucleic acid transfer and miRNA modulation, it is anticipated that once the roles of miRNAs in wound healing have been clarified, there will be a vast new vista of opportunities brought up for development of miRNA-targeted therapies for wound care.

  8. The Effect of Nitric Oxide Donor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    N Dashti

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is characterized by a nitric oxide deficiency at the wound site. Diabetes is a factor that influences all stages of wound healing. In animals with acute experimental diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ, the early inflammatory responses after wounding is impaired, fibroblast and endothelial cell proliferation is reduced as well as accumulation of reparative collagen and gain in wound breaking strenght. This study investigated whether exogenous nitric oxide supplimentation with nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate could reverse impaired healing in diabetes. The results suggest nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate can reverse impaired healing associated with diabetes (P<0.001 and urinary nitrate (NO-3 output may reflect the extent of repair in this wound model (P<0.001.

  9. Vitamin E and wound healing: an evidence-based review.

    Hobson, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin E has been demonstrated to modulate cellular signalling, gene expression and affect wounds infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), thus influencing wound healing. This evidence-based review aimed to identify and evaluate current research assessing the properties of vitamin E in relation to wound healing, through its role as an antioxidant and its influence on connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), MRSA and gene transcription. Literature dated from 1996 to 2012, published in English, involving either animals or adult humans with an acute or chronic wound were included. The databases that contained relevant articles were narrowed down to four, and a total of 33 identified studies were included. The literature review revealed that there is a significant dearth of robust studies establishing the effects of vitamin E on wound healing, and further research is clearly warranted. PMID:25124164

  10. Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium promote primary wound healing regeneration

    Dwi Liliek Kusindarta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This research was conducted to clarify the capability of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium (HU-MSCM to promote regenerations of primary wound healing on the incision skin injury. Materials and Methods: In this study, two approaches in vitro and in vivo already done. On in vitro analysis, tube formation was performed using HU vein endothelial cells in the presence of HU-MSCM, in some experiments cells line was incubated prior the presence of lipopolysaccharide and HU-MSCM then apoptosis assay was performed. Furthermore, in vivo experiments 12 female rats (Rattus norvegicus were used after rats anesthetized, 7 mm wound was made by incision on the left side of the body. The wound was treated with HU-MSCM containing cream, povidone iodine was run as a control. Wound healing regenerations on the skin samples were visualized by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Results: In vitro models elucidate HU-MSCM may decreasing inflammation at the beginning of wound healing, promote cell migration and angiogenesis. In addition in vivo models show that the incision length on the skin is decreasing and more smaller, HE staining describe decreasing of inflammation phase, increasing of angiogenesis, accelerate fibroplasia, and maturation phase. Conclusions: Taken together our observation indicates that HU-MSCM could promote the acceleration of skin tissue regenerations in primary wound healing process.

  11. Biofilm delays wound healing: A review of the evidence

    Metcalf, Daniel G.; Philip G Bowler

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm is the predominant mode of life for bacteria and today it is implicated in numerous human diseases. A growing body of scientific and clinical evidence now exists regarding the presence of biofilm in wounds. This review summarizes the clinical experiences and in vivo evidence that implicate biofilm in delayed wound healing. The various mechanisms by which biofilm may impede healing are highlighted, including impaired epithelialization and granulation tissue formation, and reduced susce...

  12. Clinical Application of Growth Factors and Cytokines in Wound Healing

    Barrientos, Stephan; Brem, Harold; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex and dynamic biological process that involves the coordinated efforts of multiple cell types and is executed and regulated by numerous growth factors and cytokines. There has been a drive in the past two decades to study the therapeutic effects of various growth factors in the clinical management of non-healing wounds (e.g. pressure ulcers, chronic venous ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers). For this review, we conducted a nonline search of Medline and Pub Medical and crit...

  13. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: a complication of wound healing

    Sarah Chadwick; Rebecca Heath; Mamta Shah

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutan...

  14. Wound healing after radiation therapy: Review of the literature

    Radiation therapy is an established modality in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients. Compromised wound healing in irradiated tissues is a common and challenging clinical problem. The pathophysiology and underlying cellular mechanisms including the complex interaction of cytokines and growth factors are still not understood completely. In this review, the current state of research regarding the pathomechanisms of compromised wound healing in irradiated tissues is presented. Current and possible future treatment strategies are critically reviewed

  15. Multigenerational Epigenetic Adaptation of the Hepatic Wound-Healing Response

    Zeybel, Müjdat; Hardy, Timothy; Wong, Yi K.; Mathers, John C; Fox, Christopher R.; Gackowska, Agata; Oakley, Fiona; Burt, Alastair D; Wilson, Caroline L.; Anstee, Quentin M.; Barter, Matt J; Masson, Steven; Elsharkawy, Ahmed M.; Mann, Derek A.; Mann, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    We asked if ancestral liver damage leads to heritable reprogramming of hepatic wound-healing. We discovered that male rats with a history of liver damage transmit epigenetic suppressive adaptation of the fibrogenic component of wound-healing through male F1 and F2 generations. Underlying this adaptation was reduced generation of liver myofibroblasts, increased hepatic expression of antifibrogenic PPAR-γ and decreased expression of profibrogenic TGF-β1. Remodelling of DNA methylation and histo...

  16. Wound healing activity of Ipomoea batatas tubers (sweet potato)

    Madhav Sonkamble; Vandana Panda

    2011-01-01

    Background: Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. from the family Convolvulaceae is the world’s sixth largest food crop. The tubers of Ipomoea batatas commonly known as sweet potato are consumed as a vegetable globally. The tubers contain high levels of polyphenols such as anthocyanins and phenolic acids and vitamins A, B and C, which impart a potent antioxidant activity that can translate well to show wound healing effects. To check their effects on wound healing, the peels and peel bandage were tested ...

  17. Adenosine receptor agonists for promotion of dermal wound healing

    Valls, María D.; Cronstein, Bruce N.; Montesinos, M. Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex process that involves a well coordinated, highly regulated series of events including inflammation, tissue formation, revascularization and tissue remodeling. However, this orderly sequence is impaired in certain pathophysiological conditions such as diabetes mellitus, venous insufficiency, chronic glucocorticoid use, aging and malnutrition. Together with proper wound care, promotion of the healing process is the primary objective in the management of ch...

  18. Glucocorticoid dynamics and impaired wound healing in diabetes mellitus.

    Bitar, M S

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine corticosterone dynamics and its role in the pathogenesis of impaired wound healing in diabetes mellitus (DM). The streptozotocin-treated rat was used as an animal model for type I DM. A linear skin incision and subcutaneously implanted polyvinyl alcohol sponge disks were considered as wound-healing models. The data regarding corticosterone dynamics revealed diabetes-related increments in plasma corticosterone concentrations at various time intervals...

  19. Aloe vera and Vitis vinifera improve wound healing in an in vivo rat burn wound model.

    Lin, Li-Xin; Wang, Peng; Wang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Yong; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Xue-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Aloe vera and Vitis vinifera have been traditionally used as wound healing agents. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of aloe emodin and resveratrol in the burn wound healing procedure. Burn wounds are common in developed and developing countries, however, in developing countries, the incidence of severe complications is higher and financial resources are limited. The results of the present study demonstrated that neither aloe emodin or resveratrol were cytotoxic to THP-1 macrophages at concentrations of 1, 100 and 500 ng/ml. A significant increase in wound-healing activity was observed in mice treated with the aloe emodin and resveratrol, compared with those which received control treatments. The levels of IL-1β in the exudates of the burn wound area of the treated mice increased in a time-dependent manner over 7 days following burn wound injury. At 10 days post-injury, steady and progressive wound healing was observed in the control animals. The present study confirmed that increased wound healing occurs following treatment with aloe emodin,, compared with resveratrol, providing support for the use of Aloe vera plants to improve burn wound healing. PMID:26677006

  20. Wound-healing potential of the fruit extract of Phaleria macrocarpa

    Walaa Najm Abood

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The wound-healing potential of Phaleria macrocarpa was evaluated by monitoring the levels of inflammatory mediators, collagen, and antioxidant enzymes. Experimentally, two-centimeter-wide full-thickness-deep skin excision wounds were created on the posterior neck area of the rats. The wounds were topically treated with gum acacia as a vehicle in the control group, intrasite gel in the reference group, and 100 and 200 mg/mL P. macrocarpa ‎fruit extract in the treatment group. Granulation tissues were excised on the 15th day and were further processed for histological and biochemical analyzes. Wound healing was evaluated by measuring the contractions and protein contents of the wounds. Cellular redistribution and collagen deposition were assessed morphologically using Masson’s trichrome stain. Superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT activities, along with malondialdehyde (MDA level were determined in skin tissue homogenates of the dermal wounds. Serum levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α were evaluated in all the animals. A significant decrease in wound area was caused by a significant increase in TGF-β1 level in the treated groups. Decrease in TNF-α level and increase in the collagen formation were also observed in the treated groups. Topical treatment with P. macrocarpa fruit extract increased the SOD and CAT activities in the healing wounds, thereby significantly increasing MDA level. The topical treatment with P. macrocarpa fruit extract showed significant healing effect on excision wounds and demonstrated an important role in the inflammation process by increasing antioxidant enzyme activities, thereby accelerating the wound healing process and reducing tissue injury.

  1. EVALUATION OF WOUND HEALING ACTIVITY OF HELIOTROPIUM INDICUM LEAVES

    Shenoy Ashoka M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study is about the wound healing activity of ethanol and aqueous extracts of H.indicum leaves in wistar rats. Three wound models viz incision, excision and dead space wound were used in this study. The biophysical parameters studied were breaking strength in case of incision wounds and granulation tissue dry weight, breaking strength and hydroxyproline content in dead space wound model. In excision wound model, rate of contraction and number of days for epithelialization and also the granulation tissue formed on day 4, 8 and 12 were used to estimate some biochemical parameters like protein, DNA, collagen and lipid peroxides. For tropical application, 2% w/w sodium alginate ointment was prepared with 5% of aqueous and ethanol extracts of leaves. For oral administration 1% gum tragacanth suspension with 500mg/ml of extract was used. In excision and incision wound models, the control groups of animals were left untreated and in dead space wound model the animals were treated with 1 ml of 1% gum tragacanth per Kg, body weight orally.Aqueous and ethanol leaf extracts induced significant wound-healing activity against all the wound models studied. High rate of wound contraction, decrease in the period for epithelialisation, high skin breaking strength and granulation strength, increase in dry granulation tissue weight were observed in treated animals when compared to the control group of animals. There was significant increase in hydroxyproline, protein, collagen contents and decrease in lipid peroxide level in treated animals. Results of the study confirmed the prominent wound healing activity of the test extracts. Ethanol extract of H.indicum possesses better wound healing property compared to the aqueous extract.

  2. Biological properties and therapeutic activities of honey in wound healing: A narrative review and meta-analysis.

    Oryan, Ahmad; Alemzadeh, Esmat; Moshiri, Ali

    2016-05-01

    For thousands of years, honey has been used for medicinal applications. The beneficial effects of honey, particularly its anti-microbial activity represent it as a useful option for management of various wounds. Honey contains major amounts of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, vitamin and minerals that have important roles in wound healing with minimum trauma during redressing. Because bees have different nutritional behavior and collect the nourishments from different and various plants, the produced honeys have different compositions. Thus different types of honey have different medicinal value leading to different effects on wound healing. This review clarifies the mechanisms and therapeutic properties of honey on wound healing. The mechanisms of action of honey in wound healing are majorly due to its hydrogen peroxide, high osmolality, acidity, non-peroxide factors, nitric oxide and phenols. Laboratory studies and clinical trials have shown that honey promotes autolytic debridement, stimulates growth of wound tissues and stimulates anti-inflammatory activities thus accelerates the wound healing processes. Compared with topical agents such as hydrofiber silver or silver sulfadiazine, honey is more effective in elimination of microbial contamination, reduction of wound area, promotion of re-epithelialization. In addition, honey improves the outcome of the wound healing by reducing the incidence and excessive scar formation. Therefore, application of honey can be an effective and economical approach in managing large and complicated wounds. PMID:26852154

  3. Quantitative stain-free and continuous multimodal monitoring of wound healing in vitro with digital holographic microscopy.

    Dominik Bettenworth

    Full Text Available Impaired epithelial wound healing has significant pathophysiological implications in several conditions including gastrointestinal ulcers, anastomotic leakage and venous or diabetic skin ulcers. Promising drug candidates for accelerating wound closure are commonly evaluated in in vitro wound assays. However, staining procedures and discontinuous monitoring are major drawbacks hampering accurate assessment of wound assays. We therefore investigated digital holographic microscopy (DHM to appropriately monitor wound healing in vitro and secondly, to provide multimodal quantitative information on morphological and functional cell alterations as well as on motility changes upon cytokine stimulation. Wound closure as reflected by proliferation and migration of Caco-2 cells in wound healing assays was studied and assessed in time-lapse series for 40 h in the presence of stimulating epidermal growth factor (EGF and inhibiting mitomycin c. Therefore, digital holograms were recorded continuously every thirty minutes. Morphological changes including cell thickness, dry mass and tissue density were analyzed by data from quantitative digital holographic phase microscopy. Stimulation of Caco-2 cells with EGF or mitomycin c resulted in significant morphological changes during wound healing compared to control cells. In conclusion, DHM allows accurate, stain-free and continuous multimodal quantitative monitoring of wound healing in vitro and could be a promising new technique for assessment of wound healing.

  4. Wound healing and hyper-hydration: a counterintuitive model.

    Rippon, M G; Ousey, K; Cutting, K F

    2016-02-01

    Winter's seminal work in the 1960s relating to providing an optimal level of moisture to aid wound healing (granulation and re-epithelialisation) has been the single most effective advance in wound care over many decades. As such the development of advanced wound dressings that manage the fluidic wound environment have provided significant benefits in terms of healing to both patient and clinician. Although moist wound healing provides the guiding management principle, confusion may arise between what is deemed to be an adequate level of tissue hydration and the risk of developing maceration. In addition, the counter-intuitive model 'hyper-hydration' of tissue appears to frustrate the moist wound healing approach and advocate a course of intervention whereby tissue is hydrated beyond what is a normally acceptable therapeutic level. This paper discusses tissue hydration, the cause and effect of maceration and distinguishes these from hyper-hydration of tissue. The rationale is to provide the clinician with a knowledge base that allows optimisation of treatment and outcomes and explains the reasoning behind wound healing using hyper-hydration. Declaration of interest: K. Cutting is a Clinical Research Consultant to the medical device and biotechnology industry. M. Rippon is Visiting Clinical Research Fellow, University of Huddersfield and K. Ousey provides consultancy for a range of companies through the University of Huddersfield including consultancy services for Paul Hartmann Ltd on HydroTherapy products. PMID:26878298

  5. The Efficacy of Gelam Honey Dressing towards Excisional Wound Healing

    Mui Koon Tan; Durriyyah Sharifah Hasan Adli; Mohd Amzari Tumiran; Mahmood Ameen Abdulla; Kamaruddin Mohd Yusoff

    2012-01-01

    Honey is one of the oldest substances used in wound management. Efficacy of Gelam honey in wound healing was evaluated in this paper. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups of 24 rats each (untreated group, saline group, Intrasite Gel group, and Gelam honey group) with 2 cm by 2 cm full thickness, excisional wound created on neck area. Wounds were dressed topically according to groups. Rats were sacrificed on days 1, 5, 10, and 15 of treatments. Wounds were then processed ...

  6. Nitric oxide: a newly discovered function on wound healing

    Jian-dong LUO; Alex F CHEN

    2005-01-01

    Wound healing impairment represents a particularly challenging clinical problem to which no efficacious treatment regimens currently exist. The factors ensuring appropriate intercellular communication during wound repair are not completely understood. Although protein-type mediators are well-established players in this process, emerging evidence from both animal and human studies indicates that nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in wound repair. The beneficial effects of NO on wound repair may be attributed to its functional influences on angiogenesis,inflammation, cell proliferation, matrix deposition, and remodeling. Recent findings from in vitro and in vivo studies of NO on wound repair are summarized in this review. The unveiled novel mechanisms support the use of NO-containing agents and/or NO synthase gene therapy as new therapeutic regimens for impaired wound healing.

  7. Effect of novel blend nanofibrous scaffolds on diabetic wounds healing.

    Gholipour-Kanani, Adeleh; Bahrami, S Hajir; Rabbani, Shahram

    2016-02-01

    Chitosan-poly (vinyl alcohol) (Cs: PVA) (2:3) and poly (caprolactone)-chitosan-poly (vinyl alcohol) (PCL: Cs: PVA) (2:1:1.5) nanofibrous blend scaffolds were fabricated using the electrospinning technique in the authors' previous studies. The results of the previous studies confirmed the high biological properties of the scaffolds and their ability in healing of burn and excision wounds on rat model. In the present study, the biological scaffolds were applied on diabetic dorsum skin wounds and diabetic foot wound on rat models (n = 16). Macroscopic and microscopic investigations were carried out using digital images and haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining respectively, to measure the wound areas and to track wound healing rate. It was found that at all time points the areas of wounds treated with nanofibrous scaffolds were smaller compared with the controls. Pathological results showed much better healing efficacy for the test samples compared with the control ones. Pathological investigations proved the presence of more pronounced granulation tissues in the scaffold-treated wounds compared with the control ones. At 20 days post excision, the scaffold-treated groups achieved complete repair. The results indicated that Cs: PVA and PCL: Cs: PVA nanofibrous webs could be considered to be promising materials for burn, excision and diabetic wounds healing. PMID:26766866

  8. Gender affects skin wound healing in plasminogen deficient mice

    Rønø, Birgitte; Engelholm, Lars Henning; Lund, Leif Røge; Hald, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    functional plasmin thus display decreased tumor growth in a variety of cancer models. Interestingly, this role of plasmin has, in regard to skin cancer, been shown to be restricted to male mice. It remains to be clarified whether gender also affects other phenotypic characteristics of plasmin deficiency or......The fibrinolytic activity of plasmin plays a fundamental role in resolution of blood clots and clearance of extravascular deposited fibrin in damaged tissues. These vital functions of plasmin are exploited by malignant cells to accelerate tumor growth and facilitate metastases. Mice lacking...... if this gender effect is restricted to skin cancer. To investigate this, we tested the effect of gender on plasmin dependent immune cell migration, accumulation of hepatic fibrin depositions, skin composition, and skin wound healing. Gender did not affect immune cell migration or hepatic fibrin...

  9. Pro-healing effects of bilirubin in open excision wound model in rats.

    Ahanger, Azad A; Leo, Marie D; Gopal, Anu; Kant, Vinay; Tandan, Surendra K; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-06-01

    Bilirubin, a by-product of heme degradation, has an important role in cellular protection. Therefore, we speculated that bilirubin could be of potential therapeutic value in wound healing. To validate the hypothesis, we used a full-thickness cutaneous wound model in rats. Bilirubin (30 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally every day for 9 days. The surface area of the wound was measured on days 0, 2, 4, 7 and 10 after the creation of the wound. The granulation tissue was collected on day 10 post-wounding for analysing various parameters of wound healing. Bilirubin treatment accelerated wound contraction and increased hydroxyproline and glucosamine contents. mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory factors such as intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were down-regulated and that of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) was up-regulated. The findings suggest that bilirubin could be a new agent for enhancing cutaneous wound healing. PMID:24947136

  10. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    Sarah Chadwick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options.

  11. Neurolaena lobata L. promotes wound healing in Sprague Dawley rats

    Nayak, Bijoor Shivananda; Ramlogan, Surrin; Chalapathi Rao, AV; Maharaj, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Background: The leaves of the Neurolaena lobata (Asteraceae) plant are used to control diabetes and heal wounds and infections. Aim: The ethanolic extract of N. lobata leaf was evaluated for its ability to heal inflicted wounds in rats using the excision wound model. Materials and Methods: Animals were divided into three groups of six each. Test group animals were treated topically with an ethanolic extract of N. lobata (1:1 with petroleum jelly, 100 mg/kg/day). Standard and control group ani...

  12. Bee Venom Accelerates Wound Healing in Diabetic Mice by Suppressing Activating Transcription Factor-3 (ATF-3) and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS)-Mediated Oxidative Stress and Recruiting Bone Marrow-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    Badr, Gamal; Hozzein, Wael N; Badr, Badr M; Al Ghamdi, Ahmad; Saad Eldien, Heba M; Garraud, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Multiple mechanisms contribute to impaired diabetic wound healing including impaired neovascularization and deficient endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) recruitment. Bee venom (BV) has been used as an anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment of several diseases. Nevertheless, the effect of BV on the healing of diabetic wounds has not been studied. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the impact of BV on diabetic wound closure in a type I diabetic mouse model. Three experimental groups were used: group 1, non-diabetic control mice; group 2, diabetic mice; and group 3, diabetic mice treated with BV. We found that the diabetic mice exhibited delayed wound closure characterized by a significant decrease in collagen production and prolonged elevation of inflammatory cytokines levels in wounded tissue compared to control non-diabetic mice. Additionally, wounded tissue in diabetic mice revealed aberrantly up-regulated expression of ATF-3 and iNOS followed by a marked elevation in free radical levels. Impaired diabetic wound healing was also characterized by a significant elevation in caspase-3, -8, and -9 activity and a marked reduction in the expression of TGF-β and VEGF, which led to decreased neovascularization and angiogenesis of the injured tissue by impairing EPC mobilization. Interestingly, BV treatment significantly enhanced wound closure in diabetic mice by increasing collagen production and restoring the levels of inflammatory cytokines, free radical, TGF-β, and VEGF. Most importantly, BV-treated diabetic mice exhibited mobilized long-lived EPCs by inhibiting caspase activity in the wounded tissue. Our findings reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying improved diabetic wound healing and closure following BV treatment. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2159-2171, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26825453

  13. SPEED UP THE PROCESS OF HEALING THE OPEN WOUNDS BY LOW POWER HE-NE LASER RADIATION

    N TAKZARE

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Reducing pain and enhancement of wound healing have several advantages. Wound healing is a complicated but regular process that includes synchronized and organized phenomena such as paranchyma cells migration, proliferation and synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. Rate of wound healing is affected by various factors. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of low power He-Ne laser radiation (630 nm, on metabolic process, cellular proliferation and finally wound repairment. Methods: In our research, about 50 healthy and mature rats were studied by experimental method. After shaving, small cuts (10 mm were made at the neck. Then they were divided randomly into control and case groups. The rats of the case group were radiated by He-Ne laser in the wounds about 4 minutes each day. After a week, we did wound autopsy of both groups and all the specimens were studied microscopically. Results: The findings showed that there were significant increase in the fibroblasts and connective tissue fibers and also vascularisation in the case group compared with the control group. Discussion: Wound healing in the case group was accelerated and wound diameter was smaller significantly. So, low power He-Ne laser radiation accelerates wound healing process.

  14. Wound healing potential of Pterocarpus santalinus linn: a pharmacological evaluation.

    Biswas, Tuhin Kanti; Maity, Lakshmi Narayan; Mukherjee, Biswapati

    2004-09-01

    The need for new therapeutics for wound healing has encouraged the drive to examine the nature and value of plant products. Ayurveda, the Indian traditional system of medicine, mentions the values of medicinal plants for wound healing. One of these is Pterocarpus santalinus. This article describes a pharmacological study to evaluate its toxicity as well as wound-healing potential in animal studies. Powder made from the wood of the P. santalinus tree was used to make up an ointment in a petroleum jelly base. No toxic effects were observed in 72 hours. Studies were done on punch and burn wound models on normal and diabetic rats using the test ointment, untreated and vehicle controls, and standard therapy. Physical and biochemical measurements were made. The test ointment-treated wounds healed significantly faster. On healing, collagenesis and biochemical measurements yielded supportive data. These studies permit the conclusion that the P. santalinus ointment is safe and effective in treating acute wounds in animal models. PMID:15866805

  15. The neglected role of copper ions in wound healing.

    Kornblatt, Allison Paige; Nicoletti, Vincenzo Giuseppe; Travaglia, Alessio

    2016-08-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process that aims to repair damaged tissue. Even though many biological and biochemical mechanisms associated with the steps of physiological wound healing are known, there is still significant morbidity and mortality due to dysregulation of physiological mechanisms. It might be useful to revise the activity of old players and their links with new, often neglected, molecular entities. This review revises new findings supporting the hypothesis that copper ions regulate the activity and/or the expression of proteins crucially involved in the wound repair process. A better understanding of these interactions might suggest potential new targets for therapeutic intervention on scars or non-healing wounds. PMID:26920228

  16. Scientific production on the applicability of phenytoin in wound healing

    Flávia Firmino

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenytoin is an anticonvulsant that has been used in wound healing. The objectives of this study were to describe how the scientific production presents the use ofphenytoinas a healing agent and to discuss its applicability in wounds. A literature review and hierarchy analysis of evidence-based practices was performed. Eighteen articles were analyzed that tested the intervention in wounds such as leprosy ulcers, leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, trophic ulcers, war wounds, burns, preparation of recipient graft area, radiodermatitis and post-extraction of melanocytic nevi. Systemic use ofphenytoinin the treatment of fistulas and the hypothesis of topical use in the treatment of vitiligo were found. In conclusion, topical use ofphenytoinis scientifically evidenced. However robust research is needed that supports a protocol for the use ofphenytoinas another option of a healing agent in clinical practice.

  17. The effects of cancer and cancer therapies on wound healing

    Based on experimental evidence in rodents, most of the antineoplastic agents will affect wound healing. With most of the agents, this impairment is not sufficient to produce increased morbidity based on the clinical reports in humans. Radiation therapy appears to inhibit healing in both experimental animals and during clinical trials. In spite of this, it is reported that wounds in animals will heal when they are receiving radiation therapy after surgery. Based on the information presented here and experience at the University of Missouri, the decision to use adjuvant therapy should depend on the surgery performed. With a single incision that had no increased tension, there should be no hesitation to use adjuvant therapy. If removal of the tumor required reconstructive surgery, no radiation or chemotherapy should be used until the wound has healed. 30 references

  18. Intracellular processing of epidermal growth factor by early wound healing cells

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a potent 53-amino-acid residue polypeptide that has been implicated in normal wound healing. Although past studies have shown that locally applied EGF accelerates wound healing, these studies have not examined intracellular events related to the processing of the growth factor. The objective of this study was to characterize both initial and later postbinding intracellular processing of EGF by a responsive cell line (osteoblasts) that is important in the healing of wounds. Cloned mouse calvarial osteoblasts (MC-3TC-E1) were incubated with radiolabeled EGF, with and without preincubation with nonlabeled EGF, for specific time intervals. Cell-associated radioactivity was characterized by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results showed that EGF is processed as three distinct species and that the relative proportions of these species are altered at later time periods when compared with initial processing. The patterns, similar to those reported for human fibroblasts, indicate a possible common pathway for the mitogenic signal in cells associated with the early events of wound healing. In addition, these data represent the first direct evidence that preexposure of cells to nonlabeled EGF alters the processing of radiolabeled EGF. This is significant, because cells must be exposed to EGF for 5 to 8 hours to elicit a growth response. Such data may help to explain the lag phase of wound healing

  19. Translation medicine in wound healing: successful cases and personal deliberation%创面治疗中的转化医学:部分成果的研发和转化应用与思考

    付小兵

    2014-01-01

    Local wound care is the key step in wound management,and it is affected by many factors.The innovation and translation application of some new theories and skills may help accelerate local wound healing velocity and improve wound healing quality.In this paper,the translation medicine in wound healing,such as debridement,dressings,and tissue engineering products,are reviewed.In the meantime,personal consideration concerning their successful and future development is given.

  20. Influence of radiation crosslinked carboxymethyl-chitosan/gelatin hydrogel on cutaneous wound healing

    Huang, Xin [Beijing Key Laboratory for Solid Waste Utilization and Management, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Burns, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing 100035 (China); Zhang, Yaqing; Zhang, Xiangmei [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xu, Ling, E-mail: lingxu@pku.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory for Solid Waste Utilization and Management, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Shenzhen Key Laboratory for Polymer Science, Peking University Shenzhen Institute, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Chen, Xin, E-mail: xchin@vip.sina.com [Department of Burns, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing 100035 (China); Wei, Shicheng [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2013-12-01

    A series of carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-chitosan) and gelatin hydrogels were prepared by radiation crosslinking. A pre-clinical study was performed by implantation model and full-thickness cutaneous wound model in Sprague–Dawley rats to preliminarily evaluate the biocompatibility, biodegradability and effects on healing. In the implantation test, as a component of the hydrogels, CM-chitosan showed a positive effect on promoting cell proliferation and neovascularization, while gelatin was efficient to stabilize the structure and prolong the degradation time. To evaluate the function on wound healing, the hydrogels were applied to the relatively large full-thickness cutaneous wounds (Φ3.0 cm). Compared with the control groups, the hydrogel group showed significantly higher percentage of wound closure on days 9, 12 and 15 postoperatively, which was consistent with the significantly thicker granulation tissue on days 3 and 6. All results apparently revealed that the radiation crosslinked CM-chitosan/Gelatin hydrogels could induce granulation tissue formation and accelerate the wound healing. - Highlights: • The hydrogels were prepared by a facile and green method, radiation crosslinking. • The biodegradability and mechanical strength can be regulated by composition. • The hydrogels promote fibroblasts proliferation and neovascularization. • The hydrogels lead to earlier tissue granulation and re-epithelialization. • The hydrogels are ideal wound healing materials with excellent biocompatibility.

  1. Influence of radiation crosslinked carboxymethyl-chitosan/gelatin hydrogel on cutaneous wound healing

    A series of carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-chitosan) and gelatin hydrogels were prepared by radiation crosslinking. A pre-clinical study was performed by implantation model and full-thickness cutaneous wound model in Sprague–Dawley rats to preliminarily evaluate the biocompatibility, biodegradability and effects on healing. In the implantation test, as a component of the hydrogels, CM-chitosan showed a positive effect on promoting cell proliferation and neovascularization, while gelatin was efficient to stabilize the structure and prolong the degradation time. To evaluate the function on wound healing, the hydrogels were applied to the relatively large full-thickness cutaneous wounds (Φ3.0 cm). Compared with the control groups, the hydrogel group showed significantly higher percentage of wound closure on days 9, 12 and 15 postoperatively, which was consistent with the significantly thicker granulation tissue on days 3 and 6. All results apparently revealed that the radiation crosslinked CM-chitosan/Gelatin hydrogels could induce granulation tissue formation and accelerate the wound healing. - Highlights: • The hydrogels were prepared by a facile and green method, radiation crosslinking. • The biodegradability and mechanical strength can be regulated by composition. • The hydrogels promote fibroblasts proliferation and neovascularization. • The hydrogels lead to earlier tissue granulation and re-epithelialization. • The hydrogels are ideal wound healing materials with excellent biocompatibility

  2. Taking the trauma out of wound care: the importance of undisturbed healing.

    Rippon, M; Davies, P; White, R

    2012-08-01

    Significant advances in wound dressing technology have resulted in a myriad of dressing choices for wound-care clinicians, providing more than just an inert wound cover. The establishment of a moist wound environment under modern wound dressings and the optimisation of the healing response are now the goals expected of these dressings. However, the use of wound dressings, particularly traditional dressings such as gauze, frequently results in wound and peri-wound tissue damage that impairs the wound healing response, counteracting any of the dressings' healing benefits. Therefore, in order to maximise the healing benefits wounds covered by today's wound dressings must minimise tissue disturbance (physical as well as chemical). This review aims to consider the ways traditional, as well as modern, wound dressings may disturb wounds, summarising the potential areas of wound disturbance, and suggesting how best to address this aspect of the use of wound dressings to treat acute as well as chronic wounds. PMID:22885308

  3. Effects of Silk Sericin on Incision Wound Healing in a Dorsal Skin Flap Wound Healing Rat Model

    Ersel, Murat; Uyanikgil, Yigit; AKARCA, Funda Karbek; OZCETE, Enver; Altunci, Yusuf Ali; Karabey, Fatih; Cavusoglu, Turker; Meral, Ayfer; Yigitturk, Gurkan; Cetin, Emel Oyku

    2016-01-01

    Background The wound healing process is complex and still poorly understood. Sericin is a silk protein synthesized by silk worms (Bombyx mori). The objective of this study was to evaluate in vivo wound healing effects of a sericin-containing gel formulation in an incision wound model in rats. Material/Methods Twenty-eight Wistar-Albino rats were divided into 4 groups (n=7). No intervention or treatment was applied to the Intact control group. For other groups, a dorsal skin flap (9×3 cm) was ...

