WorldWideScience

Sample records for accelerated radioactive beams

  1. Opportunities with accelerated Radioactive Ion Beams

    A discussion of the exciting and rapidly developing field of accelerated Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) production for nuclear and astrophysics research is presented. In particular, some scientific opportunities with RIBs are highlighted, the methods of RIB production are reviewed, and the existing and proposed facilities for this research are described. In addition, the ORNL RIB project, the only funded ISOL project employing an electrostatic accelerator, is described in some detail

  2. Electron Accelerators for Radioactive Ion Beams

    Lia Merminga

    2007-10-10

    The summary of this paper is that to optimize the design of an electron drive, one must: (a) specify carefully the user requirements--beam energy, beam power, duty factor, and longitudinal and transverse emittance; (b) evaluate different machine options including capital cost, 10-year operating cost and delivery time. The author is convinced elegant solutions are available with existing technology. There are several design options and technology choices. Decisions will depend on system optimization, in-house infrastructure and expertise (e.g. cryogenics, SRF, lasers), synergy with other programs.

  3. Charge-state enhancement for radioactive beam post-acceleration

    A critical question for an ISOL-type radioactive-beam facility, such as that being discussed by the North American Isospin Laboratory Committee, is the efficiency and q/m of the ion source for the radioactive species. ISOLDE at CERN demonstrated that high efficiency is obtained for a wide variety of species in the 1+ charge state. These ion sources also generally have excellent transverse emittances and low energy spreads. One possibility is to use this proven technology plus an ionizer stage to increase the output of such sources to 2, 3, or 4+ with high efficiency. We are currently investigating technical options for such charge-state enhancement. There is a proposal by a Heidelberg/ISOLDE collaboration to build a open-quotes charge-state breederclose quotes as part of an experiment called REX-ISOLDE. This concept would deliver batches of radioactive ions with low duty cycle, optimized for relatively low-intensity secondary beams, on the order of 106/sec. We are independently doing simulations of an alternative approach, called the Electron-Beam Charge-State Amplifier (EBQA), which would yield DC beams with improved transverse emittance and would not have the intensity limitation of the batch transfer process. The cost and efficiency of the EBQA will have to be compared with those of a normally-conducting CW RFQ followed by ion stripping, as alternatives for the first stage of a secondary ion accelerator

  4. Studies of pear-shaped nuclei using accelerated radioactive beams

    Gaffney, L P; Scheck, M; Hayes, A B; Wenander, F; Albers, M; Bastin, B; Bauer, C; Blazhev, A; Bonig, S; Bree, N; Cederkall, J; Chupp, T; Cline, D; Cocolios, T E; Davinson, T; DeWitte, H; Diriken, J; Grahn, T; Herzan, A; Huyse, M; Jenkins, D G; Joss, D T; Kesteloot, N; Konki, J; Kowalczyk, M; Kroll, Th; Kwan, E; Lutter, R; Moschner, K; Napiorkowski, P; Pakarinen, J; Pfeiffer, M; Radeck, D; Reiter, P; Reynders, K; Rigby, S V; Robledo, L M; Rudigier, M; Sambi, S; Seidlitz, M; Siebeck, B; Stora, T; Thoele, P; Van Duppen, P; Vermeulen, M J; von Schmid, M; Voulot, D; Warr, N; Wimmer, K; Wrzosek-Lipska, K; Wu, C Y; Zielinska, M

    2013-01-01

    There is strong circumstantial evidence that certain heavy, unstable atomic nuclei are ‘octupole deformed’, that is, distorted into a pear shape. This contrasts with the more prevalent rugby-ball shape of nuclei with reflection-symmetric, quadrupole deformations. The elusive octupole deformed nuclei are of importance for nuclear structure theory, and also in searches for physics beyond the standard model; any measurable electric-dipole moment (a signature of the latter) is expected to be amplified in such nuclei. Here we determine electric octupole transition strengths (a direct measure of octupole correlations) for short-lived isotopes of radon and radium. Coulomb excitation experiments were performed using accelerated beams of heavy, radioactive ions. Our data on and $^{224}$Ra show clear evidence for stronger octupole deformation in the latter. The results enable discrimination between differing theoretical approaches to octupole correlations, and help to constrain suitable candidates for experimental...

  5. SIRIUS: A Proposal for an accelerated Radioactive Beams Facility at ISIS

    A Proposal for a future Radioactive Beams Facility has been developed based on ISIS, the world's brightest pulsed neutron source. Radioactive ions are produced by the spallation process driven by a 100 μA, 800 MeV proton beam delivered from the ISIS synchrotron accelerator. This is ten times more powerful than currently available in the world today, and follows on from the successful work performed by the RIST project to develop a high power radioactive beam target for such a facility. The proposed design provides for both low (200 keV), and high energy (10 MeV/A) radioactive beams with high to medium mass resolution. A flexible facility layout allows the maximum simultaneous and independent use of the radioactive beams by a number of different users. An overview of the proposed facility is presented

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on prospects for research with radioactive beams from heavy ion accelerators

    The SuperHILAC Users Executive Committee organized a workshop on Prospects for Research with Radioactive Beams from Heavy Ion Accelerators. The main purpose of the workshop was to bring together a diverse group of scientists who had already done experients with radioactive beams or were interested in their use in the future. The topics of the talks ranged from general nuclear physics, astrophysics, production of radioactive beams and high energy projectile fragmentation to biomedical applications. This publication contains the abstracts of the talks given at the workshop and copies of the viewgraphs as they were supplied to the editor

  7. Proceedings of the workshop on prospects for research with radioactive beams from heavy ion accelerators

    Nitschke, J.M. (ed.)

    1984-04-01

    The SuperHILAC Users Executive Committee organized a workshop on Prospects for Research with Radioactive Beams from Heavy Ion Accelerators. The main purpose of the workshop was to bring together a diverse group of scientists who had already done experients with radioactive beams or were interested in their use in the future. The topics of the talks ranged from general nuclear physics, astrophysics, production of radioactive beams and high energy projectile fragmentation to biomedical applications. This publication contains the abstracts of the talks given at the workshop and copies of the viewgraphs as they were supplied to the editor.

  8. The Acceleration and Storage of Radioactive Ions for a Beta-Beam Facility

    Lindroos, M; Napoly, O; Payet, J; Benedikt, Michael; Butler, P; Garoby, R; Hancock, S; Köster, U; Lindroos, M; Magistris, M; Nilsson, T; Wenander, F; Blondel, A; Gilardoni, S S; Boine-Frankenheim, O; Franzke, B; Höllinger, R; Steck, Markus; Spiller, P J; Weick, H; Burguet, J; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Hernández, P; Laune, B; Müller, A; Sortais, P; Villari, A C C; Volpe, C; Facco, A; Mezzetto, Mauro; Palladino, V; Pisent, A; Zucchelli, P; Delbar, T; Ryckewaert, G; Chartier, M; Prior, C; Reistad, D; Baartman, R A; Jansson, A

    2004-01-01

    The term beta-beam has been coined for the production of a pure beam of electron neutrinos or their antiparticles through the decay of radioactive ions circulating in a storage ring. This concept requires radioactive ions to be accelerated to as high Lorentz  as 150. The neutrino source itself consists of a storage ring for this energy range, with long straight sections in line with the experiment(s). Such a decay ring does not exist at CERN today, nor does a high-intensity proton source for the production of the radioactive ions. Nevertheless, the existing CERN accelerator infrastructure could be used as this would still represent an important saving for a beta-beam facility.

  9. Nuclear physics with radioactive beams

    Radioactive beam production through two different mechanisms: acceleration of radioactive nuclei, and production of secondary beams from projectile fragmentation is overviewed. Some topics of the applications of radioactive beams in nuclear physics, such as identification and study of exotic nuclei, neutron halos, nuclear astrophysics and medical applications are discussed. (K.A.). 24 refs., 8 figs

  10. Near-threshold pion production with radioactive beams at the Rare Isotope Accelerator

    Li, B A; Zuo, W; Li, Bao-An; Yong, Gao-Chan; Zuo, Wei

    2005-01-01

    Using an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model we study near-threshold pion production in heavy-ion collisions induced by radioactive beams at the planned Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). We revisit the question of probing the high density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy $E_{sym}(\\rho)$ using the $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratio. It is found that both the total and differential $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratios remain sensitive to the $E_{sym}(\\rho)$ when the momentum-dependence of both the isoscalar and isovector potentials are consistently taken into account. Moreover, the multiplicity and spectrum of $\\pi^-$ mesons are found more sensitive to the $E_{sym}(\\rho)$ than those of $\\pi^+$ mesons. Finally, effects of the Coulomb potential on the pion spectra and $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratio are also discussed.

  11. Radioactive ion beams at SPIRAL

    The radioactive ion beam facility SPIRAL, presently under construction, will be based on the very high intensity heavy-ion beams (96AMeV at 6kW from He to Ar) at GANIL, France. The facility will produce radioactive ion beams using the ISOL method and a permanent magnet ECRIS which will allow for the production of multiple charged radioactive ions. The beam will be accelerated by a K=265 compact cyclotron and delivered into the existing experimental areas. The first tests for the production of radioactive ion beams have been undertaken with the test bench separator SIRa. A description of the facility, including the first results for the production of radioactive ion beams and perspectives are given. ((orig.))

  12. Radioactive ion beams at Spiral

    The radioactive ion beam facility SPIRAL, presently under construction, will be based on the very high intensity heavy-ion beams (96A MeV at 6kW from He to Ar) at GANIL, France. The facility will produce radioactive ion beams using the ISOL method and a permanent magnet ECRIS which will allow for the production of multiple charged radioactive ions. The beam will be accelerated by a K = 265 compact cyclotron and delivered into the existing experimental areas. The first tests for the production of radioactive ion beams has been undertaken with the test bench separator SIRa. A description of the facility, including the first results for the production of radioactive ion beams and perspectives are given. (authors). 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  13. Selective isobar suppression for accelerator mass spectrometry and radioactive ion-beam science

    A new method of selective isobar suppression by photodetachment in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion cooler is being developed at HRIBF with a twofold purpose: (1) increasing the AMS sensitivity for certain isotopes of interest and (2) purifying radioactive ion beams for nuclear science. The potential of suppressing the 36S contaminants in a 36Cl beam using this method has been explored with stable S- and Cl- ions and a Nd:YLF laser. In the study, the laser beam was directed along the experiment's beam line and through a RF quadrupole ion cooler. Negative 32S and 35Cl ions produced by a Cs sputter ion source were focused into the ion cooler where they were slowed by collisions with He buffer gas; this increased the interaction time between the negative-ion beam and the laser beam. As a result, suppression of S- by a factor of 3000 was obtained with about 2.5 W average laser power in the cooler while no reduction in Cl- current was observed.

  14. Accelerating nondiffracting beams

    Yan, Shaohui; Li, Manman; Yao, Baoli, E-mail: yaobl@opt.ac.cn; Yu, Xianghua; Lei, Ming; Dan, Dan; Yang, Yanlong; Min, Junwei; Peng, Tong

    2015-06-05

    We present a set of beams which combine the properties of accelerating beams and (conventional) diffraction-free beams. These beams can travel along a desired trajectory while keeping an approximately invariant transverse profile, which may be (higher-order) Bessel-, Mathieu- or parabolic-nondiffracting-like beams, depending on the initial complex amplitude distribution. A possible application of these beams presented here may be found in optical trapping field. For example, a higher-order Bessel-like beam, which has a hollow (transverse) pattern, is suitable for guiding low-refractive-index or metal particles along a curve. - Highlights: • A set of beams having arbitrary trajectories of accelerating and nondiffracting behaviors are generalized and presented. • Bessel-like accelerating beams are generalized to the higher-order (hollow) version. • Mathieu-like accelerating beams and parabolic-nondiffracting-like accelerating beams are presented. • A possible application of these beams may be found in optical trapping and guiding of particles.

  15. GANIL radioactive beam experiments

    Examples of recent experiments performed at GANIL are used to highlight the present-day interest in secondary radioactive beams. Essentially, studies done by means of the doubly achromatic spectrometer LISE are discussed but future possibilities at GANIL are also mentioned. (author) 25 refs., 8 figs

  16. Radioactive Ion Beam Development at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    Stracener, Dan; Beene, James R; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Blackmon, Jeff C; Carter, Ken; Dowling, Darryl; Juras, Raymond; Kawai, Yoko; Kronenberg, Andreas; Liu, Yuan; Meigs, Martha; Müller, Paul; Spejewski, Eugene H; Tatum, A

    2005-01-01

    Radioactive beams are produced at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL) technique. Radioactive nuclei are produced in a thick target via irradiation with energetic light ions (protons, deuterons, helium isotopes) and then post-accelerated to a few MeV/nucleon for use in nuclear physics experiments. An overview of radioactive beam development at the HRIBF will be presented, including ion source development, improvements in the ISOL production targets, and a description of techniques to improve the quality (intensity and purity) of the beams. Facilities for radioactive ion beam development include two ion source test facilities, a target/ion source preparation and quality assurance facility, and an in-beam test facility where low intensity production beams are used. A new test facility, the High Power Target Laboratory, will be available later this year. At this facility, high intensity production beams will be available t...

  17. Residual radioactivity measurements at Indus accelerator complex

    Indus-1 and Indus-2 are two Synchrotron Radiation Sources (SRS) operational at RRCAT, Indore. Indus-1 and Indus-2 are designed for maximum electron beam energy of 450 MeV and 2.5 GeV respectively. During shut down of these accelerators for maintenance purpose, residual radioactivity measurements were carried out. The residual radioactivity formation in various parts of the high energy electron accelerators is due to the beam loss taking place at these locations. The present paper describes the recent residual radioactivity measurements carried out at the electron accelerators of Indus Accelerator Complex and the radio-isotopes identified. The maximum dose rate due to induced activity obtained is 30 μSv/h, near dipole-5 of booster synchrotron after 12 h of cooling time. In case of Indus-1 and Indus-2 SRS the dose rate due to induced radioactivity is found to be of the order of 2 - 3 μSv/h. The radio isotopes identified at these beam loss locations are beta emitters that do not pose serious external hazard to the working personnel. However, precautions are to be observed while doing maintenance on activated components. The paper describes the measurements in detail with the results. (author)

  18. North American radioactive beam initiatives

    After a brief review of existing radioactive beam facilities in North America, two new initiative (the Oak Ridge Radioactive Ion Beam Facility and the IsoSpin Laboratory) are described in some detail. An evaluation of which nuclei these facilities will be able to study, that cannot be studied with stable targets and beams, also is presented

  19. Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility Status

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) produces high-quality beams of short-lived radioactive isotopes for nuclear science research, and is currently unique worldwide in the ability to provide neutron-rich fission fragment beams post-accelerated to energies above the Coulomb barrier. HRIBF is undergoing a multi-phase upgrade. Phase I (completed 2005) was construction of the High Power Target Laboratory to provide the on-going Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL) development program with a venue for testing new targets, ion sources, and radioactive ion beam (RIB) production techniques with high-power beams. Phase II, which is on schedule for completion in September 2009, is the Injector for Radioactive Ion Species 2 (IRIS2), a second RIB production station that will improve facility reliability and accommodate new ion sources, new RIB production targets, and some innovative RIB purification techniques, including laser applications. The Phase III goal is to substantially improve facility performance by replacing or supplementing the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) production accelerator with either a high-power 25-50 MeV electron accelerator or a high-current multi-beam commercial cyclotron. Either upgrade is applicable to R and D on isotope production for medical or other applications.

  20. Radioactive beams and their applications

    The proceedings contain lectures and contributed papers submitted to the second INR (Kiev's) International School on Nuclear Physics (Kiev, June 25 -July 2, 1991). The following sections were included in the Proceedings: Radioactive Beam Facilities, Application of Radioactive Beams in the Investigations of Nuclear Reactions, Exotic Nuclei and Clusters, Polarization Phenomena, Astrophysics and Others

  1. Detection systems for radioactive ion beams

    Two main methods are used to produce radioactive ion beams: -) the ISOL method (isotope separation on-line) in which the stable beam interacts with a thick target, the reaction products diffuse outside the target and are transferred to a source where they are ionized, a mass separator and a post-accelerator drive the selected radioactive ions to the right energy; -) the in-flight fragmentation method in which the stable beam interacts with a thin target, the reaction products are emitted from the target with a restricted angular distribution and a velocity close to that of the incident beam, the experimenter has to take advantage from the reaction kinetics to get the right particle beam. Characteristic time is far longer with the ISOL method but the beam intensity is much better because of the use of a post-accelerator. In both cases, the beam intensity is lower by several orders of magnitude than in the case of a stable beam. This article presents all the constraints imposed by radioactive beams to the detection systems of the reaction products and gives new technical solutions according to the type of nuclear reaction studied. (A.C.)

  2. Post-acceleration of sup 7 Be at the Louvain-la-Neuve radioactive ion beam facility

    Gaelens, M; Loiselet, M; Ryckewaert, G

    2003-01-01

    The development of an intense and pure post-accelerated sup 7 Be beam at Louvain-la-Neuve will be discussed. Given its properties (metallic nature, long half-life (53 days)) and the special beam parameters required (multi-charge ions, high purity), a range of special techniques had to be investigated. At Louvain-la-Neuve, sup 7 Be is produced by irradiating a lithium target with 30 mu A of 27 MeV protons and is extracted using offline chemical separation techniques. Because of the large amounts of activity required, the chemistry has to be adapted for use in hotcells. The ionization is performed with an Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with the sup 7 Be injected in the source by means of sputtering. Special techniques have to be used to prevent the beryllium atoms from being lost on the plasma chamber walls. A dedicated heated plasma chamber for the ion source was developed. The ionization efficiency was increased by studying the chemistry involved in the ion source. The atoms are ionized to the 1+ or ...

  3. Problems raised by radioactive ion acceleration in the SPIRAL project. Accelerator tuning and stabilisation

    This study is related to the SPIRAL project. This facility uses a cyclotron to accelerate radioactive ion beams produced in a thick target by the Grant Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds primary beam. The low intensity of radioactive beams and the mixing of several species imply special tuning methods and associated diagnostics. Also, a cyclotron and the beam line will be used to switch from this tuning beam to the radioactive one. We present a theoretical study and a numerical simulation of the tuning of five radioactive beams using three different methods. the beam dynamic is performed through the injection beam line and the cyclotron up to the electrostatic deflector. Within the frame of these methods we have described all the SPIRAL beam diagnostics. Construction and test of a new low intensity diagnosis based on a plastic scintillator for phase measurement inside the cyclotron is described in details. (author)

  4. Overview of linac applications at future radioactive beam facilities

    There is considerable interest worldwide in the research which could be done at a next generation, advanced radioactive beam facility. To generate high quality, intense beams of accelerated radionuclides via the open-quotes isotope separator on-lineclose quotes (ISOL) method requires two major accelerator components: a high power (100 kW) driver device to produce radionuclides in a production target/ion source complex, and a secondary beam accelerator to produce beams of radioactive ions up to energies on the order of 10 MeV per nucleon over a broad mass range. In reviewing the technological challenges of such a facility, several types of modem linear accelerators appear well suited. This paper reviews the properties of the linacs currently under construction and those proposed for future facilities for use either as the driver device or the radioactive beam post-accelerator. Other choices of accelerators, such as cyclotrons, for either the driver or secondary beam devices of a radioactive beam complex will also be compared. Issues to be addressed for the production accelerator include the choice of ion beam types to be used for cost-effective production of radionuclides. For the post-accelerator the choice of ion source technology is critical and dictates the charge-to-mass requirements at the injection stage

  5. Particle accelerator requirements for burning radioactive wastes

    One of the four subprograms of the Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) program is the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) subprogram which in term is a program. The capacity to burn waste is given by the enhanced neutron economy made possible by the presence of the extra accelerator-produced neutrons. The better neutron economy increases the capacity of burning (transmute) anything that absorbs neutrons including long-lived fission products and actinides. By these transmuted or 'burning' systems, the bulk of long-lived radionuclides in disposed radioactive wastes can be reduced by factors of 1000 and the storage time of residual products can be greatly reduced from hundreds of thousands of years to several centuries. This paper presents particle beam requirements for ADTT applications. These are most often specified with a nominal 1 GeV energy and an average beam current for ATW ranging from 100 to 250 m A depending on different applications and different system concepts. It is sketched the reference RF-Linac Accelerator Design for ATW systems. (author)

  6. Nuclear reaction studies with radioactive 17 F beams

    Full text: Radioactive 17 F beams were produced at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility using the Isotope Separator On Line (ISOL) technique. A 40 MeV deuteron beam provided by the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) was used to bombard a hafnium oxide target to produce 17 F by the 16 O(d,n) reaction. The 17 F ions were mass analysed and subsequently accelerated by the 25 MV tandem. Two of the experiments using accelerated 17 F beams will be reported: the breakup of 170 MeV 17 F by 208 Pb and the simultaneous emission of two protons from a resonance in 18 Ne. (Author)

  7. Isobar Separators for Radioactive Ion Beam Facilities

    Garrett, J D; Wollnik, H

    1998-10-05

    A radioactive ion beam facility - in short a RIB facility - produces ions of short-lived nuclei and accelerates them to energies of 0.1...10 MeV per nucleon or even higher. In this process it is important that the resulting RIB beams are free from nuclei of neighboring isobars or of neighboring elements. This task requires the production and ionization of the nuclei of interest as well as separating them from all others with a high-mass resolving power and small-mass cross contaminations. When constructing such a facility it also is very important to find ways that allow the accelerated ions to be provided to different experiments at least quasi simultaneously.

  8. A radioactive ion beam facility using photofission

    Diamond, W T

    1999-01-01

    Use of a high-power electron linac as the driver accelerator for a Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility is proposed. An electron beam of 30 MeV and 100 kW can produce nearly 5x10 sup 1 sup 3 fissions/s from an optimized sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U target and about 60% of this from a natural uranium target. An electron beam can be readily transmitted through a thin window at the exit of the accelerator vacuum system and transported a short distance through air to a water-cooled Bremsstrahlung-production target. The Bremsstrahlung radiation can, in turn, be transported through air to the isotope-production target. This separates the accelerator vacuum system, the Bremsstrahlung target and the isotope-production target, reducing remote handling problems. The electron beam can be scanned over a large target area to reduce the power density on both the Bremsstrahlung and isotope-production targets. These features address one of the most pressing technological challenges of a high-power RIB facility, namely the production o...

  9. Self accelerating electron Airy beams

    Voloch-Bloch, Noa; Lilach, Yigal; Gover, Avraham; Arie, Ady

    2013-01-01

    We report the first experimental generation and observation of Airy beams of free electrons. The electron Airy beams are generated by diffraction of electrons through a nanoscale hologram, that imprints a cubic phase modulation on the beams' transverse plane. We observed the spatial evolution dynamics of an arc-shaped, self accelerating and shape preserving electron Airy beams. We directly observed the ability of electrons to self-heal, restoring their original shape after passing an obstacle. This electromagnetic method opens up new avenues for steering electrons, like their photonic counterparts, since their wave packets can be imprinted with arbitrary shapes or trajectories. Furthermore, these beams can be easily manipulated using magnetic or electric potentials. It is also possible to efficiently self mix narrow beams having opposite signs of acceleration, hence obtaining a new type of electron interferometer.

  10. Development of radioactive ion beam production systems for Tokai Radioactive Ion Acceleration Complex--High temperature ion source for short-lived isotopes

    We have developed a new ion source system in the isotope separator on-line at Japan Atomic Energy Agency, for separation of short-lived isotopes produced by proton-induced fission of 238U. The ion source system is a forced electron beam induced arc discharge version E type ion source with a target container. We successfully operated this system at 2000 deg. C as a result of reductions in volume of the ion source and the target container, introduction of heating method by electron bombardment, and improvement to the heat shield. This new ion source system was tested using 238U of 640 mg/cm2 with a proton primary beam of 30 MeV, 350 nA. Release times were measured for Kr, In, and Xe. The values of release times are 2.6 s for Kr, 1.8 s for In, and 4.6 s for Xe. In this work, the ion source system enabled us to mass-separate short-lived isotopes such as 93Kr(T1/2=1.286 s), 129In(T1/2=0.61 s), and 141Xe(T1/2=1.73 s) with intensity of 103 ions/s.

  11. Characterization of low energy radioactive beams using direct reactions

    Johansen, J.G.; Fraser, M.A.; Bildstein, V.;

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new technique to determine the beam structure of low energy radioactive beams using coincidence events from a direct reaction. The technique will be described and tested using Geant4 simulations. We use the technique to determine for the first time the width, divergence and energy...... of an accelerated radioactive beam produced at ISOLDE. We use data from an experiment with an 11Be beam incident on a deuteron target producing 10Be from a (d,t) reaction. The T-REX Si detector array was used for particle detection, but the technique is applicable for other setups....

  12. Research on biological effects of radioactive ion beam

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential importance of radioactive ion beams such as 9C, 8B and 8Li, representing double radiation sources coming from the external beams themselves and the delayed particles emitted internally, in medical use, cell radiobiological experiments using radioactive 8B beam and corresponding comparable 10B-ion beam were carried out in the secondary beam line (SBL) at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). In these radiobiological experiments, biological endpoints such as survival fraction, micronucleus frequency and γ-H2AX focus induction at different penetration depths around the Bragg peaks along these beams were measured. Because human salivary gland (HSG) cancer cells were used in the experiments, it is hard to evaluate the biological effectiveness of the radioactive 8B beam exactly based on the results obtained in the radiobiological experiments. Therefore, normal cell line is expected to be employed in future experiments. In addition, a primary 10B beam of 100 MeV/u was used to produce radioactive 8Li beam under the conditions of 6 mm thick Beryllium target and 3.5 mm thick Aluminum degrader in the SBL at HIMAC. The lateral fluence distributions of the produced beam were measured at different penetration depths along the beam direction. To keep the uniformity of the irradiation field suitable for radiobiological experiments using the produced 8Li beam, a narrow momentum width has to be applied so that the beam intensity decreases. (author)

  13. Experiments with radioactive nuclear beams II

    The studies of nuclear reactions with heavy ions have been carried out for years for the group of heavy ions of the laboratory of the Accelerator of the ININ. Especially in the last years the group has intruded in the studies of nuclear reactions with radioactive beams, frontier theme at world level. Presently Technical Report is presented in detailed form the experimental methods and the analysis procedures of the research activities carried out by the group. The chpater II is dedicated to the procedures used in the analysis of the last two experiments with radioactive beams carried out by the group. In the chapter III is presented the procedure followed to carrying out an extended analysis with the CCDEF code, to consider the transfer channel of nucleons in the description of the fusion excitation functions of a good number of previously measured systems by the group. Finally, in the chapter IV the more important steps to continue in the study of the reaction 12C + 12C experiment drifted to be carried out using the available resources of the Tandem Accelerator Laboratory of the ININ are described. At the end of each chapter some of the more representative results obtained in the analysis are presented and emphasis on the scientific production generated by the group for each case is made. (Author)

  14. Fresnel diffraction patterns as accelerating beams

    Zhang, Yiqi; Belić, Milivoj R.; Zheng, Huaibin; Wu, Zhenkun; Li, Yuanyuan; Lu, Keqing; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that beams originating from Fresnel diffraction patterns are self-accelerating in free space. In addition to accelerating and self-healing, they also exhibit parabolic deceleration property, which is in stark contrast to other accelerating beams. We find that the trajectory of Fresnel paraxial accelerating beams is similar to that of nonparaxial Weber beams. Decelerating and accelerating regions are separated by a critical propagation distance, at which no acceleration is prese...

  15. Radioactive beam production at the Bevalac

    At the Bevalac radioactive beams are routinely produced by the fragmentation process. The effectiveness of this process with respect to the secondary beam' emittance, intensity and energy spread depends critically on the nuclear reaction kinematics and the magnitude of the incident beam energy. When this beam energy significantly exceeds the energies of the nuclear reaction process, many of the qualities of the incident beam can be passed on the secondary beam. Factors affecting secondary beam quality are discussed along with techniques for isolating and purifying a specific reaction product. The on-going radioactive beam program at the Bevalac is used as an example with applications, present performance and plans for the future

  16. An MCNPX accelerator beam source

    Durkee, Joe W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Elson, Jay S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jason, Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Johns, Russell C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Waters, Laurie S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2009-06-04

    MCNPX is a powerful Monte Carlo code that can be used to conduct sophisticated radiation-transport simulations involving complex physics and geometry. Although MCNPX possesses a wide assortment of standardized modeling tools, there are instances in which a user's needs can eclipse existing code capabilities. Fortunately, although it may not be widely known, MCNPX can accommodate many customization needs. In this article, we demonstrate source-customization capability for a new SOURCE subroutine as part of our development to enable simulations involving accelerator beams for active-interrogation studies. Simulation results for a muon beam are presented to illustrate the new accelerator-source capability.

  17. Radioactive ion beam line in Lanzhou

    詹文龙; 郭忠言; 刘冠华; 党建荣; 何锐荣; 周嗣信; 尹全民; 罗亦孝; 王义芳; 魏宝文; 孙志宇; 肖国青; 王金川; 江山红; 李加兴; 孟祥伟; 张万生; 秦礼军; 王全进

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive ion beam line in Lanzhou (RIBLL) has been constructed for the production of short-lived radioactive nuclei and studies of exotic nuclei far from the β-stability line. It has been put into operation recently at the National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator Lanzhou. RIBLL consists of two doubly achromatic parts with a solid acceptance ΔΩ≥6.5 msr, momentum acceptance Δp/p=±5% and maximum magnetic rigidity Bρmax=4.2 Tm. The second part of RIBLL serving as a spectrometer gives an element resolution Z/ΔZ>150 and mass resolution A/ΔA>300. The polarized secondary beams can be obtained by using a swinger dipole magnet to change the incident direction of primary projectile from 0°to 5°. The shortest lift time for secondary beams on RIBLL is less than 1μs. First experiments were performed with neutron rich nuclei for understanding the properties of halo nuclei and exotic nuclear reactions.

  18. Low voltage electron beam accelerators

    Widely used electron accelerators in industries are the electron beams with acceleration voltage at 300 kV or less. The typical examples are shown on manufactures in Japan, equipment configuration, operation, determination of process parameters, and basic maintenance requirement of the electron beam processors. New electron beam processors with acceleration voltage around 100 kV were introduced maintaining the relatively high dose speed capability of around 10,000 kGy x mpm at production by ESI (Energy Science Inc. USA, Iwasaki Electric Group). The application field like printing and coating for packaging requires treating thickness of 30 micron or less. It does not require high voltage over 110 kV. Also recently developed is a miniature bulb type electron beam tube with energy less than 60 kV. The new application area for this new electron beam tube is being searched. The drive force of this technology to spread in the industries would be further development of new application, process and market as well as the price reduction of the equipment, upon which further acknowledgement and acceptance of the technology to societies and industries would entirely depend. (Y. Tanaka)

  19. Low voltage electron beam accelerators

    Ochi, Masafumi [Iwasaki Electric Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    Widely used electron accelerators in industries are the electron beams with acceleration voltage at 300 kV or less. The typical examples are shown on manufactures in Japan, equipment configuration, operation, determination of process parameters, and basic maintenance requirement of the electron beam processors. New electron beam processors with acceleration voltage around 100 kV were introduced maintaining the relatively high dose speed capability of around 10,000 kGy x mpm at production by ESI (Energy Science Inc. USA, Iwasaki Electric Group). The application field like printing and coating for packaging requires treating thickness of 30 micron or less. It does not require high voltage over 110 kV. Also recently developed is a miniature bulb type electron beam tube with energy less than 60 kV. The new application area for this new electron beam tube is being searched. The drive force of this technology to spread in the industries would be further development of new application, process and market as well as the price reduction of the equipment, upon which further acknowledgement and acceptance of the technology to societies and industries would entirely depend. (Y. Tanaka)

  20. Induced radioactivity of the IHEP proton synchrotron beam extraction equipment

    The measurement results of induced radioactivity of the beam extraction equipment during 1972-1978 are presented. All the values are given to the moment of the accelerator stop. The experimental data permits to predict further possible variations of the induced radioactivity levels of the equipment. Given are the measures required for reduction of the accelerator equipment irradiation, which are the following: 1) compensation of residual distortion of a closed beam orbit in the course of the induction system operation; 2) limitation of the intensity of drop on the internal targets up to the 11 protons per target level over a cycle; 3) putting into operation the program control system for the duration of a current pulse of a linear accelerator to minimize the beam residues at the 70 GeV energy during physical experiments; 4) construction of the system of beam interception and cutting-off to ensure effective energy suppression of uncontrolled beam residues and localization of their radiation effect; 5) extraction of a high-energy beam out of the accelerator during the experiments (e.g., into the neutrino channel for apparatus adjusting) instead of its dropping on the interceptor-target; 6) beam orbit controlling in the case of multiturn injection into the accelerator

  1. Recent results of radioactive beam experiments at ATLAS.

    Rehm, K. E.

    2000-12-01

    Various beams of short- and long-lived radioactive nuclei have recently been produced at the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory, using either the so-called In-Flight or the Two-Accelerator method. With these beams many questions which are of interest in the areas of nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics can be addressed. In this contribution first results from experiments with {sup 44}Ti (T{sub 1/2}=60y) and {sup 17}F (T{sub 1/2}=64s) beams are discussed, which are of interest to the nucleosynthesis in supernovae and X-ray bursts.

  2. Recent results on reactions with radioactive beams at RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil)

    Lépine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthäler, R.; Guimarães, V.; Arazi, A.; Barioni, A.; Benjamim, E. A.; de Faria, P. N.; Descouvemont, P.; Gasques, L. R.; E; Leistenschneider; Mendes, D. R., Jr.; Morais, M. C.; Morcelle, V.; Moro, A. M.; Pampa Condori, R.; Pires, K. C. C.; Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.; Scarduelli, V.; Shorto, J. M. B.; Zamora, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    We present a quick description of RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion beams in Brazil), which is a superconducting double solenoid system, installed at the Pelletron Laboratory of the University of São Paulo and extends the capabilities of the original Pelletron Tandem Accelerator of 8MV terminal voltage (8UD) by producing secondary beams of unstable nuclei. The experimental program of the RIBRAS covers the study of elastic and inelastic scattering with the objective to study the interaction potential and the reaction mechanisms between weakly bound (RIB) and halo (6He and 8B) projectiles on light, medium and heavy mass targets. With highly purified beams, the study of resonant elastic scattering and resonant transfer reactions, using inverse kinematics and thick targets, have also been included in our recent experimental program.

  3. Beam dynamics simulation of the EURISOL radioactive beam superconducting LINAC option

    The EURISOL project is aimed at designing a preliminary setup of the next-generation European Rare Isotope Separation On-Line facility. For most of the scientific applications a post-accelerator is needed in order to accelerate the rare isotopes to a wide range of energies. The EURISOL main dictated requirements for the post accelerator are: a: acceleration of all possible radioactive beams. b: to all possible final energies up to 100 MeV/u, c: finely tunable final energy. d: very good beam-quality up to at least 10 MeV/u. e: high transmission efficiency aiming to 100%. f: mass resolution capable of isobar separation and g: affordable construction and operation cost. For the design of the post-accelerator a test case of a radioactive beam of 132Sn25+, generated by a charge breeder, was dictated. In this work we propose a design of an independently phased superconducting cavities linear accelerator for this EURISOL post-accelerator. Recent developments in the field allow high transmission efficiency after stripping due to multi-charge beam transport [2] and high acceleration gradient. Both achievements enable the design of a competitive construction and low operation cost post-accelerator. The rare isotopes are produced in a conventional ISOL target by fragmentation, spallation, or fission techniques. Upon extraction, a desired isotope, as 132Sn, is selected by a high-resolution mass separator and introduced into a charge breeder. The ions are then accelerated by the post-accelerator

  4. Fresnel diffraction patterns as accelerating beams

    Zhang, Yiqi; Zheng, Huaibin; Wu, Zhenkun; Li, Yuanyuan; Lu, Keqing; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that beams originating from Fresnel diffraction patterns are self-accelerating in free space. In addition to accelerating and self-healing, they also exhibit parabolic deceleration property, which is in stark contrast to other accelerating beams. We find that the trajectory of Fresnel paraxial accelerating beams is similar to that of nonparaxial Weber beams. Decelerating and accelerating regions are separated by a critical propagation distance, at which no acceleration is present. During deceleration, the Fresnel diffraction beams undergo self-smoothing, in which oscillations of the diffracted waves gradually focus and smooth out at the critical distance.

  5. Geometrically focused neutral beam accelerators

    A more reliable 40 kV, 65 A power supply drain at 0.4 A/cm2, neutral-beam accelerator was developed for the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX). Multiple slotted aperture grids of 60% transparency are fabricated from refractory metal wires mounted to form a spherical surface. This geometrically focuses the beam by aiming individual beamlets at the center of curvature of the spherical grid (r = 3.2 m). We attain greater reliability and faster conditioning with geometrical focusing than with the previous technique of electrostatically steering beamlets to a common point. Electrostatic steering, accomplished by offsetting grid wires, is satisfactory if the offset of a beamlet is much less than the distance from the beamlet to the grids. It was found that Pierce Angle entrance grids performed better if sharper edged. A redesigned accelerator grid support structure reduced the number of ceramic-to-metal vacuum joints, and eliminated O rings between precisely aligned parts. The suppressor grid feedthrough is required to withstand a maximum voltage of 15 kV occurring during breakdown, greatly exceeding the operating voltage of 1.5 kV. Convenient fabrication and assembly techniques have been developed. Assembly of accelerators and plasma sources in a clean room appears to reduce the conditioning time. Following the successful testing of the prototype, eight 40 kV accelerators were built for TMX. Furthermore, ten 20 kV versions were built that are modifiable to 40 kV by exchanging the entrance grid

  6. The electron test accelerator beam injector

    A beam chopper and buncher system has been designed to improve the capture efficiency and reduce the beam spill in the Electron Test Accelerator. The buncher increases the dc beam capture from 30 to 70%. 100% beam transmission through the accelerator structures is obtained with the chopper. This report describes results of experimental tests with the beam injector. Results from computer modeling and from measurements with prototypes that have led to the design of the beam chopper and buncher system are discussed

  7. Radioactive Beams and Exploding Stars at ORNL

    Beams of radioactive nuclei from the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are being used to make direct and indirect measurements of reactions important in novae, X-ray bursts, supernovae, and our Sun. Experimental results are used in nuclear data evaluations and element synthesis calculations to determine their astrophysical impact. Recent accomplishments include: the first neutron transfer reaction [(d, p)] measurements on nuclei in the r-process path in supernovae; precision measurements with radioactive 18F beams for novae; and a direct 7Be(p,γ)8B measurement relevant for the solar neutrino flux determination

  8. Multi-beam linear accelerator EVT

    Teryaev, Vladimir E.; Kazakov, Sergey Yu.; Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2016-09-01

    A novel electron multi-beam accelerator is presented. The accelerator, short-named EVT (Electron Voltage Transformer) belongs to the class of two-beam accelerators. It combines an RF generator and essentially an accelerator within the same vacuum envelope. Drive beam-lets and an accelerated beam are modulated in RF modulators and then bunches pass into an accelerating structure, comprising uncoupled with each other and inductive tuned cavities, where the energy transfer from the drive beams to the accelerated beam occurs. A phasing of bunches is solved by choice correspond distances between gaps of the adjacent cavities. Preliminary results of numerical simulations and the initial specification of EVT operating in S-band, with a 60 kV gun and generating a 2.7 A, 1.1 MV beam at its output is presented. A relatively high efficiency of 67% and high design average power suggest that EVT can find its use in industrial applications.

  9. Present and future radioactive nuclear beam developments at Argonne

    Decrock, P.

    1996-11-01

    A scheme for building an ISOL-based radioactive nuclear beam facility at the Argonne Physics Division, is currently evaluated. The feasibility and efficiency of the different steps in the proposed production- and acceleration cycles are being tested. At the Dynamitron Facility of the ANL Physics Division, stripping yields of Kr, Xe and Ph beams in a windowless gas cell have been measured and the study of fission of {sup 238}U induced by fast neutrons from the {sup 9}Be(dn) reaction is in progress. Different aspects of the post-acceleration procedure are currently being investigated. In parallel with this work, energetic radioactive beams such as {sup 17}F, {sup 18}F and {sup 56}Ni have recently been developed at Argonne using the present ATLAS facility.

  10. Nonparaxial Mathieu and Weber accelerating beams

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Tongcang; Cannan, Drake; Yin, Xiaobo; Morandotti, Roberto; Chen, Zhigang; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally nonparaxial Mathieu and Weber accelerating beams, generalizing the concept of previously found accelerating beams. We show that such beams bend into large angles along circular, elliptical or parabolic trajectories but still retain nondiffracting and self-healing capabilities. The circular nonparaxial accelerating beams can be considered as a special case of the Mathieu accelerating beams, while an Airy beam is only a special case of the Weber beams at the paraxial limit. Not only generalized nonparaxial accelerating beams open up many possibilities of beam engineering for applications, but the fundamental concept developed here can be applied to other linear wave systems in nature, ranging from electromagnetic and elastic waves to matter waves.

  11. Study of resonant reactions with radioactive ion beams

    Galindo-Uribarri, A; Chavez, E; Gomez-Del Campo, J; Gross, C J; Huerta, A; Liang, J F; Ortiz, M E; Padilla, E; Pascual, S; Paul, S D; Shapira, D; Stracener, D W; Varner, R L

    2000-01-01

    A fast and efficient method to study (p,p) and (p,alpha) resonances with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics is described. It is based on the use of thick targets and large area double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs) to detect the recoiling light-charged particles and to determine precisely their scattering angle. The first nuclear physics experiments with the technique have been performed recently at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge with stable beams of sup 1 sup 7 O and radioactive beams of sup 1 sup 7 F. The high-quality resonance measurements obtained demonstrate the capabilities of the technique. Pure sup 1 sup 7 F beams from HRIBF were produced by fully stripping the ions and separating the interfering and more abundant sup 1 sup 7 O ions by the beam transport system. The removal of interfering isobars is one of the various common challenges to both accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and radioactive ion beam (RIB) production. Experiments done with RIBs will ben...

  12. High energy beams of radioactive nuclei and their biomedical applications

    The availability of high-energy beams of radioactive species is the most recent advancement in the field of accelerator physics. One of the primary interactions experienced by relativistic heavy ions is the peripheral nuclear collision. Thus, radioactive nuclei are produced as secondary particles from peripheral nuclear fragmentation reactions. These nuclei have trajectories and energies differing little from that of the parent particle. Various radioactive beams produced as a result of these reactions, now available on a regular basis from the Bevalac, are: 11C, 13N, 15O, and 19Ne with sufficient intensity. Besides the interest in such beams for nuclear physics, important applications in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology and in nuclear medicine are discussed

  13. The SPES Radioactive-Ion Beam Facility of INFN

    de Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.; Calabretta, L.

    2015-11-01

    A new radioactive-ion beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using a UCx direct target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam will be provided by a high-current cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions will be produced by proton-induced fission on a uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes will be re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107-109 pps. The aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high-intensity radioactive-ion beams of neutron-rich nuclei for nuclear physics research, as well as to be an interdisciplinary research center for radioisotope production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  14. 2014 Joint International Accelerator School: Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection

    JAS - Joint US-CERN-Japan-Russia Accelerator School

    2016-01-01

    Many particle accelerators operate with very high beam power and very high energy stored in particle beams as well as in magnet systems. In the future, the beam power in high intensity accelerators will further increase. The protection of the accelerator equipment from the consequences of uncontrolled release of the energy is essential. This was the motivation for organizing a first school on beam losses and accelerator protection (in general referred to as machine protection). During the school the methods and technologies to identify, mitigate, monitor and manage the technical risks associated with the operation of accelerators with high-power beams or subsystems with large stored energy were presented. At the completion of the school the participants should have been able to understand the physical phenomena that can damage machine subsystems or interrupt operations and to analyze an accelerator facility to produce a register of technical risks and the corresponding risk mitigation and management strategie...

  15. Nuclear astrophysics experiments with radioactive beams

    In Nuclear Astrophysics, experiments with radioactive beams present particular problems (e.g. low beam intensity, large background) to which specific solutions (i.e. non-standard detection setup) can be brought. Selected reactions measured in Louvain-la-Neuve are treated as practical examples. (author)

  16. Essay: Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  17. SISSI: a new tool for radioactive beams

    At GANIL, secondary beams are routinely produced from a target placed in the high energy beam line of the accelerator. In order to increase the transmission of the beam line for secondary beams, SISSI (Superconducting Intense Source for Secondary Ions), an optical set-up has been implemented. In this article, the authors explain how SISSI works, present the lenses design, the cryogenic system, the high power target system, the optical properties and the computer control system

  18. Beam dynamics in high energy particle accelerators

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Particle accelerators are essential tools for scientific research in fields as diverse as high energy physics, materials science and structural biology. They are also widely used in industry and medicine. Producing the optimum design and achieving the best performance for an accelerator depends on a detailed understanding of many (often complex and sometimes subtle) effects that determine the properties and behavior of the particle beam. Beam Dynamics in High Energy Particle Accelerators provides an introduction to the concepts underlying accelerator beam line design and analysis, taking an approach that emphasizes the elegance of the subject and leads into the development of a range of powerful techniques for understanding and modeling charged particle beams.

  19. Resonant Laser Cooling of Circular Accelerator Beams

    Tumanian, R. V.

    2004-01-01

    The resonant laser cooling of circular accelerator beams of relativistic charged particle is studied. It is shown that in the approximation of the given external electromagnetic wave amplitude (small gain free electron laser) the emittance of a beam of charged particles decreases. In the field of particle energy about 100 in the mass energy units the beam energy losses are negligible. The discovered effect can be used for cooling of charged particle beams in various accelerators. The signific...

  20. Realistic physics perspectives using radioactive beams from SPIRAL at GANIL

    The majority of the large international community in nuclear physics is looking towards the use of radioactive ion beams to broaden the horizon of our understanding of the physics of the nucleus. In theory, the use of radioactive beams will open a new era in nuclear physics by allowing access to new isotopes and by increasing the production rates of nuclei which can presently only be populated with extremely low cross-sections or not at all. However the beam intensities as well as the rather low variety of accelerated species will be constraints at least at the start up of the new facilities. A realistic physics program at SPIRAL is described as well as the necessary experimental tools. These essentially consist in two major devices built in the framework of large european collaborations: the VAMOS spectrometer and the EXOGAM γ-ray array. (author)

  1. Radioactive beam diagnostics status and development at the Spiral facility

    In 2001 the first radioactive beam will be accelerated in the CIME cyclotron of the SPIRAL project at GANIL. In order to be able to tune such low intensity beams in the cyclotron (down to few particles per second), a silicon and a scintillator detectors are mounted on probes. They measure the beam energy and the beam phase/RF in the cyclotron as a function of the radius. Such fragile diagnostics are meant to be used routinely from the control room by non-specialists in instrumentation and in presence of various beam intensities. Therefore, a program is developed to control and secure the acquisition procedure, the measurements and the isochronism correction. Additional detectors are installed at a fixed position in the ejection line before the experimental areas. Additionally, a diamond detector is foreseen to be installed in the machine to be tested in order to ease the CIME operation. (authors)

  2. Coulomb excitation of a 78Rb radioactive beam

    We have produced a secondary radioactive beam of 78Rb and Coulomb re-excited it. The beam was produced in the reaction 24Mg(58Ni,3pn)78Rb at a beam energy of 260 MeV, using the ANL ATLAS accelerator. The residues of interest were separated from other reaction products and non-interacting beam using the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA). The beam leaving the FMA was 78Kr and 78Rbgs,m1,m2, which was refocused onto a 58Ni secondary target. We have extracted a spectrum of γ-rays associated with re-excitation of A=78 isobars. The re-excitation of stable 78Kr was observed, which serves as a reference. γ-rays associated with excitation of 78Rbgs,m1,m2 were also seen. The measured yields indicate that all the 78Rb states are highly deformed. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  3. Parallel beam dynamics simulation of linear accelerators

    Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we describe parallel particle-in-cell methods for the large scale simulation of beam dynamics in linear accelerators. These techniques have been implemented in the IMPACT (Integrated Map and Particle Accelerator Tracking) code. IMPACT is being used to study the behavior of intense charged particle beams and as a tool for the design of next-generation linear accelerators. As examples, we present applications of the code to the study of emittance exchange in high intensity b...

