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Sample records for accelerated bioremediation research

  1. Natural and accelerated bioremediation research program plan

    This draft plan describes a ten-year program to develop the scientific understanding needed to harness and develop natural and enhanced biogeochemical processes to bioremediate contaminated soils, sediments and groundwater at DOE facilities. The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) developed this program plan, with advice and assistance from DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM). The program builds on OHER's tradition of sponsoring fundamental research in the life and environmental sciences and was motivated by OHER's and Office of Energy Research's (OER's) commitment to supporting DOE's environmental management mission and the belief that bioremediation is an important part of the solution to DOE's environmental problems

  2. Natural and accelerated bioremediation research program plan

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This draft plan describes a ten-year program to develop the scientific understanding needed to harness and develop natural and enhanced biogeochemical processes to bioremediate contaminated soils, sediments and groundwater at DOE facilities. The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) developed this program plan, with advice and assistance from DOE`s Office of Environmental Management (EM). The program builds on OHER`s tradition of sponsoring fundamental research in the life and environmental sciences and was motivated by OHER`s and Office of Energy Research`s (OER`s) commitment to supporting DOE`s environmental management mission and the belief that bioremediation is an important part of the solution to DOE`s environmental problems.

  3. Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Program. Final Report

    Bioremediation of radionuclides and metals in the subsurface necessitate an understanding of the metabolic capacities and interactions of the anaerobic microorganisms that are found there, including members of the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Genetic investigation into the pathway of reductant flow to U(VI) in the SRB belonging to the genus Desulfovibrio has been the focus of this project. In Dv. desulfuricans strain G20, we confirmed the importance of the tetraheme cytochrome c3 by disruption of the gene encoding that cytochrome, cycA, and demonstrated a decrease in the ability of the mutant (I2) to reduce U(VI). We found that the cytochrome c3 was necessary for electrons from pyruvate to reach sulfate or fumarate as terminal electron acceptors. It was not needed for electrons from lactate to reach sulfate, from which we infer that a different pathway is used for the electrons from these two substrates. Cyrstal structure of the tetraheme cytochrome c3 was obtained and site-directed mutations of the protein indicated a binding site for metals at heme 4 of the structure. Kinetic studies for oxidation of reduced cytochrome c3 with U(VI) or molybdate revealed a preference for U(VI) as a substrate. Evidence for a role for sodium gradients in the energetic scheme for this soil organism was obtained.

  4. Environmental Assessment for Selection and Operation of the Proposed Field Research Centers for the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program

    N/A

    2000-04-18

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), within the Office of Science (SC), proposes to add a Field Research Center (FRC) component to the existing Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. The NABIR Program is a ten-year fundamental research program designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. An FRC would be integrated with the existing and future laboratory and field research and would provide a means of examining the fundamental biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. The NABIR Program would continue to perform fundamental research that might lead to promising bioremediation technologies that could be demonstrated by other means in the future. For over 50 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have been responsible for the research, design, and production of nuclear weapons, as well as other energy-related research and development efforts. DOE's weapons production and research activities generated hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste products. Past disposal practices have led to the contamination of soils, sediments, and groundwater with complex and exotic mixtures of compounds. This contamination and its associated costs and risks represents a major concern to DOE and the public. The high costs, long duration, and technical challenges associated with remediating the subsurface contamination at DOE sites present a significant need for fundamental research in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences that will contribute to new and cost-effective solutions. One possible low-cost approach for remediating the subsurface contamination of DOE sites is through the use of a technology known as bioremediation. Bioremediation has been defined as the use of microorganisms to

  5. ORD RESEARCH PRIORITIES IN BIOREMEDIATION

    ORD is conducting research on bioremediation impacting Superfund sites, RCRA facilities, underground storage tanks and oil spills. Work supporting Superfund is focused on understanding monitored natural recovery in sediments for contaminants including PCBs and PAHs. Under RCRA,...

  6. Accelerated in situ bioremediation of groundwater

    Truex, M.J.; Hooker, B.S.; Anderson, D.B.

    1996-07-01

    In situ bioremediation, as applied in this project, is based on the principal of biostimulation: supplying nutrients to indigenous microbes to stimulate their metabolic activity and subsequent degradation of contaminants. Typically, a network of injection and extraction wells are used to recirculate groundwater into which amendments are added and distributed within the aquifer. The objective of the in situ process is to create in the aquifer a microbially active zone that maximizes contaminant destruction while controlling the distribution of microbial growth. It is important to control microbial growth to avoid plugging the aquifer near the injection well and to establish and sustain maximum treatment zones for each injection well. Figure I illustrates this concept for in situ bioremediation. The technology described herein is innovative in its use of the computer-based Accelerated Bioremediation Design Tool (ABDT) to aid in selecting appropriate system designs and to determine optimal operating strategies. In addition, numerical simulations within the design tool proved to be valuable during remediation operations to determine appropriate changes in the` operating strategy as the bioremediation process progressed. This is particularly important because in situ bioremediation is not a steady- state process, and corrective actions to operating parameters are typically needed to maintain both rapid destruction rates and hydraulic containment.

  7. Practical Solutions for the Design of Accelerated In Situ Bioremediation

    Zhang, M.; Yoshikawa, M.; Takeuchi, M.; Komai, T.

    2010-12-01

    Bioremediation is potentially a cost-effective and environmentally friendly approach for clean-up of hazardous chemicals from polluted geoenvironments, especially toxic organic compounds, like perchloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) from low-permeability strata at depths. The use of Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC) or Oxygen Release Compound (ORC) is a common practice to accelerate anaerobic bioremediation or aerobic bioremediation, depending on the chemical forms of pollutants to be treated. An effective remediation, however, needs effective mixing of, and interaction between the bacteria, target compound(s), injected HRC or ORC as well as other substances if necessary. An understanding of migration behavior of dissolved hydrogen and dissolved oxygen in geological formations is, therefore, an important research subject for predicting potential areas of remediation during acceptable time periods. In this study, 3 practical solutions to the plane source, point source and line source diffusions which correspond to the semi-infinite, spherical and cylindrical models were derived and used to discuss the diffusive transport through low permeability geological media. A series of parameter studies using feasible values for the diffusion coefficient obtained from both literature survey and independent laboratory experiments were performed. Expected areas of hydrogen or oxygen migration were assumed to be from several tens of centimeters to a few meters with consideration of practical pollution problems, and acceptable remediation time periods were considered to be from several months to the maximum of 10-15 years. The results obtained from this study illustrated that transport of chemical substances, like dissolved hydrogen or oxygen used for accelerated bioremediation, due to diffusion is very sensitive to the magnitude of diffusion coefficient. The area of migration due to natural diffusion could be very limited. To effectively design and perform an accelerated

  8. Subtask 1.16-Slow-Release Bioremediation Accelerators

    Low-cost methods are needed to enhance various bioremediation technologies, from natural attenuation to heavily engineered remediation of subsurface hydrocarbon contamination. Many subsurface sites have insufficient quantities of nitrogen and phosphorus, resulting in poor bioactivity and increased remediation time and costs. The addition of conventional fertilizers can improve bioactivity, but often the nutrients dissolve quickly and migrate away from the contaminant zone before being utilized by the microbes. Through this project, conducted by the Energy and Environmental Research Center, polymers were developed that slowly release nitrogen and phosphorus into the subsurface. Conceptually, these polymers are designed to adhere to soil particles in the subsurface contamination zone where they slowly degrade and release nutrients over longer periods of time compared to conventional fertilizer applications. Tests conducted during this study indicate that some of the developed polymers have excellent potential to satisfy the microbial requirements for enhanced bioremediation

  9. BIOREMEDIATION

    Bioremediation is a method for using the activities of microorganisms and-or plants to transform organic or inorganic compounds that may be harmful to humans, animals, plants or the environment to compounds that are less harmful. In many instances the toxic compounds may be compl...

  10. Cyclodextrines accelerate off-site bioremediation of soils contaminated with mineral oil

    Sniegowski, Kristel; Achten, Sonja; Vanhecke, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Soils contaminated with mineral oil are often excavated and bioremediated off-site by biostimulation and biodegradation. The soils are aerated and supplied with the necessary nutrients to accelerate biodegradation. Ideally, without seriously disturbing the soil, the contaminants are completely mineralized and the soil can be reused. However, for some soils the degradation performance is poor despite the sufficient amount of bacteria, oxygen and nutrients present in the soil. The main factor i...

  11. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    Temkin, Richard [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics. Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    2016-07-12

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low-power microwave cold test and high-power, high-gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  12. Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Pollutedwith Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    Hazen, Terry C.; Tabak, Henry H.

    2007-03-15

    Bioremediation of metals and radionuclides has had manyfield tests, demonstrations, and full-scale implementations in recentyears. Field research in this area has occurred for many different metalsand radionuclides using a wide array of strategies. These strategies canbe generally characterized in six major categories: biotransformation,bioaccumulation/bisorption, biodegradation of chelators, volatilization,treatment trains, and natural attenuation. For all field applicationsthere are a number of critical biogeochemical issues that most beaddressed for the successful field application. Monitoring andcharacterization parameters that are enabling to bioremediation of metalsand radionuclides are presented here. For each of the strategies a casestudy is presented to demonstrate a field application that uses thisstrategy.

  13. Review of arctic Norwegian bioremediation research

    Traditional oil spill onshore clean up in arctic and sub-arctic parts of Norway involves methods that are both time-consuming, and labor intensive. The applicability of the methods depends both on the environmental constraints of the area, and the availability of man-power. If oil exploration is successful this will mean that the exploitation of oil moves north into the arctic regions of Norway. This area is remote, both in terms of accessability and lack of inhabitants. The threat to natural resources that always accompanies oil activities, will move into areas that are considered vulnerable, and which are also highly valued in terms of natural resources. Contingency measures must be adapted both to be feasible and to meet the framework in which they must operate. This situation has increased the focus on alternative methods for oil spill clean-ups, especially on shorelines. SINTEF (The Foundation for Scientific and Industrial Research at the Norwegian Institute of Technology) Applied Chemistry has evaluated the application of fertilizers as a practical measure in oil spill treatment for years. Several fertilizers have been assessed, in different environments. The effect of these products is difficult to establish categorically since their efficiency seems to be greatly dependent on the environment in which the test is conducted, as well as the design of the test. The aim of this paper is to summarize and evaluate a series of tests conducted with INIPOL EAP22, an oil soluble fertilizer developed by Elf Aquitaine, and water soluble fertilizers. The paper will emphasize treatment failure and success, and point out some necessary prerequisites that must be met for fertilizers to work. 14 refs., 3 figs

  14. Accelerators for atomic energy research

    The research and educational activities accomplished using accelerators for atomic energy research were studied. The studied items are research subjects, facility operation, the number of master theses and doctor theses on atomic energy research using accelerators and the future role of accelerators in atomic energy research. The strategy for promotion of the accelerator facility for atomic energy research is discussed. (author)

  15. Accelerator research studies

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under contract number AC05-85ER40216-8, is currently in the third year of its three-year funding cycle. This Renewal Proposal requests DOE support for the next three-year period from June 1, 1991 to May 31, 1994. It documents the progress made during the past year and outlines the proposed research program for the next three years. The program consisted of the following three tasks: Task A, ''Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,'' Task B, ''Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,'' Task C, ''Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders.'' These tasks will be discussed in this paper

  16. Accelerator research studies

    This progress report for the Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland covers the second year (June 1, 1989 to May 31, 1990) of the current three-year contract period from June 1, 1988 to May 31, 1991, funded by the Department of Energy under Contract No. AC05-85ER40216. The research program is divided into three separate tasks, as follows: the study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams; the study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pulse-Powered Plasma Focus; the study of Microwave Sources and Parameter Scaling for High-Frequency Linacs. This report consists of three sections in which the progress for each task is documented separately. An introduction and synopsis is presented at the beginning of the progress report for each task

  17. Accelerator research studies

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the first year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams, TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams; TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders. In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks

  18. Accelerator research studies

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, ''Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,'' (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, ''Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,'' (Co-P.I.'s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, ''Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,'' (Co-P.I.'s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks

  19. Accelerator research studies

    1993-01-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,'' (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,'' (Co-P.I.'s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,'' (Co-P.I.'s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  20. Application of time release electron donors and electron acceptors for accelerated bioremediation

    Currently, there are limited options for cost effective approaches to soil and groundwater contamination. One technology that has proven its potential involves the use of time release electron acceptors to accelerate the natural bioattenuation of aerobically degradable compounds and time release electron donors to accelerate the natural bioattenuation of anaerobic compounds. This technology enjoys its reputations as a sensible strategy for engineering accelerated bioattenuation, because it delivers results while 1) limiting or eliminating design, capital and management costs and 2) allowing for the engineering of a low-impact application and a subsequently invisible remediation process. Oxygen Release Compound (ORC ) is proprietary formulation of intercalated magnesium peroxide that releases oxygen slowly, for about a year, and facilitates the aerobic degradation of a range of environmental contaminants including petroleum hydrocarbons, certain chlorinated hydrocarbons, ether oxygenates and nitroaromatics. The history of ORC's introduction and acceptance represents a model for the evolution of an innovative technology. This statement comes by virtue of the fact that since 1994 ORC has been used on over 7000 sites worldwide and has been the subject of an extensive body of literature. Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC) is also a proprietary polylactate ester that is food grade and, upon being deposited into the aquifer, is slowly hydrolyzed to release lactic acid and other organic acid derivatives for about one to two years. The organic acids are fermented to hydrogen, which in turn donates electrons that drive reductive bioattenuation processes. This is primarily directed at a wide range of chlorinated hydrocarbons, but can be applied to the remediation of metals by redox induced precipitation. HRC has now been used on over 220 sites, which we believe make it the most widely used electron donor for accelerating bioattenuation. ORC and HRC can be configured as a

  1. Accelerator and fusion research division

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations

  2. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Fifteen different experiments were run during these 12 months, approximately the same as the previous two years. Brief summaries of each experiment are included. Accelerator usage is summarized and development activities are discussed. 7 refs., 4 tabs

  3. Accelerators for research and applications

    The newest particle accelerators are almost always built for extending the frontiers of research, at the cutting edge of science and technology. Once these machines are operating and these technologies mature, new applications are always found, many of which touch our lives in profound ways. The evolution of accelerator technologies will be discussed, with descriptions of accelerator types and characteristics. The wide range of applications of accelerators will be discussed, in fields such as nuclear science, medicine, astrophysics and space-sciences, power generation, airport security, materials processing and microcircuit fabrication. 13 figs

  4. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF STRATEGIES FOR OIL SPILL BIOREMEDIATION: POTENTIAL AND LIMITATION, LABORATORY TO FIELD (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    Several important additional research efforts were identified during the development of test systems and protocols for assessing the effectiveness and environmental safety of oil spill commercial bioremediation agents (CBAs). Research that examined CBA efficacy issues included: (...

  5. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Brief summaries of research experiments are included. Accelerator usage is summarized and development activities are discussed. 8 refs., 8 tabs

  6. Bioremediation via Methanotrophy: Overview of Recent Findings and Suggestions for Future Research

    Jeremy eSemrau

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbially-mediated bioremediation of polluted sites has been a subject of much research over the past 30 years, with many different compounds shown to be degraded under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Aerobic-mediated bioremediation commonly examines the use of methanotrophs, microorganisms that consume methane as their sole source of carbon and energy. Given the diverse environments in which methanotrophs have been found, the range of substrates they can degrade and the fact that they can be easily stimulated with the provision of methane and oxygen, these microorganisms in particular have been examined for aerobic degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The physiological and phylogenetic diversity of methanotrophy, however, has increased substantially in just the past five years. Here in this review, the current state of knowledge of methanotrophy, particularly as it applies to pollutant degradation is summarized, and suggestions for future research provided.

  7. Bioremediation of oil spills: A review of challenges for research advancement

    Macaulay, Babajide Milton; Rees, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    As the demand for liquid petroleum increases, the need for reliable and efficient oil spill clean-up techniques is inevitable. Bioremediation is considered one of the most sustainable clean-up techniques but the potential has not been fully exploited in the field because it is too slow to meet the immediate demands of the environment. This study reviews the challenges to managing oil spills in terrestrial and marine environments to identify areas that require further research. Current challen...

  8. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described.

  9. Bioremediation of Hanford groundwater

    Liquid wastes containing radioactive, hazardous, and regulated chemicals have been generated throughout the 40 years of operations at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. Some of these wastes were discharged to the soil column and many of the waste components, including nitrate (NO3-), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and several radionuclides, have been detected in the Hanford groundwater. A research and development program is presently underway to develop bioremediation technologies for treating contaminated Hanford groundwaters. The program includes development of both ex situ and in situ treatment methods, with primary emphasis on developing an in situ treatment process. The goal of the in situ process is to stimulate the native microorganisms and accelerate the natural degradation of NO3- and CCl4. A demonstration site at Hanford for in situ biological treatment was selected in 1990, and extensive hydrological, chemical, and biological characterization of the site is underway. Current research and development activities are focusing on developing methods for supplying nutrients to the subsurface, evaluating the effect of in situ bioremediation on the long-term mobility of metal and radionuclide co-contaminants, and modeling the bioremediation process using three-dimensional visualization tools to help design the field-scale demonstration site and predict performance

  10. UCLA accelerator research and development

    This progress report covers work supported by the above DOE grant over the period November 1, 1991 to July 31, 1992. The work is a program of experimental and theoretical studies in advanced particle accelerator research and development for high energy physics applications. The program features research at particle beam facilities in the United States and includes research on novel high power sources, novel focussing systems (e.g. plasma lens), beam monitors, novel high brightness, high current gun systems, and novel flavor factories in particular the φ Factory

  11. Bioremediation: A natural solution

    Bioremediation is an attractive remediation alternative because most full-scale bioremediation projects involve cost-effective contaminant treatment on-site. Recently, large scale bioremediation projects have included cleanups of ocean tanker spills, land-based chemical spills, and leaking chemical and petroleum storage tanks. Contaminated matrices have included beaches, soils, groundwater, surface waters (i.e., pits, ponds, lagoons), process waste streams and grease traps. Bioremediation is especially cost-effective when both soil and groundwater matrices are impacted because one remediation treatment system can be design to treat both media simultaneously in place. The primary advantages of in situ bioremediation include: on-site destruction of contaminants; accelerated cleanup time; minimal disruption to operations; lower remediation costs; and reduction of future liability

  12. Research needs of the new accelerator technologies

    A review is given of some of the new accelerator technologies with a special eye to the requirements which they generate for research and development. Some remarks are made concerning the organizational needs of accelerator research

  13. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  14. Bioremediation in oil-contaminated sites: bacteria and surfactant accelerated remediation

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M.; Guzman, Francisco

    1996-11-01

    In Mexico, there are several environmental issues which are being addressed under the current governmental legislation. One important issue is restoring sites belonging to Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX). PEMEX is a large government owned oil company that regulates and manages the oil reserves. These sites are primarily contaminated with weathered hydrocarbons which are a consequence of extracting millions of barrels of oil. Within the southern regions of Mexico there are sites which were contaminated by activities and spills that have occurred during the past 30 years. PEMEX has taken the leadership in correcting environmental problems and is very concerned about cleaning up the contaminated sites as quickly as possible. The most significant contaminated sites are located to the north of Veracruz and south of Tabasco. These sites areas are close to refineries or locations of oil exploration. The primary category of contaminants are hydrocarbons, among them asphaltens, aromatic and other contaminants. The concentration of the contaminants varies depending on the location of the sites, but it can reach as high as 500,000 ppm. PEMEX has been searching for appropriate, and cost- effective technologies to clean up these sites. Biologically based remediation activities are of primary interest to PEMEX. However, other treatment technologies such as chemical-physical methods, encapsulation and incineration are also being considered. The present report summarizes preliminary experiments that measured the feasibility of bioremediation for a contaminated site in southern Mexico.

  15. Bioremediation in oil-contaminated sites: Bacteria and surfactant accelerated remediation

    In Mexico, there are several environmental issues which are being addressed under the current governmental legislation. One of the important issues is restoring sites belonging to Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX). PEMEX is a large government owned oil company that regulates and manages the oil reserves. These sites are primarily contaminated with weathered hydrocarbons which are a consequence of extracting millions of barrels of oil. Within the southern regions of Mexico there are sites which were contaminated by activities and spills that have occurred during the past 30 years. PEMEX has taken the leadership in correcting environmental problems and is very concerned about cleaning up the contaminated sites as quickly as possible. The most significant contaminated sites are located to the north of Veracruz and south of Tabasco. These site areas are close to refineries or locations of oil exploration. The primary category of contaminants are hydrocarbons, among them asphaltenes, aromatic and other contaminants. The concentration of the contaminants varies depending on the location of the sites, but it can reach as high as 500,000 ppm. PEMEX has been searching for appropriate, and cost-effective technologies to clean up these sites. Biologically based remediation activities are of primary interest to PEMEX. However, other treatment technologies such as chemical-physical methods, encapsulation and incineration are also being considered. The present report summarizes preliminary experiments that measured the feasibility of bioremediation for a contaminated site in southern Mexico

  16. Modeling bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    Atlas, R M; Hazen, T.; Philp, J. C.; Prommer, H.; Barry, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    Bioremediation: Applied Microbial Solutions for Real-World Environmental Cleanup is a fascinating examination of research and its real-world application. Intended for both academics and practitioners, the book presents information on the legal, scientific, and engineering principles behind bioremediation for cleaning up contaminated soil and groundwater sources. Bioremediation incorporates a variety of international perspectives in detailing for industrial engineers and rese...

