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Sample records for accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy

  1. Comparison between continuous accelerated hyperfractionated and late-course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    Purpose: To compare the treatment results and toxicity of continuous accelerated hyperfractionated (CAHF) and late-course accelerated hyperfractionated (LCAF) radiotherapy (RT) for esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between August 1996 and March 1999, 101 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus were randomized into two groups: 49 to the CAHF group and 52 to the LCAF group. Patients in the CAHF group received RT at 1.5 Gy/fraction b.i.d. (6-h interval), 5 d/wk, to a total dose 66 Gy in 44 fractions during 4.4 weeks. The patients in the LCAF group received conventional fractionation RT, 1.8 Gy/fraction, to a dose of 41.4 Gy in 23 fractions during 4.6 weeks, followed by accelerated fractionation RT using reduced fields, b.i.d., at 1.5 Gy/fraction, with a minimal interval of 6 h between fractions. The total dose was 68.4 Gy in 41 fraction during 6.4 weeks. Patient age, gender, performance score, diet, lesion location, lesion length, stage, and fractionation (CAHF or LCAF) were entered into the univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: All patients finished the treatment course, except for 1 patient in the CAHF group because of severe acute esophagitis. The rate of Grade I, II, and III acute bronchitis was 18.4% (9 of 49), 30.6% (15 of 49), and 8.2% (4 of 49) in the CAHF group and 13.5% (7 of 52), 21.2% (11 of 52), and 3.8% (2 of 52) in the LCAF group, respectively. However, the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (p=0.084). The rate of Grade I, II, III, and IV acute esophagitis was 6.1% (3 of 49), 32.7% (16 of 49), 46.9% (23 of 49), and 14.3% (7 of 49) in the CAHF group and 26.9% (14 of 52), 32.7% (17 of 52), 7.7% (4 of 52), and 1.9% (1 of 52) in the LCAF group, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). The local control rate at 1, 2, and 3 years was 88.7%, 83.9%, and 55.9% in the CAHF group and 80.7%, 71.4%, and 57.1% in the LCAF group, respectively (p=0.1251). The 1-, 2-, and 3

  2. Late course accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Objective: To study the efficacy of late course accelerated fractionation (LCAF) radio- therapy in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma(NPC). The end-po s were local control, radiation-induced complications, factors influencing survival. Methods: From December 1995 to April 1998, 178 NPC patients were admitted for radiation treatment. The radiation beam used was 60Co γ or 6 MV X-ray. For the first two-thirds of the treatment, two daily fractions of 1.2 Gy were given to the primary lesion , with an interval of ≥6 hours, 5 days per week to a total dose of 48 Gy/40 fractions, over a period of 4 weeks. For the last one third of the treatment, i. e. beginning from the 5th week, an accelerated hyperfractionation schedule was carried out. The dose per fraction was increased to 1.5 Gy, 2 fractions per day with an interval of ≥6 hours, the total dose for this part of the protocol was 30 Gy/20 fractions over 2 weeks. Thus the total dose was 78 Gy in 60 fractions in 6 weeks. Results: All patients completed the treatment. Acute mucositis: none in 2 patients, Grade 1 in 43 , Grade 2 in 78, Grade 3 in 52, and Grade 4 in 3 patients. Local control rate: the 5 -year nasopharyngeal local control rate was 87.7%, and the cervical lymph node local control rate was 85.7%. The 5-year distant metastasis rate was 26.1%, and 5-year survivals was 67.9%. Sixteen patients had radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy. Conclusions: With this treatment schedule, patient's tolerance is good, local control and 5 year survivals are better than control groups of conventional fractionation and hyperfractionation radiotherapy. Radiation-related late complication does not increase. Randomized clinical trials are being carried out to further confirm the efficacy of LCAF for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. (authors)

  3. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for locally advanced cervix cancer

    Purpose: A phase II trial was designed to evaluate the toxicity and outcome of patients with locally advanced cervix cancer treated with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (AHFX). Methods and Materials: In this prospective trial, AHFX doses of 1.25 Gy were administered twice daily at least 6 hours apart to a total pelvic dose of 57.5 Gy. A booster dose was then administered via either low-dose rate brachytherapy or external beam therapy to a smaller volume. All patients were accrued and treated at Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute (PMCI) between 1986 until April 1991. Results: Sixty-one eligible patients were enrolled in this protocol; 2 (3.2%) had Stage IIB; 42 (68.9%) had Stage III; 8 (13.1%) had Stage IV and 9 (14.8%) had recurrent cervical cancer. Fifty-two patients (85%) completed the planned external beam without a treatment break. Thirty patients had acute toxicity that required regular medication. One patient died of acute treatment related toxicity. Fifty-five patients received booster therapy: 45 with intrauterine brachytherapy, 6 with interstitial brachytherapy, and 4 with external beam. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 6 years. Overall 5-year survival is 27% and 5-year relapse free survival is 36%. Nineteen patients died with pelvic disease and the actuarial local control rate was 66%. There were 8 severe late complications observed in 7 patients. Seven required surgical intervention (an actuarial rate of 27%). Five patients also required total hip replacement. Conclusions: The local control rate was favorable compared with other series that have used standard fractionation, although overall survival remained similar. The severe late complication rate was high for this protocol and higher than similar protocols reported in the literature

  4. Late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for clinical T1-2 esophageal carcinoma

    Kuai-Le Zhao; Yang Wang; Xue-Hui Shi

    2003-01-01

    AIM: This retrospective study was designed to analyze the results and the failure patterns of late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for clinical T1-2NoMo esophageal carcinoma. METHODS: From Aug. 1994 to Feb. 2001, 56 patients with clinical T1-2 esophageal carcinoma received late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in Cancer Hospital,Fudan University. All patients had been histologically proven to have squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and were diagnosed to be T1-2NoMo by CT scan. All patients were treated with conventional fractionation (CF) irradiation during the first twothirds course of the treatment to a dose of about 41.4Gy/23fx/4 to 5 weeks, Which was then followed by accelerated hyperfractionation irradiation using reduced fields, twice daily at 1.SGy per fraction, to a dose about 27Gy/18 fx. Thus the total dose was 67-70Gy/40-43fx/40-49 d. RESULTS: The 1-, 3- and 5-year overall survival was 90.9 %,54.6 %, 47.8 % respectively. The 1-, 3- and 5-year local control rate was 90.9 %, 84.5 % and 84.5 %, respectively.Twenty-five percent (14/56) patients had distant metastasis and/or lymph nodes metastasis alone. Eight point nine percent (5/56) patients had local disease alone. Another 3.6 % (2/56) patients had regional relapse and distant metastasis. CONCLUSION: Late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy is effective on clinical T1-2 esophageal carcinoma.The main failure pattern is distant metastasis.

  5. Randomized study on late course accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy plus cisplatin in the treatment of esophageal carcinomas

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic results of late course accelerated hyperfractionation (LCAH) radiotherapy plus cisplatin as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of esophageal carcinoma. Methods: One hundred and four patients with squamou s cell carcinoma of the esophagus were randomized into two groups: LCAH alone group (53 patients) and LCAH + cisplatin group (51 patients). The same irradiation technique was given for both groups with conventional fractionation (2 Gy daily, 5 times a week) in the first 3 weeks and late course accelerated hyperfractionation (1.5 Cry twice daily, a minimum interfraction interval of 6 hours, 5 days per week) in the last 2 weeks. The total dose was 60 Gy/5 wks. In LCAH + cisplatin group, cisplatin was given simultaneous with 20 mg once daily for 5 days in the 1st and 5th weeks. The acute and late side effects were evaluated during :and after the treatment. Results: The median survival time was 12.2 months and 17.0 months in the LCAH alone group and LCAH + cisplatin group. The 1- and 3-year survival rates in LCAH group were 52.8 % and 20.8%; while those of LCAH + cisplatin group were 58.0 % and 24.0% (P>0.05). The acute gastrointestinal toxicities and hematological toxicities were obvious in LCAH + cisplatin group, but no increased acute esophagitis or late complications was observed. Conclusions: Late course accelerated hyperfractionation radio-therapy used simultaneously with cisplatin tends to increase the overall survival rate compared with the late course accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy alone in the treatment of esophageal carcinoma. (authors)

  6. Hyperfractionated or accelerated radiotherapy in head and neck cancer: a meta-analysis

    Bourhis, J.; Overgaard, Jens; Audry, H.;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several trials have studied the role of unconventional fractionated radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, but the effect of such treatment on survival is not clear. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess whether this type of radiotherapy could improve survival......-specified categories: hyperfractionated, accelerated, and accelerated with total dose reduction. FINDINGS: 15 trials with 6515 patients were included. The median follow-up was 6 years. Tumours sites were mostly oropharynx and larynx; 5221 (74%) patients had stage III-IV disease (International Union Against Cancer...... radiotherapy (2% with accelerated fractionation without total dose reduction and 1.7% with total dose reduction at 5 years, p=0.02). There was a benefit on locoregional control in favour of altered fractionation versus conventional radiotherapy (6.4% at 5 years; p<0.0001), which was particularly efficient in...

  7. Preoperative concurrent CBDCA chemotherapy and accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary region

    Between 1994 and 2000, 28 patients with T3/T4 squamus cell carcinoma of the maxillary region (maxillary sinus, 22; maxillary gingiva, 4; maxillary bone, 1; buccal mucosa, 1) had accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy combined with simultaneous CBDCA chemotherapy preoperatively, at Chiba Cancer Center Hospital. The protocol consisted of combined therapy with accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation of 1.6 Gy, twice a day, to a total dose of 32.0-51.2 Gy and concurrent intra-arterial or intravenous infusion of CBDCA 20-30 mg/body/day for a cumulative total dose of 270-480 mg. After completion of the preoperative combined therapy, the clinical CR rate was 17.9%, and the good PR·CR rate was 32.1%. According to the initial findings and response to the combined therapy, all patients had maxillectomy (subtotal, 3; total, 16; extended, 9) 4 weeks after completion of the preoperative combined therapy. Postoperatively, the complete pathologic response (Ohboshi and Shimozato's classification, grade III and IV) rate was 28.6%. And the actuarial local control rate was 85.7%, with a mean follow-up of 46.2 months. Based on these results, we believe this preoperative therapy with CBDCA chemotherapy and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation is a significant choice as treatment for squamous cell cancer of the maxillary region. (author)

  8. Hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy followed by radical surgery in locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity

    Hoeller, U. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Radiooncology and Nuclear Medicine, Vivantes Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Biertz, I.; Tribius, S.; Alberti, W. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Flinzberg, S.; Schmelzle, R. [Dept. of Dental, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Univ. Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the outcome of hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy and subsequent planned primary tumor resection and radical neck dissection in locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity. Patients and Methods: this retrospective analysis evaluates 126 subsequent patients who were treated between 1988 and 1997 for locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity (with extension into the oropharynx in 17 patients), 34 (27%) AJCC stage III and 92 (73%) stage IV. Primary tumor and nodal metastases were irradiated with 1.4 Gy bid to a median total dose of 72.8 Gy (range 58.8-75.6 Gy). Then, planned radical surgery of the primary site according to the initial tumor extent and cervical nodes was performed. Median follow-up of living patients was 6 years (range 1-11 years). Results: 4 weeks after radiotherapy, 14 patients (11%) had complete tumor remission, 92 (73%) partial remission, 15 (12%) no change, and five (4%) progressive disease. Complete resection was achieved in 117 (93%) patients (nine incomplete resections). 5-year locoregional control rate was 62 {+-} 9%, overall survival 36 {+-} 9%. Surgery-related morbidity occurred in 42 patients (33%; mainly delayed wound healing and fistulae), overall severe treatment-related morbidity in 46 patients (36%). 24/84 relapse-free patients (29%) required a percutaneous gastrostomy or nasal tube {>=} 1 year after therapy. Conclusion: in this study, the outcome of combined curative radiotherapy and planned surgery of the primary tumor and neck nodes was comparable to reported results of hyperfractionated radiotherapy with or without salvage surgery of the neck nodes with respect to locoregional control and overall survival. Planned surgery carries a substantial risk of morbidity and seems to offer no benefit in comparison to salvage surgery of the neck nodes only. Therefore, salvage surgery is preferred. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of remote results of conventional fractionation radiotherapy and late course accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Objective: To compare the long-term effects of conventional fractionation (CF) radio-therapy and late course accelerated hyperfractionation (LCAHF) radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and to arrive at a appropriate NPC radiotherapy protocol. Methods: According to the criteria, 496 patients with NPC were allotted to our retrospective analysis, including 269 in the CF group and 227 in the LCAHF group. Two large lateral opposing fields were first used to treat the nasopharynx and the upper neck at a fraction of 2 Gy daily, 5 days per week. After 36-40 Gy, two small lateral opposing fields were used to boost the primary tumor while the spinal cord shielded. In the CF group, the accumulated total dose of naso-pharynx was 68-76 Gy at 2 Gy daily. In the LCAHF group, the radiation fraction of primary tumor was 1.5 Gy twice daily, with a minimum of six-hour interval in the late course. The accumulated total dose was 69-72 Gy. Survival was assessed by Kaplan-Meier method and Logrank analysis. Results: The 5-year primary site control, tumor-free survival and overall survival rates was 65.4% ,61.5% and 68.1% in the LCAHF group and 52.8%, 49.4% and 57.5% in the CF group. The difference between the two groups were significant (P=0.006, 0.006 and 0.031). Further analysis showed that LCAHF improved the primary site control, tumor-free survival and overall survival rates of T2-T3 NPC (P0.05). Conclusions: When compared with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, late course accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy, being tolerable, definitely can improve the local control, tumor-free survival and overall survival in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. But the recurrence rates of cervical lymph nodes and distant metastasis were similar in between these two groups. (authors)

  10. Late course accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy for elderly patients with esophageal carcinoma

    Objective: To study the clinical results and prognostic factors of late course accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy (LCAHR) in the treatment of esophageal carcinoma in the elderly. Methods: 105 over 60 year-old patients with esophageal carcinoma who received radical LCAHR, were retrospectively analysed. Radical tumoricidal dose of 67.9-72.0 Gy was delivered in 39-43 fractions over 42-53 days. Results: The 5-year local control rate was 63.7%. The 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival rate were 22.6% and 34.4%. Acute esophagitis and bronchitis were the most common but acceptable radioreactions Grade 1-2. No significant differences were found either in the clinical response or complication, between the 60-69 year and 70-80 year groups. By multivariate analysis, T stage and KPS score were two independent prognostic factors. Of 67 death cases, 31 died of local relapse, 23 of distant metastases, 8 of both and 5 of other causes. Conclusions: LCAHR toxicity, being tolerable for the older esophageal carcinoma patients, may improve their survival and quality of life

  11. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (HART) with maintenance chemotherapy for metastatic (M1–3) Medulloblastoma – A safety/feasibility study

    Background and purpose: To evaluate feasibility and toxicity of Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (HART) 1.24 Gy b.i.d. followed by chemotherapy for M1–3 Medulloblastoma (MB). The aim of HART was to use hyperfractionation to improve therapeutic ratio combined with acceleration to minimise tumour cell repopulation during radiotherapy (RT). Materials and methods: Between February 2002 and May 2008, 34 eligible patients (22 male, 12 female) aged 3–15 years (median 7) with metastatic MB (M1–9; M2–3, M3–22) received HART with a craniospinal radiotherapy (CSRT) dose of 39.68 Gy followed by 22.32 Gy boost to the whole posterior fossa and 9.92 Gy metastatic boosts. The 8th and subsequent patients received vincristine (VCR) 1.5 mg/m2 weekly × 8 doses over 8 weeks starting during the 1st week of RT. Maintenance chemotherapy comprised 8 six-weekly cycles of VCR 1.5 mg/m2 weekly × 3, CCNU 75 mg/m2 and cisplatin 70 mg/m2. Results: Median duration of HART was 34 days (range 31–38). Grade 3–4 toxicities included mucositis (8), nausea (10), anaemia (5), thrombocytopaenia (2), leucopaenia (24). With 4.5-year median follow-up, 3-year EFS and OS were 59% and 71%, respectively. Of 10 relapses, 1 was outside the central nervous system (CNS), 1 posterior fossa alone and 8 leptomeningeal with 3 also associated with posterior fossa. Conclusion: HART with or without VCR was well tolerated and may have a place in the multi-modality management of high-risk MB

  12. Alternating chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in non-metastatic inflammatory breast cancer; Radiotherapie hyperfractionnee acceleree alternee avec une chimiotherapie dans le cancer du sein inflammatoire non metastatique

    Hasbini, A.; Le Pechoux, C.; Roche, B.; Pignol, J.P.; Abdulkarim, B.; Habrand, J.L. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France); Zelek, L.; Spielmann, M. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Dept. d' oncologie Medicale, 94 - Villejuif (France); Arriagada, R. [Instituto de Radiomedicina, IRAM, Santiago, (Chile); Guinebretiere, J.M. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Dept. d' Anatomopothologie, 94 - Villejuif (France); Tardivon, A. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Dept. de Radiodiagnostic, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2000-08-01

    Based on encouraging results reported in alternating radiotherapy and chemotherapy in inflammatory breast carcinoma, we have tried in this study to optimize locoregional treatment with a hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy schedule alternating with chemotherapy. From May 1991 to May 1995, 54 patients, previously untreated, with non-metastatic inflammatory breast cancer were entered in an alternating protocol consisting of eight courses of combined chemotherapy and two series of loco-regional hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with a total dose of 66 Gy. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy was started after three courses of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (Adriamycin, Vincristine, Cyclophosphamide, Methotrexate, 5-fluoro-uracil) administered every 21 days {+-}G.CSF. The first series delivered 45 Gy/three weeks to the breast, the axillary, sub-clavicular and internal mammary nodes, with two daily sessions of 1.5 Gy separated by an interval of eight hours, the second series consisted of a boost (21 Gy/14 fractions/10d) alternating with another regimen of anthracycline-based-chemotherapy (a total of five cycles every three weeks). Hormonal treatment was given to all patients. Of the 53 patients evaluated at the end of the treatment, 44(83%) had a complete clinical response, seven (13%) had a partial response (>50%) and two (4%) had tumoral progression. Of the 51 patients who were locally controlled, 18 (35%) presented a locoregional recurrence (LRR); eight(15 %) had to undergo a mastectomy. All the patients but two LRR developed metastases or died of local progressive disease and 26 (50%) developed metastases. With a median follow-up of 39 months (range: 4-74 months), survival rates at three and five years were respectively, 66 and 45% for overall survival and 45 and 36% for disease-free survival. Alternating a combination of chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy is a well-tolerated regimen which provides acceptable local control

  13. Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) in children: A prospective experience with adjuvant intensive chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy

    Purpose: Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) are rare and have a grim prognosis, frequently taking an aggressive course with local relapse and metastatic spread. We report the results of a mono-institutional therapeutic trial. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 15 consecutive patients to preradiation chemotherapy (CT) consisting of high-dose methotrexate, high-dose etoposide, high-dose cyclophosphamide, and high-dose carboplatin, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) plus focal boost, maintenance with vincristine/lomustine or consolidation with high-dose thiotepa followed by autologous stem-cell rescue. Results: Median age was 9 years; 7 were male, 8 female. Site of disease was pineal in 3, elsewhere in 12. Six patients were had no evidence of disease after surgery (NED). Of those with evidence of disease after surgery (ED), 2 had central nervous system spread. Of the 9 ED patients, 2 had complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR) after CT, 4 stable disease, and 1 progressive disease. Of the 7 ED patients before radiotherapy, 1 had CR, 4 PR, and 2 minor response, thus obtaining a 44% CR + PR after CT and 71% after HART. Because of rapid progression in 2 of the first 5 patients, high-dose thiotepa was systematically adopted after HART in the subsequent 10 patients. Six of 15 patients relapsed (4 locally, 1 locally with dissemination, 1 with dissemination) a mean of 6 months after starting CT, 2 developed second tumors; 5 of 6 relapsers died at a median of 13 months. Three-year progression-free survival, event-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 34%, and 61%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated accelerated RT was the main tool in obtaining responses in S-PNET; introducing the myeloablative phase improved the prognosis (3/10 vs. 3/5 relapses), though the outcome remained unsatisfactory despite the adoption of this intensive treatment

  14. Accelerated hyperfractionation plus temozolomide in glioblastoma

    Hyperfractionated (HFRT) or accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (AHFRT) have been discussed as a potential treatment for glioblastoma based on a hypothesized reduction of late radiation injury and prevention of repopulation. HFRT and AHFRT have been examined extensively in the pre-Temozolomide era with inconclusive results. In this study we examined the role of accelerated hyperfractionation in the Temozolomide era. Sixty-four patients who underwent AHFRT (62 of which received Temozolomide) were compared to 67 patients who underwent normofractionated radiotherapy (NFRT) (64 of which received TMZ) between 02/2009 and 10/2014. Follow-up data were analyzed until 01/2015. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6 months for the entire cohort. For patients treated with NFRT median PFS was 7 months, for patients treated with AHFRT median PFS was 6 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 13 months for all patients. For patients treated with NFRT median OS was 15 months, for patients treated with AHFRT median OS was 10 months. The fractionation regimen was not a predictor of PFS or OS in univariable- or multivariable analysis. There was no difference in acute toxicity profiles between the two treatment groups. Univariable and multivariable analysis did not show significant differences between NFRT and AHFRT fractionation regimens in terms of PFS or OS. The benefits are immanent: the regimen does significantly shorten hospitalization time in a patient collective with highly impaired life expectancy. We propose that the role of AHFRT + TMZ should be further examined in future prospective trials

  15. Impact on cellular immunocompetence by late course accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy assisted with cisplatin in the treatment of esophageal carcinoma

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic results of late course accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy (LCAHR) combined with concomitant cisplatin administration as a sensitizer, and to assess the effects on cell-mediated immunocompetence in the treatment of esophageal carcinoma. Methods: From Jan. to Nov. 199, 104 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the esophagus were randomized to receive LCAHR alone (Group A, 53 patients) or LCAHR plus cisplatin (Group B, 51 patients). For both groups, the same radiation technic was given with the conventional fractionation in the first 3 weeks and 1.5 Gy twice daily, a minimum inter fraction interval of 6 hours, 5 days per week in the final 2 weeks. The total dose was 60 Gy/35 fs/5 wk. For the B group patients, cisplatin was given synchronously with 20 mg once daily for 5 days in the 1 st and 5 th weeks. The CD4, CD8 and CD56 expressions in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were quantitatively assessed with flow cytometry before and during the treatment. Results: The CD4/CD8 ratio of PBL decreased significantly after treatment completion (P < 0.01 in Group A and P < 0.01 in Group B). Whereas the percentage of positive CD56 PBL increased dramatically (P < 0.01 in two groups). There were no evidence that CD expression difference had any statistical or clinical significance. Conclusion: Immunosuppression may be present on cell-mediated immuno-activity (CD4/CD8) and NK cell (CD56)immuno-enhancement may be obtainable on immuno-surveillance, when esophageal carcinoma is being treated by LCAHR with or without cisplatin

  16. Neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer

    The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and feasibility of a novel protocol of neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer. A total of 56 patients with lower rectal cancer of cT3N1M0 (Stage III b) was treated with SC-HART followed by radical surgery, and were analyzed in the present study. SC-HART was performed with a dose of 2.5 Gy twice daily, with an interval of at least 6 hours between fractions, up to a total dose of 25 Gy (25 Gy in 10 fractions for 5 days) combined with S-1 for 10 days. Radical surgery was performed within three weeks following the end of the SC-HART. The median age was 64.6 (range, 39-85) years. The median follow-up term was 16.3 (range, 2-53) months. Of the 56 patients, 53 (94.4%) had no apparent adverse events before surgery; 55 (98.2%) completed the full course of neoadjuvant therapy, while one patient stopped chemotherapy because of Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (CTCAE v.3). The sphincter preservation rate was 94.6%. Downstaging was observed in 45 patients (80.4%). Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 43 patients (76.8%). The local control rate, disease-free survival rate and disease-specific survival rate were 100%, 91.1% and 100%, respectively. To conclude, SC-HART combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer was well tolerated and produced good short-term outcomes. SC-HART therefore appeared to have a good feasibility for use in further clinical trials. (author)

  17. Neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Doi, Hiroshi; Beppu, Naohito; Odawara, Soichi; Tanooka, Masao; Takada, Yasuhiro; Niwa, Yasue; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Kimura, Fumihiko; Yanagi, Hidenori; Yamanaka, Naoki; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Hirota, Shozo

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and feasibility of a novel protocol of neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer. A total of 56 patients with lower rectal cancer of cT3N1M0 (Stage III b) was treated with SC-HART followed by radical surgery, and were analyzed in the present study. SC-HART was performed with a dose of 2.5 Gy twice daily, with an interval of at least 6 hours between fractions, up to a total dose of 25 Gy (25 Gy in 10 fractions for 5 days) combined with S-1 for 10 days. Radical surgery was performed within three weeks following the end of the SC-HART. The median age was 64.6 (range, 39-85) years. The median follow-up term was 16.3 (range, 2-53) months. Of the 56 patients, 53 (94.4%) had no apparent adverse events before surgery; 55 (98.2%) completed the full course of neoadjuvant therapy, while one patient stopped chemotherapy because of Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (CTCAE v.3). The sphincter preservation rate was 94.6%. Downstaging was observed in 45 patients (80.4%). Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 43 patients (76.8%). The local control rate, disease-free survival rate and disease-specific survival rate were 100%, 91.1% and 100%, respectively. To conclude, SC-HART combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer was well tolerated and produced good short-term outcomes. SC-HART therefore appeared to have a good feasibility for use in further clinical trials. PMID:23658415

  18. A meta-analysis of hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy and combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens in unresected locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Former meta-analyses have shown a survival benefit for the addition of chemotherapy (CHX) to radiotherapy (RT) and to some extent also for the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) and accelerated radiation therapy (AFRT) in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck. However, the publication of new studies and the fact that many older studies that were included in these former meta-analyses used obsolete radiation doses, CHX schedules or study designs prompted us to carry out a new analysis using strict inclusion criteria. Randomised trials testing curatively intended RT (≥60 Gy in >4 weeks/>50 Gy in <4 weeks) on SCC of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx published as full paper or in abstract form between 1975 and 2003 were eligible. Trials comparing RT alone with concurrent or alternating chemoradiation (5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cisplatin, carboplatin, mitomycin C) were analyzed according to the employed radiation schedule and the used CHX regimen. Studies comparing conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) with either HFRT or AFRT without CHX were separately examined. End point of the meta-analysis was overall survival. Thirty-two trials with a total of 10 225 patients were included into the meta-analysis. An overall survival benefit of 12.0 months was observed for the addition of simultaneous CHX to either CFRT or HFRT/AFRT (p < 0.001). Separate analyses by cytostatic drug indicate a prolongation of survival of 24.0 months, 16.8 months, 6.7 months, and 4.0 months, respectively, for the simultaneous administration of 5-FU, cisplatin-based, carboplatin-based, and mitomycin C-based CHX to RT (each p < 0.01). Whereas no significant gain in overall survival was observed for AFRT in comparison to CFRT, a substantial prolongation of median survival (14.2 months, p < 0.001) was seen for HFRT compared to CFRT (both without CHX). RT combined with simultaneous 5-FU, cisplatin, carboplatin, and mitomycin C as

  19. The role of accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer: a controlled clinical trial

    Radiotherapy remains the basic form of treatment in cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but there still exist controversies concerning optimal radiotherapy regimen and in particular, the total dose and fractionation schedules. To prove whether the question: if using an unconventional dose fractionation regimen (accelerated hyperfractionation) could improve the results of palliative teleradiotherapy patients with NSCLC. Between 1997 and 2000 in the Cancer Centre in Cracow (COOK) a controlled clinical trial was conducted in a group of 150 patients with locally advanced (III Deg) inoperable and unsuitable for radical radiotherapy NSCLC, with no major symptoms of the disease. In 76 patients conventionally fractionated radiotherapy was performed - 50 Gy in 25 fractions during 5 weeks (CF). 74 patients were irradiated twice a day (AHF); the dose per fraction was 1.25 Gy and the minimum interval between fractions - 6 hours. The total dose was 50 Gy in 40 fractions during 26 days. The probability of 12 months survival was 47.4% in the CF arm and 45.9% in the AHF arm; the probability of 24 months survival was 16.2% and 15.8%, respectively. In all 76 patients in CF arm the treatment was carried out in prescribed time without breaks. Out of 74 patients in the A HF group 8 (10,8%) did not complete the treatment and 2 of then died in 3rd and 4th week of treatment. The use of accelerated hyperfractionation does not improve the results of palliative teleradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced NSCLC without severe symptoms related to intrathoracic tumor. The treatment of choice in this group of patients os conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions in 5 week of treatment. (author)

  20. Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer: Multi-Institutional Prospective Study of Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia Among Eight Asian Countries

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A multi-institutional prospective single-arm study was conducted among eight Asian countries. Between 1999 and 2002, 120 patients (64 with Stage IIB and 56 with Stage IIIB) with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were treated with accelerated hyperfractionated RT. External beam RT consisted of 30 Gy to the whole pelvis, 1.5 Gy/fraction twice daily, followed by 20 Gy of pelvic RT with central shielding at a dose of 2-Gy fractions daily. A small bowel displacement device was used with the patient in the prone position. In addition to central shielding RT, intracavitary brachytherapy was started. Acute and late morbidities were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Results: The median overall treatment time was 35 days. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 4.7 years. The 5-year pelvic control and overall survival rate for all patients was 84% and 70%, respectively. The 5-year pelvic control and overall survival rate was 78% and 69% for tumors ≥6 cm in diameter, respectively. No treatment-related death occurred. Grade 3-4 late toxicities of the small intestine, large intestine, and bladder were observed in 1, 1, and 2 patients, respectively. The 5-year actuarial rate of Grade 3-4 late toxicity at any site was 5%. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that accelerated hyperfractionated RT achieved sufficient pelvic control and survival without increasing severe toxicity. This treatment could be feasible in those Asian countries where chemoradiotherapy is not available

  1. Accelerated hyperfractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent/unresectable rectal cancer in patients with previous pelvic irradiation: results of a phase II study

    This study was conducted to investigate the local effects and toxicity of accelerated hyperfractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent/unresectable rectal cancer in patients with previous pelvic irradiation. Twenty-two patients with recurrent/unresectable rectal cancer who previously received pelvic irradiation were enrolled in our single-center trial between January 2007 and August 2012. Reirradiation was scheduled for up to 39 Gy in 30 fractions using intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. The dose was delivered via a hyperfractionation schedule of 1.3 Gy twice daily. Patient follow-up was performed by clinical examination, CT/MRI, or PET/CT every 3 months for the first 2 years and every 6 months thereafter. Tumor response was evaluated 1 month after reirradiation by CT/MRI based on the RECIST criteria. Adverse events were assessed using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) common toxicity criteria (version 3.0). The median time from the end of the initial radiation therapy to reirradiation was 30 months (range, 18-93 months). Overall local responses were observed in 9 patients (40.9%). None of the patients achieved a complete response (CR), and 9 patients (40.9%) had a partial response (PR). Thirteen patients failed to achieve a clinical response: 12 (54.5%) presented with stable disease (SD) and 1 (4.5%) with progressive disease (PD). Among all the patients who underwent reirradiation, partial or complete symptomatic relief was achieved in 6 patients (27.3%) and 13 patients (59.1%), respectively. Grade 4 acute toxicity and treatment-related deaths were not observed. The following grade 3 acute toxicities were observed: diarrhea (2 patients, 9.1%), cystitis (1 patient, 4.5%), dermatitis (1 patient, 4.5%), and intestinal obstruction (1 patient, 4.5%). Late toxicity was infrequent. Chronic severe diarrhea, small bowel obstruction, and dysuria were observed in 2 (9.1%), 1 (4.5%) and 2 (9.1%) of the patients, respectively. This study showed that

  2. Second Study of Hyper-Fractionated Radiotherapy

    R. Jacob

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Method. Hyper-fractionated radiotherapy for treatment of soft tissue sarcomas is designed to deliver a higher total dose of radiation without an increase in late normal tissue damage. In a previous study at the Royal Marsden Hospital, a total dose of 75 Gy using twice daily 1.25 Gy fractions resulted in a higher incidence of late damage than conventional radiotherapy using 2 Gy daily fractions treating to a total of 60 Gy. The current trial therefore used a lower dose per fraction of 1.2 Gy and lower total dose of 72 Gy, with 60 fractions given over a period of 6 weeks.

  3. Concurrent hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with 5-FU and once weekly cisplatin in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The 10-year results of a prospective phase II trial

    In this study, the acute toxicity and long-term outcome of a hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiation regimen with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of head and neck were evaluated. From 2000-2002, 38 patients with stage III (5.3 %) and stage IV (94.7 %) head and neck cancer were enrolled in a phase II study. Patients received hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy with 72 Gy in 15 fractions of 2 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily with concurrent, continuous infusion 5-FU of 600 mg/m2 on days 1-5 and 6 cycles of weekly cisplatin (30 mg/m2). Acute toxicities (CTCAEv2.0), locoregional control (LRC), metastases-free (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed and exploratively compared with the ARO 95-06 trial. Median follow-up was 11.4 years (95 % CI 8.6-14.2) and mean dose 71.6 Gy. Of the patients, 82 % had 6 (n = 15) or 5 (n = 16) cycles of cisplatin, 5 and 2 patients received 4 and 3 cycles, respectively. Grade 3 anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia were observed in 15.8, 15.8, and 2.6 %, respectively. Grade 3 mucositis in 50 %, grade 3 and 4 dysphagia in 55 and 13 %. The 2-, 5-, and 10-year LRC was 65, 53.6, and 48.2 %, the MFS was 77.5, 66.7, and 57.2 % and the OS 59.6, 29.2, and 15 %, respectively. Chemoradiation with 5-FU and cisplatin seems feasible and superior in terms of LRC and OS to the ARO 95-06C-HART arm at 2 years. However, this did not persist at the 5- and 10-year follow-ups. (orig.)

  4. Hyperfractionation in radiotherapy of malignant neoplasms. Polish studies in relation to the world experience

    Theoretical assumptions for hyperfractionation and accelerated hyperfractionation in radiotherapy of malignant neoplasms are presented. Polish clinical studies in this field are presented basing on the responses to questionnaires which were sent to oncological centres. Most of the studies included patients with advanced head and neck cancer and also patients with brain tumours and cervical cancer. Different hyperfractionation schedules were used reflecting various approaches proposed in famous world centres. Polish phase studies included so far small groups of patients. It seems justified to undertake multicentre randomized trial according to common protocol. (author)

  5. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost of 70-75 Gy in 5 weeks for advanced head and neck cancer. A phase I dose escalation study

    Cvek, J.; Skacelikova, E.; Otahal, B.; Halamka, M.; Feltl, D. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Oncology; Kubes, J. [University Hospital Bulovka, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kominek, P. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2012-08-15

    Background and purpose: The present study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of a new, 5-week regimen of 70-75 Gy hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost (HARTCIB) for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. Methods and materials: A total of 39 patients with very advanced, stage IV nonmetastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (median gross tumor volume 72 ml) were included in this phase I dose escalation study. A total of 50 fractions intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were administered twice daily over 5 weeks. Prescribed total dose/dose per fraction for planning target volume (PTV{sub tumor}) were 70 Gy in 1.4 Gy fractions, 72.5 Gy in 1.45 Gy fractions, and 75 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions for 10, 13, and 16 patients, respectively. Uninvolved lymphatic nodes (PTV{sub uninvolved}) were irradiated with 55 Gy in 1.1 Gy fractions using the concomitant integrated boost. Results: Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale; the incidence of grade 3 mucositis was 51% in the oral cavity/pharynx and 0% in skin and the recovery time was {<=} 9 weeks for all patients. Late toxicity was evaluated in patients in complete remission according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. No grade 3/4 late toxicity was observed. The 1-year locoregional progression-free survival was 50% and overall survival was 55%. Conclusion: HARTCIB (75 Gy in 5 weeks) is feasible for patients deemed unsuitable for chemoradiation. Acute toxicity was lower than predicted from radiobiological models; duration of dysphagia and confluent mucositis were particularly short. Better conformity of radiotherapy allows the use of more intensive altered fractionation schedules compared with older studies. These results suggest that further dose escalation might be possible when highly conformal techniques (e.g., stereotactic radiotherapy) are used.

  6. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy combined with induction and concomitant chemotherapy for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer. Impact of total treatment time

    Tumour cell proliferation during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (RT) can negatively influence the treatment outcome in patients with unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Accelerated and hyperfractionated RT may therefore have an advantage over conventional RT. Moreover, earlier studies have suggested improved survival with addition of cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CT). We present here the results of combined treatment with induction and concomitant CT and accelerated hyperfractionated RT in a retrospective series of patients with advanced NSCLS. Between August 1990 and August 1995, 90 consecutive patients, aged 42-77 years (median 63 years), with locally advanced unresectable or medically inoperable NSCLC and good performance status were referred for treatment: stage: I 23%, IIIa 37%, IIIb 40%. Patient histologies included: squamous cell carcinoma 52%, adenocarcinoma 34% and large cell carcinoma 13%. The treatment consisted of two courses of CT (cisplatin 100 mg/m2 day 1 and etoposide 100 mg/m2 day 1-3 i.v.), the second course given concomitantly with RT. The total RT dose was 61.2-64.6 Gy, with two daily fractions of 1.7 Gy. A one-week interval was introduced after 40.8 Gy to reduce acute toxicity, making the total treatment time 4.5 weeks. Concerning toxicity, 33 patients had febrile neutropenia, 10 patients suffered from grade III oesophagitis and 7 patients had grade III pneumonitis. There were two possible treatment-related deaths, one due to myocardial infarction and the other due to a pneumocystis carinii infection. The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 72%, 46% and 34%, respectively; median survival was 21.3 months. Fifty-nine patients had progressive disease: 21 failed locoregionally, 29 had distant metastases and 9 patients had a combination of these. Pretreatment weight loss was the only prognostic factor found, except for stage. However, the results for stage IIIb were no different from those for stage IIIa. We conclude

  7. Locoregionally advanced carcinoma of the oropharynx: conventional radiotherapy vs. accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy vs. concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy - a multicenter randomized trial

    Purpose: To compare conventional fractionation radiation therapy (RT), Arm A, vs. split-course accelerated hyperfractionated RT (S-AHF), Arm B, vs. conventional fractionation RT plus concomitant chemotherapy (CT), Arm C, in terms of survival and toxicity for advanced, unresectable epidermoid tumors of oropharynx. Methods and Materials: Between January 1993 and June 1998, 192 previously untreated patients affected with Stage III and IV oropharyngeal carcinoma (excluding T1N1 and T2N1) were accrued in a multicenter, randomized Phase III trial (ORO 93-01). For Arms A and C, 66-70 Gy in 33-35 fractions, 5 days a week, were administered in 6.5-7 weeks to tumor and positive nodes. In Arm B, the dose delivered to tumor and involved nodes was 64-67.2 Gy, giving 2 fractions of 1.6 Gy every day with an interfraction interval of at least 4 h and preferably 6 h, 5 days a week. At 38.4 Gy, a 2-week split was planned; after the split, RT was resumed with the same modality. In Arm C, CT regimen consisted of carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil (CBDCA 75 mg/m2, Days 1-4; 5-FU 1,000 mg/m2 i.v. over 96 h, Days 1-4, recycling every 28 days (at 1st, 5th, and 9th week). Results: No statistically significant difference was detected in overall survival (p=0.129): 40% Arm A vs. 37% Arm B vs. 51% Arm C were alive at 24 months. Similarly, there was no statistically significant difference in terms of event-free survival (p=0.196): 20% for Arm A, 19% for Arm B, and 37% for Arm C were event free at 24 months. On the contrary, the 2-year disease-free survival was significantly different among the three arms (p = 0.022), with a superiority for Arm C. At 24 months, the proportion of patients without relapse was 42% for Arm C vs. 23% for Arm A and 20% for Arm B. Patients in Arm A less frequently developed G3+ acute mucositis than their counterparts in Arm B or C (14.7% vs. 40.3% vs. 44%). Regarding the CT-related acute toxicity, apart from 1 case of fatal nephrotoxicity, only hematologic G3+ (Grade 3 or

  8. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    Tada, Takuhito, E-mail: tada@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Chiba, Yasutaka [Department of Environmental Medicine and Behavioural Science, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Tsujino, Kayoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Fukuda, Haruyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka Prefectural Medical Center for Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, Habikino (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Negoro, Shunichi [Department of Medical Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Kudoh, Shinzoh [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Fukuoka, Masahiro [Department of Medical Oncology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Nakagawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Nakanishi, Yoichi [Research Institute for Disease of the Chest, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyusyu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade {>=}4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade {>=}3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  9. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non–small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non–small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m2) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m2). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade ≥4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade ≥3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  10. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy for Burkitt-type lymphoma

    A case of Burkitt-type lymphoma treated by accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation combined with COP chemotherapy is presented. The effectiveness of treatment was evaluated on the basis of the growth curve, and the radiobiological aspects are discussed. During the treatment, the initial volume doubling time of 15 days was shortened to 4.5 days suggesting accelerated tumor growth. From dose response curve estimated for clinical data taken from literature, an effD0 of 1.37 Gy was calculated. The surviving fraction after 58 Gy given in the twice-a-day regimen was 10-19 suggesting local tumor control. However, only partial remission was observed. This nonradical effect may likely result in accelerated repopulation of surviving tumor clonogenic cells. This suggests that such a fast growing tumor as Burkitt-type lymphoma should be irradiated using three instead two fractions per day combined with adjuvant or concomitant chemotherapy with short intervals between cycles. (author) 5 figs., 2 tabs., 12 refs

  11. Induction Chemotherapy and Continuous Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (CHART) for Patients With Locally Advanced Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The MRC INCH Randomized Trial

    Purpose: Recent clinical trials and meta-analyses have shown that both CHART (continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy) and induction chemotherapy offer a survival advantage over conventional radical radiotherapy for patients with inoperable non-small cell-lung cancer (NSCLC). This multicenter randomized controlled trial (INCH) was set up to assess the value of giving induction chemotherapy before CHART. Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically confirmed, inoperable, Stage I-III NSCLC were randomized to induction chemotherapy (ICT) (three cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by CHART) or CHART alone. Results: Forty-six patients were randomized (23 in each treatment arm) from 9 UK centers. As a result of poor accrual, the trial was closed in December 2007. Twenty-eight patients were male, 28 had squamous cell histology, 34 were Stage IIIA or IIIB, and all baseline characteristics were well balanced between the two treatment arms. Seventeen (74%) of the 23 ICT patients completed the three cycles of chemotherapy. All 42 (22 CHART + 20 ICT) patients who received CHART completed the prescribed treatment. Median survival was 17 months in the CHART arm and 25 months in the ICT arm (hazard ratio of 0.60 [95% CI 0.31-1.16], p = 0.127). Grade 3 or 4 adverse events (mainly fatigue, dysphagia, breathlessness, and anorexia) were reported for 13 (57%) CHART and 13 (65%) ICT patients. Conclusions: This small randomized trial indicates that ICT followed by CHART is feasible and well tolerated. Despite closing early because of poor accrual, and so failing to show clear evidence of a survival benefit for the additional chemotherapy, the results suggest that CHART, and ICT before CHART, remain important options for the treatment of inoperable NSCLC and deserve further study.

  12. Elective lymph node irradiation late course accelerated hyper-fractionated radiotherapy plus concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a phase II study

    In this phase II study, we evaluated the efficacy, toxicity, and patterns of failure of elective lymph node irradiation (ENI) late course accelerated hyper-fractionated radiotherapy (LCAHRT) concurrently with cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CHT) for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Patients with clinical stage II-IVa (T1-4N0-1M0 or M1a) ESCC were enrolled between 2004 and 2011. Radiation therapy (RT) comprised two courses: The first course of radiation covered the primary and metastatic regional tumors and high risk lymph nodal regions, given at 2 Gy per fraction for a dose of 40 Gy. In the second course, LCAHRT was delivered to the boost volume twice a day for an additional 19.6 Gy in 7 treatment days, using 1.4 Gy per fraction. Two cycles of CHT were given at the beginning of RT. The median age and Karnofsky performance status were 63 years and 80, respectively. The American Joint Committee on Cancer stage was II in 14 (20.6%) patients, III in 32 (47.1%), and IVa in 22 (32.3%). With a median follow-up of 18.5 months, the overall survival at 1-, 3-, 5-year were 75.5%, 46.5%, 22.7% for whole group patients, versus 78.6%, 49.4%, 39.9% for patients with stage II–III. The patterns of first failure from local recurrence, regional failure, and distant metastasis were seen in 20.6%, 17.6%, and 19.1%, respectively. The most frequent acute high-grade (≥ 3) toxicities were esophagitis and leucopenia, occurred in 26.4% and 32.4%. ENI LCAHRT concurrently with CHT was appeared to be an effective regimen for ESCC patient with a favorable and tolerated profile. Further observation with longer time and randomized phase III trial is currently underway.

  13. Concurrent hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with 5-FU and once weekly cisplatin in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The 10-year results of a prospective phase II trial

    Budach, V.; Boehmer, D.; Badakhshi, H.; Jahn, U.; Stromberger, C. [Campus Virchow Klinikum, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiooncology, Clinic for Radiooncology, Berlin (Germany); Becker, E.T. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Berlin (Germany); Wernecke, K.D. [Sostana Statistics GmbH, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    In this study, the acute toxicity and long-term outcome of a hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiation regimen with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of head and neck were evaluated. From 2000-2002, 38 patients with stage III (5.3 %) and stage IV (94.7 %) head and neck cancer were enrolled in a phase II study. Patients received hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy with 72 Gy in 15 fractions of 2 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily with concurrent, continuous infusion 5-FU of 600 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5 and 6 cycles of weekly cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2}). Acute toxicities (CTCAEv2.0), locoregional control (LRC), metastases-free (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed and exploratively compared with the ARO 95-06 trial. Median follow-up was 11.4 years (95 % CI 8.6-14.2) and mean dose 71.6 Gy. Of the patients, 82 % had 6 (n = 15) or 5 (n = 16) cycles of cisplatin, 5 and 2 patients received 4 and 3 cycles, respectively. Grade 3 anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia were observed in 15.8, 15.8, and 2.6 %, respectively. Grade 3 mucositis in 50 %, grade 3 and 4 dysphagia in 55 and 13 %. The 2-, 5-, and 10-year LRC was 65, 53.6, and 48.2 %, the MFS was 77.5, 66.7, and 57.2 % and the OS 59.6, 29.2, and 15 %, respectively. Chemoradiation with 5-FU and cisplatin seems feasible and superior in terms of LRC and OS to the ARO 95-06C-HART arm at 2 years. However, this did not persist at the 5- and 10-year follow-ups. (orig.) [German] Untersuchung der Akuttoxizitaet und des Langzeitueberlebens einer hyperfraktioniert-akzelerierten simultanen Radiochemotherapie mit Cisplatin/5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) bei Patienten mit lokal fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Von 2000 bis 2002 wurden 38 Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region im Stadium III (5,3 %) und IV (94,7 %) eingeschlossen. Es erfolgte eine simultane hyperfraktionierte akzelerierte Radiochemotherapie mit 72 Gy in 15 Fraktionen a 2 Gy

  14. Rapidly alternating combination of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in split course for Stage IIIA and Stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer: results of a Phase I-II study by the GOTHA group

    Alberto, P.; Mermillod, B. [Hopital Cantonal Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Mirimanoff, R.O.; Leyvraz, S.; Nagy-Mignotte, H.; Bolla, M.; Wellmann, D.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, E. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-08-01

    The prognosis of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by a combination of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). In this study, the GOTHA group evaluated the feasibility, tolerance, tumour response, pattern of failure and effect on survival of a combination alternating accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) RT and CT in patients with tumour stage III NSCLC. Toxic effects were leucopenia, nausea and vomiting, mucositis, diarrhoea, alopecia and peripheral neuropathy. Alternating CT and AHRT, as used in this study, were well tolerated and allowed full dose delivery within less than 12 weeks. Initial response was not predictive of survival. The survival curve is encouraging and the 5 year survival is superior to the 5% generally observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. (author).

  15. Neurocognitive outcome in brain metastases patients treated with accelerated-fractionation vs. accelerated-hyperfractionated radiotherapy: an analysis from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Study 91-04

    Purpose: To evaluate neurocognitive outcome as measured by the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) among patients with unresectable brain metastases randomly assigned to accelerated fractionation (AF) vs. accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) accrued 445 patients with unresectable brain metastases to a Phase III comparison of AH (1.6 Gy b.i.d. to 54.4 Gy) vs. AF (3 Gy q.d. to 30 Gy). All had a KPS of ≥ 70 and a neurologic function status of 0-2. Three hundred fifty-nine patients had MMSEs performed and were eligible for this analysis. Changes in the MMSE were analyzed according to criteria previously defined in the literature. Results: The median survival was 4.5 months for both arms. The average change in MMSE at 2 and 3 months was a drop of 1.4 and 1.1, respectively, in the AF arm as compared to a drop of 0.7 and 1.3, respectively, in the AH arm (p=NS). Overall, 91 patients at 2 months and 23 patients at 3 months had both follow-up MMSE and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging documentation of the status of their brain metastases. When an analysis was performed taking into account control of brain metastases, a significant effect on MMSE was observed with time and associated proportional increase in uncontrolled brain metastases. At 2 months, the average change in MMSE score was a drop of 0.6 for those whose brain metastases were radiologically controlled as compared to a drop of 1.9 for those with uncontrolled brain metastases (p=0.47). At 3 months, the average change in MMSE score was a drop of 0.5 for those whose brain metastases were radiologically controlled as compared to a drop of 6.3 for those with uncontrolled brain metastases (p=0.02). Conclusion: Use of AH as compared to AF-WBRT was not associated with a significant difference in neurocognitive function as measured by MMSE in this patient population with unresectable brain metastases and

  16. Aggressive simultaneous radiochemotherapy with cisplatin and paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck tumors. Results of a phase I-II trial

    Kuhnt, T.; Pigorsch, S.; Pelz, T.; Haensgen, G.; Dunst, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Becker, A. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Dept. of Radiotherapy, Municipial Hospital, Dessau (Germany); Bloching, M.; Passmann, M. [Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Lotterer, E. [Dept. of Internal Medicine I, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2003-10-01

    We have tested a very aggressive combination protocol with cisplatin and escalated paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy to assess the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), overall toxicity, and response rate. Patients and Methods: The trial recruited 24 patients (21 males, three females, mean age 57 years) treated at our department from 1998 through 2001. Irradiation was administered in daily doses of 2 Gy up to 30 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily up to 70.6 Gy to the primary tumor and involved nodes and 51 Gy to the clinically negative regional nodes. The chemotherapy schedule included cisplatin in a fixed dose of 20 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5 and 29-33 and paclitaxel at increasing dose levels of 20, 25, 30 mg/m{sup 2} twice weekly over the whole treatment time. Patients were recruited in cohorts of three to six, and the MTD was reached if two out of six patients in one cohort developed DLT. DLT was defined as any grade 4 toxicity or any grade 3 toxicity requiring treatment interruption or unplanned hospitalization or any grade 3 neurotoxicity. We recruited mainly patients with large tumors for this protocol; all patients were stage IV, and the mean tumor volume (primary + metastases) amounted to 72 {+-} 61 cm{sup 3}. The mean follow-up was 30 months (range 4-39 months). Results: One early death (peritonitis and sepsis a t day 10) occurred, and 23 patients were evaluable for acute toxicity and response. The MTD of paclitaxel was reached at the third dose level (30 mg/m{sup 2} paclitaxel twice weekly). The DLT was severe mucositis grade 3 (n = 1) and skin erythema grade 4 (n = 2). After determining the MTD, another 14 patients were treated at the recommended dose level of paclitaxel with 25 mg/m{sup 2} twice weekly. In summary, 13/23 patients (57%) developed grade 3 and 10/23 (43%) grade 2 mucositis. Two patients (9%) had grade 4, five (22%) grade 3, and 16 (69%) grade 2 dermatitis. One patient died at day 30

  17. Efficacy of intensified hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy with carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil: Updated results of a randomized multicentric trial in advanced head-and-neck cancer

    Purpose: To prove an expected benefit of concurrent radiochemotherapy (RCT), a two-arm randomized multicentric study was performed. In a subgroup analysis the influence of pretherapeutical hemoglobin level (p-Hb) on survival under locoregional control (SLC) was tested. Patients and Methods: The study included primarily untreated Stage III/IV (International Union Against Cancer [UICC]) oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas. Patients were randomized to receive either hyperfractionated (hf) and accelerated (acc) RCT with two cycles 5-fluorouracil (600 mg/m2/day) and carboplatin (70 mg/m2/day) on Days 1-5 and 29-33 or hf-acc radiotherapy (RT) alone. Total RT dose in both arms was 69.9 Gy in 38 days in concomitant boost technique. Results: After a median follow-up time of 57 months, SLC is significantly better in RCT than in RT (p = 0.01), with median SLC of 17 months and 11 months, respectively. Also overall survival (OS) shows a benefit for RCT (p 0.016), with a median survival of 23 months for RCT and 16 months for RT. However, the benefit in SLC and OS is not seen in hypopharyngeal carcinomas. In a multivariate analysis of oropharyngeal cancer patients, p-Hb levels lower than 12.7 g/dL resulted in lower SLC compared with higher p-Hb levels up to 13.8 g/dL. P-Hb levels >13.8 g/dL did not further improve SLC. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated-accelerated RCT is superior to hf-acc RT in oropharyngeal carcinomas. P-Hb levels >13.8 g/dL do not further improve SLC

  18. Effectiveness of surgery and individualized high-dose hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy on survival in clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer. A propensity score matched analysis

    Background and purpose: Surgery is considered the treatment of choice for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with poor pulmonary function or other comorbidities are treated with radiotherapy. The objective of this investigation is to compare the 3-year survival of two early-stage NSCLC populations treated in two different hospitals, either by surgical resection (lobectomy) or by individualized high-dose accelerated radiotherapy, after matching patients by propensity scoring analysis. Methods: A retrospective comparative study has been performed on two series of consecutive patients with cytohistological diagnosis of NSCLC, clinically staged IA by means of PET-scan (radiotherapy group) and pathologically staged IA (surgery group). Results: A total of 157 cases were initially selected for the analysis (110 operated and 47 treated by radiotherapy). Patients in the radiotherapy group were older, with higher comorbidity and lower FEV1% with 3-years probability of survival for operated patients higher than that found for patients treated by radiotherapy. After matching by propensity scoring (using age and FEV1%), differences disappear and 3-years probability of survival had no statistical differences. Conclusions: Although this is a non-randomized retrospective analysis, we have not found 3-years survival differences after matching cases between surgery and radiotherapy. Nevertheless, data presented here support the continuous investigation for non-surgical alternatives in this disease.

  19. Linear Correlation Between Patient Survival and Decreased Percentage of Tumor [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake for Late-Course Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Purpose: The aims of this trial were to study whether a decreased percentage of tumor fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake (%DeltaSUVmax) correlated with overall survival and local control times for patients with esophageal cancer and which patients would benefit from a late-course accelerated hyperfractionated (LCHF) radiation scheme. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 eligible patients with squamous esophageal cancer received positron-emission tomography examinations three times and were treated with the LCHF radiation scheme, with a dose of 68.4 Gy/41 fractions in 6.5 weeks. A %DeltaSUVmax value was calculated, and patients were stratified as highly radiosensitive (HR), moderately radiosensitive (MR), and low radiosensitivity (LR) according to %DeltaSUVmax values in the conventional fraction (CF) scheme. Then, a linear correlation was calculated between patients’ survival time and %DeltaSUVmax. Local control and overall survival rates were compared after stratification. Results: In the MR subgroup, there was no linear correlation between %DeltaSUVmax and the CF and LCHF schemes (correlation coefficient, R 0.05). In the other subgroups (HR and LR), %DeltaSUVmax values between the CF and LCHF schemes were correlated. Also, in the HR and LR subgroups, %DeltaSUVmax after radiation correlated with overall survival or local control rates (correlation coefficient, R >0.5, and p < 0.05). Three-year local control rates in the HR, MR, and LR subgroups were 100%, 81.5%, and 0%, respectively (p < 0.001). Also, 3-year overall survival rates were 92.4%, 58.8%, and 0% for HR, MR, and LR subgroups, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Postradiation %DeltaSUVmax was positively correlated with survival time for patients’ with esophageal cancer. Patients who benefited from LCHF schedules were those with a decrease of 30% to 60% in tumor FDG uptake after the completion of CF radiation.

  20. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with facial cervical portal and late-course hyperfractionation radiotherapy

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical results and side reactions of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with facial cervical portal and late-course hyperfractionation radiotherapy. Methods: From July 1996 to December 1997, 93 NPC patients were divided into conventional fractionation and hyperfractionation radio- therapy groups. In 47 patients, facial cervical portal was used until the dose of 36 Gy/20 fraction in 4 weeks, and then followed by hyperfractionation radiotherapy: 1.15-1.2 Gy/fraction, 2 fraction/day, with 6-8 hour interval between, to a total dose of 74.2-76.7 Gy in 7.5 weeks without changing the shape of the portal. Forty-six patients were treated by conventional radiotherapy: 2.0 Gy/fraction, 5 fraction/week, to a total dose of 69-72 Gy in 7.5 weeks. Results: The regression rate was 100%, 96% in hyperfractionation and conventional fractionation radio-therapy group after 6 months of radiotherapy, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year local control rate was 100%, 98%, 86% in the hyperfractionation radiotherapy group and 98%, 86%, 54% in the conventional fractionation group (P0.05). Conclusions: In nasopharyngeal carcinoma, the local control rate and survival rate are raised by hyperfractionation radiotherapy. But recurrence rate and distant metastasis rate are not significantly different. (authors)

  1. Final results of the randomized phase III CHARTWEL-trial (ARO 97-1) comparing hyperfractionated-accelerated versus conventionally fractionated radiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Background: Continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) counteracts repopulation and may significantly improve outcome of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Nevertheless high local failure rates call for radiation dose escalation. We report here the final results of the multicentric CHARTWEL trial (CHART weekend less, ARO 97-1). Patients and methods: Four hundred and six patients with NSCLC were stratified according to stage, histology, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and centre and were randomized to receive 3D-planned radiotherapy to 60 Gy/40 fractions/2.5 weeks (CHARTWEL) or 66 Gy/33 fractions/6.5 weeks (conventional fractionation, CF). Results: Overall survival (OS, primary endpoint) at 2, 3 and 5 yr was not significantly different after CHARTWEL (31%, 22% and 11%) versus CF (32%, 18% and 7%; HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.75-1.13, p = 0.43). Also local tumour control rates and distant metastases did not significantly differ. Acute dysphagia and radiological pneumonitis were more pronounced after CHARTWEL, without differences in clinical signs of pneumopathy. Exploratory analysis revealed a significant trend for improved LC after CHARTWEL versus CF with increasing UICC, T or N stage (p = 0.006-0.025) and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (HR 0.48, 0.26-0.89, p = 0.019). Conclusions: Overall, outcome after CHARTWEL or CF was not different. The lower total dose in the CHARTWEL arm was compensated by the shorter overall treatment time, confirming a time factor for NSCLC. The higher efficacy of CHARTWEL versus CF in advanced stages and after chemotherapy provides a basis for further trials on treatment intensification for locally advanced NSCLC.

  2. In vivo cell kinetic measurements in a randomized trial of continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with or without mitomycin C in head-and-neck cancer

    Purpose: Tumor cell repopulation is still considered to be a major cause of failure in radiotherapy. In this study, we investigated the influence of cell kinetic parameters on the outcome of patients treated in a randomized trial of accelerated fractionation, with or without mitomycin C, vs. conventional fractionation. Methods and Materials: Sixty-two patients were studied using administration of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd), and cell kinetic parameters were measured using flow cytometry. The patients were treated with either 70 Gy for 7 weeks or 55.3 Gy for 17 continuous days (V-CHART) with or without 20 mg/m2 mitomycin C on day 5. Results: The potential doubling time (Tpot) and labeling index (LI) failed to provide any prognostic information with regard to local control or survival. However, the duration of the S phase (Ts) revealed patients whose tumors had a long Ts had significantly worse local control (p = 0.028) and survival (p = 0.034) irrespective of treatment. A similar trend was evident within the different treatment arms particularly associated with overall survival. Conclusions: The Ts values of head-and-neck squamous cell cancers provided prognostic information that predicted clinical outcome irrespective of treatment schedule in this study. This neglected parameter of the Tpot method might provide information related to redistribution of cells during fractionated radiotherapy

  3. Late course accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation combined with intraluminal hyperthermia for esophageal carcinoma

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of late course accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation combined with intraluminal hyperthermia for esophageal carcinoma. Methods: From March 2000 to October 2002, totally 91 such eligible patients were entered into the prospective randomized control trial of late course accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation (LCAH-, 44 patients) versus LCAH combined with intraluminal hyperthermia (LC- AH-HT-, 47 patients). Radiotherapy regimen consisted of conventional fractionation radiotherapy (1.8 Gy/f, 5f/w, totally 41.4 Gy/23fx) during the first two-thirds of the radiotherapy course, followed by accelerated hyperfrac-tionation radiotherapy (1.5 Gy/f, 2f/d, with 6h interval), using the cone-down fields, to a total dose of 68.4 Gy/41fx. Hyperthermia was given weekly during conventional fractionation irradiation, totally 4 times. Results: The CR and PR rates were 47.7% and 72.3%, 52.3% and 27.8% in the LCAH arm and LCAH-HT group, respectively (P=0.016). The median survivals were 30.3 and 30.6 months, the 1-, 2-, 3-year survival rates were 77.3%, 57.4%, 37.3% and 80.5%, 68.6%, 46.3% (P=0.526), the 1-, 2-, 3- year local control rates were 86.3%, 70.5%, 56.5% and 92.4%, 72.5%, 65.5% (P=0.686) in the LCAH group and LCAH-HT group, respectively. Grade III and severer of esophagitis were 18.2% and 27.6% in LCAH and LCAH-HT (P=0.498), Grade III and severer tracheitis were 11.4% and 19.2% respectively (P=0.191). Conclusions: The immediate effect of LCAH combined with hyperthermia is better than that of LCAH alone. Additional hyper-thermia to LCAH does not increase the likelihood of radiation injury. (authors)

  4. Phase I trial of concomitant hyperfractionated radiotherapy with docetaxel and cisplatin for locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Allal, Abdelkarim Said; Zwahlen, Daniel; Becker, Minerva; Dulguerov, Pavel; Mach, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose of docetaxel when administered concomitantly with radical hyperfractionated radiotherapy and cisplatin in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

  5. A pilot study of hyperfractionated radiotherapy for infants with retinoblastoma

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess the use of twice daily fractionated radiotherapy using low doses per fraction in the treatment of intraocular retinoblastoma in infants in terms of local control, ocular complications and bony growth disturbances. Methods: Children were irradiated using standard techniques including en face electrons (3 patients) or opposed lateral photon fields to one or both orbits (7 patients). Patients were treated with 100 cGy twice daily with an inter fraction interval of 4 or more hours to total doses of 43 to 45 Gy. No patients received chemotherapy. Results: Ten children under the age of 13 months were entered onto the twice daily radiation protocol from 4/87 through 6/90. Nine patients presented with nonfamilial bilateral retinoblastoma; one later failed in the pineal region representing trilateral retinoblastoma. The tenth patient had advanced unilateral disease. Of 19 eyes involved with tumor, 13 were group V and all patients had at least one eye with advanced disease (group III-V). Two patients underwent enucleation of the more advanced eye up front and received radiation to the intact eye only. Overall survival was 8 of 10 patients with a median follow-up of 28 months (range 12-47 months). Two patients died of distant metastases, one with local recurrence and one with trilateral disease but local control. Local recurrence after initial external beam radiation therapy only was seen in 8 of 19 eyes (42%). Failures occurred in 6 of 13 group V eyes, 1 of 2 group IV eyes and 1 of 2 group III eyes. Further local therapy included plaque therapy in 3 eyes, cryotherapy in 3 eyes and enucleation in one eye. Surgery was refused for one patient with bilateral recurrences. Ultimate local control after external beam irradiation plus additional local therapies was 16 of 19 eyes (84%). Post-irradiation ocular loss occurred in 5 of 19 eyes. Therefore, overall local control with ocular preservation was achieved in 14 of 19 eyes (74%). Vision

  6. Phase II, two-arm RTOG trial (94-11) of bischloroethyl-nitrosourea plus accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (64.0 or 70.4 Gy) based on tumor volume (> 20 or ≤ 20 cm2, respectively) in the treatment of newly-diagnosed radiosurgery-ineligible glioblastoma multiforme patients

    Purpose: To compare survivorship, and acute and delayed toxicities following radiation therapy (RT) of radiosurgery-ineligible glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with tumor volume-influenced, high-dose accelerated, hyperfractionated RT plus bischloroethyl-nitrosourea (BCNU), using prior RTOG malignant glioblastoma patients as historical controls. Methods and Materials: One hundred four of 108 patients accrued from June 1994 through May 1995 from 26 institutions were analyzable. Patients were histologically confirmed with GBM, and previously untreated. Treatment assignment (52 patients/arm) was based on tumor mass (TM), defined as the product of the maximum diameter and greatest perpendicular dimension of the titanium-gadolinium-enhanced postoperative MRI: Arm A, 64 Gy, TM > 20 cm2; or Arm B, 70.4 Gy, TM ≤ 20 cm2. Both Arms A and B received BCNU (80 mg/m2, under hyperhydration) days 1-3, 56-58, then 4 cycles, each 8 weeks, for a total of 6 treatment series. Results: During the 24 months immediately post-treatment, the overall median survival was 9.1 months in Arm A (64 Gy) and 11.0 months in Arm B (70.4 Gy). Median survival in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class III/IV was 10.4 months in Arm A and 12.2 months in Arm B, while RPA Class V/VI was 7.6 months in Arm A and 6.1 months in Arm B. There were no grade 4 neurological toxicities in Arm A; 2 grade 4 neurological toxicities were observed in Arm B (1 motor deficit, 1 necrosis at 157 days post-treatment). Conclusion: This strategy of high-dose, accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy shortens overall RT treatment times while allowing dose escalation, and it provides the potential for combination with currently available, as well as newer, chemotherapy agents. Survival is comparable with previously published RTOG data, and toxicities are within acceptable limits.

  7. Hyperfractionation radiotherapy combined with hepatic artery catheterization chemotherapy for unresectable primary liver cancer

    Objective: To compare the effect of hyperfractionation radiotherapy combined with hepatic artery catheterization chemotherapy and hepatic artery ligation (group A, 65 patients) with conventional fractionation radiation combined with hepatic artery catheterization chemotherapy and hepatic artery ligation (group B, 65 patients) for unresectable primary liver cancer. Methods: A total to 130 stage II primary liver patients confirmed by pathology and evaluated as unresectable by exploratory laparotomy were divided evenly into group A and group B by the sequence of exploration. The two groups were comparable in age, sex, tumor type and positive fetal protein (AFP). Group A patients were treated by hepatic artery chemotherapy (PDD, 10 mg/day) 6 day a week with hepatic artery ligation followed by hyperfractionation radiotherapy (250 cGy/f, bid) 3 days a week with the scheme alternated weekly. Group B patients were treated by conventional fractionation radiotherapy with the same scheme of chemotherapy as group A. The total dose of PDD and radiotherapy for both groups were 240 mg and 45 Gy. Results: The AFP level was reduced to half in 89.7% of patients in group A and 67.6% in group B. The 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were 90.8%, 63.1%, 23.1% for group A and 73.9%, 41.5%, 9.2% for group B, the difference was statistically significant (P 0.05). Conclusions: Hyperfractionation radiotherapy combined with hepatic artery catheterization chemotherapy and hepatic artery ligation is an effective and reasonable therapeutic scheme for unresectable liver cancer. It can effectively relieve symptoms, reduce the tumor, increase second surgical resection rate and prolong the survival. At the same time, the operation is simple and relatively easy

  8. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy (2100 cGY) for stage 4 neuroblastoma as part of intensive multimodality therapy

    PURPOSE: To retrospectively evaluate the role of hyperfractionated radiotherapy to the primary site following induction chemotherapy and aggressive surgical resection in patients (pts) with stage 4 neuroblastoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 48 previously untreated children (median age at diagnosis 3 yo, range 1-10 yo) with stage 4 neuroblastoma achieved a complete-, near-complete-, or partial-remission after multimodality therapy (protocol N4: 6 pts, N5: 7 pts, N6: 27 pts, or N7: 8 pts). All protocols included a regimen consisting of dose-intensive multiagent chemotherapy, maximal surgical debulking, followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Most pts then underwent consolidation with either autologous marrow transplantation (N4 and N5), or immunotherapy (N6 and N7) with radioimmunotherapy (N7). Of 48 pts, 46 had microscopic disease at the primary site prior to beginning radiotherapy (45 underwent gross total resection of the primary, and one had no residual primary disease after chemotherapy alone). One pt had a partial resection, and one remained unresectable after mutimodality therapy. The pre-chemotherapy volume of the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes were irradiated to a total dose of 2100cGy delivered twice-daily in 150 cGy fractions over 7 treatment days. RESULTS: With a median follow-up of 32.5 months (range= 8-145 months), local-regional control was achieved in 44 of the 48 pts. Of the pts who are progression-free, median follow-up was 53.5 months. Overall, 24 of 48 pts progressed, three with local-regional recurrence as the first site of relapse, one with distant failure first and subsequent local-regional recurrence, and 21 with distant failure only. The probability of local-regional control at 32 months was 83%. One of the four pts with local-regional relapse never achieved a complete remission with either systemic therapy, surgical resection or radiotherapy. The progression-free survival at 32 months was 46%. Median time to overall progression was 16

  9. Telecobalt therapy of bone metastases - conventional versus accelerated hyperfractionation

    Purpose of this study was to compare the results of two different modalities of palliative radiation i.e. conventional fractionated (group I: 35 patients) vs. hyperfractionated radiation (group II: 20 patients). Group I received 1.8 to 2.3 Gy one time a day (total dose 30 to 40 Gy), with an average treatment duration of 20 days. Group II received 1.8 to 2 Gy two times a day (total dose 25 to 35 Gy), with an average treatment duration of ten days. Regression of complaints occurred in 80% of group I, with an average of twelve days, and in 95% of group II, with an average onset of four days after beginning of treatment. Neither acute nor long term complications did occur in any group. The advantages of the hyperfractionated radiation modality therefore are on one hand a higher regression-rate of subjective complaints, with equal good recovery of clinical and radiological findings and lack of side-effects especially those of the myelon, and on the other hand are resulting in a shortening of hospitalisation. (orig.)