  4. Ion Beam Energy Calibration Method for Accelerator

    Ion beam energy calibration methods, i e : nuclear reaction method, magnetic field method and calorimeter method were elaborated and studied from its advantage and disadvantage in this paper. Ion beam energy calibration method for accelerator using the method of magnetic field on 3 MV Tandem Accelerator have been carried out at Tiara, JAERI, Japan. The result showed that the energy of ion beam current is 43.56 keV. The result of study conclude that nuclear reaction method generally used to calibrate ion beam energy at the accelerator of energy larger than 2 MeV, calorimetric method for the accelerator electron including linac, magnetic field method for all particle type of accelerator. (author)

  5. Beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators

    One model for beam growth due to the beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators is that it is due to the presence of non-linear forces generated by the fields produced by the beam plus some radomizing effect like noise, or a tune modulation. According to this model, to limit beam-beam effects, one should try to limit the size of the non-linear forces and the sources of noise or tune modulation. This model can also be used to compare the severity of beam-beam effects in two situations by comparing the size of the non-linear forces. In this paper, this approach will be used to study three problems: to compare the effects of beam-beam non-linear resonances in the ISR with those in ISABELLE; to estimate the strength of a spectrometer magnet that may be placed at one of the beam crossing points, without appreciably increasing the beam-beam effects; and to compare the beam-beam interaction for colliding beam accelerators with different crossing-angles and different ν/sub x/ and ν/sub y/ at the crossing points

  6. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    On February 13, 1987, construction started on the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility - a 4-GeV, 200-μA, continuous beam, electron accelerator facility designed for nuclear physics research. The machine has a racetrack configuration with two antiparallel, 500-MeV, superconducting linac segments connected by beam lines to allow four passes of recirculation. The accelerating structure consists of 1500-MHz, five-cell niobium cavities developed at Cornell University. A liquid helium cryogenic system cools the cavities to an operating temperature of 2 K. Beam extraction after any three of the four passes allows simultaneous delivery of up to three beams of independently variable currents and different, but correlated, energies to the three experimental areas. Beam breakup thresholds exceed the design current by nearly two orders of magnitude. Project completion and the start of physics operations are scheduled for 1993. The total estimated cost is $255 million

  7. Coulomb excitation of a 78Rb radioactive beam

    In order to test the feasibility of Coulomb excitation of radioactive projectiles with low beam energies and intensities, they have produced a secondary radioactive beam of 78Rb and Coulomb re-excited it. The beam was produced in the fusion evaporation reaction 24Mg(58Ni,3pn)78Rb at a beam energy of 260 MeV, using the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS accelerator. The residues of interest were separated from other reaction products and non-interacting beam using the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA). The beam leaving the FMA was 78Kr and 78Rbgs,m1,m2, which was refocused onto a 58Ni secondary target. They have extracted a spectrum of γ-rays associated with re-excitation of A = 78 isobars. The re-excitation of stable 78Kr was observed, which serves as a reference. Gamma-rays associated with excitation of 78Rbgs,m1,m2 were also seen. The measured yields indicate that all the 78Rb states are highly deformed

  8. Acceleration of charged particles in laser beam

    M.J. Małachowski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this paper was to find parameters of the laser and maser beams in numerical ways with additionally applied external static axial magnetic field which satisfies the proper conditions for charged particle acceleration.Design/methodology/approach: The set acceleration was designed in order to obtain the possible high kinetic energy of the charged particles in the controllable manner. This was achieved applying a circularly polarized high intensity laser beam and a static axial magnetic field, both acting on the particle during the proper period.Findings: The quantitative illustrations of the calculation results, in a graphical form enabled to discuss the impact of many parameters on the acceleration process of the electrons and protons. We have found the impact of the Doppler Effect on the acceleration process to be significant. Increase in laser or maser beam intensity results in particle’s energy increase and its trajectory dimension. However, increase in external magnetic field results in shrinking of the helical trajectories. It enables to keep the particle inside the laser beam.Research limitations/implications: Limits in the energy of accelerated particles arise from the limitsin up-to-date available laser beam energy and the beam diameters.Originality/value: The authors show the parameters of the circularly polarized laser beam which should be satisfied in order to obtain the desired energy of the accelerated particles. The influence of the magnetic field strength is also shown.

  9. Charge breeding simulations for radioactive ion beam production

    The charge breeding technique is used for radioactive ion beam (RIB) production in order of optimizing the re-acceleration of the radioactive element ions produced by a primary beam in a thick target. Charge breeding is achieved by means of a device capable of increasing the ion charge state from 1+ to a desired value n+. In order to get high intensity RIB, experiments with charge breeding of very high efficiency could be required. To reach this goal, the charge breeding simulation could help to optimize the high charge state production efficiency by finding more proper parameters for the radioactive 1+ ions. In this paper a device based on an electron beam ion source (EBIS) is considered. In order to study that problem, a code already developed for studying the ion selective containment in an EBIS with RF quadrupoles, BRICTEST, has been modified to simulate the ion charge state breeding rate for different 1+ ion injection conditions. Particularly, the charge breeding simulations for an EBIS with a hollow electron beam have been studied.

  10. Negative ion beam formation, transport and acceleration

    Alessi, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    The BNL Neutral Beam Development Group is working on the development of negative ion based neutral beam systems, using high current density surface plasma sources of the magnetron and hollow cathode discharge (HCD) type. With the magnetron source, the plan is to transport a 2A D/sup -/ beam through a bending magnet before acceleration to 200 keV. In experiments with a pulsed magnetron, 0.4A of H/sup -/ was transported through a 90/sup 0/, n = 1, bending magnet with 80% transmission. With the lower operating pressure in the HCD source, close coupled acceleration will be applied. The MEQALAC, RFQ, and a dc accelerating scheme with periodic quadrupole focusing are considered for reaching higher energies. A preliminary experiment was performed with quadrupole beam transport and a 3.8 mA beam was transported through a series of twelve quadrupoles, with 3 mm apertures and a total length of 7.2 cm.

  11. Notes on beam dynamics in linear accelerators

    Gluckstern, R.L.

    1980-09-01

    A collection of notes, on various aspects of beam dynamics in linear accelerators, which were produced by the author during five years (1975 to 1980) of consultation for the LASL Accelerator Technology (AT) Division and Medium-Energy Physics (MP) Division is presented.

  12. Accreting Neutron Stars and Radioactive Beam Experiments

    The nuclear processes on accreting neutron stars in X-ray binaries are related to a number of open astrophysical questions. I review these open questions, their relation to the α p, rp and crust processes, and the nuclear data needed to solve the problems. Data on very unstable proton and neutron rich nuclei are most critical, and therefore radioactive beam experiments together with progress in the theoretical understanding of nuclei far from stability are needed. (author)

  13. Method for charged particle beam acceleration

    The method of charged particle beam acceleration based on its resonance interaction with electromagnetic field of travelling wave is suggested. The electron beam is injected into waveguide in which longitudinal magnetic field and electromagnetic wave are excited. With the purpose of reducing HF-power losses in the waveguide walls, the azimuthal particle motion is synchronized with azimuthal change of longitudinal component of electric field of the accelerating electromagnetic wave. The suggested method permits to increase the efficiency and shunting resistance of the accelerating waveguide by reducing its boundary surface

  14. The Acceleration and Storage of Radioactive Ions for a Neutrino Factory

    Autin, Bruno; Hancock, S; Haseroth, H; Jansson, A; Köster, U; Lindroos, M; Russenschuck, Stephan; Wenander, F; Grieser, M

    2003-01-01

    The term beta-beam has been coined for the production of a pure beam of electron neutrinos or their antiparticles through the decay of radioactive ions circulating in a storage ring. This concept requires radioactive ions to be accelerated to a Lorentz gamma of 150 for 6He and 60 for 18Ne. The neutrino source itself consists of a storage ring for this energy range, with long straight sections in line with the experiment(s). Such a decay ring does not exist at CERN today, nor does a high-intensity proton source for the production of the radioactive ions. Nevertheless, the existing CERN accelerator infrastructure could be used as this would still represent an important saving for a beta-beam facility. This paper outlines the first study, while some of the more speculative ideas will need further investigations.

  15. 2014 CERN Accelerator Schools: Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection

    2014-01-01

    The US-CERN-JAPAN-RUSSIA Joint International Accelerator School is organising a course on Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection to be held in Newport Beach, California, USA from 5-14 November, 2014.    This school is intended for physicists and engineers who are or may be engaged in the design, construction, and/or operation of accelerators with high power photon or particle beams and/or accelerator sub-systems with large stored energy. Application deadlines are 15 August and 4 September. Further information on this Joint School can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/JAS/Newport%20Beach%202014/NPBadvert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/287647/ http://uspas.fnal.gov/programs/JAS/JAS14.shtml

  16. Building a LLNL Capability in Radioactive Ion Beam Experiments

    Bernstein, L A; Becker, J A; Garrett, P E; Younes, W; Schiller, A

    2002-01-31

    The purpose of this LDRD was to establish a program at LLNL in radioactive ion beam (RIB) experiments that would use these experiments to address a wide range physics issues in both stellar nucleosynthesis and stockpile stewardship radiochemistry. The LDRD was funded for a total of two years (fiscal years 2000 and 2001) and transferred to the Physical Data Research Program in fiscal year 2002. Reactions on unstable nuclei and isomeric states play a central role in the formation of elements in both stars and nuclear devices. However, the abilities of reaction models to predict cross sections on radioactive nuclei are uncertain at best. This can be attributed to the lack of experimental data to guide reaction-modeling efforts. Only the 10% of all bound nuclei that can be formed with stable targets and beams have been accessed and studied. The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) and existing RIB facilities offer an unprecedented opportunity to address many of the outstanding questions in nuclear structure, reactions and astrophysics by enabling the observation of nuclear reactions with radioactive targets and/or beams. The primary goal of this LDRD is to develop three experimental capabilities for use with RIB experiments: (1) Level density and {gamma}-ray strength function measurements using statistical {gamma}-rays. (2) Charged particle-induced cross sections measurements on radioactive nuclei. (3) Neutron-induced cross section measurements on a radioactive target. RIA and RIB based experiments are the new frontier for nuclear physics. The joint DOE/NSF nuclear science advisory committee has named development of a RIA facility in the United States as the highest new construction priority. In addition to addressing the questions presented above, this LDRD has helped to establish a position for LLNL at the forefront of the international nuclear science community.

  17. Radioactive ion beam production by the ISOL method for SPIRAL

    This work is directly related to the SPIRAL project (Systeme de Production d'Ions Radioactifs Acceleres en Lignes) of which the start up will begin in September 2001 at GANIL (Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds) in Caen. This thesis primarily concerns the development of radioactive ion production systems (target/ion source) by the thorough study of each production stage of the ISOL (Isotopic Separation On Line) method: target and/or projectile fragmentation production, diffusion out of target material, effusion into the ion source and finally the ionization of the radioactive atoms. A bibliographical research and thermal simulations allowed us to optimize materials and the shape of the production and diffusion targets. A first target was optimized and made reliable for the radioactive noble gases production (argon, neon...). A second target dedicated to the radioactive helium production was entirely designed and realised (from the specifications to the 'off line' and 'on line' tests). Finally, a third target source system was defined for singly-charged radioactive alkaline production. The intensities of secondary beams planned for SPIRAL are presented here. A detailed study of the diffusion effusion efficiency for these various targets showed that the use of a fine microstructure carbon (grain size of 1 μm) improved the diffusion and showed the importance of thickness of the lamella for the short lived isotope effusion. (author)

  18. World new facilities for radioactive isotope beams

    The use of unstable nuclei in the form of energetic beams for nuclear physics studies is now entering into a new era. 'New-generation' facilities are either in operation, under construction or being planned. They are designed to provide radioactive isotope (RI) beams with very high intensities over a wide range of nuclides. These facilities are expected to provide opportunities to study nuclear structure, astrophysical nuclear processes and nuclear matter with large proton-neutron imbalance in grate detail. This article reports on the current status of such new-generation RI-beam facilities around the world. In order to cover different energy domains and to meet various scientific demands, the designs of RI-beam facilities are of a wide variety. For example, RIBF in Japan, FAIR in Germany and FRIB in US are based on the fragmentation scheme for beams with energies of a few hundred MeV/nucleon to GeV/nucleon, whereas Spiral2 in France, SPES in Italy, HIE-ISOLDE in Switzerland/France, and the future facility EURISOL in Europe are based on the ISOL method, and aim at providing lower-energy RI beams. There are a many other projects including upgrades of existing facilities in the three continents, America, Asia and Europe

  19. Beam acceleration through proton radio frequency quadrupole accelerator in BARC

    Bhagwat, P. V.; Krishnagopal, S.; Mathew, J. V.; Singh, S. K.; Jain, P.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, M.; Kumar, R.; Roychowdhury, P.; Kelwani, H.; Rama Rao, B. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Agarwal, A.; Kukreti, B. M.; Singh, P.

    2016-05-01

    A 3 MeV proton Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India, for the Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) programme. The 352 MHz RFQ is built in 4 segments and in the first phase two segments of the LEHIPA RFQ were commissioned, accelerating a 50 keV, 1 mA pulsed proton beam from the ion source, to an energy of 1.24 MeV. The successful operation of the RFQ gave confidence in the physics understanding and technology development that have been achieved, and indicate that the road forward can now be traversed rather more quickly.

  20. Problems raised by radioactive ion acceleration in the SPIRAL project. Accelerator tuning and stabilisation; Problemes poses par l`acceleration d`ions radioactifs dans le project SPIRAL. Reglage et stabilisation de l`accelerateur

    Boy, L. [Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France)

    1997-12-31

    This study is related to the SPIRAL project. This facility uses a cyclotron to accelerate radioactive ion beams produced in a thick target by the Grant Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds primary beam. The low intensity of radioactive beams and the mixing of several species imply special tuning methods and associated diagnostics. Also, a cyclotron and the beam line will be used to switch from this tuning beam to the radioactive one. We present a theoretical study and a numerical simulation of the tuning of five radioactive beams using three different methods. the beam dynamic is performed through the injection beam line and the cyclotron up to the electrostatic deflector. Within the frame of these methods we have described all the SPIRAL beam diagnostics. Construction and test of a new low intensity diagnosis based on a plastic scintillator for phase measurement inside the cyclotron is described in details. (author). 63 refs.

  1. Fundamental symmetries and astrophysics with radioactive beams

    A major new initiative at TRIUMF pertains to the use of radioactive beams for astrophysics and for fundamental symmetry experiments. Some recent work is described in which the β-decay-followed by alpha particle emission of 16N was used to find the resonance parameters dominating the alpha particle capture in 12C and thus to find the astrophysical S-factor of this reaction which is of crucial importance for alpha-particle burning and the subsequent collapse of stars. In some work underway trapped neural atoms of radioactive potassium atoms will be used to study fundamental symmetries of the weak interactions. Trapping has been achieved and soon 38mK decay will be used to search for evidence of scalar interactions and 37K decay to search for right-handed gauge-bosom interactions. Future experiments are planned to look for parity non-conservation in trapped francium atoms. This program is part of a revitalization for the TRIUMF laboratory accompanied by the construction of the radioactive beam facility (ISAC). (author)

  2. Acceleration of trapped particles and beams

    Granot, Er'el

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of a quantum particle bound by an accelerating delta-functional potential is investigated. Three cases are considered, using the reference frame moving along with the {\\delta}-function, in which the acceleration is converted into the additional linear potential. (i) A stationary regime, which corresponds to a resonance state, with a minimum degree of delocalization, supported by the accelerating potential trap. (ii) A pulling scenario: an initially bound particle follows the accelerating delta-functional trap, within a finite time. (iii) The pushing scenario: the particle, which was initially localized to the right of the repulsive delta-function, is shoved to the right by the accelerating potential. For the two latter scenarios, the life time of the trapped particle, and the largest velocity to which it can be accelerated while staying trapped, are found. The same regimes may be realized by Airy-like planar optical beams guided by a narrow bending potential channel or crest. Physical estimates a...

  3. Storage rings for radioactive ion beams

    Nolden, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dolinskii, A.; Steck, M.

    2008-10-01

    Storage rings for radioactive heavy ions can be applied for a wide range of experiments in atomic and nuclear physics. The rare isotope beams are produced in flight via fragmentation or fission of high-intensity primary ions and they circulate in the storage ring at moderately relativistic energies (typically between 0.1 GeV/u up to 1 GeV/u). Due to their production mechanism they are usually highly charged or even fully stripped. The circulating radioactive heavy ion beams can be used to measure nuclear properties such as masses and decay times, which, in turn, can depend strongly on the ionic charge state. The storage rings must have large acceptances and dynamic apertures. The subsequent application of stochastic precooling of the secondary ions which are injected with large transverse and longitudinal emittances, and electron cooling to reach very high phase space densities has turned out to be a helpful tool for experiments with short-lived ions having lifetimes down to a few seconds. Some of these experiments have already been performed at the experimental storage ring ESR at GSI. The storage ring complex of the FAIR project is intended to enhance significantly the range of experimental possibilities. It is planned to extend the scope of experimental possibilities to collisions with electron or antiproton beams.

  4. Electron beam accelerator energy control system

    A control system has been developed for the energy control of the electron beam accelerator using PLC. The accelerating voltage of 3 MV has been obtained by using parallel coupled voltage multiplier circuit. A autotransformer controlled variable 0-10 KV DC is fed to a tube based push pull oscillator to generate 120 Khz, 10 KV AC. Oscillator output voltage is stepped up to 0-300 KV/AC using a transformer. 0-300 KVAC is fed to the voltage multiplier column to generate the accelerating voltage at the dome 0-3 MV/DC. The control system has been designed to maintain the accelerator voltage same throughout the operation by adjusting the input voltage in close loop. Whenever there is any change in the output voltage either because of beam loading or arcing in the accelerator. The instantaneous accelerator voltage or energy is a direct proportional to 0-10 KVDC obtained from autotransformer. A PLC based control system with user settable energy level has been installed for 3 MeV, EB accelerator. The PLC takes the user defined energy value through a touch screen and compares it to the actual accelerating voltage (obtained using resistive divider). Depending upon the error the PLC generates the pulses to adjust the autotransformer to bring the actual voltage to the set value within the window of error (presently set to +/- 0.1%). (author)

  5. High spin studies with radioactive ion beams

    The variety of new research possibilities afforded by the culmination of the two frontier areas of nuclear structure: high spin and studies far from nuclear stability (utilizing intense radioactive ion beams) are discussed. Topics presented include: new regions of exotic nuclear shape (e.g. superdeformation, hyperdeformation, and reflection-asymmetric shapes); the population of and consequences of populating exotic nuclear configurations; and complete spectroscopy (i.e. the overlap of state of the art low-and high-spin studies in the same nucleus)

  6. A review of radioactive beam facilities in the world

    Ion beams of radioactive isotopes have been used for over 25 years in studies of the properties of unstable nuclei. Within the past 8 years technological advances have provided the opportunity to produce radioactive beams (RB) with energies and intensities sufficient to perform reactions of interest to nuclear astrophysics, to nuclear structure studies at the extremes, to possibly new paths to heavy element synthesis, to tests of the Standard Model of Electroweak Interactions among the many unique scientific opportunities. Facilities now exist around the world which produce both high energy RB using the PFM (Projectile Fragmentation Method) and low energy RB using the ISOL approach coupled to a post-accelerator. Further, these facilities have also led to renewed interest in the associated technologies including ion source and accelerator developments. In this talk a comparative review and status of RB facilities (proposed, funded and operating) around the world of both production methods will be given with particular emphasis on those utilizing the ISOL approach

  7. Biomedical applications of radioactive nuclear beams

    Charged particles, such as protons and heavy ions, are increasingly used in cancer radiotherapy. With respect to the conventional treatment using photons or electrons, they offer the advantage of a better concentration of the dose deposition at a depth corresponding to the tumor location. Moreover, biological advantages of these highly ionizing particles have also been observed for the treatment of radioresistant tumors. Such treatments require high precision in the localization of the dose deposition which must coincide exactly with the tumor volume. The used of radioactive beams of β+ emitters, at several hundreds of MeV/u, combined with positron emission tomography provide radiotherapeutists with a unique tool which may be used either for diagnostic purposes, prior to the actual treatment (performed with a stable beam of higher intensity), or for on line controlled treatment if the necessary intensities (≅ 108 pps) become accessible in the future

  8. Experiments with a radioactive sup 5 sup 6 Ni beam

    Rehm, K E; Jiang, C L; Ackermann, D; Ahmad, I; Brumwell, F; Davids, C N; Decrock, P; Fischer, S M; Görres, J; Greene, J P; Hackmann, G; Harss, B; Henderson, D; Henning, W F; Janssens, R V F; McMichael, G E; Nanal, V; Nisius, D; Nolen, Jerry A; Pardo, R C; Paul, M; Reiter, P; Schiffer, J P; Seweryniak, D; Segel, R E; Wiedenhöver, I; Wiescher, M; Wuosmaa, A H

    2000-01-01

    A technique for producing a high-quality radioactive sup 5 sup 6 Ni (T sub 1 sub / sub 2 =6.1 d) beam via the two-accelerator method has been developed. Beam intensities of 2x10 sup 7 sup 5 sup 6 Ni/s were extracted from the ion source and 2x10 sup 4 sup 5 sup 6 Ni/s were delivered to the target. For a study of neutron transfer reactions in inverse kinematics, a high-efficiency detection system was built consisting of a large solid angle (2.8 sr), high-granularity Si detector array for measuring the outgoing protons in coincidence with the heavy reaction products identified with respect to mass A and nuclear charge Z in the focal plane of a recoil mass separator.

  9. RP process studies with radioactive beams at ATLAS

    Rehm, K.E. [Argonne National Lab., Physics Div., Argonne, IL (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Reactions of interest to nuclear astrophysics have been studied with radioactive beams at the ATLAS accelerator. Using a modified ISOL technique, beams of {sup 18}F(T{sub 1/2}=110 min) and {sup 56}Ni(T{sub 1/2}=6.1 d) have been produced. The reactions {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O, {sup 18}F(p,{gamma}){sup 19}Ne, and {sup 56}Ni(d,p){sup 57}Ni have been investigated. The results indicate that the {sup 18}F(p,{gamma}) route is a small contributor to the breakout from the hot CNO cycle into the rp process, while the {sup 56}Ni(p,{gamma}){sup 57}Cu rate is about ten times larger than previously assumed. (orig.)

  10. P.I.A.F.E. project: production of highly charged particles for radioactive ion beams

    The transformation of a mono-charged ion beam into a multicharged ion beam is an important problem in the projects of radioactive beams acceleration. This transformation must be performed with the best possible efficiency and in the shortest possible time to avoid the loss of particles by radioactive degenerescence. A ionization method using an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source is proposed. It consists in the fast capture by the ECR plasma of the radioactive elements injected inside this source in the form of a mono-charged ion beam. This method gives good results (2 to 6% efficiency to move from the 1+ to the 9+ charge state) for the ionization of alkaline elements, rare and metallic gases, with fast times of response allowing the ionization of radioactive products with a lifetime inferior to 1 s. (J.S.)

  11. Beam profile for Malaysian electron accelerator

    This paper comprises of two calculations that require in designing a dose profile for an electron accelerator machine before its fabrication. The first is to calculate the beam deflection due to changes of high voltage (HV) supply as well as the deflection coil currents so that the electron beam will only scan at the window foil of 18 cm length and 6 cm width. Secondly, we also require to calculate the beam profile at 50 mm underneath the window foil. The electron gun that produces a beam of 10 mm diameter has to be oscillated in a sawtooth wave for the prescribed window size at frequencies of 50 Hz and 400 Hz along the length and width directions respectively. For the beam deflection, we apply a basic formula from Lorentz force law to obtain a set of HV supply and the coil current that is suitable for both deflections and this result can assist in designing the coil current against HV changes via an electronic controller. The dose profile was calculated using the RMS current formulation along the length direction. We found that the measured and the calculated RMS currents are in comparable for the case of 1 MeV, 50 mA accelerator facility that is going to be installed at Nuclear Malaysia complex. A similar measurement will be carried out for our locally designed accelerator of 150 KeV, 10 mA after fabrication and installation of the machine are completed. (Author)

  12. New Beam Line Design of TRIAC as a Stable Heavy-Ion Accelerator at KAERI

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Chang, Dae Sik; Oh, Byung Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Kyun [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Chang Seog; Yun, Chong Cheoul [Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Sun Chan [dHigh Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba-shi (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) TRIAC (Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex) was a radioactive isotope accelerator which can provide beams of uranium fission fragments with the maximum energy of 1.1 MeV/nucleon produced by protons of 30 MeV and 1 {mu}A (30 W in beam power, actually deposited in the production target) from the JAEA Tandem Accelerator. Because of the critical limitations in the reaccelerated energy and intensity of available RIBs (Radioactive ion beams), TRIAC considered an upgrade program seriously, but it was canceled. Finally the complex had been closed at the end of 2010, and it was transferred to KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) after being disassembled to promote a new availability in Korea. KAERI team has a plan to reassemble this device as a stable ion beam accelerator with a minimized change for the low energy beam line including the ion source and the target system. The new stable ion accelerator will be used not only for the basic research but also for the application of heavy ion beams. Before the reassembling of TRIAC at KAERI, new layout of the beam line should be designed, and checked by beam optics simulation. The operation conditions and beam optics characteristics of the new beam line components can be understood with this simulation. The works that should be done before reassembling as a new machine have been done in this study. The beam optics calculations were preferentially carried out with arbitrary order beam physics code COSY INFINITY (COSY) or beam envelope code TRANSPORT

  13. New Beam Line Design of TRIAC as a Stable Heavy-Ion Accelerator at KAERI

    KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) TRIAC (Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex) was a radioactive isotope accelerator which can provide beams of uranium fission fragments with the maximum energy of 1.1 MeV/nucleon produced by protons of 30 MeV and 1 μA (30 W in beam power, actually deposited in the production target) from the JAEA Tandem Accelerator. Because of the critical limitations in the reaccelerated energy and intensity of available RIBs (Radioactive ion beams), TRIAC considered an upgrade program seriously, but it was canceled. Finally the complex had been closed at the end of 2010, and it was transferred to KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) after being disassembled to promote a new availability in Korea. KAERI team has a plan to reassemble this device as a stable ion beam accelerator with a minimized change for the low energy beam line including the ion source and the target system. The new stable ion accelerator will be used not only for the basic research but also for the application of heavy ion beams. Before the reassembling of TRIAC at KAERI, new layout of the beam line should be designed, and checked by beam optics simulation. The operation conditions and beam optics characteristics of the new beam line components can be understood with this simulation. The works that should be done before reassembling as a new machine have been done in this study. The beam optics calculations were preferentially carried out with arbitrary order beam physics code COSY INFINITY (COSY) or beam envelope code TRANSPORT

  14. Studies of nuclei using radioactive beams

    The 12 month period from May 1988 to July 1989 represents the first full year of our 18 month pilot program in nuclear structure research. In this period, research was initiated to develop a capability for radioactive secondary beams at Argonne National Laboratory using the Atlas and the new Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA), which is currently under construction. Two major new detector facilities are currently in the final stages of design and testing. The Large-Area, Scintillator Telescope (LAST) detector is fully operational and will be shipped to Argonne National Laboratory in August for fit-tests and in-beam calibrations. The first segments of a new sixteen-segment neutron multiplicity detector have been built and tested. The remaining segments are currently being constructed. Research was continued in the areas of (1) Coulomb excitation studies of rare earth and actinide nuclei; (2) In-beam, gamma-ray spectroscopy of nuclei in the mass 100 region, and (3) Advanced detector design. Several journal articles and abstracts were published or submitted for publication in the reporting period, and others are currently in preparation. Three graduate students participated in the program, one from the University of Florida and two from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden

  15. Accelerator complex for unstable beams at INS

    The construction of the prototype facility of the Exotic arena in the Japan Hadron Project (JHP) is started in 1992 at the Institute for Nuclear Study (INS), University of Tokyo. The purpose of this facility is to study the various technical problems of the Exotic arena, and to perform the experiment on nuclear and astrophysics with unstable nuclear beam. The unstable nuclei produced by bombarding a thick target with 40 MeV proton beam from the existing SF cyclotron are ionized in the ion sources, mass-analyzed by an ISOL, and transported to the accelerator complex. The accelerator complex consists of a split coaxial RFQ and an interdigital H type linac. The construction of accelerator will be completed in fiscal year 1994. The development of the SCRFQ and the IH linac which is suitable to the post-accelerator of the SCRFQ are reported. Charge stripper and the beam matching between the SCRFQ and the IH linac are explained. A buncher is necessary for the matching of longitudinal phase space between the SCRFQ and the IH linac. (K.I.)

  16. Blood irradiation with accelerator produced electron beams

    Blood and blood products are irradiated with gamma rays to reduce the risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD). A simple technique using electron beams produced by a medical linear accelerator has been studied to evaluate irradiation of blood and blood products. Variations in applied doses for a single field 20 MeV electron beam are measured in a phantom study. Doses have been verified with ionization chambers and commercial diode detectors. Results show that the blood product volume can be given a relatively homogeneous dose to within 6% using 20 MeV electrons without the need to rotate the blood bags or the beam entry point. The irradiation process takes approximately 6.5 minutes for 30 Gy applied dose to complete as opposed to 12 minutes for a dual field x-ray field irradiation at our centre. Electron beams can be used to satisfactorily irradiate blood and blood products in a minimal amount of time. (author)

  17. Trends for Electron Beam Accelerator Applications in Industry

    Machi, Sueo

    2011-02-01

    Electron beam (EB) accelerators are major pieces of industrial equipment used for many commercial radiation processing applications. The industrial use of EB accelerators has a history of more than 50 years and is still growing in terms of both its economic scale and new applications. Major applications involve the modification of polymeric materials to create value-added products, such as heat-resistant wires, heat-shrinkable sheets, automobile tires, foamed plastics, battery separators and hydrogel wound dressing. The surface curing of coatings and printing inks is a growing application for low energy electron accelerators, resulting in an environmentally friendly and an energy-saving process. Recently there has been the acceptance of the use of EB accelerators in lieu of the radioactive isotope cobalt-60 as a source for sterilizing disposable medical products. Environmental protection by the use of EB accelerators is a new and important field of application. A commercial plant for the cleaning flue gases from a coal-burning power plant is in operation in Poland, employing high power EB accelerators. In Korea, a commercial plant uses EB to clean waste water from a dye factory.

  18. Isobar separator for radioactive nuclear beams project

    Davids, C.N.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    In order to produce pure beams of radioactive products emanating from the production target/ion source system, both mass and isobar separation is required. A preliminary mass separation with a resolution {triangle}M/M of approximately 10{sup -3} will select the proper mass beam. An isobar separator is needed because the masses of adjacent isobars are usually quite close, especially for beams near stability. In general, a mass resolution of 5 x 10{sup -5} is needed for isobar separation in the A < 120 region, while a resolution of 3 x 10{sup -5} or better is needed for heavier masses. Magnets are used to obtain mass separation. However, in addition to having mass dispersion properties, magnets also have an equal energy dispersion. This means that an energy variation in the beam cannot be distinguished from a mass difference. This is important because ions emerge from the ion source having a small ({approximately} 10{sup -5} - 10{sup -4}) energy spread. In order to make the system respond only to mass differences, it must be made energy dispersion. This is normally accomplished by using a combination of electric and magnetic fields. The most convenient way of doing this is to use an electric deflection following the magnet separator. A preliminary isobar separator which achieves a mass resolution of 2.7 x 10{sup -5} is shown in Figure I-38. It uses two large 60{degrees} bending magnets to obtain a mass dispersion of 140 mm/%, and four electric dipoles with bending angles of 39{degrees} to cancel the energy dispersion. Sextupole and octupole correction elements are used to reduce the geometrical aberrations.

  19. Radioactive ion beam line of CSR

    A new radioactive ion beam line designed to work at higher energy equivalent up to a magnetic rigidity of 10.64 Tm is going to be constructed at Lanzhou. It is to connect the main ring and the experiment ring of the HIRFL-CSR complex. The separator is mirror-symmetrically configured both in geometry and magnet strength, achieving a point-point and parallel-parallel image at its intermediate focal plane with maximum spatial dispersion. Achromatism is automatically realized at the final focal plane. The total length is about 26 meters. Its resolution power of magnetic rigidity is 1200 at +- 1% momentum deviation and +- 25 mrad divergence simultaneously. With sextupole- and octupole- magnets carefully positioned and powered, second and third-order aberrations are corrected to a large extent. The magnet design has already fulfilled

  20. New ISOL-based radioactive nuclear beam facility at INS

    An ISOL-based radioactive nuclear beam facility is just about to come into operation at INS. The present status of the INS radioactive nuclear beam project is reported. The capability of the facility and possible experiments are also discussed, including research programs of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics. (orig.)

  1. CTF3 Drive Beam Accelerating Structures

    Jensen, E

    2002-01-01

    The 3 GHz drive beam accelerator of the CLIC Test Facility CTF3, currently under construction at CERN, will be equipped with 16 novel SICA (Slotted Iris – Constant Aperture) accelerating structures. The slotted irises couple out the potentially disruptive induced transverse HOM energy to integrated silicon carbide loads (dipole mode Q's below 20). The use of nose cones for detuning allows a constant inner aperture (34 mm). The structures will be 1.2 m long and consist of 34 cells. A first 6 cell prototype structure has been tested successfully up to power levels of 100 MW (nominal: 30 MW), corresponding to surface electric field levels of 180 MV/m.

  2. Tesla-transformer-type electron beam accelerator

    An electron-beam Tesla-transformer accelerator is described. It consists of the primary storage energy system. Tesla transformer, oil Blumlein pulse form line, and the vacuum diode. The experiments of initial stage showed that diode voltage rises up to about 500 kV with an input of 20 kV and the maximum electron-beam current is about 9 kA, the pulse width is about 50 ns. This device can operate stably and be set up easily

  3. Laser driven proton acceleration and beam shaping

    Sinigardi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    In the race to obtain protons with higher energies, using more compact systems at the same time, laser-driven plasma accelerators are becoming an interesting possibility. But for now, only beams with extremely broad energy spectra and high divergence have been produced. The driving line of this PhD thesis was the study and design of a compact system to extract a high quality beam out of the initial bunch of protons produced by the interaction of a laser pulse with a thin solid target, usi...

  4. Charged particle acceleration by electron beam in corrugated plasma waveguide

    A two-beam charged particle acceleration scheme in a plasma waveguide with corrugated conducting walls is considered. The guiding heavy-current relativistic electron beam is in synchronism with the first plasma wave space harmonics and the accelerated beam is synchronism with a quicker plasma wave. In this case under weak corrugation of the wall the accelerating resonance field effecting the accelerated particles notably increases the field braking the guiding beam. The process of plasma wave excitation with regard to the guiding beam space charge and the relativistic particle acceleration dynamics are investigated by numeric methods. Optimal acceleration modes are found. 19 refs.; 12 figs

  5. Radioactive nuclear beams and the North American IsoSpin Laboratory (ISL) initiative

    Radioactive nuclear beams (RNBs) offer exciting new research opportunities in fields as diverse as nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, astrophysics atomic, materials, and applied science. Their realization in new accelerator complexes also offers important technical challenges. Some of the nuclear physics possibilities afforded by RNBs, with emphasis on low spin nuclear structure, are discussed, accompanied by an outline of the ISL initiative and its status

  6. Radioactive beam experiments using the Fragment Mass Analyzer

    Davids, C.N.

    1994-04-01

    The Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) is a recoil mass spectrometer that has many potential applications in experiments with radioactive beams. The FMA can be used for spectroscopic studies of nuclei produced in reactions with radioactive beams. The FMA is also an ideal tool for studying radiative capture reactions of astrophysical interest, using inverse kinematics. The FMA has both mass and energy dispersion, which can be used to efficiently separate the reaction recoils from the primary beam. When used with radioactive beams, the FMA allows the recoils from radiative capture reactions to be detected in a low-background environment.

  7. Jacobi equations and particle accelerator beam dynamics

    Torrome, Ricardo Gallego

    2012-01-01

    A geometric formulation of the linear beam dynamics in accelerator physics is presented. In particular, it is proved that the linear transverse and longitudinal dynamics can be interpret geometrically as an approximation to the Jacobi equation of an affine averaged Lorentz connection. We introduce a specific notion reference trajectory as integral curves of the main velocity vector field. A perturbation caused by the statistical nature of the bunch of particles is considered.

  8. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized

  9. The beam business: Accelerators in industry

    Most physicists know that particle accelerators are widely used for treating cancer. But few are acquainted with the depth and breadth of their use in a myriad of applications outside of pure science and medicine. Society benefits from the use of particle beams in the areas of communications, transportation, the environment, security, health, and safety - in terms both of the global economy and quality of life. On the manufacturing level, the use of industrial accelerators has resulted in the faster and cheaper production of better parts for medical devices, automobiles, aircraft, and virtually all modern electronics. Consumers also benefit from the use of accelerators to explore for oil, gas, and minerals; sterilize food, wastewater, and medical supplies; and aid in the development of drugs and biomaterials.

  10. Gamma spectroscopy: from steady beams to radioactive beams

    The author gives an overview of his research works in the field of gamma spectroscopy. First, he recalls some results of experiments performed for the study of peculiar structures associated with different modes of nucleus rotation, and notably in the case of collective rotation of deformed and even super-deformed nuclei. Then, he details tools and methods used to experimentally determine the level scheme. The main characteristics of steady and radioactive beams are briefly presented, and their complementarities and differences are highlighted. Specific spectrometers and sensors are described. In a last chapter, the author discusses several research projects he is involved in, and more particularly the 'gamma tracking' which is the fundamental principle for gamma multi-sensors of the next generations

  11. The positioning device of beam probes for accelerator LUE-200

    The description of a device for the positioning of sliding beam probes which is the part of the beam diagnostic system for the LUE-200 electron linac of IREN installation is presented. The device provides remote control of input-output operation of beam probes of five diagnostic stations established in an accelerating tract and in the beam transportation channel of the accelerator

  12. Two-beam detuned-cavity electron accelerator structure

    Progress has been made in the theory, development, cavity design and optimization, beam dynamics study, beam transport design, and hardware construction for studies of a detuned two-beam electron accelerator structure.

  13. Spin-polarized radioactive isotope beam produced by tilted-foil technique

    Hirayama, Yoshikazu, E-mail: yoshikazu.hirayama@kek.jp [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Mihara, Mototsugu [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Watanabe, Yutaka; Jeong, Sun-Chan; Miyatake, Hiroari [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Momota, Sadao [Kochi University of Technology, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Hashimoto, Takashi; Imai, Nobuaki [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Matsuta, Kensaku [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ishiyama, Hironobu [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Ichikawa, Shin-ichi; Ishii, Tetsuro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Izumikawa, Takuji [Radioisotope Center, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8510 (Japan); Katayama, Ichiro; Kawakami, Hirokane [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kawamura, Hirokazu [Department of Physics, Rikkyo University, Tokyo 171-8501 (Japan); Nishinaka, Ichiro; Nishio, Katsuhisa; Makii, Hiroyuki; Mitsuoka, Shin-ichi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Detail study for tilted foil technique. • New equation for estimating nuclear polarization dependence on the beam energy. • Production of nuclear polarization for heaviest nucleus {sup 123}In in ground state. -- Abstract: The tilted-foil method for producing spin-polarized radioactive isotope beams has been studied using the re-accelerated radioactive {sup 8}Li and {sup 123}In beams produced at Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex (TRIAC) facility. We successfully produced polarization in a {sup 8}Li beam of 7.3(5)% using thin polystyrene foils (4.2 μg/cm{sup 2}). The systematic study of the nuclear polarization as a function of the number of foils and beam energy has been performed, confirming the features of the tilted-foil technique experimentally. After the study, a spin-polarized radioactive {sup 123}In beam, which is the heaviest ever polarized in its ground state by this method, has been successfully generated by the tilted-foil method, for the nuclear spectroscopy around the doubly magic nucleus {sup 132}Sn.

  14. Accelerated ion beams for in-beam e-gamma spectroscopy

    Dionisio, JS; Vieu, C; Schuck, C; Meunier, R; Ledu, D; Lafoux, A; Lagrange, JM; Pautrat, M; Waast, B; Phillips, WR; Varley, BJ; Durell, JL; Dagnall, PG; Dorning, SJ; Jones, MA; Smith, AG; Bacelar, JCS; Rzaca-Urban, T; Folger, H; Vanhorenbeeck, J; Urban, W

    1998-01-01

    A few accelerated ion beam requirements for in-beam e-gamma spectroscopy are briefly reviewed as well as several features of the MP Tandem accelerator of IPN-Orsay and the accelerated ion-beam transport devices leading to the experimental area of in-beam e-gamma spectroscopy. In particular, the main

  15. Development of four-beam IH-RFQ linear accelerator

    A multi-beam linear accelerator (linac) that accelerates the multiple beams in an acceleration cavity has advantages for downsizing and cost reduction of the linac system. However, the configuration of electrodes of the multi-beam linac is more complicated than that of single beam type, and so it influences the resonance frequency. A minimum of cavity diameter is restricted by the volume of electrodes, which depends largely on the numbers of beams. The relation between the numbers of beam and the acceleration structure is studied with electromagnetic simulation. (author)

  16. High-resolution mass separator and 60 m beam transport line for the radioactive nuclear beam facility at INS

    A high resolution on-line isotope separator (ISOL) followed by a long beam transport line is under testing at INS, as a pilot radioactive beam facility for the E-arena of the Japanese Hadron Project. The ISOL has a unique feature in its high voltage potential configuration; it has two separation stages and both are electrically insulated from the ground. This feature is effective to eliminate impurities as well as to perform high resolution mass separation while keeping the injection beam velocity to the post accelerator constant. The design concept and present status of performance tests are reported. (author)

  17. Coherent and incoherent nonparaxial self-accelerating Weber beams

    Zhang, Yiqi; Wen, Feng; Li, Changbiao; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Yanpeng; Belić, Milivoj R

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the coherent and incoherent nonparaxial Weber beams, theoretically and numerically. We show that the superposition of coherent self-accelerating Weber beams with transverse displacement cannot display the nonparaxial accelerating Talbot effect. The reason is that their lobes do not accelerate in unison, which is a requirement for the appearance of the effect. While for the incoherent Weber beams, they naturally cannot display the accelerating Talbot effect but can display the nonparaxial accelerating properties, although the transverse coherence length is smaller than the beam width, based on the second-order coherence theory. Our research method directly applies to the nonparaxial Mathieu beams as well, and one will obtain similar conclusions as for the Weber beams, although this is not discussed in the paper. Our investigation identifies families of nonparaxial accelerating beams that do not exhibit the accelerating Talbot effect, and in addition broadens the understanding of coherence proper...

  18. Radioactive nuclear beams of COMBAS facility

    Artukh, A. G.; Klygin, S. A.; Kononenko, G. A.; Kyslukha, D. A.; Lukyanov, S. M.; Mikhailova, T. I.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Sereda, Yu. M.; Vorontsov, A. N.; Erdemchimeg, B.

    2016-01-01

    The basic ion-optical characteristics of the luminosity and the high-resolution of kinematic separator COMBAS realized for the first time on the strong focusing principle are presented. The developed facility allows to separate the high-intensity secondary radioactive beams in a wide range of mass numbers A and atomic numbers Z which are produced in heavy ion reactions in the energy range of 20 ≤ E ≤ 100 MeV/A (Fermi energy domain). Two distinct detector systems such as realized Si strip detector telescope and the promising development of the three dimension time-projection chamber are discussed. Program of the investigations of nuclear reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies of 20-100 MeV/A, measurement of the radii of unstable nuclei, study of the cluster structure of light nuclei near the nuclear drip-line and search of 26,28O resonances in exchange reactions is proposed. The upgrading of experimental facility by the integration of COMBAS separator with the Ion Catcher is discussed.

  19. Reactor - and accelerator-based filtered beams

    The neutrons produced in high flux nuclear reactors and in accelerator, induced fission and spallation reactions, represent the most intense sources of neutrons available for research. However, the neutrons from these sources are not monoenergetic, covering the broad range extending from 10-3 eV up to 107 eV or so. In order to make quantitative measurements of the effects of neutrons and their dependence on neutron energy it is desirable to have mono-energetic neutron sources. The paper describes briefly methods of obtaining mono-energetic neutrons and different methods of filtration. This is followed by more detailed discussion of neutron window filters and a summary of the filtered beam facilities using this technique. The review concludes with a discussion of the main applications of filtered beams and their present and future importance

  20. Production of and experiments with secondary radioactive beams

    Examples of recent experiments performed at the doubly achromatic spectrometer LISE are used to highlight the present-day interest in secondary radioactive beams and to point to some future experimental possibilities

  1. Physics prospects from accelerated radioactive Ions at CERN

    Butler, P A

    2004-01-01

    Through the advent of post-accelerated beams with REX-ISOLDE at CERN, probing nuclear properties using transfer reactions and Coulomb excitation of exotic nuclear species is now possible. REX ISOLDE currently provides beams of energy 2.2 MeV/u (soon be upgraded to 3.1 MeV/u) into the $\\gamma$-ray MINIBALL array, and other instrumentation, at the secondary target position. Examples of research topics currently addressed using REX are presented. Scheduled energy up-grades will increase the physics potential even further. The goal for the next five years will be to accelerate ions up to 5 MeV/A and higher energies. Increase of primary beam intensity will also be achieved in a phased approach, with a significant enhancement provided by the proposed Superconducting Proton Linac as the primary accelerator.

  2. A beam-matching concept for medical linear accelerators

    Sjöström, David; Bjelkengren, Ulf; Ottosson, Wiviann;

    2009-01-01

    not revealed by the vendor-defined acceptance criteria, whereas the other six accelerators were satisfactorily matched. The beam-matching acceptance criteria defined by the vendor are not strict enough to guarantee optimal beam-match. Deviations related to dose calculations and to beam-matched accelerators may...

  3. Beam optics of the folded tandem ion accelerator at BARC

    S Santra; P Singh

    2002-07-01

    The beam optics of the 6 MV folded tandem ion accelerator, that has recently been commissioned at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, is presented. Typical beam trajectories for proton and 12C beams under different conditions, are shown. The constraints on the design due to the use of the infrastructure of the Van de Graaff accelerator, which existed earlier, are discussed.

  4. The ADRIA project for high intensity radioactive beams production

    Bisoffi, G.; Cavenago, M.; Dainelli, A.; Facco, A.; Fortuna, G.; Lombardi, A.; Moisio, M.F.; Pisent, A.; Spolaore, P.; Tiveron, B. (Laboratori Nazionali di Legnari, Legnaro (Italy)); Ruggiero, A.G. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Tecchio, L. (Turin Univ. (Italy) Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Turin (Italy))

    1992-01-01

    A proposal of an accelerator complex (ADRIA) for the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) is described in this report. The main components of the complex are a Heavy Ion Injection system and two rings, a Booster and a Decelerator, both with a maximum rigidity of 22.25 Tm, connected by a Transfer Line where exotic proposal has two main goals consisting in the isotopes are produced and selected. The proposal has two main goals consisting in the acceleration of stable ion species up to kinetic energies of the order of few GeV/u, at a repetition rate of 10 Hz with intensities of about 10[sup 12] ions per second, for fixed target experiments in nuclear physics and for the production of fully stripped radioactive beams, using particle fragmentation method for nuclear spectroscopy experiments. Fragments are accumulated in the Decelerator, with intensities 10[sup 8] [divided by] 10[sup 9] ions/s, cooled and delivered at the production energies or decelerated down to energies of few MeV/u, in proximity of the Coulomb barrier.