  17. Health physics practices at research accelerators

    A review is given of the uses of particle accelerators in health physics, the text being a short course given at the Health Physics Society Ninth Midyear Topical Symposium in February, 1976. Topics discussed include: (1) the radiation environment of high energy accelerators; (2) dosimetry at research accelerators; (3) shielding; (4) induced activity; (5) environmental impact of high energy accelerators; (6) population dose equivalent calculation; and (7) the application of the ''as low as practicable concept'' at accelerators

  18. Bioremediation of oil spills

    In-situ bioremediation of crude oil spills relies on either the indigenous microbes at the polluted site, whose degradative abilities are accelerated by adding such agents as fertilizers or dispersants, or on introducing pollutant-degrading microbes into the site (possibly accompanied by stimulatory chemicals). The bioremediation method to be used at a specific site must be selected to be suitable for that site and its environmental conditions. The basic components of bioremediation are outlined and the background information needed to understand the chemical and biological limitations of the technique are presented. Specifically, the microbial community, the crude oil substrate composition, and biological limiting factors are discussed. Generalized examples of bioremediation applications are illustrated. 10 refs

  19. Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER) exploits radiation chemistry techniques to study chemical reactions (and other phenomena) by subjecting samples to...

  20. Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, 1989

    This report discusses the following topics on heavy-ion fusion accelerator research: MBE-4: the induction-linac approach; transverse beam dynamics and current amplification; scaling up the results; through ILSE to a driver; ion-source and injector development; and accelerator component research and development

  1. Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, 1991

    This report discusses the following topics: research with multiple- beam experiment MBE-4; induction linac systems experiments; and long- range research and development of heavy-ion fusion accelerators

  2. Accelerator research studies. Progress report

    The major goal of this project is to study the effects that lead to emittance growth and limitation of beam current and brightness in periodic focusing systems (including linear accelerators). This problem is of great importance for all accelerator applications requiring high intensity beams with small emittance such as heavy ion fusion, spallation neutron sources and high energy physics. In the latter case, future machines must not only provide higher energies (in the range of 10 to 100 TeV), but also higher luminosities than the existing facilities. This implies considerably higher phase-space density of the particle beam produced by the injector linac, i.e., the detrimental emittance growth and concurrent beam loss observed in existing linacs must be avoided

  3. Accelerator research studies: Annual technical report

    This paper discusses accelerator research at the University of Maryland. The three task studies contained in this paper are: Instabilities and Emittance Growth in Periodic Focusing Systems for Intense Beams; Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pulse Powered Plasma Focus; and Microwave Sources and Parameter Scaling for High-Frequency e+e/sup /minus// Supercollider Linacs

  4. NIH/NSF accelerate biomedical research innovations

    A collaboration between the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health will give NIH-funded researchers training to help them evaluate their scientific discoveries for commercial potential, with the aim of accelerating biomedical in

  5. Proposed research on advanced accelerator concepts

    This report summarizes technical progress and accomplishments during the proposed three-year research on advanced accelerator concepts supported by the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-88ER40465. A vigorous theoretical program has been pursued in critical problem areas related to advanced accelerator concepts and the basic equilibrium, stability, and radiation properties of intense charged particle beams. Broadly speaking, our research has made significant contributions in the following three major areas: Investigations of physics issues related to particle acceleration including two-beam accelerators and cyclotron resonance laser (CRL) accelerators; Investigations of RF sources including the free- electron lasers, cyclotron resonance masers, and relativistic magnetrons; Studies of coherent structures in electron plasmas and beams ranging from a low-density, nonrelativistic, pure electron plasma column to high-density, relativistic, non-neutral electron flow in a high-voltage diode. The remainder of this report presents theoretical and computational advances in these areas

  6. Bioremediation of oil on shoreline environments: development of techniques and guidelines

    Over the last 20 years, the development of operational procedures to accelerate the natural biodegradation rates of oil spilled on shoreline environments has been the focus of numerous research programs. As a result, bioremediation has been demonstrated to be an effective oil spill countermeasure for use in cobble, sand beach, salt marsh, and mudflat environments. Today, studies are directed towards improving the efficacy and evaluating the ecological impacts of available bioremediation agents and/or procedures. This review describes the latest developments in bioremediation strategies and their key success factors. (author)

  7. Research in nuclear chemistry using accelerators

    The article gives the general outline of the nuclear chemistry research carried out using accelerators. Studies on heavy ion induced nuclear reactions as well as heavy ion fusion fission reactions using accelerators providing heavy ion beams of energy in the range of 4-8 MeV/nucleon and light ion beams for energy below 50 MeV have been reviewed in the context of the work carried out in our laboratory. (author). 28 refs., 10 figs

  8. Accelerating Geothermal Research (Fact Sheet)

    2014-05-01

    Geothermal research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is advancing geothermal technologies to increase renewable power production. Continuous and not dependent on weather, the geothermal resource has the potential to jump to more than 500 gigawatts in electricity production, which is equivalent to roughly half of the current U.S. capacity. Enhanced geothermal systems have a broad regional distribution in the United States, allowing the potential for development in many locations across the country.

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF PROTOCOLS FOR EVALUATION OF OIL SPILL BIOREMEDIATION (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    Protocols were developed and evaluated to assess the efficacy and environmental safety of commercial oil spill bioremediation agents (CBAs). Test systems that simulate oil slicks on open water or oiled sandy beaches were used to test the effectiveness of CBAs. Gravimetric and gas...

  10. Research and transference of the ICES over Malargue, Mendoza, uranium bioremediation

    The origin of the International Center for Earth Sciences (ICES) dates back to 2002 when the Acoustic Emission Station on Volcano Peteroa was installed. Up to now, it represents the first of its kind in the entire Andean Cordillera. This scientific activity is jointly coordinated by scientists from Italy and Argentina. At the First Conference on Acoustic Emission held on 2004, a letter of intent for the establishment of ICES was signed. Presently, ICES is composed by 4 departments: Environment and Climate; Anthropology; Environmental and Territorial Environmental Risk; Resources and Exploration Geophysics. One of the primary objectives of ICES is to promoting applied research and development in the broad field of Earth Sciences. The experimental work consists of main 4 steps listed below: The 'Helianthus annus' (sunflower) has proven its ability to raise Uranium (U) in hydroponic systems and was widely used in the model U rizophyiltration extraction of groundwater in Ashtabula, Ohio, USA. Hydroponic trial design consists of 6 treatments and 4 repetitions plants witnesses without minimum level of U, U witnesses plants without and 4 with various levels of U (Stage 1). The Glomus intraradices is a mycorrhizal fungus used in strategies of U phyto-stabilization. Test consists in the cultivation of sunflower with roots inoculated with Glomus intraradices to determine their uptake and translocation of U (Stage 2). The inoculation of 'Glomus intraradices' in 'Helianthus annus' produces an effective symbiosis with the type of strain and its genetic diversity, some genotypes are highly suitable for this. There have been experiences of this kind in the basic research in several countries. In this work, we use the system in 'Helianthus-Glomus' phyto-stabilization or rizophyiltration soil as a strategy for bioremediation of U at the Malargue area, Province of Mendoza (Stage 3). It will launch a pilot test of the transfer plan, which involves creating a garden for the growth of

  11. Bioremediation of oil spills

    The conversion of oil to environmentally benign chemicals such as water and carbon dioxide by 'hydrocarbon-eating' bacteria is described. The emphasis is on a new process to selectively increase the population of 'oil eating' bacteria, a development that became the foundation for the second-generation bioremediation accelerator, Inipol EAP-22. Second-generation bioremediation products focus on providing nitrogen and phosphorus, chemicals that are not present in crude oil in readily available form, but are essential for the synthesis of proteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids and the energy metabolism of the bacteria. Providing these chemicals in the proper amounts encourages the preferential growth of oil-degrading microbes already present in the local biomass, thus overcoming the major limiting factor for biodegradation. These second-generation bioremediation products also have strong oleophilic properties engineered into them, to assure that the nutrients essential for the bacteria are in contact with the oil. The first major test for second-generation bioremediation accelerators came with the clean-up of the oil spill from the Exxon Valdez, a disaster that contaminated more than 120 kilometres of Alaskan beaches along the shores of Prince William Sound. The Inipol EAP-22 successfully held the nutrients in contact with the oil for the duration of the treatment period, despite constant exposure to the washing action of the surf and occasional heavy rainstorms. Today, the accelerator is routinely used in cleaning up all types of ordinary spills including diesel fuel spills along railway right-of-ways, truck yards and refinery sludge. Conditions under which the application of the accelerator is likely to be most successful are described

  12. 重金属镉污染生物修复的研究进展%Research Progress of Bioremediation of Heavy Metal Cadmium Pollution

    肖春文; 罗秀云; 田云; 卢向阳

    2013-01-01

    The present situation and main harm of cadmium pollution are overviewed,and then the research progress of bioremediation of cadmium pollution is summarized.The latest research progress of cadmium hyperaccumulation plants and microorganisms for adsorbing cadmium are especially reviewed.The bioremediation application prospect and the future research direction for bioremediation of cadmium pollution are systemtically elaborated.%概述了镉污染的现状及其主要危害,综述了镉污染生物修复的研究进展,特别是镉超富集植物和吸附镉微生物筛选的最新研究进展,系统阐述了镉污染生物修复的应用前景和今后的研究方向.

  13. Field evaluations of marine oil spill bioremediation.

    Swannell, R P; Lee, K; McDonagh, M

    1996-06-01

    Bioremediation is defined as the act of adding or improving the availability of materials (e.g., nutrients, microorganisms, or oxygen) to contaminated environments to cause an acceleration of natural biodegradative processes. The results of field experiments and trials following actual spill incidents have been reviewed to evaluate the feasibility of this approach as a treatment for oil contamination in the marine environment. The ubiquity of oil-degrading microorganisms in the marine environment is well established, and research has demonstrated the capability of the indigenous microflora to degrade many components of petroleum shortly after exposure. Studies have identified numerous factors which affect the natural biodegradation rates of oil, such as the origin and concentration of oil, the availability of oil-degrading microorganisms, nutrient concentrations, oxygen levels, climatic conditions, and sediment characteristics. Bioremediation strategies based on the application of fertilizers have been shown to stimulate the biodegradation rates of oil in aerobic intertidal sediments such as sand and cobble. The ratio of oil loading to nitrogen concentration within the interstitial water has been identified to be the principal controlling factor influencing the success of this bioremediation strategy. However, the need for the seeding of natural environments with hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria has not been clearly demonstrated under natural environmental conditions. It is suggested that bioremediation should now take its place among the many techniques available for the treatment of oil spills, although there is still a clear need to set operational limits for its use. On the basis of the available evidence, we have proposed preliminary operational guidelines for bioremediation on shoreline environments. PMID:8801437

  14. Cometabolic bioremediation

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-15

    Cometabolic bioremediation is probably the most under appreciated bioremediation strategy currently available. Cometabolism strategies stimulate only indigenous microbes with the ability to degrade the contaminant and cosubstrate e.g. methane, propane, toluene and others. This highly targeted stimulation insures that only those microbes that can degrade the contaminant are targeted, thus reducing amendment costs, well and formation plugging, etc. Cometabolic bioremediation has been used on some of the most recalcitrant contaminants, e.g. PCE, TCE, MTBE, TNT, dioxane, atrazine, etc. Methanotrophs have been demonstrated to produce methane monooxygense, an oxidase that can degrade over 300 compounds. Cometabolic bioremediation also has the advantage of being able to degrade contaminants to trace concentrations, since the biodegrader is not dependent on the contaminant for carbon or energy. Increasingly we are finding that in order to protect human health and the environment that we must remediate to lower and lower concentrations, especially for compounds like endocrine disrupters, thus cometabolism may be the best and maybe the only possibility that we have to bioremediate some contaminants.

  15. The Light Ion Biomedical Research Accelerator (LIBRA)

    LIBRA is a concept to place a light-ion, charged-particle facility in a hospital environment, and to dedicate it to applications in biology and medicine. There are two aspects of the program envisaged for LIBRA: a basic research effort coupled with a program in clinical applications of accelerated charged particles. The operational environment to be provided for LIBRA is one in which both of these components can coexist and flourish, and one that will promote the transfer of technology and knowledge from one to the other. In order to further investigate the prospects for a Light Ion Biomedical Research Accelerator (LIBRA), discussions are underway with the Merritt Peralta Medical Center (MPMC) in Oakland, California, and the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF). In this paper, a brief discussion of the technical requirements for such a facility is given, together with an outline of the accelerator technology required. While still in a preliminary stage, it is possible nevertheless to develop an adequate working description of the type, size, performance and cost of the accelerator facilities required to meet the preliminary goals for LIBRA

  16. Radiation safety research at Indus accelerator complex

    A brief description of the radiation safety research being carried out at the electron synchrotron radiation sources, Indus-1 (450 MeV) and Indus-2 (2.5 GeV) is presented. As these sources being operated at high energy, the radiation environment is primarily due to the interaction of these electrons with accelerating structure, when beam loss takes place, and subsequent development of electromagnetic cascade. Radiation in the cascade mainly consists of the Bremsstrahlung component which initiates photo-neutron production. Characteristics of these radiations are that the energy can be as high up to the energy of the accelerated electron. This gives rise to problems in detection and personnel dosimetry due to dose buildup effects. The angular dependency and pulsed nature of these radiations complicate the issue of detection. Besides, accidental loss of beam in the vacuum envelope of the accelerator, in addition to normal loss calls for appropriate evaluation of these contributions for personnel radiation safety. Attempts made to understand these problems and the research and development work carried out at Indus Accelerator Complex in order to address them will be discussed. (author)

  17. Arctic bioremediation

    Cleanup of oil and diesel spills on gravel pads in the Arctic has typically been accomplished by utilizing a water flushing technique to remove the gross contamination or excavating the spill area and placing the material into a lined pit, or a combination of both. Enhancing the biological degradation of hydrocarbon (bioremediation) by adding nutrients to the spill area has been demonstrated to be an effective cleanup tool in more temperate locations. However, this technique has never been considered for restoration in the Arctic because the process of microbial degradation of hydrocarbon in this area is very slow. The short growing season and apparent lack of nutrients in the gravel pads were thought to be detrimental to using bioremediation to cleanup Arctic oil spills. This paper discusses the potential to utilize bioremediation as an effective method to clean up hydrocarbon spills in the northern latitudes

  18. Arctic bioremediation

    Cleanup of oil and diesel spills on gravel pads in the Arctic has typically been accomplished by utilizing a water flushing technique to remove the gross contamination or excavating the spill area and placing the material into a lined pit, or a combination of both. This paper discusses the potential to utilize bioremediation as an effective method to clean up hydrocarbon spills in the northern latitudes. Discussed are the results of a laboratory bioremediation study which simulated microbial degradation of hydrocarbon under arctic conditions

  19. CARE07 Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe

    2007-01-01

    Annual Meeting, at CERN, 29-31 October 2007 The CARE project started on 1st January 2004 and will end on 31st December 2008. At the end of each year, the progress and status of its activities are reported in a general meeting. This year, the meeting takes place at CERN. The CARE objective is to generate structured and integrated European cooperation in the field of accelerator research and related R&D. The programme includes the most advanced scientific and technological developments, relevant to accelerator research for particle physics. It is articulated around three Networking Activities and four Joint Activities. The Networking Activities ELAN, BENE and HHH aim to better coordinate R&D efforts at the European level and to strengthen Europe’s ability to produce intense and high-energy particle beams (electrons and positrons, muons and neutrinos, protons and ions, respectively). The Joint Activities, SRF, PHIN, HIPPI and NED, aim at technical developments on s...

  20. CARE07 Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe

    2007-01-01

    Annual Meeting, at CERN, 29-31 October 2007 The CARE project started on 1st January 2004 and will end on 31st December 2008. At the end of each year, the progress and status of its activities are reported in a general meeting. This year, the meeting is taking place at CERN. The CARE objective is to generate structured and integrated European cooperation in the field of accelerator research and related R&D. The programme includes the most advanced scientific and technological developments, relevant to accelerator research for particle physics. It is articulated around three Networking Activities and four Joint Activities. The Networking Activities ELAN, BENE and HHH aim to better coordinate R&D efforts at the European level and to strengthen Europe’s ability to produce intense and high-energy particle beams (electrons and positrons, muons and neutrinos, protons and ions, respectively). The Joint Activities, SRF, PHIN, HIPPI and NED, aim at technical developments ...

  1. Monitoring and interpreting bioremediation effectiveness

    Following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, extensive research was conducted by the US Environments Protection Agency and Exxon to develop and implement bioremediation techniques for oil spill cleanup. A key challenge of this program was to develop effective methods for monitoring and interpreting bioremediation effectiveness on extremely heterogenous intertidal shorelines. Fertilizers were applied to shorelines at concentrations known to be safe, and effectiveness achieved in acceleration biodegradation of oil residues was measure using several techniques. This paper describes the most definitive method identified, which monitors biodegradation loss by measuring changes in ratios of hydrocarbons to hopane, a cycloalkane present in the oil that showed no measurable degradation. Rates of loss measured by the hopane ratio method have high levels of statistical confidence, and show that the fertilizer addition stimulated biodegradation rates as much a fivefold. Multiple regression analyses of data show that fertilizer addition of nitrogen in interstitial pore water per unit of oil load was the most important parameter affecting biodegradation rate, and results suggest that monitoring nitrogen concentrations in the subsurface pore water is preferred technique for determining fertilizer dosage and reapplication frequency

  2. Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides: What It Is and How It Works (2nd Edition)

    Palmisano, Anna; Hazen, Terry

    2003-09-30

    This primer is intended for people interested in environmental problems of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and in their potential solutions. It will specifically look at some of the more hazardous metal and radionuclide contaminants found on DOE lands and at the possibilities for using bioremediation technology to clean up these contaminants. The second edition of the primer incorporates recent findings by researchers in DOE's Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. Bioremediation is a technology that can be used to reduce, eliminate, or contain hazardous waste. Over the past two decades, it has become widely accepted that microorganisms, and to a lesser extent plants, can transform and degrade many types of contaminants. These transformation and degradation processes vary, depending on the physical-chemical environment, microbial communities, and nature of the contaminant. This technology includes intrinsic bioremediation, which relies on naturally occurring processes, and accelerated bioremediation, which enhances microbial degradation or transformation through the addition of nutrients (biostimulation) or inoculation with microorganisms (bioaugmentation). Over the past few years, interest in bioremediation has increased. It has become clear that many organic contaminants such as hydrocarbon fuels can be degraded to relatively harmless products such as CO{sub 2} (the end result of the degradation process). Waste water managers and scientists have also found that microorganisms can interact with metals and convert them from one chemical form to another. Laboratory tests and ex situ bioremediation applications have shown that microorganisms can change the valence, or oxidation state, of some heavy metals (e.g., chromium and mercury) and radionuclides (e.g., uranium) by using them as electron acceptors. In some cases, the solubility of the altered species decreases and the contaminant is immobilized in situ, i.e., precipitated into

  3. SINP MSU accelerator facility and applied research

    Full text: SINP accelerator facility includes 120 cm cyclotron, electrostatic generator with the upper voltage 3.0 MeV, electrostatic generator with the upper voltage 2.5 MeV, Cocroft -Walton generator with the upper voltage 500 keV, 150 keV accelerator for solid microparticles. A new generation of electron beam accelerators has been developed during the last decade. The SINP accelerator facility will be shortly described in the report. A wide range of basic research in nuclear and atomic physics, physics of ion-beam interactions with condensed matter is currently carried out. SINP activity in the applied research is concentrated in the following areas of materials science: - Materials diagnostics with the Rutherford backscattering techniques (RBS) and channeling of ions (RBS/C). A large number of surface ad-layers and multilayer systems for advanced micro- and nano-electronic technology have been investigated. A selected series of examples will be illustrated. - Concentration depth profiles of hydrogen by the elastic recoils detection techniques (ERD). Primarily, the hydrogen depth profiles in perspective materials for thermonuclear reactors have been investigated. - Lattice site locations of hydrogen by a combination of ERD and channeling techniques. This is a new technique which was successfully applied for investigation of hydrogen and hydrogen-defect complexes in silicon for the smart-cut technology. - Light element diagnostics by RBS and nuclear backscattering techniques (NBS). The technique is illustrated by applications for nitrogen concentration profiling in steels. Nitrogen take-up and release, nitrides precipitate formation will be illustrated. - New medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) facility and applications. Ultra-high vacuum and superior energy resolution electrostatic toroidal analyzer is designed to be applied for characterization of composition and structure of several upper atomic layers of materials

  4. Bioremediation of marine oil pollution

    An assessment is presented of the scientific and technological developments in the area of bioremediation and biodegradation of marine oil pollution. A number of allied technologies are also considered. The basic technology in bioremediation involves adding fertilizers to an oil spill to enhance the natural process of oil biodegradation. Bioremediation can be applied to open systems such as beach or land spills, or in closed and controlled environments such as storage containers, specially constructed or modified bioreactors, and cargo tanks. The major advantage of using closed environments is the opportunity to control the physical and nutritional parameters to optimize the rate of biodegradation. An evaluation of the state of the art of bioremediation in Canada is also included. Recommendations are made to involve the Canadian Transportation Development Centre in short-term research projects on bioremediation. These projects would include the use of a barge as a mobile bioreactor for the treatment of off-loaded oily waste products, the use of in-situ bioremediation to carry out extensive cleaning, degassing, and sludge remediation on board an oil tanker, and the use of a barge as a mobile bioreactor and facility for the bioremediation of bilges. 51 refs., 4 figs., 14 tabs

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry in biomedical research

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1993-10-20

    Biological effects occur in natural systems at chemical concentrations of parts per billion (1:10{sup 9}) or less. Affected biomolecules may be separable in only milligram or microgram quantities. Quantification at attomole sensitivity is needed to study these interactions. AMS measures isotope concentrations to parts per 10{sup 13--15} on milligram-sized samples and is ideal for quantifying long-lived radioisotopic labels that are commonly used to trace biochemical pathways in natural systems. {sup 14}C-AMS has now been coupled to a variety of organic separation and definition technologies. The primary research investigates pharmacokinetics and genotoxicities of toxins and drugs at very low doses. Human subject research using AMS includes nutrition, toxicity and elemental balance studies. {sup 3} H, {sup 41}Ca and {sup 26}Al are also traced by AMS for fundamental biochemical kinetic research. Expansion of biomedical AMS awaits further development of biochemical and accelerator technologies designed specifically for these applications.

