WorldWideScience

Sample records for acam2000 smallpox vaccinia

  1. ACAM2000™: The new smallpox vaccine for United States Strategic National Stockpile

    Aysegul Nalca

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aysegul Nalca, Elizabeth E ZumbrunCenter for Aerobiological Sciences, US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID, Fort Detrick, MD, USAAbstract: Smallpox was eradicated more than 30 years ago, but heightened concerns over bioterrorism have brought smallpox and smallpox vaccination back to the forefront. The previously licensed smallpox vaccine in the United States, Dryvax® (Wyeth Laboratories, Inc., was highly effective, but the supply was insufficient to vaccinate the entire current US population. Additionally, Dryvax® had a questionable safety profile since it consisted of a pool of vaccinia virus strains with varying degrees of virulence, and was grown on the skin of calves, an outdated technique that poses an unnecessary risk of contamination. The US government has therefore recently supported development of an improved live vaccinia virus smallpox vaccine. This initiative has resulted in the development of ACAM2000™ (Acambis, Inc.™, a single plaque-purified vaccinia virus derivative of Dryvax®, aseptically propagated in cell culture. Preclinical and clinical trials reported in 2008 demonstrated that ACAM2000™ has comparable immunogenicity to that of Dryvax®, and causes a similar frequency of adverse events. Furthermore, like Dryvax®, ACAM2000™ vaccination has been shown by careful cardiac screening to result in an unexpectedly high rate of myocarditis and pericarditis. ACAM2000™ received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval in August 2007, and replaced Dryvax® for all smallpox vaccinations in February 2008. Currently, over 200 million doses of ACAM2000™ have been produced for the US Strategic National Stockpile. This review of ACAM2000™ addresses the production, characterization, clinical trials, and adverse events associated with this new smallpox vaccine.Keywords: smallpox, vaccinia, variola, vaccine, efficacy, safety

  2. Treatment with the smallpox antiviral tecovirimat (ST-246) alone or in combination with ACAM2000 vaccination is effective as a postsymptomatic therapy for monkeypox virus infection.

    Berhanu, Aklile; Prigge, Jonathan T; Silvera, Peter M; Honeychurch, Kady M; Hruby, Dennis E; Grosenbach, Douglas W

    2015-07-01

    The therapeutic efficacies of smallpox vaccine ACAM2000 and antiviral tecovirimat given alone or in combination starting on day 3 postinfection were compared in a cynomolgus macaque model of lethal monkeypox virus infection. Postexposure administration of ACAM2000 alone did not provide any protection against severe monkeypox disease or mortality. In contrast, postexposure treatment with tecovirimat alone or in combination with ACAM2000 provided full protection. Additionally, tecovirimat treatment delayed until day 4, 5, or 6 postinfection was 83% (days 4 and 5) or 50% (day 6) effective. PMID:25896687

  3. Use of Vaccinia Virus Smallpox Vaccine in Laboratory and Health Care Personnel at Risk for Occupational Exposure to Orthopoxviruses - Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2015.

    Petersen, Brett W; Harms, Tiara J; Reynolds, Mary G; Harrison, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    On June 25, 2015, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended routine vaccination with live smallpox (vaccinia) vaccine (ACAM2000) for laboratory personnel who directly handle 1) cultures or 2) animals contaminated or infected with replication-competent vaccinia virus, recombinant vaccinia viruses derived from replication-competent vaccinia strains (i.e., those that are capable of causing clinical infection and producing infectious virus in humans), or other orthopoxviruses that infect humans (e.g., monkeypox, cowpox, and variola) (recommendation category: A, evidence type 2 [Box]). Health care personnel (e.g., physicians and nurses) who currently treat or anticipate treating patients with vaccinia virus infections and whose contact with replication-competent vaccinia viruses is limited to contaminated materials (e.g., dressings) and persons administering ACAM2000 smallpox vaccine who adhere to appropriate infection prevention measures can be offered vaccination with ACAM2000 (recommendation category: B, evidence type 2 [Box]). These revised recommendations update the previous ACIP recommendations for nonemergency use of vaccinia virus smallpox vaccine for laboratory and health care personnel at risk for occupational exposure to orthopoxviruses (1). Since 2001, when the previous ACIP recommendations were developed, ACAM2000 has replaced Dryvax as the only smallpox vaccine licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and available for use in the United States (2). These recommendations contain information on ACAM2000 and its use in laboratory and health care personnel at risk for occupational exposure to orthopoxviruses. PMID:26985679

  4. Smallpox vaccine, ACAM2000: Sites and duration of viral shedding and effect of povidone iodine on scarification site shedding and immune response.

    Pittman, Phillip R; Garman, Patrick M; Kim, Sung-Han; Schmader, Trevor J; Nieding, William J; Pike, Jason G; Knight, Ryan; Johnston, Sara C; Huggins, John W; Kortepeter, Mark G; Korman, Lawrence; Ranadive, Manmohan; Quinn, Xiaofei; Meyers, Mitchell S

    2015-06-12

    The U.S. Department of Defense vaccinates personnel deployed to high-risk areas with the vaccinia virus (VACV)-based smallpox vaccine. Autoinoculations and secondary and tertiary transmissions due to VACV shedding from the vaccination site continue to occur despite education of vaccinees on the risks of such infections. The objectives of this study were to investigate, in naïve smallpox vaccinees, (a) whether the vaccination site can remain contagious after the scab separates and (b) whether the application of povidone iodine ointment (PIO) to the vaccination site inactivates VACV without affecting the immune response. These objectives were tested in 60 individuals scheduled to receive smallpox vaccine. Thirty individuals (control) did not receive PIO; 30 subjects (treatment) received PIO starting on post-vaccination day 7. Counter to current dogma, this study showed that VACV continues to shed from the vaccination site after the scab separates. Overall viral shedding levels in the PIO group were significantly lower than those in the control group (p=0.0045), and PIO significantly reduced the duration of viral shedding (median duration 14.5 days and 21 days in the PIO and control groups, respectively; p=0.0444). At least 10% of control subjects continued to shed VACV at day 28, and 3.4% continued to shed the virus at day 42. PIO reduced the proportion of subjects shedding virus from the vaccination site from day 8 until days 21-23 compared with control subjects. Groups did not differ significantly in the proportion of subjects mounting an immune response, as measured by neutralizing antibodies, IgM, IgG, and interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assay. When applied to the vaccination site starting on day 7, PIO reduced viral shedding without altering the immune response. The use of PIO in addition to a semipermeable dressing may reduce the rates of autoinoculation and contact transmission originating from the vaccination site in smallpox-vaccinated individuals

  5. 42 CFR 102.21 - Smallpox (Vaccinia) Vaccine Injury Table.

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Smallpox (Vaccinia) Vaccine Injury Table. 102.21 Section 102.21 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES... Reaction R or C: 1-21 days. 2. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome R or C: 1-21 days. 3. Inadvertent Inoculation R...

  6. Smallpox Vaccination

    ... Newsletters Events Also Known As Smallpox = Vaccinia Smallpox Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The smallpox ... like many other vaccines. For that reason, the vaccination site must be cared for carefully to prevent ...

  7. Host range, growth property, and virulence of the smallpox vaccine: Vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain

    Vaccinia Tian Tan (VTT) was used as a vaccine against smallpox in China for millions of people before 1980, yet the biological characteristics of the virus remain unclear. We have characterized VTT with respect to its host cell range, growth properties in vitro, and virulence in vivo. We found that 11 of the 12 mammalian cell lines studied are permissive to VTT infection whereas one, CHO-K1, is non-permissive. Using electron microscopy and sequence analysis, we found that the restriction of VTT replication in CHO-K1 is at a step before viral maturation probably due to the loss of the V025 gene. Moreover, VTT is significantly less virulent than vaccinia WR but remains neurovirulent in mice and causes significant body weight loss after intranasal inoculation. Our data demonstrate the need for further attenuation of VTT to serve either as a safer smallpox vaccine or as a live vaccine vector for other pathogens

  8. Vaccinia viruses: vaccines against smallpox and vectors against infectious diseases and tumors

    Walsh, Stephen R.; Dolin, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    Less than 200 years after its introduction, widespread use of vaccinia virus (VACV) as a smallpox vaccine has eradicated variola virus. Along with the remarkable success of the vaccination program, frequent and sometimes severe adverse reactions to VACV were encountered. After eradication, VACV has been reserved for select populations who might be at significant risk for orthopoxvirus infections. Events over the past decade have renewed concerns over the potential use of variola virus as a bi...

  9. Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine

    ... A - Z Index SMALLPOX FACT SHEET The Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine The vaccinia virus is the "live ... it cannot cause smallpox. What is a "live virus" vaccine? A "live virus" vaccine is a vaccine ...

  10. Bioluminescent imaging of vaccinia virus infection in immunocompetent and immunodeficient rats as a model for human smallpox.

    Liu, Qiang; Fan, Changfa; Zhou, Shuya; Guo, Yanan; Zuo, Qin; Ma, Jian; Liu, Susu; Wu, Xi; Peng, Zexu; Fan, Tao; Guo, Chaoshe; Shen, Yuelei; Huang, Weijin; Li, Baowen; He, Zhengming; Wang, Youchun

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing concern of using smallpox virus as biological weapons for terrorist attack, there is renewed interest in studying the pathogenesis of human smallpox and development of new therapies. Animal models are highly demanded for efficacy and safety examination of new vaccines and therapeutic drugs. Here, we demonstrated that both wild type and immunodeficient rats infected with an engineered vaccinia virus carrying Firefly luciferase reporter gene (rTV-Fluc) could recapitulate infectious and clinical features of human smallpox. Vaccinia viral infection in wild type Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats displayed a diffusible pattern in various organs, including liver, head and limbs. The intensity of bioluminescence generated from rTV-Fluc correlated well with viral loads in tissues. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies had a protective effect against virus reinfection. The recombination activating gene 2 (Rag2) knockout rats generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology were further used to examine the infectivity of the rTV-Fluc in immunodeficient populations. Here we demonstrated that Rag2-/- rats were more susceptible to rTV-Fluc than SD rats with a slower virus clearance rate. Therefore, the rTV-Fluc/SD rats and rTV-Fluc/Rag2-/- rats are suitable visualization models, which recapitulate wild type or immunodeficient populations respectively, for testing human smallpox vaccine and antiviral drugs. PMID:26235050

  11. Genomic sequence and virulence of clonal isolates of vaccinia virus Tiantan, the Chinese smallpox vaccine strain.

    Qicheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Despite the worldwide eradication of smallpox in 1979, the potential bioterrorism threat from variola virus and the ongoing use of vaccinia virus (VACV as a vector for vaccine development argue for continued research on VACV. In China, the VACV Tiantan strain (TT was used in the smallpox eradication campaign. Its progeny strain is currently being used to develop a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV vaccine. Here we sequenced the full genomes of five TT clones isolated by plaque purification from the TT (752-1 viral stock. Phylogenetic analysis with other commonly used VACV strains showed that TT (752-1 and its clones clustered and exhibited higher sequence diversity than that found in Dryvax clones. The ∼190 kbp genomes of TT appeared to encode 273 open reading frames (ORFs. ORFs located in the middle of the genome were more conserved than those located at the two termini, where many virulence and immunomodulation associated genes reside. Several patterns of nucleotide changes including point mutations, insertions and deletions were identified. The polymorphisms in seven virulence-associated proteins and six immunomodulation-related proteins were analyzed. We also investigated the neuro- and skin- virulence of TT clones in mice and rabbits, respectively. The TT clones exhibited significantly less virulence than the New York City Board of Health (NYCBH strain, as evidenced by less extensive weight loss and morbidity in mice as well as produced smaller skin lesions and lower incidence of putrescence in rabbits. The complete genome sequences, ORF annotations, and phenotypic diversity yielded from this study aid our understanding of the Chinese historic TT strain and are useful for HIV vaccine projects employing TT as a vector.

  12. Smallpox

    ... the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and the anthrax scare that same year, the U.S. government took the precaution of asking several companies to begin making smallpox vaccine again. Today, there's enough vaccine on hand to ...

  13. Mucosal Immunization Induces a Higher Level of Lasting Neutralizing Antibody Response in Mice by a Replication-Competent Smallpox Vaccine: Vaccinia Tiantan Strain

    Bin Lu; Wenbo Yu; Xiaoxing Huang; Haibo Wang; Li Liu; Zhiwei Chen

    2011-01-01

    The possible bioterrorism threat using the variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, has promoted us to further investigate the immunogenicity profiles of existing vaccines. Here, we study for the first time the immunogenicity profile of a replication-competent smallpox vaccine (vaccinia Tiantan, VTT strain) for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) through mucosal vaccination, which is noninvasive and has a critical implication for massive vaccination programs. Four different routes ...

  14. Co-administration of the broad-spectrum antiviral, brincidofovir (CMX001), with smallpox vaccine does not compromise vaccine protection in mice challenged with ectromelia virus.

    Parker, Scott; Crump, Ryan; Foster, Scott; Hartzler, Hollyce; Hembrador, Ed; Lanier, E Randall; Painter, George; Schriewer, Jill; Trost, Lawrence C; Buller, R Mark

    2014-11-01

    Natural orthopoxvirus outbreaks such as vaccinia, cowpox, cattlepox and buffalopox continue to cause morbidity in the human population. Monkeypox virus remains a significant agent of morbidity and mortality in Africa. Furthermore, monkeypox virus's broad host-range and expanding environs make it of particular concern as an emerging human pathogen. Monkeypox virus and variola virus (the etiological agent of smallpox) are both potential agents of bioterrorism. The first line response to orthopoxvirus disease is through vaccination with first-generation and second-generation vaccines, such as Dryvax and ACAM2000. Although these vaccines provide excellent protection, their widespread use is impeded by the high level of adverse events associated with vaccination using live, attenuated virus. It is possible that vaccines could be used in combination with antiviral drugs to reduce the incidence and severity of vaccine-associated adverse events, or as a preventive in individuals with uncertain exposure status or contraindication to vaccination. We have used the intranasal mousepox (ectromelia) model to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination with Dryvax or ACAM2000 in conjunction with treatment using the broad spectrum antiviral, brincidofovir (BCV, CMX001). We found that co-treatment with BCV reduced the severity of vaccination-associated lesion development. Although the immune response to vaccination was quantifiably attenuated, vaccination combined with BCV treatment did not alter the development of full protective immunity, even when administered two days following ectromelia challenge. Studies with a non-replicating vaccine, ACAM3000 (MVA), confirmed that BCV's mechanism of attenuating the immune response following vaccination with live virus was, as expected, by limiting viral replication and not through inhibition of the immune system. These studies suggest that, in the setting of post-exposure prophylaxis, co-administration of BCV with vaccination should be considered

  15. Extent of Systemic Spread Determines CD8+ T Cell Immunodominance for Laboratory Strains, Smallpox Vaccines, and Zoonotic Isolates of Vaccinia Virus.

    Flesch, Inge E A; Hollett, Natasha A; Wong, Yik Chun; Quinan, Bárbara Resende; Howard, Debbie; da Fonseca, Flávio G; Tscharke, David C

    2015-09-01

    CD8(+) T cells that recognize virus-derived peptides presented on MHC class I are vital antiviral effectors. Such peptides presented by any given virus vary greatly in immunogenicity, allowing them to be ranked in an immunodominance hierarchy. However, the full range of parameters that determine immunodominance and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we show across a range of vaccinia virus strains, including the current clonal smallpox vaccine, that the ability of a strain to spread systemically correlated with reduced immunodominance. Reduction in immunodominance was observed both in the lymphoid system and at the primary site of infection. Mechanistically, reduced immunodominance was associated with more robust priming and especially priming in the spleen. Finally, we show this is not just a property of vaccine and laboratory strains of virus, because an association between virulence and immunodominance was also observed in isolates from an outbreak of zoonotic vaccinia virus that occurred in Brazil. PMID:26195812

  16. Mucosal Immunization Induces a Higher Level of Lasting Neutralizing Antibody Response in Mice by a Replication-Competent Smallpox Vaccine: Vaccinia Tiantan Strain

    Bin Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The possible bioterrorism threat using the variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, has promoted us to further investigate the immunogenicity profiles of existing vaccines. Here, we study for the first time the immunogenicity profile of a replication-competent smallpox vaccine (vaccinia Tiantan, VTT strain for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs through mucosal vaccination, which is noninvasive and has a critical implication for massive vaccination programs. Four different routes of vaccination were tested in parallel including intramuscular (i.m., intranasal (i.n., oral (i.o., and subcutaneous (s.c. inoculations in mice. We found that one time vaccination with an optimal dose of VTT was able to induce anti-VTT Nabs via each of the four routes. Higher levels of antiviral Nabs, however, were induced via the i.n. and i.o. inoculations when compared with the i.m. and s.c. routes. Moreover, the i.n. and i.o. vaccinations also induced higher sustained levels of Nabs overtime, which conferred better protections against homologous or alternating mucosal routes of viral challenges six months post vaccination. The VTT-induced immunity via all four routes, however, was partially effective against the intramuscular viral challenge. Our data have implications for understanding the potential application of mucosal smallpox vaccination and for developing VTT-based vaccines to overcome preexisting antivaccinia immunity.

  17. Development of a highly efficacious vaccinia-based dual vaccine against smallpox and anthrax, two important bioterror entities

    Tod J Merkel; Perera, Pin-Yu; Kelly, Vanessa K.; Verma, Anita; Llewellyn, Zara N.; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Mosca, Joseph D.; Perera, Liyanage P.

    2010-01-01

    Bioterrorism poses a daunting challenge to global security and public health in the 21st century. Variola major virus, the etiological agent of smallpox, and Bacillus anthracis, the bacterial pathogen responsible for anthrax, remain at the apex of potential pathogens that could be used in a bioterror attack to inflict mass casualties. Although licensed vaccines are available for both smallpox and anthrax, because of inadequacies associated with each of these vaccines, serious concerns remain ...

  18. Smallpox: clinical highlights and considerations for vaccination.

    Mahoney M; Symons A; Kimmel S

    2003-01-01

    Smallpox virus has gained considerable attention as a potential bioterrorism agent. Recommendations for smallpox (vaccinia) vaccination presume a low risk for use of smallpox as a terrorist biological agent and vaccination is currently recommended for selected groups of individuals such as health care workers, public health authorities, and emergency/rescue workers, among others. Information about adverse reactions to the smallpox vaccine is based upon studies completed during the 1950s and 1...

  19. Immunogenicity and Protection Efficacy of Subunit-based Smallpox Vaccines Using Variola Major Antigens

    Sakhatskyy, Pavlo; Wang, Shixia; Zhang, Chuanyou; Chou, Te-Hui; Kishko, Michael; Lu, Shan

    2007-01-01

    The viral strain responsible for smallpox infection is variola major (VARV). As a result of the successful eradication of smallpox with the vaccinia virus (VACV), the general population is no longer required to receive a smallpox vaccine, and will have no protection against smallpox. This lack of immunity is a concern due to the potential for use of smallpox as a biological weapon. Considerable progress has been made in the development of subunit-based smallpox vaccines resulting from the ide...

  20. 42 CFR 102.54 - Documentation the representative of the estate of a deceased smallpox vaccine recipient or...

    2010-10-01

    ... deceased smallpox vaccine recipient or vaccinia contact must submit to be deemed eligible by the Secretary... VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Required Documentation To Be Deemed Eligible § 102.54 Documentation the representative of the estate of a deceased smallpox vaccine recipient or vaccinia contact...

  1. B5 deficient vaccinia virus as a vaccine vector for the expression of a foreign antigen in vaccinia immune animals

    Viner, Kendra M.; Girgis, Natasha; Kwak, Heesun; Isaacs, Stuart N.

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant vaccinia viruses have shown promise as vaccine vectors. However, their effectiveness is markedly reduced by pre-existing anti-vaccinia immunity. The possibility of new vaccinia immunizations in the event of a bioterror-related smallpox release poses an additional negative impact on the utility of vaccinia-based vectors. Thus, we aimed to design a vaccinia vector that would enhance the immune response to an expressed foreign protein in a pre-immune animal model. To do this, we made...

  2. Smallpox vaccines: targets of protective immunity

    Moss, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The eradication of smallpox, one of the great triumphs of medicine, was accomplished through the prophylactic administration of live vaccinia virus, a comparatively benign relative of variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox. Nevertheless, recent fears that variola virus may be used as a biological weapon together with the present susceptibility of unimmunized populations have spurred the development of new generation vaccines that are safer than the original and can be produced by mode...

  3. Smallpox: clinical highlights and considerations for vaccination.

    Mahoney M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Smallpox virus has gained considerable attention as a potential bioterrorism agent. Recommendations for smallpox (vaccinia vaccination presume a low risk for use of smallpox as a terrorist biological agent and vaccination is currently recommended for selected groups of individuals such as health care workers, public health authorities, and emergency/rescue workers, among others. Information about adverse reactions to the smallpox vaccine is based upon studies completed during the 1950s and 1960s. The prevalence of various diseases has changed over the last four decades and new disease entities have been described during this period. The smallpox vaccination may be contra-indicated in many of these conditions. This has made pre-screening of potential vaccines necessary. It is believed that at present, the risks of vaccine-associated complications far outweigh the potential benefits of vaccination in the general population.

  4. Recent advances in the study of live attenuated cell-cultured smallpox vaccine LC16m8.

    Eto, Akiko; Saito, Tomoya; Yokote, Hiroyuki; Kurane, Ichiro; Kanatani, Yasuhiro

    2015-11-01

    LC16m8 is a live, attenuated, cell-cultured smallpox vaccine that was developed and licensed in Japan in the 1970s, but was not used in the campaign to eradicate smallpox. In the early 2000s, the potential threat of bioterrorism led to reconsideration of the need for a smallpox vaccine. Subsequently, LC16m8 production was restarted in Japan in 2002, requiring re-evaluation of its safety and efficacy. Approximately 50,000 children in the 1970s and about 3500 healthy adults in the 2000s were vaccinated with LC16m8 in Japan, and 153 adults have been vaccinated with LC16m8 or Dryvax in phase I/II clinical trials in the USA. These studies confirmed the safety and efficacy of LC16m8, while several studies in animal models have shown that LC16m8 protects the host against viral challenge. The World Health Organization Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization recommended LC16m8, together with ACAM2000, as a stockpile vaccine in 2013. In addition, LC16m8 is expected to be a viable alternative to first-generation smallpox vaccines to prevent human monkeypox. PMID:26319072

  5. Side-by-side comparison of gene-based smallpox vaccine with MVA in nonhuman primates.

    Joseph W Golden

    Full Text Available Orthopoxviruses remain a threat as biological weapons and zoonoses. The licensed live-virus vaccine is associated with serious health risks, making its general usage unacceptable. Attenuated vaccines are being developed as alternatives, the most advanced of which is modified-vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA. We previously developed a gene-based vaccine, termed 4pox, which targets four orthopoxvirus antigens, A33, B5, A27 and L1. This vaccine protects mice and non-human primates from lethal orthopoxvirus disease. Here, we investigated the capacity of the molecular adjuvants GM-CSF and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT to enhance the efficacy of the 4pox gene-based vaccine. Both adjuvants significantly increased protective antibody responses in mice. We directly compared the 4pox plus LT vaccine against MVA in a monkeypox virus (MPXV nonhuman primate (NHP challenge model. NHPs were vaccinated twice with MVA by intramuscular injection or the 4pox/LT vaccine delivered using a disposable gene gun device. As a positive control, one NHP was vaccinated with ACAM2000. NHPs vaccinated with each vaccine developed anti-orthopoxvirus antibody responses, including those against the 4pox antigens. After MPXV intravenous challenge, all control NHPs developed severe disease, while the ACAM2000 vaccinated animal was well protected. All NHPs vaccinated with MVA were protected from lethality, but three of five developed severe disease and all animals shed virus. All five NHPs vaccinated with 4pox/LT survived and only one developed severe disease. None of the 4pox/LT-vaccinated animals shed virus. Our findings show, for the first time, that a subunit orthopoxvirus vaccine delivered by the same schedule can provide a degree of protection at least as high as that of MVA.

  6. In silico-accelerated identification of conserved and immunogenic variola/vaccinia T-cell epitopes

    Moise, Leonard; McMurry, Julie A; Buus, Søren; Frey, Sharon; Martin, William D; De Groot, Anne S

    2009-01-01

    Epitopes shared by the vaccinia and variola viruses underlie the protective effect of vaccinia immunization against variola infection. We set out to identify a subset of cross-reactive epitopes using bioinformatics and immunological methods. Putative T-cell epitopes were computationally predicted...... experimental validation of computational predictions illustrates the potential for immunoinformatics methods to identify candidate immunogens for a new, safer smallpox vaccine....

  7. What Is Smallpox?

    ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? What Is Smallpox? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Is Smallpox? Print A A A Text Size en español ¿ ... es la viruela? You may have heard about smallpox and wondered what it is or whether you ...

  8. Brazilian Vaccinia Viruses and Their Origins

    2007-07-30

    Smallpox was eradicated more than 25 years ago, but live viruses used in vaccines may have survived to cause animal and human illness today. Dr. Inger Damon, Acting Branch Chief of the Poxvirus and Rabies Branch at CDC, discusses efforts to determine origins and spread of vaccinia viruses in Brazil.  Created: 7/30/2007 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 7/30/2007.

  9. Smallpox Vaccines for Biodefense

    Kennedy, Richard B.; Ovsyannikova, Inna; Gregory A Poland

    2009-01-01

    Few diseases can match the enormous impact that smallpox has had on mankind. Its influence can be seen in the earliest recorded histories of ancient civilizations in Egypt and Mesopotamia. With fatality rates up to 30%, smallpox left its survivors with extensive scarring and other serious sequelae. It is estimated that smallpox killed 500 million people in the 19th and 20th centuries. Given the ongoing concerns regarding the use of variola as a biological weapon, this review will focus on the...

  10. Smallpox vaccines for biodefense.

    Kennedy, Richard B; Ovsyannikova, Inna; Poland, Gregory A

    2009-11-01

    Few diseases can match the enormous impact that smallpox has had on mankind. Its influence can be seen in the earliest recorded histories of ancient civilizations in Egypt and Mesopotamia. With fatality rates up to 30%, smallpox left its survivors with extensive scarring and other serious sequelae. It is estimated that smallpox killed 500 million people in the 19th and 20th centuries. Given the ongoing concerns regarding the use of variola as a biological weapon, this review will focus on the licensed vaccines as well as current research into next-generation vaccines to protect against smallpox and other poxviruses. PMID:19837292

  11. A Novel High-Throughput Vaccinia Virus Neutralization Assay and Preexisting Immunity in Populations from Different Geographic Regions in China

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Weijin; Nie, Jianhui; Zhu, Rong; Gao, Dongying; Song, Aijing; Meng, Shufang; Xu, Xuemei; Wang, Youchun

    2012-01-01

    Background Pre-existing immunity to Vaccinia Tian Tan virus (VTT) resulting from a large vaccination campaign against smallpox prior to the early 1980s in China, has been a major issue for application of VTT-vector based vaccines. It is essential to establish a sensitive and high-throughput neutralization assay to understand the epidemiology of Vaccinia-specific immunity in current populations in China. Methodology/Principal Findings A new anti-Vaccinia virus (VACV) neutralization assay that ...