  5. The ADRIA project for high intensity radioactive beams production

    Bisoffi, G.; Cavenago, M.; Dainelli, A.; Facco, A.; Fortuna, G.; Lombardi, A.; Moisio, M.F.; Pisent, A.; Spolaore, P.; Tiveron, B. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnari, Legnaro (Italy); Ruggiero, A.G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Tecchio, L. [Turin Univ. (Italy)]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Turin (Italy)

    1992-12-31

    A proposal of an accelerator complex (ADRIA) for the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) is described in this report. The main components of the complex are a Heavy Ion Injection system and two rings, a Booster and a Decelerator, both with a maximum rigidity of 22.25 Tm, connected by a Transfer Line where exotic proposal has two main goals consisting in the isotopes are produced and selected. The proposal has two main goals consisting in the acceleration of stable ion species up to kinetic energies of the order of few GeV/u, at a repetition rate of 10 Hz with intensities of about 10{sup 12} ions per second, for fixed target experiments in nuclear physics and for the production of fully stripped radioactive beams, using particle fragmentation method for nuclear spectroscopy experiments. Fragments are accumulated in the Decelerator, with intensities 10{sup 8} {divided_by} 10{sup 9} ions/s, cooled and delivered at the production energies or decelerated down to energies of few MeV/u, in proximity of the Coulomb barrier.

  6. The SPES radioactive ion beam project of LNL: status and perspectives

    de Angelis, Giacomo; Prete, G.; Andrigetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2016-01-01

    A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 8 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.7 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission on an Uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research centre for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  7. Proton external beam in the TANDAR Accelerator

    An external proton beam has been obtained in the TANDAR accelerator with radiological and biomedical purposes. The protons have excellent physical properties for their use in radiotherapy allowing a very good accuracy in the dose spatial distribution inside the tissue so in the side direction as in depth owing to the presence of Bragg curve. The advantage of the accuracy in the dose localization with proton therapy is good documented (M. Wagner, Med. Phys. 9, 749 (1982); M. Goitein and F. Chen, Med. Phys. 10, 831 (1983); M.R. Raju, Rad. Res. 145, 391 (1996)). It was obtained external proton beams with energies between 15-25 MeV, currents between 2-10 p A and a uniform transversal sections of 40 mm2 approximately. It was realized dosimetric evaluations with CR39 and Makrofol foliation. The irradiations over biological material contained experiences In vivo with laboratory animals, cellular and bacterial crops. It was fixed the optimal conditions of position and immobilization of the Wistar rats breeding for the In vivo studies. It was chosen dilutions and sowing techniques adequate for the exposition at the cellular and bacterial crops beam. (Author)

  8. MAGNEX: a large-acceptance spectrometer for radioactive nuclear beam experiments

    A large acceptance (51 msr) high-resolution magnetic spectrometer MAGNEX is under construction at INFN-LNS Catania. It is intended primarily for use with the radioactive beam facility EXCYT. The relatively low beam energies (0.5 - 8 MeV/A) and excellent beam quality from the 15 MV Tandem accelerator will provide new opportunities for direct reactions and other studies of nuclei far from stability. The structure and dynamics of nuclei in the extreme conditions of high isospin asymmetry, large deformations, and low binding energies will be accessible. A particular area to be explored with EXCYT-MAGNEX is the study of processes of astrophysical interest. (Author)

  9. Development of the heat sink structure of a beam dump for the proton accelerator

    The beam dump is the essential component for the good beam quality and the reliable performance of the proton accelerator. The beam dump for a 20 MeV and 20 mA proton accelerator was designed and manufactured in this study. The high heats deposited, and the large amount of radioactivity produced in beam dump should be reduced by the proper heat sink structure. The heat source by the proton beam of 20 MeV and 20 mA was calculated. The radioactivity assessments of the beam dump were carried out for the economic shielding design with safety. The radioactivity by the protons and secondary neutrons in designed beam dump were calculated in this sturdy. The effective engineering design for the beam dump cooling was performed, considering the mitigation methods of the deposited heats with small angle, the power densities with the stopping ranges in the materials and the heat distributions in the beam dump. The heat sink structure of the beam dump was designed to meet the accelerator characteristics by placing two plates of 30 cm by 60 cm at an angle of 12 degree. The highest temperatures of the graphite, copper, and copper faced by cooling water were designed to be 223 degree, 146 degree, and 85 degree, respectively when the velocity of cooling water was 3 m/s. The heat sink structure was manufactured by the brazing graphite tiles to a copper plate with the filler alloy of Ti-Cu-Ag. The brazing procedure was developed. The tensile stress of the graphite was less than 75% of a maximum tensile stress during the accelerator operation based on the analysis. The safety analyses for the commissioning of the accelerator operation were also performed. The specimens from the brazed parts of beam dump structure were made to identify manufacturing problems. The soundness of the heat sink structure of the beam dump was confirmed by the fatigue tests of the brazed specimens of the graphite-copper tile components with the repetitive heating and cooling. The heat sink structure developed

  10. Waste management of radioactive residual material at a research center operating a heavy ion accelerator

    Since the 70th GSI in Darmstadt succesfully operates a large heavy ion accelerator. Limited amounts of Radioactive residual material and waste is produced in addition to great and numerous research results. These residual materials have to be measured, described and declared in order to safely reuse these materials or to dispose them in a controlled way. This is a challenge for the radioactive waste management group. The application areas at the research facility are divided in groups with similar radioactive inventory: - The ion sources with depleted uranium; - The beam line an the surrounding areas with mainly activation nuclides; - The caves for the experiments with activation products as well as contaminations from target material or open sources in rare occasions; - the radiochemical laboratories where all nuclides especially transuranium targets are handled. These nuclides are partially difficult to detect. One of the problems for radioactive waste management is the determination of nuclides and their activities. Another one is the chemical composition of the waste material. Materials with different properties must be strictly separated and described. In this paper the specific problems for all 4 groups are discussed and the characteristic solutions presented. In the future with the new facility FAIR higher beam energies and intensities will require an efficient radioactive waste management for optimised waste reduction and effective handling methods. (orig.)

  11. High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions

    Martin, Ronald L.; Arnold, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

  12. Effusive-Flow of Pure Elemental Species in Tubular Transport Systems: Radioactive Ion Beam Applications

    Maximum practically achievable intensities are required for research with accelerated radioactive ion beams (RIBs). Time delays due to diffusion of radioactive species from solid or liquid target materials and their effusive-flow transport to the ion source can severely limit intensities of short-lived radioactive beams, and therefore, such delays must be minimized. An analytical formula has been developed that can be used to calculate characteristic effusive-flow times through tubular transport systems, independent of species, tube material, and operational temperature for ideal cases. Thus, the equation permits choice of materials of construction on a relative basis that minimize transport times of atoms or molecules moving through the system, independent of transport system geometry and size. In this report, we describe the formula and compare results derived by its use with those determined by use of Monte-Carlo techniques

  13. Highly localized accelerating beams using nano-scale metallic gratings

    Naserpour, Mahin; Zapata-Rodríguez, Carlos J.; Zakery, Abdolnaser; Miret, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Spatially accelerating beams are non-diffracting beams whose intensity is localized along curvilinear trajectories, also incomplete circular trajectories, before diffraction broadening governs their propagation. In this paper we report on numerical simulations showing the conversion of a high-numerical-aperture focused beam into a nonparaxial shape-preserving accelerating beam having a beam-width near the diffraction limit. Beam shaping is induced near the focal region by a diffractive optical element that consists of a non-planar subwavelength grating enabling a Bessel signature.

  14. The radioactive ion beam project at VECC, Kolkata – A status report

    Alok Chakrabarti

    2002-12-01

    A project to build an ISOL-post accelerator type of radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility has been undertaken at VECC, Kolkata. The funding for the first phase of the project was approved in August 1997. This phase will be the R&D phase and will be completed by December 2003. The present status of development of the various sub-systems of the RIB facility will be discussed.

  15. Latest developments at GANIL for stable and radioactive ion beam production

    In the frame of the SPIRAL II (Systeme de Production d'Ions Radioactifs Acceleres en Ligne Partie II) project, several developments of stable and radioactive ion production systems have been started up. In parallel, GANIL has the ambition to preserve the existing stable and radioactive beams and also to increase its range by offering new ones. In order to identify the best directions for this development, a new group called GANISOL has been formed. Its preliminary conclusions and the latest developments at GANIL are presented.

  16. Radioactive waste management and clearance of accelerator waste at CERN

    The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN, Geneva, CH) has been operating accelerators for high-energy physics for more than 50 years. The interactions of the accelerated particles (for example protons up to 450 GeV and soon up to 7 TeV) and their secondaries with matter in various nuclear processes lead to the activation of accelerator components and other material. The resulting range of radionuclides depends on the irradiation history and the composition of the material. If accelerator components come to the end of their operational lifetime they will be disposed of as waste. This waste requires radiological characterization in order to be either declared as radioactive waste or, if appropriate, to be cleared and released. Different methods for the evaluation of the radionuclide inventory of activated components are currently under investigation at CERN. Due to its international status, CERN defines and applies its own set of regulations for operational radiation protection, which are comparable, but not necessarily identical, to those of the two CERN Host States: France and Switzerland. In the context of radioactive waste management in general - and of clearance in particular - however, CERN has to take account of host regulations. The differences between the French and Swiss regulations have a practical impact on the procedures to be applied at CERN. This paper provides a description of operational radioactive waste management at CERN, with focus on the methods for the radiological characterisation of the waste. Examples of the application of 'clearance' and a comparison between the Swiss and the French regulations in this field are provided. (author)

  17. Beam-driven, Plasma-based Particle Accelerators

    Muggli, P

    2016-01-01

    We briefly give some of the characteristics of the beam-driven, plasma-based particle accelerator known as the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA). We also mention some of the major results that have been obtained since the birth of the concept. We focus on high-energy particle beams where possible.

  18. Moessbauer Effect applications using intense radioactive ion beams

    The Moessbauer Effect is reviewed as a promising tool for a number of new solid state studies when used in combination with radioactive beam/implantation facilities. The usual Moessbauer Effect involves long-lived radioactive parents (days to years) that populate low-lying nuclear excited states that subsequently decay to the ground state. Resonant emission/absorption of recoil-free gamma rays from these states provide information on a number of properties of the host materials. Radioactive ion beams (RIB) produced on-line allow new Moessbauer nuclei to be studied where there is no suitable parent. The technique allows useful sources to be made having extremely low local concentrations. The ability to separate the beams in both Z and A should provide high specific activity ''conventional'' sources, a feature important in some applications such as Moessbauer studies in diamond anvil high pressure cells. Exotic chemistry is proposed using RIB and certain Krypton and Xenon Moessbauer isotopes

  19. Beam transport system selection on the accelerator LU-10

    Presently at the NSC KIPT the upgrading of the linear accelerator LU-10, designed for radiation processing of materials and products within the range of about 10 MeV, is started. For the accelerator operation time be used more efficiently it is supposed to design the second beam output onto the target. Possible variants of the second channel have been considered. The beam characteristics and beam losses are calculated with taking into account the desired parameters of the beam at the accelerating section output. Analysis of some channel variants by various criteria has been performed. The most effective version is chosen

  20. Measurement of accelerated electron beam current at the Erevan synchrotron

    A system which ensures high accuracy of accelerated electro n beam current measurement at the synchrotron is described. The expected limits for the frequency characteristic of the measured magnitude, i.e. current of accelerated electron beam, are analyzed. A structure of measurement devices ensuring a necessary frecuency range for measured signals is chosen. A magnetoinduction feedback converter operating in aperiodic mode is taken as a primary beam current monitor. The parameters of the converter with a coincidence amplifier were calculated with a computer. Oscillograms of accelerated electron beam current corresponding to different operational modes of the synchrotron are presented

  1. Accelerating Airy beams in the presence of inhomogeneities

    Besieris, Ioannis M.; Shaarawi, Amr M.; Zamboni-Rached, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Studies have already been made of accelerating Airy beams in the presence of deterministic inhomogeneities, illustrating, in particular, that the inherent self-healing properties of such beams are preserved. The cases of a range-dependent linear transverse potential and a converging GRIN structure (harmonic oscillator) have been examined thoroughly. Examples will be given in this article of novel accelerating Airy beams in the presence of five other types of potential functions. Three of the resulting exact analytical solutions have a common salient characteristic property: they are constructed using the free-space accelerating Airy beam solution as a seed.

  2. Characteristics of an electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator

    An electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator has been designed, built, assembled, and tested as a proof-of-principle (POP) apparatus. The main goal of accelerators based on this concept is to use intense electron-beam heating and ablation of a hydrogen propellant stick to accelerate deuterium and/or tritium pellets to ultrahigh speeds (10 to 20 km/s) for plasma fueling of next-generation fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER). The POP apparatus is described and initial results of pellet acceleration experiments are presented. Conceptual ultrahigh-speed pellet accelerators are discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs

  3. Characteristics of an electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator

    Tsai, C.C.; Foster, C.A.; Schechter, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    An electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator has been designed, built, assembled, and tested as a proof-of-principle (POP) apparatus. The main goal of accelerators based on this concept is to use intense electron-beam heating and ablation of a hydrogen propellant stick to accelerate deuterium and/or tritium pellets to ultrahigh speeds (10 to 20 km/s) for plasma fueling of next-generation fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER). The POP apparatus is described and initial results of pellet acceleration experiments are presented. Conceptual ultrahigh-speed pellet accelerators are discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Measurement of nuclear cross sections using radioactive beams

    One of the main applications of the production and use of nuclear radioactive beams is the measurement of nuclear cross sections. In this work is used a 6 He nuclear radioactive beam (β emitting with half life 806.7 ms) for the study of the reaction 6 + 209 Bi which could have several products. This investigation was realized in collaboration with the personnel of the Nuclear Structure laboratory at the University of Notre Dame (U.S.A.) and the National institute of Nuclear Research and CONACyT by Mexico. (Author)

  5. Beam and spin dynamics of hadron beams in intermediate-energy ring accelerators

    In this thesis beam and spin dynamics of ring accelerators are described. After a general theoretical treatment methods for the beam optimization and polarization conservation are discussed. Then experiments on spin manipulation at the COSY facility are considered. Finally the beam simulation and accelerator lay-out for the HESR with regards to the FAIR experiment are described. (HSI)

  6. Radioactive beam EXperiments at ISOLDE : Coulomb excitation and neutron transfer reactions of exotic nuclei.

    Kugler, E; Ratzinger, U; Wenander, F J C

    2002-01-01

    % IS347 \\\\ \\\\We propose to perform a pilot experiment to study very neutron rich (A<32) Na-Mg and (A<52) K-Ca isotopes in the region around the neutron shell closures of N=20 and N=28 after Coulomb excitation and neutron transfer, and to demonstrate highly efficient and cost-effective ways to bunch, charge-state breed and accelerate already existing mass-separated singly-charged radioactive ion beams. \\\\ \\\\To do this we plan to accelerate the ISOLDE beams up to 2~MeV/u by means of a novel acceleration scheme and to install an efficient $\\gamma$-ray array for low-multiplicity events around the target position.

  7. SPIRaL: A radioactive ion beam facility at GANIL

    The SPIRaL project makes use of the very high intensity ion beams soon available at GANIL (over 1013 pps at 95 MeV/u from He to Ar) to produce radioactive nuclei by the ISOL method. The facility will consist of a production target situated close to an ECRIS specially designed for this purpose, a very low energy beam line, a k=265 compact cyclotron as postaccelerator (2 to 20 MeV/u according to the Q/A factor), a medium energy beam line transferring the radioactive beams into the existing experimental rooms through the α spectrometer. The whole facility will be installed at the end of the existing machine. (author) 4 refs., 3 figs

  8. Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility Development and Status

    Tatum, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) is a national user facility dedicated to nuclear structure, reactions, and nuclear astrophysics research with radioactive ion beams (RIBs) using the isotope separator on-line (ISOL) technique. An integrated strategic plan for physics, experimental systems, and RIB production facilities have been developed and implementation of the plan is under way. Specific research objectives are defined for studying the nature of nucleonic matter, the origin of elements, solar physics, and synthesis of heavy elements. Experimental systems upgrade plans include new detector arrays and beam lines, and expansion and upgrade of existing devices. A multifaceted facility expansion plan includes a $4.75M High Power Target Laboratory (HPTL), presently under construction, to provide a facility for testing new target materials, target geometries, ion sources, and beam preparation techniques. Additional planned upgrades include a second RIB production system (IRIS2), an external axi...

  9. Use of electron beams for the production of radioactive nuclei through photo-fission

    The IPN (institute of nuclear physics) of Orsay decided to build a linear accelerator in order to produce an electron beam of 50 MeV energy and of 10 μA average intensity. It is the ALTO project (Linear Accelerator near the Tandem of Orsay). This project will be dedicated to the production of the radioactive ions using the photo-fission process. The central topic of this thesis is the study of the beam dynamics of the ALTO facility. The first part presents studies concerning the injector. The simulations made with the simulation code PARMELA allowed the optimization of the characteristics of pre-buncher (dephasing HF, accelerating field peak...) to obtain a good bunching factor at the entrance of the buncher and at the entrance of the accelerating section according to the distance separating the two systems. The second part of this thesis is related to measurements of transverse emittance of the beam at the buncher exit. The three gradients method has been selected and the optical system used is a solenoid. The results obtained are in good agreement with former measurements. Finally a calculation of the beam line was carried out to optimize the transport of the beam to the PARRNe target without degrading its characteristics. The calculation codes that have been used are BETA and TRACE-WIN. (author)

  10. Use of electrons beams for the production of radioactive nuclei by photofission

    The IPN of Orsay decided to build a linear accelerator in order to produce an electron beam of 50 MeV energy and of 10 mA average intensity. It is the ALTO project (Linear Accelerator near the Tandem of Orsay). This project will be dedicated to the production of the radioactive ions using the photo-fission process. The central topic of this thesis is the study of the beam dynamics of the ALTO facility. The first part presents studies concerning the injector. The simulations made with the simulation code PARMELA allowed the optimization of the characteristics of pre-buncher (dephasing HF, accelerating field peak...) to obtain a good bunching factor at the entrance of the buncher and at the entrance of the accelerating section according to the distance separating the two systems. The second part of this thesis is related to measurements of transverse emittance of the beam at the buncher exit. The three gradients method has been selected and the optical system used is a solenoid. The results obtained are in good agreement with former measurements. Finally a calculation of the beam line was carried out to optimize the transport of the beam to the PARRNe target without degrading its characteristics. The calculation codes that have been used are BETA and TRACE-WIN. (author)

  11. Synthesis and investigation of superheavy elements - perspectives with radioactive beams

    The perspectives for the investigation of heavy and superheavy elements with intense beams of radioactive nuclei available from the new generation of secondary beam facilities in combination with modern experimental developments are the subject of this paper. The nuclear properties of the recently discovered shell nuclei centered at Z=108 and N=164 and predictions on the location of the superheavy region with improved theoretical models will be discussed. (orig.)

  12. Relativistic radioactive heavy ion beams at the Bevalac

    The Bevalac has been demonstrated to be an efficient source of radioactive beams of good quality, and is attracting a growing body of users of this capability. Immediately on the table are an increasing demand by biomedical experimenters, leading up to eventual clinical use; and two most interesting nuclear science experiments. We are anticipating a substantial increase in interest and demand in coming years, and are planning beam line improvements to enhance transmission and purification efficiencies. 8 references, 3 figures

  13. Generation and transport of laser accelerated ion beams

    Currently the LIGHT- Project (Laser Ion Generation, Handling and Transport) is performed at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH Darmstadt. Within this project, intense proton beams are generated by laser acceleration, using the TNSA mechanism. After the laser acceleration the protons are transported through the beam pipe by a pulsed power solenoid. To study the transport a VORPAL 3D simulation is compared with CST simulation. A criterion as a function of beam parameters was worked out, to rate the importance of space charge. Furthermore, an exemplary comparison of the solenoid with a magnetic quadrupole-triplet was carried out. In the further course of the LIGHT-Project, it is planned to generate ion beams with higher kinetic energies, using ultra-thin targets. The acceleration processes that can appear are: RPA (Radiation Pressure Acceleration) and BOA (Break-Out Afterburner). Therefore the transport of an ion distribution will be studied, as it emerges from a RPA acceleration.

  14. Staging laser plasma accelerators for increased beam energy

    Panasenko, Dmitriy

    2010-01-01

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10m, ...

  15. The operational procedure of an electron beam accelerator

    Lee, Byung Cheol; Choi, Hwa Lim; Yang, Ki Ho; Han, Young Hwan; Kim, Sung Chan

    2008-12-15

    The KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy of Research Institute) high-power electron beam irradiation facility, operating at the energies between 0.3 MeV and 10 MeV, has provided irradiation services to users in industries, universities, and institute in various fields. This manual is for the operation of an electron beam which is established in KAERI, and describes elementary operation procedures of electron beam between 0.3 Mev and 10 MeV. KAERI Electron Accelerator facility(Daejeon, Korea) consists of two irradiators: one is a low-energy electron beam irradiator operated by normal conducting RF accelerator, the other is medium-energy irradiator operated by superconducting RF accelerator. We explain the check points of prior to operation, operation procedure of this facility and the essential parts of electron beam accelerator.

  16. Focusing of ion beam with limit emittance by accelerator tube of electrostatic accelerator

    Focusing of nonrelativistic ion beam with finite emittance by accelerator tube is considered. Analytical relation between positions of the entrance and exit crossovers as a function of the beam emittance and the accelerator tube parameters was obtained. The comparison of conditions providing crossover to crossover transformation and conditions of entrance crossover optical image forming was carried out. 10 refs.; 3 figs

  17. Cross-Section Measurements with the Radioactive Isotope Accelerator (RIA)

    RIA will produce beams of exotic nuclei of unprecedented luminosity. Preliminary studies of the feasibility of measuring cross-sections of interest to the science based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) program will be presented, and several experimental techniques will be discussed. Cross-section modeling attempts for the A = 95 mass region will be shown. In addition, several radioactive isotopes could be collected for target production or medical isotope purposes while the main in-beam experiments are running. The inclusion of a broad range mass analyzer (BRAMA) capability at RIA will enable more effective utilization of the facility, enabling the performance of multiple experiments at the same time. This option will be briefly discussed

  18. Cross-Section Measurements with the Radioactive Isotope Accelerator (ria)

    Stoyer, M. A.; Moody, K. J.; Wild, J. F.; Patin, J. B.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Stoyer, N. J.; Harris, L. J.

    2003-10-01

    RIA will produce beams of exotic nuclei of unprecedented luminosity. Preliminary studies of the feasibility of measuring cross-sections of interest to the science based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) program will be presented, and several experimental techniques will be discussed. Cross-section modeling attempts for the A = 95 mass region will be shown. In addition, several radioactive isotopes could be collected for target production or medical isotope purposes while the main in-beam experiments are running. The inclusion of a broad range mass analyzer (BRAMA) capability at RIA will enable more effective utilization of the facility, enabling the performance of multiple experiments at the same time. This option will be briefly discussed.

  19. Cross-Section Measurements with the Radioactive Isotope Accelerator (RIA)

    Stoyer, M A; Moody, K J; Wild, J F; Patin, J B; Shaughnessy, D A; Stoyer, N J; Harris, L J

    2002-11-19

    RIA will produce beams of exotic nuclei of unprecedented luminosity. Preliminary studies of the feasibility of measuring cross-sections of interest to the science based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) program will be presented, and several experimental techniques will be discussed. Cross-section modeling attempts for the A = 95 mass region will be shown. In addition, several radioactive isotopes could be collected for target production or medical isotope purposes while the main in-beam experiments are running. The inclusion of a broad range mass analyzer (BRAMA) capability at RIA will enable more effective utilization of the facility, enabling the performance of multiple experiments at the same time. This option will be briefly discussed.

  20. Staging laser plasma accelerators for increased beam energy

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  1. Staging laser plasma accelerators for increased beam energy

    Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shu, Anthony; Schroeder, Carl; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Matlis, Nicholas; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Plateau, Guillaume; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2008-09-29

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  2. Wien filter for cooled low-energy radioactive ion beams

    Nummela, S; Dendooven, P; Heikkinen, P; Huikari, J; Nieminen, A; Jokinen, A; Rinta-Antila, S; Rubchenya, V.; Aysto, J

    2002-01-01

    A Wien filter for cooled radioactive ion beams has been designed at Ion Guide Isotope Separator On Line technique (IGISOL). The purpose of such device is to eliminate doubly charged ions from the mass separated singly charged ions, based on q = +2-->q = +1 charge exchange process in an ion cooler, T

  3. On the capabilities of present radioactive beam facilities

    The possibilities and limitations of present, i.e. existing, radioactive beam facilities are reviewed. After a definition of the criteria used for an evaluation, the discussion is mainly oriented on the complementarity between the ISOL-method and fast recoil separators. (author) 76 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Low-energy radioactive nuclear beam project at INS

    The present status of the Institute for Nuclear Study of the University of Tokyo (INS) radioactive nuclear beam project is reported. The capability of the facility and possible experiments are also discussed, including research programs of nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, and material science. (authors). 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. Intense ion beams accelerated by relativistic laser plasmas

    Roth, Markus; Cowan, Thomas E.; Gauthier, Jean-Claude J.; Allen, Matthew; Audebert, Patrick; Blazevic, Abel; Fuchs, Julien; Geissel, Matthias; Hegelich, Manuel; Karsch, S.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, Jurgen; Pukhov, Alexander; Schlegel, Theodor

    2001-12-01

    We have studied the influence of the target properties on laser-accelerated proton and ion beams generated by the LULI multi-terawatt laser. A strong dependence of the ion emission on the surface conditions, conductivity, shape and material of the thin foil targets were observed. We have performed a full characterization of the ion beam using magnetic spectrometers, Thompson parabolas, radiochromic film and nuclear activation techniques. The strong dependence of the ion beam acceleration on the conditions on the target back surface was found in agreement with theoretical predictions based on the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. Proton kinetic energies up to 25 MeV have been observed.

  6. High-gradient two-beam electron accelerator

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-11-04

    The main goal for this project was to design, build, and evaluate a detuned-cavity, collinear, two-beam accelerator structure. Testing was to be at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory, under terms of a sub-grant from Omega-P to Yale. Facilities available at Yale for this project include a 6-MeV S-band RF gun and associated beam line for forming and transporting a ~1 A drive beam , a 300 kV beam source for use as a test beam, and a full panoply of laboratory infrastructure and test equipment. During the first year of this project, availability and functionality of the 6-MeV drive beam and 300 kV test beam were confirmed, and the beam line was restored to a layout to be used with the two-beam accelerator project. Major efforts during the first year were also focused on computational design and simulation of the accelerator structure itself, on beam dynamics, and on beam transport. Effort during the second year was focussed on building and preparing to test the structure, including extensive cold testing. Detailed results from work under this project have been published in twelve archival journal articles, listed in Section IV of the technical report.

  7. Beam dynamics studies in a tesla positron pre-accelerator

    Moiseev, V A; Flöttmann, K

    2001-01-01

    The TESLA linear collider is based on superconducting accelerating cavities.Behind the positron production target normal conducting cavities have to be used in order to cope with high particle losses and with focusing solenoid surrounding the cavities.The main purpose of this pre-accelerator is to provide maximum capture efficiency for the useful part of the totally acceptable positron beam with technically reasonable parameters of the linac.The coupled optimization of the capture optics behind the target and pre-accelerator rf-operation has been carried out.The beam dynamics simulation results as well as the pre-accelerator peculiarities are presented.

  8. Beam dynamics studies of the ISOLDE post-accelerator for the high intensity and energy upgrade

    Fraser, M A

    2012-01-01

    The High Intensity and Energy (HIE) project represents a major upgrade of the ISOLDE (On-Line Isotope Mass Separator) nuclear facility at CERN with a mandate to significantly increase the energy, intensity and quality of the radioactive nuclear beams provided to the European nuclear physics community for research at the forefront of topics such as nuclear structure physics and nuclear astrophysics. The HIE-ISOLDE project focuses on the upgrade of the existing Radioactive ion beam EXperiment (REX) post-accelerator with the addition of a 40MVsuperconducting linac comprising 32 niobium sputter-coated copper quarter-wave cavities operating at 101.28 MHz and at an accelerating gradient close to 6 MV/m. The energy of post-accelerated radioactive nuclear beams will be increased from the present ceiling of 3 MeV/u to over 10 MeV/u, with full variability in energy, and will permit, amongst others, Coulomb interaction and few-nucleon transfer reactions to be carried out on the full inventory of radionuclides available ...

  9. Beam Dynamics Studies of the ISOLDE Post-accelerator for the High Intensity and Energy Upgrade

    Fraser, Matthew Alexander; Pasini, M

    2012-01-01

    The High Intensity and Energy (HIE) project represents a major upgrade of the ISOLDE (On-Line Isotope Mass Separator) nuclear facility at CERN with a mandate to significantly increase the energy, intensity and quality of the radioactive nuclear beams provided to the European nuclear physics community for research at the forefront of topics such as nuclear structure physics and nuclear astrophysics. The HIE-ISOLDE project focuses on the upgrade of the existing Radioactive ion beam EXperiment (REX) post-accelerator with the addition of a 40MVsuperconducting linac comprising 32 niobium sputter-coated copper quarter-wave cavities operating at 101.28 MHz and at an accelerating gradient close to 6 MV/m. The energy of post-accelerated radioactive nuclear beams will be increased from the present ceiling of 3 MeV/u to over 10 MeV/u, with full variability in energy, and will permit, amongst others, Coulomb interaction and few-nucleon transfer reactions to be carried out on the full inventory of radionuclides available ...

  10. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    Jang, Hyojae; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-01

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  11. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    Jang, Hyojae, E-mail: lkcom@ibs.re.kr; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  12. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described

  13. Beam dynamics at the main LEBT of RAON accelerator

    Jin, Hyunchang

    2015-01-01

    The high-intensity rare-isotope accelerator (RAON) of the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) in Daejeon, Korea, has been designed to accelerate multiple-charge-state beams. The ion beams, which are generated by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECR-IS), will be transported through the main Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). While passing the beams through LEBT, we should keep the transverse beam size and longitudinal emittance small. Furthermore, the matching of required twiss parameter at the RFQ entrance will be performed by using electro-static quadrupoles at the main LEBT matching section which is from the multi-harmonic buncher (MHB) to the entrance of RFQ. We will briefly review the new aspects of main LEBT lattice and the beam matching at the main LEBT matching section will be presented. In addition, the effects of various errors on the beam orbit and the correction of distorted orbit will be discussed.

  14. Photo-fission for the production of radioactive beams ALTO project

    In order to probe neutron rich radioactive noble gases produced by photo-fission, a PARRNe-1 experiment (Production d'Atomes Radioactifs Riches en Neutrons) has been carried out at CERN. The incident electron beam of 50 MeV was delivered by the LIL machine: LEP Injector Linac. The experiment allowed us to compare under the same conditions two production methods of radioactive noble gases: fission induced by fast neutrons and photo-fission. The obtained results show that the use of the electrons is a promising mode to get intense neutron rich ion beams. After the success of this photo-fission experiment, a conceptual design for the installation at IPN Orsay of a 50 MeV electron accelerator close to the PARRNe-2 device has been worked out: ALTO Project. This work has started within a collaboration between IPNO, LAL (Laboratoire de l'Accelerateur Lineaire) and CERN groups

  15. Progress Toward Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    Kourbanis, I.

    2014-01-01

    After a 14 month shutdown accelerator modifications and upgrades are in place to allow us doubling of the Main Injector beam power. We will discuss the past MI high power operation and the current progress towards doubling the power.

  16. Beam manipulation and acceleration with Dielectric-Lined Waveguides

    Lemery, Francois [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The development of next-generation TeV+ electron accelerators will require either immense footprints based on conventional acceleraton techniques or the development of new higher{gradient acceleration methods. One possible alternative is beam-driven acceleration in a high-impedance medium such as a dielectric-lined-waveguide (DLW), where a highcharge bunch passes through a DLW and can excite gradients on the order of GV/m. An important characteristic of this acceleration class is the transformer ratio which characterizes the energy transfer of the scheme. This dissertation discusses alternative methods to improve the transformer ratio for beam-driven acceleration and also considers the use of DLWs for beam manipulation at low energy.

  17. Double-decker electron beam accelerator and pulse radiolysis

    A new concept of double-decker electron beam accelerator is proposed to study the ultra-fast electron-induced reactions in materials by pulse radiolysis. The double-decker electron beams are generated and accelerated in an S-band linear accelerator with different positions in vertical direction and a time delay. One of them is used as a pump electron source and another is converted to light as a probe light source. The time jitter between the pump electron beam and the probe light is thus reduced. The time resolution of pulse radiolysis is expected to be improved. The double-decker electron beam has been generated successfully by injected two laser beam into the photocathode RF gun, which is generated by splitting an Nd:YLF picosecond laser beam. The double-decker electron beams were accelerated up to 31 MeV by an S-band booster linear accelerator and compressed into femtosecond by a magnetic bunch compressor. The profiles of the double-decker electron beams were measured at the exits of the RF gun, the linac and the bunch compressor. The normalized transverse emittance was obtained to be 3.3 mm-mrad for the upper beam and 6.4 mm-mrad for the lower beam at bunch charge of 2nC. The relative energy spread was obtained to be 0.1-0.2% for both beams. The Cherenkov light generated in a suprasil plate and OTR produced on a mirror from the electron beam were also measured. (author)

  18. ISABELLE accelerator software, control system, and beam diagnostic philosophy

    The ISABELLE Project combines two large proton accelerators with two storage rings in the same facility using superconducting magnet technology. This combination leads to severe constraints on beam loss in magnets and involves complex treatment of magnetic field imperfections and correction elements. The consequent demands placed upon beam diagnostics, accelerator model programs, and the computer oriented control system are discussed in terms of an illustrative operation scenario

  19. Beam operation aspects for the MYRRHA linear accelerator

    The aim of the MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of transmutation in a 100 MWth accelerator-driven System (ADS) by building a new flexible irradiation complex in Mol (Belgium). The MYRRHA Facility requires a 600 MeV accelerator delivering a maximum proton flux of 4 mA in continuous operation with an additional requirement for exceptional reliability. This paper describes the current status of this ADS accelerator design and focuses on the specific aspects related to beam operation such as beam time structure requirements, beam power control and ramp-up strategies, beam reconfiguration schemes in fault cases and beam instrumentation needs. (authors)

  20. Beam dynamics in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    Ekdahl, Carl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Epifanio O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragon, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Rita [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cook, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dalmas, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esquibel, Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gallegos, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garnett, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harrison, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Jeffrey B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jacquez, Edward B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Cuistian, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Nicholas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nath, Subrato [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nielsen, Kurt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prichard, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rose, Chris R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Manolito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schauer, Martin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seitz, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulze, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bender, Howard A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Broste, William B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frayer, Daniel K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Douglas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tom, C Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trainham, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scarpetti, Raymond [LLNL; Genoni, Thomas [VOSS; Hughes, Thomas [VOSS; Toma, Carsten [VOSS

    2010-01-01

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiography of Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6 microseconds. It accomplishes this by slicing four micro-pulses out of a long 1.8-kA, 16.5-MeV electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The long beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for radiography. High frequency motion, such as from beam breakup instability, would blur the individual spots. Low frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed power variation, would produce spot to spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it.

  1. Beam dynamics in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiography of Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6 microseconds. It accomplishes this by slicing four micro-pulses out of a long 1.8-kA, 16.5-MeV electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The long beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for radiography. High frequency motion, such as from beam breakup instability, would blur the individual spots. Low frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed power variation, would produce spot to spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it.

  2. Measurement of induced radioactivities for the evaluation of internal exposure at high energy accelerator facilities

    At high-intense and high energy accelerator facilities, accelerator components are exposed to primary and/or secondary high energy particles during machine operation. As a result, these become radioactive and the radioactivities are accumulated with operation time. When workers engage in maintenance work such as cutting, welding, etc. in the areas with residual activities. These become a source of internal exposure through the inhalation of radioactive airbornes as well as a source of external exposure. The estimation of external doses to workers is relatively easy by directly measuring the radiation fields by pertinent radiation counters. While the internal dose depends very much on the kinds of radioactive nuclides and their concentrations in air. In a routine survey for internal dose evaluation, airborne activities are filtered and their activities on the filter are measured with a GM counter with an automatic sample changer at KEK (the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization). Ordinarily many filter samples have to be measured with a relatively short counting time, so this gross beta counting is a practical way in a routine procedure. In order to evaluate the internal dose from these countings, it is necessary to examine precisely the kinds of radioactivities and their concentrations collected on the filters by a Ge semiconductor detector, and the correlation between the gross beta counting and the actual dose has to be made clear in advance. However, kinds of radioactivities and their concentrations depend very much on production rates of individual nuclides and time variations after beam-off. First, in order to elucidate the production rates of individual nuclides and their concentrations after beam-off, metal samples of Al, Fe, Cu, Steel, etc., which are principal materials used in accelerator facilities, were irradiated at various places in the tunnel of KEK-500MeV and 12GeV proton synchrotrons. By using these irradiated samples, we examined

  3. Isotropic beam bouquets for shaped beam linear accelerator radiosurgery

    Wagner, Thomas H.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Bova, Frank J.; Friedman, William A.; Buatti, John M.; Bouchet, Lionel G.

    2001-10-01

    In stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy treatment planning, the steepest dose gradient is obtained by using beam arrangements with maximal beam separation. We propose a treatment plan optimization method that optimizes beam directions from the starting point of a set of isotropically convergent beams, as suggested by Webb. The optimization process then individually steers each beam to the best position, based on beam's-eye-view (BEV) critical structure overlaps with the target projection and the target's projected cross sectional area at each beam position. This final optimized beam arrangement maintains a large angular separation between adjacent beams while conformally avoiding critical structures. As shown by a radiosurgery plan, this optimization method improves the critical structure sparing properties of an unoptimized isotropic beam bouquet, while maintaining the same degree of dose conformity and dose gradient. This method provides a simple means of designing static beam radiosurgery plans with conformality indices that are within established guidelines for radiosurgery planning, and with dose gradients that approach those achieved in conventional radiosurgery planning.

  4. Isotropic beam bouquets for shaped beam linear accelerator radiosurgery

    In stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy treatment planning, the steepest dose gradient is obtained by using beam arrangements with maximal beam separation. We propose a treatment plan optimization method that optimizes beam directions from the starting point of a set of isotropically convergent beams, as suggested by Webb. The optimization process then individually steers each beam to the best position, based on beam's-eye-view (BEV) critical structure overlaps with the target projection and the target's projected cross sectional area at each beam position. This final optimized beam arrangement maintains a large angular separation between adjacent beams while conformally avoiding critical structures. As shown by a radiosurgery plan, this optimization method improves the critical structure sparing properties of an unoptimized isotropic beam bouquet, while maintaining the same degree of dose conformity and dose gradient. This method provides a simple means of designing static beam radiosurgery plans with conformality indices that are within established guidelines for radiosurgery planning, and with dose gradients that approach those achieved in conventional radiosurgery planning. (author)

  5. Submicro and Nano Structured Porous Materials for the Production of High-Intensity Exotic Radioactive Ion Beams

    Fernandes, Sandrina; Stora, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    ISOLDE, the CERN Isotope Separator On-line DEvice is a unique source of low energy beams of radioactive isotopes - atomic nuclei that have too many or too few neutrons to be stable. The facility is like a small ‘chemical factory’, giving the possibility of changing one element to another, by selecting the atomic mass of the required isotope beam in the mass separator, rather as the ‘alchemists’ once imagined. It produces a total of more than 1000 different isotopes from helium to radium, with half-lives down to milliseconds, by impinging a 1.4 GeV proton beam from the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) onto special targets, yielding a wide variety of atomic fragments. Different components then extract the nuclei and separate them according to mass. The post-accelerator REX (Radioactive beam EXperiment) at ISOLDE accelerates the radioactive beams up to 3 MeV/u for many experiments. A wide international user radioactive ion beam (RIB) community investigates fundamental aspects of nuclear physics, particle...

  6. Start-to-end simulation with rare isotope beam for post accelerator of the RAON accelerator

    Jin, Hyunchang

    2016-01-01

    The RAON accelerator of the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) has been developed to create and accelerate various kinds of stable heavy ion beams and rare isotope beams for a wide range of the science applications. In the RAON accelerator, the rare isotope beams generated by the Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) system will be transported through the post accelerator, namely, from the post Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system and the post Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) to the superconducting linac (SCL3). The accelerated beams will be put to use in the low energy experimental hall or accelerated again by the superconducting linac (SCL2) in order to be used in the high energy experimental hall. In this paper, we will describe the results of the start-to-end simulations with the rare isotope beams generated by the ISOL system in the post accelerator of the RAON accelerator. In addition, the error analysis and correction at the superconducting linac SCL3 will be presented.

  7. CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] design report

    This book describes the conceptual design of, and the planning for, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), which will be a high-intensity, continuous-wave electron linear accelerator (linac) for nuclear physics. Its principal scientific goal is to understand the quark structure, behavior, and clustering of individual nucleons in the nuclear medium, and simultaneously to understand the forces governing this behavior. The linac will consist of 1 GeV of accelerating structure, split into two antiparallel 0.5-GeV segments. The segments will be connected by a beam transport system to circulate the electron beams from one segment to the other for up to four complete passes of acceleration. The maximum beam energy will be 4 GeV at a design current of 200 microamperes. The accelerator complex will also include systems to extract three continuous beams from the linac and to deliver them to three experimental halls equipped with detectors and instrumentation for nuclear physics research. The accelerating structure will be kept superconducting within insulated cryostats filled with liquid helium produced at a central helium refrigerator and distributed to the cryostats via insulated transfer lines. An injector, instrumentation and controls for the accelerator, radio-frequency power systems, and several support facilities will also be provided. A cost estimate based on the Work Breakdown Structure has been completed. Assuming a five-year construction schedule starting early in FY 1987, the total estimated cost is $236 million (actual year dollars), including contingency

  8. Generation of monoenergetic ion beams with a laser accelerator

    Pfotenhauer, Sebastian M.

    2009-01-29

    A method for the generation of monoenergetic proton and ion beams from a laser-based particle accelerator is presented. This method utilizes the unique space-charge effects occurring during relativistic laser-plasma interactions on solid targets in combination with a dot-like particle source. Due to this unique interaction geometry, MeV proton beams with an intrinsically narrow energy spectrum were obtained, for the first time, from a micrometer-scale laser accelerator. Over the past three years, the acceleration scheme has been consistently improved to enhance both the maximum particle energy and the reliability of the setup. The achieved degree of reliability allowed to derive the first scaling laws specifically for monoenergetic proton beams. Furthermore, the acceleration scheme was expanded on other target materials, enabling the generation of monoenergetic carbon beams. The experimental work was strongly supported by the parallel development of a complex theoretical model, which fully accounts for the observations and is in excellent agreement with numerical simulations. The presented results have an extraordinarily broad scope way beyond the current thesis: The availability of monoenergetic ion beams from a compact laser-plasma beam source - in conjunction with the unique properties of laser-produced particle beams - addresses a number of outstanding applications in fundamental research, material science and medical physics, and will help to shape a new generation of accelerators. (orig.)

  9. Generation of monoenergetic ion beams with a laser accelerator

    A method for the generation of monoenergetic proton and ion beams from a laser-based particle accelerator is presented. This method utilizes the unique space-charge effects occurring during relativistic laser-plasma interactions on solid targets in combination with a dot-like particle source. Due to this unique interaction geometry, MeV proton beams with an intrinsically narrow energy spectrum were obtained, for the first time, from a micrometer-scale laser accelerator. Over the past three years, the acceleration scheme has been consistently improved to enhance both the maximum particle energy and the reliability of the setup. The achieved degree of reliability allowed to derive the first scaling laws specifically for monoenergetic proton beams. Furthermore, the acceleration scheme was expanded on other target materials, enabling the generation of monoenergetic carbon beams. The experimental work was strongly supported by the parallel development of a complex theoretical model, which fully accounts for the observations and is in excellent agreement with numerical simulations. The presented results have an extraordinarily broad scope way beyond the current thesis: The availability of monoenergetic ion beams from a compact laser-plasma beam source - in conjunction with the unique properties of laser-produced particle beams - addresses a number of outstanding applications in fundamental research, material science and medical physics, and will help to shape a new generation of accelerators. (orig.)

  10. An Accelerated Radioactive Decay (ARD) Model for Type Ia Supernovae

    Rust, Bert W.; Leventhal, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    In 1975, Leventhal and McCall [Nature, 255, 690-692] presented a radioactive decay model 56N i --> 56Co --> 56Fe for the post-peak luminosity decay of Type I supernovae light curves, in which the two decay rates are both accelerated by a common factor. In 1976, Rust, Leventhal and McCall [Nature, 262, 118-120] used sums of exponentials fitting to confirm the acceleration hypothesis, but their result was nevertheless rejected by the astronomical community. Here, we model Type Ia light curves with a system of ODEs (describing the nuclear decays) forced by a Ni-deposition pulse modelled by a 3-parameter Weibull pdf, with all of this occuring in the center of a pre-existing, optically thick, spherical shell which thermalizes the emitted gamma rays. Fitting this model to observed light curves routinely gives fits which account for 99.9+% of the total variance in the observed record. The accelerated decay rates are so stable, for such a long time, that they must occur in an almost unchanging environment -- not it a turbulent expanding atmosphere. The amplitude of the Ni-deposition pulse indicates that its source is the fusion of hydrogen. Carbon and oxygen could not supply the large energy/nucleon that is observed. The secondary peak in the infrared light curve can be easily modelled as a light echo from dust in the back side of the pre-existing shell, and the separation between the peaks indicates a radius of ≈15 light days for the shell. The long-term stability of the acceleration suggests that it is a kinematic effect arising because the nuclear reactions occur either on the surface of a very rapidly rotating condensed object, or in a very tight orbit around such an object, like the fusion pulse in a tokomak reactor.

  11. Unveiling orbital angular momentum and acceleration of light beams and electron beams

    Arie, Ady

    Special beams, such as the vortex beams that carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) and the Airy beam that preserves its shape while propagating along parabolic trajectory, have drawn significant attention recently both in light optics and in electron optics experiments. In order to utilize these beams, simple methods are needed that enable to easily quantify their defining properties, namely the OAM for the vortex beams and the nodal trajectory acceleration coefficient for the Airy beam. Here we demonstrate a straightforward method to determine these quantities by astigmatic Fourier transform of the beam. For electron beams in a transmission electron microscope, this transformation is easily realized using the condenser and objective stigmators, whereas for light beam this can be achieved using a cylindrical lens. In the case of Laguerre-Gauss vortex beams, it is already well known that applying the astigmatic Fourier transformation converts them to Hermite-Gauss beams. The topological charge (and hence the OAM) can be determined by simply counting the number of dark stripes of the Hermite-Gauss beam. We generated a series of electron vortex beams and managed to determine the topological charge up to a value of 10. The same concept of astigmatic transformation was then used to unveil the acceleration of an electron Airy beam. The shape of astigmatic-transformed depends only on the astigmatic measure and on the acceleration coefficient. This method was experimentally verified by generating electron Airy beams with different known acceleration parameters, enabling direct comparison to the deduced values from the astigmatic transformation measurements. The method can be extended to other types of waves. Specifically, we have recently used it to determine the acceleration of an optical Airy beams and the topological charge of so-called Airy-vortex light beam, i.e. an Airy light beam with an embedded vortex. This work was supported by DIP and the Israel Science

  12. Beam Physics of Integrable Optics Test Accelerator at Fermilab

    Nagaitsev, S.; Valishev, A.; Danilov, V. V.; Shatilov, D. N.