  10. Hyperfractionated versus conventional radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy in standard-risk medulloblastoma: Results from the randomized multicenter HIT-SIOP PNET 4 trial

    B. Lannering (Birgitta); P. Rutkowski (Piotr); F.F. Doz (François); B. Pizer (Barry); G. Gustafsson (Göran); A. Navajas (Aurora); M. Massimino (Maura); R.E. Reddingius (Roel); M. Benesch (Martin); C. Carrie (Christian); R. Taylor; L. Gandola (Lorenza); T. Bjor̈k-Eriksson (Thomas); S. Giralt; F. Oldenburger (Foppe); T. Pietsch (Torsten); D. Figarella-Branger (Dominique); K. Robson (Kathryn); G. Forni (Gianluca); S.C. Clifford (Steven); M. Warmuth-Metz (Monica); D.D. Von Hoff; A. Faldum (Andreas); V. Mosseri (Véronique); B. Kortmann

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To compare event-free survival (EFS), overall survival (OS), pattern of relapse, and hearing loss in children with standard-risk medulloblastoma treated by postoperative hyperfractionated or conventionally fractionated radiotherapy followed by maintenance chemotherapy. Patients

  11. Conformal radiotherapy, reduced boost volume, hyperfractionated radiotherapy, and online quality control in standard-risk medulloblastoma without chemotherapy: Results of the French M-SFOP 98 protocol

    Purpose: Between December 1998 and October 2001, patients 60 Gy, but a slight increase in the volume irradiated to 40 Gy. No decrease in intelligence was observed in the 22 children tested during the first 2 years. Conclusion: This hyperfractionated radiotherapy protocol with a reduced boost volume and without chemotherapy was not associated with early relapses in children. Moreover, intellectual function seemed to be preserved. These results are promising

  12. Thyroid dysfunction as a late effect in childhood medulloblastoma: a comparison of hyperfractionated versus conventionally fractionated craniospinal radiotherapy

    Purpose: Primary hypothyroidism is a common sequela of craniospinal radiotherapy in the treatment of childhood medulloblastoma. Due to the strong radiobiologic rationale, hyperfractionation can reduce the delayed effects of radiation injury. Methods and Materials: The authors compared the incidence of thyroid dysfunction after conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (Group A, n=20 patients) vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy (Group B, n=12 patients) in a group of pediatric patients with posterior fossa primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). Results: The mean age at the time of tumor diagnosis was 7.4 years in Group A and 8.4 years in Group B. Thyroid function was evaluated yearly, with ultrasonographic examination every 2 years. The patients were followed after diagnosis for a mean of 10.8 years for Group A and 6.0 years for Group B. Approximately 80% of the Group A (16/20) and 33.3% of the Group B (4/12) patients developed primary hypothyroidism within a similar period after irradiation (4.2 vs. 3.5 years, respectively). Analysis by cumulative incidence function demonstrated a significant difference in the risk of developing thyroid dysfunction between these two groups of patients (p<0.05). Ultrasonography showed reduced thyroid volume in 7 Group A patients and structural changes in 21 patients (17 Group A, 4 Group B cases); a thyroid benign nodule was detected in 2 Group A patients. Conclusions: The current study findings suggest that the use of hyperfractionated craniospinal radiotherapy in the treatment of childhood medulloblastoma is associated with a lower risk of these patients' developing late thyroid dysfunction

  13. Phase I Trial of Gross Total Resection, Permanent Iodine-125 Brachytherapy, and Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: From April 1999 to May 2002, 21 patients with glioblastoma multiforme were enrolled on a Phase I protocol investigating planned gross total resection and immediate placement of permanent I-125 seeds, followed by postoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gy at 100 cGy b.i.d., 5 days per week. Median age and Karnofsky performance status were 50 years (range, 32-65 years) and 90 (range, 70-100), respectively. Toxicity was assessed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: Eighteen patients completed treatment according to protocol. The median preoperative tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging was 18.6 cm3 (range, 4.4-41.2 cm3). The median brachytherapy dose measured 5 mm radially outward from the resection cavity was 400 Gy (range, 200-600 Gy). Ten patients underwent 12 reoperations, with 11 of 12 reoperations demonstrating necrosis without evidence of tumor. Because of high toxicity, the study was terminated early. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 57 and 114 weeks, respectively, but not significantly improved compared with historical patients treated at University of California, San Francisco, with gross total resection and radiotherapy without brachytherapy. Conclusions: Treatment with gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy as performed in this study results in high toxicity and reoperation rates, without demonstrated improvement in survival

  14. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancers: a phase I-II trial

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity, pathologic response rates, type of surgery, and oncologic results in a prospective Phase I-II trial using pure hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) preoperatively in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1997 and April 2000, 50 patients with T3-T4 or N1 rectal cancers were treated preoperatively with 50 Gy (45 Gy to the pelvis and a 5-Gy tumor boost) in 40 fractions of 1.25 Gy during 4 weeks. The pretreatment tumor stage as determined by CT and endorectal ultrasonography (80% of patients) included 1 Stage T2 (2%), 45 T3 (90%), and 4 T4 (8%). Nodal involvement (N1) was documented in 26 patients (52%). Surgery was performed at a median interval of 45 days (range 26-114 days) after RT completion. Seventeen patients who presented with pT4 or pN1 and/or pM1 received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy postoperatively. Results: All patients completed the RT schedule as planned. Severe acute toxicities included two Grade 3 skin reactions (4%) that did not require a break. The other acute toxicities were Grade 2 or less (skin, diarrhea, urinary, rectal tenesmus, and fatigue). A complete pathologic response was observed in 7 patients (14%), and microscopic residual cancer was found in 10 (20%). Of the 20 patients presenting with tumor located ≤6 cm from the anal verge, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 14 (70%). At 3 years, the actuarial locoregional control rate was 90.5%, and the disease-free survival rate was 74.6%. At a median follow-up of 32 months, 4 patients (8%) presented with severe late complications (Grade 3-4) that might have been RT related (one rectovaginal fistula, two chronic perineal fistulas, and one bilateral ureteral stenosis). Conclusion: In locally advanced rectal cancer, preoperative hyperfractionated RT to a total dose of 50 Gy is feasible, with acceptable acute and late toxicity and an objective downstaging effect. In view of these results, this schedule might be used as a

  15. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy in esophageal cancer followed by transhiatal esophagectomy

    Purpose/Objectives: A prospective study for localized esophageal cancer using hyperfractionated radiotherapy(1.2Gy/fx, BID, 48Gy/4wks) with concurrent chemotherapy FP(CDDP 60mg/M2/d, d1 and d29, 5-FU 1gm/M2/d, continuous infusion d2-6 and d30-34) followed by esophagectomy has been conducted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiation followed by surgery and curative potential of transhiatal esophagecomy. We analyze the clinical/pathological response and toxicity of preoperative regimen and report the patterns of failure and the survival of patients in esophagectomy group compared with patients who treated with definitive radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Since May 1993, 48 patients with localized esophageal cancer entered on this trial and 42 patients were evaluated for response and toxicity in 4 weeks after completion of preoperative regimen. 15 patients underwent surgery and 5 are waiting for surgery. Among 22 patients who refused the surgery, 11 patients received the definitive radiotherapy (≥60Gy) and 11 of them refused further therapy. In 41 men and 1 women with median age of 61 years old (range 41-75 years), 8 patients were staged as SI, 22 SII, and 12 SIII with endoscopic, histologic and radiologic evaluation. Results: Clinical tumor response was observed in 79%((33(42))) and 66%((23(35))) of patients who had histologic evaluation showed complete pathologic response. (13(15)) who underwent surgery achieved complete resection and surgical specimen of 7(47%) patients showed no histologic evidence of disease. 20% ((3(15))) surgical mortality was observed. Among 15 patients who underwent surgery, 53% ((8(15))) are alive NED in 3-19 months (median 7 months), 1 patient is alive with disease in 3 months, 2 patients died of progression, 3 postoperative mortality and 1 patient died of lung cancer in 5 months. Among 11 patients who received curative radiotherapy, 6 are alive with good performance, NED in 9-15 months (median 10 months), 3 are alive

  16. CLINICAL STUDY IN ACCELERATED HYPERFRACTIONATED IRRADIATION IN THE TREATMENT OF LOCAL ADVANCED NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    姚原; 吴国华; 陆冬青; 蒋马伟; 邬国琴; 翁霞

    2001-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation ( AHFI ) and conventional fractionated irradiation (CFI) for local advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods The patients of AHFI group were irradiated to large-field target volume by a daily fraction of 2Gy , and small-field target volume by a daily fraction of 1Gy with more than 6h interval. The total dose of largefield target volume was 50Gy /25Fx/5W and of small-field target volume was 75Gy /50Fx/5W. The patients in CFI group were irradiated by a daily fraction of 2Gy to the total dose of 66Gy /33Fx/6. 6W. After 3 months of radiotherapy, the tumor response rates of complete recovery ( CR ), partial recovery ( PR ), and no change ( NC ) and 1- and 2- year survival rate in the two groups were observed. Results The tumor response rates of CR, PR, NC in AHFI group and CFI group were 22.9% (8/35), 60.0% (21/35), 17.1% (6/35) and 11.4% (4/35), 51.4% (18/35), 37.2% (13/35) respectively (P>0.05). All patients were followed up 2 years or more. The 1- and 2- year survival rates in AHFI group and CFI group were 62.9% (22/35 ), 31.4 % ( 11/35) and 42.9% (15/35) , 17.1% (6/35) respectively (P0.05). Conclusion In comparison with CFI, AHFI may increase 1- and 2- year survival rate after treatment of local advanced non-small cell lung cancer, while the radio-reactions, either early or late, did not increase significantly.

  17. Concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiotherapy with late intensification in advanced head and neck cancer

    Purpose: To determine whether a course of hyperfractionated radiation therapy concomitant with escalated radiosensitizing platinum compounds can be administered with acceptable morbidity and achieve a high rate of loco-regional control for Stage III and IV head and neck cancer and whether the patients can be tumor free at the primary site after initial therapy and cured by the additional chemoradiation without radical resection of the primary tumor. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III/IV head and neck cancer were treated in this multicenter Phase II Study with 1.8 Gy fraction radiotherapy for 2 weeks, with escalation to 1.2 Gy b.i.d. hyperfractionation to 46.8 Gy. Concomitant continuous infusion cisplatinum (CDDP) 20 mg per meter square on day 1 to 4 and 22 to 25 was given. Reassessment by biopsy of primary and nodes was done. Patients with a complete response continued with hyperfractionated radiotherapy to 75.6 Gy with simultaneous carboplatinum (Carbo), 25 mg per meter square b.i.d. for 12 consecutive treatment days. Patients with residual disease at 46.8 Gy required curative surgery. Seventy-four patients were treated at the three institutions; 20 were Stage III and 54 were Stage IV. All patients had daily mouth care, nutritional, and psychosocial support. Results: This regime was well tolerated. Eighty-five percent of toxicities were Grade 1 or 2 and there was only one Grade 4 hematologic toxicity. Late toxicities included xerostomia in 25 patients, dysplasia in 18, and mild speech impediment in 11. Biopsies of primary site were done after the first course of treatment in 59 patients. Neck dissections were performed in 35 patients. Forty-four of 59 (75%) primary sites and 16 of 35 (46%) lymph nodes had pathologically complete response (CR). Of the 74 patients, only 12 required surgical resection of the primary site. Thirty-five of the 50 node positive patients had neck dissections, 16 of these were CRs at surgery. At 4 years (median follow-up of 26

  18. Enhanced regeneration response of laryngeal and hypopharyngeal mucosa with accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy for glottic cancers

    The course and severity of acute mucosal reactions in 22 patients with previously untreated T1-2N0 glottic cancers were compared between two treatment schedules with different dose intensities: accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (AHF) and standard conventional fractionation radiation therapy (CF). AHF consisted of a twice-daily fractionation of 1.5 Gy 10 times weekly to a total dose of 66 Gy given in 30-40 (median, 33) days. For CF, the fractionation was 2 Gy five times weekly for a total dose of 66 Gy in 45-51 (median, 49) days. Both treatment schedules were well tolerated and no treatment interruptions were necessary. The mucosal reaction reached a peak score clearly earlier with AHF than CF and already demonstrated improvement in the final treatment week. In contrast, the reaction persisted with CF. It is suggested that damaged mucosal tissues with AHF can be effectively compensated by enhanced regeneration response due to an adequately high dose intensity, suggesting a possible tolerability advantage for AHF. (author)

  19. Hyperfractionated Low-Dose (21 Gy) Radiotherapy for Cranial Skeletal Metastases in Patients With High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    Purpose: To present a large experience (73 patients) using a standard radiotherapy (RT) protocol to prevent relapse in cranial sites where measurable metastatic neuroblastoma (NB), an adverse prognostic marker, is common. Methods and Materials: High-risk NB patients with measurable cranial disease at diagnosis or residual cranial disease after induction therapy had those sites irradiated with hyperfractionated 21 Gy; a brain-sparing technique was used for an extensive field. The patients were grouped according to the response to systemic therapy. Thus, when irradiated, Group 1 patients were in complete remission and Group 2 patients had primary refractory disease. Follow-up was from the start of cranial RT. Results: At 3 years, the 39 Group 1 patients had a progression-free survival rate of 51%; control of cranial disease was 79%. Two relapses involved irradiated cranial sites. Two other patients relapsed in the irradiated cranial sites 6 and 12 months after a systemic relapse. At 3 years, the 34 Group 2 patients had a progression-free survival rate of 33%; control of cranial disease was 52%. Group 2 included 19 patients who had residual cranial (with or without extracranial) disease. The cranial sites showed major (n = 13), minor (n = 2), or no response (n = 4) to RT. Five patients had progression in the cranial RT field at 10-27 months. Group 2 also included 15 patients who had persistent NB in extracranial, but not cranial, sites. Of these 15 patients, 2 relapsed in the irradiated cranial sites and elsewhere at 8 and 14 months. Cranial RT was well tolerated, with no Grade 2 or greater toxicity. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated 21-Gy cranial RT might help control NB and is feasible without significant toxicity in children.

  20. Constitutive gene expression profile segregates toxicity in locally advanced breast cancer patients treated with high-dose hyperfractionated radical radiotherapy

    Breast cancer patients show a wide variation in normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. The individual sensitivity to x-rays limits the efficiency of the therapy. Prediction of individual sensitivity to radiotherapy could help to select the radiation protocol and to improve treatment results. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between gene expression profiles of ex vivo un-irradiated and irradiated lymphocytes and the development of toxicity due to high-dose hyperfractionated radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Raw data from microarray experiments were uploaded to the Gene Expression Omnibus Database http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ (GEO accession GSE15341). We obtained a small group of 81 genes significantly regulated by radiotherapy, lumped in 50 relevant pathways. Using ANOVA and t-test statistical tools we found 20 and 26 constitutive genes (0 Gy) that segregate patients with and without acute and late toxicity, respectively. Non-supervised hierarchical clustering was used for the visualization of results. Six and 9 pathways were significantly regulated respectively. Concerning to irradiated lymphocytes (2 Gy), we founded 29 genes that separate patients with acute toxicity and without it. Those genes were gathered in 4 significant pathways. We could not identify a set of genes that segregates patients with and without late toxicity. In conclusion, we have found an association between the constitutive gene expression profile of peripheral blood lymphocytes and the development of acute and late toxicity in consecutive, unselected patients. These observations suggest the possibility of predicting normal tissue response to irradiation in high-dose non-conventional radiation therapy regimens. Prospective studies with higher number of patients are needed to validate these preliminary results

  1. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Unascertainable Non Small Cell Lung Cancer : Preliminary Report for Response and Toxicity

    Lung cancer study group at Asan Medical Center has conducted the second prospective study to determine the efficacy and feasibility of MVP chemotherapy with concurrent hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC). All eligible patients with stage III unresectable NSCLC were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy( 120 cGy/fx BID, 6480 cGY/54fx) and concurrent 2 cycles of MVP(Motomycin C 6 mg/m2 , d2 and d29, Vinblastin 6 mg/m2 , d2 and d29, Cisplatin 6 mg/m2 , d1 and d28) chemotherapy. Between Aug. 1993 and Nov. 1994, 62 patients entered this study ; 6(10%) had advanced stage IIIa and 56(90%) had IIIb disease including 1 with pleural effusion and 10 with supraclavicular metastases. Among 62 Patients, 48(77%) completed planned therapy. Fourteen patients refused further treatment during chemoradiotherapy. Of 46 patients evaluable for response, 34(74%) showed major response including 10(22%) with complete and 24(52%) with partial responses. Of 48 patients evaluable for toxicity, 13(27%) showed grade IV hematologic toxicity but treatment delay did not exceed 5 days. Two patients died of sepsis during chemoradiotherapy. Server weight(more than 10%) occurred in 9 patients(19%) during treatment. Nine patients(19%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Six of these patients had grad I(mild) pneumonitis with radiographic changes within the treatment fields. Three other patients had grade II pneumonitis, but none of theses patients had continuous symptoms after steroid treatment. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with advanced NSCLC was well tolerated with acceptable toxicity and achieved higher response rates than the first study, but rather low compliance rate(7%) in this study is worrisome. We need to improve nutritional support during treatment and to use G-CSF to improve leukopenia and if necessary, supportive care will given as in patients. Longer follow-up and larger sample size is needed to observe

  2. Improvement of local control of T3 and T4 nasopharyngeal carcinoma by hyperfractionated radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy

    Purpose: When the primary tumor of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is treated at the base of skull and intracranium with conventional radiotherapy, the result is generally poor. In this report, we investigated whether hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HFRT) and concomitant chemotherapy (CCT) could achieve better local control and survival in NPC patients with T3 and T4 lesions. Patients and Methods: Forty-eight patients (11 T3 and 37 T4 NPC) were treated with HFRT and CCT. HFRT was administered at 1.2 Gy per fraction, two fractions per day, Monday-Friday for 62 fractions for a total dose of 74.4 Gy. Concomitant chemotherapy consisting of cis-diamino-dichloroplatinum (CDDP) alone or CDDP and 5-fluorouracil was delivered simultaneously with radiotherapy during Weeks 1 and 6. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of CDDP and 5-fluorouracil for 2 to 3 cycles and was given monthly beginning 1 month after completion of radiation. Results: With a median follow-up of 57 months (range: 28-94 months), the 3-year locoregional control rate was 93%, the disease-free survival rate was 71%, and the overall survival rate was 72%. For T4 patients, the 3-year locoregional control rate was 91%, disease-free survival was 62%, and overall survival was 63%. The major acute toxicity was Grade 3 mucositis in 73% and Grade 2 weight loss in 31% of patients. Fifty percent of patients were tube fed. Most patients tolerated the combined modality treatments relatively well; 88% of patients completed their radiation treatment within 8 weeks. Conclusion: HFRT and CCT for T3 and T4 NPC were associated with excellent local control and improved survival. The treatment-related toxicity was acceptable and reversible. We would recommend using HFRT with CCT for advanced T-stage NPC if the three-dimensional conformal radiation planning shows a significant portion of the brainstem to be inside the treatment field

  3. Hyperfractionated craniospinal radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy for children with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma and other primitive neuroectodermal tumors

    Purpose: This single-institution Phase I/II study conducted from 1989 to 1995 evaluates the feasibility of a multi-modality protocol combining hyperfractionated craniospinal radiotherapy (HFRT) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy in 23 patients with newly diagnosed primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) arising in the central nervous system. Methods and Materials: All 23 patients had a histologically confirmed PNET and were over 3 years of age at diagnosis. The eligibility criteria for PNET patients with cerebellar primaries (medulloblastoma) included either a high T stage (T3b or 4) or high M stage (M1-3). All patients with noncerebellar primaries were eligible regardless of T or M stage. The median age of the 23 patients was 9 years (mean 3-25); 11 were female. The primary tumor arose in the cerebellum in 19. Of these medulloblastoma patients, 15 had high T stages (T3b or T4) with large locally invasive tumors and no evidence of metastases (M0), constituting Group 1. Thirteen (86%) of these patients had gross total resections. Four other medulloblastoma patients had both high T and high M stages, constituting Group 2. Group 3 consisted of four other patients with exocerebellar primaries (two brain, one brain stem, and one cauda equina), three of whom were M3. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy was administered within 4 weeks of surgery. Twice-daily 1-Gy fractions were administered separated by 4-6 h. The total dose to the primary intracranial tumor and other areas of measurable intracranial disease was 72 Gy. The prophylactic craniospinal axis dose was 36 Gy, and boosts of 44-56 Gy were administered to metastatic spinal deposits. Following radiotherapy, monthly courses of multiagent chemotherapy were administered sequentially (cyclophosphamide-vincristine followed by cisplatin-etoposide followed by carboplatin-vincristine) for a total of 9 months. Results: All patients completed radiotherapy as planned. Only three patients lost >10% of their body weight. One patient

  4. A Phase I study of daily carboplatin and simultaneous accelerated, hyperfractionated chest irradiation in patients with regionally inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    Purpose: This Phase I study was designed to determine the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) of daily low dose carboplatin with concurrent accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (AHFX) in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Patients also received consolidation chemotherapy with carboplatin. Secondary objectives were to determine the response rate, response duration, sites of first relapse, and survival. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients received daily carboplatin at doses of 25 or 30 mg/m2. Concurrent radiotherapy was given in 1.5 Gy fractions twice daily for a total dose of 60 Gy. Following chemoradiotherapy, patients received four cycles of carboplatin at 350 mg/m2. Results: Grade 4 esophagitis developed in 2 of 6 (33%) patients receiving 30 mg/m2 of daily carboplatin and was dose limiting. The remaining 24 patients received carboplatin at 25 mg/m2, with 3 patients developing Grade 4 esophagitis (13%). One of 22 patients who received consolidation carboplatin developed Grade 4 thrombocytopenia. An objective response was observed in 70% of patients (2 complete and 17 partial). Sites of failure were local (7 patients), distant (7 patients), and both (3 patients). The median time to progression was 8.3 months, with a median survival time of 18.3 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 63 and 49%, respectively. Conclusions: Esophagitis was dose limiting when 30 mg/m2 of daily carboplatin was administered with AHFX. At the MTD of 25 mg/m2 of daily carboplatin plus AHFX followed by four cycles of carboplatin, the regimen was shown to be safe and as active or more active than other regimens. Thus, further studies with this regimen are warranted

  5. Treatment of patients with unresectable squamous head and neck cancer with induction chemotherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy

    Purpose: the contribution of induction chemotherapy (CT) followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy (h.f.R.T.) in unresectable squamous head and neck cancer has been evaluated in a single institution as an assistancial protocol. Patients and methods: from March 1994 to June 2000 all consecutive patients with unresectable disease were treated with four courses of platin plus fluorouracil based CT followed by h.f.R.T.. Tumor resectability and response was assessed by a multidisciplinary committee. Results: ninety-nine patients (pts) were treated. All of them had stage IV-M0 disease: 67 T4, 88 N2-N3. Tumor location: 62 oropharynx, 22 hypopharynx, eight oral cavity and seven larynx. Tumor response at the end of treatment: 61 patients complete response, 17 partial response, two stable disease, 10 progressive disease and nine unevaluated. With a median follow-up of 70 months the 5-year loco-regional control and overall survival was 30.3% (95% CI: 21.9-38.6) and 21.6% (95% CI: 13.4-29.8), respectively. Loco-regional control and overall survival is significantly influenced by prior response to induction CT. Main grade 3-4 toxicity related to CT was stomatitis, but there were five patients with an ischemic event. Grade 3-4 acute toxicity related to h.f.R.T.: 47 stomatitis, 20 epithelitis. Chronic toxicity related to h.f.R.T.: six emergency tracheotomies due to laryngeal edema, five pneumonia and one mucous/soft-tissue necrosis. There were eight toxic related deaths. Conclusion: induction CT followed by h.f.R.T. might increase the overall survival rate in unresectable disease. H.f.R.T. resulted in a high rate of acute toxicity and its use would not be warranted in those patients with no response to induction CT who had a low probability of long-term control. (authors)

  6. Limited-stage small cell lung cancer. Local failure after concurrent chemoradiotherapy with use of accelerated hyperfractionation

    The aim of this study was to update data of radiation therapy regimens for improvement in local control in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer, a retrospective study was conducted. Results of early concurrent chemoradiotherapy with accelerated hyperfractionation in 30 patients between 1998 and 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. The prescribed dose was 45 Gy in 30 fractions in all patients. All patients received a full dose of radiation therapy; however, interruptions for ≥5 days, mainly due to hematologic toxicity, were required in 18 patients (60%). The 5-year Kaplan-Meier survival rate and the median survival time were 26% and 26 months, respectively. The 4-year in-field control rate was 56%. Sites of relapse were local relapse in 9 patients (6 for in-field relapse, 3 for marginal relapse) and distant metastases in 16 patients (11 for distant metastases only, 5 for distant metastases with local relapse). The sites of marginal relapse were the upper margin in two patients and the peripheral margin in one patient. Grade 3 radiation esophagitis was observed in only three patients. Because in-field control was insufficient, a more effective approach should be sought to provide better local control. (author)

  7. Short course continuous, hyperfractionated, accelerated radiation therapy (CHART) as preoperative treatment for rectal cancer

    Brooks, S.; Glynne-Jones, R.; Harrison, M.; Makris, A. [Mount Vernon Cancer Center, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Novell, R.; Brown, K. [Luton and Dunstable Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    Determine feasibility and toxicity of preoperative short course pelvic CHART (25 Gy in 15 fractions over 5 days) for treatment of clinically resectable primary rectal tumours. Between 1998 and 2004, 20 patients with clinically staged T3 resectable rectal carcinoma were treated in this prospective pilot study with preoperative short course CHART to their pelvis. The aim was for total mesorectal excision within 7 days. Radiation toxicity, surgical morbidity, locoregional control (LRC), overall (OS), cause specific (CSS) and disease free survival (DFS) outcomes were documented. Nineteen of the 20 patients completed planned radiotherapy. One discontinued radiotherapy due to toxicity. All patients underwent potentially curative radical surgery. One patient developed grade 3, and three patients grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity. With a median follow-up of 31 months (range 0.9-88), there is no grade 3, 4 or 5 late toxicity. Two patients experienced grade 2, and three patients grade 1 late bowel toxicity. Two patients died from postoperative complications, and two developed grade 2 abdominal wound infections. At 3 years LRC is 95% (95% CI 83-100), OS 72% (95% CI 51-94), CSS 86% (95% CI 68-100) and DFS 80% (95% CI 60-100). Two patients died from metastatic disease, one patient from a second primary and one patient is alive after successful resection of hepatic metastases. This small study suggests preoperative short course CHART for clinically resectable rectal carcinoma is feasible with acceptable compliance and tolerable side effects.

  8. Split Course Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radio-Chemotherapy (SCHARC) for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: Influence of protocol deviations and hemoglobin on overall survival, a retrospective analysis

    The advantage of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer has been reported. Furthermore, randomized trials and meta-analyses have confirmed the survival benefit of additional chemotherapy to radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed the efficiency and toxicity of the Regensburg standard therapy protocol 'SCHARC' and the overall survival of our patients. From 1997 to 2004, 64 patients suffering from advanced head and neck cancer (88 % stage IV, 12 % stage III) were assigned to receive the SCHARC protocol. Around half of the patients were diagnosed with oro-hypopharynx carcinoma (52 %), one third with tongue and floor of mouth tumors (29 %) and one fifth (19 %) suffered from H & N cancer at other sites. The schedule consisted of one therapy block with 30 Gy in 20 fractions over a two week period with concomitant chemotherapy (d 1–5: 20 mg/m2/d DDP + 750–1000 mg/m2/d 5FU (cont. infusion). This therapy block was repeated after a fortnight break up to a cumulative dose of 60 Gy and followed by a boost up to 70 Gy (69–70.5 Gy). All patients assigned to this scheme were included in the survival evaluation. Forty patients (63 %) received both radiation and chemotherapy according to the protocol. The mean follow up was 2.3 years (829 d) and the median follow up was 1.9 years (678 d), respectively. The analysis of survival revealed an estimated 3 year overall survival rate of 57 %. No patient died of complications, 52 patients (80 %) had acute grade 2–3 mucositis, and 33 patients (58 %) suffered from acute grade 3 skin toxicity. Leucopenia was no major problem (mean nadir 3.4 g/nl, no patient < 1.0 g/nl) and the mean hemoglobin value decreased from 13.2 to 10.5 g/dl. Univariate analysis of survival showed a better outcome for patients with a hemoglobin nadir >10.5 g/dl and for patients who completed the protocol. The SCHARC protocol was effective in patients diagnosed with advanced head and neck cancer. It led to

  9. Selective lymph node dissection following hyperfractionated accelerated radio-(chemo-)therapy for advanced head and neck cancer

    Hehr, T.; Classen, J.; Schreck, U.; Glocker, S.; Bamberg, M.; Budach, W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Eberhard-Karls Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Koitschev, A. [Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery, Eberhard-Karls Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Background: 2-year results of a German multicenter randomized trial showed that accelerated chemoradiation with MMC/5-FU to 70.6 Gy is more effective than accelerated radiation to 77.6 Gy alone at equivalent levels of acute and late radiation morbidity. Frequency, histopathology and impact on local tumor control of selective lymph node dissection were analyzed. Patients and Methods: Between February 1996 and October 2000 at Tuebingen University 42 randomized patients plus 45 nonrandomized patients with stage III/IV MO head and neck cancer were treated according to this protocol. After completion of hyperfractionated accelerated (chemo-)radiation a selective lymph node dissection was performed, if the primary tumor was in complete remission and clinical plus computed tomography proved residual lymph node disease. 17 of 38 patients with residual node metastasis underwent uni- or bilateral selective mode dissection, the remaining patients had residual primary tumors, clinical deterioration or refused neck dissection. Results: After a median follow-up of 26 months, the Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a 2-year overall survival of 49%, disease-specific survival of 64% and loco-regional tumor control of 60%, respectively. 3-year loco-regional tumor control in randomized patients was 52% compared to 58% in non-randomized patients (log rank p=0.23). 2-year loco-regional tumor control in stage cT4cNO was 76% compared to 57% in cT2-4 cN1-3 tumors. Subgroup analysis of patients with involved nodes revealed a 2-year loco-regional tumor control of 74% after complete remission of primary tumor and neck disease, 53% after complete remission of primary tumor and partial remission of neck disease. In patients with selective lymph node dissection loco-regional tumor control was 62%. Histopathological examination showed viable tumor in eight of 17 patients. Conclusions: Selective lymph node dissection of residual neck masses after completion of hyperfractionated accelerated radio

  10. Long-term Outcomes in Treatment of Invasive Bladder Cancer With Concomitant Boost and Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    Canyilmaz, Emine, E-mail: dremocan@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Yavuz, Melek Nur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Akdeniz University, Antalya (Turkey); Serdar, Lasif [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Zengin, Ahmet Yasar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kanuni Research and Education Hospital, Trabzon (Turkey); Aynaci, Ozlem; Haciislamoglu, Emel; Bahat, Zumrut; Yoney, Adnan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical efficacy and toxicity of concomitant boost and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (CBAHRT) in patients with invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and September 2012, 334 patients with diagnoses of invasive bladder cancer were selected. These patients received CBAHRT as a bladder-conserving approach. The treatment consisted of a dose of 45 Gy/1.8 Gy to the whole pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 1.5 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 67.5 Gy in 5 weeks. A total of 32 patients (10.3%) had a diagnosis of stage T1, 202 (64.3%) were at stage T2, 46 (14.6%) were at stage T3a, 22 (7%) were at stage T3b, and 12 (3.8%) were at stage T4a. Results: The follow-up period was 33.1 months (range, 4.3-223.3 months). Grade 3 late intestinal toxicity was observed in 9 patients (2.9%), whereas grade 3 late urinary toxicity was observed in 8 patients (2.5%). The median overall survival (OS) was 26.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.4-31.2). The 5-, 10, and 15-year OS rates were 32.1% (standard error [SE], ± 0.027), 17.9% (SE, ± 0.025) and 12.5% (SE, ± 0.028), respectively. The median cause-specific survival (CSS) was 42.1 months (95% CI: 28.7-55.5). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates were 43.2% (SE, ± 0.03), 30.3% (SE, ± 0.03), and 28% (SE, ± 0.04), respectively. The median relapse-free survival (RFS) was 111.8 months (95% CI: 99.6-124). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year RFS rates were 61.9% (SE, ± 0.03), 57.6% (SE, ± 0.04), and 48.2% (SE, ± 0.07), respectively. Conclusions: The CBAHRT technique demonstrated acceptable toxicity and local control rates in patients with invasive bladder cancer, and this therapy facilitated bladder conservation. In selected patients, the CBAHRT technique is a practical alternative treatment option with acceptable 5-, 10-, and 15-year results in patients undergoing cystectomy as well as concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  11. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy and simultaneous cisplatin for stage-III and -IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Long-term results including functional outcome

    Purpose: To assess the survival rate, the probability of local control, the patterns of relapse and late sequelae including self-reported quality of life in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous CDDP chemotherapy for stage-III to stage-IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Methods: From 1988 to 1994, 64 patients (median age 55.5 years) with carcinomas of different subsites, excluding the nasopharynx, were treated in a pilot study with 1.2 Gy bid (6 h interval; total dose 74.4 Gy) and simultaneous CDDP (20 mg/m2 daily, 5 days in week 1 and 5) and followed at regular intervals. Overall survival and local control, as well as the rates of late toxicity, were estimated using the actuarial method. Median follow-up was 3.3 years for all and 5.2 years for surviving patients. To assess the quality of life, the EORTC QLQ-C 30 questionnaire and the H and N35 module questionnaire were sent to the patients surviving with no evidence of disease or second primary tumors; they were answered by 15/23 (67%). Results: Overall survival was 37% at 5 years, whereas disease-specific survival was 59%. Twenty-three patients died from uncontrolled head and neck cancer. Second primary tumors were observed in 13 patients, most frequently in the lung. Local control without salvage surgery was 74% at 5 years for all subsites and stages, and loco-regional disease-free survival was 72%. Eleven patients developed distant metastases, which was the only site of failure in 6 cases. Salvage surgery was successful in 2 cases. The actuarial estimates of ≥grade-3 late toxicity was 4% for the mandibular bone and 23% for dysphagia, and 50% of the patients experienced a permanent xerostomy. Self-reported global quality of life in surviving patients was good (mean 68 points on a scale 0 to 100); consequences of impaired salivary function had most impact on nutritional and social aspects. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated RT with concomitant CDDP is well tolerated and highly

  12. Usefulness of two independent histopathological classifications of tumor regression in patients with rectal cancer submitted to hyperfractionated pre-operative radiotherapy

    (L)ukasz Liszka; Ewa Zieli(n)ska-Paj(a)k; Jacek Paj(a)k; Dariusz Go(l)ka; Jacek Starzewski; Zbigniew Lorenc

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the usefulness of two independent histopathological classifications of rectal cancer regression following neo-adjuvant therapy.METHODS: Forty patients at the initial stage cT3NxMO submitted to preoperative radiotherapy (42 Gy during 18 d) and then to radical surgical treatment. The relationship between "T-downstaging" versus regressive changes expressed by tumor regression grade (TRG 1-5)and Nasierowska-Guttmejer classification (NG 1-3) was studied as well as the relationship between TRG and NG versus local tumor stage ypT and lymph nodes status,ypN.RESULTS: Complete regression (ypTO, TRG 1) was found in one patient. "T-downstaging" was observed in 11 (27.5%) patients. There was a weak statistical significance of the relationship between "T-downstaging"and TRG staging and NG stage. Patients with ypT1 were diagnosed as TRG 2-3 while those with ypT3 as TRG5.No lymph node metastases were found in patients with TRG 1-2. None of the patients without lymph node metastases were diagnosed as TRG 5. Patients in the ypT1 stage were NG 1-2. No lymph node metastases were found in NG 1. There was a significant correlation between TRG and NG.CONCLUSION: Histopathological classifications may be useful in the monitoring of the effects of hyperfractionated preoperative radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer at the stage of cT3NxMO. There is no unequivocal relationship between "T-downstaging"and TRG and NG. There is some concordance in the assessment of lymph node status with ypT, TRG and NG.TRG and NG are of limited value for the risk assessment of the lymph node involvement.

  13. A non-randomised, single-centre comparison of induction chemotherapy followed by radiochemotherapy versus concomitant chemotherapy with hyperfractionated radiotherapy in inoperable head and neck carcinomas

    Felix Roland

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of induction chemotherapy failed to provide a consistent benefit for local control in primary treatment of advanced head and neck (H&N cancers. The aim of this study was to compare the results of concomitant application of radiochemotherapy for treating locally advanced head-and-neck carcinoma in comparison with the former standard of sequential radiochemotherapy. Methods Between 1987 and 1995 we treated 122 patients with unresectable (stage IV head and neck cancer by two different protocols. The sequential protocol (SEQ; 1987–1992 started with two courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (cisplatin [CDDP] + 120-h continuous infusions (c.i. of folinic acid [FA] and 5-fluorouracil [5-FU], followed by a course of radiochemotherapy using conventional fractionation up to 70 Gy. The concomitant protocol (CON; since 1993 combined two courses of FA/5-FU c.i. plus mitomycin (MMC concomitantly with a course of radiotherapy up to 30 Gy in conventional fractionation, followed by a hyperfractionated course up to 72 Gy. Results from the two groups were compared. Results Patient and tumor characteristics were balanced (SEQ = 70, CON = 52 pts.. Mean radiation dose achieved (65.3 Gy vs. 71.6 Gy, p = 0.00, response rates (67 vs. 90 % for primary, p = 0.02, and local control (LC; 17.6% vs. 41%, p = 0.03, were significantly lower in the SEQ group, revealing a trend towards lower disease-specific (DSS; 19.8% vs. 31.4%, p = 0.08 and overall (14.7% vs. 23.7%, p = 0.11 survival rates after 5 years. Mucositis grades III and IV prevailed in the CON group (54% versus 44%. Late toxicity was similar in both groups. Conclusion Concurrent chemotherapy seemed more effective in treating head and neck tumors than induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation, resulting in better local control and a trend towards improved survival.

  14. Simultaneous chemo-radiotherapy with Cisplatin/5-Fluorouracil/Leucovorin and hyperfractionated radiation for patients with advanced unresectable head and neck cancer

    Reitmeier, M.; Pohlmann, H.; Schorer, H.; Hartenstein, R. [Munich-Harlaching City Hospital, Dept. of medicine IV, Munich (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    Thirty-one previously untreated patients with unresectable stage 3rd and 4th squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with a simultaneous chemo-radiotherapy consisting of a cisplatin/5-fluoroucil/leucovorin-combination and of an accelerated split course radiotherapy. severe mucositis (77 %) and weight loss of 10 % or more (48 %) were the most common toxic effects. The overall response rate was 81 % with a 45 % complete response rate and a 36 % partial response rate. Median follow up time of the surviving patients was 50 %, the actuarial survival probability at 2 years was 63 % (Kaplan-Meier estimates).

  15. Simultaneous chemo-radiotherapy with Cisplatin/5-Fluorouracil/Leucovorin and hyperfractionated radiation for patients with advanced unresectable head and neck cancer

    Thirty-one previously untreated patients with unresectable stage 3rd and 4th squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with a simultaneous chemo-radiotherapy consisting of a cisplatin/5-fluoroucil/leucovorin-combination and of an accelerated split course radiotherapy. severe mucositis (77 %) and weight loss of 10 % or more (48 %) were the most common toxic effects. The overall response rate was 81 % with a 45 % complete response rate and a 36 % partial response rate. Median follow up time of the surviving patients was 50 %, the actuarial survival probability at 2 years was 63 % (Kaplan-Meier estimates)

  16. Accelerated radiotherapy for advanced laryngeal cancer

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a single institution's outcome for patients with advanced laryngeal cancer treated with accelerated radiotherapy (RT). Fifty-eight patients with advanced laryngeal cancer were treated with curative intent with accelerated RT during the period 1990-1998. Patients received radiotherapy alone or with induction chemotherapy. The 5-year local control (LC) and loco-regional control (LRC) probabilities were both 49% for T3 and 75% for T4 tumors. The 5-year disease-free survival probability was 46% and 68% and overall survival probability was 30% and 39% for T3 and T4 tumors respectively. No significant statistical difference in outcome was found, either between T3 and T4 tumors, or between patients who received induction chemotherapy and those who did not. The treatment results for advanced laryngeal cancer at this institution were comparable to those reported in the literature. The results for T3 and T4 were similar. T4 classification alone should not be an exclusion criterion for larynx preservation. Overall survival was poor, partly because of a high incidence of deaths from intercurrent diseases

  17. Accelerated radiotherapy for advanced laryngeal cancer

    Haugen, Hedda; Mercke, Claes [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Johansson, Karl-Axel [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Radiophysics; Ejnell, Hasse; Edstroem, Staffan [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a single institution's outcome for patients with advanced laryngeal cancer treated with accelerated radiotherapy (RT). Fifty-eight patients with advanced laryngeal cancer were treated with curative intent with accelerated RT during the period 1990-1998. Patients received radiotherapy alone or with induction chemotherapy. The 5-year local control (LC) and loco-regional control (LRC) probabilities were both 49% for T3 and 75% for T4 tumors. The 5-year disease-free survival probability was 46% and 68% and overall survival probability was 30% and 39% for T3 and T4 tumors respectively. No significant statistical difference in outcome was found, either between T3 and T4 tumors, or between patients who received induction chemotherapy and those who did not. The treatment results for advanced laryngeal cancer at this institution were comparable to those reported in the literature. The results for T3 and T4 were similar. T4 classification alone should not be an exclusion criterion for larynx preservation. Overall survival was poor, partly because of a high incidence of deaths from intercurrent diseases.

  18. Results from the IRS-IV randomized trial of hyperfractionated radiotherapy in children with rhabdomyosarcoma--a report from the IRSG

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome and toxicity of hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HFRT) vs. conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) in children with Group III rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: Five hundred fifty-nine children were enrolled into the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study IV with Group III RMS. Sixty-nine were ineligible for the analysis because of incorrect group or pathologic findings. Of the 490 remaining, 239 were randomized to HFRT (59.4 Gy in 54 1.1-Gy twice daily fractions) and 251 to CFRT (50.4 Gy in 28 1.8-Gy daily fractions). The age range was <1-21 years. All patients received chemotherapy. RT began at Week 9 after induction chemotherapy for all but those with high-risk parameningeal tumors who received RT during induction chemotherapy. The patient groups were equally balanced. The median follow-up was 3.9 years. Results: Analysis by randomized treatment assignment (intent to treat) revealed an estimated 5-year failure-free survival (FFS) rate of 70% and overall survival (OS) of 75%. In the univariate analysis, the factors associated with the best outcome were age 1-9 years at diagnosis; noninvasive tumors; tumor size <5 cm; uninvolved lymph nodes; Stage 1 or 2 disease; primary site in the orbit or head and neck; and embryonal histologic features (p=0.001 for all factors). No differences in the FFS or OS between the two RT treatment methods and no differences in the FFS or OS between HFRT and CFRT were found when analyzed by age, gender, tumor size, tumor invasiveness, nodal status, histologic features, stage, or primary site. Treatment compliance differed by age. Of the children <5 years, 57% assigned to HFRT received HFRT and 77% assigned to CFRT received CFRT. Of the children ≥5 years, 88% assigned to both HFRT and CFRT received their assigned treatment. The reasons for not receiving the appropriate randomized treatment were progressive disease, early death, parent or physician refusal, young age, or surgery. The

  19. Accelerated radiotherapy for T1, 2 glottic carcinoma: analysis of results with KI-67 index

    Purpose: Hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy without a split was performed to improve the local control probability of early glottic carcinomas. We analyzed the results of this regimen by using the Ki-67 index. Methods and Materials: Over a 12-year period, 85 T1N0M0 glottic cancers and 50 T2N0M0 glottic cancers were treated with conventional fractionation (CF) from 1984 to 1989 and with accelerated fractionation (AF) since 1990. The CF program consisted of five daily fractions of 2 Gy per week, for a total of 64 Gy. The AF program consisted of 1.72 Gy per fraction, two fractions per day, 5 days a week, for a total of 55 or 58 Gy. The specimens, taken before radiotherapy, were immunohistochemically stained with anti-Ki-67 antibody. Results: The 5-year local control probability for T1 tumors was 79.6 ± 6.9% with CF treatment, whereas with AF it was 86.9 ± 5.6%. For T2 tumors it was 62.7 ± 12.2% with CF, whereas it was 74.7 ± 7.8% with AF. The difference between CF and AF did not reach the point of statistical significance. However, when T1 tumors had a Ki-67 index lower than 50%, the local control rate achieved with AF was significantly better than that with CF (p = 0.018). When the tumors had a Ki-67 index that was 50% or more, there was no difference in the local control rate between CF and AF, whether they were T1 or T2. The peak mucosal reactions at the larynx and/or hypopharynx were much more severe and appeared at smaller doses and earlier in AF than in CF. The patients with AF showed no severe late complications. Conclusions: AF could not obtain statistically significant improvement in local control probability of T1 or T2 glottic carcinomas

  20. Pilot study of human recombinant interferon gamma and accelerated hyperfractionated thoracic radiation therapy in patients with unresectable stage IIIA/B nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Purpose: Gamma interferon has a wide range of properties, including the ability to sensitize solid tumor cells to the effects of ionizing radiation. The North Central Cancer Treatment Group has previously completed pilot studies of accelerated hyperfractionated thoracic radiation therapy (AHTRT) in patients with unresectable Stage IIIA/B nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This Phase I study was designed to assess the toxicity of concomitant gamma interferon and AHTRT in a similar patient population. Methods and Materials: Between December 1991 and May 1992, 18 patients with unresectable Stage IIIA/B NSCLC were treated with daily gamma interferon (0.2 mg subcutaneously) concomitant with AHTRT (60 Gy given in 1.5 Gy twice daily fractions). All patients had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1 with weight loss < 5%. Eight patients had Stage IIIA and 10 had Stage IIIB disease. Results: Nine patients (50%) experienced severe, life-threatening, or fatal toxicities. Eight of the patients (44%) developed significant radiation pneumonitis, which was severe in six patients and fatal in two patients (11% treatment-related mortality). Two patients (11%) developed severe radiation esophagitis. With follow-up of 15-21 months, 2 patients are alive, and 16 have died. The median survival time and 1-year survival rate is 7.8 months and 38%, respectively. Conclusion: Gamma interferon appeared to sensitize normal lung tissue to the effects of radiation, as demonstrated by the high incidence of severe or fatal radiation pneumonitis. We do not recommend pursuing gamma interferon as a radiosensitizer in this setting

  1. The incidence of bladder cancer recurrences and metastases after radical radiotherapy

    The authors compare the incidence of bladder carcinoma recurrences and dissemination after long-distance gamma-beam therapy, carried out according to a traditional method, and in an accelerated hyperfractionation mode combined with metronidazole therapy. The recurrences were most frequently detected at the site of the primary tumor (62-67 % of cases) in 6 to 18 months after the treatment. They come to a conclusion that accelerated hyperfractionation and local metronidazole radiomodification were conductive to a reduction of the incidence of recurrences from 45 to 28 % as against the traditional split radiotherapy course in the classical fractionation mode

  2. A Phase II Study of Preradiotherapy Chemotherapy Followed by Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Medulloblastoma/Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group (CCG 9931)

    Purpose: To verify feasibility and monitor progression-free survival and overall survival in children with high-risk medulloblastoma and noncerebellar primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) treated in a Phase II study with preradiotherapy chemotherapy (CHT) followed by high-dose, hyperfractionated craniospinal radiotherapy (CSRT). Methods and Materials: Eligibility criteria included age >3 years at diagnosis, medulloblastoma with either high M stage and/or >1.5 cm2 postoperative residual disease, and all patients with noncerebellar PNET. Treatment was initiated with five alternating monthly cycles of CHT (A [cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and vincristine], B [carboplatin and etoposide], A, B, and A) followed by hyperfractionated CSRT (40 Gy) with a boost to the primary tumor (72 Gy) given in twice-daily 1-Gy fractions. Results: The valid study group consisted of 124 patients whose median age at diagnosis was 7.8 years. Eighty-four patients (68%) completed the entire protocol according to study guidelines (within 9 months), and the median time to complete CSRT was 1.6 months. Major reasons for failure to complete CHT included progressive disease (17%) and toxic death (2.4%). The 5-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 43% ± 5% and 52% ± 5%, respectively. No significant differences were detected in subset analysis related to response to CHT, site of primary tumor, postoperative residual disease, or M stage. Conclusions: The feasibility of this intensive multimodality protocol was confirmed, and response to pre-RT CHT did not impact on survival. Survival data from this protocol can not be compared with data from other studies, given the protocol design.

  3. Hyperfractionation in management of mouth and oropharyngeal carcinomas

    The effect was studied of hyperfractionation in 60Co telegamma therapy using 2 opposite fields for epidermoid carcinomas in the head and neck. Patients (71) were irradiated three times a day with a focal dose of 1 Gy at 4-hour intervals. The total dose was 60 Gy. A comparison with the standard fractionation therapy showed that hyperfractionation can, thanks to the short total management time, become a suitable method for advanced mouth and oropharyngeal carcinoma treatment, with better local effects immediately after radiotherapy while showing identical effects on regional metastases and equivalent survival as with conventional fractionation. (L.O.). 3 figs., 7 tabs., 8 refs

  4. Pre-irradiation carboplatin and etoposide and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy in patients with high-grade astrocytomas: a phase II study

    Purpose: To investigate feasibility, activity and toxicity of pre-irradiation chemotherapy (CHT) in patients with newly diagnosed high-grade astrocytoma. Material and Methods: Thirty-five patients with glioblastoma multiform (GBM) and ten patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) entered into this study. Three weeks after surgery patients started their CHT consisting of two cycles of carboplatin (CBDCA) (C) 400 mg/m2, day 1 and etoposide (VP 16) (E) 120 mg/m2, days 1-3, given in a 3-week interval. One week after the second cycle of CE, accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (ACC HFX RT) was introduced with tumor dose of 60 Gy in 40 fractions in 20 treatment days in 4 weeks, 1.5 Gy b.i.d. fractionation.Results: Responses to two cycles of CE could be evaluated in 29 (67%) of 43 patients who received it. Fourteen patients were found impossible to determine radiographic response due to an absence of post-operative contrast enhancement because they were all grossly totally resected. There were 7, 24% (95% confidence intervals - CI, 9-40%), PR (2 AA and 5 GBM), 19 SD, and 3 PD. After RT, of those 29 patients, there were 3 CR and 11 PR (overall objective response rate was 48% (95% CI, 30-67%)), 12 SD, and 3 PD. Median survival time (MST) for all 45 patients is 14 months (95% CI, 11-20 months, while median time to progression (MTP) for all patients is 12 months (95% CI, 8-16 months). Toxicities of this combined modality approach were mild to moderate, with the incidences of CHT-induced grade 3 leukopenia, being 5% (95% CI, 0-11%), and grade 3 thrombocytopenia being 7% (95% CI, 0-15%). Of RT-induced toxicity, grade 1 external otitis was observed in 26% (95% CI, 13-39%), while nausea, vomiting and somnolence were each observed in 5% (95% CI, 0-11%) patients.Conclusion: Pre-irradiation CE and ACC HFX RT was a feasible treatment regimen with mild to moderate toxicity, but failed to improve results over what usually would be obtained with 'standard' approach in this

  5. Quality assurance protocol for linear accelerators used in radiotherapy

    Radiotherapy is a modality of choice for treatment of malignant diseases. Linear accelerators are the most common devices for implementing external radiation therapy. Taking into account the fact during the treatment, healthy tissue will inevitably be exposed to ionizing radiation, predicted dose in each radiotherapy case should be delivered with the greatest possible accuracy. Medical requirement for quality treatment achieving means as mach as possible dose into volume of interest and the greatest possible healthy tissue protection. From radiation protection point of view, occupational exposure of the staff involved in radiotherapy process should be minimized. To be able to reach it, consistent adherence to the Quality Assurance Programme is necessary. It should be in accordance with higher national and international protocols, because they give guidelines on the necessary standards, procedures, processes, resources and responsibilities that should be defined in structuring the overall radiotherapy quality management. As a part of this Master thesis, quality management as well as Quality Assurance Programme that is necessary to be applied in each radiotherapy center have been prepared. Mandatory dosimetry measurements included in the internal recommendations are also emphasized. Measurement results and external audit by IAEA indicated high accuracy and quality radiotherapy dose delivering in Macedonia. Based on the measurements and analysis, the aim of this Master thesis is offering a Quality Assurance Protocol for external beam radiotherapy that can be used on the national level in Republic of Macedonia. (Author)

  6. Radiotherapy using a laser proton accelerator

    Murakami, Masao; Miyajima, Satoshi; Okazaki, Yoshiko; Sutherland, Kenneth L; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Bulanov, Sergei V; Daido, Hiroyuki; Esirkepov, Timur Zh; Koga, James; Yamagiwa, Mitsuru; Tajima, Toshiki

    2008-01-01

    Laser acceleration promises innovation in particle beam therapy of cancer where an ultra-compact accelerator system for cancer beam therapy can become affordable to a broad range of patients. This is not feasible without the introduction of a technology that is radically different from the conventional accelerator-based approach. The laser acceleration method provides many enhanced capabilities for the radiation oncologist. It reduces the overall system size and weight by more than one order of magnitude. The characteristics of the particle beams (protons) make them suitable for a class of therapy that might not be possible with the conventional accelerator, such as the ease for changing pulse intensity, the focus spread, the pinpointedness, and the dose delivery in general. A compact, uncluttered system allows a PET device to be located in the vicinity of the patient in concert with the compact gantry. The radiation oncologist may be able to irradiate a localized tumor by scanning with a pencil-like particle...

  7. Autologous bone marrow transplantation following high-dose chemotherapy with or without accelerated hyperfractionated total lymphoid irradiation for patients with refractory or relapsed Hodgkin's disease

    PURPOSE: To analyze the 10-year experience at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in the salvage of relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's disease (HD) patients with high-dose chemotherapy with or without accelerated hyperfractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) followed by autologous bone marrow transplantation (AuBMT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 1985 through 1992, 127 patients with relapsed (n=79) or refractory (n=48) patients with HD were enrolled in two high-dose salvage therapy protocols at MSKCC. Patients who had not received any prior radiation therapy were assigned to protocol A (n=58) and those with a history of previous radiation therapy were assigned to protocol B (n=69). In both protocols treatment followed reinduction with standard-dose chemotherapy. Protocol A included involved-field irradiation (15 Gy) to areas of relapsed or persistent disease and TLI (20.04 Gy given in 1.67 Gy fractions, all fields treated t.i.d. for 4 days). Subsequently, patients received high-dose etoposide and cyclophosphamide, followed by infusion of autologous bone marrow. In protocol B, high-dose cyclophosphamide, BCNU and etoposide (CBV) were administered prior to AuBMT. The group selected to treatment on protocol A included significantly more patients with advanced-stage, extra-nodal disease, B symptoms at diagnosis and prior to AuBMT and also a higher fraction of patients who remained refractory to their primary therapy compared to the group treated on protocol B. All surviving patients had a minimum follow-up of 2 years. The median follow-up for survivors was 5+ years. RESULTS: Response to standard-dose reinduction chemotherapy for patients enrolled in protocols A and B was 60% and 80% respectively (p=0.03). The complete response rates after the high-dose therapy were 65% in either protocol. Transplant-related mortality occurred in(9(58)) (16%) patients in protocol A and (3(69)) (4%) of patients in protocol B (p=0.07). However since 1990, mortality in protocol

  8. Neutronic fields produced by a lineal accelerator for radiotherapy

    Measurements and Monte Carlo calculations has been utilized to determine the dosimetric features as well as the neutron spectra of photoneutrons produced around an 18 MV linear accelerator for radiotherapy. Measurements were carried out with bare and Cd covered thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD600 and TLD700, as well as inside a paraffine moderator. TLD pairs were also utilized as thermal neutrons inside a Bonner sphere spectrometer (au)

  9. Future directions for radiotherapy: Gray or Blue perspective?

    Over the past 20 years radiobiological and clinical rationale for altered radiotherapy were defined. Better understanding of the importance of dose per fraction, ovetrall treatment time, time interval between fractions, and tumor and normal tissue repair mechanisms have contributed to the studies on accelerated (AF) and hyperfractionated (HF) radiotherapy. The results of these studies lead to development of combined AF-HF schedules. Among numerous pilot and randomized studies the only few were recognized as important. Hyperfractionation was found to be advantageous in advanced oropharyngeal cancers, and CHART increased therapeutic gain in advanced laryngeal cancer. Accelerated hyperfractionation (AF-FH) improves local control and/or permits a lower total dose for the same rate of control. Better tumor control has always involved increased severity of acute mucosal reactions. The results of clinical trials which improved effectiveness of radiotherapy are discussed. A variety of physical parameters used in altered fractionation makes difficult the comparison of biological effect of different fractionation regimens based on doses in Grays. A new concept of Biological Units of effectiveness - BLUE, proposed by Withers is presented. It is interesting complex system of biological dosimetry which might supplement the Gray doses. Basic assumption of this concept and practical example are presented. (author)

  10. Accelerated radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer

    The purpose of the study is to present the reasons for introducing concomitant boost accelerated radiotherapy (CBAR) and its practical aspects at advanced head and neck carcinomas (HNC). Accelerated clonogenic repopulation of the tumor during radiotherapy necessitates its termination within the shortest possible term. The differentiated effect of the fractionated dose on both early and late response of tissues requires the use of several smaller daily fractions with an interval between exceeding six hours during all the time of radiotherapy or a part of it. If there is no data about earlier kinetics of the tumor cells, schemes with total dose 69-72 Gy are given preference. The practical aspects of CBAR also are presented: 1. specificity of the clinical target volume (ICRU 50) considering the requirements for beam and fields; 2. irradiation techniques most frequently used and 3. the method of patient immobilization. The characteristic features of CBAR are also discussed: 1. The primary tumor and its subclinical diffusion are irradiated in standard fields or in such with exclusion of the spinal cord at dose up to 54 in 30 fractions for 5.5 weeks. During the first two days, two daily fractions at six-hours interval are delivered with partial exclusion of the spinal cord. The primary tumor is given during the last 2.5 weeks up to total dose 69-72 Gy with a second daily fraction of 1.5 Gy six hours after the first one; 2. The current concepts for spinal cord radiation tolerance and very high risk of transverse myelitis in some accelerated radiotherapeutical schemes are also discussed. The therapeutic approach described is based on the experience got from the conventional fractionation; 3. Without neglecting enhanced acute toxicity CBAR is recommended as a well tolerated radiotherapeutical method

  11. Quality of life assessment in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients undergoing an accelerated radiotherapy regimen: report of ECOG study 4593

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the quality of life (QOL) before, at completion, and after therapy for patients receiving an accelerated fractionation schedule of radiotherapy for advanced, unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer in a Phase II multi-institutional trial. Methods and Materials: The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung (FACT-L) patient questionnaire was used to score the QOL in patients enrolled in the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Phase II trial (ECOG 4593) of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer. Radiotherapy (total dose 57.6 Gy in 36 fractions) was delivered during 15 days, with three radiation fractions given each treatment day. The protocol was activated in 1993, and 30 patients had accrued by November 1995. The FACT-L questionnaire was administered at study entry (baseline), on the last day of radiotherapy (assessment 2), and 4 weeks after therapy (assessment 3). The FACT-L includes scores for physical, functional, emotional, and social well-being (33 items), and a subscale of lung cancer symptoms (10 additional items). The summation of the physical, functional, and lung cancer symptom subscales (21 items) constitutes the Trial Outcome Index (TOI), considered the most clinically relevant outcome measure in lung cancer treatment trials. Results: The FACT-L completion rates at the designated study time points were as follows: baseline, 30 of 30 (100%); assessment 2, 29 (97%) of 30; and assessment 3, 24 (80%) of 30. At treatment completion, statistically significant declines in QOL scores were noted, compared with baseline for physical and functional well-being. Emotional well-being scores improved at both assessment 2 and assessment 3. The physical and functional scores returned approximately to baseline values at assessment 3. The change in TOI score was evaluated as a function of the clinical response to treatment, toxicity grade, and survival; no clear association was noted. A trend for the

  12. Accelerated Deformable Registration of Repetitive MRI during Radiotherapy in Cervical Cancer

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Tanderup, Kari; Kiritsis, Christian; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Lindegaard, Jacob; Grau, Cai

    Tumour regression and organ deformations during radiotherapy (RT) of cervical cancer represent major challenges regarding accurate conformation and calculation of dose when using image-guided adaptive radiotherapy. Deformable registration algorithms are able to handle organ deformations, which can...... be useful with advanced tools such as auto segmentation of organs and dynamic adaptation of radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to accelerate and validate deformable registration in MRI-based image-guided radiotherapy of cervical cancer.    ...

  13. Biological dose volume histograms during conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Radiobiological data suggest that prostate cancer has a low α/β ratio. Large radiotherapy fractions may, therefore, prove more efficacious than standard radiotherapy, while radiotherapy acceleration should further improve control rates. This study describes the radiobiology of a conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy scheme for the treatment of high risk prostate cancer. Anteroposterior fields to the pelvis deliver a daily dose of 2.7 Gy, while lateral fields confined to the prostate and seminal vesicles deliver an additional daily dose of 0.7 Gy. Radiotherapy is accomplished within 19 days (15 fractions). Dose volume histograms, calculated for tissue specific α/β ratios and time factors, predict a high biological dose to the prostate and seminal vesicles (77-93 Gy). The biological dose to normal pelvic tissues is maintained at standard levels. Radiobiological dosimetry suggests that, using hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy, high biological radiation dose can be given to the prostate without overdosing normal tissues

  14. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using robotic radiotherapy: a dosimetric comparison with tomotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    Rault, Erwann; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dang, Hong-Phuong; Crop, Frederik; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick; Pasquier, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a new breast treatment modality aiming to reduce treatment time using hypo fractionation. Compared to conventional whole breast irradiation that takes 5 to 6 weeks, APBI is reported to induce worse cosmetic outcomes both when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). These late normal tissue effects may be attributed to the dose volume effect because a large portion of the no...

  15. Prospective Trial of Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and acute toxicities of an accelerated, partial breast, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) protocol. Methods and Materials: Between February 2004 and August 2005, 55 patients with Stage I breast cancer and initial follow-up were enrolled at four facilities on a HealthONE and Western institutional review board-approved accelerated partial breast IMRT protocol. All patients were treated in 10 equal fractions delivered twice daily within 5 consecutive days. The first 7 patients were treated to 34 Gy, and the remaining 48 patients were treated to 38.5 Gy. Results: The median follow-up after IMRT was 10 months (range, <1-19) and after diagnosis was 11.5 months (range, 2-21). No local or distant recurrences developed. The T stage distribution was as follows: T1a in 11 patients, T1b in 24, and T1c in 20. The median tumor size was 9 mm (range, 1-20 mm). Breast cosmesis was judged by the patient as poor by 2, good by 12, and excellent by 40 (1 patient was legally blind) and by the physician as poor for 1, good for 10, and excellent for 44 patients. Breast pain, as judged by patient, was none in 34, mild in 19, moderate in 2, and severe in 0 patients. There was a single report of telangiectasia but no incidents of significant edema. Compared with historic controls for whom three-dimensional treatment planning techniques were used, IMRT provided similar dose delivery to the target while reducing the volume of normal breast included in the 100%, 75%, and 50% isodose lines. Conclusion: This initial report prospectively explored the feasibility of accelerated partial breast IMRT. After short-term follow-up, the dose delivery and clinical outcomes were very acceptable. We believe this regimen deserves additional investigation under institutional review board guidance

  16. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    Rasmussen, Rune, E-mail: rune333@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Claesson, Magnus [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Stangerup, Sven-Eric [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Roed, Henrik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Ib Jarle [Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Caye-Thomasen, Per [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Juhler, Marianne [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a 'wait-and-scan' group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  17. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a “wait-and-scan” group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  18. Avoidance of treatment interruption: an unrecognized benefit of accelerated radiotherapy in oropharyngeal carcinomas?

    Allal, Abdelkarim Said; De Pree, Christian; Dulguerov, Pavel; Bieri, Sabine; Maire, Daphne Isabel; Kurtz, John

    1999-01-01

    To assess the impact of treatment interruption on the potential gain in locoregional control obtained with accelerated radiotherapy (RT) compared with conventionally fractionated RT in patients with oropharyngeal carcinomas.

  19. Salvage surgery after radical accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant boost technique for head and neck carcinomas

    Taussky, Daniel; Dulguerov, Pavel; Allal, Abdelkarim Said

    2005-01-01

    Definitive radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer is increasingly used to preserve organ function, whereas surgery is reserved for treatment failure. However, data are sparse regarding the feasibility of salvage surgery, particularly for unselected patients after accelerated RT.

  20. Clinical Experience With Image-Guided Radiotherapy in an Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Protocol

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of fiducial markers for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in an accelerated partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients consented to an institutional review board approved protocol of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker placement and treatment with IGRT. Patients (1 patient with bilateral breast cancer; 20 total breasts) underwent ultrasound guided implantation of three 1.2- x 3-mm gold markers placed around the surgical cavity. For each patient, table shifts (inferior/superior, right/left lateral, and anterior/posterior) and minimum, maximum, mean error with standard deviation were recorded for each of the 10 BID treatments. The dose contribution of daily orthogonal films was also examined. Results: All IGRT patients underwent successful marker placement. In all, 200 IGRT treatment sessions were performed. The average vector displacement was 4 mm (range, 2-7 mm). The average superior/inferior shift was 2 mm (range, 0-5 mm), the average lateral shift was 2 mm (range, 1-4 mm), and the average anterior/posterior shift was 3 mm (range, 1 5 mm). Conclusions: This study shows that the use of IGRT can be successfully used in an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol. The authors believe that this technique has increased daily treatment accuracy and permitted reduction in the margin added to the clinical target volume to form the planning target volume.

  1. Feasibility and early results of accelerated radiotherapy for head and neck carcinoma in the elderly

    Allal, Abdelkarim Said; Maire, Daphne Isabel; Becker, Minerva; Dulguerov, Pavel

    2000-01-01

    Accelerated radiotherapy (RT) represents a promising method with which to improve the treatment outcome in patients with head and neck carcinoma. However, its applicability to elderly patients has not been well established. This study assessed treatment toxicities, patient compliance, and oncologic results in patients age >/= 70 years who were treated with an accelerated concomitant boost RT schedule.

  2. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of vestibular schwannomas accelerates hearing loss

    Rasmussen, Rune; Claesson, Magnus; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hear......To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea...

  3. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation with Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Is Feasible for Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    He, Zhenyu; Wu, Sangang; Zhou, Juan; Li, Fengyan; Sun, Jiayan; Lin, Qin; Lin, Huanxin; Guan, Xunxing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Several accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) techniques are being investigated in patients with early-stage breast cancer. The present study evaluated the feasibility, early toxicity, initial efficacy, and cosmetic outcomes of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for Chinese female patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. Methods A total of 38 patients met the inclusion criteria and an accelerated partial breast in...