  12. A Novel High-Throughput Vaccinia Virus Neutralization Assay and Preexisting Immunity in Populations from Different Geographic Regions in China

    Qiang Liu; Weijin Huang; Jianhui Nie; Rong Zhu; Dongying Gao; Aijing Song; Shufang Meng; Xuemei Xu; Youchun Wang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-existing immunity to Vaccinia Tian Tan virus (VTT) resulting from a large vaccination campaign against smallpox prior to the early 1980s in China, has been a major issue for application of VTT-vector based vaccines. It is essential to establish a sensitive and high-throughput neutralization assay to understand the epidemiology of Vaccinia-specific immunity in current populations in China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new anti-Vaccinia virus (VACV) neutralization assay tha...

  13. Planning for smallpox outbreaks

    Ferguson, Neil M.; Keeling, Matt J.; John Edmunds, W.; Gani, Raymond; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Anderson, Roy M.; Leach, Steve

    2003-10-01

    Mathematical models of viral transmission and control are important tools for assessing the threat posed by deliberate release of the smallpox virus and the best means of containing an outbreak. Models must balance biological realism against limitations of knowledge, and uncertainties need to be accurately communicated to policy-makers. Smallpox poses the particular challenge that key biological, social and spatial factors affecting disease spread in contemporary populations must be elucidated largely from historical studies undertaken before disease eradication in 1979. We review the use of models in smallpox planning within the broader epidemiological context set by recent outbreaks of both novel and re-emerging pathogens.

  14. Immunomodulator-based enhancement of anti smallpox immune responses.

    Osmarie Martínez

    Full Text Available The current live vaccinia virus vaccine used in the prevention of smallpox is contraindicated for millions of immune-compromised individuals. Although vaccination with the current smallpox vaccine produces protective immunity, it might result in mild to serious health complications for some vaccinees. Thus, there is a critical need for the production of a safe virus-free vaccine against smallpox that is available to everyone. For that reason, we investigated the impact of imiquimod and resiquimod (Toll-like receptors agonists, and the codon-usage optimization of the vaccinia virus A27L gene in the enhancement of the immune response, with intent of producing a safe, virus-free DNA vaccine coding for the A27 vaccinia virus protein.We analyzed the cellular-immune response by measuring the IFN-γ production of splenocytes by ELISPOT, the humoral-immune responses measuring total IgG and IgG2a/IgG1 ratios by ELISA, and the TH1 and TH2 cytokine profiles by ELISA, in mice immunized with our vaccine formulation.The proposed vaccine formulation enhanced the A27L vaccine-mediated production of IFN-γ on mouse spleens, and increased the humoral immunity with a TH1-biased response. Also, our vaccine induced a TH1 cytokine milieu, which is important against viral infections.These results support the efforts to find a new mechanism to enhance an immune response against smallpox, through the implementation of a safe, virus-free DNA vaccination platform.

  15. 76 FR 13990 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    2011-03-15

    ... several Phase IV post-licensure studies to evaluate the long-term safety of ACAM2000 smallpox vaccine... ACAM2000 Myopericarditis Registry is designed to study the natural history of myopericarditis following receipt of the ACAM2000 vaccine, including evaluating factors that may influence disease prognosis,...

  16. Neurologic Complications of Smallpox Vaccination

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Smallpox and smallpox vaccination is reviewed from the Departments of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, and University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque.

  17. Mankind's Magnificent Milestone: Smallpox Eradication.

    Small, Parker A., Jr.; Small, Natalie S.

    1996-01-01

    Illustrates the complex interactions between disease, societal attitudes, and technology by looking at the history of smallpox. Describes one of mankind's most magnificent accomplishments--the eradication of smallpox from the earth. (JRH)

  18. Small(pox success?

    Anne-Emanuelle Birn

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The 30th anniversary of the World Health Organization's (WHO official certification of smallpox eradication was marked by a slew of events hailing the campaign's dramatic tale of technological and organizational triumph against an ancient scourge. Yet commemorations also serve as moments of critical reflection. This article questions the acclaim showered upon smallpox eradication as the single greatest public health success in history. It examines how and why smallpox eradication and WHO's concurrent social justice-oriented primary health care approach (following from the Declaration of Alma-Ata became competing paradigms. It synthesizes critiques of eradication's shortcomings and debunks some of the myths surrounding the global eradication campaign as a public health priority and necessity, and as a Cold War victory of cooperation. The article concludes with thoughts on integrating technical and social-political aspects of health within the context of welfare states as the means to achieving widespread and enduring global public health success.

  19. Smallpox subunit vaccine produced in planta confers protection in mice

    Golovkin, Maxim; Spitsin, Sergei; Andrianov, Vyacheslav; Smirnov, Yuriy; Xiao, Yuhong; Pogrebnyak, Natalia; Markley, Karen; Brodzik, Robert; Gleba, Yuri; Isaacs, Stuart N.; Koprowski, Hilary

    2007-01-01

    We report here the in planta production of the recombinant vaccinia virus B5 antigenic domain (pB5), an attractive component of a subunit vaccine against smallpox. The antigenic domain was expressed by using efficient transient and constitutive plant expression systems and tested by various immunization routes in two animal models. Whereas oral administration in mice or the minipig with collard-derived insoluble pB5 did not generate an anti-B5 immune response, intranasal administration of sol...

  20. Traditional Smallpox Vaccines and Atopic Dermatitis

    ... Grant Request DONATE Traditional Smallpox Vaccines and Atopic Dermatitis Frequently Asked Questions Eczema Living with Eczema Get ... News Research Donate Traditional Smallpox Vaccines and Atopic Dermatitis Frequently Asked Questions What is the traditional smallpox ...

  1. Position on reproductive donors and smallpox vaccine: a committee opinion.

    2016-05-01

    Although there is presently no definitive evidence linking vaccinia virus transmission through reproductive cells, the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) accordingly recommend that assisted reproductive technology (ART) practitioners consider deferring individuals who are planning on donating gametes for reproductive use (reproductive donors) who have recently received smallpox vaccine or contracted symptomatic vaccinia virus infection through close contact with a vaccine recipient (until after the vaccine or infectious scab has spontaneously separated). Good donor practice further suggests that reproductive donors who are not in good health, including those with recent complications from smallpox vaccine, should be similarly deferred. This document replaces the previous document of the same name last published in 2012 (Fertil Steril 2012;98:e1-e2). PMID:26829211

  2. Pre-event Smallpox Vaccination for Healthcare Workers Revisited – the Need for a Carefully Screened Multidisciplinary Cadre

    Malone, JD D.

    2007-03-01

    Abstract As healthcare institutions are a focus of smallpox transmission early in an epidemic, several mathematical models support pre-event smallpox vaccination of healthcare workers (HCWs). The deciding factor for HCW voluntary vaccination is the risk of disease exposure versus the risk of vaccine adverse events. In a United States military population, with careful screening to exclude atopic dermatitis/eczema and immunosuppression, over 1 million vaccinia vaccinations were delivered with 1 fatality attributed to vaccination. Among 37,901 U.S. civilian volunteer healthcare workers vaccinated, 100 serious adverse events were reported including 10 ischemic cardiac episodes and six myocardial infarctions – 2 were fatal. This older population had a higher rate of adverse events due to age related coronary artery disease. T-cell mediated inflammatory processes, induced by live vaccinia vaccination, may have a role in the observed acute coronary artery events. With exclusion of individuals at risk for coronary artery disease, atopic dermatitis/eczema, and immunosuppression, HCWs can be smallpox vaccinated with minimal risk. A smallpox pre-vaccinated multidisciplinary cadre (physician, nurse, infection control practitioner, technician) will supply leadership to deal with fear and uncertainty while limiting spread and initial mortality of smallpox. Stochastic – from the Greek meaning “skillful in aiming” – is currently interpreted as arising from chance and involving probability. This issue’s article “Containing a large bioterrorist smallpox attack: a computer simulation approach” by Longini et al. is a discrete time, stochastic computer simulation model that offers additional planning guidance for a smallpox (variola virus) outbreak (1). Although interpretation of the model’s information may differ, Longini’s article concludes “Given that surveillance and containment measures are in place, preemptive vaccination of hospital workers would further

  3. Protective efficacy of a recombinant vaccinia virus in vaccinia-immune mice.

    Andrew, M E

    1989-10-01

    Recombinant viral vectors offer a potential means of vaccinating against diseases for which there are no current safe vaccines. One of the criteria on which a viral vaccine vector would be selected is that it either circulates in the human or livestock population without producing overt disease (e.g. adenovirus) or has a history as a safe vaccine (e.g. vaccinia virus). However, this selection criterion also means that the target population is likely to have circulating antibodies that are specific to the vaccine vector. Since a percentage of the world's population has been vaccinated during the World Health Organization's Smallpox Eradication Campaign, such antibody titres, which are likely to lower vaccine efficacy, have been raised as an objection to the use of recombinant vaccinia viruses as vaccines. We have tested the effect of vaccinia-specific immunity on the protective efficacy of a recombinant virus, VV-PR8-HA6 (1) which expresses the haemagglutinin of the influenza virus A/PR/8/34. PMID:2613281

  4. From Crescent to Mature Virion: Vaccinia Virus Assembly and Maturation

    Liang Liu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV has achieved unprecedented success as a live viral vaccine for smallpox which mitigated eradication of the disease. Vaccinia virus has a complex virion morphology and recent advances have been made to answer some of the key outstanding questions, in particular, the origin and biogenesis of the virion membrane, the transformation from immature virion (IV to mature virus (MV, and the role of several novel genes, which were previously uncharacterized, but have now been shown to be essential for VACV virion formation. This new knowledge will undoubtedly contribute to the rational design of safe, immunogenic vaccine candidates, or effective antivirals in the future. This review endeavors to provide an update on our current knowledge of the VACV maturation processes with a specific focus on the initiation of VACV replication through to the formation of mature virions.

  5. Defending against smallpox: a focus on vaccines.

    Voigt, Emily A; Kennedy, Richard B; Poland, Gregory A

    2016-09-01

    Smallpox has shaped human history, from the earliest human civilizations well into the 20th century. With high mortality rates, rapid transmission, and serious long-term effects on survivors, smallpox was a much-feared disease. The eradication of smallpox represents an unprecedented medical victory for the lasting benefit of human health and prosperity. Concerns remain, however, about the development and use of the smallpox virus as a biological weapon, which necessitates the need for continued vaccine development. Smallpox vaccine development is thus a much-reviewed topic of high interest. This review focuses on the current state of smallpox vaccines and their context in biodefense efforts. PMID:27049653

  6. Oncolytic vaccinia therapy of squamous cell carcinoma

    Yu Yong A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel therapies are necessary to improve outcomes for patients with squamous cell carcinomas (SCC of the head and neck. Historically, vaccinia virus was administered widely to humans as a vaccine and led to the eradication of smallpox. We examined the therapeutic effects of an attenuated, replication-competent vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68 as an oncolytic agent against a panel of six human head and neck SCC cell lines. Results All six cell lines supported viral transgene expression (β-galactosidase, green fluorescent protein, and luciferase as early as 6 hours after viral exposure. Efficient transgene expression and viral replication (>150-fold titer increase over 72 hrs were observed in four of the cell lines. At a multiplicity of infection (MOI of 1, GLV-1h68 was highly cytotoxic to the four cell lines, resulting in ≥ 90% cytotoxicity over 6 days, and the remaining two cell lines exhibited >45% cytotoxicity. Even at a very low MOI of 0.01, three cell lines still demonstrated >60% cell death over 6 days. A single injection of GLV-1h68 (5 × 106 pfu intratumorally into MSKQLL2 xenografts in mice exhibited localized intratumoral luciferase activity peaking at days 2–4, with gradual resolution over 10 days and no evidence of spread to normal organs. Treated animals exhibited near-complete tumor regression over a 24-day period without any observed toxicity, while control animals demonstrated rapid tumor progression. Conclusion These results demonstrate significant oncolytic efficacy by an attenuated vaccinia virus for infecting and lysing head and neck SCC both in vitro and in vivo, and support its continued investigation in future clinical trials.

  7. Eradicating smallpox in Indonesia: the archipelagic challenge.

    Neelakantan, Vivek

    2010-01-01

    From 1804 to 1974, the colonial Dutch East Indies government and the postcolonial Indonesian state attempted to tackle the problem of smallpox. The vaccination efforts in the colonial era virtually eliminated smallpox by 1940. Unfortunately, as a consequence of the war smallpox was reintroduced into the archipelago in 1947. Indonesia finally succeeded in eradicating smallpox in 1974 through campaigns of mass vaccination and surveillance. In the last few years of the fight against smallpox, a detection system was set up in order to have every suspected case of smallpox isolated and investigated by the health authorities until verified in the government laboratory at Bandung. This paper looks at the impact of the archipelagic nature of Indonesia on the smallpox eradication campaigns. PMID:20973337

  8. 76 FR 81918 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    2011-12-29

    ... designed to study the natural history of myopericarditis following receipt of the ACAM2000 vaccine... studies to evaluate the long term safety of ACAM2000 smallpox vaccine. Among the required post licensure... requirement and ensuring the continued licensing of this vaccine. Affected Public: Individuals or...

  9. A randomized, double-blind, dose-finding Phase II study to evaluate immunogenicity and safety of the third generation smallpox vaccine candidate IMVAMUNE®

    von Krempelhuber, Alfred; Vollmar, Jens; Pokorny, Rolf; Rapp, Petra; Wulff, Niels; Petzold, Barbara; Handley, Amanda; Mateo, Lyn; Siersbol, Henriette; Kollaritsch, Herwig; Chaplin, Paul

    2009-01-01

    IMVAMUNE® is a Modified Vaccinia Ankara-based virus that is being developed as a safer 3rd generation smallpox vaccine. In order to determine the optimal dose for further development, a double-blind, randomized Phase II trial was performed testing three different doses of IMVAMUNE® in 164 healthy volunteers. All three IMVAMUNE® doses displayed a favourable safety profile, with local reactions as the most frequent observation. The 1×108 TCID50 IMVAMUNE® dose induced a total antibody response i...

  10. Incongruencies in Vaccinia Virus Phylogenetic Trees

    Chad Smithson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, as more complete poxvirus genomes have been sequenced, phylogenetic studies of these viruses have become more prevalent. In general, the results show similar relationships between the poxvirus species; however, some inconsistencies are notable. Previous analyses of the viral genomes contained within the vaccinia virus (VACV-Dryvax vaccine revealed that their phylogenetic relationships were sometimes clouded by low bootstrapping confidence. To analyze the VACV-Dryvax genomes in detail, a new tool-set was developed and integrated into the Base-By-Base bioinformatics software package. Analyses showed that fewer unique positions were present in each VACV-Dryvax genome than expected. A series of patterns, each containing several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified that were counter to the results of the phylogenetic analysis. The VACV genomes were found to contain short DNA sequence blocks that matched more distantly related clades. Additionally, similar non-conforming SNP patterns were observed in (1 the variola virus clade; (2 some cowpox clades; and (3 VACV-CVA, the direct ancestor of VACV-MVA. Thus, traces of past recombination events are common in the various orthopoxvirus clades, including those associated with smallpox and cowpox viruses.

  11. The Smallpox Threat: The School Nurse's Role

    Martin, Mary E.; Didion, Judy

    2003-01-01

    Today, with the threat of bioterrorism and war, there is a new dimension to the traditional role of the school nurse. The smallpox threat to public health will invoke the school nurse's role as an educator, liaison, and consultant in the community. This article discusses smallpox, the vaccination process, adverse effects, and postvaccination care.…

  12. Smallpox: A Review for Health Educators

    Bungum, Timothy J.

    2003-01-01

    Since the declaration of the eradication of smallpox in May of 1980 concern about this virus has ebbed. However, recent world events, including the destabilization of governments, have raised concerns that smallpox could fall into the hands of nefarious individuals or groups who might attempt to use the virus as a weapon. In Centers for Disease…

  13. A novel high-throughput vaccinia virus neutralization assay and preexisting immunity in populations from different geographic regions in China.

    Qiang Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pre-existing immunity to Vaccinia Tian Tan virus (VTT resulting from a large vaccination campaign against smallpox prior to the early 1980s in China, has been a major issue for application of VTT-vector based vaccines. It is essential to establish a sensitive and high-throughput neutralization assay to understand the epidemiology of Vaccinia-specific immunity in current populations in China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new anti-Vaccinia virus (VACV neutralization assay that used the attenuated replication-competent VTT carrying the firefly luciferase gene of Photinus pyralis (rTV-Fluc was established and standardized for critical parameters that included the choice of cell line, viral infection dose, and the infection time. The current study evaluated the maintenance of virus-specific immunity after smallpox vaccination by conducting a non-randomized, cross-sectional analysis of antiviral antibody-mediated immune responses in volunteers examined 30-55 years after vaccination. The rTV-Fluc neutralization assay was able to detect neutralizing antibodies (NAbs against Vaccinia virus without the ability to differentiate strains of Vaccinia virus. We showed that the neutralizing titers measured by our assay were similar to those obtained by the traditional plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT. Using this assay, we found a low prevalence of NAb to VTT (7.6% in individuals born before 1980 from Beijing and Anhui provinces in China, and when present, anti-VTT NAb titers were low. No NAbs were detected in all 222 samples from individuals born after 1980. There was no significant difference observed for titer or prevalence by gender, age range and geographic origin. CONCLUSION: A simplified, sensitive, standardized, reproducible, and high-throughput assay was developed for the quantitation of NAbs against different Vaccinia strains. The current study provides useful insights for the future development of VTT-based vaccination in

  14. Isolation and characterization of cidofovir resistant vaccinia viruses

    Prichard Mark N

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of drug resistant viruses, together with the possibility of increased virulence, is an important concern in the development of new antiviral compounds. Cidofovir (CDV is a phosphonate nucleotide that is approved for use against cytomegalovirus retinitis and for the emergency treatment of smallpox or complications following vaccination. One mode of action for CDV has been demonstrated to be the inhibition of the viral DNA polymerase. Results We have isolated several CDV resistant (CDVR vaccinia viruses through a one step process, two of which have unique single mutations within the DNA polymerase. An additional resistant virus isolate provides evidence of a second site mutation within the genome involved in CDV resistance. The CDVR viruses were 3–7 fold more resistant to the drug than the parental viruses. The virulence of the CDVR viruses was tested in mice inoculated intranasally and all were found to be attenuated. Conclusion Resistance to CDV in vaccinia virus can be conferred individually by at least two different mutations within the DNA polymerase gene. Additional genes may be involved. This one step approach for isolating resistant viruses without serial passage and in the presence of low doses of drug minimizes unintended secondary mutations and is applicable to other potential antiviral agents.

  15. Poxviruses: smallpox vaccine, its complications and chemotherapy

    Mimi Remichkova

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mimi RemichkovaDepartment of Pathogenic Bacteria, The Stephan Angeloff Institute of Microbiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, BulgariaAbstract: The threat of bioterrorism in the recent years has once again posed to mankind the unresolved problems of contagious diseases, well forgotten in the past. Smallpox (variola is among the most dangerous and highly contagious viral infections affecting humans. The last natural case in Somalia marked the end of a successful World Health Organization campaign for smallpox eradication by vaccination on worldwide scale. Smallpox virus still exists today in some laboratories, specially designated for that purpose. The contemporary response in the treatment of the post-vaccine complications, which would occur upon enforcing new programs for mass-scale smallpox immunization, includes application of effective chemotherapeutics and their combinations. The goals are to provide the highest possible level of protection and safety of the population in case of eventual terrorist attack. This review describes the characteristic features of the poxviruses, smallpox vaccination, its adverse reactions, and poxvirus chemotherapy.Keywords: poxvirus, smallpox vaccine, post vaccine complications, inhibitors

  16. What We Learn about Smallpox from Movies - Fact or Fiction

    ... Health Matters What's New A - Z Index What We Learn About Smallpox from Movies - Fact or Fiction ... Disease Fiction: In the F/X movie Smallpox , we see a police composite sketch of a supposed ...

  17. What We Learn about Smallpox from Movies - Fact or Fiction

    ... film and television programs and movies have chosen disease outbreaks as the central theme of their storylines. The ... great to contain. Fact: Smallpox is a contagious disease, but it ... outbreaks that occurred before naturally occurring smallpox was eradicated ...

  18. Basal cell carcinoma arising in a smallpox vaccination site.

    Rich, J D; Shesol, B F; Horne, D W

    1980-01-01

    A case of pigmented basal cell carcinoma developing in a smallpox revaccination site is presented. Any progressive change within a smallpox vaccination scar should be thoroughly evaluated and treated appropriately after tissue diagnosis.

  19. The Future of Smallpox Vaccination: is MVA the key?

    Slifka, Mark K.

    2005-01-01

    Eradication of the smallpox virus through extensive global vaccination efforts has resulted in one of the most important breakthroughs in medical history, saving countless lives from the severe morbidity and mortality that is associated with this disease. Although smallpox is now extinct in nature, laboratory stocks of this virus still remain and the subject of smallpox vaccination has gained renewed attention due to the potential risk that smallpox may be used as a biological weapon by terro...

  20. Passatempo Virus, a Vaccinia Virus Strain, Brazil

    Leite, Juliana A.; Drumond, Betânia P.; Trindade, Giliane S; Zélia I P Lobato; da Fonseca, Flávio G.; dos Santos, João R.; Madureira, Marieta C.; Guedes, Maria I.M.C.; Ferreira, Jaqueline M. S.; Bonjardim, Cláudio A.; Ferreira, Paulo C. P.; Kroon, Erna G.

    2005-01-01

    Passatempo virus was isolated during a zoonotic outbreak. Biologic features and molecular characterization of hemagglutinin, thymidine kinase, and vaccinia growth factor genes suggested a vaccinia virus infection, which strengthens the idea of the reemergence and circulation of vaccinia virus in Brazil. Molecular polymorphisms indicated that Passatempo virus is a different isolate.

  1. Recombinant Vaccinia Virus: Immunization against Multiple Pathogens

    Perkus, Marion E.; Piccini, Antonia; Lipinskas, Bernard R.; Paoletti, Enzo

    1985-09-01

    The coding sequences for the hepatitis B virus surface antigen, the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D, and the influenza virus hemagglutinin were inserted into a single vaccinia virus genome. Rabbits inoculated intravenously or intradermally with this polyvalent vaccinia virus recombinant produced antibodies reactive to all three authentic foreign antigens. In addition, the feasibility of multiple rounds of vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus was demonstrated.

  2. Smallpox: An eradicated infection with persistent sequels - Case report and a brief on smallpox

    Sequelae of smallpox infection on the ocular surface are still seen, including corneal scars adherent leukoma and phthisical globes. This paper will report another sequel of smallpox infection causing inadvertent bleb in a 62-year-old diabetic female with no history of ocular surgery or trauma in either eye. The patient had smallpox infection during her childhood. Her follow up extended from May 1997 until August 2007 with a constant eye examinations including controlled intraocular pressure, avascular cystic inadvertent bleb, and up drown peaked pupil. (author)

  3. A randomized, double-blind, dose-finding Phase II study to evaluate immunogenicity and safety of the third generation smallpox vaccine candidate IMVAMUNE®

    von Krempelhuber, Alfred; Vollmar, Jens; Pokorny, Rolf; Rapp, Petra; Wulff, Niels; Petzold, Barbara; Handley, Amanda; Mateo, Lyn; Siersbol, Henriette; Kollaritsch, Herwig; Chaplin, Paul

    2009-01-01

    IMVAMUNE® is a Modified Vaccinia Ankara-based virus that is being developed as a safer 3rd generation smallpox vaccine. In order to determine the optimal dose for further development, a double-blind, randomized Phase II trial was performed testing three different doses of IMVAMUNE® in 164 healthy volunteers. All three IMVAMUNE® doses displayed a favourable safety profile, with local reactions as the most frequent observation. The 1×108 TCID50 IMVAMUNE® dose induced a total antibody response in 94% of the subjects following the first vaccination and the highest peak seroconversion rates by ELISA (100%) and PRNT (71%). This IMVAMUNE® dose was considered to be optimal for the further clinical development of this highly attenuated poxvirus as a safer smallpox vaccine. PMID:19944151

  4. Evaluating anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies in individuals from Brazilian rural areas prior to the bovine vaccinia era

    Poliana de Oliveira Figueiredo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus naturally circulates in Brazil and is the causative agent of a zoonotic disease known as bovine vaccinia (BV. We retrospectively evaluated two populations from the Amazon and Southeast Regions. BV outbreaks had not been reported in these regions before sample collection. Neutralising antibodies were found in 13 individuals (n = 132 with titres ranging from 100 ≥ 6,400 neutralising units/mL. Univariate analysis identified age and vaccination as statistically significant risk factors in individuals from the Southeast Region. The absence of detectable antibodies in vaccinated individuals raises questions about the protection of smallpox vaccine years after vaccination and reinforces the need for surveillance of Orthopoxvirus in Brazilian populations without evidence of previous outbreaks.

  5. Potent T cell Responses Induced by Single DNA Vaccine Boosted with Recombinant Vaccinia Vaccine

    Lianxing Liu; Chao Qiu; Yang Huang; Jianqing Xu; Yiming Shao

    2013-01-01

    Plasmid DNA,an effective vaccine vector,can induce both cellular and humoral immune responses.However,plasmid DNA raises issues concerning potential genomic integration after injection.This issue should be considered in preclinical studies.Tiantan vaccinia virus (TV) has been most widely utilized in eradicating smallpox in China.This virus has also been considered as a successful vaccine vector against a few infectious diseases.Potent T cell responses through T-cell receptor (TCR) could be induced by three injections of the DNA prime vaccine followed by a single injection of recombinant vaccinia vaccine.To develop a safer immunization strategy,a single DNA prime followed by a single recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTV) AIDS vaccine was used to immunize mice.Our data demonstrated that one DNA prime/rTV boost regimen induced mature TCR activation with high functional avidity,preferential T cell Vβ receptor usage and high sensitivity to anti-CD3 antibody stimulation.No differences in T cell responses were observed among one,two or three DNA prime/rTV boost regimens.This study shows that one DNA prime/rTV boost regimen is sufficient to induce potent T cell responses against HIV.