  4. Biosurgery in wound healing--the renaissance of maggot therapy.

    Wollina, U; Karte, K; Herold, C; Looks, A

    2000-07-01

    Chronic wounds are a challenge for modern health care. A basic principle of treatment is the removal of sloughy, necrotic, devitalized tissue to prevent wound infection and delayed healing. Biosurgery (syn. maggot or larval therapy) is a promising adjunct to the whole spectrum of topical treatment methods, in particular for debridement. The term 'biosurgery' describes the use of living maggots on wounds to remove devitalized tissue, decrease the risk of infection and improve wound healing. The present paper gives a brief review of history, entomology, biochemistry and medical indications of biosurgery and the practical handling of maggots. We also provide some clinical data from the literature and our own experience in a wound care unit. Biosurgery is an effective and safe treatment option for debridement and disinfection. PMID:11204517

  5. Epidermal growth factor loaded heparin-based hydrogel sheet for skin wound healing.

    Goh, MeeiChyn; Hwang, Youngmin; Tae, Giyoong

    2016-08-20

    A heparin-based hydrogel sheet composed of thiolated heparin and diacrylated poly (ethylene glycol) was prepared via photo polymerization and human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) were loaded into it for the purpose of wound healing. It showed a sustained release profile of hEGF in vitro. In order to evaluate its function on wound healing in vivo, full thickness wounds were created on the dorsal surface of mice. Application of hEGF loaded heparin-based hydrogel sheet accelerated the wound closure compared to the non-treated control group, hEGF solution, and hEGF loaded PEG hydrogel sheet. Histological and immunohistological examinations also demonstrated an advanced granulation tissue formation, capillary formation, and epithelialization in wounds treated by hEGF loaded heparin-based hydrogel compared to other groups, and no biocompatibility issue was observed. In conclusion, the delivery of hEGF using the heparin-based hydrogel could accelerate the skin wound healing process. PMID:27178931

  6. Wound healing complications in brain tumor patients on Bevacizumab.

    Ladha, Harshad; Pawar, Tushar; Gilbert, Mark R; Mandel, Jacob; O-Brien, Barbara; Conrad, Charles; Fields, Margaret; Hanna, Teresa; Loch, Carolyn; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-09-01

    Bevacizumab (BEV) is commonly used for treating recurrent glioblastoma (GBM), and wound healing is a well-established adverse event. Retrospective analysis of GBM patients with and without wound healing complications while on BEV treatment is reported. 287 patients identified, majority were males (60 %) with median age of 52.5 years. 14 cases identified with wound healing problems, related to either craniotomy (n = 8) or other soft tissue wounds (n = 6). Median duration of BEV treatment to complication was 62 days (range 6-559). Majority received 10 mg/kg (n = 11) and nine (64.3 %) were on corticosteroids, with median daily dose of 6 mg (range 1-16 mg) for median of 473 days before starting BEV. For dehisced craniotomy wounds, median time for starting BEV from last surgery was 29 days (range 27-345). Median time from starting BEV to developing wound complication was 47 days (range 16-173). Seven (87.5 %) had infected wounds requiring antibiotics, hospitalization. Four (50 %) required plastic surgery. BEV stopped and safely resumed in 6 (75 %) patients; median delay was 70 days (range 34-346). Soft tissue wounds included decubitus ulcer, dehisced striae, herpes simplex, trauma to hand and back, and abscess. Median time from starting BEV to wound issues was 72 days (range 6-559). Five (83.3 %) were infected, requiring antibiotics. While three (50 %) required hospitalization, none required plastic surgery. Treatment stopped in five (83.3 %) and restarted in two (median delay 48 days, range 26-69). Wound healing complications are uncommon but associated with significant morbidity. Identifying those at risk and contributing factors warrants further investigation. PMID:26298437

  7. Compromised Wound Healing in Ischemic Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    Peilang Yang

    Full Text Available Ischemia is one of the main epidemic factors and characteristics of diabetic chronic wounds, and exerts a profound effect on wound healing. To explore the mechanism of and the cure for diabetic impaired wound healing, we established a type 2 diabetic rat model. We used an 8 weeks high fat diet (HFD feeding regimen followed by multiple injections of streptozotocin (STZ at a dose of 10mg/kg to induce Wister rat to develop type 2 diabetes. Metabolic characteristics were assessed at the 5th week after the STZ injections to confirm the establishment of diabetes mellitus on the rodent model. A bipedicle flap, with length to width ratio 1.5, was performed on the back of the rat to make the flap area ischemic. Closure of excisional wounds on this bipedicle flap and related physiological and pathological changes were studied using histological, immunohistochemical, real time PCR and protein immunoblot approaches. Our results demonstrated that a combination of HFD feeding and a low dose of STZ is capable of inducing the rats to develop type 2 diabetes with noticeable insulin resistance, persistent hyperglycemia, moderate degree of insulinemia, as well as high serum cholesterol and high triglyceride levels. The excision wounds on the ischemic double pedicle flap showed deteriorative healing features comparing with non-ischemic diabetic wounds, including: delayed healing, exorbitant wound inflammatory response, excessive and prolonged ROS production and excessive production of MMPs. Our study suggested that HFD feeding combined with STZ injection could induce type 2 diabetes in rat. Our ischemic diabetic wound model is suitable for the investigation of human diabetic related wound repair; especically for diabetic chronic wounds.

  8. Compromised Wound Healing in Ischemic Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    Yang, Peilang; Pei, Qing; Yu, Tianyi; Chang, Qingxuan; Wang, Di; Gao, Min; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia is one of the main epidemic factors and characteristics of diabetic chronic wounds, and exerts a profound effect on wound healing. To explore the mechanism of and the cure for diabetic impaired wound healing, we established a type 2 diabetic rat model. We used an 8 weeks high fat diet (HFD) feeding regimen followed by multiple injections of streptozotocin (STZ) at a dose of 10mg/kg to induce Wister rat to develop type 2 diabetes. Metabolic characteristics were assessed at the 5th week after the STZ injections to confirm the establishment of diabetes mellitus on the rodent model. A bipedicle flap, with length to width ratio 1.5, was performed on the back of the rat to make the flap area ischemic. Closure of excisional wounds on this bipedicle flap and related physiological and pathological changes were studied using histological, immunohistochemical, real time PCR and protein immunoblot approaches. Our results demonstrated that a combination of HFD feeding and a low dose of STZ is capable of inducing the rats to develop type 2 diabetes with noticeable insulin resistance, persistent hyperglycemia, moderate degree of insulinemia, as well as high serum cholesterol and high triglyceride levels. The excision wounds on the ischemic double pedicle flap showed deteriorative healing features comparing with non-ischemic diabetic wounds, including: delayed healing, exorbitant wound inflammatory response, excessive and prolonged ROS production and excessive production of MMPs. Our study suggested that HFD feeding combined with STZ injection could induce type 2 diabetes in rat. Our ischemic diabetic wound model is suitable for the investigation of human diabetic related wound repair; especically for diabetic chronic wounds. PMID:27028201

  9. Wound healing activity of Ipomoea batatas tubers (sweet potato

    Madhav Sonkamble

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam. from the family Convolvulaceae is the world’s sixth largest food crop. The tubers of Ipomoea batatas commonly known as sweet potato are consumed as a vegetable globally. The tubers contain high levels of polyphenols such as anthocyanins and phenolic acids and vitamins A, B and C, which impart a potent antioxidant activity that can translate well to show wound healing effects. To check their effects on wound healing, the peels and peel bandage were tested on various injury models in rats in the present study.Methods: The methanolic extracts of the peels and peel bandage of Ipomoea batatas tubers (sweet potato were screened for wound healing by excision and incision wound models on Wistar rats. Three types of gel formulations were prepared, viz., gel containing 3.0% (w/w peel extract, gel containing 6.0% (w/w peel extract and gel containing 10% (w/w peel extract. Betadine (5% w/w povidone iodine cream was used as a reference standard. In the incision wound model, Tensile strength of the skin was measured. Epithelization time, wound contraction, hydroxyproline content of the scab, and ascorbic acid and malondialdehyde content of the plasma were determined in the excision wound model.Results: In the incision wound model, high tensile strength of the wounded skin was observed in animals treated with the peel extract gels and the peel bandage when compared with wounded control animals. The increase in tensile strength indicates the promotion of collagen fibers and that the disrupted wound surfaces are being firmly knit by collagen. In the excision wound model, significant wound closure was observed on the 4th day in rats treated with all three gel formulations when compared with the wounded control rats. A significant increase inFunctional Foods in Health and Disease 2011; 10:403-415hydroxyproline and ascorbic acid content in the gel-treated animals and a significant decrease in malondialdehyde content in the

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells and cutaneous wound healing: novel methods to increase cell delivery and therapeutic efficacy.

    Lee, Dylan E; Ayoub, Nagi; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) (also known as multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells) possess the capacity for self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation, and their ability to enhance cutaneous wound healing has been well characterized. Acting via paracrine interactions, MSCs accelerate wound closure, increase angiogenesis, promote resolution of wound inflammation, favorably regulate extracellular matrix remodeling, and encourage regeneration of skin with normal architecture and function. A number of studies have employed novel methods to amplify the delivery and efficacy of MSCs. Non-traditional sources of MSCs, including Wharton's jelly and medical waste material, have shown efficacy comparable to that of traditional sources, such as bone marrow and adipose tissue. The potential of alternative methods to both introduce MSCs into wounds and increase migration of MSCs into wound areas has also been demonstrated. Taking advantage of the associations between MSCs with M2 macrophages and microRNA, methods to enhance the immunomodulatory capacity of MSCs have shown success. New measures to enhance angiogenic capabilities have also exhibited effectiveness, often demonstrated by increased levels of proangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor. Finally, hypoxia has been shown to have strong wound-healing potential in terms of increasing MSC efficacy. We have critically reviewed the results of the novel studies that show promise for the continued development of MSC-based wound-healing therapies and provide direction for continued research in this field. PMID:26960535

  11. The Role of Iron in the Skin & Cutaneous Wound Healing

    JosephineAnneWright

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review article we discuss current knowledge about iron in the skin and the cutaneous wound healing process. Iron plays a key role in both oxidative stress and photo-induced skin damage. The main causes of oxidative stress in the skin include reactive oxygen species (ROS generated in the skin by ultraviolet (UVA 320-400 nm portion of the ultraviolet spectrum and biologically available iron. We also discuss the relationships between iron deficiency, anaemia and cutaneous wound healing. Studies looking at this fall into two distinct groups. Early studies investigated the effect of anaemia on wound healing using a variety of experimental methodology to establish anaemia or iron deficiency and focused on wound-strength rather than effect on macroscopic healing or re-epithelialisation. More recent animal studies have investigated novel treatments aimed at correcting the effects of systemic iron deficiency and localised iron overload. Iron overload is associated with local cutaneous iron deposition, which has numerous deleterious effects in chronic venous disease and hereditary haemochromatosis. Iron plays a key role in chronic ulceration and conditions such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA and Lupus Erythematosus are associated with both anaemia of chronic disease and dysregulation of local cutaneous iron haemostasis. Iron is a potential therapeutic target in the skin by application of topical iron chelators and novel pharmacological agents, and in delayed cutaneous wound healing by treatment of iron deficiency or underlying systemic inflammation.

  12. Stem Cells in Skin Wound Healing: Are We There Yet?

    Cerqueira, Mariana Teixeira; Pirraco, Rogério Pedro; Marques, Alexandra Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Cutaneous wound healing is a serious problem worldwide that affects patients with various wound types, resulting from burns, traumatic injuries, and diabetes. Despite the wide range of clinically available skin substitutes and the different therapeutic alternatives, delayed healing and scarring are often observed. Recent Advances: Stem cells have arisen as powerful tools to improve skin wound healing, due to features such as effective secretome, self-renewal, low immunogenicity, and differentiation capacity. They represent potentially readily available biological material that can particularly target distinct wound-healing phases. In this context, mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote cell migration, angiogenesis, and a possible regenerative rather than fibrotic microenvironment at the wound site, mainly through paracrine signaling with the surrounding cells/tissues. Critical Issues: Despite the current insights, there are still major hurdles to be overcome to achieve effective therapeutic effects. Limited engraftment and survival at the wound site are still major concerns, and alternative approaches to maximize stem cell potential are a major demand. Future Directions: This review emphasizes two main strategies that have been explored in this context. These comprise the exploration of hypoxic conditions to modulate stem cell secretome, and the use of adipose tissue stromal vascular fraction as a source of multiple cells, including stem cells and factors requiring minimal manipulation. Nonetheless, the attainment of these approaches to target successfully skin regeneration will be only evident after a significant number of in vivo works in relevant pre-clinical models. PMID:27076994

  13. Recent advances on the association of apoptosis in chronic non healing diabetic wound

    Arya, Awadhesh K; Tripathi, Richik; Kumar, Santosh; Tripathi, Kamlakar

    2014-01-01

    Generally, wounds are of two categories, such as chronic and acute. Chronic wounds takes time to heal when compared to the acute wounds. Chronic wounds include vasculitis, non healing ulcer, pyoderma gangrenosum, and diseases that cause ischemia. Chronic wounds are rapidly increasing among the elderly population with dysfunctional valves in their lower extremity deep veins, ulcer, neuropathic foot and pressure ulcers. The process of the healing of wounds has several steps with the involvement...

  14. Substance P Promotes Wound Healing in Diabetes by Modulating Inflammation and Macrophage Phenotype

    Leal, Ermelindo C.; Carvalho, Eugénia; Tellechea, Ana; Kafanas, Antonios; Tecilazich, Francesco; Kearney, Cathal; Kuchibhotla, Sarada; Auster, Michael E.; Kokkotou, Efi; Mooney, David J.; LoGerfo, Frank W; Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; Veves, Aristidis

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication of diabetes. Substance P (SP) is involved in wound healing, but its effect in diabetic skin wounds is unclear. We examined the effect of exogenous SP delivery on diabetic mouse and rabbit wounds. We also studied the impact of deficiency in SP or its receptor, neurokinin-1 receptor, on wound healing in mouse models. SP treatment improved wound healing in mice and rabbits, whereas the absence of SP or its receptor impaired wound progression in mi...

  15. Vitamin C promotes wound healing through novel pleiotropic mechanisms.

    Mohammed, Bassem M; Fisher, Bernard J; Kraskauskas, Donatas; Ward, Susan; Wayne, Jennifer S; Brophy, Donald F; Fowler, Alpha A; Yager, Dorne R; Natarajan, Ramesh

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin C (VitC) or ascorbic acid (AscA), a cofactor for collagen synthesis and a primary antioxidant, is rapidly consumed post-wounding. Parenteral VitC administration suppresses pro-inflammatory responses while promoting anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution effects in human/murine sepsis. We hypothesised that VitC could promote wound healing by altering the inflammatory, proliferative and remodelling phases of wound healing. Mice unable to synthesise VitC (Gulo(-/-) ) were used in this study. VitC was provided in the water (sufficient), withheld from another group (deficient) and supplemented by daily intra-peritoneal infusion (200 mg/kg, deficient + AscA) in a third group. Full thickness excisional wounds (6 mm) were created and tissue collected on days 7 and 14 for histology, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blotting. Human neonatal dermal fibroblasts (HnDFs) were used to assess effects of In conclusion, VitC favorably on proliferation. Histological analysis showed improved wound matrix deposition and organisation in sufficient and deficient +AscA mice. Wounds from VitC sufficient and deficient + AscA mice had reduced expression of pro-inflammatory mediators and higher expression of wound healing mediators. Supplementation of HnDF with AscA induced the expression of self-renewal genes and promoted fibroblast proliferation. VitC favourably impacts the spatiotemporal expression of transcripts associated with early resolution of inflammation and tissue remodelling. PMID:26290474

  16. Effects of Topically Applied Vitamin D during Corneal Wound Healing

    Reins, Rose Y.; Hanlon, Samuel D.; Magadi, Sri; McDermott, Alison M.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important regulator of immune function and largely acts to dampen chronic inflammatory events in a variety of tissues. There is also accumulating evidence that vitamin D acts to enhance initial inflammation, beneficial during both infection and wound healing, and then promotes resolution and prevention of chronic, damaging inflammation. The current study examines the effect of topical vitamin D in a mouse of model of corneal epithelial wound healing, where acute inflammation is necessary for efficient wound closure. At 12 and 18 hours post-wounding, vitamin D treatment significantly delayed wound closure by ~17% and increased infiltration of neutrophils into the central cornea. Basal epithelial cell division, corneal nerve density, and levels of VEGF, TGFβ, IL-1β, and TNFα were unchanged. However, vitamin D increased the production of the anti-microbial peptide CRAMP 12 hours after wounding. These data suggest a possible role for vitamin D in modulating corneal wound healing and have important implications for therapeutic use of vitamin D at the ocular surface. PMID:27035345

  17. Profiling wound healing with wound effluent: Raman spectroscopic indicators of infection

    Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    The care of modern traumatic war wounds remains a significant challenge for clinicians. Many of the extremity wounds inflicted during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom are colonized or infected with multi-drug resistant organisms, particularly Acinetobacter baumannii. Biofilm formation and resistance to current treatments can significantly confound the wound healing process. Accurate strain identification and targeted drug administration for the treatment of wound bioburden has become a priority for combat casualty care. In this study, we use vibrational spectroscopy to examine wound exudates for bacterial load. Inherent chemical differences in different bacterial species and strains make possible the high specificity of vibrational spectroscopy.

  18. Evaluation of In Vivo Wound Healing Activity of Bacopa monniera on Different Wound Model in Rats

    Murthy, S; Gautam, M. K.; Shalini Goel; V Purohit; SHARMA, H; Goel, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing effects of 50% ethanol extract of dried whole plant of Bacopa monniera (BME) was studied on wound models in rats. BME (25 mg/kg) was administered orally, once daily for 10 days (incision and dead space wound models) or for 21 days or more (excision wound model) in rats. BME was studied for its in vitro antimicrobial and in vivo wound breaking strength, WBS (incision model), rate of contraction, period of epithelization, histology of skin (excision model), granulation tissue free...

  19. Advances in research on mechanisms of the effect of negative pressure wound treatment in wound healing

    Lei LI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure wound treatment (NPWT refers to apply a highly porous material between the wound and a semipermeable membrane, and it is then connected to a suction apparatus, leading to a minimal deformation of wound, resulting in promoting cell proliferation and wound repair. These devices may significantly expedite wound healing, facilitate the formation of granulation tissue, and reduce the complexity of subsequent reconstructive operations. In recent years, along with wide clinical use, the therapeutic effect of NPWT has been recognized, but the mechanism of its clinical effect still needs further research. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.08.15

  20. News in wound healing and management

    Gottrup, Finn; Jørgensen, Bo; Karlsmark, Tonny

    2009-01-01

    . In the treatment of wounds, the new trend in the wound device marked is to produce dressings containing compounds or drugs. This could be local antiseptics (silver, other antiseptics, honey) and pain relieving drugs such as ibuprofen and morphine. New treatments such as anti-tumor necrosis factor...

  1. Effect of cow urine on wound healing property in Wister Albino Rats

    V.P. Tikare.,Paniraj K.L and Swetha R

    Full Text Available The wound healing activity of cow urine was studied in Wistar albino rats. The efficacy of wound healing property was evaluated by excision wound model. The parameter studied was the rate of wound contraction. The studies on excision wound healing revealed that all the groups showed decreased wound area from day to day. On day 4th, the external application of urine showed significant increase in wound healing in male and female rats compared to all other groups. However, on 14th post wounding day, Group I and VIII animals showed 0 % and 0.40.4 % of healing was left, which may be due to normal immunity of the animals. Where as nitrofurazone treated animals showed 0 % and 0.50.3 % healing .The study revealed that the cow urine on external application to the wound, hastened the wound healing process. [Vet. World 2011; 4(7.000: 317-321

  2. [New directions of research related to chronic wound healing].

    Rusak, Agnieszka; Rybak, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Optimal nutrition, immunological state and psychological condition play an important role in the process of chronic wound healing. Infections caused by pathogens resistant to commonly used antibiotics additionally complicate and disturb regeneration of wounds. As part of the treatment, modern wound dressings are used, for example designed on the basis of alginates, dextranomers, hydrogels, hydrofiber, polyurethanes foams, hydrocolloids and liquids for wound debridement such us 0.9% NaCl, the PWE liquid, Ringer's liquid, octenidine. Owing to their features, treatment in accordance with TIME concept could be realized, because they provide moisture wound bed, protection against contamination, gas exchange, protection of wound edges and infection control. Repairing process in chronic wounds is dependent on blood flow in tissues, which may be insufficient. The result is a permanent hypoxia. Natural occurring antioxidants are becoming more crucial in chronic wound treatment. They decrease oxygen radical concentration, increase angiogenesis, reduce inflammatory response, stimulate fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation, possess antibacterial properties against chemotherapeutic resistant strains. There are a lot of antioxidants in honey, papaya fruit (Carrica papaia L.), transgenic flax (Linum usitatissimum), and in orange oil (Citrus sinensis), stem of acanthus (Acanthus ebracteatus), leafs of tea (Camellia sinensis). Application of biologically active, natural derived compounds is nowadays a direction of intense in vitro and in vivo research focused on the chronic wound treatment. Results suggest beneficial influence of antioxidant on wound repairing process. Clinical research are needed to state effective influence of natural compound in the chronic wound treatment. PMID:24377187

  3. Immune and vascular dysfunction in diabetic wound healing.

    Ahmed, A S; Antonsen, E L

    2016-07-01

    The diminished capacity for wound healing in patients with diabetes contributes to morbidity through ulceration and recurrent infections, loss of function and decreased workplace productivity, increased hospitalisation rates, and rising health-care costs. These are due to diabetes' effects on signalling molecules, cellular cascades, different cell populations, and the vasculature. The function of multiple immune system components including cellular response, blood factors, and vascular tone are all negatively impacted by diabetes. The purpose of this paper is to review the current understanding of immune and vascular dysfunction contributing to impaired wound healing mechanisms in the diabetic population. Normal wound healing mechanisms are reviewed followed by diabetic aberrations to immune and inflammatory function and atherogenesis and angiopathy. PMID:27410470

  4. Wound healing and all-cause mortality in 958 wound patients treated in home care

    Zarchi, Kian; Martinussen, Torben; Jemec, Gregor B. E.

    2015-01-01

    Skin wounds are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Data are, however, not readily available for benchmarking, to allow prognostic evaluation, and to suggest when involvement of wound-healing experts is indicated. We, therefore, conducted an observational cohort study to investig...

  5. [Wound-healing effect of carbopol hydrogels in rats with alloxan diabetes model].

    Zinov'ev, E V; Ivakhniuk, G K; Dadaian, K A; Lagvilava, T O

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 0.5% hydrogels of acrylic polymers (carbopol), antibiotic ointment based on polyethylene oxides (levomekol), silver-containing creams (dermazin and argosulfan), silver sulfadiazine ointment with epidermal growth factor (ebermin), and wound-covering fabric of antibacterial cellulose with poviargol and zero-valent silver (aquacell-Ag) on skin repair processes have been evaluated in comparative experiments on rats. The wound-healing effects were characterized by the time of cleansing and epithelization, rate of suppuration, index of healing, and skin impedance under conditions of necrotic skin lesions on the background of diabetes. It is established that local application of carbopol hydrogels modified by electric (frequency-modulated) signal with antiseptics (poviargol) and nanostructural components (natural fullerene complex) shortens the period of wound cleansing from detritus on the background of decompensated diabetes by 3.6 days (p > 0.05), accelerates healing by 8.4 days (p wound infections by pathogens, and restores tissue impedance. Thus, hydrogels based on low-crosslinked acrylic polymers are a promising basis of wound-healing formulations for the treatment of necrotic lesions on the background of diabetic foot syndrome. PMID:24649598

  6. Wound Healing and Indigenous Drugs: Role as Antioxidants: A Review

    B Somashekar Shetty

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicine, especially herbal medicine has recently been receiving heightened interest all over the world. Man from the very beginning has been aware of the health problems and has been taking care of health through diet and drugs for which plants were used extensively. Molecular oxygen plays a central role in the pathogenesis and therapy of chronic wounds. When reactive oxygen species are overproduced, oxidative stress results in detrimental cytotoxic effects causing delayed wound healing. Therefore, elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS could be an important strategy to improve healing of chronic wounds. Currently therapeutic strategies targeting reactive oxygen species (ROS by antioxidants are being introduced into the treatment of chronic wounds. Natural compounds from medicinal plants having antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities are used as therapeutic agents. Indian medicinal plants with these activities have been identified and their antioxidant and immunomodulatory effects have been reviewed.

  7. Remodeling of skin nerve fibers during burn wound healing

    Yongqiang Feng; Xia Li; Rui Zhang; Yu Liu; Tingting Leng; Yibing Wang

    2010-01-01

    Burn wound healing involves a complex sequence of processes.Recent studies have revealed that skin reinnervation may have an impact on physiological wound repair.Few studies have addressed the process of reinnervation and morphological changes in regenerated nerve fibers.The regeneration of neurites during full-thickness burn wound healing was determined by immunofluorescent staining using an anti-neurofilament protein monoclonal antibody,and three-dimensional morphology was observed under a laser scanning confocal microscope.Morphology and the volume fraction of collagen and nerve fibers were measured.Skin reinnervation increased during wound healing,peaked during the proliferative scar stage,and then decreased to lower levels during the maturation period.The results from the skin nerve fibers correlated with those from collagen using semi-quantitative analysis.Disintegration and fragmentation were observed frequently in samples from the proliferative stage,and seldom occurred during the maturation stage.There was a remodeling process of regenerated nerve fibers during wound healing,which comprised changed innervation density and topical morphology.The mechanism of remodeling for nerve fibers requires further investigation.

  8. From a traditional medicinal plant to a rational drug: understanding the clinically proven wound healing efficacy of birch bark extract.

    Sandra Ebeling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Birch bark has a long lasting history as a traditional medicinal remedy to accelerate wound healing. Recently, the efficacy of birch bark preparations has also been proven clinically. As active principle pentacyclic triterpenes are generally accepted. Here, we report a comprehensive study on the underlying molecular mechanisms of the wound healing properties of a well-defined birch bark preparation named as TE (triterpene extract as well as the isolated single triterpenes in human primary keratinocytes and porcine ex-vivo wound healing models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show positive wound healing effects of TE and betulin in scratch assay experiments with primary human keratinocytes and in a porcine ex-vivo wound healing model (WHM. Mechanistical studies elucidate that TE and betulin transiently upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and cyclooxygenase-2 on gene and protein level. For COX-2 and IL-6 this increase of mRNA is due to an mRNA stabilizing effect of TE and betulin, a process in which p38 MAPK and HuR are involved. TE promotes keratinocyte migration, putatively by increasing the formation of actin filopodia, lamellipodia and stress fibers. Detailed analyses show that the TE components betulin, lupeol and erythrodiol exert this effect even in nanomolar concentrations. Targeting the actin cytoskeleton is dependent on the activation of Rho GTPases. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide insights to understand the molecular mechanism of the clinically proven wound healing effect of birch bark. TE and betulin address the inflammatory phase of wound healing by transient up-regulation of several pro-inflammatory mediators. Further, they enhance migration of keratinocytes, which is essential in the second phase of wound healing. Our results, together with the clinically proven efficacy, identify birch bark as the first medical plant with a high potential to improve wound healing, a field which urgently

  9. Roles of Proteoglycans and Glycosaminoglycans in Wound Healing and Fibrosis

    Shibnath Ghatak; Maytin, Edward V.; Mack, Judith A.; Vincent C. Hascall; Ilia Atanelishvili; Ricardo Moreno Rodriguez; Markwald, Roger R.; Suniti Misra

    2015-01-01

    A wound is a type of injury that damages living tissues. In this review, we will be referring mainly to healing responses in the organs including skin and the lungs. Fibrosis is a process of dysregulated extracellular matrix (ECM) production that leads to a dense and functionally abnormal connective tissue compartment (dermis). In tissues such as the skin, the repair of the dermis after wounding requires not only the fibroblasts that produce the ECM molecules, but also the overlying epithelia...

  10. Fibroblasts and Myofibroblasts in Wound Healing: Force Generation and Measurement

    Li, Bin; Wang, James H-C

    2009-01-01

    Fibroblasts are one of the most abundant cell types in connective tissues. These cells are responsible for tissue homeostasis under normal physiological conditions. When tissues are injured, fibroblasts become activated and differentiate into myofibroblasts, which generate large contractions and actively produce extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins to facilitate wound closure. Both fibroblasts and myofibroblasts play a critical role in wound healing by generating traction and contractile force...

  11. Wound healing potential of Spirulina platensis extracts on human dermal fibroblast cells.

    Syarina, Pauzi Nur Aimi; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Abas, Faridah; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis) is a well renowned nutri-supplement due to its high nutritional and medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to examine the wound healing efficiency of Spirulina platensis at various solvent extracts using in vitro scratch assay on human dermal fibroblast cells (HDF). Various gradient solvent extracts (50 μg/ml of methanolic, ethanolic and aqueous extracts) from Spirulina platensis were treated on HDF cells to acquire its wound healing properties through scratch assay and in this investigation we have used allantoin, as a positive control to compare efficacy among the phytoextracts. Interestingly, aqueous extract were found to stimulate proliferation and migration of HDF cells at given concentrations and enhanced closure rate of wound area within 24 hours after treatment. Methanolic and ethanolic extracts have shown proliferative effect, however these extracts did not aid in the migration and closure of wound area when compared to aqueous extract. Based on phytochemical profile of the plant extracts analyzed by LC-MS/MS, it was shown that compounds supposedly involved in accelerating wound healing are cinnamic acid, narigenin, kaempferol, temsirolimus, phosphatidylserine isomeric derivatives and sulphoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. Our findings concluded that blue-green algae may pose potential biomedical application to treat various chronic wounds especially in diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:27004048

  12. Comparison of EGF with VEGF Non-Viral Gene Therapy for Cutaneous Wound Healing of Streptozotocin Diabetic Mice

    Junghae Ko

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTo accelerate the healing of diabetic wounds, various kinds of growth factors have been employed. It is the short half-life of administered growth factors in hostile wound beds that have limited wide-spread clinical usage. To overcome this limitation, growth factor gene therapy could be an attractive alternative rather than direct application of factors onto the wound beds. We administered two growth factor DNAs, epidermal growth factor (EGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF into a cutaneous wound on diabetic mice. We compared the different characteristics of the healing wounds.MethodsStreptozotocin was injected intraperitoneally to induce diabetes into C57BL/6J mice. The ultrasound micro-bubble destruction method with SonoVue as a bubbling agent was used for non-viral gene delivery of EGF828 and VEGF165 DNAs. Each gene was modified for increasing efficacy as FRM-EGF828 or minicircle VEGF165. The degree of neoangiogenesis was assessed using qualitative laser Doppler flowmetry. We compared wound size and histological findings of the skin wounds in each group.ResultsIn both groups, accelerated wound closure was observed in the mice receiving gene therapy compared with non treated diabetic control mice. Blood flow detected by laser doppler flowmetry was better in the VEGF group than in the EGF group. Wound healing rates and histological findings were more accelerated in the EGF gene therapy group than the VEGF group, but were not statistically significant.ConclusionBoth non-viral EGF and VEGF gene therapy administrations could improve the speed and quality of skin wound healing. However, the detailed histological characteristics of the healing wounds were different.

  13. Wound healing and the effect of pineal gland and melatonin

    Jacek Drobnik

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a complex phenomenon that is controlled by local and general regulatory mechanisms. The aim of the paper is to analyze recently-published data devoted to the regulation of wound repair by melatonin. The effect of melatonin has been reported in different wound types healed with various mechanisms. The action of the pineal indoleamine is dependent on the used dose, time of application and target organ. Moreover, melatonin influences different phases of wound repair such as inflammation, by regulating the release of inflammatory mediators, cell proliferation and migration, by influencing angiogenesis, and the proliferation of fibroblasts, as well as the synthesis phase, by regulating collagen and glycosaminoglycan accumulation in the wounded milieu. Thus, healing of the skin wound, myocardial infarction, bone fractures and gastric ulcer is influenced by melatonin. In patients with low levels of melatonin (elderly or β-blocker treated patients, its regulatory effects are expected to be impaired. Thus, the need for melatonin supplementation in those patients is postulated in the study. [J Exp Integr Med 2012; 2(1.000: 3-14

  14. Effect of pirfenidone delivered using layer-by-layer thin film on excisional wound healing.

    Mandapalli, Praveen Kumar; Labala, Suman; Bojja, Jagadeesh; Venuganti, Venkata Vamsi Krishna

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a new anti-fibrotic agent, pirfenidone (PFD), delivered using polyelectrolyte multilayer films on excisional wound healing. Polyelectrolyte multilayer films were prepared by layer-by-layer (LbL) sequential adsorption of chitosan and sodium alginate. The UV-spectrophotometer, FTIR and differential scanning calorimeter were used to characterize the LbL thin films. The PFD was entrapped within the LbL thin films and its effect on excisional wound healing was studied in C57BL/6. The total protein, collagen content and TGF-β expression within the wound tissue were determined after application of PFD using LbL thin films, chitosan hydrogel and polyethylene glycol hydrogel. UV-spectrophotometer and FTIR studies showed a sequential adsorption of chitosan and alginate polymer layers to form LbL thin films. The thickness of LbL thin films with 15 bilayers was found to be 15 ± 2 μm. HPLC analysis showed a PFD loading efficiency of 1.0 ± 0.1mg in 1cm(2) area of LbL thin film. In vivo wound healing studies in C57BL/6 mice showed an accelerated (<9 days) wound contraction after treatment with the PFD compared with blank LbL thin film and commercial povidone-iodine gel (12 days). The collagen content within the wound tissue was significantly (p<0.05) less after treatment with PFD compared with blank film application. Western blot analysis showed gradual decrease in TGF-β expression within the wound tissue after treatment with PFD. This study for the first time demonstrated that new anti-fibrotic agent PFD loaded in LbL thin films can be utilized for excisional wound healing. PMID:26723907

  15. Contact dermatitis presenting as non-healing wound: case report

    Leelavathi M; Le YY; Tohid H; Hasliza AH

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Topical antiseptics are commonly used in the management of minor wounds, burns, and infected skin. These agents are widely used by health professionals and are often self-prescribed by patients as they are easily available over-the-counter. This case illustrates a 73 year old man who presented with a non-healing wound on his right forearm for 4 weeks. The wound started from an insect bite and progressively enlarged with increasing pruritus and burning sensation. Clinically an ill-def...

  16. Scar-Free Embryonic Wound Healing and the Prevention of Scarring Following Wound Healing in the Adult

    McCallion, R. L.; Ferguson, M W J

    1997-01-01

    The development of scarring following accidental injury or surgery is an important clinical problem, often resulting in adverse effects on frowth and function, as well as an undersirable cosmetic appearance. Adult wound healing and scar formation are characterised by acute inflammation, wound contraction and disordered collagen deposition. Similar processes may also be involved in the progression of fibrotic disease states such as pulmonary fibrosis and hepatic cirrhosis. A major clinical obj...

  17. WOUND HEALING ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL POTENTIALS OF SELECTED MEDICINAL PLANTS USED BY MALAYALI TRIBES

    Ramya Subramanian; Gopinath Krishnasamy; Aruna Devaraj; Padmavathy Sethuraman; Ramaraj Jayakumararaj

    2011-01-01

    Healing chronic lower extremity wound is a problem worldwide, especially in developing countries. Aim of the present study is to document the traditional knowledge base / medicinal plants pertinent to healing wound popular among Malayali’s in Vattal Hills, Dharmapuri, Tamilnadu, India. Malayali’s in this area use a large number of plants extracts/ decoctions/ pastes to heal wound/ cut. Further, many of the plants used by Malayali’s have not been validated for their wound healing potential. Th...

  18. [Comparative Evaluation of Healing Wounds at a Local and Combined Radiation Injury in an Experiment].