  4. Prostaglandin inhibitor and radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancers

    Radiotherapy is the usual mode of treatment for unresectable head and neck cancer. To improve cure rates, extend survival, and reduce morbidity, we use accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy and an adjuvant drug to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis. In this study, 19 patients received 300 rad/day of radiotherapy in two equally divided doses to a total dose averaging 6,200 rad. Either indomethacin, 25 mg, or placebo was given four times a day in a double-blind fashion during therapy. Radiation mucositis was graded as 0 to 4+; pain, nutritional status, and tumor status were monitored daily and recorded biweekly. Evaluation of the data showed delayed mucositis in the experimental group for grades 1 to 3, with a significant difference at grade 3 compared with controls. The significance of a long-term comparison of cure rates would be doubtful considering the heterogeneity of the primary sites and regional disease in this group coupled with the small size of our study

  5. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiation Therapy (HART) of 70.6 Gy With Concurrent 5-FU/Mitomycin C Is Superior to HART of 77.6 Gy Alone in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Long-term Results of the ARO 95-06 Randomized Phase III Trial

    Purpose: To report the long-term results of the ARO 95-06 randomized trial comparing hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiation with mitomycin C/5-fluorouracil (C-HART) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy (HART) alone in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: The primary endpoint was locoregional control (LRC). Three hundred eighty-four patients with stage III (6%) and IV (94%) oropharyngeal (59.4%), hypopharyngeal (32.3%), and oral cavity (8.3%) cancer were randomly assigned to 30 Gy/2 Gy daily followed by twice-daily 1.4 Gy to a total of 70.6 Gy concurrently with mitomycin C/5-FU (C-HART) or 16 Gy/2 Gy daily followed by twice-daily 1.4 Gy to a total dose of 77.6 Gy alone (HART). Statistical analyses were done with the log-rank test and univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 8.7 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.8-9.7 years). At 10 years, the LRC rates were 38.0% (C-HART) versus 26.0% (HART, P=.002). The cancer-specific survival and overall survival rates were 39% and 10% (C-HART) versus 30.0% and 9% (HART, P=.042 and P=.049), respectively. According to multivariate Cox regression analysis, the combined treatment was associated with improved LRC (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.6 [95% CI: 0.5-0.8; P=.002]). The association between combined treatment arm and increased LRC appeared to be limited to oropharyngeal cancer (P=.003) as compared with hypopharyngeal or oral cavity cancer (P=.264). Conclusions: C-HART remains superior to HART in terms of LRC. However, this effect may be limited to oropharyngeal cancer patients

  6. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiation Therapy (HART) of 70.6 Gy With Concurrent 5-FU/Mitomycin C Is Superior to HART of 77.6 Gy Alone in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Long-term Results of the ARO 95-06 Randomized Phase III Trial

    Budach, Volker, E-mail: volker.budach@charite.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Stromberger, Carmen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Poettgen, Christoph [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Essen (Germany); Baumann, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Dresden (Germany); Budach, Wilfried [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heinrich Heine Universität Düsseldorf (Germany); Grabenbauer, Gerhard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals of Erlangen (Germany); Marnitz, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Olze, Heidi [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter [Sostana GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Ghadjar, Pirus [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term results of the ARO 95-06 randomized trial comparing hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiation with mitomycin C/5-fluorouracil (C-HART) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy (HART) alone in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: The primary endpoint was locoregional control (LRC). Three hundred eighty-four patients with stage III (6%) and IV (94%) oropharyngeal (59.4%), hypopharyngeal (32.3%), and oral cavity (8.3%) cancer were randomly assigned to 30 Gy/2 Gy daily followed by twice-daily 1.4 Gy to a total of 70.6 Gy concurrently with mitomycin C/5-FU (C-HART) or 16 Gy/2 Gy daily followed by twice-daily 1.4 Gy to a total dose of 77.6 Gy alone (HART). Statistical analyses were done with the log-rank test and univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 8.7 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.8-9.7 years). At 10 years, the LRC rates were 38.0% (C-HART) versus 26.0% (HART, P=.002). The cancer-specific survival and overall survival rates were 39% and 10% (C-HART) versus 30.0% and 9% (HART, P=.042 and P=.049), respectively. According to multivariate Cox regression analysis, the combined treatment was associated with improved LRC (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.6 [95% CI: 0.5-0.8; P=.002]). The association between combined treatment arm and increased LRC appeared to be limited to oropharyngeal cancer (P=.003) as compared with hypopharyngeal or oral cavity cancer (P=.264). Conclusions: C-HART remains superior to HART in terms of LRC. However, this effect may be limited to oropharyngeal cancer patients.

  7. Prolonged survival when temozolomide is added to accelerated radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    The goal of this study was to evaluate accelerated radiotherapy with and without temozolomide (TMZ) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This retrospective analysis evaluated 86 patients with histologically proven GBM who were treated with accelerated radiotherapy of 1.8 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 54 Gy within 3 weeks. Median age was 62 years and median Karnofsky index was 90. A total of 41 patients received radiotherapy only from 2002-2005 and 45 patients were treated with TMZ concomitantly and after radiotherapy from 2005-2007. Median overall survival (OS) was 12.5 months and 2-year OS was 15.4%. Patient characteristics were well balanced between the two groups except for better performance status (p = 0.05) and higher frequency of retreatment for the first recurrence (p = 0.02) in the TMZ group. Age at diagnosis (HR 2.83) and treatment with TMZ (HR 0.60) were correlated with OS in the multivariate analysis: treatment with and without TMZ resulted in median OS of 16 months and 11.3 months, respectively. Hematological toxicity grade > II was observed in 2/45 patients and 5/37 patients during simultaneous radiochemotherapy and adjuvant TMZ. TMZ added to accelerated radiotherapy for GBM resulted in prolonged overall survival with low rates of severe hematological toxicity. (orig.)

  8. European organization for research on treatment of cancer trials using radiotherapy with multiple fractions per day

    During the past decade (1976-1986), radiotherapy with altered fractionation schemes using multiple fractions per day (MFD) was the major field of the clinical research undertaken in the EORTC Cooperative Group of Radiotherapy. Some of its participating institutions (Portsmouth, Dijon, Leuven, Amsterdam, Rome) performed pilot studies in the midseventies in more than 400 patients. Then largely based upon the previous institutional experiences, EORTC-labelled phase II and III were activated: 1,678 patients have been entered in 8 trials during the period 1978-1987. In order to summarize these clinical experiments covering various fields of tumor pathology, radiotherapy schemes are divided according to the type of altered fractionation: pure hyperfractionation, accelerated fractionation and mixed hyprfractionated and accelerated schemes

  9. Radiobiological modeling of interplay between accelerated repopulation and altered fractionation schedules in head and neck cancer

    Marcu Loredana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancer represents a challenge for radiation oncologists due to accelerated repopulation of cancer cells during treatment. This study aims to simulate, using Monte Carlo methods, the response of a virtual head and neck tumor to both conventional and altered fractionation schedules in radiotherapy when accelerated repopulation is considered. Although clinical trials are indispensable for evaluation of novel therapeutic techniques, they are time-consuming processes which involve many complex and variable factors for success. Models can overcome some of the limitations encountered by trials as they are able to simulate in less complex environment tumor cell kinetics and dynamics, interaction processes between cells and ionizing radiation and their outcome. Conventional, hyperfractionated and accelerated treatment schedules have been implemented in a previously developed tumor growth model which also incorporates tumor repopulation during treatment. This study focuses on the influence of three main treatment-related parameters, dose per fraction, inter fraction interval and length of treatment gap and gap timing based on RTOG trial data on head and neck cancer, on tumor control. The model has shown that conventionally fractionated radiotherapy is not able to eradicate the stem population of the tumor. Therefore, new techniques such as hyperfractionated/ accelerated radiotherapy schedules should be employed. Furthermore, the correct selection of schedule-related parameters (dose per fraction, time between fractions, treatment gap scheduling is crucial in overcoming accelerated repopulation. Modeling of treatment regimens and their input parameters can offer better understanding of the radiobiological interactions and also treatment outcome.

  10. PhoNeS: A novel approach to BNCT with conventional radiotherapy accelerators

    PhoNeS (Photo Neutron Source) is an INFN project devoted to the optimization of the neutron production and moderation in radiotherapy linear accelerators. LinAcs producing high energy (15-25MeV) photon beams are becoming widespread. At this energy neutron photo-production is unavoidable and the neutron dose must be controlled and reduced during normal radiotherapy. A technique known as BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) uses neutrons for radiotherapic treatments: the cells are given a drug containing B10 which undergoes fission after neutron capture, inducing heavy damages to the DNA of the cell itself. This paper will describe the moderator developed by PhoNeS and the results in terms of neutron flux and spectrum and photon contamination of the measurements performed on several radiotherapy accelerators

  11. Particle-beam accelerators for radiotherapy and radioisotopes

    The philosophy used in developing the new PIGMI technology was that the parameters chosen for physics research machines are not necessarily the right ones for a dedicated therapy or radioisotope machine. In particular, the beam current and energy can be optimized, and the design should emphasize minimum size, simplicity and reliability of operation, and economy in capital and operating costs. A major part of achieving these goals lay in raising the operating frequency and voltage gradient of the accelerator, which shrinks the diameter and length of the components. Several other technical innovations resulted in major system improvements. One of these is a radically new type of accelerator structure named the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator. This allowed us to eliminate the large, complicated ion source used in previous ion accelerators, and to achieve a very high quality accelerated beam. Also, by using advanced permanent magnet materials to make the focusing elements, the system becomes much simpler. Other improvements have been made in all of the accelerator components and in the methods for operating them. These will be described, and design and costing information examples given for several possible therapy and radioisotope production machines

  12. Quality Assesment Of Photon And Electron Beams From Siemens PRIMUS Radiotherapy Accelerator

    There are two types of radiation from SIEMENS Primus Radiotherapy Accelerator at the National Cancer Hospital (K Hospital): electron and photon beams. Electron beams with four different energies of 6; 9; 12 and 15 MeV. Photon beams with two different energies: 6 MV and 15 MV. The symmetry as well as flatness of profiles created by all these beams are very important factors using in clinical practice. This report presents the method using water phantom to define absorbed dose distribution in medium of all beams. This is an effective and accurate method to define quality of radiation beams with different field sizes using in radiotherapy. (author)

  13. Hyperfractionation radiation therapy in advanced head and neck cancer

    Kim, Jin Hee; Ye, Ji Won [College of Medicine, Keimyung Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    The effects of hyperfractionation radiation therapy, such as the failure pattern and survival, on the treatment results in advanced stage head and neck cancer were studied. Between September 1990 and October 1998, 24 patients with advanced stage (III, IV) head and neck cancers, were treated using hyperfractionation radiation therapy in the Department at Radiation Oncology at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The male to female ratio was 7 ; 1, and the age range from 38 to 71 years with the median of 56 years. With regard to the TNM stage, 11 patients were stage III and 13 were stage IV. The sites of primary cancer were the nasopharynx in six, the hypopharynx in 6, the larynx in five, the oropharynx in three, the maxillary sinus in three, and the oral cavity in one patient. The radiotherapy was delivered by 6 MV X-ray, with a fraction size of 1.2 Gy at two fractions a day, with at least 6 hours inter-fractional interval. The mean total radiation doses was 72 Gy, (ranging from 64.4 to 76.8 Gy). Fallow-up periods ranged between 3 and 136 months, with the median of 52 months. The overall survival rates at 3 and 5 years in all patients were 66.7% and 52.4%. The disease-free survival rates at 3 and 5 years (3YDFS, 5YDFS) in all patients Were 66.7% and 47.6%. The 3YDFS and 5YDFS in stage III patients were 81.8% and 63.6%, and those in stage IV patients were 53.8% and 32.3%. Ten patients were alive with no local nor distant failures at the time of analyses. Six patients (25%) died due to distant metastasis and 12.5% died due to local failure. Distant metastasis was the major cause of failure, but 2 patients died due to unknown failures and 3 of other diseases. The distant metastasis sites were the lung (3 patients), the bone (1 patient), and the liver (2 patients). One patient died of second esophageal cancer. There were no severe late complications, with the exception of 1 osteoradionecrosis of the mandible 58 months after treatment. Although this study was

  14. Hyperfractionation radiation therapy in advanced head and neck cancer

    The effects of hyperfractionation radiation therapy, such as the failure pattern and survival, on the treatment results in advanced stage head and neck cancer were studied. Between September 1990 and October 1998, 24 patients with advanced stage (III, IV) head and neck cancers, were treated using hyperfractionation radiation therapy in the Department at Radiation Oncology at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The male to female ratio was 7 ; 1, and the age range from 38 to 71 years with the median of 56 years. With regard to the TNM stage, 11 patients were stage III and 13 were stage IV. The sites of primary cancer were the nasopharynx in six, the hypopharynx in 6, the larynx in five, the oropharynx in three, the maxillary sinus in three, and the oral cavity in one patient. The radiotherapy was delivered by 6 MV X-ray, with a fraction size of 1.2 Gy at two fractions a day, with at least 6 hours inter-fractional interval. The mean total radiation doses was 72 Gy, (ranging from 64.4 to 76.8 Gy). Fallow-up periods ranged between 3 and 136 months, with the median of 52 months. The overall survival rates at 3 and 5 years in all patients were 66.7% and 52.4%. The disease-free survival rates at 3 and 5 years (3YDFS, 5YDFS) in all patients Were 66.7% and 47.6%. The 3YDFS and 5YDFS in stage III patients were 81.8% and 63.6%, and those in stage IV patients were 53.8% and 32.3%. Ten patients were alive with no local nor distant failures at the time of analyses. Six patients (25%) died due to distant metastasis and 12.5% died due to local failure. Distant metastasis was the major cause of failure, but 2 patients died due to unknown failures and 3 of other diseases. The distant metastasis sites were the lung (3 patients), the bone (1 patient), and the liver (2 patients). One patient died of second esophageal cancer. There were no severe late complications, with the exception of 1 osteoradionecrosis of the mandible 58 months after treatment. Although this study was

  15. Accelerated ray tracing for radiotherapy dose calculations on a GPU

    M. de Greef; J. Crezee; J.C. van Eijk; R. Pool; A. Bel

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The graphical processing unit (GPU) on modern graphics cards offers the possibility of accelerating arithmetically intensive tasks. By splitting the work into a large number of independent jobs, order-of-magnitude speedups are reported. In this article, the possible speedup of PLATO's ray t

  16. Study of the Accelerator Technology Development for Cancer Radiotherapy

    The hadronic particle beams including both protons, neutrons and charged particles have been studied for cancer therapy by a number of research centers in several countries during the past two decades. In this paper is briefly discussed concerning the accelerator type and its applications. The future trends are seen in the new technological developments like the use of proton gantries, beam scanning techniques, improved patient handling system and in the increasing precision of treatment. (author)

  17. The results of accelerated radiotherapy and concomitant cisplatin administration in advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    The accelerated radiotherapy and concomitant infusion of cisplatin in low doses was evaluated in 15 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oral part of pharynx. Clinical complete response was seen in 6 of 15 patients (40%) and 4 patients (26.6%) were alive 12 months with no evidence of disease, of all group of 15 patients 9 (60%) were alive 12 months after treatment. (author)

  18. Acceleration of pubertal development following pituitary radiotherapy for Cushing's disease

    Nicholl, R.M.; Kirk, J.M.W.; Grossman, A.B.; Plowman, P.N.; Besser, G.M.; Savage, M.O. (Saint Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-01

    A 7-year-old boy with pituitary dependent Cushing's disease was treated with pituitary irradiation following unsuccessful microadenomectomy. This led to normalization of the hypercortisolaemia, but was followed by GH deficiency. Two years after radiotherapy he had the onset of pubertal development with testicular enlargement to 8 ml bilaterally. Pubertal regression was induced using the long-acting GnRH analogue goserelin. Acceleration of skeletal maturation was also arrested, resulting in improvement of final height prediction. Irradiation directly to the hypothalamo-pituitary region, as well as whole brain irradiation, may thus be associated with accelerated pubertal development. (author).

  19. Physical-dosimetric enabling a dual linear accelerator 3D planning systems for radiotherapy

    The process of commissioning clinical linear accelerator requires a dual comprehensive study of the therapeutic beam parameters, both photons Electron. All information gained by measuring physical and dosimetric these beams must be analyzed, processed and refined for further modeling in computer-based treatment planning (RTPS). Of professionalism of this process will depend on the accuracy and precision of the calculations the prescribed doses. This paper aims to demonstrate availability clinical linear accelerator system-RTPS with late radiotherapy treatments shaped beam of photons and electrons. (author)

  20. Radiotherapy

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  1. TLD Intercomparison in accelerators for radiotherapy in three Latin american countries

    In Radiotherapy one of the objectives is to establish and to give follow up to quality assurance programs which make sure that the doses administered to the patients with cancer are a high probability of a success in external radiation. Likewise, one of the present preoccupations of the United Nations Agencies as well as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Pan-American Health Organization is the optimal employment of the radiations in the treatment of cancer patients since the administered dose in Radiotherapy suffers considerable variations by the lack of quality assurance programs. The use of Electron linear accelerators requires a program of quality assurance that includes expert personnel, equipment and adequate facilities. The more used methodology for the dosimetry calibration and characterization of X-ray beams and high energy electrons for radiotherapy use is using a ionization chamber dosemeter calibrated in a regional secondary standardization laboratory. However, to establish and give follow up to the quality assurance programs it is necessary the dosimetric intercomparison through TLD. In this study it was designed plastic phantoms with TLD crystals and it was made its characterization to realize an absorbed dose analysis in the crystals exposed at X-ray beams 6 MV and high energy electrons 10 and 12 MeV to standardize the dosimetric procedures and proceeding to realize an International Pilot intercomparison of absorbed doses in TLD crystals in three Latin American countries: Mexico, Peru and Colombia with the participation of accelerators of five different institutions. The found results show that the majority of the measured doses with TLD in the different accelerators were in the 0.95-1.05 range though it had two cases outside of this range. The use of the phantoms with TLD crystals shows that they are of excellent aid to make analysis of the doses administered to the patients and an intercomparison of results to standardize procedures at

  2. Predictors for Clinical Outcomes After Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Purpose: To correlate the treatment planning parameters with the clinical outcomes in patients treated with accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 105 patients with Stage I breast cancer were treated between February 2004 and March 2007 in a Phase II prospective trial and had detailed information available on the planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral breast volume (IBV), PTV/IBV ratio, lung volume, chest wall volume, surgery to radiotherapy interval, follow-up interval, breast pain, and cosmesis. The first 7 of these patients were treated to 34 Gy, and the remaining 98 were treated to 38.5 Gy. All patients were treated twice daily for 5 consecutive days. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months. No recurrences or deaths were observed. Of the 105 patients, 30 reported mild or moderate breast pain in their most recently recorded follow-up visit. The irradiated lung volume (p 35 Gy (p 35 Gy) and to lung correlated with reports of mild pain after accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Also, the PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, was predictive of post-treatment reports of pain.

  3. Toshiba's accelerator technology and approach toward higher performance and downsizing for heavy-ion radiotherapy

    Toshiba has developed various systems and components for particle beam accelerators, and delivered a number of accelerator systems including for SPring-8, which is the world's largest-class synchrotron radiation facility, as well as for the Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Facility (provisional name). Combining our proprietary technologies cultivated through our experience in the development of particle beam accelerators, we are promoting the development of an accelerator for heavy-ion radiotherapy. Toward the higher performance and downsizing of its accelerator, we are also focusing on the research and development of both an ion source applying laser beam technologies, and a superconducting deflecting magnet for accelerators. (author)

  4. Visual Outcome in Meningiomas Around Anterior Visual Pathways Treated With Linear Accelerator Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Purpose: Meningiomas threatening the anterior visual pathways (AVPs) and not amenable for surgery are currently treated with multisession stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiotherapy is available with a number of devices. The most ubiquitous include the gamma knife, CyberKnife, tomotherapy, and isocentric linear accelerator systems. The purpose of our study was to describe a case series of AVP meningiomas treated with linear accelerator fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) using the multiple, noncoplanar, dynamic conformal rotation paradigm and to compare the success and complication rates with those reported for other techniques. Patients and Methods: We included all patients with AVP meningiomas followed up at our neuro-ophthalmology unit for a minimum of 12 months after FSRT. We compared the details of the neuro-ophthalmologic examinations and tumor size before and after FSRT and at the end of follow-up. Results: Of 87 patients with AVP meningiomas, 17 had been referred for FSRT. Of the 17 patients, 16 completed >12 months of follow-up (mean 39). Of the 16 patients, 11 had undergone surgery before FSRT and 5 had undergone FSRT as first-line management. Tumor control was achieved in 14 of the 16 patients, with three meningiomas shrinking in size after RT. Two meningiomas progressed, one in an area that was outside the radiation field. The visual function had improved in 6 or stabilized in 8 of the 16 patients (88%) and worsened in 2 (12%). Conclusions: Linear accelerator fractionated RT using the multiple noncoplanar dynamic rotation conformal paradigm can be offered to patients with meningiomas that threaten the anterior visual pathways as an adjunct to surgery or as first-line treatment, with results comparable to those reported for other stereotactic RT techniques.

  5. Visual Outcome in Meningiomas Around Anterior Visual Pathways Treated With Linear Accelerator Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas, E-mail: kalishhadas@gmail.com [Neuro-Ophthalmology Unit, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva (Israel); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Reich, Ehud [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Department of Ophthalmology, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva (Israel); Gal, Lior [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Rappaport, Zvi Harry [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Department of Neurosurgery, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva (Israel); Nissim, Ouzi [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Stereotactic Radiosurgery Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Neurosurgery, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Pfeffer, Raphael [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Stereotactic Radiosurgery Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Spiegelmann, Roberto [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Stereotactic Radiosurgery Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Neurosurgery, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Meningiomas threatening the anterior visual pathways (AVPs) and not amenable for surgery are currently treated with multisession stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiotherapy is available with a number of devices. The most ubiquitous include the gamma knife, CyberKnife, tomotherapy, and isocentric linear accelerator systems. The purpose of our study was to describe a case series of AVP meningiomas treated with linear accelerator fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) using the multiple, noncoplanar, dynamic conformal rotation paradigm and to compare the success and complication rates with those reported for other techniques. Patients and Methods: We included all patients with AVP meningiomas followed up at our neuro-ophthalmology unit for a minimum of 12 months after FSRT. We compared the details of the neuro-ophthalmologic examinations and tumor size before and after FSRT and at the end of follow-up. Results: Of 87 patients with AVP meningiomas, 17 had been referred for FSRT. Of the 17 patients, 16 completed >12 months of follow-up (mean 39). Of the 16 patients, 11 had undergone surgery before FSRT and 5 had undergone FSRT as first-line management. Tumor control was achieved in 14 of the 16 patients, with three meningiomas shrinking in size after RT. Two meningiomas progressed, one in an area that was outside the radiation field. The visual function had improved in 6 or stabilized in 8 of the 16 patients (88%) and worsened in 2 (12%). Conclusions: Linear accelerator fractionated RT using the multiple noncoplanar dynamic rotation conformal paradigm can be offered to patients with meningiomas that threaten the anterior visual pathways as an adjunct to surgery or as first-line treatment, with results comparable to those reported for other stereotactic RT techniques.

  6. A real time scintillating fiber dosimeter for gamma and neutron monitoring on radiotherapy accelerators

    Bartesaghi, G. [INFN Sez. di Milano and Universita dell' Insubria, Como (Italy)]. E-mail: giacomobartesaghi@libero.it; Conti, V. [INFN Sez. di Milano and Universita dell' Insubria, Como (Italy); Prest, M. [INFN Sez. di Milano and Universita dell' Insubria, Como (Italy); Mascagna, V. [Universita dell' Insubria, Como (Italy); Scazzi, S. [Universita dell' Insubria, Como (Italy); Cappelletti, P. [Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Frigerio, M. [Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Gelosa, S. [Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Monti, A. [Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Ostinelli, A. [Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Mozzanica, A. [INFN Sez. di Pavia and Universita di Brescia (Italy); Bevilacqua, R. [Universita di Trieste and INFN sez. di Trieste (Italy); Giannini, G. [Universita di Trieste and INFN sez. di Trieste (Italy); Totaro, P. [Universita di Trieste and INFN sez. di Trieste (Italy); Vallazza, E. [INFN Sez. di Trieste (Italy)

    2007-03-01

    The quality of the radiotherapic treatment depends strongly on the capability to measure the dose released in the treated volume and the one absorbed by the surrounding volumes, which is mainly due to the scattered radiation produced by the primary beam interaction with the accelerator collimating system. Radiotherapy linear accelerators produce electron (6-20MeV) and photon (6, 18MV) irradiating fields up to 40x40cm{sup 2}. Photons with energies greater than 8MeV generate neutrons via photoproduction which are being studied for possible BNCT applications. We have developed a prototype of a real time dosimeter with 1mm diameter scintillating and clear fibers readout by multianode photomultipliers. For neutron applications, the fibers have been coupled with boron loaded scintillator. We will describe the dosimeter and the results of the tests comparing them to the ones obtained with the standard dosimeters.

  7. Vertical mammaplasty associated with accelerated partial breast radiotherapy: how oncoplastic surgery techniques associated with modern techniques of radiotherapy can improve the aesthetic outcome in selected patients

    Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world, being the most common among women, responsible for 22% of new cases each year. It's surgical and radiation treatment evolved from radical procedures (Halsted radical mastectomy and total external breast radiotherapy) to less radical and more conservative procedures. With the use of modern oncoplastic surgery techniques and accelerated partial breast radiotherapy, selected patients can benefit with better aesthetic results, fewer side effects, and more comfortable and brief treatments. (author)

  8. Vertical mammaplasty associated with accelerated partial breast radiotherapy: how oncoplastic surgery techniques associated with modern techniques of radiotherapy can improve the aesthetic outcome in selected patients

    Couto, Henrique Lima, E-mail: enriquecouto@hotmail.com [Santa Fe Women' s and Maternity Hospital, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Amorim, Washington Cancado; Guimaraes, Rodrigo [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital Geral; Ramires, Leandro Cruz; Castilho, Marcus Simoes [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina; Dominguez, Lorena Lima Coto [Universidade Estacio de Sa (UNESA), Rio de Janeiro, EJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world, being the most common among women, responsible for 22% of new cases each year. It's surgical and radiation treatment evolved from radical procedures (Halsted radical mastectomy and total external breast radiotherapy) to less radical and more conservative procedures. With the use of modern oncoplastic surgery techniques and accelerated partial breast radiotherapy, selected patients can benefit with better aesthetic results, fewer side effects, and more comfortable and brief treatments. (author)

  9. Prostate stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy using a standard linear accelerator: Toxicity, biochemical, and pathological outcomes

    Background and purpose: Biological dose escalation through stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) holds promise of improved patient convenience, system capacity and tumor control with decreased cost and side effects. The objectives are to report the toxicities, biochemical and pathologic outcomes of this prospective study. Materials and methods: A phase I/II study was performed where low risk localized prostate cancer received SABR 35 Gy in 5 fractions, once weekly on standard linear accelerators. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scores were used to assess acute and late toxicities, respectively. Biochemical control (BC) was defined by the Phoenix definition. Results: As of May 2012, 84 patients have completed treatment with a median follow-up of 55 months (range 13–68 months). Median age was 67 years and median PSA was 5.3 ng/ml. The following toxicities were observed: acute grade 3+: 0% gastrointestinal (GI), 1% genitourinary (GU), 0% fatigue; late grade 3+: 1% GI, 1% GU. Ninety-six percent were biopsy negative post-treatment. The 5-year BC was 98%. Conclusions: This novel technique employing standard linear accelerators to deliver an extreme hypofractionated schedule of radiotherapy is feasible, well tolerated and shows excellent pathologic and biochemical control

  10. Clinical application of AcMAR (accelerated multiple-arc radiotherapy) for head and neck tumors. Results of a randomized, two-dose study in Kitami Red-Cross General Hospital

    Enhanced acute mucositis is the limiting factor for accelerated, hyperfractionated radiotherapy in head and neck (H and N) squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). We have developed a simple, new form of conformal radiotherapy, accelerated multiple arc radiotherapy (AcMAR), which covers the target volume by combined, segmental, and rotational arc fields. Two to three rotational fields were placed with CT guidance, each covering the primary tumor and lymph nodes separately. The optimal inter-isocenter distance was determined by 3D dose calculation. The surface area of oro-pharyngeal mucosa irradiated by more than a 50% dose by this method was reduced by 37-73% compared to that with a conventional parallel opposing technic. Dose searching, randomized two-dose study was initiated in Kitami Red-cross General Hospital (KRCGH) in January 1995, and 101 patients were registered and completed AcMAR in Oct 2000. All the patients were followed for up to 96 months (24-96 mo, median 48 mo) at the time of analysis. Fifty-one out of 101 patients were Stage III (17) and IV (34). Primary site of tumors were; 38 larynx, 25 oropharynx, 15 hypopharynx, 13 oral cavity, and 10 other miscellaneous sites. Patients were randomly allocated either to 60 Gy/24 fr/bid/3 wks to gross tumor volume (GTV) (Group A), or 66 Gy/33 fr/bid/4 wks to GTV (Group B). Forty Gy/16 fr/bid/2 wks was given to the volume of prophylactic'' irradiation in both groups of patients. Results were as follows: All the patients, except for one, completed AcMAR without treatment interruption. Acute mucositis at the site of high-dose irradiation was intense; 72% of Group A and 62.5% of Group B experienced World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 3 (confluent) mucositis focally. Fifty-one out of 53 in Group A and 48/48 in Group B, however, could maintain oral food intake (WHO Grade 1 or 2) even at the peak of their mucositis, because of the limited area of severe mucositis. With regard to late morbidity, however, 6/46 (followed >24 mo

  11. ACUTE TOXICITY PROFILE AND COMPLIANCE TO ACCELERATED RADIOTHERAPY PLUS CARBOGEN AND NICOTINAMIDE FOR CLINICAL STAGE T2-4 LARYNGEAL CANCER : RESULTS OF A PHASE III RANDOMIZED TRIAL

    Janssens, Geert O.; Terhaard, Chris H.; Doornaert, Patricia A.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; van den Ende, Piet; Chin, Alim; Pop, Lucas A.; Kaanders, Johannes H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with

  12. Acute toxicity profile and compliance to accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancer: results of a phase III randomized trial.

    Janssens, G.O.R.J.; Terhaard, C.H.J.; Doornaert, P.A.; Bijl, H.P.; Ende, P. van den; Chin, A.; Pop, L.A.M.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with

  13. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P. [IRCC, Candiolo (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was < 10 mm in 33 patients (53%) and > 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long

  14. Accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy for inflammatory breast carcinoma: complete response predicts outcome and allows for breast conservation

    Purpose: Chemotherapy and accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy were prospectively applied for inflammatory breast carcinoma with the intent of breast conservation. The efficacy, failure patterns, and patient tolerance utilizing this approach were analyzed. Methods and Materials: Between 1983 and 1996, 52 patients with inflammatory breast carcinoma presented to the Medical College of Virginia Hospitals of VCU and the New England Medical Center. Thirty-eight of these patients were jointly evaluated in multidisciplinary breast clinics and managed according to a defined prospectively applied treatment policy. Patients received induction chemotherapy, accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy, selected use of mastectomy, and concluded with additional chemotherapy. The majority were treated with 1.5 Gy twice daily to field arrangements covering the entire breast and regional lymphatics. An additional 18-21 Gy was then delivered to the breast and clinically involved nodal regions. Total dose to clinically involved areas was 63-66 Gy. Following chemoradiotherapy, patients were evaluated with physical examination, mammogram, and fine needle aspiration x 3. Mastectomy was reserved for those patients with evidence of persistent or progressive disease in the involved breast. All patients received additional chemotherapy. Results: Median age was 51 years. Median follow-up was 23.9 months (6-86) months. The breast preservation rate at the time of last follow-up was 74%. The treated breast or chest wall as the first site of failure occurred in only 13%, and the ultimate local control rate with the selected use of mastectomy was 74%. Ten patients underwent mastectomy, 2 of which had pathologically negative specimens despite a clinically palpable residual mass. Response to chemotherapy was predictive of treatment outcome. Of the 15 patients achieving a complete response, 87% remain locoregionally controlled without the use of mastectomy. Five-year overall survival for

  15. Correlation between egfr expression and accelerated proliferation during radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Pedicini Piernicola

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To investigate the correlation between the expression of Epidermal Growth Factor receptor (EGFr and the reduction of the effective doubling time (TD during radiotherapy treatment and also to determine the dose per fraction to be taken into account when the overall treatment time (OTT is reduced in accelerated radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Methods A survey of the published papers comparing 3-years of local regional control rate (LCR for a total of 2162 patients treated with conventional and accelerated radiotherapy and with a pretreatment assessment of EGFr expression, was made. Different values of TD were obtained by a model incorporating the overall time corrected biologically effective dose (BED and a 3-year clinical LCR for high and low EGFr groups of patients (HEGFr and LEGFr, respectively. By obtaining the TD from the above analysis and the sub-sites’ potential doubling time (Tpot from flow cytometry and immunohistochemical methods, we were able to estimate the average TD for each sub-site included in the analysis. Moreover, the dose that would be required to offset the modified proliferation occurring in one day (Dprolif, was estimated. Results The averages of TD were 77 (27-9095% days in LEGFr and 8.8 (7.3-11.095% days in HEGFr, if an onset of accelerated proliferation TK at day 21 was assumed. The correspondent HEGFr sub-sites’ TD were 5.9 (6.6, 5.9 (6.6, 4.6 (6.1, 14.3 (12.9 days, with respect to literature immunohistochemical (flow cytometry data of Tpot for Oral-Cavity, Oro-pharynx, Hypo-pharynx, and Larynx respectively. The Dprolif for the HEGFr groups were 0.33 (0.29, 0.33 (0.29, 0.42 (0.31, 0.14 (0.15 Gy/day if α = 0.3 Gy-1 and α/β = 10 Gy were assumed. Conclusions A higher expression of the EGFr leads to enhanced proliferation. This study allowed to quantify the extent of the effect which EGFr expression has in terms of reduced TD and Dprolif for each head and neck

  16. Correlation between egfr expression and accelerated proliferation during radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    To investigate the correlation between the expression of Epidermal Growth Factor receptor (EGFr) and the reduction of the effective doubling time (TD) during radiotherapy treatment and also to determine the dose per fraction to be taken into account when the overall treatment time (OTT) is reduced in accelerated radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). A survey of the published papers comparing 3-years of local regional control rate (LCR) for a total of 2162 patients treated with conventional and accelerated radiotherapy and with a pretreatment assessment of EGFr expression, was made. Different values of TD were obtained by a model incorporating the overall time corrected biologically effective dose (BED) and a 3-year clinical LCR for high and low EGFr groups of patients (HEGFr and LEGFr), respectively. By obtaining the TD from the above analysis and the sub-sites’ potential doubling time (Tpot) from flow cytometry and immunohistochemical methods, we were able to estimate the average TD for each sub-site included in the analysis. Moreover, the dose that would be required to offset the modified proliferation occurring in one day (Dprolif), was estimated. The averages of TD were 77 (27-90)95% days in LEGFr and 8.8 (7.3-11.0)95% days in HEGFr, if an onset of accelerated proliferation TK at day 21 was assumed. The correspondent HEGFr sub-sites’ TD were 5.9 (6.6), 5.9 (6.6), 4.6 (6.1), 14.3 (12.9) days, with respect to literature immunohistochemical (flow cytometry) data of Tpot for Oral-Cavity, Oro-pharynx, Hypo-pharynx, and Larynx respectively. The Dprolif for the HEGFr groups were 0.33 (0.29), 0.33 (0.29), 0.42 (0.31), 0.14 (0.15) Gy/day if α = 0.3 Gy-1 and α/β = 10 Gy were assumed. A higher expression of the EGFr leads to enhanced proliferation. This study allowed to quantify the extent of the effect which EGFr expression has in terms of reduced TD and Dprolif for each head and neck sub-site

  17. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long-term results are needed to assess

  18. Protocol for the isotoxic intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a feasibility study

    Haslett, Kate; Franks, Kevin; Harden, Susan; Hatton, Matthew; McDonald, Fiona; Ashcroft, Linda; Falk, Sally; Groom, Nicki; Harris, Catherine; McCloskey, Paula; Whitehurst, Philip; Bayman, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The majority of stage III patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy, the non-surgical gold standard of care. As the alternative treatment options of sequential chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone are associated with high local failure rates, various intensification strategies have been employed. There is evidence to suggest that altered fractionation using hyperfractionation, acceleration, dose escalation, and individualisation may be of benefit. The MAASTRO group have pioneered the concept of ‘isotoxic’ radiotherapy allowing for individualised dose escalation using hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy based on predefined normal tissue constraints. This study aims to evaluate whether delivering isotoxic radiotherapy using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is achievable. Methods and analysis Isotoxic IMRT is a multicentre feasibility study. From June 2014, a total of 35 patients from 7 UK centres, with a proven histological or cytological diagnosis of inoperable NSCLC, unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy will be recruited. A minimum of 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy is mandated before starting isotoxic radiotherapy. The dose of radiation will be increased until one or more of the organs at risk tolerance or the maximum dose of 79.2 Gy is reached. The primary end point is feasibility, with accrual rates, local control and overall survival our secondary end points. Patients will be followed up for 5 years. Ethics and dissemination The study has received ethical approval (REC reference: 13/NW/0480) from the National Research Ethics Service (NRES) Committee North West—Greater Manchester South. The trial is conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical Practice (GCP). The trial results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented internationally. Trial registration number NCT01836692; Pre-results. PMID:27084277

  19. Quality of life in patients with oropharynx carcinomas: assessment after accelerated radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy versus radical surgery and postoperative radiotherapy

    Allal, Abdelkarim Said; Nicoucar, Kevin; Mach, Nicolas; Dulguerov, Pavel

    2003-01-01

    In oropharyngeal carcinomas, it is assumed that the effectiveness of the different treatment approaches is roughly equivalent, whereas the functional outcome after radical radiotherapy (RT) is superior to that associated with primary surgery. The aim of this study is to assess quality of life (QoL) outcomes of patients after two treatment strategies: radical surgery with postoperative RT and accelerated concomitant boost RT with or without chemotherapy.

  20. Radiotherapy

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  1. Effectiveness of custom neutron shielding in the maze of radiotherapy accelerators

    An investigation was performed to examine the neutron dose equivalent in a radiotherapy maze lined with a customised neutron shielding material. The accelerator investigated was a Varian Clinac 2100C/D using 18 MV photons, and the neutron shielding utilised at this centre was PremadexTM commercially available neutron shielding. Based on Monte Carlo simulations, properly installed customised neutron shielding may reduce the neutron dose equivalent by up to a factor of 8 outside the maze, depending upon the installation. In addition, it was determined that the neutron dose near the entrance to the maze may be reduced by approximately 40% by using customised neutron shielding in the maze, as compared with a facility not using this shielding. This would have a positive dose-saving effect in doorless maze designs. (author)

  2. Challenges in Linear Accelerator Radiotherapy for Chordomas and Chondrosarcomas of the Skull Base: Focus on Complications

    Hauptman, Jason S., E-mail: jhauptman@mednet.ucla.edu [Division of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Barkhoudarian, Garni; Safaee, Michael; Gorgulho, Alessandra [Division of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tenn, Steven; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Selch, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); De Salles, Antonio A.F. [Division of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Intracranial chordomas and chondrosarcomas are histologically low-grade, locally invasive tumors that infiltrate the skull base. Currently, consensus therapy includes surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy. Radiation delivery is typically limited by the proximity of these tumors to critical skull base structures. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 cases of chordomas and 2 cases of chondroid chondrosarcomas of the skull based treated with linear accelerator stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT, n = 10) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, n = 5). The average time to the most recent follow-up visit was 4.5 years. The tumor characteristics, treatment details, and outcomes were recorded. Each radiation plan was reviewed, and the dosage received by the brainstem, optic apparatus, and pituitary was calculated. Results: Of the 10 patients treated with SRT, 6 were found to have unchanged or decreased tumor size as determined from radiographic follow-up. Of the 5 patients treated with SRS, 3 were found to have stable or unchanged tumors at follow-up. The complications included 1 SRT patient who developed endocrinopathy, 2 patients (1 treated with SRS and the other with SRT), who developed cranial neuropathy, and 1 SRS patient who developed visual deficits. Additionally, 1 patient who received both SRS and SRT within 2 years for recurrence experienced transient medial temporal lobe radiation changes that resolved. Conclusions: Where proton beam therapy is unavailable, linear accelerator-based SRT or radiosurgery remains a safe option for adjuvant therapy of chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base. The exposure of the optic apparatus, pituitary stalk, and brainstem must be considered during planning to minimize complications. If the optic apparatus is included in the 80% isodose line, it might be best to fractionate therapy. Exposure of the pituitary stalk should be kept to <30 Gy to minimize endocrine dysfunction. Brainstem exposure should be

  3. Challenges in Linear Accelerator Radiotherapy for Chordomas and Chondrosarcomas of the Skull Base: Focus on Complications

    Purpose: Intracranial chordomas and chondrosarcomas are histologically low-grade, locally invasive tumors that infiltrate the skull base. Currently, consensus therapy includes surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy. Radiation delivery is typically limited by the proximity of these tumors to critical skull base structures. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 cases of chordomas and 2 cases of chondroid chondrosarcomas of the skull based treated with linear accelerator stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT, n = 10) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, n = 5). The average time to the most recent follow-up visit was 4.5 years. The tumor characteristics, treatment details, and outcomes were recorded. Each radiation plan was reviewed, and the dosage received by the brainstem, optic apparatus, and pituitary was calculated. Results: Of the 10 patients treated with SRT, 6 were found to have unchanged or decreased tumor size as determined from radiographic follow-up. Of the 5 patients treated with SRS, 3 were found to have stable or unchanged tumors at follow-up. The complications included 1 SRT patient who developed endocrinopathy, 2 patients (1 treated with SRS and the other with SRT), who developed cranial neuropathy, and 1 SRS patient who developed visual deficits. Additionally, 1 patient who received both SRS and SRT within 2 years for recurrence experienced transient medial temporal lobe radiation changes that resolved. Conclusions: Where proton beam therapy is unavailable, linear accelerator-based SRT or radiosurgery remains a safe option for adjuvant therapy of chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base. The exposure of the optic apparatus, pituitary stalk, and brainstem must be considered during planning to minimize complications. If the optic apparatus is included in the 80% isodose line, it might be best to fractionate therapy. Exposure of the pituitary stalk should be kept to <30 Gy to minimize endocrine dysfunction. Brainstem exposure should be

  4. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  5. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    Ciervide, Raquel [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Dhage, Shubhada; Guth, Amber; Shapiro, Richard L.; Axelrod, Deborah M.; Roses, Daniel F. [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  6. Procedure to measure the neutrons spectrum around a lineal accelerator for radiotherapy

    An experimental procedure was developed, by means of Bonner spheres, to measure the neutrons spectrum around Linacs of medical use that only requires of a single shot of the accelerator; to this procedure we denominate Planetary or Isocentric method. One of the problems associated to the neutrons spectrum measurement in a radiotherapy room with lineal accelerator is because inside the room a mixed, intense and pulsed radiation field takes place affecting the detection systems based on active detector; this situation is solved using a passive detector. In the case of the Bonner spheres spectrometer the active detector has been substituted by activation detectors, trace detectors or thermoluminescent dosimeters. This spectrometer uses several spheres that are situated one at a time in the measurement point, this way to have the complete measurements group the accelerator should be operated, under the same conditions, so many times like spheres have the spectrometer, this activity can consume a long time and in occasions due to the work load of Linac to complicate the measurement process too. The procedure developed in this work consisted on to situate all the spectrometer spheres at the same time and to make the reading by means of a single shot, to be able to apply this procedure, is necessary that before the measurements two characteristics are evaluated: the cross-talking of the spheres and the symmetry conditions of the neutron field. This method has been applied to determine the photo-neutrons spectrum produced by a lineal accelerator of medical use Varian ix of 15 MV to 100 cm of the isocenter located to 5 cm of depth of a solid water mannequin of 30 x 30 x 15 cm. The spectrum was used to determine the total flow and the environmental dose equivalent. (Author)

  7. Radiotherapy

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  8. Hyperfractionated stereotactic reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancer

    Cvek, Jakub; Knybel, Lukas; Skacelikova, Eva; Otahal, Bretislav; Molenda, Lukas; Feltl, David [University Hospital Ostrava, Department of Oncology, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Stransky, Jiri; Res, Oldrich [University Hospital Ostrava, Department of Maxilofacial Surgery, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Matousek, Petr; Zelenik, Karol [University Hospital Ostrava, Department of Otolaryngology, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-01-15

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of hyperfractionated stereotactic reirradiation (re-RT) as a treatment for inoperable, recurrent, or second primary head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) that is not suitable for systemic treatment. Forty patients with recurrent or second primary HNSCC were included in this study. The patients had a median gross tumor volume of 76 ml (range 14-193 ml) and a previous radiotherapy dose greater than 60 Gy. Treatment was designed to cover 95 % of the planning target volume (PTV, defined as gross tumor volume [GTV] + 3 mm to account for microscopic spreading, with no additional set-up margin) with the prescribed dose (48 Gy in 16 fractions b.i.d.). Treatment was administered twice daily with a minimum 6 h gap. Uninvolved lymph nodes were not irradiated. Treatment was completed as planned for all patients (with median duration of 11 days, range 9-14 days). Acute toxicity was evaluated using the RTOG/EORTC scale. A 37 % incidence of grade 3 mucositis was observed, with recovery time of ≤ 4 weeks for all of these patients. Acute skin toxicity was never observed to be higher than grade 2. Late toxicity was also evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. Mandible radionecrosis was seen in 4 cases (10 %); however, neither carotid blowout syndrome nor other grade 4 late toxicity occurred. One-year overall survival (OS) and local progression-free survival (L-PFS) were found to be 33 and 44 %, respectively. Performance status and GTV proved to be significant prognostic factors regarding local control and survival. Hyperfractionated stereotactic re-RT is a reasonable treatment option for patients with recurrent/second primary HNSCC who were previously exposed to high-dose irradiation and who are not candidates for systemic treatment or hypofractionation. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war es, die Effektivitaet und Toxizitaet der hyperfraktionierten akzelerierten stereotaktischen Wiederbestrahlung (re

  9. Can pure accelerated radiotherapy given as six fractions weekly be an option in locally advanced carcinoma cervix: Results of a prospective randomized phase III trial

    Mukesh Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Accelerated radiotherapy given as six fractions per week is an effective alternative to concomitant chemoradiation in locally advanced carcinoma cervix and has shown lesser toxicities in our study.

  10. Retrospective study on therapy options of brain metastases surgery versus stereotactic radiotherapy with the linear accelerator

    Fortunati, M K S

    2001-01-01

    Background: in the therapy of brain metastases there has been a great progress in the last years. It was shown, that more aggressive therapies can not only extend the survival of the patients, but also improve quality of life. The major question of this study was, whether surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy with the linear accelerator show better results in behalf of the survival. Beside this major question many parameters regarding the patient or his primary cancer were examined. Methods: from the 1st of January 1995 until the 30th of June 2000 233 patients with one or more brain metastases have been treated in the Wagner Jauregg Landesnervenkrankenhaus Oberoesterreich (WJ LNKH OeO). The LINAC has been established on the 1st of July 1997. The patients have been distributed in three groups: 1. LINAC-group: 81 patients have been treated from the 1st of July 1997 until the 30th of June 2000 with the LINAC. 2. Surgery-group: 81 patients have been operated from the 1st of July 1997 until the 30th June 2000. 3 Co...

  11. Determining optimization of the initial parameters in Monte Carlo simulation for linear accelerator radiotherapy

    Chang, Kwo-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Shiau, An-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is a well known calculation algorithm which can accurately assess the dose distribution for radiotherapy. The present study investigated all the possible regions of the depth-dose or lateral profiles which may affect the fitting of the initial parameters (mean energy and the radial intensity (full width at half maximum, FWHM) of the incident electron). EGSnrc-based BEAMnrc codes were used to generate the phase space files (SSD=100 cm, FS=40×40 cm2) for the linac (linear accelerator, Varian 21EX, 6 MV photon mode) and EGSnrc-based DOSXYZnrc code was used to calculate the dose in the region of interest. Interpolation of depth dose curves of pre-set energies was proposed as a preliminary step for optimal energy fit. A good approach for determination of the optimal mean energy is the difference comparison of the PDD curves excluding buildup region, and using D(10) as a normalization method. For FWHM fitting, due to electron disequilibrium and the larger statistical uncertainty, using horn or/and penumbra regions will give inconsistent outcomes at various depths. Difference comparisons should be performed in the flat regions of the off-axis dose profiles at various depths to optimize the FWHM parameter.

  12. Radiobiological characterization of different energy-photon beams used in radiotherapy from linear accelerator

    The main objective of this study was to perform a radiobiological characterization of different energy photon beams (6 MV and 15 MV) from linear accelerator used in radiotherapy, and comparison of different treatment modalities, with special regard to late effects of radiation. Using two end points, cell survival and micronucleus induction, in the biological system (Chines hamster V79 cell line). Chromosomes number was counted and found to be 22 chromosomes per cell. Cells were kept in confluent growth for two days and then exposed to two photon beams and immediately after irradiation were counted and re seeded in different numbered for each dose. For evaluation of surviving fraction samples were incubated at 37oC for 6 days, five samples were counted for each dose. At the same time three samples were seeded for the micronuclei frequency and incubated at 37oC after 24 hours cytochalasin-B was added to block cells in cytokinesis. The survival curve showed similar curves for the two beams and decreased with dose. The micronuclei frequency was positively correlated with dose and the energy of the photon. This indicates the presence of low dose of photoneutrons produced by using high energy photon beams. (Author)

  13. Hypofractionated and Accelerated Radiotherapy With Subcutaneous Amifostine Cytoprotection as Short Adjuvant Regimen After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Interim Report

    Purpose: Short radiotherapy schedules might be more convenient for patients and overloaded radiotherapy departments, provided late toxicity is not increased. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated and highly accelerated radiotherapy regimen supported with cytoprotection provided by amifostine in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 92 patients received 12 consecutive fractions of radiotherapy (3.5 Gy/fraction for 10 fractions) to the breast and/or axillary/supraclavicular area and 4 Gy/fraction for 2 fractions to the tumor bed). Amifostine at a dose of 1,000 mg/d was administered subcutaneously. The follow-up of patients was 30-60 months (median, 39). Results: Using a dose individualization algorithm, 77.1% of patients received 1,000 mg and 16.3% received 750 mg of amifostine daily. Of the 92 patients, 13% interrupted amifostine because of fever/rash symptoms. Acute Grade 2 breast toxicity developed in 6.5% of patients receiving 1,000 mg of amifostine compared with 46.6% of the rest of the patients (p < .0001). The incidence of Grade 2 late sequelae was less frequent in the high amifostine dose group (3.2% vs. 6.6%; p = NS). Grade 1 lung fibrosis was infrequent (3.3%). The in-field relapse rate was 3.3%, and an additional 2.2% of patients developed a relapse in the nonirradiated supraclavicular area. c-erbB-2 overexpression was linked to local control failure (p = .01). Distant metastasis appeared in 13% of patients, and this was marginally related to more advanced T/N stage (p = .06). Conclusion: Within a minimal follow-up of 2.5 years after therapy, hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy with subcutaneous amifostine cytoprotection has proved a well-tolerated and effective regimen. Longer follow-up is required to assess the long-term late sequelae.

  14. Avoidance of treatment interruption: an unrecognized benefit of accelerated radiotherapy in oropharyngeal carcinomas?

    Purpose: To assess the impact of treatment interruption on the potential gain in locoregional control obtained with accelerated radiotherapy (RT) compared with conventionally fractionated RT in patients with oropharyngeal carcinomas. Methods and Materials: 152 patients treated with radical RT for oropharyngeal carcinomas between 1979 and 1996 were retrospectively analyzed. According to the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system, there were 6/30/43/73 stages I/II/III/IV. Sixty-one patients were treated with a conventional RT schedule (median dose 70 Gy in 35 fractions), and 91 patients with either of two 5/5.5-week accelerated RT schedules (median dose 69.6-69.9 Gy in 41 fractions). Discounting weekends, RT was interrupted for 2 consecutive days or more in 53 patients (median duration 11 days, range 2-97), including 67% of the patients in the conventional RT group and 13% in the accelerated RT group. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 55 months (range 23-230). The Cox proportional hazards model was used for the multivariate analysis of factors influencing locoregional control. Results: In univariate analysis, factors associated with a significant decrease in locoregional control included WHO performance status ≥1, advanced AJCC stages (III and IV), conventional RT fractionation, overall treatment time ≥44 days (median), and RT interruption. In the multivariate analysis, when introduced into the model individually, the three significant therapeutic factors remained significant after adjustment for the forced clinical variables. However, when the three therapeutic factors were introduced together into the model, beside the AJCC stage (P = 0.017), only RT interruption remained a significant independent adverse prognostic factor (P = 0.026). Conclusions: This multivariate analysis highlights the potential negative impact of treatment gaps on locoregional control in oropharyngeal carcinomas. This suggests that treatment interruption may be

  15. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study

    Caravatta, Luciana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Padula, Gilbert D.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary' s Health Care, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Ferrandina, Gabriella [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Bonomo, Pierluigi; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Rossi, Marco [Department of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care, and Pain Medicine, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Flocco, Mariano [' Madre Teresa di Calcutta' Hospice, Larino (Italy); Scapati, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, ' San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy); and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

  16. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of ≤3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

  17. Changes in serum and salivary amylase during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer; A comparison of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with CHART

    Leslie, M.D.; Dische, S. (Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom))

    1992-05-01

    The changes in serum amylase that occur when radiotherapy is given in the treatment of head and neck cancer has been studied in 41 patients, 29 treated by CHART and 12 by conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. The peak rise in serum amylase following the start of treatment is seen earlier and is greater in the patients receiving continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART). The serum amylase returns to normal earlier in the CHART patients so that the area under the curve is the same for both groups. The difference probably reflects the more rapid delivery of treatment to the patients receiving CHART. A close correlation between the peak rise in serum amylase and the amount of parotid tissue in the treatment volume is demonstrated. For six patients the total amount of amylase secreted by the parotid gland during CHART was measured and found to decline rapidly within a few days of the start of radiotherapy. The rise in serum amylase that results from the irradiation of salivary tissue provides a unique biochemical measure of an early radiation effect in a normal tissue. This probably reflects the interphase cell death of serous salivary cells. Although these immediate changes are of considerable interest they may not relate to the late effects of radiation on salivary gland function. (author). 13 refs.; 4 figs.

  18. Retrospective study on therapy options of brain metastases: surgery versus stereotactic radiotherapy with the linear accelerator

    Background: in the therapy of brain metastases there has been a great progress in the last years. It was shown, that more aggressive therapies can not only extend the survival of the patients, but also improve quality of life. The major question of this study was, whether surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy with the linear accelerator show better results in behalf of the survival. Beside this major question many parameters regarding the patient or his primary cancer were examined. Methods: from the 1st of January 1995 until the 30th of June 2000 233 patients with one or more brain metastases have been treated in the Wagner Jauregg Landesnervenkrankenhaus Oberoesterreich (WJ LNKH OeO). The LINAC has been established on the 1st of July 1997. The patients have been distributed in three groups: 1. LINAC-group: 81 patients have been treated from the 1st of July 1997 until the 30th of June 2000 with the LINAC. 2. Surgery-group: 81 patients have been operated from the 1st of July 1997 until the 30th June 2000. 3 Control-group: 71 patients have been operated from the 1st of January 1995 until the 30th of June 1997, before the LINAC has been established on the 1st of July 1997. Results: There are shown the mean survival times. Therapy options (0,05): LINAC-group: 377 days. Surgery-group: 195 days. Control-group: 285 days. Primary cancer (0,05): unknown primary: 203 days. Cancer of the colon tract: 218 days. Breast cancer: 314 days. Melanoma: 162 days. Kidney: 466 days. Lung 261 days. Others: 439 days. Metastases in one/in both hemispheres (0,05): in one hemisphere 310 days, in both 184 days. All the other parameters (age, sex, Karnofsky-Index, period between diagnose of the primary and the brain metastases, primary cancer therapy, extra cerebral metastases, number of metastases, localization of metastases supra- or infratentoriell, dose/effect relationship in the LINAC-group, whole brain radiotherapy) showed interesting differences, but the results were not statistically

  19. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the efficacy and toxicity of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (RT) for patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). Twenty-two patients with NPC treated at our hospital between April 1994 and December 2002 were the subjects of this study. They received hyperfractionated RT with a fraction size of 1.2 Gy, with a median tumor dose of 72 Gy (range 64.8-80.4). During this study period, our institutional strategy for locoregionally advanced NPC included neoadjuvant or concurrent chemotherapy combined with hyperfractionated RT, and 17 patients received some forms of cisplatin-containing chemotherapy. With a median follow-up of 59 months, the estimated 5-year disease-free survival rate and overall survival rate were 72.7 and 85.2%, respectively. Acute hematological toxicities were acceptable and manageable. However, >50% of patients required nutritional support, and experienced severe pharyngitis, skin reaction and body weight loss. With regard to late sequelae, one patient developed grade 3 osteomyelitis, and one patient each developed grade 4 passage disturbance and laryngeal edema. No patients experienced any grades of optic nerve injury or temporal lobe necrosis. Hyperfractionated RT using 1.2 Gy per fraction, for a total dose of 72 Gy, produces a comparable treatment outcome. Although deleterious neurological sequelae were not observed in this study, caution should be exercised regarding other late sequelae, such as osteomyelitis and passage disturbance. (author)

  20. Development and Dosimetric Characterization of a Tissue Substitute (Bolus) For Use in Linear Accelerator Electron Radiotherapy

    We propose the design of a new custom made material, to be used as a tissue substitute in external beam electron radiotherapy, based on cotton fabric and beeswax. Due to its inexpensive, easy preparation, constant thickness, flexibility, uniform density and physical properties similar to those of soft tissue, this bolus will insure personalized optimal dose build up and dose distribution in irregular treatment regions. Materials and Methods: We used commercial Campeche beeswax and 100% cotton fabric to prepare the bolus. Beeswax's physical characteristics were determined by thermal and density analysis. Its chemical properties are to be determined by electronic microscopy. We performed quality control tests and calibration of the Varian 2100C linear accelerator. The tissue equivalence of the material is established for a range of electron energies (6, 9, 12, 16, 20 MeV) using a water equivalent solid phantom (PTW; Freiburg, Germany) and a plane parallel ionization chamber (PTW) associated to a PTW electrometer. Results: Beeswax's absolute density was found to be 0.9181g/ml at 21 deg. C, with a melting point of 45 deg. C. For the bolus elaboration, the cotton fabric was soaked in liquid beeswax and thin sheets of approximately 1 mm were obtained. These presented high flexibility, physical stability (color, texture, thickness) and homogeneity. Determination of this dosimetric characteristics and equivalent thickness are still in process. Discussion and conclusions: Our preliminary results suggest that the tissue substitute is easily made, inexpensive to produce, molds well to the treatment area and its positioning is easy and reproducible over the course of the treatment. So we consider that it's a good alternative to the commercial bolus

  1. Output trends, characteristics, and measurements of three megavoltage radiotherapy linear accelerators.

    Hossain, Murshed

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize and understand the long-term behavior of the output from megavoltage radiotherapy linear accelerators. Output trends of nine beams from three linear accelerators over a period of more than three years are reported and analyzed. Output, taken during daily warm-up, forms the basis of this study. The output is measured using devices having ion chambers. These are not calibrated by accredited dosimetry laboratory, but are baseline-compared against monthly output which is measured using calibrated ion chambers. We consider the output from the daily check devices as it is, and sometimes normalized it by the actual output measured during the monthly calibration of the linacs. The data show noisy quasi-periodic behavior. The output variation, if normalized by monthly measured "real' output, is bounded between ± 3%. Beams of different energies from the same linac are correlated with a correlation coefficient as high as 0.97, for one particular linac, and as low as 0.44 for another. These maximum and minimum correlations drop to 0.78 and 0.25 when daily output is normalized by the monthly measurements. These results suggest that the origin of these correlations is both the linacs and the daily output check devices. Beams from different linacs, independent of their energies, have lower correlation coefficient, with a maximum of about 0.50 and a minimum of almost zero. The maximum correlation drops to almost zero if the output is normalized by the monthly measured output. Some scatter plots of pairs of beam output from the same linac show band-like structures. These structures are blurred when the output is normalized by the monthly calibrated output. Fourier decomposition of the quasi-periodic output is consistent with a 1/f power law. The output variation appears to come from a distorted normal distribution with a mean of slightly greater than unity. The quasi-periodic behavior is manifested in the seasonally averaged output

  2. Nelson's syndrome: single centre experience using the linear accelerator (LINAC) for stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Wilson, Peter J; Williams, Janet R; Smee, Robert I

    2014-09-01

    Nelson's syndrome is a unique clinical phenomenon of growth of a pituitary adenoma following bilateral adrenalectomies for the control of Cushing's disease. Primary management is surgical, with limited effective medical therapies available. We report our own institution's series of this pathology managed with radiation: prior to 1990, 12 patients were managed with conventional radiotherapy, and between 1990 and 2007, five patients underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and two patients fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), both using the linear accelerator (LINAC). Tumour control was equivocal, with two of the five SRS patients having a reduction in tumour volume, one patient remaining unchanged, and two patients having an increase in volume. In the FSRT group, one patient had a decrease in tumour volume whilst the other had an increase in volume. Treatment related morbidity was low. Nelson's syndrome is a challenging clinical scenario, with a highly variable response to radiation in our series. PMID:24825407

  3. Changes in serum and salivary amylase during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    The changes in serum amylase that occur when radiotherapy is given in the treatment of head and neck cancer has been studied in 41 patients, 29 treated by CHART and 12 by conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. The peak rise in serum amylase following the start of treatment is seen earlier and is greater in the patients receiving continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART). The serum amylase returns to normal earlier in the CHART patients so that the area under the curve is the same for both groups. The difference probably reflects the more rapid delivery of treatment to the patients receiving CHART. A close correlation between the peak rise in serum amylase and the amount of parotid tissue in the treatment volume is demonstrated. For six patients the total amount of amylase secreted by the parotid gland during CHART was measured and found to decline rapidly within a few days of the start of radiotherapy. The rise in serum amylase that results from the irradiation of salivary tissue provides a unique biochemical measure of an early radiation effect in a normal tissue. This probably reflects the interphase cell death of serous salivary cells. Although these immediate changes are of considerable interest they may not relate to the late effects of radiation on salivary gland function. (author). 13 refs.; 4 figs

  4. Prospective, longitudinal electroglottographic study of voice recovery following accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for T1/T2 larynx cancer

    Background and purpose: To measure voice outcomes following accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for larynx cancer. Materials and methods: Twenty-five patients with T1/T2 glottic cancer underwent serial electroglottographic and acoustic analysis (sustained vowel/i/ and connected speech) before radiotherapy and 1, 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Twenty-five normal subjects served as a reference control population. Results: Pre-treatment measures were significantly worse for larynx cancer patients. Median jitter (0.23% vs 0.97%, p = 0.001) and shimmer (0.62 dB vs 0.98 dB, p = 0.05) and differences in data ranges reflected greater frequency and amplitude perturbation in the larynx cancer patients. Pre-treatment Mean Phonation Time (MPT) was significantly reduced (21 s vs 14.8 s, p = 0.002) in larynx cancer patients. There was a trend towards improvement of jitter, shimmer and normalized noise energy at 12 months post-treatment. MPT improved but remained significantly worse than for normal subjects (21 s vs 16.4 s, p = 0.013). Average fundamental frequency resembled normal subjects, including improvement of the measured range (91.4-244.6 Hz in controls vs 100-201 Hz in post-treatment larynx cancer patients). Conclusions: This non-invasive technique effectively measures post-treatment vocal function in larynx cancer patients. This study demonstrated improvement of many key parameters that influence voice function over 12 months after radiotherapy

  5. Bevacizumab, Capecitabine, Amifostine, and Preoperative Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (HypoArc) for Rectal Cancer: A Phase II Study

    Purpose: Bevacizumab has established therapeutic activity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy enhances the activity of radiotherapy in experimental models. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiochemotherapy combined with bevacizumab in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with radiologic T3 and/or N+ rectal carcinoma were treated with preoperative conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy (3.4 Gy in 10 consecutive fractions) supported with amifostine (500-1,000 mg daily), capecitabine (600 mg/m2 twice daily, 5 days per week), and bevacizumab (5 mg/kg every 2 weeks for 2 cycles). Surgery followed 6 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. A cohort of 14 sequential patients treated with the same regimen without bevacizumab was available for comparison. Results: Grade 2 or 3 diarrhea was noted in 7 of 19 patients (36.8%), which was statistically worse than patients receiving the same regimen without bevacizumab (p = 0.01). A higher incidence of Grade 2 or 3 proctalgia was also noted (21.1%) (p = 0.03). Bladder and skin toxicity was negligible. All toxicities regressed completely within 2 weeks after the end of therapy. Pathologic complete and partial response was noted in 7 of 19 cases (36.8%) and 8 of 19 cases (42.1%). Within a median follow-up of 21 months, none of the patients has had late complications develop and only 1 of 18 evaluable cases (5.5%) has had locoregional relapse. Conclusions: Bevacizumab can be safely combined with hypofractionated radiotherapy and capecitabine as a preoperative radiochemotherapy regimen for patients with rectal cancer. The high pathologic complete response rates urges the testing of bevacizumab in randomized studies.

  6. Effect of external shielding for neutrons during radiotherapy for prostate cancer, considering the 2300 CD linear accelerator and voxel phantom

    Thalhofer, J. L.; Roque, H. S.; Rebello, W. F.; Correa, S. A.; Silva, A. X.; Souza, E. M.; Batita, D. V. S.; Sandrini, E. S.

    2014-02-01

    Photoneutron production occurs when high energy photons, greater than 6.7 MeV, interact with linear accelerator head structures. In Brazil, the National Cancer Institute, one of the centers of reference in cancer treatment, uses radiation at 4 angles (0°, 90°, 180° and 270°) as treatment protocol for prostate cancer. With the objective of minimizing the dose deposited in the patient due to photoneutrons, this study simulated radiotherapy treatment using MCNPX, considering the most realistic environment; simulating the radiotherapy room, the Linac 2300 head, the MAX phantom and the treatment protocol with the accelerator operating at 18 MV. In an attempt to reduce the dose deposited by photoneutrons, an external shielding was added to the Linac 2300. Results show that the equivalent dose due to photoneutrons deposited in the patient diminished. The biggest reduction was seen in bone structures, such as the tibia and fibula, and mandible, at approximately 75%. Besides that, organs such as the brain, pancreas, small intestine, lungs and thyroid revealed a reduction of approximately 60%. It can be concluded that the shielding developed by our research group is efficient in neutron shielding, reducing the dose for the patient, and thus, the risk of secondary cancer, and increasing patient survival rates.

  7. Evolution of Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer – The Sunnybrook Experience

    Hima Bindu Musunuru

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR is a newer method of ultra hypo fractionated radiotherapy that uses combination of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy(IMRT or volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT, to deliver high doses of radiation in a few fractions to a target, at the same time sparing the surrounding organs at risk(OAR.SABR is ideal for treating small volumes of disease and has been introduced in a number of disease sites including brain, lung, liver, spine and prostate. Given the radiobiological advantages of treating prostate cancer with high doses per fraction, SABR is becoming a standard of care for low and intermediate risk prostate cancer patients based upon the results from Sunny Brook and also the US-based prostate SABR consortium. This review examines the development of moderate and ultra hypo fractionation schedules at the Odette Cancer centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences. Moderate hypo fractionation protocol was first developed in 2001 for intermediate risk prostate cancer and from there on different treatment schedules including SABR evolved for all risk groups.

  8. Prospective randomized trial to compare accelerated (six fractions a week radiotherapy against concurrent chemoradiotherapy (using conventional fractionation in locally advanced head and neck cancers

    Manoj Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT is currently considered to be the standard of care in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The optimum radiotherapy schedule for best local control and acceptable toxicity is not yet clear. We aimed at shortening of treatment time by using accelerated radiation, thereby comparing the disease response, loco-regional tumor control and tolerability of accelerated radiation (six fractions per week against CCRT in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods: We conducted the prospective randomized study for a period of 2 years from June 2011 to May 2013 in 133 untreated patients of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck. Study group (66 patients received accelerated radiotherapy with 6 fractions per week (66Gy/33#/5½ weeks. Control group (67 patients received CCRT with 5 fractions per week radiation (66 Gy/33#/6½ weeks along with intravenous cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 weekly. Tumor control, survival, acute and late toxicities were assessed. Results: Median overall treatment time was 38 days and 45 days in the accelerated radiotherapy and concurrent chemoradiation arm, respectively. At a median follow up of 12 months, 41 patients (62.1% in the accelerated radiotherapy arm and 47 patients (70.1% in the CCRT arm were disease free (P = 0.402. Local disease control was comparable in both the arms. Acute toxicities were significantly higher in the CCRT arm as compared with accelerated radiotherapy arm. There was no difference in late toxicities between the two arms. Conclusion: We can achieve, same or near to the same local control, with lower toxicities with accelerated six fractions per week radiation compared with CCRT especially for Indian population.

  9. The Nano-X Linear Accelerator: A Compact and Economical Cancer Radiotherapy System Incorporating Patient Rotation.

    Eslick, Enid M; Keall, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    Rapid technological improvements in radiotherapy delivery results in improved outcomes to patients, yet current commercial systems with these technologies on board are costly. The aim of this study was to develop a state-of-the-art cancer radiotherapy system that is economical and space efficient fitting with current world demands. The Nano-X system is a compact design that is light weight combining a patient rotation system with a vertical 6 MV fixed beam. In this paper, we present the Nano-X system design configuration, an estimate of the system dimensions and its potential impact on shielding cost reductions. We provide an assessment of implementing such a radiotherapy system clinically, its advantages and disadvantages compared to a compact conventional gantry rotating linac. The Nano-X system has several differentiating features from current radiotherapy systems, it is [1] compact and therefore can fit into small vaults, [2] light weight, and [3] engineering efficient, i.e., it rotates a relatively light component and the main treatment delivery components are not under rotation (e.g., DMLCs). All these features can have an impact on reducing the costs of the system. In terms of shielding requirements, leakage radiation was found to be the dominant contributor to the Nano-X vault and as such no primary shielding was necessary. For a low leakage design, the Nano-X vault footprint and concrete volume required is 17 m2 and 35 m3 respectively, compared to 54 m2 and 102 m3 for a conventional compact linac vault, resulting in decreased costs in shielding. Key issues to be investigated in future work are the possible patient comfort concerns associated with the patient rotation system, as well as the magnitude of deformation and subsequent adaptation requirements. PMID:24949649

  10. A randomized study of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy with and without mitomycin C in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Ezzat, M.; Shouman, T.; Zaza, K.;

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This single-institution study evaluates the feasibility of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) with and without mitomycin C (MMC) in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: Between May 1998 and October 2001, sixty patients with locally...... advanced stage III and IV of head and neck cancer were randomized into three treatment arms: (1) conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CF) (5 fractions per week); (2) accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) (6 fractions per week); and (3) AF plus Mitomycin C (MMC). Results: The 2-year overall...... survival (OS) of the whole group was 21%. The OS according to treatment arm was 23%, 20%, and 28% in CF, AF, and AF+MMC arms respectively (p<0.19). The 2-year loco-regional control (LC) rate was 22% for the whole group of patients. The LC was 10%, 25%, and 30% for the CF, AF, and AF+MMC respectively (p=0...