  6. Frequently Asked Questions and Answers on Smallpox

    ... for at least 3,000 years and was one of the world’s most feared diseases until it was eradicated by a collaborative global vaccination programme led by the World Health ... which killed one person and caused a limited outbreak. Smallpox was ...

  7. Recommendations for using smallpox vaccine in a pre-event vaccination program. Supplemental recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC).

    Wharton, Melinda; Strikas, Raymond A; Harpaz, Rafael; Rotz, Lisa D; Schwartz, Benjamin; Casey, Christine G; Pearson, Michele L; Anderson, Larry J

    2003-04-01

    This report supplements the 2001 statement by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) (CDC. Vaccinia [smallpox] vaccine: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP], 2001. MMWR 2001;50[No. RR-10]:1-25). This supplemental report provides recommendations for using smallpox vaccine in the pre-event vaccination program in the United States. To facilitate preparedness and response, smallpox vaccination is recommended for persons designated by public health authorities to conduct investigation and follow-up of initial smallpox cases that might necessitate direct patient contact. ACIP recommends that each state and territory establish and maintain > or = 1 smallpox response team. ACIP and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) recommend that each acute-care hospital identify health-care workers who can be vaccinated and trained to provide direct medical care for the first smallpox patients requiring hospital admission and to evaluate and manage patients who are suspected as having smallpox. When feasible, the first-stage vaccination program should include previously vaccinated health-care personnel to decrease the potential for adverse events. Additionally persons administering smallpox vaccine in this pre-event vaccination program should be vaccinated. Smallpox vaccine is administered by using the multiple-puncture technique with a bifurcated needle, packaged with the vaccine and diluent. According to the product labeling, 2-3 punctures are recommended for primary vaccination and 15 punctures for revaccination. A trace of blood should appear at the vaccination site after 15-20 seconds; if no trace of blood is visible, an additional 3 insertions should be made by using the same bifurcated needle without reinserting the needle into the vaccine vial. If no evidence of vaccine take is apparent after 7 days, the person can be vaccinated again. Optimal infection-control practices and appropriate

  8. Demographic and clinical factors associated with response to smallpox vaccine in preimmunized volunteers.

    Philippe Bossi

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: In March 2003, the French Ministry of Health implemented a program on preparedness and response to a biological attack using smallpox as weapon. This program included the establishment of a preoutbreak national team that could be revaccinated against smallpox. OBJECTIVE: To identify demographic and clinical factors associated with vaccination success defined as the presence of a pustule at the inoculation site at day 8 (days 7-9, with an undiluted vaccinia virus derived from a Lister strain among preimmunized volunteers. VOLUNTEERS AND METHODS: From March 2003 to November 2006, we have studied prospectively 226 eligible volunteers. Demographic data were recorded for each volunteer (age, sex, number of previously smallpox vaccinations and date of the last vaccination. Smallpox vaccine adverse reactions were diagnosed on the basis of clinical examination performed at days 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after revaccination. RESULTS: A total of 226 volunteers (sex ratio H/F = 2.7 were revaccinated. Median age was 45 years (range: 27-63 yrs. All volunteers completed follow-up. Median number of vaccinations before revaccination was 2 (range: 1-8. The median delay between time of the study and the last vaccination was 29 years (range; 18-60 yrs. Sixty-one volunteers (27% experienced one (n = 40 or more (n = 21 minor side effects during the 2-14 days after revaccination. Successful vaccination was noted in 216/226 volunteers (95.6% at day 8 and the median of the pustule diameter was 5 mm (range: 1-20 mm. Size of the pustule at day 8 was correlated with age (p = 0.03 and with the presence of axillary adenopathy after revaccination (p = 0.007. Sex, number of prior vaccinations, delay between the last vaccination and revaccination, and local or systemic side effects with the exception of axillary adenopathy, were not correlated with the size of the pustule at day 8. CONCLUSIONS: Previously vaccinated volunteers can be successfully revaccinated with the

  9. Smallpox: a potential agent of bioterrorism.

    Whitley, Richard J

    2003-01-01

    The events of 11 September 2001, in New York City, and subsequent identification of anthrax in the United States Postal System, have generated a new sense of awareness for the potential of biological terrorism, if not warfare. Among those agents identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as 'Class A Bioterrorist Threats', smallpox is among the most dangerous. The ease of transmission of this agent, the lack of immunity in the population at large to this agent, and rapidity of its spread, if released, all generate significant concern for its deployment. A vaccine directed against smallpox is available but it is also associated with significant adverse events-some of which are life-threatening. Further, no antiviral drug has proven efficacious for therapy of human disease, although one licensed drug, cidofovir, does have in vitro activity. Regardless, heightened awareness should lead to the development of a vaccine without significant adverse events and safe and efficacious antiviral drugs. The availability of a vaccine and antiviral drugs that are safe would significantly remove any major threat of smallpox deployment by a terrorist. PMID:12615298

  10. Significantly reduced CCR5-tropic HIV-1 replication in vitro in cells from subjects previously immunized with Vaccinia Virus

    Alibek Kenneth

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present, the relatively sudden appearance and explosive spread of HIV throughout Africa and around the world beginning in the 1950s has never been adequately explained. Theorizing that this phenomenon may be somehow related to the eradication of smallpox followed by the cessation of vaccinia immunization, we undertook a comparison of HIV-1 susceptibility in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from subjects immunized with the vaccinia virus to those from vaccinia naive donors. Results Vaccinia immunization in the preceding 3-6 months resulted in an up to 5-fold reduction in CCR5-tropic but not in CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 replication in the cells from vaccinated subjects. The addition of autologous serum to the cell cultures resulted in enhanced R5 HIV-1 replication in the cells from unvaccinated, but not vaccinated subjects. There were no significant differences in the concentrations of MIP-1α, MIP-1β and RANTES between the cell cultures derived from vaccinated and unvaccinated subjects when measured in culture medium on days 2 and 5 following R5 HIV-1 challenge. Discussion Since primary HIV-1 infections are caused almost exclusively by the CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains, our results suggest that prior immunization with vaccinia virus might provide an individual with some degree of protection to subsequent HIV infection and/or progression. The duration of such protection remains to be determined. A differential elaboration of MIP-1α, MIP-1β and RANTES between vaccinated and unvaccinated subjects, following infection, does not appear to be a mechanism in the noted protection.

  11. Smallpox-Related Knowledge and Beliefs among Recent College Graduates

    Bungum, Timothy; Day, Charlene

    2006-01-01

    Recent world events have increased concern and preparations for possible bioterror events. Despite worldwide efforts to limit access to bio-weapons, smallpox is still considered a potential bioterror threat. Americans' understanding of smallpox could prevent panic and enhance the willingness of citizens to receive vaccinations. Objective: The…

  12. Standardized emergency management system and response to a smallpox emergency.

    Kim-Farley, Robert J; Celentano, John T; Gunter, Carol; Jones, Jessica W; Stone, Rogelio A; Aller, Raymond D; Mascola, Laurene; Grigsby, Sharon F; Fielding, Jonathan E

    2003-01-01

    The smallpox virus is a high-priority, Category-A agent that poses a global, terrorism security risk because it: (1) easily can be disseminated and transmitted from person to person; (2) results in high mortality rates and has the potential for a major public health impact; (3) might cause public panic and social disruption; and (4) requires special action for public health preparedness. In recognition of this risk, the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LAC-DHS) developed the Smallpox Preparedness, Response, and Recovery Plan for LAC to prepare for the possibility of an outbreak of smallpox. A unique feature of the LAC-DHS plan is its explicit use of the Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) framework for detailing the functions needed to respond to a smallpox emergency. The SEMS includes the Incident Command System (ICS) structure (management, operations, planning/intelligence, logistics, and finance/administration), the mutual-aid system, and the multi/interagency coordination required during a smallpox emergency. Management for incident command includes setting objectives and priorities, information (risk communications), safety, and liaison. Operations includes control and containment of a smallpox outbreak including ring vaccination, mass vaccination, adverse events monitoring and assessment, management of confirmed and suspected smallpox cases, contact tracing, active surveillance teams and enhanced hospital-based surveillance, and decontamination. Planning/intelligence functions include developing the incident action plan, epidemiological investigation and analysis of smallpox cases, and epidemiological assessment of the vaccination coverage status of populations at risk. Logistics functions include receiving, handling, inventorying, and distributing smallpox vaccine and vaccination clinic supplies; personnel; transportation; communications; and health care of personnel. Finally, finance/administration functions include monitoring

  13. Comparative Proteomics of Human Monkeypox and Vaccinia Intracellular Mature and Extracellular Enveloped Virions

    Manes, Nathan P.; Estep, Ryan D.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Clauss, Therese RW; Monroe, Matthew E.; Du, Xiuxia; Adkins, Joshua N.; Wong, Scott; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-03-07

    Orthopoxviruses are the largest and most complex of the animal viruses. In response to the recent emergence of monkeypox in Africa and the threat of smallpox bioterrorism, virulent (monkeypox virus) and benign (vaccinia virus) orthopoxviruses were proteomically compared with the goal of identifying proteins required for pathogenesis. Orthopoxviruses were grown in HeLa cells to two different viral forms (intracellular mature virus and extracellular enveloped virus), purified by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation, denatured using RapiGest™ surfactant, and digested with trypsin. Unfractionated samples and strong cation exchange HPLC fractions were analyzed by reversed-phase LC-MS/MS, and analyses of the MS/MS spectra using SEQUEST® and X! Tandem resulted in the identification of hundreds of monkeypox, vaccinia, and copurified host proteins. The unfractionated samples were additionally analyzed by LC-MS on an LTQ-Orbitrap™, and the accurate mass and elution time tag approach was used to perform quantitative comparisons. Possible pathophysiological roles of differentially expressed orthopoxvirus genes are discussed.

  14. Vaccinia Virus LC16m8∆ as a Vaccine Vector for Clinical Applications

    Minoru Kidokoro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The LC16m8 strain of vaccinia virus, the active ingredient in the Japanese smallpox vaccine, was derived from the Lister/Elstree strain. LC16m8 is replication-competent and has been administered to over 100,000 infants and 3,000 adults with no serious adverse reactions. Despite this outstanding safety profile, the occurrence of spontaneously-generated large plaque-forming virulent LC16m8 revertants following passage in cell culture is a major drawback. We identified the gene responsible for the reversion and deleted the gene (B5R from LC16m8 to derive LC16m8Δ. LC16m8∆ is non-pathogenic in immunodeficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice, genetically-stable and does not reverse to a large-plaque phenotype upon passage in cell culture, even under conditions in which most LC16m8 populations are replaced by revertants. Moreover, LC16m8∆ is >500-fold more effective than the non-replicating vaccinia virus (VV, Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA, at inducing murine immune responses against pathogenic VV. LC16m8∆, which expresses the SIV gag gene, also induced anti-Gag CD8+ T-cells more efficiently than MVA and another non-replicating VV, Dairen I minute-pock variants (DIs. Moreover, LC16m8∆ expressing HIV-1 Env in combination with a Sendai virus vector induced the production of anti-Env antibodies and CD8+ T-cells. Thus, the safety and efficacy of LC16m8∆ mean that it represents an outstanding platform for the development of human vaccine vectors.

  15. New Generation of Cell Culture Assay for Smallpox Vaccine Potency

    Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Poirier, Bertrand; El Zaouk, Annie; Tissier, Marie-Hélène; Fuchs, Florence

    2003-01-01

    The potency of smallpox vaccines produced in the 1970s was tested by titration onto chorioallantoic membranes of fertilized hen eggs (CAM assay). The potency specification commonly approved for these vaccines was a titer above 108 pock-forming units per milliliter. We developed and validated a cell culture titration assay to have a more reliable potency test. The cell titration assay and the CAM assay were tested in parallel on 34 first-generation smallpox vaccine lots. These allowed us to de...

  16. Vaccinia virus: a selectable eukaryotic cloning and expression vector.

    Mackett, M; Smith, G L; B. Moss

    1982-01-01

    Foreign DNA was inserted into two nonessential regions of the vaccinia virus genome by homologous recombination in cells infected with virus and transfected with plasmids containing the foreign DNA elements flanked by vaccinia virus DNA. Thymidine kinase-negative (TK-) recombinants were selected after inserting foreign DNA into the coding region of the TK gene of wild-type vaccinia virus; TK+ recombinants were selected after inserting the herpesvirus TK gene into TK- mutants of vaccinia virus...

  17. Vaccinia DNA topoisomerase I promotes illegitimate recombination in Escherichia coli.

    Shuman, S

    1989-01-01

    Vaccinia virus encapsidates a Mr 32,000 type IDNA topoisomerase. Although the vaccinia gene encoding the topoisomerase is essential for virus growth, the role of the enzyme in vivo remains unclear. In the present study, the physiologic consequences of vaccinia topoisomerase action have been examined in a heterologous system, Escherichia coli. The vaccinia topoisomerase gene was inducibly expressed in an int-lambda lysogen BL21(DE3) using a T7 RNA polymerase-based transcription system. Express...

  18. The generation of CD8+ T-cell population specific for vaccinia virus epitope involved in the antiviral protection against ectromelia virus challenge.

    Gierynska, Malgorzata; Szulc-Dabrowska, Lidia; Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Golke, Anna; Schollenberger, Ada

    2015-12-01

    Eradication of smallpox has led to cessation of vaccination programs. This has rendered the human population increasingly susceptible not only to variola virus infection but also to infections with other representatives of Poxviridae family that cause zoonotic variola-like diseases. Thus, new approaches for designing improved vaccine against smallpox are required. Discovering that orthopoxviruses, e.g. variola virus, vaccinia virus, ectromelia virus, share common immunodominant antigen, may result in the development of such a vaccine. In our study, the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in mice during the acute and memory phase of the immune response was induced using the vaccinia virus immunodominant TSYKFESV epitope and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as adjuvants. The role of the generated TSYKFESV-specific CD8(+) T cells was evaluated in mice during ectromelia virus infection using systemic and mucosal model. Moreover, the involvement of dendritic cells subsets in the adaptive immune response stimulation was assessed. Our results indicate that the TSYKFESV epitope/TLR9 agonist approach, delivered systemically or mucosally, generated strong CD8(+) T-cell response when measured 10 days after immunization. Furthermore, the TSYKFESV-specific cell population remained functionally active 2 months post-immunization, and gave cross-protection in virally challenged mice, even though the numbers of detectable antigen-specific T cells decreased. PMID:26474845

  19. Epidemiologic Assessment of the Protective Effects of Smallpox Vaccination

    Hiroshi Nishiura

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite smallpox eradication, the widely discussed possibility of a bioterrorist attack using a variola virus makes it necessary to review the epidemiology of smallpox and the effects of various vaccination schemes. This paper provides a literature review concerning the epidemiologic assessment of the protective effects of smallpox vaccination, with particular emphasis on the statistical and theoretical points of view. Although smallpox vaccination has the longest history of all vaccinations, we lack precise epidemiologic estimates of its effectiveness. Vaccination practice continually evolved and many places experienced vaccinations with various strains over time. Despite the weak statistical evidence, it can be stated with certainty that smallpox vaccines prevented infection for a few decades after primary vaccination and that vaccinated individuals had the benefit of a longer lasting partial protection when they contracted the disease. Confronted with the huge uncertainties and with the necessity to rely on laboratory evidence, appropriate preparedness plans for countermeasures using vaccination must be based on the best available evidence.

  20. Development of the small-molecule antiviral ST-246® as a smallpox therapeutic

    Grosenbach, Douglas W.; Jordan, Robert; Hruby, Dennis E

    2011-01-01

    Naturally occurring smallpox has been eradicated, yet it remains as one of the highest priority pathogens due to its potential as a biological weapon. The majority of the US population would be vulnerable in a smallpox outbreak. SIGA Technologies, Inc. has responded to the call of the US government to develop and supply to the Strategic National Stockpile a smallpox antiviral to be deployed in the event of a smallpox outbreak. ST-246® (tecovirimat) was initially identified via a high-throughp...

  1. The Migration of Smallpox and Its Indelible Footprint on Latin American History. Junior Division Winner.

    Thomson, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Addresses the migration of smallpox into the New World where it caused the extinction of entire indigenous civilizations and altered the survivors' cultures. Discusses the historical origins of smallpox and highlights the migration and consequences of smallpox in Central and South America. Includes an annotated bibliography, research description,…

  2. 76 FR 49776 - The Development and Evaluation of Next-Generation Smallpox Vaccines; Public Workshop

    2011-08-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The Development and Evaluation of Next-Generation Smallpox... workshop entitled ``The Development and Evaluation of Next-Generation Smallpox Vaccines.'' The purpose of... evaluation of next-generation smallpox vaccines. The public workshop will include presentations on the...

  3. What to Do After You've Gotten the Smallpox Vaccine

    ... Z Index SMALLPOX FACT SHEET What to Do After You’ve Gotten the Smallpox Vaccine The smallpox vaccine ... cared for carefully until the scab that forms after vaccination falls off on its own (in 2 to 3 weeks). Follow these instructions: What You Should Do: Cover the vaccination site loosely with ...

  4. Protective Effect of Surfactant Protein D in Pulmonary Vaccinia Virus Infection: Implication of A27 Viral Protein

    Julien Perino

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV was used as a surrogate of variola virus (VARV (genus Orthopoxvirus, the causative agent of smallpox, to study Orthopoxvirus infection. VARV is principally transmitted between humans by aerosol droplets. Once inhaled, VARV first infects the respiratory tract where it could encounter surfactant components, such as soluble pattern recognition receptors. Surfactant protein D (SP-D, constitutively present in the lining fluids of the respiratory tract, plays important roles in innate host defense against virus infection. We investigated the role of SP-D in VACV infection and studied the A27 viral protein involvement in the interaction with SP-D. Interaction between SP-D and VACV caused viral inhibition in a lung cell model. Interaction of SP-D with VACV was mediated by the A27 viral protein. Binding required Ca2+ and interactions were blocked in the presence of excess of SP-D saccharide ligands. A27, which lacks glycosylation, directly interacted with SP-D. The interaction between SP-D and the viral particle was also observed using electron microscopy. Infection of mice lacking SP-D (SP-D-/- resulted in increased mortality compared to SP-D+/+ mice. Altogether, our data show that SP-D participates in host defense against the vaccinia virus infection and that the interaction occurs with the viral surface protein A27.

  5. An interaction quantitative trait loci tool implicates epistatic functional variants in an apoptosis pathway in smallpox vaccine eQTL data.

    Lareau, C A; White, B C; Oberg, A L; Kennedy, R B; Poland, G A; McKinney, B A

    2016-06-01

    Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have functionalized nucleic acid variants through the regulation of gene expression. Although most eQTL studies only examine the effects of single variants on transcription, a more complex process of variant-variant interaction (epistasis) may regulate transcription. Herein, we describe a tool called interaction QTL (iQTL) designed to efficiently detect epistatic interactions that regulate gene expression. To maximize biological relevance and minimize the computational and hypothesis testing burden, iQTL restricts interactions such that one variant is within a user-defined proximity of the transcript (cis-regulatory). We apply iQTL to a data set of 183 smallpox vaccine study participants with genome-wide association study and gene expression data from unstimulated samples and samples stimulated by inactivated vaccinia virus. While computing only 0.15% of possible interactions, we identify 11 probe sets whose expression is regulated through a variant-variant interaction. We highlight the functional epistatic interactions among apoptosis-related genes, DIABLO, TRAPPC4 and FADD, in the context of smallpox vaccination. We also use an integrative network approach to characterize these iQTL interactions in a posterior network of known prior functional interactions. iQTL is an efficient, open-source tool to analyze variant interactions in eQTL studies, providing better understanding of the function of epistasis in immune response and other complex phenotypes. PMID:27052692

  6. From lesions to viral clones: biological and molecular diversity amongst autochthonous Brazilian vaccinia virus.

    Oliveira, Graziele; Assis, Felipe; Almeida, Gabriel; Albarnaz, Jonas; Lima, Maurício; Andrade, Ana Cláudia; Calixto, Rafael; Oliveira, Cairo; Diomedes Neto, José; Trindade, Giliane; Ferreira, Paulo César; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Abrahão, Jônatas

    2015-03-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) has had an important role for humanity because of its use during the smallpox eradication campaign. VACV is the etiologic agent of the bovine vaccinia (BV), an emerging zoonosis that has been associated with economic, social, veterinary and public health problems, mainly in Brazil and India. Despite the current and historical VACV importance, there is little information about its circulation, prevalence, origins and maintenance in the environment, natural reservoirs and diversity. Brazilian VACV (VACV-BR) are grouped into at least two groups based on genetic and biological diversity: group 1 (G1) and group 2 (G2). In this study, we went to the field and investigated VACV clonal diversity directly from exanthemous lesions, during BV outbreaks. Our results demonstrate that the G1 VACV-BR were more frequently isolated. Furthermore, we were able to co-detect the two variants (G1 and G2) in the same sample. Molecular and biological analysis corroborated previous reports and confirmed the co-circulation of two VACV-BR lineages. The detected G2 clones presented exclusive genetic and biological markers, distinct to reference isolates, including VACV-Western Reserve. Two clones presented a mosaic profile, with both G1 and G2 features based on the molecular analysis of A56R, A26L and C23L genes. Indeed, some SNPs and INDELs in A56R nucleotide sequences were observed among clones of the same virus population, maybe as a result of an increased mutation rate in a mixed population. These results provide information about the diversity profile in VACV populations, highlighting its importance to VACV evolution and maintenance in the environment. PMID:25785515

  7. Inhibition of Vaccinia virus entry by a broad spectrum antiviral peptide

    Concerns about the possible use of Variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, as a weapon for bioterrorism have led to renewed efforts to identify new antivirals against orthopoxviruses. We identified a peptide, EB, which inhibited infection by Vaccinia virus with an EC50 of 15 μM. A control peptide, EBX, identical in composition to EB but differing in sequence, was inactive (EC50 > 200 μM), indicating sequence specificity. The inhibition was reversed upon removal of the peptide, and EB treatment had no effect on the physical integrity of virus particles as determined by electron microscopy. Viral adsorption was unaffected by the presence of EB, and the addition of EB post-entry had no effect on viral titers or on early gene expression. The addition of EB post-adsorption resulted in the inhibition of β-galactosidase expression from an early viral promoter with an EC50 of 45 μM. A significant reduction in virus entry was detected in the presence of the peptide when the number of viral cores released into the cytoplasm was quantified. Electron microscopy indicated that 88% of the virions remained on the surface of cells in the presence of EB, compared to 37% in the control (p < 0.001). EB also blocked fusion-from-within, suggesting that virus infection is inhibited at the fusion step. Analysis of EB derivatives suggested that peptide length may be important for the activity of EB. The EB peptide is, to our knowledge, the first known small molecule inhibitor of Vaccinia virus entry.

  8. A prospective study of the incidence of myocarditis/pericarditis and new onset cardiac symptoms following smallpox and influenza vaccination.

    Renata J M Engler

    Full Text Available Although myocarditis/pericarditis (MP has been identified as an adverse event following smallpox vaccine (SPX, the prospective incidence of this reaction and new onset cardiac symptoms, including possible subclinical injury, has not been prospectively defined.The study's primary objective was to determine the prospective incidence of new onset cardiac symptoms, clinical and possible subclinical MP in temporal association with immunization.New onset cardiac symptoms, clinical MP and cardiac specific troponin T (cTnT elevations following SPX (above individual baseline values were measured in a multi-center prospective, active surveillance cohort study of healthy subjects receiving either smallpox vaccine or trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV.New onset chest pain, dyspnea, and/or palpitations occurred in 10.6% of SPX-vaccinees and 2.6% of TIV-vaccinees within 30 days of immunization (relative risk (RR 4.0, 95% CI: 1.7-9.3. Among the 1081 SPX-vaccinees with complete follow-up, 4 Caucasian males were diagnosed with probable myocarditis and 1 female with suspected pericarditis. This indicates a post-SPX incidence rate more than 200-times higher than the pre-SPX background population surveillance rate of myocarditis/pericarditis (RR 214, 95% CI 65-558. Additionally, 31 SPX-vaccinees without specific cardiac symptoms were found to have over 2-fold increases in cTnT (>99th percentile from baseline (pre-SPX during the window of risk for clinical myocarditis/pericarditis and meeting a proposed case definition for possible subclinical myocarditis. This rate is 60-times higher than the incidence rate of overt clinical cases. No clinical or possible subclinical myocarditis cases were identified in the TIV-vaccinated group.Passive surveillance significantly underestimates the true incidence of myocarditis/pericarditis after smallpox immunization. Evidence of subclinical transient cardiac muscle injury post-vaccinia immunization is a finding that requires further

  9. Smallpox Vaccination of Laboratory Workers at US Variola Testing Sites.

    Medcalf, Sharon; Bilek, Laura; Hartman, Teresa; Iwen, Peter C; Leuschen, Patricia; Miller, Hannah; O'Keefe, Anne; Sayles, Harlan; Smith, Philip W

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the need to revaccinate laboratory workers against smallpox, we assessed regular revaccination at the US Laboratory Response Network's variola testing sites by examining barriers to revaccination and the potential for persistence of immunity. Our data do not provide evidence to suggest prolonging the recommended interval for revaccination. PMID:26196153

  10. Bioterrorism and Smallpox: Policies, Practices, and Implications for Social Work

    Mackelprang, Romel W.; Mackelprang, Romel D.; Thirkill, Ashley D.

    2005-01-01

    Terrorist acts and the fear of terrorism have become a part of everyday life in the early 21st century. Among the threats most feared is bioterrorism, including the intentional release of smallpox. With the invasion of Iraq and toppling of the Saddam Hussein regime, acute bioterrorism fears have abated; however, an ongoing threat remains. This…

  11. Nucleotide Phosphohydrolase in Purified Vaccinia Virus

    Munyon, William; Paoletti, Enzo; Ospina, Julio; Grace, James T.

    1968-01-01

    Purified infectious vaccinia virus has been shown to contain an enzyme or enzymes that remove the terminal phosphate group from adenosine triphosphate (ATP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP), uridine triphosphate (UTP), and cytidine triphosphate (CTP). The Km for ATP of this enzyme is 5.5 × 10−4m, and the relative rates of the reaction with ATP, GTP, UTP, and CTP are 1.00, 0.34, 0.15, and 0.29, respectively. The virus enzyme does not react with any of the diphosphates. The rate of the reaction is proportional to the amount of virus added and is linear for 130 min. The virus nucleotide phosphohydrolase activity is greatly stimulated by Mg++ and very slightly stimulated by Ca++. The small residual activity observed in the absence of divalent cations is completely inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Neither Na+ nor K+ ions, nor any mixture of these, was found to stimulate the reaction significantly, and ouabain, at 10−4m, inhibited the reaction by only 27%. The response of the vaccinia enzyme to mono- and divalent cations and to ouabain indicates that the vaccinia enzyme has different properties from those associated with microsomes and mitochondria. PMID:4986904

  12. New insights about host response to smallpox using microarray data

    Dias Rodrigo A

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smallpox is a lethal disease that was endemic in many parts of the world until eradicated by massive immunization. Due to its lethality, there are serious concerns about its use as a bioweapon. Here we analyze publicly available microarray data to further understand survival of smallpox infected macaques, using systems biology approaches. Our goal is to improve the knowledge about the progression of this disease. Results We used KEGG pathways annotations to define groups of genes (or modules, and subsequently compared them to macaque survival times. This technique provided additional insights about the host response to this disease, such as increased expression of the cytokines and ECM receptors in the individuals with higher survival times. These results could indicate that these gene groups could influence an effective response from the host to smallpox. Conclusion Macaques with higher survival times clearly express some specific pathways previously unidentified using regular gene-by-gene approaches. Our work also shows how third party analysis of public datasets can be important to support new hypotheses to relevant biological problems.