  6. Accelerator mass spectrometry in biomedical research

    Biological effects occur in natural systems at chemical concentrations of parts per billion (1:109) or less. Affected biomolecules may be separable in only milligram or microgram quantities. Quantification at attomole sensitivity is needed to study these interactions. AMS measures isotope concentrations to parts per 1013--15 on milligram-sized samples and is ideal for quantifying long-lived radioisotopic labels that are commonly used to trace biochemical pathways in natural systems. 14C-AMS has now been coupled to a variety of organic separation and definition technologies. The primary research investigates pharmacokinetics and genotoxicities of toxins and drugs at very low doses. Human subject research using AMS includes nutrition, toxicity and elemental balance studies. 3 H, 41Ca and 26Al are also traced by AMS for fundamental biochemical kinetic research. Expansion of biomedical AMS awaits further development of biochemical and accelerator technologies designed specifically for these applications

  7. Postremediation bioremediation

    In applying remediation technology, an important question is when to stop operations. Conventional wisdom states that each site has a limit of treatability. Beyond a point, the site conditions limit access to residual contaminants and, therefore, treatment effectiveness. In the treatment of petroleum hydrocarbons, the issue in ceasing remedial operations is not what is the limit of treatment, but what should be the limit of effort. Because hydrocarbons are inherently biodegradable, there is a point in remediation where natural or intrinsic bioremediation is adequate to complete the remedial process. This point is reached when the rate of residual carbon release is the limiting factor, not the rate of oxygen or nutrient supply. At such a point, the rate and degree of remediation is the same whether an active system is being applied or whether nothing is being actively done. This paper presents data from several bioremediation projects where active remediation was terminated above the desired closure levels. These site data illustrate that intrinsic bioremediation is as effective in site closure as continued active remediation

  8. CARE05 coordinated accelerator research in Europe

    2005-01-01

    Annual Meeting at CERN, 23-25 November 2005 CARE started on 1st January 2004 and will last for five years. At the end of each year it holds a general meeting to report on the progress and status of its activities. This year, the CARE annual meeting is taking place at CERN The objective of the CARE project is to generate structured and integrated European cooperation in the field of accelerator research and related R&D. The program includes the most advanced scientific and technological developments, relevant to accelerator research for Particle Physics. It is articulated around three Networking Activities and four Joint Activities. The Networking Activities ELAN, BENE and HHH aim to better coordinate R&D efforts at the European level and to strengthen Europe's ability to evaluate and develop methods of producing intense and high energy beams of electrons, protons, muons and neutrinos. These activities are embedded in world-wide efforts towards future e+e- linear colliders, superior neutrino beam fa...

  9. Accelerator physics and technology research toward future multi-MW proton accelerators

    Shiltsev, V; Romanenko, A; Valishev, A; Zwaska, R

    2015-01-01

    Recent P5 report indicated the accelerator-based neutrino and rare decay physics research as a centrepiece of the US domestic HEP program. Operation, upgrade and development of the accelerators for the near-term and longer-term particle physics program at the Intensity Frontier face formidable challenges. Here we discuss accelerator physics and technology research toward future multi-MW proton accelerators.

  10. Accelerators for Society - TIARA 2012 Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area (in Polish)

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    TIARA (Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area - Preparatory Phae) is an European Collaboration of Accelerator Technology, which by running research projects, technical, networks and infrastructural has a duty to integrate the research and technical communities and infrastructures in the global scale of Europe. The Collaboration gathers all research centers with large accelerator infrastructures. Other ones, like universities, are affiliated as associate members. TIARA-PP (preparato...

  11. Advanced accelerator and mm-wave structure research at LANL

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-22

    This document outlines acceleration projects and mm-wave structure research performed at LANL. The motivation for PBG research is described first, with reference to couplers for superconducting accelerators and structures for room-temperature accelerators and W-band TWTs. These topics are then taken up in greater detail: PBG structures and the MIT PBG accelerator; SRF PBG cavities at LANL; X-band PBG cavities at LANL; and W-band PBG TWT at LANL. The presentation concludes by describing other advanced accelerator projects: beam shaping with an Emittance Exchanger, diamond field emitter array cathodes, and additive manufacturing of novel accelerator structures.

  12. Accelerators for Society - TIARA 2012 Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area (in Polish)

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    TIARA (Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area - Preparatory Phae) is an European Collaboration of Accelerator Technology, which by running research projects, technical, networks and infrastructural has a duty to integrate the research and technical communities and infrastructures in the global scale of Europe. The Collaboration gathers all research centers with large accelerator infrastructures. Other ones, like universities, are affiliated as associate members. TIARA-PP (preparatory phase) is an European infrastructural project run by this Consortium and realized inside EU-FP7. The paper presents a general overview of TIARA activities, with an introduction containing a portrait of contemporary accelerator technology and a digest of its applications in modern society.

  13. Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides: What It Is and How It Works (2nd Edition)

    Palmisano, Anna; Hazen, Terry

    2003-09-30

    This primer is intended for people interested in environmental problems of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and in their potential solutions. It will specifically look at some of the more hazardous metal and radionuclide contaminants found on DOE lands and at the possibilities for using bioremediation technology to clean up these contaminants. The second edition of the primer incorporates recent findings by researchers in DOE's Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. Bioremediation is a technology that can be used to reduce, eliminate, or contain hazardous waste. Over the past two decades, it has become widely accepted that microorganisms, and to a lesser extent plants, can transform and degrade many types of contaminants. These transformation and degradation processes vary, depending on the physical-chemical environment, microbial communities, and nature of the contaminant. This technology includes intrinsic bioremediation, which relies on naturally occurring processes, and accelerated bioremediation, which enhances microbial degradation or transformation through the addition of nutrients (biostimulation) or inoculation with microorganisms (bioaugmentation). Over the past few years, interest in bioremediation has increased. It has become clear that many organic contaminants such as hydrocarbon fuels can be degraded to relatively harmless products such as CO{sub 2} (the end result of the degradation process). Waste water managers and scientists have also found that microorganisms can interact with metals and convert them from one chemical form to another. Laboratory tests and ex situ bioremediation applications have shown that microorganisms can change the valence, or oxidation state, of some heavy metals (e.g., chromium and mercury) and radionuclides (e.g., uranium) by using them as electron acceptors. In some cases, the solubility of the altered species decreases and the contaminant is immobilized in situ, i.e., precipitated into

  14. Recent progress on laser acceleration research

    Recently there has been a tremendous experimental progress in ultrahigh field particle acceleration driven by ultraintense laser pulses in plasmas. A design of the laser wakefield accelerators aiming at GeV energy gains is discussed by presenting our recent progress on the laser wakefield acceleration experiments, the developments of high quality electron beam injectors and the capillary plasma waveguide for optical guiding of ultrashort intense laser pulses. (author)

  15. Research on feedback system of synchrotron accelerator

    It is a very complex problem to use feedback control system in synchrotron accelerator. Some scientists design feedback control system to make high energy beam stable in synchrotron accelerator, but it is very rare to see theoretically analysis feedback system in synchrotron accelerator by using new concept of control model. One new feedback control model is a fresh idea to discuss the feedback system more deeply. A topic about feedback control system discussed here will be useful for synchrotron accelerator design and operation. It is an good idea for some scientists and technician to continue study. (authors)

  16. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division 1989 summary of activities

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the research being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. The main topics covered are: heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; high-energy physics technology; and bevalac operations.

  17. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division 1989 summary of activities

    This report discusses the research being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. The main topics covered are: heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; high-energy physics technology; and bevalac operations

  18. Research of Virtual Accelerator Control System

    DongJinmei; YuanYoujin; ZhengJianhua

    2003-01-01

    A Virtual Accelerator is a computer process which simulates behavior of beam in an accelerator and responds to the accelerator control program under development in a same way as an actual accelerator. To realize Virtual Accelerator, control system should provide the same program interface to top layer Application Control Program, it can make 'Real Accelerator' and 'Virtual Accelerator'use the same GUI, so control system should have a layer to hide hardware details, Application Control Program access control devices through logical name but not through coded hardware address. Without this layer, it is difficult to develop application program which can access both 'Virtual' and 'Real' Accelerators using same program interfaces. For this reason, we can create CSR Runtime Database which allows application program to access hardware devices and data on a simulation process in a unified way. A device 'is represented as a collection of records in CSR Runtime Database. A control program on host computer can access devices in the system only through names of record fields, called channel.

  19. Bioremediation of soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum, pesticides, chlorophenols and heavy metals by composting: Applications, microbes and future research needs.

    Chen, Ming; Xu, Piao; Zeng, Guangming; Yang, Chunping; Huang, Danlian; Zhang, Jiachao

    2015-11-01

    Increasing soil pollution problems have caused world-wide concerns. Large numbers of contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), petroleum and related products, pesticides, chlorophenols and heavy metals enter the soil, posing a huge threat to human health and natural ecosystem. Chemical and physical technologies for soil remediation are either incompetent or too costly. Composting or compost addition can simultaneously increase soil organic matter content and soil fertility besides bioremediation, and thus is believed to be one of the most cost-effective methods for soil remediation. This paper reviews the application of composting/compost for soil bioremediation, and further provides a critical view on the effects of this technology on microbial aspects in contaminated soils. This review also discusses the future research needs for contaminated soils. PMID:26008965

  20. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR)

    This report discusses the following topics: emittance variations in current-amplifying ion induction lina; transverse emittance studies of an induction accelerator of heavy ions; drift compression experiments on MBE-4 and related emittance; low emittance uniform- density Cs+ sources for heavy ion fusion accelerator studies; survey of alignment of MBE-4; time-of-flight dependence on the MBE-4 quadrupole voltage; high order calculation of the multiple content of three dimensional electrostatic geometries; an induction linac injector for scaled experiments; induction accelerator test module for HIF; longitudinal instability in HIF beams; and analysis of resonant longitudinal instability in a heavy ion induction linac

  1. Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing

    Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

  2. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: Summary of activities, 1986

    1987-04-15

    This report contains a summary of activities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division for the year 1986. Topics and facilities investigated in individual papers are: 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source, the Center for X-Ray Optics, Accelerator Operations, High-Energy Physics Technology, Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research and Magnetic Fusion Energy. Six individual papers have been indexed separately. (LSP)

  3. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: Summary of activities, 1986

    This report contains a summary of activities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division for the year 1986. Topics and facilities investigated in individual papers are: 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source, the Center for X-Ray Optics, Accelerator Operations, High-Energy Physics Technology, Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research and Magnetic Fusion Energy. Six individual papers have been indexed separately

  4. Accelerator ampersand Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations

  5. Accelerator Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    Berkner, Klaus H.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  6. Accelerator & Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  7. Accelerator and fusion research division. 1992 Summary of activities

    1992-12-01

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations.

  8. Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, 1988

    This report discusses the following topics: MBE-4: The Induction-Linac Approach; Current Amplification and Acceleration Schedules; Emittance and Current Amplification; Scaling Up the Results; Progress on the Carbon-Arc Source; Injector Development; Progress Towards an ILSE Design; Beam Combination; and Focusing-System Alignment Tolerances

  9. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    Chakraborty, Romy; Wu, Cindy H.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2012-06-01

    Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ‘black box’ in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Finally, understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ‘black box’.

  10. Bioremediation:A review of applications and problems to be resolved

    ZHOU Qixing; HUA Tao

    2004-01-01

    This review article describes the factors affecting bioremediation processes including: goals of bioremediation and the optimal ecological conditions required; inoculation of microorganisms; cometabolism; bioavailability and its improvement; biological evolution and its utilization;monitoring and control of bioremediation processes; identification of bioremediation effectiveness and ecological remediation and its key elements. The current progress in bioremediation techniques is summarized. The direction of future development, research and applications is also examined.

  11. KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) annual report, 2005

    This report summarizes research activities of KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) in the fiscal year 2005. Two years have passed since the KEK was reorganized as an inter-university research institute corporation, and KEK continue to facilitate a wide range of research programs based on high-energy accelerators for users from universities. KEK consists of two research institutes, the Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS) and the Institute of Materials Science (IMSS); and two laboratories, the Accelerator Laboratory and the Applied Research Laboratory. KEK has been operating four major accelerator facilities in Tsukuba: the 12 GeV Proton Synchrotron (PS), the KEK B-factory (KEKB), the Photon Factory (PF), and the Electron/Positron Injector Linac. We are now engaged in the construction of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) in Tokai in cooperation with the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The J-PARC Center was established in February 2006 to take full responsibility for the operation of J-PARC. With the progress of construction, the PS ceased operation at the end of March 2006 after a history of 26 years. The task of KEK is to play a key role in the fields of elementary particle, nuclei, materials and life science as one of leading research facilities of the world. The fiscal year 2005 activities of both KEK employees and visiting researchers yielded excellent outcomes in these research fields. (J.P.N.)

  12. Accelerator research for heavy ion inertial fusion

    It is now one decade since serious consideration was first given to the use of heavy ion accelerators for inertial confinement fusion. After an initial period of wide-ranging studies, the US program settled on an induction linac method proposed by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The ion kinetic energy is modest (30-100 MeV/amu, 5-10 GeV total) but intense beam currents of order 1 kA per beam in 10-30 beams are required on target in a short pulse of order 10-20 ns. In this review the conceptual designs are described, together with recent theory and experiments on high-current beam transport and use of multiple beams. Parallel efforts in West Germany, Japan and the Soviet Union are mentioned, and a two-year US study of heavy ion fusion electric power plants is summarized. (orig.)

  13. Bioremediation of oil spills

    For some years now UK and European oil spill response agencies, together with oil companies having an exploration or production interest in the European area, have been developing interest in the possible use of bioremediation techniques in combatting oil spills. The interest has accelerated in the aftermath of Exxon Valdez but there is significant scepticism over the actual value of the technique. The promise of increased rates of oil degradation, using bacteria or nutrients, does not yet appear to have been properly validated and there is concern over possible knock-on environmental effects. In consequence the response agencies are reluctant to bring the technique into their current combat armory. Some of the questions raised are: What efficacious techniques are available and how were they proven? On what type of oils can they be used? What is the scope for their use (at sea, type of coastline, temperature limitations, etc.)? What are the short and long term effects? Does bioremediation really work and offer a potential tool for oil spill clean-up? How do cleaning rates compare with natural recovery? There are many others. The view of the European Commission is that there should be a coordinated effort to answer these questions, but that effort should be properly targeted. I concur strongly with this view. The tasks are too large and varied for piecemeal attention. The European Commission wishes to initiate appropriate coordinated work, directed at the needs of European nations but which will subsequently inform the international response community through the International Maritime Organization and its Oil Pollution Preparedness and Response Cooperation initiative

  14. Accelerating research into the Higgs boson particle

    Nikolaidou, Rosy

    "The only Standard Model particle yet to be observed, the search for the Higgs Boson - the so-called 'God Particle' - demands advanced facilities and physics expertise. At the Cern laboratory in Switzerland, the ARTEMIS project is well-placed to pursue research in this area" (2 pages)

  15. Accelerator-driven neutron sources for materials research

    Particle accelerators are important tools for materials research and production. Advances in high-intensity linear accelerator technology make it possible to consider enhanced neutron sources for fusion material studies or as a source of spallation neutrons. Energy variability, uniformity of target dose distribution, target bombardment from multiple directions, time-scheduled dose patterns, and other features can be provided, opening new experimental opportunities. New designs have also been used to ensure hands-on maintenance on the accelerator in these factory-type facilities. Designs suitable for proposals such as the Japanese Energy-Selective Intense Neutron Source, and the international Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility are discussed

  16. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1987 summary of activities

    1988-04-01

    An overview of the design and the initial studies for the Advanced Light Source is given. The research efforts for the Center for X-Ray Optics include x-ray imaging, multilayer mirror technology, x-ray sources and detectors, spectroscopy and scattering, and synchrotron radiation projects. The Accelerator Operations highlights include the research by users in nuclear physics, biology and medicine. The upgrade of the Bevalac is also discussed. The High Energy Physics Technology review includes the development of superconducting magnets and superconducting cables. A review of the Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research is also presented. The Magnetic Fusion Energy research included the development of ion sources, accelerators for negative ions, diagnostics, and theoretical plasma physics. (WRF)

  17. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1987 summary of activities

    An overview of the design and the initial studies for the Advanced Light Source is given. The research efforts for the Center for X-Ray Optics include x-ray imaging, multilayer mirror technology, x-ray sources and detectors, spectroscopy and scattering, and synchrotron radiation projects. The Accelerator Operations highlights include the research by users in nuclear physics, biology and medicine. The upgrade of the Bevalac is also discussed. The High Energy Physics Technology review includes the development of superconducting magnets and superconducting cables. A review of the Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research is also presented. The Magnetic Fusion Energy research included the development of ion sources, accelerators for negative ions, diagnostics, and theoretical plasma physics

  18. idaho Accelerator Center Advanced Fuel Cycle Research

    Wells, Douglas; Dale, Dan

    2011-10-20

    The technical effort has been in two parts called; Materials Science and Instrumentation Development. The Materials Science technical program has been based on a series of research and development achievements in Positron-Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) for defect detection in structural materials. This work is of particular importance in nuclear power and its supporting systems as the work included detection of defects introduced by mechanical and thermal phenomena as well as those caused by irradiation damage. The second part of the program has focused on instrumentation development using active interrogation techniques supporting proliferation resistant recycling methodologies and nuclear material safeguards. This effort has also lead to basic physics studies of various phenomena relating to photo-fission. Highlights of accomplishments and facility improvement legacies in these areas over the program period include

  19. Accelerator R&D: Research for Science - Science for Society

    The HEP Accelerator R& D Task Force: N.R. Holtkamp,S. Biedron, S.V. Milton, L. Boeh, J.E. Clayton, G. Zdasiuk, S.A. Gourlay, M.S. Zisman,R.W. Hamm, S. Henderson, G.H. Hoffstaetter, L. Merminga, S. Ozaki, F.C. Pilat, M. White

    2012-07-01

    In September 2011 the US Senate Appropriations Committee requested a ten-year strategic plan from the Department of Energy (DOE) that would describe how accelerator R&D today could advance applications directly relevant to society. Based on the 2009 workshop 'Accelerators for America's Future' an assessment was made on how accelerator technology developed by the nation's laboratories and universities could directly translate into a competitive strength for industrial partners and a variety of government agencies in the research, defense and national security sectors. The Office of High Energy Physics, traditionally the steward for advanced accelerator R&D within DOE, commissioned a task force under its auspices to generate and compile ideas on how best to implement strategies that would help fulfill the needs of industry and other agencies, while maintaining focus on its core mission of fundamental science investigation.

  20. The CARE project - Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe

    2003-01-01

    A one-day presentation of the project will take place on Monday February 10th in the CERN Council Chamber. The meeting will start a 9am and is expected to end at 4:30pm. The meeting, which is open to the whole community, will present an initiative on accelerator R&D in Europe, supported by ECFA, with the aim to bid for European Union support through the Framework 6 scheme. This initiative is coordinated by a steering group (ESGARD - European Steering Group on Accelerator Research and Development), which has been set up to coordinate European efforts on accelerator R&D and the submission of such bids. The initial bids have to be submitted by April 15th. All those interested in accelerator R&D are welcome to attend.

  1. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: summary of activities, 1983

    The activities described in this summary of the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division are diverse, yet united by a common theme: it is our purpose to explore technologically advanced techniques for the production, acceleration, or transport of high-energy beams. These beams may be the heavy ions of interest in nuclear science, medical research, and heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; they may be beams of deuterium and hydrogen atoms, used to heat and confine plasmas in magnetic fusion experiments; they may be ultrahigh-energy protons for the next high-energy hadron collider; or they may be high-brilliance, highly coherent, picosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation

  2. Accelerator ampersand Fusion Research Division: 1993 Summary of activities

    The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division (AFRD) is not only one of the largest scientific divisions at LBL, but also the one of the most diverse. Major efforts include: (1) investigations in both inertial and magnetic fusion energy; (2) operation of the Advanced Light Source, a state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation facility; (3) exploratory investigations of novel radiation sources and colliders; (4) research and development in superconducting magnets for accelerators and other scientific and industrial applications; and (5) ion beam technology development for nuclear physics and for industrial and biomedical applications. Each of these topics is discussed in detail in this book

  3. Accelerator & Fusion Research Division: 1993 Summary of activities

    Chew, J.

    1994-04-01

    The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division (AFRD) is not only one of the largest scientific divisions at LBL, but also the one of the most diverse. Major efforts include: (1) investigations in both inertial and magnetic fusion energy; (2) operation of the Advanced Light Source, a state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation facility; (3) exploratory investigations of novel radiation sources and colliders; (4) research and development in superconducting magnets for accelerators and other scientific and industrial applications; and (5) ion beam technology development for nuclear physics and for industrial and biomedical applications. Each of these topics is discussed in detail in this book.