    Legeza, V I; Grebenyuk, A N; Kondakov, A Y; Zargarova, N I

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing activity of 20 different means of conservative treatment of radiation burns was studies in the experiments on the rats subjected to local β-radiation (at a dose of 60 Gy) and combined radiation damage (β-radiation at a dose of 60 Gy and the whole-body γ-irradiation at a dose of 4 Gy). It was found that reparative processes in the irradiated,skin in the case of the local radiation injuries are most effectively accelerated by ointments Biopin, Panthenol-Ratiopharm, IL-1β and Iruksol; Dimexidum solution; aerosols Olazol, Gipozol and Polkortolon; wound coverings Procell-super and Selenopol. Ointments containing IL-1β, Dimexidum solution, aerosols and wound coverings have a healing effect in the case of combined radiation injury. PMID:26964343

  19. Silk sericin ameliorates wound healing and its clinical efficacy in burn wounds.

    Aramwit, Pornanong; Palapinyo, Sirinoot; Srichana, Teerapol; Chottanapund, Suthat; Muangman, Pornprom

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silk sericin, a protein from silkworm cocoon, on scratch wound healing in vitro. For applicable result in clinical use, we also study the efficacy of sericin added to a standard antimicrobial cream, silver zinc sulfadiazine, for open wound care in the treatment of second-degree burn wounds. In vitro scratch assays show that sericin at concentration 100 μg/mL can promote the migration of fibroblast L929 cells similar to epidermal growth factor (positive control) at 100 μg/mL. After 1 day of treatment, the length of scratch in wounds treated with sericin was significantly shorter than the length of negative control wounds (culture medium without sericin). For clinical study, a total of 29 patients with 65 burn wounds which covered no less than 15 % of total body surface area were randomly assigned to either control (wounds treated with silver zinc sulfadiazine cream) or treatment (wounds treated with silver zinc sulfadiazine with added sericin cream) group in this randomized, double-blind, standard-controlled study. The results showed that the average time to reach 70 % re-epithelialization of the burned surface and complete healing in the treatment group was significantly shorter, approximately 5-7 days, than in the control group. Regarding time for complete healing, control wounds took approximately 29.28 ± 9.27 days, while wounds treated with silver zinc sulfadiazine with added sericin cream took approximately 22.42 ± 6.33 days, (p = 0.001). No infection or severe reaction was found in any wounds. This is the first clinical study to show that silk sericin is safe and beneficial for burn wound treatment when it is added to silver sulfadiazine cream. PMID:23748948

  20. Wound healing activity of Malva sylvestris and Punica granatum in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    Pirbalouti, Abdollah Ghasemi; Azizi, Shahrzad; Koohpayeh, Abed; Hamedi, Behzad

    2010-01-01

    The flowers of Malva sylvestris Linn. (Malvaceae) and Punica granatum Linn. (Punicaceae) are important medicinal plants in Iranian traditional medicine (Unani) whose have been used as remedy against edema, bum, wound and for their carminative, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities. The diethyl ether extract of M. sylvestris and P. granatum flowers were used to evaluate the wound healing activity at 200 mg/kg/day dose in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Wounds were induced in Wister rats divided into six groups as following; Group I, normal rats were treated with simple ointment base. Group II, diabetic rats were treated with simple ointment base (control). Groups III and IV, diabetic rats were treated with simple ointment base containing of extracts (diabetic animals), Groups V, diabetic rats were treated with simple ointment base containing of mixed extracts (1:1), Group VI, diabetic rats received the standard drug (nitrofurazone). The efficacy of treatment was evaluated based on wound area relative and histopathological characteristics. The extract-treated diabetic animals showed significant reduction in the wound area when compared with control. Also, histological studies of the tissue obtained on days 9th and 18th from the extract-treated by extract of M. sylvestris showed increased well organized bands of collagen, more fibroblasts and few inflammatory cells. These findings demonstrate that extract of M. sylvestis effectively stimulates wound contraction as compared to control group and other groups. M. sylvestris accelerated wound healing in rats and thus supports its traditional use. PMID:20873419

  1. Negative pressure wound therapy accelerates rats diabetic wound by promoting agenesis

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Jiaqi; Liu, Yang; Hu, Xiaolong; Dong, Maolong; Wang, Hongtao; Hu, Dahai

    2015-01-01

    Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) has become widely adopted to several wound treatment over the last 15 years, including diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). Much of the existing evidence supports that NPWT increase in blood flow, reduce in edema, decrease bacterial proliferation and accelerate granulation-tissue formation. However, the accurate mechanism is not clear till now. The aim of the present study was to further elucidate the effects of NPWT on angiogenesis of diabetic wound model. As result, our data showed: 1) NPWT promoted the wound healing and blood perfusion on both diabetic and normal wound compared with control, 2) The NPWT increased wound vessel density, and the wound treated with NPWT showed well developed and more functional vessels at day 7 post operation compared with control 3) NPWT up regulated the expression of VEGF at day 3 and Ang1 at day 7 on RNA and protein level. 4) Ang2 was up regulated in diabetic rats but NPWT attenuated this affection. Our data indicated that NPWT increased vessel density and promoted the maturation of neovascular over the potential mechanism of up regulated VEGF and Ang1 and down regulated of Ang2. PMID:26064242

  2. WOUND HEALING ACTIVITY OF FLAVONOID FRACTION OF CYNODON DACTYLON IN SWISS ALBINO MICE

    M. Saroja; Santhi, R; S. ANNAPOORANI

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the wound healing activity of flavonoid fraction of Cynodon dactylon in swiss albino mice. The wound healing property of the fraction was studied in excision wound which was inflicted by cutting away 0.5cm standard full thickness of wound was created on the predetermined dorsal area. The flavonoid fraction of Cynodon dactylon were applied externally daily on the excised wound area for 8 days. This fraction facilitates the healing process as evidence...

  3. The Review on Properties of Aloe Vera in Healing of Cutaneous Wounds

    Seyyed Abbas Hashemi; Seyyed Abdollah Madani; Saied Abediankenari

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of wounds is very important and was subject of different investigations. In this regard, natural substance plays crucial role as complementary medicine. Various studies reported that aloe vera has useful effects on wounds especially cutaneous wounds healing. Therefore in the current review, we examined the effect of aloe vera on cutaneous wound healing and concluded that although aloe vera improves the wound healing as well as other procedures both clinically and experimentally, mor...

  4. Wnt signaling induces epithelial differentiation during cutaneous wound healing

    Hocking Anne

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cutaneous wound repair in adult mammals does not regenerate the original epithelial architecture and results in altered skin function. We propose that lack of regeneration may be due to the absence of appropriate molecular signals to promote regeneration. In this study, we investigated the regulation of Wnt signaling during cutaneous wound healing and the consequence of activating either the beta-catenin-dependent or beta-catenin-independent Wnt signaling on epidermal architecture during wound repair. Results We determined that the expression of Wnt ligands that typically signal via the beta-catenin-independent pathway is up-regulated in the wound while the beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling is activated in the hair follicles adjacent to the wound edge. Ectopic activation of beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling with lithium chloride in the wound resulted in epithelial cysts and occasional rudimentary hair follicle structures within the epidermis. In contrast, forced expression of Wnt-5a in the deeper wound induced changes in the interfollicular epithelium mimicking regeneration, including formation of epithelia-lined cysts in the wound dermis, rudimentary hair follicles and sebaceous glands, without formation of tumors. Conclusion These findings suggest that adult interfollicular epithelium is capable of responding to Wnt morphogenic signals necessary for restoring epithelial tissue patterning in the skin during wound repair.

  5. Bathysa cuspidata extract modulates the morphological reorganization of the scar tissue and accelerates skin wound healing in rats: a time-dependent study.

    Gonçalves, Reggiani V; Novaes, Rômulo D; Cupertino, Marli C; Araújo, Bruna M; Vilela, Emerson F; Machado, Aline T; Leite, João P V; Matta, Sérgio L P

    2014-01-01

    The technological development of pharmaceutical products based on plant extracts is currently responsible for a large number of recent innovations in healthcare. The objective of this study was to develop and investigate the effect and potential applicability of an ointment-based Bathysa cuspidata extract (BCE) for the management of skin wounds in rats. Three skin wounds of 12 mm in diameter were made on the backs of the animals, which were randomized into 4 groups according to the application received, i.e. the SAL group: 0.9% saline solution, the LAN group: lanolin, the BCE 2.5% group: 2.5% BCE emulsified in lanolin and the BCE 5% group: 5% BCE emulsified in lanolin. The applications were made daily over 21 days, and every 7 days tissue from different wounds was removed. On days 7, 14 and 21, the BCE 2.5% and BCE 5% groups showed the best results in relation to wound closure, and a higher proportion (in length, density and volume) of blood vessels and fibroblasts compared to the other groups. On days 7 and 14, there was a significant increase in the number of mast cells in these 2 groups when compared to the SAL and LAN groups. On day 21, they also had a higher proportion of collagen I than collagen III. B. cuspidata in an ointment base was effective in stimulating tissue cellularity, mast cell recruitment, neoangiogenesis, synthesis and maturation of collagen, epidermal thickness and surface area in scar tissue. These events were potentially related to the best quality and speed for skin regeneration in the rats treated with the BCE ointment. PMID:25300223

  6. The heme-heme oxygenase system in wound healing; implications for scar formation.

    Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.; Scharstuhl, A.; Tyrrell, R.M.; Hoff, J.W. von den; Jozkowicz, A.; Dulak, J.; Russel, F.G.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing is an intricate process requiring the concerted action of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages. Here, we review the literature on normal wound healing and the pathological forms of wound healing, such as hypertrophic or excessive scar formation, with special e

  7. Regenerative Medicine: Charting a New Course in Wound Healing

    Gurtner, Geoffrey C.; Chapman, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Chronic wounds are a prevalent and costly problem in the United States. Improved treatments are needed to heal these wounds and prevent serious complications such as infection and amputation. Recent Advances: In wound healing, as in other areas of medicine, technologies that have the potential to regenerate as opposed to repair tissue are gaining ground. These include customizable nanofiber matrices incorporating novel materials; a variety of autologous and allogeneic cell types at various stages of differentiation (e.g., pluripotent, terminally differentiated); peptides; proteins; small molecules; RNA inhibitors; and gene therapies. Critical Issues: Wound healing is a logical target for regenerative medicine due to the accessibility and structure of skin, the regenerative nature of healing, the lack of good limb salvage treatments, and the current use of cell therapies. However, more extensive knowledge of pathophysiologic targets is needed to inform regenerative strategies, and new technologies must demonstrate value in terms of outcomes and related health economic measures to achieve successful market access and penetration. Future Directions: Due to similarities in cell pathways and developmental mechanisms, regenerative technologies developed in one therapeutic area may be applicable to others. Approaches that proceed from human genomic or other big data sources to models are becoming increasingly common and will likely suggest novel therapeutic avenues. To fully capitalize on the advances in regenerative medicine, studies must demonstrate the value of new therapies in identified patient populations, and sponsors must work with regulatory agencies to develop appropriate dossiers supporting timely approval. PMID:27366592

  8. Targeting connexin 43 in diabetic wound healing: Future perspectives

    Bajpai S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The unknown mechanisms of impaired tissue repair in diabetes mellitus are making this disease a serious clinical problem for the physicians worldwide. The lacuna in the knowledge of the etiology of diabetic wounds necessitates more focused research in order to develop new targeting tools with higher efficacy for their effective management. Gap-junction proteins, connexins, have shown some promising results in the process of diabetic wound healing. Till now the role of connexins has been implicated in peripheral neuropathy, deafness, skin disorders, cataract, germ cell development and treatment of cancer. Recent findings have revealed that gap junctions play a key role in normal as well as diabetic wound healing. The purpose of this review is to provide the information related to etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation of diabetic wounds and to analyze the role of connexin 43 (Cx43 in the diabetic wound healing process. The current control strategies and the future research challenges have also been discussed briefly in this review.

  9. Regenerative Medicine: Novel Approach in Burn Wound Healing

    Zare

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Context Burn wounds of the skin require a long period to healing, which very often is incomplete, with functional and esthetic consequences for the patients. Stem cells in the traumatized tissue represent the promoters of the healing process and are a primary focus for regenerative medicine, which aims to find and use the triggers for the activation of stem cells of sin tissue. Evidence Acquisition At present, tissue engineering, composite epithelial autografts, multipotent stem cells and combined gene delivery with stem cell therapy are the approaches used in regenerative medicine. Alongside, the development of 3D scaffolds or matrices is a promising adjunct, as studies investigate the multiple uses of these supports for wound repair. Results Application of cells to the burn wound could be performed, either by the bedside, as a non-invasive procedure, or in the operating room, with the use of a matrix, scaffold or dermal substitute. Cell spraying, although under use in clinical setting, is not yet supported by conclusive data. Magnetic resonance imaging, optical imaging and positron emission tomography are currently used to assess the viability and location of stem cells, after transplantation. Conclusions Stem cell therapies in wound care may lessen the morbidities associated with wound healing. An ideal method for the effective administration of stem cells for burn patients has not yet been elucidated. Further comparison of the local and systemic effects in burn patients, associated with each route of stem cell delivery, needs to be performed.

  10. Enhanced Cutaneous Wound Healing In Vivo by Standardized Crude Extract of Poincianella pluviosa.

    Fernanda Giacomini Bueno

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a complex process that involves several biological events, and a delay in this process may cause economic and social problems for the patient. The search continues for new alternative treatments to aid healing, including the use of herbal medicines. Members of the genus Caesalpinia are used in traditional medicine to treat wounds. The related species Poincianella pluviosa (DC. L.P. Queiroz increases the cell viability of keratinocytes and fibroblasts and stimulates the proliferation of keratinocytes in vitro. The crude extract (CE from bark of P. pluviosa was evaluated in the wound-healing process in vivo, to validate the traditional use and the in vitro activity. Standardized CE was incorporated into a gel and applied on cutaneous wounds (TCEG and compared with the formulation without CE (Control for 4, 7, 10, or 14 days of treatment. The effects of the CE on wound re-epithelialization; cell proliferation; permeation, using photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS; and proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD-2 and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2 were evaluated. The TCEG stimulated the migration of keratinocytes at day 4 and proliferation on the following days, with a high concentration of cells in metaphase at 7 days. Type I collagen formed more rapidly in the TCEG. PAS showed that the CE had permeated through the skin. TCEG stimulated VEGF at day 4 and SOD-2 and COX-2 at day 7. The results suggest that the CE promoted the regulation of proteins and helped to accelerate the processes involved in healing, promoting early angiogenesis. This led to an increase in the re-epithelialized surface, with significant mitotic activity. Maturation of collagen fibers was also enhanced, which may affect the resistance of the extracellular matrix. PAS indicated a correlation between the rate of diffusion and biological events during the healing process. The CE from P. pluviosa appears promising as an aid in

  11. Serum amyloid P inhibits dermal wound healing

    The repair of open wounds depends on granulation tissue formation and contraction, which is primarily mediated by myofibroblasts. A subset of myofibroblasts originates from bone-marrow-derived monocytes which differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes. Serum amyloid P (SAP) inhibits ...

  12. Simultaneous irrigation and negative pressure wound therapy enhances wound healing and reduces wound bioburden in a porcine model.

    Davis, Kathryn; Bills, Jessica; Barker, Jenny; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Infected foot wounds are one of the most common reasons for hospitalization and amputation among persons with diabetes. The objective of the study was to investigate a new wound therapy system that employs negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) with simultaneous irrigation therapy. For this study, we used a porcine model with full-thickness excisional wounds, inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Wounds were treated for 21 days of therapy with either NPWT, NPWT with simultaneous irrigation therapy using normal saline or polyhexanide biguanide (PHMB) at low or high flow rates, or control. Data show that NPWT with either irrigation condition improved wound healing rates over control-treated wounds, yet did not differ from NPWT alone. NPWT improved bioburden over control-treated wounds. NPWT with simultaneous irrigation further reduced bioburden over control and NPWT-treated wounds; however, flow rate did not affect these outcomes. Together, these data show that NPWT with simultaneous irrigation therapy with either normal saline or PHMB has a positive effect on bioburden in a porcine model, which may translate clinically to improved wound healing outcomes. PMID:24134060

  13. Effects of Silk Sericin on Incision Wound Healing in a Dorsal Skin Flap Wound Healing Rat Model

    Ersel, Murat; Uyanikgil, Yigit; Akarca, Funda Karbek; Ozcete, Enver; Altunci, Yusuf Ali; Karabey, Fatih; Cavusoglu, Turker; Meral, Ayfer; Yigitturk, Gurkan; Cetin, Emel Oyku

    2016-01-01

    Background The wound healing process is complex and still poorly understood. Sericin is a silk protein synthesized by silk worms (Bombyx mori). The objective of this study was to evaluate in vivo wound healing effects of a sericin-containing gel formulation in an incision wound model in rats. Material/Methods Twenty-eight Wistar-Albino rats were divided into 4 groups (n=7). No intervention or treatment was applied to the Intact control group. For other groups, a dorsal skin flap (9×3 cm) was drawn and pulled up with sharp dissection. The Sham operated group received no treatment. The Placebo group received placebo gel without sericin applied to the incision area once a day from day 0 to day 9. The Sericin Group 3 received 1% sericin gel applied to the incision area once a day from day 0 to day 9. Hematoxylin and eosin stain was applied for histological analysis and Mallory-Azan staining was applied for histoimmunochemical analysis of antibodies and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase), and desmin was applied to paraffin sections of skin wound specimens. Parameters of oxidative stress were measured in the wound area. Results Epidermal thickness and vascularization were increased, and hair root degeneration, edema, cellular infiltration, collagen discoloration, and necrosis were decreased in Sericin group in comparison to the Placebo group and the Sham operated group. Malonyldialdehyde (MDA) levels were decreased, but superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were increased in the sericin group. Conclusions We found that sericin had significant positive effects on wound healing and antioxidant activity. Sericin-based formulations can improve healing of incision wounds. PMID:27032876

  14. Stimulatory effects of topical application of radioactive lantern mantle powder on wound healing

    the 3rd and 5th days after wounding, a statistically significant difference was observed between the thorium and the control groups at the day 7, day 10 and day 15. The mean wound surface in thorium and control groups were 150.20±15.87 and 186.37±12.68 mm2 at day 7 (P2 at day 10 (P2 at day 15 after wounding, respectively (P<0.01). On the other hand, histological study showed a significant statistically difference between cases and controls with respect to fibrinoid necrosis and exudative neutrophilic at the days 3 and 14. Considering the existence of granulation tissue, a significant difference was observed between case and control groups at days 3 and 7. No difference was observed in superficial epithelization and collagen fiber synthesis at all days. Tensile strength study showed no statistically significant difference between the cases and controls at the days 14 and 21. However, a significant difference was observed at day 31 (P<0.001). The overall results obtained in this long-term study suggest that low-level radioactive burned mantle is capable of decreasing inflammatory reactions and accelerates wound healing in rats. However, as thorium oxide is a known human carcinogen, more research is needed to clarify if low levels of radioactive burned mantle can be utilized for accelerating the healing of human wounds. These results confirm the findings of other investigators who showed a wide variety of stimulatory effects in human and laboratory animals after exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. (author)

  15. Genomic Loci Modulating the Retinal Transcriptome in Wound Healing

    Félix R. Vázquez-Chona

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study predicts and tests genetic networks that modulate gene expression during the retinal wound-healing response.Methods: Upstream modulators and target genes were defined using meta-analysis and bioinfor matic approaches. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs for retinal acute phase genes (Vazquez-Chona et al. 2005 were defi ned using QTL analysis of CNS gene expression (Chesler et al. 2005. Candidate modulators were defi ned using computational analysis of gene and motif sequences. The effect of candidate genes on wound healing was tested using animal models of gene expression.Results: A network of early wound-healing genes is modulated by a locus on chromosome 12. The genetic background of the locus altered the wound-healing response of the retina. The C57BL/6 allele conferred enhanced expression of neuronal marker Thy1 and heat-shock-like crystallins, whereas the DBA/2J allele correlated with greater levels of the classic marker of retinal stress, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Id2 and Lpin1 are candidate upstream modula tors as they strongly correlated with the segregation of DBA/2J and C57BL/6 alleles, and their dosage levels correlated with the enhanced expression of survival genes (Thy1 and crystallin genes.Conclusion: We defined a genetic network associated with the retinal acute injury response. Using genetic linkage analysis of natural transcript variation, we identified regulatory loci and candidate modulators that control transcript levels of acute phase genes. Our results support the convergence of gene expression profiling, QTL analysis, and bioinformatics as a rational approach to discover molecular pathways controlling retinal wound healing.

  16. The Wound Healing and Antibacterial Activity of Five Ethnomedical Calophyllum inophyllum Oils: An Alternative Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Infected Wounds.

    Teddy Léguillier

    Full Text Available Calophyllum inophyllum L. (Calophyllaceae is an evergreen tree ethno-medically used along the seashores and islands of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, especially in Polynesia. Oil extracted from the seeds is traditionally used topically to treat a wide range of skin injuries from burn, scar and infected wounds to skin diseases such as dermatosis, urticaria and eczema. However, very few scientific studies reported and quantified the therapeutic properties of Calophyllum inophyllum oil (CIO. In this work, five CIO from Indonesia (CIO1, Tahiti (CIO2, 3, Fiji islands (CIO4 and New Caledonia (CIO5 were studied and their cytotoxic, wound healing, and antibacterial properties were presented in order to provide a scientific support to their traditional use and verify their safety.The safety of the five CIO was ascertained using the Alamar blue assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO wound healing properties were determined using the scratch test assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO-stimulated antibacterial innate immune response was evaluated using ELISA by measuring β defensin-2 release in human derivative macrophage cells. CIO antibacterial activity was tested using oilogramme against twenty aerobic Gram- bacteria species, twenty aerobic Gram+ bacteria species, including a multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and two anaerobic Gram+ bacteria species e.g. Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum. To detect polarity profile of the components responsible of the antibacterial activity, we performed bioautography against a Staphylococcus aureus strain.Based on Alamar Blue assay, we showed that CIO can be safely used on keratinocyte cells between 2.7% and 11.2% depending on CIO origin. Concerning the healing activity, all the CIO tested accelerated in vitro wound closure, the healing factor being 1.3 to 2.1 higher compared to control when keratinocytes were incubated after scratch with CIO at 0.1%. Furthermore, our results

  17. Stem cells and chronic wound healing: state of the art

    Leavitt T

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tripp Leavitt, Michael S Hu, Clement D Marshall, Leandra A Barnes, Michael T Longaker, H Peter Lorenz Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Currently available treatments for chronic wounds are inadequate. A clearly effective therapy does not exist, and treatment is often supportive. This is largely because the cellular and molecular processes underlying failure of wound repair are still poorly understood. With an increase in comorbidities, such as diabetes and vascular disease, as well as an aging population, the incidence of these intractable wounds is expected to rise. As such, chronic wounds, which are already costly, are rapidly growing as a tremendous burden to the health-care system. Stem cells have garnered much interest as a therapy for chronic wounds due to their inherent ability to differentiate into multiple lineages and promote regeneration. Herein, we discuss the types of stem cells used for chronic wound therapy, as well as the proposed means by which they do so. In particular, we highlight mesenchymal stem cells (including adipose-derived stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. We include the results of recent in vitro and in vivo studies in both animal models and human clinical trials. Finally, we discuss the current studies to improve stem cell therapies and the limitations of stem cell-based therapeutics. Stem cells promise improved therapies for healing chronic wounds, but further studies that are well-designed with standardized protocols are necessary for fruition. Keywords: stem cells, chronic wounds, cell therapy, wound healing

  18. The role of nurses in the care of chronic wounds by using alternative methods and materials of moist wound healing

    SKŘÍŠOVSKÁ, Martina

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor?s thesis deals with the actual classification of wounds and the issue of the chronic wound treatment. In the preface of the theoretical part of the thesis, the term wound is defined and the wounds are subcategorized in the terms of their pathological traumatological origin. In the next chapters, the process of the wound healing is analysed from molecular biological aspect, the terms acute and chronic wound are defined and newly introduces the term non-healing wound for the chron...

  19. Traditional Therapies for Skin Wound Healing

    Pereira, Rúben F.; Bártolo, Paulo J

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The regeneration of healthy and functional skin remains a huge challenge due to its multilayer structure and the presence of different cell types within the extracellular matrix in an organized way. Despite recent advances in wound care products, traditional therapies based on natural origin compounds, such as plant extracts, honey, and larvae, are interesting alternatives. These therapies offer new possibilities for the treatment of skin diseases, enhancing the access to the he...

  20. New pathogenic mechanisms in diabetic wound healing

    Sunkari, Vivekananda

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) represent one of the most feared and invalidating complication of diabetes with high financial pressure for the healthcare system. For the moment there is no specific therapy available and it has become a priority to develop novel rational therapeutic strategies based on new pathophysiological mechanisms. Our focus was therefore to delineate relevant pathogenic pathways specifically deregulated in diabetes that could contribute to the defective wound ...

  1. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing

    Salamone, Joseph C.; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E.

    2016-01-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by R...

  2. Wound Healing of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries

    Graham, John S.; Chilcott, Robert P.; Rice, Paul; Milner, Stephen M.; Hurst, Charles G.; Maliner, Beverly I.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating chemical warfare agent that primarily affects the eyes, skin, and airways. Sulfur mustard injuries can take several months to heal, necessitate lengthy hospitalizations, and result in significant cosmetic and/or functional deficits. Historically, blister aspiration and/or deroofing (epidermal removal), physical debridement, irrigation, topical antibiotics, and sterile dressings have been the main courses of action in the medical management of cutaneous sulfur m...

  3. Development of honey hydrogel dressing for enhanced wound healing

    Radiation at 25 and 50 kGy showed no effect on the acidic pH of the local honey, Gelam, and its antimicrobial property against Staphylococcus aureus but significantly reduced the viscosity. Honey stored up to 2 years at room temperature retained all the properties studied. Radiation sterilized Gelam honey significantly stimulated the rate of burn wound healing in Sprague-Dawley rats as demonstrated by the increased rate of wound contraction and gross appearance. Gelam honey attenuates wound inflammation; and re-epithelialization was well advanced compared to the treatment using silver sulphadiazine (SSD) cream. To enhance further the use of honey in wound treatment and for easy handling, Gelam honey was incorporated into our hydrogel dressing formulation, which was then cross-linked and sterilized using electron beam at 25 kGy. Hydrogel with 6% of honey was selected based on the physical appearance

  4. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 improves impaired dermal wound healing in old mice.

    Demyanenko, Ilya A; Popova, Ekaterina N; Zakharova, Vlada V; Ilyinskaya, Olga P; Vasilieva, Tamara V; Romashchenko, Valeria P; Fedorov, Artem V; Manskikh, Vasily N; Skulachev, Maxim V; Zinovkin, Roman A; Pletjushkina, Olga Yu; Skulachev, Vladimir P; Chernyak, Boris V

    2015-07-01

    The process of skin wound healing is delayed or impaired in aging animals. To investigate the possible role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) in cutaneous wound healing of aged mice, we have applied the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1. The SkQ1 treatment resulted in accelerated resolution of the inflammatory phase, formation of granulation tissue, vascularization and epithelization of the wounds. The wounds of SkQ1-treated mice contained increased amount of myofibroblasts which produce extracellular matrix proteins and growth factors mediating granulation tissue formation. This effect resembled SkQ1-induced differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblast, observed earlierin vitro. The Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFb) produced by SkQ1-treated fibroblasts was found to stimulated motility of endothelial cells in vitro, an effect which may underlie pro-angiogenic action of SkQ1 in the wounds. In vitro experiments showed that SkQ1 prevented decomposition of VE-cadherin containing contacts and following increase in permeability of endothelial cells monolayer, induced by pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF. Prevention of excessive reaction of endothelium to the pro-inflammatory cytokine(s) might account for anti-inflammatory effect of SkQ1. Our findings point to an important role of mtROS in pathogenesis of age-related chronic wounds. PMID:26187706

  5. Laser therapy in wound healing associated with diabetes mellitus - Review*

    de Sousa, Raquel Gomes; Batista, Keila de Nazaré Madureira

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the results of a literature review on the application of low intensity laser therapy on the healing of wounds associated diabetes mellitus in the last 10 years. Objective To determine the most effective parameter in healing wounds related to diabetes mellitus, as well as the most widely used type of laser. Methodology consisted of bibliographic searching the databases Bireme, SciELO, PubMed/Medline and Lilacs by using the keywords related to the topic. Were selected from these keywords, papers discussing the use of laser on wounds associated with diabetes, published in the period 2005-2014, in Portuguese or English. Results After analyzing the research, 12 studies consistent with the theme were selected. Conclusion Based on this review, the studies that showed more satisfactory results in healing diabetic wounds were those who applied energy densities in the range of 3-5 J/cm2, power densities equal to or below 0.2 W/cm2 and continuous emission. The He-Ne laser with a wavelength of 632.8 nm was used more often. PMID:27579745

  6. Roles of Proteoglycans and Glycosaminoglycans in Wound Healing and Fibrosis

    Shibnath Ghatak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wound is a type of injury that damages living tissues. In this review, we will be referring mainly to healing responses in the organs including skin and the lungs. Fibrosis is a process of dysregulated extracellular matrix (ECM production that leads to a dense and functionally abnormal connective tissue compartment (dermis. In tissues such as the skin, the repair of the dermis after wounding requires not only the fibroblasts that produce the ECM molecules, but also the overlying epithelial layer (keratinocytes, the endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells of the blood vessel and white blood cells such as neutrophils and macrophages, which together orchestrate the cytokine-mediated signaling and paracrine interactions that are required to regulate the proper extent and timing of the repair process. This review will focus on the importance of extracellular molecules in the microenvironment, primarily the proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, and their roles in wound healing. First, we will briefly summarize the physiological, cellular, and biochemical elements of wound healing, including the importance of cytokine cross-talk between cell types. Second, we will discuss the role of proteoglycans and hyaluronan in regulating these processes. Finally, approaches that utilize these concepts as potential therapies for fibrosis are discussed.

  7. A review of herbal medicines in wound healing.

    Maver, Tina; Maver, Uroš; Stana Kleinschek, Karin; Smrke, Dragica M; Kreft, Samo

    2015-07-01

    Herbs have been integral to both traditional and non-traditional forms of medicine dating back at least 5000 years. The enduring popularity of herbal medicines may be explained by the perception that herbs cause minimal unwanted side effects. More recently, scientists increasingly rely on modern scientific methods and evidence-based medicine to prove efficacy of herbal medicines and focus on better understanding of mechanisms of their action. However, information concerning quantitative human health benefits of herbal medicines is still rare or dispersed, limiting their proper valuation. Preparations from traditional medicinal plants are often used for wound healing purposes covering a broad area of different skin-related diseases. Herbal medicines in wound management involve disinfection, debridement, and provision of a suitable environment for aiding the natural course of healing. Here we report on 22 plants used as wound healing agents in traditional medicine around the world. The aim of this review is therefore to review herbal medicines, which pose great potential for effective treatment of minor wounds. PMID:25808157

  8. Evaluation of In Vivo Wound Healing Activity of Bacopa monniera on Different Wound Model in Rats

    S. Murthy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing effects of 50% ethanol extract of dried whole plant of Bacopa monniera (BME was studied on wound models in rats. BME (25 mg/kg was administered orally, once daily for 10 days (incision and dead space wound models or for 21 days or more (excision wound model in rats. BME was studied for its in vitro antimicrobial and in vivo wound breaking strength, WBS (incision model, rate of contraction, period of epithelization, histology of skin (excision model, granulation tissue free radicals (nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation, antioxidants (catalase, superoxide dismutase, and reduced glutathione, acute inflammatory marker (myeloperoxidase, connective tissue markers (hydroxyproline, hexosamine, and hexuronic acid, and deep connective tissue histology (dead space wound. BME showed antimicrobial activity against skin pathogens, enhanced WBS, rate of contraction, skin collagen tissue formation, and early epithelization period with low scar area indicating enhanced healing. Healing effect was further substantiated by decreased free radicals and myeloperoxidase and enhanced antioxidants and connective tissue markers with histological evidence of more collagen formation in skin and deeper connective tissues. BME decreased myeloperoxidase and free radical generated tissue damage, promoting antioxidant status, faster collagen deposition, other connective tissue constituent formation, and antibacterial activity.

  9. The beneficial effects of Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) on wound healing of rabbit skin.

    Pişkin, Ahmet; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Tümentemur, Gamze; Kaplan, Süleyman; Yazıcı, Ozgür Bülent; Hökelek, Murat

    2014-08-01

    Momordica charantia (MC; bitter gourd) is a traditional herbal commonly used for its antidiabetic, antioxidant, contraceptive and antibacterial properties. In the current study, the authors aim to observe the topical effect of MC cream on the wound-healing process in rabbits. Moreover, they compare the healing potential with conventional creams used therapeutically. Towards this aim, 28 New Zealand rabbits were divided into four groups and excision wounds (7 cm²) were made on their backs. Open wound dressing was carried out daily for 28 days among the experimental groups with the application of dekspanthenol (Bepanthen®; BP group, n = 7), nitrofurazon (Furacin®; FR group, n = 7) and olive oil extract of MC (MC group, n = 7). No application was made to the control group. At the end of day 28, areas of the skin with initial wound area were en bloc dissected and prepared for histopathological and stereological analysis. Inflammatory cells were abundant in the control group and cream application led to a decrease in the number of these cells, especially in the MC group. The highest number of fibroblasts was detected in the MC group. Furthermore, the MC group displayed the highest fractions of epidermis to papillary dermis, fibroblasts to reticular dermis and collagen fibres to reticular dermis. The MC group also presented a high density of blood vessels, moderate density of collagen fibres and mature fibroblasts. The BP group showed better epithelialisation compared with the FR group, but the latter provided more effective reorganisation of the dermis. Different cream supplements caused healthy and fast wound healing according to untreated controls and the results show that administration of the MC extract improves and accelerates the process of wound healing in rabbits in comparison with the BP and FR extracts. PMID:22812507

  10. Contact dermatitis presenting as non-healing wound: case report

    Leelavathi M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Topical antiseptics are commonly used in the management of minor wounds, burns, and infected skin. These agents are widely used by health professionals and are often self-prescribed by patients as they are easily available over-the-counter. This case illustrates a 73 year old man who presented with a non-healing wound on his right forearm for 4 weeks. The wound started from an insect bite and progressively enlarged with increasing pruritus and burning sensation. Clinically an ill-defined ulcer with surrounding erythema and erosion was noted. There was a yellow crust overlying the center of the ulcer and the periphery was scaly. Further inquiry revealed history of self treatment with a yellow solution to clean his wound for 3 weeks. Patient was provisionally diagnosed to have allergic contact dermatitis secondary to acriflavine. Topical acriflavine was stopped and the ulcer resolved after treatment with non-occlusive saline dressing. Skin patch test which is the gold standard for detection and confirmation of contact dermatitis showed a positive reaction (2+ to acriflavine. Acriflavine is widely used as a topical antiseptic agent in this part of the world. Hence, primary care physicians managing a large variety of poorly healing wounds should consider the possibility of contact allergy in recalcitrant cases, not responding to conventional treatment. Patient education is an important aspect of management as this would help curb the incidence of future contact allergies.