  13. New insights about host response to smallpox using microarray data

    Esteves, Gustavo H; Simoes, Ana CQ; Souza, Estevao; Dias, Rodrigo A; Ospina, Raydonal; Venancio, Thiago M

    2007-01-01

    Background Smallpox is a lethal disease that was endemic in many parts of the world until eradicated by massive immunization. Due to its lethality, there are serious concerns about its use as a bioweapon. Here we analyze publicly available microarray data to further understand survival of smallpox infected macaques, using systems biology approaches. Our goal is to improve the knowledge about the progression of this disease. Results We used KEGG pathways annotations to define groups of genes (or modules), and subsequently compared them to macaque survival times. This technique provided additional insights about the host response to this disease, such as increased expression of the cytokines and ECM receptors in the individuals with higher survival times. These results could indicate that these gene groups could influence an effective response from the host to smallpox. Conclusion Macaques with higher survival times clearly express some specific pathways previously unidentified using regular gene-by-gene approaches. Our work also shows how third party analysis of public datasets can be important to support new hypotheses to relevant biological problems. PMID:17718913

  14. A novel replication-competent vaccinia vector MVTT is superior to MVA for inducing high levels of neutralizing antibody via mucosal vaccination.

    Xiaoxing Huang

    Full Text Available Mucosal vaccination offers great advantage for inducing protective immune response to prevent viral transmission and dissemination. Here, we report our findings of a head-to-head comparison of two viral vectors modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA and a novel replication-competent modified vaccinia Tian Tan (MVTT for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs via intramuscular and mucosal vaccinations in mice. MVTT is an attenuated variant of the wild-type VTT, which was historically used as a smallpox vaccine for millions of Chinese people. The spike glycoprotein (S of SARS-CoV was used as the test antigen after the S gene was constructed in the identical genomic location of two vectors to generate vaccine candidates MVTT-S and MVA-S. Using identical doses, MVTT-S induced lower levels ( approximately 2-3-fold of anti- SARS-CoV neutralizing antibodies (Nabs than MVA-S through intramuscular inoculation. MVTT-S, however, was capable of inducing consistently 20-to-100-fold higher levels of Nabs than MVA-S when inoculated via either intranasal or intraoral routes. These levels of MVTT-S-induced Nab responses were substantially (approximately 10-fold higher than that induced via the intramuscular route in the same experiments. Moreover, pre-exposure to the wild-type VTT via intranasal or intraoral route impaired the Nab response via the same routes of MVTT-S vaccination probably due to the pre-existing anti-VTT Nab response. The efficacy of intranasal or intraoral vaccination, however, was still 20-to-50-fold better than intramuscular inoculation despite the subcutaneous pre-exposure to wild-type VTT. Our data have implications for people who maintain low levels of anti-VTT Nabs after historical smallpox vaccination. MVTT is therefore an attractive live viral vector for mucosal vaccination.

  15. Adsorption of recombinant poxvirus L1-protein to aluminum hydroxide/CpG vaccine adjuvants enhances immune responses and protection of mice from vaccinia virus challenge

    Xiao, Yuhong; Zeng, Yuhong; Alexander, Edward; Mehta, Shyam; Joshi, Sangeeta B.; Buchman, George W.; Volkin, David B.; Middaugh, C. Russell; Isaacs, Stuart N.

    2012-01-01

    The stockpiling of live vaccinia virus vaccines has enhanced biopreparedness against the intentional or accidental release of smallpox. Ongoing research on future generation smallpox vaccines is providing key insights into protective immune responses as well as important information about subunit vaccine design strategies. For protein-based recombinant subunit vaccines, the formulation and stability of candidate antigens with different adjuvants are important factors to consider for vaccine design. In this work, a non-tagged secreted L1-protein, a target antigen on mature virus, was expressed using recombinant baculovirus technology and purified. To identify optimal formulation conditions for L1, a series of biophysical studies was performed over a range of pH and temperature conditions. The overall physical stability profile was summarized in an empirical phase diagram. Another critical question to address for development of an adjuvanted-vaccine was if immunogenicity and protection could be affected by the interactions and binding of L1 to aluminum salts (Alhydrogel) with and without a second adjuvant, CpG. We thus designed a series of vaccine formulations with different binding interactions between the L1 and the two adjuvants, and then performed a series of vaccination-challenge experiments in mice including measurement of antibody responses and post-challenge weight-loss and survival. We found that better humoral responses and protection were conferred with vaccine formulations when the L1-protein was adsorbed to Alhydrogel. These data demonstrate that designing vaccine formulation conditions to maximize antigen-adjuvant interactions is a key factor in smallpox subunit vaccine immunogenicity and protection. PMID:23153450

  16. 42 CFR 102.51 - Documentation a smallpox vaccine recipient must submit to be deemed eligible by the Secretary.

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Documentation a smallpox vaccine recipient must..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Required Documentation To Be Deemed Eligible § 102.51 Documentation a smallpox vaccine recipient must submit to be deemed eligible...

  17. Lessons for Implementation from the World's Most Successful Programme: The Global Eradication of Smallpox.

    Pratt, David

    1999-01-01

    Focuses on lessons educators might learn from the Intensified Campaign for the Global Eradication of Smallpox. Outlines the history of smallpox eradication. Discusses the eradication effort's obstacles, campaign, and costs and benefits. Considers five factors relevant to the successful implementation of educational programs. (CMK)

  18. Governments, off-patent vaccines, smallpox and universal childhood vaccination.

    Music, Stanley

    2010-01-22

    WHO is now celebrating more than 30 years of freedom from smallpox. What was originally seen as a victory over an ancient scourge can now be viewed as an epidemiologically driven programme to overcome governmental inertia and under-achievement in delivering an off-patent vaccine. Though efforts are accelerating global vaccine use, a plea is made to push the world's governments to commit to universal childhood vaccination via a proposed new programme. The latter should begin by exploiting a long list of ever more affordable off-patent vaccines, vaccines that can virtually eliminate the bulk of the world's current vaccine-preventable disease burden. PMID:19699330

  19. Vaccinia Virus Infections in a Martial Arts Gym

    2011-04-04

    This podcast discusses an outbreak of vaccinia virus in Maryland in 2008. Christine Hughes, a health scientist with the Poxvirus and Rabies Branch at CDC, and co-author of a paper in the April 2011 issue of CDC's journal, discusses vaccinia virus infections in a martial arts gym.  Created: 4/4/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/5/2011.

  20. Antibody against extracellular vaccinia virus (EV protects mice through complement and Fc receptors.

    Matthew E Cohen

    Full Text Available Protein-based subunit smallpox vaccines have shown their potential as effective alternatives to live virus vaccines in animal model challenge studies. We vaccinated mice with combinations of three different vaccinia virus (VACV proteins (A33, B5, L1 and examined how the combined antibody responses to these proteins cooperate to effectively neutralize the extracellular virus (EV infectious form of VACV. Antibodies against these targets were generated in the presence or absence of CpG adjuvant so that Th1-biased antibody responses could be compared to Th2-biased responses to the proteins with aluminum hydroxide alone, specifically with interest in looking at the ability of anti-B5 and anti-A33 polyclonal antibodies (pAb to utilize complement-mediated neutralization in vitro. We found that neutralization of EV by anti-A33 or anti-B5 pAb can be enhanced in the presence of complement if Th1-biased antibody (IgG2a is generated. Mechanistic differences found for complement-mediated neutralization showed that anti-A33 antibodies likely result in virolysis, while anti-B5 antibodies with complement can neutralize by opsonization (coating. In vivo studies found that mice lacking the C3 protein of complement were less protected than wild-type mice after passive transfer of anti-B5 pAb or vaccination with B5. Passive transfer of anti-B5 pAb or monoclonal antibody into mice lacking Fc receptors (FcRs found that FcRs were also important in mediating protection. These results demonstrate that both complement and FcRs are important effector mechanisms for antibody-mediated protection from VACV challenge in mice.

  1. Smallpox and its eradication in the Democratic Republic of Congo: lessons learned.

    Muyembe-Tamfum, Jean-Jacques; Mulembakani, Prime; Lekie, René Botee; Szczeniowski, Mark; Ježek, Zdeněk; Doshi, Reena; Hoff, Nicole; Rimoin, Anne W

    2011-12-30

    Smallpox eradication is considered to be one of the most remarkable accomplishments of the 20th century. Lessons learned from the campaign during the 1960s and 1970s in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) can provide important information for the development of other eradication programs including polio. The DRC is the third largest country in Africa; the population suffers from extreme poverty, deteriorating infrastructure and health systems, and long periods of civil strife. Despite these challenges, DRC's smallpox eradication campaign was successful, eradicating smallpox only 41 months after initiation. DRC had been polio free since 2001; however, in 2006, imported cases were identified in the country. Polio transmission has since been re-established and DRC now has the second greatest number of reported polio cases in the world. Challenges which existed during the smallpox campaign in DRC are still present today; additionally, the polio vaccine itself poses unique challenges which include requiring multiple doses to confer immunity. In the fight against polio in DRC, it will be important to draw from the smallpox eradication experience. A number of important themes emerged during the campaign that could be beneficial to eradicating polio and future eradication programs that may follow. During the smallpox campaign, a standard vaccination program was implemented, surveillance was intensified, and there were strong collaborative programs with community involvement. These successful elements of the smallpox campaign should be adapted and applied in DRC in polio eradication programs. PMID:22188930

  2. Vaccination scars in HIV infected patients – does vaccinia vaccination confer protection against HIV?

    Jespersen, Sanne; Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Medina, Candida;

    Vaccination scars in HIV infected patients – does vaccinia vaccination confer protection against HIV?......Vaccination scars in HIV infected patients – does vaccinia vaccination confer protection against HIV?...

  3. Zoonotic Vaccinia Virus Infection in Brazil: Clinical Description and Implications for Health Professionals▿

    de Souza Trindade, Giliane; Drumond, Betania Paiva; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Leite, Juliana Almeida; Mota, Bruno Eduardo Fernandes; Campos, Marco Antônio; da Fonseca, Flávio Guimarães; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela; Bonjardim, Cláudio Antônio; Ferreira, Paulo César Peregrino; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2007-01-01

    Bovine vaccinia virus outbreaks have been occurring in different regions of Brazil. We report here the time course of natural human infection by vaccinia virus and describe important clinical and epidemiological aspects of this zoonotic infection. The diagnosis of vaccinia virus infection was based on clinical, serological, and molecular procedures.

  4. Antitumor efficacy of vaccinia virus-modified tumor cell vaccine

    The antitumor efficacies of vaccinia virus-modified tumor cell vaccines were examined in murine syngeneic MH134 and X5563 tumor cells. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus was inoculated i.p. into C3H/HeN mice that had received whole body X-irradiation at 150 rads. After 3 weeks, the vaccines were administered i.p. 3 times at weekly intervals. One week after the last injection, mice were challenged i.p. with various doses of syngeneic MH134 or X5563 viable tumor cells. Four methods were used for preparing tumor cell vaccines: X-ray irradiation; fixation with paraformaldehyde for 1 h or 3 months; and purification of the membrane fraction. All four vaccines were effective, but the former two vaccines were the most effective. A mixture of the membrane fraction of untreated tumor cells and UV-inactivated vaccinia virus also had an antitumor effect. These results indicate that vaccine with the complete cell structure is the most effective. The membrane fraction of UV-inactivated vaccinia virus-absorbed tumor cells was also effective. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus can react with not only intact tumor cells but also the purified membrane fraction of tumor cells and augment antitumor activity

  5. Cryo-electron tomography of vaccinia virus

    Cyrklaff, Marek; Risco, Cristina; Fernández, Jose Jesús; Jiménez, Maria Victoria; Estéban, Mariano; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Carrascosa, José L.

    2005-01-01

    The combination of cryo-microscopy and electron tomographic reconstruction has allowed us to determine the structure of one of the more complex viruses, intracellular mature vaccinia virus, at a resolution of 4–6 nm. The tomographic reconstruction allows us to dissect the different structural components of the viral particle, avoiding projection artifacts derived from previous microscopic observations. A surface-rendering representation revealed brick-shaped viral particles with slightly rounded edges and dimensions of ≈360 × 270 × 250 nm. The outer layer was consistent with a lipid membrane (5–6 nm thick), below which usually two lateral bodies were found, built up by a heterogeneous material without apparent ordering or repetitive features. The internal core presented an inner cavity with electron dense coils of presumptive DNA–protein complexes, together with areas of very low density. The core was surrounded by two layers comprising an overall thickness of ≈18–19 nm; the inner layer was consistent with a lipid membrane. The outer layer was discontinuous, formed by a periodic palisade built by the side interaction of T-shaped protein spikes that were anchored in the lower membrane and were arranged into small hexagonal crystallites. It was possible to detect a few pore-like structures that communicated the inner side of the core with the region outside the layer built by the T-shaped spike palisade. PMID:15699328

  6. Traditional smallpox vaccination with reduced risk of inadvertent contact spread by administration of povidone iodine ointment

    Hammarlund, Erika; Lewis, Matthew W.; Hanifin, Jon; Simpson, Eric L.; Carlson, Nichole E; Slifka, Mark K.

    2007-01-01

    One concern with traditional smallpox vaccination is inadvertent spread of virus to atopic or immunocompromised contacts. To reduce this risk, we tested the ability of povidone iodine to inactivate infectious virus at the vaccination site beginning at 7 days after transcutaneous smallpox vaccination. This ointment rapidly inactivated virus on the skin without reducing neutralizing antibody titers or antiviral T cell responses. Moreover, there was no delay in healing/eschar separation followin...

  7. 42 CFR 102.50 - Medical records necessary to establish that a covered injury was sustained.

    2010-10-01

    ... to establish that a smallpox vaccine recipient or vaccinia contact sustained a covered injury, a... records, including the admission history and physical examination, the discharge summary, all physician... the smallpox vaccine) or vaccinia contracted through accidental vaccinia inoculation. (c) If...

  8. SIMULTANEOUS BCG AND SMALLPOX VACCINATION ON NEWBORN INFANTS

    Abdul Rivai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Telah dikemukakan anggapan-anggapan yang terdapat dewasa ini tentang vaksinasi BCG dan cacar secara simultan. Telah dilakukan vaksinasi BCG dan cacar secara simultan pada 729 neonati dengan freeze dried Smallpox vaccine buatan dari Bio Farma dan freeze dried BCG vaccine Tokyo. Pencacaran dilakukan secara multiple puncture dan bifurcated needle dengan suntikan BCG dengan jarum dan spuit khusus intracutan dengan dosis 0,1 ml. Tuberkulin test dilakukan dengan PPD dari Kopenhagen dengan kekuatan 2 TU 9 minggu setelah vaksinasi. Dari 741 bayi yang diikut sertakan dalam survey, 12 menolak, 3 bayi tidak dapat dilakukan pemeriksaan pertama, 35 bayi belum diperiksa, pemeriksaan pertama telah dilakukan pada 691 bayi. Dari 406 bayi yang seharusnya sudah diperiksa untuk pemeriksaan kedua, 23 dapat dilakukan karena tidak dapat dijumpai atau meninggal. Telah dikemukakan bahwa pencatatan alamat yang jelas dan lengkap serta kesungguhan dalam melakukan home visits sangat penting untuk berhasilnya penyelidikan semacam ini. Dari hasil-hasil yang didapatkan sampai sekarang telah dapat diambil kesimpulan sementara, bahwa vaksinasi BCG dan cacar secara simultan memberikan hasil yang memuaskan, juga bila dibandingkan dengan hasil-hasil penyelidikan diluar negeri take pada pencacaran 99.4 percent, test tuberkulin dengan PPD 2 TU 9 minggu setelah vaksinasi memberikan indurasi lebih dari 5 mm pada 99.75 percent dan tidak menimbulkan komplikasi-komplikasi. Pelaksanaan vaksinasi BCG dan cacar dapat dilakukan oleh tenaga paramedis yang telah mendapat latihan khusus dan diawasi oleh dokter yang kompeten. Dianjurkan untuk melakukan follow up pada bayi-bayi yang diikut sertakan dalam survey ini.

  9. Mapping the active site of vaccinia virus RNA triphosphatase

    The RNA triphosphatase component of vaccinia virus mRNA capping enzyme (the product of the viral D1 gene) belongs to a family of metal-dependent phosphohydrolases that includes the RNA triphosphatases of fungi, protozoa, Chlorella virus, and baculoviruses. The family is defined by two glutamate-containing motifs (A and C) that form the metal-binding site. Most of the family members resemble the fungal and Chlorella virus enzymes, which have a complex active site located within the hydrophilic interior of a topologically closed eight-stranded β barrel (the so-called ''triphosphate tunnel''). Here we queried whether vaccinia virus capping enzyme is a member of the tunnel subfamily, via mutational mapping of amino acids required for vaccinia triphosphatase activity. We identified four new essential side chains in vaccinia D1 via alanine scanning and illuminated structure-activity relationships by conservative substitutions. Our results, together with previous mutational data, highlight a constellation of six acidic and three basic amino acids that likely compose the vaccinia triphosphatase active site (Glu37, Glu39, Arg77, Lys107, Glu126, Asp159, Lys161, Glu192, and Glu194). These nine essential residues are conserved in all vertebrate and invertebrate poxvirus RNA capping enzymes. We discerned no pattern of clustering of the catalytic residues of the poxvirus triphosphatase that would suggest structural similarity to the tunnel proteins (exclusive of motifs A and C). We infer that the poxvirus triphosphatases are a distinct lineage within the metal-dependent RNA triphosphatase family. Their unique active site, which is completely different from that of the host cell's capping enzyme, recommends the poxvirus RNA triphosphatase as a molecular target for antipoxviral drug discovery

  10. New effective chemically synthesized anti-smallpox compound NIOCH-14.

    Mazurkov, Oleg Yu; Kabanov, Alexey S; Shishkina, Larisa N; Sergeev, Alexander A; Skarnovich, Maksim O; Bormotov, Nikolay I; Skarnovich, Maria A; Ovchinnikova, Alena S; Titova, Ksenya A; Galahova, Darya O; Bulychev, Leonid E; Sergeev, Artemiy A; Taranov, Oleg S; Selivanov, Boris A; Tikhonov, Alexey Ya; Zavjalov, Evgenii L; Agafonov, Alexander P; Sergeev, Alexander N

    2016-05-01

    Antiviral activity of the new chemically synthesized compound NIOCH-14 (a derivative of tricyclodicarboxylic acid) in comparison with ST-246 (the condensed derivative of pyrroledione) was observed in experiments in vitro and in vivo using orthopoxviruses including highly pathogenic ones. After oral administration of NIOCH-14 to outbred ICR mice infected intranasally with 100 % lethal dose of ectromelia virus, it was shown that 50 % effective doses of NIOCH-14 and ST-246 did not significantly differ. The 'therapeutic window' varied from 1 day before infection to 6 days post-infection (p.i.) to achieve 100-60 % survival rate. The administration of NIOCH-14 and ST-246 to mice resulted in a significant reduction of ectromelia virus titres in organs examined as compared with the control and also reduced pathological changes in the lungs 6 days p.i. Oral administration of NIOCH-14 and ST-246 to ICR mice and marmots challenged with monkeypox virus as compared with the control resulted in a significant reduction of virus production in the lungs and the proportion of infected mice 7 days p.i. as well as the absence of disease in marmots. Significantly lower proportions of infected mice and virus production levels in the lungs as compared with the control were demonstrated in experiments after oral administration of NIOCH-14 and ST-246 to ICR mice and immunodeficient SCID mice challenged with variola virus 3 and 4 days p.i., respectively. The results obtained suggest good prospects for further study of the chemical compound NIOCH-14 to create a new smallpox drug on its basis. PMID:26861777

  11. Modeling the Effect of Herd Immunity and Contagiousness in Mitigating a Smallpox Outbreak.

    Graeden, Ellie; Fielding, Russel; Steinhouse, Kyle E; Rubin, Ilan N

    2015-07-01

    The smallpox antiviral tecovirimat has recently been purchased by the U.S. Strategic National Stockpile. Given significant uncertainty regarding both the contagiousness of smallpox in a contemporary outbreak and the efficiency of a mass vaccination campaign, vaccine prophylaxis alone may be unable to control a smallpox outbreak following a bioterror attack. Here, we present the results of a compartmental epidemiological model that identifies conditions under which tecovirimat is required to curtail the epidemic by exploring how the interaction between contagiousness and prophylaxis coverage of the affected population affects the ability of the public health response to control a large-scale smallpox outbreak. Each parameter value in the model is based on published empirical data. We describe contagiousness parametrically using a novel method of distributing an assumed R-value over the disease course based on the relative rates of daily viral shedding from human and animal studies of cognate orthopoxvirus infections. Our results suggest that vaccination prophylaxis is sufficient to control the outbreak when caused either by a minimally contagious virus or when a very high percentage of the population receives prophylaxis. As vaccination coverage of the affected population decreases below 70%, vaccine prophylaxis alone is progressively less capable of controlling outbreaks, even those caused by a less contagious virus (R0 less than 4). In these scenarios, tecovirimat treatment is required to control the outbreak (total number of cases under an order of magnitude more than the number of initial infections). The first study to determine the relative importance of smallpox prophylaxis and treatment under a range of highly uncertain epidemiological parameters, this work provides public health decision-makers with an evidence-based guide for responding to a large-scale smallpox outbreak. PMID:25480757

  12. [Study of allergic reactions in the body after experimental smallpox vaccination].

    Vorob'ev, A A; Afanas'ev, S S; Patrikeev, G T; Prigoda, A S; Podkuiĭko, V N

    1977-09-01

    Experiments on guinea pigs demonstrated a mixed cellular-humoral character of allergy in smallpox vaccination. The ratio of cellular and humoral components depended on the site of the vaccina application. Skin manifestations in smallpox vaccination (hyperemia, infiltration, papula) were due to the multiplication of the virus proper, increased sensitivity of the surrounding tissues to the live vibrio, and specific immunological reconstruction. The skin of the sensitized animal after the anaphylactic shock in response to the intracardiac injection of the challenging dose of the vaccine virus acquired areactivity to its subsequent application. PMID:596021

  13. Vaccinia virus vectors: new strategies for producing recombinant vaccines.

    Hruby, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    The development and continued refinement of techniques for the efficient insertion and expression of heterologous DNA sequences from within the genomic context of infectious vaccinia virus recombinants are among the most promising current approaches towards effective immunoprophylaxis against a variety of protozoan, viral, and bacterial human pathogens. Because of its medical relevance, this area is the subject of intense research interest and has evolved rapidly during the past several years...

  14. Successive site translocating inoculation potentiates DNA/recombinant vaccinia vaccination

    Yanqin Ren; Na Wang; Weiguo Hu; Xiaoyan Zhang; Jianqing Xu; Yanmin Wan

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines have advantages over traditional vaccine modalities; however the relatively low immunogenicity restrains its translation into clinical use. Further optimizations are needed to get the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine closer to the level required for human use. Here we show that intramuscularly inoculating into a different limb each time significantly improves the immunogenicities of both DNA and recombinant vaccinia vaccines during multiple vaccinations, compared to repeated vaccina...

  15. GMCSF-armed vaccinia virus induces an antitumor immune response.

    Parviainen, Suvi; Ahonen, Marko; Diaconu, Iulia; Kipar, Anja; Siurala, Mikko; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-03-01

    Oncolytic Western Reserve strain vaccinia virus selective for epidermal growth factor receptor pathway mutations and tumor-associated hypermetabolism was armed with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) and a tdTomato fluorophore. As the assessment of immunological responses to human transgenes is challenging in the most commonly used animal models, we used immunocompetent Syrian golden hamsters, known to be sensitive to human GMCSF and semipermissive to vaccinia virus. Efficacy was initially tested in vitro on various human and hamster cell lines and oncolytic potency of transgene-carrying viruses was similar to unarmed virus. The hGMCSF-encoding virus was able to completely eradicate subcutaneous pancreatic tumors in hamsters, and to fully protect the animals from subsequent rechallenge with the same tumor. Induction of specific antitumor immunity was also shown by ex vivo co-culture experiments with hamster splenocytes. In addition, histological examination revealed increased infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages in GMCSF-virus-treated tumors. These findings help clarify the mechanism of action of GMCSF-armed vaccinia viruses undergoing clinical trials. PMID:25042001

  16. Les hasards de la variole The hazards of smallpox

    Jean-Marc Rohrbasser

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La nécessité d’un calcul ayant pour fin d’estimer un risque peut être révoquée en doute lorsqu’il s’agit de prendre une décision en situation d’incertitude, a fortiori lorsqu’il s’agit d’une question de vie ou de mort. Dans la controverse engagée sur l’opportunité d’inoculer la variole, la position de D’Alembert constitue un cas exemplaire de scepticisme portant sur l’application des mathématiques, et en l’occurrence du calcul des probabilités, à des décisions relatives à la vie humaine. D’Alembert, en effet, conteste aux mathématiques sociales le pouvoir de rendre compte de phénomènes humains en y cherchant des régularités et des formalisations sans dissocier les dimensions mathématiques et probabilistes des dimensions philosophiques et éthiques. En suivant le débat qui, au milieu du xviiie siècle, se déroule entre le mathématicien français et son homologue suisse Daniel Bernoulli, on assiste à l’un des épisodes de la lente gestation des notions de prise de risque, de décision et de rationalité.The necessity of a calculation aiming to evaluate a risk can be revoked in doubt when the question is to make a decision in a situation of uncertainty, all the more when the question is about life or death. In the controversy opened on the opportunity to inoculate the smallpox, D'Alembert’s position constitutes an exemplary case of scepticism concerning the application of the mathematics, and in this particular case the probability theory, to decisions relative to the human life. D’Alembert, indeed, disputes in the social mathematics the power to describe human phenomena by looking for regularities and for formalizations without separating the mathematical and probability dimensions of the philosophic and ethical ones. By following the debate which, in the middle of the 18th century, takes place between the French mathematician and his Swiss counterpart Daniel Bernoulli, we attend one of the

  17. Smallpox inoculation (variolation) in East Africa with special reference to the practice among the Boran and Gabra of Northern Kenya.