  4. THE CARE PROJECT - Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe

    2003-01-01

    A one-day presentation of the project will take place on Monday February 10th in the CERN Council Chamber. The meeting will start a 9am and is expected to end at 4:30pm. The meeting, which is open to the whole community, will present an initiative on accelerator R&D in Europe, supported by ECFA, with the aim to bid for European Union support through the Framework 6 scheme. This initiative is coordinated by a steering group (ESGARD - European Steering Group on Accelerator Research and Development), which has been set up to coordinate European efforts on accelerator R&D and the submission of such bids. The initial bids have to be submitted by April 15th. All those interested in accelerator R&D are welcome to attend. Presentation of the CARE project (Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe) to be submitted within FP6 February 10th, at CERN in the council room Agenda Chair : C. Wyss 9:00 General presentation of FP6 and introduction of IA proposal (R. Aleksan) 9:45 Networking activities on e ...

  5. Bioremediation Education Science and Technology (BEST) Program Annual Report 1999

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2000-07-01

    The Bioremediation, Education, Science and Technology (BEST) partnership provides a sustainable and contemporary approach to developing new bioremedial technologies for US Department of Defense (DoD) priority contaminants while increasing the representation of underrepresented minorities and women in an exciting new biotechnical field. This comprehensive and innovative bioremediation education program provides under-represented groups with a cross-disciplinary bioremediation cirruculum and financial support, coupled with relevant training experiences at advanced research laboratories and field sites. These programs are designed to provide a stream of highly trained minority and women professionals to meet national environmental needs.

  6. Advocacy For Accelerated Research In Phytotherapy For Repairs And Regenerations

    Charles A. Oyinbo; Awoniyi B. Adeyanju

    2011-01-01

    Th e article advocates for an accelerated research in phytotherapy for spinal cord injury recovery and functional restoration. Pubmed search analysis shows that phytotherapeutic products for spinal cord injury treatment are negligible, and not in the main stream neurosciences research. With the potentials inherent in medicinal plants, it is imperative to explore phytotherapy for spinal cord injury since conventional methods of treatments have failed to provide any satisfactory clinical interv...

  7. A facility for accelerator research and education at Fermilab

    Church, Mike; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Fermilab is currently constructing the 'SRF Test Accelerator at the New Muon Lab' (NML). NML consists of a photo-emitted RF electron gun, followed by a bunch compressor, low energy test beamlines, SCRF accelerating structures, and high energy test beamlines. The initial primary purpose of NML will be to test superconducting RF accelerating modules for the ILC and for Fermilab's 'Project X' - a proposal for a high intensity proton source. The unique capability of NML will be to test these modules under conditions of high intensity electron beams with ILC-like beam parameters. In addition NML incorporates a photoinjector which offers significant tunability and especially the possibility to generate a bright electron beam with brightness comparable to state-of-the-art accelerators. This opens the exciting possibility of also using NML for fundamental beams research and tests of new concepts in beam manipulations and acceleration, instrumentation, and the applications of beams.

  8. Basic research with low-energy accelerator systems

    The major important tasks of basic research are to push back the frontiers of scientific knowledge, and to train students. It will be shown that small accelerator facilities are still capable of producing interesting and exciting results that are on the leading edge of scientific inquiry. In addition, I will argue that, although these facilities often cannot afford to train students in the use of the most modern research equipment, there is an important compensating benefit in that they larger facilities. This 'liberal' education, as opposed to 'technical' instruction in the use of the most modern research equipment, may well be of more value to society in the long run. (Author)

  9. BIOREMEDIATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN MARINE HABITATS

    Bioremediation is being increasingly seen as an effective environmentally benign treatment for shorelines contaminated as a result of marine oil spills. Despite a relatively long history of research on oil-spill bioremediation, it remains an essentially empirical technology and m...

  10. Steady State Plasma Accelerators and their Applications in Thermonuclear Research

    Steady state plasma accelerators make it possible in principle to obtain plasma fluxes of high energy and large flow rate. This is of interest in thermonuclear research for two reasons. Firstly, the accelerator can be used for injecting plasma into existing traps; secondly, it can be used to design new-types of thermonuclear reactors, which might be referred to as, ''Flow-type Reactors'' in which a positive yield is-realised during the time the material passes through the reactor system. The main types of accelerating mechanisms operating in this accelerator are described and a brief review is given of theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations carried out by the author and his colleagues. The numerical and theoretical analysis of the processes taking place in coaxial steady state accelerators revealed the possible existence of steady-state compressive flows during which the applied electromagnetic energy is not converted into kinetic plasma energy but is used for compression of the plasma. When the compressed flow is allowed to expand its thermal energy is converted into kinetic energy. Devices in which compressive flow is attained are referred to as magnetic plasma compressors. At the present stage the existence of compressive flows has been confirmed experimentally. To ensure a positive yield in-the region of compression a density of 1020 - 1020 cm-3 is essential. The possibility of obtaining a positive yield in linear ''Flow type Reactors'' is discussed. Such reactors consist of magnetic plasma guides of length ∼ 100 m, in which a flow of hot plasma is produced by a steady state plasma accelerator. (author)

  11. Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH). Part 2

    Baughman, Jack A.; Micheletti, David A.; Nelson, Gordon L.; Simmons, Gloyd A.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the activities, results, conclusions and recommendations of the Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research Into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH) Project in which the use of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) technology is investigated for its applicability to augment hypersonic wind tunnels. The long range objective of this investigation is to advance the development of ground test facilities to support the development of hypervelocity flight vehicles. The MHD accelerator adds kinetic energy directly to the wind tunnel working fluid, thereby increasing its Mach number to hypervelocity levels. Several techniques for MHD augmentation, as well as other physical characteristics of the process are studied to enhance the overall performance of hypersonic wind tunnel design. Specific recommendations are presented to improve the effectiveness of ground test facilities. The work contained herein builds on nearly four decades of research and experimentation by the aeronautics ground test and evaluation community, both foreign and domestic.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research Into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH). Part 1

    Micheletti, David A.; Baughman, Jack A.; Nelson, Gordon L.; Simmons, Gloyd A.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the activities, results, conclusions and recommendations of the Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research Into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH) Project in which the use of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) technology is investigated for its applicability to augment hypersonic wind tunnels. The long range objective of this investigation is to advance the development of ground test facilities to support the development of hypervelocity flight vehicles. The MHD accelerator adds kinetic energy directly to the wind tunnel working fluid, thereby increasing its Mach number to hypervelocity levels. Several techniques for MHD augmentation, as well as other physical characteristics of the process are studied to enhance the overall performance of hypersonic wind tunnel design. Specific recommendations are presented to improve the effectiveness of ground test facilities. The work contained herein builds on nearly four decades of research and experimentation by the aeronautics ground test and evaluation community, both foreign and domestic.

  13. Research and Development for Ultra-High Gradient Accelerator Structures

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Dolgashev, Valery; Higashi, Yasuo; Spataro, Bruno

    2010-11-01

    Research on the basic physics of high-gradient, high frequency accelerator structures and the associated RF/microwave technology are essential for the future of discovery science, medicine and biology, energy and environment, and national security. We will review the state-of-the-art for the development of high gradient linear accelerators. We will present the research activities aimed at exploring the basic physics phenomenon of RF breakdown. We present the experimental results of a true systematic study in which the surface processing, geometry, and materials of the structures have been varied, one parameter at a time. The breakdown rate or alternatively, the probability of breakdown/pulse/meter has been recorded for different operating parameters. These statistical data reveal a strong dependence of breakdown probability on surface magnetic field, or alternatively on surface pulsed heating. This is in contrast to the classical view of electric field dependence.

  14. AN APPROACH TO BIOREMEDIATION

    ELENA-ROXANA ARDELEANU

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides some mathematical models associated with bioremediation processes. Bioremediation is a process in which contaminants in polluted soils are eliminated by bacteria. The initial model is the one given by Keller and Segel. The Keller- Segel model takes into account the movement of bacteria by diffusion and chemotaxis. Starting from this generalized model, we present different forms of diffusion and chemotactic coefficients. All particular cases presented were confirmed experim...

  15. Application of Novel Accelerator Research for Particle Therapy

    Bjerke, Henrik Hemmestad

    2014-01-01

    This thesis seeks to review the latest trends in hadron therapy devices, and evaluate the potential of novel, researched accelerator concepts for future application. Although the clinical benefits of hadron therapy over photon therapy is unproven or disputed for many cancer types, there are several cases where hadron therapy presents a superior option. Many governments and medical institutions are planning or already executing development of new hadron treatment facilities. However, the highe...

  16. The South African National Accelerator Centre and its research programme

    Watanabe, Y. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    An overview of the South African National Accelerator Centre and its research activities is given with emphasis on medium energy nuclear physics and nuclear data measurements for medical use. Also presented is a preliminary result of {sup 40}Ca(p,p`x) spectrum measurement for 392 MeV which has been carried out at RCNP, Osaka University, under the South Africa-Japan collaborative programme. (author)

  17. Application of accelerators for the research and development of scintillators.

    Shibuya, Kengo; Koshimizu, Masanori; Asai, Keisuke; Muroya, Yusa; Katsumura, Yosuke; Inadama, Naoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yamaya, Taiga; Murayama, Hideo

    2007-08-01

    We introduce experimental systems which use accelerators to evaluate scintillation properties such as scintillation intensity, wavelength, and lifetime. A single crystal of good optical quality is often unavailable during early stages in the research and development (R&D) of new scintillator materials. Because of their beams' high excitation power and/or low penetration depth, accelerators facilitate estimation of the properties of early samples which may only be available as powders, thin films, and very small crystals. We constructed a scintillation spectrum measurement system that uses a Van de Graaff accelerator and an optical multichannel analyzer to estimate the relative scintillation intensity. In addition, we constructed a scintillation time profile measurement system that uses an electron linear accelerator and a femtosecond streak camera or a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube followed by a digital oscilloscope to determine the scintillation lifetimes. The time resolution is approximately 10 ps. The scintillation spectra or time profiles can be obtained in a significantly shorter acquisition time in comparison with that required by conventional measuring systems. The advantages of the systems described in this study can significantly promote the R&D of novel scintillator materials. PMID:17764319

  18. Hands-on Training Courses Using Research Reactors and Accelerators

    The enhancement of nuclear science education and training in all Member States is of interest to the IAEA since many of these countries, particularly in the developing world, are building up and expanding their scientific and technological infrastructures. Unfortunately, most of these countries still lack sufficient numbers of well-educated and qualified nuclear specialists and technologists. This may arise from, amongst other things: a lack of candidates with sufficient educational background in nuclear science who would qualify to receive specialized training; a lack of institutions available for training nuclear science specialists; a lack of lecturers in nuclear related fields; and a lack of suitable educational and teaching materials. A related concern is the potential loss of valuable knowledge accumulated over many decades due to the ageing workforce. An imperative for Member States is to develop and offer suitable graduate and postgraduate academic programmes which combine study and project work so that students can attain a prerequisite level of knowledge, abilities and skills in their chosen subject area. In nearly all academic programmes, experimental work forms an essential and integral component of study to help students develop general and subject specific skills. Experimental laboratory courses and exercises can mean practical work in a conventional laboratory or an advanced facility with an operational particle accelerator or research reactor often accompanied by computer simulations and theoretical exercises. In this context, available or newly planned research reactors and particle accelerators should be seen as extremely important and indispensable components of nuclear science and technology curricula. Research reactors can demonstrate nuclear science and technology based on nuclear fission and the interaction of neutrons and photons with matter, while particle accelerators can demonstrate nuclear science and technology based on charged particle

  19. A brief account of National Centre for Accelerator based Research: 3.0 MV pelletron accelerator (9SDH4) based research facility for interdisciplinary research

    The upcoming National Centre for Accelerator based Research is a flagship programme of the University. The Centre is financially supported by Ministry of Human Resource Development through University Grants Commission (UGC) and Department of Atomic Energy, Govt. of India through Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences (BRNS). In addition University has signed a MoU with Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi. A brief outline of the experimental facilities being commissioned and the description of its salient features are described

  20. COBRA accelerator for Sandia ICF diode research at Cornell University

    Smith, D.L.; Ingwersen, P.; Bennett, L.F.; Boyes, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, D.E.; Greenly, J.B.; Sudan, R.N. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The new COBRA accelerator is being built in stages at the Laboratory of Plasma Studies in Cornell University where its applications will include extraction diode and ion beam research in support of the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The 4- to 5-MV, 125- to 250-kA accelerator is based on a four-cavity inductive voltage adder (IVA) design. It is a combination of new ferromagnetically-isolated cavities and self magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) hardware and components from existing Sandia and Cornell facilities: Marx generator capacitors, hardware, and power supply from the DEMON facility; water pulse forming lines (PFL) and gas switch from the Subsystem Test Facility (STF); a HERMES-III intermediate store capacitor (ISC); and a modified ion diode from Cornell`s LION. The present accelerator consists of a single modified cavity similar to those of the Sandia SABRE accelerator and will be used to establish an operating system for the first stage initial lower voltage testing. Four new cavities will be fabricated and delivered in the first half of FY96 to complete the COBRA accelerator. COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 180{degrees} about their vertical axis. The site preparations, tank construction, and diode design and development are taking place at Cornell with growing enthusiasm as this machine becomes a reality. Preliminary results with the single cavity and short positive inner cylinder MITL configuration will soon be available.

  1. An overview of the JAERI accelerator research and development

    The high-intensity proton accelerator with an energy of 1.5 GeV and a beam power of 8 MW has been proposed for the Neutron Science Project (NSP) at JAERI. The purpose of the NSP is to explore various basic research fields such as condensed matter physics in combination with a proton storage ring and nuclear technologies for radioactive waste transmutation based on proton induced spallation neutrons. The conceptual design and R and D work have been carried out for the components of the low energy accelerator portion. For the high energy portion above 100 MeV, the superconducting (SC) linac has been designed and developed as a major option. The proton storage ring has been studied to produce high intensity pulsed beam. (author)

  2. Field evaluations of marine oil spill bioremediation.

    Swannell, R P; Lee, K; McDonagh, M

    1996-01-01

    Bioremediation is defined as the act of adding or improving the availability of materials (e.g., nutrients, microorganisms, or oxygen) to contaminated environments to cause an acceleration of natural biodegradative processes. The results of field experiments and trials following actual spill incidents have been reviewed to evaluate the feasibility of this approach as a treatment for oil contamination in the marine environment. The ubiquity of oil-degrading microorganisms in the marine environ...

  3. Progress in high field accelerator magnet development by the US LHC Accelerator Research Program

    Sabbi, Gian Luca; Collaboration, for the LARP

    2011-01-01

    The maximum magnetic field available to guide and focus the proton beams will be the most important factor driving the design of the High Energy LHC. The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is a collaboration of US National Laboratories aiming at demonstrating the feasibility of Nb3Sn magnet technology for application to future colliders. While LARP is primarily focused on the requirements of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), it is also directly relevant to the High-Energy LHC (HE-LHC)...

  4. Progress in high field accelerator magnet development by the US LHC Accelerator Research Program

    Sabbi, Gian Luca

    2011-01-01

    The maximum magnetic field available to guide and focus the proton beams will be the most important factor driving the design of the High Energy LHC. The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is a collaboration of US National Laboratories aiming at demonstrating the feasibility of Nb3Sn magnet technology for application to future colliders. While LARP is primarily focused on the requirements of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), it is also directly relevant to the High-Energy LHC (HE-LHC). Program results and future directions will be discussed.

  5. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1984 summary of activities

    1985-05-01

    During fiscal 1984, major programmatic activities in AFRD continued in each of five areas: accelerator operations, highlighted by the work of nuclear science users, who produced clear evidence for the formation of compressed nuclear matter during heavy-ion collisions; high-energy physics, increasingly dominated by our participation in the design of the Superconducting Super Collider; heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, which focused on the design of a four-beam experiment as a first step toward assessing the promise of heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; and research at the Center for X-Ray Optics, which completed its first year of broadly based activities aimed at the exploitation of x-ray and ultraviolet radiation. At the same time, exploratory studies were under way, aimed at investigating major new programs for the division. During the past year, for example, we took a preliminary look at how we could use the Bevatron as an injector for a pair of colliding-beam rings that might provide the first glimpse of a hitherto unobserved state of matter called the quark-gluon plasma. Together with Livermore scientists, we also conducted pioneering high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) experiments and proposed a new FEL-based scheme (called the two-beam accelerator) for accelerating electrons to very high energies. And we began work on the design of the Coherent XUV Facility (CXF), an advanced electron storage ring for the production of intense coherent radiation from either undulators or free-electron lasers.

  6. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1984 summary of activities

    During fiscal 1984, major programmatic activities in AFRD continued in each of five areas: accelerator operations, highlighted by the work of nuclear science users, who produced clear evidence for the formation of compressed nuclear matter during heavy-ion collisions; high-energy physics, increasingly dominated by our participation in the design of the Superconducting Super Collider; heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, which focused on the design of a four-beam experiment as a first step toward assessing the promise of heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; and research at the Center for X-Ray Optics, which completed its first year of broadly based activities aimed at the exploitation of x-ray and ultraviolet radiation. At the same time, exploratory studies were under way, aimed at investigating major new programs for the division. During the past year, for example, we took a preliminary look at how we could use the Bevatron as an injector for a pair of colliding-beam rings that might provide the first glimpse of a hitherto unobserved state of matter called the quark-gluon plasma. Together with Livermore scientists, we also conducted pioneering high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) experiments and proposed a new FEL-based scheme (called the two-beam accelerator) for accelerating electrons to very high energies. And we began work on the design of the Coherent XUV Facility (CXF), an advanced electron storage ring for the production of intense coherent radiation from either undulators or free-electron lasers

  7. IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA G4 PR1: ANALYSIS OF MICROBIAL ECOLOGY PARAMETERS FOR RISK ASSESSMENT (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    The introduction of bacteria into aquifers for bioremediation purposes requires monitoring of the persistence and activity of microbial populations for efficacy and risk assessment purposes. Burkholderia cepacia G4 PR1 constitutively expresses a toluene ortho-monooxygenase (tom) ...

  8. Bioremediation effectiveness following the Exxon Valdez spill

    Statistical analyses of changes in the composition of oil residues remaining on beaches following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound have demonstrated that bioremediation was effective in accelerating oil removal. Extensive data were obtained in a joint bioremediation monitoring program conducted during the summer of 1990 by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the State of Alaska, and Exxon. Composition changes in the oil relative to hopane, a trace oil component very resistant to biodegradation, provided the basis for accurately determining rates and extent of biodegradation. Results show that on fertilized beaches the rate of oil biodegradation was from three to more than five times faster than on adjacent, unfertilized control beaches. Further, most hydrocarbon components of the oil were biodegraded simultaneously, although at different rates. On one beach studied, about 60 percent of the total hydrocarbons detectable by gas chromatograph and 45 percent of the total PAH were biodegraded in three months. Bioremediation effectiveness was determined to depend primarily on the amount of nitrogen fertilizer delivered to the sediment per unit of oil present, time, and the extent of oil degradation prior to fertilizer application. The results suggest ways to improve future bioremediation application strategies and monitoring

  9. Bioremediation: A countermeasure for marine oil spills

    Three main types of bioremediation techniques are currently being developed or used for treatment of oil spills: adding nutrients to oiled shorelines; adding microbes to oiled shorelines; and addition of nutrients and/or microbes to open water oil slicks. Since all these technologies attempt to accelerate biodegradation, the processes of biodegradation of oil are summarized. Some of the potential uses of this technology are discussed, including specific instances where bioremediation has been applied at oil spills. Guidelines for evaluating and monitoring bioremediation applications are presented. Of the three types of bioremediation discussed, nutrient addition seems to hold the most immediate promise, especially for use in areas that would be adversely affected by physical or other removal methods. Environments where nutrient addition may play an important role in shoreline treatment include sheltered shorelines that are heavily oiled, shorelines with subsurface oil, and sensitive environments, especially wetlands. Nutrient additions are less likely to be effective in environments that are already nutrient-rich and for short-term, immediate response actions. 41 refs., 1 tab

  10. Status and future directions for advanced accelerator research - conventional and non-conventional collider concepts

    The relationship between advanced accelerator research and future directions for particle physics is discussed. Comments are made about accelerator research trends in hadron colliders, muon colliders, and e+3- linear colliders

  11. MYRRHA: a multipurpose accelerator driven system for research and development

    SCK-CEN, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, and IBA s.a., Ion Beam Application, a world leader in accelerator technology, want to fulfil a prominent role in the Accelerator Driven Systems field and are designing an ADS prototype, the MYRRHA Project, and conducting an associated R and D programme. The partners are foreseeing MYRRHA as a first step towards the European ADS-Demo facility. The project focuses primarily on ADS related research, i.e. structural materials and nuclear fuel research, liquid metals and associated aspects, sub-critical reactor physics and subsequently on applications such as waste transmutation, radioisotope production and safety research on sub-critical systems. In this respect, the MYRRHA system should become a new major research infrastructure for the European partners presently involved in the ADS Demo development, supporting and enabling the international R and D programs. Ion Beam Applications, the Belgium world leader in particle accelerators, had joined the MYRRHA Project to perform the accelerator development. Currently the study and preliminary conceptual design of the MYRRHA system is going on and an intensive R and D programme is conducted to assess the most risky points of the present design. This study will define the final choice of the characteristics of the facility depending on the selected fields of application to be achieved. The MYRRHA concept, as it is today, is based on the coupling of an upgraded commercial proton accelerator with a spallation target surrounded by a subcritical neutron-multiplying medium. Its design is determined by the versatility m applications that should be made possible. Further technical and/or strategic developments of the project might change the concept. A cyclotron, based on positive ion acceleration technology brings the protons up to an energy level of 350 MeV. The nominal current is 5 mA of protons. The spallation target system consists in a circuit with, at the upper part, a free

  12. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated surface water, groundwater, and soils

    Bioremediation is currently receiving considerable attention as a remediation option for sites contaminated with hazardous organic compounds. There is an enormous amount of interest in bioremediation, and numerous journals now publish research articles concerning some aspect of the remediation approach. A review of the literature indicates that two basic forms of bioremediation are currently being practiced: the microbiological approach and the microbial ecology approach. Each form has its advocates and detractors, and the microbiological approach is generally advocated by most of the firms that practice bioremediation. In this paper, the merits and disadvantages of these forms are reviewed and a conceptual approach is presented for assessing which form may be most useful for a particular contaminant situation. I conclude that the microbial ecology form of bioremediation may be the most useful for the majority of contaminant situations, and I will present two case histories in support of this hypothesis

  13. BIOREMEDIATION OF LOW GRADE ORES

    Rashmi Mishra*

    2016-01-01

    The research work presented in this paper is on a Bioremediation for the recovery of zinc from mining waste i.e. Low grade ore of Hindustan Zinc Limited. They are waste product for the mines, as the recovery process is expensive compared to the recovery product moreover it causes lots of pollution   Bioleaching Studies were carried out at different pH using mixed culture grown from mine water. Recovery of zinc in control set (without culture) was 8% in 37 days and at the same pH ...