    2013-01-01

    Fermilab's Integrable Optics Test Accelerator is an electron storage ring designed for testing advanced accelerator physics concepts, including implementation of nonlinear integrable beam optics and experiments on optical stochastic cooling. The machine is currently under construction at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator facility. In this report we present the goals and the current status of the project, and describe the details of machine design. In particular, we concentrate on ...

  13. Nondestructive diagnostics of charged particle beams in accelerators

    Logachev, P. V.; Meshkov, O. I.; Starostenko, A. A.; Nikiforov, D. A.; Andrianov, A. V.; Maltseva, Yu. I.; Levichev, A. E.; Emanov, F. A.

    2016-03-01

    The basic techniques for nondestructive diagnostics and detection of losses of charged particle beams used in accelerator engineering are reviewed. The data provided may help choose the systems for diagnostics and detection of losses of beams and give a qualitative picture of the operation principles of such devices. Quantitative characteristics that define the limits of applicability of each diagnostic technique are outlined.

  14. Beam dynamics simulations of post low energy beam transport section in RAON heavy ion accelerator

    Jin, Hyunchang, E-mail: hcjin@ibs.re.kr; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jang, Hyojae; Hong, In-Seok [Institute for Basic Science, Yuseong-daero 1689-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    RAON (Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness) heavy ion accelerator of the rare isotope science project in Daejeon, Korea, has been designed to accelerate multiple-charge-state beams to be used for various science programs. In the RAON accelerator, the rare isotope beams which are generated by an isotope separation on-line system with a wide range of nuclei and charges will be transported through the post Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to transport many kinds of rare isotope beams stably to the RFQ, the post LEBT should be devised to satisfy the requirement of the RFQ at the end of post LEBT, simultaneously with the twiss parameters small. We will present the recent lattice design of the post LEBT in the RAON accelerator and the results of the beam dynamics simulations from it. In addition, the error analysis and correction in the post LEBT will be also described.

  15. Off-axis beam quality change in linear accelerator x-ray beams

    The effective energy of the x-ray beam from linear accelerators changes as a function of the position in the beam due to nonuniform filtration by the flattening filter. In this work, the transmittance through a water column was measured in good geometry and the beam quality characterized in units of HVL in water. Measurements were made on a variety of linear accelerators from 4 to 10 MV. The beam energy decreased with increasing distance from the central ray for all accelerators measured

  16. Probing new physics with underground accelerators and radioactive sources

    New light, weakly coupled particles can be efficiently produced at existing and future high-intensity accelerators and radioactive sources in deep underground laboratories. Once produced, these particles can scatter or decay in large neutrino detectors (e.g. Super-K and Borexino) housed in the same facilities. We discuss the production of weakly coupled scalars ϕ via nuclear de-excitation of an excited element into the ground state in two viable concrete reactions: the decay of the 0+ excited state of 16O populated via a (p,α) reaction on fluorine and from radioactive 144Ce decay where the scalar is produced in the de-excitation of 144Nd⁎, which occurs along the decay chain. Subsequent scattering on electrons, e(ϕ,γ)e, yields a mono-energetic signal that is observable in neutrino detectors. We show that this proposed experimental setup can cover new territory for masses 250 keV≤mϕ≤2me and couplings to protons and electrons, 10−11≤gegp≤10−7. This parameter space is motivated by explanations of the “proton charge radius puzzle”, thus this strategy adds a viable new physics component to the neutrino and nuclear astrophysics programs at underground facilities

  17. Probing New Physics with Underground Accelerators and Radioactive Sources

    Izaguirre, Eder; Pospelov, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    New light, weakly coupled particles can be efficiently produced at existing and future high-intensity accelerators and radioactive sources in deep underground laboratories. Once produced, these particles can scatter or decay in large neutrino detectors (e.g Super-K and Borexino) housed in the same facilities. We discuss the production of weakly coupled scalars $\\phi$ via nuclear de-excitation of an excited element into the ground state in two viable concrete reactions: the decay of the $0^+$ excited state of $^{16}$O populated via a $(p,\\alpha)$ reaction on fluorine and from radioactive $^{144}$Ce decay where the scalar is produced in the de-excitation of $^{144}$Nd$^*$, which occurs along the decay chain. Subsequent scattering on electrons, $e(\\phi,\\gamma)e$, yields a mono-energetic signal that is observable in neutrino detectors. We show that this proposed experimental set-up can cover new territory for masses $250\\, {\\rm keV}\\leq m_\\phi \\leq 2 m_e$ and couplings to protons and electrons, $10^{-11} < g_e...

  18. A compact and high efficient electron beam accelerator

    To obtain short duration time high-current electron beam for KrF laser, a compact high-efficient electron beam accelerator has been constructed based on a co-axial Marx generator. The generator can be connected directly with a vacuum diode without additional pulse forming line because of low inductance. The energy conversion efficiency from the Marx generator to the electron beam reached to 61 % at an optimum condition. (author)

  19. Electron beam accelerators for environmental applications

    In the last decade, DC Electron Accelerators in the energy range (0.7-2.5 MeV) and power (100-600 kW) have been used for treatment of flue gases and industrial and municipal wastewater. Operation of such accelerators at the industrial plant level have been found to be economically viable in these environmental applications. India's power generation is largely dependent on coal-burning and the effect of consequent emission of polluting gases on the environment cannot be ignored. Besides this, water pollution resulting from discharge of effluents from industries like paper and textile mills degrade the environment irrevocably. This paper gives a brief description of application of accelerators in pollution control and describes efforts being made in India to tackle these issues by developing high power accelerator technology. (author)

  20. Cryogenic molecular separation system for radioactive 11C ion acceleration

    A 11C molecular production/separation system (CMPS) has been developed as part of an isotope separation on line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive 11C ion beams. In the ISOL system, 11CH4 molecules will be produced by proton irradiation and separated from residual air impurities and impurities produced during the irradiation. The CMPS includes two cryogenic traps to separate specific molecules selectively from impurities by using vapor pressure differences among the molecular species. To investigate the fundamental performance of the CMPS, we performed separation experiments with non-radioactive 12CH4 gases, which can simulate the chemical characteristics of 11CH4 gases. We investigated the separation of CH4 molecules from impurities, which will be present as residual gases and are expected to be difficult to separate because the vapor pressure of air molecules is close to that of CH4. We determined the collection/separation efficiencies of the CMPS for various amounts of air impurities and found desirable operating conditions for the CMPS to be used as a molecular separation device in our ISOL system

  1. Crystal devices for beam steering in the IHEP accelerator

    Different crystal devices are described, which provide an extraction and splitting of beams for a long period of time at the U-70 accelerator of IHEP. The modes of channeling and volume reflections in the bent crystals are used for these tasks. In regular accelerator runs crystals produce the particle beams in a wide range of intensity, from 106 up to 1012 particles in a cycle. Novel crystal techniques suitable for charged particle beams deflection and focus as well as photon generation are presented also.

  2. Concept design of a radioactive ion beam thick target

    The concept design procedure of a thick target used in generating Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) is described. The harsh terms of target material and temperature condition for this purpose are discussed, and several kinds of candidate target materials are listed. Design of a carbon target matrix and its water cooling heat-sink system, and calculation of three-dimensional temperature distributions of the target system are given. The result shows that the thick target has a capacity to receive proton beam of power up to 14 kW, meanwhile its temperature can be maintained at 1300∼2000 degree C. (3 refs., 6 figs.)

  3. Production of radioactive molecular beams for CERN-ISOLDE

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)703149; Kröll, Thorsten

    SOLDE, the Isotope Separation On-Line facility, at CERN is a leading facility for the production of beams of exotic radioactive isotopes. Currently over 1000 different isotopes with half lives down to milliseconds can be extracted with beam intensities of up to 10^11 ions per second. However, due to the reactive target environment not all isotopes are extractable in sufficient amounts. In this work the extraction of short lived carbon and boron isotopes is investigated. Therefore a variety of experimental and computanional techniques have been used.

  4. Production of radioactive molecular beams for CERN-ISOLDE

    Seiffert, Christoph

    2015-06-15

    ISOLDE, the Isotope Separation On-Line facility, at CERN is a leading facility for the production of beams of exotic radioactive isotopes. Currently over 1000 different isotopes with half lives down to milliseconds can be extracted with beam intensities of up to 10{sup 11} ions per second. However, due to the reactive target environment not all isotopes are extractable in sufficient amounts. In this work the extraction of short lived carbon and boron isotopes is investigated. Therefore a variety of experimental and computational techniques have been used.

  5. Production of radioactive molecular beams for CERN-ISOLDE

    ISOLDE, the Isotope Separation On-Line facility, at CERN is a leading facility for the production of beams of exotic radioactive isotopes. Currently over 1000 different isotopes with half lives down to milliseconds can be extracted with beam intensities of up to 1011 ions per second. However, due to the reactive target environment not all isotopes are extractable in sufficient amounts. In this work the extraction of short lived carbon and boron isotopes is investigated. Therefore a variety of experimental and computational techniques have been used.

  6. Production of fast neutrons from deuteron beams in view of producing radioactive heavy ions beams

    This thesis is part of two research and development programmes for the study of neutron rich radioactive nuclear beam production. The technique is based on the ISOL method and can be summarized as follows. Fast neutrons are generated by the break-up of deuterons in a thick target. These neutrons irradiate a fissionable 238U target. The resulting fission products are extracted from the target, ionised, mass selected and post-accelerated. The aim of the thesis is to study the neutron angular and energetic distributions. After a bibliographical research to justify the choice of deuterons as the best projectile, we developed more specifically three points: - the extension of the activation detector method for neutron spectroscopy to a wide energy range (1 to 150 MeV), - the experimental measurement of neutron angular and energetic distributions produced by deuterons on thick targets. The deuteron energy ranges from 17 to 200 MeV and the thick targets were Be, C and U, - the realization of a code based on Serber's theory to predict the neutron distribution for any couple (deuteron energy-thick target). We conclude that for our application the most suitable target is C and the best deuteron energy is about 100 MeV. (author)

  7. High energy gain electron beam acceleration by 100TW laser

    A laser wakefield acceleration experiment using a 100TW laser is planed at JAERI-Kansai. High quality and short pulse electron beams are necessary to accelerate the electron beam by the laser. Electron beam - laser synchronization is also necessary. A microtron with a photocathode rf-gun was prepared as a high quality electron injector. The quantum efficiency (QE) of the photocathode of 2x10-5 was obtained. A charge of 100pC from the microtron was measured. The emittance and pulse width of the electron beam was 6π mm-mrad and 10ps, respectively. In order to produce a short pulse electron beam, and to synchronize between the electron beam and the laser pulse, an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is planned. One of problems of LWFA is the short acceleration length. In order to overcome the problem, a Z-pinch plasma waveguide will be prepared as a laser wakefield acceleration tube for 1 GeV acceleration. (author)

  8. Experimental demonstration of dielectric structure based two beam acceleration.

    Gai, W.; Conde, M. E.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Schoessow, P.; Sun, X.; Zou, P.

    2000-11-28

    We report on the experimental results of the dielectric based two beam accelerator (step-up transformer). By using a single high charge beam, we have generated and extracted a high power RF pulse from a 7.8 GHz primary dielectric structure and then subsequently transferred to a second accelerating structure with higher dielectric constant and smaller transverse dimensions. We have measured the energy change of a second (witness) beam passing through the acceleration stage. The measured gradient is >4 times the deceleration gradient. The detailed experiment of set-up and results of the measurements are dimmed. Future plans for the development of a 100 MeV demonstration accelerator based on this technique is presented.

  9. Some Key Problems Related to Radioactive Ion Beam Physics

    叶沿林; 吕林辉

    2012-01-01

    The latest progress made in the field of radioactive ion beam physics is outlined and the key problems still under investigation are indicated. The focal points are the limit of nuclear existence, shell evolution and new magic numbers, halo and cluster structures, new excitation modes, and strong coupling between reaction channels. This field is still at a starting phase and much more new outcomes are foreseen.

  10. Transformer ratio improvement for beam based plasma accelerators

    Increasing the transformer ratio of wakefield accelerating systems improves the viability of present novel accelerating schemes. The use of asymmetric bunches to improve the transformer ratio of beam based plasma systems has been proposed for some time[1, 2] but suffered from lack appropriate beam creation systems. Recently these impediments have been overcome [3, 4] and the ability now exists to create bunches with current profiles shaped to overcome the symmetric beam limit of R ≤ 2. We present here work towards experiments designed to measure the transformer ratio of such beams, including theoretical models and simulations using VORPAL (a 3D capable PIC code) [5]. Specifically we discuss projects to be carried out in the quasi-nonlinear regime [6] at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory and the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Lab.

  11. A study on beam profile at an industrial electron beam accelerator

    An industrial type electron beam accelerator located at BARC-BRIT complex, Vashi, Navi Mumbai is operational for development of applications and technology demonstration to the Indian industry in the field of polymer modifications and for processing of various other products. Recently the accelerator has been upgraded from 2 MeV to 5 MeV to process thick polymers, packaged products and for waste water treatment. This accelerator is capable of delivering powered electron beams up to 15 kW average beam power in the energy range 3 to 5 MeV. In the facility, product is irradiated either in static or conveyor mode of operation under the scanning- type beam. In the present work, we have performed beam profile measurement at different distances from the beam extraction window under conveyor and static mode of operation. We have used cellulose triacetate (CTA) strip dosimeters for the beam profile measurement. Dose profile measured along the scan direction (beam width) in conveyor mode and beam length profile in static mode of operation at different distances below accelerator beam exit window is shown. In the conveyor mode of operation, as the distance increases from the beam window the uniformity of the dose distribution improves but dose decreases linearly with distance. For a scanned beam, the beam width defines the dimension of the beam sweep. For static mode of operation, the dose from the exit window of the accelerator follows inverse relation with distance (i.e. l/r). This shows that the system is a line-type directional radiation source. Beam length is critical for processes where product is stationary under the beam and also for setting speed of the conveyor depending on pulse frequency in conveyor mode of operation. The present paper describes optimization of operational parameters to maximize the efficiency of the irradiation process based on these measurements. (author)

  12. Materials science and biophysics applications at the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    Wahl, U

    2011-01-01

    The ISOLDE isotope separator facility at CERN provides a variety of radioactive ion beams, currently more than 800 different isotopes from ~65 chemical elements. The radioisotopes are produced on-line by nuclear reactions from a 1.4 GeV proton beam with various types of targets, outdiffusion of the reaction products and, if possible, chemically selective ionisation, followed by 60 kV acceleration and mass separation. While ISOLDE is mainly used for nuclear and atomic physics studies, applications in materials science and biophysics account for a significant part (currently ~15%) of the delivered beam time, requested by 18 different experiments. The ISOLDE materials science and biophysics community currently consists of ~80 scientists from more than 40 participating institutes and 21 countries. In the field of materials science, investigations focus on the study of semiconductors and oxides, with the recent additions of nanoparticles and metals, while the biophysics studies address the toxicity of metal ions i...

  13. Extensions of MAD Version 8 to Include Beam Acceleration

    In this paper, the authors describe modifications to MAD version 8.23 to include linear accelerator cavities and beam acceleration. An additional energy variable has been added which is modified as the beam passes through LCAV elements (linear accelerator cavities) and can be used as a constraint in matching commands. The calculation of the beta functions and phase advance is consistent with that in other codes that treat acceleration such as TRANSPORT or DIMAD. These modifications allow this version of MAD to be used for the design and modeling of linacs and the authors present examples from the Next Linear Collider design as well as a muon acceleration complex. The code is available from CERN or SLAC

  14. Determination of beam intensity and position in a particle accelerator

    Kasprowicz, G

    2011-01-01

    A subject of the thesis is conception, design, implementation, tests and deployment of new position measurement system of particle bunch in the CERN PS circular accelerator. The system is based on novel algorithms of particle position determination. The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajectory and orbit measurement system of the PS is dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam position monitors...

  15. CERN accelerator school: Antiprotons for colliding beam facilities

    This is a specialized course which addresses a wide spectrum of theoretical and technological problems confronting the designer of an antiproton facility for high-energy-physics research. A broad and profound basis is provided by the lecturers' substantial experience gained over many years with CERN's unique equipment. Topics include beam optics, special lattices for antiproton accumulation and storage rings, antiproton production, stochastic cooling, acceleration and storage, r.f. noise, r.f. beam manipulations, beam-beam interaction, beam stability due to ion accumulation, and diagnostics. The SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) panti p collider, LEAR (the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN), antiprotons in the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings), the new antiproton collector (ACOL) and gas jet targets are also discussed. A table is included listing the parameters of all CERN's accelerators and storage rings. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  16. Determination of Beam Intensity and Position in a Particle Accelerator

    Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Raich, Uli

    2011-10-04

    A subject of the thesis is conception, design, implementation, tests and deployment of new position measurement system of particle bunch in the CERN PS circular accelerator. The system is based on novel algorithms of particle position determination. The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN†, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)‡. The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajectory and orbit measurement system of the PS is dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam posi...

  17. LONGITUDINAL RESISTIVE INSTABILITIES OF INTENSE COASTING BEAMS IN PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    Neil, V. Kelvin; Sessler, Andrew M.

    1964-09-29

    The effect of finite resistance in the vacuum-tank walls on the longitudinal stability of an intense beam of particles in an accelerator is investigated theoretically. We show that even if the particle frequency is an increasing function of particle energy, the wall resistance can render the beam unstable against longitudinal bunching. In the absence of frequency spread in the unperturbed beam, the instability occurs with a growth rate that is proportional to (N/{sigma}){sup 1/2}, where N is the number of particles in the beam and {sigma} is the conductivity of the surface material. By means of the Vlasov equation a criterion for beam stability is obtained. In the limit of highly conducting walls the criterion involves the frequency spread in the unperturbed beam, the number of particles N, the beam energy, geometrical properties of the accelerator, but not the conductivity {sigma}. A numerical example presented indicates that certain observations of beam behavior in the MURA 40-Mev-electron accelerator may be related to the phenomenon we investigated.

  18. Targets for ion sources for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is based on the use of the well-known on-line isotope separator (ISOL) technique in which radioactive nuclei are produced by fusion type reactions in selectively chosen target materials by high-energy proton, deuteron, or He ion beams from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). Among several major challenges posed by generating and accelerating adequate intensities of radioactive ion beams (RIBs), selection of the most appropriate target material for production of the species of interest is, perhaps, the most difficult. In this report, we briefly review present efforts to select target materials and to design composite target matrix/heat-sink systems that simultaneously incorporate the short diffusion lengths, high permeabilities, and controllable temperatures required to effect maximum diffusion release rates of the short-lived species that can be realized at the temperature limits of specific target materials. We also describe the performance characteristics for a selected number of target ion sources that will be employed for initial use at the HRIBF as well as prototype ion sources that show promise for future use for RIB applications

  19. Development of negative ion beam accelerators for high power neutral beam systems

    A 500 keV negative ion source for JT-60U and a 1 MeV ion source for ITER are being developed at JAERI. Beam acceleration test of the JT-60U negative ion source, that is designed to produce a 500 keV, 22 A D- beam for 10 S, has started. The ion source consists of a cesium seeded volume negative ion generator and a three-stage multi-aperture accelerator. Up to now, D- ion beam of 410 keV, 6.1 A, 0.2 s, 2.5MW was accelerated. This is the world record of deuterium negative ion beam current and negative ion beam power. On the other hand, to demonstrate negative ion acceleration up to an energy of 1 MeV for ITER, the authors constructed a five-stage electrostatic accelerator and a 1MV/1A test facility called MeV Test Facility (MTF). The accelerator was conditioned up to a high voltage of 760 kV without beam. The H- ion beam was successfully accelerated up to the energy of 700 keV with a drain current of 230 mA for 1 s

  20. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2003-04-11

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  1. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  2. Possibility for ultra-bright electron beam acceleration in dielectric wakefield accelerators

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    We describe a conceptual proposal to combine the Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator (DWA) with the Emittance Exchanger (EEX) to demonstrate a high-brightness DWA with a gradient of above 100 MV/m and less than 0.1% induced energy spread in the accelerated beam. We currently evaluate the DWA concept as a performance upgrade for the future LANL signature facility MaRIE with the goal of significantly reducing the electron beam energy spread. The preconceptual design for MaRIE is underway at LANL, with the design of the electron linear accelerator being one of the main research goals. Although generally the baseline design needs to be conservative and rely on existing technology, any future upgrade would immediately call for looking into the advanced accelerator concepts capable of boosting the electron beam energy up by a few GeV in a very short distance without degrading the beam's quality. Scoping studies have identified large induced energy spreads as the major cause of beam quality degradation in high-gradient advanced accelerators for free-electron lasers. We describe simulations demonstrating that trapezoidal bunch shapes can be used in a DWA to greatly reduce the induced beam energy spread, and, in doing so, also preserve the beam brightness at levels never previously achieved. This concept has the potential to advance DWA technology to a level that would make it suitable for the upgrades of the proposed Los Alamos MaRIE signature facility.

  3. Proceedings of the meeting on the acceleration of polarized beams

    The project for accelerating polarized proton beam with the 12 GeV synchrotron in the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics was started in full scale, and the development of a polarized ion source of high intensity and the analysis of reduced polarization problem on the way to accelerate in the booster or the main ring have been carried out. On the other hand, with the cyclotrons in the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, and the Institute for Nuclear Research, University of Tokyo, and with the tandem machine in the Accelerator Center, Tsukuba University, polarized beams have already been accelerated, and the steady operations have been continued. Taking this opportunity, this study meeting was planned, considering that it is necessary to exchange informations among the researchers on polarized beam. It was the significant study meeting as unexpectedly many persons took part and the useful advices to the polarized beam project in this Laboratory were obtained. The construction of the preaccelerator for polarized protons was commenced in this year in the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. In the proceedings, the introduction, the foreword, and eight papers are summarized. The progress of polarized beam researches in the world was mentioned in the introduction, and the project for proton acceleration in this Laboratory was explained in the foreword. (Kako, I.)

  4. Ion collective acceleration and high current beam transport

    Results of investigation of high-current beam (HCB) transport in vacuum channels with dielectric walls (VCDW) are presented. It is shown, that HCB transport can be realized not only in rectilinear dielectric channels, but also in curvili also in curvilitear oges. In particular, it proved to be possible to bend the beam with parameters 50 kA, 400 keV by 90 deg. A problem of negative ion intense beam production is considered. It is shown, that in magnetic insulation diodes hydrogen ion currents of about several kA are obtained at current densities 10 A/cm2. Results of collective ion acceleration in VCDW are given. Two regions with different physical mechanisms of ion acceleration should be distinguished. In the first region (''plasma''), corresponding to HCB motion in VCDW ion generation and their acceleration in quasipotential field of HCB up to the energy of the order of electrons or less takes place. In the second region (''beam''), corresponding to joint motion of ''extracted'' ions and HCB electrons, ion acceleration takes place in the fields of waves, which can be excited due to the mechanism of two-beam instability type. Considerable contribution can also be made by stochastic mechanism of ion acceleration

  5. Positron beam production with a deuteron accelerator

    A graphite target was bombarded with 1.5 MeV deuterons, producing the isotope 13N, which is a positron emitter. Using the activated material a slow positron beam with an intensity of 0.7 (0.14)x105 s-1 was produced. A (saturated) 13N yield of 63 (11) MBq/μA was observed, with 1.5 MeV deuterons, which is consistent with previous calculations and experiments. Our results show that, with the method we outline, positron beams with an average intensity of up to 1x108 s-1 may be produced

  6. Polarized antiproton beam at U-70 accelerator of IHEP

    Nurushev, S. B.; Chetvertkov, M. A.; Chetvertkova, V. A.; Garkusha, V. I.; Meschanin, A. P.; Mochalov, V. V.; Nurusheva, M. B.; Rykov, V. L.; Semenov, P. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Zapolsky, V. N.

    2016-02-01

    The polarized proton and antiproton beam channel is currently under development at the U-70 accelerator of IHEP, Protvino, Russia. An availability of the both, polarized protons and antiprotons provides an exciting opportunity for the comparative studies of spin effects induced by polarized protons and antiprotons in a variety of hadronic reactions. While the proton and antiproton beams are formed by essentially the same method, there is the specific in the antiproton beam shaping and properties compared to protons. In this report, we address some technical details of forming the polarized antiproton beam and describe its main properties.

  7. A rich revenue from the use of radioactive beams and radioactive targets: recent highlights from the nTOF and ISOLDE facilities (1/2)

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    The On-Line Isotope Mass Separator ISOLDE is a facility dedicated to the production of a large variety of radioactive ion beams for a great number of different experiments, e.g. in the field of nuclear and atomic physics, solid-state physics, life sciences and material science. At ISOLDE, radioactive nuclides are produced in thick high-temperature targets via spallation, fission or fragmentation reactions. The targets are placed in the external proton beam of the PSB, which has an energy of 1.0 or 1.4 GeV and an intensity of about 2 microA. The target and ion-source together represent a small chemical factory for converting the nuclear reaction products into a radioactive ion beam. An electric field accelerates the ions, which are mass separated and steered to the experiments. Until now more than 600 isotopes of more than 60 elements (Z=2 to 88) have been produced with half-lives down to milliseconds and intensities up to 1011 ions per second. Through the advent of post-accelerated beams with the REX-ISOLDE c...

  8. Enhancing the accelerated beam current in the booster synchrotron by optimizing the transport line beam propagation

    Saini R S; Tyagi Y; Ghodke A D; Puntambekar T A

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present the results of transverse beam emittance and twiss parameter measurement of an electron beam, delivered by a 20 MeV microtron which is used as a pre-injector system for a booster synchrotron in the Indus Accelerator Facility at RRCAT Indore. Based on these measured beam parameters, beam optics of a transport line was optimized and its results are alsodiscussed in this paper. This beam transport line is used to transport the electron beam from the 20MeV microtron to the booster synchrotron. The booster synchrotron works as a main injector for Indus-1 and Indus-2 synchrotron radiation facilities. To optimize the beam optics of a transport linefor proper beam transmission through the line as well as to match the beam twiss parameters at the beam injection point of another accelerator, it is necessary to know the transverse beam emittance and twiss parameters of the beam coming from the first one. A MATLAB-based GUI program has been developed to calculate the beam emittance and twiss parameters, using quadrupole scanmethod. The measured parameters have been used for beam transport line optimization and twiss parameters matching at booster injection point. After this optimization, an enhancement of ∼50% beam current has been observed in the booster synchrotron.

  9. Reference zoning of the radioactive waste in the frame of the decommissioning of particle accelerators

    In the frame of the decommissioning of two particle accelerators, one linear (700 MeV, electrons) and one synchrotron (3 GeV, protons), the CEA has set up a reference zoning of the radioactive waste and has looked for some elimination networks. That zoning has been established following an analytic process which has taken into account the installations' design, their running rules, and their history, in order to determine the possible presence of added radioactivity. We have used the following methodology: Identification of the sectors and elements, and within them of the main materials, where interactions between beam and matter may have happened; Characterisation of the radiation fields; Identification of the radio-elements representative of the potential activation of the materials; Evaluation of their mass activity, by semi empirical calculation or Monte Carlo simulation method, whether significant or not, compared with the reference values (Instruction 96/29/Euratom); Verification of the radiological state of the zones through radioactivity measures made on samples and through cartographies of the absorbed dose rates; Standard spectrums and transfer functions to assess the activity levels of the waste have then been calculated to allow the setting up of a control, of a selection and of a rigorous management of the waste coming from the concerned nuclear installations

  10. Production of multicharged radioactive ion beams for spiral: studies and realization of the first target-ion source system

    In the framework of the SPIRAL project, which concerns the production and the acceleration of a multicharged radioactive ions beam, the following part has been studied: production and ionization of the radioactive ions beam. A first target-source (nanogan II), devoted exclusively to the production of multicharged radioactive ions gas type beams, has been studied and tested. The diffusion efficiency has been deduced from the diffusion equations (Fick laws). This efficiency is governed by the following parameters: the temperature, the grains size of the target, the Arrhenius parameters and the radioactive period. Another study concerning the production targets is presented. It deals with the temperature distribution allowing an utilization of more than one month at a temperature of 2400 K. Another development (SPIRAL II) is devoted to the production of high neutron content radioactive atoms created by the uranium fission, from fast neutrons. The neutrons beam is produced by the ''stripping break-up'' of a deutons beam in a converter. (A.L.B.)

  11. Beam Loss Calibration Studies for High Energy Proton Accelerators

    Stockner, M

    2007-01-01

    CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a proton collider with injection energy of 450 GeV and collision energy of 7 TeV. Superconducting magnets keep the particles circulating in two counter rotating beams, which cross each other at the Interaction Points (IP). Those complex magnets have been designed to contain both beams in one yoke within a cryostat. An unprecedented amount of energy will be stored in the circulating beams and in the magnet system. The LHC outperforms other existing accelerators in its maximum beam energy by a factor of 7 and in its beam intensity by a factor of 23. Even a loss of a small fraction of the beam particles may cause the transition from the superconducting to the normal conducting state of the coil or cause physical damage to machine components. The unique combination of these extreme beam parameters and the highly advanced superconducting technology has the consequence that the LHC needs a more efficient beam cleaning and beam loss measurement system than previous accelerators....

  12. Beam acceleration test of the HIMAC injector

    A heavy-ion synchrotron dedicated to medical use is under construction at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The injector system, comprising a PIG source, an ECR source, an RFQ linac, and an Alvarez linac of 100MHz, accelerates heavy ions with a charge-to-mass ratio as small as 1/7, up to 6 MeV/u. First operation of the injector system has shown satisfactory performance. (author)

  13. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  14. Beam Commissioning of Phase I of the SARAF Accelerator

    The Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) linac's injector consists of a 20 keV/u protons and deuterons ECR ion source (EIS), a 5 mA low energy beam transport (MEBT) and a 1. 5 MeV/u, 4 m/k 176 MHz, 4-rod RFQ. The RFQ is followed by a short medium energy beam transport (MEBT) and a dedicated diagnostic plate (D-plate) for beam measurements. After beam commissioning of the RFQ the prototype superconducting module (PSM), housing six 176 MHz, s.c. half-wave resonators, will be installed between the MEBT and the D-plate finalizing phase I of SARAF. This paper describes the commissioning results of the ion source with H+, H2+ and D+ particle beams and of the RFQ with H+ beam

  15. Optical beam diagnostics at the Electron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA

    At the ELectron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA, a resonant excitation of the horizontal particle oscillations is used to extract the electrons to the experiments. This so-called resonance extraction influences the properties of the extracted beam. The emittance, as a number of the beam quality, was determined by using synchrotron light monitors. To enable broad investigations of the emittance a system of synchrotron light monitors was set up. This system was used to measure the influence of the extraction method on the emittance. Time resolved measurements were conducted to investigate the development of the emittance during an accelerator cycle. To improve the optical beam diagnostics a new beamline to an external laboratory was constructed. There, a new high resolution synchrotron light monitor was commissioned. In addition, a streak camera has been installed to enable longitudinal diagnostics of the beam profiles. First measurements of the longitudinal charge distribution with a time resolution in the range of a few picoseconds were conducted successfully.

  16. Beam loading and cavity compensation for the Ground Test Accelerator

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) will be heavily beam-loaded H- linac with tight tolerances on accelerating field parameters. The methods used in modeling the effects of beam loading in this machine are described. The response of the cavity to both beam and radio-frequency (RF) drive stimulus is derived, including the effects of cavity detuning. This derivation is not restricted to a small-signal approximation. An analytical method for synthesizing a predistortion network that decouples the amplitude and phase responses of the cavity is also outline. Simulation of performance, including beam loading, is achieved through use of a control system analysis software package. A straightforward method is presented for extrapolating this work to model large coupled structures with closely spaced parasitic modes. Results to date have enabled the RF control system designs for GTA to be optimized and have given insight into their operation. 6 refs., 10 figs

  17. Naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials: 1987 review

    From time to time, the issue as to whether the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) should seek legislative authority to regulate naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials (NARM) is raised. Because NARM exists in the environment, in homes, in workplaces, in medical institutions, and in consumer products, the issue of Federal controls over NARM is very old and very complex. This report presents a review of NARM sources and uses as well as incidents and problems associated with those materials. A review of previous congressional and Federal agency actions on radiation protection matters, in general, and on NARM, in particular, is provided to develop an understanding of existing Federal regulatory activity in ionizing radiation and in control of NARM. In addition, State controls over NARM are reviewed. Eight questions are examined in terms of whether the NRC should seek legislative authority to regulate NARM. The assessment of these questions serves as the basis for developing and evaluating five options. The evaluation of those options leads to two recommendations

  18. HIGHLIGHTS LHC First Beam - Accelerating Science : 10 September 2008

    CERN Audiovisual Service

    2008-01-01

    First beam in the LHC - accelerating science A historic moment in the CERN Control Centre: the beam was successfully steered around the accelerator. Channel 1 : International Channel 2 : English guide A historic moment in the CERN Control Centre: the beam was successfully steered around the accelerator. Geneva, 10 September 2008. The first beam in the Large Hadron Collider at CERN1 was successfully steered around the full 27 kilometres of the world’s most powerful particle accelerator at 10h28 this morning. This historic event marks a key moment in the transition from over two decades of preparation to a new era of scientific discovery. “It’s a fantastic moment,” said LHC project leader Lyn Evans, “we can now look forward to a new era of understanding about the origins and evolution of the universe.” Starting up a major new particle accelerator takes much more than flipping a switch. Thousands of individual elements have to work in harmony, timings have to be synchronized to under a billionth of a...

  19. H-Mode Accelerating Structures with PMQ Beam Focusing

    Kurennoy, Sergey S; O'Hara, James F; Olivas, Eric R; Wangler, Thomas P

    2011-01-01

    We have developed high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures by combining H-mode resonator cavities and a transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of inter-digital H-mode (IH-PMQ) structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. Results of the combined 3-D modeling - electromagnetic computations, multi-particle beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis - for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. Measurements of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank show a good agreement with the calculations. H-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or ...

  20. Gamma-ray generation using laser-accelerated electron beam

    Park, Seong Hee; Lee, Ho-Hyung; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Yong-Ho; Lee, Ji-Young; Kim, Kyung-Nam; Jeong, Young Uk

    2011-06-01

    A compact gamma-ray source using laser-accelerated electron beam is being under development at KAERI for nuclear applications, such as, radiography, nuclear activation, photonuclear reaction, and so on. One of two different schemes, Bremsstrahlung radiation and Compton backscattering, may be selected depending on the required specification of photons and/or the energy of electron beams. Compton backscattered gamma-ray source is tunable and quasimonochromatic and requires electron beams with its energy of higher than 100 MeV to produced MeV photons. Bremsstrahlung radiation can generate high energy photons with 20 - 30 MeV electron beams, but its spectrum is continuous. As we know, laser accelerators are good for compact size due to localized shielding at the expense of low average flux, while linear RF accelerators are good for high average flux. We present the design issues for a compact gamma-ray source at KAERI, via either Bremsstrahlung radiation or Compton backscattering, using laser accelerated electron beams for the potential nuclear applications.

  1. Beam manipulation techniques, nonlinear beam dynamics, and space charge effect in high energy high power accelerators

    Lee, S. Y.

    2014-04-07

    We had carried out a design of an ultimate storage ring with beam emittance less than 10 picometer for the feasibility of coherent light source at X-ray wavelength. The accelerator has an inherent small dynamic aperture. We study method to improve the dynamic aperture and collective instability for an ultimate storage ring. Beam measurement and accelerator modeling are an integral part of accelerator physics. We develop the independent component analysis (ICA) and the orbit response matrix method for improving accelerator reliability and performance. In collaboration with scientists in National Laboratories, we also carry out experimental and theoretical studies on beam dynamics. Our proposed research topics are relevant to nuclear and particle physics using high brightness particle and photon beams.

  2. Physics of beam self-modulation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    Lotov, K. V. [Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    The self-modulation instability is a key effect that makes possible the usage of nowadays proton beams as drivers for plasma wakefield acceleration. Development of the instability in uniform plasmas and in plasmas with a small density up-step is numerically studied with the focus at nonlinear stages of beam evolution. The step parameters providing the strongest established wakefield are found, and the mechanism of stable bunch train formation is identified.

  3. Intense ion beams accelerated by ultra-intense laser pulses

    Roth, Markus; Cowan, T. E.; Gauthier, J. C.; Vehn, J. Meyer-Ter; Allen, M.; Audebert, P.; Blazevic, A.; Fuchs, J.; Geissel, M.; Hegelich, M.; Karsch, S.; Pukhov, A.; Schlegel, T.

    2002-04-01

    The discovery of intense ion beams off solid targets irradiated by ultra-intense laser pulses has become the subject of extensive international interest. These highly collimated, energetic beams of protons and heavy ions are strongly depending on the laser parameters as well as on the properties of the irradiated targets. Therefore we have studied the influence of the target conditions on laser-accelerated ion beams generated by multi-terawatt lasers. The experiments were performed using the 100 TW laser facility at Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Laser Intense (LULI). The targets were irradiated by pulses up to 5×1019 W/cm2 (~300 fs,λ=1.05 μm) at normal incidence. A strong dependence on the surface conditions, conductivity, shape and purity was observed. The plasma density on the front and rear surface was determined by laser interferometry. We characterized the ion beam by means of magnetic spectrometers, radiochromic film, nuclear activation and Thompson parabolas. The strong dependence of the ion beam acceleration on the conditions on the target back surface was confirmed in agreement with predictions based on the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. Finally shaping of the ion beam has been demonstrated by the appropriate tailoring of the target. .

  4. Overview of the Beam diagnostics in the Medaustron Accelerator:Design choices and test Beam commissioning

    Osmic, F; Gyorgy, A; Kerschbaum, A; Repovz, M; Schwarz, S; Neustadt, W; Burtin, G

    2012-01-01

    The MedAustron centre is a synchrotron based accelerator complex for cancer treatment and clinical and non-clinical research with protons and light ions, currently under construction in Wiener Neustadt, Austria. The accelerator complex is based on the CERN-PIMMS study [1] and its technical implementation by the Italian CNAO foundation in Pavia [2]. The MedAustron beam diagnostics system is based on sixteen different monitor types (153 devices in total) and will allow measuring all relevant beam parameters from the source to the irradiation rooms. The monitors will have to cope with large intensities and energy ranges. Currently, one ion source, the low energy beam transfer line and the RFQ are being commissioned in the Injector Test Stand (ITS) at CERN. This paper gives an overview of all beam monitors foreseen for the MedAustron accelerator, elaborates some of the design choices and reports the first beam commissioning results from the ITS.

  5. Experiments with radioactive nuclear beams for nuclear structure

    Radioactive Nuclear Beams (RNBs) are opening new regions of the nuclear landscape to nuclear structure studies. Early experiments with RNBs rely on reactions with large cross sections, inverse kinematics, and very efficient detector geometries in order to measure observables that are very sensitive to structural features. A Coulomb excitation experiment extracted the B(E2;01+ → 21+) values of the neutron rich RNBs 132,134Te at the HRIBF with the GRAFIK through-well NaI(Tl) detector. In addition, other experiments with RNBs, such as Coulomb excitation of octupole states and reorientation experiments, inelastic scattering, and single-particle transfer, will be discussed

  6. Experiments with radioactive nuclear beams II; Experimentos con haces nucleares radiactivos II

    Aguilera R, E.F.; Martinez Q, E.; Gomez C, A.; Lizcano C, D.; Garcia M, H.; Rosales M, P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-12-15

    The studies of nuclear reactions with heavy ions have been carried out for years for the group of heavy ions of the laboratory of the Accelerator of the ININ. Especially in the last years the group has intruded in the studies of nuclear reactions with radioactive beams, frontier theme at world level. Presently Technical Report is presented in detailed form the experimental methods and the analysis procedures of the research activities carried out by the group. The chpater II is dedicated to the procedures used in the analysis of the last two experiments with radioactive beams carried out by the group. In the chapter III is presented the procedure followed to carrying out an extended analysis with the CCDEF code, to consider the transfer channel of nucleons in the description of the fusion excitation functions of a good number of previously measured systems by the group. Finally, in the chapter IV the more important steps to continue in the study of the reaction {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C experiment drifted to be carried out using the available resources of the Tandem Accelerator Laboratory of the ININ are described. At the end of each chapter some of the more representative results obtained in the analysis are presented and emphasis on the scientific production generated by the group for each case is made. (Author)

  7. Dynamics and transport of laser-accelerated particle beams

    The subject of this thesis is the investigation and optimization of beam transport elements in the context of the steadily growing field of laser-driven particle acceleration. The first topic is the examination of the free vacuum expansion of an electron beam at high current density. It could be shown that particle tracking codes which are commonly used for the calculation of space charge effects will generate substantial artifacts in the regime considered here. The artifacts occurring hitherto predominantly involve insufficient prerequisites for the Lorentz transformation, the application of inadequate initial conditions and non negligible retardation artifacts. A part of this thesis is dedicated to the development of a calculation approach which uses a more adequate ansatz calculating space charge effects for laser-accelerated electron beams. It can also be used to validate further approaches for the calculation of space charge effects. The next elements considered are miniature magnetic quadrupole devices for the focusing of charged particle beams. General problems involved with their miniaturization concern distorting higher order field components. If these distorting components cannot be controlled, the field of applications is very limited. In this thesis a new method for the characterization and compensation of the distorting components was developed, which might become a standard method when assembling these permanent magnet multipole devices. The newly developed characterization method has been validated at the Mainz Microtron (MAMI) electron accelerator. Now that we can ensure optimum performance, the first application of permanent magnet quadrupole devices in conjunction with laser-accelerated ion beams is presented. The experiment was carried out at the Z-Petawatt laser system at Sandia National Laboratories. A promising application for laser-accelerated electron beams is the FEL in a university-scale size. The first discussion of all relevant aspects

  8. Dynamics and transport of laser-accelerated particle beams

    Becker, Stefan

    2010-04-19

    The subject of this thesis is the investigation and optimization of beam transport elements in the context of the steadily growing field of laser-driven particle acceleration. The first topic is the examination of the free vacuum expansion of an electron beam at high current density. It could be shown that particle tracking codes which are commonly used for the calculation of space charge effects will generate substantial artifacts in the regime considered here. The artifacts occurring hitherto predominantly involve insufficient prerequisites for the Lorentz transformation, the application of inadequate initial conditions and non negligible retardation artifacts. A part of this thesis is dedicated to the development of a calculation approach which uses a more adequate ansatz calculating space charge effects for laser-accelerated electron beams. It can also be used to validate further approaches for the calculation of space charge effects. The next elements considered are miniature magnetic quadrupole devices for the focusing of charged particle beams. General problems involved with their miniaturization concern distorting higher order field components. If these distorting components cannot be controlled, the field of applications is very limited. In this thesis a new method for the characterization and compensation of the distorting components was developed, which might become a standard method when assembling these permanent magnet multipole devices. The newly developed characterization method has been validated at the Mainz Microtron (MAMI) electron accelerator. Now that we can ensure optimum performance, the first application of permanent magnet quadrupole devices in conjunction with laser-accelerated ion beams is presented. The experiment was carried out at the Z-Petawatt laser system at Sandia National Laboratories. A promising application for laser-accelerated electron beams is the FEL in a university-scale size. The first discussion of all relevant aspects

  9. Auto-focusing accelerating hyper-geometric laser beams

    Kovalev, A. A.; Kotlyar, V. V.; Porfirev, A. P.

    2016-02-01

    We derive a new solution to the paraxial wave equation that defines a two-parameter family of three-dimensional structurally stable vortex annular auto-focusing hyper-geometric (AH) beams, with their complex amplitude expressed via a degenerate hyper-geometric function. The AH beams are found to carry an orbital angular momentum and be auto-focusing, propagating on an accelerating path toward a focus, where the annular intensity pattern is ‘sharply’ reduced in diameter. An explicit expression for the complex amplitude of vortex annular auto-focusing hyper-geometric-Gaussian beams is derived. The experiment has been shown to be in good agreement with theory.

  10. Active steering of laser-accelerated ion beams

    A technique for optical control of the spatial distribution of laser-accelerated ion beams is presented. An ultrashort laser pulse, tightly focused to relativistic intensities on a thin foil target, drives a beam of MeV ions. An auxiliary, nanosecond laser pulse drives a shock and locally deforms the initially flat target prior to the main pulse interaction. By changing the properties of the shock-driving laser pulse, the normal direction of the ion emitting surface is locally manipulated and the emission direction is thereby controlled. In the future, this method could be used to achieve dynamic control of the ion beam divergence

  11. Radio-tracing 'without' radioactivity: accelerator mass spectrometry in biomedicine

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a form of isotope-ratio mass spectrometry that quantifies concentrations of certain long-lived radioisotopes independently of their radioactive decay. AMS is primarily used in the geosciences for determining the age of a material that contains naturally occurring radioisotopes. AMS uses the same high specificity for enriched levels of these radioisotopes in tracing low chemical doses for long periods in biological systems, including humans. AMS provides the safety of low radiative exposure to experimental subjects and investigators, while obtaining attomole sensitivities that are not possible with stable isotope tracers because of their natural isotopic abundances. AMS isotope tracing was first applied to quantifying the genotoxicity of low level environmental chemicals in animals and later in humans. Physiologic concentrations of 14C-labeled trace nutrients (folate, carotene, and tocopherol) are now measured directly in humans without concern about radiation. The radiative exposure is less than the commonly accepted risks of natural background radiation or the radiation fields found in high altitude air flights. AMS measures very small biological samples (such as 20 microliters of blood) that are easily obtained from human volunteers or model animals at frequent intervals for detailed analysis of kinetic profiles. This high data density enables the construction of compartmental models that elucidate nutrient behavior in tissues that cannot be directly sampled. The pharmaceutical industry is enthusiastic about AMS as a detector for 'micro-dosing' in which the human kinetics of an assuredly non-toxic dose of a candidate drug is tested early in a development project. Molecular tracing uses 3H or 14C as common isotopic labels, but AMS contributes to elemental tracing with certain radioisotopes having very long lives, such as 26AL or 41Ca. Calcium-41 is a particularly useful isotope in biomedical research because it is used to

  12. Investigations of the neutron halo by radioactive beam experiments

    Recently, a new tool has become available to study the behaviour of nuclei at the limits of particle stability. Heavy-ion projectile fragmentation, in combination with efficient recoil spectrometers, allows to prepare 'exotic' beams which can be used to induce secondary nuclear reactions. First experiments have revealed surprising features in the reactions of the most neutron-rich light nuclei. There is now conclusive evidence that the observed effects are due to long-tail matter distributions ('neutron halo') which occur for the last, very weakly bound neutrons. The results of some recent radioactive beam experiments, made by means of the spectrometer LISE3 at GANIL, are presented. (author) 24 refs.; 7 figs

  13. Multiparametric ionization probes for monitoring accelerated particle beams

    Paper describes high-sensitive ionization probes of transverse cross section of accelerated particle beam. Image of beam real cross section is formed at the display of electron-optical converter on the basis of multichannel plates, is recorded by TV camera and is processes and presented by means of computer. Probe structures for 1-100 MeV energy round and strip beams are developed and tested. Distortions of beam cross section image under the effect of the external magnetic field and of space charge field are estimated. The results of the first investigations into prototype ionization probes to control form, duration, phase of cyclotron beam microclusters are presented. 13 refs.; 9 figs

  14. LATTICES FOR HIGH-POWER PROTON BEAM ACCELERATION AND SECONDARY BEAM COLLECTION AND COOLING.

    WANG, S.; WEI, J.; BROWN, K.; GARDNER, C.; LEE, Y.Y.; LOWENSTEIN, D.; PEGGS, S.; SIMOS, N.