  11. Relationship between Post-kidney Transplantation Antithymocyte Globulin Therapy and Wound Healing Complications

    2012-01-01

    Background: Wound healing disorders are probably the most common post-transplantation surgical complications. It is thought that wound healing disturbance occurs due to antiproliferative effects of immunosuppressive drugs. On the other hand, success of transplantation is dependent on immunosuppressive therapies. Antihuman thymocyte globulin (ATG) has been widely used as induction therapy but the impact of this treatment on wound healing is not fully understood. Objective: To investigate wound...

  12. Selective induction of integrin β1 by hypoxia-inducible factor: implications for wound healing

    Keely, Simon; Glover, Louise E; MacManus, Christopher F.; Campbell, Eric L.; Scully, Melanie M.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Colgan, Sean P.

    2009-01-01

    Because of localized vascular damage and increased tissue oxygen demand, wound healing occurs in a relatively hypoxic microenvironment. These features are particularly relevant to wound healing and fibrosis in chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. In these studies, we sought to identify the contribution of hypoxia to mechanisms of wound repair in a model of the intestinal submucosa. Initial studies revealed that hypoxia promotes wound healing, as mod...

  13. Effect of topically applied Saccharomyces boulardii on the healing of acute porcine wounds: a preliminary study

    Partlow, Jessica; Blikslager, Anthony; Matthews, Charles; Law, Mac; Daniels, Joshua; Baker, Rose; Labens, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Background Normal wound healing progresses through a series of interdependent physiological events: inflammation, angiogenesis, re-epithelialization, granulation tissue formation and extracellular matrix remodeling. Alterations in this process as well as the bacterial type and load on a wound may alter the wound healing rate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical Saccharomyces boulardii on the healing of acute cutaneous wounds, using a prospective, controlled, experi...

  14. Healing of excisional wound in alloxan induced diabetic sheep: A planimetric and histopathologic study

    Farshid Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei; Amir-Abbas Farshid; Siamak Kazemi-Darabadi; Reza Baradar-Jalili

    2013-01-01

    Healing of skin wound is a multi-factorial and complex process. Proper treatment of diabetic wounds is still a major clinical challenge. Although diabetes mellitus can occur in ruminants, healing of wounds in diabetic ruminants has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate healing of ovine excisional diabetic wound model. Eight 4-month-old Iranian Makoui wethers were equally divided to diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Alloxan monohydrate (60 mg kg-1, IV) was used for di...

  15. Gene Expression of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines and Neuropeptides in Diabetic Wound Healing

    Pradhan, Leena; Cai, Xuemei; Wu, Szuhuei; Andersen, Nicholas D.; Martin, Michelle; Malek, Junaid; Guthrie, Patrick; Veves, Aristidis; LoGerfo, Frank W

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between neuropeptides and cytokines and its role in cutaneous wound healing is becoming evident. The goal of the present study is to investigate the impact of diabetes on peripheral cytokine and neuropeptide expression and their role in diabetic wound healing. To achieve this goal, the effect of diabetes on wound healing along with the role of inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) secreted in the wound microenvironment and neuropeptides, ...

  16. The Use of Stem Cells in Burn Wound Healing: A Review

    Fadi Ghieh; Rosalyn Jurjus; Amir Ibrahim; Alice Gerges Geagea; Hisham Daouk; Bassel El Baba; Sana Chams; Michel Matar; Wadih Zein; Abdo Jurjus

    2015-01-01

    Burn wound healing involves a series of complex processes which are subject to intensive investigations to improve the outcomes, in particular, the healing time and the quality of the scar. Burn injuries, especially severe ones, are proving to have devastating effects on the affected patients. Stem cells have been recently applied in the field to promote superior healing of the wounds. Not only have stem cells been shown to promote better and faster healing of the burn wounds, but also they h...

  17. Comparison of the Effects of Some Wound Healing Materials on Full Thickness Skin Wounds in Rabbits

    KILIÇ, Servet

    2002-01-01

    The values of some materials with various mechanisms of actions on the wound healing were determined using qualitative and quantitative parameters and histopathologic findings. A total of 48 full thickness skin wounds, 4 from each of 12 rabbits, were created on their dorsal aspects. Of these wounds, 4 were allocated to group 1 (control), 24 to group 2 and 20 to group 3. Op-site, epigard, tagaderm, sclera, rabbit amnion and cow amnion were used in group 2 and yeast, methycellulose (MS), polyet...

  18. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP changes gene expression of key molecules of the wound healing machinery and improves wound healing in vitro and in vivo.

    Stephanie Arndt

    Full Text Available Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP has the potential to interact with tissue or cells leading to fast, painless and efficient disinfection and furthermore has positive effects on wound healing and tissue regeneration. For clinical implementation it is necessary to examine how CAP improves wound healing and which molecular changes occur after the CAP treatment. In the present study we used the second generation MicroPlaSter ß® in analogy to the current clinical standard (2 min treatment time in order to determine molecular changes induced by CAP using in vitro cell culture studies with human fibroblasts and an in vivo mouse skin wound healing model. Our in vitro analysis revealed that the CAP treatment induces the expression of important key genes crucial for the wound healing response like IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TGF-ß1, TGF-ß2, and promotes the production of collagen type I and alpha-SMA. Scratch wound healing assays showed improved cell migration, whereas cell proliferation analyzed by XTT method, and the apoptotic machinery analyzed by protein array technology, was not altered by CAP in dermal fibroblasts. An in vivo wound healing model confirmed that the CAP treatment affects above mentioned genes involved in wound healing, tissue injury and repair. Additionally, we observed that the CAP treatment improves wound healing in mice, no relevant side effects were detected. We suggest that improved wound healing might be due to the activation of a specified panel of cytokines and growth factors by CAP. In summary, our in vitro human and in vivo animal data suggest that the 2 min treatment with the MicroPlaSter ß® is an effective technique for activating wound healing relevant molecules in dermal fibroblasts leading to improved wound healing, whereas the mechanisms which contribute to these observed effects have to be further investigated.

  19. Wound healing potential of Pañcavalkala formulations in a postfistulectomy wound

    Meena, Rakesh Kumar; Dudhamal, Tukaram; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Mahanta, Vyasadeva

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Sushruta mentioned sixty measures for management of wounds. Panchavalkal is the combination of five herbs having properties like Shodhana (cleaning) and Ropana (healing) of wounds. Individual drugs and in combination have Kashaya rasa (astringent) dominant and useful in the management of Vrana (wounds) as well as Shotha (inflammations). A 35 years old male patient consulted in Shalya OPD with complaints like discharge per anum, induration and intermittent pain at perianal region since last five years. On inspection external opening was observed at anterior portion 1 O’ clock position which was four centimeter away from anal verge. That case was diagnosed as Bhagandara (fistula-in-ano) and was treated with partial fistulectomy and application of Guggulu based Ksharasutra in the remaining tract. The big fistulectomy wound was treated with local application of Panchavalkal ointment daily and simultaneous change of Ksharasutra. The wound was assessed daily for pain, swelling, discharge, size, and shape. The wound healed completely within two and half month with normal scar having good tissue strength. This case demonstrated that post fistulectomy wound can be treated with Panchavalkal ointment. PMID:26865745

  20. Targeting Imbalance between IL-1β and IL-1 Receptor Antagonist Ameliorates Delayed Epithelium Wound Healing in Diabetic Mouse Corneas.

    Yan, Chenxi; Gao, Nan; Sun, Haijing; Yin, Jia; Lee, Patrick; Zhou, Li; Fan, Xianqun; Yu, Fu-Shin

    2016-06-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus often develop corneal complications and delayed wound healing. How diabetes might alter acute inflammatory responses to tissue injury, leading to delayed wound healing, remains mostly elusive. Using a streptozotocin-induced type I diabetes mellitus mice and corneal epithelium-debridement wound model, we discovered that although wounding induced marked expression of IL-1β and the secreted form of IL-1 receptor antagonist (sIL-1Ra), diabetes suppressed the expressions of sIL-1Ra but not IL-1β in healing epithelia and both in whole cornea. In normoglycemic mice, IL-1β or sIL-1Ra blockade delayed wound healing and influenced each other's expression. In diabetic mice, in addition to delayed reepithelization, diabetes weakened phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt signaling, caused cell apoptosis, diminished cell proliferation, suppressed neutrophil and natural killer cell infiltrations, and impaired sensory nerve reinnervation in healing mouse corneas. Local administration of recombinant IL-1Ra partially, but significantly, reversed these pathological changes in the diabetic corneas. CXCL10 was a downstream chemokine of IL-1β-IL-1Ra, and exogenous CXCL10 alleviated delayed wound healing in the diabetic, but attenuated it in the normal corneas. In conclusion, the suppressed early innate/inflammatory responses instigated by the imbalance between IL-1β and IL-1Ra is an underlying cause for delayed wound healing in the diabetic corneas. Local application of IL-1Ra accelerates reepithelialization and may be used to treat chronic corneal and potential skin wounds of diabetic patients. PMID:27109611

  1. Recent advances on the association of apoptosis in chronic non healing diabetic wound

    Awadhesh; K; Arya; Richik; Tripathi; Santosh; Kumar; Kamlakar; Tripathi

    2014-01-01

    Generally, wounds are of two categories, such as chronic and acute. Chronic wounds takes time to heal when compared to the acute wounds. Chronic wounds include vasculitis, non healing ulcer, pyoderma gangrenosum, and diseases that cause ischemia. Chronic wounds are rapidly increasing among the elderly population with dysfunctional valves in their lower extremity deep veins, ulcer, neuropathic foot and pressure ulcers. The process of the healing of wounds has several steps with the involvement of immune cells and several other cell types. There are many evidences supporting the hypothesis that apoptosis of immune cells is involved in the wound healing process by ending inflammatory condition. It is also involved in the resolution of various phases of tissue repair. During final steps of wound healing most of the endothelial cells, macrophagesand myofibroblasts undergo apoptosis or exit from the wound, leaving a mass that contains few cells and consists mostly of collagen and other extracellular matrix proteins to provide strength to the healing tissue. This review discusses the various phases of wound healing both in the chronic and acute wounds especially during diabetes mellitus and thus support the hypothesis that the oxidative stress, apoptosis, connexins and other molecules involved in the regulation of chronic wound healing in diabetes mellitus and gives proper understanding of the mechanisms controlling apoptosis and tissue repair during diabetes and may eventually develop therapeutic modalities to fasten the healing process in diabetic patients.

  2. Corneal wound healing is compromised by immunoproteasome deficiency.

    Deborah A Ferrington

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed roles for immunoproteasome in regulating cell processes essential for maintaining homeostasis and in responding to stress and injury. The current study investigates how the absence of immunoproteasome affects the corneal epithelium under normal and stressed conditions by comparing corneas from wildtype (WT mice and those deficient in two immunoproteasome catalytic subunits (lmp7(-/-/mecl-1(-/-, L7M1. Immunoproteasome expression was confirmed in WT epithelial cells and in cells of the immune system that were present in the cornea. More apoptotic cells were found in both corneal explant cultures and uninjured corneas of L7M1 compared to WT mice. Following mechanical debridement, L7M1 corneas displayed delayed wound healing, including delayed re-epithelialization and re-establishment of the epithelial barrier, as well as altered inflammatory cytokine production compared to WT mice. These results suggest that immunoproteasome plays an important role in corneal homeostasis and wound healing.

  3. Hyaluronic acid hydrogels for vocal fold wound healing

    Gaston, Joel; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    The unique vibrational properties inherent to the human vocal fold have a significant detrimental impact on wound healing and scar formation. Hydrogels have taken prominence as a tissue engineered strategy to restore normal vocal structure and function as cellularity is low. The frequent vibrational and shear forces applied to, and present in this connective tissue make mechanical properties of such hydrogels a priority in this active area of research. Hyaluronic acid has been chemically modi...

  4. Cell therapy and wound healing - state of art and perspectives

    Smetana, Karel; Dvořánková, B.; Labský, Jiří; Holíková, Z.

    Daejon : Pai Chai University, 2002 - (Kim, H.; Kim, T.; Park, J.), s. 77-80 [International Symposium on Advanced Materials /4./. Daejon (KR), 03.06.2002-07.06.2002] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065; GA ČR GA203/00/1310; GA AV ČR IBS4050005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : epidermal stem cell * cell therapy * wound healing Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  5. Cutaneous wound healing: recruiting developmental pathways for regeneration

    Bielefeld, Kirsten A.; Amini-Nik, Saeid; Alman, Benjamin A.

    2012-01-01

    Following a skin injury, the damaged tissue is repaired through the coordinated biological actions that constitute the cutaneous healing response. In mammals, repaired skin is not identical to intact uninjured skin, however, and this disparity may be caused by differences in the mechanisms that regulate postnatal cutaneous wound repair compared to embryonic skin development. Improving our understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in these processes is essential to generate new...

  6. Wound healing: a new perspective on glucosylated tetrahydrocurcumin

    Bhaskar Rao A; Prasad E.; Deepthi SS; Haritha V; Ramakrishna.S,; Madhusudan K; Surekha MV; Venkata Rao YSR

    2015-01-01

    Adari Bhaskar Rao,1 Ernala Prasad,1 Seelam Siva Deepthi,1 Vennapusa Haritha,1 Sistla Ramakrishna,1 Kuncha Madhusudan,1 Mullapudi Venkata Surekha,2 Yerramilli Sri Rama Venkata Rao3 1Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology Division, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research – Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, 2Pathology Division, National Institute of Nutrition, 3Ashian Herbex Ltd, Hyderabad, AP, India Abstract: Wound healing represents a dynamic set of coordinated ...

  7. Silver Nanoparticles as Real Topical Bullets for Wound Healing

    Gunasekaran, Thirumurugan; Nigusse, Tadele; Dhanaraju, Magharla Dasaratha

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology is on the threshold of providing a host of new materials and approaches, revolutionizing the medical and pharmaceutical fields. Several areas of medical care are already profiting from the advantage that nanotechnology offers. Recently, silver nanoparticles are attracting interest for a clinical application because of its potential biological properties such as antibacterial activity, anti-inflammatory effects, and wound healing efficacy, which could be exploited in developing ...

  8. Jaundice and wound healing: a tissue-culture study.

    Taube, M.; Elliot, P.; Ellis, H.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of jaundice on wound healing have been studied by growing fibroblasts, in vitro, in normal culture media, in culture media to which bilirubin has been added, and in culture media containing sera from jaundiced patients. It has been found that the addition of bilirubin to the culture media causes morphological changes in the fibroblasts, and impairs the growth of cells. The addition of jaundiced human sera to the culture also causes similar changes.

  9. Diabetic cornea wounds produce significantly weaker electric signals that may contribute to impaired healing

    Yunyun Shen; Trisha Pfluger; Fernando Ferreira; Jiebing Liang; Navedo, Manuel F.; Qunli Zeng; Brian Reid; Min Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Wounds naturally produce electric signals which serve as powerful cues that stimulate and guide cell migration during wound healing. In diabetic patients, impaired wound healing is one of the most challenging complications in diabetes management. A fundamental gap in knowledge is whether diabetic wounds have abnormal electric signaling. Here we used a vibrating probe to demonstrate that diabetic corneas produced significantly weaker wound electric signals than the normal cornea. This was conf...

  10. Estrogen modulates cutaneous wound healing by downregulating macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    Ashcroft, Gillian S.; Stuart J. Mills; Lei, Kejian; Gibbons, Linda; Jeong, Moon-Jin; Taniguchi, Marisu; Burow, Matthew; Horan, Michael A.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2003-01-01

    Characteristic of both chronic wounds and acute wounds that fail to heal are excessive leukocytosis and reduced matrix deposition. Estrogen is a major regulator of wound repair that can reverse age-related impaired wound healing in human and animal models, characterized by a dampened inflammatory response and increased matrix deposited at the wound site. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a candidate proinflammatory cytokine involved in the hormonal regulation of inflammation. We...

  11. Total Particulate Matter and Wound Healing: An in vivo Study with Histological Insights

    SOHAIL EJAZ; MUHAMMAD ASHRAF; MUHAMMAD NAWAZ; CHAE WOONG LIM

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Wound healing in the skin is a multifarious orchestration of cellular processes and cigarette smoking may be a cause for delayed wound healing. The aim of this study was to investigate the plausible association between exposures of cigarette total particulate matter (TPM) and wound healing. Methods An in vivo wound healing model of mice was established for determination of assorted events of wound healing, dermal matrix regeneration, re-epithelialization, and neovascularization. A total of 72 adult mice, separated in eight groups, were exposed to TPM for 12 days. Results A highly considerable diminution in wound closure (P<0.001) was pragmatic among all TPM-treated mice from day 6 to day 8 post-wounding. Histological investigations unveiled a noteworthy impede in the outcome of re-epithelialization, dermal matrix regeneration and maturation of collagen bundles among all TPM-exposed wounds. Delayed commencement of neovascularization was pragmatic among all TPM-treated mice, on day 12 post wounding. Abbot curve, angular spectrum, and other different parameters of 3D surface behavior of wounds revealed a very highly significant reduction (P<0.001) in angiogenesis on days 6 and 8 post-wounding, which points that application of TPM instigates extensive delay in trigging the progression of angiogenesis, resulting in delayed onset of wound healing. Conclusion Our annotations validate the damaging effects of TPM on wound healing and excessive use of TPM may lead to the production of chronic wounds and oral ulcers.

  12. Bioinspired porous membranes containing polymer nanoparticles for wound healing.

    Ferreira, Ana M; Mattu, Clara; Ranzato, Elia; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2014-12-01

    Skin damages covering a surface larger than 4 cm(2) require a regenerative strategy based on the use of appropriate wound dressing supports to facilitate the rapid tissue replacement and efficient self-healing of the lost or damaged tissue. In the present work, A novel biomimetic approach is proposed for the design of a therapeutic porous construct made of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fabricated by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS). Biomimicry of ECM was achieved by immobilization of type I collagen through a two-step plasma treatment for wound healing. Anti-inflammatory (indomethacin)-containing polymeric nanoparticles (nps) were loaded within the porous membranes in order to minimize undesired cell response caused by post-operative inflammation. The biological response to the scaffold was analyzed by using human keratinocytes cell cultures. In this work, a promising biomimetic construct for wound healing and soft tissue regeneration with drug-release properties was fabricated since it shows (i) proper porosity, pore size, and mechanical properties, (ii) biomimicry of ECM, and (iii) therapeutic potential. PMID:24522948

  13. Antidiabetic and Wound Healing Effects of Smeathxanthone A

    David Emery Tsala

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether smeathxanthone A isolated from Garcinia smeathmanii improves incisional wound healing in diabetic mice. Male albino alloxan-induced diabetic mice (n = 20 were divided into five groups: normal control, diabetic control, 2.5 mg/kg glibenclamide given orally, 0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg smeathxanthone A given subcutaneously. Animals were euthanized on postoperative day 10 after wounding; body weight, blood glucose, breaking strength, and histologic examination were reviewed. Smeathxanthone A significantly increased skin tensile strength (24% higher than diabetic control group when given at 0.1 mg/kg, stimulated hair growth, and reduced signs of inflammation in the scar sections. Smeathxanthone A also reduced blood glucose levels in diabetic mice (45% higher than diabetic control group when given at 0.1 mg/kg. The present study demonstrates that administration of smeathxanthone A after laparotomy expedites wound healing in mice. We suggest that it could confer benefits to tissue healing by significantly enhancing tissue collagen deposition and controlling blood glucose levels.

  14. Mechanical compression attenuates normal human bronchial epithelial wound healing

    Malavia Nikita

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway narrowing associated with chronic asthma results in the transmission of injurious compressive forces to the bronchial epithelium and promotes the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and the denudation of the bronchial epithelium. While the individual effects of compression or denudation are well characterized, there is no data to elucidate how these cells respond to the application of mechanical compression in the presence of a compromised epithelial layer. Methods Accordingly, differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to one of four conditions: 1 unperturbed control cells, 2 single scrape wound only, 3 static compression (6 hours of 30 cmH2O, and 4 6 hours of static compression after a scrape wound. Following treatment, wound closure rate was recorded, media was assayed for mediator content and the cytoskeletal network was fluorescently labeled. Results We found that mechanical compression and scrape injury increase TGF-β2 and endothelin-1 secretion, while EGF content in the media is attenuated with both injury modes. The application of compression after a pre-existing scrape wound augmented these observations, and also decreased PGE2 media content. Compression stimulated depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton and significantly attenuated wound healing. Closure rate was partially restored with the addition of exogenous PGE2, but not EGF. Conclusion Our results suggest that mechanical compression reduces the capacity of the bronchial epithelium to close wounds, and is, in part, mediated by PGE2 and a compromised cytoskeleton.

  15. WOUND HEALING ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL POTENTIALS OF SELECTED MEDICINAL PLANTS USED BY MALAYALI TRIBES

    Ramya Subramanian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Healing chronic lower extremity wound is a problem worldwide, especially in developing countries. Aim of the present study is to document the traditional knowledge base / medicinal plants pertinent to healing wound popular among Malayali’s in Vattal Hills, Dharmapuri, Tamilnadu, India. Malayali’s in this area use a large number of plants extracts/ decoctions/ pastes to heal wound/ cut. Further, many of the plants used by Malayali’s have not been validated for their wound healing potential. The investigation resulted in the identification of 82 medicinal plants across 39 families to heal wound/cut. Maximum remedies were obtained from herbs (40% followed by trees (31% > shrubs (18% > climbers (10% and straggler (1%. Most of the healing aliments use leaves (30% followed by whole plant (16% > root (15% > seed (11% > fruit (10% > stem (14% > flower (4%. Further, external application of herbal formulations outnumbered oral consumption to promote wound healing.

  16. Profibrinolytic effects of metalloproteinases during skin wound healing in the absence of plasminogen

    Green, Kirsty A; Almholt, Kasper; Ploug, Michael;

    2008-01-01

    profibrinolytic enzymes has been investigated by comparing skin wound healing in the absence and presence of fibrin. Plg deficiency impairs skin wound healing kinetics, but this delay is only partially restored in the absence of fibrin. This suggests that plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis is the primary, but not the...... of Plg-deficient wounds after metalloproteinase inhibition. In conclusion, the residual impairment of skin wound healing in the absence of fibrin suggests the existence of a fibrin-independent substrate(s) for plasmin and metalloproteinases. Furthermore, these in vivo data reveal that galardin......-sensitive metalloproteinases mediate compensatory fibrinolysis to facilitate wound healing in the absence of plasmin....

  17. Angiogenesis is induced and wound size is reduced by electrical stimulation in an acute wound healing model in human skin.

    Sara Ud-Din

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is critical for wound healing. Insufficient angiogenesis can result in impaired wound healing and chronic wound formation. Electrical stimulation (ES has been shown to enhance angiogenesis. We previously showed that ES enhanced angiogenesis in acute wounds at one time point (day 14. The aim of this study was to further evaluate the role of ES in affecting angiogenesis during the acute phase of cutaneous wound healing over multiple time points. We compared the angiogenic response to wounding in 40 healthy volunteers (divided into two groups and randomised, treated with ES (post-ES and compared them to secondary intention wound healing (control. Biopsy time points monitored were days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14. Objective non-invasive measures and H&E analysis were performed in addition to immunohistochemistry (IHC and Western blotting (WB. Wound volume was significantly reduced on D7, 10 and 14 post-ES (p = 0.003, p = 0.002, p0.05 on day 14 in VEGF-A expression post-ES compared to controls. Furthermore, organisation of granulation tissue was improved on day 14 post-ES. This randomised controlled trial has shown that ES enhanced wound healing by reduced wound dimensions and increased VEGF-A and PLGF expression in acute cutaneous wounds, which further substantiates the role of ES in up-regulating angiogenesis as observed over multiple time points. This therapeutic approach may have potential application for clinical management of delayed and chronic wounds.

  18. Surgical Approaches to Create Murine Models of Human Wound Healing

    Victor W. Wong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound repair is a complex biologic process which becomes abnormal in numerous disease states. Although in vitro models have been important in identifying critical repair pathways in specific cell populations, in vivo models are necessary to obtain a more comprehensive and pertinent understanding of human wound healing. The laboratory mouse has long been the most common animal research tool and numerous transgenic strains and models have been developed to help researchers study the molecular pathways involved in wound repair and regeneration. This paper aims to highlight common surgical mouse models of cutaneous disease and to provide investigators with a better understanding of the benefits and limitations of these models for translational applications.

  19. Monitoring wound healing by multiphoton tomography/endoscopy

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Bückle, Rainer; Kaatz, Martin; Hipler, Christina; Zens, Katharina; Schneider, Stefan W.; Huck, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Certified clinical multiphoton tomographs are employed to perform rapid label-free high-resolution in vivo histology. Novel tomographs include a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm for autofluorescence and SHG imaging as well as rigid two-photon GRIN microendoscope. Mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen can be imaged with submicron resolution in human skin. The system was employed to study the healing of chronic wounds (venous leg ulcer) and acute wounds (curettage of actinic or seborrheic keratosis) on a subcellular level. Furthermore, a flexible sterile foil as interface between wound and focusing optic was tested.

  20. Wound Healing Activity of Topical Application Forms Based on Ayurveda

    Hema Sharma Datta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional Indian medicine—Ayurveda, describes various herbs, fats, oils and minerals with anti-aging as well as wound healing properties. With aging, numerous changes occur in skin, including decrease in tissue cell regeneration, decrease in collagen content, loss of skin elasticity and mechanical strength. We prepared five topical anti-aging formulations using cow ghee, flax seed oil, Phyllanthus emblica fruits, Shorea robusta resin, Yashada bhasma as study materials. For preliminary efficacy evaluation of the anti-aging activity we chose excision and incision wound healing animal models and studied the parameters including wound contraction, collagen content and skin breaking strength which in turn is indicative of the tissue cell regeneration capacity, collagenation capacity and mechanical strength of skin. The group treated with the formulations containing Yashada bhasma along with Shorea robusta resin and flax seed oil showed significantly better wound contraction (P < .01, higher collagen content (P < .05 and better skin breaking strength (P < .01 as compared to control group; thus proposing them to be effective prospective anti-aging formulations.

  1. Wound healing activity of topical application forms based on ayurveda.

    Datta, Hema Sharma; Mitra, Shankar Kumar; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2011-01-01

    The traditional Indian medicine-Ayurveda, describes various herbs, fats, oils and minerals with anti-aging as well as wound healing properties. With aging, numerous changes occur in skin, including decrease in tissue cell regeneration, decrease in collagen content, loss of skin elasticity and mechanical strength. We prepared five topical anti-aging formulations using cow ghee, flax seed oil, Phyllanthus emblica fruits, Shorea robusta resin, Yashada bhasma as study materials. For preliminary efficacy evaluation of the anti-aging activity we chose excision and incision wound healing animal models and studied the parameters including wound contraction, collagen content and skin breaking strength which in turn is indicative of the tissue cell regeneration capacity, collagenation capacity and mechanical strength of skin. The group treated with the formulations containing Yashada bhasma along with Shorea robusta resin and flax seed oil showed significantly better wound contraction (P skin breaking strength (P < .01) as compared to control group; thus proposing them to be effective prospective anti-aging formulations. PMID:19252191

  2. Local Hyperglycemia in Full-Thickness Wounds in Euglycemic Rats Impairs Wound Healing in a Concentration Dependent Manner

    Kruse, C.; Nuutila, K.; Eriksson, E.;

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Non-invasive monitoring of wound healing is warranted. Opticalcoherence tomography (OCT) enables instant visualization of the epidermis andupper dermis. We have studied the healing of uniform epidermal wounds inhumans using OCT. Methods: Thirty-two, 16 females and 16 males, non-smok...

  3. Exercise, Obesity, and Cutaneous Wound Healing: Evidence from Rodent and Human Studies

    Pence, Brandt D.; Jeffrey A Woods

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Impaired cutaneous wound healing is a major health concern. Obesity has been shown in a number of studies to impair wound healing, and chronic nonhealing wounds in obesity and diabetes are a major cause of limb amputations in the United States.

  4. Age-Induced Loss of Wound-Healing Ability in Potato Tubers is Regulated by ABA

    Wounding of potato tubers stimulates the development of a suberized wound periderm that resists desiccation and microbial invasion. Wound-healing ability declines with advancing tuber age (storage period). The mechanism of age-induced loss in healing capacity is not known; however, older tubers ha...

  5. Review of recent research on biomedical applications of electrospun polymer nanofibers for improved wound healing.

    Hassiba, Alaa J; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Webster, Thomas J; Luyt, Adriaan S; Abdullah, Aboubakr M; Elzatahry, Ahmed A

    2016-03-01

    Wound dressings play an important role in a patient's recovery from health problems, as unattended wounds could lead to serious complications such as infections or, ultimately, even death. Therefore, wound dressings since ancient times have been continuously developed, starting from simple dressings from natural materials for covering wounds to modern dressings with functionalized materials to aid in the wound healing process and enhance tissue repair. However, understanding the nature of a wound and the subsequent healing process is vital information upon which dressings can be tailored to ensure a patient's recovery. To date, much progress has been made through the use of nanomedicine in wound healing due to the ability of such materials to mimic the natural dimensions of tissue. This review provides an overview of recent studies on the physiology of wound healing and various wound dressing materials made of nanofibers fabricated using the electrospinning technique. PMID:26744905

  6. How photons modulate wound healing via the immune system

    Dyson, Mary

    2009-02-01

    The immune system is a diverse group of cells that recognize and attack foreign substances, pathogenic organisms and cancer cells. It also produces inflammation, an essential component of the wound healing process and, following the resolution of inflammation, plays a crucial role in the control of granulation tissue formation. Granulation tissue is the precursor of scar tissue. Injured skin and mucous membranes generally heal rapidly. However, some wounds are either slow to heal or fail to heal while in others overgrowth of scar tissue occurs, resulting in the production of either hypertophic or keloid scars. The modulation of wound healing in such conditions is clinically important and may even be vital. Evidence will be presented that phototherapy can modulate wound healing, and that changes induced in the immune system, in particular the secretion of soluble protein mediators including cytokines, may be involved in this modulation. The immune system has peripheral and deep components. The former, being located mainly in the skin and mucous membranes, are readily accessible to photons, which can affect them directly. The components of the immune system are linked by lymphatic vessels and blood vessels, which include many capillaries located in the sub-epithelial connective tissues of the skin and mucous membranes. The superficial location of these capillaries provides the immune cells and molecules in transit through them with ready access to photons. When these cells and molecules, some modified by exposure to photons, reach susceptible cells such as lymphocytes in the deeper parts of the immune system and cells of injured tissues, they can modify their activity. In addition to having direct effects on peripheral cells, photons can thus also produce indirect effects on cells too distant for the photons to reach them. For example, cytokines released from peripheral macrophages in response to the direct action of photons can be transported to and affect other

  7. Nanoparticles Encapsulated with LL37 and Serpin A1 Promotes Wound Healing and Synergistically Enhances Antibacterial Activity.