  14. Research for the Relationships between Body Acceleration and Energy Expenditure

    ZHUYi; RUANXing-yun; SHENGYi; XUZhi-rong; GUOHai

    2004-01-01

    During our research, It has been found that body acceleration has strong relationships with the human energy expenditure. This paper discusses the methods to assess physical activity and concludes that for accurate assessment of physical activity under free living conditions the recently introduced accelerometer looks most promising. We developed a new computerized machine to assess the body activity and energy expenditure. Test datas of the treadmill experiment, respiration experiment and 5-kilometer-running experiment have been archieved,we found that body acceration integrals with time has linear relations with body energy expenture.

  15. Bioremediation of contaminated sites

    By volatilizing aromatic compounds through aeration, landfarming is a recognized approach to the bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soil. With this method, the soil is cultivated and aided with fertilizer amendment to provide a nutrient source for the microbial population involved in the degradation of hydrocarbons. The effectiveness of bioremediation will depend on several factors, including topographic features, soil properties, and biochemistry. Since bioremediation is inhibited by anaerobic conditions, sites that are sloped or have trenches to collect runoff water are preferable. As for soil properties, the percentage of sand should not be too high, but aeration is essential to avoid anaerobic conditions. Addition of straw is generally beneficial, and fertilizers with nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium will help degrading hydrocarbons. Temperature, pH, and salt content are also important factors since they facilitate microbial activity. 3 refs

  16. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    PE Long; SB Yabusaki; PD Meyer; CJ Murray; AL N’Guessan

    2008-04-01

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation.

  17. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation

  18. High intensity linear accelerator development topics for panel discussion on ''Nuclear Energy Research and Accelerators: Future Prospects''

    Two companion papers at this meeting have introduced the subject of high intensity linacs for materials research and for radioactive waste transmutation; Prof. Kaneko's paper ''Intense Proton Accelerator,'' and my paper ''Accelerator-Based Intense Neutron Source for Materials R ampersand D.'' I will expand on those remarks to briefly outline some of the extensive work that has been done at Los Alamos toward those two application areas, plus a third --- the production of tritium in an accelerator-based facility (APT--Accelerator Production of Tritium). 1 ref., 11 figs

  19. Advocacy For Accelerated Research In Phytotherapy For Repairs And Regenerations

    Charles A. Oyinbo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Th e article advocates for an accelerated research in phytotherapy for spinal cord injury recovery and functional restoration. Pubmed search analysis shows that phytotherapeutic products for spinal cord injury treatment are negligible, and not in the main stream neurosciences research. With the potentials inherent in medicinal plants, it is imperative to explore phytotherapy for spinal cord injury since conventional methods of treatments have failed to provide any satisfactory clinical intervention. The current reasoning is to evaluate several therapeutic agents in a multimodal therapeutic strategy for the treatment of spinal cord injury. However, determining the therapeutic agents for this strategy that would provide satisfactory clinical intervention to achieve meaningful functional sensorimotor improvement remains critical. The interventions that would be safe and efficacious for a multimodal treatment strategy for spinal cord injury are not known yet. Fortunately, phytotherapy eliminates the fear of complications that combined conventional high-tech treatment may exhibit since the bioactive constituents in phytotherapeutic agents are naturally combined.

  20. Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites

    Fallgren, Paul

    2009-03-30

    Bioremediation has been widely applied in the restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated. Parameters that may affect the rate and efficiency of biodegradation include temperature, moisture, salinity, nutrient availability, microbial species, and type and concentration of contaminants. Other factors can also affect the success of the bioremediation treatment of contaminants, such as climatic conditions, soil type, soil permeability, contaminant distribution and concentration, and drainage. Western Research Institute in conjunction with TechLink Environmental, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory studies to evaluate major parameters that contribute to the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated drill cuttings using land farming and to develop a biotreatment cell to expedite biodegradation of hydrocarbons. Physical characteristics such as soil texture, hydraulic conductivity, and water retention were determined for the petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil. Soil texture was determined to be loamy sand to sand, and high hydraulic conductivity and low water retention was observed. Temperature appeared to have the greatest influence on biodegradation rates where high temperatures (>50 C) favored biodegradation. High nitrogen content in the form of ammonium enhanced biodegradation as well did the presence of water near field water holding capacity. Urea was not a good source of nitrogen and has detrimental effects for bioremediation for this site soil. Artificial sea water had little effect on biodegradation rates, but biodegradation rates decreased after increasing the concentrations of salts. Biotreatment cell (biocell) tests demonstrated hydrocarbon biodegradation can be enhanced substantially when utilizing a leachate recirculation design where a 72% reduction of hydrocarbon concentration was observed with a 72-h period at a treatment temperature of 50 C. Overall, this study demonstrates the investigation of the effects of

  1. Bioremediation of nanomaterials

    Chen, Frank Fanqing; Keasling, Jay D; Tang, Yinjie J

    2013-05-14

    The present invention provides a method comprising the use of microorganisms for nanotoxicity study and bioremediation. In some embodiment, the microorganisms are bacterial organisms such as Gram negative bacteria, which are used as model organisms to study the nanotoxicity of the fullerene compounds: E. coli W3110, a human related enterobacterium and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally important bacterium with versatile metabolism.

  2. 放射性污染土壤生物修复的研究进展%Research advances review over the bioremediation of soil contaminated by radionuclide

    范婷; 张晓文; 吕俊文; 唐东山; 陈亮

    2011-01-01

    土壤中放射性核素主要为天然来源和人为来源.而人为来源主要包括核试验、核武器制造、核能生产、核事故、放射性同位素的生产应用和矿物的开采冶炼等.综述了放射性核素污染土壤的植物修复、菌根修复、微生物修复等生物修复技术的研究进展,侧重探讨了这3种修复技术的协同作用,并对其研究的发展方向及今后的应用前景进行了讨论.%The present paper would like to give a general revision of research advances on the bioremediation of soil contaminated by ra-dionuclide. As the nuclear industry has been developing fast, the ra-dionuclide in the soil has become one of the major factors threatening human health and eco-toxicology. And, in turn, it has been found from the research channels that the rqain sources of the radionuclide pollution in the soil are coming from the nuclear tests, nuclear weapons production, the energy production of the nuclear power stations, nuclear accidents, as well as the production and application of radioisotopes and refining and application of minerals. It is just for the above reasons that we believe it necessary to point out the ever more great significance of such research advances in helping to reclaim the contaminated land soil and then illustrate some more effective and efficient new pollution-reducing and -removing techniques. Among them, the bioremediation technology is universally considered to be safest and most reliable. What is more, it also enjoys the obvious technological advantages of low cost, subtle disturbance on the environment with its capability of removing pollutants from the surrounding conditions of soil or water along with the radioactive contaminations. In addition, we also think it worthwhile to make a review of their new research advances, such as, phytoremediation, microbial remediation and mycorhiza remediation technologies. In spite of this, we would also like to put our emphasis on the limitations

  3. An accelerator facility within a mineral research establishment

    The importance of the minerals industry in Australia is evident from its share of about 40% of the country's export earnings. Its economic success is due in no small measure to the industry's ability to keep abreast with technological innovations and scientific developments, often through collaborations with federal Governments research laboratories such as the CSIRO. In this context, the CSIRO Division of Mineral Physics recently commissioned a laboratory, known as HIAF - the Heavy Ion Analytical Facility - based on a General Ionex 3 MV Tandetron, a tandem electrostatic accelerator. The Laboratory was designed to facilitate the development of the applications of a host of ion-beam techniques to problems in the geosciences, extending or complementing established methods. Flow-on to the minerals industry is anticipated, with varying degrees of immediacy dependent on the particular technique. The first stage operational at the commissioning provides RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) and NRA (nuclear reaction analysis) measurements, and includes the development of a beam microprobe. An ultra-sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system is planned for the second stage, to permit studies of chronology based on radio cosmogenic isotopes and ultra-traces in mineral samples. (orig.)

  4. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms. Implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, the way how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides is assessed. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. The way how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility is described. Why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions is explained. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. Development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions is described. Throughout, the key research needs are identified. (author)

  5. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures.

    Banaszak, J.E.; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-02-12

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs.

  6. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs

  7. Accelerator

    The invention claims equipment for stabilizing the position of the front covers of the accelerator chamber in cyclic accelerators which significantly increases accelerator reliability. For stabilizing, it uses hydraulic cushions placed between the electromagnet pole pieces and the front chamber covers. The top and the bottom cushions are hydraulically connected. The cushions are disconnected and removed from the hydraulic line using valves. (J.P.)

  8. Accelerator driven radiation clean nuclear power system conceptual research symposium

    The R and D of ADS (Accelerators Driven Subcritical System) in China introduced. 31 theses are presented. It includes the basic principle of ADS, accelerators, sub-critical reactors, neutron physics, nuclear data, partitioning and transmutation

  9. MYRRHA: a multipurpose accelerator driven system for research and development

    The development of a new nuclear installation that is able to fulfil the economical, social, environmental and technological demands, is a cornerstone for the future provision of sustainable energy. Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) can pave the way for a more environmentally safe and acceptable nuclear energy production. Fundamental and applied R and D are crucial in the development of ADS technologies and demand the availability of appropriate prototype installations. In answer to this need and in order to update its current irradiation potential, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK·CEN), in partnership with Ion Beam Applications s. a. (IBA), is launching the MYRRHA project. It is focussed on the design, development and realisation of a modular and flexible irradiation facility based on the ADS concept. This paper describes the concept, the applications foreseen in the MYRRHA installation and the accompanying design activities currently being performed at SCK·CEN and IBA. (authors)

  10. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, fiscal year 1980, October 1979-September 1980

    1981-03-01

    Research during October 1979 to September 1980 is summarized. Areas covered include: accelerator operations; positron-electron project; stochastic beam cooling; high-field superconducting magnets; accelerator theory; neutral beam sources; and heavy ion fusion. (GHT)

  11. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, fiscal year 1980, October 1979-September 1980

    Research during October 1979 to September 1980 is summarized. Areas covered include: accelerator operations; positron-electron project; stochastic beam cooling; high-field superconducting magnets; accelerator theory; neutral beam sources; and heavy ion fusion

  12. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    Xu, Y.; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, T. N.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Johnson, G. W.; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-01

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.

  13. Bioremediation evaluation of surface soils contaminated with organic compounds

    This paper presents background information on bioremediation; information on biotechnologies that have been proven in other industries and that may be applicable to the natural gas industry; a protocol for assessing the feasibility of bioremediation; and, some preliminary results on some soils that were evaluated using the protocol. Background information related to natural gas production and processing sites and chemicals that are typically used are presented because both are important preliminary feasibility screening criteria. Applications of bioremediation to sites with similar chemicals such as refineries, wood treating plants, and former manufactured gas plants (MGP's) have been used for approximately 30 years, however bioremediation is not widely used to treat wellhead sites or natural gas production and processing sites. Examples of applications of bioremediation to non-natural gas industry sites are presented and the similarities, primarily chemical, are presented. The GRI developed an Accelerated Biotreatability Protocol for former MGP sites and it is currently being modified for application to the Exploration and Production (E and P) industry. The Accelerated Treatability Protocol is a decision-making framework to evaluate the potential full-scale biological treatment options. Preliminary results from some soils collected and evaluated using the protocol are presented

  14. Bioremediation of Creosote - contaminated Soil

    BYSS, Marius

    2008-01-01

    Bioremediation of creosote-contaminated soil was studied employing the methods of soil microbial biology and using new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry analytical approach. The changes of the soil microbial community under the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) pollution impact were analyzed and described, as well as the changes during the bioremediation experiments. Laboratory-scale bioremediation experiments using the soil microbial community (consisted of bacteria...

  15. Status of Accelerator Driven Systems Research and Technology Development

    One of the greatest challenges for nuclear energy is how to properly manage the highly radioactive waste generated during irradiation in nuclear reactors. In order for nuclear power to exploit its full potential as a major sustainable energy source, there needs to be a safe and effective way to deal with this waste. Since 1995, several scenario studies have been conducted on different advanced nuclear fuel cycle and waste management options in various countries. Examples include the collaborative projects under “Global sustainable nuclear energy scenarios for long term development and deployment of nuclear energy” of the IAEA International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) initiative, and the scenario studies conducted under the auspices of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the Euratom research project PATEROS — Partitioning and Transmutation European Roadmap for Sustainable Nuclear Energy. Some of the proposed long term nuclear fuel cycles include an innovative concept of a hybrid system for the transmutation of long lived radioisotopes. This is usually the called accelerator driven system (ADS) — or accelerator driven transmutation of waste (ATW) — and consists of a high power proton accelerator, a heavy metal spallation target that produces neutrons when bombarded by the high power beam, and a subcritical core that is neutronically coupled to the spallation target. The ADS, which has been developed in different countries for more than 40 years, is claimed to offer new prospects and advantages for the transmutation of high level radioactive waste. The ADS would convert highly radioactive material to non-radioactive material or material with a much shorter half-life. In addition, these hybrid systems can generate electricity during the conversion of transuranic waste. In 1997, under the guidance of its Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), the IAEA published IAEA-TECDOC-985, Accelerator Driven Systems: Energy

  16. Bioremediation of crude oil spills in marine and terrestrial environments

    Bioremediation can be a safe and effective tool for dealing with crude oil spills, as demonstrated during the cleanup following the Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska. Crude oil has also been spilled on land, and bioremediation is a promising option for land spills too. Nevertheless, there are still areas where understanding of the phenomenon is rather incomplete. Research groups around the world are addressing these problems, and this symposium provides an excellent overview of some of this work

  17. Bioremediation of Bunker C

    In the states of Washington and Oregon, the highest priority for waste management is now given to recycling, reuse and permanent solutions as opposed to landfill disposal. Bioremediation is recognized as a treatment of choice over other technologies that do not provide permanent solutions. From a business point of view, it is usually the most cost-effective. Bioremediation works extremely well for most common hydrocarbons including aviation fuel, heating oil and diesel oil. Bunker C, a high boiling point distillate, is the most recalcitrant hydrocarbon for treatment and is the topic of this paper. Bunker C lives up to its reputation of being a very recalcitrant hydrocarbon to biodegrade. The authors have demonstrated, however, that the soil matrix standards at industrial sites in Washington and Oregon can be achieved using new bioremediation techniques. These techniques are necessary over those typically used to biodegrade jet fuel, heating oil and diesel oil. These extra steps have been developed for our own use in our treatability laboratory

  18. Bioremediation of bunker C

    Bioremediation works extremely well for most common hydrocarbons including aviation fuel, heating oil and diesel oil. Bunker C, a high boiling point distillate, is the most recalcitrant hydrocarbon for treatment and is the topic of this paper. Bioremediation, Inc. has had an opportunity to perform two projects involving soil contaminated with bunker C. One was at a bulk terminal site which involved predominantly diesel, but also had bunker C contamination; the other was a paper-mill site which had exclusively bunker C contamination. This paper will address the authors' experiences at the paper-mill site. Bunker C lives up to its reputation of being a very recalcitrant hydrocarbon to biodegrade. They have demonstrated, however, that the soil matrix standards at industrial sites in Washington and Oregon can be achieved using new bioremediation techniques. These techniques are necessary over those typically used to biodegrade jet fuel, heating oil and diesel oil. These extra steps, as discussed later, have been developed for their own use in their treatability laboratory

  19. The Research of a Novel SW Accelerating Structure with Small Beam Spot

    Yang, X; Chen, Y; Jin, X; Li, Maozhen; Lü, H; Xu, Z

    2004-01-01

    A new kind of on-axis coupled biperiodic standing-wave (SW) accelerating structure has been built for a 9 MeV accelerator. The research progress was introduced in this paper, it includes the choice of the accelerating structure, the analysis of electron beam dynamics, the tuning of the cavity, the measurement of the accelerating tube and the powered test. The small beam spot is the most interesting feature of this accelerating structure, the diameter of the beam spot is 1.4 mm. This accelerator has been used for the x photons generation and the x-ray dose rate is about 3400 rad/min/m.

  20. Soil bioremediation at CFB Trenton: evaluation of bioremediation processes

    Bioremediation processes and their application in the cleanup of contaminated soil, were discussed. The petroleum contaminated soil at CFB Trenton, was evaluated to determine which bioremediation process or combination of processes would be most effective. The following processes were considered: (1) white hot fungus, (2) Daramend proprietary process, (3) composting, (4) bioquest proprietary bioremediation processes, (5) Hobbs and Millar proprietary bioremediation process, and (6) farming. A brief summary of each of these options was included. The project was also used as an opportunity to train Latvian and Ukrainian specialists in Canadian field techniques and laboratory analyses. Preliminary data indicated that bioremediation is a viable method for treatment of contaminated soil. 18 refs., 3 figs

  1. Contaminants at DOE sites and their susceptibility to bioremediation

    Contaminants at DOE sites encompass a range of common industrial pollutants. However, the prevalence of contaminant mixtures including organics, metals, and radionuclides is relatively unique to DOE's facilities. Bioremediation has been shown to be effective for destruction of many of the organic pollutants. The technology also has promise for application to many of the metals and radionuclides; however, field demonstrations for these applications have not yet been attempted. Because of the complexity of biodegradation of even a single-compound class, little has been done to develop or demonstrate in situ bioremediation technologies for multicompound combinations. The current bioremediation demonstration on CCl4 and nitrates within the VOC-Arid Integrated Demonstration is one the first efforts to address inorganic and organic co-contaminants simultaneously. Additional research, technology development, and field demonstrations are needed to evaluate the applicability of in situ bioremediation to DOE's most common contaminant mixtures

  2. Bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils: A recipe for success

    Wittenbach, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    Bioremediation of land crude oil and lube oil spills is an effective and economical option. Other options include road spreading (where permitted), thermal desorption, and off-site disposal. The challenge for environment and operations managers is to select the best approach for each remediation site. Costs and liability for off-site disposal are ever increasing. Kerr-McGee`s extensive field research in eastern and western Texas provides the data to support bioremediation as a legitimate and valid option. Both practical and economical bioremediation as a legitimate and valid option. Both practical and economical, bioremediation also offers a lower risk of, for example, Superfund clean-up exposure than off-site disposal.

  3. Soils bio-remediation; Bioremediation des sols

    Vogel, T.M. [Universite Claude Bernard, 69 - Lyon-1 (France)

    2001-06-01

    The biological treatment of soils (in-situ or excavated) consists in the use of micro-organisms for the transformation of noxious compounds into non-noxious ones. Bacteria are the main micro-organisms used but fungi can play a role in some ex-situ processes. The bio-remediation of the soil and aquifer requires the use of various processes like diffusion and advection, sorption and desorption, and biodegradation. The degradation of the pollutants is efficient only if a sufficient amount of micro-organisms is in close-contact with the pollutants. The efficiency, fastness and cost are important factors to take into consideration in such remedial actions. Thus, a good mastery of soils sciences and processes engineering is needed. This article presents the concepts and processes used in biological remediation of soils: 1 - concept of processes engineering (heterogenous environments, processes characteristics, in-situ or on-site reactors); 2 - concept of biological treatments (micro-organisms, biodegradation, microbial ecology, bio-stimulation, bio-augmentation); 3 - biological treatment process (bio-venting, bio-spargeing, bio-slurping, in-situ aerobic bio-process, bio-hillock, phyto-remediation, metals extraction). (J.S.)

  4. Low-energy electron accelerators in industry and applied research

    Mondelaers, W.

    1998-04-01

    The use of electron accelerators in industry involve a broad range of machines and applications. The major actual large-scale applications are crosslinking of wire and cable insulation, plastic films and foam, curing of coatings and rubbers, and sterilisation of medical products. The recent availability, at attractive costs, of electron accelerators with high beam power (up to 200 kW) covering an energy range up to 10 MeV, has created new possibilities for a substantial expansion of the application range. The actual position of electron accelerators in industry is reviewed, new emerging applications and novel opportunities for multipurpose facilities are described.

  5. Neural computation and particle accelerators research, technology and applications

    D'Arras, Horace

    2010-01-01

    This book discusses neural computation, a network or circuit of biological neurons and relatedly, particle accelerators, a scientific instrument which accelerates charged particles such as protons, electrons and deuterons. Accelerators have a very broad range of applications in many industrial fields, from high energy physics to medical isotope production. Nuclear technology is one of the fields discussed in this book. The development that has been reached by particle accelerators in energy and particle intensity has opened the possibility to a wide number of new applications in nuclear technology. This book reviews the applications in the nuclear energy field and the design features of high power neutron sources are explained. Surface treatments of niobium flat samples and superconducting radio frequency cavities by a new technique called gas cluster ion beam are also studied in detail, as well as the process of electropolishing. Furthermore, magnetic devises such as solenoids, dipoles and undulators, which ...