    2006-06-23

    Rapid cycling synchrotrons are used to accelerate high-intensity proton beams to energies of tens of GeV for secondary beam production. After primary beam collision with a target, the secondary beam can be collected, cooled, accelerated or decelerated by ancillary synchrotrons for various applications. In this paper, we first present a lattice for the main synchrotron. This lattice has: (a) flexible momentum compaction to avoid transition and to facilitate RF gymnastics (b) long straight sections for low-loss injection, extraction, and high-efficiency collimation (c) dispersion-free straights to avoid longitudinal-transverse coupling, and (d) momentum cleaning at locations of large dispersion with missing dipoles. Then, we present a lattice for a cooler ring for the secondary beam. The momentum compaction across half of this ring is near zero, while for the other half it is normal. Thus, bad mixing is minimized while good mixing is maintained for stochastic beam cooling.

  15. LATTICES FOR HIGH-POWER PROTON BEAM ACCELERATION AND SECONDARY BEAM COLLECTION AND COOLING

    Rapid cycling synchrotrons are used to accelerate high-intensity proton beams to energies of tens of GeV for secondary beam production. After primary beam collision with a target, the secondary beam can be collected, cooled, accelerated or decelerated by ancillary synchrotrons for various applications. In this paper, we first present a lattice for the main synchrotron. This lattice has: (a) flexible momentum compaction to avoid transition and to facilitate RF gymnastics (b) long straight sections for low-loss injection, extraction, and high-efficiency collimation (c) dispersion-free straights to avoid longitudinal-transverse coupling, and (d) momentum cleaning at locations of large dispersion with missing dipoles. Then, we present a lattice for a cooler ring for the secondary beam. The momentum compaction across half of this ring is near zero, while for the other half it is normal. Thus, bad mixing is minimized while good mixing is maintained for stochastic beam cooling

  16. Outline of heavy ion beam accelerator for inertial confinement fusion

    Heavy ion inertial fusion program has become more promising through the intense works on high energy, heavy ion accelerators during past four years. The heavy iron method is superior to the methods with other particle beam, because the peak current requirement is reduced drastically to several kA. The driver efficiency is expected to be 20% or more in the heavy ion method, and the absorption efficiency in the pellets is three times as high as that of laser fusion method. In Japan, Institute of Plasma Physics of Nagoya University and Institute of Laser Engineering of Osaka University participate mainly in the design of reactor and pellet systems, while National Laboratory for High Energy Physics and Institute for Nuclear Study of University of Tokyo have studied on heavy ion accelerators. In this paper, the outline of the accelerator system is described on the basis of the typical parameters of pellet design. The determination of beam parameters, the beam lines in reactors, current multiplication, the main parameters of the storage ring, the ion source and the linear accelerator are explained. In the present design concept, an RFQ linac is proposed in low velocity region. The focus action is independent of the beam velocity, and it has the capture efficiency as high as about 90%. (Kako, I.)

  17. Irradiation application of electronic beam accelerator NBL-1010

    The application of electronic beam accelerator NBL-1010 in semiconductor denature, gem coloring, waster treatment, chemical synthesize of radiation, degrading of agricultural waster, sterilization of one-off medical treatment, sterilization of herbs, food preservation, crystal coloring and preservation of commodities was studied for its effects equaled with cobalt gamma irradiation

  18. Radiation Shielding Analysis of Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    The objective of this technical report are to establish the radiation shielding technology of a high-energy electron accelerator to the facilities which utilize with electron beam. The technologies of electron beam irradiation(300 KeV -10 MeV) demand on the diverse areas of material processing, surface treatment, treatments on foods or food processing, improvement of metal properties, semiconductors, and ceramics, sterilization of medical goods and equipment, treatment and control of contamination and pollution, and so on. In order to acquire safety design for the protection of personnel from the radiations produced by electron beam accelerators, it is important to develop the radiation shielding analysis technology. The shielding analysis are carried out by which define source term, calculation modelling and computer calculations for 2 MeV and 10 MeV accelerators. And the shielding analysis for irradiation dump shield with 10 MeV accelerators are also performed by solving the complex 3-D geometry and long computer run time problem. The technology development of shielding analysis will be contributed to extend the further high energy accelerator development

  19. Low voltage, hermetically sealed electron beam accelerator for industrial applications

    Three types of hermetically sealed, low voltage electron beam accelerators and novel solid state power supply/control systems have been developed by Advanced Electron Beams. These accelerators produce uniform, unscanned electron beams through the unique management of the thermionic emitter profile and vacuum body shape. The power density of the accelerators range from 0.02 to 0.2 kW per square centimetre with accelerating voltages ranging from 60 to 150 kV and extracted electron currents of 1 to 30 mA. A wide variety of in-process-line industrial applications have been implemented and continue to be developed for these accelerators including: curing of high density and/or high opacity thin films; cross-linking or chain scission of thermoplastic films; pre-fill disinfestation of food and beverage packaging; sterilization of medical devices and pharmaceutical container surfaces; and the active treatment of air streams for pollution abatement and bioburden remediation. This paper will describe the design of the three emitters and the methods of application implementation. (author)

  20. SPIRAL2 at GANIL: next generation of ISOL facility for intense secondary radioactive ion beams

    During the last two decades, secondary Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) has allowed the investigation of a new territory of nuclei with extreme N/Z called *terra incognita*. The quest for Rare Isotope Beams (RIB), which are orders of magnitude more intense than those currently available, is the main motivation behind the design and construction of the next generation of RIB facilities. As selected by the ESFRI committee, the next generation of ISOL facility in Europe is represented by the SPIRAL2 project to be built at GANIL (Caen, France). SPIRAL 2 is based on a high power, CW, superconducting LINAC,delivering 5 mA of deuteron beams at 40 MeV (200 kW) directed on a C converter+Uranium target and producing more 1013 fissions/s. The expected radioactive beams intensities in the mass range from A=60 to A=140, will surpass by two order of magnitude any existing facilities in the world. These unstable atoms will be available at energies between few keV/n to 15 MeV/n. The same driver will accelerate high intensity (100*A to 1 mA), heavier ions up to Ar at 14 MeV/n. Under the 7FP program of European Union called *Preparatory phase*, the SPIRAL2 project has been granted a budget of about 4MEUR to build up an international consortium around this new venture. The status of the construction of SPIRAL2 accelerator and associated physics instruments in collaboration with EU and International partners are presented.

  1. Low-energy radioactive ion beam production of 22Mg

    The 22Mg nucleus plays an important role in nuclear astrophysics, specially in the 22Mg(α,p)25Al and proton capture 22Mg(p,γ)23Al reactions. It is believed that 22Mg is a waiting point in the αp-process of nucleosynthesis in novae. We proposed a direct measurement of the 22Mg+α resonance reaction in inverse kinematics using a radioactive ion (RI) beam. A 22Mg beam of 3.73 MeV/u was produced at CRIB (Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) low-energy RI Beam) facility of the University of Tokyo located at RIKEN (Japan) in 2011. In this paper we present the results about the production of the 22Mg beam used for the direct measurement of the scattering reaction 22Mg(α,α)22Mg, and the stellar reaction 22Mg(α,p)25Al in the energy region concerning an astrophysical temperature of T9=1–3 GK

  2. Beam dynamics studies of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator injector

    A driver-scale injector for the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator project has been built at LBL. This machine has exceeded the design goals of high voltage (> 2 MV), high current (> 0.8 A of K+) and low normalized emittance (< 1 π mm-mr). The injector consists of a 750 keV diode pre-injector followed by an electrostatic quadrupole accelerator (ESQ) which provides strong (alternating gradient) focusing for the space-charge dominated beam and simultaneously accelerates the ions to 2 MeV. The fully 3-D PIC code WARP together with EGUN and POISSON were used to design the machine and analyze measurements of voltage, current and phase space distributions. A comparison between beam dynamics characteristics as measured for the injector and corresponding computer calculations will be presented

  3. Coulomb excitation of re-accelerated 208Rn and 206Po beams

    In the present study, B(E2; 2+ → 0+) values have been measured in the 208Rn and 206Po nuclei through Coulomb excitation of re-accelerated radioactive beams in inverse kinematics at CERN-ISOLDE. The resulting B(E2; 2+ → 0+) in 208Rn is ∼ 0.08 e2b2. These nuclei lie in, or at the boundary of the region where seniority scheme should persist. However, contributions from collective excitations may be present when moving away from the N = 126 shell closure. To date, surprisingly little is known of the transition probabilities between the low-spin states in this region. (authors)

  4. Controls and Beam Diagnostics for Therapy-Accelerators

    Eickhoff, H

    2000-01-01

    During the last four years GSI has developed a new procedure for cancer treatment by means of the intensity controlled rasterscan-method. This method includes active variations of beam parameters during the treatment session and the integration of 'on-line' PET monitoring. Starting in 1997 several patients have been successfully treated within this GSI experimental cancer treatment program; within this program about 350 patients shall be treated in the next 5 years. The developments and experiences of this program accompanied by intensive discussions with the medical community led to a proposal for a hospital based light ion accelerator facility for the clinic in Heidelberg. An essential part for patients treatments is the measurement of the beam properties within acceptance and constancy tests and especially for the rasterscan method during the treatment sessions. The presented description of the accelerator controls and beam diagnostic devices mainly covers the requests for the active scanning method, which...

  5. Preliminary shielding estimates for the proposed National ISOL Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) Facility at Oak Ridge

    ORNL built a first-generation Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility for astrophysics and nuclear physics research; it was named Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) and is based on the Isotope Separator On Line (ISOL) technique. Planning is underway for a second- generation facility, the National ISOL RIB facility at Oak Ridge; it will build on the existing HRIBF and may utilize many existing components and shielded areas. Preliminary upgrade plan for the new facility includes: adding a superconducting booster for the tandem accelerator; replacing the 1960-vintage, 60-MeV proton, 50-microamp ORIC (Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron) with a modern 200-MeV proton, 200-microamp cyclotron; and building a high-power 238U fission target to accept the 200-MeV proton beam. This report summarizes the results of a preliminary 1-D shielding analysis of the proposed upgrade, to determine the shielding requirements for a 0.25 mrem/h dose rate at the external surface of the exclusion area. Steel shielding weights ranging from 60 to 100 metric tons, were considered manageable; these could be reduced by a factor of 2 to 3 if the orientation of the proposed target station was changed

  6. Ion source developments for stable and radioactive ion beams at GANIL

    Leroy, R; Lecesne, N; Jardin, P; Gaubert, G; Huguet, Y; Pacquet, J Y; Villari, A C C; Lecler, D; Been, T

    1999-01-01

    Since now many years, the Ganil ion source team has in charge to develop ion sources with three main purposes. The first one concerns the radioactive ion production that implies high efficiency ion sources as the amount of created exotic atoms is very low (between 10 to 108 particle per second). The second one deals with high intensities of stable metallic ion beams for the injectors of the accelerator while the last one tries to increase the intensities of very high charge state ion beams for atomic physic. Concerning radioactive ion production, the recent results obtained, in collaboration with the ISN Grenoble group, with the 1+/n+ method drove us to develop a new concept of ecr ion source for monocharged ion production. The results of the first tests of this source will be given. This new idea for the construction of ecr ion source can be applied to multicharged ion production. Concerning the high charge state ion beam production, a new source called SUPERSHYPIE has been built that allow to increase by a ...

  7. Towards new proton radioactivities with radioactive beams and digital signal processing

    Rykaczewski, K; Bingham, C R; Grzywacz, R; Karny, M; Batchelder, J C; Gross, C J; Janas, Z; Momayezi, M; Wahl, J; Piechaczek, A; Zganjar, E F; Ginter, T N; Hamilton, J H; Walters, W B; Kulp, W D; Winger, J A

    2002-01-01

    Particle radioactivity studies using the XIA DGF-4C digital signal processing units at the Recoil Mass Separator of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are presented. Proton emission signals were observed starting from 500 ns after recoil implantation. An energy threshold below 100 keV for particle detection was achieved. For the sup 1 sup 4 sup 5 Tm and sup 1 sup 4 sup 6 Tm decay, evidence for the fine structure in proton emission was obtained. An experiment to search for a new proton emitter sup 1 sup 4 sup 9 Lu is described as an example where the combination of a sup 5 sup 6 Ni radioactive beam and digital signal processing is a major advantage.

  8. Particle-beam accelerators for radiotherapy and radioisotopes

    The philosophy used in developing the new PIGMI technology was that the parameters chosen for physics research machines are not necessarily the right ones for a dedicated therapy or radioisotope machine. In particular, the beam current and energy can be optimized, and the design should emphasize minimum size, simplicity and reliability of operation, and economy in capital and operating costs. A major part of achieving these goals lay in raising the operating frequency and voltage gradient of the accelerator, which shrinks the diameter and length of the components. Several other technical innovations resulted in major system improvements. One of these is a radically new type of accelerator structure named the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator. This allowed us to eliminate the large, complicated ion source used in previous ion accelerators, and to achieve a very high quality accelerated beam. Also, by using advanced permanent magnet materials to make the focusing elements, the system becomes much simpler. Other improvements have been made in all of the accelerator components and in the methods for operating them. These will be described, and design and costing information examples given for several possible therapy and radioisotope production machines

  9. Laser-accelerated proton beams as a new particle source

    Nuernberg, Frank

    2010-11-15

    The framework of this thesis is the investigation of the generation of proton beams using high-intensity laser pulses. In this work, an experimental method to fully reconstruct laser-accelerated proton beam parameters, called radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy (RIS), was developed. Since the proton beam expansion is a plasma expansion with accompanying electrons, a low-energy electron spectrometer was developed, built and tested to study the electron distribution matching to the proton beam energy distribution. Two experiments were carried out at the VULCAN Petawatt laser with the aim of showing dynamic control and enhancement of proton acceleration using multiple or defocused laser pulses. Irradiating the target with a long pulse, low-intensity laser (10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}) prior to the main pulse ({proportional_to}ns), an optimum pre-plasma density scale length of 60 {mu}m is generated leading to an enhancement of the maximum proton energy ({proportional_to}25%), the proton flux (factor of 3) and the beam uniformity. Proton beams were generated more efficiently than previously by driving thinner target foils at a lower intensity over a large area. The optimum condition was a 2 {mu}m foil irradiated with an intensity of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} onto a 60 {mu}m spot. Laser to proton beam efficiencies of 7.8% have been achieved (2.2% before) - one of the highest conversion efficiencies ever achieved. In the frame of this work, two separate experiments at the TRIDENT laser system have shown that these laser-accelerated proton beams, with their high number of particles in a short pulse duration, are well-suited for creating isochorically heated matter in extreme conditions. Besides the manipulation of the proton beam parameters directly during the generation, the primary aim of this thesis was the capture, control and transport of laser-accelerated proton beams by a solenoidal magnetic field lense for further purpose. In a joint project proposal, the laser and

  10. Laser-accelerated proton beams as a new particle source

    The framework of this thesis is the investigation of the generation of proton beams using high-intensity laser pulses. In this work, an experimental method to fully reconstruct laser-accelerated proton beam parameters, called radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy (RIS), was developed. Since the proton beam expansion is a plasma expansion with accompanying electrons, a low-energy electron spectrometer was developed, built and tested to study the electron distribution matching to the proton beam energy distribution. Two experiments were carried out at the VULCAN Petawatt laser with the aim of showing dynamic control and enhancement of proton acceleration using multiple or defocused laser pulses. Irradiating the target with a long pulse, low-intensity laser (1012 W/cm2) prior to the main pulse (∝ns), an optimum pre-plasma density scale length of 60 μm is generated leading to an enhancement of the maximum proton energy (∝25%), the proton flux (factor of 3) and the beam uniformity. Proton beams were generated more efficiently than previously by driving thinner target foils at a lower intensity over a large area. The optimum condition was a 2 μm foil irradiated with an intensity of 1019 W/cm2 onto a 60 μm spot. Laser to proton beam efficiencies of 7.8% have been achieved (2.2% before) - one of the highest conversion efficiencies ever achieved. In the frame of this work, two separate experiments at the TRIDENT laser system have shown that these laser-accelerated proton beams, with their high number of particles in a short pulse duration, are well-suited for creating isochorically heated matter in extreme conditions. Besides the manipulation of the proton beam parameters directly during the generation, the primary aim of this thesis was the capture, control and transport of laser-accelerated proton beams by a solenoidal magnetic field lense for further purpose. In a joint project proposal, the laser and plasma physics group of the Technische Universitat Darmstadt

  11. Shaping of electron beam picosecond current pulses in waveguide accelerators

    Results are given of experiments on extracting a single bunch in an experimental SHF wavegujde accelerator operating in the stoped energy mode. The accelerator has the following parameters: 8 MeV energy, 1818 MHz frequency of the accelerating field, 10 ns pulse duration of current; 20 A pulsed current, operation in the mode of single massages. An electron beam in the shape of a 10 ns pulse has been injected into the waveguide at the end of a SHF-pulse. The shape of detected picosecond pulses of accelerated electron current is close to triangular one, pulse duration at half-height with correction for rise time of the measuring system is equal to 50 ps, pulse current is about 100 A, electron energy equals 8 MeV

  12. Combined in-beam gamma-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy with radioactive ion beams

    Konki J.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In-beam gamma-ray and electron spectroscopy have been widely used as tools to study the broad variety of phenomena in nuclear structure. The SPEDE spectrometer is a new device to be used in conjunction with the MINIBALL germanium detector array to enable the detection of internal conversion electrons in coincidence with gamma rays from de-exciting nuclei in radioactive ion beam experiments at the upcoming HIE-ISOLDE facility at CERN, Switzerland. Geant4 simulations were carried out in order to optimise the design and segmentation of the silicon detector to achieve good energy resolution and performance.

  13. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K.W.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Fuerst, J.D.; Waldschmidt, G.; /Argonne; Gonin, I.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006 < v/c < 0.06. Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to CW acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently-phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front-end of such linacs, particularly for the post-acceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008 < {beta} = v/c < 0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3-4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  14. Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators

    The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC

  15. Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC

  16. Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-03-01

    The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC

  17. UNDULATOR-BASED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC

    We discuss the design and current status of experiments to couple the THUNDER undulator to the LOASIS Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). Currently the LWFA has achieved quasi-monoenergetic electron beams with energies up to 1 GeV. These ultra-short, high-peak-current, electron beams are ideal for driving a compact XUV free electron laser (FEL). Understanding the electron beam properties such as the energy spread and emittance is critical for achieving high quality light sources with high brightness. By using an insertion device such as an undulator and observing changes in the spontaneous emission spectrum, the electron beam energy spread and emittance can be measured with high precision. The initial experiments will use spontaneous emission from 1.5 m of undulator. Later experiments will use up to 5 m of undulator with a goal of a high gain, XUV FEL.

  18. A large distributed digital camera system for accelerator beam diagnostics

    Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Honkavaara, K.

    2005-07-01

    Optical diagnostics, providing images of accelerated particle beams using radiation emitted by particles impinging a radiator, typically a fluorescent screen, has been extensively used, especially on electron linacs, since the 1970's. Higher intensity beams available in the last decade allow extending the use of beam imaging techniques to perform precise measurements of important beam parameters such as emittance, energy, and energy spread using optical transition radiation (OTR). OTR-based diagnostics systems are extensively used on the superconducting TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac driving the vacuum ultraviolet free electron laser (VUV-FEL) at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron facility. Up to 30 optical diagnostic stations have been installed at various positions along the 250-m-long linac, each equipped with a high-performance digital camera. This paper describes the new approach to the design of the hardware and software setups required by the complex topology of such a distributed camera system.

  19. A large distributed digital camera system for accelerator beam diagnostics

    Optical diagnostics, providing images of accelerated particle beams using radiation emitted by particles impinging a radiator, typically a fluorescent screen, has been extensively used, especially on electron linacs, since the 1970's. Higher intensity beams available in the last decade allow extending the use of beam imaging techniques to perform precise measurements of important beam parameters such as emittance, energy, and energy spread using optical transition radiation (OTR). OTR-based diagnostics systems are extensively used on the superconducting TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac driving the vacuum ultraviolet free electron laser (VUV-FEL) at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron facility. Up to 30 optical diagnostic stations have been installed at various positions along the 250-m-long linac, each equipped with a high-performance digital camera. This paper describes the new approach to the design of the hardware and software setups required by the complex topology of such a distributed camera system

  20. Development of a radioactive ion beam test stand at LBNL

    For the on-line production of a 14O+ ion beam, an integrated target transfer line ion source system is now under development at LBNL. 14O is produced in the form of CO in a high temperature carbon target using a 20 MeV 3He beam from the LBNL 88double-prime Cyclotron via the reaction 12C(3He,n)14O. The neutral radioactive CO molecules diffuse through an 8 m room temperature stainless steel line from the target chamber into a cusp ion source. The molecules are dissociated, ionized and extracted at energies of 20 to 30 keV and mass separated with a double focusing bending magnet. The different components of the setup are described. The release and transport efficiency for the CO molecules from the target through the transfer line was measured for various target temperatures. The ion beam transport efficiencies and the off-line ion source efficiencies for Ar, O2 and CO are presented. Ionization efficiencies of 28% for Ar+, 1% for CO, 0.7% for O+, 0.33 for C+ have been measured. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  1. Development of a radioactive ion beam test stand at LBNL

    For the on-line production of a 14O+ ion beam, an integrated target--transfer line ion source system is now under development at LBNL. 14O is produced in the form of CO in a high temperature carbon target using a 20 MeV 3He beam from the LBNL 88'' Cyclotron via the reaction 12C(3He,n)14O. The neutral radioactive CO molecules diffuse through an 8 m room temperature stainless steel line from the target chamber into a cusp ion source. The molecules are dissociated, ionized and extracted at energies of 20 to 30 keV and mass separated with a double focusing bending magnet. The different components of the setup are described. The release and transport efficiency for the CO molecules from the target through the transfer line was measured for various target temperatures. The ion beam transport efficiencies and the off-line ion source efficiencies for Ar, O2 and CO are presented. Ionization efficiencies of 28% for Ar+, 1% for CO, 0.7% for O+, 0.33 for C+ have been measured

  2. Recent direct reaction experimental studies with radioactive tin beams

    Jones, K L; Allmond, J M; Ayres, A; Bardayan, D W; Baugher, T; Bazin, D; Berryman, J S; Bey, A; Bingham, C; Cartegni, L; Cerizza, G; Chae, K Y; Cizewski, J A; Gade, A; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Garcia-Ruiz, R F; Grzywacz, R; Howard, M E; Kozub, R L; Liang, J F; Manning, B; Matos, M; McDaniel, S; Miller, D; Nesaraja, C D; O'Malley, P D; Padgett, S; Padilla-Rodal, E; Pain, S D; Pittman, S T; Radford, D C; Ratkiewicz, A; Schmitt, K T; Shore, A; Smith, M S; Stracener, D W; Stroberg, S R; Tostevin, J; Varner, R L; Weisshaar, D; Wimmer, K; Winkler, R

    2015-01-01

    Direct reaction techniques are powerful tools to study the single-particle nature of nuclei. Performing direct reactions on short-lived nuclei requires radioactive ion beams produced either via fragmentation or the Isotope Separation OnLine (ISOL) method. Some of the most interesting regions to study with direct reactions are close to the magic numbers where changes in shell structure can be tracked. These changes can impact the final abundances of explosive nucleosynthesis. The structure of the chain of tin isotopes is strongly influenced by the Z=50 proton shell closure, as well as the neutron shell closures lying in the neutron-rich, N=82, and neutron-deficient, N=50, regions. Here we present two examples of direct reactions on exotic tin isotopes. The first uses a one-neutron transfer reaction and a low-energy reaccelerated ISOL beam to study states in 131Sn from across the N=82 shell closure. The second example utilizes a one-neutron knockout reaction on fragmentation beams of neutron-deficient 106,108Sn...

  3. A nuclear physics program at the Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator Facility in Korea

    Chang-Bum Moon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the new physics possibilities that fall within the field of nuclear structure and astrophysics based on experiments with radioactive ion beams at the future Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator facility in Korea. This ambitious multi-beam facility has both an Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL and fragmentation capability to produce rare isotopes beams (RIBs and will be capable of producing and accelerating beams of wide range mass of nuclides with energies of a few to hundreds MeV per nucleon. The large dynamic range of reaccelerated RIBs will allow the optimization in each nuclear reaction case with respect to cross section and channel opening. The low energy RIBs around Coulomb barrier offer nuclear reactions such as elastic resonance scatterings, one or two particle transfers, Coulomb multiple-excitations, fusion-evaporations, and direct capture reactions for the study of the very neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclides. In contrast, the high energy RIBs produced by in-flight fragmentation with reaccelerated ions from the ISOL enable to explore the study of neutron drip lines in intermediate mass regions. The proposed studies aim at investigating the exotic nuclei near and beyond the nucleon drip lines, and to explore how nuclear many-body systems change in such extreme regions by addressing the following topics: the evolution of shell structure in areas of extreme proton to neutron imbalance; the study of the weak interaction in exotic decay schemes such as beta-delayed two-neutron or two-proton emission; the change of isospin symmetry in isobaric mirror nuclei at the drip lines; two protons or two neutrons radioactivity beyond the drip lines; the role of the continuum states including resonant states above the particle-decay threshold in exotic nuclei; and the effects of nuclear reaction rates triggered by the unbound proton-rich nuclei on nuclear astrophysical processes.

  4. Nuclear reactions with 11C and 14O radioactive ion beams

    Guo, Fanqing

    2004-12-09

    Radioactive ion beams (RIBs) have been shown to be a useful tool for studying proton-rich nuclides near and beyond the proton dripline and for evaluating nuclear models. To take full advantage of RIBs, Elastic Resonance Scattering in Inverse Kinematics with Thick Targets (ERSIKTT), has proven to be a reliable experimental tool for investigations of proton unbound nuclei. Following several years of effort, Berkeley Experiments with Accelerated Radioactive Species (BEARS), a RIBs capability, has been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. The current BEARS provides two RIBs: a 11C beam of up to 2x108 pps intensity on target and an 14O beam of up to 3x104 pps intensity. While the development of the 11C beam has been relatively easy, a number of challenges had to be overcome to obtain the 14O beam. The excellent 11C beam has been used to investigate several reactions. The first was the 197Au(11C,xn)208-xnAt reaction, which was used to measure excitation functions for the 4n to 8n exit channels. The measured cross sections were generally predicted quite well using the fusion-evaporation code HIVAP. Possible errors in the branching ratios of ?? decays from At isotopes as well as the presence of incomplete fusion reactions probably contribute to specific overpredictions. 15F has been investigated by the p(14O,p)14O reaction with the ERSIKTT technology. Several 14O+p runs have been performed. Excellent energy calibration was obtained using resonances from the p(14N,p)14N reaction in inverse kinematics, and comparing the results to those obtained earlier with normal kinematics. The differences between 14N+p and 14O+p in the stopping power function have been evaluated for better energy calibration. After careful calibration, the energy levels of 15F were fitted with an R-matrix calculation. Spins and parities were assigned to the two observed resonances. This new measurement of the 15F ground state supports the disappearance of the Z

  5. Nuclear reactions with 11C and 14O radioactive ion beams

    Radioactive ion beams (RIBs) have been shown to be a useful tool for studying proton-rich nuclides near and beyond the proton dripline and for evaluating nuclear models. To take full advantage of RIBs, Elastic Resonance Scattering in Inverse Kinematics with Thick Targets (ERSIKTT), has proven to be a reliable experimental tool for investigations of proton unbound nuclei. Following several years of effort, Berkeley Experiments with Accelerated Radioactive Species (BEARS), a RIBs capability, has been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. The current BEARS provides two RIBs: a 11C beam of up to 2x108 pps intensity on target and an 14O beam of up to 3x104 pps intensity. While the development of the 11C beam has been relatively easy, a number of challenges had to be overcome to obtain the 14O beam. The excellent 11C beam has been used to investigate several reactions. The first was the 197Au(11C,xn)208-xnAt reaction, which was used to measure excitation functions for the 4n to 8n exit channels. The measured cross sections were generally predicted quite well using the fusion-evaporation code HIVAP. Possible errors in the branching ratios of ?? decays from At isotopes as well as the presence of incomplete fusion reactions probably contribute to specific overpredictions. 15F has been investigated by the p(14O,p)14O reaction with the ERSIKTT technology. Several 14O+p runs have been performed. Excellent energy calibration was obtained using resonances from the p(14N,p)14N reaction in inverse kinematics, and comparing the results to those obtained earlier with normal kinematics. The differences between 14N+p and 14O+p in the stopping power function have been evaluated for better energy calibration. After careful calibration, the energy levels of 15F were fitted with an R-matrix calculation. Spins and parities were assigned to the two observed resonances. This new measurement of the 15F ground state supports the disappearance of the Z = 8

  6. The fingerprint method for characterization of radioactive waste in hadron accelerators

    Magistris, M. [CERN, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland)], E-mail: matteo.magistris@cern.ch; Ulrici, L. [CERN, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2008-06-21

    Beam losses are responsible for material activation in most of the components of particle accelerators. The activation is caused by several nuclear processes and varies with the irradiation history and the characteristics of the material (namely chemical composition and size). Once at the end of their operational lifetime, these materials require radiological characterization. The radionuclide inventory depends on the particle spectrum, the irradiation history and the chemical composition of the material. As long as these factors are known and the material cross-sections are available, the induced radioactivity can be calculated analytically. However, these factors vary widely among different items of waste and sometimes they are only partially known. The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN, Geneva) has been operating accelerators for high-energy physics for 50 years. Different methods for the evaluation of the radionuclide inventory are currently under investigation at CERN, including the so-called 'fingerprint method'. This paper provides a mathematical formulation of the fingerprint method highlighting its advantages and limits of validity. The study includes the application to a real case and the validation of the predictions.

  7. Beam loading compensation for acceleration of multi-bunch electron beam train

    Liu, Shengguang; Fukuda, Masafumi; Araki, Sakae; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; Hirano, Koichiro; Sasao, Noboru

    2008-01-01

    The laser undulator compact X-ray source (LUCX) is a test bench used with the compact, high-brightness X-ray generator at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization). Our group is conducting experiments with LUCX to demonstrate the possibility of K-edge digital subtraction angiography, based on Compton scattering. One of the challenging problems is to generate high-brightness multi-bunch electron beams to compensate for the energy difference arising from the beam loading effect. In this paper we calculate the transient beam loading voltage and energy gain from the RF field in the gun and accelerating tube for a multi-bunch train. To do so we consider the process by which the RF field builds up in the gun and accelerating tube, and the special shape of the RF pulse. We generate and accelerate 100 bunches with a 50 nC electron bunch train, effectively compensating for the beam loading effect by adjusting the injection timing. Using a beam position monitor (BPM) and optical transition radiation (OTR) system, we measure the electron beam energy bunch by bunch. The average energy of a 100-bunch train is 40.5 MeV and the maximum energy difference from bunch to bunch is 0.26 MeV.

  8. Beam loading compensation for acceleration of multi-bunch electron beam train

    The laser undulator compact X-ray source (LUCX) is a test bench used with the compact, high-brightness X-ray generator at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization). Our group is conducting experiments with LUCX to demonstrate the possibility of K-edge digital subtraction angiography, based on Compton scattering. One of the challenging problems is to generate high-brightness multi-bunch electron beams to compensate for the energy difference arising from the beam loading effect. In this paper we calculate the transient beam loading voltage and energy gain from the RF field in the gun and accelerating tube for a multi-bunch train. To do so we consider the process by which the RF field builds up in the gun and accelerating tube, and the special shape of the RF pulse. We generate and accelerate 100 bunches with a 50 nC electron bunch train, effectively compensating for the beam loading effect by adjusting the injection timing. Using a beam position monitor (BPM) and optical transition radiation (OTR) system, we measure the electron beam energy bunch by bunch. The average energy of a 100-bunch train is 40.5 MeV and the maximum energy difference from bunch to bunch is 0.26 MeV

  9. Determination of beam characteristic parameters for a linear accelerator

    A mechanism to determine electron beam characteristic parameters of a linear accelerator was constructed. The mechanism consists in an electro-calorimeter and an accurate optical densitometer. The following parameters: mean power, mean current, mean energy/particle, pulse Width, pulse amplitude dispersion, and pulse frequency, operating the 2 MeV linear accelerator of CBPF (Brazilian Center pf Physics Researches). The optical isodensity curves of irradiated glass lamellae were obtained, providing information about focus degradation penetration direction in material and the reach of particle. The point to point dose distribution in the material from optical density curves were obtained, using a semi empirical and approached model. (M.C.K.)

  10. The LICPA accelerator of dense plasma and ion beams

    Badziak, J.; Jabłoński, S.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Parys, P.; Rączka, P.; Rosiński, M.; Krouský, Eduard; Ullschmied, Jiří; Liska, R.; Kucharik, M.; Torrisi, L.

    Vol. 508. Bristol: IOP Publishing, 2014, 012006-012006. (IOPscience. 508). ISSN 1742-6588. [Plasma Physics by Laser and Applications 2013 Conference (PPLA2013). Lecce (IT), 02.10.2013-04.10.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010014 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : LICPA accelerator * ion beams * macroparticle acceleration * PALS laser * PIC simulations Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/508/1/012006/pdf/1742-6596_508_1_012006.pdf

  11. Hertzian spectroscopy application to excited states in accelerated ion beams

    It is shown that accelerated ion beams enables the application of optical hertzian spectrometry methods to be extended to research on the excited states of free ionic systems. The photon beat method has proved especially simple to apply in beam foil geometry because of the unidirectional beam velocity while the beam gas device is suitable for experiments of the energy level crossing type. Only the resonance technique involving direct application of high-frequency magnetic fields poses serious problems because of the high HF powers necessary. So far structure intervals have been measured in ions carrying up to three charges (seven in the special case of Lamb shift measurements) with a precision of a few percent. The interest of these structure studies in free ions is emphasized particularly. The study of hydrogen-like or helium-like ions of high Z allows the fundamental calculations of quantum electrodynamics to be checked with regard to the Lamb shift or the spontaneous emission theory. In more complex electronic systems, optical spectroscopy of accelerated ion beams gives wavelengths with a resolution reaching 10-5, lifetimes with an accuracy better than 10% when the cascade effects are properly studied, and Lande factors with a precision of several % under present technical conditions. The photon beat method concerns hyperfine nuclear effects in light atoms of Z<=20. Another line of research study the hyperfine structure of a given configuration in an isoelectronic sequence

  12. In flight production of a 8Li radioactive beam for Big Bang nucleosynthesis investigations at LNS Catania

    The in flight production of a secondary 8Li radioactive beam using the existing beam transport lines at the SMP13 Tandem accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud in Catania is studied. The method consists in the momentum filtering by a switching magnet of the 8Li ions emitted backward in the centre of mass of the 2H(7Li,p)8Li reaction, followed by a time-of-flight tagging of the deflected ions. Details of the experimental procedures and preliminary results of the 8Li(4He,n)11B reaction study relevant for pregalactic nucleosynthesis are presented and discussed

  13. Transformer ratio saturation in a beam-driven wakefield accelerator

    Farmer, J. P.; Martorelli, R.; Pukhov, A. [Institut für Theoretische Physik I, Heinrich Heine Universität, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    We show that for beam-driven wakefield acceleration, the linearly ramped, equally spaced train of bunches typically considered to optimise the transformer ratio only works for flat-top bunches. Through theory and simulation, we explain that this behaviour is due to the unique properties of the plasma response to a flat-top density profile. Calculations of the optimal scaling for a train of Gaussian bunches show diminishing returns with increasing bunch number, tending towards saturation. For a periodic bunch train, a transformer ratio of 23 was achieved for 50 bunches, rising to 40 for a fully optimised beam.

  14. H-Mode Accelerating Structures with PMQ Beam Focusing

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Eric R.; Wangler, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures by combining H-mode resonator cavities and a transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of inter-digital H-mode (IH-PMQ) structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. Results of the combined 3-D modeling - electromagnetic c...

  15. Nitrogen implantation in steel with a pulsed ion beam accelerator

    The modification of wear properties of high speed steel cutting tools for lathe by nitrogen implantation, were studied in a normal boring process of SAE 1045 steel parts. The implantation was done with a pulsed ion beam accelerator, which produced a nitrogen ion beam of continuous energy spectrum (10-300 KeV) with 400 ns pulsed duration on target. A tool fluence of 1.65 x 1017 cm-2 - obtained by 30 singles shot accumulation was used in the experiments. (author)

  16. Materials science and biophysics applications at the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    Wahl, U., E-mail: uwahl@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-12-15

    The ISOLDE isotope separator facility at CERN provides a variety of radioactive ion beams, currently more than 800 different isotopes from {approx}70 chemical elements. The radioisotopes are produced on-line by nuclear reactions from a 1.4 GeV proton beam with various types of targets, outdiffusion of the reaction products and, if possible, chemically selective ionisation, followed by 60 kV acceleration and mass separation. While ISOLDE is mainly used for nuclear and atomic physics studies, applications in materials science and biophysics account for a significant part (currently {approx}15%) of the delivered beam time, requested by 18 different experiments. The ISOLDE materials science and biophysics community currently consists of {approx}80 scientists from more than 40 participating institutes and 21 countries. In the field of materials science, investigations focus on the study of semiconductors and oxides, with the recent additions of nanoparticles and metals, while the biophysics studies address the toxicity of metal ions in biological systems. The characterisation methods used are typical radioactive probe techniques such as Moessbauer spectroscopy, perturbed angular correlation, emission channeling, and tracer diffusion studies. In addition to these 'classic' methods of nuclear solid state physics, also standard semiconductor analysis techniques such as photoluminescence or deep level transient spectroscopy profit from the application of radioactive isotopes, which helps them to overcome their chemical 'blindness' since the nuclear half life of radioisotopes provides a signal that changes in time with characteristic exponential decay or saturation curves. In this presentation an overview will be given on the recent research activities in materials science and biophysics at ISOLDE, presenting some of the highlights during the last five years, together with a short outlook on the new developments under way.

  17. Study of a multi-beam accelerator driven thorium reactor

    The primary advantages that accelerator driven systems have over critical reactors are: (1) Greater flexibility regarding the composition and placement of fissile, fertile, or fission product waste within the blanket surrounding the target, and (2) Potentially enhanced safety brought about by operating at a sufficiently low value of the multiplication factor to preclude reactivity induced events. The control of the power production can be achieved by vary the accelerator beam current. Furthermore, once the beam is shut off the system shuts down. The primary difference between the operation of an accelerator driven system and a critical system is the issue of beam interruptions of the accelerator. These beam interruptions impose thermo-mechanical loads on the fuel and mechanical components not found in critical systems. Studies have been performed to estimate an acceptable number of trips, and the value is significantly less stringent than had been previously estimated. The number of acceptable beam interruptions is a function of the length of the interruption and the mission of the system. Thus, for demonstration type systems and interruption durations of 1sec 5mins 2500/yr and 50/yr are deemed acceptable. However, for industrial scale power generation without energy storage type systems and interruption durations of t 5mins, the acceptable number of interruptions are 25000, 2500, 250, and 3 respectively. However, it has also been concluded that further development is required to reduce the number of trips. It is with this in mind that the following study was undertaken. The primary focus of this study will be the merit of a multi-beam target system, which allows for multiple spallation sources within the target/blanket assembly. In this manner it is possible to ameliorate the effects of sudden accelerator beam interruption on the surrounding reactor, since the remaining beams will still be supplying source neutrons. The proton beam will be assumed to have an

  18. Development of compact low energy election beam accelerator

    Sumitomo Heavy Industries has developed new compact accelerator jointly with its affiliated company RPC industries and some of which have already been in use in industries. Named WIPL, or WIP, which stands for Wire Ion Plasma, this accelerator is almost half the size of existing accelerators yet with performance as high as well enough to cope with industrial requirements. Background of our determination to develop such accelerator was that there prevails fairly good numbers of small laboratory units but only small numbers of production machines are in use. The main reason which brought such environment was that those production units were husky and costly. To overcome such problem and to turn situation in favor we launched the development programme and eventually succeeded to complete WIPL. Unique feature of WIPL was materialized by adopting special method of generating electrons. Unlike existing accelerators which use heated filaments WIPL utilizes the system using electron emission by bombardment of cathode plate by helium ions as electron source. Electrons are to be generated in following manner. 1) Thin helium gas is introduced in plasma chamber in which wire(s) for applying electric power. When power is supplied helium gas is turned into helium plasma by electric field. 2) Being energized by separate high voltage power source cathode plate is charged minus simultaneously. 3) Plus charged helium ions in plasma are then accelerated toward cathode plate and hit the surface. 4) Cathode plate emits electrons by bombardment and emitted electrons are compelled by the field and accelerated to the direction which helium ion came. Since such system no longer requires insulated transformers and control system for controlling electron beam current used in filament type machines equipment becomes remarkably small and economical. We really hope that this machine is accepted widely and contributes for exploiting the new horizon of electron beam market. (author)

  19. Proceedings of the workshop on the production and use of intense radioactive beams at the Isospin Laboratory

    Garrett, J.D. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    These proceedings report the deliberations of a 3 1/2 day workshop on the Production and Use of Intense Radioactive Ion Beams at the Isospin Laboratory, which was held at the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1992. The purpose of this workshop was not to duplicate the programs of other recent radioactive ion beam workshops or international conferences that have focused on the scientific concepts which radioactive beams can, and in fact already are, addressing. Instead, the intent was to address the technical problems associated with the construction of the next generation ISOL facility and to initiate a discussion of the type of experimental equipment that should be developed for such a facility. We have tried to bring together in Oak Ridge the world`s experts in radioactive targets/ion sources, light and heavy-ion accelerators, and detection systems. After 1 1/2 days of overview presentations, the participants divided into three discussion groups (Experiments with Radioactive Beams, Target Ion Sources and Mass Separation, and Accelerators-Primary and Secondary) for 1 1/2 days of detailed discussions of the most pertinent issues. The final session was devoted to reports from each of the discussion groups and a general discussion of where to go from here. An outgrowth of these discussions was the establishment of working groups to coordinate future technical developments associated with the pertinent issues. The proceedings include the text of all the overview presentations, reports from each discussion group, as well as contributions from those participants who chose to provide the text of their presentations in the discussion groups and the Concluding Remarks. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Proceedings of the workshop on the production and use of intense radioactive beams at the Isospin Laboratory

    These proceedings report the deliberations of a 3 1/2 day workshop on the Production and Use of Intense Radioactive Ion Beams at the Isospin Laboratory, which was held at the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1992. The purpose of this workshop was not to duplicate the programs of other recent radioactive ion beam workshops or international conferences that have focused on the scientific concepts which radioactive beams can, and in fact already are, addressing. Instead, the intent was to address the technical problems associated with the construction of the next generation ISOL facility and to initiate a discussion of the type of experimental equipment that should be developed for such a facility. We have tried to bring together in Oak Ridge the world's experts in radioactive targets/ion sources, light and heavy-ion accelerators, and detection systems. After 1 1/2 days of overview presentations, the participants divided into three discussion groups (Experiments with Radioactive Beams, Target Ion Sources and Mass Separation, and Accelerators-Primary and Secondary) for 1 1/2 days of detailed discussions of the most pertinent issues. The final session was devoted to reports from each of the discussion groups and a general discussion of where to go from here. An outgrowth of these discussions was the establishment of working groups to coordinate future technical developments associated with the pertinent issues. The proceedings include the text of all the overview presentations, reports from each discussion group, as well as contributions from those participants who chose to provide the text of their presentations in the discussion groups and the Concluding Remarks. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  1. Preliminary Research Results for the Generation and Diagnostics of High Power Ion Beams on FLASH II Accelerator

    杨海亮; 邱爱慈; 孙剑锋; 何小平; 汤俊萍; 王海洋; 李洪玉; 李静雅; 任书庆; 欧阳小平; 张国光

    2004-01-01

    The preliminary experimental results of the generation and diagnostics of high power ion beams on FLASH II accelerator are reported. The high-power ion beams presently are being produced in a pinched diode. The method for enhancing the ratio of ion to electron current is to increase the electron residing time by pinching the electron flow. Furthermore, electron beam pinching can be combined with electron reflexing to achieve ion beams with even higher efficiency and intensity. The anode plasma is generated by anode foil bombarded with electronand anode foil surface flashover. In recent experiments on FLASH II accelerator, ion beams have been produced with a current of 160 kA and anen ergy of 500 keV corresponding to an ion beam peak power of about 80 GW. The ion number ard current of high power ion beams were determined by monitoring delayed radioactivity from nuclear reactions induced in a 12C target by the proton beams. The prompt γ-rays and diode bremsstrahlung X-rays were measured with a PIN semi-conductor detector and a plastic scintillator detector. The current density distribution of ion beam were measured with a biased ion collector array. The ion beams were also recorded with a CR-39 detector.

  2. Collective ion acceleration in high current relativistic electron beams

    This report describes the progress made during the current contract period investigating the use of high power relativistic electron beams for electron and ion acceleration. Section 2 gives a summary of results from the relativistic klystron experiment and details our plans for a large diameter coaxial system. Section 3 summarizes our efforts to generate upper hybrid waves on relativistic electron beams. Simulation work of the upper hybrid excitation process is reported. Our experiment using high power microwaves for electron acceleration is discussed. This paper also reports progress on development of repetitive pulsed experimental and data acquisition systems. Our future research plans are outlined, followed by a list of publications and presentations from our present work. 10 figs

  3. Plasma opening switch experiments on the Particle Beam Accelerator II

    Plasma opening switch (POS) experiments have been done since 1986 on the PBFA-II ion beam accelerator to develop a rugged POS that will open rapidly (80%) into a high impedance (> 10 ohm) load. In a recent series of experiments on PBFA II, the authors have developed and tested three different switch designs that use magnetic fields to control and confine the injected plasma. All three configurations couple current efficiently to a 5-ohm electron beam diode. In this experimental series, the PBFA-II Delta Series, more extensive diagnostics were used than in previous switch experiments on PBFA II or on the Blackjack 5 accelerator at Maxwell Laboratories. Data from the experiments with these three switch designs is presented

  4. Beam by design: laser manipulation of electrons in modern accelerators

    Hemsing, Erik; Xiang, Dao; Zholents, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Accelerator-based light sources such as storage rings and free-electron lasers use relativistic electron beams to produce intense radiation over a wide spectral range for fundamental research in physics, chemistry, materials science, biology and medicine. More than a dozen such sources operate worldwide, and new sources are being built to deliver radiation that meets with the ever increasing sophistication and depth of new research. Even so, conventional accelerator techniques often cannot keep pace with new demands and, thus, new approaches continue to emerge. In this article, we review a variety of recently developed and promising techniques that rely on lasers to manipulate and rearrange the electron distribution in order to tailor the properties of the radiation. Basic theories of electron-laser interactions, techniques to create micro- and nano-structures in electron beams, and techniques to produce radiation with customizable waveforms are reviewed. We overview laser-based techniques for the generation ...