  11. Prevalence and peak incidence of acute and late normal tissue morbidity in the DAHANCA 6&7 randomised trial with accelerated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Mortensen, Hanna R.; Overgaard, Jens; Specht, Lena;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The aim of this report was to describe the incidence and prevalence of acute and late morbidity in the DAHANCA 6&7 multicentre randomised trial with accelerated radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The DAHANCA 6&7 study...

  12. Dosimetric comparison of the linear accelerators at the University Clinic of Radiotherapy and Oncology in Skopje, Macedonia

    In radiotherapy practice, for various practical reasons it is important to know whether two or more linear accelerators (linacs) are dosimetric matched and whether the patient’s treatment can be shifted from one linac to another without reducing the treatment quality. This work presents the data from the dosimetric comparison of the two Varian Clinacs 23EX and one Varian Clinac iX at the University Clinic of Radiotherapy and Oncology in Skopje. Both Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) and Beam Profile (BP) curves were compared for the photon energies (6MV, 15MV) in use at the clinic. The comparison was performed using the IBA OmniPro Accept 7.4™ software. The results from the comparison of the PDD curves showed that in the clinically significant region the dose differences were smaller than 1%. The results from the comparison of the in line and cross line BP curves showed that in the flattened area the dose differences were smaller than 2.5%, while in the penumbra region they were usually between 2% and 8%, but sometimes up to 21%. This suggests that for treatments where the influence of the penumbra region is small, the three linacs may be considered to be dosimetric matched. For treatments where the influence of the penumbra region is greater, the patient can be switched to another machine only after recalculation of the treatment plan. (Author)

  13. Application Monte Carlo code calculates dose distribution of the emitted photon beams from linear accelerator in case radiotherapy lung cancer

    The dose distribution calculation is one of major steps in cancer radiotherapy. This paper applies Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, in simulation 15 MV photon beams from linear accelerator of General Hospital of Kien Giang in a case treatment of lung cancer. The settings for beam direction, field size and isocenter position used in MCNP5 must be the same as in treatment plan at hospital to ensure the results from MCNP5 are accurate. We also built a program CODIM by using MATLAB® programming software. This program is used to construct digital voxel phantoms from lung CT images obtained from cancer treatment cases at Kien Giang hospital and then simulate the delivered dose of linac in these phantoms by using MCNP5 simulation code. The results show that there is a difference of 5% in comparison to Prowess Panther program - a semi-empirical simulation program which is being used for treatment planning in Kien Giang hospital. (author)

  14. Stereotactic radiotherapy of intracranial lesions with micro multi leaf collimator mounted on linear accelerator

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is an advancement on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) which aims not only to conform the therapeutic dose volume to the shape of the tumor, but also ensures low dose to the other normal tissues. As the therapeutic dose volume tightly covers the tumor, small variation between intended plan and executed plan parameters may lead to significant under-dose of tumor or over-dose of normal tissue, which may result in the failure of the treatment. Therefore, SRT should be carried out through a well-laid out systematic procedure in order to achieve its goal. This paper highlights the systematic procedure and comprehensive quality assurance (QA) involved at various steps of intracranial SRT followed in our hospital and our preliminary experience with brain lab stereotactic system. Of the 18 patients treated so far with SRT, we have analyzed the SRT treatment plans for the first 11 brain tumor patients to highlight the volume of tumor covered by the therapeutic dose and integral dose to other normal tissues. The average gross target volume (GTV) and planning target volume (PTV) treated are 14.07 cc, and 43.72 cc, respectively. Out of the 11 patients treated, 100% volume of PTV is covered by 95% isodose volume in 4 patients, 99% of PTV in another 4 patients and 98% of PTV in the remaining 3 patients. But in all the cases, a minimum volume of 96% of the GTV is adequately covered by 100% dose. The conformity index of PTV varies from 1.27 to 1.56, with a mean value of 1.42. As the target volume decreases from 76 cc to 20 cc, the mean dose within the target volume increases from 1.7 Gy to 1.76 Gy. The average volume of normal brain treated with 80%, 50% and 33% dose are 6.53 cc, 73 cc and 298 cc, respectively. Stereotactic radiotherapy with static beams and micro-multileaf collimator (mMLC) shaped fields gives the flexibility to tailor the irregular shaped target volume, thereby ensuring better dose conformity and homogeneous dose

  15. GPU-accelerated automatic identification of robust beam setups for proton and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    We demonstrate acceleration on graphic processing units (GPU) of automatic identification of robust particle therapy beam setups, minimizing negative dosimetric effects of Bragg peak displacement caused by treatment-time patient positioning errors. Our particle therapy research toolkit, RobuR, was extended with OpenCL support and used to implement calculation on GPU of the Port Homogeneity Index, a metric scoring irradiation port robustness through analysis of tissue density patterns prior to dose optimization and computation. Results were benchmarked against an independent native CPU implementation. Numerical results were in agreement between the GPU implementation and native CPU implementation. For 10 skull base cases, the GPU-accelerated implementation was employed to select beam setups for proton and carbon ion treatment plans, which proved to be dosimetrically robust, when recomputed in presence of various simulated positioning errors. From the point of view of performance, average running time on the GPU decreased by at least one order of magnitude compared to the CPU, rendering the GPU-accelerated analysis a feasible step in a clinical treatment planning interactive session. In conclusion, selection of robust particle therapy beam setups can be effectively accelerated on a GPU and become an unintrusive part of the particle therapy treatment planning workflow. Additionally, the speed gain opens new usage scenarios, like interactive analysis manipulation (e.g. constraining of some setup) and re-execution. Finally, through OpenCL portable parallelism, the new implementation is suitable also for CPU-only use, taking advantage of multiple cores, and can potentially exploit types of accelerators other than GPUs.

  16. Determination of radiation levels by neutrons in an accelerator for radiotherapy

    It was determined the radiation levels by neutrons due to photonuclear reactions (γ, n) which occur in the target, levelling filter, collimators and the small pillow blinding of a medical accelerator Varian Clinac 2100C of 18 MeV, using thermoluminescent dosemeters UD-802AS and US-809AS. The experimental values were presented for the patient level, inside and outside of the radiation field, as well as for the small pillow. (Author)

  17. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D conformal radiotherapy: initial clinical experience

    Gatti, M.; Madeddu, A.; Malinverni, G.; Delmastro, E.; Bona, C.; Gabriele, P. [IRCC-Radiotherapy, Candiolo, TO (Italy); Baiotto, B.; Stasi, M. [IRCC-Medical Physics, Candiolo, TO (Italy); Ponzone, R.; Siatis, D. [IRCC-Surgery, Candiolo, TO (Italy)

    2006-11-15

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D-C.R.T. is technically sophisticate but feasible and acute toxicity to date has been minimal. A C.T.V.-to-P.T.V. margin of 10 mm seems to provide coverage for analyzed patients. However, more patients and additional studies will be needed to validate the accuracy of this margin, and longer follow-up will be needed to assess acute and chronic toxicity, tumor control, and cosmetic results. (author)

  18. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy with linear accelerator for uveal melanoma - preliminary Vienna results

    Between June 1997 and February 1998, 21 patients suffering from uveal melanomas have been treated with a sterotactic 6 MeV LINAC (Saturne 43 trademark, General Electric, France) in conjunction with a stereotactic frame system (BrainLAB trademark, Germany). Immobilization of the eye was ensured with an optical fixation system which was proven reliable. During radiotherapy, movements of the irradiated eye were controlled on a monitor and documented by video recording. All patients co-operated very well with the optical fixation system. In 1164 measurements, the median value of horizontal deviation of the diseased eye during treatment was 0.3 mm (range: 0 to 1.3 mm). Median vertical deviation was 0.2 mm (range: 0 to 1.2 mm). For all patients, mean tumor prominence before treatment was 6.0±2.2 mm. In 20 patients, the total dose of 70 Gy (at 80%) was delivered in 5 fractions within 10 days. In one patient with a ciliary body tumor, the total dose of 70 Gy was divided into 7 fractions for better sparing of the anterior eye segment. Results: After a follow-up of at least 6 months, local tumor control was seen in all eyes. Mean tumor thickness reduction after 3, 6 and 9 months was 7%, 13% and 31%, respectively. Up to now, only mild subacute side-effects located in the anterior eye segment have been noticed. (orig.)

  19. Accelerated split-course radiotherapy and concomitant cis-platinum and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy with folinic acid enhancement in unresectable head and neck cancer

    In patients suffering from locally advanced, unresectable squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the base of the tongue, the floor of the mouth, the mobile part of the tongue, the tonsils, the hypopharynx and the larynx radiotherapy yields poor results, due to local failure rather than to distant metastases. Since toxicity of radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy do not overlap entirely efforts were made to achieve better results combining these two treatment modalities. Clinical trials on simultaneous radiotherapy/chemotherapy focussed on two cytotoxic agents: Cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II) (cis-DDP) and 5-flourouracil (5-FU). Another approach to overcome the radioresistance of large SCC adopts accelerated fractionation. The potential tumor doubling time of sqamous cell carcinomas is about four days, and thus repopulation of surviving clonogenic tumor cells during fractionated radiotherapy may be the cause of poor treatment results. In this pilot study a twice daily fractionated split-course radiotherapy is combined with simultaneous administration of cis-DDP and 5-FU with folinic acid (FA) enhancement. (orig.)

  20. Accelerated split-course radiotherapy and concomitant cis-platinum and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy with folinic acid enhancement in unresectable head and neck cancer

    Wendt, T.G.; Wustrow, T.P.U.; Hartenstein, R.C.; Trott, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    In patients suffering from locally advanced, unresectable squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the base of the tongue, the floor of the mouth, the mobile part of the tongue, the tonsils, the hypopharynx and the larynx radiotherapy yields poor results, due to local failure rather than to distant metastases. Since toxicity of radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy do not overlap entirely efforts were made to achieve better results combining these two treatment modalities. Clinical trials on simultaneous radiotherapy/chemotherapy focussed on two cytotoxic agents: Cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II) (cis-DDP) and 5-flourouracil (5-FU). Another approach to overcome the radioresistance of large SCC adopts accelerated fractionation. The potential tumor doubling time of sqamous cell carcinomas is about four days, and thus repopulation of surviving clonogenic tumor cells during fractionated radiotherapy may be the cause of poor treatment results. In this pilot study a twice daily fractionated split-course radiotherapy is combined with simultaneous administration of cis-DDP and 5-FU with folinic acid (FA) enhancement.

  1. Can concomitant-boost accelerated radiotherapy be adopted as routine treatment for head-and-neck cancers? A 10-year single-institution experience

    Allal, Abdelkarim Said; Taussky, Daniel; Mach, Nicolas; Becker, Minerva; Bieri, Sabine; Dulguerov, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    Accelerated schedules are effective in overcoming repopulation during radiotherapy (RT) for head-and-neck cancers, but their feasibility is compromised by increased toxicity. The therapeutic ratio may be particularly favorable for 5-week regimens. This study reports the 10-year experience of a single institution in the routine use of concomitant boost RT as standard radical treatment in all but the most favorable stage patients.

  2. The hyperfractionation in the oropharynx carcinomas treatment: stages III and IV

    From April 1986 until May 1989. 112 patients with stages III and IV oropharynx carcinomas were included in a protocol comparing the use of Hyperfractionation and Conventional Fractionation. The doses were 6600 rad in 33 fractions of 200 rad for the conventional fractionation and 7040 rad in 64 fractions, two fractions of 110 rad per day for the hyperfractionation. As of January 1990 an analysis was performed in 98 patients, with a median follow-up of 14 months. The probability of complete responses in the oropharynx was 74%, with 84% for the hyperfractionation and 64% for the conventional fractionation ( p < 0,05). Survival was improved in 42 months for those patients treated with hyperfractionation: 27% versus 8% (p < 0,05). In patients with lesions out of the base of the tongue and in those with Karnofsky performance status of 50%, 60% and 70%, survival was improved with the use of hyperfractionation (p = 0,02 and p 0,006 respectively. The study demonstrates the superiority of hyperfractionation over the classical fractionation in the treatment of patients with carcinoma of the oropharynx. (author)

  3. Dose-response relationship with radiotherapy: an evidence?

    The dose-response relationship is a fundamental basis of radiobiology. Despite many clinical data, difficulties remain to demonstrate a relation between dose and local control: relative role of treatment associated with radiation therapy (surgery, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy), tumor heterogeneity, few prospective randomized studies, uncertainty of local control assessment. Three different situations are discussed: tumors with high local control probabilities for which dose effect is demonstrated by randomized studies (breast cancer) or sound retrospective data (soft tissues sarcomas), tumors with intermediate local control probabilities for which dose effect seems to be important according to retrospective studies and ongoing or published phase III trials (prostate cancer), tumors with low local control probabilities for which dose effect appears to be modest beyond standard doses, and inferior to the benefit of concurrent chemotherapy (lung and oesophageal cancer). For head and neck tumors, the dose-response relationship has been explored through hyperfractionation and accelerated radiation therapy and a dose effect has been demonstrated but must be compared to the benefit of concurrent chemotherapy. Last but not least, the development of conformal radiotherapy allow the exploration of the dose response relationship for tumors such as hepatocellular carcinomas traditionally excluded from the field of conventional radiation therapy. In conclusion, the dose-response relationship remains a sound basis of radiation therapy for many tumors and is a parameter to take into account for further randomized studies. (author)

  4. Compliance to the prescribed dose and overall treatment time in five randomized clinical trials of altered fractionation in radiotherapy for head-and-neck carcinomas

    Purpose: To investigate compliance to the prescribed dose-fractionation schedule in five randomized controlled trials of altered fractionation in radiotherapy for head-and-neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Individual patient data from 2566 patients participating in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 22791, EORTC 22811, EORTC 22851, Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH), and continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) head-and-neck trials were merged in the fractionation IMPACT (Intergroup Merger of Patient data from Altered or Conventional Treatment schedules) study database. The ideal treatment time was defined as the minimum time required to deliver a prescribed schedule. Compliance to the prescribed overall treatment time was quantified as the difference between the actual and the ideal overall time. An overall measure of compliance in an individual patient, the total dose lost (TDL), was calculated as the dose lost due to prolongation of therapy (assuming a Dprolif of 0.64 Gy/day) plus the difference between the prescribed and the actual dose given. Results: The time in excess of the ideal ranged up to 97 days (average 3.9 days), and 25% of the patients had delays of 6 days or more. World Health Organization (WHO) performance status and nodal stage had a significant effect on TDL. TDL was significantly higher in the conventional than in the altered arm of the EORTC 22851 and CHART trials. In the PMH trial, TDL was significantly higher in the hyperfractionation than in the conventional arm. Centers participating in the three EORTC trials varied significantly in their compliance. There was a significant improvement in compliance in patients treated more recently. Conclusions: Even in randomized controlled trials, compliance to the prescribed radiation therapy schedule may be relatively poor, especially after conventional fractionation. This affects the interpretation of the outcome of these trials

  5. Impact of Schedule Duration on Head and Neck Radiotherapy: Accelerated Tumor Repopulation Versus Compensatory Mucosal Proliferation

    Purpose: To determine how modelled maximum tumor control rates, achievable without exceeding mucositis tolerance (tcpmax-early) vary with schedule duration for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and materials: Using maximum-likelihood techniques, we have fitted a range of tcp models to two HNSCC datasets (Withers’ and British Institute of Radiology [BIR]), characterizing the dependence of tcp on duration and equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2). Models likely to best describe future data have been selected using the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and its quasi-AIC extension to overdispersed data. Setting EQD2s in the selected tcp models to levels just tolerable for mucositis, we have plotted tcpmax-early against schedule duration. Results: While BIR dataset tcp fits describe dose levels isoeffective for tumor control as rising significantly with schedule protraction, indicative of accelerated tumor repopulation, repopulation terms in fits to Withers’ dataset do not reach significance after accounting for overdispersion of the data. The tcpmax-early curves calculated from tcp fits to the overall Withers’ and BIR datasets rise by 8% and 0-4%, respectively, between 20 and 50 days duration; likewise, tcpmax-early curves calculated for stage-specific cohorts also generally rise slowly with increasing duration. However none of the increases in tcpmax-early calculated from the overall or stage-specific fits reach significance. Conclusions: Local control rates modeled for treatments which lie just within mucosal tolerance rise slowly but insignificantly with increasing schedule length. This finding suggests that whereas useful gains may be made by accelerating unnecessarily slow schedules until they approach early reaction tolerance, little is achieved by shortening schedules further while reducing doses to remain within mucosal tolerance, an approach that may slightly worsen outcomes.

  6. Accelerated versus conventional fractionated postoperative radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer: Results of a multicenter Phase III study

    Purpose: To determine whether, in the postoperative setting, accelerated fractionation (AF) radiotherapy (RT) yields a superior locoregional control rate compared with conventional fractionation (CF) RT in locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx. Methods and materials: Patients from four institutions with one or more high-risk features (pT4, positive resection margins, pN >1, perineural/lymphovascular invasion, extracapsular extension, subglottic extension) after surgery were randomly assigned to either RT with one daily session of 2 Gy up to 60 Gy in 6 weeks or AF. Accelerated fractionation consisted of a 'biphasic concomitant boost' schedule, with the boost delivered during the first and last weeks of treatment, to deliver 64 Gy in 5 weeks. Informed consent was obtained. The primary endpoint of the study was locoregional control. Analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. Results: From March 1994 to August 2000, 226 patients were randomized. At a median follow-up of 30.6 months (range, 0-110 months), 2-year locoregional control estimates were 80% ± 4% for CF and 78% ± 5% for AF (p = 0.52), and 2-year overall survival estimates were 67% ± 5% for CF and 64% ± 5% for AF (p = 0.84). The lack of difference in outcome between the two treatment arms was confirmed by multivariate analysis. However, interaction analysis with median values as cut-offs showed a trend for improved locoregional control for those patients who had a delay in starting RT and who were treated with AF compared with those with a similar delay but who were treated with CF (hazard ratio = 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.1). Fifty percent of patients treated with AF developed confluent mucositis, compared with only 27% of those treated with CF (p = 0.006). However, mucositis duration was not different between arms. Although preliminary, actuarial Grade 3+ late toxicity estimates at 2 years were 18% ± 4% and 27% ± 6% for CF and AF

  7. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous modulated accelerated boost technique and chemotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    To present our experience of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) boost technique in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Sixty eight patients of NPC were treated between April 2006 and December 2011 including 45 males and 23 females with mean age of 46 (range 15–78). Stage distribution was; stage I 3, stage II 7, stage III 26 and stage IV 32. Among 45 (66.2%) evaluated patients for presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), 40 (88.8%) were positive for EBV. Median radiation doses delivered to gross tumor volume (GTV) and positive neck nodes were 66–70 Gy, 63 Gy to clinical target volume (CTV) and 50.4 Gy to clinically negative neck. In addition 56 (82.4%) patients with bulky tumors (T4/N2+) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy 2–3 cycles (Cisplatin/Docetaxel or Cisplatin/Epirubicin or Cisplatin/5 Flourouracil). Concurrent chemotherapy with radiation was weekly Cisplatin 40 mg/m2 (40 patients) or Cisplatin 100 mg/m2 (28 patients). With a median follow up of 20 months (range 3–43), one patient developed local recurrence, two experienced regional recurrences and distant failure was seen in 3 patients. Estimated 3 year disease free survival (DFS) was 94%. Three year DFS for patients with EBV was 100% as compared to 60% without EBV (p = 0.0009). Three year DFS for patients with undifferentiated histology was 98% as compared to 82% with other histologies (p = 0.02). Acute grade 3 toxicity was seen as 21 (30.9%) having G-III mucositis and 6 (8.8%) with G-III skin reactions. Late toxicity was minimal and loss of taste was seen in 3 patients (7.5%) at time of analysis. IMRT with SMART in combination with chemotherapy is feasible and effective in terms of both the clinical response and safety profile. EBV, histopathology and nodal involvement were found important prognostic factors for locoregional recurrence

  8. Radiobiological Characterization of Two Photon-Beam Energies 6 and 15 MV used in Radiotherapy From Linear Accelerator

    The main objective of this study is to perform radiobiological characterization of two different photon beam energies, 6 MV and 15 MV, from linear accelerator used in radiotherapy, with special regard to late effects of radiation. Two end-points, namely cell survival and micronucleus induction were used for the characterization. Chinese hamster V 79 lung fibroblast cell line to prepare cell culture and to perform the innervate experiments. chromosomes number was counted and found to be 22 chromosomes per cell, this result is in complete agreement with expected 11 pairs of chromosomes representing the genome of this species. Cells were kept in confluent growth for two days and then exposed to two photon beam energies, 6 and 15 MV respectively. Different dose rates were used for the two beam energies, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 7.0 Gy. Cells were counted immediately after irradiation and re seeded, the seeded number of cells was calculated to the dose rate used. Another set of unirradiated cells treated the same as the experimental set was used as a control group. The plating efficiency (PE) was calculated for the control group, then cells were incubated at 37oC for 6 days to construct the survival curve, five samples were counted per dose and the mean was calculated. The two survival curves are similar for photon beam energies (6 and 15 MV) and the surviving fraction was decreased with dose rate. The two curves showed similar values of α and β parameters, this result is expected for the same radiation type (X-ray). For the micronuclei assay three samples for each dose were seeded and incubated at 37oC for 24 hours then Cytochalasin-B was added to block cells in cytokinesis phase of the mitosis. The micronuclei number was counted and plotted with dose. A significant positive correlation was found between dose and micronuclei frequency (P=0.00), moreover, the micronuclei frequency is relatively higher with 15 MV compared with 6 MV energy. This indicates the presence

  9. TLD Intercomparison in accelerators for radiotherapy in three Latin american countries; Intercomparacion TLD en aceleradores para radioterapia en tres paises latinoamericanos

    Gaona, E.; Azorin N, J.; Perez, M.A.; Picon, C.; Castellanos, E.; Plazas, M.C.; Murcia, G.; Archundia, L. [Depto. El Hombre y su Ambiente. Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Calz. Del Hueso 1100, 04960 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    In Radiotherapy one of the objectives is to establish and to give follow up to quality assurance programs which make sure that the doses administered to the patients with cancer are a high probability of a success in external radiation. Likewise, one of the present preoccupations of the United Nations Agencies as well as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Pan-American Health Organization is the optimal employment of the radiations in the treatment of cancer patients since the administered dose in Radiotherapy suffers considerable variations by the lack of quality assurance programs. The use of Electron linear accelerators requires a program of quality assurance that includes expert personnel, equipment and adequate facilities. The more used methodology for the dosimetry calibration and characterization of X-ray beams and high energy electrons for radiotherapy use is using a ionization chamber dosemeter calibrated in a regional secondary standardization laboratory. However, to establish and give follow up to the quality assurance programs it is necessary the dosimetric intercomparison through TLD. In this study it was designed plastic phantoms with TLD crystals and it was made its characterization to realize an absorbed dose analysis in the crystals exposed at X-ray beams 6 MV and high energy electrons 10 and 12 MeV to standardize the dosimetric procedures and proceeding to realize an International Pilot intercomparison of absorbed doses in TLD crystals in three Latin American countries: Mexico, Peru and Colombia with the participation of accelerators of five different institutions. The found results show that the majority of the measured doses with TLD in the different accelerators were in the 0.95-1.05 range though it had two cases outside of this range. The use of the phantoms with TLD crystals shows that they are of excellent aid to make analysis of the doses administered to the patients and an intercomparison of results to standardize procedures at

  10. Whole brain radiotherapy: Prognostic factors and results of a radiation boost delivered through a conventional linear accelerator

    Purpose: Assess prognostic factors for overall survival and the potential benefit of a boost in patients treated with whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Methods and materials: From 2002 to 2006, a retrospective analysis was made from 250 unselected consecutive patients with secondary brain metastases from lung cancer, breast cancer and melanoma. Eighteen patients received surgery and were excluded from analysis. Four potential prognostic factors have been studied: primary tumor type, gender, number of metastases and improvement of neurological symptoms after radiation therapy. A subgroup analysis was performed to determine whether an additional boost could potentially improve outcome in patients who presented with less than three metastases, performance status <2, and no surgical resection of their metastasis. Results: Average follow-up was 10.3 months. Median overall survival was 5.6 months and survival rates at 1 and 2 years were 22.7% and 10%, respectively. Age less than 65 (p < 0.01), neurological improvement after WBRT (p < 0.01), and presence of less than three metastases were significant factors for overall survival in multivariate analysis. When focusing on the selected subgroup (120 assessable patients), median overall survival was 4.0 months in patients with no radiation boost, versus 8.9 months in patients with radiation boost (p = 0.0024). Conclusions: Survival and prognostic factors were similar to those found in the literature. Boost delivered after WBRT by a conventional particle accelerator could provide a benefit in selected patients, especially for centers that do not have radiotherapy techniques in stereotactic conditions. This warrants further prospective assessment.

  11. Quality assurance audit in an Australasian phase III trial of accelerated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (TROG 91.01)

    The Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) initiated a randomized trial, testing accelerated (twice daily) radiotherapy against conventional radiotherapy for stage II and stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in 1991. In 1996, the Trial Management Committee arranged for a technical audit of 76 cases from 11 institutions, conducted by investigators from interstate institutions. A 10% unacceptable protocol violation rate was detected, which compares favourably with initial Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) experience in the late 1970s. Infrastructural deficits with poor quality of documentation, incomplete retrieval of films and document return have been demonstrated in some cases. The Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group is actively pursuing procedural and resourcing issues in order to redress this and is actively expanding its Quality Assurance (QA) Programme with an intercentre dosimetry study. Ultimately, comprehensive clinical and technical QA site visits are planned. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  12. Hyperfractionated cranio-spinal irradiation in the complex treatment of inoperable pinealoblastoma in childhood

    We present a rare case of brain pineal neoplasm in 14 years old girl - pinealobastoma - brain primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). The tumor in the pineal region causes occlusive hydrocephaly, not cured following ventriculostomy of the 3rd ventricle. After liquor-draining valve (ventriculo-peritoneal drain) was applied hyperfractionated cranio-spinal irradiation (cranio-spinal irradiation), which was needed due to the high risk of leptomeningeal and spinal liquor metastases. Unfavorable prognosis requires postoperative hyperfractionated cranio-spinal irradiation twice daily whit daily dose of 1,5 Gy in 6 hours interval to total dose of 36 Gy in CNS and spinal; at second step boost - hyperfractionated in 6 hours interval to total dose 48 Gy in the ventricles and of 58-60 Gy in pineal tumor. In addition to cranio-spinal irradiation was applied Dexometasone 1 amp. daily i.m. and Ecomer 3 x 1-2 caps, daily per os. Hyperfractionated cranio-spinal irradiation was required in pinealobastoma with hydrocephaly, followed by chemotherapy after ventriculo-peritoneat liquor drain and biopsy. This complex treatment approach significantly improves free of disease survival through minimization of local leptomeningeal and spinal recurrences. (authors) Key words: PINEALOBASTOMA IN CHILDHOOD. PNET. HYPER-FRACTIONATED CRANIO-SPINAL IRRADIATION. COMPLEX TREATMENT. CHEMOTHERAPY

  13. Dose escalation using twice-daily radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: does heavier dosing result in a happier ending?

    Purpose: To present our experience using a twice-daily radiotherapy (RT) technique, including hyperfractionated and accelerated-hyperfractionated RT, on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. The dose to the primary tumor was increased in the hope that local control could be increased without the cost of increased late complications. We analyzed acute and late complications and local control and compared the results with the results of NPC patients treated during the same period using conventional once-daily RT. Methods and Materials: Between October 1991 and July 1998, 222 histologically confirmed, Stage M0, previously unirradiated NPC patients completed RT at our hospital. Most patients had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) 1992 Stage III and IV disease. Among them, 88 received altered fractionated, twice-daily RT; 76 patients received hyperfractionated RT and 12 accelerated-hyperfractionated RT. The remaining 134 patients received a conventional once-daily regimen. Hyperfractionated RT was delivered using 120 cGy b.i.d. separated by 6-h intervals throughout the course. For the accelerated-hyperfractionated patients, 160 cGy b.i.d. was given, also at 6-h intervals. The median dose in the twice-daily group was 7810 cGy (range 6840-8200). In the once-daily regimen, RT was delivered using 180-200 cGy q.d. The median tumor dose to the primary tumor was 7000 cGy (range 6560-8100) given during about 8 weeks. The median follow-up time was 70.5 and 72 months for the twice-daily and once-daily groups, respectively. Results: The incidence of acute toxicities was higher in the twice-daily group with more severe mucositis and moist desquamation than in the once-daily group. Both groups had a similar incidence of late complications, except for 3 cases of temporal lobe necrosis in the twice-daily group, all in patients treated with 160 cGy. No difference was noted in recurrence-free local control between the two groups when the individual T stage was compared using

  14. Preliminary comparison of the therapeutic efficacy of accelerated relative to conventional fractionation radiotherapy by treatment of spontaneous canine malignancies

    Purpose/Objective: This study's ultimate goals involve development of an accelerated fractionation (AF) regimen with an integrated final concomitant boost (CB) and examination of factors prognostic of the CB's therapeutic efficacy which could be measured during the initial AF portion to determine for which patients CB should be used. These endpoints can be accurately determined quickly by evaluating the treatment (tx) of spontaneous canine veterinary patient tumors. Because surviving tumor clonogen growth rate increases after radiotherapy (RT) begins, this accelerated repopulation (AR) should be reduced by AF. Furthermore, CB using a small field encompassing only the tumor bed, given as a second daily tx during the last week of RT, should further reduce AR. The initial portion of this project which is nearing completion was designed to determine if incidentally treated normal tissues could tolerate the AF regimen and project whether addition of the tumor bed CB would also be tolerated. Materials and Methods: Currently 20 canine patients with biopsy proven localized tumors have received canine AF radiotherapy given as 3.2Gy/fraction(fx) administered 5 days a week (Mon-Fri) to a total of 15 fxs (48Gy) within 18 elapsed days. RT is given with a 60Co teletherapy unit. Their tumor response, control, survival, and acute normal tissue responses are being directly compared to results we previously obtained from canines receiving a nearly equivalent dose/fx and total dose conventional fractionation (CF) regimen which was given alone or with adjuvant hyperthermia (HT). In that study the canines were stratified by tumor histology and anatomic site and randomly assigned to receive canine CF (3.5Gy/fx, 3 fxs/week [Mon-Wed-Fri] to 14 fxs (49Gy) in an elapsed time of approx. 30 days) either alone or followed weekly by local HT (44 deg. +/- 2 deg. C) for 30 minutes (5 HT fxs). As is currently done, these CF+/-HT patients were followed up to 3 years to quantitate the magnitudes and

  15. Experimental research of dose distribution and protection for mobile intra-operative radiotherapy accelerator in operating room

    Objective: To study the dose distribution characteristics for mobile intra-operative radiotherapy accelerator (Mobetron) in an operating room, and to provide basic data for developing appropriate radiation protection measures and protection standard. Methods: For most commonly used electron energy 9 MeV, TLD dosimeters were placed at 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm high plane, respectively. For each plane,the measurement points were selected at every 50 cm from the central axis at every 45° at eight different directions. Also different electron energies, such as 4, 6, 9 and 12 MeV, were taken into consideration at the plane at 100 cm height. After 10 Gy with a dose rate of 10 Gy/min were delivered, the TLD dosimeters were used to read out the data. Results: For 9 MeV, at the phantom plane (100 cm high plane), the average doses were 169, 756, 395 and 241 μSv at 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm from the central axis,respectively. The maximum deviation between the doses at 50 cm from the central axis in different angles and their average values were 9.1%. In the identical angle, the average doses of 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm high planes at the distance of 100 cm from central axis were 527, 756, 570 and 141 μSv, respectively. For the energies of 4, 6, 9 and 12 MeV, the average doses were 573, 486, 689 and 781 μSv at 100 cm from the central axis at 90° of 100 cm high plane. Conclusions: For the same energy,the dose values at different directions were decreased by the minus exponential function law with the distance. The doses were uniformly distributed at different directions at the same distance from the central axis. The doses on the plane of 100 cm height were much higher than those at other heights,and the dose values were increased with the election energy. (authors)

  16. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head.

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-01

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB6) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mm X 0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-Ib (mA) X 0.00808 (MeV/mA), where Ib is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1. PMID:17555261

  17. IAEA-HypoX. A randomized multicenter study of the hypoxic radiosensitizer nimorazole concomitant with accelerated radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Metwally, Mohamed Ahmed Hassan; Ali, Rubina; Kuddu, Maire;

    2015-01-01

    multicenter randomized trial in patients with HNSCC. Tumors were treated to a dose of 66-70Gy, 33-35 fractions, 6 fractions per week. NIM was administered in a dose of 1.2gperm(2), 90min before the first daily RT fraction. The primary endpoint was loco-regional failure. The trial was closed prematurely by......PURPOSE: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can be improved by hypoxic modification using nimorazole (NIM) in association with accelerated fractionation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The protocol was activated in March 2012 as an international...... HNSCC given the hypoxic modifier NIM in addition to accelerated fractionation RT. However, the trial also revealed that conducting multicenter and multinational study combining drug and RT in developing countries may suffer from uncontrolled and unsolvable problems....

  18. High-dose accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (at 3 Gy/fraction) with concurrent vinorelbine and carboplatin chemotherapy in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a feasibility study

    Increasing the radiotherapy dose can result in improved local control for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and can thereby improve survival. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy can expose tumors to a high dose of radiation in a short period of time, but the optimal treatment regimen remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing high-dose accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (at 3 Gy/fraction) with concurrent vinorelbine (NVB) and carboplatin (CBP) chemotherapy for the treatment of local advanced NSCLC. Untreated patients with unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB NSCLC or patients with a recurrence of NSCLC received accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The total dose was greater than or equal to 60 Gy. The accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy was conducted once daily at 3 Gy/fraction with 5 fractions per week, and the radiotherapy was completed in 5 weeks. In addition to radiotherapy, the patients also received at least 1 cycle of a concurrent two-drug chemotherapy regimen of NVB and CBP. A total of 26 patients (19 previously untreated cases and 7 cases of recurrent disease) received 60Gy-75Gy radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy. All of the patients underwent evaluations for toxicity and preliminary therapeutic efficacy. There were no treatment-related deaths within the entire patient group. The major acute adverse reactions were radiation esophagitis (88.5%) and radiation pneumonitis (42.3%). The percentages of grade III acute radiation esophagitis and grade III radiation pneumonitis were 15.4% and 7.7%, respectively. Hematological toxicities were common and did not significantly affect the implementation of chemoradiotherapy after supportive treatment. Two patients received high dose of 75 Gy had grade III late esophageal toxicity, and none had grade IV and above. Grade III and above late lung toxicity did not occur. High-dose accelerated

  19. Accelerator

    The invention claims equipment for stabilizing the position of the front covers of the accelerator chamber in cyclic accelerators which significantly increases accelerator reliability. For stabilizing, it uses hydraulic cushions placed between the electromagnet pole pieces and the front chamber covers. The top and the bottom cushions are hydraulically connected. The cushions are disconnected and removed from the hydraulic line using valves. (J.P.)

  20. A retrospective analysis of survival outcomes for two different radiotherapy fractionation schedules given in the same overall time for limited stage small cell lung cancer

    To compare survival outcomes for two fractionation schedules of thoracic radiotherapy, both given over 3 weeks, in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). At Radiation Oncology Mater Centre (ROMC) and the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH), patients with LS-SCLC treated with curative intent are given radiotherapy (with concurrent chemotherapy) to a dose of either 40Gy in 15 fractions ('the 40Gy/15⧣group') or 45Gy in 30 fractions ('the 45Gy/30⧣group'). The choice largely depends on institutional preference. Both these schedules are given over 3 weeks, using daily and twice-daily fractionation respectively. The records of all such patients treated from January 2000 to July 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and survival outcomes between the two groups compared. Of 118 eligible patients, there were 38 patients in the 40Gy/15⧣ group and 41 patients in the 45Gy/30⧣ group. The median relapse-free survival time was 12 months in both groups. Median overall survival was 21 months (95% CI 2–37 months) in the 40Gy/15⧣ group and 26 months (95% CI 1–48 months) in the 45Gy/30⧣ group. The 5-year overall survival rates were 20% and 25%, respectively (P=0.24). On multivariate analysis, factors influencing overall survival were: whether prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) was given (P=0.01) and whether salvage chemotherapy was given at the time of relapse (P=0.057). Given the small sample size, the potential for selection bias and the retrospective nature of our study it is not possible to draw firm conclusions regarding the efficacy of hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy compared with hyperfractionated accelerated thoracic radiotherapy however hypofractionated radiotherapy may result in equivalent relapse-free survival.

  1. Clinical role of18F-FDG PET/CT-based simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy treatment plan-ning for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Jianshe Wang; Tianyou Tang Co-first author; Jing Xu; Andrew Z Wang; Liang Li; Junnian Zheng; Longzhen Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the long-term local control, overal survival, and late toxicities of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided dose escalation radio-therapy versus conventional radiotherapy in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy treatment of local y ad-vanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods A total of 48 patients with stage III–IVa NPC were recruited and randomly administered PET/CT-guided dose escalation chemoradiotherapy (group A) or conventional chemoradiotherapy (group B). The dose-escalation radiotherapy was performed using the simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy technique at prescribed doses of 77 gray (Gy) in 32 fractions (f) to the gross target volume (GTV): planning target volume (PTV) 1 received 64 Gy/32 f, while PTV2 received 54.4 Gy/32 f. Patients in group B received uniform-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy, PTV1 received 70 Gy/35 f and PTV2 received 58 Gy/29 f. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin [20 mg/m2 intravenous (IV) on days 1–4] and docetaxel (75 mg/m2 IV on days 1 and 8) administered during treatment weeks 1 and 4. Al patients received 2–4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy of the same dose and drug regimen. Results The use of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT significantly reduced the treat-ment volume delineation of the GTV in 83.3% (20/24) of patients. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival rates of the two groups were 100% and 79.2%, respectively (P = 0.019). The 5-year disease free survival (DFS) rates were 95.8% and 75.0%, respectively (P = 0.018). The 5-year local progression-free survival and DFS rates were significantly dif erent. The 5-year overal survival (OS) rates were 95.8% and 79.2%, re-spectively. Dif erences in OS improvement were insignificant (P = 0.079). Late toxicities were similar in the two groups. The most common late toxicities of the two arms were grade 1–2 skin dystrophy, xerostomia, subcutaneous fibrosis, and

  2. Advances in conformal radiotherapy using Monte Carlo Code to design new IMRT and IORT accelerators and interpret CT numbers

    Wysocka-Rabin, A

    2013-01-01

    The introductory chapter of this monograph, which follows this Preface, provides an overview of radiotherapy and treatment planning. The main chapters that follow describe in detail three significant aspects of radiotherapy on which the author has focused her research efforts. Chapter 2 presents studies the author worked on at the German National Cancer Institute (DKFZ) in Heidelberg. These studies applied the Monte Carlo technique to investigate the feasibility of performing Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) by scanning with a narrow photon beam. This approach represents an alternative to techniques that generate beam modulation by absorption, such as MLC, individually-manufactured compensators, and special tomotherapy modulators. The technical realization of this concept required investigation of the influence of various design parameters on the final small photon beam. The photon beam to be scanned should have a diameter of approximately 5 mm at Source Surface Distance (SSD) distance, and the penumbr...

  3. Early Clinical Outcomes Demonstrate Preserved Cognitive Function in Children With Average-Risk Medulloblastoma When Treated With Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    Purpose: To report on acute toxicity, longitudinal cognitive function, and early clinical outcomes in children with average-risk medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty children ≥5 years of age classified as having average-risk medulloblastoma were accrued on a prospective protocol of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) alone. Radiotherapy was delivered with two daily fractions (1 Gy/fraction, 6 to 8 hours apart, 5 days/week), initially to the neuraxis (36 Gy/36 fractions), followed by conformal tumor bed boost (32 Gy/32 fractions) for a total tumor bed dose of 68 Gy/68 fractions over 6 to 7 weeks. Cognitive function was prospectively assessed longitudinally (pretreatment and at specified posttreatment follow-up visits) with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children to give verbal quotient, performance quotient, and full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). Results: The median age of the study cohort was 8 years (range, 5–14 years), representing a slightly older cohort. Acute hematologic toxicity was mild and self-limiting. Eight (40%) children had subnormal intelligence (FSIQ <85), including 3 (15%) with mild mental retardation (FSIQ 56–70) even before radiotherapy. Cognitive functioning for all tested domains was preserved in children evaluable at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after completion of HFRT, with no significant decline over time. Age at diagnosis or baseline FSIQ did not have a significant impact on longitudinal cognitive function. At a median follow-up time of 33 months (range, 16–58 months), 3 patients had died (2 of relapse and 1 of accidental burns), resulting in 3-year relapse-free survival and overall survival of 83.5% and 83.2%, respectively. Conclusion: HFRT without upfront chemotherapy has an acceptable acute toxicity profile, without an unduly increased risk of relapse, with preserved cognitive functioning in children with average-risk medulloblastoma.

  4. Early Clinical Outcomes Demonstrate Preserved Cognitive Function in Children With Average-Risk Medulloblastoma When Treated With Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    Gupta, Tejpal, E-mail: tejpalgupta@rediffmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Jalali, Rakesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Goswami, Savita [Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry Unit, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Nair, Vimoj [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Moiyadi, Aliasgar [Division of Neuro-Surgery, Department of Surgical Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Epari, Sridhar [Department of Pathology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Sarin, Rajiv [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report on acute toxicity, longitudinal cognitive function, and early clinical outcomes in children with average-risk medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty children {>=}5 years of age classified as having average-risk medulloblastoma were accrued on a prospective protocol of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) alone. Radiotherapy was delivered with two daily fractions (1 Gy/fraction, 6 to 8 hours apart, 5 days/week), initially to the neuraxis (36 Gy/36 fractions), followed by conformal tumor bed boost (32 Gy/32 fractions) for a total tumor bed dose of 68 Gy/68 fractions over 6 to 7 weeks. Cognitive function was prospectively assessed longitudinally (pretreatment and at specified posttreatment follow-up visits) with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children to give verbal quotient, performance quotient, and full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). Results: The median age of the study cohort was 8 years (range, 5-14 years), representing a slightly older cohort. Acute hematologic toxicity was mild and self-limiting. Eight (40%) children had subnormal intelligence (FSIQ <85), including 3 (15%) with mild mental retardation (FSIQ 56-70) even before radiotherapy. Cognitive functioning for all tested domains was preserved in children evaluable at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after completion of HFRT, with no significant decline over time. Age at diagnosis or baseline FSIQ did not have a significant impact on longitudinal cognitive function. At a median follow-up time of 33 months (range, 16-58 months), 3 patients had died (2 of relapse and 1 of accidental burns), resulting in 3-year relapse-free survival and overall survival of 83.5% and 83.2%, respectively. Conclusion: HFRT without upfront chemotherapy has an acceptable acute toxicity profile, without an unduly increased risk of relapse, with preserved cognitive functioning in children with average-risk medulloblastoma.

  5. Serial histopathological changes in irradiated guinea pig lung receiving conventional fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation

    The purpose of this study is to determine serial histopathological differences in guinea pig lungs receiving the same total dose as clinically used between conventional fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation. The guinea pigs received 80 Gy in 40 daily fractions of 2 Gy each (conventional fractionation), 80 Gy in 80 fractions of 1 Gy each twice a day (hyperfractionation), 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions of 3 Gy each (conventional fractionation), or 81 Gy in 54 fractions of 1.5 Gy each twice a day (hyperfractionation). We evaluated the histopathological changes of irradiated guinea pig lungs at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after irradiation. The guinea pig lungs that received 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions showed histopathological changes of inflammation including formation of lymph follicles after 6 months. The lungs which received 81 Gy in 54 fractions showed similar but slightly less pronounced changes than those that received 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions. The guinea pig lungs of other groups showed no histopathological changes during the observation period. In hyperfractionated irradiation the damage to the guinea pig lung is quantitatively less than that occurring as a result of conventional fractionated irradiation of the same total dose. (author)

  6. A Randomized Study of Accelerated Fractionation Radiotherapy with and Without Mitomycin C in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    This single-institution study evaluates the feasibility of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) with and without mitomycin C (MMC) in thc treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: Between May 1998 and October 2001, sixty patients with locally advanced stage III and IV of head and neck cancer were randomized into three treatment arms: (I) conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CF) (5 fractions per week); (2) accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) (6 fractions per week); and (3) AF plus Mitomycin C (MMC). The 2-year overall survival (OS) of the whole group was 21 %. The OS according to treatment arm was 23%, 20%. and 28% in CF. AF. and AF+MMC arms respectively (ρ<0. 19). The 2-year loco-regional control (LC) rate was 22% for the whole group of patients. The LC was 10%, 25%. and 30% for the CF, AF, and AF+MMC respectively (ρ=0.27). The only significant parameters for OS and LC were performance status and pre-treatment hemoglobin level. Mucositis grades 3 and 4 occurred in 70% and 90% of the patients in the AF and AF+MMC arm respectively compared to 55% of patients in the CF arm (ρ=0.04). However the addition of MMC did not significantly increase the incidence or severity of mucositis between AF and AF+MMC (ρ=0.13). Hematological toxicity grades 3 and 4 were significantly higher after MMC (occurred in 40% of patients versus 10% and 5% in CF and AF arms respectively, ρ=0.04). There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of grade 3 dryness of mouth (ρ=0.06). fibrosis (ρ=0.6). or lymphoedema (ρ=0.39) among the three arms. There was a trend for improvement of LC and OS rates with the use or AF and the addition of MMC to AF compared to CF radiotherapy. although the difference was not statistically significant. The small number of the patients in each treatment arm and the inclusion or multiple tumor sites may contribute to these statistically insignificant results. Accordingly we advise to continue

  7. Normal tissue complication models for clinically relevant acute esophagitis (≥ grade 2) in patients treated with dose differentiated accelerated radiotherapy (DART-bid)

    One of the primary dose-limiting toxicities during thoracic irradiation is acute esophagitis (AE). The aim of this study is to investigate dosimetric and clinical predictors for AE grade ≥ 2 in patients treated with accelerated radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 66 NSCLC patients were included in the present analysis: 4 stage II, 44 stage IIIA and 18 stage IIIB. All patients received induction chemotherapy followed by dose differentiated accelerated radiotherapy (DART-bid). Depending on size (mean of three perpendicular diameters) tumors were binned in four dose groups: <2.5 cm 73.8 Gy, 2.5–4.5 cm 79.2 Gy, 4.5–6 cm 84.6 Gy, >6 cm 90 Gy. Patients were treated in 3D target splitting technique. In order to estimate the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), two Lyman models and the cutoff-logistic regression model were fitted to the data with AE ≥ grade 2 as statistical endpoint. Inter-model comparison was performed with the corrected Akaike information criterion (AICc), which calculates the model’s quality of fit (likelihood value) in relation to its complexity (i.e. number of variables in the model) corrected by the number of patients in the dataset. Toxicity was documented prospectively according to RTOG. The median follow up was 686 days (range 84–2921 days), 23/66 patients (35 %) experienced AE ≥ grade 2. The actuarial local control rates were 72.6 % and 59.4 % at 2 and 3 years, regional control was 91 % at both time points. The Lyman-MED model (D50 = 32.8 Gy, m = 0.48) and the cutoff dose model (Dc = 38 Gy) provide the most efficient fit to the current dataset. On multivariate analysis V38 (volume of the esophagus that receives 38 Gy or above, 95 %-CI 28.2–57.3) was the most significant predictor of AE ≥ grade 2 (HR = 1.05, CI 1.01–1.09, p = 0.007). Following high-dose accelerated radiotherapy the rate of AE ≥ grade 2 is slightly lower than reported for concomitant radio-chemotherapy with the

  8. Dosimetric Characteristics of Circular 6-MeV X-Ray Beams for Stereotactic Radiotherapy with a Linear Accelerator

    Wysocka, A.; Rostkowska, J.; Kania, M.; Bulski, W.; Fijuth, J.

    2000-01-01

    Dosimetric characteristics of 6 MeV circular X-ray beams of diameters ranging from 7.5 to 35.0 mm are reported. The 6-MeV X-ray beam from Clinac 2300CD was formed using additional cylindrical BrainLAB's collimators. The mechanical stability of the entire system was verified. Specific quantities measured include tissue maximum ratios (TMR), beam profiles (off-axis ratios OAR) and relative output factors. Measurements of these parameters were performed in a water phantom using small cylindrical ionization chambers and a diamond detector. Comparison of TMR values measured with the ionization chamber and the diamond detector showed no significant differences. It was shown that the latter yields more accurate results for beam profiles than ionization chambers. The mechanical and dosimetric characteristics of this radiotherapy unit are found to be suitable for stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy.

  9. Breast cancer radiotherapy: controversies and prospectives

    YU Jin-ming; WANG Yong-sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Despite consensus on breast cancer radiotherapy, there are still some controversies over post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), appropriate sequence of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal treatment, and radiotherapy after preoperative systemic therapy.

  10. Analysis of quality control data of eight modern radiotherapy linear accelerators: the short- and long-term behaviours of the outputs and the reproducibility of quality control measurements

    Kapanen, Mika [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Laippatie 4, 00881 Helsinki (Finland); Tenhunen, Mikko [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Haartmaninkatu 4, 00029 Helsinki (Finland); Haemaelaeinen, Tuomo [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Haartmaninkatu 4, 00029 Helsinki (Finland); Sipilae, Petri [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Laippatie 4, 00881 Helsinki (Finland); Parkkinen, Ritva [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Laippatie 4, 00881 Helsinki (Finland); Jaervinen, Hannu [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Laippatie 4, 00881 Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-21

    Quality control (QC) data of radiotherapy linear accelerators, collected by Helsinki University Central Hospital between the years 2000 and 2004, were analysed. The goal was to provide information for the evaluation and elaboration of QC of accelerator outputs and to propose a method for QC data analysis. Short- and long-term drifts in outputs were quantified by fitting empirical mathematical models to the QC measurements. Normally, long-term drifts were well ({<=}1%) modelled by either a straight line or a single-exponential function. A drift of 2% occurred in 18 {+-} 12 months. The shortest drift times of only 2-3 months were observed for some new accelerators just after the commissioning but they stabilized during the first 2-3 years. The short-term reproducibility and the long-term stability of local constancy checks, carried out with a sealed plane parallel ion chamber, were also estimated by fitting empirical models to the QC measurements. The reproducibility was 0.2-0.5% depending on the positioning practice of a device. Long-term instabilities of about 0.3%/month were observed for some checking devices. The reproducibility of local absorbed dose measurements was estimated to be about 0.5%. The proposed empirical model fitting of QC data facilitates the recognition of erroneous QC measurements and abnormal output behaviour, caused by malfunctions, offering a tool to improve dose control.

  11. Analysis of quality control data of eight modern radiotherapy linear accelerators: the short- and long-term behaviours of the outputs and the reproducibility of quality control measurements

    Quality control (QC) data of radiotherapy linear accelerators, collected by Helsinki University Central Hospital between the years 2000 and 2004, were analysed. The goal was to provide information for the evaluation and elaboration of QC of accelerator outputs and to propose a method for QC data analysis. Short- and long-term drifts in outputs were quantified by fitting empirical mathematical models to the QC measurements. Normally, long-term drifts were well (≤1%) modelled by either a straight line or a single-exponential function. A drift of 2% occurred in 18 ± 12 months. The shortest drift times of only 2-3 months were observed for some new accelerators just after the commissioning but they stabilized during the first 2-3 years. The short-term reproducibility and the long-term stability of local constancy checks, carried out with a sealed plane parallel ion chamber, were also estimated by fitting empirical models to the QC measurements. The reproducibility was 0.2-0.5% depending on the positioning practice of a device. Long-term instabilities of about 0.3%/month were observed for some checking devices. The reproducibility of local absorbed dose measurements was estimated to be about 0.5%. The proposed empirical model fitting of QC data facilitates the recognition of erroneous QC measurements and abnormal output behaviour, caused by malfunctions, offering a tool to improve dose control

  12. Three-dimensional conformal arc radiotherapy using a C-arm linear accelerator with a computed tomography on-rail system for prostate cancer: clinical outcomes

    We report the feasibility and treatment outcomes of image-guided three-dimensional conformal arc radiotherapy (3D-CART) using a C-arm linear accelerator with a computed tomography (CT) on-rail system for localized prostate cancer. Between 2006 and 2011, 282 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with in-room CT-guided 3D-CART. Biochemical failure was defined as a rise of at least 2.0 ng/ml beyond the nadir prostate-specific antigen level. Toxicity was scored according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. A total of 261 patients were analyzed retrospectively (median follow-up: 61.6 months). The median prescribed 3D-CART dose was 82 Gy (2 Gy/fraction, dose range: 78–86 Gy), and 193 of the patients additionally received hormonal therapy. The 5-year overall survival rate was 93.9 %. Among low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, 5-year rates of freedom from biochemical failure were 100, 91.5 and 90.3 %, respectively. Rates of grade 2–3 late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were 2.3 and 11.4 %, respectively. No patient experienced late grade 4 or higher toxicity. In-room CT-guided 3D-CART was feasible and effective for localized prostate cancer. Treatment outcomes were comparable to those previously reported for intensity-modulated radiotherapy

  13. Commissioning and quality assurance of the X-ray volume Imaging system of an image-guided radiotherapy capable linear accelerator

    Muralidhar K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An Image-Guided Radiotherapy-capable linear accelerator (Elekta Synergy was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with a kV x-ray volume imaging (XVI system and electronic portal imaging device (iViewGT. The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the XVI facility to verify the manufacturer′s specifications and also to evolve a QA schedule which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (safety features, geometric accuracy, and image quality. These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the XVI system and also proved that XVI system is very suitable for image-guided high-precision radiation therapy.

  14. Locally advanced head and neck cancer treated with accelerated radiotherapy, the hypoxic modifier nimorazole and weekly cisplatin. Results from the DAHANCA 18 phase II study

    Bentzen, Jens; Toustrup, Kasper; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Primdahl, Hanne; Andersen, Lisbeth Juhler; Overgaard, Jens

    2015-01-01

    150 oropharyngeal cancers. Of these, 112 (79%) were p16 pos and 29 (21%) were p16 neg. LRC for the p16 neg oropharyngeal cancers was poorer than for the p16 pos (74% vs. 91%; p = 0.02). Tube feeding during treatment was necessary for 146 (64%) patients. At 12 months this number was reduced to 6......%. CONCLUSION: The treatment was tolerable in this cohort of locally advanced HNSCC patients. Acute and late toxicity was comparable to similar studies of chemoradiotherapy, and the outcome superior to the data reported in the literature. This strongly indicates that RT of a......PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: A phase II clinical trial evaluating the feasibility and outcome of treating locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with accelerated radiotherapy, the hypoxic modifier nimorazole and weekly cisplatin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 227 patients with...

  15. Possibilities and limits of radiotherapy in larynx carcinoma. Moeglichkeiten und Grenzen der Radiotherapie des Larynxkarzinoms

    Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik)

    1992-01-01

    Early stage glottic carcinoma can be treated with primary radiotherapy reaching equally good results compared to primary surgery; for supraglottic carcinoma surgery offers only slight advantages over primary radiotherapy. Tumor control for recurrences is considerably improved by salvage surgery. The use of primary radiotherapy allows improved or at least preserved voice and reduced rated of acute complications and late treatment sequelae. However, treatment duration is longer and probably more expensive compared to function preservation microlaryngoscopic surgery. Which treatment approach is chosen, depends in individual patient factors and specific conditions in the clinical setting. In any case, primary radiotherapy deserves a stronger say in the early stage tumor situation. In our institution early stage supraglottic carcinoma undergo primary surgery. Advanced carcinomas (T2b and more) are rarely suited for primary radiotherapy with the exception of some very confined T3 tumors. Surgical approaches should be favoured, since they provide a detailed pathological tumor staging including R-classification, which would be lacking using primary radiotherapy. There are clear reasons to treat the lymph nodes for glottic carcinomas stage T2b and more and for all supraglottic carcinomas with radiotherapy. Specific risk factors are: tumor at the margins of the incision (R1), infiltration of the cartilage and pre-epiglottic space, paratracheal and subglottic extension more than 1 cm, perineural invasion, grade III and IV as well as emergency tracheostomy. Postoperative radiotherapy should be given to the lymph nodes for all positive neck-dissections. New therapeutic approaches are on the horizon, which may improve thee results of radiotherapy even for advanced larynx carcinomas, like hyperfractionation radiotherapy and simultaneous radio-chemotherapy combined enoral resection and postoperative radiotherapy may yield larynx preservation even for advanced stages. (orig./MG).

  16. Acute Toxicity Profile and Compliance to Accelerated Radiotherapy Plus Carbogen and Nicotinamide for Clinical Stage T2–4 Laryngeal Cancer: Results of a Phase III Randomized Trial

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2–4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2–4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Results: Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. Conclusion: With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2–4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit.

  17. Acute Toxicity Profile and Compliance to Accelerated Radiotherapy Plus Carbogen and Nicotinamide for Clinical Stage T2-4 Laryngeal Cancer: Results of a Phase III Randomized Trial

    Janssens, Geert O., E-mail: g.janssens@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Terhaard, Chris H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Doornaert, Patricia A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bijl, Hendrik P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Ende, Piet van den [Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Chin, Alim [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands); Pop, Lucas A.; Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2-4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2-4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Results: Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. Conclusion: With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit.

  18. Late Toxicities after Conventional Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Incidence and Risk Factors

    Background. To determine the incidence and analyze the factors affecting late toxicity for nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with conventional radiotherapy. Patients and Methods. Retrospective analysis was performed on 239 NPC patients treated between 1993 and 2004 in our institution. One hundred and fifty-seven patients were treated with conventional fractionation (2 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week) and eighty-two patients with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (1.6 Gy per fraction twice a day, 5 days per week). One hundred fifty nine patients underwent neoadjuvant cisplatin based chemotherapy. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC score. Results. Xerostomia was the most common related complication (98.7%). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiotherapy did not increase late toxicities. Multivariate analyses showed that radiation dose was a significant factor for hearing impairment, younger age for trismus, initial node status for neck fibrosis, and initial dental hygiene for dental complications. Female gender was associated with significantly higher incidence of trismus and hearing impairment. Conclusion. Conventional radiotherapy was associated with a high rate of late toxicities which affect patients’ quality of life. With the development of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy, a reduced incidence of radiation related complications could be expected.

  19. Post irradiation eardrum: a rare complication of the radiotherapy of naso-pharynx carcinomas

    The eardrum necrosis is a serious and dreadful complication but rarely described after irradiation of cavum cancers. We report in this work five cases of eardrum necrosis after radiotherapy of nasopharynx carcinomas. Patients and methods: between february 1993 and december 2004 239 patients suffering of anon metastatic nasopharynx cancer have been treated by classical irradiation associated or not to a chemotherapy. The radiotherapy was delivered at the dose of 70 to 75 Gy in the cavum and the ganglions initially reached according a classical modality of hyperfractionated one. We analysed retrospectively the delayed complications occurred six months or more after the radiotherapy beginning. Results: Five cases of eardrum necrosis were reported sixty five months after the end of radiotherapy. these patients suffered of hypoacusia and buzzing. The clinical examination allowed to bring out the eardrum perforation that did not exist before radiotherapy. The total dose of irradiation was 75 Gy for a patient and 71.5 Gy according a hyperfractionated modality for four patients. Three patients had an hearing prosthesis in order to improve their quality of life. Conclusion: the eardrum necrosis after radiotherapy for nasopharynx cancer is a rare and unusual complication, very few reported in the literature. The total dose of irradiation is considered as the principal factor of occurrence risk in such complication. (N.C.)

  20. Procedure to measure the neutrons spectrum around a lineal accelerator for radiotherapy; Procedimiento para medir el espectro de los neutrones en torno a un acelerador lineal para radioterapia

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Letechipia de L, C. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas (Mexico); Benites R, J. L. [Servicios de Salud de Nayarit, Centro Estatal de Cancerologia, Calzada de la Cruz 116 Sur, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Salas L, M. A., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Agronomia, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    An experimental procedure was developed, by means of Bonner spheres, to measure the neutrons spectrum around Linacs of medical use that only requires of a single shot of the accelerator; to this procedure we denominate Planetary or Isocentric method. One of the problems associated to the neutrons spectrum measurement in a radiotherapy room with lineal accelerator is because inside the room a mixed, intense and pulsed radiation field takes place affecting the detection systems based on active detector; this situation is solved using a passive detector. In the case of the Bonner spheres spectrometer the active detector has been substituted by activation detectors, trace detectors or thermoluminescent dosimeters. This spectrometer uses several spheres that are situated one at a time in the measurement point, this way to have the complete measurements group the accelerator should be operated, under the same conditions, so many times like spheres have the spectrometer, this activity can consume a long time and in occasions due to the work load of Linac to complicate the measurement process too. The procedure developed in this work consisted on to situate all the spectrometer spheres at the same time and to make the reading by means of a single shot, to be able to apply this procedure, is necessary that before the measurements two characteristics are evaluated: the cross-talking of the spheres and the symmetry conditions of the neutron field. This method has been applied to determine the photo-neutrons spectrum produced by a lineal accelerator of medical use Varian ix of 15 MV to 100 cm of the isocenter located to 5 cm of depth of a solid water mannequin of 30 x 30 x 15 cm. The spectrum was used to determine the total flow and the environmental dose equivalent. (Author)

  1. Quality control in radiotherapy treatment: Radiation induced myelopathy

    Direct injury of the spinal cord has been reported many times, particularly in cases of overexposures with radiotherapy of neoplasm that occurred outside the Central Nervous System. Permanent damage to the spinal cord is the most feared complication of radiation therapy treatments and one of the relatively common causes of litigation for medical malpractice in the context of cancer treatment. We have learned from clinical experience, data from randomized trials and animal experimentation, the dose tolerance as well as the interfraction interval for hyperfractionation regimes. We are still lacking precious clinical information, in particular the dose tolerance in combined modality treatments that represent the vast majority of modern treatments. (author)

  2. A randomised multicentre trial of CHART versus conventional radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    Background and purpose: Continuous, hyperfractionated, accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) has shown promise of improved tumour control and reduced late morbidity in pilot studies and has now been tested in a multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial. Material and methods: Patients with squamous cell cancer in the main sites within the head and neck region with the general exception of early T1 N0 tumours were entered into the study by 11 centres. There was a 3:2 randomisation to either CHART, where a dose of 54 Gy was given in 36 fractions over 12 days, or to conventional therapy where 66 Gy was given in 33 fractions over 6.5 weeks. A total of 918 patients were included over a 5 year period from March 1990. Results: Acute Morbidity: Acute radiation mucositis was more severe with CHART, occurred earlier but settled sooner and was in nearly all cases healed by 8 weeks in both arms. Skin reactions were less severe and settled more quickly in the CHART treated patients. Tumour control and survival: Life table analyses of loco-regional control, primary tumour control, nodal control, disease-free interval, freedom from metastasis and survival showed no evidence of differences between the two arms. In exploratory subgroup analyses there was evidence of a greater response to CHART in younger patients (P = 0.041) and poorly differentiated tumours appeared to fare better with conventional radiotherapy (P = 0.030). In the larynx there was evidence of a trend towards increasing benefit with more advanced T stage (P = 0.002). Late treatment related morbidity: Osteoradionecrosis occurred in 0.4% of patients after CHART and 1.4% of patients after conventional radiotherapy. The incidence of chondritis or cartilage necrosis was similar in both arms. Life table analysis showed evidence of reduced severity in a number of late morbidities in favour of CHART. These were most striking for skin telangiectasia, superficial and deep ulceration of the mucosa and laryngeal oedema

  3. Monte Carlo simulation for the production of neutrons inside the labyrinth function rooms radiotherapy in head rotation of medical linear accelerator use and energy operation

    This work consists of an analysis, through computer simulation using the Monte Carlo method, the production of neutrons generated by the interaction of the beam with useful materials that are heavy in head-accelerated linear medical use. We developed a computer model of the head of the linear accelerator Varian, where there was the ambient dose equivalent due to the neutrons H*(10)n the plane of the patient and the region of the labyrinth bunker for several angles of operating at energies of 10, 15, 18 MV. It was found that production of neutrons in the plane of the patient has direct dependency with increasing beam energy useful, since the labyrinth it appears that besides energy the operating angle also has a direct influence on the production of neutrons in the region of the labyrinth, consequently the door. Therefore, a survey of H*(10)n at various angles with different operating ranges of energy contributes to better planning studies concerning shielding doors in rooms radiotherapy. (author)

  4. Intraoperative radiotherapy

    The potential benefit of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was originally recognized years ago and has recently attracted renewed interest. Modern radiotherapeutic approaches may be more successful as a result of technical innovation, particularly in the use of electron beam accelerators. Preliminary studies, mainly uncontrolled and nonrandomized, have assessed the role of IORT for treatment of a variety of deep seated abdominal, retroperitoneal, and pelvic cancers. The results of some studies show much promise, but prospective trials are needed to scientifically validate these favorable initial observations. (Auth.)

  5. T but not N stage predicts survival for patients with tonsillar carcinoma treated with external radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    Background. Our aim was to determine the efficacy of a therapeutic schedule including external radiation and brachytherapy in a consecutive and retrospective series of tonsillar carcinoma patients. Patients and methods. Ninety-six patients with tonsillar carcinoma were treated between 1988 and 2000 and were followed up for at least for three years. All patients were treated with accelerated hyperfractionated external radiotherapy, 68 patients had additional brachytherapy and 69 patients with advanced stages also received chemotherapy. There was no planned surgery even though 73% had N+ disease. Eleven patients with persistent neck nodes underwent ultimate salvage surgery. Results. The overall three-year survival (OS) was 70%. OS for the T stage was T1 90%, T2 89%, T3 54% and T4 60%. The corresponding numbers for the N stage were N0 61.5%, N1 73%, N2 78% and N3 66%. Accordingly OS was influenced by the T stage (p>0.001) rather than by N stage. Only four patients with salvage surgery had viable tumour cells in the specimen, their survival was not inferior. Discussion. The primary tumour stage is an essential determinant for survival in patients with irradiated tonsillar carcinoma. Neck dissection should be confined only as a salvage procedure

  6. Three-year outcomes of a once daily fractionation scheme for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)

    The aim of this study was to report 3-year outcomes of toxicity, cosmesis, and local control using a once daily fractionation scheme (49.95 Gy in 3.33 Gy once daily fractions) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between July 2008 and August 2010, women aged ≥40 years with ductal carcinoma in situ or node-negative invasive breast cancer ≤3 cm in diameter, treated with breast-conserving surgery achieving negative margins, were accrued to a prospective study. Women were treated with APBI using 3–5 photon beams, delivering 49.95 Gy over 15 once daily fractions over 3 weeks. Patients were assessed for toxicities, cosmesis, and local control rates before APBI and at specified time points. Thirty-four patients (mean age 60 years) with Tis 0 (n = 9) and T1N0 (n = 25) breast cancer were treated and followed up for an average of 39 months. Only 3% (1/34) patients experienced a grade 3 subcutaneous fibrosis and breast edema and 97% of the patients had good/excellent cosmetic outcome at 3 years. The 3-year rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) was 0% while the rate of contralateral breast events was 6%. The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) was 94%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Our novel accelerated partial breast fractionation scheme of 15 once daily fractions of 3.33 Gy (49.95 Gy total) is a remarkably well-tolerated regimen of 3D-CRT-based APBI. A larger cohort of patients is needed to further ascertain the toxicity of this accelerated partial breast regimen

  7. Poster — Thur Eve — 28: Enabling trajectory-based radiotherapy on a TrueBeam accelerator with the Eclipse treatment planning system

    Mullins, J; Asiev, K; DeBlois, F; Morcos, M; Seuntjens, J; Syme, A [Department of Oncology, McGill University (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    The TrueBeam linear accelerator platform has a developer's mode which permits the user dynamic control over many of the machine's mechanical and radiation systems. Using this research tool, synchronous couch and gantry motion can be programmed to simulate isocentric treatment with a shortened SAD, with benefits such as smaller projected MLC leaf widths and an increased dose rate. In this work, water tank measurements were used to commission a virtual linear accelerator with an 85 cm SAD in Eclipse, from which several arc-based radiotherapy treatments were generated, including an inverse optimized VMAT delivery. For each plan, the pertinent treatment delivery information was extracted from control points specified in the Eclipse-exported DICOM files using the pydicom package in Python, allowing construction of an XML control file. The dimensions of the jaws and MLC positions, defined for an 85 cm SAD in Eclipse, were scaled for delivery on a conventional SAD linear accelerator, and translational couch motion was added as a function of gantry angle to simulate delivery at 85 cm SAD. Ionization chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were used to compare the radiation delivery to dose calculations in Eclipse. With the exception of the VMAT delivery, ionization chamber measurements agreed within 3.3% of the Eclipse calculations. For the VMAT delivery, the ionization chamber was located in an inhomogeneous region, but gamma evaluation of the Gafchromic film plane resulted in a 94.5% passing rate using criteria of 3 mm/3%. The results indicate that Eclipse calculation infrastructure can be used.