    Imperato, Pascal James; Imperato, Gavin H

    2014-12-01

    Smallpox inoculation (variolation) was widely reported in sub-Sahara Africa before, during, and after the colonial era. The infective smallpox materials and techniques used, as well as the anatomical sites for inoculation, varied widely among different ethnic groups. The practice among the Boran and Gabra pastoralists of northern Kenya resembled that which was prevalent in a number of areas of Ethiopia. This is not surprising as the Boran also live in southern Ethiopia, and Gabra herdsmen frequently cross the border into this region. The Boran and Gabra technique for smallpox inoculation consisted of taking infective material from the vesicles or pustules of those with active smallpox, and scraping it into the skin on the dorsum of the lower forearm. Although the intent was to cause a local reaction and at most a mild form of smallpox, severe cases of the disease not infrequently resulted. Also, variolated individuals were capable of infecting others with smallpox, thereby augmenting outbreaks and sustaining them. The limited known reports of smallpox inoculation among the Boran and Gabra are presented in this communication. The expansion of vaccination with effective heat stable vaccines, the development of medical and public health infrastructures, and educational programs all contributed to the eventual disappearance of the practice among the Boran and Gabra. PMID:25100176

  18. Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease following Bacille Calmette-Guérin and Smallpox Vaccination

    Villumsen, Anne Marie; Jess, Tine; Sørup, Signe; Ravn, Henrik; Sturegård, Erik; Benn, Christine Stabell; Aaby, Peter; Roth, Adam Anders Edvin

    2013-01-01

    Childhood immunology has been suggested to play a role in development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) based on the studies of childhood vaccinations, infections, and treatment with antibiotics. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and smallpox vaccinations were gradually phased-out in Denmark for...

  19. Sewers and scapegoats: spatial metaphors of smallpox in nineteenth century San Francisco.

    Craddock, S

    1995-10-01

    Medical geography is slowly including more social and cultural theory in its analysis of health issues. Yet there is still room for theoretical growth in the discipline, in areas such as historical inquiry, metaphoric landscapes of disease, and the role of disease and its interpretations in the production of place. With the example of four smallpox epidemics in nineteenth century San Francisco, application of these concepts is illustrated. Each successive epidemic in San Francisco brought stronger association of the disease with Chinatown, until an almost complete metonymy of place and disease had occurred by the last decades of the century. The articulation of biased medical theory onto a landscape of xenophobia engendered this metaphorical transformation of Chinatown into a pustule of contagion threatening to infect the rest of the urban body. A less metaphoric mapping of smallpox focused on the sewer. According to 19th-century miasmatic theories of epidemiology, sewers were the most dangerous urban topographical feature. In an increasingly class-stratified city, they undercut attempts of the upper classes to escape disease by carrying smallpox-causing miasmas across class and ethnic boundaries. A reinvigorated sanitation movement was the result. Both reactions to smallpox epidemics had significant influence in shaping San Francisco's landscape, real and symbolic. PMID:8545670

  20. Oral vaccination with modified vaccinia virus Ankara attached covalently to TMPEG-modified cationic liposomes overcomes pre-existing poxvirus immunity from recombinant vaccinia immunization

    Naito, Toshio; Kaneko, Yutaro; Kozbor, Danuta

    2007-01-01

    Development of a safe and effective vaccine for induction of mucosal immunity to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein (Env, gp160) represents the best hope for containing the spread of an HIV epidemic worldwide. The highly attenuated modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is a laboratory virus well suited as a safe vaccine vector. However, the presence of pre-existing immunity to Vaccinia virus in the adult population represents a hindrance that limits the application of...

  1. Expression of the F and HN glycoproteins of human parainfluenza virus type 3 by recombinant vaccinia viruses: contributions of the individual proteins to host immunity.

    Spriggs, M K; Murphy, B R; Prince, G A; Olmsted, R A; Collins, P L

    1987-01-01

    cDNA clones containing the complete coding sequences for the human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) fusion (F) and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein genes were inserted into the thymidine kinase gene of vaccinia virus (WR strain) under the control of the P7.5 early-late vaccinia virus promotor. The recombinant vaccinia viruses, designated vaccinia-F and vaccinia-HN, expressed glycoproteins in cell culture that appeared to be authentic with respect to glycosylation, disulfide link...

  2. Molecular genetics of vaccinia virus: demonstration of marker rescue.

    Nakano, E.; Panicali, D; E. Paoletti

    1982-01-01

    Two genomic variants of vaccinia virus isolated from serially propagated stocks were used to demonstrate marker rescue. The smaller (S variant) virus contains a 6.3 megadalton (MDal) deletion of unique DNA sequences present in the 123-MDal larger (L variant) virus. The deletion was mapped at 6.85 MDal from the left terminus of the genome, just outside of the inverted terminal repetition. Rescue of the unique deleted DNA sequences by infectious S variant virus was obtained in CV-1 cells by usi...

  3. The Immune Response: Romanticism and the Radical Literary History of Smallpox Inoculation

    Wang, Fuson

    2014-01-01

    My dissertation untangles the oxymoron of Romantic medicine. The literary history of inoculation, I contend, reveals that smallpox eradication was as much a triumph of the literary imagination as it was an achievement of Enlightenment science. Underlying this argument is the larger disciplinary question: Who counts as a producer of scientific knowledge? My project uncovers a surprisingly literary history of medicine that includes poetry and imaginative fiction in the discovery, propagation, a...

  4. Extracting key information from historical data to quantify the transmission dynamics of smallpox

    Brockmann Stefan O

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantification of the transmission dynamics of smallpox is crucial for optimizing intervention strategies in the event of a bioterrorist attack. This article reviews basic methods and findings in mathematical and statistical studies of smallpox which estimate key transmission parameters from historical data. Main findings First, critically important aspects in extracting key information from historical data are briefly summarized. We mention different sources of heterogeneity and potential pitfalls in utilizing historical records. Second, we discuss how smallpox spreads in the absence of interventions and how the optimal timing of quarantine and isolation measures can be determined. Case studies demonstrate the following. (1 The upper confidence limit of the 99th percentile of the incubation period is 22.2 days, suggesting that quarantine should last 23 days. (2 The highest frequency (61.8% of secondary transmissions occurs 3–5 days after onset of fever so that infected individuals should be isolated before the appearance of rash. (3 The U-shaped age-specific case fatality implies a vulnerability of infants and elderly among non-immune individuals. Estimates of the transmission potential are subsequently reviewed, followed by an assessment of vaccination effects and of the expected effectiveness of interventions. Conclusion Current debates on bio-terrorism preparedness indicate that public health decision making must account for the complex interplay and balance between vaccination strategies and other public health measures (e.g. case isolation and contact tracing taking into account the frequency of adverse events to vaccination. In this review, we summarize what has already been clarified and point out needs to analyze previous smallpox outbreaks systematically.

  5. What was the primary mode of smallpox transmission? Implications for biodefense

    Milton, Donald K

    2012-01-01

    The mode of infection transmission has profound implications for effective containment by public health interventions. The mode of smallpox transmission was never conclusively established. Although, “respiratory droplet” transmission was generally regarded as the primary mode of transmission, the relative importance of large ballistic droplets and fine particle aerosols that remain suspended in air for more than a few seconds was never resolved. This review examines evidence from the history ...

  6. Using ICR and SCID mice as animal models for smallpox to assess antiviral drug efficacy.

    Titova, Ksenya A; Sergeev, Alexander A; Zamedyanskaya, Alena S; Galahova, Darya O; Kabanov, Alexey S; Morozova, Anastasia A; Bulychev, Leonid E; Sergeev, Artemiy A; Glotova, Tanyana I; Shishkina, Larisa N; Taranov, Oleg S; Omigov, Vladimir V; Zavjalov, Evgenii L; Agafonov, Alexander P; Sergeev, Alexander N

    2015-09-01

    The possibility of using immunocompetent ICR mice and immunodeficient SCID mice as model animals for smallpox to assess antiviral drug efficacy was investigated. Clinical signs of the disease did not appear following intranasal (i.n.) challenge of mice with strain Ind-3a of variola virus (VARV), even when using the highest possible dose of the virus (5.2 log10 p.f.u.). The 50 % infective doses (ID50) of VARV, estimated by the virus presence or absence in the lungs 3 and 4 days post-infection, were 2.7 ± 0.4 log10 p.f.u. for ICR mice and 3.5 ± 0.7 log10 p.f.u. for SCID mice. After i.n. challenge of ICR and SCID mice with VARV 30 and 50 ID50, respectively, steady reproduction of the virus occurred only in the respiratory tract (lungs and nose). Pathological inflammatory destructive changes were revealed in the respiratory tract and the primary target cells for VARV (macrophages and epithelial cells) in mice, similar to those in humans and cynomolgus macaques. The use of mice to assess antiviral efficacies of NIOCH-14 and ST-246 demonstrated the compliance of results with those described in scientific literature, which opens up the prospect of their use as an animal model for smallpox to develop anti-smallpox drugs intended for humans. PMID:26067292

  7. Vaccinia scars associated with better survival for adults. An observational study from Guinea-Bissau

    Aaby, Peter; Gustafson, Per; Roth, Adam Anders Edvin;

    2006-01-01

    Live vaccines including BCG and measles may have non-targeted beneficial effects on childhood survival in areas with high mortality. The authors therefore undertook a survey of vaccinia scars to evaluate subsequent mortality.......Live vaccines including BCG and measles may have non-targeted beneficial effects on childhood survival in areas with high mortality. The authors therefore undertook a survey of vaccinia scars to evaluate subsequent mortality....

  8. Stringent chemical and thermal regulation of recombinant gene expression by vaccinia virus vectors in mammalian cells.

    Ward, G. A.; Stover, C. K.; B. Moss; Fuerst, T R

    1995-01-01

    We developed a stringently regulated expression system for mammalian cells that uses (i) the RNA polymerase, phi 10 promoter, and T phi transcriptional terminator of bacteriophage T7; (ii) the lac repressor, lac operator, rho-independent transcriptional terminators and the gpt gene of Escherichia coli; (iii) the RNA translational enhancer of encephalomyocarditis virus; and (iv) the genetic background of vaccinia virus. In cells infected with the recombinant vaccinia virus, reporter beta-galac...

  9. Recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara-based malaria vaccines.

    Sebastian, Sarah; Gilbert, Sarah C

    2016-01-01

    A safe and effective malaria vaccine is a crucial part of the roadmap to malaria elimination/eradication by the year 2050. Viral-vectored vaccines based on adenoviruses and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing malaria immunogens are currently being used in heterologous prime-boost regimes in clinical trials for induction of strong antigen-specific T-cell responses and high-titer antibodies. Recombinant MVA is a safe and well-tolerated attenuated vector that has consistently shown significant boosting potential. Advances have been made in large-scale MVA manufacture as high-yield producer cell lines and high-throughput purification processes have recently been developed. This review describes the use of MVA as malaria vaccine vector in both preclinical and clinical studies in the past 5 years. PMID:26511884

  10. Vaccinia virus replication is not affected by APOBEC3 family members

    Sutter Gerd

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The APOBEC3G protein represents a novel innate defense mechanism against retroviral infection. It facilitates the deamination of the cytosine residues in the single stranded cDNA intermediate during early steps of retroviral infection. Most poxvirus genomes are relatively A/T-rich, which may indicate APOBEC3G-induced mutational pressure. In addition, poxviruses replicate exclusively in the cytoplasm where APOBEC3G is located. It was therefore tempting to analyze whether vaccinia virus replication is affected by APOBEC3G. Results The replication of vaccinia virus, a prototype poxvirus, was not, however, inhibited in APOBEC3G-expressing cells, nor did other members of the APOBEC3 family alter vaccinia virus replication. HIV counteracts APOBEC3G by inducing its degradation. However, Western blot analysis showed that the levels of APOBEC3G protein were not affected by vaccinia virus infection. Conclusion The data indicate that APOBEC3G is not a restriction factor for vaccinia virus replication nor is vaccinia virus able to degrade APOBEC3G.

  11. Smallpox eradication, laboratory visits, and a touch of tourism: travel notes of a Canadian scientist in Brazil.

    Palmer, Steven; Hochman, Gilberto; Arbex, Danieli

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents and discusses the travel notes diary of Canadian scientist Robert J. Wilson when he visited Brazil in April 1967 during the Smallpox Eradication Programme run by the World Health Organisation. Wilson's report makes it possible to reflect on the smallpox eradication campaign in Brazil; on the Canada-Brazil cooperation to improve the quality of the smallpox vaccine; on his assessment by of scientists and Brazilian laboratories; on the effects of intersections between scientific activity and social and cultural activities; on the role played by specialist communities of experts role in international scientific cooperation projects; and on a Canadian traveller's concepts and prejudices about Brazil at the end of the 1960s. PMID:21461539

  12. Transmission patterns of smallpox: systematic review of natural outbreaks in Europe and North America since World War II

    Boer Rob

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because smallpox (variola major may be used as a biological weapon, we reviewed outbreaks in post-World War II Europe and North America in order to understand smallpox transmission patterns. Methods A systematic review was used to identify papers from the National Library of Medicine, Embase, Biosis, Cochrane Library, Defense Technical Information Center, WorldCat, and reference lists of included publications. Two authors reviewed selected papers for smallpox outbreaks. Results 51 relevant outbreaks were identified from 1,389 publications. The median for the effective first generation reproduction rate (initial R was 2 (range 0–38. The majority outbreaks were small (less than 5 cases and contained within one generation. Outbreaks with few hospitalized patients had low initial R values (median of 1 and were prolonged if not initially recognized (median of 3 generations; outbreaks with mostly hospitalized patients had higher initial R values (median 12 and were shorter (median of 3 generations. Index cases with an atypical presentation of smallpox were less likely to have been diagnosed with smallpox; outbreaks in which the index case was not correctly diagnosed were larger (median of 27.5 cases and longer (median of 3 generations compared to outbreaks in which the index case was correctly diagnosed (median of 3 cases and 1 generation. Conclusion Patterns of spread during Smallpox outbreaks varied with circumstances, but early detection and implementation of control measures is a most important influence on the magnitude of outbreaks. The majority of outbreaks studied in Europe and North America were controlled within a few generations if detected early.

  13. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    Meseda, Clement A. [Division of Viral Products, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Srinivasan, Kumar [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wise, Jasen [Qiagen, Frederick, MD (United States); Catalano, Jennifer [Center for Tobacco Products, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dhawan, Subhash, E-mail: subhash.dhawan@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. • Reduced infectivity inversely correlated with increased expression of non-coding RNAs. • The regulation of HO-1 and ncRNAs suggests a novel host defense response against vaccinia virus infection. - Abstract: Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are <200 nucleotide non-coding uridylate-rich RNAs. Although the functions of many snRNAs remain undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection.

  14. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    Highlights: • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. • Reduced infectivity inversely correlated with increased expression of non-coding RNAs. • The regulation of HO-1 and ncRNAs suggests a novel host defense response against vaccinia virus infection. - Abstract: Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are <200 nucleotide non-coding uridylate-rich RNAs. Although the functions of many snRNAs remain undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection

  15. Redundancy complicates the definition of essential genes for vaccinia virus.

    Dobson, Bianca M; Tscharke, David C

    2015-11-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) genes are characterized as either essential or non-essential for growth in culture. It seems intuitively obvious that if a gene can be deleted without imparting a growth defect in vitro it does not have a function related to basic replication or spread. However, this interpretation relies on the untested assumption that there is no redundancy across the genes that have roles in growth in cell culture. First, we provide a comprehensive summary of the literature that describes the essential genes of VACV. Next, we looked for interactions between large blocks of non-essential genes located at the ends of the genome by investigating sets of VACVs with large deletions at the genomic termini. Viruses with deletions at either end of the genome behaved as expected, exhibiting only mild or host-range defects. In contrast, combining deletions at both ends of the genome for the VACV Western Reserve (WR) strain caused a devastating growth defect on all cell lines tested. Unexpectedly, we found that the well-studied VACV growth factor homologue encoded by C11R has a role in growth in vitro that is exposed when 42 genes are absent from the left end of the VACV WR genome. These results demonstrate that some non-essential genes contribute to basic viral growth, but redundancy means these functions are not revealed by single-gene-deletion mutants. PMID:26290187

  16. Production and characterisation of a monoclonal antibody to human papillomavirus type 16 using recombinant vaccinia virus.

    McLean, C S; Churcher, M J; Meinke, J.; Smith, G.L.; Higgins, G; Stanley, M.; Minson, A C

    1990-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody was raised against the major capsid protein L1 of human papillomavirus type 16, using a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses the L1 protein, as a target for screening. This antibody, designated CAMVIR-1, reacted with a 56 kilodalton protein in cells infected with L1-vaccinia virus, and the protein was present in a predominantly nuclear location. The antibody also detects the HPV-16 L1 antigen in formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded biopsy specimens and on routine c...

  17. Live-Cell Imaging of Vaccinia Virus Recombination

    Paszkowski, Patrick; Noyce, Ryan S.; Evans, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Recombination between co-infecting poxviruses provides an important mechanism for generating the genetic diversity that underpins evolution. However, poxviruses replicate in membrane-bound cytoplasmic structures known as factories or virosomes. These are enclosed structures that could impede DNA mixing between co-infecting viruses, and mixing would seem to be essential for this process. We hypothesize that virosome fusion events would be a prerequisite for recombination between co-infecting poxviruses, and this requirement could delay or limit viral recombination. We have engineered vaccinia virus (VACV) to express overlapping portions of mCherry fluorescent protein fused to a cro DNA-binding element. In cells also expressing an EGFP-cro fusion protein, this permits live tracking of virus DNA and genetic recombination using confocal microscopy. Our studies show that different types of recombination events exhibit different timing patterns, depending upon the relative locations of the recombining elements. Recombination between partly duplicated sequences is detected soon after post-replicative genes are expressed, as long as the reporter gene sequences are located in cis within an infecting genome. The same kinetics are also observed when the recombining elements are divided between VACV and transfected DNA. In contrast, recombination is delayed when the recombining sequences are located on different co-infecting viruses, and mature recombinants aren’t detected until well after late gene expression is well established. The delay supports the hypothesis that factories impede inter-viral recombination, but even after factories merge there remain further constraints limiting virus DNA mixing and recombinant gene assembly. This delay could be related to the continued presence of ER-derived membranes within the fused virosomes, membranes that may once have wrapped individual factories. PMID:27525721

  18. One-step selection of Vaccinia virus-binding DNA aptamers by MonoLEX

    Stöcklein Walter

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a new class of therapeutic and diagnostic reagents, more than fifteen years ago RNA and DNA aptamers were identified as binding molecules to numerous small compounds, proteins and rarely even to complete pathogen particles. Most aptamers were isolated from complex libraries of synthetic nucleic acids by a process termed SELEX based on several selection and amplification steps. Here we report the application of a new one-step selection method (MonoLEX to acquire high-affinity DNA aptamers binding Vaccinia virus used as a model organism for complex target structures. Results The selection against complete Vaccinia virus particles resulted in a 64-base DNA aptamer specifically binding to orthopoxviruses as validated by dot blot analysis, Surface Plasmon Resonance, Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and real-time PCR, following an aptamer blotting assay. The same oligonucleotide showed the ability to inhibit in vitro infection of Vaccinia virus and other orthopoxviruses in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusion The MonoLEX method is a straightforward procedure as demonstrated here for the identification of a high-affinity DNA aptamer binding Vaccinia virus. MonoLEX comprises a single affinity chromatography step, followed by subsequent physical segmentation of the affinity resin and a single final PCR amplification step of bound aptamers. Therefore, this procedure improves the selection of high affinity aptamers by reducing the competition between aptamers of different affinities during the PCR step, indicating an advantage for the single-round MonoLEX method.

  19. Relationship between RNA polymerase II and efficiency of vaccinia virus replication

    It is clear from previous studies that host transcriptase or RNA polymerase II (pol II) has a role in poxvirus replication. To elucidate the participation of this enzyme further, in this study the authors examined several parameters related to pol II during the cycle of vaccinia virus infection in L-strain fibroblasts, HeLa cells, and L6H9 rat myoblasts. Nucleocytoplasmic transposition of pol II into virus factories and virions was assessed by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting by using anti-pol II immunoglobulin G. RNA polymerase activities were compared in nuclear extracts containing cured enzyme preparations. Rates of translation into cellular or viral polypeptides were ascertained by labeling with [35S]methionine. In L and HeLa cells, which produced vaccinia virus more abundantly, the rate of RNA polymerase and translation in controls and following infection were higher than in myoblasts. The data on synthesis and virus formation could be correlated with observations on transmigration of pol II, which was more efficient and complete in L and HeLa cells. The stimulus for pol II to leave the nucleus required the expression of both early and late viral functions. On the basis of current and past information, the authors suggest that mobilization of pol II depends on the efficiency of vaccinia virus replication and furthermore that control over vaccinia virus production by the host is related to the content or availability (or both) of pol II in different cell types

  20. Attenuation of vaccinia virus by the expression of human Flt3 ligand

    Žurková, K.; Hainz, P.; Kryštofová, J.; Kutinová, L.; Šanda, Miloslav; Němečková, Š.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2010), 109/1-109/15. ISSN 1743-422X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : vaccinia virus * antibodies * virulence Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.546, year: 2010

  1. Proteome analysis of vaccinia virus IHD-W-infected HEK 293 cells with 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-PSD-TOF MS of on solid phase support N-terminally sulfonated peptides

    Bartel Sebastian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the successful eradication of smallpox by the WHO-led vaccination programme, pox virus infections remain a considerable health threat. The possible use of smallpox as a bioterrorism agent as well as the continuous occurrence of zoonotic pox virus infections document the relevance to deepen the understanding for virus host interactions. Since the permissiveness of pox infections is independent of hosts surface receptors, but correlates with the ability of the virus to infiltrate the antiviral host response, it directly depends on the hosts proteome set. In this report the proteome of HEK293 cells infected with Vaccinia Virus strain IHD-W was analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-PSD-TOF MS in a bottom-up approach. Results The cellular and viral proteomes of VACV IHD-W infected HEK293 cells, UV-inactivated VACV IHD-W-treated as well as non-infected cells were compared. Derivatization of peptides with 4-sulfophenyl isothiocyanate (SPITC carried out on ZipTipμ-C18 columns enabled protein identification via the peptides' primary sequence, providing improved s/n ratios as well as signal intensities of the PSD spectra. The expression of more than 24 human proteins was modulated by the viral infection. Effects of UV-inactivated and infectious viruses on the hosts' proteome concerning energy metabolism and proteins associated with gene expression and protein-biosynthesis were quite similar. These effects might therefore be attributed to virus entry and virion proteins. However, the modulation of proteins involved in apoptosis was clearly correlated to infectious viruses. Conclusions The proteome analysis of infected cells provides insight into apoptosis modulation, regulation of cellular gene expression and the regulation of energy metabolism. The confidence of protein identifications was clearly improved by the peptides' derivatization with SPITC on a solid phase support. Some of the identified proteins

  2. Introduction of the Six Major Genomic Deletions of Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) into the Parental Vaccinia Virus Is Not Sufficient To Reproduce an MVA-Like Phenotype in Cell Culture and in Mice▿

    Meisinger-Henschel, Christine; Späth, Michaela; Lukassen, Susanne; Wolferstätter, Michael; Kachelriess, Heike; Baur, Karen; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Wagner, Markus; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; Hausmann, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has a highly restricted host range in cell culture and is apathogenic in vivo. MVA was derived from the parental chorioallantois vaccinia virus Ankara (CVA) by more than 570 passages in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells. During CEF cell passaging, six major deletions comprising 24,668 nucleotides occurred in the CVA genome. We have cloned both the MVA and the parental CVA genome as bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and have sequentially introduce...

  3. From smallpox eradication to the future of global health: innovations, application and lessons for future eradication and control initiatives.

    Tomori, Oyewale

    2011-12-30

    Technological advancements, including landmark innovations in vaccinology through molecular virology, and significant transformation and changes in the society have taken place since the eradication of smallpox thirty years ago. The success with eradicating smallpox gave confidence for initiating the eradication of other diseases, such as malaria and polio. However, these efforts have not been as effective, as recorded for small pox, for a variety of reasons. There is now a debate within the global health community as to whether eradication campaigns should be abandoned in favor of less costly and perhaps more effective primary health and containment or control programmes. Significant changes that have taken place in the last thirty years, since the eradication of smallpox include, among others, (i) post-colonial political changes, with varying commitment to disease eradication initiatives, especially in the parts of the world most burdened by infectious and vaccine preventable diseases, (ii) innovations leading to the development of new and highly effective vaccines, targeted to specific diseases, (iii) the transformation brought about by improvement in education and the new global access to information (cell phones, internet, etc.), leading to an unlimited access to different types of information, subject to either positive or negative use. At the onset of eradication of smallpox, global health was confined in its operation. Today, global health is at the intersection of medical and social science disciplines-including demography, economics, epidemiology, political economy and sociology. Therefore, in considering the issue of disease eradication, medical and social perspectives must be brought into play, if future eradication programmes must succeed. The paper discusses the roles of these disciplines in disease control and eradication, especially as it affects sub Saharan Africa, the melting pot and verdant pasture of infectious diseases. PMID:22185830

  4. Anti-tumour activity of oncolytic Western Reserve vaccinia viruses in canine tumour cell lines, xenografts, and fresh tumour biopsies.

    Autio, K; Knuuttila, A; Kipar, A; Ahonen, M; Parviainen, S; Diaconu, I; Kanerva, A; Hakonen, T; Vähä-Koskela, M; Hemminki, A

    2014-10-10

    Cancer is one of the most common reasons for death in dogs. One promising approach is oncolytic virotherapy. We assessed the oncolytic effect of genetically modified vaccinia viruses in canine cancer cells, in freshly excised tumour biopsies, and in mice harbouring canine tumour xenografts. Tumour transduction efficacy was assessed using virus expressing luciferase or fluorescent marker genes and oncolysis was quantified by a colorimetric cell viability assay. Oncolytic efficacy in vivo was evaluated in a nude mouse xenograft model. Vaccinia virus was shown to infect most tested canine cancer cell lines and primary surgical tumour tissues. Virus infection significantly reduced tumour growth in the xenograft model. Oncolytic vaccinia virus has antitumour effects against canine cancer cells and experimental tumours and is able to replicate in freshly excised patient tumour tissue. Our results suggest that oncolytic vaccinia virus may offer an effective treatment option for otherwise incurable canine tumours. PMID:25302859

  5. Vaccinia virus-mediated melanin production allows MR and optoacoustic deep tissue imaging and laser-induced thermotherapy of cancer

    Stritzker, Jochen; Kirscher, Lorenz; Scadeng, Miriam; Deliolanis, Nikolaos C.; Morscher, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Schaefer, Karin; Zhang, Qian; Buckel, Lisa; Hess, Michael; Donat, Ulrike; Bradley, William G.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2013-01-01

    We reported earlier the delivery of antiangiogenic single chain antibodies by using oncolytic vaccinia virus strains to enhance their therapeutic efficacy. Here, we provide evidence that gene-evoked production of melanin can be used as a therapeutic and diagnostic mediator, as exemplified by insertion of only one or two genes into the genome of an oncolytic vaccinia virus strain. We found that produced melanin is an excellent reporter for optical imaging without addition of substrate. Melanin...