  5. Million revolution accelerator beam instrument for logging and evaluation

    A data acquisition and analysis instrument for the processing of accelerator beam position monitor (BPM) signals has been assembled and used preliminarily for beam diagnosis of the Fermilab accelerators. Up to eight BPM (or other analogue) channels are digitized and transmitted to an acquisition Sun workstation and from there both to a monitor workstation and a workstation for off-line (but immediate) data analysis. A coherent data description format permits fast data object transfers to and from memory, disk and tape, across the Sun ethernet. This has helped the development of both general purpose and experiment-specific data analysis, presentation and control tools. Flexible software permits immediate graphical display in both time and frequency domains. The instrument acts simultaneously as a digital oscilloscope, as a network analyzer and as a correlating, noise-reducing spectrum analyzer. 2 refs., 3 figs

  6. Direct reaction experimental studies with beams of radioactive tin ions

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at 100Sn, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at 132Sn out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich 130Sn. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of γ rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications

  7. Nuclear-structure studies far from stability with high-energy radioactive beams

    The fragmentation of high-energy heavy-ion projectiles routinely produces nuclei at the limits of stability. The recent combination of versatile heavy-ion accelerators (primarily cyclotrons) with large acceptance fragment separators has made these exotic isotopes available for nuclear structure studies. The four presently operating projectile-fragmentation facilities devote significant fractions of their experimental programs to studies of nuclei divided into three rough categories: demonstration of existence, measured at the limits to stability that can be divided in to three rough categories: demonstration of existance, measurement of the decay properties, and use in secondary reactions. Recent work using unusual isotopic beams has demonstrated the production of nuclei along the proton drip-line up to A∼80 and up to A∼30 in the substantially harder to attain neutron drip line. The measurement of the decay properties of such exotic nuclei have been readily carried out by transporting, them with normal beam lines to low background vaults for traditional measurements of beta-decay half-lives, delayed particle emission', etc. of the stopped beams. Perhaps the most exciting and new feature of these radioactive beams is that even the most exotic unstable nuclei can be used in secondary nuclear reactions. Intense effort has been put into studies of light neutron-rich nuclei, ranging from elastic scattering, to direct reactions and even secondary open-quote projectile-fragmentationclose quotes but many other possibilities are beginning to be explored

  8. Manipulating nonlinear optical processes with accelerating light beams

    We show theoretically that accelerating light beams can be used to manipulate nonlinear optical processes through spatiotemporal quasi-phase-matching, allowing for unprecedented temporal and spectral shaping of the generated light. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate exquisite control over the high-order harmonic frequency conversion process, showing efficient enhancement of an extremely broad range of harmonics emitted during a selected quarter-cycle of the driving laser pulse.

  9. Shielding design of electron beam accelerators using supercomputer

    The MCNP5 neutron, electron, photon Monte Carlo transport program was installed on the KISTI's SUN Tachyon computer using the parallel programming. Electron beam accelerators were modeled and shielding calculations were performed in order to investigate the reduction of computation time in the supercomputer environment. It was observed that a speedup of 40 to 80 of computation time can be obtained using 64 CPUs compared to an IBM PC

  10. Results of the SINGAP Neutral Beam Accelerator Experiment at JAEA

    de Esch, H. P. L.; Svensson, L.; Inoue, T.; Taniguchi, M.; Umeda, N.; Kashiwagi, M.; Fubiani, G.

    2009-03-01

    IRFM (CEA Cadarache) and JAEA Naka have entered into a collaboration in order to test a SINGAP [1] accelerator at the JAEA Megavolt Test Facility (MTF) at Naka, Japan. Whereas at the CEA testbed the acceleration current was limited to 0.1 A, at JAEA 0.5 A is available. This allows the acceleration of 15 H- beamlets in SINGAP to be tested and a direct comparison between SINGAP and MAMuG [2] to be made. High-voltage conditioning in the SINGAP configuration has been quite slow, with 581 kV in vacuum achieved after 140 hours of conditioning. With 0.1 Pa of H2 gas present in the accelerator 787 kV could be achieved. The conditioning curve for MAMuG is 200 kV higher. SINGAP beam optics appears in agreement with calculation results. A beamlet divergence better than 5 mrad was obtained. SINGAP accelerates electrons to a higher energy than MAMuG. Measurements of the power intercepted on one of the electron dumps have been compared with EAMCC code [3] calculations. Based on the experiments described here, electron production by a SINGAP accelerator scaled up to ITER size was estimated to be too high for comfort

  11. Radioactive beams produced by the ISOL method: development for laser ionization and for surface ionization

    The works were carried out in the framework of the research program PARRNe (production of radioactive neutron-rich nuclei). This program aims to determine optimal conditions to produce intense beams of neutron-rich isotopes. This thesis treats multiple technical aspects related to the production of separate radioactive isotopes in line (ISOL). It deals mainly with the development of the target-source unit which is the key element for projects such as SPIRAL-2 or EURISOL.The first part presents the various methods using fission as production mode and compares them: fission induced by thermal neutrons, induced by fast neutrons and photofission. The experiment carried out at CERN validated the interest of the photofission as a promising production mode of radioactive ions. That is why the institute of nuclear physics of Orsay decided to build a linear electron accelerator at the Tandem d'Orsay (ALTO).The second part of this thesis deals with the development of uranium targets. The X-rays diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy have been used as analysis techniques. They allowed to determine the chemical and structural characteristics of uranium carbide targets as function of various heating temperatures. After the production, the process of ionization has been studied. Two types of ion source have been worked out: the first one is a surface ion source and the second one is a source based on resonant ionization by laser. These two types of sources will be used for the ALTO project. (author)

  12. CD: A double sided silicon strip detector for radioactive nuclear beam experiments

    A very compact double sided silicon strip detector array is described, designed for use in reaction studies involving radioactive nuclear beams. It is small enough to fit inside a large solid angle γ-detector array and will enable Doppler-shift corrections at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. The detector provides sufficient energy and time-of-flight resolution for the identification of light reaction products and can be set up to cover a substantial part of the scattering angular distribution with good resolution. The device is available in thicknesses of up to 500 μm to stop all interesting reaction products. Moreover, a very thin (35-40 μm) variant of this detector is described that can be used as an energy loss detector in a ΔE-E telescope geometry followed by a detector that measures the residual energy. This provides additional particle identification capabilities, e.g. in light exotic nuclei induced reactions. First results from a commissioning run using a post-accelerated radioactive beam are presented

  13. Studies of Nanotube Channeling for Efficient Beam Scraping at Accelerators

    Biryukov, V M

    2005-01-01

    While particle beam steering (and in particular, "scraping") in accelerators by bent channeling crystals is an established technique extensively tested at IHEP Protvino and other major high-energy labs, an interesting question is how one could improve channeling capabilities by applying modern nanotechnology. Theoretical research of nanotube channeling was in progress over recent years. In this work, we assess potential benefits from nanotube channeling for real accelerator systems. We report simulation studies of channeling in nanostructured material (carbon SWNT and MWNT) tested for possible serving as a primary scraper for the collimation systems of hadron colliders. The advantages of nanostructured material as a potential choice for a primary scraper in a high-energy accelerator such as LHC or the Tevatron are discussed in comparison to crystal lattices and amorphous material. We evaluate physical processes relevant to this application and reveal nanotechnology requirements.

  14. Electron Beam Focusing in the Linear Accelerator (linac)

    Jauregui, Luis

    2015-10-01

    To produce consistent data with an electron accelerator, it is critical to have a well-focused beam. To keep the beam focused, quadrupoles (quads) are employed. Quads are magnets, which focus the beam in one direction (x or y) and defocus in the other. When two or more quads are used in series, a net focusing effect is achieved in both vertical and horizontal directions. At start up there is a 5% calibration error in the linac at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This means that the momentum of particles passing through the quads isn't always what is expected, which affects the focusing of the beam. The objective is to find exactly how sensitive the focusing in the linac is to this 5% error. A linac was simulated, which contained 290 RF Cavities with random electric fields (to simulate the 5% calibration error), and a total momentum kick of 1090 MeV. National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, Jefferson Lab, Old Dominion University.

  15. A DSP based data acquisition module for colliding beam accelerators

    In 1999, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory will accelerate and store two beams of gold ions. The ions will then collide head on at a total energy of nearly 40 trillion electron volts. Attaining these conditions necessitates real-time monitoring of beam parameters and for this purpose a flexible data acquisition platform has been developed. By incorporating a floating point digital signal processor (DSP) and standard input/output modules, this system can acquire and process data from a variety of beam diagnostic devices. The DSP performs real time corrections, filtering, and data buffering to greatly reduce control system computation and bandwidth requirements. We will describe the existing hardware and software while emphasizing the compromises required to achieve a flexible yet cost effective system. Applications in several instrumentation systems currently construction will also be presented

  16. Beam control in the ETA-II linear induction accelerator

    Corkscrew beam motion is caused by chromatic aberration and misalignment of a focusing system. We have taken some measures to control the corkscrew motion on the ETA-II induction accelerator. To minimize chromatic aberration, we have developed an energy compensation scheme which reduces energy sweep and differential phase advance within a beam pulse. To minimize the misalignment errors, we have developed a time-independent steering algorithm which minimizes the observed corkscrew amplitude averaged over the beam pulse. The steering algorithm can be used even if the monitor spacing is much greater than the system's cyclotron wavelength and the corkscrew motion caused by a given misaligned magnet is fully developed, i.e., the relative phase advance is greater than 2π. (Author) 5 figs., 11 refs

  17. Study of electrostatic acceleration of H and D negative ion beams. Application to the 1 MeV SINGAP accelerator

    In the framework of the development of a neutral beam injection system for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the electrostatic acceleration of negative ion H/D beams up to an energy of 1 MeV has been studied. With the support of 3-D beam trajectory calculations, the limitations of the multi-aperture multi-grid acceleration concept, ITER reference concept, ar shown and the relevance of a new concept, called SINGAP, is demonstrated. In a SINGAP accelerator, beamlets are pre-accelerated with a classical triode multi-apertures system up to ∼ 50 keV. The pre-accelerated beamlets are then merged into a single beam and post-accelerated at high energy through a large SINGle APerture using one SINgle GAP. The optics of one pre-accelerated beamlet has been studied on the INCA triode accelerator at the Ecole Polytechnique. A diagnostic has been developed to measure the emittance of the pre-accelerated beamlet. A diagnostic has been developed to measure the emittance of the pre-accelerated beamlet. Values of ∼ 0.03π.mrad.cm for the effective normalized emittance and ∼ 12 mrad for the minimal beam divergence have been found (Hbeams). Besides, the effects of co-extracted electrons and pressure in the transport region on the beam optics are shown and experiment is compared to beam numerical simulation. On the Cadarache 1 MeV, 100 mA, D- SINGAP accelerator, beams of 1 s pulse were produced at a level of 900 keV (without observing breakdowns between electrodes). SINGAP optics has been investigated using an infrared calorimetric beam profile diagnostic (2-D) and a neutral beam profile diagnostic (1-D). The control of the beam optics is very satisfying: a divergence of ∼ 10 mrad has been measured, and 3-D simulations and experimentation are in good agreement. (author)

  18. Generation of accelerating Airy and accelerating parabolic beams using phase-only patterns

    Davis, Jeffrey A.; Mitry, Mark J.; Bandres, Miguel A.; Ruiz, Isaac; McAuley, Kevin-P; Cottrell, Don M.

    2009-01-01

    We generate both accelerated Airy and accelerated parabolic beams using phase-only patterns encoded onto a liquid crystal display (LCD). The usual system length is 2f, where f is the focal length of the Fourier transform lens. We develop a compact optical system having a total system length of f. However, the mask must now incorporate the Fresnel diffraction that is not provided by the reduced optical system length. Finally we incorporate the Fourier transform lens onto the mask. We obtain ex...

  19. Production of and studies with secondary radioactive ion beams at Lise

    The doubly achromatic spectrometer LISE, installed at GANIL has delivered secondary radioactive beams for the past 6 years. Essentially, it consists of by two dipole magnets selecting (in A/Z) and refocusing (achromatically) the projectile-like fragment-beams emitted at 00. Important features of LISE and selected experimental results will be discussed. LISE was substantially upgraded, recently, by adding a Wien-filter, providing secondary radioactive beams of still increased intensity and isotopic purity. (6 figs)

  20. Upgrade of accelerator beam facilities and revitalization of the utilization

    Through this project, the quality of the research with the proton accelerator could be improved due to the construction of the sample radiation measurement system which monitor the radiation after proton beam irradiation and the optical properties analysis system which is necessary for the irradiated samples. The semiconductor ion implanter was moved to Gyungju PEFP from Daejeon and set up. The ion beam service was performed 95 times from August to November 30. Blue sapphire was made by the metal ion implanter so that the possibility for the mass production and the industrial application was certified. In addition, PCB drill durability enhancement research was performed in the various condition, which helps other research for the industrial parts, and the light catalyst research was also effective to the real products. The number of paper submission and acceptance exceeds the original plan and three patent are processing. The semiconductor ion implanter can provide the various metal ion beam, which is evaluated as a big outcome. We are planing to activate the use of the metal ion implanter, to increase the available metal ion beam after obtaining a budget, to collect some fee for ion beam service, to commercialize the blue and yellow sapphire, to apply the metal ion implanter for other sapphire coloring, to transfer the light catalyst technology to company after additional researches. For PCB drill which some companies notice about, we endeavor the possibility of commerce by evaluating the mass production and economic advantage

  1. Determination of Beam Intensity and Position in a Particle Accelerator

    Kasprowicz, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajec- tory and orbit measurement system of the PS dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam position monitors (BPMs) and an analogue signal processing chain to acquire the trajectory of one single particle bunch out of many, over two consecutive turns at a maximum rate of once every 5ms. The BPMs were in good condition, however the electronics was aging and ...

  2. Collective acceleration of protons by the plasma waves in a counterstreaming electron beam

    A novel advanced accelerator is proposed. The counterstreaming electron beam accelerator relies on the same physical mechanism as that of the plasma accelerator but replaces the stationary plasma in the plasma accelerator by a magnetized relativistic electron beam, drifting antiparallel to the driving source and the driven particles, as the wave supporting medium. The plasma wave in a counterstreaming electron beam can be excited either by a density-ramped driving electron beam or by properly beating two laser beams. The fundamental advantages of the counterstreaming electron beam accelerator over the plasma accelerator are a longer and tunable plasma wavelength, a longer pump depletion length or a larger transformer ratio, and easier pulse shaping for the driving source and the driven beam. Thus the energy gain of the driven particles can be greatly enhanced whereas the trapping threshold can be dramatically reduced so as to admit the possibility for proton acceleration

  3. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    Sandri, S.; Coniglio, A.; D'Arienzo, M.; Poggi, C.

    2011-12-01

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  4. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    Sandri, S.; Poggi, C. [ENEA, Radiation Protection Institute, IRP-FUAC, Frascati (Italy); Coniglio, A. [Medical Physics Department, S. Giovanni Calibita Hospital, Fatebenefratelli, Isola Tiberina, Roma (Italy); D' Arienzo, M. [ENEA, Ionizing Radiation Metrology National Institute, METR, Casaccia, Rome (Italy)

    2011-12-13

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  5. High energy electron beam processing experiments with induction accelerators

    Induction accelerators are capable of producing very high electron beam power for processing at energies of 1-10 MeV. A high energy electron beam (HEEB) material processing system based on all-solid-state induction accelerator technology is in operation at Science Research Laboratory. The system delivers 50 ns 500 A current pulses at 1.5 MeV and is capable of operating at high power (500 kW) and high ( similar 5 kHz) repetition rate. HEEB processing with induction accelerators is useful for a wide variety of applications including the joining of high temperature materials, powder metallurgical fabrication, treatment of organic-contaminated wastewater and the curing of polymer matrix composites. High temperature HEEB experiments at SRL have demonstrated the brazing of carbon-carbon composites to metallic substrates and the melting and sintering of powders for graded-alloy fabrication. Other experiments have demonstrated efficient destruction of low-concentration organic contaminants in water and low temperature free-radical cross-linking of fiber-reinforced composites with acrylated resin matrices. (orig.)

  6. Design and development of pulsed electron beam accelerator 'AMBICA - 600'

    Verma, Rishi; Deb, Pankaj; Shukla, Rohit; Sharma, Surender; Shyam, Anurag

    2012-11-01

    Short duration, high power pulses with fast rise time and good flat-top are essentially required for driving pulsed electron beam diodes. To attain this objective, a dual resonant Tesla transformer based pulsed power accelerator 'AMBICA-600' has been developed. In this newly developed system, a coaxial water line is charged through single turn Tesla transformer that operates in the dual resonant mode. For making the accelerator compact, in the high power pulse forming line, water has been used as dielectric medium because of its high dielectric constant, high dielectric strength and high energy density. The coaxial waterline can be pulsed charged up to 600kV, has impedance of ~5Ω and generates pulse width of ~60ns. The integrated system is capable of producing intense electron beam of 300keV, 60kA when connected to impedance matched vacuum diode. In this paper, system hardware details and experimental results of gigawatt electron beam generation have been presented.

  7. Spin dynamics of electron beams in circular accelerators

    Experiments using high energy beams of spin polarized, charged particles still prove to be very helpful in disclosing a deeper understanding of the fundamental structure of matter. An important aspect is to control the beam properties, such as brilliance, intensity, energy, and degree of spin polarization. In this context, the present studies show various numerical calculations of the spin dynamics of high energy electron beams in circular accelerators. Special attention has to be paid to the emission of synchrotron radiation, that occurs when deflecting charged particles on circular orbits. In the presence of the fluctuation of the kinetic energy due to the photon emission, each electron spin moves non-deterministically. This stochastic effect commonly slows down the speed of all numeric estimations. However, the shown simulations cover - using appropriate approximations - trackings for the motion of thousands of electron spins for up to thousands of turns. Those calculations are validated and complemented by empirical investigations at the electron stretcher facility ELSA of the University of Bonn. They can largely be extended to other boundary conditions and thus, can be consulted for new accelerator layouts.

  8. Environmental assessment: Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia

    This Environmental Assessment has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to fulfill its obligations pursuant to Sect. 102 of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (Public Law 91-190). The proposed federal action addressed in this document is DOE's funding of a Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Newport News, Virginia. DOE intends to contract with the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) for operation of CEBAF, a continuous wave (CW) linear accelerator system (linac) capable of providing high-duty-factor beams throughout the energy range from 0.5 to 4.0 GeV. CEBAF will be the first of its kind worldwide and will offer a multi-GeV energy, high-intensity, high-duty-factor electron beam for use by the US nuclear physics community in research on the states of nuclear matter and the short-distance behavior of nuclei. The CEBAF project is largely in the conceptual design stage, with some components in the preliminary design stage. Construction is anticipated to begin in 1987 and be completed by 1992

  9. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-27

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  10. Advanced target concepts for production of radioactive ions and neutrino beams

    The 1-20 MW of proton beam power which modern accelerator technology put at our disposal for production of intense secondary beams presents a major technically challenge to the production targets. A conceptual design is presented for a high power pion production target and collection system, which was originally suggested to be used as the source for the proposed CERN muon-neutrino factory. It will be shown that the major parts of this target could also serve as an efficient spallation neutron source for production of 6He and fission products in the two-step converter target concept. The heart of the system consists of a free surface mercury jet with a high axial velocity, which allows the heat to be carried away efficiently from the production region. For the neutrino factory the secondary pions are collected and injected into the pion decay channel by means of a magnetic horn. For the radioactive ion-beam facility the Hg-jet is surrounded by the high-temperature isotope separator on-line (ISOL) production target. The suggested mechanical layout and technical parameters of the Hg-jet, ISOL target, horn and cooling system are discussed. The critical issues are identified and a description of the R and D program designed to provide experimental proof of the principle as well as providing engineering parameters is given

  11. Testing fundamental symmetries using radioactive ion beams at TRIUMF-ISAC

    Full text: The Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF in Vancouver, British Columbia, makes use of a 500 MeV proton beam with intensities up to 100 μA to produce radioactive ion beams (RIBs) by the Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL) technique. At present, low energy ion beams from the ion source are delivered to several experimental stations that address a range of nuclear physics issues, many of which are important for precision tests of the Standard Model of particle physics. These include the TRIUMF Neutral Atom Trap (TRINAT) facility, the TRIUMF Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear Science (TITAN) facility, the 8π gamma-ray spectrometer, the General Purpose Station (GPS) 4π gas counter, and the Radon-Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) set up. There exists significant collaboration amongst the members of these facilities in various experiments. In this talk I will present an overview of the scientific motivation of the above mentioned experimental facilities, and their relevance to the broad rubric of Standard Model tests. I will also present results from a few recently concluded experiments

  12. Theoretical and numerical studies on the transport of transverse beam quality in plasma-based accelerators

    Mehrling, Timon

    2014-01-01

    This work examines effects, which impact the transverse quality of electron-beams in plasma-based accelerators, by means of theoretical and numerical methods. Plasma-based acceleration is a promising candidate for future particle accelerator technologies. In plasma-based acceleration, highly intense laser beams or high-current relativistic particle beams are focused into a plasma to excite plasma-waves with extreme transverse and longitudinal electric fields. The amplitude of these fields exc...

  13. High resolution line for secondary radioactive beams at the U400M cyclotron

    For implementation of an experimental program for studying nuclear reactions with radioactive ion beams in the energy domain of 20 through 80 MeV · A the high resolution beam line ACCULINNA was put into commissioning on a primary beam line of the JINR U-400M cyclotron. By means of nuclear fragmentation of the 14N beam with the energy of 51 MeV · A on the 170 mg/cm2 carbon target radioactive beams of 6He, 8He and 8B were obtained. Possibilities of further development of the set-up are discussed. 6 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Transport of radioactive ion beams and related safety issues: The 132Sn+ case study

    The transport of intense radioactive ion beam currents requires a careful design in order to limit the beam losses, the contamination and thus the dose rates. Some investigations based on numerical models and calculations have been performed in the framework of the SPIRAL 2 project to evaluate the performance of a low energy beam transport line located between the isotope separation on line (ISOL) production cell and the experiment areas. The paper presents the results of the transverse phase-space analysis, the beam losses assessment, the resulting contamination, and radioactivity levels. They show that reasonable beam transmission, emittance growth, and dose rates can be achieved considering the current standards

  15. Contribution to the study of radioactive ion beam production by the ISOL method

    This thesis is related to the R and D program for the production of radioactive ion beams by the ISOL method at GANIL in Caen. This work concerns several different techniques based on the ISOL method. The first one is the production of radioactive ion beams with a SPIRAL target-source system (target + ECR source). The production rates of radioactive neon beams were determined on the SIRa test bench and previsions for SPIRAL were established. The feasibility of the production of radioactive condensable element beams with such target-source system, using a transport under a volatile molecular form between the target and the source, was experimentally proven by the production of radioactive oxygen beams via the CO molecule. The second technique is the production of radioactive alkaline beams with the target-source system MONOLITHE (target + hot cavity source). The production efficiencies of lithium and sodium radioactive beams were determined. A new methodology, the 'global method', has been developed as part of this thesis, for deducing diffusion, effusion and ionisation properties of these two elements with this ensemble. It is shown that the evolution of diffusion properties between different alkali elements is similar to noble gases. The third one is the IGISOL technique (target + ion guide). The MI-GI-CHEMIN code was created for simulating the movement of ions in an ion guide filled with helium and a given concentration of impurities, including electric and magnetic fields. A first IGISOL prototype is in realisation at GANIL. (author)

  16. Post acceleration of a pseudospark-produced high-brightness electron beam

    Preliminary results are presented of post-acceleration experiment of a pseudospark-produced high-brightness electron beam. The electron beam that is propagating in a low pressure gas is accelerated by a simple induction linac system. Time-resolved energy spectrum is constructed for the electron beam. The resultant spectrum reveals that the instantaneous beam energy is approximately equal to the sum of the cathode voltage and the induction-linac accelerating voltage

  17. Beam loading in a laser-plasma accelerator using a near-hollow plasma channel

    Schroeder, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Beam loading in laser-plasma accelerators using a near-hollow plasma channel is examined in the linear wake regime. It is shown that, by properly shaping and phasing the witness particle beam, high-gradient acceleration can be achieved with high-efficiency, and without induced energy spread or emittance growth. Both electron and positron beams can be accelerated in this plasma channel geometry. Matched propagation of electron beams can be achieved by the focusing force provided by the chan...

  18. Reactions with fast radioactive beams of neutron-rich nuclei

    Aumann, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-11-01

    The neutron dripline has presently been reached only for the lightest nuclei up to the element oxygen. In this region of light neutron-rich nuclei, scattering experiments are feasible even for dripline nuclei by utilizing high-energy secondary beams produced by fragmentation. In the present article, reactions of high-energy radioactive beams will be exemplified using recent experimental results mainly derived from measurements of breakup reactions performed at the LAND and FRS facilities at GSI and at the S800 spectrometer at the NSCL. Nuclear and electromagnetically induced reactions allow probing different aspects of nuclear structure at the limits of stability related to the neutron-proton asymmetry and the weak binding close to the dripline. Properties of the valence-neutron wave functions are studied in the one-neutron knockout reaction, revealing the changes of shell structure when going from the beta-stability line to more asymmetric loosely bound neutron-rich systems. The vanishing of the N=8 shell gap for neutron-rich systems like {sup 11}Li and {sup 12}Be, or the new closed N=14, 16 shells for the oxygen isotopes are examples. The continuum of weakly bound nuclei and halo states can be studied by inelastic scattering. The dipole response, for instance, is found to change dramatically when going away from the valley of stability. A redistribution of the dipole strength towards lower excitation energies is observed for neutron-rich nuclei, which partly might be due to a new collective excitation mode related to the neutron-proton asymmetry. Halo nuclei in particular show strong dipole transitions to the continuum at the threshold, being directly related to the ground-state properties of the projectile. Finally, an outlook on future experimental prospects is given. (orig.)

  19. Reactions with fast radioactive beams of neutron-rich nuclei

    The neutron dripline has presently been reached only for the lightest nuclei up to the element oxygen. In this region of light neutron-rich nuclei, scattering experiments are feasible even for dripline nuclei by utilizing high-energy secondary beams produced by fragmentation. In the present article, reactions of high-energy radioactive beams will be exemplified using recent experimental results mainly derived from measurements of breakup reactions performed at the LAND and FRS facilities at GSI and at the S800 spectrometer at the NSCL. Nuclear and electromagnetically induced reactions allow probing different aspects of nuclear structure at the limits of stability related to the neutron-proton asymmetry and the weak binding close to the dripline. Properties of the valence-neutron wave functions are studied in the one-neutron knockout reaction, revealing the changes of shell structure when going from the beta-stability line to more asymmetric loosely bound neutron-rich systems. The vanishing of the N=8 shell gap for neutron-rich systems like 11Li and 12Be, or the new closed N=14, 16 shells for the oxygen isotopes are examples. The continuum of weakly bound nuclei and halo states can be studied by inelastic scattering. The dipole response, for instance, is found to change dramatically when going away from the valley of stability. A redistribution of the dipole strength towards lower excitation energies is observed for neutron-rich nuclei, which partly might be due to a new collective excitation mode related to the neutron-proton asymmetry. Halo nuclei in particular show strong dipole transitions to the continuum at the threshold, being directly related to the ground-state properties of the projectile. Finally, an outlook on future experimental prospects is given. (orig.)

  20. Recent developments of SOLEROO: Australia’s first high energy radioactive Ion Beam capability

    Carter I. P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The first measurements of the Australian National University’s new radioactive ion beam capability were carried out using elastic scattering of a 8Li radioactive beam from a 197Au target. The purpose of this experiment was to test the radioactive ion beam capability as a complete system, which uses a pair of twin position-sensitive parallel plate avalanche counters as tracking detectors along with a highly pixelated double sided Si detector array. The tracking detector system allows us to have extremely high purity secondary radioactive ion beams by electronically tagging the reaction products of interest, thus allowing complete separation from the unwanted contaminant beam species of similar mass and charge. Here, some recent developments and characteristics of this system are presented.

  1. Outline of application plans of accelerator beams in JAERI

    Suzuki, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has various application plans of accelerators such as; Neutron Science Research Complex (NSRC), Positron Factory, International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), and Spring-8 Project. Each application plan has its own research program and its own core accelerator. The NSRC is a multi-purpose research complex composed of seven research facilities: slow neutron scattering facility for material science, the nuclear energy research facility like nuclear transmutation and so on. The Positron Factory will be applied to the research of precise analysis of material structure by novel method of positron probing. The IFMIF aims at simulating the wall loading of a demo fusion reactor by producing high intense neutron flux. The SPring-8 is the largest synchrotron radiation source in the world. More than 60 X-ray beam lines will be equipped for the various researches. (author)

  2. The issue of accelerator beam trips for efficient ADS operation

    The development of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs) is motivated by the potential of these machines to reduce the volume and the radiotoxicity of accumulated nuclear waste, more particularly that of minor actinides currently generated by the operation of existing pressurized water reactors. The reduction of both volume and radiotoxicity of nuclear waste is achieved by transmutation and fission of minor actinides into less-active isotopes or shorter-lived by-products. Various technical challenges exist regarding designing reliable and efficient ADSs. The key points are very much linked to the design of the spallation module, the assurance that reactivity remains below criticality under any circumstances, and the accelerator reliability. This paper addresses the latter two challenges imposed on the accelerator in order to assure safe and reliable ADS operation. It discusses the possibility of performing online absolute reactivity measurements and the limits in the number of allowable accelerator beam trips, which might impede plant integrity and/or plant efficiency. (authors)

  3. Direct Electron Acceleration with Radially Polarized Laser Beams

    Michel Piché

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past years, there has been a growing interest in innovative applications of radially polarized laser beams. Among them, the particular field of laser-driven electron acceleration has received much attention. Recent developments in high-power infrared laser sources at the INRS Advanced Laser Light Source (Varennes, Qc, Canada allowed the experimental observation of a quasi-monoenergetic 23-keV electron beam produced by a radially polarized laser pulse tightly focused into a low density gas. Theoretical analyses suggest that the production of collimated attosecond electron pulses is within reach of the actual technology. Such an ultrashort electron pulse source would be a unique tool for fundamental and applied research. In this paper, we propose an overview of this emerging topic and expose some of the challenges to meet in the future.

  4. Study on radiation sterilization of electron beam accelerator

    To study the effects of radiation sterilization of the electron beam, the three species of microorganisms, Escherichia. coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris were irradiated with the electron beam, delivered by the electron accelerator independently developed by the Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the changes of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of these irradiated microorganisms were also tested. The results indicated that the Staphylococcus aureus were fully radio-sterilized with the radiation dosage of 2.0 kGy, but 2.2 kGy to the Escherichia. coli and Proteus vulgaris. Moreover, the data also demonstrated that the irradiation had noticeable effects on the SOD activity of the three microorganisms. (authors)

  5. The CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] superconducting accelerator: An overview

    The CEBAF accelerator is a CW linac based on rf superconductivity and making use of multiple recirculation. Its major components are a 50 MeV injector, two linac segments of 0.5 GeV energy gain each, and recirculator arcs connecting the two linac segments. Each linac segment consists of 25 cryomodules, separated by warm sections with quadrupoles, steering magnets, and beam diagnostics. Each cryomodule contains 8, 1500 MHz, 5-cell, Cornell type cavities with waveguide couplers for fundamental power and HOM damping, each cavity being powered by its own klystron. Recirculator arcs are vertically stacked, large radius, strong focusing beam lines that minimize synchrotron radiation effects. A high quality (ΔE/E ∼ 10-4, ε ∼ 10-9 m) beam of 200μA, 100% duty factor, with 0.5 GeV ≤ E ≤ 4.0 GeV will be generated

  6. Estimation of acceptable beam-trip frequencies of accelerators for accelerator-driven systems and comparison with existing performance data

    Frequent beam trips as experienced in the existing high-power proton accelerators may cause thermal fatigue in accelerator-driven system (ADS) components, which may lead to degradation of their structural integrity and reduction of their lifetime. In this study, acceptable beam-trip frequencies of the ADS accelerator were evaluated and compared with the performance of the ADS accelerator, which was estimated based on the operational data on existing accelerators. Thermal transient analyses were performed to investigate the effects of beam trips on the reactor components, with the objective of determining the feasibility of engineering the ADS and the reliability of the accelerator. These analyses were based on the thermal responses of the following reactor components: the beam window, the fuel cladding, the inner barrel and the reactor vessel. Assuming that the annual plant availability was 70%, our results indicated three acceptable beam-trip frequencies, depending on the beam-trip duration, τb: 2 x 104 times per year for 0 ≤ τb ≤ 10 s; 2 x 103 times per year for 10 s b ≤ 5 min; and 42 times per year for τb > 5 min. In order to consider methods to reduce beam-trip frequency, we compared the acceptable beam-trip frequency with the performance of the ADS accelerator, which was estimated based on the operational data on existing accelerators. The comparison showed that for beam trips with a duration of 10 s or less, the beam-trip frequency was acceptable. On the other hand, for beam trips with durations of 10 s b ≤ 5 min and τb > 5 min, it was necessary to reduce the beam-trip frequencies to about 1/6 and 1/35, respectively. (author)

  7. Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams as a New Particle Source

    Nürnberg, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The framework of this thesis is the investigation of the generation of proton beams using high-intensity laser pulses. Today's high power, ultrashort pulse laser systems are capable of achieving laser intensities up to 10^21 W/cm^2. When focused onto thin foil targets, extremely high field gradients of the order of TV/m are produced on the rear side of the target resulting in the acceleration of protons to multi-MeV energies with an exponential spectrum including up to 10^13 particles. This a...

  8. Transient beam loading compensation in traveling wave linear accelerators

    For normal conducting linear colliders the transient beam loading in the accelerating structures is typically of the order of 20-30%. This results in a multibunch energy spread of the same magnitude if no remedy is taken into account. On the other hand, in a linear collider the transient energy spread has to be controlled down to a few tenth of a percent. Two possible methods, assuming two different setups, e.g. klystron plus structure and klystron plus SLED cavity plus structure, are investigated. A description of the whole rf system and the resulting energy spread is presented especially for the case of the S-Band linear collider study. (orig.)

  9. Lua(Jit) for computing accelerator beam physics

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    As mentioned in the 2nd developers meeting, I would like to open the debate with a special presentation on another language - Lua, and a tremendous technology - LuaJit. Lua is much less known at CERN, but it is very simple, much smaller than Python and its JIT is extremely performant. The language is a dynamic scripting language easy to learn and easy to embedded in applications. I will show how we use it in HPC for accelerator beam physics as a replacement for C, C++, Fortran and Python, with some benchmarks versus Python, PyPy4 and C/C++.

  10. Levy-Student distributions for halos in accelerator beams

    We describe the transverse beam distribution in particle accelerators within the controlled, stochastic dynamical scheme of stochastic mechanics (SM) which produces time reversal invariant diffusion processes. This leads to a linearized theory summarized in a Schroedinger-like (SL) equation. The space charge effects have been introduced in recent papers by coupling this S-L equation with the Maxwell equations. We analyze the space-charge effects to understand how the dynamics produces the actual beam distributions, and in particular we show how the stationary, self-consistent solutions are related to the (external and space-charge) potentials both when we suppose that the external field is harmonic (constant focusing), and when we a priori prescribe the shape of the stationary solution. We then proceed to discuss a few other ideas by introducing generalized Student distributions, namely, non-Gaussian, Levy infinitely divisible (but not stable) distributions. We will discuss this idea from two different standpoints: (a) first by supposing that the stationary distribution of our (Wiener powered) SM model is a Student distribution; (b) by supposing that our model is based on a (non-Gaussian) Levy process whose increments are Student distributed. We show that in the case (a) the longer tails of the power decay of the Student laws and in the case (b) the discontinuities of the Levy-Student process can well account for the rare escape of particles from the beam core, and hence for the formation of a halo in intense beams

  11. Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

    2010-04-01

    The ability of short but intense laser pulses to generate high-energy electrons and ions from gaseous and solid targets has been well known since the early days of the laser fusion program. However, during the past decade there has been an explosion of experimental and theoretical activity in this area of laser-matter interaction, driven by the prospect of realizing table-top plasma accelerators for research, medical and industrial uses, and also relatively small and inexpensive plasma accelerators for high-energy physics at the frontier of particle physics. In this focus issue on laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators, the latest advances in this field are described. Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators Contents Slow wave plasma structures for direct electron acceleration B D Layer, J P Palastro, A G York, T M Antonsen and H M Milchberg Cold injection for electron wakefield acceleration X Davoine, A Beck, A Lifschitz, V Malka and E Lefebvre Enhanced proton flux in the MeV range by defocused laser irradiation J S Green, D C Carroll, C Brenner, B Dromey, P S Foster, S Kar, Y T Li, K Markey, P McKenna, D Neely, A P L Robinson, M J V Streeter, M Tolley, C-G Wahlström, M H Xu and M Zepf Dose-dependent biological damage of tumour cells by laser-accelerated proton beams S D Kraft, C Richter, K Zeil, M Baumann, E Beyreuther, S Bock, M Bussmann, T E Cowan, Y Dammene, W Enghardt, U Helbig, L Karsch, T Kluge, L Laschinsky, E Lessmann, J Metzkes, D Naumburger, R Sauerbrey, M. Scḧrer, M Sobiella, J Woithe, U Schramm and J Pawelke The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime W Lu, W An, M Zhou, C Joshi, C Huang and W B Mori Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET M J Hogan, T O Raubenheimer, A Seryi, P Muggli, T Katsouleas, C Huang, W Lu, W An, K A Marsh, W B Mori, C E Clayton and C Joshi Electron trapping and acceleration on a downward density ramp: a two-stage approach R M G M Trines, R Bingham, Z Najmudin

  12. Multipass beam breakup in the CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] superconducting linac

    Multipass beam breakup can severely limit current in superconducting linear accelerators due to the inherently high Q's of transverse deflecting modes of the rf cavities. The success of higher-order-mode damping in increasing threshold currents for the 4-pass CEBAF SRF linac design is investigated with computer modeling. This simulation is shown to be in agreement with theoretical analyses which have successfully described beam breakup in the Stanford superconducting, recirculating linac. Numerical evaluation of an analytic treatment by Gluckstern of multipass beam breakup with distributed cavities is also found to be consistent with the computer model. Application of the simulation to the design array of 400 five-cell CEBAF/Cornell cavities with measured higher-order-mode damping indicates that the beam breakup threshold current is at least an order of magnitude above the CEBAF design current of 200 μA

  13. Electron beam dynamics in the DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    Ekdahl, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Epifanio O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragon, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Rita [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cook, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dalmas, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esquibel, Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gallegos, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garnett, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harrison, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Jeffrey B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jacquez, Edward B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccuistian, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Nicholas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nath, Subrata [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nielsen, Kurt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prichard, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowton, Lawrence [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Manolito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scarpetti, Raymond [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schauer, Martin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seitz, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulze, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bender, Howard A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Broste, William B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frayer, Daniel K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Douglas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tom, C Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trainham, C [NSTEC/STL; Williams, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Genoni, Thomas [VOSS; Hughes, Thomas [VOSS; Toma, Carsten [VOSS

    2008-01-01

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) accelerates a 2-kA electron beam to more than 17 MeV. The beam pulse has a greater than 1.5-microsecond flattop region over which the electron kinetic energy is constant to within 1%. The beam dynamics are diagnosed with 21 beam-position monitors located throughout the injector, accelerator, and after the accelerator exit, where we also have beam imaging diagnostics. We discuss the tuning of the injector and accelerator, and present data for the resulting beam dynamics. We discuss the tuning procedures and other methods used to minimize beam motion, which is undesirable for its application as a bremsstrahlung source for multi-pulse radiography of exlosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. We also present beam stability measurements, which we relate to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  14. Electron beam dynamics in the DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) accelerates a 2-kA electron beam to more than 17 MeV. The beam pulse has a greater than 1.5-microsecond flattop region over which the electron kinetic energy is constant to within 1%. The beam dynamics are diagnosed with 21 beam-position monitors located throughout the injector, accelerator, and after the accelerator exit, where we also have beam imaging diagnostics. We discuss the tuning of the injector and accelerator, and present data for the resulting beam dynamics. We discuss the tuning procedures and other methods used to minimize beam motion, which is undesirable for its application as a bremsstrahlung source for multi-pulse radiography of exlosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. We also present beam stability measurements, which we relate to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  15. The Research of a Novel SW Accelerating Structure with Small Beam Spot

    Yang, X; Chen, Y; Jin, X; Li, Maozhen; Lü, H; Xu, Z

    2004-01-01

    A new kind of on-axis coupled biperiodic standing-wave (SW) accelerating structure has been built for a 9 MeV accelerator. The research progress was introduced in this paper, it includes the choice of the accelerating structure, the analysis of electron beam dynamics, the tuning of the cavity, the measurement of the accelerating tube and the powered test. The small beam spot is the most interesting feature of this accelerating structure, the diameter of the beam spot is 1.4 mm. This accelerator has been used for the x photons generation and the x-ray dose rate is about 3400 rad/min/m.

  16. Small type accelerator. Try for accelerator driven system

    Mori, Y

    2003-01-01

    FFAG (Fixed-field alternating gradient) accelerator for accelerator driven subcritical reactor, which aims to change from long-lived radioactive waste to short-lived radioactivity, is introduced. It is ring accelerator. The performance needed is proton as accelerator particle, 10MW (total) beam power, about 1GeV beam energy, >30% power efficiency and continuous beam. The feature of FFAG accelerator is constant magnetic field. PoP (Proof-of-principle)-FFAG accelerator, radial type, was run at first in Japan in 2000. The excursion is about some ten cm. In principle, beam can be injected and extracted at any place of ring. The 'multi-fish' acceleration can accelerate beams to 100% duty by repeating acceleration. 150MeV-FFAG accelerator has been started since 2001. It tried to practical use, for example, treatment of cancer. (S.Y.)

  17. Beam Dynamics Studies for a Laser Acceleration Experiment

    Spencer, James; Noble, Robert; Palmer, Dennis T; Siemann, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The NLC Test Accelerator at SLAC was built to address various beam dynamics issues for the Next Linear Collider. An S-Band RF gun, originally proposed for the NLCTA, is being installed together with a large-angle extraction line at 60 MeV. This is followed by a matching section, final focus and buncher for the laser acceleration experiment, E163. The laser-electron interaction area is followed by a broad range, high resolution spectrometer (HES) for electron bunch analysis. The RF gun is discussed in another paper. We discuss only the beam dynamics and high resolution analysis system at 6 MeV based on using Parmela and high-order Transport for bunch charges from 50 pC to 1 nC. Beyond the diagnostics, this system uses the emittance compensating solenoids and a low energy, high resolution spectrometer (LES) to help tune for best operating point and match to the linac. Optical symmetries in the design of the 25.5° extraction line provide 1:1 phase space transfer without linear dispersion or use of sextu...

  18. Measurement of acceleration and orbital angular momentum of Airy beam and Airy-vortex beam by astigmatic transformation.

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Remez, Roei; Tsur, Yuval; Arie, Ady

    2015-11-15

    Special beams, including the Airy beam and the vortex-embedded Airy beam, draw much attention due to their unique features and promising applications. Therefore, it is necessary to devise a straightforward method for measuring these peculiar features of the beams with ease. Hence we present the astigmatic transformation of Airy and Airy-vortex beam. The "acceleration" coefficient of the Airy beam is directly determined from a single image by fitting the astigmatically transformed beam to an analytic expression. In addition, the orbital angular momentum of optical vortex in Airy-vortex beam is measured directly using a single image. PMID:26565887

  19. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-10-19

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  20. Planning and commissioning of a multipurpose election beam accelerator

    Full text: Electron beam (EB) irradiation is extensively used in a number of industries such as wire and cable, polyethylene foam, curing and converting, automobile tyre, sterilization, flue gas treatment etc. The efforts to introduce this sophisticated technology in the country gathered momentum with the commissioning of the ILU- 6 EB accelerator in BARC during 1980. The need for indigenisation of the EB accelerator components, particularly insulation formulations has been recognised and the issue was given due consideration by the Indian cable industry in the light of specifications laid by Indian Railways for the EB irradiation cross-linked wires and cables. Nicco Corporation Ltd. has developed the necessary insulation formulations for EB cross-linking of wires and also for heat shrinking accessories in collaboration with BARC, and IIT, Kharagpur with assistance from BRNS. The Company also ventured to establish an in-house EB accelerator at its premises. This paper highlights the various aspects of planning and commissioning of this collaborative effort

  1. Numerical simulation of high-current ion linear induction accelerator with additional electron beam injection

    The 2d3v particle-in-cell simulations of the transportation and acceleration of a high-current tubular ion beam through six magnetoinsulated accelerating gaps are presented. Charge and current compensations are carried out by an accompanying electron beam, and also by additionally injected electron beams. The accelerating electric field is enclosed to the first, third and fifth cusps. Its magnitudes are those, that initial kinetic energy of compensating electron beams is little bit higher than a potential barrier of an accelerating field in each cusp, that allows an electron beam to overcome accelerating potential in one cusp. The second, fourth and sixth cusps in which the accelerating field is absent, are used for injection of additional compensating electron beams which replace the electron beam which has 'worked-out' on the previous accelerating gap. The simulations involve solving a complete set of Maxwell's equations with charge-conserving scheme for calculating the current density on a mesh, and relativistic motion equations for charged particles. The possibility of transporting and acceleration of a high-current tubular ion beam in six cusps is shown. It is shown, that distribution function of a high-current ion beam on an output of the accelerator essentially improves due to optimization of parameters of additionally injected electron beams.

  2. Induced radioactivity of steel components in industrial flaw inspection with electron accelerators

    The results are presented of experimental investigations of the characteristics of gamma radiation of induced radioactivity of steel components and also of structural members of the accelerator/flaw detector. Semiempirical equations are proposed for determining the holding time of inspected components and the betatron which take into account the focusing distance, exposure time, and braking radiation intensity

  3. A review of high beam current RFQ accelerators and funnels

    The authors review the design features of several high-current (> 20-mA) and high-power (> 1-mA average) proton or H- injectors, RFQs, and funnels. They include a summary of observed performance and will mention a sampling of new designs, including the proposed incorporation of beam choppers. Different programs and organizations have chosen to build the RFQ in diverse configurations. Although the majority of RFQs are either low-current or very low duty-factor, several versions have included high-current and/or high-power designs for either protons or H- ions. The challenges of cooling, handling high space-charge forces, and coupling with injectors and subsequent accelerators are significant. In all instances, beam tests were a valuable learning experience, because not always did these as-built structures perform exactly as predicted by the earlier design codes. They summarize the key operational parameters, indicate what was achieved, and highlight what was learned in these tests. Based on this generally good performance and high promise, even more challenging designs are being considered for new applications that include even higher powers, beam funnels and choppers

  4. A Beam Interlock System for CERN High Energy Accelerators

    Todd, Benjamin; Schmidt, R

    2006-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (The European Organisation for Nuclear Research) is one of the largest and most complicated machines envisaged to date. The LHC has been conceived and designed over the course of the last 25 years and represents the cutting edge of accelerator technology with a collision energy of 14TeV, having a stored beam energy over 100 times more powerful than the nearest competitor. Commissioning of the machine is already nderway and operation with beam is intended for Autumn 2007, with 7TeV operation expected in 2008. The LHC is set to answer some of the fundemental questions in theoretical physics, colliding particles with such high energy that the inner workings of the quantum world can be revealed. Colliding particles together at such high energy makes very high demands on machine operation and protection. The specified beam energy requires strong magnetic fields that are made in superconducting dipole magnets, these magnets are kept only around two degrees above absolute zero...