    Fumakia, Miral; Ho, Emmanuel A

    2016-07-01

    Wound care is a serious healthcare concern, often complicated by prolonged inflammation and bacterial infection, which contributes significantly to mortality and morbidity. Agents commonly used to treat chronic wound infections are limited due to toxicity of the therapy, multifactorial etiology of chronic wounds, deep skin infections, lack of sustained controlled delivery of drugs, and development of drug resistance. LL37 is an endogenous host defense peptide possessing antimicrobial activity and is involved in the modulation of wound healing. Serpin A1 (A1) is an elastase inhibitor and has been shown to demonstrate wound-healing properties. Hence, our goal was to develop a topical combination nanomedicine for the controlled sustained delivery of LL37 and A1 at precise synergistic ratio combinations that will significantly promote wound closure, reduce bacterial contamination, and enhance anti-inflammatory activity. We have successfully developed the first solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) formulation that can simultaneously deliver LL37 and A1 at specific ratios resulting in accelerated wound healing by promoting wound closure in BJ fibroblast cells and keratinocytes as well as synergistically enhancing antibacterial activity against S. aureus and E. coli in comparison to LL37 or A1 alone. PMID:27182713

  8. Negative pressure induces p120-catenin-dependent adherens junction disassembly in keratinocytes during wound healing.

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Chen, Carl Pai-Chu; Chow, Shu-Er; Wang, Jong-Shyan; Shyu, Yu-Chiau; Lu, Mu-Jie

    2016-09-01

    A negative-pressure of 125mmHg (NP) has been widely used to treat chronic wounds in modern medicine. Keratinocytes under NP treatment have shown accelerated cell movement and decreased E-cadherin expression. However, the molecular mechanism of E-cadherin regulation under NP remains incompletely understood. Therefore, we investigated the E-cadherin regulation in keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) under NP. HaCaT cells were treated at ambient pressure (AP) and NP for 12h. Cell movement was measured by traditional and electric wound healing assays at the 2 different pressures. Mutants with overexpression of p120-catenin (p120(ctn)) were used to observe the effect of NP on p120(ctn) and E-cadherin expression during wound healing. Cell fractionation and immunoblotting data showed that NP increased Y228-phosphorylated p120(ctn) level and resulted in the translocation of p120(ctn) from the plasma membrane to cytoplasm. Immunofluorescence images revealed that NP decreased the co-localization of p120(ctn) and E-cadherin on the plasma membrane. Knockdown of p120(ctn) reduced E-cadherin expression and accelerated cell movement under AP. Overexpression of the Y228-phosphorylation-mimic p120(ctn) decreased E-cadherin membrane expression under both AP and NP. Phosphorylation-deficient mutants conferred restored adherens junctions (AJs) under NP. The Src inhibitor blocked the phosphorylation of p120(ctn) and impeded cell migration under NP. In conclusion, Src-dependent phosphorylation of p120(ctn) can respond rapidly to NP and contribute to E-cadherin downregulation. The NP-induced disassembly of the AJ further accelerates wound healing. PMID:27220534

  9. Androgen actions in mouse wound healing: Minimal in vivo effects of local antiandrogen delivery.

    Wang, Yiwei; Simanainen, Ulla; Cheer, Kenny; Suarez, Francia G; Gao, Yan Ru; Li, Zhe; Handelsman, David; Maitz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this work were to define the role of androgens in female wound healing and to develop and characterize a novel wound dressing with antiandrogens. Androgens retard wound healing in males, but their role in female wound healing has not been established. To understand androgen receptor (AR)-mediated androgen actions in male and female wound healing, we utilized the global AR knockout (ARKO) mouse model, with a mutated AR deleting the second zinc finger to disrupt DNA binding and transcriptional activation. AR inactivation enhanced wound healing rate in males by increasing re-epithelialization and collagen deposition even when wound contraction was eliminated. Cell proliferation and migration in ARKO male fibroblasts was significantly increased compared with wild-type (WT) fibroblasts. However, ARKO females showed a similar healing rate compared to WT females. To exploit local antiandrogen effects in wound healing, while minimizing off-target systemic effects, we developed a novel electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold wound dressing material for sustained local antiandrogen delivery. Using the antiandrogen hydroxyl flutamide (HF) at 1, 5, and 10 mg/mL in PCL scaffolds, controlled HF delivery over 21 days significantly enhanced in vitro cell proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts and human keratinocytes. HF-PCL scaffolds also promoted in vivo wound healing in mice compared with open wounds but not to PCL scaffolds. PMID:26873751

  10. Multiple functions of gingival and mucoperiosteal fibroblasts in oral wound healing and repair.

    Chiquet, Matthias; Katsaros, Christos; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2015-06-01

    Fibroblasts are cells of mesenchymal origin. They are responsible for the production of most extracellular matrix in connective tissues and are essential for wound healing and repair. In recent years, it has become clear that fibroblasts from different tissues have various distinct traits. Moreover, wounds in the oral cavity heal under very special environmental conditions compared with skin wounds. Here, we reviewed the current literature on the various interconnected functions of gingival and mucoperiosteal fibroblasts during the repair of oral wounds. The MEDLINE database was searched with the following terms: (gingival OR mucoperiosteal) AND fibroblast AND (wound healing OR repair). The data gathered were used to compare oral fibroblasts with fibroblasts from other tissues in terms of their regulation and function during wound healing. Specifically, we sought answers to the following questions: (i) what is the role of oral fibroblasts in the inflammatory response in acute wounds; (ii) how do growth factors control the function of oral fibroblasts during wound healing; (iii) how do oral fibroblasts produce, remodel and interact with extracellular matrix in healing wounds; (iv) how do oral fibroblasts respond to mechanical stress; and (v) how does aging affect the fetal-like responses and functions of oral fibroblasts? The current state of research indicates that oral fibroblasts possess unique characteristics and tightly controlled specific functions in wound healing and repair. This information is essential for developing new strategies to control the intraoral wound-healing processes of the individual patient. PMID:25867977

  11. EFFECT OF BENTONITE ON SKIN WOUND HEALING: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN THE RAT MODEL

    S. H. Emami-Razavi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing in the skin depends upon the availability of appropriate trace metals as enzyme cofactors and structural components in tissue repair. The present study is a part of a series of experimental investigations to examine the influence of Bentonite on skin wound healing. Surgically induced skin wounds in 48 young adult male rats were exposed topically to Bentonite (12 round wound and 12 incisional wound and control wounds (12 round wound and 12 incisional wound received de-ionized water only. Skin wounds (round and incisional treated with Bentonite exhibited no significant difference in margins with erythema and edematous changes. Scab and wound debris was more extensive and persisted for at least 7 days after surgery in control group (P < 0.05. Skin wounds exposed to Bentonite exhibited a mild retarded re-epithelialization, the treatment wounds were characterized by a prominent central mass of inflammatory cells, cell debris and wound exudate. The intense infiltrate of lymphocytes, macrophages, monocytes and fibroblasts extended from the wound margin into the region of the panniculus carnosus muscle and hypodermis. Vascular dilatation and dermal oedema were prominent features of these wounds. External utilization of Bentonite for wound healing is safe and feasible, and we finalized that macroscopic healing of wound that treated by Bentonite was superior versus control group.

  12. Moist wound healing compared with standard care of treatment of primary closed vascular surgical wounds: a prospective randomized controlled study

    Vogt, Katja C; Uhlyarik, M; Schroeder, Torben V

    2007-01-01

    This study was a randomized-controlled trial comparing the standard type of dry dressing, Mepore, with moist wound healing, using a hydrofiber dressing, Aquacel, in primary closed wounds after vascular surgery. The endpoints were patient comfort, cost-effectiveness, infections, wound complication...

  13. Repairing effects of Iran flora on wound healing

    Mohammad Afshar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The skin is the largest and the heaviest organ in the human body which, in addition to its important roles in the protection, waste removal, and contribution to vitamin D synthesis. As an important sensory organ, it can play a major role in the maintenance of homeostasis in the body. Total loss of of the skin integrity can cause harms and diseases that lead to physical disability and even death. Therefore, one of the main problem faced by medical science so far, is the question of .wound healing in the shortest possible time and with minimal side effects. Increasing the wound healing rate leads to positive financial and health results. Thus, several studies on new therapeutic techniques such as use of chemical drugs, herbal medication and homeopathy have been done. Moreover, physical methods such as laser therapy and other treatmentshave been constantly improving. In recent decades, the use of herbal medicine, as an effective method, has been progressing in most countries including Iran. In the traditional medicine of Iran various methods of using plants for the treatment of diseases are common. This is actually justifiable due to the geographic diversity of the flora in Iran. In the present paper the effectivity of the cut healing properties of some medicinal herbs in Iran is discussed.

  14. Wound healing suppressant effect of vincristine reversed by vitamin A: an experimental study

    Venkatadri T.V.; Afzal Khan A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Use of antineoplastic drugs pre and postoperatively have shown to adversely affect the healing of surgical wounds. Vincristine is an antineoplastic drug with a wide range of antitumor activity. Prior studies have demonstrated that vincristine impairs skin wound healing. Methods: In this study we investigated the effect of vitamin A on vincristine induced suppression of healing in two wound models, viz: incision and dead space in rats. Hydroxyproline (measure of collagen) was es...

  15. Wound Healing and Cancer Stem Cells: Inflammation as a Driver of Treatment Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Arnold, Kimberly M; Opdenaker, Lynn M.; Daniel Flynn; Jennifer Sims-Mourtada

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between wound healing and cancer has long been recognized. The mechanisms that regulate wound healing have been shown to promote transformation and growth of malignant cells. In addition, chronic inflammation has been associated with malignant transformation in many tissues. Recently, pathways involved in inflammation and wound healing have been reported to enhance cancer stem cell (CSC) populations. These cells, which are highly resistant to current treatments, are capable o...

  16. Persistent Inflammation and Angiogenesis during Wound Healing in K14-directed Hoxb13 Transgenic Mice

    Mack, Judith A.; Maytin, Edward V.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds and inadequate tissue repair characterized by excessive fibrosis continue to have a major negative impact on health and quality of life. Understanding the molecular events required for adequate healing, including the transcriptional control of wound repair, will be important for the development of future therapies. We previously showed that loss of Hoxb13 from murine skin results in enhanced cutaneous wound healing, suggesting that Hoxb13 has a negative effect on w...

  17. Phenotypic overlap between MMP-13 and the plasminogen activation system during wound healing in mice.

    Juncker-Jensen, Anna; Lund, Leif R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix is a crucial step in the healing of incisional skin wounds. Thus, healing of skin wounds is delayed by either plasminogen-deficiency or by treatment with the broad-spectrum metalloproteinase (MP) inhibitor Galardin alone, while the two perturbations combined completely prevent wound healing. Both urokinase-type plasminogen activator and several matrix metallo proteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-3, -9 and -13, are expressed in the leading-...

  18. Microencapsulated equine mesenchymal stromal cells promote cutaneous wound healing in vitro

    Bussche, Leen; Harman, Rebecca M.; Syracuse, Bethany A; Plante, Eric L; Lu, Yen-Chun; Curtis, Theresa M; Ma, Minglin; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of impaired cutaneous wound healing is high and treatment is difficult and often ineffective, leading to negative social and economic impacts for our society. Innovative treatments to improve cutaneous wound healing by promoting complete tissue regeneration are therefore urgently needed. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been reported to provide paracrine signals that promote wound healing, but (i) how they exert their effects on target cells is unclear and (ii...

  19. The Combination of Three Natural Compounds Effectively Prevented Lung Carcinogenesis by Optimal Wound Healing.

    Linxin Liu

    Full Text Available The tumor stroma has been described as "normal wound healing gone awry". We explored whether the restoration of a wound healing-like microenvironment may facilitate tumor healing. Firstly, we screened three natural compounds (shikonin, notoginsenoside R1 and aconitine from wound healing agents and evaluated the efficacies of wound healing microenvironment for limiting single agent-elicited carcinogenesis and two-stage carcinogenesis. The results showed that three compounds used alone could promote wound healing but had unfavorable efficacy to exert wound healing, and that the combination of three compounds made up treatment disadvantage of a single compound in wound healing and led to optimal wound healing. Although individual treatment with these agents may prevent cancer, they were not effective for the treatment of established tumors. However, combination treatment with these three compounds almost completely prevented urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis and reduced tumor burden. Different from previous studies, we found that urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis was associated with lung injury independent of pulmonary inflammation. LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation did not increase lung carcinogenesis, whereas decreased pulmonary inflammation by macrophage depletion promoted lung carcinogenesis. In addition, urethane damaged wound healing in skin excision wound model, reversed lung carcinogenic efficacy by the combination of three compounds was consistent with skin wound healing. Further, the combination of these three agents reduced the number of lung cancer stem cells (CSCs by inducing cell differentiation, restoration of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC and blockade of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Our results suggest that restoration of a wound healing microenvironment represents an effective strategy for cancer prevention.

  20. Wound healing activity of Carallia brachiata bark

    Krishnaveni. B; Neeharika V; Venkatesh S; Padmavathy R; Reddy B.

    2009-01-01

    The stem bark of Carallia brachiata was studied for wound healing activity. The bark was extracted with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol successively. All the extracts were screened for wound healing activity by excision and incision models in Wistar rats. The ethyl acetate and methanol extracts were found to possess significant wound healing activity. The extracts revealed the presence of sterols or triterpenoids, flavonoids, phenols, tannins, carbohydrates, fixed oils and fats.

  1. Formulation and Evaluation of Neomycin Sulphate Ointment containing Natural Wound Healing Agent Curcuma longa

    Akanksha D; Vikas G; Neetesh K. J; Shailendra S; Neelam B; Dinesh K. J

    2014-01-01

    Present investigation was to develop novel ointment formulation in combination of natural wound healing agent curcuma longa, which is reported to possess wound healing and anti-bacterial activities. Combination of neomycin sulphate and curcuma longa is good rational, where curcuma longa produces synergistic wound healing effect with neomycin sulphate. Formulations containing fixed concentration (0.5 %) of neomycin sulphate and 3 %, 4 % and 5 % of curcuma longa were prepared. To assess the eff...

  2. Evaluation of wound healing potential of Pterocarpus marsupium heart wood extract in normal and diabetic rats

    Anil Kumar Singhal; Manish Gupta; Sheeja Edwin; Rupesh Soni

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study is to evaluate and compare the cutaneous wound healing potential of Pterocarpus marsupium in normal and diabetic rats and make inference for the cutaneous wound healing potential by possible "mode of action" P. marsupium extract. Materials and Methods: The effect of heart wood extract of P. marsupium on wound healing has been studied in diabetic and normal animals. The effect has also been compared with standard (mupirocin ointment) application. In the absenc...

  3. Chemokines as Therapeutic Targets to Improve Healing Efficiency of Chronic Wounds

    Satish, Latha

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Impaired wound healing leading to chronic wounds is an important clinical problem that needs immediate attention to develop new effective therapies. Members of the chemokine family seem to be attractive and amenable to stimulate the healing process in chronic wounds. Targeting specific chemokines and/or their receptors has the potential to modify chronic inflammation to acute inflammation, which will hasten the healing process.

  4. Neurotensin-loaded collagen dressings reduce inflammation and improve wound healing in diabetic mice

    Liane I. F. Moura; Dias, Ana M. A.; Suesca, Edward; Casadiegos, Sergio; Leal, Ermelindo C.; Fontanilla, Marta R.; Carvalho, Lina; Sousa, Hermínio C. de; Carvalho, Eugénia

    2014-01-01

    Impaired wound healing is an important clinical problem in diabetes mellitus and results in failure to completely heal diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), which may lead to lower extremity amputations. In the present study, collagen based dressings were prepared to be applied as support for the delivery of neurotensin (NT), a neuropeptide that acts as an inflammatory modulator in wound healing. The performance of NT alone and NT–loaded collagen matrices to treat wounds in streptozotocin (STZ) diabet...

  5. The Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Diabetic Wound Healing in relation to Photobiomodulation

    Sandra Matabi Ayuk; Heidi Abrahamse; Nicolette Nadene Houreld

    2016-01-01

    The integration of several cellular responses initiates the process of wound healing. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an integral role in wound healing. Their main function is degradation, by removal of damaged extracellular matrix (ECM) during the inflammatory phase, breakdown of the capillary basement membrane for angiogenesis and cell migration during the proliferation phase, and contraction and remodelling of tissue in the remodelling phase. For effective healing to occur, all wound...

  6. Whey protein enhances normal inflammatory responses during cutaneous wound healing in diabetic rats

    Ebaid Hossam; Salem Amir; Sayed Abdalla; Metwalli Ali

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Prolonged wound healing is a complication of diabetes that contributes to mortality. Impaired wound healing occurs as a consequence of excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Whey protein (WP) is able to reduce the oxygen radicals and increase the levels of the antioxidant glutathione. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether dietary supplementation with WP could enhance normal inflammatory responses during wound healing in diabetic rats. Animals we...

  7. Inflammation and Its Correlates in Regenerative Wound Healing: An Alternate Perspective

    Gourevitch, Dmitri; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Zhang, Yong; Clark, Lise; Chang, Celia; Showe, Louise C; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The wound healing response may be viewed as partially overlapping sets of two physiological processes, regeneration and wound repair with the former overrepresented in some lower species such as newts and the latter more typical of mammals. A robust and quantitative model of regenerative healing has been described in Murphy Roths Large (MRL) mice in which through-and-through ear hole wounds in the ear pinna leads to scarless healing and replacement of all tissue through blastema fo...

  8. Wound-healing activity of a proteolytic fraction from Carica candamarcensis on experimentally induced burn.

    Gomes, Flávia S L; Spínola, Cássia de V; Ribeiro, Henrique A; Lopes, Miriam T P; Cassali, Geovanni D; Salas, Carlos E

    2010-03-01

    Carica candamarcensis is a species from the Caricaceae family whose immature fruit contains latex with large amounts of cysteine proteinases. In prior studies, we isolated two of these enzymes displaying mitogenic activity when incubated with L929 fibroblastic cells. One of the fractions containing these enzymes (P1G10) was shown to enhance wound healing of skin and to accelerate healing of chemically induced gastric ulcer. In this study we evaluate the effect of P1G10 on heat-induced, third-degree burn using a rodent model. The results show that 0.1% P1G10 accelerates epithelisation while the effect of 1% or 0.01% P1G10 is not significantly different to 1% silver sulphadiazine, 2% papain or the hydrosoluble vehicle used as control. In a double-blind randomised experiment comparing the healing response of 0.1%, 1% and the vehicle alone, we confirmed the enhanced healing property of P1G10. Histological analysis of burn-tissue sections following treatment with P1G10 support these observations. These results extend the healing properties of these groups of enzymes to a different type of trauma and open the way to future clinical applications. PMID:19577373

  9. Poly (3-hydroxyalkanoates)-co-(6-hydroxyhexanoate) hydrogel promotes angiogenesis and collagen deposition during cutaneous wound healing in rats.

    Gumel, Ahmad Mohammed; Razaif-Mazinah, Mohd Rafais Mohd; Anis, Siti Nor Syairah; Annuar, Mohamad Suffian Mohamad

    2015-08-01

    Wound management and healing in several physiological or pathological conditions, particularly when comorbidities are involved, usually proves to be difficult. This presents complications leading to socio-economic and public health burdens. The accelerative wound healing potential of biocompatible poly(3-hydroxyalkanoates)-co-(6-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHA-PCL) composite hydrogel is reported herein. The biosynthesized PHA-PCL macromer was cross-linked with PEGMA to give a hydrogel. Twenty-four rats weighing 200-250 g each were randomly assigned to four groups of six rats. Rats in group I (negative control) were dressed with sterilized gum acacia paste in 10% normal saline while PEGMA-alone hydrogel (PH) was used to dress group II (secondary control) rats. Group III rats were dressed with PHAs-PCL cross-linked PEGMA hydrogel (PPH). For the positive control (group IV), the rats were dressed with Intrasite(®) gel. Biochemical, histomorphometric and immunohistomorphometric analyses revealed a significant difference in area closure and re-epithelialization on days 7 and 14 in PPH or Intrasite(®) gel groups compared to gum acacia or PEGMA-alone groups. Furthermore, wounds dressed with PPH or Intrasite(®) gel showed evident collagen deposition, enhanced fibrosis and extensively organized angiogenesis on day 14 compared to the negative control group. While improvement in wound healing of the PH dressed group could be observed, there was no significant difference between the negative control group and the PH dressed group in any of the tests. The findings suggested that topical application of PPH accelerated the rats' wound healing process by improving angiogenesis attributed to the increased microvessel density (MVD) and expressions of VEGF-A in tissue samples. Thus, PPH has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of cutaneous wounds in rats, and could be a potential novel agent in the management and acceleration of wound healing in humans and animals. PMID

  10. Evidence That Mast Cells Are Not Required for Healing of Splinted Cutaneous Excisional Wounds in Mice

    Nauta, Allison C.; Grova, Monica; Montoro, Daniel T.; Zimmermann, Andrew; Tsai, Mindy; Geoffrey C Gurtner; Galli, Stephen J.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process involving the interaction of many cell types to replace lost or damaged tissue. Although the biology of wound healing has been extensively investigated, few studies have focused on the role of mast cells. In this study, we investigated the possible role of mast cells in wound healing by analyzing aspects of cutaneous excisional wound healing in three types of genetically mast cell-deficient mice. We found that C57BL/6-KitW-sh/W-sh , WBB6F1-KitW/W-...

  11. Investigation of wound healing activity of Lantana camara L. in Sprague dawley rats using a burn wound model

    B S Nayak

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Lantana camara is used in herbal medicine for the treatment of skin itches, as an antiseptic for wounds, and externally for leprosy and scabies. The objective of our study is to investigate burn wound healing activity of the leaf extract of L.camara in rats. The animals were divided into two groups of 6 each. The test group animals were treated with the ethanol extract of L. camara (100 mg kg-1 day-1 topically and the control group animals were left untreated. Healing was assessed by the rate of wound contraction, period of epithelialization. Antimicrobial activities of the extract against the specific microorganisms were assessed. The extract showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella Pneumoniae and E.coli. Extract treated wounds were healed in about 21 days which is not distinct from the controls. Our data suggest that L.camara has antimicrobial activity but not wound healing promoting activity on burn wound.   Industrial relevance: Extensive work has been done on the L. camara and demonstrated the antimicrobial and fungicidal activity of its chemical constituents. Lantana oil is used for the treatment of skin itches and as an antiseptic for wounds. It has been used in folk medicine for the treatment of cancers, chicken pox, measles, ulcers, swellings, eczema. Our earlier work showed the healing activity on excision wound model. However, there is no data to support the wound healing activity of L. camara on burn wound. Hence, we have conducted the present study to explore the wound healing activity and the antimicrobial activities of L. camara against the specific microorganisms which generally infect burn wound.

  12. Stem Cells in Skin Regeneration, Wound Healing, and Their Clinical Applications

    Nkemcho Ojeh; Irena Pastar; Marjana Tomic-Canic; Olivera Stojadinovic

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the body and has an array of functions. Skin compartments, epidermis, and hair follicles house stem cells that are indispensable for skin homeostasis and regeneration. These stem cells also contribute to wound repair, resulting in restoration of tissue integrity and function of damaged tissue. Unsuccessful wound healing processes often lead to non-healing wounds. Chronic wounds are caused by depletion of stem cells and a variety of other cellular and molecular...

  13. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Wound Healing Properties of Kigelia africana (Lam.) Beneth. and Strophanthus hispidus DC.

    Christian Agyare; Anita Serwaa Dwobeng; Nicholas Agyepong; Yaw Duah Boakye; Kwesi Boadu Mensah; Patrick George Ayande; Martin Adarkwa-Yiadom

    2013-01-01

    Microbial infections of various types of wounds are a challenge to the treatment of wounds and wound healing. The study was to investigate antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of methanol leaf and stem bark extracts of Kigelia africana and methanol leaf and root extracts of Strophanthus hispidus and also to determine wound healing properties of the extracts. The antimicrobial activities of the methanol extracts were determined against two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria and a...

  14. What Is New in the Understanding of Non Healing Wounds Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Therapies

    H. Trøstrup; T. Bjarnsholt; Kirketerp-Møller, K.; Høiby, N; Moser, C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a growing socioeconomic problem in the western world. Knowledge on recalcitrant wounds relies on in vitro studies or clinical observations, and there is emerging evidence on the clinical impact of bacterial biofilm on skin healing. Chronic wounds are locked in the inflammatory state of wound healing, and there are multiple explanations for this arrest with the theory of exaggerated proteolysis as the most commonly accepted. Previously, there has not been enough focus on the...

  15. p38 MAPK inhibition reduces diabetes-induced impairment of wound healing

    Medicherla, Satyanarayana; Wadsworth, Scott; Cullen, Breda; Silcock, Derek; Ma, Jing Y; Mangadu, Ruban; Kerr, Irene; Chakravarty, Sarvajit; Luedtke, Gregory L; Dugar, Sundeep; Protter, Andrew A.; Higgins, Linda S

    2009-01-01

    In healthy tissue, a wound initiates an inflammatory response characterized by the presence of a hematoma, infiltration of inflammatory cells into the wound and, eventually, wound healing. In pathological conditions like diabetes mellitus, wound healing is impaired by the presence of chronic nonresolving inflammation. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors have demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects, primarily by inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines and regulati...

  16. Evaluation of wound healing potential of Jatropha gossypifolia Linn. root extracts in normal and diabetic rats

    Harneet Singh; Surendra Kr. Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Jatropha gossypifolia Linn. is used in Indian folk medicine for treatment of cuts and wounds. Root extract is used to promote wound and fracture healing in animals. Present study was conducted to assess wound healing potential of ointments prepared using successive extracts of roots of the plant. Incision and excision wounds were inflicted upon normal and nicotinamide streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, respectively. Animals were treated topically with ointments containing 5% and 10% w/w pe...

  17. Antioxidant, antibacterial and in vivo dermal wound healing effects of Opuntia flower extracts.

    Ammar, Imene; Bardaa, Sana; Mzid, Massara; Sahnoun, Zouheir; Rebaii, Tarak; Attia, Hamadi; Ennouri, Monia

    2015-11-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica flowers are used for various medicinal purposes. The aims of the present investigation were to evaluate biological properties of O. ficus-indica flowers extracts and to investigate its antioxidant and antibacterial activities and its ability to enhance wound healing. The wound healing activity of the mucilaginous and methanol extracts of O. ficus-indica flowers were assessed using excision wound model in rats. After thirteen days of treatment by both extracts, a beneficial effect on cutaneous repair was observed as assessed by the acceleration of wound contraction and remodeling phases. Histopathological studies of the granulation tissue indicated that the derma is properly arranged with the Opuntia flowers extract, compared with the control group. The mucilage extract was more effective than the methanol extract, but both showed significant results compared with the control. Such investigation was supported by the efficiency of the methanolic and mucilage extract as antimicrobial and antioxidant. Indeed, the extracts showed a potential antioxidant activity determined by different test systems, namely DPPH radicals scavenging activity, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, reducing power, β-carotene bleaching assay and metal chelating activity and exhibited significant antibacterial activity against almost all tested bacteria. PMID:26306411

  18. Efficacy of silver sulfadiazine phonophoresis on wound healing in acute burn patients

    Omar, Ghada Said Mohammed

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of SSD phonophoresis approaches (continuous and pulsed modes on the rate of healing following acute burn injury . forty female patients with second degree burn in thrir anterior aspect of the dominant foream were divided randomly into ...... phonophoresis might be valuable for enhance acute burn healing and the pulsed SSD phonophoresis is more effective for accelerating the acute burn wound healing......The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of SSD phonophoresis approaches (continuous and pulsed modes on the rate of healing following acute burn injury . forty female patients with second degree burn in thrir anterior aspect of the dominant foream were divided randomly into...... frequency of 1 MHz , and intensity of 1 W/cm2 . the parameters investigated inclding 1.burn surface area measured by tracing the burn wound parameters , and 2.determination of glycosaminoglycan in urine by using cetylpyridinuin chloride turbidity method . both parameters are measured 24 hours post...

  19. The Review on Properties of Aloe Vera in Healing of Cutaneous Wounds

    Seyyed Abbas Hashemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of wounds is very important and was subject of different investigations. In this regard, natural substance plays crucial role as complementary medicine. Various studies reported that aloe vera has useful effects on wounds especially cutaneous wounds healing. Therefore in the current review, we examined the effect of aloe vera on cutaneous wound healing and concluded that although aloe vera improves the wound healing as well as other procedures both clinically and experimentally, more studies are still needed to approve the outcomes.

  20. The Review on Properties of Aloe Vera in Healing of Cutaneous Wounds.

    Hashemi, Seyyed Abbas; Madani, Seyyed Abdollah; Abediankenari, Saied

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of wounds is very important and was subject of different investigations. In this regard, natural substance plays crucial role as complementary medicine. Various studies reported that aloe vera has useful effects on wounds especially cutaneous wounds healing. Therefore in the current review, we examined the effect of aloe vera on cutaneous wound healing and concluded that although aloe vera improves the wound healing as well as other procedures both clinically and experimentally, more studies are still needed to approve the outcomes. PMID:26090436

  1. Monitoring combat wound healing by IR hyperspectral imaging

    Howle, Chris R.; Spear, Abigail M.; Gazi, Ehsan; Crane, Nicole J.

    2016-03-01

    In recent conflicts, battlefield injuries consist largely of extensive soft injuries from blasts and high energy projectiles, including gunshot wounds. Repair of these large, traumatic wounds requires aggressive surgical treatment, including multiple surgical debridements to remove devitalised tissue and to reduce bacterial load. Identifying those patients with wound complications, such as infection and impaired healing, could greatly assist health care teams in providing the most appropriate and personalised care for combat casualties. Candidate technologies to enable this benefit include the fusion of imaging and optical spectroscopy to enable rapid identification of key markers. Hence, a novel system based on IR negative contrast imaging (NCI) is presented that employs an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) source comprising a periodically-poled LiNbO3 (PPLN) crystal. The crystal operates in the shortwave and midwave IR spectral regions (ca. 1.5 - 1.9 μm and 2.4 - 3.8 μm, respectively). Wavelength tuning is achieved by translating the crystal within the pump beam. System size and complexity are minimised by the use of single element detectors and the intracavity OPO design. Images are composed by raster scanning the monochromatic beam over the scene of interest; the reflection and/or absorption of the incident radiation by target materials and their surrounding environment provide a method for spatial location. Initial results using the NCI system to characterise wound biopsies are presented here.

  2. Periodontal and peri-implant wound healing following laser therapy.

    Aoki, Akira; Mizutani, Koji; Schwarz, Frank; Sculean, Anton; Yukna, Raymond A; Takasaki, Aristeo A; Romanos, Georgios E; Taniguchi, Yoichi; Sasaki, Katia M; Zeredo, Jorge L; Koshy, Geena; Coluzzi, Donald J; White, Joel M; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Ishikawa, Isao; Izumi, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    Laser irradiation has numerous favorable characteristics, such as ablation or vaporization, hemostasis, biostimulation (photobiomodulation) and microbial inhibition and destruction, which induce various beneficial therapeutic effects and biological responses. Therefore, the use of lasers is considered effective and suitable for treating a variety of inflammatory and infectious oral conditions. The CO2 , neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) and diode lasers have mainly been used for periodontal soft-tissue management. With development of the erbium-doped yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) and erbium, chromium-doped yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) lasers, which can be applied not only on soft tissues but also on dental hard tissues, the application of lasers dramatically expanded from periodontal soft-tissue management to hard-tissue treatment. Currently, various periodontal tissues (such as gingiva, tooth roots and bone tissue), as well as titanium implant surfaces, can be treated with lasers, and a variety of dental laser systems are being employed for the management of periodontal and peri-implant diseases. In periodontics, mechanical therapy has conventionally been the mainstream of treatment; however, complete bacterial eradication and/or optimal wound healing may not be necessarily achieved with conventional mechanical therapy alone. Consequently, in addition to chemotherapy consisting of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory agents, phototherapy using lasers and light-emitting diodes has been gradually integrated with mechanical therapy to enhance subsequent wound healing by achieving thorough debridement, decontamination and tissue stimulation. With increasing evidence of benefits, therapies with low- and high-level lasers play an important role in wound healing/tissue regeneration in the treatment of periodontal and peri-implant diseases. This article discusses the outcomes of laser therapy in soft-tissue management, periodontal

  3. A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF VACUUM-ASSISTED CLOSURE VERSUS STANDARD THERAPY OF CHRONIC NON-HEALING WOUNDS

    Raghupathy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The application of controlled levels of negative pressure has been shown to accelerate debridement and promote healing in many different types of wounds. The optimum level of negative pressure appears to be around 125 mmHg below ambient and there is evidence that this is most effective if applied in a cyclical fashion of five minutes on and two minutes off. It is believed that the negative pressure assists with removal of interstitial fluid, decreasing localised oedema and increasing blood flow. This in turn decreases tissue bacterial levels. Additionally, mechanical deformation of cells is thought to result in protein and matrix molecule synthesis, which increases the rate of cell proliferation. Despite the significant costs involved, the technique is said to compare favourably in financial terms with conventional treatments in the management of difficult to heal wounds. METHODS VAC therapy using facilities available in government. RESULTS Study group of 20 members with 98-100% graft uptake for most used VAC therapy of 1 to 2 settings. CONCLUSION Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT is a therapeutic technique using a vacuum dressing to promote healing in acute or chronic wounds and enhance healing of second and third degree burns. The therapy involves the controlled application of subatmospheric pressure to the local wound environment using a sealed wound dressing connected to a vacuum pump. The use of this technique in wound management increased dramatically over the 1990s and 2000s and a large number of studies have been published examining NPWT. NPWT appears to be useful for diabetic wound and management of the open abdomen (Laparotomy, but further research is required for other wound types, always superior to normal saline dressing.

  4. Effect of laser-pulse structure and wavelength on wound healing

    Fortune, D. S.; Huang, Shan; Bryant, G. L.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Reinisch, Lou

    1998-07-01

    We have investigated wound healing of incisions in the buccal mucosa of a canine model created with the Vanderbilt Free Electron Laser tuned to 6.1, 6.45 and 6.8 microns. We have also used a carbon dioxide laser, continuous wave and with a short-pulse structure (100 microseconds) to access wavelength and pulse structure components to wound healing from laser incisions. The tissue was evaluated histologically and with tensiometry acutely and at post operative days 3, 7, and 14. The data indicate that shorter laser pulse durations create less lateral thermal injury and wounds with greater tensile strength, resulting in earlier wound healing. Wound healing was only slightly dependent upon the wavelength of the laser. These results demonstrate that surgical carbon dioxide lasers with a short-pulse structure of approximately 100 microseconds or less could offer more prompt wound healing while maintaining the advantages of a 10.6 micron wavelength laser.

  5. Shedding Light on a New Treatment for Diabetic Wound Healing: A Review on Phototherapy

    Nicolette N. Houreld

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired wound healing is a common complication associated with diabetes with complex pathophysiological underlying mechanisms and often necessitates amputation. With the advancement in laser technology, irradiation of these wounds with low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI or phototherapy, has shown a vast improvement in wound healing. At the correct laser parameters, LILI has shown to increase migration, viability, and proliferation of diabetic cells in vitro; there is a stimulatory effect on the mitochondria with a resulting increase in adenosine triphosphate (ATP. In addition, LILI also has an anti-inflammatory and protective effect on these cells. In light of the ever present threat of diabetic foot ulcers, infection, and amputation, new improved therapies and the fortification of wound healing research deserves better prioritization. In this review we look at the complications associated with diabetic wound healing and the effect of laser irradiation both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic wound healing.

  6. A Skin Fixation Method for Decreasing the Influence of Wound Contraction on Wound Healing in a Rat Model

    Seong Hwan Bae

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The elasticity of the back skin of the rat reduced the tension around woundsduring the wound healing process in that region, and thus activates wound contraction. Theauthors proposed two skin fixation methods using readily available materials to decrease theinfluence of wound contraction on wound healing and designed an experiment to determinetheir effects.Methods The authors made 36 skin wounds on the backs of 18 rats, and they divided theminto three groups. Each group was treated with three different kinds of dressing materials,each with different skin fixing characteristics. Group A was a control group. Group B andgroup C were dressed by the first and the second skin fixation method. We measured the areasof the wounds post-surgically and calculated the wound area reduction rates.Results The two skin fixation methods both reduced the effect of wound contractioncompared to the control group. Each of the two methods had different outcomes in reducingwound contraction.Conclusions The experiment demonstrated significant differences among the wound areasand the wound area reduction rates of the three groups as a result of differences in thedegree of wound contraction. To obtain accurate results from wound healing experiments,appropriate skin fixation methods must be adopted.