  6. Darmstadt Linear Accelerator (DALINAC) Research Laboratory. Status report - July 1988

    The status of the DALINAC project is reviewed. The accelerator and the experimental facilities are described, and a free-electron laser project is considered. Furthermore, experiments on inelastic electron scattering on nuclei and atomic systems are listed. (HSI)

  7. Research and application of electron accelerator in China

    Zhan Wenlong; Liu Zhenghao [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China)

    2003-02-01

    There are more than 30 product lines of irradiation cross-linking wire and cable and shrinkable tube by EB in Chinese industry. Total of 3,000 KW power of EB, in which 40% coming from home made accelerator. Recently, about 450 KW electron accelerator is being manufactured and used in protection of environment that is removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gas. (author)

  8. Research and application of electron accelerator in China

    There are more than 30 product lines of irradiation cross-linking wire and cable and shrinkable tube by EB in Chinese industry. Total of 3,000 KW power of EB, in which 40% coming from home made accelerator. Recently, about 450 KW electron accelerator is being manufactured and used in protection of environment that is removal of SO2 and NOx from flue gas. (author)

  9. Essay: Robert H. Siemann As Leader of the Advanced Accelerator Research Department

    Colby, Eric R.; Hogan, Mark J.; /SLAC

    2011-11-14

    Robert H. Siemann originally conceived of the Advanced Accelerator Research Department (AARD) as an academic, experimental group dedicated to probing the technical limitations of accelerators while providing excellent educational opportunities for young scientists. The early years of the Accelerator Research Department B, as it was then known, were dedicated to a wealth of mostly student-led experiments to examine the promise of advanced accelerator techniques. High-gradient techniques including millimeter-wave rf acceleration, beam-driven plasma acceleration, and direct laser acceleration were pursued, including tests of materials under rf pulsed heating and short-pulse laser radiation, to establish the ultimate limitations on gradient. As the department and program grew, so did the motivation to found an accelerator research center that brought experimentalists together in a test facility environment to conduct a broad range of experiments. The Final Focus Test Beam and later the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator provided unique experimental facilities for AARD staff and collaborators to carry out advanced accelerator experiments. Throughout the evolution of this dynamic program, Bob maintained a department atmosphere and culture more reminiscent of a university research group than a national laboratory department. His exceptional ability to balance multiple roles as scientist, professor, and administrator enabled the creation and preservation of an environment that fostered technical innovation and scholarship.

  10. Essay: Robert H. Siemann As Leader of the Advanced Accelerator Research Department

    Robert H. Siemann originally conceived of the Advanced Accelerator Research Department (AARD) as an academic, experimental group dedicated to probing the technical limitations of accelerators while providing excellent educational opportunities for young scientists. The early years of the Accelerator Research Department B, as it was then known, were dedicated to a wealth of mostly student-led experiments to examine the promise of advanced accelerator techniques. High-gradient techniques including millimeter-wave rf acceleration, beam-driven plasma acceleration, and direct laser acceleration were pursued, including tests of materials under rf pulsed heating and short-pulse laser radiation, to establish the ultimate limitations on gradient. As the department and program grew, so did the motivation to found an accelerator research center that brought experimentalists together in a test facility environment to conduct a broad range of experiments. The Final Focus Test Beam and later the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator provided unique experimental facilities for AARD staff and collaborators to carry out advanced accelerator experiments. Throughout the evolution of this dynamic program, Bob maintained a department atmosphere and culture more reminiscent of a university research group than a national laboratory department. His exceptional ability to balance multiple roles as scientist, professor, and administrator enabled the creation and preservation of an environment that fostered technical innovation and scholarship.

  11. PAHs污染土壤生物修复强化技术研究进展%Research progress in enhanced bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contaminated soil

    王洪; 李海波; 孙铁珩; 胡筱敏

    2011-01-01

    为提高生物修复多环芳烃(PAHs)污染土壤的效率,从PAHs生物修复的原理和强化措施出发,综述了PAHs污染土壤生物修复的物理化学强化技术和生物强化技术,分析了各种技术的原理与适用条件,提出了植物强化微生物修复是PAHs污染土壤生物修复的重要发展方向.在进行强化修复的过程中,要注重现场应用和安全性评价.%This paper is aimed to present a general review on the enhanced measures to the bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contaminated soil. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are well known as a group of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and more than 90% of PAHs present in the soil, which are toxic to the environment and pose as a hazard in food chain to human health.Bioremediation technology is the primary method to treat the PAHs contaminated soil and the enhanced measures of bioremediation treatment are essential to improve the degradation rate and adapt to the needs of field application. Referring to the reported literature at home and abroad in recent years, this paper comes out with a detail introduction and discussion on the principles and application of physicalchemical and biological based enhancement. The enhanced measures of physical-chemical included the application of surfactants, nutrient addition and co-metabolic substrate addition as well as the electron acceptors addition and utilization of chemical oxidants. The enhanced measures of bioremediation included the addition of highly efficient PAH-degrading bacteria and immobilization of bacteria, utilization of mycorrhizal fungi and application of bio-surfactants. The combined remediation of phytoremediation and microorganism on the PAHs conlaminated soil is an important direction of development and field application technology. At the same time, safety evaluation in the process of enhanced bioremediation is necessary in order to avoid new pollution and other security risks to

  12. Bioremediation a promising technology for nuclear waste treatment

    Microbes play a primordial role in completing various elemental cycles namely carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, which are necessary for sustainability of planet Earth. This natural capability of microbes is employed to transform manmade compounds to their elemental forms. Redeployment of microbes for specific tasks needs a re-engineering of microbial metabolism to accelerate transformation. The most widely used approach is genetic modification but this approach has resulted into grievous failures due to inability of genetically modified organism to survive in natural environment. Consequently, development of new approach towards bioremediation was conceptualized, where desired metabolic capability were achieved using consortia of microorganisms having complementary metabolism. Of late, the potential of biofilm communities for bioremediation processes has been realized since it has many advantages over whole cells, used as biocatalysts. Naturally immobilized microbial biofilms exclude the necessity of cell-immobilization as biofilm cells are already embedded in self-produced exopolymers. Moreover, biofilm-mediated bioremediation offers a proficient and safer alternative to planktonic cells-mediated bioremediation because cells in a biofilm are more robust to toxic materials present in the waste as they are embedded in the matrix that provides a physical barrier. This presentation will highlight the importance of planktonic and sessile bacteria in bioremediation of a few nuclear waste compounds. (author)

  13. Bioremediation Education Science and Technology (BEST) Program Annual Report 1999; TOPICAL

    The Bioremediation, Education, Science and Technology (BEST) partnership provides a sustainable and contemporary approach to developing new bioremedial technologies for US Department of Defense (DoD) priority contaminants while increasing the representation of underrepresented minorities and women in an exciting new biotechnical field. This comprehensive and innovative bioremediation education program provides under-represented groups with a cross-disciplinary bioremediation cirruculum and financial support, coupled with relevant training experiences at advanced research laboratories and field sites. These programs are designed to provide a stream of highly trained minority and women professionals to meet national environmental needs

  14. Annual report of Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, JFY2007. Operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR and tandem accelerator

    The Department of Research Reactors and Tandem Accelerator is in charge of the operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3(Japan Research Reactor-3), JRR-4(Japan Research Reactor-4), NSRR(Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) and Tandem Accelerator. This annual report describes a summary of activities of services and technical developments carried out in the period between April 1, 2007 and March 31, 2008. The activities were categorized into five service/development fields: (1) Operation and maintenance of research reactors and tandem accelerator. (2) Utilization of research reactors and tandem accelerator. (3) Upgrading of utilization techniques of research reactors and tandem accelerator. (4) Safety administration for research reactors and tandem accelerator. (5) International cooperation. Also contained are lists of publications, meetings, granted permissions on lows and regulations concerning atomic energy, commendation, plans and outcomes in service and technical developments and so on. (author)

  15. Annual report of Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, JFY2009. Operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR and Tandem Accelerator

    The Department of Research Reactors and Tandem Accelerator is in charge of the operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3(Japan Research Reactor-3), JRR-4(Japan Research Reactor-4), NSRR(Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) and Tandem Accelerator. This annual report describes a summary of activities of services and technical developments carried out in the period between April 1, 2009 and March 31, 2010. The activities were categorized into five service/development fields: (1) Operation and maintenance of research reactors and tandem accelerator. (2) Utilization of research reactors and tandem accelerator. (3) Upgrading of utilization techniques of research reactors and tandem accelerator. (4) Safety administration for research reactors and tandem accelerator. (5) International cooperation. Also contained are lists of publications, meetings, granted permissions on lows and regulations concerning atomic energy, commendation, outcomes in service and technical developments and so on. (author)

  16. Annual report of Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, JFY2008. Operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR and Tandem Accelerator

    The Department of Research Reactors and Tandem Accelerator is in charge of the operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3(Japan Research Reactor-3), JRR-4(Japan Research Reactor-4), NSRR(Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) and Tandem Accelerator. This annual report describes a summary of activities of services and technical developments carried out in the period between April 1, 2008 and March 31, 2009. The activities were categorized into five service/development fields: (1) Operation and maintenance of research reactors and tandem accelerator. (2) Utilization of research reactors and tandem accelerator. (3) Upgrading of utilization techniques of research reactors and tandem accelerator. (4) Safety administration for research reactors and tandem accelerator. (5) International cooperation. Also contained are lists of publications, meetings, granted permissions on lows and regulations concerning atomic energy, commendation, outcomes in service and technical developments and so on. (author)

  17. Research on GPU Acceleration for Monte Carlo Criticality Calculation

    Xu, Qi; Yu, Ganglin; Wang, Kan

    2014-06-01

    The Monte Carlo neutron transport method can be naturally parallelized by multi-core architectures due to the dependency between particles during the simulation. The GPU+CPU heterogeneous parallel mode has become an increasingly popular way of parallelism in the field of scientific supercomputing. Thus, this work focuses on the GPU acceleration method for the Monte Carlo criticality simulation, as well as the computational efficiency that GPUs can bring. The "neutron transport step" is introduced to increase the GPU thread occupancy. In order to test the sensitivity of the MC code's complexity, a 1D one-group code and a 3D multi-group general purpose code are respectively transplanted to GPUs, and the acceleration effects are compared. The result of numerical experiments shows considerable acceleration effect of the "neutron transport step" strategy. However, the performance comparison between the 1D code and the 3D code indicates the poor scalability of MC codes on GPUs.

  18. Principles of Bioremediation Assessment

    Madsen, E. L.

    2001-12-01

    Although microorganisms have successfully and spontaneously maintained the biosphere since its inception, industrialized societies now produce undesirable chemical compounds at rates that outpace naturally occurring microbial detoxification processes. This presentation provides an overview of both the complexities of contaminated sites and methodological limitations in environmental microbiology that impede the documentation of biodegradation processes in the field. An essential step toward attaining reliable bioremediation technologies is the development of criteria which prove that microorganisms in contaminated field sites are truly active in metabolizing contaminants of interest. These criteria, which rely upon genetic, biochemical, physiological, and ecological principles and apply to both in situ and ex situ bioremediation strategies include: (i) internal conservative tracers; (ii) added conservative tracers; (iii) added radioactive tracers; (iv) added isotopic tracers; (v) stable isotopic fractionation patterns; (vi) detection of intermediary metabolites; (vii) replicated field plots; (viii) microbial metabolic adaptation; (ix) molecular biological indicators; (x) gradients of coreactants and/or products; (xi) in situ rates of respiration; (xii) mass balances of contaminants, coreactants, and products; and (xiii) computer modeling that incorporates transport and reactive stoichiometries of electron donors and acceptors. The ideal goal is achieving a quantitative understanding of the geochemistry, hydrogeology, and physiology of complex real-world systems.

  19. Bioremediation of oil contaminated soils

    The Baldwin Waste Oil Site was an abandoned waste oil recycling facility located in Robstown, Nueces County, Texas. As part of their site assessment activities, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requested that the Ecology and Environment, Inc., Technical Assistance Team (TAT) investigate the feasibility of using in-situ bioremediation to remediate soils contaminated with oil and grease components, petroleum hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds. Bioremediation based on the land treatment concept was tested. The land treatment concept uses techniques to optimize indigenous microbial populations and bring them in contact with the contaminants. The study was designed to collect data upon which to base conclusions on the effectiveness of bioremediation, to demonstrate the effectiveness of bioremediation under field conditions, and to identify potential problems in implementing a full-scale project. Bioremediation effectiveness was monitored through total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and Oil and Grease (O and G) analyses. Site specific treatment goals for the pilot project were concentrations of less than 1% for O and G and less than 10,000 mg/kg for TPH. Based on the reduction of TPH and O and G concentrations and the cost effectiveness of bioremediation based on the land treatment concept, full-scale in-situ bioremediation was initiated by the EPA at the Baldwin Waste Oil Site in February of 1993

  20. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1990--September 30, 1990

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, induction acceleration, is being studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: (1) beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; (2) development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; (3) acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; (4) final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target

  1. CARE Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe: integrating activity implemented as integrated infrastructure initiative

    Aleksan, R

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the CARE project was to generate a structured and integrated European area in the field of accelerator research and related R&D. A set of integrating activities involving the largest European infrastructure laboratories and their user communities “active in accelerator R&D”, including industrial partners was established with the following general objectives: 1) To optimise the use of existing infrastructures for improving the European knowledge on accelerator physics  By promoting a coherent and coordinated utilization and development of infrastructures and to facilitate the access to accelerators and test facilities for carrying accelerator studies  By understanding accelerator operation and reliability issues 2) To tackle new or state-of-the-art technologies in a more co-ordinated and collaborative approach  By developing a coherent and coordinated accelerator R&D program in Europe and carrying out joint R&D projects allowing one to enhance the existing (or...

  2. Database application research in real-time data access of accelerator control system

    The control system of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) is a large-scale distributed real-time control system, It involves many types and large amounts of real-time data access during the operating. Database system has wide application prospects in the large-scale accelerator control system. It is the future development direction of the accelerator control system, to replace the differently dedicated data structures with the mature standardized database system. This article discusses the application feasibility of database system in accelerators based on the database interface technology, real-time data access testing, and system optimization research and to establish the foundation of the wide scale application of database system in the SSRF accelerator control system. Based on the database interface technology, real-time data access testing and system optimization research, this article will introduce the application feasibility of database system in accelerators, and lay the foundation of database system application in the SSRF accelerator control system. (authors)

  3. Research activities related to accelerator-based transmutation at PSI

    Transmutation of actinides and fission products using reactors and other types of nuclear systems may play a role in future waste management schemes. Possible advantages of separation and transmutation are: volume reductions, the re-use of materials, the avoidance of a cumulative risk, and limiting the duration of the risk. With its experience in reactor physics, accelerator-based physics, and the development of the SINQ spallation neutron source, PSI is in a good position to perform basic theoretical and experimental studies relating to the accelerator-based transmutation of actinides. Theoretical studies at PSI have been concentrated, so far, on systems in which protons are used directly to transmute actinides. With such systems and appropriate recycling schemes, the studies showed that considerable reduction factors for long-term toxicity can be obtained. With the aim of solving some specific data and method problems related to these types of systems, a programme of differential and integral measurements at the PSI ring accelerator has been initiated. In a first phase of this programme, thin samples of actinides will be irradiated with 590 MeV protons, using an existing irradiation facility. The generated spallation and fission products will be analysed using different experimental techniques, and the results will be compared with theoretical predictions based on high-energy nucleon-meson transport calculations. The principal motivation for these experiments is to resolve discrepancies observed between calculations based on different high-energy fission models. In a second phase of the programme, it is proposed to study the neutronic behaviour of multiplying target-blanket assemblies with the help of zero-power experiments set up at a separate, dedicated beam line of the accelerator. (author) 3 figs., 2 tabs., 8 refs

  4. Accelerator mass spectrometry as a bioanalytical tool for nutritional research

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1997-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is a mass spectrometric method of detecting long-lived radioisotopes without regard to their decay products or half-life. The technique is normally applied to geochronology, but recently has been developed for bioanalytical tracing. AMS detects isotope concentrations to parts per quadrillion, quantifying labeled biochemicals to attomole levels in milligram- sized samples. Its advantages over non-isotopeic and stable isotope labeling methods are reviewed and examples of analytical integrity, sensitivity, specificity, and applicability are provided.

  5. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. Annual report, October 1978-September 1979

    Topics covered include: Super HILAC and Bevalac operations; high intensity uranium beams line item; advanced high charge state ion source; 184-inch synchrocyclotron; VENUS project; positron-electron project; high field superconducting accelerator magnets; beam cooling; accelerator theory; induction linac drivers; RF linacs and storage rings; theory; neutral beam systems development; experimental atomic physics; neutral beam plasma research; plasma theory; and the Tormac project

  6. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1--September 30, 1988

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification --both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target

  7. Summary proceedings of a workshop on Bioremediation and its Societal Implications and Concerns (BASIC)

    This document summarizes the proceedings of a workshop on Bioremediation and Its Societal Implications and Concerns (BASIC) held July 18-19, 1996 at the Airlie Center near Warrenton, Virginia. The workshop was sponsored by the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its fundamental research program in Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR). The information summarized in these proceedings represents the general conclusions of the workshop participants, and not the opinions of workshop organizers or sponsors. Neither are they consensus opinions, as opinions differed among participants on a number of points. The general conclusions presented below were reached through a review, synthesis, and condensation of notes taken by NABIR Program Office staff and OHER program managers throughout the workshop. Specific contributions by participants during breakout sessions are recorded in bullet form in the appropriate sections, without attribution to the contributors. These contributions were transcribed as faithfully as possible from notes about the original discussions. They were edited only to make them grammatically correct, parallel in structure, and understandable to someone not familiar with the NABIR Program or BASIC element

  8. Summary proceedings of a workshop on Bioremediation and its Societal Implications and Concerns (BASIC)

    Drell, D.W. [Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Health and Environmental Research, Health Effects and Life Sciences Research Division; Metting, F.B. Jr. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wuy, L.D. [ed.] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    This document summarizes the proceedings of a workshop on Bioremediation and Its Societal Implications and Concerns (BASIC) held July 18-19, 1996 at the Airlie Center near Warrenton, Virginia. The workshop was sponsored by the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its fundamental research program in Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR). The information summarized in these proceedings represents the general conclusions of the workshop participants, and not the opinions of workshop organizers or sponsors. Neither are they consensus opinions, as opinions differed among participants on a number of points. The general conclusions presented below were reached through a review, synthesis, and condensation of notes taken by NABIR Program Office staff and OHER program managers throughout the workshop. Specific contributions by participants during breakout sessions are recorded in bullet form in the appropriate sections, without attribution to the contributors. These contributions were transcribed as faithfully as possible from notes about the original discussions. They were edited only to make them grammatically correct, parallel in structure, and understandable to someone not familiar with the NABIR Program or BASIC element.

  9. Inverse free electron laser beat-wave accelerator research

    A calculation on the stabilization of the sideband instability in the free electron laser (FEL) and inverse FEL (IFEL) was completed. The issue arises in connection with the use of a tapered (''variable-parameter'') undulator of extended length, such as might be used in an ''enhanced efficiency'' traveling-wave FEL or an IFEL accelerator. In addition, the FEL facility at Columbia was configured as a traveling wave amplifier for a 10-kW signal from a 24-GHz magnetron. The space charge field in the bunches of the FEL was measured. Completed work has been published

  10. Technical development of high intensity proton accelerators in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)

    Science and Technology Agency decided 'Options making extra gains of actinides and fission products (OMEGA)' and to promote the related researches. Also in JAERI, the research on the group separation method for separating transuranic elements, strontium and cesium from high level radioactive wastes has been carried out since the beginning of 1970s. Also the concept of the fast reactors using minor actinide mixture fuel is being established, and the accelerator annihilation treatment utilizing the nuclear spallation reaction by high energy protons has been examined. In this report, from the viewpoint of the application of accelerators to atomic energy field, the annihilation treatment method by the nuclear spallation reaction utilizing high intensity proton accelerators, the plan of the various engineering utilization of proton beam, and the development of accelerators in JAERI are described. The way of thinking on the annihilation treatment of radioactive waste, the system using fast neutrons, the way of thinking on the development of high intensity proton accelerator technology, the steps of the development, the research and development for constructing the basic technology accelerator, 2 MeV beam acceleration test, the basic technology accelerator utilization facility and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  11. EuCARD2: enhanced accelerator research and development in Europe

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. EuCARD2 is an European research project which will be realized during 2013-2017 inside the EC FP7 framework. The project concerns the development and coordination of European Accelerator Research and Development. The project is particularly important, to a number of domestic laboratories, due to some plans to build large accelerator infrastructure in Poland. Large accelerator infrastructure of fundamental and applied research character stimulates around it the development and industrial applications as well as biomedical of advanced accelerators, material research and engineering, cryo-technology, mechatronics, robotics, and in particular electronics - like networked measurement and control systems, sensors, computer systems, automation and control systems. The paper presents a digest of the European project EuCARD2 which is Enhanced European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. The paper presents a digest of the research results and assumptions in the domain of accelerator science and technology in Europe, shown during the final fourth annual meeting of the EuCARD - European Coordination of Accelerator R&D, and the kick-off meeting of the EuCARD2. There are debated a few basic groups of accelerator systems components like: measurement - control networks of large geometrical extent, multichannel systems for large amounts of metrological data acquisition, precision photonic networks of reference time, frequency and phase distribution, high field magnets, superconducting cavities, novel beam collimators, etc. The paper bases on the following materials: Internet and Intranet documents combined with EuCARD2, Description of Work FP7 EuCARD-2 DoW-312453, 2013-02-13, and discussions and preparatory materials worked on by Eucard-2 initiators.