  6. Safety and biodistribution of a double-deleted oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in laboratory Beagles

    Autio, Karoliina; Knuuttila, Anna; Kipar, Anja; Pesonen, Sari; Guse, Kilian; Parviainen, Suvi; Rajamäki, Minna; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated adverse events, biodistribution and shedding of oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in two Beagles, in preparation for a phase 1 trial in canine cancer patients. Dog 1 received one dose of vaccinia virus and was euthanized 24 hours afterwards, while dog 2 received virus four times once weekly and was euthanized 7 days after that. Dogs were monitored for adverse events and underwent a detailed postmortem examination. Blood, saliva, urine, feces, and organs were collected...

  7. Extracts from rabbit skin inflamed by the vaccinia virus attenuate bupivacaine-induced spinal neurotoxicity in pregnant rats☆

    Cui, Rui; Xu, Shiyuan; WANG, LIANG; Lei, Hongyi; Cai, Qingxiang; Zhang, Hongfei; Wang, Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    Extracts from rabbit skin inflamed by the vaccinia virus can relieve pain and promote repair of nerve injury. The present study intraperitoneally injected extracts from rabbit skin inflamed by the vaccinia virus for 3 and 4 days prior to and following intrathecal injection of bupivacaine into pregnant rats. The pain threshold test after bupivacaine injection showed that the maximum possible effect of tail-flick latency peaked 1 day after intrathecal injection of bupivacaine in the extract-pre...

  8. Construction of Poxviruses as Cloning Vectors: Insertion of the Thymidine Kinase Gene from Herpes Simplex Virus into the DNA of Infectious Vaccinia Virus

    Panicali, Dennis; Paoletti, Enzo

    1982-08-01

    We have constructed recombinant vaccinia viruses containing the thymidine kinase gene from herpes simplex virus. The gene was inserted into the genome of a variant of vaccinia virus that had undergone spontaneous deletion as well as into the 120-megadalton genome of the large prototypic vaccinia variant. This was accomplished via in vivo recombination by contransfection of eukaryotic tissue culture cells with cloned BamHI-digested thymidine kinase gene from herpes simplex virus containing flanking vaccinia virus DNA sequences and infectious rescuing vaccinia virus. Pure populations of the recombinant viruses were obtained by replica filter techniques or by growth of the recombinant virus in biochemically selective medium. The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene, as an insert in vaccinia virus, is transcribed in vivo and in vitro, and the fidelity of in vivo transcription into a functional gene product was detected by the phosphorylation of 5-[125I]iodo-2'-deoxycytidine.

  9. A varíola, uma antiga inimiga Smallpox, an old foe

    Hermann G. Schatzmayr

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A varíola acompanhou o homem por muitos séculos, causando mortes e lesões graves e irreversíveis. Usada como arma biológica em situações de guerra, volta a ser tema de discussão no mundo exatamente por essa possibilidade, apesar de ter sido erradicada das Américas em 1971, e do mundo em 1977. Os dados acumulados durante as Campanhas de Erradicação, mostram que a infecção se disseminava com relativa lentidão, através de contato muito próximo do receptor com o paciente. Infecções sub-clínicas em não-vacinados eram raras e vacinações de bloqueio em torno de novos casos, desde que estes fossem identificados e confirmados com rapidez, eram capazes de impedir a disseminação da infecção. As transmissões indiretas através de aerossóis eram menos comuns. Vacinados mesmo uma única vez, raramente apresentavam doença grave, no caso de reinfecção. A possibilidade de uso do vírus da varíola como arma biológica deve ser considerada como real, apesar de, com base nos conhecimentos atuais, serem necessárias suspensões virais de alta potência, lançadas muito próximo das pessoas a serem atingidas em grande número.Smallpox has accompanied mankind for centuries, causing deaths and permanent lesions. Used in the past as a biological weapon during wars, it has come into focus again precisely because of this renewed possibility, although the disease has been eradicated in the Americas since 1971 and worldwide since 1977. Data gathered during the eradication campaigns show that the disease spread relatively slowly through close contacts between patients and susceptibles. Sub-clinical infection in non-vaccinated individuals was a rare event, and blockade vaccination surrounding new cases (as long as these cases were confirmed early was able to prevent the disease from spreading in the community. Even with only one dose, vaccinated individuals rarely developed a serious case of the disease upon reinfection. The use of smallpox as

  10. Characterization of a new Vaccinia virus isolate reveals the C23L gene as a putative genetic marker for autochthonous Group 1 Brazilian Vaccinia virus.

    Felipe L Assis

    Full Text Available Since 1999, several Vaccinia virus (VACV isolates, the etiological agents of bovine vaccinia (BV, have been frequently isolated and characterized with various biological and molecular methods. The results from these approaches have grouped these VACV isolates into two different clusters. This dichotomy has elicited debates surrounding the origin of the Brazilian VACV and its epidemiological significance. To ascertain vital information to settle these debates, we and other research groups have made efforts to identify molecular markers to discriminate VACV from other viruses of the genus Orthopoxvirus (OPV and other VACV-BR groups. In this way, some genes have been identified as useful markers to discriminate between the VACV-BR groups. However, new markers are needed to infer ancestry and to correlate each sample or group with its unique epidemiological and biological features. The aims of this work were to characterize a new VACV isolate (VACV DMTV-2005 molecularly and biologically using conserved and non-conserved gene analyses for phylogenetic inference and to search for new genes that would elucidate the VACV-BR dichotomy. The VACV DMTV-2005 isolate reported in this study is biologically and phylogenetically clustered with other strains of Group 1 VACV-BR, the most prevalent VACV group that was isolated during the bovine vaccinia outbreaks in Brazil. Sequence analysis of C23L, the gene that encodes for the CC-chemokine-binding protein, revealed a ten-nucleotide deletion, which is a new Group 1 Brazilian VACV genetic marker. This deletion in the C23L open reading frame produces a premature stop-codon that is shared by all Group 1 VACV-BR strains and may also reflect the VACV-BR dichotomy; the deletion can also be considered to be a putative genetic marker for non-virulent Brazilian VACV isolates and may be used for the detection and molecular characterization of new isolates.

  11. Game theory of pre-emptive vaccination before bioterrorism or accidental release of smallpox.

    Molina, Chai; Earn, David J D

    2015-06-01

    Smallpox was eradicated in the 1970s, but new outbreaks could be seeded by bioterrorism or accidental release. Substantial vaccine-induced morbidity and mortality make pre-emptive mass vaccination controversial, and if vaccination is voluntary, then there is a conflict between self- and group interests. This conflict can be framed as a tragedy of the commons, in which herd immunity plays the role of the commons, and free-riding (i.e. not vaccinating pre-emptively) is analogous to exploiting the commons. This game has been analysed previously for a particular post-outbreak vaccination scenario. We consider several post-outbreak vaccination scenarios and compare the expected increase in mortality that results from voluntary versus imposed vaccination. Below a threshold level of post-outbreak vaccination effort, expected mortality is independent of the level of response effort. A lag between an outbreak starting and a response being initiated increases the post-outbreak vaccination effort necessary to reduce mortality. For some post-outbreak vaccination scenarios, even modest response lags make it impractical to reduce mortality by increasing post-outbreak vaccination effort. In such situations, if decreasing the response lag is impossible, the only practical way to reduce mortality is to make the vaccine safer (greater post-outbreak vaccination effort leads only to fewer people vaccinating pre-emptively). PMID:25926701

  12. The eradication of smallpox--an overview of the past, present, and future.

    Henderson, Donald A

    2011-12-30

    The 30th anniversary of the declaration of smallpox eradication is a propitious time to look back on the evolutionary history of the program, its execution, and its legacy for the future. The eradication of history's most feared disease culminated a decade-long World Health Organization campaign which began despite skepticism and doubt and succeeded despite a never ending array of obstacles occasioned by floods, civil war, famine, and bureaucratic inertia. New concepts in public health management, surveillance, and the application of large-scale programs for vaccination were fostered and matured. A new generation of young health workers emerged who applied new approaches and experienced the gratification of public health achievement. A definitive legacy for the future was the extension of the program into an "Expanded Program on Immunization", now functioning world-wide and resulting in dramatic improvements in health through control of vaccine-preventable diseases. No less important are the growing number of multi-national programs whose foundations rest on the development of active case surveillance to measure achievement and to guide progress - poliomyelitis, measles, guinea worm, and rubella. PMID:22188929

  13. Serological studies on an outbreak of smallpox in the State of Bahia - Brazil in 1969

    Eduardo de Azeredo Costa

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available Four weeks after Containment Vaccination undertaken against the largest outbreak of smallpox occured in Brazil in 1969, that of the municipality of Utinga, Bahia, 99 samples of serum were collected from the local population. These samples were classified in four groups: a - Individuals with a history of variola prior to the beginning of present outbreak in town (15 sera; "Previous smallpox group"; b - Individuals with primary vaccination, with no record variola, at the time of containment measures (15 sera. "Primary vaccinated group"; c - Individuals with no previous record of variola revaccinated with "take" at the time of containment (15 sera0, "Revaccinated group"; d - Individuals who contracted variola in present outbreak (54 sera these were subdivided in four sub-groups, according to dates on which cases ocurred, "Variola in outbreak group". Serological study of samples was done by tests of hemagglutination inhibition, neutralization, and complement fixation. It was observed that HI titers were significantly lower in cases of previous smallpox than in other groups. Although they were slightly higher on revaccinated individuals than on primary vaccinated group and than in the group of variola in outbreak, this difference was not significant. Those same antibodies were present in all cases of variola in outbreak, and it was found that titers decreased in direct proportion to time elapsed from occurrence of cases. Neutralizing antibodies proved to be significantly higher on the revaccinated group than on variola in outbreak group, and higher on these than on primary vaccinated and on the previous smallpox groups. In cases from the variola in outbreak it was verified that neutralizing antibodies remained stable, although with great variation in titers. Tests of complement fixation could not be undertaken on all samples, because many of them proved to have anticomplementarity. However, it was found that complement fixing antibodies diminished

  14. Evaluating public health responses to reintroduced smallpox via dynamic, socially structured, and spatially distributed metapopulation models.

    Glasser, John W; Foster, Stanley O; Millar, J Donald; Lane, J Michael

    2008-03-15

    The risk of smallpox reintroduction has motivated preparations in potential target countries. After reproducing the spatiotemporal pattern after the 1972 importation into Yugoslavia via coupled, biologically realistic systems of ordinary differential equations, we developed dynamic population models with current US age distributions and typical spatially distributed social structures. Surveillance and containment (S&C) coupled with vaccination of 95% of hospital-based health care workers (HCWs) within 2 days after the first diagnosis (estimated to be 18 days after aerosol release) were modeled after simulated exposure of 10, 50, or 10,000 people in various settings. If 90% of patients were isolated within days after symptom onset and 75% of contacts were vaccinated and monitored, S&C would reduce cases by 82%-99%. Preemptive immunization of HCWs, closing of schools, and even vaccination of as many as 80% within 1 week would have small marginal benefits. Preparations should emphasize stockpiling vaccine, training HCWs, improving laboratory capacity, and fostering an understanding of S&C. PMID:18284358

  15. Structure–function analysis of vaccinia virus mRNA cap (guanine-N7) methyltransferase

    Zheng, Sushuang; Shuman, Stewart

    2008-01-01

    The guanine-N7 methyltransferase domain of vaccinia virus mRNA capping enzyme is a heterodimer composed of a catalytic subunit and a stimulatory subunit. Structure–function analysis of the catalytic subunit by alanine scanning and conservative substitutions (49 mutations at 25 amino acids) identified 12 functional groups essential for methyltransferase activity in vivo, most of which were essential for cap methylation in vitro. Defects in cap binding were demonstrated for a subset of lethal m...

  16. Vaccinia Virus-mediated Therapy of Solid Tumor Xenografts: Intra-tumoral Delivery of Therapeutic Antibodies

    Huang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, much effort and financial support have been invested in the fight against cancer, yet cancer still represents the leading cause of death in the world. Conventional therapies for treatment of cancer are predominantly directed against tumor cells. Recently however, new treatments options have paid more attention to exploiting the advantage of targeting the tumor stroma instead. Vaccinia virus (VACV) has played an important role in human medicine since the 18th century...

  17. Identification of the major membrane and core proteins of vaccinia virus by two-dimensional electrophoresis.

    Jensen, O N; Houthaeve, T; Shevchenko, A.; Cudmore, S; Ashford, T; MANN, M; Griffiths, G; Krijnse Locker, J

    1996-01-01

    Vaccinia virus assembly has been well studied at the ultrastructural level, but little is known about the molecular events that occur during that process. Towards this goal, we have identified the major membrane and core proteins of the intracellular mature virus (IMV). Pure IMV preparations were subjected to Nonidet P-40 (NP-40) and dithiothreitol (DTT) treatment to separate the core proteins from the membrane proteins. These proteins were subsequently separated by two-dimensional (2D) gel e...

  18. Stability of vaccinia-vectored recombinant oral rabies vaccine under field conditions: A 3-year study

    Hermann, Joseph R.; Fry, Alethea M.; Siev, David; Slate, Dennis; Lewis, Charles; Gatewood, Donna M.

    2011-01-01

    Rabies is an incurable zoonotic disease caused by rabies virus, a member of the rhabdovirus family. It is transmitted through the bite of an infected animal. Control methods, including oral rabies vaccination (ORV) programs, have led to a reduction in the spread and prevalence of the disease in wildlife. This study evaluated the stability of RABORAL, a recombinant vaccinia virus vaccine that is used in oral rabies vaccination programs. The vaccine was studied in various field microenvironment...

  19. Vaccinia recombinant virus expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein: safety and efficacy trials in Canadian wildlife.

    Artois, M.; Charlton, K M; Tolson, N D; Casey, G A; Knowles, M. K.; Campbell, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-six meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus), ten woodchucks (Marmota monax), thirteen grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis), thirteen ring-billed gulls (Larus delawarensis), six red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and eight great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) received vaccinia virus recombinant expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (V-RG) by direct instillation into the oral cavity. Each of ten coyotes (Canis latrans) received the virus in two vaccine-laden baits. Several voles and...

  20. Potential effect of prior raccoonpox virus infection in raccoons on vaccinia-based rabies immunization

    MacCarthy Kathleen A; Slate Dennis; McLean Robert G; Root J Jeffrey; Osorio Jorge E

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The USDA, Wildlife Services cooperative oral rabies vaccination (ORV) program uses a live vaccinia virus-vectored (genus Orthopoxvirus) vaccine, Raboral V-RG® (V-RG), to vaccinate specific wildlife species against rabies virus in several regions of the U.S. Several naturally occurring orthopoxviruses have been found in North America, including one isolated from asymptomatic raccoons (Procyon lotor). The effect of naturally occurring antibodies to orthopoxviruses on success...

  1. The vaccinia virus E6 protein influences virion protein localization during virus assembly

    Condit, Richard C., E-mail: condit@mgm.ufl.edu; Moussatche, Nissin

    2015-08-15

    Vaccinia virus mutants in which expression of the virion core protein gene E6R is repressed are defective in virion morphogenesis. E6 deficient infections fail to properly package viroplasm into viral membranes, resulting in an accumulation of empty immature virions and large aggregates of viroplasm. We have used immunogold electron microscopy and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to assess the intracellular localization of several virion structural proteins and enzymes during E6R mutant infections. We find that during E6R mutant infections virion membrane proteins and virion transcription enzymes maintain a normal localization within viral factories while several major core and lateral body proteins accumulate in aggregated virosomes. The results support a model in which vaccinia virions are assembled from at least three substructures, the membrane, the viroplasm and a “pre-nucleocapsid”, and that the E6 protein is essential for maintaining proper localization of the seven-protein complex and the viroplasm during assembly. - Highlights: • Mutation of E6 disrupts association of viral membranes with viral core proteins • Mutation of E6 does not perturb viral membrane biosynthesis • Mutation of E6 does not perturb localization of viral transcription enzymes • Mutation of E6 causes mis-localization and aggregation of viral core proteins • Vaccinia assembly uses three subassemblies: membranes, viroplasm, prenucleocapsid.

  2. The vaccinia virus E6 protein influences virion protein localization during virus assembly

    Vaccinia virus mutants in which expression of the virion core protein gene E6R is repressed are defective in virion morphogenesis. E6 deficient infections fail to properly package viroplasm into viral membranes, resulting in an accumulation of empty immature virions and large aggregates of viroplasm. We have used immunogold electron microscopy and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to assess the intracellular localization of several virion structural proteins and enzymes during E6R mutant infections. We find that during E6R mutant infections virion membrane proteins and virion transcription enzymes maintain a normal localization within viral factories while several major core and lateral body proteins accumulate in aggregated virosomes. The results support a model in which vaccinia virions are assembled from at least three substructures, the membrane, the viroplasm and a “pre-nucleocapsid”, and that the E6 protein is essential for maintaining proper localization of the seven-protein complex and the viroplasm during assembly. - Highlights: • Mutation of E6 disrupts association of viral membranes with viral core proteins • Mutation of E6 does not perturb viral membrane biosynthesis • Mutation of E6 does not perturb localization of viral transcription enzymes • Mutation of E6 causes mis-localization and aggregation of viral core proteins • Vaccinia assembly uses three subassemblies: membranes, viroplasm, prenucleocapsid

  3. Initial characterization of Vaccinia Virus B4 suggests a role in virus spread

    Currently, little is known about the ankyrin/F-box protein B4. Here, we report that B4R-null viruses exhibited reduced plaque size in tissue culture, and decreased ability to spread, as assessed by multiple-step growth analysis. Electron microscopy indicated that B4R-null viruses still formed mature and extracellular virions; however, there was a slight decrease of virions released into the media following deletion of B4R. Deletion of B4R did not affect the ability of the virus to rearrange actin; however, VACV811, a large vaccinia virus deletion mutant missing 55 open reading frames, had decreased ability to produce actin tails. Using ectromelia virus, a natural mouse pathogen, we demonstrated that virus devoid of EVM154, the B4R homolog, showed decreased spread to organs and was attenuated during infection. This initial characterization suggests that B4 may play a role in virus spread, and that other unidentified mediators of actin tail formation may exist in vaccinia virus. - Highlights: • B4R-null viruses show reduced plaque size, and decreased ability to spread. • B4R-null viruses formed mature and extracellular virions; and rearranged actin. • Virus devoid of EVM154, the B4R homolog, was attenuated during infection. • Initial characterization suggests that B4 may play a role in virus spread. • Unidentified mediators of actin tail formation may exist in vaccinia virus

  4. Permissivity of the NCI-60 cancer cell lines to oncolytic Vaccinia Virus GLV-1h68

    Oncolytic viral therapy represents an alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. We previously described GLV-1h68, a modified Vaccinia Virus with exclusive tropism for tumor cells, and we observed a cell line-specific relationship between the ability of GLV-1h68 to replicate in vitro and its ability to colonize and eliminate tumor in vivo. In the current study we surveyed the in vitro permissivity to GLV-1h68 replication of the NCI-60 panel of cell lines. Selected cell lines were also tested for permissivity to another Vaccinia Virus and a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) strain. In order to identify correlates of permissity to viral infection, we measured transcriptional profiles of the cell lines prior infection. We observed highly heterogeneous permissivity to VACV infection amongst the cell lines. The heterogeneity of permissivity was independent of tissue with the exception of B cell derivation. Cell lines were also tested for permissivity to another Vaccinia Virus and a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) strain and a significant correlation was found suggesting a common permissive phenotype. While no clear transcriptional pattern could be identified as predictor of permissivity to infection, some associations were observed suggesting multifactorial basis permissivity to viral infection. Our findings have implications for the design of oncolytic therapies for cancer and offer insights into the nature of permissivity of tumor cells to viral infection

  5. Pexa-Vec double agent engineered vaccinia: oncolytic and active immunotherapeutic.

    Breitbach, Caroline J; Parato, Kelley; Burke, James; Hwang, Tae-Ho; Bell, John C; Kirn, David H

    2015-08-01

    Oncolytic immunotherapies (OI) selectively infect, amplify within and destroy cancer cells, thereby representing a novel class of anti-cancer therapy. In addition to this primary mechanism-of-action (MOA), OI based on vaccinia have been shown to selectively target tumor-associated vasculature, triggering an acute reduction in tumor perfusion. This review focuses on a third complementary MOA for this product class: the induction of active immunotherapy. While the active immunotherapy approach has been validated by recent product approvals, the field is still faced with significant challenges. Tumors have evolved diverse mechanisms to hide from immune-mediated destruction. Here we hypothesize that oncolytic immunotherapy replication within tumors may tip the immune balance to allow for the effective induction and execution of adaptive anti-tumor immunity, resulting in long-term tumor control following OI clearance. This immune activation against the cancer can be augmented through OI 'arming' for the expression of immunostimulatory transgene products from the virus genome. With the first vaccinia OI (Pexa-Vec, thymidine kinase-inactivated vaccinia expressing Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor [GM-CSF]) now in advanced-stage clinical trials, it has become more important than ever to understand the complimentary MOA that contributes to tumor destruction and control in patients. PMID:25900822

  6. Permissivity of the NCI-60 cancer cell lines to oncolytic Vaccinia Virus GLV-1h68

    Bedognetti Davide

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncolytic viral therapy represents an alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. We previously described GLV-1h68, a modified Vaccinia Virus with exclusive tropism for tumor cells, and we observed a cell line-specific relationship between the ability of GLV-1h68 to replicate in vitro and its ability to colonize and eliminate tumor in vivo. Methods In the current study we surveyed the in vitro permissivity to GLV-1h68 replication of the NCI-60 panel of cell lines. Selected cell lines were also tested for permissivity to another Vaccinia Virus and a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV strain. In order to identify correlates of permissity to viral infection, we measured transcriptional profiles of the cell lines prior infection. Results We observed highly heterogeneous permissivity to VACV infection amongst the cell lines. The heterogeneity of permissivity was independent of tissue with the exception of B cell derivation. Cell lines were also tested for permissivity to another Vaccinia Virus and a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV strain and a significant correlation was found suggesting a common permissive phenotype. While no clear transcriptional pattern could be identified as predictor of permissivity to infection, some associations were observed suggesting multifactorial basis permissivity to viral infection. Conclusions Our findings have implications for the design of oncolytic therapies for cancer and offer insights into the nature of permissivity of tumor cells to viral infection.

  7. Neurologic adverse events associated with smallpox vaccination in the United States – response and comment on reporting of headaches as adverse events after smallpox vaccination among military and civilian personnel

    Schumm Walter R

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate reporting of adverse events occurring after vaccination is an important component of determining risk-benefit ratios for vaccinations. Controversy has developed over alleged underreporting of adverse events within U.S. military samples. This report examines the accuracy of adverse event rates recently published for headaches, and examines the issue of underreporting of headaches as a function of civilian or military sources and as a function of passive versus active surveillance. Methods A report by Sejvar et al was examined closely for accuracy with respect to the reporting of neurologic adverse events associated with smallpox vaccination in the United States. Rates for headaches were reported by several scholarly sources, in addition to Sejvar et al, permitting a comparison of reporting rates as a function of source and type of surveillance. Results Several major errors or omissions were identified in Sejvar et al. The count of civilian subjects vaccinated and the totals of both civilians and military personnel vaccinated were reported incorrectly by Sejvar et al. Counts of headaches reported in VAERS were lower (n = 95 for Sejvar et al than for Casey et al (n = 111 even though the former allegedly used 665,000 subjects while the latter used fewer than 40,000 subjects, with both using approximately the same civilian sources. Consequently, rates of nearly 20 neurologic adverse events reported by Sejvar et al were also incorrectly calculated. Underreporting of headaches after smallpox vaccination appears to increase for military samples and for passive adverse event reporting systems. Conclusion Until revised or corrected, the rates of neurologic adverse events after smallpox vaccinated reported by Sejvar et al must be deemed invalid. The concept of determining overall rates of adverse events by combining small civilian samples with large military samples appears to be invalid. Reports of headaches as adverse events

  8. [Seeds against smallpox: Joaquim Vás and the scientific translation of bananeira brava seeds in Goa, India (1894-1930)].