  8. Predicting the Effect of Accelerated Fractionation in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Based on Molecular Marker Profiles: Data From a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic and predictive values of molecular marker expression profiles based on data from a randomized clinical trial of postoperative conventional fractionation (p-CF) therapy versus 7-day-per-week postoperative continuous accelerated irradiation (p-CAIR) therapy for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Tumor samples from 148 patients (72 p-CF and 76 p-CAIR patients) were available for molecular studies. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess levels of EGFR, nm23, Ki-67, p-53, and cyclin D1 expression. To evaluate the effect of fractionation relative to the expression profiles, data for locoregional tumor control (LRC) were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Survival curves were compared using the Cox f test. Results: Patients who had tumors with low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression levels and oral cavity/oropharyngeal primary cancer sites tended to benefit from p-CAIR. A joint score for the gain in LRC from p-CAIR based of these features was used to separate the patients into two groups: those who benefited significantly from p-CAIR with respect to LRC (n = 49 patients; 5-year LRC of 28% vs. 68%; p = 0.01) and those who did not benefit from p-CAIR (n = 99 patients; 5-year LRC of 72% vs. 66%; p = 0.38). The nm23 expression level appeared useful as a prognostic factor but not as a predictor of fractionation effect. Conclusions: These results support the studies that demonstrate the potential of molecular profiles to predict the benefit from accelerated radiotherapy. The molecular profile that favored accelerated treatment (low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression) was in a good accordance with results provided by other investigators. Combining individual predictors in a joint score may improve their predictive potential.

  9. Poster — Thur Eve — 28: Enabling trajectory-based radiotherapy on a TrueBeam accelerator with the Eclipse treatment planning system

    The TrueBeam linear accelerator platform has a developer's mode which permits the user dynamic control over many of the machine's mechanical and radiation systems. Using this research tool, synchronous couch and gantry motion can be programmed to simulate isocentric treatment with a shortened SAD, with benefits such as smaller projected MLC leaf widths and an increased dose rate. In this work, water tank measurements were used to commission a virtual linear accelerator with an 85 cm SAD in Eclipse, from which several arc-based radiotherapy treatments were generated, including an inverse optimized VMAT delivery. For each plan, the pertinent treatment delivery information was extracted from control points specified in the Eclipse-exported DICOM files using the pydicom package in Python, allowing construction of an XML control file. The dimensions of the jaws and MLC positions, defined for an 85 cm SAD in Eclipse, were scaled for delivery on a conventional SAD linear accelerator, and translational couch motion was added as a function of gantry angle to simulate delivery at 85 cm SAD. Ionization chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were used to compare the radiation delivery to dose calculations in Eclipse. With the exception of the VMAT delivery, ionization chamber measurements agreed within 3.3% of the Eclipse calculations. For the VMAT delivery, the ionization chamber was located in an inhomogeneous region, but gamma evaluation of the Gafchromic film plane resulted in a 94.5% passing rate using criteria of 3 mm/3%. The results indicate that Eclipse calculation infrastructure can be used

  10. NSCLC: primary tumor size - radiation dose-related accelerated, twice daily radiotherapy by target splitting, preceded by 2 cycles of chemotherapy. First results of a prospective study

    Ensuing a phase I trial of accelerated, twice daily high dose radiotherapy showing good tolerability, a prospective study relating primary tumor size with radiation dose in non-operated patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was started. From 01/2004 until 12/2006 79 patients with 81 histologically/cytologically proven NSCLC tumors were treated, representing 94% of all referred non-operated NSCLC patients in stage Mo, malignant pleural effusions excluded. For the majority of patients the conformal target splitting technique has been employed. The target is split into a cranial and a caudal part; beam arrangements in the two parts are completely independent. In order to reduce internal margins slow planning CTs (4 sec./slice) were used, patients freely breathing, 7 mm margins from gross tumor volume to planning target volume. We formed 4 groups with primary tumor sizes (mean number of 3 perpendicular diameters) 6,0 cm (11/41/22/7 patients, respectively); tumor doses of 73,8, 79,2, 84,6 and 90,0 Gy (ICRU) were applied to the primary tumors of the patients in the respective groups. Single dose 1,8 Gy; twice daily, interval 11 h; 5 days/week; duration 33 days median (range 29-42). Macroscopically involved nodes 61,2 Gy median (range 54,0-75,6 Gy), nodes electively 45,0 Gy (to volume about 6 cm cranial to apparently involved nodes). In 62 patients chemotherapy before radiotherapy was given, 2 cycles median, generally a cisplatin or carboplatin containing doublet; no concurrent chemotherapy. Median follow-up of all patients 16,7 months, of patients alive 19,3 months. Until now 10 local failures (0/11, 3/41, 5/22, 2/7 in the respective groups) and 2 regional failures occured, resulting in an actuarial local and regional tumor control of 80,1% and 96% at 2 years, respectively. Local failures relate to the primary tumor site, regional failures to the regional node sites. Overall actuarial 1-, 2-year survival rate for all patients: 76%, 56%, respectively, median 26

  11. Tracking the dynamic seroma cavity using fiducial markers in patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, UMDNJ/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Kearney, Thomas; Kirstein, Laurie [Division of Surgical Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, UMDNJ/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Chen Sining [Department of Biostatistics, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, UMDNJ/School of Public Health, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to perform an analysis of the changes in the dynamic seroma cavity based on fiducial markers in early stage breast cancer patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods: A prospective, single arm trial was designed to investigate the utility of gold fiducial markers in image guided APBI using 3D-CRT. At the time of lumpectomy, four to six suture-type gold fiducial markers were sutured to the walls of the cavity. Patients were treated with a fractionation scheme consisting of 15 fractions with a fractional dose of 333 cGy. Treatment design and planning followed NSABP/RTOG B-39 guidelines. During radiation treatment, daily kV imaging was performed and the markers were localized and tracked. The change in distance between fiducial markers was analyzed based on the planning CT and daily kV images. Results: Thirty-four patients were simulated at an average of 28 days after surgery, and started the treatment on an average of 39 days after surgery. The average intermarker distance (AiMD) between fiducial markers was strongly correlated to seroma volume. The average reduction in AiMD was 19.1% (range 0.0%-41.4%) and 10.8% (range 0.0%-35.6%) for all the patients between simulation and completion of radiotherapy, and between simulation and beginning of radiotherapy, respectively. The change of AiMD fits an exponential function with a half-life of seroma shrinkage. The average half-life for seroma shrinkage was 15 days. After accounting for the reduction which started to occur after surgery through CT simulation and treatment, radiation was found to have minimal impact on the distance change over the treatment course. Conclusions: Using the marker distance change as a surrogate for seroma volume, it appears that the seroma cavity experiences an exponential reduction in size. The change in seroma size has implications in the size of

  12. Determination of the neutron spectra in the treatment room of a linear accelerator for radiotherapy; Determinacion de los espectros de neutrones en la sala de tratamiento de un acelerador lineal para radioterapia

    Vega C, H.R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Cuerpo Academico de Radiobiologia, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Barquero, R. [Hospital Universitario Rio Hortega, Valladolid (Spain); Mendez, R.; Iniguez, M.P. [Depto. de Fisica Teorica, Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    By means of a series of measures and Monte Carlo calculations the dosimetric characteristics of the photoneutrons have been determined that take place in volume to a linear accelerator of radiotherapy of 18 MV, LINAC, mark Siemens Mevatron model. The measures were carried out with thermoluminescent dosemeters TLD 600 and TLD 700 that were naked exposed and confined with cover of Cd and Sn, inside a sphere of paraffin and inside spheres Bonner. (Author)

  13. Clinical Experiences With Onboard Imager KV Images for Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy Setup

    Purpose: To report our clinical experiences with on-board imager (OBI) kV image verification for cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and radiotherapy (SRT) treatments. Methods and Materials: Between January 2007 and May 2008, 42 patients (57 lesions) were treated with SRS with head frame immobilization and 13 patients (14 lesions) were treated with SRT with face mask immobilization at our institution. No margin was added to the gross tumor for SRS patients, and a 3-mm three-dimensional margin was added to the gross tumor to create the planning target volume for SRT patients. After localizing the patient with stereotactic target positioner (TaPo), orthogonal kV images using OBI were taken and fused to planning digital reconstructed radiographs. Suggested couch shifts in vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions were recorded. kV images were also taken immediately after treatment for 21 SRS patients and on a weekly basis for 6 SRT patients to assess any intrafraction changes. Results: For SRS patients, 57 pretreatment kV images were evaluated and the suggested shifts were all within 1 mm in any direction (i.e., within the accuracy of image fusion). For SRT patients, the suggested shifts were out of the 3-mm tolerance for 31 of 309 setups. Intrafraction motions were detected in 3 SRT patients. Conclusions: kV imaging provided a useful tool for SRS or SRT setups. For SRS setup with head frame, it provides radiographic confirmation of localization using the stereotactic target positioner. For SRT with mask, a 3-mm margin is adequate and feasible for routine setup when TaPo is combined with kV imaging

  14. Treatment results of different radiotherapy for 763 patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of different radiotherapy protocols in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. Methods: From 1976 to 2006, 763 patients with stage III cervical cancer (722 with squamous cell carcinoma and 41 with adenocarcinoma) were treated by radiotherapy in our hospital. 113 patients were treated by two-field whole pelvic irradiation in conventional fractionation plus brachytherapy (CF group), 44 by four-field whole pelvic irradiation in accelerated hyperfractionation plus brachytherapy (AHF group), and 606 by concomitant four-field unconventional fractionation radiotherapy and brachytherapy( FRT group). Sixty-one patients were treated by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Among 350 patients who had complete data, the shore-term efficacy and toxicities were compared. Results: For patients in CF, AHF and FRT groups, the 3-year overall survival rates (OS) were 65.7%, 66.8% and 44.3%, respectively (P=0.000), and the 5-year OS were 65.7%, 66.8% and 36.3%, respectively (P=0.000). The 10-year OS were 43.3% and 31.9% in CF and FRT groups(P=0.200). For squamous cell carcinoma,the OS was higher of patients with chemotherapy than those without. In 350 patients who had complete data, the local control rates of CF, AHF and FRT groups were 83.0%, 93.2% and 86.1%, respectively (χ2=2.70, P =0.259); AHF group had the lowest side effect rate, especially skin reaction (9.1%, χ2=20.25, P= 0.002); CF group had the lowest acute bone marrow suppression rate (χ2=25.95, P=0.000); for squamous cell carcinoma, the OS was higher in patients with chemotherapy than those without; the acute bone marrow and intestinal toxicities were more in patients with chemotherapy than those without. Conclusions: CF and AHF groups have similar 5-year OS of patients with advanced cervical cancer. AHF group has less toxicities, shorter treatment course and a trend of better local control. Concurrent chemoradiation could improve survival and local control of the patients with

  15. Be aware of neutrons outside short mazes from 10-mv linear accelerators x-rays in radiotherapy facilities

    During the radiation survey of a reinstalled 10-MV linear accelerator in an old radiation treatment facility, high dose rates of neutrons were observed. The area outside the maze entrance is used as a waiting room where patients, their relatives and staff other than those involved in the actual treatment can freely pass. High fluence rates of neutrons would cause an unnecessary high effective dose to the staff working in the vicinity of such a system, and it can be several orders higher than the doses received due to X-rays at the same location. However, the common knowledge appears to have been that the effect of neutrons at 10-MV X-ray linear accelerator facilities is negligible and shielding calculations models seldom mention neutrons for this operating energy level. Although data are scarce, reports regarding this phenomenon are now emerging. For the future, it is advocated that contributions from neutrons are considered already during the planning stage of new or modified facilities aimed for 10 MV and that estimated dose levels are verified. (authors)

  16. Determination of attenuation of X-radiations in some selected materials using the linear accelerator for radiotherapy

    Radiation travelling through a medium could be attenuated in different ways depending on the type of medium. The research was done on the above basis and was carried out at the Medical Physics department of the National Hospital Abuja using the linear accelerator and an ionization chamber (farmer-type) which served as a radiation detector. The materials used for this research were: the Perspex, concrete, moulded clay (mud), wood, jean material, ordinary material (clothe), cardboard paper, ordinary paper and foam of which each was of (12 x 12 x 1)cm3 except for Perspex which was of (30 x 30 x 1)cm3. They were all beamed at one after the other using energy of 6MV photons from the linear accelerator. The chamber detected the radiation passing through each material and sent it (radiation) in minute current signals to an electrometer which read the signals in milligray. The results obtained indicated that Perspex would best attenuate radiation, but considering its cost, concrete is considered cheaper and next to Perspex from the results and would play a better role.

  17. Calculation of the structural shielding of the radiotherapy treatment room equipped with a linear accelerator type Tomo therapy Hi-Art in the Oncology Center of Chihuahua, Mexico

    The helicoid tomo therapy is an external radiotherapy system of modulated intensity, guided by image, in which the radiation is imparted to the patient using a narrow radiation beam in helicoid form, in a similar way to the scanning process with a computerized tomography. The tomo therapy equipment (Tomo Therapy Hi-Art) consists in an electrons linear accelerator with acceleration voltages of 6 MV for treatment and 3.5 MV for image, coupled to a ring that turn around the patient as this is transferred through this ring in perpendicular sense to the radiation beam. The radiation beam is narrow because has the maximum size of 5 x 40 cm2 in the isocenter. The intensity modulation of the beam is carried out with a binary dynamic collimator of 64 crisscross sheets, and the guide by image though a system of megavoltage computerized tomography. Opposed to the radiation beam, also coupled to the rotational ring, a group of lead plates exists with a total thickness of 13 cm that acts as barrier of the primary radiation beam. The special configuration of the tomography equipment makes to have the following characteristics: 1) the presence of the lead barrier of the equipment reduces the intensity of the primary beam that reaches the bunker walls in considerable way, 2) the disperse and leakage radiations are increased with regard to a conventional accelerator due to the increase in the necessary irradiation time to produce modulated intensity fields by means of the narrow radiation beam. These special characteristics of the tomo therapy equipment make that particularities exist in the application of the formulations for structural shielding calculations that appears in the NCRP reports 49, NCRP 151 and IAEA-SRS-47. For this reason, several researches have development analytic models based on geometric considerations of continuous rotation of the equipment ring to determine the shielding requirements for the primary beam, the dispersed and leakage radiation in tomo therapy

  18. SU-E-T-190: First Integration of Steriotactic Radiotherapy Planning System Iplan with Elekta Linear Accelerator

    Purpose: For the first time in the world, BrainLAB has integrated its iPlan treatment planning system for clinical use with Elekta linear accelerator (Axesse with a Beam Modulator). The purpose of this study was to compare the calculated and measured doses with different chambers to establish the calculation accuracy of iPlan system. Methods: The iPlan has both Pencil beam (PB) and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation algorithms. Beam data include depth doses, profiles and output measurements for different field sizes. Collected data was verified by vendor and beam modelling was done. Further QA tests were carried out in our clinic. Dose calculation accuracy verified point, volumetric dose measurement using ion chambers of different volumes (0.01cc and 0.125cc). Planner dose verification was done using diode array. Plans were generated in iPlan and irradiated in Elekta Axesse linear accelerator. Results: Dose calculation accuracies verified using ion chamber for 6 and 10 MV beam were 3.5+/-0.33(PB), 1.7%+/-0.7(MC) and 3.9%+/-0.6(PB), 3.4%+/-0.6(MC) respectively. Using a pin point chamber, dose calculation accuracy for 6MV and 10MV was 3.8%+/-0.06(PB), 1.21%+/-0.2(MC) and 4.2%+/-0.6(PB), 3.1%+/-0.7(MC) respectively. The calculated planar dose distribution for 10.4×10.4 cm2 was verified using a diode array and the gamma analysis for 2%-2mm criteria yielded pass rates of 88 %(PB) and 98.8%(MC) respectively. 3mm-3% yields 100% passing for both MC and PB algorithm. Conclusion: Dose calculation accuracy was found to be within acceptable limits for MC for 6MV beam. PB for both beams and MC for 10 MV beam were found to be outside acceptable limits. The output measurements were done twice for conformation. The lower gamma matching was attributed to meager number of measured profiles (only two profiles for PB) and coarse measurement resolution for diagonal profile measurement (5mm). Based on these measurements we concluded that 6 MV MC algorithm is suitable for patient treatment

  19. Hyperfractionated craniospinal radiation therapy for primitive neuroectodermal tumors: results of a phase II study

    Purpose: To report the results of a Phase II study of hyperfractionated craniospinal radiation therapy, with and without adjuvant chemotherapy for primitive neuroectodermal brain tumors (PNETs) and malignant ependymomas. Methods and Materials: Newly diagnosed PNET or malignant ependymomas were treated with hyperfractionated craniospinal radiation therapy. The primary tumor site was treated to a dose of 72 Gy, with 30 Gy given to the rest of the craniospinal axis. The fraction size was 1.0 Gy, given twice a day. Patients with poor risk factors also received adjuvant chemotherapy with CCNU, cisplatin, and vincristine. Patients had follow-up for survival, time to tumor progression, and patterns of relapse. Results: A total of 39 patients (21 males/18 females) were treated between March 12, 1990 and October 29, 1992. The median age was 16 years (range 3-59 years). Tumor types included 25 medulloblastomas, 5 pineoblastomas, 5 cerebral PNETs, 1 spinal cord PNET, and 3 malignant ependymomas. Twenty cases were staged as poor-risk and received adjuvant chemotherapy following radiation. Three-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 60% and 63% for poor-risk and good-risk patients, respectively. Overall 3-year survival for these groups was 70% and 79%, respectively. For the 25 patients with medulloblastoma, there were 16 good-risk and 9 poor-risk patients. Three-year PFSs were 63% and 56%, respectively. The 5-year survival for good-risk medulloblastoma was 69% with 43.7% of these patients having failures outside the primary site. Conclusions: Survival in patients with good-risk medulloblastoma was no better than that seen in previous studies with single-fraction radiation, and the rate of failure outside the primary site is excessive. Those with poor-risk features had comparable survival to that seen in patients with good risk factors, but these patients were treated with chemotherapy, and the role that hyperfractionated radiation played in their outcome is uncertain

  20. Pentoxifylline enhances tumor oxygenation and radiosensitivity in rat rhabdomyosarcomas during continuous hyperfractionated irradiation

    Purpose: to examine the influence of the hemorrheologic agent pentoxifylline (PTX) on tumor oxygenation and radiosensitivity. Material and methods: tumor oxygenation in rat rhabdomyosarcomas R1H after PTX administration (50 mg/kg body weight) was measured using interstitial pO2 probes (licox CMP system and eppendorf pO2-histograph). Tumors were irradiated with 60Co γ-irradiation using single doses (15 and 30 Gy), conventional fractionation (60 Gy/30 fractions/6 weeks), and continuous hyperfractionation (54 Gy/36 fractions/18 days) in combination with PTX or an equivalent volume of physiological saline. Radiation effects were determined by tumor growth delay (2Vo), and by partial and complete tumor remission. Results: PTX increased tumor oxygenation for up to 45 min after administration of the drug. Single doses of 15 and 30 Gy of irradiation, when combined with PTX, produced little radiosensitization of the R1H tumors as indicated by dose-modifying factors (DMFs) of 1.11 and 1.04, respectively. In conventional fractionated irradiation with PTX, a DMF of 1.10 was obtained only. However, in continuous hyperfractionated irradiation with 18 x 50 mg/kg of PTX, the DMF with respect to tumor growth delay was found to be 1.37. Local tumor control was not influenced by PTX. In vitro studies identified R1H cells as p53 wildtype and showed a G1 arrest in response to irradiation. When 2 mM PTX was given prior to irradiation, it did not improve radiosensitivity of R1H cells as measured by clonogenic survival assays. Conclusion: PTX effectively enhances tumor oxygenation and radiosensitivity of R1H rhabdomyosarcomas, especially during continuous hyperfractionated irradiation. Given to rats as an adjuvant to fractionated irradiation, PTX does not enhance acute or late skin reactions or tumor metastasis. No radiosensitization was observed in vitro, when oxygen was not limiting. The observed radiosensitization by PTX is caused mainly by improved tumor oxygenation. (orig.)

  1. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with external beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Five-year results of a prospective phase II clinical study

    Mozsa, Emoeke [National Institute of Oncology, Centre of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Landesklinikum Wiener Neustadt, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Meszaros, Norbert; Major, Tibor; Froehlich, Georgina; Stelczer, Gabor; Fodor, Janos; Polgar, Csaba [National Institute of Oncology, Centre of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Sulyok, Zoltan [National Institute of Oncology, Centre of Surgery, Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this study was to report the 5-year results of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using external beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2011, 44 patients with low-risk, stage I-II breast cancer underwent breast-conserving surgery. Postoperative APBI was given by means of 3D-CRT using three to five non-coplanar fields. The total dose of APBI was 36.9 Gy (nine fractions of 4.1 Gy b.i.d.). The mean follow-up time was 58.2 months for surviving patients. Survival results, side effects, and cosmetic results were assessed. One (2.3 %) local recurrence was observed, for a 5-year actuarial rate of 3.7 %. Neither regional nor distant failure was observed. Two patients died of internal disease. The 5-year disease-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival rates were 96.3, 100, and 95.1 %, respectively. Acute side effects included grade 1 (G1) erythema in 75 %, G1 parenchymal induration in 46 %, and G1 pain in 46 % of patients. No G2 or higher acute side effect occurred. Late side effects included G1, G2, and G3 fibrosis in 44, 7, and 2 % of patients, respectively, G1 skin pigmentation in 12 %, and G1 pain in 2 %. Asymptomatic fat necrosis occurred in 14 %. Cosmetic results were rated excellent or good in 86 % of cases by the patients themselves and 84 % by the physicians. The 5-year local tumor control, toxicity profile, and cosmetic results of APBI delivered with external beam 3D-CRT are encouraging and comparable to other APBI series. (orig.) [German] Evaluation der 5-Jahres-Ergebnisse bezueglich Ueberleben, Tumorkontrolle, Nebenwirkungen und Kosmetik nach Teilbrustbestrahlung (APBI) mittels 3-D-konformaler, akzelerierter Radiotherapie (3D-CRT). Zwischen 2006 und 2011 wurden 44 Patienten mit Brustkrebs im Stadium I-II und niedrigem Risikoprofil brusterhaltend operiert. Die adjuvante, 3-D-konformale APBI wurde mittels 3-5 nonkoplanarer Feldern durchgefuehrt. Die Gesamtdosis betrug 36,9 Gy bei 9 -mal 4,1 Gy b.i.d.. Nach

  2. Main of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of the radiotherapy treatment process with a linear accelerator for medical purposes (linac)

    The radiation safety assessments traditionally have been based on analyzing the lessons you learn of new events that are becoming known. Although these methods are very valuable, their main limitation is that only cover known events and leave without consider other possible failures that have occurred or have not been published, This does not mean they can not occur. Other tools to analyze prospectively the safety, among which found Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). This paper summarizes the project of American Forum of agencies radiological and nuclear regulators aimed at applying the methods of APS treatment process with a linear accelerator. We defined as unintended consequences accidental exposures both single patient and multiple patients. FMEA methodology was used to define events initiators of accidents and methods of event trees and trees failure to identify the accident sequences that may occur. A Once quantified the frequency of occurrence of accidental sequences Analyses of importance in determining the most recent events significant from the point of view of safety. We identified 158 of equipment failure modes and 295 errors human if they occurred would have the potential to cause the accidental exposures defined. We studied 118 of initiating events accident and 120 barriers. We studied 434 accident sequences. The accidental exposure of a single patient were 40 times likely that multiple patients. 100% of the total frequency of accidental exposures on a single patient is caused by human errors . 8% of the total frequency of accidental exposures on multiple patients initiating events may occur by equipment failure (Computerized tomography, treatment planning system, throttle linear) and 92% by human error. As part of the and recommendations of the study presents the events that are more contribution on the reduction of risk of accidental exposure. (author)

  3. Estimation of absorbed dose in clinical radiotherapy linear accelerator beams: effect of ion chamber calibration and long-term stability

    The measured dose in water at reference point in phantom is a primary parameter for planning the treatment monitor units (MU); both in conventional and intensity modulated/image guided treatments. Traceability of dose accuracy therefore still depends mainly on the calibration factor of the ion chamber/dosimeter provided by the accredited Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) network of laboratories. The data related to Nd,water calibrations, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) postal dose validation, inter-comparison of different dosimeter/electrometers, and validity of Nd,water calibrations obtained from different calibration laboratories were analyzed to find out the extent of accuracy achievable. Nd,w factors in Gray/Coulomb calibrated at IBA, GmBH, Germany showed a mean variation of about 0.2% increase per year in three Farmer chambers, in three subsequent calibrations. Another ion chamber calibrated in different accredited laboratory (PTW, Germany) showed consistent Nd,w for 9 years period. The Strontium-90 beta check source response indicated long-term stability of the ion chambers within 1% for three chambers. Results of IAEA postal TL 'dose intercomparison' for three photon beams, 6 MV (two) and 15 MV (one), agreed well within our reported doses, with mean deviation of 0.03% (SD 0.87%) (n = 9). All the chamber/electrometer calibrated by a single SSDL realized absorbed doses in water within 0.13% standard deviations. However, about 1-2% differences in absorbed dose estimates observed when dosimeters calibrated from different calibration laboratories are compared in solid phantoms. Our data therefore imply that the dosimetry level maintained for clinical use of linear accelerator photon beams are within recommended levels of accuracy and uncertainities are within reported values. (author)

  4. Cost minimization analysis at the Hospital Mexico in the Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social for the accommodation of patients with radiotherapy with linear accelerator: shelter vs transfers

    Patients with oncological pathology have attended daily in sessions for several weeks in the linear accelerator radiation therapy. Persons subject to this intervention have moved to the Hospital Mexico of the social security of Costa Rica, place that centralizes this treatment. The Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social (CCSS) has considered two options depending on the place of origin of users: bear the costs of commuting from the area of habitual residence, or place them temporarily in a shelter provided by the institution; the CCSS has chosen the first alternative. This research has consisted of a cost-minimization analysis between these two alternatives. The study population are patients with oncological pathology attending sessions of radiotherapy with linear accelerator at the Hospital Mexico in the first half of 2009 using ambulances of Cruz Roja Costarricense. The size of the study population is 107 persons, the total number of transferred recorded in the Fondo Rotatorio de Operaciones of Hospital Mexico is 998. Patients came from five regions and twenty areas of health according to the geographical division of the CCSS. The variables included have been: cost per day by way of transfer, which involves the distance to the radiotherapy center of Hospital Mexico and the cost of the rate at Cruz Roja ambulance per Km (326.86 colons, according to the agreement CCSS-Cruz Roja in June 2009) estimated daily cost of lodging in a shelter, and the reason daily cost of relocation / daily cost of shelter. The cost of shelter includes food and were used data from the company International Medical Suppliers S. A. as a basis for estimating the daily cost, the price fixed by the company was 65 dollars a day, and the conversion into colons exchange rate as established by the Banco Central de Costa Rica; dated April 30, 2010, the amount has been 33.542.60 colons. The reason for each area of health was given by the ratio of the average daily cost in colons by way of ambulance of

  5. Dose volume histogram analysis of normal structures associated with accelerated partial breast irradiation delivered by high dose rate brachytherapy and comparison with whole breast external beam radiotherapy fields

    Mutyala Subhakar

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess the radiation dose delivered to the heart and ipsilateral lung during accelerated partial breast brachytherapy using a MammoSite™ applicator and compare to those produced by whole breast external beam radiotherapy (WBRT. Materials and methods Dosimetric analysis was conducted on patients receiving MammoSite breast brachytherapy following conservative surgery for invasive ductal carcinoma. Cardiac dose was evaluated for patients with left breast tumors with a CT scan encompassing the entire heart. Lung dose was evaluated for patients in whom the entire lung was scanned. The prescription dose of 3400 cGy was 1 cm from the balloon surface. MammoSite dosimetry was compared to simulated WBRT fields with and without radiobiological correction for the effects of dose and fractionation. Dose parameters such as the volume of the structure receiving 10 Gy or more (V10 and the dose received by 20 cc of the structure (D20, were calculated as well as the maximum and mean doses received. Results Fifteen patients were studied, five had complete lung data and six had left-sided tumors with complete cardiac data. Ipsilateral lung volumes ranged from 925–1380 cc. Cardiac volumes ranged from 337–551 cc. MammoSite resulted in a significantly lower percentage lung V30 and lung and cardiac V20 than the WBRT fields, with and without radiobiological correction. Conclusion This study gives low values for incidental radiation received by the heart and ipsilateral lung using the MammoSite applicator. The volume of heart and lung irradiated to clinically significant levels was significantly lower with the MammoSite applicator than using simulated WBRT fields of the same CT data sets. Trial registration Dana Farber Trial Registry number 03-179

  6. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with external beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Five-year results of a prospective phase II clinical study

    The aim of this study was to report the 5-year results of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using external beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2011, 44 patients with low-risk, stage I-II breast cancer underwent breast-conserving surgery. Postoperative APBI was given by means of 3D-CRT using three to five non-coplanar fields. The total dose of APBI was 36.9 Gy (nine fractions of 4.1 Gy b.i.d.). The mean follow-up time was 58.2 months for surviving patients. Survival results, side effects, and cosmetic results were assessed. One (2.3 %) local recurrence was observed, for a 5-year actuarial rate of 3.7 %. Neither regional nor distant failure was observed. Two patients died of internal disease. The 5-year disease-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival rates were 96.3, 100, and 95.1 %, respectively. Acute side effects included grade 1 (G1) erythema in 75 %, G1 parenchymal induration in 46 %, and G1 pain in 46 % of patients. No G2 or higher acute side effect occurred. Late side effects included G1, G2, and G3 fibrosis in 44, 7, and 2 % of patients, respectively, G1 skin pigmentation in 12 %, and G1 pain in 2 %. Asymptomatic fat necrosis occurred in 14 %. Cosmetic results were rated excellent or good in 86 % of cases by the patients themselves and 84 % by the physicians. The 5-year local tumor control, toxicity profile, and cosmetic results of APBI delivered with external beam 3D-CRT are encouraging and comparable to other APBI series. (orig.)

  7. Long-term results of low dose daily cisplatin chemotherapy used concurrently with modestly accelerated radiotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head neck cancer region

    Pramod Kumar Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Concurrent single agent cisplatin (CDDP with radiotherapy (RT improves outcomes in locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head neck (LA-SCCHN. CDDP at 100 mg/m 2 at 3 weekly intervals raise compliance, hospitalization, and supportive care issues. Low dose daily CDDP was delivered with RT to evaluate its compliance, long-term safety and efficacy. Patients and Methods: During the period of month between November 2005 and May 2007, 52 patients of stage III/IV LA-SCCHN were given with conventional RT in a phased manner (dose-70 Gy/35 fractions/6 weeks along with daily CDDP (6 mg/m 2 ; capped 10 mg-30 cycles over 6 weeks. No hospitalization or antiemetic cover was planned. Compliance, acute and late toxicity were recorded as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer grading system and survival outcomes were evaluated. Results : The median follow-up was 63 months. 43 (83% cases complied with RT schedule and >28 cycles of CDDP was administered in 38 (73% cases. Confluent mucositis was seen in 65%, Grade III/IV dysphagia in 67%; 77% required enteral feed and hospitalization in 15%. There were four treatment related deaths. At 5 years, the loco-regional control was 25% (median-11 months and the overall survival was 31% (median-11 months. The 5 years actuarial rates of late Grade III/IV toxicity was 24%. Late swallowing difficulty/aspiration were seen in 17%; xerostomia-40%; ototoxicity-6%; nephrotoxicity-4%; and no second malignancy. Conclusion: Low dose cisplatin with moderately accelerated RT schedule appears feasible and logistically suitable "out-patient" option without increasing long-term toxicity in LA-SCCHN cancer region.

  8. Radiotherapy cure: safety

    In radiotherapy, a precisely measured dose of ionising radiation is directed at a limited tumour area so as not to damage healthy tissues. The most important form of therapy is external radiation therapy given by means of radiotherapy equipment. The bigger the tumour, the more cancer cells it contains and the higher the radiation dose that is needed to destroy the tumour. Different cancer types respond differently to radiation. Healthy tissues also respond in different ways to radiotherapy, e.g. the reaction may come during the treatment or later. The growth of some cancer types accelerates in two to four weeks after the initiation of the therapy. This information has brought about a reduction in treatment times so as to avoid cell growth that might endanger the treatment result. The radiotherapy that is given today by specialist doctors is safe because the side effects of the treatment are well under control. (orig.)

  9. Prospective evaluation of delayed central nervous system (CNS) toxicity of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI)

    Purpose: Prospective evaluation of chronic radiation effects on the healthy adult brain using neuropsychological testing of intelligence, attention, and memory. Methods and Materials: 58 patients (43 ± 10 yr) undergoing hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) (TBI, 14.4 Gy, 12 x 1.2 Gy in 4 days) before bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation were prospectively included. Twenty-one recurrence-free long-term survivors were re-examined 6-36 months (median 27 months) after completion of TBI. Neuropsychological testing included assessment of general intelligence, attention, and memory using normative, standardized psychometric tests. Mood status was controlled, as well. Test results are given as IQ scores (population mean 100) or percentiles for attention and memory (population mean 50). Results: The 21 patients showed normal baseline test results of IQ (101 ± 13) and attention (53 ± 28), with memory test scores below average (35 ± 21). Test results of IQ (98 ± 17), attention (58 ± 27), and memory (43 ± 28) showed no signs of clinically measurable radiation damage to higher CNS (central nervous system) functions during the follow-up. The mood status was improved. Conclusion: The investigation of CNS toxicity after hyperfractionated TBI showed no deterioration of test results in adult recurrence-free patients with tumor-free CNS. The median follow-up of 27 months will be extended.

  10. DART-bid: dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily. High local control in early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer

    Zehentmayr, Franz; Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversitaet, Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Salzburg (Austria); Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Dagn, Karin; Fastner, Gerd [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Porsch, Peter; Studnicka, Michael [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Pneumologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-09-23

    While surgery is considered standard of care for early stage (I/II), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiotherapy is a widely accepted alternative for medically unfit patients or those who refuse surgery. International guidelines recommend several treatment options, comprising stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small tumors, conventional radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy for larger sized especially centrally located lesions or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated RT (CHART). This study presents clinical outcome and toxicity for patients treated with a dose-differentiated accelerated schedule using 1.8 Gy bid (DART-bid). Between April 2002 and December 2010, 54 patients (median age 71 years, median Karnofsky performance score 70 %) were treated for early stage NSCLC. Total doses were applied according to tumor diameter: 73.8 Gy for < 2.5 cm, 79.2 Gy for 2.5-4.5 cm, 84.6 Gy for 4.5-6 cm, 90 Gy for > 6 cm. The median follow-up was 28.5 months (range 2-108 months); actuarial local control (LC) at 2 and 3 years was 88 %, while regional control was 100 %. There were 10 patients (19 %) who died of the tumor, and 18 patients (33 %) died due to cardiovascular or pulmonary causes. A total of 11 patients (20 %) died intercurrently without evidence of progression or treatment-related toxicity at the last follow-up, while 15 patients (28 %) are alive. Acute esophagitis ≤ grade 2 occurred in 7 cases, 2 patients developed grade 2 chronic pulmonary fibrosis. DART-bid yields high LC without significant toxicity. For centrally located and/or large (> 5 cm) early stage tumors, where SBRT is not feasible, this method might serve as radiotherapeutic alternative to present treatment recommendations, with the need of confirmation in larger cohorts. (orig.) [German] Die Standardbehandlung fuer nichtkleinzellige Bronchialkarzinome (NSCLC) im Stadium I/II ist die Operation, wobei Radiotherapie fuer Patienten, die nicht operabel sind oder die Operation ablehnen, als Alternative

  11. Peripheral dose measurements with diode and thermoluminescence dosimeters for intensity modulated radiotherapy delivered with conventional and un-conventional linear accelerator

    Rajesh Kinhikar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to measure the peripheral dose (PD with diode and thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with linear accelerator (conventional LINAC, and tomotherapy (novel LINAC. Ten patients each were selected from Trilogy dual-energy and from Hi-Art II tomotherapy. Two diodes were kept at 20 and 25 cm from treatment field edge. TLDs (LiF:MgTi were also kept at same distance. TLDs were also kept at 5, 10, and 15 cm from field edge. The TLDs were read with REXON reader. The readings at the respective distance were recorded for both diode and TLD. The PD was estimated by taking the ratio of measured dose at the particular distance to the prescription dose. PD was then compared with diode and TLD for LINAC and tomotherapy. Mean PD for LINAC with TLD and diode was 2.52 cGy (SD 0.69, 2.07 cGy (SD 0.88 at 20 cm, respectively, while at 25 cm, it was 1.94 cGy (SD 0.58 and 1.5 cGy (SD 0.75, respectively. Mean PD for tomotherapy with TLD and diode was 1.681 cGy SD 0.53 and 1.58 (SD 0.44 at 20 cm, respectively. The PD was 1.24 cGy (SD 0.42 and 1.088 cGy (SD 0.35 at 25 cm, respectively, for tomotherapy. Overall, PD from tomotherapy was found lower than LINAC by the factor of 1.2-1.5. PD measurement is essential to find out the potential of secondary cancer. PD for both (conventional LINAC and novel LINACs (tomotherapy were measured and compared with each other. The comparison of the values for PD presented in this work and those published in the literature is difficult because of the different experimental conditions. The diode and TLD readings were reproducible and both the detector readings were comparable.

  12. WE-G-BRE-09: Targeted Radiotherapy Enhancement During Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (ABPI) Using Controlled Release of Gold Nanoparticles (GNPs)

    Cifter, G; Ngwa, W [University of Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Dana Farber Cancer Institute (United States); Chin, J; Cifter, F; Sajo, E [University of Massachusetts (United States); Sinha, N [Wentworth Institute of Technology, Boston, MA (United States); Bellon, J [Harvard Medical School, Dana Farber Cancer Institute (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Several studies have demonstrated low rates of local recurrence with brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). However, long-term outcomes on toxicity (e.g. telangiectasia), and cosmesis remain a major concern. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of using targeted non-toxic radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for localized dose enhancement to the planning target volume (PTV) during APBI while reducing dose to normal tissue. Methods: Two approaches for administering the GNPs were considered. In one approach, GNPs are assumed to be incorporated in a micrometer-thick polymer film on the surface of routinely used mammosite balloon applicators, for sustained controlled in-situ release, and subsequent treatment using 50-kVp Xoft devices. In case two, GNPs are administered directly into the lumpectomy cavity e.g. via injection or using fiducials coated with the GNP-loaded polymer film. Recent studies have validated the use of fiducials for reducing the PTV margin during APBI with 6 MV beams. An experimentally determined diffusion coefficient was used to determine space-time customizable distribution of GNPs for feasible in-vivo concentrations of 43 mg/g. An analytic calculational approach from previously published work was employed to estimate the dose enhancement due to GNPs (2 and 10 nm) as a function of distance up to 1 cm from lumpectomy cavity. Results: Dose enhancement due to GNP was found to be about 130% for 50-kVp x-rays, and 110% for 6-MV external beam radiotherapy, 1 cm away from the lumpectomy cavity wall. Higher customizable dose enhancement could be achieved at other distances as a function of nanoparticle size. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that significant dose enhancement can be achieved to residual tumor cells targeted with GNPs during APBI with electronic brachytherapy or external beam therapy. The findings provide a useful basis for developing nanoparticle

  13. WE-G-BRE-09: Targeted Radiotherapy Enhancement During Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (ABPI) Using Controlled Release of Gold Nanoparticles (GNPs)

    Purpose: Several studies have demonstrated low rates of local recurrence with brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). However, long-term outcomes on toxicity (e.g. telangiectasia), and cosmesis remain a major concern. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of using targeted non-toxic radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for localized dose enhancement to the planning target volume (PTV) during APBI while reducing dose to normal tissue. Methods: Two approaches for administering the GNPs were considered. In one approach, GNPs are assumed to be incorporated in a micrometer-thick polymer film on the surface of routinely used mammosite balloon applicators, for sustained controlled in-situ release, and subsequent treatment using 50-kVp Xoft devices. In case two, GNPs are administered directly into the lumpectomy cavity e.g. via injection or using fiducials coated with the GNP-loaded polymer film. Recent studies have validated the use of fiducials for reducing the PTV margin during APBI with 6 MV beams. An experimentally determined diffusion coefficient was used to determine space-time customizable distribution of GNPs for feasible in-vivo concentrations of 43 mg/g. An analytic calculational approach from previously published work was employed to estimate the dose enhancement due to GNPs (2 and 10 nm) as a function of distance up to 1 cm from lumpectomy cavity. Results: Dose enhancement due to GNP was found to be about 130% for 50-kVp x-rays, and 110% for 6-MV external beam radiotherapy, 1 cm away from the lumpectomy cavity wall. Higher customizable dose enhancement could be achieved at other distances as a function of nanoparticle size. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that significant dose enhancement can be achieved to residual tumor cells targeted with GNPs during APBI with electronic brachytherapy or external beam therapy. The findings provide a useful basis for developing nanoparticle

  14. Modelling accelerated fractionation in radiotherapy

    This study was undertaken to investigate optimum treatment schedules for highly proliferative tumours. The linear quadratic model is used to predict the most effective fractionation regimes. It should be pointed out that greater early effects are associated with improved tumour control, as such these data should be treated as a useful guideline and should never be used out of context with clinical experience. The linear quadratic model with proliferation has been used to investigate the effect on cell survival and associated tumour control probability (TCP)

  15. Pentoxifylline enhances tumor oxygenation and radiosensitivity in rat rhabdomyosarcomas during continuous hyperfractionated irradiation

    Zywietz, F. [Inst. for Biophysics and Radiobiology, Univ. Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Boehm, L. [Dept. of Pharmacology, Univ. of Stellenbosch, Tygerberg (South Africa); Sagowski, C.; Kehrl, W. [Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Univ. Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    Purpose: to examine the influence of the hemorrheologic agent pentoxifylline (PTX) on tumor oxygenation and radiosensitivity. Material and methods: tumor oxygenation in rat rhabdomyosarcomas R1H after PTX administration (50 mg/kg body weight) was measured using interstitial pO{sub 2} probes (licox CMP system and eppendorf pO{sub 2}-histograph). Tumors were irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-irradiation using single doses (15 and 30 Gy), conventional fractionation (60 Gy/30 fractions/6 weeks), and continuous hyperfractionation (54 Gy/36 fractions/18 days) in combination with PTX or an equivalent volume of physiological saline. Radiation effects were determined by tumor growth delay (2V{sub o}), and by partial and complete tumor remission. Results: PTX increased tumor oxygenation for up to 45 min after administration of the drug. Single doses of 15 and 30 Gy of irradiation, when combined with PTX, produced little radiosensitization of the R1H tumors as indicated by dose-modifying factors (DMFs) of 1.11 and 1.04, respectively. In conventional fractionated irradiation with PTX, a DMF of 1.10 was obtained only. However, in continuous hyperfractionated irradiation with 18 x 50 mg/kg of PTX, the DMF with respect to tumor growth delay was found to be 1.37. Local tumor control was not influenced by PTX. In vitro studies identified R1H cells as p53 wildtype and showed a G1 arrest in response to irradiation. When 2 mM PTX was given prior to irradiation, it did not improve radiosensitivity of R1H cells as measured by clonogenic survival assays. Conclusion: PTX effectively enhances tumor oxygenation and radiosensitivity of R1H rhabdomyosarcomas, especially during continuous hyperfractionated irradiation. Given to rats as an adjuvant to fractionated irradiation, PTX does not enhance acute or late skin reactions or tumor metastasis. No radiosensitization was observed in vitro, when oxygen was not limiting. The observed radiosensitization by PTX is caused mainly by improved tumor

  16. IAEA-HypoX. A randomized multicenter study of the hypoxic radiosensitizer nimorazole concomitant with accelerated radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can be improved by hypoxic modification using nimorazole (NIM) in association with accelerated fractionation. Materials and methods: The protocol was activated in March 2012 as an international multicenter randomized trial in patients with HNSCC. Tumors were treated to a dose of 66–70 Gy, 33–35 fractions, 6 fractions per week. NIM was administered in a dose of 1.2 g per m2, 90 min before the first daily RT fraction. The primary endpoint was loco-regional failure. The trial was closed prematurely by June 2014 due to poor recruitment. An associated quality assurance program was performed to ensure the consistency of RT with the protocol guidelines. Results: The trial was dimensioned to include 600 patients in 3 years, but only 104 patients were randomized between March 2012 and May 2014 due to the inability to involve three major centers and the insufficient recruitment rate from the other participating centers. Twenty patients from two centers had to be excluded from the analysis due to the unavailability of the follow-up data. Among the remaining 84 patients, 82 patients were evaluable (39 and 43 patients in the RT + NIM and the RT-alone arms, respectively). The treatment compliance was good with only six patients not completing the full planned RT course, and 31 patients (79%) out of 39 allocated for NIM, achieving at least 90% of the prescribed drug dose. At the time of evaluation, 40 patients had failed to achieve persistent loco-regional tumor control, and a total of 45 patients had died. The use of NIM improved the loco-regional tumor control with an 18 month post-randomization cumulative failure rate of 33% versus 51% in the control arm, yielding a risk difference of 18% (CI −3% to 39%; P = 0.10). The corresponding values for overall death was 43% versus 62%, yielding a risk difference of 19% (CI −3% to 42%; P = 0.10). Sixteen patients, out of 55

  17. Quantitative analysis of results of quality control tests in linear accelerators used in radiotherapy; Analise quantitativa dos resultados de testes de controle de qualidade em aceleradores lineares usados em radioterapia

    Passaro, Bruno M.; Rodrigues, Laura N. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Videira, Heber S., E-mail: bruno.passaro@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this study is to assess and analyze the stability of the calibration factor of three linear accelerators, as well as the other dosimetric parameters normally included in a program of quality control in radiotherapy. The average calibration factors of the accelerators for the period of approximately four years for the Clinac 600C and Clinac 6EX were (0.998±0.012) and (0.996±0.014), respectively. For the Clinac 2100CD 6 MV and 15 MV was (1.008±0.009) and (1.006±0.010), respectively, in a period of approximately four years. The data of the calibration factors were divided into four subgroups for a more detailed analysis of behavior over the years. Through statistical analysis of calibration factors, we found that for the 600C and Clinacs 2100CD, is an expected probability that more than 90% of cases the values are within acceptable ranges according to TG-142, while for the Clinac 6EX is expected around 85% since this had several exchanges of accelerator components. The values of TPR20,10 of three accelerators are practically constant and within acceptable limits according to the TG-142. It can be concluded that a detailed study of data from the calibration factor of the accelerators and TPR{sub 20},{sub 10} from a quantitative point of view, is extremely useful in a quality assurance program. (author)

  18. Dose escalation of accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (at 3 Gy/fraction) with concurrent vinorelbine and carboplatin chemotherapy in unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase I trial

    Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy can shorten total treatment time and overcome the accelerated repopulation of tumour cells during radiotherapy. This therapeutic approach has demonstrated good efficacy in the treatment of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the optimal fractionation scheme remains uncertain. The purpose of this phase I trial was to explore the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT) (at 3 Gy/fraction) administered in combination with concurrent vinorelbine (NVB) and carboplatin (CBP) chemotherapy for unresectable stage III NSCLC. Previously untreated cases of unresectable stage III NSCLC received accelerated hypofractionated 3-DCRT, delivered at 3 Gy per fraction, once daily, with five fractions per week. The starting dose was 66 Gy and an increment of 3 Gy was utilized. Higher doses continued to be tested in patient groups until the emergence of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). The MTD was regarded as the dose that was one step below the dose at which DLT occurred. Patients received at least one cycle of a concurrent two-drug chemotherapy regimen of NVB and CBP. A total of 13 patients were enrolled and progressed through three dose escalation groups: 66 Gy, 69 Gy, and 72 Gy. No treatment-related deaths occurred. The major adverse events included radiation oesophagitis, radiation pneumonitis, and neutropenia. Nausea, fatigue, and anorexia were commonly observed, although the magnitude of these events was typically relatively minor. Among the entire group, four instances of DLT were observed, including two cases of grade 3 radiation oesophagitis, one case of grade 3 radiation pneumonitis, and one case of grade 4 neutropenia. All of these cases of DLT occurred in the 72 Gy group. Therefore, 72 Gy was designated as the DLT dose level, and the lower dose of 69 Gy was regarded as the MTD. For unresectable stage III NSCLC 69 Gy (at 3 Gy/fraction) was

  19. Histopathological changes in the irradiated normal organs of guinea pigs with conventional fractionation and hyperfractionation

    Guinea pigs were divided into groups according to four irradiation schedules : 2 Gy/3 Gy x 1/day, five fractions/week, total 80 Gy/81 Gy (A/C group) and 1.0 Gy/1.5 Gy x 2/day, ten fractions/week, total 80 Gy/81 Gy (B/D group). The A group and the C group pathologically caused severe damage in the kidney six and three months after irradiation, respectively. In the B group pathological analysis suggested that only slight-to-moderate changes were occurred in the Bowman's capsule. The D group caused slight damage in the kidney six months after irradiation. Hyperfractionation (B/D group) used in this protocol can clearly reduce radiation damage in the kidney of guinea pigs as compared with conventional fractionation (A/C group). (author)

  20. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    Ruetten, Heidi, E-mail: h.rutten@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Takes, Robert P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Knuijt, Simone [Department of Rehabilitation/Speech Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rooijakkers, Antoinette F. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Berg, Manon van den [Department of Gastroenterology-Dietetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Herpen, Carla M.L. van [Department of Medical Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  1. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence–free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  2. To the range and back - benefits vs. costs in altered radiotherapy for head and neck cancers

    To analyze the benefit and costs of clinical trials on altered fractionated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Doubts and uncertainties concerning overall therapeutic gain are discussed. Data sets of 12 clinical trials most often cited in the literature, including all together 4682 cases of head and neck cancer are included into the analysis. They represent all tumours stages and sites and wide variety of altered fractionation schedules, i.e. accelerated (AF), hyperfractionated (HF) and hybrid accelerated hyperfractionated (AHF) regimes. At least 3-year locoregional control and the incidence of consequential late effects and true late complications are used as end-points for benefits and costs respectively. In some studies AF/AHF regimens were superior for advanced tumours (CHART; EORTC 22791) but not for T2, whereas in others significant benefit was noted for tumours smaller than 4 cm (PMH). Various uncertainties arise concerning selection and dosimetric biases. Interpretation of the costs is even more uncertain than that of the LRC benefit. Grade 2 and 3 late effects (LE) are often grouped together; several events may occur in the same patient. Whilst the LRC is quantified as actuarial, the LE is presented as a crude data. Moreover; consequential late effects can mostly be only deducted from the published results. Thus the costs are generally underestimated. For some trials (Cairo, EORTC 22851), LRC benefit and the TG is apparently positive, but precise quantitation of LE and CLE makes some trials negative. Final analysis suggests that an overall therapeutic gain is moderate in the range of 0-15%. Analysis of the Normalized Total Doses corrected for changes in fraction size and overall treatment time and recalculated for 50% probability of the LRC (NTCD50) shows an average of 0.6 Gy/day balancing tumour clonogen repopulation might be to low, and it can increase to 0.85 Gy/day or even 1.1-1.2 Gy/day during the weekends. Furthermore, it seems that the lag

  3. DART-bid: dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily. High local control in early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer

    While surgery is considered standard of care for early stage (I/II), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiotherapy is a widely accepted alternative for medically unfit patients or those who refuse surgery. International guidelines recommend several treatment options, comprising stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small tumors, conventional radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy for larger sized especially centrally located lesions or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated RT (CHART). This study presents clinical outcome and toxicity for patients treated with a dose-differentiated accelerated schedule using 1.8 Gy bid (DART-bid). Between April 2002 and December 2010, 54 patients (median age 71 years, median Karnofsky performance score 70 %) were treated for early stage NSCLC. Total doses were applied according to tumor diameter: 73.8 Gy for 6 cm. The median follow-up was 28.5 months (range 2-108 months); actuarial local control (LC) at 2 and 3 years was 88 %, while regional control was 100 %. There were 10 patients (19 %) who died of the tumor, and 18 patients (33 %) died due to cardiovascular or pulmonary causes. A total of 11 patients (20 %) died intercurrently without evidence of progression or treatment-related toxicity at the last follow-up, while 15 patients (28 %) are alive. Acute esophagitis ≤ grade 2 occurred in 7 cases, 2 patients developed grade 2 chronic pulmonary fibrosis. DART-bid yields high LC without significant toxicity. For centrally located and/or large (> 5 cm) early stage tumors, where SBRT is not feasible, this method might serve as radiotherapeutic alternative to present treatment recommendations, with the need of confirmation in larger cohorts. (orig.)

  4. What next in fractionated radiotherapy

    Trends in models for predicting the total dose required to produce tolerable normal-tissue injury can be seen by the progression from the ''cube root law'', through Strandqvist's slope of 0.22, to NSD, TDF and CRE which have separate time and fraction number exponents, to even better approximations now available. The dose-response formulae that can be used to define the effect of fraction size (and number) include (1) the linear quadratic (LQ) model (2) the two-component (TC) multi-target model and (3) repair-misrepair models. The LQ model offers considerable convenience, requires only two parameters to be determined, and emphasizes the difference between late and early normal-tissue dependence on dose per fraction first shown by exponents greater than the NSD slope of 0.24. Exponents of overall time, e.g. Tsup(0.11), yield the wrong shape of time curve, suggesting that most proliferating occurs early, although it really occurs after a delay depending on the turnover time of the tissue. Improved clinical results are being sought by hyperfractionation, accelerated fractionation, or continuous low dose rate irradiation as in interstitial implants. (U.K.)

  5. Hyperfractionation in the reirradiation of head and neck cancers. Result of a pilot study

    Between November 1988 and May 1992, 19 patients were enrolled in a pilot study to evaluate feasibility and results of a hyperfractionated reirradiation in the treatment of head and neck recurrences or second primary tumors developed in previously irradiated volume. Patients were divided in two groups according to the initial treatment before reirradiation: group 1 included 14 patients treated with radical surgery and reirradiated because histological evidence of positive margins and/or extra capsular spread of tumor in lymph node metastases; group 2 included five patients treated with three cycles of CDDP-5FU for unresectable tumors and reirradiated because they experienced a complete or good partial (≥80%) response after chemotherapy. The reirradiation planned dose was 60 Gy in 5 weeks, with two daily fractions of 1.2 Gy spaced by 6-8 h intervals. Reirradiation was delivered exclusively with photon beams in 17 cases and with a combination of photon and electron beams in two cases. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 45 months with a median of 17 months. Of the 19 patients, 13 received the reirradiation scheduled dose of 60 Gy. For the six remaining patients, the reirradiation doses ranged from 45.6 to 57.6 Gy. All patients experienced an acute mucositis which never led to interruption of treatment. Of the 14 patients of group 1, 10 died 3-41 months after reirradiation (mean: 14 months), three were disease-free 16-37 months after reirradiation and one patient was alive with local progressive disease 39 months after the reirradiation. The overall local control within reirradiated volume was 36% before and 43% after salvage surgery. For all group 1 patients, 12- and 24-month overall survival was 64 and 36%, respectively (mean: 21 months). All patients of group 2 presented a local failure within the reirradiated volume. Three of them died 12, 16 and 25 months after reirradiation, while two of them were alive with progressive disease 25 and 30 months after reirradiation

  6. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy with Concurrent Cisplatin/5-Fluorouracil for Locoregional Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Analysis of 105 Consecutive Patients

    David Zaboli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We reviewed a cohort of patients with previously untreated locoregional advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC who received a uniform chemoradiotherapy regimen. Methods. Retrospective review was performed of 105 patients with stage III or IV HNSCC treated at Greater Baltimore Medical Center from 2000 to 2007. Radiation included 125 cGy twice daily for a total 70 Gy to the primary site. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (12 mg/m2/h daily for five days and 5-fluorouracil (600 mg/m2/20 h daily for five days, given with weeks one and six of radiation. All but seven patients with N2 or greater disease received planned neck dissection after chemoradiotherapy. Primary outcomes were overall survival (OS, locoregional control (LRC, and disease-free survival (DFS. Results. Median followup of surviving patients was 57.6 months. Five-year OS was 60%, LRC was 68%, and DFS was 56%. Predictors of increased mortality included age ≥55, female gender, hypopharyngeal primary, and T3/T4 stage. Twelve patients developed locoregional recurrences, and 16 patients developed distant metastases. Eighteen second primary malignancies were diagnosed in 17 patients. Conclusions. The CRT regimen resulted in favorable outcomes. However, locoregional and distant recurrences cause significant mortality and highlight the need for more effective therapies to prevent and manage these events.

  7. Postoperative external beam radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    Chun, Ha Chung; Lee, Myung Za [College of Medicine, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of craniospinal irradiation for patients with medulloblastoma and to define the optimal radiotherapeutic regimen. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 43 patients with medulloblastoma who were treated with external beam craniospinal radiotherapy at our institution between May, 1984 and April, 1998. Median follow up period was 47 months with range of 18 to 86 months. Twenty seven patients were male and sixteen patients were female, a male to female ratio of 1.7:1. Surgery consisted of biopsy alone in 5 patients, subtotal excision in 24 patients, and gross total excision in 14 patients. All of the patients were treated with craniospinal irradiation. All of the patients except four received fat least 5,000 cGy to the posterior fossa and forty patients received more than 3,000 cGy to the spinal cord. The overall survival rates at 5 and 7 years for entire group of patients were 67% and 56%, respectively. Corresponding disease free survival rates were 60% and 51%, respectively. The rates of disease control in the posterior fossa were 77% and 67% at 5 and 7 years. Gross total excision and subtotal excision resulted in 5 year overall survival rates of 76% and 66%, respectively. in contrast, those patients who had biopsy alone had a 5 year survival rate of only 40%. Posterior fossa was a component of failure in 11 of the 18 recurrences. Seven recurrences were isolated to the posterior fossa. Four patients had neuraxis recurrences, three had distant metastasis alone and four had multiple sites of failure, all involving the primary site. Craniospinal irradiation for patients with medulloblastoma is an effective adjuvant treatment without significant treatment related toxicities. There is room for improvement in terms of posterior fossa control, especially in biopsy alone patients. The advances in radiotherapy including hyperfractionation, stereotactic radiosurgery and 3D conformal radiotherapy would be

  8. Evaluation of a combined respiratory-gating system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system: a preliminary study.

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Kawamura, Shinji; Uehara, Takuya; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Koike, Masahiro; Sera, Tatsuhiro; Emoto, Yuki; Hanazawa, Hideki; Shibuya, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time, tumor-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed in our institution. The goals of this study were to assess the capability of SyncTraX in measuring the position of a fiducial marker using color fluoroscopic images, and to evaluate the dosimetric and geometric accuracy of respiratory-gated radiotherapy using this combined system for the simple geometry. For the fundamental evaluation of respiratory-gated radiotherapy using SyncTraX, the following were performed:1) determination of dosimetric and positional characteristics of sinusoidal patterns using a motor-driven base for several gating windows; 2) measurement of time delay using an oscilloscope; 3) positional verification of sinusoidal patterns and the pattern in the case of a lung cancer patient; 4) measurement of the half-value layer (HVL in mm AL), effective kVp, and air kerma, using a solid-state detector for each fluoroscopic condition, to determine the patient dose. The dose profile in a moving phantom with gated radiotherapy having a gating window ≤ 4 mm was in good agreement with that under static conditions for each photon beam. The total time delay between TrueBeam and SyncTraX was lung cancer patient. The air-kerma rates from one fluoroscopy direction were 1.93 ± 0.01, 2.86 ± 0.01, 3.92 ± 0.04, 5.28 ± 0.03, and 6.60 ± 0.05 mGy/min for 70, 80, 90, 100, and 110 kV X-ray beams at 80 mA, respectively. The combined system comprising TrueBeam and SyncTraX could track the motion of the fiducial marker and control radiation delivery with reasonable accuracy; therefore, this system provides significant dosimetric improvement. However, patient exposure dose from fluoroscopy was not clinically negligible. PMID:27455483

  9. Construction of a remote radiotherapy planning system

    We constructed a remote radiotherapy planning system, and we examined the usefulness of and faults in our system in this study. Two identical radiotherapy planning systems, one installed at our institution and the other installed at an affiliated hospital, were used for radiotherapy planning. The two systems were connected by a wide area network (WAN), using a leased line. Beam data for the linear accelerator at the affiliated hospital were installed in the two systems. During the period from December 2001 to December 2002, 43 remote radiotherapy plans were made using this system. Data were transmitted using a file transfer protocol (FTP) software program. The 43 radiotherapy plans examined in this study consisted of 13 ordinary radiotherapy plans, 28 radiotherapy plans sent to provide assistance for medical residents, and 2 radiotherapy plans for emergency cases. There were ten minor planning changes made in radiotherapy plans sent to provide assistance for medical residents. Our remote radiotherapy planning system based on WAN using a leased line is useful for remote radiotherapy, with advantages for both radiation oncologists and medical residents. (author)

  10. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the α and β terms reflect lethal damage created during the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with ''unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD

  11. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    Chen, J.; van de Geijn, J.; Goffman, T. (ROB, DCT, NCI, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (US))

    1991-05-01

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the {alpha} and {beta} terms reflect lethal damage created {ital during} the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD.

  12. Radiotherapy: yesterday, today and tomorrow

    The inaugural lecture starts with a brief history of the discovery of x-rays and the development of radiotherapy. In a modern radiotherapy department, cancer is diagnosed and mostly treated non-surgically. The modern treatment of many cancers is complex and involves a choice between at least 3 modalities; namely surgery, radiotherapy and cancer chemotherapy. One or a combination of these can be used. A discussion is given of a radiotherapy department as it functions at the University of Cape Town. At the University, cancer is not managed by any one treatment modality, but by a group of specialists who have a major intersest in a particular field. The personnel of the radiotherapy department consists of various people such as a radiographer, radiotherapist, radiobiologist and others, who are all experts in a particular area. Together they form the radiotherapy team. An individual treatment plan is drawn up for each patient. An indication is given of the cost of a major linear accelerator and the patient treatment cost on such an accelerator. Cancer chemotherapy comprises an important part in any radiotherapy department and is used to prevent the appearance of microscopic disease or to reduce and even cure established disease. A summary is given of the cost attached to chemotherapy. An indication of cure rates with the present methods of treatment is given. The reason why oxygen is necessary in the radiation of tumours is discussed. The radiobiologist plays an important role in this respect. A look is also taken at the future prospects of radiotherapy

  13. Preliminary Experience in Treatment of Papillary and Macular Retinoblastoma: Evaluation of Local Control and Local Complications After Treatment With Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiotherapy With Micromultileaf Collimator as Second-Line or Salvage Treatment After Chemotherapy

    Purpose: To determine the local control and complication rates for children with papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma progressing after chemotherapy and undergoing stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a micromultileaf collimator. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 11 children (15 eyes) with macular and/or papillary retinoblastoma were treated with SRT. The mean age was 19 months (range, 2–111). Of the 15 eyes, 7, 6, and 2 were classified as International Classification of Intraocular Retinoblastoma Group B, C, and E, respectively. The delivered dose of SRT was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions using a dedicated micromultileaf collimator linear accelerator. Results: The median follow-up was 20 months (range, 13–39). Local control was achieved in 13 eyes (87%). The actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rates were both 82%. SRT was well tolerated. Late adverse events were reported in 4 patients. Of the 4 patients, 2 had developed focal microangiopathy 20 months after SRT; 1 had developed a transient recurrence of retinal detachment; and 1 had developed bilateral cataracts. No optic neuropathy was observed. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SRT for papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma in children resulted in excellent tumor control rates with acceptable toxicity. Additional research regarding SRT and its intrinsic organ-at-risk sparing capability is justified in the framework of prospective trials.

  14. Preliminary Experience in Treatment of Papillary and Macular Retinoblastoma: Evaluation of Local Control and Local Complications After Treatment With Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiotherapy With Micromultileaf Collimator as Second-Line or Salvage Treatment After Chemotherapy

    Pica, Alessia, E-mail: Alessia.Pica@chuv.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Moeckli, Raphael [University Institute for Radiation Physics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Balmer, Aubin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Beck-Popovic, Maja [Unit of Pediatric Oncology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Chollet-Rivier, Madeleine [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Do, Huu-Phuoc [University Institute for Radiation Physics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Weber, Damien C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Munier, Francis L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the local control and complication rates for children with papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma progressing after chemotherapy and undergoing stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a micromultileaf collimator. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 11 children (15 eyes) with macular and/or papillary retinoblastoma were treated with SRT. The mean age was 19 months (range, 2-111). Of the 15 eyes, 7, 6, and 2 were classified as International Classification of Intraocular Retinoblastoma Group B, C, and E, respectively. The delivered dose of SRT was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions using a dedicated micromultileaf collimator linear accelerator. Results: The median follow-up was 20 months (range, 13-39). Local control was achieved in 13 eyes (87%). The actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rates were both 82%. SRT was well tolerated. Late adverse events were reported in 4 patients. Of the 4 patients, 2 had developed focal microangiopathy 20 months after SRT; 1 had developed a transient recurrence of retinal detachment; and 1 had developed bilateral cataracts. No optic neuropathy was observed. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SRT for papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma in children resulted in excellent tumor control rates with acceptable toxicity. Additional research regarding SRT and its intrinsic organ-at-risk sparing capability is justified in the framework of prospective trials.

  15. Solid state tuneable power RF source for S-band klystron used in the indigenous development of medical linear accelerator for radiotherapy

    Medical Linear Accelerators (LINAC) are being widely used in the treatment of the cancer patients. The requirement of the energy and the particle type depends on the tumour site and its volume. Hence, it is a necessary to design and develop the multiple energy electron medical accelerators. We have successfully indigenously developed, installed and commissioned the 4 MV (Jeevan-Jyoti) and 6 MV (Siddarth) machines for this purpose. The said machines have been type approved by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB), Mumbai for the treatment of cancer patient. After this achievement we have taken up the project to design and develop the dual mode (Photon and Electron) multiple energy Medical Accelerator. This LINAC will deliver the two photon energies of 6 and 10 MV, whereas five electron energies viz. 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 MeV. The system has various sub system such as Linear accelerator (radiation source), High power Modulator, Microwave system based on Klystron, Gantry, Patient Support Assembly, Dosimetry, Beam limiting system, control console, etc. In conclusion, we have successfully achieved the precise variation of RF power using this RF source which will be input to klystron amplifier and the accelerator will produce the different energies as per the treatment requirement using the FPGA based control system

  16. Accelerated high-dose radiotherapy alone or combined with either concomitant or sequential chemotherapy; treatments of choice in patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Results of high-dose chemo-radiotherapy (CRT), using the treatment schedules of EORTC study 08972/22973 or radiotherapy (RT) alone were analyzed among all patients (pts) with Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) treated with curative intent in our department from 1995–2004. Included are 131 pts with medically inoperable or with irresectable NSCLC (TNM stage I:15 pts, IIB:15 pts, IIIA:57 pts, IIIB:43 pts, X:1 pt). Group I: Concomitant CRT: 66 Gy/2.75 Gy/24 fractions (fx)/33 days combined with daily administration of cisplatin 6 mg/m2: 56 pts (standard). Group II: Sequential CRT: two courses of a 21-day schedule of chemotherapy (gemcitabin 1250 mg/m2 d1, cisplatin 75 mg/m2 d2) followed by 66 Gy/2.75 Gy/24 fx/33 days without daily cisplatin: 26 pts. Group III: RT: 66 Gy/2.75 Gy/24 fx/33 days or 60 Gy/3 Gy/20 fx/26 days: 49 pts. The 1, 2, and 5 year actuarial overall survival (OS) were 46%, 24%, and 15%, respectively. At multivariate analysis the only factor with a significantly positive influence on OS was treatment with chemo-radiation (P = 0.024) (1-, 2-, and 5-yr OS 56%, 30% and 22% respectively). The incidence of local recurrence was 36%, the incidence of distant metastases 46%. Late complications grade 3 were seen in 21 pts and grade 4 in 4 patients. One patient had a lethal complication (oesophageal). For 32 patients insufficient data were available to assess late complications. In this study we were able to reproduce the results of EORTC trial 08972/22973 in a non-selected patient population outside of the setting of a randomised trial. Radiotherapy (66 Gy/24 fx/33 days) combined with either concomitant daily low dose cisplatin or with two neo-adjuvant courses of gemcitabin and cisplatin are effective treatments for patients with locally advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. The concomitant schedule is also suitable for elderly people with co-morbidity

  17. A strategy for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) on linear accelerators and its impact on treatment margins for prostate cancer patients

    In external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer, the consideration of various systematic error types leads to wide treatment margins compromising normal tissue tolerance. We investigated if systematic set-up errors can be reduced by a set of initial image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) sessions. 27 patients received daily IGRT resulting in a set of 882 cone-beam computed tomographies (CBCTs). After matching to bony structures, we analyzed the dimensions of remaining systematic errors from zero up to six initial IGRT sessions and aimed at a restriction of daily IGRT for 10% of all patients. For threshold definition, we determined the standard deviations (SD) of the shift corrections and selected patients out of this range for daily image guidance. To calculate total treatment margins, we demanded for a cumulative clinical target volume (CTV) coverage of at least 95% of the specified dose in 90% of all patients. The gain of accuracy was largest during the first three IGRTs. In order to match precision and workload criteria, thresholds for the SD of the corrections of 3.5 mm, 2.0 mm and 4.5 mm in the left-right (L-R), cranial-caudal (C-C), and anterior-posterior (A-P) direction, respectively, were identified. Including all other error types, the total margins added to the CTV amounted to 8.6 mm in L-R, 10.4 mm in C-C, and 14.4 mm in A-P direction. Only initially performed IGRT might be helpful for eliminating gross systematic errors especially after virtual simulation. However, even with daily IGRT performance, a substantial PTV margin reduction is only achievable by matching internal markers instead of bony anatomical structures. (orig.)