  12. Driving Parts Optimization Design for Radiation Shielding Doors of Proton Accelerator Research Center

    PEFP(Proton Engineering Frontier Project) was Launched in 2002 as one of the 21st Century Frontier R and D Programs of MOST(Ministry of Science and Technology). Gyeongju city was selected as the project host site in March, 2006, where 'Proton Accelerator Research Center' was going to be constructed. After starting the design in 2005, the Architectural and Civil design work has been performed by 2010. Since the Earthwork was started in 2009, the Construction works of Accelerator Facilities has been going smoothly to complete by 2012. In this paper, we describe driving Parts optimization design for radiation shielding doors of Proton Accelerator Research Center

  13. Project Development Teams: A Novel Mechanism for Accelerating Translational Research

    Sajdyk, Tammy J.; Sors, Thomas G.; Hunt, Joe D.; Murray, Mary E.; Deford, Melanie E.; Shekhar, Anantha; Denne, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    The trend in conducting successful biomedical research is shifting from individual academic labs to coordinated collaborative research teams. Teams of experienced investigators with a wide variety of expertise are now critical for developing and maintaining a successful, productive research program. However, assembling a team whose members have the right expertise requires a great deal of time and many resources. To assist investigators seeking such resources, the Indiana Clinical and Transla...

  14. Graduate education and research in the ERA of large accelerators

    Questions and concerns of the experimental particle physics community are addressed in these categories: quality of research, independence, creativity, evaluation and recognition, and value in graduate education

  15. NASA's Spaceflight Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension Research Plan: An accelerated Research Collaboration

    Otto, Christian; Fogarty, J.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J.

    2010-01-01

    To date six long duration astronauts have experienced in flight visual changes and post flight signs of optic disc edema, globe flattening, choroidal folds, hyperoptic shifts and or raised intracranial pressure. In some cases the changes were transient while in others they are persistent with varying degrees of visual impairment. Given that all astronauts exposed to microgravity experience a cephalad fluid shift, and that both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients have exhibited optic nerve sheath edema on MRI, there is a high probability that all astronauts develop in-flight idiopathic intracranial hypertension to some degree. Those who are susceptible, have an increased likelihood of developing treatment resistant papilledema resulting in visual impairment and possible long-term vision loss. Such an acquired disability would have a profound mission impact and would be detrimental to the long term health of the astronaut. The visual impairment and increased intracranial pressure phenomenon appears to have multiple contributing factors. Consequently, the working "physiological fault bush" with elevated intracranial pressure at its center, is divided into ocular effects, and CNS and other effects. Some of these variables have been documented and or measured through operational data gathering, while others are unknown, undocumented and or hypothetical. Both the complexity of the problem and the urgency to find a solution require that a unique, non-traditional research model be employed such as the Accelerated Research Collaboration(TM) (ARC) model that has been pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. In the ARC model a single entity facilitates and manages all aspects of the basic, translational, and clinical research, providing expert oversight for both scientific and managerial efforts. The result is a comprehensive research plan executed by a multidisciplinary team and the elimination of stove-piped research. The ARC model emphasizes efficient and effective

  16. Electron accelerators for research at the frontiers of nuclear physics

    Electron accelerators for the frontiers of nuclear physics must provide high duty factor (>80%) for coincidence measurements; few-hundred-MeV through few-GeV energy for work in the nucleonic, hadronic, and confinement regimes; energy resolution of ∼10-4; and high current (≥ 100 μA). To fulfill these requirements new machines and upgrades of existing ones are being planned or constructed. Representative microtron-based facilities are the upgrade of MAMI at the University of Mainz (West Germany), the proposed two-stage cascaded microtron at the University of Illinois (USA), and the three-stage Troitsk ''polytron'' (USSR). Representative projects to add pulse stretcher rings to existing linacs are the upgrades at MIT-Bates (USA) and at NIKHEF-K (Netherlands). Recent advances in superconducting rf technology, especially in cavity design and fabrication, have made large superconducting cw linacs become feasible. Recirculating superconducting cw linacs are under construction at the University of Darmstadt (West Germany) and at CEBAF (USA), and a proposal is being developed at Saclay (France). 31 refs

  17. International topical meeting on nuclear research applications and utilization of accelerators. Book of abstracts

    Applications of particle accelerators cover a number of areas, from strategic and applied research, safety and security, environmental applications, materials research and analytical sciences, to radioisotope production and radiation processing. Accelerator based techniques and pulsed neutron sources are expected to lead to new initiatives in materials research of relevance for both the nuclear and non-nuclear fields. Material science studies with the use of accelerators, neutron beams and other nuclear analytical methods are relevant to the development of advanced reactors, nuclear fuel cycle needs and fusion research. In this regard, a better understanding of the irradiation effects in materials for energy and non-energy applications is needed, and is reflected in accelerator techniques for modification and analysis of materials for nuclear technologies. Accelerator applications for innovative nuclear systems aiming at rad-waste transmutation (e.g., accelerator driven systems) are being pursued in many countries. Research and development using accelerators involves a broad spectrum of skills to build a cadre of trained experts in nuclear techniques in IAEA Member States, and to generate knowledge for innovative methodologies and tools. The present conference is also being held in cooperation with the American Nuclear Society (ANS), which successfully organized the series of accelerator applications conferences known as AccApp. The ANS series of topical meetings has provided a forum for the global exchange of scientific and technical knowledge on a wide variety of related topics since the first AccApp took place in 1997 in Albuquerque, USA. The last conference which was held in 2007 in Pocatello, USA, was jointly organized by the ANS and the IAEA. The main objectives of the conference are to promote exchange of information among IAEA Member States representatives/delegates and to discuss new trends in accelerator applications including nuclear materials research

  18. Bacteria and bioremediation of marine oil spills

    Virtually all marine ecosystems harbor indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. These hydrocarbon degraders comprise less than one percent of the bacterial community in unpolluted environments, but generally increase to one to ten percent following petroleum contamination. Various hydrocarbons are degraded by these microorganisms at different rates, so there is an evolution in the residual hydrocarbon mixture, and some hydrocarbons and asphaltic petroleum hydrocarbons remain undegraded. Fortunately, these persistent petroleum pollutants are, for the most part, insoluble or are bound to solids; hence they are not biologically available and therefore not toxic to marine organisms. Carbon dioxide, water, and cellular biomass produced by the microorganisms from the degradable hydrocarbons may be consumed by detrital feeders and comprise the end products of the natural biological degradation process. Bioremediation attempts to accelerate the natural hydrocarbon degradation rates by overcoming factors that limit bacterial hydrocarbon degrading activities

  19. Bioremediation of metals and radionuclides: What it is and How itWorks

    McCullough, J.; Hazen, Terry; Benson, Sally

    1999-01-01

    This primer is intended for people interested in DOE environmental problems and in their potential solutions. It will specifically look at some of the more hazardous metal and radionuclide contaminants found on DOE lands and at the possibilities for using bioremediation technology to clean up these contaminants. Bioremediation is a technology that can be used to reduce, eliminate, or contain hazardous waste. Over the past two decades, it has become widely accepted that microorganisms, and to a lesser extent plants, can transform and degrade many types of contaminants. These transformation and degradation processes vary, depending on physical environment, microbial communities, and nature of contaminant. This technology includes intrinsic bioremediation, which relies on naturally occurring processes, and accelerated bioremediation, which enhances microbial degradation or transformation through inoculation with microorganisms (bioaugmentation) or the addition of nutrients (biostimulation).

  20. Accelerating String Set Matching in FPGA Hardware for Bioinformatics Research

    Burgess Shane C

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes techniques for accelerating the performance of the string set matching problem with particular emphasis on applications in computational proteomics. The process of matching peptide sequences against a genome translated in six reading frames is part of a proteogenomic mapping pipeline that is used as a case-study. The Aho-Corasick algorithm is adapted for execution in field programmable gate array (FPGA devices in a manner that optimizes space and performance. In this approach, the traditional Aho-Corasick finite state machine (FSM is split into smaller FSMs, operating in parallel, each of which matches up to 20 peptides in the input translated genome. Each of the smaller FSMs is further divided into five simpler FSMs such that each simple FSM operates on a single bit position in the input (five bits are sufficient for representing all amino acids and special symbols in protein sequences. Results This bit-split organization of the Aho-Corasick implementation enables efficient utilization of the limited random access memory (RAM resources available in typical FPGAs. The use of on-chip RAM as opposed to FPGA logic resources for FSM implementation also enables rapid reconfiguration of the FPGA without the place and routing delays associated with complex digital designs. Conclusion Experimental results show storage efficiencies of over 80% for several data sets. Furthermore, the FPGA implementation executing at 100 MHz is nearly 20 times faster than an implementation of the traditional Aho-Corasick algorithm executing on a 2.67 GHz workstation.

  1. Graduate Student Program in Materials and Engineering Research and Development for Future Accelerators

    Spentzouris, Linda [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-07-07

    The objective of the proposal was to develop graduate student training in materials and engineering research relevant to the development of particle accelerators. Many components used in today's accelerators or storage rings are at the limit of performance. The path forward in many cases requires the development of new materials or fabrication techniques, or a novel engineering approach. Often, accelerator-based laboratories find it difficult to get top-level engineers or materials experts with the motivation to work on these problems. The three years of funding provided by this grant was used to support development of accelerator components through a multidisciplinary approach that cut across the disciplinary boundaries of accelerator physics, materials science, and surface chemistry. The following results were achieved: (1) significant scientific results on fabrication of novel photocathodes, (2) application of surface science and superconducting materials expertise to accelerator problems through faculty involvement, (3) development of instrumentation for fabrication and characterization of materials for accelerator components, (4) student involvement with problems at the interface of material science and accelerator physics.

  2. Architecture and Civil Design Status of the Proton Accelerator Research Center in PEFP

    PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project) is scheduled to administrate the conventional facilities design with Gyeongju and complement its unfit points. When construction work starts according to the construction schedule, a field work office will be installed to supervise the Proton Accelerator Conventional Facilities Construction. In this paper, we describe the geological investigation procedure for the construction of the proton accelerator conventional facilities of PEFP. By the geological investigation, data for the reasonable and economic construction work, such as stratum structure and geotechnical characteristics. In Site Plot Plan for PEFP, we classified center as 2 groups such as main facilities and support facilities. We also designed access road of the Proton Accelerator Research Center of PEFP. In architectural design for PEFP, we described the design procedure of the buildings and landscape architectures of the Proton Accelerator Research Center

  3. Research on accelerator-driven transmutation and studies of experimental facilities

    Takizuka, Takakazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    JAERI is carrying out R and Ds on accelerator-driven transmutation systems under the national OMEGA Program that aims at development of the technology to improve efficiency and safety in the final disposal of radioactive waste. Research facilities for accelerator-driven transmutation experiments are proposed to construct within the framework of the planned JAERI Neutron Science Project. This paper describes the features of the proposed accelerator-driven transmutation systems and their technical issues to be solved. A research facility plan under examination is presented. The plan is divided in two phases. In the second phase, technical feasibility of accelerator-driven systems will be demonstrated with a 30-60 MW experimental integrated system and with a 7 MW high-power target facility. (author)

  4. Computational Science Guides and Accelerates Hydrogen Research (Fact Sheet)

    2010-12-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in using computational science to enhance hydrogen-related research and development in areas such as storage and photobiology. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center and Biosciences Center.

  5. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. Annual report, October 1978-September 1979

    1980-03-01

    Topics covered include: Super HILAC and Bevalac operations; high intensity uranium beams line item; advanced high charge state ion source; 184-inch synchrocyclotron; VENUS project; positron-electron project; high field superconducting accelerator magnets; beam cooling; accelerator theory; induction linac drivers; RF linacs and storage rings; theory; neutral beam systems development; experimental atomic physics; neutral beam plasma research; plasma theory; and the Tormac project. (GHT)

  6. Research on cw electron accelerators using room-temperature rf structures: Annual report

    This joint NBS-Los Alamos project of ''Research on CW Electron Accelerators Using Room-Temperature RF Structures'' began seven years ago with the goal of developing a technology base for cw electron accelerators. In this report we describe our progress during FY 1986 and present our plans for completion of the project. First, however, it is appropriate to review the past contributions of the project, describe its status, and indicate its future benefits

  7. High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) Archives Office

    At KEK, there is a section named Archives Office since 2004. The mission of the Office is for collecting and preserving, as research materials and official documents which are understood to be important from historical point of view. The Office was originally proposed by the former Director General, Hirotaka Sugawara based on his experiences as the manager of the KEK laboratory. In this article, we sketch the activity of the Office. (author)

  8. Accelerating cancer systems biology research through Semantic Web technology.

    Wang, Zhihui; Sagotsky, Jonathan; Taylor, Thomas; Shironoshita, Patrick; Deisboeck, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    Cancer systems biology is an interdisciplinary, rapidly expanding research field in which collaborations are a critical means to advance the field. Yet the prevalent database technologies often isolate data rather than making it easily accessible. The Semantic Web has the potential to help facilitate web-based collaborative cancer research by presenting data in a manner that is self-descriptive, human and machine readable, and easily sharable. We have created a semantically linked online Digital Model Repository (DMR) for storing, managing, executing, annotating, and sharing computational cancer models. Within the DMR, distributed, multidisciplinary, and inter-organizational teams can collaborate on projects, without forfeiting intellectual property. This is achieved by the introduction of a new stakeholder to the collaboration workflow, the institutional licensing officer, part of the Technology Transfer Office. Furthermore, the DMR has achieved silver level compatibility with the National Cancer Institute's caBIG, so users can interact with the DMR not only through a web browser but also through a semantically annotated and secure web service. We also discuss the technology behind the DMR leveraging the Semantic Web, ontologies, and grid computing to provide secure inter-institutional collaboration on cancer modeling projects, online grid-based execution of shared models, and the collaboration workflow protecting researchers' intellectual property. PMID:23188758

  9. Analysis of conditions to safety and radiological protection of Brazilian research particle accelerators facilities

    Eleven institutions of education and research in Brazil use particle accelerators, which fulfill different functions and activities. Currently, these institutions employ a total of fifteen accelerators. In this paper, the object of study is the radiological protection of occupationally exposed individuals, the general public and the radiation safety of particle accelerators. Research facilities with accelerators are classified in categories I and II according to the International Atomic Energy Agency or groups IX and X in accordance with the Brazilian National Commission of Nuclear Energy. Of the 15 accelerators in use for research in Brazil, four belong to category I or group X and eleven belong to category II or group IX. The methodology presented and developed in this work was made through the inspection and assessment of safety and radiological protection of thirteen particle accelerators facilities, and its main purpose was to promote safer use of this practice by following established guidelines for safety and radiological protection. The results presented in this work showed the need to create a program, in our country, for the control of safety and radiological protection of this ionizing radiation practice. (author)

  10. Ligninolytic fungi in bioremediation: extracellular enzyme production and degradation rate

    Novotný, Čeněk; Svobodová, Kateřina; Erbanová, Pavla; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Kasinath, Aparna; Lang, E.; Šašek, Václav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 36, - (2004), s. 1545-1551. ISSN 0038-0717 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/00/1303; GA MŠk 1P05ME828 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : ligninolytic fungi * bioremediation * organopollutants Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.234, year: 2004

  11. Microbial bioremediation of a uranium(VI) contaminated aquifer

    Leigh, M. B.; Cardenas, E.; Wu, W. M.; Uhlík, Ondřej; Carley, J.; Carroll, S.; Gentry, T.; Marsh, T. L.; Zhou, J.; Jardine, P.; Criddle, C. S.; Tiedje, J. M.

    Praha: VŠCHT Praha, 2007 - (Macková, M.; Macek, T.; Demnerová, K.; Pazlar, V.). s. 16 ISBN 978-80-7080-025-6. [Symposium on Biosorption and Bioremediation /4./. 26.08.2007-30.08.2007, Praha] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : stable isotope probing * uranium * biostimulation Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  12. Genomic and physiological perspectives on bioremediation processes at the FRC

    Cardenas, Erick; Leigh, Mary Beth; Hemme, Christopher; Gentry, Terry; Harzman, Christina; Wu, Weimin; Criddle, Craig S.; Zhou, Jizhong; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James M.

    2006-04-05

    A suite of molecular and physiological studies, including metal reduction assays, metagenomics, functional gene microarrays and community sequence analyses were applied to investigate organisms involved in bioremediation processes at the ERSP Field Research Center and to understand the effects of stress on the makeup and evolution of microbial communities to inform effective remediation strategies.

  13. INTRINSIC BIOREMEDIATION OF A PETROLEUM-IMPACTED WETLAND

    Following the 1994 San Jacinto River flood and oil spill in southeast Texas, a petroleum-contaminated wetland was reserved for a long-term research program to evaluate bioremediation as a viable spill response tool. The first phase of this program, presented in this paper, evalua...

  14. Neutron physics and nuclear data measurements with accelerators and research reactors

    The report contains a collection of lectures devoted to the latest theoretical and experimental developments in the field of fast neutron physics and nuclear data measurements. The possibilities offered by particle accelerators and research reactors for research and technological applications in these fields are pointed out. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Neutron physics and nuclear data measurements with accelerators and research reactors

    The report contains a collection of lectures devoted to the latest theoretical and experimental developments in the field of fast neutron measurements and in the studies of neutron interactions with nuclei. The possibilities offered by particle accelerators and research reactors for research and technological applications in these fields are pointed out

  16. Bioremediation of fossil fuel contaminated soils

    Bioremediation involves the use of microorganisms and their biodegradative capacity to remove pollutants. The byproducts of effective bioremediation, such as water and carbon dioxide, are nontoxic and can be accommodated without harm to the environment and living organisms. This paper reports that using bioremediation to remove pollutants has many advantages. This method is cheap, whereas physical methods for decontaminating the environment are extraordinarily expensive. Neither government nor private industry can afford the cost to clean up physically the nation's known toxic waste sites. Therefore, a renewed interest in bioremediation has developed. Whereas current technologies call for moving large quantities of toxic waste and its associated contaminated soil to incinerators, bioremediation can be done on site and requires simple equipment that is readily available. Bioremediation, though, is not the solution for all environmental pollution problems. Like other technologies, bioremediation has limitations

  17. Proceedings of International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Research Applications and Utilization of Accelerators

    The IAEA has responded to Member States needs by implementing programmatic activities that provide interested Member States, particularly those in developing countries, forums to exchange information on new trends and applications in accelerator-based nuclear science and technology. Accelerator-based technologies are regarded by many Member States as a key element to serve social and economic development in a wide variety of applications in the energy, health, agriculture, environment, materials, natural resources and education sectors. Almost all of the more than 18 000 particle accelerators in the world today are dedicated machines used for commercial applications, being either in the medical sector (radiotherapy treatments) or in the industrial sector (materials modification). Only a few percent (a few hundred) of the worldwide inventory of accelerators is used for scientific research, mainly at universities, research institutes and international organizations. However, the knowledge and technological spin-offs gained from these research accelerators drive the development of commercial applications and support the research and development needs of researchers in a wide and diverse range of fields, including strategic and applied research, safety and security, environment, materials, analytical services, advanced nuclear fuel cycles, radioisotope production and radiation processing. The ongoing benefits afforded by accelerators derive principally from their ability to adapt to and keep pace with evolving changes in user demands. The trend in advanced countries is to utilize accelerators in a dedicated and optimized way to support a few specific high technology application areas. The main demand from researchers is for high quality X ray, neutron and ion beams to engage in cutting-edge research in energy, food and agriculture, biology, medicine and materials science. The enhancement of nuclear science education and research in all Member States, but in particular

  18. Legal and social concerns to the development of bioremediation technologies

    The social and legal framework within which bioremediation technologies must be researched, developed, and deployed in the US are discussed in this report. Discussions focus on policies, laws and regulations, intellectual property, technology transfer, and stakeholder concerns. These discussions are intended to help program managers, scientists and engineers understand the social and legal framework within which they work, and be cognizant of relevant issues that must be navigated during bioremediation technology research, development, and deployment activities. While this report focuses on the legal and social environment within which the DOE operates, the laws, regulations and social processes could apply to DoD and other sites nationwide. This report identifies specific issues related to bioremediation technologies, including those involving the use of plants; native, naturally occurring microbes; non-native, naturally occurring microbes; genetically engineered organisms; and microbial products (e.g., enzymes, surfactants, chelating compounds). It considers issues that fall within the following general categories: US biotechnology policy and the regulation of field releases of organisms; US environmental laws and waste cleanup regulations; intellectual property and patenting issues; technology transfer procedures for commercializing technology developed through government-funded research; stakeholder concerns about bioremediation proposals; and methods for assuring public involvement in technology development and deployment

  19. Legal and social concerns to the development of bioremediation technologies

    Bilyard, G.R.; McCabe, G.H.; White, K.A.; Gajewski, S.W.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Jaksch, J.A.; Kirwan-Taylor, H.A.; McKinney, M.D.

    1996-09-01

    The social and legal framework within which bioremediation technologies must be researched, developed, and deployed in the US are discussed in this report. Discussions focus on policies, laws and regulations, intellectual property, technology transfer, and stakeholder concerns. These discussions are intended to help program managers, scientists and engineers understand the social and legal framework within which they work, and be cognizant of relevant issues that must be navigated during bioremediation technology research, development, and deployment activities. While this report focuses on the legal and social environment within which the DOE operates, the laws, regulations and social processes could apply to DoD and other sites nationwide. This report identifies specific issues related to bioremediation technologies, including those involving the use of plants; native, naturally occurring microbes; non-native, naturally occurring microbes; genetically engineered organisms; and microbial products (e.g., enzymes, surfactants, chelating compounds). It considers issues that fall within the following general categories: US biotechnology policy and the regulation of field releases of organisms; US environmental laws and waste cleanup regulations; intellectual property and patenting issues; technology transfer procedures for commercializing technology developed through government-funded research; stakeholder concerns about bioremediation proposals; and methods for assuring public involvement in technology development and deployment.