    Roque, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    In 1914, in the former Portuguese colony of Goa, India, the physician António Joaquim Vás announced the discovery of a wonderful treatment for smallpox, entailing clinical application of seeds from the bananeira brava (Heliconia biabi Sw.m.), a plant remedy allegedly derived from Indian medical practices. The present article explores the circumstances surrounding the successes and failures of this discovery. The concept of scientific translation is used to interpret the transformation of bananeira brava seeds into an early twentieth-century remedy for smallpox. This transfer from indigenous use to scientific therapeutic constitutes the creation of a quasi-medicine, that is, a case of 'medium translation'. Although these seeds occupy a problematic place within the program of scientific translation, they enjoyed active circulation within science and remained a part of medical practices for combating smallpox. PMID:15446280

  9. Incomplete but Infectious Vaccinia Virions Are Produced in the Absence of Oncolysis in Feline SCCF1 Cells

    Parviainen, Suvi; Autio, Karoliina; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Guse, Kilian; Pesonen, Sari; Rosol, Thomas J.; Zhao, Fang; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus is a large, enveloped virus of the poxvirus family. It has broad tropism and typically virus replication culminates in accumulation and lytic release of intracellular mature virus (IMV), the most abundant form of infectious virus, as well as release by budding of extracellular enveloped virus (EEV). Vaccinia viruses have been modified to replicate selectively in cancer cells and clinically tested as oncolytic agents. During preclinical screening of relevant cancer targets for a recombinant Western Reserve strain deleted for both copies of the thymidine kinase and vaccinia growth factor genes, we noticed that confluent monolayers of SCCF1 cat squamous carcinoma cells were not destroyed even after prolonged infection. Interestingly, although SCCF1 cells were not killed, they continuously secreted virus into the cell culture supernatant. To investigate this finding further, we performed detailed studies by electron microscopy. Both intracellular and secreted virions showed morphological abnormalities on ultrastructural inspection, suggesting compromised maturation and morphogenesis of vaccinia virus in SCCF1 cells. Our data suggest that SCCF1 cells produce a morphologically abnormal virus which is nevertheless infective, providing new information on the virus-host cell interactions and intracellular biology of vaccinia virus. PMID:25799430

  10. Oncolytic and immunologic cancer therapy with GM-CSF-armed vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9.

    Deng, Lili; Fan, Jun; Guo, Mingming; Huang, Biao

    2016-03-28

    Targeted oncolytic vaccinia viruses are being developed as a novel strategy in cancer therapy. Arming vaccinia viruses with immunostimulatory cytokines can enhance antitumor efficacy. Such engineered oncolytic viruses, like JX-594, a Wyeth strain vaccinia virus modified with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), have shown promising results and have proceeded rapidly in clinical trials. However, the oncolytic potential of the Chinese vaccine strain Tian Tan (VTT) has not been explored. In this study, we constructed a targeted oncolytic vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9 (VG9) expressing murine GM-CSF (VG9-GMCSF) and evaluated the antitumor effect of this recombinant vaccinia virus in a murine melanoma model. In vitro, viral replication and cytotoxicity of VG9-GMCSF was as potent as VG9; in vivo, VG9-GMCSF significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneously implanted melanoma tumors, prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice, and produced an antitumor cytotoxic response. Such antitumor effect may be due to the lytic nature of virus as well as the stimulation of immune activity by GM-CSF production. Our results indicate that VG9-GMCSF induces strong tumoricidal activity, providing a potential therapeutic strategy for combating cancer. PMID:26803055

  11. Identification of the DNA sequences encoding the large subunit of the mRNA-capping enzyme of vaccinia virus

    The DNA sequences encoding the large subunit of the mRNA-capping enzyme of vaccinia virus were located on the viral genome. The formation of an enzyme-guanylate covalent intermediate labeled with [alpha-32P]GTP allowed the identification of the large subunit of the capping enzyme and was used to monitor the appearance of the enzyme during the infectious cycle. This assay confirmed that after vaccinia infection, a novel 84,000-molecular-weight polypeptide corresponding to the large subunit was rapidly synthesized before viral DNA replication. Hybrid-selected cell-free translation of early viral mRNA established that vaccinia virus encoded a polypeptide identical in molecular weight with the 32P-labeled 84,000-molecular-weight polypeptide found in vaccinia virions. Like the authentic capping enzyme, this virus-encoded cell-free translation product bound specifically to DNA-cellulose. A comparison of the partial proteolytic digestion fragments generated by V8 protease, chymotrypsin, and trypsin demonstrated that the 32P-labeled large subunit and the [35S]methionine-labeled cell-free translation product were identical. The mRNA encoding the large subunit of the capping enzyme was located 3.1 kilobase pairs to the left of the HindIII D restriction fragment of the vaccinia genome. Furthermore, the mRNA was determined to be 3.0 kilobases in size, and its 5 and 3 termini were precisely located by S1 nuclease analysis

  12. Host range restriction of vaccinia virus in Chinese hamster ovary cells: relationship to shutoff of protein synthesis

    Chinese hamster ovary cells were found to be nonpermissive for vaccinia virus. Although early virus-induced events occurred in these cells (RNA and polypeptide synthesis), subsequent events appeared to be prevented by a very rapid and nonselective shutoff of protein synthesis. Within less than 2 h after infection, both host and viral protein syntheses were arrested. At low multiplicities of infection, inhibition of RNA synthesis with cordycepin resulted in failure of the virus to block protein synthesis. Moreover, infection of the cells in the presence of cycloheximide prevented the immediate onset of shutoff after reversal of cycloheximide. Inactivation of virus particles by uv irradiation also impaired the capacity of the virus to inhibit protein synthesis. These results suggested that an early vaccinia virus-coded product was implicated in the shutoff of protein synthesis. Either the nonpermissive Chinese hamster ovary cells were more sensitive to this inhibition than permissive cells, or a regulatory control of the vaccinia shutoff function was defective

  13. Could hantavirus circulation superpose areas of highly endemic vaccinia virus outbreaks? A retrospective seroepidemiological study in State of Minas Gerais

    Giliane de Souza Trindade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hantavirus infections have been described in several regions in Brazil through seroepidemiological studies. Usually, populations are associated with rural and wild environment mainly due to close contact to species of Sigmodontinae rodents, considered hantavirus reservoirs. Methods A retrospective serosurvey was conducted to access the hantavirus seroprevalence in people living in regions affected by bovine vaccinia outbreaks. Results Sera from 53 patients were analyzed and none of them presented anti-hantavirus IgG antibodies. Conclusions This study presents an opportunity to analyze seronegativity despite close and recurrent contact with known hantavirus reservoirs. Aspects of hantavirus and bovine vaccinia emergence are also discussed.

  14. Attenuation of vaccinia virus by the expression of human Flt3 ligand

    Sanda Miloslav

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccinia virus, one of the best known members of poxvirus family, has a wide host range both in vivo and in vitro. The expression of Flt3 ligand (FL by recombinant vaccinia virus (rVACV highly influenced properties of the virus in dependence on the level of expression. Results High production of FL driven by the strong synthetic promoter decreased the growth of rVACV in macrophage cell line J774.G8 in vitro as well as its multiplication in vivo when inoculated in mice. The inhibition of replication in vivo was mirrored in low levels of antibodies against vaccinia virus (anti-VACV which nearly approached to the negative serum level in non-infected mice. Strong FL expression changed not only the host range of the recombinant but also the basic protein contents of virions. The major proteins - H3L and D8L - which are responsible for the virus binding to the cells, and 28 K protein that serves as a virulence factor, were changed in the membrane portion of P13-E/L-FL viral particles. The core virion fraction contained multiple larger, uncleaved proteins and a higher amount of cellular proteins compared to the control virus. The overexpression of FL also resulted in its incorporation into the viral core of P13-E/L-FL IMV particles. In contrary to the equimolar ratio of glycosylated and nonglycosylated FL forms found in cells transfected with the expression plasmid, the recombinant virus incorporated mainly the smaller, nonglycosylated FL. Conclusions It has been shown that the overexpression of the Flt3L gene in VACV results in the attenuation of the virus in vivo.

  15. Can vaccinia virus be replaced by MVA virus for testing virucidal activity of chemical disinfectants?

    Rapp Ingrid

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccinia virus strain Lister Elstree (VACV is a test virus in the DVV/RKI guidelines as representative of the stable enveloped viruses. Since the potential risk of laboratory-acquired infections with VACV persists and since the adverse effects of vaccination with VACV are described, the replacement of VACV by the modified vaccinia Ankara strain (MVA was studied by testing the activity of different chemical biocides in three German laboratories. Methods The inactivating properties of different chemical biocides (peracetic acid, aldehydes and alcohols were tested in a quantitative suspension test according to the DVV/RKI guideline. All tests were performed with a protein load of 10% fetal calf serum with both viruses in parallel using different concentrations and contact times. Residual virus was determined by endpoint dilution method. Results The chemical biocides exhibited similar virucidal activity against VACV and MVA. In three cases intra-laboratory differences were determined between VACV and MVA - 40% (v/v ethanol and 30% (v/v isopropanol are more active against MVA, whereas MVA seems more stable than VACV when testing with 0.05% glutardialdehyde. Test accuracy across the three participating laboratories was high. Remarkably inter-laboratory differences in the reduction factor were only observed in two cases. Conclusions Our data provide valuable information for the replacement of VACV by MVA for testing chemical biocides and disinfectants. Because MVA does not replicate in humans this would eliminate the potential risk of inadvertent inoculation with vaccinia virus and disease in non-vaccinated laboratory workers.

  16. Role for CCR5 in Dissemination of Vaccinia Virus In Vivo▿

    Rahbar, Ramtin; Murooka, Thomas T.; Fish, Eleanor N.

    2008-01-01

    In an earlier report, we provided evidence that expression of CCR5 by primary human T cells renders them permissive for vaccinia virus (VACV) replication. This may represent a mechanism for dissemination throughout the lymphatic system. To test this hypothesis, wild-type CCR5+/+ and CCR5 null mice were challenged with VACV by intranasal inoculation. In time course studies using different infective doses of VACV, we identified viral replication in the lungs of both CCR5+/+ and CCR5−/− mice, ye...

  17. Vectores recombinantes basados en el virus Vaccinia modificado de Ankara (MVA) como vacunas contra la leishmaniasis

    Pérez Jiménez, Eva; Larraga, Vicente; Esteban, Mariano

    2005-01-01

    Vectores recombinantes basados en el virus vaccinia modificado de Ankara (MVA) como vacunas contra la leishmaniasis. Los vectores de la invención contienen secuencias codificantes de la proteína LACK, preferentemente insertadas en el locus de hemaglutinina del virus y bajo el control de un promotor que permite su expresión a lo largo del ciclo de infección del virus. Son vectores seguros, estables, que dan lugar a una potente respuesta inmune que confiere protección frente a la leishmaniasis,...

  18. Construction of Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) Expressing Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen

    2006-01-01

    The T lymphocyte response has been shown to be the determinant in the clearance of many viral infections.Hence, therapeutic vaccine candidates against HBV are designed to enhance this response of the immune system.Vaccinia virus vector-based vaccines have been proposed as excellent candidates to elicit long-term and strong T lymphocyte mediated immune responses. In this study, the recombinant MVA expressing HBV surface antigen has been constructed, which can elicit a potent T cell mediated response. The ELISA results for the surface protein in the medium of the recombinant MVA, strongly indicate that the recombinant virus has been successfully obtained.

  19. Use of Reporter Genes in the Generation of Vaccinia Virus-Derived Vectors.

    Al Ali, Sally; Baldanta, Sara; Fernández-Escobar, Mercedes; Guerra, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is one of the most extensively-studied viruses of the Poxviridae family. It is easy to genetically modify, so it has become a key tool for many applications. In this context, reporter genes facilitate the study of the role of foreign genes introduced into the genome of VACV. In this review, we describe the type of reporter genes that have been used to generate reporter-expressing VACV and the applications of the recombinant viruses obtained. Reporter-expressing VACV are currently employed in basic and immunology research, in the development of vaccines and cancer treatment. PMID:27213433

  20. Gel-eletroforese no diagnóstico da varíola Gel-electrophoresis in the smallpox diagnosis

    Julio A. Mesquita

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available O emprego de gel-eletroforese no diagnóstico da varíola, demonstrou ser ao menos trinta vezes (30X mais sensível que o teste de agar-gel, nas condições descritas (tabela I. Doze (12 espécimes, cujos testes convencionais de inoculação em ovos embrionados e de agar-gel resultaram positivos, foram testados em suas diluições originais congeladas por mais de um ano, sendo seis deles revelados por gel-eletroforese enquanto nenhum o foi por agar-gel (tabela II. Trinta e três (33 amostras isoladas no laboratório, foram testadas com material colhido de membrana cório-alantóica da primeira inoculação para o diagnóstico, conservado em glicerina 50%, resultando 15 positivas em gel-eletroforese e apenas 3 em agar-gel (tabela II. Os últimos 60 espécimes recebidos para diagnóstico, através a Campanha de Erradicação da Varíola, também resultaram negativos em gel-eletroforese, que não mostrou falsos-positivos nas condições descritas.The test of gel-electrophoresis applied to the pox virus group showed to be at least thirth times (30X more sensitive than agar-gel test on the described conditions (Table I. Twelve specimens, which were positives form Smallpox in the conventional tests of egg inoculation and agar-gel difusion test, have been screened in their original dilutions frozen for more than 1 year and six of them were still detectable by gel-eletrophoresis, while by agar-gel test any of them was positive (Table II. Thirty three Smallpox isolates have been tested with material from first egg inoculation (chorioallantoic membranes which have been stored in glycerin 50%, at - 15ºC. Fifteen of them were still positive by gel-electrophoresis and only 3 by agar-gel (Table II. The last 60 specimens received for diagnosis from Smallpox Erradication Campaign (CEV, were negatives by both tests. The gel-electrophoresis, did not show false-positives on described conditions.

  1. Fine structure of the vaccinia virion determined by controlled degradation and immunolocalization

    The vaccinia virion is a membraned, slightly flattened, barrel-shaped particle, with a complex internal structure featuring a biconcave core flanked by lateral bodies. Although the architecture of the purified mature virion has been intensely characterized by electron microscopy, the distribution of the proteins within the virion has been examined primarily using biochemical procedures. Thus, it has been shown that non-ionic and ionic detergents combined or not with a sulfhydryl reagent can be used to disrupt virions and, to a limited degree, separate the constituent proteins in different fractions. Applying a controlled degradation technique to virions adsorbed on EM grids, we were able to immuno-localize viral proteins within the virion particle. Our results show after NP40 and DTT treatment, membrane proteins are removed from the virion surface revealing proteins that are associated with the lateral bodies and the outer layer of the core wall. Combined treatment using high salt and high DTT removed lateral body proteins and exposed proteins of the internal core wall. Cores treated with proteases could be disrupted and the internal components were exposed. Cts8, a mutant in the A3 protein, produces aberrant virus that, when treated with NP-40 and DTT, releases to the exterior the virus DNA associated with other internal core proteins. With these results, we are able to propose a model for the structure the vaccinia virion

  2. Identification of a Bohle iridovirus thymidine kinase gene and demonstration of activity using vaccinia virus.

    Coupar, B E H; Goldie, S G; Hyatt, A D; Pallister, J A

    2005-09-01

    In recent years interest in the family Iridoviridae has been renewed by the identification of a number of viruses, particularly from the genus Ranavirus, associated with disease in a range of poikilotherms. Ranaviruses have been isolated from amphibian, piscine and reptilian species. Here we describe an open reading frame (ORF) identified in the genome of Bohle iridovirus (BIV) which contains a nucleotide binding motif conserved within the thymidine kinase (TK) genes of iridoviruses from other genera (lymphocystis disease virus, LCDV, type species of the genus Lymphocystivirus; Chilo iridescent virus, CIV, type species of the genus Iridovirus). The ability of this putative gene to express a functional TK was confirmed by rescue of a TK negative mutant vaccinia virus in the presence of selective media, when expression was controlled by a vaccinia virus promoter. The sequence of the BIV TK was compared with the homologous sequences from epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV), a virus associated with disease in fish, from Wamena iridovirus (WIV) associated with systemic disease in green pythons, and from frog virus 3 (FV3) the ranavirus type species. Comparisons between these sequences and those available from other ranaviruses, other iridoviruses, other DNA viruses and cellular TKs are presented. PMID:15883656

  3. Preclinical evaluation of oncolytic vaccinia virus for therapy of canine soft tissue sarcoma.

    Ivaylo Gentschev

    Full Text Available Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV strains is one promising new strategy for canine cancer therapy. In this study we describe the establishment of an in vivo model of canine soft tissue sarcoma (CSTS using the new isolated cell line STSA-1 and the analysis of the virus-mediated oncolytic and immunological effects of two different Lister VACV LIVP1.1.1 and GLV-1h68 strains against CSTS. Cell culture data demonstrated that both tested VACV strains efficiently infected and destroyed cells of the canine soft tissue sarcoma line STSA-1. In addition, in our new canine sarcoma tumor xenograft mouse model, systemic administration of LIVP1.1.1 or GLV-1h68 viruses led to significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to control mice. Furthermore, LIVP1.1.1 mediated therapy resulted in almost complete tumor regression and resulted in long-term survival of sarcoma-bearing mice. The replication of the tested VACV strains in tumor tissues led to strong oncolytic effects accompanied by an intense intratumoral infiltration of host immune cells, mainly neutrophils. These findings suggest that the direct viral oncolysis of tumor cells and the virus-dependent activation of tumor-associated host immune cells could be crucial parts of anti-tumor mechanism in STSA-1 xenografts. In summary, the data showed that both tested vaccinia virus strains and especially LIVP1.1.1 have great potential for effective treatment of CSTS.

  4. Fine structure of the vaccinia virion determined by controlled degradation and immunolocalization

    Moussatche, Nissin, E-mail: nissin@ufl.edu; Condit, Richard C.

    2015-01-15

    The vaccinia virion is a membraned, slightly flattened, barrel-shaped particle, with a complex internal structure featuring a biconcave core flanked by lateral bodies. Although the architecture of the purified mature virion has been intensely characterized by electron microscopy, the distribution of the proteins within the virion has been examined primarily using biochemical procedures. Thus, it has been shown that non-ionic and ionic detergents combined or not with a sulfhydryl reagent can be used to disrupt virions and, to a limited degree, separate the constituent proteins in different fractions. Applying a controlled degradation technique to virions adsorbed on EM grids, we were able to immuno-localize viral proteins within the virion particle. Our results show after NP40 and DTT treatment, membrane proteins are removed from the virion surface revealing proteins that are associated with the lateral bodies and the outer layer of the core wall. Combined treatment using high salt and high DTT removed lateral body proteins and exposed proteins of the internal core wall. Cores treated with proteases could be disrupted and the internal components were exposed. Cts8, a mutant in the A3 protein, produces aberrant virus that, when treated with NP-40 and DTT, releases to the exterior the virus DNA associated with other internal core proteins. With these results, we are able to propose a model for the structure the vaccinia virion.

  5. An improved high pressure freezing and freeze substitution method to preserve the labile vaccinia virus nucleocapsid.

    Jesus, Desyree Murta; Moussatche, Nissin; Condit, Richard C

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, high pressure freezing and freeze substitution have been widely used for electron microscopy to reveal viral and cellular structures that are difficult to preserve. Vaccinia virus, a member of the Poxviridae family, presents one of the most complex viral structures. The classical view of vaccinia virus structure consists of an envelope surrounding a biconcave core, with a lateral body in each concavity of the core. This classical view was challenged by Peters and Muller (1963), who demonstrated the presence of a folded tubular structure inside the virus core and stated the difficulty in visualizing this structure, possibly because it is labile and cannot be preserved by conventional sample preparation. Therefore, this tubular structure, now called the nucleocapsid, has been mostly neglected over the years. Earlier studies were able to preserve the nucleocapsid, but with low efficiency. In this study, we report the protocol (and troubleshooting) that resulted in preservation of the highest numbers of nucleocapsids in several independent preparations. Using this protocol, we were able to demonstrate an interdependence between the formation of the virus core wall and the nucleocapsid, leading to the hypothesis that an interaction exists between the major protein constituents of these compartments, A3 (core wall) and L4 (nucleocapsid). Our results show that high pressure freezing and freeze substitution can be used in more in-depth studies concerning the nucleocapsid structure and function. PMID:27155322

  6. ATM protein purified from vaccinia virus expression system: DNA binding requirements for kinase activation

    The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene product plays a role in responding to double stand DNA breaks. Some biochemical studies of ATM function have been hampered by lack of an efficient expression system and abundant purified ATM protein. We report the construction of a vaccinia virus expressing ATM, vWR-ATM, which was used to produce large amounts of functional FLAG-tagged ATM protein (FLAG-ATM) in HeLa cells. Kinase activity of the purified FLAG-ATM was dependent on manganese and inhibited with wortmannin. Using the FLAG-ATM recombinant protein, GST-p53 serine 15 phosphorylation increased in the presence of damaged DNA. PHAS-1 phosphorylation was found to be DNA independent. Purified FLAG-ATM was recovered in the autophosphorylated form, as demonstrated by phosphorylation of ATM serine 1981. As shown by atomic force microscopy, FLAG-ATM bound to linear DNA both at broken ends and in mid-strands. Vaccinia virus is the most efficient ATM expression system described to date

  7. Vaccinia virus p37 interacts with host proteins associated with LE-derived transport vesicle biogenesis

    Harver Chris

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins associated with the late endosome (LE appear to play a central role in the envelopment of a number of taxonomically diverse viruses. How viral proteins interact with LE-associated proteins to facilitate envelopment is not well understood. LE-derived transport vesicles form through the interaction of Rab9 GTPase with cargo proteins, and TIP47, a Rab9-specific effector protein. Vaccinia virus (VV induces a wrapping complex derived from intracellular host membranes to envelope intracellular mature virus particles producing egress-competent forms of virus. Results We show that VV p37 protein associates with TIP47-, Rab9-, and CI-MPR-containing membranes. Mutation of a di-aromatic motif in p37 blocks association with TIP47 and inhibits plaque formation. ST-246, a specific inhibitor of p37 function, inhibits these interactions and also blocks wrapped virus particle formation. Vaccinia virus expressing p37 variants with reduced ST-246 susceptibility associates with Rab9 and co-localizes with CI-MPR in the presence and absence of compound. Conclusion These results suggest that p37 localizes to the LE and interacts with proteins associated with LE-derived transport vesicle biogenesis to facilitate assembly of extracellular forms of virus.

  8. Vaccinia Virus Recombinant Expressing Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein D Prevents Latent Herpes in Mice

    Cremer, Kenneth J.; Mackett, Michael; Wohlenberg, Charles; Notkins, Abner Louis; Moss, Bernard

    1985-05-01

    In humans, herpes simplex virus causes a primary infection and then often a latent ganglionic infection that persists for life. Because these latent infections can recur periodically, vaccines are needed that can protect against both primary and latent herpes simplex infections. Infectious vaccinia virus recombinants that contain the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D gene under control of defined early or late vaccinia virus promoters were constructed. Tissue culture cells infected with these recombinant viruses synthesized a glycosylated protein that had the same mass (60,000 daltons) as the glycoprotein D produced by HSV-1. Immunization of mice with one of these recombinant viruses by intradermal, subcutaneous, or intraperitoneal routes resulted in the production of antibodies that neutralized HSV-1 and protected the mice against subsequent lethal challenge with HSV-1 or HSV-2. Immunization with the recombinant virus also protected the majority of the mice against the development of a latent HSV-1 infection of the trigeminal ganglia. This is the first demonstration that a genetically engineered vaccine can prevent the development of latency.

  9. Molecular genetic analysis of a vaccinia virus gene with an essential role in DNA replication

    The poxvirus, vaccinia, is large DNA virus which replicates in the cytoplasma of the host cell. The virus is believed to encode most or all of the functions required for the temporally regulated transcription and replication of its 186 kilobase genome. Physical and genetic autonomy from the host make vaccinia a useful eukaryotic organism in which to study replication genes and proteins, using a combination of biochemical and genetic techniques. Essential viral functions for replication are identified by conditional lethal mutants that fail to synthesize DNA at the non-permissive temperatures. One such group contains the non-complementing alleles ts17, ts24, ts69 (WR strain). Studies were undertaken to define the phenotype of ts mutants, and to identify and characterize the affected gene and protein. Mutant infection was essentially normal at 32 degree C, but at 39 degree C the mutants did not incorporate 3H-thymidine into nascent viral DNA or synthesize late viral proteins. If mutant cultures were shifted to non-permissive conditions at the height of replication, DNA synthesis was halted rapidly, implying that the mutants are defective in DNA elongation. The gene affected in the WR mutants and in ts6389, a DNA-minus mutant of the IHD strain, was mapped by marker rescue and corresponds to open reading frame 5 (orfD5) of the viral HindIII D fragment

  10. Identification of sites phosphorylated by the vaccinia virus B1R kinase in viral protein H5R

    Hardie Grahame

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccinia virus gene B1R encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase. In vitro this protein kinase phosphorylates ribosomal proteins Sa and S2 and vaccinia virus protein H5R, proteins that become phosphorylated during infection. Nothing is known about the sites phosphorylated on these proteins or the general substrate specificity of the kinase. The work described is the first to address these questions. Results Vaccinia virus protein H5R was phosphorylated by the B1R protein kinase in vitro, digested with V8 protease, and phosphopeptides separated by HPLC. The N-terminal sequence of one radioactively labelled phosphopeptide was determined and found to correspond to residues 81-87 of the protein, with Thr-84 and Thr-85 being phosphorylated. A synthetic peptide based on this region of the protein was shown to be a substrate for the B1R protein kinase, and the extent of phosphorylation was substantially decreased if either Thr residue was replaced by an Ala. Conclusions We have identified the first phosphorylation site for the vaccinia virus B1R protein kinase. This gives important information about the substrate-specificity of the enzyme, which differs from that of other known protein kinases. It remains to be seen whether the same site is phosphorylated in vivo.

  11. Mutations Conferring Resistance to Viral DNA Polymerase Inhibitors in Camelpox Virus Give Different Drug-Susceptibility Profiles in Vaccinia Virus

    Duraffour, S.; Andrei, G.; Topalis, D.; Krečmerová, Marcela; Crance, J. M.; Garin, D.; Snoeck, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 13 (2012), s. 7310-7325. ISSN 0022-538X Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : camelpox virus * CMLV * vaccinia virus VACV * acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * HPMPDAP * cidofovir * drug resistance Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.076, year: 2012

  12. Mapping of the vaccinia virus DNA polymerase gene by marker rescue and cell-free translation of selected RNA

    The previous demonstration that a phosphonoacetate (PAA)-resistant (PAA/sup r/) vaccinia virus mutant synthesized an altered DNA polymerase provided the key to mapping this gene. Marker rescue was performed in cells infected with wild-type PAA-sensitive (PAA/sup s/) vaccinia by transfecting with calcium phosphate-precipitated DNA from a PAA/sup r/ mutant virus. Formation of PAA/sup r/ recombinants was measured by plaque assay in the presence of PAA. Of the 12 HindIII fragments cloned in plasmid or cosmid vectors, only fragment E conferred the PAA/sup r/ phenotype. Successive subcloning of the 15-kilobase HindIII fragment E localized the marker within a 7.5-kilobase BamHI-HindIII fragment and then within a 2.9-kilobase EcoRI fragment. The location of the DNA polymerase gene, about 57 kilobases from the left end of the genome, was confirmed by cell-free translation of mRNA selected by hybridization to plasmids containing regions of PAA/sup r/ vaccinia DNA active in marker rescue. A 100,000-dalton polypeptide that comigrated with authentic DNA polymerase was synthesized. Correspondence of the in vitro translation product with purified vaccinia DNA polymerase was established by peptide mapping

  13. Combined immunity of DNA vector and recombinant vaccinia virus expressing Gag proteins of equine infectious anemia virus

    DAI Chunming; ZHANG Xiaoyan; WANG Shuhui; LIU Ying; DUAN Danli; SHEN Rongxian; SHAO Yiming

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop a new vaccine candidate for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), gag gene of Chinese donkey leukocyte attenuated strain (EIAV DLV) and its parental virulent strain (EIAV LN) were inserted respectively into the TK region of the Tiantan strain (VV) of vaccinia virus by homologous recombination and the positive clone was confirmed by blue plaque assay. Protein expression was examined by Western blot. Prime and prime-boost procedures were used to immunize mice with two DNA vectors and two recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing EIAV Gag proteins. The results showed that the specific lysis of CTL responses in the DNA+rVV groups was stronger than those in the DNA groups, amounting to 31%. Although the levels of specific antibodies were not significantly different, we could conclude that the recombinant vaccinia virus could boost the cellular responses following DNA vector priming. There was no detectable difference between the immune responses induced by DLV and LN Gag proteins. This data demonstrates that the combined immunity of DNA vector and recombinant vaccinia virus expressing EIAV gag proteins, utilizing the prime-boost procedure, can drive immunized mice to produce powerful cellular responses. These results lay an important foundation for the development of a new EIAV genetic engineering vaccine.