  5. Performance testing of the LUEhR-40M structure with an accelerated beam

    The results of experimental investigation of the prototype of the accelerating structure of the therapeutic linear accelerator of the LUEhR-40M model with an accelerating beam are presented. The accelerating structure is the standing wave biperiodic structure with inner coupling cells of 1.6 m length. The design energy of accelerated electrons equalling 20 MeV (during single electron beam passage through an accelerating structure) is obtained. 60 % of accelerated particles are accumulated in the energy interval of (20±1) MeV at 20 mA pulse current and at 3.6 MW SHF-power at the structure input

  6. Accelerator beams for x-ray-gamma lasers

    The relativistic accelerator beams interaction with strong laser fields in different schemes for generation of intense shortwave coherent radiation is investigated. As a new generation of light sources of shortwave radiation, specifically for x-ray and γ-ray lasers, the high brightness ion beams or channelled in the crystals ultrarelativistic electron beams are considered where due to the existence of quantum bound states the ion-photon or channelled electron-photon interaction cross sections are resonantly enhanced by several orders with respect to the Thompson/Compton cross section on the free electrons. The latter means that the coherent radiation generated in such systems will rather exceed by intensity the contemporary Free Electron Laser systems. Hence, the stimulated radiation by relativistic charged particle beams with discrete energy levels is of certain interest as a potential synthesis of the conventional Quantum Generators and Free Electron Lasers in x-ray and γ-ray domains. Besides, the spectral intensity of spontaneous radiation of the channelled electrons/ ions well exceeds the intensities of other radiation processes in this frequency range. Hence, the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regimes of x-ray laser by means of relativistic ion beam or channelled in a crystal ultrarelativistic electron beam with the strong counterprop-agating pump laser fields are investigated. The consideration is based on the self-consistent set of the Maxwell and relativistic quantum kinetic equations. In the considering schemes the pump wave (optical or strong infrared laser radiation) due to the Doppler up-shifting of its frequency resonantly couples two internal ionic or transverse electronic levels in the channel of a crystal, and the necessity of the initial inverse population of energy levels for lasing in such systems vanishes, which is obligatory for conventional quantum generators on atomic systems. Different regimes of generation of coherent x

  7. Laser-driven proton beams: Acceleration mechanism, beam optimization, and radiographic applications

    Borghesi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Kar, S.; Wilson, P.A. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen' s University of Belfast (United Kingdom); Cecchetti, C.A. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen' s University of Belfast (United Kingdom); Also with the Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, IPCF-CNR, Pisa (Italy); Toncian, T.; Pipahl, A.; Amin, M.; Jung, R.; Osterholz, J.; Willi, O. [Institute for Laser and Plasma Physics, Heinrich Heine University, Dusseldorf (Germany); Fuchs, J.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses LULI, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Antici, P. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses LULI, UMR 7605 CNRS CEA Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Frascati National Laboratories INFN, Frascati (Italy); Nazarov, W. [School of Chemistry, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews (United Kingdom); Clarke, R.J.; Notley, M.; Neely, D. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, OX Didcot (United Kingdom); Mora, P.; Grismayer, T. [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Schurtz, G. [Centre d' Etudes des Lasers Intenses et Applications, UMR 5107 University Bordeaux I-CNRS-CEA, 33 - Talence (France); Schiavi, A. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita -La Sapienza-, Rome (Italy); Sentoku, Y.; D' Humieres, E. [Physics Department, MS 220, University of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2008-08-15

    This paper reviews recent experimental activity in the area of optimization, control, and application of laser-accelerated proton beams, carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses 100 TW facility in France. In particular, experiments have investigated the role of the scale length at the rear of the plasma in reducing target-normal-sheath-acceleration acceleration efficiency. Results match with recent theoretical predictions and provide information in view of the feasibility of proton fast-ignition applications. Experiments aiming to control the divergence of the proton beams have investigated the use of a laser-triggered micro-lens, which employs laser-driven transient electric fields in cylindrical geometry, enabling to focus the emitted protons and select monochromatic beamlets; out of the broad spectrum beam. This approach could be advantageous in view of a variety of applications. The use of laser-driven protons as a particle probe for transient field detection has been developed and applied to a number of experimental conditions. Recent work in this area has focused on the detection of large-scale self-generated magnetic fields in laser-produced plasmas and the investigation of fields associated to the propagation of relativistic electron both on the surface and in the bulk of targets irradiated by high-power laser pulses. (authors)

  8. Neutron yield and induced radioactivity: a study of 235-MeV proton and 3-GeV electron accelerators

    This study evaluated the magnitude of potential neutron yield and induced radioactivity of two new accelerators in Taiwan: a 235-MeV proton cyclotron for radiation therapy and a 3-GeV electron synchrotron serving as the injector for the Taiwan Photon Source. From a nuclear interaction point of view, neutron production from targets bombarded with high-energy particles is intrinsically related to the resulting target activation. Two multi-particle interaction and transport codes, FLUKA and MCNPX, were used in this study. To ensure prediction quality, much effort was devoted to the associated benchmark calculations. Comparisons of the accelerators' results for three target materials (copper, stainless steel and tissue) are presented. Although the proton-induced neutron yields were higher than those induced by electrons, the maximal neutron production rates of both accelerators were comparable according to their respective beam outputs during typical operation. Activation products in the targets of the two accelerators were unexpectedly similar because the primary reaction channels for proton- and electron-induced activation are (p,pn) and (γ,n), respectively. The resulting residual activities and remnant dose rates as a function of time were examined and discussed. (authors)

  9. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    Kourbanis, Ioanis [Fermilab

    2014-07-01

    After a 16 month shutdown to reconfigure the Fermilab Accelerators for high power operations, the Fermilab Accelerator Complex is again providing beams for numerous Physics Experiments. By using the Recycler to slip stack protons while the Main Injector is ramping, the beam power at 120 GeV can reach 700 KW, a factor of 2 increase. The progress towards doubling the Fermilab's Accelerator complex beam power will be presented.

  10. Accelerators and Beams, multimedia computer-based training in accelerator physics

    We are developing a set of computer-based tutorials on accelerators and charged-particle beams under an SBIR grant from the DOE. These self-paced, interactive tutorials, available for Macintosh and Windows platforms, use multimedia techniques to enhance the user close-quote s rate of learning and length of retention of the material. They integrate interactive On-Screen Laboratories, hypertext, line drawings, photographs, two- and three-dimensional animations, video, and sound. They target a broad audience, from undergraduates or technicians to professionals. Presently, three modules have been published (Vectors, Forces, and Motion), a fourth (Dipole Magnets) has been submitted for review, and three more exist in prototype form (Quadrupoles, Matrix Transport, and Properties of Charged-Particle Beams). Participants in the poster session will have the opportunity to try out these modules on a laptop computer. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  11. ''Accelerators and Beams,'' multimedia computer-based training in accelerator physics

    We are developing a set of computer-based tutorials on accelerators and charged-particle beams under an SBIR grant from the DOE. These self-paced, interactive tutorials, available for Macintosh and Windows platforms, use multimedia techniques to enhance the user's rate of learning and length of retention of the material. They integrate interactive ''On-Screen Laboratories,'' hypertext, line drawings, photographs, two- and three-dimensional animations, video, and sound. They target a broad audience, from undergraduates or technicians to professionals. Presently, three modules have been published (Vectors, Forces, and Motion), a fourth (Dipole Magnets) has been submitted for review, and three more exist in prototype form (Quadrupoles, Matrix Transport, and Properties of Charged-Particle Beams). Participants in the poster session will have the opportunity to try out these modules on a laptop computer

  12. Electron beam manipulation, injection and acceleration in plasma wakefield accelerators by optically generated plasma density spikes

    Wittig, Georg; Karger, Oliver S.; Knetsch, Alexander; Xi, Yunfeng; Deng, Aihua; Rosenzweig, James B.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Smith, Jonathan; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, Dino A.; Manahan, Grace G.; Hidding, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    We discuss considerations regarding a novel and robust scheme for optically triggered electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators [1]. In this technique, a transversely propagating focused laser pulse ignites a quasi-stationary plasma column before the arrival of the plasma wake. This localized plasma density enhancement or optical "plasma torch" distorts the blowout during the arrival of the electron drive bunch and modifies the electron trajectories, resulting in controlled injection. By changing the gas density, and the laser pulse parameters such as beam waist and intensity, and by moving the focal point of the laser pulse, the shape of the plasma torch, and therefore the generated trailing beam, can be tuned easily. The proposed method is much more flexible and faster in generating gas density transitions when compared to hydrodynamics-based methods, and it accommodates experimentalists needs as it is a purely optical process and straightforward to implement.

  13. Dynamic response of an accelerator driven system to accelerator beam interruptions for criticality

    Subcritical nuclear reactors driven by intense neutron sources can be very suitable tools for nuclear waste transmutation, particularly in the case of minor actinides with very low fractions of delayed neutrons. A proper control of these systems needs to know at every time the absolute value of the reactor subcriticality (negative reactivity), which must be measured by fully reliable methods, usually conveying a short interruption of the accelerator beam in order to assess the neutron flux reduction. Those interruptions should be very short in time, for not disturbing too much the thermal magnitudes of the reactor. Otherwise, the cladding and the fuel would suffer from thermal fatigue produced by those perturbations, and the mechanical integrity of the reactor would be jeopardized. It is shown in this paper that beam interruptions of the order of 400 μs repeated every second would not disturb significantly the reactor thermal features, while enabling for an adequate measurement of the negative reactivity

  14. Lévy-Student distributions for halos in accelerator beams.

    Cufaro Petroni, Nicola; De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2005-12-01

    We describe the transverse beam distribution in particle accelerators within the controlled, stochastic dynamical scheme of stochastic mechanics (SM) which produces time reversal invariant diffusion processes. This leads to a linearized theory summarized in a Schrödinger-like (SL) equation. The space charge effects have been introduced in recent papers by coupling this S-L equation with the Maxwell equations. We analyze the space-charge effects to understand how the dynamics produces the actual beam distributions, and in particular we show how the stationary, self-consistent solutions are related to the (external and space-charge) potentials both when we suppose that the external field is harmonic (constant focusing), and when we a priori prescribe the shape of the stationary solution. We then proceed to discuss a few other ideas by introducing generalized Student distributions, namely, non-Gaussian, Lévy infinitely divisible (but not stable) distributions. We will discuss this idea from two different standpoints: (a) first by supposing that the stationary distribution of our (Wiener powered) SM model is a Student distribution; (b) by supposing that our model is based on a (non-Gaussian) Lévy process whose increments are Student distributed. We show that in the case (a) the longer tails of the power decay of the Student laws and in the case (b) the discontinuities of the Lévy-Student process can well account for the rare escape of particles from the beam core, and hence for the formation of a halo in intense beams. PMID:16486070

  15. Proposed low-level radioactive waste handling building at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), evaluating the impacts associated with the proposed Low-Level Radioactive Waste Building at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois. As a result of the high energy physics program at Fermilab, small quantities of low-level radioactive wastes are generated. These wastes are collected, sorted and packaged for shipment to an off-site disposal facility in Hanford, Washington. The proposed project includes the construction of a new building to house, all low-level radioactive waste handling operations. The building would provide workspace for five full-time workers. The proposed project would improve the efficiency and safety of the low-level radioactive waste handling at Fermilab by upgrading equipment and consolidating operations into one facility.

  16. Measurement of radioactivity induced by GeV-protons and spallation neutrons using AGS accelerator

    Measurement of radioactivity induced by high-energy protons with energy of 2.83 and 24 GeV and spallation neutrons produced by bombarding a mercury target with the high-energy protons were performed by using the AGS (Alternative Gradient Synchrotron) accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The samples of boron, carbon, aluminum, iron, copper, niobium, mercury-oxide, lead, bismuth, acrylic resin, SS-316, Inconel-625 and Inconel-718 were irradiated around the mercury target. After the irradiation, the radioactivity of each sample was measured by using HPGe detectors at the cooling time between 2 h and 200 d. In the processing of the measured γ-ray spectra, more than 90 radioactive nucleus were identified, and the radioactivity production data were obtained. This report gives the experimental procedure, the data processing and the experimental results. (author)

  17. The future of the accelerator mass spectrometry of rare long-lived radioactive isotopes

    Accelerators, originally designed for nuclear physics, can be added to mass spectrometric apparatus to increase the sensitivity so that isotope ratios in the range 10-12 to 10-15 can be measured routinely. This significant improvement of high-sensitivity mass spectrometry has been called Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. The present article addresses the basic principles of accelerator mass spectrometry and some recent applications which show its versatility. In particular, it is noted that accelerator mass spectrometry could play an increasing role in the measurement of the levels of long lived radioactivities in the environment, including the actinides, which result from human activities such as the use of nuclear power. To fulfill this promise, continued research and development is necessary to provide ion sources, various types of heavy ion accelerators and peripheral magnetic and electric analysers. (N.K.)

  18. Accelerating airy beams generated by ultrafast laser induced space-variant nanostructures in glass

    Gecevičius, M.; M. Beresna; Kazansky, P. G.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate new technique to generate accelerating Airy beam with femtosecond laser imprinted space variant birefringence produced by self-assembled nanostructures in fused silica. The technique enables dual Airy beam generation.

  19. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

  20. Radioactivity

    This educative booklet give a general overview of radioactivity: history, structure of matter, radiations, radioactivity law, origin of radioactivity, radioactivity uses, radioprotection and measurement units. (J.S.)

  1. Comparison of depth-dose distributions between reactor and accelerator neutron beams proposed by design studies

    Accelerator epithermal neutron beams produced by 7Li(p,n)7Be reactions were compared with reactor neutron beams using a fission converter (20% enriched 235U 5mm-thick plate) from view points of neutron spectrum and depth-dose distributions in a phantom. It is possible to design accelerator epithermal neutron beams having better depth-dose distributions than reactor neutron beams. (author)

  2. Beam Spot Measurement on a 400 keV Electron Accelerator

    Miller, Arne

    A line probe is used to measure the beam spot radius and beam divergence at a 400 keV ICT electron accelerator, and a method is shown for reducing the line probe data in order to get the radial function.......A line probe is used to measure the beam spot radius and beam divergence at a 400 keV ICT electron accelerator, and a method is shown for reducing the line probe data in order to get the radial function....

  3. Intrinsic beam emittance of laser-accelerated electrons measured by x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    G. Golovin; Banerjee, S.; Liu, C; Chen, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, P.; Veale, M.; Wilson, M.; P. Seller; Umstadter, D.

    2016-01-01

    The recent combination of ultra-intense lasers and laser-accelerated electron beams is enabling the development of a new generation of compact x-ray light sources, the coherence of which depends directly on electron beam emittance. Although the emittance of accelerated electron beams can be low, it can grow due to the effects of space charge during free-space propagation. Direct experimental measurement of this important property is complicated by micron-scale beam sizes, and the presence of ...

  4. Neutrino factory and beta beam: accelerator options for future neutrino experiments

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2012-06-03

    Two accelerator options for producing intense neutrino beams a Neutrino Factory based on stored muon beams and a Beta Beam facility based on stored beams of beta unstable ions are described. Technical challenges for each are described and current R&D efforts aimed at mitigating these challenges are indicated. Progress is being made in the design of both types of facility, each of which would extend the state-of-the-art in accelerator science.

  5. Beam optics and lattice design for particle accelerators

    Holzer, Bernhard J

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this manuscript is to give an introduction into the design of the magnet lattice and as a consequence into the transverse dynamics of the particles in a synchrotron or storage ring. Starting from the basic principles of how to design the geometry of the ring we will briefly review the transverse motion of the particles and apply this knowledge to study the layout and optimization of the principal elements, namely the lattice cells. The detailed arrangement of the accelerator magnets within the cells is explained and will be used to calculate well defined and predictable beam parameters. The more specific treatment of low beta insertions is included as well as the concept of dispersion suppressors that are an indispensable part of modern collider rings.

  6. ELIMED, future hadrontherapy applications of laser-accelerated beams

    Cirrone, Giuseppe A.P.; Carpinelli, M.; Cuttone, G.; Gammino, S.; Jia, S.B.; Korn, Georg; Maggiore, Mario; Manti, L.; Margarone, Daniele; Prokůpek, Jan; Renis, M.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, Francesco; Tomasello, B.; Torrisi, L.; Tramontana, A.; Velyhan, Andriy

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 730, Dec (2013), s. 174-177. ISSN 0168-9002. [International Conference on Radiation Effects on Semiconductor Materials, Detectors and Devices /9./(RESMDD). Florence, 09.10.2012-12.10.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/1165; GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0087 Grant ostatní: ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; OP VK 2 Laser Gen(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0087 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser acceleration * cancer treatment * particle selection * Monte Carlo simulation * beam handling Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s Impact factor: 1.316, year: 2013

  7. Modification of the beam transfer model of travelling wave accelerator structures at SACLA

    In order to perform efficient beam tuning at SACLA, we had developed a beam transfer model to calculate the beam transverse envelope in a linear accelerator using linear symplectic matrices. However the measured beam orbit responses were not consistent with the calculated orbit. In order to investigate the error source, we modify the transfer matrix of an accelerator structure so that the matrix model reproduces the measured orbit response. In this paper, we report detail of the error source and how the beam transfer model of a travelling wave accelerator structure is modified. (author)

  8. Laser Ion Source Operation at the TRIUMF Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    Lassen, J.; Bricault, P.; Dombsky, M.; Lavoie, J. P.; Gillner, M.; Gottwald, T.; Hellbusch, F.; Teigelhöfer, A.; Voss, A.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2009-03-01

    The TRIUMF Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) for radioactive ion beam production is presented, with target ion source, laser beam transport, laser system and operation. In this context aspects of titanium sapphire (TiSa) laser based RILIS and facility requirements are discussed and results from the first years of TRILIS RIB delivery are given.

  9. Application of Diamond Detectors in Tracking of Heavy Ion Slowed Down Radioactive Beams

    Results of irradiation of thin Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond detectors with low energy: p, α and 7Li beams are presented. Energy resolution: Δ E / E 9 particles/s cm2 the tested detectors showed low dead-time and satisfactory radiation hardness. Perspectives of applying thin CVD diamond detectors in monitoring of a slowed down radioactive beam (RIB) are discussed. (author)

  10. Two-beam type IH-RFQ linear accelerator for low-energy and high intensity heavy ion beam

    We developed a two-beam type IH-RFQ (Interdigital H type Radio Frequency Quadrupole) linac system to proof the principle of a multi-beam type IH-RFQ linac in Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors of Tokyo Institute of Technology. The multi-beam type RFQ linac has several beam channels in a cavity for accelerating high intensity and low energy heavy ion beams. The developed system consists of a two-beam type IH-RFQ cavity as a prototype of the multi-beam type cavity, a two-beam type laser ion source with DPIS (Direct Plasma Injection Scheme) and beam analyzers mainly. A a result of the beam acceleration test, the linac system accelerates carbon ions from 5 keV/u to 60 keV/u and generates about 108 mA (2x54 mA/channel) in the total output current. In this paper, we describe the development of the linac system and some results of the beam acceleration test. (author)

  11. Beam Dynamics Measurements for the SLAC Laser Acceleration Experiment

    The NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) was built to address beam dynamics issues for the Next Linear Collider and beyond. An S-Band RF gun, diagnostics and low energy spectrometer (LES) at 6 MeV together with a large-angle extraction line at 60 MeV have now been built and commissioned for the laser acceleration experiment, E163. Following a four quad matching section after the NLCTA chicane, the extraction section is followed by another matching section, final focus and buncher. The laser-electron interaction point (IP) is followed by a broad range, high resolving power spectrometer (HES) for electron bunch analysis. Optical symmetries in the design of the 25.5 degree extraction line provide 1:1 phase space transfer without sextupoles for a large, 6D phase space volume and range of input conditions. Spot sizes down to a few microns at the IP (HES object) allow testing microscale structures with high resolving power at the HES image. Tolerances, tuning sensitivities, diagnostics and the latest commissioning results are discussed and compared to design expectations

  12. Education in a rapidly advancing technology: Accelerators and beams

    The field of accelerators and beams (A and B) is one of today's fast changing technologies. Because university faculties have not been able to keep pace with the associated advancing knowledge, universities have not been able to play their traditional role of educating the scientists and engineers needed to sustain this technology for use in science, industry, commerce, and defense. This problem for A and B is described and addressed. The solution proposed, a type of ''distance'' education, is the U.S. Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) created in the early 1980s. USPAS provides the universities with a means of serving the education needs of the institutions using A and B, primarily but not exclusively the national laboratories. The field of A and B is briefly summarized. The need for education outside the university framework, the raison d'etre for USPAS, the USPAS method, program structure, and curriculum, and particular USPAS-university connections are explained. The management of USPAS is analyzed, including its unique administrative structure, its institutional ties, and its operations, finance, marketing, and governmental relations. USPAS performance over the years is documented and a business assessment is made. Finally, there is a brief discussion of the future potential for this type of educational program, including possible extrapolation to new areas and/or different environments, in particular, its extra-government potential and its international possibilities. (c) 2000 American Association of Physics Teachers

  13. Education in a rapidly advancing technology: Accelerators and beams

    Month, Mel

    2000-06-01

    The field of accelerators and beams (A&B) is one of today's fast changing technologies. Because university faculties have not been able to keep pace with the associated advancing knowledge, universities have not been able to play their traditional role of educating the scientists and engineers needed to sustain this technology for use in science, industry, commerce, and defense. This problem for A&B is described and addressed. The solution proposed, a type of "distance" education, is the U.S. Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) created in the early 1980s. USPAS provides the universities with a means of serving the education needs of the institutions using A&B, primarily but not exclusively the national laboratories. The field of A&B is briefly summarized. The need for education outside the university framework, the raison d'être for USPAS, the USPAS method, program structure, and curriculum, and particular USPAS-university connections are explained. The management of USPAS is analyzed, including its unique administrative structure, its institutional ties, and its operations, finance, marketing, and governmental relations. USPAS performance over the years is documented and a business assessment is made. Finally, there is a brief discussion of the future potential for this type of educational program, including possible extrapolation to new areas and/or different environments, in particular, its extra-government potential and its international possibilities.

  14. Beam Dynamics Studies for a Laser Acceleration Experiment

    The NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC was built to address various beam dynamics issues for the Next Linear Collider. An S-Band RF gun is being installed together with a large-angle extraction line at 60 MeV followed by a matching section, buncher and final focus for the laser acceleration experiment, E163. The laser-electron interaction area is followed by a broad range, high resolution spectrometer (HES) for electron bunch analysis. Another spectrometer at 6 MeV will be used for analysis of bunch charges up to 1 nC. Emittance compensating solenoids and the low energy spectrometer (LES) will be used to tune for best operating point and match to the linac. Optical symmetries in the design of the 25.5o extraction line provide 1:1 phase space transfer without use of sextupoles for a large, 6D phase space volume and range of input conditions. Design techniques, tolerances, tuning sensitivities and orthogonal knobs are discussed

  15. Generation of low-emittance electron beams in electrostatic accelerators for FEL applications

    This paper reports results of transverse emittance studies and beam propagation in electrostatic accelerators for free electron laser applications. In particular, we discuss emittance growth analysis of a low current electron beam system consisting of a miniature thermoionic electron gun and a National Electrostatics Accelerator (NEC) tube. The emittance growth phenomenon is discussed in terms of thermal effects in the electron gun cathode and aberrations produced by field gradient changes occurring inside the electron gun and throughout the accelerator tube. A method of reducing aberrations using a magnetic solenoidal field is described. Analysis of electron beam emittance was done with the EGUN code. Beam propagation along the accelerator tube was studied using a cylindrically symmetric beam envelope equation that included beam self-fields and the external accelerator fields which were derived from POISSON simulations. ((orig.))

  16. Electron-beam dynamics for an advanced flash-radiography accelerator

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-06-22

    Beam dynamics issues were assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator. Special attention was paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. Especially problematic would be high-frequency beam instabilities that could blur individual radiographic source spots, low-frequency beam motion that could cause pulse-to-pulse spot displacement, and emittance growth that could enlarge the source spots. Beam physics issues were examined through theoretical analysis and computer simulations, including particle-in cell (PIC) codes. Beam instabilities investigated included beam breakup (BBU), image displacement, diocotron, parametric envelope, ion hose, and the resistive wall instability. Beam corkscrew motion and emittance growth from beam mismatch were also studied. It was concluded that a beam with radiographic quality equivalent to the present accelerators at Los Alamos will result if the same engineering standards and construction details are upheld.

  17. New developments of 11C post-accelerated beams for hadron therapy and imaging

    Augusto, R. S.; Mendonca, T. M.; Wenander, F.; Penescu, L.; Orecchia, R.; Parodi, K.; Ferrari, A.; Stora, T.

    2016-06-01

    Hadron therapy was first proposed in 1946 and is by now widespread throughout the world, as witnessed with the design and construction of the CNAO, HIT, PROSCAN and MedAustron treatment centres, among others. The clinical interest in hadron therapy lies in the fact that it delivers precision treatment of tumours, exploiting the characteristic shape (the Bragg peak) of the energy deposition in the tissues for charged hadrons. In particular, carbon ion therapy is found to be biologically more effective, with respect to protons, on certain types of tumours. Following an approach tested at NIRS in Japan [1], carbon ion therapy treatments based on 12C could be combined or fully replaced with 11C PET radioactive ions post-accelerated to the same energy. This approach allows providing a beam for treatment and, at the same time, to collect information on the 3D distributions of the implanted ions by PET imaging. The production of 11C ion beams can be performed using two methods. A first one is based on the production using compact PET cyclotrons with 10-20 MeV protons via 14N(p,α)11C reactions following an approach developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [2]. A second route exploits spallation reactions 19F(p,X)11C and 23Na(p,X)11C on a molten fluoride salt target using the ISOL (isotope separation on-line) technique [3]. This approach can be seriously envisaged at CERN-ISOLDE following recent progresses made on 11C+ production [4] and proven post-acceleration of pure 10C3/6+ beams in the REX-ISOLDE linac [5]. Part of the required components is operational in radioactive ion beam facilities or commercial medical PET cyclotrons. The driver could be a 70 MeV, 1.2 mA proton commercial cyclotron, which would lead to 8.1 × 10711C6+ per spill. This intensity is appropriate using 11C ions alone for both imaging and treatment. Here we report on the ongoing feasibility studies of such approach, using the Monte Carlo particle transport code FLUKA [6,7] to simulate

  18. Beam dynamics in a linear accelerator for generations of short electron beams and femtosecond hard X-ray pulses

    We investigate a linear accelerator system capable of generating short electron beams and femtosecond hard X-ray pulses. We show a detailed for a two-stage bunch compressor to generate the short electron beams in the linear accelerator. The bunch compressor system consists of two chicanes with a short system length that can compress an electron bunch of 0.6 nC and beam energy of 162 MeV, from 3 to 0.5 ps rms. One important design issue in the bunch compressor is to make as small growths of the emittance and energy spread as possible. The normalized horizontal emittance of 3 mm mrad is increased by approximately 10% due to coherent synchrotron radiation in the designed bunch compressor. Lattice distortions due to machine errors associate with quadrupole magnets, bending magnets and beam position monitors in the linear accelerator were investigated. It is shown that the lattice distortions due to the machine errors can be easily compensated by performing both orbit correction and dispersion correction in the linear accelerator. We have performed tolerance studies due to the various jitter sources in the linear accelerator to examine their sensitivities on the beam quality. From these results, it is shown that the linear accelerator system provides sufficient tolerances to maintain stable electron beams. We also investigated the generation of femtosecond hard X-ray pulses that may be provided by the interactions at 90deg of the short electron beams in the linear accelerator with a laser system. It is shown that 3.4x106 photons within 10% bandwidth at 0.04 A wavelength in about 350 fs rms pulse may be provided using the linear accelerator system. We presented studies on beam dynamics in the linear accelerator system that may provide the short beams and intense X-ray pulses. (author)

  19. Levy-Student Distributions for Halos in Accelerator Beams

    Petroni, N C; De Siena, S; Illuminati, F

    2005-01-01

    We describe the transverse beam distribution in particle accelerators within the controlled, stochastic dynamical scheme of the Stochastic Mechanics (SM) which produces time reversal invariant diffusion processes. This leads to a linearized theory summarized in a Shchr\\"odinger--like (\\Sl) equation. The space charge effects have been introduced in a recent paper \\cite{prstab} by coupling this \\Sl equation with the Maxwell equations. We analyze the space charge effects to understand how the dynamics produces the actual beam distributions, and in particular we show how the stationary, self--consistent solutions are related to the (external, and space--charge) potentials both when we suppose that the external field is harmonic (\\emph{constant focusing}), and when we \\emph{a priori} prescribe the shape of the stationary solution. We then proceed to discuss a few new ideas \\cite{epac04} by introducing the generalized Student distributions, namely non--Gaussian, L\\'evy \\emph{infinitely divisible} (but not \\emph{sta...

  20. Recent radioactive ion beam program at RIKEN and related topics

    Akira Ozawa

    2001-08-01

    Recent experimental programs at RIKEN concerning RI beams are reviewed. RIKEN has the ring cyclotron (RRC) with high intense heavy-ion beams and large acceptance fragment separator, RIPS. The complex can provide high intense RI-beams. By using the high intense RI-beams, a variety of experiments have been done. Recently, nuclear structure for unstable nuclei has been paid much attention. In special, disappearance and appearance of magic numbers are discussed experimentally and theoretically. Thus, in this review, related experiments concerning disappearance and appearance of magic numbers are described. Finally, future project in RIKEN, RI-beam factory, is introduced briefly.

  1. Beam optics of a superconducting booster for the JAERI tandem accelerator

    In order to investigate beam optics of a superconducting booster for the JAERI tandem accelerator, a computer program has been written which calculates beam trajectories in the booster. By using this program various configurations have been examined and a configuration has been chosen as a 'good' candidate. Calculation has been made for 12C, 35Cl and 127I beams and it has been shown that 50-60% of continuous beam can be accelerated even without a prebuncher, if intended control of the beam can be accomplished. Some discussion is given on problems in contro-ling the beam. (author)

  2. ECR [electron cyclotron resonance] ion source beams for accelerator applications: Final report

    Reliable, easily operated ion sources are always in demand for accelerator applications. This paper reports on a systematic study of ion-beam characterisrtics and optimization of beam quality for production of light ion beams in an ECR ion source. Of particular interest is the optimization of beam brightness (defined as ion current divided by the square of the emittance), which is typically used as a figure-of-merit for accelerator-quality beams. Other areas to be discussed include the measurement of beam emittance values, the effects of various source parameters on emittances, and scaling effects from operating the same ECR source at different frequencies. 4 refs., 4 figs

  3. Recent results in the study of exotic nuclei using the 'Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil' (RIBRAS) facility

    Full text: The 'Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil' (RIBRAS) facility consists of two super-conducting solenoids of maxi- mum magnetic field B 6.5T, coupled to the 8UD-Pelletron tandem Accelerator installed at the University of Sao Paulo Physics Institute. It is the first radioactive beam facility of the Southern Hemisphere. The production mechanism of the radioactive ions is by transfer reactions, using 9Be, 3He, LiF and other production targets, and the forward focused reaction products are selected and focalized by the solenoids into a scattering chamber. Low energy (3-5 MeV/u) radioactive beams of 6He, 8Li, 7,10Be and 8,12B are produced currently and used to study elastic, inelastic, and transfer reactions on a variety of light, medium mass and heavy (9Be, 12C, 27Al, 51V and 120Sn) secondary targets. The data are analyzed, using most of the time, the Sao Paulo Potential (SPP) and compared to optical model and continuum discretized coupled-channels (CDCC) calculations. The total reaction cross section as a function of energy has been extracted from the elastic scattering data and the role of breakup of weakly bound or exotic nuclei is discussed. Some examples of reactions recently studied are 1H(8Li,4He)5He, 1H(8Li,1H)8Li using thick (CH2)n targets to measure their excitation functions. The transfer reaction 12C(8Li,4He)16N, leading to well defined excited states of 16N, through the transfer of 4H or the sequential decay 3H+n, is also being studied. (author)

  4. GEANT4 simulations for beam emittance in a linear collider based on plasma wakefield acceleration

    Alternative acceleration technologies are currently under development for cost-effective, robust, compact, and efficient solutions. One such technology is plasma wakefield acceleration, driven by either a charged particle or laser beam. However, the potential issues must be studied in detail. In this paper, the emittance evolution of a witness beam through elastic scattering from gaseous media and under transverse focusing wakefields is studied

  5. Augmentation of beam currents in the JAERI tandem-booster accelerator facility

    Takeuchi, Suehiro; Matsuda, Makoto; Yoshida, Tadashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-02-01

    Modifications have been executed in these years of the accelerator system, aiming at higher beam currents. Advanced experiments e.g. search of unknown heavy nuclei and their synthesis, need large current accelerators. The use of stripper foils in tandem accelerators for the electron detachment severely limits the beam current, however. The first modification is to install ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) ion source in a high voltage terminal board, multicharged, rare gas ions being accelerated directly. The second is to eliminate the use of the second foils, but to increase the beam intensity. (M. Tanaka)

  6. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator.

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I; Clayton, Chris E; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A; Mori, Warren B; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m(-1) is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:27250570

  7. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M.; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I.; Clayton, Chris E.; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z.; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J.; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A.; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-06-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m-1 is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.

  8. Application of high power modulated intense relativistic electron beams for development of Wake Field Accelerator

    This final Progress Report addresses DOE-sponsored research on the development of future high-gradient particle accelerators. The experimental and the theoretical research, which lasted three years, investigated the Two Beam Accelerator (TBA). This high-voltage-gradient accelerator was powered by a modulated intense relativistic electron beam (MIREB) of power >1010 watts. This research was conceived after a series of successful experiments performed at NRL generating and using MIREBs. This work showed that an RF structure could be built which was directly powered by a modulated intense relativistic electron beam. This structure was then used to accelerate a second electron beam. At the end of the three year project the proof-of-principle accelerator demonstrated the generation of a high current beam of electrons with energy >60 MeV. Scaling laws needed to design practical devices for future applications were also derived

  9. Regulation of naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials. A Task Force review

    The use of accelerator-produced radioisotopes (NARM), particularly in medicine, is growing rapidly. One NARM radioisotope, 226Ra, is one of the most hazardous of radioactive materials, and 226Ra is used by about 1/5 of all radioactive material users. Also, there are about 85,000 medical treatments using 226Ra each year. All of the 25 Agreement States and 5 non-Agreement States have licensing programs covering NARM users. The Agreement States' programs for regulating NARM are comparable to their programs for regulating byproduct, source, and special nuclear materials under agreements with NRC. But there are 7 states who exercise no regulatory control over NARM users, and the remaining States have control programs which are variable in scope. There are no national, uniformly applied programs to regulate the design, fabrication and quality of sources and devices containing NARM or consumer products containing NARM which are distributed in interstate commerce. Naturally occurring radioactive material (except source material) associated with the nuclear fuel cycle is only partially subject to NRC regulation, i.e., when it is associated with source or special nuclear material being used under an active NRC license. The Task Force recommends that the NRC seek legislative authority to regulate naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials for the reason that these materials present significant radiation exposure potential and present controls are fragmentary and non-uniform at both the State and Federal level

  10. Impacts of Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility operations on groundwater and surface water: Appendix 9

    The operation of the proposed Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Newport News, Virginia, is expected to result in the activation and subsequent contamination of water resources in the vicinity of the accelerator. Since the proposed site is located in the headwaters of the watershed supplying Big Bethel Reservoir, concern has been expressed about possible contamination of water resources used for consumption. Data characterizing the surface water and groundwater regime in the site area are limited. A preliminary geotechnical investigation of the site has been completed (LAW 1985). This investigation concluded that groundwater flow is generally towards the southeast at an estimated velocity of 2.5 m/y. This conclusion is based on groundwater and soil boring data and is very preliminary in nature. This analysis makes use of the data and conclusions developed during the preliminary geotechnical investigation to provide an upper-bound assessment of radioactive contamination from CEBAF operations. A site water balance was prepared to describe the behavior of the hydrologic environment that is in close agreement with the observed data. The transport of contamination in the groundwater regime is assessed using a one-dimensional model. The groundwater model includes the mechanisms of groundwater flow, groundwater recharge, radioactive decay, and groundwater activation. The model formulation results in a closed-form, exact, analytic solution of the concentration of contamination in the groundwater. The groundwater solution is used to provide a source term for a surface-water analysis. The surface-water and groundwater models are prepared for steady state conditions such that they represent conservative evaluations of CEBAF operations

  11. Instrumentation for diagnostics and control of laser-accelerated proton (ion) beams

    Bolton, P. R.; Borghesi, M. (Massimo); Brenner, C.; Carroll, D C; Martinis, C.; Fiorini, F.; Flacco, A.; Floquet, V; J. Fuchs; Gallegos, P.; Giove, D.; Green, J S; Green, S; Jones, B.; Kirby, D.

    2014-01-01

    Suitable instrumentation for laser-accelerated proton (ion) beams is critical for development of integrated, laser-driven ion accelerator systems. Instrumentation aimed at beam diagnostics and control must be applied to the driving laser pulse, the laser-plasma that forms at the target and the emergent proton (ion) bunch in a correlated way to develop these novel accelerators. This report is a brief overview of established diagnostic techniques and new developments based on material presented...

  12. Vacuum laser acceleration using a radially polarized CO2 laser beam

    Utilizing the high-power, radially polarized CO2 laser and high-quality electron beam at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility, a vacuum laser acceleration scheme is proposed. In this scheme, optics configuration is simple, a small focused beam spot size can be easily maintained, and optical damage becomes less important. At least 0.5 GeV/m acceleration gradient is achievable by 1 TW laser power

  13. A theory of two-beam acceleration of charged particles in a plasma waveguide

    The progress made in recent years in the field of high-current relativistic electron beam (REB) generation has aroused a considerable interest in studying REB potentialities for charged particle acceleration with a high acceleration rate T = 100MeV/m. It was proposed, in particular, to employ high-current REB in two-beam acceleration schemes (TBA). In these schemes high current REB (driving beam) excites intense electromagnetic waves in the electrodynamic structure which, in their turn, accelerate particles of the other beam (driven beam). The TBA schemes can be divided into two groups. The first group includes the schemes, where the two beams (driving and driven) propagate in different electrodynamic structures coupled with each other through the waveguides which ensure the microwave power transmission to accelerate driven beam particles. The second group includes the TBA schemes, where the driving and driven beams propagate in one electrodynamic structure. The main aim of this work is to demonstrate by theory the possibility of realizing effectively the TBA scheme in the plasma waveguide. The physical model of the TBA scheme under study is formulated. A set of equations describing the excitation of RF fields by a high-current REB and the acceleration of driven beam electrons is also derived. Results are presented on the the linear theory of plasma wave amplification by the driving beam. The range of system parameters, at which the plasma-beam instability develops, is defined. Results of numerical simulation of the TBA scheme under study are also presented. The same section gives the description of the dynamics of accelerated particle bunching in the high-current REB-excited field. Estimates are given for the accelerating field intensities in the plasma and electron acceleration rates

  14. Exploiting neutron-rich radioactive ion beams to constrain the symmetry energy

    Kohley, Z; Baumann, T; DeYoung, P A; Finck, J E; Frank, N; Jones, M; Smith, J K; Snyder, J; Spyrou, A; Thoennessen, M

    2013-01-01

    The Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and 4 Tm Sweeper magnet were used to measure the free neutrons and heavy charged particles from the radioactive ion beam induced 32Mg + 9Be reaction. The fragmentation reaction was simulated with the Constrained Molecular Dynamics model(CoMD), which demonstrated that the of the heavy fragments and free neutron multiplicities were observables sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy at sub-saturation densities. Through comparison of these simulations with the experimental data constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy were extracted. The advantage of radioactive ion beams as a probe of the symmetry energy is demonstrated through examination of CoMD calculations for stable and radioactive beam induced reactions.

  15. Design alternatives for beam halo monitors in high intensity accelerators

    Braun, H; Corsini, R; Lefèvre, T; Schulte, Daniel; Tecker, F A; Welsch, C P

    2005-01-01

    In future high intensity, high energy accelerators it must be ensured that particle losses are minimized as activation of the vacuum chambers or other components makes maintenance and upgrade work time consuming and costly. It is imperative to have a clear understanding of the mechanisms that can lead to halo formation and to have the possibility to test available theoretical models with an adequate experimental setup. Optical transition radiation (OTR) provides an interesting opportunity for linear real-time measurements of the transverse beam profile with a resolution which has been so far at best in the some μm range. However, the dynamic range of standard OTR systems is typically limited and needs to be improved for its application for halo measurements. In this contribution, the existing OTR system as it is installed in the CLIC test facility (CTF3) is analyzed and the contribution of each component to the final image quality discussed. Finally, possible halo measurement techniques based on OTR are pres...

  16. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    Liu, Zhengzheng, E-mail: liuz@frib.msu.edu; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-11

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR), to be implemented upstream of each FRIB cryomodule, as part of the direct loss monitoring system to fulfill the needs of machine protection. - Highlights: • Traditional BLM is not effective for beam loss monitoring at FRIB low energy linac segments. • We developed LMR to intercept a small portion of beam loss and output voltage signals. • We made a prototype LMR and demonstrated its functionality to monitor small beam losses. • The LMR is very sensitive for small beam losses and is independent of beam current. • The LMR is especially useful for loss monitoring at low energy ion/proton accelerators.

  17. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR), to be implemented upstream of each FRIB cryomodule, as part of the direct loss monitoring system to fulfill the needs of machine protection. - Highlights: • Traditional BLM is not effective for beam loss monitoring at FRIB low energy linac segments. • We developed LMR to intercept a small portion of beam loss and output voltage signals. • We made a prototype LMR and demonstrated its functionality to monitor small beam losses. • The LMR is very sensitive for small beam losses and is independent of beam current. • The LMR is especially useful for loss monitoring at low energy ion/proton accelerators

  18. DIPAC 2005 7. European workshop on beam diagnostics and instrumentation for particle accelerators

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Accelerators can not be improved without the development of adequate beam instruments and diagnostic tools. This year this statement is particularly right: a lot of contributions are dedicated to beam monitoring and to the design of new beam monitors based on original technologies. This document gathers about 100 contributions.

  19. DIPAC 2005 7. European workshop on beam diagnostics and instrumentation for particle accelerators

    Accelerators can not be improved without the development of adequate beam instruments and diagnostic tools. This year this statement is particularly right: a lot of contributions are dedicated to beam monitoring and to the design of new beam monitors based on original technologies. This document gathers about 100 contributions

  20. CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] design overview and project status

    This paper discusses the design and specifications of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. Beam performance objectives are discussed, as well as the recirculating linac concept, the injector, cavities, cryogenic system, beam transport and optics, rf system and construction progress. 19 refs., 10 figs

  1. THE MECHANICAL AND SHIELDING DESIGN OF A PORTABLE SPECTROMETER AND BEAM DUMP ASSEMBLY AT BNLS ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY

    A portable assembly containing a vertical-bend dipole magnet has been designed and installed immediately down-beam of the Compton electron-laser interaction chamber on beamline 1 of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The water-cooled magnet designed with field strength of up to 0.7 Tesla will be used as a spectrometer in the Thompson scattering and vacuum acceleration experiments, where field-dependent electron scattering, beam focusing and energy spread will be analyzed. This magnet will deflect the ATF's 60 MeV electron-beam 90o downward, as a vertical beam dump for the Compton scattering experiment. The dipole magnet assembly is portable, and can be relocated to other beamlines at the ATF or other accelerator facilities to be used as a spectrometer or a beam dump. The mechanical and shielding calculations are presented in this paper. The structural rigidity and stability of the assembly were studied. A square lead shield surrounding the assembly's Faraday Cup was designed to attenuate the radiation emerging from the 1 inch-copper beam stop. All photons produced were assumed to be sufficiently energetic to generate photoneutrons. A safety evaluation of groundwater tritium contamination due to the thermal neutron capturing by the deuterium in water was performed, using updated Monte Carlo neutron-photon coupled transport code (MCNP). High-energy neutron spallation, which is a potential source to directly generate radioactive tritium and sodium-22 in soil, was conservatively assessed in verifying personal and environmental safety

  2. Beam emittance reconstructions at the KFUPM 350 keV ion accelerator

    We successfully reconstructed the horizontal and vertical beam emittances of a 160 keV low-intensity deuteron ion beam from the Energy Research Laboratory's low intensity duoplasmatron deuteron ion source. Reconstructions were made from horizontal and vertical beam width measurements. These measurements were done using only one quadrupole triplet and a beam profile monitor situated towards the end of the 45 beam line of the 350 kV ion accelerator. The deuteron beam emittances were εh = 67 π mm-mrad and εv = 4π mm-mrad at 90% of the beam. (orig.)

  3. Start-to-end simulations for beam dynamics in the RISP heavy-ion accelerator

    Kim, Eun-San, E-mail: eskim1@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Deagu (Korea, Republic of); Bahng, JungBae [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Deagu (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ji-Gwang [KIRAMS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Bong-Hyuk; Kim, Hye-Jin; Jeon, Dong-O [Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-11

    RAON has been designed as a rare isotope accelerator facility for the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP). The main accelerator for the in-flight system accelerates uranium and proton beams to 200 MeV/u and 660 MeV, respectively, with a beam power of 400 kW. The front-end system consists of two 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (10 keV/u), a low-energy beam transport (LEBT) line with two 90° bends, a multi-harmonic buncher with three different rf frequencies, a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and a medium-energy beam transport line (MEBT) with three rebunchers and eight quadrupoles. A driver linac system consisting of Linac-1 and Linac-2 has been designed to optimize the beam and accelerator parameters so as to meet the required design goals. A charge stripper section is located between Linac-1 and Linac-2. To optimize these designs, we performed start-to-end simulations with the beams from the LEBT to Linac-2 using 1 million macroparticles. We present the resulting beam dynamics to evaluate the performance of the accelerator. Our simulation results predict that the transmission rate of the uranium beam is 85.8% from the LEBT to Linac-2. The designed facility is expected to achieve the required beam loss condition of less than 1 W/m. The RAON driver linac lattice design was developed and an overview of the beam dynamics is presented.

  4. Conceptual design of parallel beam lines for tandem accelerator

    In order to get enough beam current for each parallel beam line, the beam intensity distribution along aperture on the diaphragm is calculated to deduce a function which is verified by computer program for simulating charged particle beam transport systems, based on this function relationship between emittance of beam and the different aperture parameters on diaphragm is analyzed. At the end, a conceptual design of parallel beam line is given and the parameters of the optical elements are calculated. The results are accurate and credible. quality of beam can reach the requirements of user for nuclear physics experiments. (authors)

  5. Designing a program to assess potential induced radioactivity in electron beam sterilization of medical devices

    ISO 11137-1:2006 requires that the potential for induced radioactivity be evaluated for medical devices irradiated with electrons with energy more than 10 MeV. For a manufacturing operation where new devices are being developed, a practical program for making such an evaluation needs to be engrained in the process. A program was developed such that the induced radioactivity evaluation is imbedded in the development of the irradiation process. - Highlights: • A program is described to evaluate induced radioactivity in electron beam. • The program entails evaluation of design prior to manufacturing. • Radiation measurement is done immediately following irradiation. • The instrument has adequate sensitivity for this purpose

  6. Characterization of a radioactive {sup 11}C beam by means of the associated particle technique

    Varela, A.; Policroniades, R.; Murillo, G.; Moreno, E. [ININ, Laboratorio del Acelerador Tandem, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Huerta, A.; Chavez, E.; Ortiz, M. E.; Barron, L.; Curiel, Q. [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Aguilar, C.; Coello, E. A.; Juarez, M. A.; Martinez, J. N. [UNAM, Facultad de Ciencias, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-02-15

    This paper describes the results obtained for the production and characterization of a radioactive {sup 11}C beam, by means of the in flight technique and the tandem laboratory of the National Institute of Nuclear Research, Mexico. The {sup 11}C production technique described here, uses the well known associated particle technique with the reaction {sup 2}H({sup 10}B, {sup 11}C)n, in order to obtain a bi univocal correspondence between the radioactive {sup 11}C particles and the associated neutrons. A discussion concerning the possible use of this {sup 11}C beam in the study of the elastic scattering of protons is introduced. (Author)

  7. Resonant scattering experiments with radioactive nuclear beams - Recent results and future plans

    Teranishi, T.; Sakaguchi, S. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8581 (Japan); Uesaka, T.; Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yamaguchi, H.; Kurihara, Y.; Bihn, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Watanabe, S. [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hashimoto, T. [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 Japan and Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Hayakawa, S. [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 Japan and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nationali del Sud (INFN-LNS), via S.Sofia 62, Catania, 95125 (Italy); Khiem, L. H.; Cuong, P. V. [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy for Science and Technology, 10 Daotan, Badinh, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Goto, A. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan and National Insitute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), 4-9-1 Anagawa, Chiba-shi, 263-8555 (Japan)

    2013-04-19

    Resonant scattering with low-energy radioactive nuclear beams of E < 5 MeV/u have been studied at CRIB of CNS and at RIPS of RIKEN. As an extension to the present experimental technique, we will install an advanced polarized proton target for resonant scattering experiments. A Monte-Carlo simulation was performed to study the feasibility of future experiments with the polarized target. In the Monte-Carlo simulation, excitation functions and analyzing powers were calculated using a newly developed R-matrix calculation code. A project of a small-scale radioactive beam facility at Kyushu University is also briefly described.