  20. STUDIES ON BIOREMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS: BIOAVAILABILITY, BIODEGRADABILITY, AND TOXICITY ISSUES

    The widespread contamination of aquatic sediments by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has created a need for cost-effective bioremediation processes, on which the bioavailability and the toxicity of PAHs often have a significant impact. This research investigated the biode...

  1. A new NEDO research project towards hospital based accelerator BNCT using advanced DDS system

    A new national project of developing a hospital based accelerator for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) with advanced drug delivery system (DDS) has been started in 2005. In this paper, the outline of the new project will be introduced. The project includes two main topics: 1) a hospital based accelerator for BNCT will be developed by a research consortium of Universities and companies. A fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) type of accelerator with internal target is planned. 2) New boronated DDS using different methods including porphyrins, virus envelope vector, and liposome are planned. BNCT may become a first line charged particle therapy if the hospital based accelerator become feasible due to broadening the opportunity to use the neutron source. Due to such clinical convenience, there will be also possibility to spread the indication of BNCT for the diseases (cancer and other diseases) which has not been the candidate for BNCT in the nuclear-reactor era. (author)

  2. Research and development activities around the EUROTRANS accelerator for ADS applications

    An Accelerator Driven System (ADS) for transmutation of nuclear waste typically requires a 600 MeV - 1 GeV accelerator delivering a proton flux of a few mAs for demonstrators, and of a few tens of mAs for large industrial systems. Such a machine belongs to the category of the high power proton accelerators, with an additional requirement for exceptional 'reliability': because of the induced thermal stress to the subcritical core, the number of unwanted 'beam-trips' should not exceed a few per year, a specification that is several orders of magnitude above usual performance. This paper briefly describes the reference solution adopted for such a machine, based on a linear superconducting accelerator, and presents the status of the Research and Development performed in this context. This work is performed within the 6th Framework Program EC project 'EUROTRANS' (EC Contract No: FI6W 516520, 'EUROTRANS')

  3. Bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil

    This paper reports on bioremediation, which offers a cost-competitive, effective remediation alternative for soil contaminated with petroleum products. These technologies involve using microorganisms to biologically degrade organic constituents in contaminated soil. All bioremediation applications must mitigate various environmental rate limiting factors so that the biodegradation rates for petroleum hydrocarbons are optimized in field-relevant situations. Traditional bioremediation applications include landfarming, bioreactors, and composting. A more recent bioremediation application that has proven successful involves excavation of contaminated soil. The process involves the placement of the soils into a powerscreen, where it is screened to remove rocks and larger debris. The screened soil is then conveyed to a ribbon blender, where it is mixed in batch with nutrient solution containing nitrogen, phosphorus, water, and surfactants. Each mixed soil batch is then placed in a curing pile, where it remains undisturbed for the remainder of the treatment process, during which time biodegradation by naturally occurring microorganisms, utilizing biochemical pathways mediated by enzymes, will occur

  4. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility. Progress report, December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described.

  5. 典型POPs的生物降解修复技术研究与发展%Research and development of bioremediation technology for persistent organic pollutants degradation

    吴海珍; 韦朝海; 周盛

    2012-01-01

    engineered bacteria composed of multi-plasmids that are capable of degrading different pollutants due to the change of metabolic pathway; (iii) the technique of enzyme immobilization using carriers for improving enzyme stability, recycling and reuse; and (iv) the construction of biodegradation enzymes by subunit molecular replacement, enzyme-directed mutagenesis, and in vitro evolution of enzymes. In addition, the principles for improving POPs bioremediation by molecular biology are analyzed. The obstacles for the practical application of the genetically engineered microorganisms and immobilized enzymes are presented. Based on the analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) degradation as a typical case of bioremediation of POPs, it is stressed that it is necessary to establish multi-scale functions for the strengthen of biodegradation process. The fundamental scientific issues to resolve POPs pollution problems by the combination of molecular biology and genetic engineering are also proposed. This means that the typical POPs bioremediation techniques emphasize the need to build a synergic degradation theory for degradation of both POPs and macro-pollutants, and the pursuit of more functions with respect to the gene level, molecular level, reactor level and project level.

  6. Letter report: Ari Patrinos -- Subsurface bioremediation

    During the past summer, the authors had the opportunity to examine aspects of the remediation program of the Department of Energy (DOE). The most important conclusion that they have come to is that there is an urgent need to mount a comprehensive research program in remediation. It is also clear to them that DOE does not have the funding to carry out a program on the scale that is required. On the other hand, Environmental Management could very well fund such activities. They would hope that in the future there would be close collaboration between Environmental Management and Energy Research in putting together a comprehensive and well thought-out research program. Here, the authors comment on one aspect of remediation: subsurface bioremediation

  7. Bioremediation of oil spills

    Sánchez-Palencia González, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    Due to the increasing demand of petroleum everywhere, and the great amount of spills, accidents and disasters, there is an urgent need to find an effective, non-cost and harmless method to clean up the affected areas. There are microorganisms in nature (bacteria and fungi, mainly) that feed on hydrocarbons and transform them into others harmless chemical substances. These bacteria produce enzymes that degrade oil very effectively. This natural process can be accelerated by adding more bacteri...

  8. Research program for the 660 MeV proton accelerator driven MOX-plutonium subcritical assembly

    Barashenkov, V. S.; Buttsev, V. S.; Buttseva, G. L.; Dudarev, S. Ju.; Polanski, A.; Puzynin, I. V.; Sissakian, A. N.

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents the research program of the Experimental Accelerator Driven System (ADS), which employs a subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator operating in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna. Mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel (25% PuO2+75% UO2) designed for the BN-600 reactor use will be adopted for the core of the assembly. The present conceptual design of the experimental subcritical assembly is based on a core nominal unit capacity of 15 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient keff=0.945, energetic gain G=30, and accelerator beam power of 0.5 kW.

  9. Technical issues of accelerator-driven transmutation and a research facility

    In the late 1980s, Japan launched an ambitious long-term program on partitioning and transmutation (P-T), called OMEGA, aiming at development of the technology to improve efficiency and safety in the final disposal of high-level waste (HLW) and to recover useful elements from HLW. This paper describes the concept of double stratum nuclear fuel cycle and the concept of accelerator-driven transmutation systems, which are proposed by JAERI as the most efficient strategy and system for the deployment of P-T. Technical issues of accelerator-driven transmutation and a research facility plan under reviewing are summarized. More detail descriptions of technical issues and research facility plan are presented in the successive two companion papers. National and international R and D activities on accelerator-based transmutation are overviewed with emphasis placed on engineering experiment and demonstration test part of programs. (author)

  10. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) half-year report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1989

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification --both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; and final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target

  11. Artificial intelligence research in particle accelerator control systems for beam line tuning

    Pieck, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Tuning particle accelerators is time consuming and expensive, with a number of inherently non-linear interactions between system components. Conventional control methods have not been successful in this domain and the result is constant and expensive monitoring of the systems by human operators. This is particularly true for the start-up and conditioning phase after a maintenance period or an unexpected fault. In turn, this often requires a step-by-step restart of the accelerator. Surprisingly few attempts have been made to apply intelligent accelerator control techniques to help with beam tuning, fault detection, and fault recovery problems. The reason for that might be that accelerator facilities are rare and difficult to understand systems that require detailed expert knowledge about the underlying physics as well as months if not years of experience to understand the relationship between individual components, particularly if they are geographically disjoint. This paper will give an overview about the research effort in the accelerator community that has been dedicated to the use of artificial intelligence methods for accelerator beam line tuning.

  12. The history of development and applications of accelerators in the Institute of Nuclear Research and its ''daughter'' institutions

    In brief review, the general survey of particle accelerators' design, construction and applications in various fields of science and technology is given. The development of accelerator physics was initiated by Professor Soltan immediately after foundation of Institute of Nuclear Research. These works oriented initially on accelerator for research, were after extended on numerous applications of accelerator radiation sources in such important areas as medicine, radiation technology, nondestructive testing, agriculture and environmental protection. Due to this broad spectrum of different types of accelerators' design, it was necessary to master the fundamental directions of accelerator physics and technology: theory, computation methods, metrology and production basis. As the result of this efforts, nearly 90 of electron and ion accelerators were produced - half of them were exported. At present nearly 70 accelerators are operating in Poland, about 20 of them are of foreign origin. (author). 51 refs, 35 figs, 2 tabs

  13. A field experimentation on bioremediation: Bioren

    Most shoreline bioremediation strategies are based on the addition of limiting nutrients to contaminated environments to cause an acceleration of the natural biodegradation process. Before approval for operational use, these products designed to be used in the environment, should be validated in field trials to assure their efficiency in reducing residual contaminant concentrations and toxicity. This paper describes the design, implementation and preliminary results of an experimental field study to evaluate the effectiveness of the bioremediation agents BIOREN 1 and BIOREN 2 of interest to the EUREKA BIOREN program. The agents BIOREN 1 and 2 are proprietary formulations of nutrients synthesised from fish meal and they were proven effective in laboratory studies of the two granular nutrient formulations. BIOREN 1 is unique in that it is augmented with a biosurfactant. To provide equivalent nitrogen concentrations the quantities of BIOREN 1 and 2 added were respectively 10 and 14.4% of the oil quantity. The results showed a 'starter effect' for the formulation BIOREN 1: biodegradation was significantly enhance during the first five weeks of the experiment; after that the enhancement was weaker and significant differences were not observed between treatments. These results may be attributed to the fact that significant nutrient depletion may not occur in small scale controlled spill experiments. In addition, it has been proven that oxygen availability limited biodegradation. There is a need to develop aeration techniques, such as raking, that aerate the sediment without further burying the pollutant. Final oil balance assessment proved to be very instructive as it is the main practical factor taken into consideration by the operational team: the aim of the shoreline cleaning operation remains to reduce oil sediment content. (Author)

  14. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by cold-adapted microorganisms:Research advance%低温微生物修复石油烃类污染土壤研究进展

    王世杰; 王翔; 卢桂兰; 汪群慧; 李发生; 郭观林

    2011-01-01

    Cold-adapted microorganisms such as psychrotrophs and psychrophiles widely exist in the soils of sub-Arctic, Arctic, Antarctic, alpine, and high mountains, being the important microbial resources for the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons at low temperature. Using the unique advantage of cold-adapted microorganisms to the bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in low temperature region has become a research hotspot. This paper summarized the category and cold-adaptation mechanisms of the microorganisms able to degrade petroleum hydrocarbon at low temperature, biodegradation characteristics and mechanisms of different petroleum fractions under the action of cold-adapted microorganisms. bio-stimulation techniques for improving biodegradation efficiency, e. g. , inoculating petroleum-degrading microorganisms and adding nutrients or bio-surfactants. and the present status of applying molecular biotechnology in this research field,aimed to provide references to the development of bioremediation techniques for petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.%耐冷菌、嗜冷菌等低温微生物广泛存在于极地、高山以及高纬度等土壤环境中,是石油烃类污染物在低温条件下降解与转化的重要微生物资源.利用低温微生物的独特优势,石油污染土壤的低温生物修复技术的研究成为当前热点领域.本文系统综述了低温石油烃降解菌的分类及冷适机制,低温微生物对不同类型石油烃组分的降解特征和降解机理,低温环境中接种降解菌、添加营养物质和表面活性剂等强化技术在石油污染土壤中生物修复的应用.以及微生物分子生物学技术在低温微生物降解石油烃的研究现状,为拓展我国石油污染土壤生物修复技术提供参考.

  15. Accelerator research studies: Technical progress report, June 1, 1988--May 31, 1989

    This report discusses research progress in the following general topics: Study of transport and longitudinal compression of intense, high-brightness beams; study of collective ion acceleration by intense electron beams and pulse powered plasma focus; and study of microwave sources and parameter scaling for high-frequency electron-positron supercollider linacs

  16. Research and application of accelerated ageing management for important and susceptible components in nuclear power plants

    This paper introduced the background of research on accelerated ageing management (AAM) technology for important and susceptible components in Daya Bay nuclear power plant (NPP) and Lingao NPP, and expounded the connotation of AAM, demonstrated the AAM technical route, work architecture and interfaces with existing operation and maintenance system in NPPs. Some representative application examples of AAM technology for verifying the rationality and effectiveness of relevant research achievements also were presented. Development prospect of AAM technology was proposed at the last. (authors)

  17. Priority research areas to accelerate the development of practical ultraconductive copper conductors

    Lee, Dominic F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burwell, Malcolm [International Copper Association, Washington, DC (United States); Stillman, H. [International Copper Association, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report documents the findings at an Ultraconductive Copper Strategy Meeting held on March 11, 2015 in Washington DC. The aim of this meeting was to bring together researchers of ultraconductive copper in the U.S. to identify and prioritize critical non-proprietary research activities that will enhance the understanding in the material and accelerate its development into practical conductors. Every effort has been made to ensure that the discussion and findings are accurately reported in this document.

  18. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, Nuclear and Solid State Research Project, University of Tsukuba

    During the academic year of 1978 to 1979, the 12 UD pelletron tandem accelerator has operated successfully. Ion species used were polarized p, polarized d, α(from the polarized ion source), p, d, 16O and 18O (from the direct extraction ion source), and C, O, Cu and Au (from the sputtering ion source). Improvements were made in the detector and data acquisition system. The data handling system 'SHINE' was completed and is in full operation. Research works are reported in individual summaries under the following chapters: accelerator and beam transport system, general equipments nuclear physics, atomic and solid-state physics, and biological and medical science and others. (Mori, K.)

  19. Research progress for accelerator driven sub-critical Transmutation system (ADS)

    The minimization of the nuclear waste is the key problem for the long term and sustainable nuclear energy development. Accelerator driven system (ADS) is a kind of high efficient nuclear waste transmutation machine (or incinerator), which is the key technique to solve the nuclear water problem. The basic theory of ADS and driven influence of ADS and driven influence of ADS on the advanced accelerator, advanced cooling technique, etc are introduced. Mean while the present research situations of ADS in some countries are compared. At last, the key problem of the ADS development and the relationship between ADS and the development of nuclear energy in China is discussed. (authors)

  20. Bioremediation of PCBs. CRADA final report

    The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was signed between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and General Electric Company (GE) on August 12, 1991. The objective was a collaborative venture between researchers at GE and ORNL to develop bioremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The work was conducted over three years, and this report summarizes ORNL's effort. It was found that the total concentration of PCBs decreased by 70% for sequential anaerobic-aerobic treatment compared with a 67% decrease for aerobic treatment alone. The sequential treatment resulted in PCB products with fewer chlorines and shorter halflives in humans compared with either anaerobic or aerobic treatment alone. The study was expected to lead to a technology applicable to a field experiment that would be performed on a DOE contaminated site

  1. Bioremediation of PCBs. CRADA final report

    Klasson, K.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div., TN (United States); Abramowicz, D.A. [General Electric Co. Corporate Research and Development, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was signed between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and General Electric Company (GE) on August 12, 1991. The objective was a collaborative venture between researchers at GE and ORNL to develop bioremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The work was conducted over three years, and this report summarizes ORNL`s effort. It was found that the total concentration of PCBs decreased by 70% for sequential anaerobic-aerobic treatment compared with a 67% decrease for aerobic treatment alone. The sequential treatment resulted in PCB products with fewer chlorines and shorter halflives in humans compared with either anaerobic or aerobic treatment alone. The study was expected to lead to a technology applicable to a field experiment that would be performed on a DOE contaminated site.

  2. TOXICITY TRENDS DURING AN OIL SPILL BIOREMEDIATION EXPERIMENT ON A SANDY SHORELINE IN DELAWARE, USA

    A 13-week, refereed, inter-agency toxicity testing program involving five bioassay methods was used to document the effectiveness of shoreline bioremediation to accelerate toxicity reduction of an oiled sandy shoreline at Fowler Beach, Delaware, USA. The study was part of an inte...

  3. Research and Development of Nb3Sn Wires and Cables for High-Field Accelerator Magnets

    Barzi, Emanuela [Fermilab; Zlobin, Alexander V. [Fermilab

    2016-02-18

    The latest strategic plans for High Energy Physics endorse steadfast superconducting magnet technology R&D for future Energy Frontier Facilities. This includes 10 to 16 T Nb3Sn accelerator magnets for the luminosity upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider and eventually for a future 100 TeV scale proton-proton (pp) collider. This paper describes the multi-decade R&D investment in the Nb3Sn superconductor technology, which was crucial to produce the first reproducible 10 to 12 T accelerator-quality dipoles and quadrupoles, as well as their scale-up. We also indicate prospective research areas in superconducting Nb3Sn wires and cables to achieve the next goals for superconducting accelerator magnets. Emphasis is on increasing performance and decreasing costs while pushing the Nb3Sn technology to its limits for future pp colliders.

  4. BESTIA - The next generation ultra-fast CO2 laser for advanced accelerator research

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Babzien, Markus; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Skaritka, John; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.

    2016-09-01

    Over the last two decades, BNL's ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. Our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the mid-infrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain, including new regimes in the particle acceleration of ions and electrons.

  5. The COBRA accelerator pulsed-power driver for Cornell/Sandia ICF research

    Smith, D.L.; Ingwersen, P.; Bennett, L.F.; Boyes, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, D.E.; Greenly, J.B.; Sudan, R.N.; Hammer, D.A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1995-07-01

    This paper introduces and describes the new Cornell Beam Research Accelerator, COBRA, the result of a three and one-half year collaboration. The flexible 4 to 5-MV, 100 to 250-kA, 46-ns pulse width accelerator is based on a four-cavity Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA) design. In addition to being a mix of new and existing components, COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 1800 about their vertical axis. Our tests with negative high voltage on the inner MITL stalk indicate that the vacuum power flow has established reasonable azimuthal symmetry within about 2 ns (or 0.6 m) after the cavity output cap. Preliminary results with the accelerator, single cavity, and MITL are presented alone, with the design details and circuit model predictions.

  6. White rot fungi in bioremediation – Ecology in the soil environment

    Baldrian, Petr

    Chania: Technical University of Crete, 2008, s. 1-4. ISBN 978-960-8475-12-0. [European Bioremediation Conference /4./. Chania (GR), 03.09.2008-06.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 155; GA MŠk LC06066 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : basidiomycetes * bioremediation * forest soil Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  7. Role of Microbial Enzymes in the Bioremediation of Pollutants: A Review

    Karigar, Chandrakant S.; Rao, Shwetha S.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of enzymes from bacteria, fungi, and plants have been reported to be involved in the biodegradation of toxic organic pollutants. Bioremediation is a cost effective and nature friendly biotechnology that is powered by microbial enzymes. The research activity in this area would contribute towards developing advanced bioprocess technology to reduce the toxicity of the pollutants and also to obtain novel useful substances. The information on the mechanisms of bioremediation-related...

  8. Research nuclear reactor and particle accelerator as complementary facilities in obtaining experimental nuclear data

    In the last decade a large amount of diverse and high precision nuclear data is in high demand to support both power applications (in nuclear fusion and fission reactors, fuel cycle in all its stages, nuclear safety) and non-power applications (radiation dosimetry, life sciences, ecology, industry, etc.) of atomic and nuclear techniques. The atomic and nuclear data are generated from experimental measurements, theoretical model calculations and data evaluation, which are finally validated internationally and included in data bases under standardized formats. Measuring of these data imply utilization of research reactors and charged particle accelerators, in complex experiments characterized by high degree of complementarity. Aspects of this complementarity in the nuclear data obtained from reactors and accelerators will be presented in this work. In Romania an advanced research reactor (TRIGA at INR Pitesti) and an electrostatic 4-5 MeV/nucleon accelerator (TANDEM Van de Graaff at IFIN - HH, Bucharest) are operational and a rich scientific expertise in the field of nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms is available. Consequently, the paper considers a project at a national scale for measuring and evaluating nuclear data. Having in view numerous signals launched by international organizations (IAEA-Vienna, NEA-OECD, NNDC-USA) such a project would have a powerful international support because of increasing world wide demand of atomic and nuclear data. Nuclear data are either structure and decay nuclear data or reaction nuclear data. The first class refers to nuclear state properties (masses, excitation energies, quantum numbers, lifetimes, etc.) as well as to their decay modes. Data from the second class refer to differential or integral cross sections. The paper presents comparatively the data obtainable at accelerators and reactors for the two above mentioned classes of nuclear data, particularly, the data required for building ADS (Accelerator Driven Systems

  9. Selected works of basic research on the physics and technology of accelerator driven clean nuclear power system

    38 theses are presented in this selected works of basic research on the physics and technology of accelerator driven clean nuclear power system. It includes reactor physics and experiment, accelerators physics and technology, nuclear physics, material research and partitioning. 13 abstracts, which has been presented on magazines home and abroad, are collected in the appendix

  10. Medical bioremediation of age-related diseases

    Rittmann Bruce E

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Catabolic insufficiency in humans leads to the gradual accumulation of a number of pathogenic compounds associated with age-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and macular degeneration. Removal of these compounds is a widely researched therapeutic option, but the use of antibodies and endogenous human enzymes has failed to produce effective treatments, and may pose risks to cellular homeostasis. Another alternative is "medical bioremediation," the use of microbial enzymes to augment missing catabolic functions. The microbial genetic diversity in most natural environments provides a resource that can be mined for enzymes capable of degrading just about any energy-rich organic compound. This review discusses targets for biodegradation, the identification of candidate microbial enzymes, and enzyme-delivery methods.