  7. Healing of excisional wound in alloxan induced diabetic sheep: A planimetric and histopathologic study

    Farshid Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Healing of skin wound is a multi-factorial and complex process. Proper treatment of diabetic wounds is still a major clinical challenge. Although diabetes mellitus can occur in ruminants, healing of wounds in diabetic ruminants has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate healing of ovine excisional diabetic wound model. Eight 4-month-old Iranian Makoui wethers were equally divided to diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Alloxan monohydrate (60 mg kg-1, IV was used for diabetes induction. In each wether, an excisional wound was created on the dorsum of the animal. Photographs were taken in distinct times for planimetric evaluation. Wound samples were taken on day 21 post-wounding for histopathologic evaluations of epidermal thickness, number of fibroblasts and number of new blood vessels. The planimetric study showed slightly delay in wound closure of diabetic animals, however, it was not significantly different from nondiabetic wounds (p ≥ 0.05. Furthermore, epidermal thickness, number of fibroblasts and number of blood vessels were significantly lower in diabetic group (p < 0.05. We concluded that healing of excisional diabetic wounds in sheep may be compromised, as seen in other species. However, contraction rate of these wounds may not be delayed due to metabolic features of ruminants and these animals might go under surgeries without any serious concern. However, healing quality of these wounds may be lower than normal wounds.

  8. Cicatrização de feridas Wound healing

    Antonio Carlos Ligocki Campos

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A cicatrização de feridas consiste em perfeita e coordenada cascata de eventos que culminam com a reconstituição tecidual. O processo cicatricial é comum a todas as feridas, independe do agente que a causou. O processo de cicatrização é dividido didaticamente em três fases: inflamatória, proliferação ou granulação e remodelamento ou maturação. O colágeno é a proteína mais abundante no corpo humano e também é o principal componente da matriz extracelular dos tecidos. Estrutura-se numa rede densa e dinâmica resultante da sua constante deposição e reabsorção. O tecido cicatricial é resultado da interação entre sua síntese, fixação e degradação. Existem várias maneiras de avaliar a cicatrização das feridas. Os métodos mais utilizados atualmente são a tensiometria, a densitometria e morfometria do colágeno, a imunoistoquímica e, mais recentemente, a dosagem de fatores de crescimento. MÉTODOS: Foram revisadas todas as dissertações de mestrado e teses de doutorado realizadas na linha de pesquisa "Cicatrização de órgãos e tecidos" do programa de Pós-Graduação em Clínica Cirúrgica da Universidade Federal do Paraná. Foi realizada, também, revisão atualizada da literatura internacional no Pubmed e nacional. CONCLUSÃO: A cicatrização é um processo complexo, que começou a ser entendido em maior amplitude nos últimos anos. Recentes pesquisas têm sido direcionadas para atuar na modulação da cicatrização a nível molecular, na tentativa de evitar completamente cicatrizes patológicas.BACKGROUND: The wound healing consists of a perfect and coordinated cascade of events that result in tissue reconstitution. The healing process is common to all wounds, independently of the agent that has caused it. It is divided didactically into three phases: inflammation, proliferation or granulation and remodelation or maturation. The collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body and is

  9. Enhancement of wound healing with roots of Ficus racemosa L. in albino rats

    Krishna Murti; Upendra Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To establish the wound healing activity of aqueous and ethanolic extract of roots ofFicus racemosa (F. racemosa). Methods: Two models were performed to evaluate the wound healing activity i.e. incision and excision models. In incision model the parameter which was carried out was breaking strength of wounded skin. In excision model percentage wound contraction and period of epithelialization were established for both the extracts. Reference standard drug was povidone iodine ointment for comparison with other groups. Results: From the observation in both two models, aqueous extract of F. racemosa was found to have greater wound healing activity in terms of breaking strength in incision model and percentage wound contraction, period of epithelialization in excision model than that of other groups. Conclusions:In conclusion, our findings suggest that aqueous extract of F. racemosa possesses better wound healing ability than the ethanolic extract.

  10. Effect of ozone water rinse on wound healing in rats withPseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    Ju-Hua Ye; Jun-Wu Huang; Hong-Yun Shi

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the promoting effect of ozone water rinse on wound healing in rats with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.Methods:Wistar male rats were selected as experimental animals and randomly divided into control group, chlorhexidine group and ozone water group,Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected wounds were made and cleaned with normal saline, chlorhexidine and ozone water respectively; would healing of three groups was observed, wound tissue was collected and contents of inflammatory factors, apoptosis molecules and autophagy markers were detected.Results:Wound healing rates of chlorhexidine group and ozone water group were higher than that of control group and wound healing time was shorter than that of control group, wound healing rate of ozone water group was higher than that of chlorhexidine group and wound healing time was shorter than that of chlorhexidine group; TNF-α, IL-1, IL-2, Fas, FasL and Beclin-1 contents and LC3Ⅱ/LC3Ⅰ ratios in wound tissue of chlorhexidine group and ozone water group were lower than those of control group, and TNF-α, IL-1, IL-2, Fas, FasL and Beclin-1 contents and LC3Ⅱ/LC3Ⅰ ratios in wound tissue of ozone water group were lower than those of chlorhexidine group.Conclusions:Compared with normal saline and chlorhexidine, ozone water rinse helps to promote wound healing, improve wound healing rate and shorten wound healing time in rats withPseudomonas aeruginosa infection, and meanwhile it can inhibit cell apoptosis and autophagy in the wounds.

  11. Hyperbaric hyperoxia accelerates fracture healing in mice.

    Shigeo Kawada

    Full Text Available Increased oxygen tension influences bone metabolism. This study comprised two main experiments: one aimed to determine the bone mineral apposition and bone formation rates in vivo under hyperbaric hyperoxia (HBO, and the other aimed to evaluate the effects of exposure to HBO on fracture healing. In experiment 1, male mice were exposed to HBO [90 min/day at 90% O₂ at 2 atmospheres absolute (ATA for 5 days]. In experiment 2, an open femur fracture model was created in mice, followed by exposure to HBO 5 times/week (90 min/day at 90% O₂ at 2 ATA for 6 weeks after surgery. In experiment 1, HBO treatment significantly increased the mineral apposition and bone formation rates in the lumbar vertebra and femur and type 1 collagen alpha 1 and alkaline phosphatase mRNA expression in the lumbar vertebra. In experiment 2, at 2 weeks after fracture, the fracture callus was significantly larger in the HBO group than in the non-HBO group. Furthermore, at 4 and 6 weeks after fracture, radiographic findings showed accelerated fracture healing in the HBO group. At 6 weeks after fracture, femur stiffness and maximum load were significantly higher in the HBO group than in the non-HBO group. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and plasma calcium concentrations were not significantly different between groups. These results suggest that exposure to HBO enhances bone anabolism and accelerates fracture healing without causing oxidative DNA damage or disruption of plasma calcium homeostasis.

  12. p38 MAPK inhibition reduces diabetes-induced impairment of wound healing

    Satyanarayana Medicherla

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Satyanarayana Medicherla1, Scott Wadsworth2, Breda Cullen3, Derek Silcock3, Jing Y Ma1, Ruban Mangadu1, Irene Kerr1, Sarvajit Chakravarty1, Gregory L Luedtke1, Sundeep Dugar1, Andrew A Protter1, Linda S Higgins11Scios Inc., Fremont, CA, USA; 2Center for Biomaterials and Advanced Technologies, Somerville, NJ, USA; 3Johnson & Johnson Wound Management, Gargrave, UKAbstract: In healthy tissue, a wound initiates an inflammatory response characterized by the presence of a hematoma, infiltration of inflammatory cells into the wound and, eventually, wound healing. In pathological conditions like diabetes mellitus, wound healing is impaired by the presence of chronic nonresolving inflammation. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK inhibitors have demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects, primarily by inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines and regulating cellular traffic into wounds. The db/db mouse model of type 2 diabetes was used to characterize the time course of expression of activated p38 during impaired wound healing. The p38α-selective inhibitor, SCIO-469, was applied topically and effects on p38 activation and on wound healing were evaluated. A topical dressing used clinically, PromogranTM, was used as a comparator. In this study, we established that p38 is phosphorylated on Days 1 to 7 post-wounding in db/db mice. Further, we demonstrated that SCIO-469, at a dose of 10 µg/wound, had a positive effect on wound contraction, granulation tissue formation, and re-epithelialization, and also increased wound maturity during healing. These effects were similar to or greater than those observed with PromogranTM. These results suggest a novel approach to prophylactic and therapeutic management of chronic wounds associated with diabetes or other conditions in which healing is impaired.Keywords: p38 MAPK ihibition, diabetic wound healing, db/db mouse, nonresolving healing, PromogranTM

  13. The genomics of oral cancer and wound healing

    Aswini Y

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is the most common malignancy in India, where it is epidemiologically linked to the chewing of betel quid and other carcinogens. But various point mutations were detectable in the p53 and p15 genes. Hence, this review was conducted with the aim to find out genetic risks as well as markers for oral cancers and wound healing. Tobacco-related cancers are associated with polymorphisms of the CYP1A1 and GSTM1 genes in terms of genotype frequencies and cigarette smoking dose. Expression of E6/E7 were also found in tumors, most of which were derived from the oropharynx. Presence of homozygous arginine at codon 72 renders p53 about seven times more susceptible to E6-mediated proteolytic degradation. Erythropoietin, vascular permeability factor (VPF, also known as vascular endothelial growth factor or VEGF, and PDGF has been implicated as one of the principal mitogens involved in cutaneous wound healing. Activation of NF-kB is associated with enhanced cell survival. Human papilloma virus status is a significantly favorable prognostic factor in tonsilar cancer and may be used as a marker in order to optimize the treatment of patients with this type of cancer.

  14. The spleen and skin wound healing in Xenopus adults.

    Franchini, Antonella; Della Rocca, Annalaura; Bertolotti, Evelina

    2016-07-01

    In most vertebrates, the regenerative capacity to restore lost/damage tissues to original structure and functionality decreases at some time during ontogenesis. To evaluate the role of the acquired immunity in the decline of regenerative potential, we examined the cellular responses elicited in the spleen during skin repair in Xenopus adults. Modifications in the architecture were found to be induced and were remarkable 14 days postinjury when the spleen increased significantly in size. In white pulp, the periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths were associated with follicles having central light zones, morphologically similar to germinal centers. With the progress of healing, pigment-containing cells were seen to accumulate in both white and red pulp regions. Moreover, compared to controls, the cells immunoreactive to anti-cytokines (TNF-α, TGF-β1) and -iNOS increased from the first days after wounding. The 14th day, the positive cells formed a dense network of reticular cells in central regions of lymphoid follicles and more frequent reactive leukocytes were detected within the red pulp. A higher number of lymphoid cells immunostained with anti-CD3ε were also observed in the perifollicular zone. The results suggest that the spleen of adult frogs is involved in skin wound healing with the expansion of lymphoid compartments. J. Morphol. 277:888-895, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27059432

  15. Multigenerational epigenetic adaptation of the hepatic wound-healing response.

    Zeybel, Müjdat; Hardy, Timothy; Wong, Yi K; Mathers, John C; Fox, Christopher R; Gackowska, Agata; Oakley, Fiona; Burt, Alastair D; Wilson, Caroline L; Anstee, Quentin M; Barter, Matt J; Masson, Steven; Elsharkawy, Ahmed M; Mann, Derek A; Mann, Jelena

    2012-09-01

    We investigated whether ancestral liver damage leads to heritable reprogramming of hepatic wound healing in male rats. We found that a history of liver damage corresponds with transmission of an epigenetic suppressive adaptation of the fibrogenic component of wound healing to the male F1 and F2 generations. Underlying this adaptation was less generation of liver myofibroblasts, higher hepatic expression of the antifibrogenic factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) and lower expression of the profibrogenic factor transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) compared to rats without this adaptation. Remodeling of DNA methylation and histone acetylation underpinned these alterations in gene expression. Sperm from rats with liver fibrosis were enriched for the histone variant H2A.Z and trimethylation of histone H3 at Lys27 (H3K27me3) at PPAR-γ chromatin. These modifications to the sperm chromatin were transmittable by adaptive serum transfer from fibrotic rats to naive rats and similar modifications were induced in mesenchymal stem cells exposed to conditioned media from cultured rat or human myofibroblasts. Thus, it is probable that a myofibroblast-secreted soluble factor stimulates heritable epigenetic signatures in sperm so that the resulting offspring better adapt to future fibrogenic hepatic insults. Adding possible relevance to humans, we found that people with mild liver fibrosis have hypomethylation of the PPARG promoter compared to others with severe fibrosis. PMID:22941276

  16. Identification of Biomarkers for Footpad Dermatitis Development and Wound Healing.

    Chen, Juxing; Tellez, Guillermo; Escobar, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Footpad dermatitis (FPD) is a type of skin inflammation that causes necrotic lesions on the plantar surface of the footpads in commercial poultry, with significant animal welfare, and economic implications. To identify biomarkers for FPD development and wound healing, a battery cage trial was conducted in which a paper sheet was put on the bottom of cages to hold feces to induce FPD of broilers. Day-of-hatch Ross 308 male broiler chicks were fed a corn-soybean meal diet and assigned to 3 treatments with 8 cages per treatment and 11 birds per cage. Cages without paper sheets were used as a negative control (NEG). Cages with paper sheets during the entire growth period (d 0-30) were used as a positive control (POS) to continually induce FPD. Cages with paper sheets during d 0-13 and without paper sheets during d 14-30 were used to examine the dynamic of FPD development and lesion wound healing (LWH). Footpad lesions were scored to grade (G) 1-5 with no lesion in G1 and most severe lesion in G5. Covering with paper sheets in POS and LWH induced 99% incidence of G3 footpads on d 13. Removing paper sheets from LWH healed footpad lesions by d 30. One representative bird, with lesions most close to pen average lesion score, was chosen to collect footpad skin samples for biomarker analysis. Total collagen protein and mRNA levels of tenascin X (TNX), type I α1 collagen (COL1A1), type III α1 collagen (COL3A1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3), and integrin α1 (ITGA1) mRNA levels were decreased (P < 0.05), while mRNA levels of tenascin C (TNC), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), IL-1β, and the ratio of MMP2 to all TIMP were increased (P < 0.03) in G3 footpads in POS and LWH compared to G1 footpads in NEG on d 14. These parameters continued to worsen with development of more severe lesions in POS. After paper sheets were removed (i.e., LWH), levels of these parameters gradually or rapidly

  17. Healing of partial thickness porcine skin wounds in a liquid environment.

    Breuing, K; Eriksson, E; Liu, P; Miller, D R

    1992-01-01

    This study employs a liquid-tight vinyl chamber for the topical fluid-phase treatment of experimental wounds in pigs. Continuous treatment with normal saline significantly reduced the early progression of tissue destruction in partial thickness burns. Uncovered burns formed a deep layer of necrosis (0.49 +/- 0.004 mm, mean +/- SD) although burn wounds covered with empty chambers demonstrated less necrosis (0.14 +/- 0.01 mm), fluid-treated wounds formed no eschar, and little tissue necrosis could be detected (less than 0.005 mm). Topical treatment with hypertonic dextran increased water flux across burn wounds by 0.24 ml/cm2/24 hr (mean, n = 95) over saline-treated wounds during the first 5 days after wounding. When partial thickness burn and excisional wounds were immersed in isotonic saline until healed, the daily efflux of water, protein, electrolytes, and glucose across the wound surface declined during healing to baseline values found in controls (saline-covered unwounded skin). The declining protein permeability was used as a reproducible, noninvasive, endogenous marker for the return of epithelial barrier function. Saline-treated excisional wounds healed within 8.6 +/- 0.6 days (mean +/- SD, n = 27) and burn wounds within 12.1 +/- 1.4 days (mean +/- SD, n = 15). Healing of fluid-treated wounds occurred without tissue maceration and showed less inflammation and less scar formation than healing of air exposed wounds (no attempt was made to compare rates of healing between air- and fluid-exposed wounds). We consider the fluid-filled chamber a potentially very useful diagnostic, monitoring, and delivery system for wound-healing research and for human wound therapy. PMID:1548868

  18. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF INTRA- UTERINE HEALING OF FETAL RAT WOUNDS

    崔磊; 张群; 钱云良

    2000-01-01

    Objective In order to investigate the fetal scarless wound healing, we developed an in vivo model to observe the process of wound healing occurring in SD-rat fetus. Methods SD-rat fetuses were given full-thickness incisional wounds in the upper lips under ether anesthesia. Wound specimens were removed successively 12,24,48,72h postwounding (PW) from fetus and 1,3,5,7d PW from adult rats for histological examination. Results In the fetus, re-epithelialization of the skin wound was completed by 24h PW, without apparent acute inflammatory response. Regenerated skin wound with normal architecture and elements was completed by 72h postoperation, indistinguishable from the surrounding normal skin. While in the adult rats, the wounds showed an acute inflammatory response resulting in thickened epithelia and scar formation. Conclusion Fetal wound is characterized by rapid and efficient healing without scar formation followed by real skin regeneration.

  19. Raman Spectroscopy Enables Noninvasive Biochemical Characterization and Identification of the Stage of Healing of a Wound

    Jain, Rishabh; Calderon, Diego; Kierski, Patricia R.; Schurr, Michael J.; Czuprynski, Charles J.; Murphy, Christopher J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and rapid assessment of the healing status of a wound in a simple and noninvasive manner would enable clinicians to diagnose wounds in real time and promptly adjust treatments to hasten the resolution of nonhealing wounds. Histologic and biochemical characterization of biopsied wound tissue, which is currently the only reliable method for wound assessment, is invasive, complex to interpret, and slow. Here we demonstrate the use of Raman microspectroscopy coupled with multivariate spe...

  20. Recent advances in topical wound care

    Sarabahi, Sujata

    2012-01-01

    There are a wide variety of dressing techniques and materials available for management of both acute wounds and chronic non-healing wounds. The primary objective in both the cases is to achieve a healed closed wound. However, in a chronic wound the dressing may be required for preparing the wound bed for further operative procedures such as skin grafting. An ideal dressing material should not only accelerate wound healing but also reduce loss of protein, electrolytes and fluid from the wound,...

  1. Electrospun chitosan/polyvinyl alcohol nanofibre mats for wound healing.

    Charernsriwilaiwat, Natthan; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2014-04-01

    Chitosan (CS) aqueous salt blended with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibre mats was prepared by electrospinning. CS was dissolved with hydroxybenzotriazole (HOBt), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in distilled water without the use of toxic or hazardous solvents. The CS aqueous salts were blended with PVA at different weight ratios, and the effect of the solution ratios was investigated. The morphologies and mechanical and swelling properties of the generated fibres were analysed. Indirect cytotoxicity studies indicated that the CS/PVA nanofibre mats were non-toxic to normal human fibroblast cells. The CS-HOBt/PVA and CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats demonstrated satisfactory antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, and an in vivo wound healing test showed that the CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats performed better than gauze in decreasing acute wound size during the first week after tissue damage. In conclusion, the biodegradable, biocompatible and antibacterial CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats have potential for use as wound dressing materials. PMID:22925275

  2. The effect of low-level helium-neon laser on oral wound healing

    Farimah Sardari

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This study showed that He-Ne laser had no beneficial effects on incisional oral wound healing particularly in 5 days after laser therapy. Future research in the field of laser effects on oral wound healing in human is recommended.

  3. Revisiting perioperative chemotherapy: the critical importance of targeting residual cancer prior to wound healing

    Scientists and physicians have long noted similarities between the general behavior of a cancerous tumor and the physiological process of wound healing. But it may be during metastasis that the parallels between cancer and wound healing are most pronounced. And more particularly and for the reasons detailed in this paper, any cancer remaining after the removal of a solid tumor, whether found in micrometastatic deposits in the stroma or within the circulation, may be heavily dependent on wound healing pathways for its further survival and proliferation. If cancer cells can hijack the wound healing process to facilitate their metastatic spread and survival, then the period immediately after surgery may be a particularly vulnerable period of time for the host, as wound healing pathways are activated and amplified after the primary tumor is removed. Given that we often wait 30 days or more after surgical removal of the primary tumor before initiating adjuvant chemotherapy to allow time for the wound to heal, this paper challenges the wisdom of that clinical paradigm, providing a theoretical rationale for administering therapy during the perioperative period. Waiting for wound healing to occur before initiating adjuvant therapies may be seriously compromising their effectiveness, and patients subsequently rendered incurable as a result of this wait. Clinical trials to establish the safety and effectiveness of administering adjuvant therapies perioperatively are needed. These therapies should target not only the residual cancer cells, but also the wound healing pathway utilized by these cells to proliferate and metastasize

  4. Modeling the effects of systemic mediators on the inflammatory phase of wound healing.

    Cooper, Racheal L; Segal, Rebecca A; Diegelmann, Robert F; Reynolds, Angela M

    2015-02-21

    The normal wound healing response is characterized by a progression from clot formation, to an inflammatory phase, to a repair phase, and finally, to remodeling. In many chronic wounds there is an extended inflammatory phase that stops this progression. In order to understand the inflammatory phase in more detail, we developed an ordinary differential equation model that accounts for two systemic mediators that are known to modulate this phase, estrogen (a protective hormone during wound healing) and cortisol (a hormone elevated after trauma that slows healing). This model describes the interactions in the wound between wound debris, pathogens, neutrophils and macrophages and the modulation of these interactions by estrogen and cortisol. A collection of parameter sets, which qualitatively match published data on the dynamics of wound healing, was chosen using Latin Hypercube Sampling. This collection of parameter sets represents normal healing in the population as a whole better than one single parameter set. Including the effects of estrogen and cortisol is a necessary step to creating a patient specific model that accounts for gender and trauma. Utilization of math modeling techniques to better understand the wound healing inflammatory phase could lead to new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic wounds. This inflammatory phase model will later become the inflammatory subsystem of our full wound healing model, which includes fibroblast activity, collagen accumulation and remodeling. PMID:25446708

  5. Vibrational spectroscopy: a tool being developed for the noninvasive monitoring of wound healing

    Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Wound care and management accounted for over 1.8 million hospital discharges in 2009. The complex nature of wound physiology involves hundreds of overlapping processes that we have only begun to understand over the past three decades. The management of wounds remains a significant challenge for inexperienced clinicians. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjective. Some wounds fail to close, or dehisce, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. An understanding of the molecular environment of acute and chronic wounds throughout the wound-healing process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the patient's outcome. Pathologic alterations of wounds are accompanied by fundamental changes in the molecular environment that can be analyzed by vibrational spectroscopy. Vibrational spectroscopy, specifically Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, offers the capability to accurately detect and identify the various molecules that compose the extracellular matrix during wound healing in their native state. The identified changes might provide the objective markers of wound healing, which can then be integrated with clinical characteristics to guide the management of wounds.

  6. A concomitant review of the effects of diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism in wound healing

    Konstantinos A Ekmektzoglou; Georgios C Zografos

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the negative impact of diabetes mellitus or hypothyroidism on wound healing, both in experimental and clinical settings. Since both are metabolic disorders of great clinical importance, special attention is given, not only to their pathophysiology,but also to their biochemical and histological effects on tissue integrity and regeneration. Also, special focus is awarded on wound healing of the gastrointestinal tract,i.e. in intestinal anastomosis, and how these disorders can lead to wound dehiscence. Since diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism can coexist in clinical settings, more research must be directed on their influence on wound healing, considering them as one clinical entity.

  7. Nitric oxide donor (deta nonoate) enhance experimental wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Background: Diabetes is characterized by a nitric oxide deficiency at the wound site. Diabetes is a factor that influences all stages of wound healing. In animals with acute experimental diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ), the early inflammatory responses after wounding is impaired, fibroblast and endothelial cell proliferation is reduced as well as accumulation of reparative collagen and gain in wound breaking strength. In this study we investigated whether exogenous nitric oxide supplementation with nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate could reverse impaired healing in diabetes. Methods: In this study male Sprague Dawley Rats were rendered diabetes by intraperitoneal streptozotocin administration. Nine days after induction of diabetes (blood glucose greater than 250 mg/dl), were given full thickness dermal wounds (1 x 1 cm). The test group (n=6) was treated with 100 micro mole DETA NONOate in phosphate buffer while control wounds in the control subjects (n=6) received sterile phosphate buffer on the same day and subsequently every three days. Urinary nitrate output was quantitated daily prior to wounding, during wound healing (21 days) and following external wound closure. The rate of wound healing was determined by video image analysis on the day of wounding and every 3 days during wound healing (21 days). Results: The results suggest nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate can reverse impaired healing associated with diabetes (P<0.001) and urinary nitrate NO/sub 3/) output may reflect the extent of repair in this wound model (P<0.001). Conclusion: Site specific delivery of nitric oxide via NO-donor DETA NONOate could be an effective therapeutic strategy to impaired diabetic wound healing. (author)

  8. Wound healing and antibacterial activities of chondroitin sulfate- and acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles

    For topical applications in wound healing, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted much attention as antibacterial agents. Herein, we describe a green-synthetic route for the production of biocompatible and crystalline AgNPs using two glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and acharan sulfate (AS), as reducing agents. The synthetic approach avoids the use of toxic chemicals, and the yield of AgNPs formation is found to be 98.1% and 91.1% for the chondroitin sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and the acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (AS-AgNPs), respectively. Nanoparticles with mostly spherical and amorphous shapes were observed, with an average diameter of 6.16 ± 2.26 nm for CS-AgNPs and 5.79 ± 3.10 nm for AS-AgNPs. Images of the CS-AgNPs obtained from atomic force microscopy revealed the self-assembled structure of CS was similar to a densely packed woven mat with AgNPs sprinkled on the CS. These nanoparticles were stable under cell culture conditions without any noticeable aggregation. An approximately 128-fold enhancement of the antibacterial activities of the AgNPs was observed against Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli when compared to CS and AS alone. In addition, an in vivo animal model of wound healing activity was tested using mice that were subjected to deep incision wounds. In comparison to the controls, the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs stimulated wound closure under histological examination and accelerated the deposition of granulation tissue and collagen in the wound area. The wound healing activity of the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs are comparable to that of a commercial formulation of silver sulfadiazine even though the newly prepared ointments contain a lower silver concentration. Therefore, the newly prepared AgNPs demonstrate potential for use as an attractive biocompatible nanocomposite for topical applications in the treatment of wounds. (paper)

  9. Wound healing and antibacterial activities of chondroitin sulfate- and acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles

    Im, A.-Rang; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-10-01

    For topical applications in wound healing, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted much attention as antibacterial agents. Herein, we describe a green-synthetic route for the production of biocompatible and crystalline AgNPs using two glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and acharan sulfate (AS), as reducing agents. The synthetic approach avoids the use of toxic chemicals, and the yield of AgNPs formation is found to be 98.1% and 91.1% for the chondroitin sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and the acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (AS-AgNPs), respectively. Nanoparticles with mostly spherical and amorphous shapes were observed, with an average diameter of 6.16 ± 2.26 nm for CS-AgNPs and 5.79 ± 3.10 nm for AS-AgNPs. Images of the CS-AgNPs obtained from atomic force microscopy revealed the self-assembled structure of CS was similar to a densely packed woven mat with AgNPs sprinkled on the CS. These nanoparticles were stable under cell culture conditions without any noticeable aggregation. An approximately 128-fold enhancement of the antibacterial activities of the AgNPs was observed against Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli when compared to CS and AS alone. In addition, an in vivo animal model of wound healing activity was tested using mice that were subjected to deep incision wounds. In comparison to the controls, the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs stimulated wound closure under histological examination and accelerated the deposition of granulation tissue and collagen in the wound area. The wound healing activity of the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs are comparable to that of a commercial formulation of silver sulfadiazine even though the newly prepared ointments contain a lower silver concentration. Therefore, the newly prepared AgNPs demonstrate potential for use as an attractive biocompatible nanocomposite for topical applications in the treatment of wounds.

  10. Ethanolic Extract of Eucheuma cottonii Promotes in vivo Hair Growth and Wound Healing

    Goh Yong Meng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hair is considered to be a major component of an individuals general appearance. It is also psychosocial important and patients both men and women with hair loss (alopecia often deeply suffer. Demand for medications that alter hair growth and appearance has led to a multibillion-dollar industry and thus far few natural effective products are available. For the purpose of ascertaining natural products which possess hair growing activity we looked over onto ethanolic and aqueous extracts of E. cottonii. Hair follicle epithelial stem cells and their contribution to skin healing have attracted particular attention. Oral treatments commenced soon after shaving the dorsal interscapular area of healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats. Microscopic observations of skin were performed. This study showed ethanolic extract of E. cottonii enhanced hair growth by higher proliferative activity. Ethanolic extract of this seaweed increased the rate of wound contraction and epithelization when compared to positive and negative control groups. The ethanolic extract of E. cottonii was approximately 20% more effective than aqueous extraction. The extraction also possesses several antioxidant compounds which may be responsible for the accelerated hair growth and wound healing. We demonstrated for the first time in the present study that this seaweed extracts revealed faster healing and hair growth even when compared with positive control group.

  11. Effect of wound healing period and temperature, irradiation and post irradiation storage temperature on the keeping quality of potatoes

    Langerak, D.I.; Wolters, T.C.; Jong, de, Franciska; Hollman, P C; Cramwinckel, A.B.; Oortwijn, H.; Vroomen, L.H.M.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of irradiation doses, wound healing temperature, post harvest irradiation time (wound healing period) and storage temperature on a number of quality parameters such as loss of weight, sprout inhibition and rot incidence, chemical parameters such as sugar and vitamin e content, sensory parameters taste and colour and also wound healing ability were investigated. The potatoes were irradiated with a dose range of 50 to 100 Gy, after a wound healing period varying from 0 to 6 weeks at ...

  12. Hevin plays a pivotal role in corneal wound healing.

    Shyam S Chaurasia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hevin is a matricellular protein involved in tissue repair and remodeling via interaction with the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM proteins. In this study, we examined the functional role of hevin using a corneal stromal wound healing model achieved by an excimer laser-induced irregular phototherapeutic keratectomy (IrrPTK in hevin-null (hevin(-/- mice. We also investigated the effects of exogenous supplementation of recombinant human hevin (rhHevin to rescue the stromal cellular components damaged by the excimer laser. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wild type (WT and hevin (-/- mice were divided into three groups at 4 time points- 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks. Group I served as naïve without any treatment. Group II received epithelial debridement and underwent IrrPTK using excimer laser. Group III received topical application of rhHevin after IrrPTK surgery for 3 days. Eyes were analyzed for corneal haze and matrix remodeling components using slit lamp biomicroscopy, in vivo confocal microscopy, light microscopy (LM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, immunohistochemistry (IHC and western blotting (WB. IHC showed upregulation of hevin in IrrPTK-injured WT mice. Hevin (-/- mice developed corneal haze as early as 1-2 weeks post IrrPTK-treatment compared to the WT group, which peaked at 3-4 weeks. They also exhibited accumulation of inflammatory cells, fibrotic components of ECM proteins and vascularized corneas as seen by IHC and WB. LM and TEM showed activated keratocytes (myofibroblasts, inflammatory debris and vascular tissues in the stroma. Exogenous application of rhHevin for 3 days reinstated inflammatory index of the corneal stroma similar to WT mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Hevin is transiently expressed in the IrrPTK-injured corneas and loss of hevin predisposes them to aberrant wound healing. Hevin (-/- mice develop early corneal haze characterized by severe chronic inflammation and stromal fibrosis that can be rescued

  13. Activity of mesenchymal stem cells in therapies for chronic skin wound healing

    Nuschke, Austin

    2013-01-01

    Chronic or non-healing skin wounds present an ongoing challenge in advanced wound care, particularly as the number of patients increases while technology aimed at stimulating wound healing in these cases remains inefficient. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have proved to be an attractive cell type for various cell therapies due to their ability to differentiate into various cell lineages, multiple donor tissue types, and relative resilience in ex-vivo expansion, as well as immunomodulatory effe...

  14. Protocol for a systematic review of the efficacy of epidermal grafting for wound healing

    Kanapathy, M.; Smith, O. J.; Hachach-Haram, N.; Bystrzonowski, N.; A.Mosahebi; Richards, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Autologous skin grafting is an important modality for wound coverage; however, it can result in donor site morbidity. Epidermal grafting is an emerging option to overcome this challenge. Furthermore, it can be done in an outpatient setting with minimal or no pain. To date, the evidence on the efficacy of this technique for wound healing has yet to be outlined. We aim to synthesise the current evidence on epidermal grafting for wound healing to establish the efficacy of this techniq...

  15. In Vitro Wound Healing Potential and Identification of Bioactive Compounds from Moringa oleifera Lam

    Abubakar Amali Muhammad; Nur Aimi Syarina Pauzi; Palanisamy Arulselvan; Faridah Abas; Sharida Fakurazi

    2013-01-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam. (M. oleifera) from the monogeneric family Moringaceae is found in tropical and subtropical countries. The present study was aimed at exploring the in vitro wound healing potential of M. oleifera and identification of active compounds that may be responsible for its wound healing action. The study included cell viability, proliferation, and wound scratch test assays. Different solvent crude extracts were screened, and the most active crude extract was further subjected to...

  16. Conformal tissue scaffold with multi-functional porosity for wound healing

    Khoda, AKM Bashirul; Koç, Bahattin; Koc, Bahattin

    2012-01-01

    In tissue engineering and wound healing, porous scaffolds can stimulate the wound healing process by regenerating the damaged or diseased tissue. But when applied in wound area various forces like bandage, contraction and self weight act upon these visco-elastic scaffold/membrane and cause deformation. As a result, the geometry and the designed porosity change which eventually alters the desired choreographed functionality such as material concentration, design parameters, cytokines distri...

  17. Effects of low-power light therapy on wound healing: LASER x LED *

    Chaves, Maria Emília de Abreu; de Araújo, Angélica Rodrigues; Piancastelli, André Costa Cruz; Pinotti, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Several studies demonstrate the benefits of low-power light therapy on wound healing. However, the use of LED as a therapeutic resource remains controversial. There are questions regarding the equality or not of biological effects promoted by LED and LASER. One objective of this review was to determine the biological effects that support the use of LED on wound healing. Another objective was to identify LED´s parameters for the treatment of wounds. The biological effects and parameters of LED...

  18. Shedding Light on a New Treatment for Diabetic Wound Healing: A Review on Phototherapy

    Houreld, Nicolette N.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired wound healing is a common complication associated with diabetes with complex pathophysiological underlying mechanisms and often necessitates amputation. With the advancement in laser technology, irradiation of these wounds with low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI) or phototherapy, has shown a vast improvement in wound healing. At the correct laser parameters, LILI has shown to increase migration, viability, and proliferation of diabetic cells in vitro; there is a stimulatory effect...