  18. How Do the ASTRO Consensus Statement Guidelines for the Application of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Fit Intraoperative Radiotherapy? A Retrospective Analysis of Patients Treated at the European Institute of Oncology

    Purpose: To verify how the classification according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) consensus statement (CS) for the application of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) fits patients treated with intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons (ELIOT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: The study included 1,822 patients treated with ELIOT as the sole radiation modality outside of a clinical trial at the European Institute of Oncology after breast-conserving surgery for invasive breast cancer, who were classified into CS groups of suitable, cautionary, and unsuitable. The outcome in terms of ipsilateral breast recurrence, regional node relapse, distant metastases, progression free-survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival were assessed. Results: All the 1,822 cases except for 25 could be classified according to ASTRO CS: 294 patients met the criteria for inclusion into the suitable group, 691 patients into the cautionary group, and 812 patients into the unsuitable group. The 5-year rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence for suitable, cautionary, and unsuitable groups were 1.5%, 4.4%, and 8.8%, respectively (p = 0.0003). Whereas the regional node relapse showed no difference, the rate of distant metastases was significantly different in the unsuitable group compared with the suitable and cautionary groups, having a significant impact on survival. Conclusion: In the context of patients treated with ELIOT, the ASTRO guidelines identify well the groups for whom APBI might be considered as an effective alternative to whole breast radiotherapy and also identify groups for whom APBI is not indicated.

  19. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy for incompletely resected supratentorial low-grade glioma. A phase II study

    Background and purpose: In order to investigate the feasibility, toxicity and antitumor efficacy of hyperfractionated radiation therapy, 37 adult patients with incompletely resected supratentorial low-grade glioma were entered into a phase II study. Materials and methods: The radiation therapy dose was 55 Gy in 50 fractions in 25 treatment days over 5 weeks to the tumor plus a 2-cm margin, with an additional 17.6 Gy given in 16 fractions in 8 treatment days over 1.5 weeks to the tumor plus a 1-cm margin, using 1.1 Gy b.i.d. fractionation with a 6 h interfraction interval. The total tumor dose was 72.6 Gy in 66 fractions in 33 treatment days over 6.5 weeks. Results: The median survival time (MST) for all 37 patients has not yet been attained, while 5- and 7-year survival rates were 75% and 69%, respectively. The median time to tumor progression (MTP) has also not yet been attained, while 5- and 7-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were both 70%. There was no difference in survival or PFS regarding histology, although patients with oligodendroglioma and mixed glioma had similar survival, both being higher than that of ordinary astrocytoma. On univariate analysis of potential prognostic factors, age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), neurologic status and extent of surgery were found to influence survival. The toxicity of HFX RT was generally assessed as mild to moderate. Conclusion: HFX RT is feasible with mild to moderate toxicity. Further studies are warranted with more patients and longer follow-up before testing it against standard fractionation RT in this patient population. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. The treatment of brain stem and thalamic gliomas with 78 Gy of hyperfractionated radiation therapy

    Purpose: To see whether increasing the dose of hyperfractionated radiation therapy from 72 to 78 Gy would increase survival time in patients with gliomas, particularly those with brain stem or thalamic tumors. Methods: Seventy-eight patients with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of a brain stem or thalamic glioma were enrolled in a trial to receive 78 Gy (1.0 Gy twice a day). Six patients with disease in other sites were also treated. The initial response to therapy was determined by comparing pretreatment magnetic resonance images and neurological examinations with those obtained within 2 weeks of completing therapy; subsequent responses were determined from bimonthly follow-up images. Time-to-tumor progression was measured from the date radiation therapy began until the date of documented radiographic or clinical progression. Survival time was measured from the date radiation therapy began until the date of death. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to estimate the effects of specific variables on survival. Results: Of 81 evaluable patients, 68 received ≥ 76 Gy, 10 received between 70 and 75 Gy, and 3 received between 60 and 68 Gy. The overall response or stabilization rate was 70.4%. Tumor size decreased in 30.8% of patients; 39.5% had stable disease, and 29.6% had immediate progression. The median survival time was 12.7 months (16.1 months for adults and 10.8 months for children). The median time to tumor progression was 9.0 months (11.4 months for adults and 8.4 months for children). A duration of symptoms ≤ 2 months and a diffuse lesion were each associated with shorter survival and progression times. Conclusions: For patients with brain stem or thalamic gliomas, increasing the dose of radiation therapy from 72 to 78 Gy did not significantly improve survival. Different treatment strategies are clearly needed

  1. Hyperfractionated high-dose total body irradiation in bone marrow transplantation for Ph{sup 1}-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Kikuchi, Akira; Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Tetsuo [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science] [and others

    1998-12-01

    In two cases of Philadelphia-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph{sup 1} ALL), we performed allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (AlloBMT) with preconditioning regimen, including hyperfractionated high-dose total body irradiation (TBI) (13.5 Gy, in 9 fractions). Their disease statuses at BMT were hematological relapse in case 1 and molecular relapse in case 2. Bone marrow donors were unrelated in case 1, and HLA was a partially mismatched mother in case 2. Regimen-related toxicity was tolerable in both cases. Hematological recovery was rapid, and engraftment was obtained on day 14 in case 1 and on day 12 in case 2. BCR/ABL message in bone marrow disappeared on day 89 in case 1 and on day 19 in case 2 and throughout their subsequent clinical courses. Although short-term MTX and Cy-A continuous infusion were used for GVHD prophylaxis, grade IV GVHD was observed in case 1 and grade III in case 2. Both cases experienced hemorrhagic cystitis because of adenovirus type 11 infection. Although case 1 died of interstitial pneumonitis on day 442, case 2 has been free of disease through day 231. AlloBMT for Ph{sup 1} ALL with preconditioning regimen including hyperfractionated high-dose TBI is considered to be worth further investigation. (author)

  2. Determination of radiation levels by neutrons in an accelerator for radiotherapy; Determinacion de niveles de radiacion por neutrones en un acelerador para radioterapia

    Paredes G, L.; Salazar B, M.A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Genis S, R. [Fundacion Clinica Medica Sur, Puente de Piedra 150, Col. Torriello Guerra, Tlalpan 14050, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    It was determined the radiation levels by neutrons due to photonuclear reactions ({gamma}, n) which occur in the target, levelling filter, collimators and the small pillow blinding of a medical accelerator Varian Clinac 2100C of 18 MeV, using thermoluminescent dosemeters UD-802AS and US-809AS. The experimental values were presented for the patient level, inside and outside of the radiation field, as well as for the small pillow. (Author)

  3. State of accelerator for therapy

    Maruhashi, A

    2002-01-01

    21 facilities carry out particle radiotherapy in the world and 6 facilities will start in the next year. They are shown in the table. 6 facilities of them exist in Japan. Small accelerator for proton therapy is developed. The area of them becomes smaller than 100 m sup 2. 5 makers, form, kinds of accelerator, length of track, beam energy of them are shown. States of particle radiotherapy in 4 facilities in Japan are explained by the kinds of particle, energy, beam intensity, time structure and radiation room. The important problems are reconsideration of building and compact rotating gantry. The problems of radiotherapy are explained. (S.Y.)

  4. Treatment machines for external beam radiotherapy

    Since the inception of radiotherapy soon after the discovery of X rays by Roentgen in 1895, the technology of X ray production has first been aimed towards ever higher photon and electron beam energies and intensities, and more recently towards computerization and intensity modulated beam delivery. During the first 50 years of radiotherapy the technological progress was relatively slow and mainly based on X ray tubes, van de Graaff generators and betatrons. The invention of the 60Co teletherapy unit by H.E. Johns in Canada in the early 1950s provided a tremendous boost in the quest for higher photon energies and placed the cobalt unit at the forefront of radiotherapy for a number of years. The concurrently developed medical linacs, however, soon eclipsed cobalt units, moved through five increasingly sophisticated generations and became the most widely used radiation source in modern radiotherapy. With its compact and efficient design, the linac offers excellent versatility for use in radiotherapy through isocentric mounting and provides either electron or megavoltage X ray therapy with a wide range of energies. In addition to linacs, electron and X ray radiotherapy is also carried out with other types of accelerator, such as betatrons and microtrons. More exotic particles, such as protons, neutrons, heavy ions and negative p mesons, all produced by special accelerators, are also sometimes used for radiotherapy; however, most contemporary radiotherapy is carried out with linacs or teletherapy cobalt units

  5. The spanish radiotherapy park: past and present

    The present article has as objective to provide a general overview on the spanish radiotherapy park, presenting how was its start and evolution until the current state. Considering only the units of teletherapy and the accelerators. Actually in Spain there is 28 units of Cobalt therapy, in functioning during the last two decades, being advised a rapid substitution to accelerators

  6. Radiotherapy; Strahlentherapie

    Wannenmacher, M. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Debus, J. [Univ. Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Wenz, F. (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2006-07-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy.

  7. Accelerated split-course radiotherapy and simultaneous cis-dichlorodiammine-platinum and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy with folinic acid enhancement for unresectable carcinoma of the head and neck

    Thirty-four (6 stage III, 28 stage IV) patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated by simultaneous radio-chemotherapy. Treatment was divided into three cycles. Chemotherapy consisted of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP) 60 mg/sqm i.v., 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 350 mg/sqm i.v. and folinic acid (FA)-50 mg/sqm i.v. on day 2 and 5-FU 350 mg/sqm per 24 h and FA 100 mg/sqm/24 h on days 2-5. Radiotherapy consisted of 23.4 Gy/9 days divided in 13 fractions of 1.8 Gy delivered twice a day from day 3 through day 11. This regimen was repeated on days 22 and 44. Total radiation dose amounted to 70.2 Gy/51 days. Mean follow-up of surviving patients was 21 (14-34) months. 28/32 patients achieved complete response, 4/32 partial response. Actuarial one and two years survival were 88 and 58% including two early deaths from tumour bleeding. Local control rates at one and two years were 87 and 81%, respectively. This protocol produces excellent palliation and the chance of improved long term tumour control. Two patients developed distant metastases. Overall toxicity was tolerable. Since the treatment breaks were inserted after low radiation doses, acute mucositis healed rapidly and was not a limiting factor. 39 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  8. Radiotherapy for recurrent breast cancer

    Clinico-radiobiological characteristics of radiotherapy for relapsed breast cancer were studied. Adequate choice of tissue mass to be exposed appeared much more important than any change in focal dose within 50-80 Gy, to achieve higher frequency of locoregional therapeutic effect. However, recurrent tumors more than 3 large lower radiosensitivity involving a sharp rise in the likelihood of dissemination. Radiotherapy for primary tumor did not affect the radiosensitivity of recurrent malignancies but slowed down the rate of its growth. Also, it might promote the dissemination acceleration

  9. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1974--1977. [Planning for use for radiotherapy and as radiation source for diagnostic radiography

    Elam, S. (ed.)

    1977-04-01

    The Bevalac, a versatile high-energy heavy-ion accelerator complex, has been in operation for less than two years. A major purpose for which the Bevalac was constructed was to explore the possibility of heavy-ion teams for therapy for certain forms of cancer. Significant progress has been made in this direction. The National Cancer Institute has recognized the advantages that these and other accelerated particles offer, and heavy ions have been included in a long-term plan for particle therapy that will assess by means of controlled therapeutic tests the value of various modalities. Since accelerated heavy ions became available, the possibility of other contributions, not planned, became apparent. We are developig a new diagnostic method known as heavy-ion radiography that has greatly increased sensitivity for soft-tissue detail and that may become a powerful tool for localizing early tumors and metastases. We have discovered that radioactive beams are formed from fragmentation of stable deflected beams. Use of these autoradioactive beams is just beginning; however, we know that these beams will be helpful in localizing the region in the body where therapy is being delivered. In addition, it has been demonstrated that instant implantation of the radioactive beam allows direct measurements of blood perfusion rates in inaccessible parts of the body, and such a technique may become a new tool for the study of fast hot atom reactions in biochemistry, tracer biology and nuclear medicine. The Bevalac will also be useful for the continuation of previously developed methods for the control of acromegaly, Cushing's disease and, on a research basis, advanced diabetes mellitus with vascular disease. The ability to make small bloodless lesions in the brain and elsewhere with heavy-ion beams has great potential for nervous-system studies and perhaps later for radioneurosurgery.

  10. Accelerated intensity-modulated radiotherapy plus temozolomide in patients with glioblastoma. A phase I dose-escalation study (ISIDE-BT-1)

    We performed a dose-escalation trial to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with standard concurrent and sequential-dose temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Histologically proven glioblastoma patients underwent IMRT dose escalation. IMRT was delivered over 5 weeks with the simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique to the two planning target volumes (PTVs) defined by adding 5-mm margin to the respective clinical target volumes (CTVs). CTV1 was the tumor bed plus the enhancing lesion with 10-mm margin; CTV2 was the area of perifocal edema with 20-mm margin. Only the PTV1 dose was escalated (planned dose escalation: 60, 62.5, 65, 67.5, 70 Gy) while the PTV2 dose remained the same (45 Gy). Forty consecutive glioblastoma patients were treated. While no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was recorded during the dose escalation up to 67.5/2.7 Gy, two out of the first six consecutively enrolled patients on the highest dose level (70/2.8 Gy) experienced a DLT, and therefore a cohort expansion was required. 3/14 patients experienced a DLT on the highest planned dose level, and therefore the MTD was not exceeded. After a median follow-up time of 25 months no grade >2 late neurological toxicity was recorded. By using a SIB IMRT technique, a radiation dose of 70 Gy in 25 fractions (biological effective dose-BED-of 92.8 Gy) can be delivered with concurrent and sequential standard dose TMZ, without unacceptable acute toxicity in patients with glioblastoma. (author)

  11. Cosmetic Outcomes for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgical Excision of Early-Stage Breast Cancer Using Single-Dose Intraoperative Radiotherapy

    Purpose: Determine cosmetic outcome and toxicity profile of intraoperative radiation delivered before tumor excision for patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients age 48 or older with ultrasound-visible invasive ductal cancers <3 cm and clinically negative lymph nodes were eligible for treatment on this institutional review board-approved Phase II clinical trial. Treatment planning ultrasound was used to select an electron energy and cone size sufficient to cover the tumor plus a 1.5- to 2.0-cm circumferential margin laterally and a 1-cm-deep margin with the 90% isodose line. The dose was prescribed to a nominal 15 Gy and delivered using a Mobetron electron irradiator before tumor excision by segmental mastectomy. Physician- and patient-assessed cosmetic outcome and patient satisfaction were determined by questionnaire. Results: From March 2003 to July 2007, 71 patients were treated with intraoperative radiation therapy. Of those, 56 patients were evaluable, with a median follow-up of 3.1 years (minimum 1 year). Physician and patient assessment of cosmesis was 'good or excellent' (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group cosmesis scale) in 45/56 (80%) and 32/42 (76%) of all patients, respectively. Eleven patients who received additional whole breast radiation had similar rates of good or excellent cosmesis: 40/48 (83%) and 29/36 (81%), respectively). Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities were seen in 4/71 (6%) patients. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicities or serious adverse events have been seen. Conclusion: Intraoperative radiotherapy delivered to an in situ tumor is feasible with acceptable acute tolerance. Patient and physician assessment of the cosmetic outcome is good to excellent.

  12. Five-Year Results From a Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Study (SSG XIII) of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Combined With Accelerated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremities and Trunk Wall

    Jebsen, Nina L. [Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen Faculty of Medicine, Bergen, Norway and Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Bruland, Oyvind S. [Cancer Clinic, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital and University of Oslo Faculty Division, Clinical Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Eriksson, Mikael; Engellau, Jacob [Department of Oncology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Turesson, Ingela [Department of Oncology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Folin, Annika [Department of Oncology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Trovik, Clement S. [Departments of Oncology and of Orthopedics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Hall, Kirsten Sundby [Cancer Clinic, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate adjuvant chemotherapy and interpolated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) for adult patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma in the extremities or trunk wall. Methods and Materials: High-risk soft tissue sarcoma was defined as high-grade malignancy and at least two of the following criteria: size {>=}8 cm, vascular invasion, or necrosis. Six cycles of doxorubicin and ifosfamide were prescribed for all patients. RT to a total dose of 36 Gy (1.8 Gy twice daily) was inserted between two chemotherapy cycles after marginal margin resection regardless of tumor depth or after wide-margin resection for deep-seated tumors. RT was boosted to 45 Gy in a split-course design in the case of intralesional margin resection. Results: A total of 119 patients were eligible, with a median follow-up of 5 years. The 5-year estimate of the local recurrence, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rate was 12%, 59%, and 68%, respectively. The group receiving RT to 36 Gy had a local recurrence rate of 10%. In contrast, the local recurrence rate was 29% in the group treated with RT to 45 Gy. The presence of vascular invasion and low chemotherapy dose intensity had a negative effect on metastasis-free and overall survival. Toxicity was moderate after both the chemotherapy and the RT. Conclusions: Accelerated RT interposed between chemotherapy cycles in a selected population of patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma resulted in good local and distant disease control, with acceptable treatment-related morbidity. The greater radiation dose administered after intralesional surgery was not sufficient to compensate for the poorer surgical margin. Vascular invasion was the most important prognostic factor for metastasis-free and overall survival.

  13. Five-Year Results From a Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Study (SSG XIII) of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Combined With Accelerated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremities and Trunk Wall

    Purpose: To evaluate adjuvant chemotherapy and interpolated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) for adult patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma in the extremities or trunk wall. Methods and Materials: High-risk soft tissue sarcoma was defined as high-grade malignancy and at least two of the following criteria: size ≥8 cm, vascular invasion, or necrosis. Six cycles of doxorubicin and ifosfamide were prescribed for all patients. RT to a total dose of 36 Gy (1.8 Gy twice daily) was inserted between two chemotherapy cycles after marginal margin resection regardless of tumor depth or after wide-margin resection for deep-seated tumors. RT was boosted to 45 Gy in a split-course design in the case of intralesional margin resection. Results: A total of 119 patients were eligible, with a median follow-up of 5 years. The 5-year estimate of the local recurrence, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rate was 12%, 59%, and 68%, respectively. The group receiving RT to 36 Gy had a local recurrence rate of 10%. In contrast, the local recurrence rate was 29% in the group treated with RT to 45 Gy. The presence of vascular invasion and low chemotherapy dose intensity had a negative effect on metastasis-free and overall survival. Toxicity was moderate after both the chemotherapy and the RT. Conclusions: Accelerated RT interposed between chemotherapy cycles in a selected population of patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma resulted in good local and distant disease control, with acceptable treatment-related morbidity. The greater radiation dose administered after intralesional surgery was not sufficient to compensate for the poorer surgical margin. Vascular invasion was the most important prognostic factor for metastasis-free and overall survival.

  14. Natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy

    The author examined the natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy using CT or MR imaging. Twenty patients with intracranial meningioma received radiotherapy from a high-energy linear accelerator (4-10 MV X rays) from 1980 to 1996. The total doses were 50 Gy to the tumor bed in single doses of 2 Gy in 5 weekly fractions. Meningiomas in 10 of 20 patients were reduced within 1 to 38 months after radiotherapy, the average being 11 months. The tumors were controlled for a median of 60 months after radiotherapy (range 19-126 months). Four other patients have shown no change in tumor size after radiotherapy. The tumors were controlled for a median of 70 months after radiotherapy (range 37-127 months). The other six patients have shown tumor growth within 3 to 25 months after radiotherapy, after which the tumors stopped growing for a median of 71 months (range 2-181 months). Neither tumor size nor histological type was related to response. The growth of tumors was controlled by radiotherapy for a median duration of 43 months in the meningothelial type, 52 months in the fibroblastic type, and 61 months in the transitional type. The median duration for all benign tumors was 52 months. A moderate correlation was noted between tumor response and functional outcome after radiotherapy in 9 patients with neurological deficits. The natural histories of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy were grouped into three categories. Some tumors showed no change in size over a long period. This was a characteristic response after radiotherapy that differed from that of other brain tumors. The results of this study provide important information for the follow-up of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy. (author)

  15. Radiotherapy and high-dose chemotherapy in advanced Ewing's tumors

    Background: Ewing's tumors are sensitive to radio- and chemotherapy. Patients with multifocal disease suffer a poor prognosis. Patients presenting primary bone marrow involvement or bone metastases at diagnosis herald a 3-year disease-free survival below 15%. The European Intergroup Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study (EICESS) has established the following indications for high-dose therapy in advanced Ewing's tumors: Patients with primary multifocal bone disease, patients with early (<2 years after diagnosis) or multifocal relapse. Patients and Method: As of 1987, 83 patients have been treated in the EICESS group, 39 of them at the transplant center in Duesseldorf, who have been analyzed here. All individuals received 4 courses of induction chemotherapy with EVAJA and stem cell collection after course 3 and 4. Consolidation radiotherapy of the involved bone compartments was administered in a hyperfractionated regimen 2 times 1.6 Gy per day, up to 22.4 Gy simultaneously to course 5 and 22.4 Gy to course 6 of chemotherapy. The myeloablative chemotherapy consisted of melphalan and etoposide (ME) in combination with 12 Gy TBI (Hyper-ME) oder Double-ME with whole lung irradiation up to 18 Gy (without TBI). Results: The survival probability at 40 months was 31% (44% DOD; 15% DOC). Pelvic infiltration did not reach prognostic relevance in this cohort. Radiotherapy encompassed 75% of the bone marrow at maximum (average 20%). Engraftment was not affected by radiotherapy. Conclusion: High-dose chemotherapy can improve outcome in poor prognostic advanced Ewing's tumors. The disease itself remains the main problem. The expected engraftment problems after intensive radiotherapy in large volumes of bone marrow can be overcome by stem cell reinfusion. (orig.)

  16. Accelerated radiotherapy and concomitant high dose chemotherapy in non resectable stage IV locally advanced HNSCC: Results of a GORTEC randomized trial

    Background: The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of a strong increase of the dose-intensity of concomitant radio-chemotherapy (RT-CT) in patients with far advanced non metastatic HNSCC. Methods: Eligible patients had N3 disease (UICC 1997) and the primary tumor and/or the node(s) had to be strictly unresectable. Patients with palpable N2B-C were also eligible if massive nodal involvement was present. 109 patients were included, with 53 randomized to RT-CT and 56 to accelerated RT. In the RT-CT arm, the RT regimen consisted of 64 Gy in 5 weeks and the CT regimen consisted of synchronous CDDP 100 mg/m2 on days 2, 16, and 30 and 5FU 1000 mg/m2 on days1-5 and 29-33 of the RT course. After RT-CT, two adjuvant cycles of CDDP-5FU were delivered in good responders. A control arm was using a very accelerated RT, delivering 64 Gy in 3 weeks. Results: The most common tumor sites were oropharynx and hypopharynx. Most of the patients had T4 disease (70%) and 100% had a massive nodal involvement (mainly N3 with a mean nodal size >7 cm in both arms). A significant difference was observed in favor of the RT-CT arm (p = 0.005) in terms of cumulative incidence of local regional failure or distant metastases. However, the overall survival and event free survival rates were not significantly different between the two arms (p = 0.70 and 0.16, respectively). The lack of survival benefit in favor of the RT-CT was partly due to an excess of initial early treatment related death in the RT-CT arm. Conclusion: The very intense RT-CT schedule was more efficient on disease control, but was also more toxic than accelerated RT alone, pointing out that there was no clear improvement of the therapeutic index. This study shows the limits of dose-intensification, with regard to concomitant RT-CT.

  17. Repopulation response of mouse oral mucosa during unconventional radiotherapy protocols

    Repopulation in mouse tongue epithelium was determined during unconventional fractionation schedules, i.e., hyperfractionation (2 x 1.5 and 2 x 1.75 Gy/day) and accelerated treatment (2 x 3 Gy/day). The residual tolerance of the epithelium at defined days of the fractionated treatment was tested by graded single test doses (top-up design). The dose required to induce complete epithelial denudation in 50% of the animals (ED50) was used to calculate the number of fractions repopulated during the preceding treatment. After the first week of hyperfractionation, tolerance was reduced compared to untreated epithelium. However, subsequently no further change was observed, indicating complete compensation of the weekly dose with all doses per fraction used. Epithelial cell density, defined by histological examination in additional experiments, in all fractionation arms decreased similarly by ∼40% during the first week and remained constant at 60-80% in the subsequent 2 weeks. During accelerated fractionation, the residual mucosal tolerance decreased continuously with treatment time and resulted in epithelial denudation after 12 fractions. However, a substantial repopulation effect was observed, compensating 1.5 fractions by day 2, and 5 fractions by day 5, respectively. After cessation of the therapy the repopulation rate clearly decelerated to compensate a dose equivalent to about 0.5 fractions per day. Cell density decreased linearly during the treatment with 5, 10 or 12 fractions at a rate close to normal cell loss. Marked cell production, dependent on the total fractionated dose, was seen from one day after the last fraction in each experimental arm. These results indicate that maximum stem cell repopulation occurs predominantly during treatment, while major production of differentiating cells takes place in treatment splits

  18. Incidence of interstitial pneumonia after hyperfractionated total body irradiation before autologous bone marrow/stem cell transplantation

    Purpose/Objectives Interstitial pneumonia (IP) is a severe complication after allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with incidence rates between 10 % and 40 % in different series. It is a polyetiologic disease that occurs depending on age, graft vs. host disease (GvHD), CMV-status, total body irradiation (TBI) and immunosuppressive therapy after BMT. The effects of fractionation and dose rate are not entirely clear. This study evaluates the incidence of lethal IP after hyperfractionated TBI for autologous BMT or stem cell transplantation. Materials and Methods Between 1982 and 1992, 182 patients (60 % male, 40 % female) were treated with hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) before autologous bone marrow transplantation. Main indications were leukemias and lymphomas (53 % AML, 21 % ALL, 22 % NHL, 4 % others) Median age was 30 ys (15 - 55 ys). A total dose of 14.4 Gy was applied using lung blocks (12 fractions of 1.2 Gy in 4 days, dose rate 7-18 cGy/min, lung dose 9 - 9.5 Gy). TBI was followed by cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg). 72 % were treated with bone marrow transplantation, 28 % were treated with stem cell transplantation. Interstitial pneumonia was diagnosed clinically, radiologically and by autopsy. Results 4 patients died most likely of interstitial pneumonia. For another 12 patients interstitial pneumonia was not the most likely cause of death but could not be excluded. Thus, the incidence of lethal IP was at least 2.2 % but certainly below 8.8 %. Conclusion Lethal interstitial pneumonia is a rare complication after total body irradiation before autologous bone marrow transplantation in this large, homogeously treated series. In the autologous setting, total doses of 14.4 Gy can be applied with a low risk for developing interstitial pneumonia if hyperfractionation and lung blocks are used. This falls in line with data from series with identical twins or t-cell depleted marrow and smaller, less homogeneous autologous transplant studies. Thus

  19. Randomized Trial of Hyperfractionation Versus Conventional Fractionation in T2 Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Vocal Cord (RTOG 9512)

    Trotti, Andy, E-mail: andy.trotti@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of South Florida H. Lee Moffittt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Zhang, Qiang [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bentzen, Søren M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Emami, Bahman [Department of Radiation Therapy, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Hammond, M. Elizabeth [Department of Pathology, LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Morrison, William H. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sagar, Stephen M. [McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Ridge, John A. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Fu, Karen K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California (emeritus), San Francisco, California (United States); Ang, K. Kian [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To compare hyperfractionation versus standard fractionation for T2N0 vocal cord carcinoma in a randomized controlled trial. Methods and Materials: Patients with T2 vocal cord cancer were stratified by substage (T2a vs T2b) and randomly assigned to receive either hyperfractionation (HFX) to 79.2 Gy in 66 fractions of 1.2 Gy given twice a day, or standard fractionation (SFX) to 70 Gy in 35 fractions given once a day. The trial was designed to detect a 55% reduction in the local failure hazard rate with 80% statistical power. Results: Between April 1996 and July 2003, a total of 250 patients were enrolled. Of 239 patients analyzable for outcomes, 94% were male, 83% had a Karnofsky performance status of 90-100, and 62% had T2a tumor. Median follow-up for all surviving patients was 7.9 years (range, 0.6-13.1 years). The 5-year local control (LC) rate was 8 points higher but not statistically significant (P=.14 for HFX [78%] vs SFX [70%]), corresponding to a 30% hazard rate reduction. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 49% versus 40% (P=.13) and overall survival (OS) was 72% versus 63% (P=.29). HFX was associated with higher rates of acute skin, mucosal, and laryngeal toxicity. Grade 3-4 late effects were similar with a 5-year cumulative incidence of 8.5% (3.4%-13.6%) after SFX and 8.5% (3.4%-13.5%) after HFX. Conclusions: The 5-year local control was modestly higher with HFX compared to SFX for T2 glottic carcinoma, but the difference was not statistically significant. These results are consistent with prior studies of hyperfractionation showing a benefit in local control. Substaging by T2a versus T2b carries prognostic value for DFS and OS. For cost and convenience reasons other altered fractionation schedules have been adopted in routine practice.

  20. Feasibility Study of Moderately Accelerated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plus Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin After Induction Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Head-and Neck Cancer

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of moderately accelerated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) along with weekly cisplatin, after induction chemotherapy, in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III or IV locally advanced HNC, without progressive disease after three courses of induction chemotherapy, received concurrent chemo-IMRT (weekly cisplatin 30 mg/m2 plus simultaneous integrated boost IMRT). A total of 67.5 Gy in 30 fractions were delivered to primary tumor and involved nodes, 60 Gy in 30 fractions to high-risk nodal areas, and 55.5 Gy in 30 fractions to low-risk nodal areas. Results: In all, 36 patients (median age, 56 years) with International Union Against Cancer (UICC) Stage III (n = 5) and IV (n = 31) were included. Of the 36 patients, 17 had received CF (cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (CF) and 19 had received docetaxel cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (DCF). During concurrent chemoradiation, 11 of 36 patients (30.5%) experienced Grade III mucositis (CF, 47%; DCF, 15%; p < 0.04). Grade III pharyngeal-esophageal toxicity was observed in 5 of 19 patients (26.3%; CF, 0.0%; DCF, 26.3%; p = 0.02). Two patients died of complications (5.5%). After chemoradiation, the complete response rate was 63.8%. Two-year local control was 88.7%. Two-year progression free survival and overall survival were 74.5% and 60.9%, respectively. Conclusions: In our experience, a moderately accelerated chemo-IMRT was feasible after induction chemotherapy. However, a noteworthy early death rate of 5.5% was observed. Intensive supportive care strategies should be defined to better manage radiation-induced toxic effects. Longer follow-up is required to determine the incidence of late radiation toxicities and tumor control rates.

  1. Continuous accelerated 7-days-a-week radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: Long-term results of Phase III clinical trial

    Purpose: To update 5-year results of a previously published study on special 7-days-a-week fractionation continuous accelerated irradiation (CAIR) for head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: One hundred patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck in Stage T2-4N0-1M were randomized between two definitive radiation treatments: accelerated fractionation 7 days a week including weekends (CAIR) and conventional 5 days a week (control). Hence the overall treatment time was 2 weeks shorter in CAIR. Results: Five-year local tumor control was 75% in the CAIR group and 33% in the control arm (p < 0.00004). Tumor-cure benefit corresponded with significant improvement in disease-free survival and overall survival rates. Confluent mucositis was the main acute toxicity, with the incidence significantly higher in CAIR patients than in control (respectively, 94% vs. 53%). When 2.0-Gy fractions were used, radiation necrosis developed in 5 patients (22%) in the CAIR group as a consequential late effect (CLE), but when fraction size was reduced to 1.8 Gy no more CLE occurred. Actuarial 5-year morbidity-free survival rate was similar for both treatments. Conclusions: Selected head-and-neck cancer patients could be treated very effectively with 7-days-a-week radiation schedule with no compromise of total dose and with slight 10% reduction of fraction dose (2 Gy-1.8 Gy), which article gives 1 week reduction of overall treatment time compared with standard 70 Gy in 35 fractions over 47-49 days. Although this report is based on the relatively small group of patients, its results have encouraged us to use CAIR fractionation in a standard radiation treatment for moderately advanced head-and-neck cancer patients

  2. Results of the phase II EORTC 22971 trial evaluating combined accelerated external radiation and chemotherapy with 5FU and cisplatin in patients with muscle invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    Introduction. We prospectively evaluated concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy for advanced bladder cancer in a phase II EORTC trial to test whether it could be further studied as a potential treatment of bladder cancer. Patients and methods. Patients up to 75 years of age with invasive transitional-cell carcinoma of the bladder up to 5 cm, stage pT2 to pT3b, N0M0, without residual macroscopical tumour after transurethral excision were eligible. Radiotherapy consisted of 2 fractions of 1.2 Gy daily up to 60 Gy delivered in a period of 5 weeks. During the first and the last week, cisplatin 20 mg/m2/day and 5 FU 375 mg/m2/day were given concomitantly. Results. The study was interrupted early due to poor recruitment. Nine patients of the originally 43 planned were treated. Mean age was 63 years. Five patients had tumour stage pT2, 1 stage pT3a and 3 stage pT3b. All patients completed radiotherapy and chemotherapy as scheduled. Only one grade 3 and no grade 4 toxicity was seen. All patients were evaluated 3 months after treatment: eight patients had no detectable tumour and one had para-aortic lymph nodes. During further follow-up, a second patient got lymph node metastases and two patients developed distant metastases (lung in the patient with enlarged lymph nodes at the first evaluation and abdominal in one other). Those three patients died at respectively 19, 14, and 18 months after registration. Late toxicity was limited and often temporary. After 26 to 57 months of follow-up, no local recurrences were seen. Six patients remained alive without disease. Discussion. Despite the small cohort, this combination of concomitant chemotherapy and accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer seemed to be well tolerated and to result in satisfactory local control with limited early and late toxicity. It could therefore be considered for study in further clinical trials

  3. Results of the phase II EORTC 22971 trial evaluating combined accelerated external radiation and chemotherapy with 5FU and cisplatin in patients with muscle invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    Poortmans, Philip M. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Inst., Tilburg (NL)); Van Der Hulst, Marleen; Richaud, Pierre (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Inst. Bergonieacute, Bordeaux (France)); Collette, Laurence; Pierart, Marianne (Statistics Dept., EORTC Data Center, Brussels (Belgium)); Ho Goey, S. (Dept. of Medical Oncology, TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg (NL)); Bolla, Michel (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, CHU, Grenoble (France))

    2008-06-15

    Introduction. We prospectively evaluated concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy for advanced bladder cancer in a phase II EORTC trial to test whether it could be further studied as a potential treatment of bladder cancer. Patients and methods. Patients up to 75 years of age with invasive transitional-cell carcinoma of the bladder up to 5 cm, stage pT2 to pT3b, N0M0, without residual macroscopical tumour after transurethral excision were eligible. Radiotherapy consisted of 2 fractions of 1.2 Gy daily up to 60 Gy delivered in a period of 5 weeks. During the first and the last week, cisplatin 20 mg/m2/day and 5 FU 375 mg/m2/day were given concomitantly. Results. The study was interrupted early due to poor recruitment. Nine patients of the originally 43 planned were treated. Mean age was 63 years. Five patients had tumour stage pT2, 1 stage pT3a and 3 stage pT3b. All patients completed radiotherapy and chemotherapy as scheduled. Only one grade 3 and no grade 4 toxicity was seen. All patients were evaluated 3 months after treatment: eight patients had no detectable tumour and one had para-aortic lymph nodes. During further follow-up, a second patient got lymph node metastases and two patients developed distant metastases (lung in the patient with enlarged lymph nodes at the first evaluation and abdominal in one other). Those three patients died at respectively 19, 14, and 18 months after registration. Late toxicity was limited and often temporary. After 26 to 57 months of follow-up, no local recurrences were seen. Six patients remained alive without disease. Discussion. Despite the small cohort, this combination of concomitant chemotherapy and accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer seemed to be well tolerated and to result in satisfactory local control with limited early and late toxicity. It could therefore be considered for study in further clinical trials

  4. Palliative Radiotherapy

    Palliative care does not attempt to prolong survival but to the achieve the highest quality of life both for the patient and their family covering their physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. Radiotherapy (RT), one of the most important therapeutic modalities, has a great significance in palliative medicine for cancer since it attempts to reduce as much as possible the acute reaction associated with the treatment for the patient. (Author)

  5. Fractionation and delivery schedules in combined radiotherapy-cisplatin for head and neck cancer

    Full text: Since Rosenberg's initial discovery, cisplatin has become one of the most effective anticancer drugs, with particular significance in head and neck cancer. For advanced disease, where the tumour is unresectable, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, either singularly or combined, remain the possible therapeutic modalities. The majority of the trials using a combination of cisplatin and radiation obtained much better results than the single-agent trials. But the best schedule, dosage and timing between radiation and drug administration are still unknown. Many positive steps were however made to eliminate the cisplatin-produced side effects, as much as possible. The tendency in current trials is to fractionate the drug dose by daily administration and also to hyperfractionate the radiation. In this way the long-term benefits are improved and the toxicity is better tolerated

  6. Dosimetric comparison on tissue interfaces with TLD dosimeters, L-alanine, EDR2 films and Penelope simulation for a Co-60 source and linear accelerator in radiotherapy

    Percentage depth dose curves were obtained with TLD-100 dosimeters, EDR2 films and Penelope simulation at the interfaces in an inhomogeneous mannequin, composed by equivalent materials to the human body built for this study, consisting of cylindrical plates of solid water-bone-lung-bone-solid water of 15 cm in diameter and 1 cm in height; plates were placed in descending way (4-2-8-2-4). Irradiated with Co-60 source (Theratron Equinox-100) for small radiation fields 3 x 3 cm2 and 1 x 1 cm2 at a surface source distance of 100 cm from mannequin. The TLD-100 dosimeters were placed in the center of each plate of mannequin irradiated at 10 Gy. The results were compared between these measurement techniques, giving good agreement in interfaces better than 97%. This study was compared with the same characteristics of another study realized with other equivalent materials to human body not homogeneous acrylic-bone-cork-bone-acrylic. The percentage depth dose curves were obtained with mini-dosimeters L-alanine of 1 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height and 3.5 to 4.0 mg of mass with spectrometer band K (EPR). The mini-dosimeters were irradiated with a lineal accelerator PRIMUS Siemens 6 MV. The results of percentage depth dose of L-alanine mini-dosimeters show a good agreement with the percentage depth dose curves of Penelope code, better than 97.7% in interfaces of tissues. (Author)

  7. Quality assurance (QA) and implementation of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) on 2100 C/D linear accelerator

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) involves the modulation of radiation beam intensities in order to conform the target volumes and spare surrounding critical structures and normal tissues. IMRT can improve the dose distribution to a large extent compared to conventional 3DCRT. The purpose of this article is to discuss the methodology adopted in the Quality Assurance (QA) program for the implementation of IMRT on 2100 C/D linear accelerator at our center. QA of Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) including mechanical tests, radiation tests, dynamic MLC tests and patient specific QA of the final IMRT plan has been described here in detail. The average transmission values were found to be 1.31% and 1.40% for A bank and B bank, respectively, for 6 MV photon beam measured with the parallel plate chamber. From film measurements we got the maximum interleaf transmission value of 1.88%. The speed of the MLC leaves was found to be within the specification of the manufacturer. The MLC positional accuracy with the methods mentioned gave a precision of 1 mm, irrespective of the gantry positions. The absolute dose for 6 and 15 MV photons was estimated for the Dynamic MLC (DMLC) field periodically and was found to be consistent. The inverse-planning algorithm produced satisfactory dose distribution and adequate Planning Target Volume (PTV) coverage with critical organ dose-volume parameters, within the respective tolerances. The percentage deviation between the measured and the calculated absolute dose for the Intensity Modulated (IM) fields is found to be less than 3%. The clinical implementation of inverse planning and treatment delivery with DMLC is extremely complex and involves a substantial developmental effort. The dose delivery in DMLC mode needs a confirmation using established QA program that is both stringent and efficient. However, a comprehensive QA is mandatory to ensure the safe and accurate dose delivery. (author)

  8. Quality of Survival and Growth in Children and Young Adults in the PNET4 European Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma

    Kennedy, Colin, E-mail: crk1@soton.ac.uk [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Bull, Kim [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Chevignard, Mathilde [Hôpitaux de Saint Maurice, Saint Maurice (France); Neurophysiology, University of Pierre et Marie-Curie Paris 6, Paris (France); Culliford, David [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Dörr, Helmuth G. [Kinder- und Jugendklinik der Universität Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Doz, François [Institut Curie and University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité (France); Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter [Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Lannering, Birgitta [Department of Pediatrics, The Sahlgren Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Massimino, Maura [Fondazione Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Navajas Gutiérrez, Aurora [Hospital Universitario Cruces, Baracaldo-Vizcaya (Spain); Rutkowski, Stefan [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Spoudeas, Helen A. [Center for Pediatric Endocrinology, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Calaminus, Gabriele [Pediatric Oncology, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To compare quality of survival in “standard-risk” medulloblastoma after hyperfractionated radiation therapy of the central nervous system with that after standard radiation therapy, combined with a chemotherapy regimen common to both treatment arms, in the PNET4 randomised controlled trial. Methods and Materials: Participants in the PNET4 trial and their parents/caregivers in 7 participating anonymized countries completed standardized questionnaires in their own language on executive function, health status, behavior, health-related quality of life, and medical, educational, employment, and social information. Pre- and postoperative neurologic status and serial heights and weights were also recorded. Results: Data were provided by 151 of 244 eligible survivors (62%) at a median age at assessment of 15.2 years and median interval from diagnosis of 5.8 years. Compared with standard radiation therapy, hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with lower (ie, better) z-scores for executive function in all participants (mean intergroup difference 0.48 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.81, P=.004), but health status, behavioral difficulties, and health-related quality of life z-scores were similar in the 2 treatment arms. Data on hearing impairment were equivocal. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was also associated with greater decrement in height z-scores (mean intergroup difference 0.43 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.76, P=.011). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with better executive function and worse growth but without accompanying change in health status, behavior, or quality of life.

  9. Quality of Survival and Growth in Children and Young Adults in the PNET4 European Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma

    Purpose: To compare quality of survival in “standard-risk” medulloblastoma after hyperfractionated radiation therapy of the central nervous system with that after standard radiation therapy, combined with a chemotherapy regimen common to both treatment arms, in the PNET4 randomised controlled trial. Methods and Materials: Participants in the PNET4 trial and their parents/caregivers in 7 participating anonymized countries completed standardized questionnaires in their own language on executive function, health status, behavior, health-related quality of life, and medical, educational, employment, and social information. Pre- and postoperative neurologic status and serial heights and weights were also recorded. Results: Data were provided by 151 of 244 eligible survivors (62%) at a median age at assessment of 15.2 years and median interval from diagnosis of 5.8 years. Compared with standard radiation therapy, hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with lower (ie, better) z-scores for executive function in all participants (mean intergroup difference 0.48 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.81, P=.004), but health status, behavioral difficulties, and health-related quality of life z-scores were similar in the 2 treatment arms. Data on hearing impairment were equivocal. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was also associated with greater decrement in height z-scores (mean intergroup difference 0.43 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.76, P=.011). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with better executive function and worse growth but without accompanying change in health status, behavior, or quality of life

  10. A proliferation saturation index to predict radiation response and personalize radiotherapy fractionation

    Although altered protocols that challenge conventional radiation fractionation have been tested in prospective clinical trials, we still have limited understanding of how to select the most appropriate fractionation schedule for individual patients. Currently, the prescription of definitive radiotherapy is based on the primary site and stage, without regard to patient-specific tumor or host factors that may influence outcome. We hypothesize that the proportion of radiosensitive proliferating cells is dependent on the saturation of the tumor carrying capacity. This may serve as a prognostic factor for personalized radiotherapy (RT) fractionation. We introduce a proliferation saturation index (PSI), which is defined as the ratio of tumor volume to the host-influenced tumor carrying capacity. Carrying capacity is as a conceptual measure of the maximum volume that can be supported by the current tumor environment including oxygen and nutrient availability, immune surveillance and acidity. PSI is estimated from two temporally separated routine pre-radiotherapy computed tomography scans and a deterministic logistic tumor growth model. We introduce the patient-specific pre-treatment PSI into a model of tumor growth and radiotherapy response, and fit the model to retrospective data of four non-small cell lung cancer patients treated exclusively with standard fractionation. We then simulate both a clinical trial hyperfractionation protocol and daily fractionations, with equal biologically effective dose, to compare tumor volume reduction as a function of pretreatment PSI. With tumor doubling time and radiosensitivity assumed constant across patients, a patient-specific pretreatment PSI is sufficient to fit individual patient response data (R2 = 0.98). PSI varies greatly between patients (coefficient of variation >128 %) and correlates inversely with radiotherapy response. For this study, our simulations suggest that only patients with intermediate PSI (0.45–0.9) are

  11. Postmastectomy radiotherapy

    Shikama, Naoto; Koguchi, Masahiko; Sasaki, Shigeru; Kaneko, Tomoki; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Since there have been few reports on postmastectomy radiotherapy having a high evidence level in Japan, the significance of postoperative radiotherapy and the irradiation techniques were reviewed based on reports from Western countries. Authors focused on the indications for postoperative irradiation, irradiation methods (irradiation sites, irradiation techniques; prosthetics, methods of irradiating the chest wall and lymph nodes, timing of irradiation), and complications, and discuss them. The factors thought to be adaptable to postmastectomy radiotherapy have been listed. Axillary lymph node metastasis and the size of the primary focus are thought to be important factors in locoregional recurrence. The chest wall and the supraclavicular lymph nodes are the usual sites of irradiation after mastectomy. The irradiation method consists of tangential irradiation of the chest wall and single-field irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes, with 46-50 Gy in fractional doses of 1.8-2 Gy x 5/w is administered for 4.5-5.5 weeks. The timing of irradiation in the West is generally after chemotherapy. Adverse radiation effects include ischemic heart disease, pneumonitis, arm edema, rib fractures, and brachial plexus paralysis. The frequency of these complications is increased by the combined use of chemotherapy or surgery. The breast cancer cure rate in Japan is generally better than in the West. It remains to be determined whether the clinical data from Europe and America are applicable to the treatment of breast cancer in Japan. To address this issue, a clinical investigation should be performed in Japan with close cooperation between surgeons, physicians, pathologists, and radiotherapists. (K.H.)

  12. Daily etoposide and cisplatin during thoracic radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Purpose: A phase I/II trial was performed to investigate the toxicity and potential efficacy of delivering two radiosensitizing chemotherapeutic agents (cisplatin and etoposide) on a daily basis during twice daily thoracic radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Patients were eligible for this trial if they had unresectable or incompletely resected biopsy-proven stage IIIA or IIIB non-small cell lung carcinoma. However, patients with contralateral hilar or supraclavicular disease were excluded. Patients were required to have an ECOG performance status of 0-2 and ≤10% weight loss during the preceding three months. Thoracic radiation treatment (TRT) was delivered as accelerated hyperfractionated TRT with 150 cGy given twice daily beginning on a Monday. Patients received a two-week break between two courses of 3000 cGy (total dose:6000cGy). Patients received etoposide (25 mg/m2 po) on days 1-12 and cisplatin (3 mg/m2 IV) on days 1-5 and 8-12 of each course of TRT. Two weeks following the completion of TRT patients began two cycles (q 28d) of etoposide (25 mg/m2, po, d1-21) and cisplatin (50 mg/m2 IV, d1). Patients were seen in followup at 2 months following the completion of therapy and subsequently at 3 month intervals for the first year. Results: Seventeen patients were entered on the trial and the median followup was 11 months. Of the 17 patients, 13 had evaluable disease and 4 had measurable disease; 16 were deemed unresectable and one had an incomplete resection; 6 had squamous cell carcinomas and 11 had non-squamous cell carcinomas; 5 had primary tumors greater than 6 cm, 9 were 3-6 cm and 3 were <3 cm; 14 had less than 5% weight loss and 3 had 5-10% weight loss; 9 had stage IIIA disease and 8 had IIIB disease. The most common hematologic toxicity was leukopenias: 4 patients had grade 3 and 1 had grade 4 toxicity. No grade 3 or greater thrombocytopenia was observed. There were 6 grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities

  13. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 20. Proceedings

    The proceedings include contributions on the following issues: laser driven proton accelerators on the way for radiotherapy, radiobiological evaluation of new radiations; molecular factors of radiation response; biological targeting; EGFR epidermal growth factor receptor/targeting - combined internal and external irradiation, radiobiology of normal tissues; dose-volume histograms for the radiotherapy: curves without radiobiological relevance or important information for the therapy planning; HPV (human papilloma virus) and radiation sensitivity of HNSCC (head and neck squamous cell carcinomas): evidence, radiobiological mechanism, clinical consequences and perspectives; mechanisms of action and intertumoral heterogeneity of response to EGFR inhibition in radiotherapy of solid tumors; evaluation of biomarkers for radiotherapy.

  14. The development of radiotherapy in Slovenia

    The historical data on the development of radiotherapy in Slovenia are presented from its first use in this county in 1902 until the present. The Institute of Oncology in Ljubljana was established in 1938 with the intention of providing a sound development of radium and roentgen cancer treatment. After World War II, the development of radiotherapy was dynamic, which is evident from the data on new radiation sources in external beam therapy (accelerators, telecobalt units), in brachytherapy (various sealed radioisotopes) as well as in the introduction of therapy with unsealed radioisotopes. In 1947, a Chair of Oncology and Radiotherapy was instituted at the Medical Faculty of the University of Ljubljana (with the seat at the Institute of Oncology). In 1955, radiotherapy and oncology were officially recognized as separate branches of medicine requiring special obligatory postgraduate residency training. Within the Medical Society of Slovenia, the Section for Radiotherapy was established in 1987. The following year, the Section for Radiotherapy of Slovenia became a member of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Considering the size of population of Slovenia (nearly 2 million), it was reasonable that by this time radiotherapy became almost completely concentrated in one central institution, the Institute of Oncology, whose core and cohesive activity were represented in the multidisciplinary cancer treatment approach

  15. Palliative radiotherapy in developing countries

    Full text: The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicts that cancer incidence in developing countries will increase dramatically in the first two decades of this millennium. Already some 80% of cancer patients in developing countries present with incurable disease. [n many cases pain is a severe problem and palliation is needed to improve quality of life as well as extending survival. This paper will consider the physical and clinical aspects of palliative radiotherapy (PRT), choice of radiation modality, alternative approaches to imaging and therapy and cost-benefit considerations. The potential benefits of a dedicated palliative centre include lower cost and therefore more centres, enabling more patients access to regional palliative care. Whilst there is an obvious need for palliative radiotherapy, simple curative treatments could also be managed. C060 radiotherapy has important advantages in developing countries, because of the higher initial cost of a linear accelerator, as well as the need for reliable power supply and the level of skill required by linac technicians and physicists. The beam characteristics of both C060 units and low energy linacs are compared and both are found to be acceptable for palliation. The concept of telemedicine is also discussed, using mobile phones and internet communication to allow rural clinics to receive support from specialists based in the cities, to send images for remote diagnosis and remote dose planning for radiotherapy. (author)

  16. High-energy accelerators in medicine

    Mandrillon, Pierre

    1992-01-01

    The treatment of tumours with charged particles, ranging from protons to "light ions" ( Carbon, Oxygen, Neon) has many advantages, but up to now has been little used because of the absence of facilities. After the successful pioneering work carried out with accelerators built for physics research, machines dedicated to this new radiotherapy are planned or already in construction. The rationale for this new radiotherapy, the high energy accelerators and the beam delivery systems are presented in these two lectures.

  17. Overview of radiotherapy resources in Beijing in 2010

    Objective: To investigate and analyze the resources of radiotherapy in Beijing, in order to provide reference for the subject development, resources allocation and professional training of radiotherapy. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted by on-site inspection, supplemented by telephone or e-mail investigation among the 33 hospitals with radiotherapy facilities to know the current status of distribution of radiotherapy institutions, radiotherapy facilities, human resources and number of patients treated. Results: There were 52 linear accelerators, 1 spiral CT machine, and 2 intraoperative radiotherapy machines in these 33 hospitals up to June 2010. Three-dimensional conformal or stereotactic radiotherapy was carried out in 31 hospitals, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in 19, image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) in 6, and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMRT) in 2. The number of professional personnel (except nurses) was 495, including 214 radiation oncologists, 78 radiotherapy physicists, and 203 radiotherapy technologists, and those with senior professional titles accounted for 52.3%, 17.9%, and 1.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Compared to the national level, the radiotherapy resources level is higher in Beijing, but the distribution of resources is imbalanced. The resource allocation should be optimized and training of the personnel should be strengthened so as to meet the growing needs of patients. (authors)

  18. Radiotherapy in paediatric oncology

    Full text: Radiation therapy has always been one of the most powerful tools in the fight against childhood cancer. Since the middle of the last century, we have known that most paediatric tumours are exquisitely sensitive to radiation. The early application of radiotherapy alone led to the first cures of retinoblastoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, as well as certain sarcomas and brain tumours. The generous application of radiation in conjunction with chemotherapy led to further extraordinary increases in survival rates for leukemias, Wilms tumour, sarcomas, and other paediatric malignancies. Over the past 40 years, the overall cure rate for childhood cancer has climbed from 25% to 75% in the USA. With this success, however, came the knowledge that radiation can be associated with significant late effects. We now have a much better understanding of both the benefits and risks of using radiation to treat children as we seek to optimize and refine its role in curative therapy. Leukemias constitute approximately one third of paediatric cancer diagnoses and most of these patients are successfully treated with chemotherapy alone. Central nervous system (CNS) radiation is still recommended for patients at highest risk of CNS failure and total body radiation is useful for the small percentage of patients who require bone marrow transplant. Brain tumours also make up almost one-third of paediatric neoplasms and children with most kinds of brain tumours will require high dose radiotherapy. Many of the other types of paediatric tumours (Wilms, neuroblastoma, sarcomas, etc.) also require radiotherapy as part of curative treatment. There have been considerable advances in radiation technology including three dimensional planning, intensity modulated radiation therapy, and protons. Individual paediatric patients may or may not benefit from advanced technologies based on numerous patient and disease related factors. Examples will be illustrated. We must also be mindful of economic and

  19. Concurrent Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced (Stage III) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Single Institution Experience With 600 Patients

    Jeremic, Branislav, E-mail: nebareje@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Kragujevac (Serbia); Milicic, Biljana; Milisavljevic, Slobodan [Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Kragujevac (Serbia)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Our institutional experience with the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (RT) alone or concurrently with chemotherapy (RT-CHT) in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer was reviewed. Methods and Materials: Three phase III and two phase II studies included a total of 600 patients. Hyperfractionated RT alone was given to 127 patients, and hyperfractionated RT-CHT was given to 473 patients. RT doses were 64.8 Gy and 69.6 Gy (using 1.2 Gy twice daily) and 67.6 Gy (using 1.3 Gy twice daily). CHT consisted of concurrent administration of carboplatin and etoposide to 409 patients and concurrent administration of carboplatin and paclitaxel to 64 patients. Results: The median survival times were 19 months, 21 months, and 12 months for all, RT-CHT, and RT-only patients, respectively. The survival difference between the RT-CHT and RT group was significant (p < 0.0001). Four-year rates of local progression-free survival (LPFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were 29% and 35%, respectively, for the entire group. The RT-CHT group had significantly better LPFS rates than the RT group (31% for the RT-CHT group vs. 16% for the RT group; p = 0.0015) but not DMFS rates (36% for the RT-CHT group vs. 36% for the RT group, p = 0.0571). Acute high-grade esophagitis, pneumonitis, and hematological toxicities were seen most frequently and in 11%, 9%, and 12% of patients, respectively. Late high-grade esophageal and bronchopulmonary toxicity were each seen in 6% of patients. Conclusions: Compared to the majority of existing phase II and III studies, this study reconfirmed the excellent results achieved with concurrent RT-CHT, including low toxicity. Concurrent RT-CHT results in survival benefit primarily by increasing LPFS, not DMFS.

  20. Concurrent Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced (Stage III) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Single Institution Experience With 600 Patients

    Purpose: Our institutional experience with the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (RT) alone or concurrently with chemotherapy (RT-CHT) in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer was reviewed. Methods and Materials: Three phase III and two phase II studies included a total of 600 patients. Hyperfractionated RT alone was given to 127 patients, and hyperfractionated RT-CHT was given to 473 patients. RT doses were 64.8 Gy and 69.6 Gy (using 1.2 Gy twice daily) and 67.6 Gy (using 1.3 Gy twice daily). CHT consisted of concurrent administration of carboplatin and etoposide to 409 patients and concurrent administration of carboplatin and paclitaxel to 64 patients. Results: The median survival times were 19 months, 21 months, and 12 months for all, RT-CHT, and RT-only patients, respectively. The survival difference between the RT-CHT and RT group was significant (p < 0.0001). Four-year rates of local progression-free survival (LPFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were 29% and 35%, respectively, for the entire group. The RT-CHT group had significantly better LPFS rates than the RT group (31% for the RT-CHT group vs. 16% for the RT group; p = 0.0015) but not DMFS rates (36% for the RT-CHT group vs. 36% for the RT group, p = 0.0571). Acute high-grade esophagitis, pneumonitis, and hematological toxicities were seen most frequently and in 11%, 9%, and 12% of patients, respectively. Late high-grade esophageal and bronchopulmonary toxicity were each seen in 6% of patients. Conclusions: Compared to the majority of existing phase II and III studies, this study reconfirmed the excellent results achieved with concurrent RT-CHT, including low toxicity. Concurrent RT-CHT results in survival benefit primarily by increasing LPFS, not DMFS.

  1. Status of Radiotherapy in Kenya: The Milestones and Challenges

    According to Gobacan 2012, seventy eight (78) Kenyans die daily of cancer related complications. Ratiotherapy is the treatment of cancer using high energy radiation targeting the tumour cells. The three main modalities used in treatment are radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. More than 50% of cases are treated using radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is divided into two brad categoeis, namely external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) or teletherapy and internal radiotherapy (Brachytherapy). In Kenya, the machines available for EBRT are Cobalt-60 and linear accelerators. Co-60 source emits gamma-ray with energy of 1.25 MV while linear accelerators available locally emit photons (x-rays) and electrons ranging between 6 to 8MV. Until 2010, there was only one (public) radiotherapy facility using the co-60. Currently, four private facilities using linear accelerations have joined the fray. Two more public institutions are at different stages of putting up radiotherapy facilities. Owing to the high energy range, a lot of radiation safety considerations are made prior to installation, during acceptance testing and commissioning and during the operation. These include, but not limited to shielding integrity checks, Dosimetry checks, mechanical checks and emergency procedures check. In view of these, a lot of capacity building still needs to be done in term of skilled staff development as well as equipment

  2. Project of compact accelerator for cancer proton therapy

    The status of the sub-projetc 'Compact Accelerator' in the framework of the Hadrontherapy Project leaded by Prof. Amaldi is described. Emphasis is given to the reasons of the use of protons for radiotherapy applications, to the results of the preliminary design studies of four types of accelerators as possible radiotherapy dedicated 'Compact Accelerator' and to the scenario of the fonts of financial resources

  3. The application of accelerator for medical therapy in Indonesia

    The study of the application of accelerator for medical therapy in Indonesia was carried out. Accelerator that used for therapy is an electron lintier accelerator (Linac) which can radiate electron beam and X-ray. This study shows that there are 8 unit of Linac distributed at 6 big hospitals in Indonesia, especially in Jakarta. This study also shows that radiotherapy facilities in Indonesia is un sufficient of. Therefore, providing radiotherapy facilities for hospitals, especially the big hospitals in Indonesia is necessary

  4. Present status of radiotherapy in Venezuela

    The purpose of the work was to discover the conditions obtaining in the practice of radiotherapy in Venezuela; 15 public radiotherapy centres were visited, evaluated and information obtained on physical environment, treatment units, intracavitary radiotherapy groups, medical and para-medical personnel, recording of clinical data and number of patients. In the groups it was observed that: only one of 17 voltage stabilizing units was operating; the four linear accelerators can only be operated irregularly and there are 17 60Co units operating, but the majority of those are antiquated and worn out. One centre has a simulator and another has a computer. In intracavitary radiotherapy, approximately 50% of the centres do not carry out utero-vaginal implants in proper conditions. There are sufficient radiotherapists, but their working conditions cannot be compared with those in developed countries. There is a lack of auxiliary personnel, radiation physicists and dosimetrists. There is no training for radiotherapy technicians and there are not enough of them. In 50% of the centres, no treatment plans are made; one-third do not have any devices for immobilization. Four hospitals do not use radiotherapy histories or treatment graphics, and in four institutions no tumour record is used. The conclusion is that oncological radiotherapy is not adequate in most of the centres and it is recommended that: the damaged equipment should be repaired; the 60Co units with inadequate source-axis distances should be replaced; new sources should be acquired for the equipment with source-axis distances of 80 cm; maintenance should be constant; simulators should be provided; damaged intracavitary radiotherapy equipment and sources should be replaced; the numbers and training of technical personnel should be increased; physicists and dosimetrists should be trained; a national radiation physics centre should be set up, and the recording of clinical information should be improved. (author)

  5. A detrimental effect of a combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy approach in children with diffuse intrinsic brain stem gliomas?

    Purpose: To compare the proportion of patients that survive at least 1 year following treatment with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HRT) to a dose of 70.2 Gy on Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) study no. 8495 with that of patients treated with similar radiotherapy plus cisplatinum given by continuous infusion on weeks 1, 3, and 5 of radiotherapy on POG no. 9239. Methods and Materials: The eligibility criteria for the two studies were identical and included age 3 to 21 years, previously untreated tumor involving the brain stem of which two-thirds was in the pons, history less than 6 months, and clinical findings typical for diffuse intrinsic brain stem glioma, including cranial nerve deficits, long tract signs, and ataxia. The outcome of 57 patients who were treated at the 70.2 Gy dose level of POG no. 8495 between May 1986 and February 1988 was compared with that of 64 patients treated with identical radiotherapy plus cisplatinum on POG no. 9239 between June 1992 and March 1996. Results: The number of patients accrued to POG no. 9239 was determined to guarantee that the probability was at least 0.80 of correctly detecting that the 1-year survival rate exceeded that of patients on POG no. 8495 by 0.2. However, the z value for this test was -1.564, giving a p value of 0.9411. That is, there is almost sufficient evidence to conclude that survival for patients receiving HRT plus cisplatinum on POG no. 9239 was worse than that for patients receiving the same radiotherapy alone on POG no. 8495. Conclusion: The finding that patients who received cisplatinum given as a radiosensitizing agent concurrent with HRT fared less well than those receiving the same dose of HRT alone was unexpected and is clearly a cause for concern as many current protocols for patients with diffuse intrinsic brain stem gliomas call for use of chemotherapeutic and/or biological agents given concurrent with radiotherapy

  6. Radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

    Specht, Lena [Rigshospitalet Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Depts. of Oncology and Haematology; Yahalom, Joachim (eds.) [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-07-01

    This book deals in detail with all aspects of the best practice in modern radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma. It provides the background and rationale for the inclusion of radiotherapy in today's combined-modality approach, including special clinical situations such as Hodgkin lymphoma in children, in the pregnant patient, and in the elderly. Radiotherapy planning using state-of-the-art imaging, target definition, planning software, and treatment equipment is expounded in detail. Acute and long-term side effects of radiotherapy are analyzed, and the implications for modern radiotherapy approaches in Hodgkin lymphomas are explained. (orig.)

  7. Radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

    This book deals in detail with all aspects of the best practice in modern radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma. It provides the background and rationale for the inclusion of radiotherapy in today's combined-modality approach, including special clinical situations such as Hodgkin lymphoma in children, in the pregnant patient, and in the elderly. Radiotherapy planning using state-of-the-art imaging, target definition, planning software, and treatment equipment is expounded in detail. Acute and long-term side effects of radiotherapy are analyzed, and the implications for modern radiotherapy approaches in Hodgkin lymphomas are explained. (orig.)

  8. Radiotherapy gel dosimetry

    In radiotherapy, the primary objective is to deliver a prescribed dose of radiation to a tumour or lesion within a patient while minimising the dose delivered to the surrounding healthy tissue. Traditional radiotherapy treatments usually involve simple external or internal irradiations of a tumour. External irradiations are normally achieved in the clinic with photon or electron beams produced by high energy linear accelerators. The photon or electron beams are collimated into regular shapes as they emerge from the treatment head of the unit which is supported by a gantry that can be rotated isocentrically to any position. A discrete number of photon or electron beams with different angles of incidence that intersect at the iso-centre are used to produce a region of high dose around the tumour volume (positioned at the iso-centre). Internal irradiations are normally achieved in the clinic by implanting radioactive sources in and around the tumour or lesion. Such irradiations are characterised by very high doses local to the tumour. Radioactive sources are also used to prevent post-angioplasty restenosis by inserting sources into arteries. Usually when treating a tumour, a compromise is made between tumour control and complications arising from normal tissue damage. One measure of this compromise, the therapeutic ratio, is defined as the radiation dose producing complications in 50% of patients divided by the dose providing tumour control in 50% of the patients. The therapeutic ratio depends on the radiobiological characteristics of the cancerous tissue and surrounding healthy tissues and on the radiation dose distribution achieved by the radiotherapy treatment. It is generally believed that the therapeutic ratio can be minimised by optimising the conformation of the radiation dose distribution to the target volume. This is difficult with traditional radiotherapy techniques since they do not produce dose distributions that adequately cover tumour volumes of complex

  9. Quality control programme for radiotherapy

    A 3 years pilot programme started in January 2000 with 33 philanthropic cancer institutions that provides medical services to 60% of the patients from the national social security system. Brazil has today 161 radiotherapy services (144 operating with megavoltage equipment). These 33 institutions are distributed over 19 Brazilian states. The aim of this programme is: To create conditions to allow the participants to apply the radiotherapy with quality and efficacy; To promote up dating courses for the physicians, physicists and technicians of these 33 Institutions. With the following objectives: To recommend dosimetric and radiological protection procedures in order to guarantee the tumor prescribed dose and safe working conditions; To help in establishing and implementing these procedures. The main activities are: local quality control evaluations, postal TLD audits in reference conditions, postal TLD audits in off axis conditions and training. The local quality control program has already evaluated 22 institutions with 43 machines (25 Co-60 and 18 linear accelerators). In these visits we perform dosimetric, electrical, mechanical and safety tests. As foreseen, we found more problems among the old Co-60 machines i.e., field flatness, size, symmetry and relative output factors; lasers positioning system alignment; optical distance indicator; radiation and light field coincidence; optical and mechanical distance indicators agreement, than among the linear accelerators i.e., field flatness and size; lasers positioning system alignment; tray interlocking and wedge filter factors

  10. Outline of the dose calculation system imagine for radiotherapy

    The dose calculation system IMAGINE is under development for supporting X-ray radiotherapy by rapidly providing the accurate dose distribution in a patient body utilizing precise models of the patient body and accelerator assembly incorporated with Monte Carlo calculations. The system will be used for the quality assurance of the current radiotherapy widely carried out at present, and further for promoting the prevalence of advanced therapy. The system is scheduled to be completed in 2007 after the five-year project. (author)

  11. Establishment Of An External Audit Group For Radiotherapy In Israel

    A national external audit group (EAG) was set up in Israel in 1997 in the framework of the IAEA Q A network for radiotherapy dosimetry. The members of the group were drawn from the Israeli SSDL, the Soreq Nuclear Research Center and the Soroka Medical Center. Ashen fully operational, the EAG will serve 8 hospitals in which 15 linear accelerators and 4 cobalt units are installed. The distribution of radiotherapy machines in Israel at the present time is shown in Table 1

  12. IART® (Intra-Operative Avidination for Radionuclide Therapy) for accelerated radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. Technical aspects and preliminary results of a phase II study with 90Y-labelled biotin

    Paganelli, G.; De Cicco, C; M. E. Ferrari; McVie, G.; Pagani, G; Leonardi, M C; Cremonesi, M.; Ferrari, A.; Pacifici, M.; Di Dia, A; Botta, F; De Santis, R; Galimberti, V.; Luini, A.; Orecchia, R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Breast conserving surgery (BCS) plus external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is considered the standard treatment for early breast cancer. We have investigated the possibility of irradiating the residual gland, using an innovative nuclear medicine approach named IART® (Intra-operative Avidination for Radionuclide Therapy). Aim: The objective of this study was to determine the optimal dose of avidin with a fixed activity (3.7 GBq) of 90Y-biotin, in order to provide a boost of 20 Gy, foll...