  8. Nuclear structure at extremes of stability: Prospects for radioactive beam experiments and facilities

    In the last few years, our understanding of nuclei at extremes of stability has undergone substantial development and change. It is now thought that there is every likelihood for truly new manifestations of structure at extreme N/Z ratios, unlike anything observed to date. Changes in shell structure, residual interactions, symmetries, collective modes, and the evolution of structure are envisioned. These developing ideas expand the opportunities for nuclear structure studies with radioactive beams and focus attention on the need to develop efficient experimental techniques and improved signatures of structure. These developments are discussed along with an overview of current and future radioactive beam projects in North America

  9. Measurement of nuclear cross sections using radioactive beams; Medicion de secciones eficaces nucleares usando haces radiactivos

    Lizcano, D.; Aguilera, E.F.; Martinez Q, E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    One of the main applications of the production and use of nuclear radioactive beams is the measurement of nuclear cross sections. In this work is used a {sup 6} He nuclear radioactive beam ({beta} emitting with half life 806.7 ms) for the study of the reaction {sup 6} + {sup 209} Bi which could have several products. This investigation was realized in collaboration with the personnel of the Nuclear Structure laboratory at the University of Notre Dame (U.S.A.) and the National institute of Nuclear Research and CONACyT by Mexico. (Author)

  10. Performance of MBE-4: An experimental multiple beam induction linear accelerator for heavy ions

    An experimental induction linac, called MBE-4, has been constructed to demonstrate acceleration and current amplification of multiple heavy ion beams. This work is part of a program to study the use of such an accelerator as a driver for heavy ion inertial fusion. MBE-4 is 16m long and accelerates four space-charge-dominated beams of singly-charged cesium ions, in this case from 200 keV to 700 keV, amplifying the current in each beam from 10mA by a factor of nine. Construction of the experiment was completed late in 1987 and we present the results of detailed measurements of the longitudinal beam dynamics. Of particular interest is the contribution of acceleration errors to the growth of current fluctuations and to the longitudinal emittance. The effectiveness of the longitudinal focusing, accomplished by means of the controlled time dependence of the accelerating fields, is also discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  11. High-energy beams of radioactive nuclei and their biomedical applications

    Several exploratory measurements have been conducted with radioactive beams to test the feasibility of using these beams to measure effective stopping power of heterogeneous media for heavy charged particles. Such measurements will provide direct information on the average electron density and average stopping number of a target with an unknown heterogeneous beam path. This information, once obtained with a suitable radioactive beam, can be used in equations to calculate the energy of any heavy particle of therapeutic choice so that the Bragg peak of the therapeutic beam can be placed on the tumor volume. A beam of high-energy heavy ions was collimated to a diameter of 1.58 cm (PEBA has a good positional accuracy as long as the beam diameter is less than 2 cm), and made to enter target materials (mixed or homogeneous) positioned between the detector banks and centered along the beam axis. Measurements have been made with 11C and 19Ne beams, but the short half-life of 19Ne (19 sec) allows prompt repeated measurements, making that nucleus very interesting for these purposes. Only the results obtained with it are reported

  12. Nuclear Astrophysics Data from Radioactive Beam Facilities. Final report

    The scientific aims of this project have been the evaluation and dissemination of key nuclear reactions in nuclear astrophysics, with a focus on ones to be studied at new radioactive beam facilities worldwide. These aims were maintained during the entire funding period from 2003 - 2006. In the following, a summary of the reactions evaluated during this period is provided. Year 1 (2003-04): 21Na(p,γ)22Mg and 18Ne(α,p)21Na - The importance of the 21Na(p,γ)22Mg and the 18Ne(α,p)21Na reactions in models of exploding stars has been well documented: the first is connected to the production of the radioisotope 22Na in nova nucleosynthesis, while the second is a key bridge between the Hot-CNO cycles and the rp-process in X-ray bursts. By the end of Summer 2004, our group had updated these reaction rates to include all published data up to September 2004, and cast the reaction rates into standard analytical and tabular formats with the assistance of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's computational infrastructure for reaction rates. Since September 2004, ongoing experiments on these two reactions have been completed, with our group's participation in both: 21Na(p,γ)22Mg at the TRIUMF-ISAC laboratory (DRAGON collaboration), and 18Ne(α,p)21Na at Argonne National Laboratory (collaboration with Ernst Rehm, Argonne). The data from the former was subsequently published and included in our evaluation. Publication from the latter still awaits independent confirmation of the experimental results. Year 2 (2004-05): The 25Al(p,γ)26Si and 13N(p,γ)14O reactions - For Year 2, we worked on evaluations of the 25Al(p,γ)26Si and 13N(p,γ)14O reactions, in accordance with our proposed deliverables and following similar standard procedures to those used in Year 1. The 25Al(p,γ)26Si reaction is a key uncertainty in the understanding the origin of galactic 26Al, a target radioisotope for gamma ray astronomy; the 13N(p,γ)14O reaction in turn is the trigger reaction for the transition into

  13. Beam diagnostic of transverse geometric macrostructure errors for high energy part of linear ion accelerators

    The geometric transverse mismatching between the supports on which the elements of accelerating and trans-verse focusing structure are placed for high energy part of the linear accelerators for the ions with small mass, for example for protons or negative hydrogen ions, may lead to the particle loses of an accelerated beam or to the significant amplitudes for the beam center oscillations. The proposed method, in which it was supposed knowledge about the transverse geometric errors between the neighbour supports and application of the correction elements at the beginning of an accelerator part under investigation, permits to minimize amplitude of the transverse beam center oscillations. That leads to the reduction of possible beam loses and improvement a quality of the beam dynamics.

  14. Radiation protection challenges in the management of radioactive waste from high-energy accelerators

    The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) has operated high-energy accelerators for fundamental physics research for nearly 60 y. The side-product of this activity is the radioactive waste, which is mainly generated as a result of preventive and corrective maintenance, upgrading activities and the dismantling of experiments or accelerator facilities. Prior to treatment and disposal, it is common practice to temporarily store radioactive waste on CERN's premises and it is a legal requirement that these storage facilities are safe and secure. Waste treatment typically includes sorting, segregation, volume and size reduction and packaging, which will depend on the type of component, its chemical composition, residual activity and possible surface contamination. At CERN, these activities are performed in a dedicated waste treatment centre under the supervision of the Radiation Protection Group. This paper gives an overview of the radiation protection challenges in the conception of a temporary storage and treatment centre for radioactive waste in an accelerator facility, based on the experience gained at CERN. The CERN approach consists of the classification of waste items into 'families' with similar radiological and physical-chemical properties. This classification allows the use of specific, family-dependent techniques for radiological characterisation and treatment, which are simultaneously efficient and compliant with best practices in radiation protection. The storage was planned on the basis of radiological and other possible hazards such as toxicity, pollution and fire load. Examples are given of technical choices for the treatment and radiological characterisation of selected waste families, which could be of interest to other accelerator facilities. (authors)

  15. Self-Injection and Acceleration of Monoenergetic Electron Beams from Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Highly Relativistic Regime

    Self-injection and acceleration of monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators are first investigated in the highly relativistic regime, using 100 TW class, 27fs laser pulses. Quasi-monoenergetic multi-bunched beams with energies as high as multi-hundred MeV are observed with simultaneous measurements of side-scattering emissions that indicate the formation of self-channelling and self-injection of electrons into a plasma wake, referred to as a 'bubble'. The three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations confirmed multiple self-injection of electron bunches into the bubble and their beam acceleration with gradient of 1.5GeV/cm. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  16. Self-Injection and Acceleration of Monoenergetic Electron Beams from Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Highly Relativistic Regime

    H. Yoshitama; WEN Xian-Lun; WEN Tian-Shu; WU Yu-Chi; ZHANG Bao-San; ZHU Qi-Hua; HUANG Xiao-Jun; AN Wei-Min; HUNG Wen-Hui; TANG Chuan-Xiang; LIN Yu-Zheng; T. Kameshima; WANG Xiao-Dong; CHEN Li-Ming; H. Kotaki; M. Kando; K. Nakajima; GU Yu-Qiu; GUO Yi; JIAO Chun-Ye; LIU Hong-Jie; PENG Han-Sheng; TANG Chuan-Ming; WANG Xiao-Dong

    2008-01-01

    @@ Self-injection and acceleration of monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators are first in-vestigated in the highly relativistic regime, using 100 TW class, 27 fs laser pulses. Quasi-monoenergetic multi-bunched beams with energies as high as multi-hundredMeV are observed with simultaneous measurements of side-scattering emissions that indicate the formation of self-channelling and self-injection of electrons into a plasma wake, referred to as a 'bubble'. The three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations confirmed multiple self-injection of electron bunches into the bubble and their beam acceleration with gradient of 1.5 GeV/cm.

  17. Precision atomic physics techniques for nuclear physics with radioactive beams

    Blaum, Klaus; Dilling, Jens; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Atomic physics techniques for the determination of ground-state properties of radioactive isotopes are very sensitive and provide accurate masses, binding energies, Q-values, charge radii, spins, and electromagnetic moments. Many fields in nuclear physics benefit from these highly accurate numbers. They give insight into details of the nuclear structure for a better understanding of the underlying effective interactions, provide important input for studies of fundamental symmetries in physics...

  18. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms

    Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2014-02-01

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a 18O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

  19. The damped oscillating propagation of the compensating self-accelerating beams

    Liu, Wei-Wei; Yu, Pan-Pan; Wang, Hao-wei; Wang, Zi-qiang; Li, Yin-Mei

    2016-01-01

    We report a new form of compensating accelerating beam generated by amplitude modulation of the symmetric Airy beam (SAB) caustics with an exponential apodization mask. Our numerical study manifests that the compensating beam is with one main-lobe beam structure and can maintain the mean-intensity invariant both in the free space and loss media. Specially, the beam inherits the beamlets structure from the SAB and owns a novel damped oscillating propagation property. We also conduct a comparative study of its propagation property with that of the Airy beam theoretically. And by altering the signs of 2D masks, the main lobe of the compensating beam can be modulated to orientate in four different quadrants flexibly. The proposed compensating accelerating beam is anticipated to get special applications in particle manipulation or plasmas regions.

  20. 2 MeV, 60 kW dual-beam type electron accelerator irradiation facility

    The specification of new irradiation facility which has been constructed from 1978 through 1981 as the replacement of 1st Accelerator of JAERI, TRCRE are described. The accelerator is the Cockcroft-Walton type and both vertical and horizontal accelerating tubes are arranged on a single high voltage generator. Transferring of the high voltage to the horizontal accelerating tube is performed with the high voltage changing system in the pressure vessel. The output ratings of the accelerator are 2 MV of acceleration voltage and 30 mA of beam current. By providing the dual beam system, two irradiation rooms, one for vertical and the other for horizontal beam, are independently operationable. Persons can enter the horizontal irradiation room for experimental setting even when the vertical irradiation room is in operation. The specification of the buildings, the exhaust air treatment system, the irradiation conveyor and the safety observation system are also described. (author)

  1. Photofission for the production of radioactive beams: Experimental data from an on-line measurement

    A PARRNe 1 experiment (Production d'Atomes Radioactifs Riches en Neutrons) aimed at the production of neutron-rich radioactive noble gases produced by photofission has been performed at CERN. The LEP Pre-Injector (LPI) has been used to deliver a 50 MeV electron beam. The results obtained show clearly that the use of an electron beam to produce neutron-rich fission fragments for futur RNB facilities is an option that should not be neglected. (orig.)

  2. Capture and Control of Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams: Experiment and Simulation

    This paper summarizes the ongoing studies on the possibilities for transport and RF capture of laser-accelerated proton beams in conventional accelerator structures. First results on the capture of laser-accelerated proton beams are presented, supported by Trace3D, CST particle studio and Warp simulations. Based on these results, the development of the pulsed high-field solenoid is guided by our desire to optimize the output particle number for this highly divergent beam with an exponential energy spectrum. A future experimental test stand is proposed to do studies concerning the application as a new particle source

  3. Design study of double-layer beam trajectory accelerator based on the Rhodotron structure

    Jabbari, Iraj; Poursaleh, Ali Mohammad; Khalafi, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the conceptual design of a new structure of industrial electron accelerator based on the Rhodotron accelerator is presented and its properties are compared with those of Rhodotron-TT200 accelerator. The main goal of this study was to reduce the power of RF system of accelerator at the same output electron beam energy. The main difference between the new accelerator structure with the Rhodotron accelerator is the length of the coaxial cavity that is equal to the wavelength at the resonant frequency. Also two sets of bending magnets were used around the acceleration cavity in two layers. In the new structure, the beam crosses several times in the coaxial cavity by the bending magnets around the cavity at the first layer and then is transferred to the second layer using the central bending magnet. The acceleration process in the second layer is similar to the first layer. Hence, the energy of the electron beam will be doubled. The electrical power consumption of the RF system and magnet system were calculated and simulated for the new accelerator structure and TT200. Comparing the calculated and simulated results of the TT200 with those of experimental results revealed good agreement. The results showed that the overall electrical power consumption of the new accelerator structure was less than that of the TT200 at the same energy and power of the electron beam. As such, the electrical efficiency of the new structure was improved.

  4. Strategies for mitigating the ionization-induced beam head erosion problem in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    An, W.; Zhou, M.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Marsh, K. A.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.; Lu, W.; Adli, E.; Corde, S.; Litos, M.; Li, S.; Gessner, S.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Walz, D.; England, J.; Delahaye, J. P.; Muggli, P.

    2013-10-01

    Strategies for mitigating ionization-induced beam head erosion in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) are explored when the plasma and the wake are both formed by the transverse electric field of the beam itself. Beam head erosion can occur in a preformed plasma because of a lack of focusing force from the wake at the rising edge (head) of the beam due to the finite inertia of the electrons. When the plasma is produced by field ionization from the space charge field of the beam, the head erosion is significantly exacerbated due to the gradual recession (in the beam frame) of the 100% ionization contour. Beam particles in front of the ionization front cannot be focused (guided) causing them to expand as in vacuum. When they expand, the location of the ionization front recedes such that even more beam particles are completely unguided. Eventually this process terminates the wake formation prematurely, i.e., well before the beam is depleted of its energy. Ionization-induced head erosion can be mitigated by controlling the beam parameters (emittance, charge, and energy) and/or the plasma conditions. In this paper we explore how the latter can be optimized so as to extend the beam propagation distance and thereby increase the energy gain. In particular we show that, by using a combination of the alkali atoms of the lowest practical ionization potential (Cs) for plasma formation and a precursor laser pulse to generate a narrow plasma filament in front of the beam, the head erosion rate can be dramatically reduced. Simulation results show that in the upcoming “two-bunch PWFA experiments” on the FACET facility at SLAC national accelerator laboratory the energy gain of the trailing beam can be up to 10 times larger for the given parameters when employing these techniques. Comparison of the effect of beam head erosion in preformed and ionization produced plasmas is also presented.

  5. Induced radioactivity of materials by stray radiation fields at an electron accelerator

    Rokni, S H; Gwise, T; Liu, J C; Roesler, S

    2002-01-01

    Samples of soil, water, aluminum, copper and iron were irradiated in the stray radiation field generated by the interaction of a 28.5 GeV electron beam in a copper-dump in the Beam Dump East facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The specific activity induced in the samples was measured by gamma spectroscopy and other techniques. In addition, the isotope production in the samples was calculated with detailed Monte Carlo simulations using the FLUKA code. The calculated activities are compared to the experimental values and differences are discussed.

  6. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator

  7. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF ACCELERATOR DATA REPORTING SYSTEM AND ITS APPLICATION TO TREND ANALYSIS OF BEAM CURRENT DATA

    Padilla, M.J.; Blokland, W.

    2009-01-01

    Detailed ongoing information about the ion beam quality is crucial to the successful operation of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In order to provide the highest possible neutron production time, ion beam quality is monitored to isolate possible problems or performance-related issues throughout the accelerator and accumulator ring. For example, beam current monitor (BCM) data is used to determine the quality of the beam transport through the accelerator. In this study, a reporting system infrastructure was implemented and used to generate a trend analysis report of the BCM data. The BCM data was analyzed to facilitate the identifi cation of monitor calibration issues, beam trends, beam abnormalities, beam deviations and overall beam quality. A comparison between transformed BCM report data and accelerator log entries shows promising results which represent correlations between the data and changes made within the accelerator. The BCM analysis report is one of many reports within a system that assist in providing overall beam quality information to facilitate successful beam operation. In future reports, additional data manipulation functions and analysis can be implemented and applied. Built-in and user-defi ned analytic functions are available throughout the reporting system and can be reused with new data.

  9. Vibration Energy Harvester with Bi-stable Curved Beam Spring Offset by Gravitational Acceleration

    Yamamoto, Koki; Fujita, Takayuki; Badel, Adrien; Formosa, Fabien; Kanda, Kensuke; Maenaka, Kazusuke

    2015-12-01

    We developed MEMS bi-stable spring for vibration energy harvester (VEH), which consists of intrinsically curved shape spring and gravitational acceleration. By applying the gravitational acceleration, the curved beam is offset to the gravity direction. It will make more symmetrical bi-stable motion and the symmetry is improved from 3.3 to 65.4%. We proposed that the combination between curved beam and gravity acceleration for decreasing snap- through acceleration. From the analytical result, we investigate the combination can effective to use for decreasing of snap-through force. We also fabricated the prototype device by using MEMS fabrication process. The frequency response for horizontal direction and the acceleration response for vertical direction are measured. The acceleration response shows that the gravitational acceleration improves the symmetry of snap-through force.

  10. Beam line shielding calculations for an Electron Accelerator Mo-99 production facility

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-03

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the photon and neutron fields in and around the latest beam line design for the Mo-99 production facility. The radiation dose to the beam line components (quadrupoles, dipoles, beam stops and the linear accelerator) are calculated in the present report. The beam line design assumes placement of two cameras: infra red (IR) and optical transition radiation (OTR) for continuous monitoring of the beam spot on target during irradiation. The cameras will be placed off the beam axis offset in vertical direction. We explored typical shielding arrangements for the cameras and report the resulting neutron and photon dose fields.

  11. Quality Assesment Of Photon And Electron Beams From Siemens PRIMUS Radiotherapy Accelerator

    There are two types of radiation from SIEMENS Primus Radiotherapy Accelerator at the National Cancer Hospital (K Hospital): electron and photon beams. Electron beams with four different energies of 6; 9; 12 and 15 MeV. Photon beams with two different energies: 6 MV and 15 MV. The symmetry as well as flatness of profiles created by all these beams are very important factors using in clinical practice. This report presents the method using water phantom to define absorbed dose distribution in medium of all beams. This is an effective and accurate method to define quality of radiation beams with different field sizes using in radiotherapy. (author)

  12. Generation of annular, high-charge electron beams at the Argonne wakefield accelerator

    Wisniewski, E. E.; Li, C.; Gai, W.; Power, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present and discuss the results from the experimental generation of high-charge annular(ring-shaped)electron beams at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). These beams were produced by using laser masks to project annular laser profiles of various inner and outer diameters onto the photocathode of an RF gun. The ring beam is accelerated to 15 MeV, then it is imaged by means of solenoid lenses. Transverse profiles are compared for different solenoid settings. Discussion includes a comparison with Parmela simulations, some applications of high-charge ring beams,and an outline of a planned extension of this study.

  13. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-09-09

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant β-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  14. Development of bipolar pulse accelerator for high-purity intense pulsed ion beam

    In order to improve the purity of the intense pulsed ion beam, a new type of a pulsed ion beam accelerator named “bipolar pulse accelerator” has been proposed. A double coaxial type bipolar pulse generator was developed as the power supply of the bipolar pulse accelerator. By applying the bipolar pulse with voltage of about ±100 kV and pulse duration of about 70 ns to the drift tube of the bipolar pulse accelerator, the ion beam was successfully accelerated from the grounded anode to the drift tube in the 1st gap by the negative pulse of the bipolar pulse and the pulsed ion beam with current density of 40 A/cm2 and pulse duration of 30 ns was obtained at 50 mm downstream from the anode surface. In addition, part of the ion beam was again accelerated toward the grounded cathode in the 2nd gap by the positive pulse of the bipolar pulse. The pulsed ion beam with the peak ion current density of 2 A/cm2 and the beam pulse duration of 30 ns was obtained at 25 mm downstream from the cathode surface, which suggests the bipolar pulse acceleration. (author)

  15. Progress Report of Beijing Radioactive Ion-Beam Facility (BRIF) in 2012

    YI; Hui; SUN; Yang

    2012-01-01

    <正>The year 2012 is featured with several important events for the Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility (BRIF) project. With joint efforts from all sides, the team has made significant progress in the construction, the main equipment manufacturing, installation and assembly throughout the year.

  16. Progress Report of Beijing Radioactive Ion-Beam Facility (BRIF) in 2011

    2011-01-01

    The year 2011 is featured with several important events for the Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility (BRIF) project. At the beginning of the year, the two divisions of the BRIF project, i.e. Engineering Division and Technology Division, have been merged into one as the BRIF Division.

  17. The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    The status of the new Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which is slated to start its scientific program late this year is discussed, as is the new experimental equipment which is being constructed at this facility. Information on the early scientific program also is given

  18. RIKEN radioactive isotope beam factory project – Present status and perspectives

    H Sakurai

    2010-08-01

    Programs for studying nuclear reactions and structure of exotic nuclei available at the RIKEN radioactive isotope beam factory project are introduced and discussed by demonstrating recent highlights. Special emphasis is given to the present status and future plans of new devices.

  19. Nuclear physics with simple and multi-element detectors and with stable and radioactive beams

    Neil Rowley

    2001-07-01

    The phenomenon of fusion barrier distributions is discussed in the context of a problem already investigated in some detail with simple detection systems, but possessing avenues to studies with multi-detector arrays. The complementarity of research with simple and complex detectors, as well as with stable and radioactive beams, will be highlighted.

  20. The latest from the new Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    The status of new Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which is slated to start its scientific program late in 1996 is discussed, as is the new experimental equipment which is being constructed at this facility. Information on the early scientific program is also given

  1. The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Garrett, J.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The status of the new Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which is slated to start its scientific program late this year is discussed, as is the new experimental equipment which is being constructed at this facility. Information on the early scientific program also is given.

  2. Strengthening the inherent safety and security of radioactive sources: Accelerator based options

    First and foremost, radioactive sources are both useful and cost effective. If a technology can't be utilized in an effective manner, it won't be useful, no matter how clever and elegant it is. Secondly, there are safety and proliferation concerns that must be addressed. Accidents, contamination, dirty bombs, etc., all represent real concerns. A single incident can impact the cost of all uses. These issues and regulations devised to reduce these risks are driving up the costs and lowering efficiency. An alternative would be the accelerator based option, which is nothing new, it has been around for decades. Using accelerator technologies to produce radiation will address the issues I raise by limiting the production of radiation to only those times when a switch has been flipped. Producing radiation that way has one main advantage over the use of radioactive sources. When the switch is off, there is no radiation. Making instruments that are doubly fail-safe is straightforward. Issues associated with radiation safety during transport and storage disappear. There are also minimal issues of disposal and tracking of materials. There is very little potential for diverting a transportable radiography machine or portable neutron generator for nefarious uses. There is a need to carefully monitor the balance between the increasing number of radioactive sources in use, increasing concern for their location and condition, and the cost of employing radiation generators. In many cases there will be a natural progression away from using sources towards the use of radiation generators. Another key factor that would influence this balance is if an accident and or misuse of radioactive sources were to occur. The costs of dealing with sources would rapidly escalate, and would likely tip the balance sooner

  3. The new JENSA gas-jet target for astrophysical radioactive beam experiments

    Bardayan, D. W.; Chipps, K. A.; Ahn, S.; Blackmon, J. C.; Browne, J.; Greife, U.; Jones, K. L.; Kontos, A.; Kozub, R. L.; Linhardt, L.; Manning, B.; Matoš, M.; O'Malley, P. D.; Montes, F.; Ota, S.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; Sachs, A.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Thompson, P.

    2016-06-01

    To take full advantage of advanced exotic beam facilities, target technology must also be advanced. Particularly important to the study of astrophysical reaction rates is the creation of localized and dense targets of hydrogen and helium. The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas-jet target has been constructed for this purpose. JENSA was constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) where it was tested and characterized, and has now moved to the ReA3 reaccelerated beam hall at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University for use with radioactive beams.

  4. Set-up on the basis of multiwire proportional and ionization chambers for radioactive beam experiments

    A large-aperture set-up designed for nuclear physics experiments on beams of radioactive nuclei is described. The set-up includes Multiwire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) for measuring the beam profile, MWPC for measuring reaction product angular distributions, a CsI (Tl)-crystal detector and a longitudinal drift ionization chamber for identifying scattered particles and measuring their energy. The results of tests of coordinate MWPCs, particle identification on photon and ion beams, and preliminary measurements of the elastic scattering and the charge exchange reaction of 170 MeV 6He on a CH2 target are presented

  5. Vietnam Project For Production Of Radioactive Beam Based On ISOL Technique With The Dalat Reactor

    The presence in Vietnam of Dalat nuclear reactor dedicated to fundamental studies is a unique opportunity to produce Radioactive Ion (RI) Beams with the fission of a 235U induced by the thermal neutrons produced by the reactor. We propose to produce RI beams at the Dalat nuclear reactor using ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) technique. This project should be a unique opportunity for Vietnamese nuclear physics community to use its own facilities to produce RI beams for studying nuclear physics at an international level. (author)

  6. Simulation of high-intense beam transport in electrostatic accelerating column

    卢小龙; 姚泽恩; 张宇; 徐大鹏; 陈尚文; 王俊润; 黄智武; 马占文; 王伟

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatic accelerating column was designed and fabricated by Lanzhou University for an intense D-T/D-D neutron generator. In order to achieve a neutron yield of 5.0 × 1012 n/s, a deuteron beam of 30 mA, accelerated to 400 kV, and transported in the electrostatic accelerating column smoothly are required. One particle-in-cell code BEAMPATH was used to simulate the beam transport, and the IONB1.0 code was used to simulate the intense beam envelopes. Emittance growths due to space charge effect and spherical aberration were analyzed. The simulation results show that the accelerating column can transport deuteron beam of 30 mA smoothly and the requirement for the neutron generator is satisfied.

  7. Beam collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    A pulsed high field solenoid was used in a laser-proton acceleration experiment to collimate and transport the proton beam that was generated at the irradiation of a flat foil by a high intensity laser pulse. 1012 particles at an energy of 2.3 MeV could be caught and transported over a distance of more than 240 mm. Strong space charge effects occur, induced by the high field of the solenoid that forces all co-moving electrons down the the solenoid's axis, building up a strong negative space charge that interacts with the proton beam. This leads to an aggregation of the proton beam around the solenoid's axis and therefore to a stronger focusing effect. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications like post-acceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  8. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    Kourbanis, ioanis

    2014-06-01

    After a 14 month shutdown accelerator modifications and upgrades are in place to allow us doubling of the Main Injector beam power. We will discuss the past MI high power operation and the current progress towards doubling the power.

  9. Beam shaping assembly optimization for 7Li(p,n)7Be accelerator based BNCT

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30 mA at about 2.5 MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors. - Highlights: • A Beam Shaping Assembly for accelerator based BNCT has been designed. • A conical port for easy patient positioning and the cooling system are included. • Several configurations can deliver tumor doses greater than 55 RBEGy. • Good tumor doses can be obtained in less than 60 min of irradiation time

  10. Simulation of Quasi-Adiabatic Beam Capture into Acceleration at the Nuclotron

    Volkov, V I; Issinsky, I B; Kovalenko, A D

    2003-01-01

    The routine RF system being used at the Nuclotron allows one to inject the beam at ramping magnetic field with following acceleration at constant amplitude of accelerating voltage. At these conditions at least a half of the particles circulating in the vacuum chamber after injection is not captured in longitudinal acceptance. At the same time vacuum chamber sizes permit to extend the momentum spread of the beam enough to make gymnastic with it inside the stable zone of longitudinal phase space on the flat magnetic field at injection. A quasi-adiabatic capture was considered for increasing the Nuclotron beam intensity. Simulation of such a kind of process with subsequent acceleration was performed. It was shown that in this case it is possible to capture and accelerate up to 100 % of the injected beam.

  11. CERN Accelerator School: Intensity Limitations in Particle Beams | 2-11 November

    2015-01-01

    Registration is now open for the CERN Accelerator School’s specialised course on Intensity Limitations in Particle Beams, to be held at CERN between 2 and 11 November 2015.   This course will mainly be of interest to staff in accelerator laboratories, university departments and companies manufacturing accelerator equipment. Many accelerators and storage rings, whether intended for particle physics experiments, synchrotron light sources or industrial applications, require beams of high brightness and the highest possible intensities. A good understanding of the possible limitations is required to achieve the desired performance. The programme for this course will cover the interaction of beams with their surroundings, with other beams and further collective effects. Lectures on the effects and possible mitigations will be complemented by tutorials. Further information can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/Intensity-Limitations-2015/IL-advert.html   http:/...

  12. On the polarized beam acceleration in medium energy synchrotrons

    This lecture note reviews physics of spin motion in a synchrotron, spin depolarization mechanisms of spin resonances, and methods of overcoming the spin resonances during acceleration. Techniques used in accelerating polarized ions in the low/medium energy synchrotrons, such as the ZGS, the AGS, SATURNE, and the KEK PS and PS Booster are discussed. Problems related to polarized proton acceleration with snakes or partial snake are also examined

  13. Theoretical and numerical studies on the transport of transverse beam quality in plasma-based accelerators

    This work examines effects, which impact the transverse quality of electron-beams in plasma-based accelerators, by means of theoretical and numerical methods. Plasma-based acceleration is a promising candidate for future particle accelerator technologies. In plasma-based acceleration, highly intense laser beams or high-current relativistic particle beams are focused into a plasma to excite plasma-waves with extreme transverse and longitudinal electric fields. The amplitude of these fields exceed with 10-100 GV/m the ones in today's radio-frequency accelerators by several orders of magnitude, hence, in principle allowing for accordingly shorter and cheaper accelerators based on plasma. Despite the tremendous progress in the recent decade, beams from plasma accelerators are not yet achieving the quality as demanded for pivotal applications of relativistic electron-beams, e.g. free-electron lasers (FELs).Studies within this work examine how the quality can be optimized in the production of the beams and preserved during the acceleration and transport to the interaction region. Such studies cannot be approached purely analytical but necessitate numerical methods, such as the Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method, which can model kinetic, electrodynamic and relativistic plasma phenomena. However, this method is computationally too expensive for parameter-scans in three-dimensional geometries. Hence, a quasi-static PIC code was developed in connection with this work, which is significantly more effective than the full PIC method for a class of problems in plasma-based acceleration.The evolution of the emittance of beams which are injected into plasma modules was studied in this work by means of theoretical and the above numerical methods. It was shown that the beam parameters need to be matched accurately into the focusing plasma-channel in order to allow for beam-quality preservation. This suggested that new extraction and injection-techniques are required in staged plasma-acceleration

  14. On the validity of the paraxial approximation for electron acceleration with radially polarized laser beams

    Marceau, Vincent; Varin, Charles; Piché, Michel

    2013-01-01

    In the study of laser-driven electron acceleration, it has become customary to work within the framework of paraxial wave optics. Using an exact solution to the Helmholtz equation as well as its paraxial counterpart, we perform numerical simulations of electron acceleration with a high-power TM01 beam. For beam waist sizes at which the paraxial approximation was previously recognized valid, we highlight significant differences in the angular divergence and energy distribution of the electron ...

  15. Initial investigation using statistical process control for quality control of accelerator beam steering

    Able Charles M; Hampton Carnell J; Baydush Alan H; Munley Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background This study seeks to increase clinical operational efficiency and accelerator beam consistency by retrospectively investigating the application of statistical process control (SPC) to linear accelerator beam steering parameters to determine the utility of such a methodology in detecting changes prior to equipment failure (interlocks actuated). Methods Steering coil currents (SCC) for the transverse and radial planes are set such that a reproducibly useful photon or electron...

  16. Transverse beam dynamics in recirculating accelerators for heavy-ion fusion

    A conceptual design for a circular induction accelerator has been proposed as a driver for heavy-ion fusion. In such an accelerator, errors in dipole strength and quadrupole alignment affect the transverse motion of the beam centroid. Analytic and numerical estimates are made of the beam-centroid displacement due to these errors, and a steering algorithm to correct the transverse mismatch from these errors is described and tested numerically

  17. Electron acceleration by two crossed Bessel-Gaussian beams in vacuum

    Zhao Zhi-Guo; Lü Bai-Da

    2006-01-01

    The direct acceleration of electrons by using two linearly polarized crossed Bessel-Gaussian (BG) beams with equal frequency and amplitude in vacuum is proposed and studied. It is shown that two linearly polarized BG beams of the same order (0 or 1) with a π-rad phase difference have a resultant non-zero longitudinal electric field on the z-axis and can be used, in principle, to accelerate electrons.

  18. Post-acceleration study for neutrino super-beam at CSNS

    WU Yang; TANG Jing-Yu

    2013-01-01

    A post-acceleration system based on the accelerators at CSNS (China Spallation Neutron Source) is proposed to build a super-beam facility for neutrino physics.Two post-acceleration schemes,one using superconducting dipole magnets in the main ring and the other using room temperature magnets,have been studied,both to achieve the final proton energy of 128 GeV and the beam power of 4 MW by taking 10% of the CSNS beam from the neutron source.The main design features and the comparison for the two schemes are presented.The CSNS super-beam facility will be very competitive in long-baseline neutrino physics studies,compared with other super-beam facilities proposed in the world.

  19. Diaphragm effects on the stability of an electron beam in an induction linear accelerator

    The effect of shielding of an electron beam electromagnetic field by a sequence of metallic diaphragms, used in induction linear accelerators for acceleration tube protection against charge landing, on the stability of transverse beam motion is considered. The coefficients are calculated of shielding of quasi-stationary electric and magnetic fields of a beam displaced relative to the accelerator axis. The values of longitudinal magnetic field strength necessary for coherent beam focusing are determined. The electron beam instability increment on an asymmetric hybrid wave in a decelerating structure formed by the sequence of diaphragms is found. It is shown that the destabilizing effect of the diaphragm can be weakened by increasing the ratio of the structure period to its radius

  20. New reaction chamber for transient field g-factor measurements with radioactive ion beams

    Illana, A., E-mail: a.illana@csic.es; Perea, A.; Nácher, E.; Orlandi, R.; Jungclaus, A.

    2015-06-11

    A new reaction chamber has been designed and constructed to measure g-factors of short-lived excited states using the Transient Field technique in combination with Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics. In this paper we will discuss several important aspects which have to be considered in order to successfully carry out this type of measurement with radioactive ion beams, instead of the stable beams used in a wide range of experiments in the past. The technical solutions to the problems arising from the use of such radioactive beams will be exposed in detail and the first successful experiment using the new chamber in combination with MINIBALL cluster detectors at REX-ISOLDE (CERN) will be reported on.

  1. A concept for emittance reduction of DC radioactive heavy-ion beams

    Numerical simulations indicate that it should be possible to use an electron beam to strip 1+ DC radioactive ion beams to 2+ or higher charge states with on the order of 50% efficiency. The device, which the authors call an Electron-Beam Charge-State Amplifier, is similar to an Electron Beam Ion Source, except that it is not pulsed, the beams are continuous. The 2+ beams are obtained in a single pass through a magnetic solenoid while higher charge states may be reached via multiple passes. An unexpected result of the ion optics simulations is that the normalized transverse emittance of the ion beam is reduced in proportion to the charge-state gain. Ion beams with realistic emittances and zero angular momentum relative to the optic axis before entering the solenoid will travel though the solenoid on helical orbits which intercept the axis once per cycle. With an ion beam about 2 mm in diameter and an electron beam about 0.2 mm in diameter, the ion stripping only occurs very near the optic axis, resulting in the emittance reduction

  2. Electrostatic design and beam transport for a folded tandem electrostatic quadrupole accelerator facility for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    Within the frame of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT), we discuss here the electrostatic design of the machine, including the accelerator tubes with electrostatic quadrupoles and the simulations for the transport and acceleration of a high intensity beam.

  3. Flyer Acceleration by Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation and Application for Space Propulsion

    Flyer acceleration by ablation plasma pressure produced by irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam has been studied. Acceleration process including expansion of ablation plasma was simulated based on fluid model. And interaction between incident pulsed ion beam and a flyer target was considered as accounting stopping power of it. In experiments, we used ETIGO-II intense pulsed ion beam generator with two kinds of diodes; 1) Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID, power densities of <100 J/cm2) and 2) Spherical-focused Plasma Focus Diode (SPFD, power densities of up to 4.3 kJ/cm2). Numerical results of accelerated flyer velocity agreed well with measured one over wide range of incident ion beam energy density. Flyer velocity of 5.6 km/s and ablation plasma pressure of 15 GPa was demonstrated by the present experiments. Acceleration of double-layer target consists of gold/aluminum was studied. For adequate layer thickness, such a flyer target could be much more accelerated than a single layer. Effect of waveform of ion beam was also examined. Parabolic waveform could accelerate more efficiently than rectangular waveform. Applicability of ablation propulsion was discussed. Specific impulse of 7000∼8000 seconds and time averaged thrust of up to 5000∼6000N can be expected. Their values can be controllable by changing power density of incident ion beam and pulse duration

  4. Unveiling the orbital angular momentum and acceleration of electron beams.

    Shiloh, Roy; Tsur, Yuval; Remez, Roei; Lereah, Yossi; Malomed, Boris A; Shvedov, Vladlen; Hnatovsky, Cyril; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Arie, Ady

    2015-03-01

    New forms of electron beams have been intensively investigated recently, including vortex beams carrying orbital angular momentum, as well as Airy beams propagating along a parabolic trajectory. Their traits may be harnessed for applications in materials science, electron microscopy, and interferometry, and so it is important to measure their properties with ease. Here, we show how one may immediately quantify these beams' parameters without need for additional fabrication or nonstandard microscopic tools. Our experimental results are backed by numerical simulations and analytic derivation. PMID:25793830

  5. Unveiling the orbital angular momentum and acceleration of electron beams

    Shiloh, Roy; Lereah, Yossi; Malomed, Boris A; Shvedov, Vladlen; Hnatovsky, Cyril; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Arie, Ady

    2014-01-01

    New forms of electron beams have been intensively investigated recently, including vortex beams carrying orbital angular momentum, as well as Airy beams propagating along a parabolic trajectory. Their traits may be harnessed for applications in materials science, electron microscopy and interferometry, and so it is important to measure their properties with ease. Here we show how one may immediately quantify these beams' parameters without need for additional fabrication or non-standard microscopic tools. Our experimental results are backed by numerical simulations and analytic derivation.

  6. Beam instrumentation for future high intense hadron accelerators at Fermilab

    Wendt, M.; Hu, M.; Tassotto, G.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Scarpine, V.; Shin, S.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    High intensity hadron beams of up to 2 MW beam power are a key element of new proposed experimental facilities at Fermilab. Project X, which includes a SCRF 8 GeV H{sup -} linac, will be the centerpiece of future HEP activities in the neutrino sector. After a short overview of this, and other proposed projects, we present the current status of the beam instrumentation activities at Fermilab with a few examples. With upgrades and improvements they can meet the requirements of the new beam facilities, however design and development of new instruments is needed, as shown by the prototype and conceptual examples in the last section.

  7. Noninterceptive method to measure longitudinal Twiss parameters of a beam in a hadron linear accelerator using beam position monitors

    Shishlo, A.; Aleksandrov, A.

    2013-06-01

    A new method of measuring of the rms longitudinal Twiss parameters of a beam in linear accelerators is presented. It is based on using sum signals from beam position monitors sensitive to the longitudinal charge distribution in the bunch. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on the superconducting section of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source linear accelerator. The results are compared to a direct measurement of the bunch longitudinal profiles using an interceptive bunch shape monitor in the linac warm section of the same accelerator. Limitations of the method are discussed. The method is fast and simple, and can be used to obtain the initial parameters for the longitudinal matching in linear accelerators where interceptive diagnostics are not desirable.

  8. Beam transport in the crystal x-ray accelerator

    A Fokker-Planck model of charged particle transport in crystal channels which includes the effect of strong accelerating gradients has been developed for application to the crystal x-ray accelerator and other crystal accelerator schemes. We indicate the implications of the analytic solutions found for a harmonic channeling potential for the accelerating gradient and the multiple scattering which, because we consider only the acceleration of positive particles, is dominated by scattering from the valence electrons. In order to relax the constraints imposed by these, we have been exploring the application of novel materials to this problem. One candidate is porous Si and our investigation into this material which is as yet preliminary is discussed and other possible materials are indicated

  9. A singly charged ion source for radioactive 11C ion acceleration

    A new singly charged ion source using electron impact ionization has been developed to realize an isotope separation on-line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive 11C ion beams. Low-energy electron beams are used in the electron impact ion source to produce singly charged ions. Ionization efficiency was calculated in order to decide the geometric parameters of the ion source and to determine the required electron emission current for obtaining high ionization efficiency. Based on these considerations, the singly charged ion source was designed and fabricated. In testing, the fabricated ion source was found to have favorable performance as a singly charged ion source

  10. A singly charged ion source for radioactive ¹¹C ion acceleration.

    Katagiri, K; Noda, A; Nagatsu, K; Nakao, M; Hojo, S; Muramatsu, M; Suzuki, K; Wakui, T; Noda, K

    2016-02-01

    A new singly charged ion source using electron impact ionization has been developed to realize an isotope separation on-line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive (11)C ion beams. Low-energy electron beams are used in the electron impact ion source to produce singly charged ions. Ionization efficiency was calculated in order to decide the geometric parameters of the ion source and to determine the required electron emission current for obtaining high ionization efficiency. Based on these considerations, the singly charged ion source was designed and fabricated. In testing, the fabricated ion source was found to have favorable performance as a singly charged ion source. PMID:26932062

  11. A singly charged ion source for radioactive 11C ion acceleration

    Katagiri, K.; Noda, A.; Nagatsu, K.; Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Muramatsu, M.; Suzuki, K.; Wakui, T.; Noda, K.

    2016-02-01

    A new singly charged ion source using electron impact ionization has been developed to realize an isotope separation on-line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive 11C ion beams. Low-energy electron beams are used in the electron impact ion source to produce singly charged ions. Ionization efficiency was calculated in order to decide the geometric parameters of the ion source and to determine the required electron emission current for obtaining high ionization efficiency. Based on these considerations, the singly charged ion source was designed and fabricated. In testing, the fabricated ion source was found to have favorable performance as a singly charged ion source.

  12. A singly charged ion source for radioactive {sup 11}C ion acceleration

    Katagiri, K.; Noda, A.; Nagatsu, K.; Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Muramatsu, M.; Suzuki, K.; Wakui, T.; Noda, K. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    A new singly charged ion source using electron impact ionization has been developed to realize an isotope separation on-line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive {sup 11}C ion beams. Low-energy electron beams are used in the electron impact ion source to produce singly charged ions. Ionization efficiency was calculated in order to decide the geometric parameters of the ion source and to determine the required electron emission current for obtaining high ionization efficiency. Based on these considerations, the singly charged ion source was designed and fabricated. In testing, the fabricated ion source was found to have favorable performance as a singly charged ion source.

  13. A prototype of a beam steering assistant tool for accelerator operations

    The CEBAF accelerator provides nuclear physics experiments at Jefferson Lab with high quality electron beams. Three experimental end stations can simultaneously receive the beams with different energies and intensities. For each operational mode, the accelerator setup procedures are complicated and require very careful checking of beam spot sizes and positions on multiple beam viewers. To simplify these procedures and make them reproducible, a beam steering assistant GUI tool has been created. The tool is implemented as a multi-window control screen. The screen has an interactive graphical object window, which is an overlay on top of a digitized live video image from a beam viewer. It allows a user to easily create and edit any graphical objects consisting of text, ellipses, and lines, right above the live beam viewer image and then save them in a file that is called a beam steering template. The template can show, for example, the area within which the beam must always be on the viewer. Later, this template can be loaded in the interactive graphical object window to help accelerator operators steer the beam to the specified area on the viewer

  14. E-beam accelerator cavity development for the ground-based free electron laser

    Bultman, N. K.; Spalek, G.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing and developing four prototype accelerator cavities for high power testing on the Modular Component Technology Development (MCTD) test stand at Boeing. These cavities provide the basis for the e-beam accelerator hardware that will be used in the Ground Based Free Electron Laser (GBFEL) to be sited at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) in New Mexico.

  15. Analysis of secondary particle behavior in multiaperture, multigrid accelerator for the ITER neutral beam injector

    Heat load on acceleration grids by secondary particles such as electrons, neutrals, and positive ions, is a key issue for long pulse acceleration of negative ion beams. Complicated behaviors of the secondary particles in multiaperture, multigrid (MAMuG) accelerator have been analyzed using electrostatic accelerator Monte Carlo code. The analytical result is compared to experimental one obtained in a long pulse operation of a MeV accelerator, of which second acceleration grid (A2G) was removed for simplification of structure. The analytical results show that relatively high heat load on the third acceleration grid (A3G) since stripped electrons were deposited mainly on A3G. This heat load on the A3G can be suppressed by installing the A2G. Thus, capability of MAMuG accelerator is demonstrated for suppression of heat load due to secondary particles by the intermediate grids.

  16. System for measuring parameters of electron beams injected into collective heavy ion accelerator

    The description of automation system for measurement of the intensive nanosecond electron beam characteristics of a collective heavy ion accelerator at JINR is presented. The system includes a set of the collector sensors for registering electronics for all sensors. The range of beam measured currents reaches 1000 A at repetition frequency of cycles up to 50 Hz

  17. Numerical simulations of driving beam dynamics in the plasma wakefield accelerator

    Novel plasma based acceleration devices have become the subject of active research because of their ability to support acceleration gradients in excess of 10 GeV/m. The plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) is one such device which consists of an intense electron beam (the primary beam) whose purpose is to excite a plasma wave which, in turn, accelerates a trailing electron bunch (the secondary beam). Two issues of current interest in the PWFA are (1) the equilibrium and stability of the driving beam and (2) the effect of the wakefield on the quality of the trailing electron bunch. In the UCLA experiment, a question of particular interest is the equilibrium state of the driving electron beam. Two intriguing suggestions have been made. The first is that in the limit that the beam density greatly exceeds the plasma density, the plasma electrons will be completely expelled from the axis. The second is that, in parameter regimes of interest, the driving beam will experience a severe radial pinching force. In order to investigate these assertions, the authors first consider the envelope equation for an electron beam propagating in a plasma with nb ≥ np. They then compare numerical solutions of this equation to results obtained via two-dimensional axisymmetric (r,z) particle simulation using the GRIEZR particle simulation code

  18. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    Prost, L. R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-02-17

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  19. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    Prost, Lionel R

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  20. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator

    Wang, S.; Iqbal, M.; Liu, R.; Chi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.