  19. Topical Antimicrobial and Bandaging Effects on Equine Distal Limb Wound Healing

    Berry II, Douglass Boone

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if topical antimicrobials silver sulfadiazine and povidone-iodine ointment increase rates of healing of equine distal limb wounds that heal by second intention. Second, to determine the effect of bandaging with these topical antimicrobials. Six healthy adult horses were used to create thirty-six, 2.5 cm2 standardized full-thickness metacarpal/tarsal skin wounds. Each wound was exposed to a single treatment: 1.0 % silver sulfadiazine cream ba...

  20. Hyper-hydration: a new perspective on wound cleansing, debridement and healing.

    2016-06-01

    In a recent symposium organised by Hartmann, the involvement of moisture and hydration in healing was re-evaluated and the use of hyper-hydration in promoting healing was examined. The distinction between hyperhydration and maceration was also discussed. Clinical studies were presented to give an overview of the clinical evidence to how Hydro-Responsive Wound Dressings can aid in healing via cleansing, debridement and desloughing of several wound types. PMID:27297574

  1. Blacktip reef sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus) show high capacity for wound healing and recovery following injury

    Chin, Andrew; Mourier, Johann; Rummer, Jodie L.

    2015-01-01

    International audience Wound healing is important for sharks from the earliest life stages, for example, as the 'umbilical scar' in viviparous species heals, and throughout adulthood, when sharks can incur a range of external injuries from natural and anthropogenic sources. Despite anecdotal accounts of rapid healing in elasmobranchs, data regarding recovery and survival of individuals from different wound or injury types has not been systematically collected. The present study documented:...

  2. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of repair in acute and chronic wound healing

    Martin, P.; Nunan, R

    2015-01-01

    Summary A considerable understanding of the fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning healthy acute wound healing has been gleaned from studying various animal models, and we are now unravelling the mechanisms that lead to chronic wounds and pathological healing including fibrosis. A small cut will normally heal in days through tight orchestration of cell migration and appropriate levels of inflammation, innervation and angiogenesis. Major surgeries may take several weeks to ...

  3. Interaction and effectiveness of antimicrobials along with healing-promoting agents in a novel biocellulose wound dressing.

    Napavichayanun, Supamas; Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Pienpinijtham, Prompong; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2015-10-01

    An ideal wound dressing should keep the wound moist, allow oxygen permeation, adsorb wound exudate, accelerate re-epithelialization for wound closure, reduce pain and healing time, and prevent infection. Our novel biocellulose-based wound dressing was composed of three components: 1) biocellulose (BC), intended to create a moist and oxygen-permeated environment with exudate adsorption; 2) silk sericin (SS) known for its enhancement of collagen type I production, which is critical for re-epithelialization; and 3) the antiseptic polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB). To deliver an effective BC wound dressing, the interactions between the components (PHMB vs. SS) needed to be thoroughly analyzed. In this study, we investigated important parameters such as the loading sequence, loading concentration, and loading amount of the active compounds to ensure that the BC wound dressing could provide both antimicrobial activity and promote collagen production during healing. The loading sequence of SS and PHMB into BC was critical to maintain PHMB antimicrobial activity; silk sericin needed to be loaded before PHMB to avoid any negative impacts. The minimum PHMB concentration was 0.3% w/v for effective elimination of all tested bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). The amounts of SS and PHMB in BC were optimized to ensure that the dressings released the optimal amounts of both SS to enhance fibroblast collagen production and PHMB for effective antimicrobial activity. PMID:26117743

  4. A Comparative Study of the Burn Wound Healing Properties of Saline-Soaked Dressing and Silver Sulfadiazine in Rats

    Maghsoudi, Hemmat; Monshizadeh, Siavash; Mesgari, Mehran

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to further investigate that phenomenon and to explore the effect silver sulfadiazine on wound healing. Full-thickness burn wounds were created on the dorsum of Wistar albino rats under anesthesia. The wounds were treated with silver sulfadiazine and saline-soaked dressing for fourteen days, and then observed until healed. Wound surface area was measured each three days. Time to 50% and 90% healing was compared. No clinical infections occurred. Wound half-life and...

  5. Wound healing properties of ethyl acetate fraction of Moringa oleifera in normal human dermal fibroblasts

    Sivapragasam Gothai; Palanisamy Arulselvan; Woan Sean Tan; Sharida Fakurazi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Wounds are the outcome of injuries to the skin that interrupt the soft tissue. Healing of a wound is a complex and long-drawn-out process of tissue repair and remodeling in response to injury. A large number of plants are used by folklore traditions for treatment of cuts, wounds and burns. Moringa oleifera is an herb used as traditional folk medicine for the treatment of various skin wounds and associated diseases. The underlying mechanisms of wound healing activity of ethyl a...

  6. Curcumin-Loaded Chitosan/Gelatin Composite Sponge for Wound Healing Application

    Van Cuong Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three composite sponges were made with 10% of curcumin and by using polymers, namely, chitosan and gelatin with various ratios. The chemical structure and morphology were evaluated by FTIR and SEM. These sponges were evaluated for water absorption capacity, antibacterial activity, in vitro drug release, and in vivo wound healing studies by excision wound model using rabbits. The in vivo study presented a greater wound closure in wounds treated with curcumin-composite sponge than those with composite sponge without curcumin and untreated group. These obtained results showed that combination of curcumin, chitosan and gelatin could improve the wound healing activity in comparison to chitosan, and gelatin without curcumin.

  7. Effects of a topically applied wound ointment on epidermal wound healing studied by in vivo fluorescence laser scanning microscopy analysis

    Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard; Alborova, Alena; Krüger-Corcoran, Daniela; Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Sterry, Wolfram; Kramer, Axel; Stockfleth, Eggert; Lademann, Jürgen

    2009-09-01

    Epidermal wound healing is a complex and dynamic regenerative process necessary to reestablish skin integrity. Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (FLSM) is a noninvasive imaging technique that has previously been used for evaluation of inflammatory and neoplastic skin disorders in vivo and at high resolution. We employed FLSM to investigate the evolution of epidermal wound healing noninvasively over time and in vivo. Two suction blisters were induced on the volar forearms of the study participants, followed by removal of the epidermis. To study the impact of wound ointment on the process of reepithelization, test sites were divided into two groups, of which one test site was left untreated as a negative control. FLSM was used for serial/consecutive evaluations up to 8 days. FLSM was able to visualize the development of thin keratinocyte layers developing near the wound edge and around hair follicles until the entire epidermis has been reestablished. Wounds treated with the wound ointment were found to heal significantly faster than untreated wounds. This technique allows monitoring of the kinetics of wound healing noninvasively and over time, while offering new insights into the potential effects of topically applied drugs on the process of tissue repair.

  8. Impedance spectroscopy applied to the fast wounding dynamics of an electrical wound-healing assay in mammalian cells

    Electrical wound-healing assays are often used as a means to study in vitro cell migration and proliferation. In such analysis, a cell monolayer that sits on a small electrode is electrically wounded and its spectral impedance is then continuously measured in order to monitor the healing process. The relatively slow dynamics of the cell healing have been extensively studied, while those of the much faster wounding phase have not yet been investigated. An analysis of the electrical properties of a particular cell type during this phase could give extra information about the changes in the cell membrane due to the application of the wounding current, and could also be useful to optimize the wounding regime for different cell types. The main issue when trying to register information about these dynamics is that the traditional measurement scheme employed in typical wound-healing assays doesn’t allow the simultaneous application of the wounding signal and measurement of the system’s impedance. In this paper, we overcome this limitation by implementing a measurement strategy consisting of cycles of fast alternating low- and high-voltage signals applied on electrodes covered with mammalian cells. This approach is capable of registering the fast impedance changes during the transient regime corresponding to the cell wounding process. Furthermore, these quasi-simultaneous high- and low-voltage measurements can be compared in order to obtain an empirical correlation between both quantities. (paper)

  9. Evaluation of wound healing activity of Thunbergia laurifolia supercritical carbon dioxide extract in rats with second-degree burn wounds

    Juthaporn Kwansang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thunbergia laurifolia Lindl (TL has been traditionally used as an antidote, anti-inflammatory, and anti-drug addiction. This study investigated the burn wound healing activity of TL leaf extract (TLL from supercritical CO 2 extraction in rats. The extract was prepared to 2.5%, 5%, and 10% gel (TLL gel. Rats were induced to second-degree burn wounds. They were randomly divided into six groups (six rats/group, which five groups were topically applied gel base, 1% silver sulfadiazine gel, 2.5%, 5%, and 10% TLL gel, respectively, for 14 days. Six untreated burn rats were used as the control group. The rats in each group were evaluated for wound healing rate, histological parameters, and wound collagen content. Rats treated with 10% TLL gel had a higher wound healing rate than rats in the control and untreated groups. An increase in collagen content, which indicates good regeneration of wound skin, was observed in the TLL treated rats from a pathological study by Masson′s trichrome and collagen content assay. The results from this study suggest that T. laurifolia leaf extract obtained by supercritical CO 2 extraction promotes the recovery of wound skin by shortening the inflammation phase, increasing collagen content, and stimulating fibroblasts proliferation and migration in wound healing.

  10. Slough and biofilm: removal of barriers to wound healing by desloughing.

    Percival, S L; Suleman, L

    2015-11-01

    The presence of non-viable tissue in a chronic wound presents a barrier against effective wound healing, hence removal facilitates healing and reduces areas where microorganisms can attach and form biofilms, effectively reducing the risk of infection. Wound debridement is a necessary process in those wounds that have evidence of cellular debris and non-viable tissue. As slough is a form of non-viable tissue we hypothesise that it will support the attachment and development of biofilms. Biofilms are entities that have serious implications in raising the risk of infection and delaying wound healing. In those wounds that contain only slough, high-risk debridement methods are not considered necessary for its removal. The use of mechanical techniques for removing the slough is regarded as posing a much lower risk to the patient and the wound bed. The process of removing slough from a wound is referred to as 'desloughing'. We propose that mechanical desloughing is a low-risk method of debridement to aid the specific removal of slough. Slough in a wound is a recurrent issue for a large majority of patients. Consequently, desloughing should not be deemed a one-off process but an on-going procedure referred to as 'maintenance desloughing'. Maintenance desloughing will help to achieve and maintain a healthy wound bed and aid the removal of wound biofilms, facilitating wound healing. PMID:26551642

  11. Antimicrobials and Non-Healing Wounds. Evidence, controversies and suggestions-key messages

    Gottrup, Finn; Apelqvist, Jan; Bjarnsholt, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    This article constitutes an extraction of key messages originally presented in the Document: Antimicrobials and Non-Healing Wounds. Evidence, controversies and suggestions written by the European Wound Management Association (EWMA), and originally published by the Journal of Wound Care in 2013. A...

  12. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy: solution for difficult to heal acute wounds? Systematic review

    A.M. Eskes; D.T. Ubbink; M.J. Lubbers; C. Lucas; H. Vermeulen

    2011-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is used to treat various wound types. However, the possible beneficial and harmful effects of HBOT for acute wounds are unclear. We undertook a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of HBOT compared to other interventions on wound healing and adverse effect

  13. Diabetic cornea wounds produce significantly weaker electric signals that may contribute to impaired healing.

    Shen, Yunyun; Pfluger, Trisha; Ferreira, Fernando; Liang, Jiebing; Navedo, Manuel F; Zeng, Qunli; Reid, Brian; Zhao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Wounds naturally produce electric signals which serve as powerful cues that stimulate and guide cell migration during wound healing. In diabetic patients, impaired wound healing is one of the most challenging complications in diabetes management. A fundamental gap in knowledge is whether diabetic wounds have abnormal electric signaling. Here we used a vibrating probe to demonstrate that diabetic corneas produced significantly weaker wound electric signals than the normal cornea. This was confirmed in three independent animal models of diabetes: db/db, streptozotocin-induced and mice fed a high-fat diet. Spatial measurements illustrated that diabetic cornea wound currents at the wound edge but not wound center were significantly weaker than normal. Time lapse measurements revealed that the electric currents at diabetic corneas lost the normal rising and plateau phases. The abnormal electric signals correlated significantly with impaired wound healing. Immunostaining suggested lower expression of chloride channel 2 and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator in diabetic corneal epithelium. Acute high glucose exposure significantly (albeit moderately) reduced electrotaxis of human corneal epithelial cells in vitro, but did not affect the electric currents at cornea wounds. These data suggest that weaker wound electric signals and impaired electrotaxis may contribute to the impaired wound healing in diabetes. PMID:27283241

  14. Evaluation of wound healing activity of Ammannia baccifera and Blepharis maderaspatensis leaf extracts on rats

    Aiyalu Rajasekaran

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing activity of the leaf extracts of Ammannia baccifera L., Lythraceae, and Blepharis maderaspatensis (L. B.Heyne ex Roth., Acanthaceae, was investigated by excision and incision wound healing models in rats. A phytochemical screening was done to determine the major constituents of the chloroform, ethyl acetate and ethanolic fractions of ethanolic leaf extracts. The excision and incision models were used to assess the effect of the plant extracts on wound healing in rats. Phytochemical screening reveals the presence of tannins, saponins, steroids, terpenoids, and flavonoids in the extract. The wound healing effect was comparatively evaluated with a standard drug Framycetin cream. Significant wound healing activity was observed for the creams prepared with 5% ethanol fraction of B. maderaspatensis and 5% chloroform fraction of A. baccifera ethanolic leaf extracts. The results of histopathological evaluation supported the outcome of both incision and excision wound models. Ethanolic fraction of B. maderaspatensis and chloroform fraction of A. baccifera exhibited marked wound healing activity. B. maderaspatensis extract displayed a remarkable wound healing activity compared to A. baccifera.

  15. Blocking Interleukin-1β Induces a Healing-Associated Wound Macrophage Phenotype and Improves Healing in Type 2 Diabetes

    Rita E Mirza; Fang, Milie M.; Ennis, William J.; Koh, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with persistent inflammation and defective tissue repair responses. The hypothesis of this study was that interleukin (IL)-1β is part of a proinflammatory positive feedback loop that sustains a persistent proinflammatory wound macrophage phenotype that contributes to impaired healing in diabetes. Macrophages isolated from wounds in diabetic humans and mice exhibited a proinflammatory phenotype, including expression and secretion of IL-1β. The diabetic wound environment ...

  16. Does maggot therapy promote wound healing? The clinical and cellular evidence.

    Nigam, Y; Morgan, C

    2016-05-01

    The larvae of Lucillia sericata, or maggots of the green-bottle fly, are used worldwide to help debride chronic, necrotic and infected wounds. Whilst there is abundant clinical and scientific evidence to support the role of maggots for debriding and disinfecting wounds, not so much emphasis has been placed on their role in stimulating wound healing. However, there is accumulating evidence to suggest that maggots and their externalized secretions may also promote wound healing in stubborn, recalcitrant chronic ulcers. There are a growing number of clinical reports which support the observation that wounds which have been exposed to a course of maggot debridement therapy also show earlier healing and closure end-points. In addition, recent pre-clinical laboratory studies also indicate that maggot secretions can promote important cellular processes which explain this increased healing activity. Such processes include activation of fibroblast migration, angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels) within the wound bed, and an enhanced production of growth factors within the wound environment. Thus, in this review, we summarize the clinical evidence which links maggots and improved wound healing, and we précis recent scientific studies which examine and identify the role of maggots, particularly individual components of maggot secretions, on specific cellular aspects of wound healing. PMID:26691053

  17. Application of laser scan microscopy in vivo for wound healing characterization

    Considering the advancing age of the population, wound healing disturbances are becoming increasingly important in clinical routine. The development of wound healing creams and lotions as well as therapy control require an objective evaluation of the wound healing process, which represents the destruction of the barrier. Therefore, transepidermal water loss measurements are often carried out. These measurements have the disadvantage that they are disturbed by the interstitial fluid, which is located on the surface of chronic wounds and also by water components of the creams and lotions. Additionally, the TEWL measurements are very sensitive to temperature changes and to the anxiety of the volunteers. In the present study, in vivo laser scanning microscopy was used to analyze the reepithelialization and barrier recovery of standardized wounds produced by the suction blister technique. It was demonstrated that this non-invasive, on-line spectroscopic method allows the evaluation of the wound healing process, without any disturbances. It was found that the wound healing starts not only from the edges of the wound, but also out of the hair follicles. The in vivo laser scanning microscopy is well suited to evaluate the efficacy of wound healing creams and for therapy control

  18. A Predictive Model for Diabetic Foot Ulcer Outcome: The Wound Healing Index

    Fife, Caroline E.; Horn, Susan D.; Smout, Randall J.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Thomson, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop a healing index for patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) for use in clinical practice, research analysis, and clinical trials. Approach: U.S. Wound Registry data were examined retrospectively and assigned a clear outcome (healed, amputated, etc.). Significant variables were identified with bivariate analyses. A multivariable logistic regression model was created based on significant factors (p healed (66.1%). The 10% validation sample utilized 555 ulcers, of which 377 healed (67.9%). Results: Variables that significantly predicted healing were as follows: wound age (duration in days), wound size, number of concurrent wounds of any etiology, evidence of bioburden/infection, patient age, Wagner grade, being nonambulatory, renal dialysis, renal transplant, peripheral vascular disease, and patient hospitalization for any reason. Innovation: We present a validated stratification system, previously described as the Wound Healing Index (WHI), which predicts healing likelihood of patients with DFUs, incorporating patient- and wound-specific variables. Conclusion: The DFU WHI is a comprehensive and user-friendly validated predictive model for DFU healing. It can risk stratify patients enrolled in clinical research trials, stratify patient data for quality reporting and benchmarking activities, and identify patients most likely to require costly therapy to heal. PMID:27366589

  19. Histological evaluation of the healing properties of Dead Sea black mud on full-thickness excision cutaneous wounds in BALB/c mice.

    Abu-al-Basal, Mariam A

    2012-04-01

    Dead Sea (DS) mud and salts are known for their therapeutic and cosmetic properties. Previous studies confirmed their efficacy in treating the more frequent skin diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the wound healing potential of natural and compounded skin-care product (facial mask) of DS black mud in BALB/c mice. Two full-thickness excision round wounds were created on the dorsum region of mouse. Each wound of mice test group were treated topically with 50 microL of 0.1% natural or compounded DS black mud or 50 microL of 0.2% nitrofurazone once a day for 2 consecutive days and the mice control group were left untreated. Healing was assessed by measuring the granulation tissue weight and percentage of wound contraction at day 3, 7, 14 and 21 after wounding. In addition to period of epithelialization and histological evaluation of the regenerated wound area at day 7 and 14 after wounding. Results revealed that DS black mud accelerate wound healing process by enhancing granulation, wound contraction, epithelialization, angiogenesis and collagen deposition. This may be due to high content of minerals and trace elements that possibly act as anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant with enhancement effect on cell proliferation, migration and fibroblast cellular activity. However, the healing property of DS black mud compounded in skin-care product was greater than that of natural black mud, when compared to reference drug, nitrofurazone. PMID:24163956

  20. Dual effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on skin wound healing of mice.

    Xu, Gui-Min; Shi, Xing-Min; Cai, Jing-Fen; Chen, Si-Le; Li, Ping; Yao, Cong-Wei; Chang, Zheng-Shi; Zhang, Guan-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Cold plasma has become an attractive tool for promoting wound healing and treating skin diseases. This article presents an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) generated in argon gas through dielectric barrier discharge, which was applied to superficial skin wounds in BALB/c mice. The mice (n = 50) were assigned randomly into five groups (named A, B, C, D, E) with 10 animals in each group. Natural wound healing was compared with stimulated wound healing treated daily with APPJ for different time spans (10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 seconds) on 14 consecutive days. APPJ emission spectra, morphological changes in animal wounds, and tissue histological parameters were analyzed. Statistical results revealed that wound size changed over the duration of the experimental period and there was a significant interaction between experimental day and group. Differences between group C and other groups at day 7 were statistically significant (p plasma could inactivate bacteria around the wound, activate fibroblast proliferation in wound tissue, and eventually promote wound healing. Whereas, over doses of plasma suppressed wound healing due to causing cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. Both positive and negative effects may be related to the existence of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) in APPJ. PMID:26342154

  1. Redox mechanisms in hepatic chronic wound healing and fibrogenesis

    Novo Erica

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS generated within cells or, more generally, in a tissue environment, may easily turn into a source of cell and tissue injury. Aerobic organisms have developed evolutionarily conserved mechanisms and strategies to carefully control the generation of ROS and other oxidative stress-related radical or non-radical reactive intermediates (that is, to maintain redox homeostasis, as well as to 'make use' of these molecules under physiological conditions as tools to modulate signal transduction, gene expression and cellular functional responses (that is, redox signalling. However, a derangement in redox homeostasis, resulting in sustained levels of oxidative stress and related mediators, can play a significant role in the pathogenesis of major human diseases characterized by chronic inflammation, chronic activation of wound healing and tissue fibrogenesis. This review has been designed to first offer a critical introduction to current knowledge in the field of redox research in order to introduce readers to the complexity of redox signalling and redox homeostasis. This will include ready-to-use key information and concepts on ROS, free radicals and oxidative stress-related reactive intermediates and reactions, sources of ROS in mammalian cells and tissues, antioxidant defences, redox sensors and, more generally, the major principles of redox signalling and redox-dependent transcriptional regulation of mammalian cells. This information will serve as a basis of knowledge to introduce the role of ROS and other oxidative stress-related intermediates in contributing to essential events, such as the induction of cell death, the perpetuation of chronic inflammatory responses, fibrogenesis and much more, with a major focus on hepatic chronic wound healing and liver fibrogenesis.

  2. Bioactive thermoresponsive polyblend nanofiber formulations for wound healing

    Pawar, Mahesh D. [Polymer Science and Engineering, National Chemical Laboratory, Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); MAEER' s Maharashtra Institute of Pharmacy S. No. 124, MIT Campus Paud Road, Kothrud, Pune 411 038 (India); Rathna, G.V.N., E-mail: rv.gundloori@ncl.res.in [Polymer Science and Engineering, National Chemical Laboratory, Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); Agrawal, Shubhang [Polymer Science and Engineering, National Chemical Laboratory, Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); Kuchekar, Bhanudas S. [MAEER' s Maharashtra Institute of Pharmacy S. No. 124, MIT Campus Paud Road, Kothrud, Pune 411 038 (India)

    2015-03-01

    The rationale of this work is to develop new bioactive thermoresponsive polyblend nanofiber formulations for wound healing (topical). Various polymer compositions of thermoresponsive, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), egg albumen and poly(ε-caprolactone) blend solutions with and without a drug [gatifloxacin hydrochloride, Gati] were prepared. Non-woven nanofibers of various compositions were fabricated using an electrospinning technique. The morphology of the nanofibers was analyzed by an environmental scanning electron microscope. The morphology was influenced by the concentration of polymer, drug, and polymer blend composition. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed the shift in bands due to hydrogen ion interactions between polymers and drug. Thermogram of PNIPAM/PCL/EA with Gati recorded a shift in lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of PNIPAM. Similarly T{sub g} and melting temperature (T{sub m}) of PCL were shifted. X-ray diffraction patterns recorded a decrease in the crystalline state of PCL nanofibers and transformed crystalline drug to an amorphous state. In vitro release study of nanofibers with Gati showed initial rapid release up to 10 h, followed by slow and controlled release for 696 h (29 days). Nanofiber mats with Gati exhibited antibacterial properties to Staphylococcus aureus, supported suitable controlled drug release with in vitro cell viability and in vivo wound healing. - Highlights: • Thermoresponsive and bioactive nanofiber blends of PNIPAM/EA/PCL were fabricated. • Nanofiber blends favored initial rapid release, followed by controlled release. • In vitro cell viability of pure polymers and nanofiber blends was least toxic. • In vivo studies of drug loaded nanofiber mats recorded faster tissue regeneration.

  3. Bioactive thermoresponsive polyblend nanofiber formulations for wound healing

    The rationale of this work is to develop new bioactive thermoresponsive polyblend nanofiber formulations for wound healing (topical). Various polymer compositions of thermoresponsive, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), egg albumen and poly(ε-caprolactone) blend solutions with and without a drug [gatifloxacin hydrochloride, Gati] were prepared. Non-woven nanofibers of various compositions were fabricated using an electrospinning technique. The morphology of the nanofibers was analyzed by an environmental scanning electron microscope. The morphology was influenced by the concentration of polymer, drug, and polymer blend composition. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed the shift in bands due to hydrogen ion interactions between polymers and drug. Thermogram of PNIPAM/PCL/EA with Gati recorded a shift in lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and glass transition temperature (Tg) of PNIPAM. Similarly Tg and melting temperature (Tm) of PCL were shifted. X-ray diffraction patterns recorded a decrease in the crystalline state of PCL nanofibers and transformed crystalline drug to an amorphous state. In vitro release study of nanofibers with Gati showed initial rapid release up to 10 h, followed by slow and controlled release for 696 h (29 days). Nanofiber mats with Gati exhibited antibacterial properties to Staphylococcus aureus, supported suitable controlled drug release with in vitro cell viability and in vivo wound healing. - Highlights: • Thermoresponsive and bioactive nanofiber blends of PNIPAM/EA/PCL were fabricated. • Nanofiber blends favored initial rapid release, followed by controlled release. • In vitro cell viability of pure polymers and nanofiber blends was least toxic. • In vivo studies of drug loaded nanofiber mats recorded faster tissue regeneration

  4. Healing efficacy of an EGF impregnated triple gel based wound dressing: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Khanbanha, Najmeh; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Taheri, Azade; Talaie, Fatemeh; Mahbod, Mirgholamreza; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2014-01-01

    To accomplish an ideal wound healing process which promotes healthy tissue growth with less scaring, a novel gel based topical drug delivery system composed of 3 different polymers chitosan, dextran sulfate, and polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 (CDP) was prepared. The physicochemical properties of the prepared gels were investigated in vitro. Gels showed a maximum swelling ratio of 50 ± 1.95 times of dried gel in PBS at pH 7.4. The swelling ratios increase in acidic and alkaline pH to 55.3 ± 1.75 and 65.5 ± 2.42, respectively. In the rheological test, prepared gels revealed viscoelastic properties and a small linear viscoelastic region of 0.166%. In vivo wound healing promoting activities of CDP gels containing 20 μg/mL EGF were evaluated on surgically induced dermal wounds in rats using pathologic examination. The application of CDP gel with incorporated EGF significantly reduced the defect on the rat's skin and enhanced epithelial healing compared with the topical application of the EGF-free CDP gel. The results clearly substantiate the beneficial effects of the topical application of CDP containing EGF in the acceleration of healthy wound healing process with less scarring. PMID:25110681

  5. Indications and agent selection for the antiseptic therapy of secondarily healing wounds

    Assadian, Ojan

    Full Text Available For chronic wounds to become primarily healing wounds, not only the appropriate surgical procedure - especially wound debridement - but also the treatment of the causative basic disease must be taken into consideration. In both the prophylaxis of wound infections and the treatment of existing wound infections, wound antiseptics play a crucial role. As long as a clinically manifest infection is confined to the wound and has not spread hematogenically, the indication for application of wound antiseptics is given. Should systemic involvement exist, antimicrobial chemotherapy is additionally required. Antiseptics must only be used following careful determination of indication. Impaired wound healing can otherwise result. For chronically poorly healing wounds and burns, polihexanide is the agent of first choice. However, based on new in-vitro findings, octenidine dihydrochloride is superior to polihexanide in terms of therapeutic spectrum. These findings enable a broader application of octenidine dihydrochloride to include use on chronic wounds at lower concentrations than usual. The following agents must be viewed critically in terms of their use as wound antiseptics: chlorhexidine, 8-chinolinol, nitrofural, phenol derivates, quats, silver nitrate, silver sulphadiazine, tosylchloramide sodium, triclosan, and hydrogen peroxide. As wound antiseptics, dyes and organic mercury compounds are obsolete.

  6. Pharmacological activation of cannabinoid 2 receptor attenuates inflammation, fibrogenesis, and promotes re-epithelialization during skin wound healing.

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Zhao, Rui; Li, Jiao-Yong; Li, Shan-Shan; Liu, Min; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Meng-Zhou; Dong, Wen-Wen; Jiang, Shu-Kun; Zhang, Miao; Tian, Zhi-Ling; Liu, Chang-Sheng; Guan, Da-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies showed that cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptor is expressed in multiple effector cells during skin wound healing. Meanwhile, its functional involvement in inflammation, fibrosis, and cell proliferation in other organs and skin diseases implied CB2 receptor might also regulate skin wound healing. To verify this hypothesis, mice excisional wounds were created and treated with highly selective CB2 receptor agonist GP1a (1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-6-methyl- N-piperidin-1-yl-4H-indeno[1,2-c]pyrazole-3-carboxamide) and antagonist AM630 ([6-iodo-2- methyl-1-(2-morpholin-4-ylethyl)indol-3-yl]-(4-methoxyphenyl)methanone) respectively. The inflammatory infiltration, cytokine expression, fibrogenesis, and wound re-epithelialization were analyzed. After CB2 receptor activation, neutrophil and macrophage infiltrations were reduced, and expressions of monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1, Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A were decreased. Keratinocyte proliferation and migration were enhanced. Wound re-epithelialization was accelerated. Fibroblast accumulation and fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transformation were attenuated, and expression of pro-collagen I was decreased. Furthermore, HaCaT cells in vitro were treated with GP1a or AM630, which revealed that CB2 receptor activation promoted keratinocyte migration by inducing the epithelial to mesenchymal transition. These results, taken together, indicate that activating CB2 receptor could ameliorate wound healing by reducing inflammation, accelerating re-epithelialization, and attenuating scar formation. Thus, CB2 receptor agonist might be a novel perspective for skin wound therapy. PMID:27268717

  7. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF THE HEALING PROCESS OF ORAL SOFT TISSUE SURGICAL WOUNDS STIMULATED BY LOW-LEVEL LASER THERAPY.

    Hristina Lalabonova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During the past decades laser therapy gained much popularity in clinical practice. Low-level lasers offer alternative solutions to numerous problems in oral surgery.Purpose: The purpose of the present study is to evaluate clinically the healing process of soft tissue surgical wounds in the oral cavity stimulated by low-level laser therapy (LLLT.Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty surgical wounds were assigned to three groups: Group I included 40 patients who underwent red spectrum LLLT with wavelength (λ of 658 nm;Group ІІ – 40 patients treated with infra-red LLLT with λ of 904 nm;Group ІІІ (control group - 40 patients without LLLT. In Group І and ІІ the LLLT procedures were applied 1 day before, in the day of and 1 day after the operation. Distant emission with a focused beam through an angled conical probe 3 mm in diameter (ø3mm was used. The irradiated area is 0,5 cm2. The area of impact is the surgical wound zone and the neighboring 0,5-1,0 cm of the adjacent oral mucosa.Results and discussion: The evaluation of the healing process included the following criteria: pain, edema, hyperemia, time for wound closure, postoperative complications.Conclusions: LLLT applied with the offered treatment modality accelerates the healing process of soft tissue surgical wounds in the oral cavity, reduces treatment time and restores patients’ comfort.

  8. Wound healing with nonthermal microplasma jets generated in arrays of hourglass microcavity devices

    Hum Park, Chan; Lee, Joong Seob; Heui Kim, Ji; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Ok Joo; Ju, Hyung Woo; Moon, Bo Mi; Cho, Jin Hoon; Kim, Min Hwan; Sun, Peter Peng; Park, Sung-Jin; Eden, J. Gary

    2014-10-01

    Clinical studies are reported in which artificial wounds in rat epidermal and dermal tissue have been treated by arrays of sub-500 µm diameter, low temperature plasma microjets. Fabricated in Al/nanoporous alumina (Al2O3) by wet chemical and microablation processes, each plasma jet device has a double parabolic (hourglass) structure, and arrays as large as 6  ×  6 devices with 500 µm diameter apertures have been tested to date. Treatment of 1 cm2 acute epidermal wounds for 20-40 s daily with an array of microplasma jets generated in He feedstock gas promoted wound recovery significantly, as evidenced by tissue histology and measured wound area. Seven days after wound formation, the wound area of the untreated control was 40  ±  2% of its initial value, whereas that for an identical wound treated twice daily for 20 s was 9  ±  2% of its original surface area. No histological distinctions were observed between wounds treated twice each day for 10 or 20 s - only the full recovery time differed. Spectra produced in the visible and ultraviolet by He jets in room air are dominated by atomic oxygen (3p 5P → 3s 5S) at 777 nm and violet fluorescence (391.4 nm) from N2+, a species produced when the He (2s 3S1) metastable is deactivated by Penning ionization of N2. Although the combined cross-sectional area of the jets in the array is only 7% of the wound area, the microplasma treatment results in spatially uniform, and accelerated, wound healing. Both effects are attributed to the increased surface area of the jet array (relative to a single jet having an equivalent diameter) and the concomitant enhancement in the generation of molecular radicals, and metastable atoms and molecules (such as {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft(A{}{}3 Σ \\text{u}+\\right) ).