  13. Carbon-ion radiotherapy for marginal lymph node recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy: a case report

    Recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy often occur at common iliac or para-aortic lymph nodes as marginal lymph node recurrences. Patients with these recurrences have a chance of long-term survival by optimal re-treatment with radiotherapy. However, the re-irradiation often overlaps the initial and the secondary radiotherapy fields and can result in increased normal tissue toxicities in the bowels or the stomach. Carbon-ion radiotherapy, a form of particle beam radiotherapy using accelerated carbon ions, offers more conformal and sharp dose distribution than X-ray radiotherapy. Therefore, this approach enables the delivery of high radiation doses to the target while sparing its surrounding normal tissues. Marginal lymph node recurrences in common iliac lymph nodes after radiotherapy were treated successfully by carbon-ion radiotherapy in two patients. These two patients were initially treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy and intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy. However, the diseases recurred in the lymph nodes near the border of the initial radiotherapy fields after 22 months and 23 months. Because re-irradiation with X-ray radiotherapy may deliver high doses to a section of the bowels, carbon-ion radiotherapy was selected to treat the lymph node recurrences. A total dose of 48 Gy (RBE) in 12 fractions over 3 weeks was given to the lymph node recurrences, and the tumors disappeared completely with no severe acute toxicities. The two patients showed no evidence of disease for 75 months and 63 months after the initial radiotherapy and for 50 months and 37 months after the carbon-ion radiotherapy, respectively. No severe late adverse effects are observed in these patients. The two presented cases suggest that the highly conformal dose distribution of carbon-ion radiotherapy may be beneficial in the treatment of marginal lymph node recurrences after radiotherapy. In addition, the higher biological effect of carbon

  14. Heavy-ion radiography applied to charged particle radiotherapy

    The objectives of the heavy-ion radiography research program applied to the clinical cancer research program of charged particle radiotherapy have a twofold purpose: (1) to explore the manner in which heavy-ion radiography and CT reconstruction can provide improved tumor localization, treatment planning, and beam delivery for radiotherapy with accelerated heavy charged particles; and (2) to explore the usefulness of heavy-ion radiography in detecting, localizing, and sizing soft tissue cancers in the human body. The techniques and procedures developed for heavy-ion radiography should prove successful in support of charged particle radiotherapy

  15. Japanese structure survey of high-precision radiotherapy in 2012 based on institutional questionnaire about the patterns of care

    The purpose of this study was to clarify operational situations, treatment planning and processes, quality assurance and quality control with relevance to stereotactic radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy in Japan. We adopted 109 items as the quality indicators of high-precision radiotherapy to prepare a questionnaire. In April 2012, we started to publicly open the questionnaire on the website, requesting every institution with radiotherapy machines for response. The response ratio was 62.1% (490 out of 789 institutions responded). Two or more radiotherapy technologists per linear accelerator managed linear accelerator operation in ∼90% of the responded institutions while medical physicists/radiotherapy quality managers were engaged in the operation in only 64.9% of the institutions. Radiotherapy certified nurses also worked in only 18.4% of the institutions. The ratios of the institutions equipped for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumor, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy were 43.3, 32.6 and 46.8%, respectively. In intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning, radiation oncologists were usually responsible for delineation while medical physicists/radiotherapy quality managers or radiotherapy technologists set up beam in 33.3% of the institutions. The median time required for quality assurance of intensity-modulated radiotherapy at any site of brain, head and neck and prostate was 4 h. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy quality assurance activity had to be started after clinical hours in > 60% of the institutions. This study clarified one major issue in the current high-precision radiotherapy in Japan. A manpower shortage should be corrected for high-precision radiotherapy, especially in the area relevant to quality assurance/quality control. (author)

  16. Carbon ion radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Carbon ion therapy offers the potential advantages of improved dose localization and enhanced biological effects. It has been suggested that carbon ion therapy is effective against radioresistant pancreatic cancer. In April 2000, clinical studies examining the treatment of pancreatic cancer with carbon ions were begun at the HIMAC. As of February 2010, 48 patients treated with preoperative carbon ion radiotherapy and 89 patients treated for locally advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled into the clinical trials. Both protocols are still ongoing. The interim results of these clinical trials suggest that carbon ion radiotherapy provides good local control and offers a survival advantage for patients with otherwise hard to cure pancreatic cancer, without unacceptable morbidity. (author)

  17. Radiotherapy of anal carcinomas

    Report is given on radiotherapy of anal carcinomas. Own experiences and a review of the recent literature are presented. Prior to surgery radiotherapy with high energy electrons in combination with chemotherapy is in the foreground. Especially in cloacogenous carcinoma no residual tumor was found after preliminary irradiation. Our recommended conception of post-operative radiotherapy of the regional lymphatic draining vessels is outlined. (orig./MG)

  18. Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy

    Mckenzie, Alan

    A common feature of the Radiotherapy Centres where there have been major accidents involving incorrect radiotherapy treatment is that they did not operate good Quality Assurance systems. A Quality Assurance system is sometimes called a Quality Management system, and it is designed to give assurance that quality standards are being met. One of the "spin offs" from operating a Quality Management system is that it reduces the likelihood of a radiotherapy accident. A detailed account of how to set up a quality system in radiotherapy has been given in an ESTRO booklet.2

  19. Radiotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent radical radiotherapy of cervical cancer consists of external-beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin. For each element, new developments aim to improve tumor control rates or treatment tolerance. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been shown to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity and can be used to selectively increase the radiotherapy dose. Individualized, image-guided brachytherapy enables better adaptation of high-dose volumes to the tumor extension. Intensification of concomitant or sequential systemic therapy is under evaluation. PMID:27614991

  20. Radiotherapy status in 2007. Key figures from the radiotherapy observatory 2006-2007

    This document briefly comments graphs and tables of data concerning the activity, the equipment and the human resources of French radiotherapy centres: numbers of public and private centres, numbers, types and age of installed accelerators, expected evolution of this stock, techniques used in external radiotherapy, numbers of the different involved professionals in the private sector or public sector. It indicates the status of these centres with respect to the different agreement criteria. The second part gives graphs and tables of data concerning the curie-therapy activity: curietherapy centres, medical treatment activities, used isotopes, types of curietherapy (high, low and pulsed rate)

  1. ARCON in experimental and clinical radiotherapy

    Rojas Callejas, Ana Maria

    2004-01-01

    xHypoxia and repopulation of tumour clonogens are two important determinants of treatment outcome in radiotherapy. In general clinical evidence indicates that loco-regional control may be reduced with long overall treatment times and for tumours with low pre-treatment levels of oxygen. Experimental studies with normobaric carbogen and oxygen showed a two-fold enhancement of the efficacy of radiation in a mouse tumour model when combining oxygen with treatment acceleration. It was then demonst...

  2. A New Cancer Radiotherapy System Using Multi Robotic Manipulators

    The CyberKnife system is state-of-the-art cancer treatment equipment that combines an image tracking technique, artificial intelligence software, robot technology, accelerator technology, and treatment simulation technology. The current CyberKnife System has significant shortcomings. The biggest problem is that it takes a longer time to treat a tumor. A long treatment time gives stress to patients. Furthermore it makes the patients uncomfortable with radiation and thus it is difficult to measure the exact radiation dose rate to the tumor in the processing. Linear accelerators for radiation treatment are dependent on imports, and demand high maintenance cost. This also makes the treatment cost higher and prevents the popularization of radiation. To solve the disadvantages of the existing CyberKnife, a radiation treatment robot system applied to several articulated robots is suggested. Essential element techniques for new radiotherapy robot system are investigated and some problems of similar existing systems are analyzed. This paper presents a general configuration of a new radiation robot treatment system including with a quantitative goal of the requirement techniques. This paper described a new radiotherapy robot system to track the tumor using multiple articulated robots in real time. The existing CyberKnife system using a single robot arm has disadvantages of a long radiotherapy time, high medical fee, and inaccurate measurement of the radiotherapy dose. So a new radiotherapy robot system for tumors has been proposed to solve the above problems of conventional CyberKnife systems. Necessary technologies to configure new the radiotherapy robot system have been identified. Quantitative targets of each technology have been established. Multiple robot arms are adopted to decrease the radiotherapy time. The results of this research are provided as a requisite technology for a domestic radiotherapy system and are expected to be the foundation of new technology. The

  3. A New Cancer Radiotherapy System Using Multi Robotic Manipulators

    Kim, Seung Ho; Lee, Nam Ho; Lee, Byung Chul; Jeung, Kyung Min; Lee, Seong Uk; Bae, Yeong Geol; Na, Hyun Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The CyberKnife system is state-of-the-art cancer treatment equipment that combines an image tracking technique, artificial intelligence software, robot technology, accelerator technology, and treatment simulation technology. The current CyberKnife System has significant shortcomings. The biggest problem is that it takes a longer time to treat a tumor. A long treatment time gives stress to patients. Furthermore it makes the patients uncomfortable with radiation and thus it is difficult to measure the exact radiation dose rate to the tumor in the processing. Linear accelerators for radiation treatment are dependent on imports, and demand high maintenance cost. This also makes the treatment cost higher and prevents the popularization of radiation. To solve the disadvantages of the existing CyberKnife, a radiation treatment robot system applied to several articulated robots is suggested. Essential element techniques for new radiotherapy robot system are investigated and some problems of similar existing systems are analyzed. This paper presents a general configuration of a new radiation robot treatment system including with a quantitative goal of the requirement techniques. This paper described a new radiotherapy robot system to track the tumor using multiple articulated robots in real time. The existing CyberKnife system using a single robot arm has disadvantages of a long radiotherapy time, high medical fee, and inaccurate measurement of the radiotherapy dose. So a new radiotherapy robot system for tumors has been proposed to solve the above problems of conventional CyberKnife systems. Necessary technologies to configure new the radiotherapy robot system have been identified. Quantitative targets of each technology have been established. Multiple robot arms are adopted to decrease the radiotherapy time. The results of this research are provided as a requisite technology for a domestic radiotherapy system and are expected to be the foundation of new technology. The

  4. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ)[1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  5. 3.4 Radiotherapy

    Kramer, H.-M.; Selbach, H.-J.; Vatnitsky, S.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '3.4 Radiotherapy' of the Chapter '3 Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy' with the contents:

  6. Training logbook for radiotherapy.

    Hunter, R.; Maciejewski, B.; Leer, J.W.H.; Kinay, M.; Heeren, G.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To develop a structured logbook for trainees in the medical specialty of radiotherapy with Europe that records the increasing experience throughout their training period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A working party appointed by the European Board of Radiotherapy developed a draft version of a Europea

  7. Antitumor radiotherapy in children

    The philosophy is outlined of the therapy of malignant tumors in children, including Hodgkin type lymphomas and non-Hodgkin tumors, such as Wilm's tumor. The role of radiotherapy is defined and discussed in the comprehensive management of children using a combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy system. (L.O.). 5 refs

  8. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. PMID:27522189

  9. Preoperative short-term radiation therapy (25 Gy, 2.5 Gy twice daily) for primary resectable rectal cancer (phase II)

    Widder, J; Herbst, F; Dobrowsky, W; Schmid, R; Pokrajac, B; Jech, B; Chiari, C; Stift, A; Maier, A; Karner-Hanusch, J; Teleky, B; Wrba, F; Jakesz, R; Poetter, R

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and long-term bowel function of preoperative hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in primary resectable rectal cancer. A total of 184 consecutive patients ( median age 65 years, male : female = 2 : 1) with clinical T3Nx rectal adenocarcinoma received

  10. To understand radiotherapy

    Dealing with the use of radiotherapy for adults, this guide indicates when a radiotherapy is suggested, how it acts, how the treatment is chosen, which are the professionals involved. It describes how an external radiotherapy takes place and its various techniques, the different types of side effects (general, specific to the treated zone, late effects). It indicates which organs can be treated by curie-therapy, the different curie-therapy treatment modalities, how a curie-therapy takes place and which are its side effects. It outlines how to better cope with radiotherapy (how to be supported, the important role of relatives, everyday life questions, rights). It indicates and comments the different measures adopted for the safety and quality of radiotherapy

  11. Mucosal regeneration during radiotherapy

    Background and purpose: Regeneration of the aerodigestive mucosa is known to occur during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. The circumstances surrounding its time of onset and magnitude are not well understood, however. Material and methods: Mucosal reactions were observed in 100 patients undergoing conventionally fractionated treatment at 2 Gy/day over 7 weeks and 88 receiving accelerated treatment at 1.8 Gy twice daily over 3(1(2)) weeks on the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group head and neck cancer trials. Similar observations in 61 patients treated palliatively at dose rates between 0.8 and 240 Gy/h using ten 3.0-4.2 Gy fractions over 2 weeks are compared. Results: Several findings emerged from these studies: 1. Reactions evolved more quickly at oropharyngeal sites than in the hypopharynx. 2. Reactions at both sites evolved more rapidly at greater rates of dose accumulation. 3. The timing of reactions suggested the presence of a strong regenerative mucosal response that started before the manifestation of 'patchy' (grade II) mucosal reactions. 4. The regenerative response was strong enough to 'make good' damage accumulated at a rate of 2 Gy/day in over a third of cases. 5. The linear quadratic model without time correction failed to provide an adequate prediction of the frequency or intensity of mucosal reactions produced by any of the regimes. A simple model of the regenerative response is presented. Conclusions: This study suggests that the timing and magnitude of the regenerative response vary between sites and individuals but are linked to the amount of epithelial cellular depletion occurring during treatment

  12. Clinical oxygen enhancement ratio of tumors in carbon ion radiotherapy. The influence of local oxygenation changes

    The effect of carbon ion radiotherapy on hypoxic tumors has recently been questioned because of low linear energy transfer (LET) values in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of hypoxia and local oxygenation changes (LOCs) in fractionated carbon ion radiotherapy. Three-dimensional tumors with hypoxic subvolumes were simulated assuming interfraction LOCs. Different fractionations were applied using a clinically relevant treatment plan with a known LET distribution. The surviving fraction was calculated, taking oxygen tension, dose and LET into account, using the repairable-conditionally repairable (RCR) damage model with parameters for human salivary gland tumor cells. The clinical oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was defined as the ratio of doses required for a tumor control probability of 50% for hypoxic and well-oxygenated tumors. The resulting OER was well above unity for all fractionations. For the hypoxic tumor, the tumor control probability was considerably higher if LOCs were assumed, rather than static oxygenation. The beneficial effect of LOCs increased with the number of fractions. However, for very low fraction doses, the improvement related to LOCs did not compensate for the increase in total dose required for tumor control. In conclusion, our results suggest that hypoxia can influence the outcome of carbon ion radiotherapy because of the non-negligible oxygen effect at the low LETs in the SOBP. However, if LOCs occur, a relatively high level of tumor control probability is achievable with a large range of fractionation schedules for tumors with hypoxic subvolumes, but both hyperfractionation and hypofractionation should be pursued with caution. (author)

  13. Severe Dry Eye Syndrome After Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Tumors

    Bhandare, Niranjan, E-mail: bhandn@shands.ufl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Moiseenko, Vitali [Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Song, William Y. [University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA (United States); Morris, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Bhatti, M. Tariq [Department of Ophthalmology and Medicine (Division of Neurology), Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Mendenhall, William M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence of severe dry eye syndrome (DES) after external beam radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer and its dependence on the parameters relevant to external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study included 78 patients treated for primary extracranial head-and-neck tumors between 1965 and 2000, whose lacrimal apparatus/entire globe was exposed to fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The dose received by the major lacrimal gland was used for analysis. The end point of the present study was the ophthalmologic diagnosis of severe DES leading to vision compromise. Results: Of the 78 patients, 40 developed severe DES leading to visual compromise. The incidence of DES increased steadily from 6% at 35-39.99 Gy to 50% at 45-49.99 Gy and 90% at 60-64.99 Gy. With a mean of 0.9 years (range, 1 month to 3 years), the latency of DES was observed to be a function of the total dose and the dose per fraction. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the total dose (p < .0001 and p < .0001, respectively) and dose per fraction (p {<=} .0001 and p = .0044, respectively) were significant. However, age, gender, and the use of chemoradiotherapy were not. The actuarial analysis indicated a 5-year probability of freedom from DES of 93% for doses <45 Gy, 29% for 45-59.9 Gy, and 3% doses {>=}60 Gy. A logistic normal tissue complication probability model fit to our data obtained a dose of 34 and 38 Gy corresponding to a 5% and 10% incidence of DES. Conclusion: With a dose of 34 Gy corresponding to a 5% incidence of DES, the risk of severe DES increased, and the latency decreased with an increase in the total dose and dose per fraction to the lacrimal gland. The effect of chemoradiotherapy and hyperfractionation on the risk of DES needs additional investigation.

  14. Severe Dry Eye Syndrome After Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Tumors

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence of severe dry eye syndrome (DES) after external beam radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer and its dependence on the parameters relevant to external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study included 78 patients treated for primary extracranial head-and-neck tumors between 1965 and 2000, whose lacrimal apparatus/entire globe was exposed to fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The dose received by the major lacrimal gland was used for analysis. The end point of the present study was the ophthalmologic diagnosis of severe DES leading to vision compromise. Results: Of the 78 patients, 40 developed severe DES leading to visual compromise. The incidence of DES increased steadily from 6% at 35–39.99 Gy to 50% at 45–49.99 Gy and 90% at 60–64.99 Gy. With a mean of 0.9 years (range, 1 month to 3 years), the latency of DES was observed to be a function of the total dose and the dose per fraction. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the total dose (p < .0001 and p < .0001, respectively) and dose per fraction (p ≤ .0001 and p = .0044, respectively) were significant. However, age, gender, and the use of chemoradiotherapy were not. The actuarial analysis indicated a 5-year probability of freedom from DES of 93% for doses <45 Gy, 29% for 45–59.9 Gy, and 3% doses ≥60 Gy. A logistic normal tissue complication probability model fit to our data obtained a dose of 34 and 38 Gy corresponding to a 5% and 10% incidence of DES. Conclusion: With a dose of 34 Gy corresponding to a 5% incidence of DES, the risk of severe DES increased, and the latency decreased with an increase in the total dose and dose per fraction to the lacrimal gland. The effect of chemoradiotherapy and hyperfractionation on the risk of DES needs additional investigation.

  15. Plasma accelerators

    Recently attention has focused on charged particle acceleration in a plasma by a fast, large amplitude, longitudinal electron plasma wave. The plasma beat wave and plasma wakefield accelerators are two efficient ways of producing ultra-high accelerating gradients. Starting with the plasma beat wave accelerator (PBWA) and laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) schemes and the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) steady progress has been made in theory, simulations and experiments. Computations are presented for the study of LWFA. (author)

  16. Advances of Precise Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Xin WANG; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan

    2011-01-01

    At present lung tumor radiation therapy has entered the accurate radiotherapy era. Precise radiotherapy includes intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). During the process of implementing precise radiotherapy, these problems should be fully considered to ensure executing precise radiotherapy accurately: patient positioning, controlling of the lung tumor motion, selecting of image techniques, PTV margin, dose prescrip...

  17. Linear Accelerators

    Vretenar, M

    2014-01-01

    The main features of radio-frequency linear accelerators are introduced, reviewing the different types of accelerating structures and presenting the main characteristics aspects of linac beam dynamics.

  18. Advanced medical accelerator design

    This report describes the design of an advanced medical facility dedicated to charged particle radiotherapy and other biomedical applications of relativistic heavy ions. Project status is reviewed and some technical aspects discussed. Clinical standards of reliability are regarded as essential features of this facility. Particular emphasis is therefore placed on the control system and on the use of technology which will maximize operational efficiency. The accelerator will produce a variety of heavy ion beams from helium to argon with intensities sufficient to provide delivered dose rates of several hundred rad/minute over large, uniform fields. The technical components consist of a linac injector with multiple PIG ion sources, a synchrotron and a versatile beam delivery system. An overview is given of both design philosophy and selected accelerator subsystems. Finally, a plan of the facility is described

  19. Local control of T3 carcinomas after accelerated fractionation: a look at the 'gap'

    Purpose: To study the effects of midcourse treatment break or gaps related to the local control of T3 carcinoma of the oropharynx and larynx following accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: All patients were treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 1979 through 1994 with treatment consisting of 1.6 Gy per fraction, two fractions a day for the treatment of T3 carcinoma of the oropharynx and larynx. They were entered in the head and neck data base. Their treatment dates, treatment breaks, and doses vs. local control were analyzed and compared. A p-value of 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 162 patients were available for review. Due to the acute severe mucosal effects, most of the patients required a midcourse pause or 'break' after a dose of 38.4-48 Gy before treatment could be resumed and completed. The data indicate that (a) prolongation of the treatment gap for more than 14 days, (b) total treatment course longer than 45 days, (c) total dose less than 67 Gy, and (d) male gender adversely affected local control. In spite of the gaps, the female patients with advanced carcinomas enjoyed the benefits of improved local control after the accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy. Conclusions: Accelerated hyperfractionation radiation therapy using 1.6 Gy per fraction/twice-a-day (b.i.d.) for a total dose of 70.4 Gy in 6 weeks is effective in achieving high local control of T3 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx and larynx. The midcourse treatment gap should be as short as possible with the projected total dose and time. Should the gaps be unduly prolonged due to various circumstances, further increase in the total dose, for example, 72-75 Gy, and/or increase of the fraction sizes, for example, 1.8-2.0 Gy/f b.i.d. after the gap may be necessary to compensate for the adverse effects of the tumor regeneration from the prolonged gap

  20. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 20. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 20. Proceedings

    Baumann, Michael; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemannn, Hans-Peter; Zips, Daniel (eds.)

    2011-07-01

    The proceedings include contributions on the following issues: laser driven proton accelerators on the way for radiotherapy, radiobiological evaluation of new radiations; molecular factors of radiation response; biological targeting; EGFR epidermal growth factor receptor/targeting - combined internal and external irradiation, radiobiology of normal tissues; dose-volume histograms for the radiotherapy: curves without radiobiological relevance or important information for the therapy planning; HPV (human papilloma virus) and radiation sensitivity of HNSCC (head and neck squamous cell carcinomas): evidence, radiobiological mechanism, clinical consequences and perspectives; mechanisms of action and intertumoral heterogeneity of response to EGFR inhibition in radiotherapy of solid tumors; evaluation of biomarkers for radiotherapy.

  1. DICOM in Radiotherapy

    A. Nikfarjam

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Noticeable development in achieving data from patients is acquired by means of designing a system that connects these systems: imaging, archive and monitoring systems. When several imaging devices work based on DICOM standard; they can connect to each other without any interface. There are many applications for DICOM standard in radiotherapy; however its main usage is in imaging. It has other applications such as RT Structure Set, RT Dose, RT Plan and RT Brachy Treatment. "nNow DICOM is a complete and widespread standard to use in radiotherapy. Most of the radiotherapy machines have ability to use DICOM. Before installing a new Linac, it is necessary to predict all aspects of DICOM standard in this device. Therefore, as regards to entrance of 12 Linac to Iran, it is important to have enough knowledge about it. This article is a review about development of DICOM in radiotherapy. We try to stress on DICOM applications and abstain from technological agenda.

  2. Debate about breast cancer: 'Cons: Intraoperative radiotherapy'; Debats autour du cancer du sein: 'contre' la radiotherapie peroperatoire

    Bourgier, C.; Heymann, S.; Verstraet, R.; Biron, B.; Marsiglia, H. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94800 Villejuif (France)

    2011-10-15

    Early breast cancer incidence increases owing to mammography screening. Hypo-fractionated radiotherapy is more and more proposed in women with low local relapse risk breast cancer, especially accelerated partial breast irradiation. Various irradiation modalities have been reported: brachytherapy, intraoperative irradiation, 3D-conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation. We describe limitations of intraoperative irradiation and the advantages of alternative techniques. (authors)

  3. Quality assurance methods for intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Aydın ÇAKIR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, based on the use of non-uniform radiation beam intensity of a new step in conformal radiotherapy. Was able to get the optimal dose distributions with IMRT can improve the clinical results. In case of inadequate use of IMRT, the result may be worse than conventional treatments. Multiple sub-areas the accuracy of IMRT dose used in these fields depends on the performance of linear accelerator quality control tests. Multileaf collimator (MLC positioning accuracy, table movement, gantry and collimator indicators, with a gantry rotation speed and a lot of parameters such as rates of MLC. Linear accelerators used for IMRT in the treatment of pre-defined quality control program within the mechanical and dosimetric tests should be done periodically. In this study, linear accelerators capable of IMRT and IMRT plans for quality controls were investigated in the literature.

  4. Intraoperative radiotherapy in the theatre room with electron beams: technical and dosimetric description of Sordina LIAC accelerator; Radioterapia intraoperatoria en quirofano con haces de electrones: descripcion tecnica y dosimetrica del acelerador dedicado Sordina LIAC

    Sendon del Rio, J. R.; Ayala Lazaro, R.; Gomez Cores, S.; Garcia Hernandez, M. J.; Polo Cezon, R.; Jimenez Rojas, R.; Lopez Bote, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    n this work we show our experience during the commissioning of a mobile electron-beam accelerator dedicated to intraoperative radiation therapy in the theatre room. The linac is a Sordina LIAC 12 MeV model with a hard-docking applicator system. We describe the linac, the measurement methods and the specific dosimetry. The dosimetric behavior is also discussed. Differences with other applicator systems can be explained from the particular head design of the linac. (Author)

  5. Booster linear accelerators for proton therapy

    Radiotherapy using proton beams of energies of order 200 MeV is now accepted as a feasible cancer treatment technique whose widespread use has so far been limited by the high costs of proposed facilities. AEA Technology have identified a low-cost solution using a linear accelerator to boost existing hospital cyclotrons. The present project status and the design of the booster linear accelerator are discussed. (Author) 4 tabs., 2 figs., 2 refs

  6. Experience with the functional assessment of cancer therapy-lung (FACT-L) in ECOG 4593, a phase II hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy (HART) trial

    PURPOSE: To gain experience in measuring quality of life (QOL) using the FACT-L in patients (pt) with non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with an altered fractionation regimen, HART, in a Phase II, multiinstitutional ECOG trial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Version 2 of FACT-L, with 43 questions in 6 subscale categories (8 physical well-being, 8 social/family well-being, 3 relationship with doctor, 6 emotional well-being, 8 functional well-being, 10 lung cancer symptoms), available in English, Spanish and French, was administered by data managers and filled out by pts, independent of physician presence or input. The HART trial enrolled 30 pts, and FACT-L was administered at baseline (tp 1), treatment completion (tp 2) and 4 weeks following therapy (tp 3). (35(43)) FACT-L items were designed to yield a total QOL score with higher values reflective of better QOL; in addition, a FACT-L trial outcome index (TOI) was computed (TOI = physical score + functional score + lung cancer related score), and is considered the most relevant clinical QOL measure. RESULTS: The FACT-L completion rates were: tp 1 - (30(30)) (100%), tp 2 - (29(30)) (97%) and tp 3 - (24(30)) (80%); the mean scores at various time points are summarized in the table below and indicate that FACT-L is responsive to changes over time. The differences in subscales and total scores can be used as a measure of change in QOL resulting from treatment; statistically significant change was noted from baseline to tp 2 for physical, emotional and functional well-being; and from baseline to tp 3 for emotional well-being. The change in TOI score was also evaluated as a function of response and toxicity grade, and no clear association emerged. When assessed as a function of survival (at the time of this analysis, (5(30)) pt were alive, with median survival of 56 weeks), the degradation in QOL was most severe for pt who died early; the mean change in TOI from baseline to tp 3 for pt dying in the first 25 weeks, 25-50 weeks and 50-75 weeks was -18.5, -2.8, and +2.07, respectively (graph). CONCLUSION: FACT-L is a reliable tool, responsive to changes over time for NSCLC pts who experience a measurable decrease in physical and functional well-being at the end of therapy, resulting in a decrease in TOI. At 1 month post-HART, TOI returns to baseline levels; a consistent improvement in emotional well-being results from therapy. There is no clear trend in TOI change relative to response or toxicity grade. Interestingly, the most severe drops in TOI predicted for early demise, suggesting potential prognostic value, which should be tested in a larger trial

  7. Present status of radiotherapy in Zimbabwe

    Radiotherapy departments are one of the most expensive health facilities to equip, maintain and run efficiently. In Zimbabwe, there are two radiotherapy centres, at Parirenyatwa Central Hospital in Harare and at Mpilo Central Hospital in Bulawayo. Both these centres have nuclear imaging facilities. The radiotherapy services also cater for patients from neighbouring states. A referral system for consultation and prescription by the radiotherapist is in use. Administration of most cytotoxics is done in the radiotherapy department. Zimbabwe's population is over 8 million. Of this, yearly averages of 400 to 500 and over 700 new patients are seen at the Bulawayo and Harare centres respectively. So far 159 new cervical cancer patients have been seen this year at the Bulawayo centre. To cater for this and other malignancies, facilities ranging from the supervoltage therapy to a linear accelerator are available as well as limited brachytherapy facilities. The funding of these has been from the government, charity organisations and international aid agreements. Servicing and maintenance of the units is done by the private sector. Treatment planning is done mostly by radiographers but the more complex techniques are not done due to lack of qualified medical physicists. This shortage also affects the calibration of and other routine checks of the equipment. Progress in these services has been hampered by the lack of local radiotherapists. Improvements are expected with the WHO radiotherapist training programme due to start in 1990. If the cancer awareness programme is stepped up, the demands on the radiotherapy services will increase, necessitating review and updating of the present facilities and staffing levels. (author). 1 fig., 5 tabs

  8. Future accelerators (?)

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made

  9. Future accelerators (?)

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  10. International symposium on utilization of accelerators. Book of extended synopses

    Papers presented at this meeting were devoted to accelerator facilities design, improvements, for electron, neutron, or ion beams applications in radiotherapy, industry, material testing, isotope production. A number of presentations were dealing with accelerator driven systems as a possible power production device

  11. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique compared to whole breast irradiation for patients aged 70 years or older: subgroup analysis from a randomized phase 3 trial

    Meattini, Icro; Saieva, Calogero; Marrazzo, Livia; Di Brina, Lucia; Pallotta, Stefania; Mangoni, Monica; Meacci, Fiammetta; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Francolini, Giulio; Desideri, Isacco; De Luca Cardillo, Carla; Scotti, Vieri; Furfaro, Ilaria Francesca; Rossi, Francesca; Greto, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the efficacy and the safety profile on the subset of selected early breast cancer (BC) patients aged 70 years or older from a single-center phase 3 trial comparing whole breast irradiation (WBI) to accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique. Between 2005 and 2013, 520 patients aged more than 40 years old were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either WBI or APBI in a 1:1 ratio. Eligible pat...

  12. Experimental determination of tissue maximum ratios (TMR) and of off-center ratios (OCR) of the 8MV Mel Philips linear accelerator at the Radiotherapy Center-Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo-Brazil

    Tissue maximum ratio-TMR-and off center ratio-OCR-using Baldwin Farmer ion chamber are measured for radiation field of MEL Philips 8MV Linac for a depth in a water phantom varying between 4 to 30cm. These data are compared with the values, obtained from percentage depth dose for 8MV accelerator (cf.Suppl.11, Brit.Jour.Read.). These data when used in EXTREP Computer Program yields isodose for any fields. The treatment plannings are 2-dimensional but encompass a wide variety of radiation therapy techniques including rotating beams wedged fields, tangential rotation and any number of stationary fields of different field sizes

  13. Accelerating Value Creation with Accelerators

    Jonsson, Eythor Ivar

    2015-01-01

    accelerator programs. Microsoft runs accelerators in seven different countries. Accelerators have grown out of the infancy stage and are now an accepted approach to develop new ventures based on cutting-edge technology like the internet of things, mobile technology, big data and virtual reality. It is also......Accelerators can help to accelerate value creation. Accelerators are short-term programs that have the objective of creating innovative and fast growing ventures. They have gained attraction as larger corporations like Microsoft, Barclays bank and Nordea bank have initiated and sponsored...

  14. Conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation: State of the art

    Breast conserving treatment (breast conserving surgery followed by whole breast irradiation) has commonly been used in early breast cancer since many years. New radiation modalities have been recently developed in early breast cancers, particularly accelerated partial breast irradiation. Three-dimensional conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation is the most commonly used modality of radiotherapy. Other techniques are currently being developed, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy, arc-therapy, and tomo-therapy. The present article reviews the indications, treatment modalities and side effects of accelerated partial breast irradiation. (authors)

  15. Dental status, dental rehabilitation procedures, demographic and oncological data as potential risk factors for infected osteoradionecrosis of the lower jaw after radiotherapy for oral neoplasms: a retrospective evaluation

    Retrospective evaluation of the dental status of patients with oral cancer before radiotherapy, the extent of dental rehabilitation procedures, demographic and radiotherapy data as potential risk factors for development of infected osteoradionecrosis of the lower jaw. A total of 90 patients who had undergone radiotherapy for oral cancer were included into this retrospective evaluation. None of them had distant metastases. After tumour surgery the patients were referred to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for dental examination and the necessary dental rehabilitation procedures inclusive potential tooth extraction combined with primary soft tissue closure. Adjuvant radiotherapy was started after complete healing of the gingiva (> 7 days after potential extraction). The majority of patients (n = 74) was treated with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with total doses ranging from 50-70Gy whereas further 16 patients received hyperfractionated radiotherapy up to 72Gy. The records of the clinical data were reviewed. Furthermore, questionnaires were mailed to the patients’ general practitioners and dentists in order to get more data concerning tumour status and osteoradionecrosis during follow-up. The patients’ dental status before radiotherapy was generally poor. On average 10 teeth were present, six of them were regarded to remain conservable. Extensive dental rehabilitation procedures included a mean of 3.7 tooth extractions. Chronic periodontitis with severe attachment loss was found in 40%, dental biofilm in 56%. An infected osteoradionecrosis (IORN) grade II according to (Schwartz et al., Am J Clin Oncol 25:168-171, 2002) was diagnosed in 11 of the 90 patients (12%), mostly within the first 4 years after radiotherapy. We could not find significant prognostic factors for the occurrence of IORN, but a trendwise correlation with impaired dental status, rehabilitation procedures, fraction size and tumour outcome. The occurrence of IORN is an important long

  16. Advice concerning radiotherapy

    Dutch National cancer incidence figures were calculated by using the reliable data on cancer incidence in the Eindhoven area and population forecasts and information obtained from the Central Bureau of Statistics. Several radiotherapy departments suffer from under capacity (a lack of resources and understaffing). Data have also shown that 35% of cancer patients receive radiotherapy, instead of 50%. Calculations have been made by the committee on the present and future needs with regard to equipment and staff. In 1983, the number of megavoltage therapy units amounted to 38, but should have been 65. It should be 80 in 1990 and 90 in 2000. Since building and installing such equipment is a lengthy process a considerable effort is needed to make up for the arrears. The committee advocates the extension of the system of regional cooperation in cancer care (comprehensive cancer centres), in which radiotherapy departments play a crucial role. Working parties from the committee provided a comprehensive description of current radiotherapy practice with reference to physical, technical, clinical and management aspects. Another working party assessed the results of cancer treatment with regard to many different tumour sites. Recent and expected developments were analysed or indicated. The Radiotherapy Committee commissioned an external team to conduct a project to achieve a picture of future developments using methods different to those of the committee's. An interim advice has been added on this subject. (Auth.)

  17. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and four dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT)

    Since the development of conformation radiotherapy in the 1960s by Takahashi, et al., diagnostic and localization accuracy have been the main concerns. With increasing improvement in imaging techniques and multileaf collimators, three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have prevailed to produce highly conformal dose distribution. Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT), in which diagnostic imaging techniques are equipped in the treatment room, has been paid more attention than before to increase localization accuracy in the use of complex fields in clinical radiotherapy. Setup error has been shown to be reduced by using stereotactic frames for intracranial diseases, diagnostic X ray imagers, ultrasound, or computed tomography in the treatment room for relatively static organs. Planning target volume (PTV) margin for the clinical target volume (CTV) can be reduced by using these IGRT techniques. However, for mobile tumours such as those in the liver or lung, it is still difficult to use a 'tight' margin because of difficulty focusing radiation beams exactly on the moving tumour. Planning target volume for these mobile or moving tumours has generally been determined with a large PTV margin in the direction of tumour movement. A respiration gated radiotherapy system was developed in an attempt to reduce the PTV margin. However, it remained impossible to neglect the possibility that the tumour might be dislocated by depth of breath or setup error. A more accurate method is required to determine the 3D coordinates of a moving tumour during radiotherapy. The relative relationship between the tumour and the surrounding normal structure may change due to tumour mobility, thus a more accurate treatment planning method is also required accounting for temporal changes of anatomy. We have developed a linear accelerator synchronized with a fluoroscopic real time tumour tracking radiotherapy system (RTRT) by which the 3D location of

  18. Cardiac dose sparing and avoidance techniques in breast cancer radiotherapy

    Breast cancer radiotherapy represents an essential component in the overall management of both early stage and locally advanced breast cancer. As the number of breast cancer survivors has increased, chronic sequelae of breast cancer radiotherapy become more important. While recently published data suggest a potential for an increase in cardiac events with radiotherapy, these studies do not consider the impact of newer radiotherapy techniques commonly utilized. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to evaluate cardiac dose sparing techniques in breast cancer radiotherapy. Current options for cardiac protection/avoidance include (1) maneuvers that displace the heart from the field such as coordinating the breathing cycle or through prone patient positioning, (2) technological advances such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton beam therapy (PBT), and (3) techniques that treat a smaller volume around the lumpectomy cavity such as accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), or intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). While these techniques have shown promise dosimetrically, limited data on late cardiac events exist due to the difficulties of long-term follow up. Future studies are required to validate the efficacy of cardiac dose sparing techniques and may use surrogates for cardiac events such as biomarkers or perfusion imaging

  19. Treatment of Children With Central Nervous System Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors/Pinealoblastomas in the Prospective Multicentric Trial HIT 2000 Using Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Maintenance Chemotherapy

    Gerber, Nicolas U., E-mail: nicolas.gerber@kispi.uzh.ch [Department of Pediatric Oncology, University Children' s Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Hoff, Katja von; Resch, Anika [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Ottensmeier, Holger [Department of Pediatric Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kwiecien, Robert; Faldum, Andreas [Institute of Biostatistics and Clinical Research, University of Muenster (Germany); Matuschek, Christiane [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hornung, Dagmar [Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Bremer, Michael [Institute for Radiation Therapy and Special Oncology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Benesch, Martin [Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Pietsch, Torsten [Department of Neuropathology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Warmuth-Metz, Monika [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kuehl, Joachim [Department of Pediatric Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Rutkowski, Stefan [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Kortmann, Rolf D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The prognosis for children with central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumor (CNS-PNET) or pinealoblastoma is still unsatisfactory. Here we report the results of patients between 4 and 21 years of age with nonmetastatic CNS-PNET or pinealoblastoma diagnosed from January 2001 to December 2005 and treated in the prospective GPOH-trial P-HIT 2000-AB4. Methods and Materials: After surgery, children received hyperfractionated radiation therapy (36 Gy to the craniospinal axis, 68 Gy to the tumor region, and 72 Gy to any residual tumor, fractionated at 2 × 1 Gy per day 5 days per week) accompanied by weekly intravenous administration of vincristine and followed by 8 cycles of maintenance chemotherapy (lomustine, cisplatin, and vincristine). Results: Twenty-six patients (15 with CNS-PNET; 11 with pinealoblastoma) were included. Median age at diagnosis was 11.5 years old (range, 4.0-20.7 years). Gross total tumor resection was achieved in 6 and partial resection in 16 patients (indistinct, 4 patients). Median follow-up of the 15 surviving patients was 7.0 years (range, 5.2-10.0 years). The combined response rate to postoperative therapy was 17 of 20 (85%). Eleven of 26 patients (42%; 7 of 15 with CNS-PNET; 4 of 11 with pinealoblastoma) showed tumor progression or relapse at a median time of 1.3 years (range, 0.5-1.9 years). Five-year progression-free and overall survival rates (±standard error [SE]) were each 58% (±10%) for the entire cohort: CNS-PNET was 53% (±13); pinealoblastoma was 64% (±15%; P=.524 and P=.627, respectively). Conclusions: Postoperative hyperfractionated radiation therapy with local dose escalation followed by maintenance chemotherapy was feasible without major acute toxicity. Survival rates are comparable to those of a few other recent studies but superior to those of most other series, including the previous trial, HIT 1991.

  20. Treatment of Children With Central Nervous System Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors/Pinealoblastomas in the Prospective Multicentric Trial HIT 2000 Using Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Maintenance Chemotherapy

    Purpose: The prognosis for children with central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumor (CNS-PNET) or pinealoblastoma is still unsatisfactory. Here we report the results of patients between 4 and 21 years of age with nonmetastatic CNS-PNET or pinealoblastoma diagnosed from January 2001 to December 2005 and treated in the prospective GPOH-trial P-HIT 2000-AB4. Methods and Materials: After surgery, children received hyperfractionated radiation therapy (36 Gy to the craniospinal axis, 68 Gy to the tumor region, and 72 Gy to any residual tumor, fractionated at 2 × 1 Gy per day 5 days per week) accompanied by weekly intravenous administration of vincristine and followed by 8 cycles of maintenance chemotherapy (lomustine, cisplatin, and vincristine). Results: Twenty-six patients (15 with CNS-PNET; 11 with pinealoblastoma) were included. Median age at diagnosis was 11.5 years old (range, 4.0-20.7 years). Gross total tumor resection was achieved in 6 and partial resection in 16 patients (indistinct, 4 patients). Median follow-up of the 15 surviving patients was 7.0 years (range, 5.2-10.0 years). The combined response rate to postoperative therapy was 17 of 20 (85%). Eleven of 26 patients (42%; 7 of 15 with CNS-PNET; 4 of 11 with pinealoblastoma) showed tumor progression or relapse at a median time of 1.3 years (range, 0.5-1.9 years). Five-year progression-free and overall survival rates (±standard error [SE]) were each 58% (±10%) for the entire cohort: CNS-PNET was 53% (±13); pinealoblastoma was 64% (±15%; P=.524 and P=.627, respectively). Conclusions: Postoperative hyperfractionated radiation therapy with local dose escalation followed by maintenance chemotherapy was feasible without major acute toxicity. Survival rates are comparable to those of a few other recent studies but superior to those of most other series, including the previous trial, HIT 1991

  1. Saliva in relation to dental erosion before and after radiotherapy

    Jensdottir, Thorbjorg; von Buchwald, Christian; Nauntofte, Birgitte;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Low saliva flow and abnormal saliva composition are common conditions after radiotherapy for oral cavity and pharyngeal cancer. Both conditions increase the susceptibility to dental caries and erosion, which may be further accelerated by changes in food preferences. The aim of...... this study was to determine changes in saliva flow and susceptibility to erosive challenges in pharyngeal cancer patients before and after radiotherapy to the head and neck. Materials and methods: The erosive potential of sucking acidic candies with and without calcium was determined in nine patients...

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of Radiotherapy units wit 60Co

    The SSDL network of the IAEA performs, every year, quality audit tests for radiotherapy services (60 Co units and linear accelerators), and for national SSDL as well. Because of the SSDL-Mexico results in these tests and due to our enthusiasm and confidence in our work, a parallel test has been done , which is described in this talk as well as the results. Nowadays, a second parallel test goes up, which could confirm our optimism and open the possibility to our country to start a national dosimetric audit of 60 Co radiotherapy units. (Author)

  3. Laser driven particle acceleration

    This dissertation summarizes the last ten years of research at the Laboratory of Applied Optics on laser-plasma based electron acceleration. The main result consists of the development and study of a relativistic electron source with unique properties: high energy (100-300 MeV) in short distances (few millimeters), mono-energetic, ultra-short (few fs), stable and tunable. The manuscript describes the steps that led to understanding the physics, and then mastering it in order to produce this new electron source. Non linear propagation of the laser pulse in the plasma is first presented, with phenomena such as non linear wakefield excitation, relativistic and ponderomotive self-focusing in the short pulse regime, self-compression. Acceleration and injection of electrons are then reviewed from a theoretical perspective. Experimental demonstrations of self-injection in the bubble regime and then colliding pulse injection are then presented. These experiments were among the first to produce monoenergetic, high quality, stable and tunable electron beams from a laser-plasma accelerator. The last two chapters are dedicated to the characterization of the electron beam using transition radiation and to its applications to gamma radiography and radiotherapy. Finally, the perspectives of this research are presented in the conclusion. Scaling laws are used to determine the parameters that the electron beams will reach using peta-watt laser systems currently under construction. (author)

  4. Chemical modifiers of radiotherapy

    Only two groups, anticancer drugs and radiosensitizers are discussed among many groups of chemical modifiers. In combined radiotherapy (RT) with chemotherapy (CT), sequential administration seems to be superior to concomitant administration, because simultaneous use enhances intensively normal tissue damage. In sequential administration, interruption of CT during RT causes growth of distant metastases. So, alternating scheme of RT and CT is proposed and evaluated clinically. Hypoxic cell sensitizers including well-known misonidazole and PLDR inhibitors (Ara-A etc.) are promising in radiotherapy. They should be used intermittently two or three times during RT in order to avoid neurotoxicity of misonidazole. (author) 70 refs

  5. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    Alimi D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have residual salivary gland function. Unfortunately, it is well established that in most cases radiotherapy destroys most of the salivary gland and associated salivary secretions.     

  6. Prospective study of accelerated postoperative radiation therapy in patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck; Radiotherapie externe acceleree postoperatoire des carcinomes epidermoides localement evolues de la sphere ORL: etude prospective de phase 2

    Zouhair, A.; Coucke, P.A.; Azria, D.; Moeckli, R.; Mirimanoff, R.O.; Ozsahin, M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois CHUV, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Lausanne (Switzerland); Azria, D. [Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, Dept. d' Oncologie- Radiotherapie, 34 - Montpellier (France); Pache, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois CHUV, Service d' ORL, Lausanne (Switzerland); Stupp, R. [Centre hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois CHUV, Centre Pluridisciplinaire d' Oncologie Medicale, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2003-08-01

    Purpose. - To assess the feasibility and efficacy of accelerated postoperative radiation therapy (RT) in patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and methods. - Between December 1997 and July 2001, 68 patients (male to female ratio: 52/16; median age: 60-years (range: 43-81)) with pT1-pT4 and/or pN0-pN3 SCCHN (24 oropharynx, 19 oral cavity, 13 hypopharynx, 5 larynx, 3 unknown primary, 2 maxillary sinus, and 2 salivary gland) were included in this prospective study. Postoperative RT was indicated because extra-capsular infiltration (ECT) was observed in 20 (29%), positive surgical margins (PSM) in 20 (29%) or both in 23 patients (34%). Treatment consisted of external beam R 66 Gy in 5 weeks and 3 days. Median follow-up was 15 months. Results. -According to CTC 2.0, acute morbidity was acceptable: grade 3 mucositis was observed in 15 (22%) patients, grade 3 dysphagia in 19 (28%) patients, grade 3 skin erythema in 21 (31%) patients with a median weight loss of 3.1 kg (range: 0-16). No grade 4 toxicity wa observed. Median time to relapse was 13 months; we observed only three (4%) local and four (6%) regional relapses, whereas eight (12%) patients developed distant metastases without any evidence of locoregional recurrence. The 2 years overall-, disease-free survival, an actuarial locoregional control rates were 85, 73 and 83% respectively. Conclusion.- The reduction of the overall treatment time using postoperative accelerated RT with weekly concomitant boost (six fraction per week) is feasible with local control rates comparable to that of published data. Acute RT related morbidity is acceptable. (author)

  7. Calculation of the structural shielding of the radiotherapy treatment room equipped with a linear accelerator type Tomo therapy Hi-Art in the Oncology Center of Chihuahua, Mexico; Calculo del blindaje estructural de la sala de tratamiento de radioterapia equipada con un acelerador lineal del tipo Tomotherapy Hi-Art en el Centro Oncologico de Chihuahua, Mexico

    Caballero G, C. A. [Southwest Oncology Centers, North Civic Center Plaza No. 2926, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Plascencia, J. C. [Centro Oncologico Louis and Lucille Grado, Republica del Peru No. 102-5, Col. Americas, Aguascalientes (Mexico); Vargas V, M. X.; Toledo J, P., E-mail: cabshm@msn.co [Centro Oncologico de Chihuahua, Hacienda de la Esperanza No. 6304, Fracc. Cima Comercial, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    The helicoid tomo therapy is an external radiotherapy system of modulated intensity, guided by image, in which the radiation is imparted to the patient using a narrow radiation beam in helicoid form, in a similar way to the scanning process with a computerized tomography. The tomo therapy equipment (Tomo Therapy Hi-Art) consists in an electrons linear accelerator with acceleration voltages of 6 MV for treatment and 3.5 MV for image, coupled to a ring that turn around the patient as this is transferred through this ring in perpendicular sense to the radiation beam. The radiation beam is narrow because has the maximum size of 5 x 40 cm{sup 2} in the isocenter. The intensity modulation of the beam is carried out with a binary dynamic collimator of 64 crisscross sheets, and the guide by image though a system of megavoltage computerized tomography. Opposed to the radiation beam, also coupled to the rotational ring, a group of lead plates exists with a total thickness of 13 cm that acts as barrier of the primary radiation beam. The special configuration of the tomography equipment makes to have the following characteristics: 1) the presence of the lead barrier of the equipment reduces the intensity of the primary beam that reaches the bunker walls in considerable way, 2) the disperse and leakage radiations are increased with regard to a conventional accelerator due to the increase in the necessary irradiation time to produce modulated intensity fields by means of the narrow radiation beam. These special characteristics of the tomo therapy equipment make that particularities exist in the application of the formulations for structural shielding calculations that appears in the NCRP reports 49, NCRP 151 and IAEA-SRS-47. For this reason, several researches have development analytic models based on geometric considerations of continuous rotation of the equipment ring to determine the shielding requirements for the primary beam, the dispersed and leakage radiation in tomo

  8. Concomitant boost radiotherapy in oropharynx carcinomas

    Fifty-five patients with resectable and unresectable oropharynx carcinomas were treated with concomitant boost radiotherapy. Forty-two of the patients (76%) had stages III-IV disease. Although none of the patients had undergone major surgery to the primary tumor, 11 had neck dissections prior to radiotherapy, and 19 (35%) received chemotherapy. The planned total tumor dose was 69.9 Gy, delivered over 5.5 weeks. During the last 3.5 weeks, a boost to the initial gross disease was delivered in 13 fractions of 1.5 Gy each, as a second daily fraction in a progressively accelerated schedule; the prescribed dose outside the boost volume thus was 50.4 Gy. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 31.5 months (range: 16-65 months). All patients but one completed the planned radiotherapy schedule. According to the RTOG scoring system, 48 patients (88%) presented with grades 3-4 acute toxicity. The rate of grades 3-4 late complications was 12%. At three years the actuarial locoregional control rate was 69.5% and overall survival was 60%. We conclude that this concomitant boost schedule is feasible and does not seem to be associated with an excess risk of late complications. Acute toxicity was higher in association with chemotherapy, but remained manageable. Although the oncological results appear encouraging, evaluation of the efficacy of concomitant boost schedules compared with conventionally fractionated irradiation with or without concomitant chemotherapy requires prospective randomized trials. (orig.)

  9. Concomitant boost radiotherapy in oropharynx carcinomas

    Bieri, S.; Allal, A.S.; Kurtz, J.M. [Ospedale San Giovanni, Bellinzona (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Dulguerov, P.; Lehmann, W. [Geneva Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Div. of Head and Neck Surgery

    1998-12-31

    Fifty-five patients with resectable and unresectable oropharynx carcinomas were treated with concomitant boost radiotherapy. Forty-two of the patients (76%) had stages III-IV disease. Although none of the patients had undergone major surgery to the primary tumor, 11 had neck dissections prior to radiotherapy, and 19 (35%) received chemotherapy. The planned total tumor dose was 69.9 Gy, delivered over 5.5 weeks. During the last 3.5 weeks, a boost to the initial gross disease was delivered in 13 fractions of 1.5 Gy each, as a second daily fraction in a progressively accelerated schedule; the prescribed dose outside the boost volume thus was 50.4 Gy. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 31.5 months (range: 16-65 months). All patients but one completed the planned radiotherapy schedule. According to the RTOG scoring system, 48 patients (88%) presented with grades 3-4 acute toxicity. The rate of grades 3-4 late complications was 12%. At three years the actuarial locoregional control rate was 69.5% and overall survival was 60%. We conclude that this concomitant boost schedule is feasible and does not seem to be associated with an excess risk of late complications. Acute toxicity was higher in association with chemotherapy, but remained manageable. Although the oncological results appear encouraging, evaluation of the efficacy of concomitant boost schedules compared with conventionally fractionated irradiation with or without concomitant chemotherapy requires prospective randomized trials. (orig.)

  10. Contemporary Breast Radiotherapy and Cardiac Toxicity.

    Yeboa, Debra Nana; Evans, Suzanne Buckley

    2016-01-01

    Long-term cardiac effects are an important component of survivorship after breast radiotherapy. The pathophysiology of cardiotoxicity, history of breast radiotherapy, current methods of cardiac avoidance, modern outcomes, context of historical outcomes, quantifying cardiac effects, and future directions are reviewed in this article. Radiation-induced oxidative stress induces proinflammatory cytokines and is a process that potentiates late effects of fibrosis and intimal proliferation in endothelial vasculature. Breast radiation therapy has changed substantially in recent decades. Several modern technologies exist to improve cardiac avoidance such as deep inspiration breath hold, gating, accelerated partial breast irradiation, and use of modern 3-dimensional planning. Modern outcomes may vary notably from historical long-term cardiac outcomes given the differences in cardiac dose with modern techniques. Methods of quantifying radiation-related cardiotoxicity that correlate with future cardiac risks are needed with current data exploring techniques such as measuring computed tomography coronary artery calcium score, single-photon emission computed tomography imaging, and biomarkers. Placing historical data, dosimetric correlations, and relative cardiac risk in context are key when weighing the benefits of radiotherapy in breast cancer control and survival. Estimating present day cardiac risk in the modern treatment era includes challenges in length of follow-up and the use of confounding cardiotoxic agents such as evolving systemic chemotherapy and targeted therapies. Future directions in both multidisciplinary management and advancing technology in radiation oncology may provide further improvements in patient risk reduction and breast cancer survivorship. PMID:26617212

  11. Recent innovations in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    In the last few years, hospital-based facilities for carbon-ion radiotherapy are being constructed and proposed in Europe and Asia. During the next few years, several new facilities will be opened for carbon-ion radiotherapy in the world. These facilities in operation or under construction are categorized in two types by the beam shaping method used. One is the passive beam shaping method that is mainly improved and systematized for routine clinical use at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), Japan. The other method is active beam shaping which is also known as beam scanning adopted at Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI)/Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), Germany. In this paper an overview of some technical aspects for beam shaping is reported. The technique of passive beam shaping is established for stable clinical application and has clinical result of over 4000 patients in HIMAC. In contrast, clinical experience of active beam shaping is about 400 patients, and there is no clinical experience to respiratory moving target. A great advantage of the active beam shaping method is patient-specific collimator-less and compensator-less treatment. This may be an interesting potential for adaptive radiotherapy. (author)

  12. Advances of Precise Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Xin WANG

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available At present lung tumor radiation therapy has entered the accurate radiotherapy era. Precise radiotherapy includes intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT. During the process of implementing precise radiotherapy, these problems should be fully considered to ensure executing precise radiotherapy accurately: patient positioning, controlling of the lung tumor motion, selecting of image techniques, PTV margin, dose prescription and reporting, arrangement of beams, controlling of dose volume and treatment delivering.

  13. Combined modality treatment of the rhabdomyosarcoma R1H of the rat: tumor and normal tissue response after cisplatin and conventional or accelerated irradiation treatment

    Purpose: To test the importance of the sequence of cisplatin and irradiation, either conventional or accelerated fractionated. Methods and Materials: 30 fractions of 2 Gy were given in 6 or 3 weeks preceded or followed by (time interval between cisplatin and radiotherapy: 3 days) a single IP dose of 5 mg/kg cisplatin in the rhabdomyosarcoma R1H of the rat. Survival curves were generated, and comparisons were made by the log-rank test. Results: After 60 Gy in 6 weeks, no local tumor controls were observed. If cisplatin was injected 3 days before start of 60 Gy/6 weeks, 11 ± 10% (mean ± SE) of the tumors were controlled. Cisplatin after radiotherapy resulted in 50 ± 14% local controls. The difference was significant (p 0.01) for cisplatin after radiotherapy in comparison to radiotherapy alone where no local controls were observed. After accelerated fractionation, 57 ± 19% of the animals were cured with or without cisplatin before radiotherapy. If the drug was injected after end of 60 Gy/3 weeks, 86 ± 13% survived recurrence free. The difference to accelerated radiotherapy alone was not significant. Accelerated radiotherapy produced significantly higher control rates than conventional radiotherapy (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Accelerated radiotherapy resulted in higher local tumor control rates as compared to conventional fractionated irradiation. Cisplatin combined with radiotherapy showed significantly better results if given after but not before irradiation, either conventional or accelerated fractionated

  14. Erythropoietin and radiotherapy; Erythropoietine et radiotherapie

    Le Fur, E.; Albarghach, M.N.; Pradier, O. [CHU de Morvan, Dept. de radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2010-01-15

    Erythropoietin (E.P.O.) is a glycoprotein hormone. This hormone is a growth factor for red blood cells precursors in the bone marrow. The decrease of oxygen partial pressure, a reduced number of erythrocytes caused by bleeding or excessive destruction, or increased tissues oxygen requirements lead to increased secretion of E.P.O.. Its action takes place on bone marrow erythroblastic cells through specific receptors. E.P.O. stimulates the proliferation of red cell precursors stem cells in the bone marrow, thus increasing their production in one to two weeks. The effectiveness of E.P.O. at increasing haemoglobin and improving patients quality of life has been demonstrated by several studies. However, its use in radiotherapy remains controversial. While tumour hypoxia caused by anaemia is a factor of radio resistance and thus a source of local failure, tumour expression of E.P.O. receptors presents a significant risk for tumour progression and neo-angiogenesis, which would be increased during the administration of E.P.O.. The purpose of this article is to answer the question: is there a place for E.P.O. in combination with radiotherapy in the management of cancer?

  15. Absence of thoracic radiation myelitis after hyperfractionated radiation therapy with and without concurrent chemotherapy for stage III nonsmall-cell lung cancer

    Purpose: To investigate whether thoracic spinal cord dose of 50.4 Gy given via 1.2 Gy b.i.d. fractionation carries a risk of developing radiation myelitis during studies using hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFX RT) with and without concurrent chemotherapy (CHT). Methods and Materials: Of 300 patients with Stage III nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who were treated on two consecutive Phase III studies, 158 patients received 50.4 Gy to a portion of their spinal cord and survived > 1 year after the beginning of the therapy. Results: None of these 158 patients developed thoracic radiation myelitis. Therefore, influence of potentially contributing factors on the occurrence of radiation myelitis, such as interfraction interval, or those unproven yet, such as cord length or administration of concurrent CHT, was not possible to investigate. Conclusion: Given the continuing interest in HFX RT and encouraging results obtained in studies in lung cancer, further investigation is needed to get more informations about risks of developing thoracic radiation myelitis with this cord dose

  16. External Beam Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Yields Favorable Outcomes in Patients with Prior Breast Augmentation

    RachelYi-FengLei; CharlesELeonard; JaneMKercher; TereseKaske

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes in breast cancer patients with prior breast augmentation treated with external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (EB-APBI) utilizing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), both with image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT).Methods and Materials: 16 stage 0/I breast cancer patients with previous elective bilateral augmentation were treated post-lumpectomy on institutional EB-APBI trials (01185132 and 01185145 on c...

  17. Quality indicators in radiotherapy

    Background and purpose: There is a widespread and increasing tendency to develop hospital performance indicators in the field of accreditation/certification systems and quality benchmarking. A study has been undertaken to develop a set of performance indicators for a typical radiotherapy Centre and to evaluate their ability to provide a continuous quality improvement. Materials and methods: A working group consisting of radiation oncologists, medical physicists and radiation technologists under the coordination of experts in health technology assessment has elaborated a set of general indicators able to monitor performances and the quality level of a typical radiotherapy Centre. The work has been carried out through four steps: a preliminary set of indicators was selected; data on these indicators were collected in a number of Italian radiotherapy Centres and medical physics Services; problems in collection and analysis of data were discussed; a final set of indicators was developed. Results: A final set of 13 indicators is here presented. They concern general structural and/or operational features, health physics activities and accuracy and technical complexity of the treatment. Conclusions: The indicators tested in a few Italian Centres of radiotherapy and medical physics Services are now ready to be utilized by a larger community

  18. Bowel disease after radiotherapy

    The clinical presentation, operative findings and outcome in 40 patients who required surgery for bowel disease after radiotherapy are presented. The type of presentation varied according to the time after radiotherapy. In the first month, many patients had a proctitis but none required surgery. Five patients were operated on within one month, 2 for radiation-induced acute ileitis and 3 for exacerbations of pre-existing disease (diverticular disease 2, ulcerative colitis 1). The commonest time of presentation was between 3 and 18 months after radiotherapy, when 20 patients needed surgery for bowel disease caused by radiation-induced local ischaemia. Twelve of these patients had chronic perforation, 6 had severe rectal bleeding and 2 had painful anorectal ulceration. Fifteen patients presented between 2 and 24 years after radiotherapy, usually with incomplete intestinal obstruction due to a fibrous stricture, but 2 patients had rectal carcinoma. Wide resection of the involved bowel was the principal method of treatment but any anastomosis was protected by a proximal defunctioning stoma. There was no operative mortality but 10 patients have died subsequently. The danger of dismissing these patients as having incurable malignancy is stressed because, although the condition is infrequent, it is usually amenable to adequate surgery. (author)

  19. Nanoparticle-guided radiotherapy

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and nano-sized particles for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of a target tissue. More specifically, the invention relates to nano-sized particles comprising X-ray-imaging contrast agents in solid form with the ability to block x-rays, allowing for simult...

  20. Radiotherapy treatment planning

    A teaching text on external beam radiotherapy treatment planning is presented. Chapters are included on machines, radiation units, the physics of a single radiation field, the multiple-field isodose curve pattern, electron beam therapy, manual addition of isodose curves and dose calculation methods. (U.K.)

  1. Radiotherapy equipment for conformal radiotherapy and IMRT in the Czech Republic

    The development of the equipment of radiotherapy departments in the Czech Republic is presented here. The data from the special questionnaire from 14 workplaces with linear accelerators with multi-leaf collimators (MLC) and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) are included. They show not only the equipment specification but also the application methods, the quality control, plans for future etc. In the Czech Republic, a great extension of modem irradiation techniques and accessories occurs at present. Together with it, it is necessary to develop quality assurance of the whole process of dose delivery to the patient. It is also necessary to assure further education and training of hospital staff. Modern radiotherapy techniques demand sufficient amount of all sources including personal sources. (authors)

  2. Laser accelerator

    Vigil, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited In 1979,W. B. Colson and S. K. Ride proposed a new kind of electron accelerator using a uniform magnetic field in combination with a circularly-polarized laser field. A key concept is to couple the oscillating electric field to the electron’s motion so that acceleration is sustained. This dissertation investigates the performance of the proposed laser accelerator using modern high powered lasers and mag-netic fields that are significan...

  3. Quality assurance in radiotherapy

    Good radiotherapy results and safety of treatment require the radiation to be optimally applied to a specified target area and the correct dose. According to international recommendations, the average uncertainty in therapeutic dose should not exceed 5%. The need for high precision in therapeutic dose requires quality assurance covering the entire radiotherapy process. Besides the physical and technical characteristics of the therapy equipment, quality assurance must include all radiotherapy equipment and procedures that are significant for the correct magnitude and precision of application of the therapeutic dose. The duties and responsibilities pertaining to various stages of treatment must also be precisely defined. These requirements may be best implemented through a quality system. The general requirements for supervision and quality assurance of medical radiation apparatus are prescribed in section 40 of the Radiation Act (592/1991, amendment 1142/1998) and in sections 18 and 32 of the Decree of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health on the medical use of radiation (423/2000). Guide ST 2.2 imposes requirements on structural radiation shielding of radiotherapy equipment and the premises in which it is used, and on warning and safety arrangements. Guide ST 1.1 sets out the general safety principles for radiation practices and regulatory control procedure for the use of radiation. Guide ST 1.6 provides general requirements for operational measures in the use of radiation. This Guide sets out the duties of responsible parties (the party running a radiation practice) in respect of arranging and maintaining radiotherapy quality assurance. The principles set out in this Guide and Guide ST 6.3 may be applied to radionuclide therapy

  4. The physics of radiotherapy X-rays and electrons

    Metcalfe, Peter; Hoban, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of Radiotherapy X-Rays and Electrons is an updated successor to The Physics of Radiotherapy X-Rays from Linear Accelerators published in 1997. This new volume includes a significant amount of new material, including new chapters on electrons in radiotherapy and IMRT, IGRT, and tomotherapy, which have become key developments in radiation therapy. Also updated from the earlier edition are the physics beam modeling chapters, including Monte Carlo methods, adding those mysterious electrons, as well as discourse on radiobiological modeling including TCP, NTCP, and EUD and the impact of these concepts on plan analysis and inverse planning. This book is intended as a standard reference text for postgraduate radiation oncology medical physics students. It will also be of interest to radiation oncology registrars and residents, dosimetrists, and radiation therapists. The new text contains review questions at the end of each chapter and full bibliographic entries. Fully indexed. Selected questions and ans...

  5. Quality assurance status on radiotherapy in Vietnam

    Vietnam was one of the first countries, which early applied ionizing radiation in medicine. Dr. Marie Curie herself certificated supplying radium sources to Hanoi Cancer Hospital (today name is the K Hospital) for cancer treatment since 1923. In spite of early application of radiation in medicine, Vietnam is now facing to problem of deficiency of radiotherapy facilities. 13 cobalt units and 7 Linear Accelerators (linac) per 84 millions population are working in the whole country, meanwhile about 100,000 patients suffered by cancer and tumor disease per year and only 10 percent of these are treated by radiation. The deficiency of the facilities leads to an ugly overloading with patients in the cancer centers and hospitals. The problem could be resolved by increasing the number of Cobalt therapy units and introducing of more effective tools for treatment as linear electron accelerators and other related equipment and by close cooperation and effort of physicists and physicians in the field of application of ionizing radiation in medicine to effectively use of facilities and ensure QA/QC in radiotherapy. (author)

  6. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique compared to whole breast irradiation for patients aged 70 years or older: subgroup analysis from a randomized phase 3 trial.

    Meattini, Icro; Saieva, Calogero; Marrazzo, Livia; Di Brina, Lucia; Pallotta, Stefania; Mangoni, Monica; Meacci, Fiammetta; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Francolini, Giulio; Desideri, Isacco; De Luca Cardillo, Carla; Scotti, Vieri; Furfaro, Ilaria Francesca; Rossi, Francesca; Greto, Daniela; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Casella, Donato; Bernini, Marco; Sanchez, Luis; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Simoncini, Roberta; Nori, Jacopo; Bianchi, Simonetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the efficacy and the safety profile on the subset of selected early breast cancer (BC) patients aged 70 years or older from a single-center phase 3 trial comparing whole breast irradiation (WBI) to accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique. Between 2005 and 2013, 520 patients aged more than 40 years old were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either WBI or APBI in a 1:1 ratio. Eligible patients were women with early BC (maximum diameter 2.5 cm) suitable for breast conserving surgery. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02104895. A total of 117 patients aged 70 years or more were analyzed (58 in the WBI arm, 59 in the APBI arm). At a median follow-up of 5-years (range 3.4-7.0), the ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rate was 1.9 % in both groups. No significant difference between the two groups was identified (log-rank test p = 0.96). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates in the WBI group and APBI group were 6.1 and 1.9 %, respectively (p = 0.33). The APBI group presented significantly better results in terms of acute skin toxicity, considering both any grade (p = 0.0001) and grade 2 or higher (p = 0.0001). Our subgroup analyses showed a very low rate and no significant difference in terms of IBTR, using both WBI and APBI. A significant impact on patients compliance in terms of acute and early late toxicity was shown, which could translate in a consistent improvement of overall quality of life. PMID:26350524

  7. Interim Cosmetic Results and Toxicity Using 3D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    Purpose: We present our ongoing clinical experience utilizing three-dimensional (3D)-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients were treated with APBI using our previously reported 3D-CRT technique. The clinical target volume consisted of the lumpectomy cavity plus a 10- to 15 -mm margin. The prescribed dose was 34 or 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions given over 5 consecutive days. The median follow-up was 24 months. Twelve patients have been followed for ≥4 years, 20 for ≥3.5 years, 29 for >3.0 years, 33 for ≥2.5 years, and 46 for ≥2.0 years. Results: No local recurrences developed. Cosmetic results were rated as good/excellent in 100% of evaluable patients at ≥ 6 months (n = 47), 93% at 1 year (n = 43), 91% at 2 years (n = 21), and in 90% at ≥3 years (n = 10). Erythema, hyperpigmentation, breast edema, breast pain, telangiectasias, fibrosis, and fat necrosis were evaluated at 6, 24, and 36 months after treatment. All factors stabilized by 3 years posttreatment with grade I or II rates of 0%, 0%, 0%, 0%, 9%, 18%, and 9%, respectively. Only 2 patients (3%) developed grade III toxicity (breast pain), which resolved with time. Conclusions: Delivery of APBI with 3D-CRT resulted in minimal chronic (≥6 months) toxicity to date with good/excellent cosmetic results. Additional follow-up is needed to assess the long-term efficacy of this form of APBI

  8. Project of compact accelerator for cancer proton therapy; Progetto di acceleratore compatto per terapia oncologica con protoni (TOP)

    Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vignati, A. [ENEA, Cntro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. Innovazione

    1995-04-01

    The status of the sub-project `Compact Accelerator` in the framework of the Hadrontherapy Project leaded by Prof. Amaldi is described. Emphasis is given to the reasons of the use of protons for radiotherapy applications, to the results of the preliminary design studies of four types of accelerators as possible radiotherapy dedicated `Compact Accelerator` and to the scenario of the fonts of financial resources.

  9. LIBO accelerates

    2002-01-01

    The prototype module of LIBO, a linear accelerator project designed for cancer therapy, has passed its first proton-beam acceleration test. In parallel a new version - LIBO-30 - is being developed, which promises to open up even more interesting avenues.

  10. Measurements of the Photonuclear Neutron Yield During Radiotherapy Using Bubble Detectors and Thermoluminescence Detectors

    Stokkevåg, Camilla Hanquist

    2010-01-01

    Medical linear accelerators (linacs) used for radiotherapy with photons produce an undesirable neutron contribution as treatment energies exceed the (γ,n) threshold of the high-Z constituents of the linac. Secondary neutrons in radiotherapy can contribute to an additional dose outside the treatment volume in the patient. Treatment techniques o ering improved con nement of the dose to the target volume are rapidly evolving and will contribute di erently to the production of n...

  11. Induction accelerators

    Takayama, Ken

    2011-01-01

    A broad class of accelerators rests on the induction principle whereby the accelerating electrical fields are generated by time-varying magnetic fluxes. Particularly suitable for the transport of bright and high-intensity beams of electrons, protons or heavy ions in any geometry (linear or circular) the research and development of induction accelerators is a thriving subfield of accelerator physics. This text is the first comprehensive account of both the fundamentals and the state of the art about the modern conceptual design and implementation of such devices. Accordingly, the first part of the book is devoted to the essential features of and key technologies used for induction accelerators at a level suitable for postgraduate students and newcomers to the field. Subsequent chapters deal with more specialized and advanced topics.