  9. Malnutrition in the institutionalized elderly: the effects on wound healing.

    Harris, Connie L; Fraser, Cris

    2004-10-01

    Under-nutrition and protein-energy malnutrition are seen at alarmingly high rates in institutionalized elderly and in patients admitted to hospitals. A combination of immobility and loss of lean body mass - which comprises muscle and skin - and immune system challenges increases the risk of pressure ulcers by 74%. The development of pressure ulcers in the hospital affects 10% of admissions, with the elderly at the highest risk. Common causes of malnutrition in the elderly involve: decreased appetite, dependency on help for eating, impaired cognition and/or communication, poor positioning, frequent acute illnesses with gastrointestinal losses, medications that decrease appetite or increase nutrient losses, polypharmacy, decreased thirst response, decreased ability to concentrate urine, intentional fluid restriction because of fear of incontinence or choking if dysphagic, psychosocial factors such as isolation and depression, monotony of diet, and higher nutrient density requirements along with the demands of age, illness, and disease on the body. All have been found to delay healing and increase the risk of pressure ulcer development. In addition, what is ingested should contain nutrients to support health and healing. The financial impact of malnutrition is high and the consequences for patient morbidity and mortality are severe. Practical suggestions to improve the nutritional status of long-term care residents include liberalizing previous diet restrictions where safe and appropriate, addressing impairments to dentition and swallowing, addressing physical and/or cognitive deficits, encouraging family and friends to provide favorite foods, auditing/addressing specific food under-consumption, and providing prudent nutrient supplementation. Clinicians must be aware of the numerous factors in play with regard to nutrition and its impact on not only general well-being but also on wound care. Nutritional intervention in pressure ulcer management is truly "healing from

  10. Investigation on the effects of the atmospheric pressure plasma on wound healing in diabetic rats

    Fathollah, Sara; Mirpour, Shahriar; Mansouri, Parvin; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Rahimi, Nastaran; Safaie Naraghi, Zahra; Chalangari, Reza; Chalangari, Katalin Martits

    2016-02-01

    It is estimated that 15 percent of individuals with diabetes mellitus suffer from diabetic ulcers worldwide. The aim of this study is to present a non-thermal atmospheric plasma treatment as a novel therapy for diabetic wounds. The plasma consists of ionized helium gas that is produced by a high-voltage (8 kV) and high-frequency (6 kHz) power supply. Diabetes was induced in rats via an intravascular injection of streptozotocin. The plasma was then introduced to artificial xerograph wounds in the rats for 10 minutes. Immunohistochemistry assays was performed to determine the level of transforming growth factor (TGF-β1) cytokine. The results showed a low healing rate in the diabetic wounds compared with the wound-healing rate in non-diabetic animals (P healing rate in the non-diabetic rats (P diabetic wounds (P healing in diabetic rats.

  11. Effects of aroeira (Schinus terebinthifoliu Raddi oil on cutaneous wound healing in rats

    Lígia Reis Moura Estevão

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of aroeira (Schinus terebinthifolius ointment on skin wound healing in rats. METHODS: Adult male rats (n=20 were divided into four groups of five animals each, as follows: G4, G7, G14 and G21, which corresponds to 4th, 7th, 14th and 21th days postoperatively. Each animal were made two incisions on the skin, including the subcutaneous tissue, in the right and left sides of thoracic region, separated by a distance of two inches. The right lesion was treated with base ointment (vaseline, lanolin; the left one was treated with base ointment containing 5% of aroeira oil. At the end of each experimental period the lesions were evaluated for the contraction degree. Then held the collection of fragments that were fixed in 10% formalin and processed for paraffin embedding. In the histological sections (5μm was evaluated the morphology and quantified the collagen and blood vessels. The data obtained were submitted to ANOVA test complemented by Tukey-Kramer test (p<0.05. RESULTS: The contraction of the lesions was higher in wounds treated with aroeira oil than in controls at 7th and 14th days (p<0.01, whereas in the 21st day all lesions were already completely healed. The morphology showed granulation tissue more developed, with fibroblasts more bulky and collagen fibers more arranged in the experimental group at 4th, 7th and 14th days. The morphometry showed a significant increase in the quantification of collagen fibers in the experimental group at 7th and 14th days (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The aroeira oil accelerates the healing process of wounds as a macroscopic, morphological and morphometrical analysis.

  12. Anti-Staphylococcal and wound healing activities of Ganoderma praelongum and Glycyrrhiza glabra formulation in mice

    Abdulghani - Ameri; B B Rajive; J G Vaidya; K Apte; Deokule, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Topical antimicrobial therapy is one of the most important methods of wound care. In this investigation, we evaluated topical gel preparations of Ganoderma praelongum and Glycyrrhiza glabra aqueous extracts alone and in combination for antimicrobial and wound healing activities in MRSA - infected excision and incision wound models in mice. Gel formulations containing 0.3% G. praelongum, 2.5% G. glabra and combination of the two were prepared and tested for their influence on wound in...

  13. Wound healing activity of the methanol extracts of Clematis species indigenous to Ethiopia

    Segewkal Hawaze; Habtewold Deti; Sultan Suleman

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the vulnerary activity of the methanol extracts of Clematis longicauda steud ex A. Rich, and Clematis burgensis Engl leaves. Materials and Methods: In vivo wound healing activity of methanol extracts of C. longicauda and C. burgensis were studied using excision wound model, re-sutured incision wound model, histopathological analysis and anti-inflammatory activity test. The variables studied were percentage of wound contraction and epithelialisation period in excision...

  14. Evaluation of wound healing activity of atranorin, a lichen secondary metabolite, on rodents

    Rosana S.S. Barreto; Ricardo L. C. Albuquerque-Júnior; Rose Nely Pereira-Filho; Jullyana S.S. Quintans; Barreto, André S.; DeSantana, Josimari M.; Santana-Filho, Valter J.; Santos, Marcio R. V.; Leonardo R. Bonjardim; Adriano A. S. Araújo; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the wound healing activity of atranorin cream (Patent requested) on excision wounds. Seventy-two male rats were anesthetized and an excisional wound was performed. Then the rats were randomly assigned into three groups: untreated control group; atranorin 1 (group treated with 1% AT ointment); and atranorin 5 (group treated with 5% AT ointment). Six animals of each group were euthanized 3, 7, 14 or 21 days after surgical procedures and the wounded areas...

  15. Use of Platelet Rich Plasma Gel on Wound Healing: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Marissa J Carter; Fylling, Carelyn P.; Parnell, Laura K.S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Autologous platelet rich plasma is an advanced wound therapy used in hard-to-heal acute and chronic wounds. To better understand the use and clinical outcomes of the therapy, a systematic review of the published literature in cutaneous wounds was performed. Methods: Electronic and hand searches for randomized controlled trials and comparative group studies using platelet rich plasma therapy in cutaneous wounds and published over the last 10 years was conducted. Eligible studies com...

  16. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy: Solution for Difficult to Heal Acute Wounds? Systematic Review

    Eskes, Anne M.; Ubbink, Dirk T.; Lubbers, Maarten J.; Lucas, Cees; Vermeulen, Hester

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is used to treat various wound types. However, the possible beneficial and harmful effects of HBOT for acute wounds are unclear. Methods We undertook a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of HBOT compared to other interventions on wound healing and adverse effects in patients with acute wounds. To detect all available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) we searched five relevant databases up to March 2010. Trial selection, quality assess...

  17. Kinetic and Reaction Pathway Analysis in the Application of Botulinum Toxin A for Wound Healing

    Frank J. Lebeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A relatively new approach in the treatment of specific wounds in animal models and in patients with type A botulinum toxin is the focus of this paper. The indications or conditions include traumatic wounds (experimental and clinical, surgical (incision wounds, and wounds such as fissures and ulcers that are signs/symptoms of disease or other processes. An objective was to conduct systematic literature searches and take note of the reactions involved in the healing process and identify corresponding pharmacokinetic data. From several case reports, we developed a qualitative model of how botulinum toxin disrupts the vicious cycle of muscle spasm, pain, inflammation, decreased blood flow, and ischemia. We transformed this model into a minimal kinetic scheme for healing chronic wounds. The model helped us to estimate the rate of decline of this toxin's therapeutic effect by calculating the rate of recurrence of clinical symptoms after a wound-healing treatment with this neurotoxin.

  18. Influence of low-level laser therapy on wound healing in nicotine-treated animals.

    Garcia, Valdir Gouveia; Macarini, Valmir Campos; de Almeida, Juliano Milanezi; Bosco, Alvaro Francisco; Nagata, Maria José Hitomi; Okamoto, Tetuo; Longo, Mariéllen; Theodoro, Letícia Helena

    2012-03-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been shown to have several biological effects that favor the healing process, and nicotine has been shown to delay the healing process. In this study we investigated the healing of open wounds created on the back of rats treated with nicotine with or without LLLT. Of 115 animals, 59 received subcutaneous injections of saline solution, and the others received subcutaneous injections of nicotine (3 mg/kg body weight), twice a day throughout the study period. After 30 days, skin wounds were created on the back of the animals. The animals receiving saline injections were divided into two groups: group 1 (G1, n = 29), in which the wounds were left untreated, and group 2 (G2, n = 30), in which the wounds were treated with LLLT (GaAlAs, 660 nm, 30 mW, 5.57 J/cm(2) per point, 0.39 J, 13 s per point, 0.42 W/cm(2)). The animals receiving nicotine injections were also divided into two groups: group 3 (G3, n = 29), in which the wounds were left untreated, and group 4 (G4, n = 27), in which the wounds were treated with LLLT. The animals were killed 3, 7 or 14 days after surgery. Wound healing was evaluated histologically both qualitatively and semiquantitatively. Wounds of G2 showed a delay in epithelial migration and connective tissue organization compared to those of G1. Wounds of G2 showed faster healing than those of G1; similarly, wounds of G4 showed more advanced healing than those of G3. LLLT acted as a biostimulatory coadjuvant agent balancing the undesirable effects of nicotine on wound tissue healing. PMID:21750957

  19. Controlled water vapor transmission rate promotes wound-healing via wound re-epithelialization and contraction enhancement

    Xu, Rui; Xia, Hesheng; He, Weifeng; Li, Zhichao; Zhao, Jian; Liu, Bo; Wang, Yuzhen; Lei, Qiang; Kong, Yi; Bai, Yang; Yao, Zhihui; Yan, Rongshuai; Li, Haisheng; Zhan, Rixing; Yang, Sisi; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2016-04-01

    A desirable microenvironment is essential for wound healing, in which an ideal moisture content is one of the most important factors. The fundamental function and requirement for wound dressings is to keep the wound at an optimal moisture. Here, we prepared serial polyurethane (PU) membrane dressings with graded water vapor transmission rates (WVTRs), and the optimal WVTR of the dressing for wound healing was identified by both in vitro and in vivo studies. It was found that the dressing with a WVTR of 2028.3 ± 237.8 g/m2·24 h was able to maintain an optimal moisture content for the proliferation and regular function of epidermal cells and fibroblasts in a three-dimensional culture model. Moreover, the dressing with this optimal WTVR was found to be able to promote wound healing in a mouse skin wound model. Our finds may be helpful in the design of wound dressing for wound regeneration in the future.

  20. Evaluation of wound-healing effect of Ziziphus mauritiana L. leaf extract in rats

    Meera Sumanth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ziziphus mauritiana L. leaves are used traditionally for burns, wounds, inflamed parts, hypertension and as a diuretic. Objective: To evaluate the wound-healing property of ethanol extract of Ziziphus mauritiana L. leaf (EEZM on rats using excision, incision and dead space wound models. Materials and Methods: Wistar albino rats (150 − 200 gm were divided into four groups (n = 6. Group I (control animals received no treatment, group II animals were given EEZM 300 mg/kg orally, group III animals were applied EEZM gel, 100 mg/cm 2 and group IV animals were applied Framycetin skin cream, 100 mg/cm 2 topically. In incision and dead space wound models, the treatment was given for 10 days only from the day of wound, skin-breaking strength and dry granulation tissue weight were estimated in incision wound model. Hydroxyproline content was estimated in dead space wound model. In excision wound model, treatment continued till the complete healing of the wound. Rate of wound contraction and period of epithelisation was evaluated thereafter. The data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by Dunnett′s test. P <0.05 is considered significant. Results: EEZM increased the rate of wound contraction, decreased period of epithelisation, increased skin-breaking strength and dry granulation tissue weight, elevated hydroxyproline content. Conclusion: Ziziphus mauritiana possesses wound healing activity.

  1. Stimulation of Wound Healing by Electroactive, Antibacterial, and Antioxidant Polyurethane/Siloxane Dressing Membranes: In Vitro and in Vivo Evaluations.

    Gharibi, Reza; Yeganeh, Hamid; Rezapour-Lactoee, Alireza; Hassan, Zuhair M

    2015-11-01

    A series of novel polyurethane/siloxane-based wound dressing membranes was prepared through sol-gel reaction of methoxysilane end-functionalized urethane prepolymers composed of castor oil and ricinoleic methyl ester as well as methoxysilane functional aniline tetramer (AT) moieties. The samples were fully characterized and their physicochemical, mechanical, electrical, and biological properties were assayed. The biological activity of these dressings against fibroblast cells and couple of microbes was also studied. It was revealed that samples that displayed electroactivity by introduction of AT moieties showed a broad range of antimicrobial activity toward different microorganisms, promising antioxidant (radical scavenging) efficiency and significant activity for stimulation of fibroblast cell growth and proliferation. Meanwhile, these samples showed appropriate tensile strength and ability for maintaining a moist environment over a wound by controlled equilibrium water absorption and water vapor transmission rate. The selected electroactive dressing was subjected to an in vivo assay using a rat animal model and the wound healing process was monitored and compared with analogous dressing without AT moieties. The recorded results showed that the electroactive dressings induced an increase in the rate of wound contraction, promoted collagen deposition, and encouraged vascularization in the wounded area. On the basis of the results of in vitro and in vivo assays, the positive influence of designed dressings for accelerated healing of a wound model was confirmed. PMID:26473663

  2. Photo-stimulatory effect of low energy helium-neon laser irradiation on excisional diabetic wound healing dynamics in wistar rats

    Maiya Arun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Generally, the significances of laser photo stimulation are now accepted, but the laser light facilitates wound healing and tissue repair remains poorly understood. Aims: We have examined the hypothesis that the laser photo stimulation can enhance the collagen production in diabetic wounds using the excision wound model in the Wistar rat model. Methods: The circular wounds were created on the dorsum of the back of the animals. The animals were divided into two groups. The study group (N = 24 wound was treated with 632.8 nm He-Ne laser at a dose of 3-9J/cm 2 for 5 days a week until the wounds healed completely. The control group was sham irradiated. Result: A significant increase in the hydroxyproline content and reduction in the wound size were observed in the study group. The pro-healing actions seem to be due to increased collagen deposition as well as better alignment and maturation. Conclusion: The biochemical analysis and clinical observation suggested that 3-6 J/cm 2 laser photo stimulation facilitates the tissue repair process by accelerating collagen production in diabetic wound healing.

  3. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) modulates wound healing through regulation of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)

    Serrano, Isabel; Diez-Marques, Maria L.; Rodriguez-Puyol, Manuel [Department of Physiology, University of Alcala, Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Red de Investigacion Renal Cooperativa (RedinRen) (Spain); Instituto Reina Sofia de Investigacion Nefrologica (Spain); Herrero-Fresneda, Inmaculada [Nephrology Unit, IDIBELL, Hospital de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Red de Investigacion Renal Cooperativa (RedinRen) (Spain); Garcia del Moral, Raimundo [Department of Pathology, University of Granada (Spain); Red de Investigacion Renal Cooperativa (RedinRen) (Spain); Dedhar, Shoukat [Department of Integrative Oncology, BC Cancer Research Center, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Ruiz-Torres, Maria P., E-mail: mpiedad.ruiz@uah.es [Department of Physiology, University of Alcala, Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Red de Investigacion Renal Cooperativa (RedinRen) (Spain); Instituto Reina Sofia de Investigacion Nefrologica (Spain); Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego [Nephrology Unit, Hospital Universitario Principe de Asturias, Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Red de Investigacion Renal Cooperativa (RedinRen) (Spain); Instituto Reina Sofia de Investigacion Nefrologica (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is an intracellular effector of cell-matrix interactions and regulates many cellular processes, including growth, proliferation, survival, differentiation, migration, invasion and angiogenesis. The present work analyzes the role of ILK in wound healing in adult animals using a conditional knock-out of the ILK gene generated with the tamoxifen-inducible Cre-lox system (CRE-LOX mice). Results show that ILK deficiency leads to retarded wound closure in skin. Intracellular mechanisms involved in this process were analyzed in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) isolated from CRE-LOX mice and revealed that wounding promotes rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ILK. Knockdown of ILK resulted in a retarded wound closure due to a decrease in cellular proliferation and loss of HGF protein expression during the healing process, in vitro and in vivo. Alterations in cell proliferation and wound closure in ILK-deficient MEF or mice could be rescued by exogenous administration of human HGF. These data demonstrate, for the first time, that the activation of PI3K and ILK after skin wounding are critical for HGF-dependent tissue repair and wound healing. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ILK deletion results in decreased HGF expression and delayed scratch wound repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PI3K/ILK/AKT pathway signals through HGF to regulate wound healing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An ILK-dependent increase in HGF expression is responsible for wound healing in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ILK-KO mice are used to confirm the requirement for ILK function in wound healing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human HGF treatment restores delayed wound closure in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) modulates wound healing through regulation of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is an intracellular effector of cell–matrix interactions and regulates many cellular processes, including growth, proliferation, survival, differentiation, migration, invasion and angiogenesis. The present work analyzes the role of ILK in wound healing in adult animals using a conditional knock-out of the ILK gene generated with the tamoxifen-inducible Cre-lox system (CRE-LOX mice). Results show that ILK deficiency leads to retarded wound closure in skin. Intracellular mechanisms involved in this process were analyzed in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) isolated from CRE-LOX mice and revealed that wounding promotes rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ILK. Knockdown of ILK resulted in a retarded wound closure due to a decrease in cellular proliferation and loss of HGF protein expression during the healing process, in vitro and in vivo. Alterations in cell proliferation and wound closure in ILK-deficient MEF or mice could be rescued by exogenous administration of human HGF. These data demonstrate, for the first time, that the activation of PI3K and ILK after skin wounding are critical for HGF-dependent tissue repair and wound healing. -- Highlights: ► ILK deletion results in decreased HGF expression and delayed scratch wound repair. ► PI3K/ILK/AKT pathway signals through HGF to regulate wound healing. ► An ILK-dependent increase in HGF expression is responsible for wound healing in vivo. ► ILK-KO mice are used to confirm the requirement for ILK function in wound healing. ► Human HGF treatment restores delayed wound closure in vitro and in vivo.

  5. EFFECT OF TOPICAL PHENYTOIN CREAM ON LINEAR INCISIONAL WOUND HEALING IN ALBINO RATS

    MORTEZA JARRAHI ; ABBAS ALI VAFAEI

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of phenytoin cream on linear incisional wound healing was investigated. Thirty male Wistar rats were subjected to a linear 3cm incision made over the skin of the back. The animals were randomly divided into 3 experimental, control, cold cream and treatment groups. Control group did not receive any drug or cold cream. Cold cream group received topical cold cream once a day from the beginning of experiments until the day that wounds were closed. Treatment group were treated topically by 1% phenytoin cream at the same time. For computation of the percentage of wound healing, the area of the wound were measured at the beginning of experiments and the next 2,4,6,8,10,12,14 and 16 days. The percentage of the healing wounds were calculated by Walker formula after measurement of the wound area. Results showed that there weren’t statistically significant differences between treatment and cold cream animals (P>0.05 in most of the days. It is concluded that phenytoin has possibly no significant effect on the rate of wound closing in acute wound model of incision in rat. Therefore further study is required for detection of the role of phenytoin on wound healing and the related parameters in various kinds of experimental wound models.

  6. Seasonal and reproductive effects on wound healing in the flight membranes of captive big brown bats

    Alejandra Ceballos-Vasquez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The flight membranes of bats serve a number of physiological functions important for survival. Although flight membrane injuries are commonly observed in wild-caught bats, in most cases the damage heals completely. Previous studies examining wound healing in the flight membranes of bats have not taken into consideration energy constraints that could influence healing times. Wound healing results in increased energy demands, therefore we hypothesized that wound healing times would be slower during periods of energy conservation and/or energy output. In this study we used an 8 mm diameter circular punch tool to biopsy the wing membranes of healthy adult female big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus from a captive research colony to test the hypothesis that healing times will vary with seasonal temperature changes between the summer and winter seasons, and with reproductive condition between lactating and non-reproductive females. As expected, membrane biopsies took significantly longer to heal during the winter when bats were hibernating compared to the summer when bats were active. Surprisingly, no difference in healing time was observed between lactating and non-reproductive females. The wings of most bats fully healed, although some individuals showed wound expansion demonstrating that impaired healing is occasionally observed in otherwise healthy subjects.

  7. Effect of oral olive oil on healing of 10-20% total body surface area burn wounds in hospitalized patients.

    Najmi, Mahtab; Vahdat Shariatpanahi, Zahra; Tolouei, Mohammad; Amiri, Zohreh

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of consumption of oral olive oil on clinical outcomes and wound healing of thermally injured patients with hospital stays. One hundred patients (mean age; 33.34±7 years) with 10-20% total body surface area, deep second degree and more burn wounds were randomized to receive either oral olive oil or sunflower oil as the oil in their diet. Patients were evaluated daily for occurrence of wound infection, sepsis and healing of the grafted skin. Also the duration of hospitalization and admission to the intensive care unit were compared in two groups. Results showed that there was no significant difference between the olive oil group and the control group in percent of TBSA involvement (14.28±0.53 vs. 13.02±0.48, P=0.7), albumin concentration (3.25±0.5 vs. 3.13±0.5, P=0.5) and mean calorie intake (2034±216.9 kcal vs2118±192.1 kcal, P=0.2). We found a significant difference in the duration of wound healing (7.2±0.5 vs. 8.7±0.5, P=0.04) and duration of hospitalization (7.4±0.5 vs. 8.9±0.4, P=0.05) in the olive oil group versus the control group. We did not find any difference in ICU admission, wound infection and occurrence of sepsis between two groups. This study showed that an oral diet provided with olive oil in patients with burn may accelerate wound healing and decrease the duration of hospitalization. PMID:25306088

  8. Increased Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Predicts Poor Wound Healing in Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Liu, Yu; Min, Danqing; Bolton, Thyra; Nubé, Vanessa; Stephen M Twigg; Yue, Dennis K.; McLennan, Susan V.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—We studied the relationships of diabetic ulcer wound fluid matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), and transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGF-ß1) with wound healing rate. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The ulcers were cleansed to remove exudates, and wound fluids were collected for analysis of MMP-2 and -9, TIMP-1, and TGF-ß1. RESULTS—At presentation, MMP-9 and the MMP-9–to–TIMP-1 ratio correlated inversely with the wound healing rate at 28 days (...

  9. Abnormal Cell Responses and Role of TNF-α in Impaired Diabetic Wound Healing

    Fanxing Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired diabetic wound healing constitutes a major health problem. The impaired healing is caused by complex factors such as abnormal keratinocyte and fibroblast migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, abnormal macrophage polarization, impaired recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, and decreased vascularization. Diabetes-enhanced and prolonged expression of TNF-α also contributes to impaired healing. In this paper, we discuss the abnormal cell responses in diabetic wound healing and the contribution of TNF-α.

  10. Evaluation of Effect of Oleuropein on Skin Wound Healing in Aged Male Balb/c Mice

    Fereshteh Mehraein

    2014-03-01

    : These results suggest that Oleuropein accelerates skin wound healing in aged male Balb/c mice. These findings can be useful for clinical application of Oleuropein in expediting wound healing after surgery.

  11. MicroCT angiography detects vascular formation and regression in skin wound healing.

    Urao, Norifumi; Okonkwo, Uzoagu A; Fang, Milie M; Zhuang, Zhen W; Koh, Timothy J; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2016-07-01

    Properly regulated angiogenesis and arteriogenesis are essential for effective wound healing. Tissue injury induces robust new vessel formation and subsequent vessel maturation, which involves vessel regression and remodeling. Although formation of functional vasculature is essential for healing, alterations in vascular structure over the time course of skin wound healing are not well understood. Here, using high-resolution ex vivo X-ray micro-computed tomography (microCT), we describe the vascular network during healing of skin excisional wounds with highly detailed three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed images and associated quantitative analysis. We found that relative vessel volume, surface area and branching number are significantly decreased in wounds from day 7 to days 14 and 21. Segmentation and skeletonization analysis of selected branches from high-resolution images as small as 2.5μm voxel size show that branching orders are decreased in the wound vessels during healing. In histological analysis, we found that the contrast agent fills mainly arterioles, but not small capillaries nor large veins. In summary, high-resolution microCT revealed dynamic alterations of vessel structures during wound healing. This technique may be useful as a key tool in the study of the formation and regression of wound vessels. PMID:27009591

  12. Application of laser scanning microscopy for the characterization of wound healing

    Antoniou, Christina

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical non-invasive methods have become more and more important for the characterization of skin lesions and for therapy control. In vivo laser scanning microscopy is a promising method which can be used for the analysis of cellular structures in the skin up to a depth of 250 µm. Therefore, laser scanning microscopy (LSM is well-suited for the characterization of wound healing processes. In contrast to measurements of the transepidermal waterloss (TEWL the laser scanning microscopy allows the analysis of the healing process on a cellular level. The course of wound healing determined by laser scanning microscopy was correlated with numerical values, which correspond to those used for measurements of TEWL, allowing the numerical characterization of the wound healing process. Laser scanning microscopy showed that wound healing starts not only from the wound edges but also from "islands" inside the wound area. In contrast to TEWL measurements the LSM analysis is not influenced by disturbing factors such as temperature, humidity and topically applied substances. Therefore, the laser scanning microscopy is well-suited for the characterization of different types of wound healing therapies including the topical application of creams and lotions.

  13. Effect of Newly Synthesized Polypropylene/Silver Nonwoven Fabric Dressing on Incisional Wound Healing in Rats

    Samiha M. Gawish

    2014-09-01

    RESULTS: Reduction was found in incision wound length in PP/Ag dressed rats, Ag-SD cream treated rats, and blank PP dressed rats after 5, 10 and 15 days compared to undressed rats. Skin of PP/Ag group showed less adverse histopathological changes, enhanced granulation tissue formation, enhanced angiogenesis, accelerated re-epithelialization and quick complete healing; compared to all other groups. Significant decrease in TGF-β level was recorded in PP\\Ag and Ag-SD cream groups as compared to blank PP group on day 5. While, significant decrease in TGF-β level was detected in PP\\Ag group when compared with undressed and blank PP groups on day 10. TGF-β showed significant in PP\\Ag group as compared to undressed, Ag-SD cream and blank PP groups on day 15. CONCLUSION: The present results suggest that PP/Ag dressing enhances, promotes and plays an important role in wound healing.

  14. Psychological distress and its impact on wound healing: an integrative review.

    House, Sharon L

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is typically divided into 4 stages; disruption of any one of these stages can impair this process. This integrative review summarizes findings from key studies suggesting that psychological distress may exert a clinically relevant impact on wound healing. For example, stress has been shown to decrease levels of inflammatory mediators, prolonging the inflammatory stage of healing, and increasing overall healing time. Depression has also been linked with impeding wound healing. Hostility has also been correlated with decreased inflammatory mediators, conversely, effective communication has shown faster healing time. Compounding factors such as unhealthy behaviors are also linked to poor wound healing, such as decreased sleep, poor nutrition, reduced exercise, and increased alcohol use. Clinical evidence suggests that alcohol exposure can reduce angiogenesis. Limited sleep decreases growth hormone secretion, resulting in decreased monocyte migration and activation of macrophages. protein deficiency can decrease capillary formation, collagen synthesis, and wound remodeling. Such evidence challenges clinicians to consider psychological factors when treating wound care patients. PMID:25549307

  15. Review of animal models used to study effects of bee products on wound healing: findings and applications

    Hananeh Wael M.; Ismail Zuhair Bani; Alshehabat Musa A.; Ali Ja’afar

    2015-01-01

    Non-healing wounds are associated with high morbidity and might greatly impact a patient’s well-being and economic status. For many years, scientific research has focused on developing and testing several natural and synthetic materials that enhance the rate of wound healing or eliminate healing complications. Honey has been used for thousands of years as a traditional remedy for many ailments. Recently, honey has reemerged as a promising wound care product especially for infected wounds and ...

  16. Modulation of ROS levels in fibroblasts by altering mitochondria regulates the process of wound healing.

    Janda, Jaroslav; Nfonsam, Valentine; Calienes, Fernanda; Sligh, James E; Jandova, Jana

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria are the major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in fibroblasts which are thought to be crucial regulators of wound healing with a potential to affect the expression of nuclear genes involved in this process. ROS generated by mitochondria are involved in all stages of tissue repair process but the regulation of ROS-generating system in fibroblasts still remains poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to better understand molecular mechanisms of how the regulation of ROS levels generated by mitochondria may influence the process of wound repair. Cybrid model system of mtDNA variations was used to study the functional consequences of altered ROS levels on wound healing responses in a uniform nuclear background of cultured ρ(0) fibroblasts. Mitochondrial ROS in cybrids were modulated by antioxidants that quench ROS to examine their ability to close the wound. Real-time PCR arrays were used to investigate whether ROS generated by specific mtDNA variants have the ability to alter expression of some key nuclear-encoded genes central to the wound healing response and oxidative stress. Our data suggest levels of mitochondrial ROS affect expression of some nuclear encoded genes central to wound healing response and oxidative stress and modulation of mitochondrial ROS by antioxidants positively affects in vitro process of wound closure. Thus, regulation of mitochondrial ROS-generating system in fibroblasts can be used as effective natural redox-based strategy to help treat non-healing wounds. PMID:26873374

  17. Sundew-Inspired Adhesive Hydrogels Combined with Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Wound Healing.

    Sun, Leming; Huang, Yujian; Bian, Zehua; Petrosino, Jennifer; Fan, Zhen; Wang, Yongzhong; Park, Ki Ho; Yue, Tao; Schmidt, Michael; Galster, Scott; Ma, Jianjie; Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-01-27

    The potential to harness the unique physical, chemical, and biological properties of the sundew (Drosera) plant's adhesive hydrogels has long intrigued researchers searching for novel wound-healing applications. However, the ability to collect sufficient quantities of the sundew plant's adhesive hydrogels is problematic and has eclipsed their therapeutic promise. Inspired by these natural hydrogels, we asked if sundew-inspired adhesive hydrogels could overcome the drawbacks associated with natural sundew hydrogels and be used in combination with stem-cell-based therapy to enhance wound-healing therapeutics. Using a bioinspired approach, we synthesized adhesive hydrogels comprised of sodium alginate, gum arabic, and calcium ions to mimic the properties of the natural sundew-derived adhesive hydrogels. We then characterized and showed that these sundew-inspired hydrogels promote wound healing through their superior adhesive strength, nanostructure, and resistance to shearing when compared to other hydrogels in vitro. In vivo, sundew-inspired hydrogels promoted a "suturing" effect to wound sites, which was demonstrated by enhanced wound closure following topical application of the hydrogels. In combination with mouse adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and compared to other therapeutic biomaterials, the sundew-inspired hydrogels demonstrated superior wound-healing capabilities. Collectively, our studies show that sundew-inspired hydrogels contain ideal properties that promote wound healing and suggest that sundew-inspired-ADSCs combination therapy is an efficacious approach for treating wounds without eliciting noticeable toxicity or inflammation. PMID:26731614

  18. Effects of Low-Intensity Laser Irradiation on Wound Healing in Diabetic Rats

    Hui Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The effects of low-intensity 630 nm semiconductor laser irradiation at 3.6 J/cm2 (LISL on wound healing in diabetic rats were studied in this paper. Methods. 36 diabetic rats with dorsal cutaneous excisional wounds were divided into three LISL groups and a control group randomly. The three LISL groups were irradiated with LISL at 5, 10, and 20 mW/cm2 five times a week for two weeks, respectively. The process of wound healing was assessed by assessing blood glucose, calculating percentage of wound closure, histopathological evaluation, and immunohistochemical quantification. Results. Blood glucose of all groups remained at similar levels throughout the experiment. LISL could obviously promote wound contraction, fibroblasts proliferation, and collagen synthesis, alter bFGF and TGF-β1 expression, and reduce inflammatory reaction in the early and middle phases of chronic wound-healing process. However, LISL could not shorten cicatrization time, and the treatment effects were not sensitive to illuminate parameters in the later phase of the experiment. Conclusions. LISL might have auxiliary effects in the early and middle phases of wound healing in STZ-induced diabetic rats, but the reciprocity rule might not hold. The wound-healing process of early-phase diabetes rats shows typical characteristics of self-limited disease.

  19. What Is New in the Understanding of Non Healing Wounds Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Therapies

    H. Trøstrup

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds are a growing socioeconomic problem in the western world. Knowledge on recalcitrant wounds relies on in vitro studies or clinical observations, and there is emerging evidence on the clinical impact of bacterial biofilm on skin healing. Chronic wounds are locked in the inflammatory state of wound healing, and there are multiple explanations for this arrest with the theory of exaggerated proteolysis as the most commonly accepted. Previously, there has not been enough focus on the different etiologies of chronic wounds compared to acute, healing wounds. There is an urgent need to group chronic wounds by its cause when searching for possible diagnostic or therapeutic targets. Good wound management should therefore consist of recognition of basic wound etiology, irrigation, and debridement in order to reduce microbial and necrotic load, frequently changed dressings, and appropriate antimicrobial and antibiofilm strategies based on precise diagnosis. Representative sampling is required for diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment of wounds. The present review aims at describing the impact of biofilm infections on wounds in relation to diagnosing, treatment strategies, including experimentally adjuvant approaches and animal models.

  20. Honey for Wound Healing, Ulcers, and Burns; Data Supporting Its Use in Clinical Practice

    Noori Al-Waili

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread existence of unhealed wounds, ulcers, and burns has a great impact on public health and economy. Many interventions, including new medications and technologies, are being used to help achieve significant wound healing and to eliminate infections. Therefore, to find an intervention that has both therapeutic effect on the healing process and the ability to kill microbes is of great value. Honey is a natural product that has been recently introduced in modern medical practice. Honey's antibacterial properties and its effects on wound healing have been thoroughly investigated. Laboratory studies and clinical trials have shown that honey is an effective broad-spectrum antibacterial agent. This paper reviews data that support the effectiveness of natural honey in wound healing and its ability to sterilize infected wounds. Studies on the therapeutic effects of honey collected in different geographical areas on skin wounds, skin and gastric ulcers, and burns are reviewed and mechanisms of action are discussed. (Ulcers and burns are included as an example of challenging wounds. The data show that the wound healing properties of honey include stimulation of tissue growth, enhanced epithelialization, and minimized scar formation. These effects are ascribed to honey's acidity, hydrogen peroxide content, osmotic effect, nutritional and antioxidant contents, stimulation of immunity, and to unidentified compounds. Prostaglandins and nitric oxide play a major role in inflammation, microbial killing, and the healing process. Honey was found to lower prostaglandin levels and elevate nitric oxide end products. These properties might help to explain some biological and therapeutic properties of honey, particularly as an antibacterial agent or wound healer. The data presented here demonstrate that honeys from different geographical areas have considerable therapeutic effects on chronic wounds, ulcers, and burns. The results encourage the use of honey