  12. Radiotherapy of bronco-pulmonary cancer; Radiotherapie des cancers brochopulmonaires

    Bourry, N.; Millardet, C.; Lapeyre, M.; Verrelle, P.; Gross, E.; Champeaux-Orange, E.; Lahbabi, K.; Galland, S.; Chomy, F.; Lagarde, P.; Blanchard, P

    2007-11-15

    Six oral communications as follow: tomography by positron emission with {sup 18}F-FDG and target volume determination in the non at small cells bronchi cancers: interest and limit; adjuvant radiotherapy in the non at small cells pulmonary cancers; pulmonary stereotaxic radiotherapy; the chemoradiotherapy of locally evolved bronco-pulmonary cancers; the mesothelioma: place of radiotherapy; predictive factors of the toxicity and the care of complications of thorax irradiation. (N.C.)

  13. Dosimetry at the location of secondary tumors after radiotherapy

    Baas, H.W.; Davelaar, J.J.; Broerse, J.J.; Noordijk, E.M. [University Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Clinical Oncology

    1995-12-01

    After a latency period of many years the incidence of a secondary tumor is considered a serious late effect of radiotherapy. Analysis of about 200 patients, treated by radiotherapy for Hodgkin`s disease in our hospital, shows an actuarial risk for the incidence of a secondary tumor of about 7% after 10 years. The chance of tumor induction depends on the dose at the location of the tumor and therefore a good dose estimation is mandatory. Radiotherapy was given with Co-60 in the early years and with linear accelerators thereafter, exposing the target areas to 36 - 40 Gy. For dose estimations at the penumbra and outside the beam, where tumor incidence is expected to be high, we used a.o. Monte Carlo calculations. We developed an EGS4 computer simulation for a treatment beam from a linear accelerator irradiating a mathematical phantom representing the patient geometry (GSF ADAM phantom). The isodose curves at certain energies were obtained for a water phantom and fitted quite well with measurements. In addition to Monte Carlo calculations we also used existing treatment planning systems. The dose estimations of a number of patients and the derived risk per unit of dose, which is important for both radiotherapy as well as radiation protection in general, is discussed.

  14. Experimental radiotherapy unit to be established at GSI in Darmstadt

    The Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Heidelberg, the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, GSI, Darmstadt, and the Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg, have filed an application for a joint project intended to study the feasibility and methodology of an enhancement of radiotherapy by way of application of heavy ions and novel irradiation techniques. The experimental radiotherapy unit is to be installed at the heavy ion synchrotron of GSI. It is planned to have about 70 patients a year taking part in the clinical study extending over a period of five years. The results obtained shall be analysed to answer the following questions: - Is the technique developed suitable for clinical routine? - Are the improved dose distributions obtained with the charged particles more effective for local tumor healing than the radiation applied for conventional radiotherapy? - Can an additional clinical effect be attributed to the high-LET properties of the heavy charged particles? - Do the results indicate novel applications of the high-precision radiotherapy using heavy ions? The project is also intended to yield baseline data for defining the concept and technical conditions of heavy-ion radiotherapy as a clinical routine method and therefore also encompasses a design study for a heavy-ion accelerator exclusively for clinical applications. (orig./MG)

  15. Configuration control based on risk matrix for radiotherapy treatment

    The incorporation of the science and technique breakthroughs in the application of the radiotherapy represents a challenge so that, the appearance of equipment failure or human mistakes that triggers unfavorable consequences for patients, public, or the occupationally exposed workers; it is also diversified forcing to incorporate besides, as part of the efforts, new techniques for the evaluation of risk and the detection of the weak points that can lead to these consequences. In order to evaluate the risks of the radiotherapy practices there is the SEVRRA code, based on the method of Risk Matrix. The system SEVRRA is the most frequently used code in the applications of risk studies in radiotherapy treatment. On the other hand, starting from the development of tools to control the dangerous configurations in nuclear power plants, it has been developed the SECURE code, which in its application variant of Risk Matrix, has gain a comfortable interface man-machine to make risk analyses to the radiotherapy treatment, molding in this way a lot of combinations of scenarios. These capacities outstandingly facilitate the studies and risk optimization applications in these practices. In the system SECURE-Risk Matrix are incorporated graphic and analytical capacities, which make more flexible the analyses and the subsequent documentation of all the results. The paper shows the the application of the proposed system to an integral risk study for the process of radiotherapy treatment with linear accelerator. (Author)

  16. External audit in radiotherapy dosimetry

    Quality audit forms an essential part of any comprehensive quality assurance programme. This is true in radiotherapy generally and in specific areas such as radiotherapy dosimetry. Quality audit can independently test the effectiveness of the quality system and in so doing can identify problem areas and minimize their possible consequences. Some general points concerning quality audit applied to radiotherapy are followed by specific discussion of its practical role in radiotherapy dosimetry, following its evolution from dosimetric intercomparison exercises to routine measurement-based on-going audit in the various developing audit networks both in the UK and internationally. Specific examples of methods and results are given from some of these, including the Scottish+ audit group. Quality audit in radiotherapy dosimetry is now well proven and participation by individual centres is strongly recommended. Similar audit approaches are to be encouraged in other areas of the radiotherapy process. (author)

  17. Radiotherapy of hemangiomas

    Gauwerky, F.

    1982-10-11

    The findings about the regular, spontaneous and complete regression of cavernous skin hemangiomas occurring in infants and those findings about the damaging effects due to ionising radiation - here particularly local growth disturbances - led to the development of very cautious diagnostic methods and to a considerate individual dosage and radiotherapy, which always takes into consideration the spontaneous regression tendency of the hemangiomas. However, a function-impairing localisation at the orifices, fulminant macrosomia, tendency to hemorrhages and poly-infection with superficial ulceration and even thrombopenic syndromes of the Kasabach-Merritt type may become necessary, urgent and also vital indications for a particular radiotherapy. For the sake of the patients, irradiation methods, which do not provoke any risk of radiation hazards, have to be preserved and applied in practice. Certainly further research and the nosologic nature of hemangiomas is required. A general non-treatment of hemangiomas is refused.

  18. Nutrition and radiotherapy

    Full text: Radiation is a common method of treating large tumours, however one of the major problems in radiation therapy is the severe side effects that may limit its efficacy. Utilising nutrients can assist in the control of these side effects which will greatly enhance the quality of life of the patient plus improve the effectiveness of the radiation. Another controversial point regarding radiation and nutrition is the concurrent use of antioxidants and radiotherapy. The science literature is in agreement that supplementing with antioxidants after radiation is essential. In addition, most studies now show that antioxidants do not interfere with the efficacy of radiotherapy. These issues and suggestions for nutrients to assist during and after radiation will be discussed

  19. Radiotherapy for aggressive fibromatosis

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate local control with radiotherapy for aggressive fibromatosis. Materials and Methods: Fifty-three patients with histologically confirmed aggressive fibromatosis were treated with radiotherapy at the University of Florida between March 1975 and June 1992. The minimum length of follow-up was 2 years; 88% of patients had follow-up for at least 5 years. Thirty-nine patients had lesions in an extremity and 14 patients had lesions in the trunk. Twenty-nine patients were treated for gross disease. Patients were treated with total doses between 35 Gy and 70 Gy; 83% of patients received 50 Gy to 60 Gy. Results: Local control was achieved in 23 of 29 patients (79%) treated for postoperative microscopic residual disease. Local control was achieved in 21 of 24 patients (88%) treated for gross disease; gross disease was controlled in 8 of 8 patients with previously untreated lesions, and in 13 of 16 patients treated for postoperative gross residual and recurrent disease. Overall, aggressive fibromatosis was locally controlled in 83% of treated patients. All 9 treatment failures occurred with extremity lesions 4 to 68 months after initiation of treatment. Of the 9 recurrences, 4 were out-of-field, 3 were in-field, and 4 occurred at the margin of the irradiated field. Salvage was successful in 8 of 9 patients in whom salvage was attempted with surgery alone or combined with postoperative radiotherapy. A functional limb was maintained in 38 of 39 patients with extremity or limb girdle lesions. The most serious complication of treatment was pathologic fracture, which occurred in 3 of 53 treated patients; all 3 fractures healed with conservative management. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a valuable adjunct to surgery in the management of aggressive fibromatosis and can be used alone in patients with unresectable or inoperable disease

  20. Conformal radiotherapy: a glossary

    Most of the concepts and terms related to conformal radiotherapy were produced by English-speaking authors and eventually validated by international groups of experts, whose working language was also English. Therefore, a significant part of this literature is poorly accessible to the French-speaking radiation oncology community. The present paper gathers the 'official' definitions already published in French, along with propositions for the remaining terms which should be submitted to a more formal and representative validation process. (author)

  1. DICOM in Radiotherapy

    A. Nikfarjam; E Ganjalikhan Hakemi; E. Negahbani; MR. Khajeaminian

    2007-01-01

    Noticeable development in achieving data from patients is acquired by means of designing a system that connects these systems: imaging, archive and monitoring systems. When several imaging devices work based on DICOM standard; they can connect to each other without any interface. There are many applications for DICOM standard in radiotherapy; however its main usage is in imaging. It has other applications such as RT Structure Set, RT Dose, RT Plan and RT Brachy Treatment. "nNow DICOM is ...

  2. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    Alimi, David

    2015-01-01

    David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have resi...

  3. Technologies for Delivery of Proton and Ion Beams for Radiotherapy

    Owen, Hywel; Alonso, Jose; MacKay, Ranald

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments for the delivery of proton and ion beam therapy have been significant, and a number of technological solutions now exist for the creation and utilisation of these particles for the treatment of cancer. In this paper we review the historical development of particle accelerators used for external beam radiotherapy and discuss the more recent progress towards more capable and cost-effective sources of particles.

  4. TECHNOLOGIES FOR DELIVERY OF PROTON AND ION BEAMS FOR RADIOTHERAPY

    Owen, H; Alonso, J; Mackay, R

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments for the delivery of proton and ion beam therapy have been significant, and a number of technological solutions now exist for the creation and utilisation of these particles for the treatment of cancer. In this paper we review the historical development of particle accelerators used for external beam radiotherapy and discuss the more recent progress towards more capable and cost-effective sources of particles.

  5. Characteristic evaluation of photoneutron in radiotherapy room using MCNPX

    Linear accelerators are now playing a pivotal role in radiotherapy and high energy photon beams of a strength exceeding 8 MV have recently been mainly used. However, when using high energy photons, neutron contamination due to photonuclear reaction develops. This study focused on the dose distribution of photoneutrons emitted from a linear accelerator using Monte Carlo MCNPX code. MCNPX was used to simulate transportation of photoneutrons in the linear accelerator and the entire space of the radiotherapy room and is useful for calculating the flux, spectrum and absorbed dose. As result of the simulation, we could know that the neutron absorbed dose was as less as negligible when comparing to the photon absorbed dose in radiotherapy room. And it was found that the photoneutron flux increased substantially starting from 10 MV while the absorbed dose rose sharply between 10 MV and 12 MV. It was observed that although the ratio of thermal neutrons to fast neutrons was not altered as the energy increased, it was found that as the distance from the source increased the ratio of thermal neutrons rose markedly

  6. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for recurrent small cell lung cancer brain metastases after whole brain radiotherapy

    Objective: Evaluation the Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy (FSRT) for the patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) after the whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) failure. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 35 patients with brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer treated with linear accelerator FSRT after the WBRT failure. Multivariate analysis was used to determine significant prognostic factor related to survival. Results: The following-up rate was 100%. The median following-up time was 11 months. The median over-all survival (OS) time was 10.3(1 -30) months after FSRT. Controlled extra cranial disease was the only identified significant predictor of increased median OS time (χ2 =4.02, P =0.045 ). The median OS time from the diagnosis of brain metastasis was 22 (6 - 134 ) months. 14 patients died from brain metastasis, 14 from extra-cranial progression, 1 from leptomeningeal metastases, and 3 from other causes. Local control at 6 months and 12 months was 91% and 76%, respectively. No significant late complications. New brain metastases outside of the treated area developed in 17% of patients at a median time of 4(2 -20) months; all patients had received previous WBRT. Conclusions: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was safe and effective treatment for recurrent small-cell lung carcinoma brain metastases. (authors)

  7. Results of radiotherapy for T2N0 glottic carcinoma: does the ''2'' stand for twice-daily treatment?

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is often the therapy of choice for patients with Stage T2 glottic carcinoma. This retrospective study updated the results of RT for patients treated at our center. The primary focus of this study was whether a policy of using hyperfractionated RT for these patients resulted in a therapeutic gain. Methods and Materials: A search of the database of patients treated in the Department of Radiation Oncology at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center was performed to identify patients with Stage T2 glottic carcinoma treated with RT alone between 1970 and 1998. A total of 230 patients formed the study cohort. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 82 months. Of the 230 patients, 180 were treated with parallel-opposed fields, and the median field size was 30 cm2. Eighty-one patients (36%) were treated with twice-daily fractionation to 74-80 Gy. Eighty-nine patients (38%) were treated with 32-75 Gy at 2-Gy per fraction once daily, and 57 patients (25%) were treated with 2.06-2.26 Gy, once daily, to 66-70 Gy. The 2- and 5-year actuarial local control rate was 75% and 72%, respectively. After salvage therapy, the ultimate 5-year local control and disease-specific survival rate was 91% and 92%, respectively. The presence of subglottic extension and treatment with a daily dose of ≤2 Gy were associated with poorer local control (p <0.01) on both univariate and multivariate analyses. The 5-year local control rate for patients treated with twice-daily and once-daily RT was 79% and 67%, respectively (p=0.06). Conclusion: The 5-year local control rates with hyperfractionated RT for Stage T2 glottic carcinoma approach 80%. Patients treated with twice-daily fractionation to a median dose of 77 Gy had an improvement in local control compared with patients treated with 70 Gy in 35 fractions. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group is testing these two fractionation schedules in a randomized study. High control rates were also seen in

  8. Decommissioning of Radiotherapy Facilities

    Radiotherapy units containing high activity sealed radioactive sources of 60Co or 137Cs are mainly use for medical, research or calibration applications. After several half-lives of decay, the radionuclide source has to be changed or the unit is decommissioned if no longer required. Before starting a decommissioning project it is very important to look for documents relating to any sources held or installed in equipment. In general this should be no problem because the recommended working life of such sealed radioactive sources is limited to 10 or a maximum of 15 years. These time periods are short in comparison with other facilities like research laboratories or small reactors. These documents (source certificates) will be very helpful to plan the decommissioning because they say everything about the original activity of the source at a reference date, the type of the source and the manufacturer. The next step may be to contact the machine supplier or the source manufacturer, but be aware that neither may still be in existence or may have changed their type of business. In such cases, it is recommended to contact national or international sealed source manufacturers or suppliers for help. Sometimes it is also helpful to contact colleagues in other hospitals or research centres to ask for information about specialists in this topic. In general it is not useful, and even very dangerous, to try to decommission such a unit without expert help It is essential to have specialist tools and shielded containers to recover the source out of the unit. It is strongly recommended to invite the source removal specialist for a site visit to review the situation before starting any decommissioning process. A further problem can occur, if the source must be transported to a national storage centre or even an international storage facility, as the source must be packaged to meet international transport requirements. The end state of such a project should be an empty room where the

  9. Combined hyperfractionated irradiation and protracted infusion chemotherapy in invasive bladder cancer with conservative intent. Phase I study

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to define the optimal schedule of chemo-radiotherapy in selective bladder preservation. Materials and Methods: >From November 1992 to February 1996, 34 patients with invasive transitional cell bladder carcinoma have been accrued in this dose-finding study. After aggressive TUR, patients underwent 2 cycles of MCV chemotherapy (CT) followed by radiotherapy (RT) with concomitant protracted venous infusion (PVI) of cisplatin (cDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which was started within 30-40 days from the completion of CT. Fifty Gy were given to the small pelvis followed by 20 Gy to the bladder (1 Gy x 3 fractions a day/5 days a week for 4.5 weeks). The following levels of doses have been tested: 5-FU 180 mg/sm/die and cDDP 4mg/sm/die (3 pts), cDDP 5mg/sm/die (3 pts), cDDP 6mg/sm/die (3 pts); cDDP 6 mg/sm/die and 5-FU 200 mg/sm/die (6 pts), 5-FU 220 mg/sm/die (6 pts), cDDP 5 mg/sm/die and 5-FU 220 mg/sm/die (4 pts). In the remaining 9 patients MCV CT has been omitted for medical reasons and/or age >75 years. In the MCV CT group, we have treated 25 patients, 22 males and 3 females (age range 53-75 years). Nine cases were T2N0M0, 2 T2N1M0, 13 T3N0M0, 1 T4aN0M0, 19 were G2 and 6 G3. In the group without MCV, 8 male and 1 female (age range 62-80 years), 3 were T2N0M0 and 6 T3N0M0, 4 G2 and 5 G3. RT-CT has been performed at doses of cDDP 5 mg/sm/die and 5-FU 200 mg/sm/die. Results: All patients are evaluable for toxicity. Very mild rectal tenesmus and dysuria were observed, except for the dose level cDDP 6 mg/sm/die and 5-FU 220 mg/sm/die, where the treatment has been interrupted for 5-15 days in all patients, due to grade III-IV tenesmus and dysuria and in(4(6)) patients also for leukopenia and/or thrombocytopenia grade III. Only in one patient at the first level of dose, RT-CT was stopped at the dosage of 58 Gy because of grade IV bone marrow depletion. We suggest to consider cDDP 5 mg/sm/die and 5-FU 220 mg/sm/die as the maximum tolerated

  10. Radiotherapy of presenile spinal osteoporosis

    Painfull conditions of presenile spinal osteoporosis may no longer respond to medication or physical therapy. Analgesic radiotherapy coupled with mild physical therapy and if necessary supported by orthopedic measures frequently results in pain relief and physical stability. Fifty-two cases of osteoporosis and osteoporotic spinal fractures illustrate how better longterm results are achieved by increasing the customary dosage and speeding up radiotherapy. (orig.)

  11. Tandem accelerators

    After the installation of Ti-acceleration tubes and substantial modifications and additions to the EN tandem accelerator the performance of the machine has stabilized. The voltage behaviour of the tubes obviously improves as conditioning times necessary to run up to 6 MV decrease. A gridded lens has been added at the entrance of the first acceleration tube, and a second foil stripper is now installed in the short dead section between the high-energy tubes. The MP tandem also has been running stably during most of the year. However, beam instabilities originating from the last tube section and wear problems at the low-energy set of pelletron-chains caused some loss of beam time. During the fall, one set of pelletron charging chains has to be replaced after 49,000 hours of operation. In the course of the year, the MP and the EN tandem accelerators finished their 100,000th and 150,000th hours of operations, respectively. Preparations for the installation of the 3 MV negative heavy ion injector for the MP are progressing steadily. External beam transport, terminal ion optics, and data acquisition and control systems are to a major extent completed; the integration of the terminal power supplies has started. After the final assembly of the accelerator column structure, first voltage runs can be performed. (orig.)

  12. Radiotherapy for eyelid cancer

    Saika, Kazumi [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-05-01

    Some studies on radiotherapy for eyelid cancer have been reported, but the optimal radiation doses for different histological types and tumor sizes have not been detailed. So I studied the optimal radiation doses in radiotherapy for eyelid cancer. The patients were fourteen and histological diagnoses were made on the basis of biopsies or surgery before radiotherapy. Surgical cut margins were positive in 10 cases. In 5 of these cases, tumors were visible. There were 9 sebaceous adenocarcinomas (SAC), 4 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and 1 basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In 13 of 14 cases, radiation was applied to eyelids in which tumor-surgical cut margin distances were 3 mm or less. The eyeballs were covered with lead or tungsten shields, and the eyelids were irradiated with a total dose of 50 to 66.6 Gy. In 5 cases, radiation was applied prophylactically for ipsilateral pre-auricle lymph node areas. 11 of 13 cases were locally controlled. I gave greater radiation doses for SAC than for SCC or BCC. I also gave greater doses for in visible tumors than for invisible ones. In the acute phase dermatitis, inflammation of the cornea, conjunctivitis, etc. occurred but they were mild. Later reactions were decreased cilia, dry eye, inflammation of cornea, conjunctivitis, discomfort of the scar, etc. Cataracts were also seen, but they were of senile origen. Because 81.8% of the tumors were controlled, this radiation method was useful with salvage therapies to select an optimal radiation dose according to the differences among histological types and tumor sizes. 60% of visible tumors were also controlled so I think that radical therapy using radiation alone is possible. (author)

  13. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent sudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. synringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine. (MG)

  14. Clinical treatment of lumbodorsal radiotherapy ulcers

    Objective: To summarize our experience in the treatment of 12 cases of severe lumbodorsal radio-therapy ulcers. Methods: Of the 12 cases, 4 were male and 8 female. The youngest patient was 29 and the oldest was 67 years old. Their injuries were mainly resulted from radiotherapy for costal metastasis of breast cancer, carcinoma of uterus and dorsal skin carcinoma or scar induced by 60Co γ-rays, deep X-rays or superficial accelerator electrons. Their local accumulative dose was 60-120 Gy. Palliative debridement was performed with partial excision of the ribs and spinous process. And then the defects were repaired with local skin flap in 2 cases, parascapular skin flap in 1 case and island musculocutaneous flap of latissimus dorsi muscle in 9 cases. Results: All the skin flaps and musculocutaneous flaps grafted on the wounds of the 12 cases survived (100%). Grade A healing was achieved in 11 cases of ulcer (91.7%) and grade B healing in 1 cases (8.3%). All the skin flaps and musculocutaneous flaps grafted survived and the ulcers never recurred. Conclusion: Severe lumbodorsal radiotherapy injury often results in complications. The authors performed palliative excision and repaired by transferring an axial skin flap or a musculocutaneous flap with good blood circulation selected in accordance with the principles of plastic surgery, which can effectively improve blood circulation and promote wound healing. Reverse musculocutaneous flap of latissimus dorsi muscle is an especially good material for reconstruction. It has axial blood vessel and proper thickness. It is broad and can be rotated with great range and the donor site can be sutured directly

  15. Problems of clinical dosimetry in Russian radiotherapy centers

    Due to the general catastrophic situation of radiation oncology in Russia, its outdated equipment and shortage of medical physicists, the clinical dosimetry is also in a very poor state and doesn't meet the modern requirements of the quality assurance in radiotherapy. In Russia there are 140 radiotherapy departments, 100 medical accelerators and 250 gamma apparatus but only 150 clinical dosimeters and 75 dose field analyzers, 90% of which are morally and physically obsolete and do not meet the requirements of the quality assurance. Ten percent of the radiotherapy departments are not equipped with clinical dosimeters at all. There is no national program of quality assurance in radiotherapy. Service for dosimetry equipment calibration is lacking. The national standards and protocols of clinical dosimetry haven't been elaborated. Two-hundred-and-sixty medical physicists work in radiotherapy, 90% of whom have insufficient experience and qualification. Ten percent of radiotherapy departments do not have medical physicists in its staff at all and the rest of the departments face a shortage of medical physicists. The number of medical physicists is not enough to provide the full medical physics service. Qualified medical physicists do not stay long in clinics because of the small salary. As a result of these drawbacks the accuracy of the therapeutic dose delivery to the tumour often achieves 30% instead of the 5% admissible error. This situation leads to high radiation risks, particularly for radiation overdosage or underdosage during the patient's treatment. However, there are no radiation accident statistics in Russia; therefore it's impossible to evaluate them in terms of quantity. Unfortunately, this is the outcome of the lack of the state policy in this field. Neither the Health Ministry nor the Rosatom is concerned about this problem. The only thing that the Health Ministry is undertaking now is the purchase of the new equipment, dosimetry equipment included, for

  16. Performance of different radiotherapy workload models

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of different radiotherapy workload models using a prospectively collected dataset of patient and treatment information from a single center. Methods and Materials: Information about all individual radiotherapy treatments was collected for 2 weeks from the three linear accelerators (linacs) in our department. This information included diagnosis code, treatment site, treatment unit, treatment time, fields per fraction, technique, beam type, blocks, wedges, junctions, port films, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status. We evaluated the accuracy and precision of the original and revised basic treatment equivalent (BTE) model, the simple and complex Addenbrooke models, the equivalent simple treatment visit (ESTV) model, fields per hour, and two local standards of workload measurement. Results: Data were collected for 2 weeks in June 2001. During this time, 151 patients were treated with 857 fractions. The revised BTE model performed better than the other models with a mean vertical bar observed - predicted vertical bar of 2.62 (2.44-2.80). It estimated 88.0% of treatment times within 5 min, which is similar to the previously reported accuracy of the model. Conclusion: The revised BTE model had similar accuracy and precision for data collected in our center as it did for the original dataset and performed the best of the models assessed. This model would have uses for patient scheduling, and describing workloads and case complexity

  17. A scintillating fiber dosimeter for radiotherapy

    Bartesaghi, G. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN sezione di Milano (Italy)], E-mail: giacomo.bartesaghi@gmail.com; Conti, V. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN sezione di Milano (Italy); Bolognini, D.; Grigioni, S.; Mascagna, V.; Prest, M.; Scazzi, S. [Universita dell' Insubria, Como and INFN sezione di Milano (Italy); Mozzanica, A. [Universita degli Studi di Brescia and INFN sezione di Pavia (Italy); Cappelletti, P.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Monti, A.; Ostinelli, A. [Fisica Sanitaria, Ospedale S. Anna di Como (Italy); Giannini, G.; Vallazza, E. [INFN sezione di Trieste and Universita degli Studi di Trieste (Italy)

    2007-10-21

    Radiotherapy, together with chemotherapy and surgery, is one of the main methods applied in the fight against cancer; in order to increase the chances of a successful radiotherapy treatment the dose delivery to the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues has to be computed with high accuracy. Traditional dosimeters are accurate but single channel (ionization chambers and diodes) or non real-time (radiographic films) devices. At present there is no device water equivalent that can perform real-time and bidimensional measurements of a dose distribution. This article describes the development of a real-time dosimeter based on scintillating fibers for photon and electron beams; the fibers are made of polystyrene, that is water equivalent and thus tissue equivalent, allowing a direct dose calculation. Three prototypes (single and multichannel) have been assembled, consisting in small scintillators coupled to white fibers that carry the light to photomultiplier tubes. In this article the prototypes and the readout electronics are described, together with the results of the measurements with electron and photon beams with energy up to 20 MeV (produced by linear accelerators Varian Clinac 1800 and 2100CD)

  18. A scintillating fiber dosimeter for radiotherapy

    Radiotherapy, together with chemotherapy and surgery, is one of the main methods applied in the fight against cancer; in order to increase the chances of a successful radiotherapy treatment the dose delivery to the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues has to be computed with high accuracy. Traditional dosimeters are accurate but single channel (ionization chambers and diodes) or non real-time (radiographic films) devices. At present there is no device water equivalent that can perform real-time and bidimensional measurements of a dose distribution. This article describes the development of a real-time dosimeter based on scintillating fibers for photon and electron beams; the fibers are made of polystyrene, that is water equivalent and thus tissue equivalent, allowing a direct dose calculation. Three prototypes (single and multichannel) have been assembled, consisting in small scintillators coupled to white fibers that carry the light to photomultiplier tubes. In this article the prototypes and the readout electronics are described, together with the results of the measurements with electron and photon beams with energy up to 20 MeV (produced by linear accelerators Varian Clinac 1800 and 2100CD)

  19. Transverse tomography and radiotherapy

    This study was intended to delineate the indications for radiotherapy treatment-planning with the help of computerized axial tomography (C.T.) and transverse analog tomography (T.A.T.). Radiotherapy localisation procedures with the conventional method (simulator), with the CT-scanner and with the transverse analog tomograph (T.A.T., Simtomix, Oldelft) were compared. As criterium for evaluation differences in reconstruction drawing based on these methods were used. A certain method was judged ''superior'' to another if the delineation of the target volume was more accurate, if a better impression was gained of the site of (for irradiation) organs at risk, or if the localisation could only be performed with that method. The selected group of patients consisted of 120 patients for whom a reconstruction drawing in the transverse plane was made according to the treatment philosophy. In this group CT-assisted localisation was judged on 68 occasions superior to the conventional method. In a number of cases it was found that a ''standard'' change in a standard target volume, on the base of augmented anatomical knowledge, made the conventional method sufficient. The use of CT-scanner for treatment planning was estimated. For ca. 270/1000 new patients a CT-scan is helpful (diagnostic scan), for 140 of them the scan is necessary (planning scan). The quality of the anatomical information obtained with the T.A.T. does not yet fall within acceptable limits, but progress has been made. (Auth.)

  20. Imaging in radiotherapy

    The diagnostic methodologies used for the radiotherapy planning have undergone great developments in the last 30 years. Since the 1980s, after the introduction of the CT scanner, the modality for the planning moved beyond the planar 2D assessment to approach a real and more realistic volumetric 3D definition. Consequently the dose distribution, previously obtained by means of an overly simple approximation, became increasingly complex, better tailoring the true shape of the tumour. The final therapeutic improvement has been obtained by a parallel increase in the complexity of the irradiating units: the Linacs for therapy have, in fact, been equipped with a full accessory set capable to modulate the fluence (IMRT) and to check the correct target position continuously during the therapy session (IMRT-IGRT). The multimodal diagnostic approach, which integrates diagnostic information, from images of the patient taken with CT, NMR, PET and US, further improves the data for a biological and topological optimization of the radiotherapy plan and consequently of the dose distribution in the Planning Target Volume. Proteomic and genomic analysis will be the next step in tumour diagnosis. These methods will provide the planners with further information, for a true personalization of the treatment regimen and the assessment of the predictive essays for each tumour and each patient.

  1. Pregnancy and radiotherapy : management options for minimising risk, case series and comprehensive literature review

    Full text: This article reviews the efficacy and safety of radiotherapy in patients with cancer who are pregnant. Our review provided extended follow-up results in nine cases, presents a technical discussion on measures taken to minimise foetal radiation exposure and provides a comprehensive summary of the literature. Nine patients who received radiotherapy while pregnant are described. The clinical presentation and outcomes of these and 100 additional cases identified on a systematic literature review are presented. Comparisons of scattered radiation doses from three linear accelerators are presented. The average maternal follow-up in our series was 8.9 years with one patient having a recurrence of their astrocytoma. In terms of foetal outcome, there were one death in utero, one elective termination of pregnancy and one on which no data were available. Six children, on whom long-term follow-up (average 10.3 years) was obtainable, were in good health. Overall, there had been 109 cases of radiotherapy in pregnancy that met our search criteria with 13 adverse outcomes and a median follow-up of 37 months. Comparisons of three linear accelerators demonstrated significant differences in the amount of scattered radiation to the abdominal surface. In summary radiotherapy during pregnancy can be associated with a significant number of adverse outcomes. While it may be difficult for a patient not to attribute these effects to radiotherapy, it is also difficult to define the mechanisms by which radiotherapy would have caused them, if that were the case.

  2. Advanced Accelerator Applications in Medicine

    besides the original purpose on development of particle acceleratora as research tools in nuclear and high-energy physics, there are large variety of accelerators used in various fileds from fundamental research to industrial usesand applications chemistry, biology and medicine. Pratical accelators used in various field of medical applications since serveral decades. Even through, a large fraction of applications is emphasized on cancer therappy, the number of accelerators used in midicine for other diagnostics and treatments has increased steady over the years. Several types of accelerated particles are used including electron, proton, neutron and ions. Presently, relativistic electron beams and radiation from linear accelerators (linas) are widely used. A combination of positron emission tomography (PRT) and radiotherapy is an example of excellent invention early detection and treat of cancer tumors. The most developments for proton and heavy ion therapy as well as a modern boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are also great incoming effective systems. This talk will focus on developments of the accelrator systems as well as overview on biophysical properties and medical aspects of the diacnostics and treatments.

  3. Advances in radiotherapy

    Radiation therapy is in the midst of a rebirth largely driven by the use of computers for treatment planning and beam delivery. The first edge of this renaissance was the advent of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT). This was enabled by the widespread availability and utilization of three-dimensional imaging such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance scanning, themselves products of the computer revolution. For the first time this allowed radiation oncologists to segment and visualize the tumor in association with it neighboring sensitive soft-tissue structures. Software tools to visualize the beam paths through the body enabled the beam directions and beam shapes to be manually optimized. Simultaneously, improved dose calculations utilizing the CT images of the patient anatomy produced more accurate distributions of dose. The dose was delivered with custom-shaped blocks or recently collimators with multiple leaves that allow complex shaped fields to be delivered without the need for block fabrication. In the last couple of decades new treatment delivery methodologies have emerged. The first has been stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which is the purview of neurosurgeons (who call it SRS) as well as radiation oncologists (who usually call it SRT). SRS and SRT are premised on multiple beams focusing on one location typically with circular aperture collimators but increasingly with fields shaped by multi-leaved collimators. Often only a single treatment session (the usual for SRS) is used when the treatment volume is small, but for larger lesions several treatment sessions, or fractions, are used (most often for SRT) to allow for normal tissue repair. The new equipment market for SRS and SRT is about 10% of the total for radiation therapy. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the latest treatment methodology and its adoption has been extremely rapid, particularly in the United States. IMRT uses

  4. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for pediatric medulloblastoma: a clinical study of 33 cases

    Wei ZHENG

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To retrospectively review the clinical characteristics of medulloblastoma,discuss the optimized treatment regimen,and analyze the prognostic influential factors.Methods Thirty-three children with pathologically certified medulloblastoma(aged 3-14 years with average of 6.5 years,admitted from Aug.2004 to Dec.2007,received radiotherapy within 3 weeks post surgery.Ratiotherapy consisted of 28~36Gy whole craniospinal radiation and a supplementary radiation aimed at tumors by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy(3D-CRT for a total dose of 50~54Gy(conventional fraction dose of 1.8-2.0Gy.A part of patients received hyperfractionation radiotherapy(1.0Gy/f,2f/d for alleviating the tardive adverse events.Meanwhile,a synchronized chemotherapy,consisting of lomustine + vincristine + cisplatin,or isophosphamide + carboplatin + etoposide,was administered after the completion of whole craniospinal radiation,and 3-5 courses of sequential chemotherapy were given after the overall radiotherapy was finished.According to the metastasis,and the residual tumor and its size,the 33 patients were divided into 2 groups as follows: low-risk group(n=24: no metastases,total or sub-total excision of tumors(residual tumors ≤1.5cm3;high-risk group(n=9: either metastases or residual tumor > 1.5cm3.The 3-year survival rates of two groups were then compared.Results The combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy was effective to 10 of the 11 patients(90.9% with residual tumors.Out of the 33 patients,31 obtained complete remission(93.9%,and 2 patients showed partial remission or stable status(3.0%,respectively.The median survival time of 33 patients was 51 months,3-year disease free survival(DFS was 75.8%,and 3-year overall survival(OS was 78.8%,including 33.3% in high-risk group and 95.8% in low-risk group(P < 0.01.The major side effects occurred in haematological system and digestive system,such as an incidence of 21.2%(7/33 with grade Ⅲ-Ⅳ bone marrow suppression

  5. Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for acoustic neuroma by linear accelerator

    Sakamoto, Tooru; Shirato, Hiroki; Fukuda, Satoshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1997-10-01

    We analyzed forty one patients with acoustic neuroma treated by SRT giving 36 Gy in 20 fractions to 48 Gy in 23 fractions during 1991 and 1997, and found a sterilization of tumor size in 97.6%. Twenty-six patients had measurable hearing before and after SRT and 43.5% of patients showed change in pure tone average less than 10 dB, 82.6% less than 20 dB at the last follow-up examination. Facial and trigeminal nerve function was evaluated in 41 patients. Transient facial weakness developed in 4.8% and trigeminal neuropathy in 9.6% of irradiated cases. We consider that SRT complications are less than that of gamma-knife, although the longer follow-up period should be needed. (author)

  6. Particle acceleration

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  7. Accelerator design

    The feasibility of constructing a TeV region electron-positron linear collider in Japan is discussed. The design target of the collider is given as follows: Energy, 1 TeV + 1 TeV; luminosity, 1032-1033/cm2/s; total length, 25km; electric power, 250MW; energy dispersion, 1%-10%; the start of the first experiment, early 1990s. For realizing the above target, the following research and developmental works are necessary. (a) Development of an acceleration tube with short filling time and high shunt resistance. (b) Short pulse microwave source with high peak power. (c) High current, single bunch linac. (d) Beam dynamics. As for the acceleration tube, some possibility is considered: For example, the use of DAW (Disk and Washer) which is being developed for TRISTAN as a traveling-wave tube; and the Jungle Gym-type acceleration tube. As a promising candidate for the microwave source, the Lasertron has been studied. The total cost of the collider construction is estimated to be about 310 billion yen, of which 120 billion yen is for the tunnel and buildings, and 190 billion yen for the accelerator facilities. The operation cost is estimated to be about 3 billion yen per month. (Aoki, K.)

  8. Accelerator operations

    This section is concerned with the operation of both the tandem-linac system and the Dynamitron, two accelerators that are used for entirely different research. Developmental activities associated with the tandem and the Dynamitron are also treated here, but developmental activities associated with the superconducting linac are covered separately because this work is a program of technology development in its own right

  9. Advanced accelerators

    This report discusses the suitability of four novel particle acceleration technologies for multi-TeV particle physics machines: laser driven linear accelerators (linac), plasma beat-wave devices, plasma wakefield devices, and switched power and cavity wakefield linacs. The report begins with the derivation of beam parameters practical for multi-TeV devices. Electromagnetic field breakdown of materials is reviewed. The two-beam accelerator scheme for using a free electron laser as the driver is discussed. The options recommended and the conclusions reached reflect the importance of cost. We recommend that more effort be invested in achieving a self-consistent range of TeV accelerator design parameters. Beat-wave devices have promise for 1-100 GeV applications and, while not directly scalable to TeV designs, the current generation of ideas are encouraging for the TeV regime. In particular, surfatrons, finite-angle optical mixing devices, plasma grating accelerator, and the Raman forward cascade schemes all deserve more complete analysis. The exploitation of standard linac geometry operated in an unconventional mode is in a phase of rapid evolution. While conceptual projects abound, there are no complete designs. We recommend that a fraction of sponsored research be devoted to this approach. Wakefield devices offer a great deal of potential; trades among their benefits and constraints are derived and discussed herein. The study of field limitation processes has received inadequate attention; this limits experiment designers. The costs of future experiments are such that investment in understanding these processes is prudent. 34 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Neuropsychological Outcome of Children Treated for Standard Risk Medulloblastoma in the PNET4 European Randomized Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy and Maintenance Chemotherapy

    Câmara-Costa, Hugo, E-mail: hugocamaracosta@gmail.com [National Institute of Health and Medical Research, INSERM U1178, Paris (France); Resch, Anika [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Kieffer, Virginie [Saint Maurice Hospitals, Saint Maurice (France); Lalande, Clémence [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Poggi, Geraldina [Scientific Institute, IRCCS Eugenio Medea, Bosisio Parini, Lecco (Italy); Kennedy, Colin; Bull, Kim [University of Southampton, Faculty of Medicine, Southampton (United Kingdom); Calaminus, Gabriele [Paediatric Oncology, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Grill, Jacques [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Doz, François [Institut Curie and University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris (France); Rutkowski, Stefan [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Massimino, Maura [Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter [Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Lannering, Birgitta [Paediatric Oncology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Dellatolas, Georges [National Institute of Health and Medical Research, INSERM U1178, Paris (France); Chevignard, Mathilde [Rehabilitation Department for Children With Acquired Neurological Injury, Saint Maurice Hospitals, Saint Maurice, and Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Universités Paris, INSERM CNRS, Paris (France)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: In the European HIT-SIOP PNET4 randomized controlled trial, children with standard risk medulloblastoma were allocated to hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT arm, including a partially focused boost) or standard radiation therapy (STRT arm), followed, in both arms, by maintenance chemotherapy. Event-free survival was similar in both arms. Previous work showed that the HFRT arm was associated with worse growth and better questionnaire-based executive function, especially in children <8 years of age at diagnosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare performance-based cognitive outcomes between treatment arms. Methods and Materials: Neuropsychological data were collected prospectively in 137 patients. Using the Wechsler Intelligence Scales, Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, and Raven's Progressive Matrices, we estimated full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) and, when available, verbal IQ (VIQ), performance IQ (PIQ), working memory index (WMI), and processing speed index (PSI). Results: Among the 137 participants (HFRT arm n=71, STRT arm n=66, 63.5% males), mean (±SD) ages at diagnosis and assessment respectively were 9.3 (±3.2) years of age (40.8% < 8 years of age at diagnosis) and 14.6 (±4.3) years of age. Mean (±SD) FSIQ was 88 (±19), and mean intergroup difference was 3.88 (95% confidence interval: −2.66 to 10.42, P=.24). No significant differences were found in children >8 years of age at diagnosis. In children <8 years of age at diagnosis, a marginally significant trend toward higher VIQ was found in those treated in the HFRT arm; a similar trend was found for PSI but not for PIQ, WMI, or FSIQ (mean intergroup differences were: 12.02 for VIQ [95% CI: 2.37-21.67; P=.02]; 3.77 for PIQ [95% CI: −5.19 to 12.74; P>.10]; 5.20 for WMI [95% CI: −2.07 to 12.47; P>.10]; 10.90 for PSI [95% CI: −1.54 to 23.36; P=.08]; and 5.28 for FSIQ [95% CI: −4.23 to 14.79; P>.10]). Conclusions: HFRT was associated with

  11. Long-term biochemical control of prostate cancer after standard or hyper-fractionation: Evidence for different outcomes between low–intermediate and high risk patients

    Background and purpose: To report the long-term biochemical control of a non-randomized trial comparing standard (STD) and hyper-fractionated (HFX) radiation schedules for prostate cancer treatment. Materials and methods: Between 1993 and 2003, 370 patients entered the study; 330/370 (STD: 179; HFX: 151) were evaluable for current analysis. Median doses were 79.2 Gy and 74 Gy for HFX (1.2 Gy/fr, two daily fractions) and STD (2 Gy/fr), respectively; median follow-up was 7.5 yr. The two regimens were compared in terms of biochemical relapse-free survival (according to ASTRO definition, bRFS) by univariate (log-rank test) and multivariate analyses (Cox regression hazard model). Based on published relationships between EQD2 and 5-yr biochemical control, α/β values for each subgroup could be estimated. Results: 7.5 yr bRFS were 53.4% (±4.4%, 95% CI) and 65.4% (±4.0%) for HFX and STD, respectively (p = 0.13); HFX was associated with a poorer outcome in NCCN low + intermediate patients (7.5 yr bRFS: 56.6% vs 73.5%, p = 0.048) while no differences were seen for high-risk patients (7.5 yr bRFS: 44.1% vs 45.3%). Multivariate analysis revealed that NCCN risk grouping (high vs low + intermediate; OR: 0.59, p = 0.009) and age (< vs ⩾70 yr; OR: 0.67, p = 0.03) were the main predictors of worse bRFS. In the subgroups of low + intermediate-risk patients <70 yr, the poorer outcome of HFX was more evident (7.5 yr bRFS: 47.1% vs 70.9%, p = 0.078) while no difference was seen for older patients (7.5 yr bRFS: 69.4% vs 72.0%, p = 0.76). Our α/β estimates differ between low + intermediate-risk and high-risk patients. Conclusions: The bRFS long-term results of this non-randomized trial are consistent with different sensitivities to fractionation depending on NCCN risk grouping. The impact of age on the outcome of HFX for younger low + intermediate patients is consistent with an incomplete repair effect in older patients.

  12. Neuropsychological Outcome of Children Treated for Standard Risk Medulloblastoma in the PNET4 European Randomized Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy and Maintenance Chemotherapy

    Purpose: In the European HIT-SIOP PNET4 randomized controlled trial, children with standard risk medulloblastoma were allocated to hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT arm, including a partially focused boost) or standard radiation therapy (STRT arm), followed, in both arms, by maintenance chemotherapy. Event-free survival was similar in both arms. Previous work showed that the HFRT arm was associated with worse growth and better questionnaire-based executive function, especially in children <8 years of age at diagnosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare performance-based cognitive outcomes between treatment arms. Methods and Materials: Neuropsychological data were collected prospectively in 137 patients. Using the Wechsler Intelligence Scales, Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, and Raven's Progressive Matrices, we estimated full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) and, when available, verbal IQ (VIQ), performance IQ (PIQ), working memory index (WMI), and processing speed index (PSI). Results: Among the 137 participants (HFRT arm n=71, STRT arm n=66, 63.5% males), mean (±SD) ages at diagnosis and assessment respectively were 9.3 (±3.2) years of age (40.8% < 8 years of age at diagnosis) and 14.6 (±4.3) years of age. Mean (±SD) FSIQ was 88 (±19), and mean intergroup difference was 3.88 (95% confidence interval: −2.66 to 10.42, P=.24). No significant differences were found in children >8 years of age at diagnosis. In children <8 years of age at diagnosis, a marginally significant trend toward higher VIQ was found in those treated in the HFRT arm; a similar trend was found for PSI but not for PIQ, WMI, or FSIQ (mean intergroup differences were: 12.02 for VIQ [95% CI: 2.37-21.67; P=.02]; 3.77 for PIQ [95% CI: −5.19 to 12.74; P>.10]; 5.20 for WMI [95% CI: −2.07 to 12.47; P>.10]; 10.90 for PSI [95% CI: −1.54 to 23.36; P=.08]; and 5.28 for FSIQ [95% CI: −4.23 to 14.79; P>.10]). Conclusions: HFRT was associated with

  13. Chest wall desmoid tumours treated with definitive radiotherapy: a plan comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy

    Liu, Jia; Ng, Diana; Lee, James; Stalley, Paul; Hong, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Definitive radiotherapy is often used for chest wall desmoid tumours due to size or anatomical location. The delivery of radiotherapy is challenging due to the large size and constraints of normal surrounding structures. We compared the dosimetry of 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) to evaluate the best treatment option. Methods and materials Ten consecutive patients with inoperable chest wall de...

  14. Radiotherapy in a public health

    The aim of our publication is to evaluate the state of radiotherapy, its role and place in oncology and in the public health system, in order to plan necessities. The cost and economical effectiveness are objectives of the current evaluation. Radiotherapy is strongly dependant of introducing new technologies and the need of gross capital investments. However, their relative cost is reduced due to their long-term use. Because of the serious delay of Bulgaria from the world standards in radiotherapy, the analysis is based on the data published in the scientific literature. The main tendencies and ideas for development are based on the analysis of The Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU) and the ESTRO QUARTS project. We use Swedish model for estimating the expenses, having in mind the conditions in Bulgaria (salary, management, patient cares). The main conclusions are: 1) Radiotherapy is basic curative and palliative method in oncology; 2) Bulgarian radiotherapy is at one of the last places in Europe (therapeutic units are 30 years old average, despite their recommended exploitation of 12-20 years); 3) In contradiction to the world tendencies delay grows during the last 10 years; 4) In countries with low or average GDP radiotherapy should be prioritized, due to its low cost in comparison to the other treatment methods in oncology; 5) The need of radiotherapy will continue to grow, this necessitate not only replacement of the old machines but increasing their number 3 times during the next few years; 6) It is necessary to form a modern radiotherapy centers, equipped with at least two compatible units, based on the currently existing radiotherapy departments. (authors)

  15. MedLinac2: a GEANT4 based software package for radiotherapy

    Barbara Caccia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Dose distribution evaluation in oncological radiotherapy treatments is an outstanding problem that requires sophisticated computing technologies to optimize the clinical results (i.e. increase the dose to the tumour and reduce the dose to the healthy tissues. Nowdays, dose calculation algorithms based on the Monte Carlo method are generally regarded as the most accurate tools for radiotherapy. The flexibility of the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code allows a wide range of applications, from high-energy to medical physics. In order to disseminate and encourage the use of Monte Carlo method in oncological radiotherapy, a software package based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit has been developed. The developed package (MedLinac2 allows to simulate in an adequate flexible way a linear accelerator for radiotherapy and to evaluate the dose distributions.

  16. Successful Application of Neutron Bubble Detectors in Neutron Dose Monitoring for Primus-M Election Linear Accelerators

    2008-01-01

    <正>Neutrons produced by 10 MeV medical electronic linear accelerators used for radiotherapy treatments may be harmful for medical personnel and patients. These neutrons are generated by the photon-induced

  17. Experiences with intraoperative radiotherapy in gastric cancer (Berlin method)

    The aim of our pilot study is to determine whether intraoperative radiotherapy in gastric cancer cannot only prevent a local relapse but also improve the survival rate. Since November 1987, 26 patients with resectable gastric cancer were irradiated intraoperatively with the linear accelerator using fast electrons (single dose: 12 to 16 Gy). Percutaneous radiotherapy was performed postoperatively with 24 to 38 Gy (4x2 Gy per week). For intraoperative and percutaneous radiotherapy the target absorbed dose was selected in a way that their combined effect on the tumor was approximately equivalent to that of a total dose of 60 Gy in the usual fractionating. Up to now, the median survival time for stage III patients (UICC 1987) has been twelve months. In five patients who died of a relapse or of peritoneal carcinosis, histologic evaluation revealed in every case a diffuse tumor type according to Lauren-classification. All relapses occurred within the first eight months. The two-year survival rate according to Kaplan-Meier is 67% for stage III. Advanced resectable gastric cancer of the intestinal tumor type seems to profit from adjuvant intraoperative radiotherapy. The results warrant further research within the framework of a prospective randomized multicenter study. (orig.)

  18. Palliative and low cost radiotherapy in developing countries

    Full text: The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicts that cancer incidence in developing countries will increase dramatically in the first two decades of this millennium. Already some 80% of cancer patients in developing countries present with incurable disease. In many cases pain is a severe problem and palliation is needed to improve quality of life as well as extending survival. This paper will consider the physical and clinical aspects of palliative radiotherapy (PRT), choice of radiation modality, alternative approaches to imaging and therapy and cost-benefit considerations. The potential benefits of a dedicated palliative care centre include lower cost and therefore more centres, enabling more patients access to regional palliative care. Simple curative treatments could also be managed. Co60 radiotherapy has important advantages in developing countries, because of the higher initial cost of a linear accelerator, as well as the need for reliable power supply and the level of skill required by linac technicians and physicists. The beam characteristics of both Co60 units and low energy linacs are compared and both are found to be acceptable for palliation. The role of palliative and low cost radiotherapy in Bangladesh is reviewed. The concept of telemedicine is also discussed, using mobile phones and internet communication to allow rural clinics to receive support from specialists based in the cities, to send images for remote diagnosis and remote dose planning for radiotherapy.

  19. Intercomparison of quality control procedures in radiotherapy in the Netherlands

    A grant was received from the Dutch government to accomplish the development and implementation of guidelines for quality control (QC) of radiotherapy equipment in The Netherlands. QC of electron accelerators, simulators, CT scanners, mould room equipment, dosimetry equipment and treatment planning systems will be considered in this project. The project started in September 1994 with an investigation of QC of medical electron accelerators as performed in all 21 radiotherapy institutions in The Netherlands. An extensive questionnaire on QC procedures of electron accelerators was sent to all centres with items related to safety systems, mechanical aspects, radiation leakage, beam data and dosimetry equipment (in total about 60 questions). From the answers the following conclusions can be drawn: There is a large variation in time spent on QC; This QC time strongly depends on the complexity of the linear accelerator; There is a large variation in frequency and tolerance levels of the various tests; The way QC of an item is performed differs considerably (extensive-comprehensive). From these data recommendations specific for the situation in The Netherlands are being prepared and compared with other existing national and international reports. Similar procedures are underway for CT scanners and simulators while for the other equipment minimum guidelines still have to be developed. (author)

  20. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy

    Murphy, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    External-beam radiotherapy has long been challenged by the simple fact that patients can (and do) move during the delivery of radiation. Recent advances in imaging and beam delivery technologies have made the solution--adapting delivery to natural movement--a practical reality. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy provides the first detailed treatment of online interventional techniques for motion compensation radiotherapy. This authoritative book discusses: Each of the contributing elements of a motion-adaptive system, including target detection and tracking, beam adaptation, and pati

  1. Development of targeted radiotherapy systems

    Conventional or external beam radiotherapy, has been a viable alternative for cancer treatment. Although this technique is effective, its use is limited if the patient has multiple malignant lesions (metastases). An alternative approach is based on the design of radiopharmaceuticals that, to be administered in the patient, are directed specifically toward the target cell producing a selective radiation delivery. This treatment is known as targeted radiotherapy. We have summarized and discussed some results related to our investigations on the development of targeted radiotherapy systems, including aspects of internal dosimetry

  2. Phase I/II study of treatment of locally advanced (T3/T4) non-oat cell lung cancer with concomitant boost radiotherapy by the radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG 83-12): long-term results

    Purpose: This pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of high dose-per-fraction radiotherapy given to the tumor primary concurrently with conventional fractionated radiotherapy to the electively irradiated regional lymph nodes (concomitant boost). This article reports the late results of toxicity and survival. Methods and Materials: Fifty-nine patients with histologically proven clinical Stage T3-T4, N1--3 nonsmall cell lung cancer were prospectively enrolled in this study. Fifty-six were evaluable for late effects. The treatment delivered 2.68 Gy daily to the primary tumor, 5 days a week, to a total dose of 75 Gy in 28 fractions in 5.5 weeks. At the same treatment sessions, the electively irradiated nodal areas received 1.8 Gy daily 5 days per week, to a total dose of 50.4 Gy. All doses were calculated with heterogeneity corrections for lung density. Results: Presently, one patient remains alive at 7.7 years. Median survival was 10.0 months with 1-, 2-, 3-,, and 5-year survival rates of 41%, 25%, 18%, and 4%, respectively. Three patients developed severe late complications, including pulmonary fibrosis and osteonecrosis. The remainder of the patients, however, developed only grade 1 or 2 pulmonary fibrosis and/or pneumonitis. Conclusion: We conclude that concomitant boost radiotherapy in the manner reported resulted in acceptable late toxicity. The 2- and 3-year survivals compared favorably with the best-reported results in the literature with either hyperfractionated or chemoradiotherapy treatment. Studies that deliver higher radiotherapy doses to the gross tumor combined with chemotherapy are in order

  3. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT. PMID:27521035

  4. Radiotherapy for bone metastases

    Between December 1986 and January 1978, 68 patients with bone metastases were analyzed to evaluate the effect of radiation for the relief of pain. The 68 patients, who had a total of 97 lesions, complained of pain caused by their bone metastasis. The good, fair, and poor responses were found to be 18%, 60%, and 22%, respectively. With reference to the primary neoplasms, the effective response rate was 73% in lung cancer, 100% in breast cancer, 75% in gastric cancer, 100% in hepatic cancer, 100% in bladder cancer, 25% in epipharyngeal cancer, and 70% in the other neoplasms. Depending on the cell types of the lung cancer, the effective response rate was 80% for small cell carcinomas, 72% for adenocarcinomas and 40% for squamous cell carcinomas. Our results suggest that radiotherapy for bone metastases is to be recommended, since the effective response rate was 78% for the relief of pain. (author)

  5. Radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer

    Purpose and approach: to summarize the current knowledge on the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The results of meta-analyses, phase III-studies, and phase II-studies using chemoradiation (CRT) and chemotherapy for resectable and non-resectable PDAC are reviewed. Results and conclusion: the role of CRT is undefined in the adjuvant setting but there may be a role as additive treatment after R1 resection. Locally advanced borderline resectable tumors may shrink down and be subject to potentially curative resections. In locally advanced clearly unresectable cancers the effect of CRT as well as chemotherapy is poorly defined and the sequence of chemotherapy and CRT should be re-evaluated. Patients with PDAC should always be treated within studies to identify optimal treatment results. (orig.)

  6. Tumours following retinoblastoma radiotherapy

    Radioinduced tumours in young patients irradiated in childhood for retinoblastoma take on a particularly deadly aspect. The onset of this true clinical entity characterized by a long post-irradiation latency period induced by a dose above 6000 rads is a real tragedy. The vast majority of patients then enter into a long martyrdom ending in death. The only cure is surgical, but seldom possible. Treatment is limited to palliative radiotherapy, effective for a while, and chemiotherapy as a last resort but often difficult to prescribe. Prevention alone is the answer. The quality and reliability of the radiotherapeutic treatment depend not only on the personal talent of the radiotherapist but above all on the standard of the equipment. A strong reduction in the doses employed as well as recent technological progress improving the material, its precision and reproducibility appear already to have lowered the frequency curve of these fatal radioinduced tumours

  7. Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    Evans, Philip M [Joint Physics Department, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: phil.evans@icr.ac.uk

    2008-06-21

    The goal of radiation therapy is to achieve maximal therapeutic benefit expressed in terms of a high probability of local control of disease with minimal side effects. Physically this often equates to the delivery of a high dose of radiation to the tumour or target region whilst maintaining an acceptably low dose to other tissues, particularly those adjacent to the target. Techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery and computer planned brachytherapy provide the means to calculate the radiation dose delivery to achieve the desired dose distribution. Imaging is an essential tool in all state of the art planning and delivery techniques: (i) to enable planning of the desired treatment, (ii) to verify the treatment is delivered as planned and (iii) to follow-up treatment outcome to monitor that the treatment has had the desired effect. Clinical imaging techniques can be loosely classified into anatomic methods which measure the basic physical characteristics of tissue such as their density and biological imaging techniques which measure functional characteristics such as metabolism. In this review we consider anatomical imaging techniques. Biological imaging is considered in another article. Anatomical imaging is generally used for goals (i) and (ii) above. Computed tomography (CT) has been the mainstay of anatomical treatment planning for many years, enabling some delineation of soft tissue as well as radiation attenuation estimation for dose prediction. Magnetic resonance imaging is fast becoming widespread alongside CT, enabling superior soft-tissue visualization. Traditionally scanning for treatment planning has relied on the use of a single snapshot scan. Recent years have seen the development of techniques such as 4D CT and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). In 4D CT raw data are encoded with phase information and reconstructed to yield a set of scans detailing motion through the breathing, or cardiac, cycle. In ART a set of

  8. MRI assisted radiotherapy planning

    To obtain the optimal radiation field, an MR simulation system (MRSS) has been developed. The system consists of an MR unit, a work station and a laser marking system. Phantom study concerned geographic distortion and the total accuracy of MRSS, the former revealed the result lesser than 1 mm within 90 mm-distance between MR slices and Center of magnetic field, the latter showed maximal errors 2 mm in the field size, and 3 mm in the iso-center. This system was applied to 15 patients with intracranial or head and neck lesions and all procedures were smoothly performed. To evaluate the usefulness of MRSS, 6 radiation oncologists compared the difference between MRSS and CT simulation system in setting radiation field. The results were satisfactory especially in cases with lesions the extent of which was unclear on CT images. It was considered that this system could support the radiotherapy planning for intracranial or head and neck lesions. (author)

  9. Image guided multibeam radiotherapy

    This paper provides an outlook of the status of the first development stages for an updated design of radiotherapy conformal system based on tumor 3D images obtained as an output the last generation imaging machines as PET, CT and MR which offer a very valuable output in cancer diagnosis. Prospective evaluation of current software codes and acquisition of useful experience in surgical planning involves a multidisciplinary process as an initial and unavoidable stage to develop an expert software and user skills which assures the delivery of the radiation dose is done correctly in geometry and value in each voxel as a radiation protection basic condition. The validation of the images obtained has been done by the production of anatomical models of interest regions by rapid prototyping of the 3D segmented images and its evaluation by contrasting with the real regions during surgical procedures. (author)

  10. Image guided multibeam radiotherapy

    This paper provides an outlook of the status of the first development stages for an updated design of radiotherapy conformal system based on tumor 3D images obtained as an output the last generation imaging machines as PET, CT and MR which offer a very valuable output in cancer diagnosis. Prospective evaluation of current software codes and acquisition of useful experience in surgical planning involves a multidisciplinary process as an initial and unavoidable stage to develop an expert software and user skills which assures the delivery of the radiation dose is done correctly in geometry and value in each voxel as a radiation protection basic condition. The validation of the images obtained has been done by the production of anatomical models of interest regions by rapid proto typing of the 3D segmented images and its evaluation by contrasting with the real regions during surgical procedures. (author)

  11. Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    The goal of radiation therapy is to achieve maximal therapeutic benefit expressed in terms of a high probability of local control of disease with minimal side effects. Physically this often equates to the delivery of a high dose of radiation to the tumour or target region whilst maintaining an acceptably low dose to other tissues, particularly those adjacent to the target. Techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery and computer planned brachytherapy provide the means to calculate the radiation dose delivery to achieve the desired dose distribution. Imaging is an essential tool in all state of the art planning and delivery techniques: (i) to enable planning of the desired treatment, (ii) to verify the treatment is delivered as planned and (iii) to follow-up treatment outcome to monitor that the treatment has had the desired effect. Clinical imaging techniques can be loosely classified into anatomic methods which measure the basic physical characteristics of tissue such as their density and biological imaging techniques which measure functional characteristics such as metabolism. In this review we consider anatomical imaging techniques. Biological imaging is considered in another article. Anatomical imaging is generally used for goals (i) and (ii) above. Computed tomography (CT) has been the mainstay of anatomical treatment planning for many years, enabling some delineation of soft tissue as well as radiation attenuation estimation for dose prediction. Magnetic resonance imaging is fast becoming widespread alongside CT, enabling superior soft-tissue visualization. Traditionally scanning for treatment planning has relied on the use of a single snapshot scan. Recent years have seen the development of techniques such as 4D CT and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). In 4D CT raw data are encoded with phase information and reconstructed to yield a set of scans detailing motion through the breathing, or cardiac, cycle. In ART a set of

  12. MUON ACCELERATION

    BERG,S.J.

    2003-11-18

    One of the major motivations driving recent interest in FFAGs is their use for the cost-effective acceleration of muons. This paper summarizes the progress in this area that was achieved leading up to and at the FFAG workshop at KEK from July 7-12, 2003. Much of the relevant background and references are also given here, to give a context to the progress we have made.

  13. KEKB accelerator

    KEKB, the B-Factory at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) recently achieved the luminosity of 1 x 1034 cm-2s-1. This luminosity is two orders higher than the world's level at 1990 when the design of KEKB started. This unprecedented result was made possible by KEKB's innovative design and technology in three aspects - beam focusing optics, high current storage, and beam - beam interaction. Now KEKB is leading the luminosity frontier of the colliders in the world. (author)

  14. Accelerating networks

    Evolving out-of-equilibrium networks have been under intense scrutiny recently. In many real-world settings the number of links added per new node is not constant but depends on the time at which the node is introduced in the system. This simple idea gives rise to the concept of accelerating networks, for which we review an existing definition and-after finding it somewhat constrictive-offer a new definition. The new definition provided here views network acceleration as a time dependent property of a given system as opposed to being a property of the specific algorithm applied to grow the network. The definition also covers both unweighted and weighted networks. As time-stamped network data becomes increasingly available, the proposed measures may be easily applied to such empirical datasets. As a simple case study we apply the concepts to study the evolution of three different instances of Wikipedia, namely, those in English, German, and Japanese, and find that the networks undergo different acceleration regimes in their evolution

  15. Radiotherapy in the Hodgkin's disease

    An up-to-date summary of Hodgkin's disease is presented taking into account its natural history, dissemination patterns, history, staging and therapeutic sugestions, with special regard to radiotherapy. (Author)

  16. Fetal dose determination in patients with breast cancer submitted to radiotherapy

    The exposure that the fetus receive during radiotherapy treatment for patients with breast cancer submitted to cobalt 60 and linear accelerator of 6 MV is studied. Measurements with a rando-Alderson Phantom and ionization chamber for each individualized irradiation field, at the body level where the fetus is localized during the several stages of pregnancy, are made. (M.A.C.)

  17. Improved internal iliac artery chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy for the treatment of stage Ⅲ-Ⅳa cervical cancers

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy of modified internal iliac artery chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy for the treatment of stage Ⅲ-Ⅳa cervical cancers. Methods: A total of 70 patients with stage Ⅲ-Ⅳa cervical cancer, who were admitted to the authors' hospital (Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Oncology) during the period from May 2005 to August 2009, were enrolled in this study. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. Modified internal iliac artery chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy was carried out in 32 patients (study group), and simple radiotherapy was adopted in 38 patients (control group). For patients in study group, puncturing of right femoral artery using Seldinger's technique was performed, which was followed by right uterine artery chemoembolization and subsequent super-selective left iliac artery chemotherapy, which lasted for three days. The chemotherapeutic drugs included cisplatin and fluorouracil. Distance external beam linear accelerator was used for radiotherapy together with 192 Ir high dose rate brachytherapy. For patients in control group, only distance external beam linear accelerator radiotherapy with 192 Ir high dose rate brachytherapy was employed, with the radioactive dose being a little bit smaller than that used in the study group. Results: The one-year survival rate for the study group and the control group was 78.1% and 55.3%, respectively (P0.05). The difference in the occurrence of radiotherapy-related complications was not significant between the two groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: For the treatment of stage Ⅲ-Ⅳa cervical cancers, modified internal iliac artery chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy is more effective than that of simple radiotherapy for a short-term period. The living quality of the patients can be markedly improved. Nevertheless, the five-year survival rate of chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy is not statistically difference from that of simple radiotherapy. (authors)

  18. Contact radiotherapy. Report of technological assessment

    This report aims at assessing safety, indications, the role in therapeutic strategy, and efficiency of contact radiotherapy. It also aims at answering questions like: is the contact radiotherapy technique validated? What are the indications for contact radiotherapy? What about the efficiency and safety of contact radiotherapy? After a presentation of preliminary notions on radiotherapy (radiation types, dose, and irradiation techniques), the report presents this specific technique of contact radiotherapy: definition, devices, use recommendations, issues of radiation protection, modalities of performance of a contact radiotherapy session, and concerned pathologies. Then, based on a literature survey, this report addresses the various concerned tumours (skin, rectum, brain, breast), indicates some general information about these tumours (epidemiological data, anatomy and classification, therapeutic options, radiotherapy), and proposes an assessment of the efficiency and safety of contact radiotherapy

  19. Radiotherapy with linear accelerator in a patient with permanent pacemaker, methodology and results of dose determination in a case in vivo; Radioterapia con Linac en un paciente con marcapasos permanente, metodologia y resultados de determinacion de dosis en un caso in vivo

    Diaz A, P.; Dominguez O, X.; Toledo B, V.; Nungaray, H.; Zazueta L, F., E-mail: pdiaz@hospitalsanjavier.co [Hospital San Javier, Pablo Casals No. 640, Col. Prados Providencia, 44670 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    This work presents the methodology used by the radiotherapy department of the Hospital San Javier in the patients handling with pacemaker. By means of dosimetry to the implant area of the pacemaker together with electrocardiography measurements during the radiotherapy sessions, the pacemaker performance is evaluated with the objective of detecting any anomaly to the same caused by electromagnetic interference and/or accumulated dose. It is necessary to follow specific protocols in these patients type that guarantee their security during the exposition to ionizing radiation since a definitive consent that allows to calculate the failure probability of pacemaker in this therapeutic condition does not exist. (Author)

  20. Indications for Salivary Gland Radiotherapy.

    Thomson, David J; Slevin, Nick J; Mendenhall, William M

    2016-01-01

    There is an established role for post-operative radiotherapy in the treatment of benign and malignant salivary gland tumours. For benign disease, the addition of radiotherapy improves local tumour control in cases with incomplete excision, involved surgical margins or multi-focal disease recurrence. After capsule rupture or spillage alone, surveillance should usually be advised. For malignant disease, post-operative radiotherapy is recommended for an advanced tumour stage, high-grade tumour, perineural or lympho-vascular invasion, close or positive resection margins, extra-parotid extension or lymph node involvement. The main benefit is increased loco-regional tumour control, although this may translate into a modest improvement in survival. The possible late side effects of parotid bed irradiation include skin changes, chronic otitis externa, sensorineural hearing loss, osteoradionecrosis and secondary malignancy. Severe complications are rare, but patients should be counselled carefully about the risks. Primary radiotherapy is unlikely to be curative and is reserved to cases in which resection would cause unacceptable functional or cosmetic morbidity or would likely result in subtotal resection (R2) or to patients with distant metastases to gain local tumour control. There are provisional data on the use of charged particle radiotherapy in this setting. Some patients may benefit from synchronous chemotherapy with radiotherapy, but this group is not defined, and data from comparative prospective studies are required before routine clinical use of this treatment. PMID:27093301

  1. Education in physics of radiotherapy

    Radiotherapy is the clinical application which requires the highest precision in dose delivery because of the very high doses administrated to patients, taking into account that new diagnostic methods and new modalities and treatment machines give greater possibilities of dose escalation. These higher doses may also produce serious side effects if not accurately administered. High qualified personnel is therefore needed for dealing with these new complex modalities, assuring that dose prescribed is correctly administered and providing adequate radiation protection to patients, public and staff. Education in Physics of Radiotherapy aims to provide students with solid theoretical and practical basis in order to be able to work with great responsibility and understanding in a Radiotherapy Department and assure that appropriate radiation protection to patients, public and staff. Since 1964 the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) gives course related to Radiotherapy and since 2002, due to a collaborative project, these courses are given at the Oncology Institute 'Angel H. Roffo' (IOAR) which belongs to the University of Buenos Aires (UBA). The IOAR is well equipped in Radiotherapy and new techniques are continuously introduced. That is why, being a University Institution and having highly specialized staff, it is the ideal hospital for teaching Radiotherapy in Buenos Aires, not only for regular courses but also for implementing workshops, seminars and updating courses as well. Continuous education helps to create and increase awareness of the importance of radiation protection in patients as well as in public and staff. (author)

  2. Carbon Beam Radio-Therapy and Research Activities at HIMAC

    Radio-therapy with carbon ion beam has been carried out since 1994 at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) in NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). Now, many types of tumors can be treated with carbon beam with excellent local controls of the tumors. Stimulated with good clinical results, requirement of the dedicated compact facility for carbon beam radio-therapy is increased. To realize this requirement, design study of the facility and the R and D's of the key components in this design