  14. A Novel Replication-Competent Vaccinia Vector MVTT Is Superior to MVA for Inducing High Levels of Neutralizing Antibody via Mucosal Vaccination

    Huang, Xiaoxing; Lu, Bin; Yu, Wenbo; Fang, Qing; Liu, Li; Zhuang, Ke; Shen, Tingting; Wang, Haibo; Tian, Po; Zhang, Linqi; Chen, Zhiwei

    2009-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination offers great advantage for inducing protective immune response to prevent viral transmission and dissemination. Here, we report our findings of a head-to-head comparison of two viral vectors modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and a novel replication-competent modified vaccinia Tian Tan (MVTT) for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) via intramuscular and mucosal vaccinations in mice. MVTT is an attenuated variant of the wild-type VTT, which was historically used as a smallp...

  15. A novel replication-competent vaccinia vector MVTT is superior to MVA for inducing high levels of neutralizing antibody via mucosal vaccination

    Xiaoxing Huang; Bin Lu; Wenbo Yu; Qing Fang; Li Liu; Ke Zhuang; Tingting Shen; Haibo Wang; Po Tian; Linqi Zhang; Zhiwei Chen

    2009-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination offers great advantage for inducing protective immune response to prevent viral transmission and dissemination. Here, we report our findings of a head-to-head comparison of two viral vectors modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and a novel replication-competent modified vaccinia Tian Tan (MVTT) for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) via intramuscular and mucosal vaccinations in mice. MVTT is an attenuated variant of the wild-type VTT, which was historically used as a smallp...

  16. Structural Basis for Antagonism by Suramin of Heparin Binding to Vaccinia Complement Protein

    Ganesh, Vannakambadi K.; Muthuvel, Suresh Kumar; Smith, Scott A.; Kotwal, Girish J.; Murthy, Krishna H.M. (U. of Cape Town); (UAB); (U. of Louisville)

    2010-07-19

    Suramin is a competitive inhibitor of heparin binding to many proteins, including viral envelope proteins, protein tyrosine phosphatases, and fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). It has been clinically evaluated as a potential therapeutic in treatment of cancers caused by unregulated angiogenesis, triggered by FGFs. Although it has shown clinical promise in treatment of several cancers, suramin has many undesirable side effects. There is currently no experimental structure that reveals the molecular interactions responsible for suramin inhibition of heparin binding, which could be of potential use in structure-assisted design of improved analogues of suramin. We report the structure of suramin, in complex with the heparin-binding site of vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP), which interacts with heparin in a geometrically similar manner to many FGFs. The larger than anticipated flexibility of suramin manifested in this structure, and other details of VCP-suramin interactions, might provide useful structural information for interpreting interactions of suramin with many proteins.

  17. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a potential wonder drug

    Purushottam Jha; Girish J Kotwal

    2003-04-01

    Vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP) was one of the first viral molecules demonstrated to have a role in blocking complement and hence in the evasion of host defense. Structurally it is very similar to the human C4b-BP and the other members of complement control protein. Functionally it is most similar to the CR1 protein. VCP blocks both major pathways of complement activation. The crystal structure of VCP was determined a little over a year ago and it is the only known structure of an intact and complete complement control protein. In addition to binding complement, VCP also binds to heparin. These two binding abilities can take place simultaneously and contribute to its many function and to its potential use in several inflammatory diseases, e.g. Alzheimer’s disease (AD), CNS injury, xenotransplantation, etc. making it a truly fascinating molecule and potential drug.

  18. Modulation of gene expression in a human cell line caused by poliovirus, vaccinia virus and interferon

    Hoddevik Gunnar

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The project was initiated to describe the response of a human embryonic fibroblast cell line to the replication of two different viruses, and, more specifically, to look for candidate genes involved in viral defense. For this purpose, the cells were synchronously infected with poliovirus in the absence or presence of interferon-alpha, or with vaccinia virus, a virus that is not inhibited by interferon. By comparing the changes in transcriptosome due to these different challenges, it should be possible to suggest genes that might be involved in defense. Results The viral titers were sufficient to yield productive infection in a majority of the cells. The cells were harvested in triplicate at various time-points, and the transcriptosome compared with mock infected cells using oligo-based, global 35 k microarrays. While there was very limited similarities in the response to the different viruses, a large proportion of the genes up-regulated by interferon-alpha were also up-regulated by poliovirus. Interferon-alpha inhibited poliovirus replication, but there were no signs of any interferons being induced by poliovirus. The observations suggest that the cells do launch an antiviral response to poliovirus in the absence of interferon. Analyses of the data led to a list of candidate antiviral genes. Functional information was limited, or absent, for most of the candidate genes. Conclusion The data are relevant for our understanding of how the cells respond to poliovirus and vaccinia virus infection. More annotations, and more microarray studies with related viruses, are required in order to narrow the list of putative defence-related genes.

  19. Crystal Structure of the Vaccinia Virus Uracil-DNA Glycosylase in Complex with DNA.

    Burmeister, Wim P; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Fender, Pascal; Contesto-Richefeu, Céline; Peyrefitte, Christophe N; Iseni, Frédéric

    2015-07-17

    Vaccinia virus polymerase holoenzyme is composed of the DNA polymerase catalytic subunit E9 associated with its heterodimeric co-factor A20·D4 required for processive genome synthesis. Although A20 has no known enzymatic activity, D4 is an active uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG). The presence of a repair enzyme as a component of the viral replication machinery suggests that, for poxviruses, DNA synthesis and base excision repair is coupled. We present the 2.7 Å crystal structure of the complex formed by D4 and the first 50 amino acids of A20 (D4·A201-50) bound to a 10-mer DNA duplex containing an abasic site resulting from the cleavage of a uracil base. Comparison of the viral complex with its human counterpart revealed major divergences in the contacts between protein and DNA and in the enzyme orientation on the DNA. However, the conformation of the dsDNA within both structures is very similar, suggesting a dominant role of the DNA conformation for UNG function. In contrast to human UNG, D4 appears rigid, and we do not observe a conformational change upon DNA binding. We also studied the interaction of D4·A201-50 with different DNA oligomers by surface plasmon resonance. D4 binds weakly to nonspecific DNA and to uracil-containing substrates but binds abasic sites with a Kd of gives new insight into the role of D4 as a co-factor of vaccinia virus DNA polymerase and allows a better understanding of the structural determinants required for UNG action. PMID:26045555

  20. Smallpox eradication, laboratory visits, and a touch of tourism: travel notes of a Canadian scientist in Brazil Erradicando a varíola, visitando laboratórios e um pouco de turismo: notas de viagem de um cientista canadense ao Brasil

    Steven Palmer; Gilberto Hochman; Danieli Arbex

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents and discusses the travel notes diary of Canadian scientist Robert J. Wilson when he visited Brazil in April 1967 during the Smallpox Eradication Programme run by the World Health Organisation. Wilson's report makes it possible to reflect on the smallpox eradication campaign in Brazil; on the Canada-Brazil cooperation to improve the quality of the smallpox vaccine; on his assessment by of scientists and Brazilian laboratories; on the effects of intersections between scientif...

  1. Hospital recruitment for the Smallpox Pre-Event Vaccination Program: experiences from Florida, Nebraska, New Jersey, and Tennessee, December 2002-June 2003.

    Ching, Pamela; Tynan, William P.; Raymond, Dick; Bresnitz, Eddy; Craig, Allen S.

    2004-01-01

    The Smallpox Pre-Event Vaccination Program (SPVP) for public health and hospital-based health care workers began on January 24, 2003. This report summarizes efforts made by health officials in Florida, Nebraska, New Jersey, and Tennessee to facilitate the voluntary participation of acute care hospitals in the SPVP. Seven common characteristics contributed to the success of programs in these four states: (1) early planning, building on existing competencies, and state government support, (2) c...

  2. Risk of lymphoma and leukaemia after bacille Calmette-Guérin and smallpox vaccination: a Danish case-cohort study

    Villumsen, Marie; Sørup, Signe; Jess, Tine;

    2009-01-01

    Vaccines may have non-specific effects as suggested mainly in mortality studies from low-income countries. The objective was to examine the effects of BCG and smallpox vaccinations on subsequent risk of lymphoma and leukaemia in a Danish population experiencing rapid out-phasing of these vaccines.......31-2.16); smallpox vaccination HR=1.32 (0.49-3.53)). The present study with very reliable vaccine history information indicates a beneficial effect of BCG vaccination on the risk of lymphomas.......Vaccines may have non-specific effects as suggested mainly in mortality studies from low-income countries. The objective was to examine the effects of BCG and smallpox vaccinations on subsequent risk of lymphoma and leukaemia in a Danish population experiencing rapid out-phasing of these vaccines....... In a background cohort (N=47,622) from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, cases of leukaemia (N=20) and lymphoma (N=51) were identified through the Danish Cancer Registry. The vaccination status of the cases was compared with the vaccination status of a 5% random sample (N=2073) of the...

  3. Analysis of pregnancy and infant health outcomes among women in the National Smallpox Vaccine in Pregnancy Registry who received Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed.

    Conlin, Ava Marie S; Bukowinski, Anna T; Gumbs, Gia R

    2015-08-26

    The National Smallpox Vaccine in Pregnancy Registry (NSVIPR) actively follows women inadvertently vaccinated with smallpox vaccine during or shortly before pregnancy to evaluate their reproductive health outcomes. Approximately 65% of NSVIPR participants also inadvertently received Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA) while pregnant, providing a ready opportunity to evaluate pregnancy and infant health outcomes among these women. AVA-exposed pregnancies were ascertained using NSVIPR and electronic healthcare data. Rates of pregnancy loss and infant health outcomes, including major birth defects, were compared between AVA-exposed and AVA-unexposed pregnancies. Analyses included AVA-exposed and AVA-unexposed pregnant women who also received smallpox vaccine 28 days prior to or during pregnancy. Rates of adverse outcomes among the AVA-exposed group were similar to or lower than expected when compared with published reference rates and the AVA-unexposed population. The findings provide reassurance of the safety of AVA when inadvertently received by a relatively young and healthy population during pregnancy. PMID:26049005

  4. A Novel Naturally Occurring Tandem Promoter in Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Drives Very Early Gene Expression and Potent Immune Responses

    Wennier, Sonia T.; Brinkmann, Kay; Steinhäußer, Charlotte; Mayländer, Nicole; Mnich, Claudia; Wielert, Ursula; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Hausmann, Jürgen; Chaplin, Paul; Steigerwald, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has been shown to be suitable for the generation of experimental vaccines against cancer and infectious diseases, eliciting strong humoral and cellular immune responses. In viral vectored vaccines, strong recombinant antigen expression and timing of expression influence the quantity and quality of the immune response. Screening of synthetic and native poxvirus promoters for strong protein expression in vitro and potent immune responses in vivo led to the i...

  5. Evidence for Protection against Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Chimpanzees by Immunization with Replicating Recombinant Vaccinia Virus▿

    Youn, Jin-Won; Hu, Yu-Wen; Tricoche, Nancy; Pfahler, Wolfram; Shata, Mohamed Tarek; Dreux, Marlene; Cosset, François-Loic; Folgori, Antonella; Lee, Dong-Hun; Brotman, Betsy; Prince, Alfred M.

    2008-01-01

    Given the failures of nonreplicating vaccines against chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, we hypothesized that a replicating viral vector may provide protective immunity. Four chimpanzees were immunized transdermally twice with recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVV) expressing HCV genes. After challenge with 24 50% chimpanzee infective doses of homologous HCV, the two control animals that had received only the parental VV developed chronic HCV infection. All four immunized animals resolved...

  6. Vaccinia virus strain NYVAC induces substantially lower and qualitatively different human antibody responses compared with strains Lister and Dryvax

    Midgley, Claire M.; Putz, Mike M.; Weber, Jonathan N.; Smith, Geoffrey L.

    2008-01-01

    The antibody responses elicited by immunization of humans with vaccinia virus (VACV) strains Lister, Dryvax and NYVAC have been determined and compared. Neutralizing antibodies against intracellular mature virus (IMV) and extracellular enveloped virus (EEV), and binding antibody titres (ELISA) against the EEV protein B5, the IMV proteins A27 and H3, and VACV-infected cell lysate were measured. Lister and Dryvax induced broadly similar antibody titres, consistent with the fact that these vacci...

  7. Heat shock protein and heat shock factor 1 expression and localization in vaccinia virus infected human monocyte derived macrophages

    Dziedzic Jakub

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses remain one of the inducers of the stress response in the infected cells. Heat shock response induced by vaccinia virus (VV infection was studied in vitro in human blood monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs as blood cells usually constitute the primary site of the infection. Methods Human blood monocytes were cultured for 12 – 14 days. The transcripts of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 and two viral genes (E3L and F17R were assayed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and the corresponding proteins measured by Western blot. Heat shock factor 1 DNA binding activities were estimated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA and its subcellular localization analyzed by immunocytofluorescence. Results It appeared that infection with vaccinia virus leads to activation of the heat shock factor 1. Activation of HSF1 causes increased synthesis of an inducible form of the HSP70 both at the mRNA and the protein level. Although HSP90 mRNA was enhanced in vaccinia virus infected cells, the HSP90 protein content remained unchanged. At the time of maximum vaccinia virus gene expression, an inhibitory effect of the infection on the heat shock protein and the heat shock factor 1 was most pronounced. Moreover, at the early phase of the infection translocation of HSP70 and HSP90 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of the infected cells was observed. Conclusion Preferential nuclear accumulation of HSP70, the major stress-inducible chaperone protein, suggests that VV employs this particular mechanism of cytoprotection to protect the infected cell rather than to help viral replication. The results taken together with our previuos data on monocytes or MDMs infected with VV or S. aureus strongly argue that VV employs multiple cellular antiapoptotic/cytoprotective mechanisms to prolong viability and proinflammatory activity of the cells of monocytic

  8. Efficacy and safety of oncolytic vaccinia virus and Semliki Forest virus in the treatment of canine and feline malignant tumours

    Autio, Karoliina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most common reasons for death in dogs, cats and humans. New therapeutic modalities are necessary to improve disease outcome. One promising approach is oncolytic virotherapy. Until now, the only oncolytic virus evaluated in a clinical trial in veterinary medicine has been canine oncolytic adenovirus, but a clinical trial has been started with oncolytic vaccinia virus (VV) in pet dogs. In cats, oncolytic viruses have not been evaluated in clinical settings. Tumour treatment...

  9. Oral immunization and protection of raccoons (Procyon lotor) with a vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus vaccine.

    Rupprecht, C E; Wiktor, T. J.; Johnston, D. H.; Hamir, A N; Dietzschold, B; Wunner, W H; Glickman, L T; Koprowski, H

    1986-01-01

    Animal rabies control has been frustrated by the existence of multiple wildlife reservoirs and the lack of efficacious oral vaccines. In this investigation, raccoons fed a vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus in a sponge bait developed rabies virus-neutralizing antibody (0.6-54.0 units) and resisted street rabies virus infection 28 and 205 days after feeding. Additional raccoons immunized by oral infusion with attenuated antigenic variants of rabies virus strains CVS-11 and ERA fail...

  10. Cross-protective immunity against multiple influenza virus subtypes by a novel modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vectored vaccine in mice.

    Brewoo, Joseph N; Powell, Tim D; Jones, Jeremy C; Gundlach, Nancy A; Young, Ginger R; Chu, Haiyan; Das, Subash C; Partidos, Charalambos D; Stinchcomb, Dan T; Osorio, Jorge E

    2013-04-01

    Development of an influenza vaccine that provides cross-protective immunity remains a challenge. Candidate vaccines based on a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) viral vector expressing antigens from influenza (MVA/Flu) viruses were constructed. A vaccine candidate, designated MVA/HA1/C13L/NP, that expresses the hemagglutinin from pandemic H1N1 (A/California/04/09) and the nucleoprotein (NP) from highly pathogenic H5N1 (A/Vietnam/1203/04) fused to a secretory signal sequence from vaccinia virus was highly protective. The vaccine elicited strong antibody titers to homologous H1N1 viruses while cross-reactive antibodies to heterologous viruses were not detectable. In mice, this MVA/HA1/C13L/NP vaccine conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with A/Vietnam/1203/04 (H5N1), A/Norway/3487-2/09 (pandemic H1N1) or A/Influenza/Puerto Rico/8/34 (seasonal H1N1) and partial protection (57.1%) against challenge with seasonal H3N2 virus (A/Aichi/68). The protective efficacy of the vaccine was not affected by pre-existing immunity to vaccinia. Our findings highlight MVA as suitable vector to express multiple influenza antigens that could afford broad cross-protective immunity against multiple subtypes of influenza virus. PMID:23376279

  11. Analysis of canine herpesvirus gB, gC and gD expressed by a recombinant vaccinia virus.

    Xuan, X; Kojima, A; Murata, T; Mikami, T; Otsuka, H

    1997-01-01

    The genes encoding the canine herpesvirus (CHV) glycoprotein B (gB), gC and gD homologues have been reported already. However, products of these genes have not been identified yet. Previously, we have identified three CHV glycoproteins, gp 145/112, gp80 and gp47 using a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). To determine which CHV glycoprotein corresponds to gB, gC or gD, the putative genes of gB, gC, and gD of CHV were inserted into the thymidine kinase gene of vaccinia virus LC16mO strain under the control of the early-late promoter for the vaccinia virus 7.5-kilodalton polypeptide. We demonstrated here that gp145/112, gp80 and gp47 were the translation products of the CHV gB, gC and gD genes, respectively. The antigenic authenticity of recombinant gB, gC and gD were confirmed by a panel of MAbs specific for each glycoprotein produced in CHV-infected cells. Immunization of mice with these recombinants produced high titers of neutralizing antibodies against CHV. These results suggest that recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing CHV gB, gC and gD may be useful to develop a vaccine to control CHV infection. PMID:9191864

  12. Extracts from rabbit skin inflamed by the vaccinia virus attenuate bupivacaine-induced spinal neurotoxicity in pregnant rats

    Rui Cui; Shiyuan Xu; Liang Wang; Hongyi Lei; Qingxiang Cai; Hongfei Zhang; Dongmei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Extracts from rabbit skin inflamed by the vaccinia virus can relieve pain and promote repair of nerve injury. The present study intraperitoneally injected extracts from rabbit skin inflamed by the vaccinia virus for 3 and 4 days prior to and following intrathecal injection of bupivacaine into pregnant rats. The pain threshold test after bupivacaine injection showed that the maximum possible effect of tail-flick latency peaked 1 day after intrathecal injection of bupivacaine in the extract-pretreatment group, and gradually decreased, while the maximum possible effect in the bupivacaine group continued to increase after intrathecal injection of bupivacaine. Histological observation showed that after 4 days of intrathecal injection of bupivacaine, the number of shrunken, vacuolated, apoptotic and caspase-9-positive cells in the dorsal root ganglion in the extract-pretreatment group was significantly reduced compared with the bupivacaine group. These findings indicate that extracts from rabbit skin inflamed by the vaccinia virus can attenuate neurotoxicity induced by intrathecal injection of bupivacaine in pregnant rats, possibly by inhibiting caspase-9 protein expression and suppressing nerve cell apoptosis.

  13. Vergleich von rekombinanten Vaccinia- und DNA-Vektoren zur Tumorimmuntherapie im C57BL/6-Mausmodell

    Johnen, Heiko

    2002-10-01

    In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurden Tumorimpfstoffe auf der Basis des Plasmid-Vektors pCI, modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) und MVA-infizierten dendritischen Zellen entwickelt und durch Sequenzierung, Western blotting und durchflußzytometrische Analyse überprüft. Die in vivo Wirksamkeit der Vakzinen wurde in verschiedenen Tumormodellen in C57BL/6 Mäusen verglichen. Die auf dem eukaryotischen Expressionsvektor pCI basierende DNA-Vakzinierung induzierte einen sehr wirksamen, antigenspezifischen und langfristigen Schutz vor Muzin, CEA oder beta-Galactosidase exprimierenden Tumoren. Eine MVA-Vakzinierung bietet in den in dieser Arbeit durchgeführten Tumormodellen keinen signifikanten Schutz vor Muzin oder beta-Galactosidase exprimierenden Tumoren. Sowohl humane, als auch murine in vitro generierte dendritische Zellen lassen sich mit MVA – im Vergleich zu anderen viralen Vektoren – sehr gut infizieren. Die Expressionsrate der eingefügten Gene ist aber gering im Vergleich zur Expression in permissiven Wirtszellen des Virus (embryonale Hühnerfibroblasten). Es konnte gezeigt werden, daß eine MVA-Infektion dendritischer Zellen ähnliche Auswirkungen auf den Reifezustand humaner und muriner dendritischer Zellen hat, wie eine Infektion mit replikationskompetenten Vakzinia-Stämmen, und außerdem die Hochregulation von CD40 während der terminalen Reifung von murinen dendritischen Zellen inhibiert wird. Die während der langfristigen in vitro Kultur auf CEF-Zellen entstandenen Deletionen im MVA Genom führten zu einer starken Attenuierung und dem Verlust einiger Gene, die immunmodulatorische Proteine kodieren, jedoch nicht zu einer Verminderung des zytopathischen Effekts in dendritischen Zellen. Die geringe Expressionsrate und die beobachtete Inhibition der Expression kostimulatorischer Moleküle auf dendritischen Zellen kann für eine wenig effektive Induktion einer Immunantwort in MVA vakzinierten Tieren durch cross priming oder die direkte Infektion antigenpr

  14. [The historical development of immunization in Germany. From compulsory smallpox vaccination to a National Action Plan on Immunization].

    Klein, S; Schöneberg, I; Krause, G

    2012-11-01

    In the German Reich, smallpox vaccinations were organized by the state. A mandatory vaccination throughout the empire was introduced in 1874, which was continued in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the German Democratic Republic (GDR) until 1982/1983. From 1935, health departments were responsible for vaccinations. In the GDR, immunization was tightly organized: The state made great efforts to achieve high vaccination rates. Responsibilities were clearly defined at all levels and for all ages. While vaccination was initially mandatory only at the regional level, the legally mandated immunization schedule later contained compulsory vaccinations, e.g., against measles. In the beginning there were mandatory vaccinations in the FRG at the Länder level. Since 1961, the Federal Epidemics Act has impeded obligatory vaccinations. Instead, voluntary vaccinations based on recommendations were stressed. Since the 1980s, vaccinations have been shifted from the public health service sector to office-based physicians. Today, public health authorities offer mainly supplementary vaccinations. In 2007, protective immunizations were introduced as compulsory benefits of the statutory health insurance (SHI). Recently, the German federal states developed a National Vaccination Plan to support immunization strategies. PMID:23114451

  15. Ectromelia Virus Disease Characterization in the BALB/c Mouse: A Surrogate Model for Assessment of Smallpox Medical Countermeasures.

    Garver, Jennifer; Weber, Lauren; Vela, Eric M; Anderson, Mike; Warren, Richard; Merchlinsky, Michael; Houchens, Christopher; Rogers, James V

    2016-01-01

    In 2007, the United States- Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued guidance concerning animal models for testing the efficacy of medical countermeasures against variola virus (VARV), the etiologic agent for smallpox. Ectromelia virus (ECTV) is naturally-occurring and responsible for severe mortality and morbidity as a result of mousepox disease in the murine model, displaying similarities to variola infection in humans. Due to the increased need of acceptable surrogate animal models for poxvirus disease, we have characterized ECTV infection in the BALB/c mouse. Mice were inoculated intranasally with a high lethal dose (125 PFU) of ECTV, resulting in complete mortality 10 days after infection. Decreases in weight and temperature from baseline were observed eight to nine days following infection. Viral titers via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and plaque assay were first observed in the blood at 4.5 days post-infection and in tissue (spleen and liver) at 3.5 days post-infection. Adverse clinical signs of disease were first observed four and five days post-infection, with severe signs occurring on day 7. Pathological changes consistent with ECTV infection were first observed five days after infection. Examination of data obtained from these parameters suggests the ECTV BALB/c model is suitable for potential use in medical countermeasures (MCMs) development and efficacy testing. PMID:27455306

  16. Reverse genetics of SARS-related coronavirus using vaccinia virus-based recombination.

    Sjoerd H E van den Worm

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is a zoonotic disease caused by SARS-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV that emerged in 2002 to become a global health concern. Although the original outbreak was controlled by classical public health measures, there is a real risk that another SARS-CoV could re-emerge from its natural reservoir, either in its original form or as a more virulent or pathogenic strain; in which case, the virus would be difficult to control in the absence of any effective antiviral drugs or vaccines. Using the well-studied SARS-CoV isolate HKU-39849, we developed a vaccinia virus-based SARS-CoV reverse genetic system that is both robust and biosafe. The SARS-CoV genome was cloned in separate vaccinia virus vectors, (vSARS-CoV-5prime and vSARS-CoV-3prime as two cDNAs that were subsequently ligated to create a genome-length SARS-CoV cDNA template for in vitro transcription of SARS-CoV infectious RNA transcripts. Transfection of the RNA transcripts into permissive cells led to the recovery of infectious virus (recSARS-CoV. Characterization of the plaques produced by recSARS-CoV showed that they were similar in size to the parental SARS-CoV isolate HKU-39849 but smaller than the SARS-CoV isolate Frankfurt-1. Comparative analysis of replication kinetics showed that the kinetics of recSARS-CoV replication are similar to those of SARS-CoV Frankfurt-1, although the titers of virus released into the culture supernatant are approximately 10-fold less. The reverse genetic system was finally used to generate a recSARS-CoV reporter virus expressing Renilla luciferase in order to facilitate the analysis of SARS-CoV gene expression in human dendritic cells (hDCs. In parallel, a Renilla luciferase gene was also inserted into the genome of human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E. Using this approach, we demonstrate that, in contrast to HCoV-229E, SARS-CoV is not able to mediate efficient heterologous gene expression in hDCs.

  17. Epitope mapping by random peptide phage display reveals essential residues for vaccinia extracellular enveloped virion spread

    He Yong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A33 is a type II integral membrane protein expressed on the extracellular enveloped form of vaccinia virus (VACV. Passive transfer of A33-directed monoclonal antibodies or vaccination with an A33 subunit vaccine confers protection against lethal poxvirus challenge in animal models. Homologs of A33 are highly conserved among members of the Orthopoxvirus genus and are potential candidates for inclusion in vaccines or assays targeting extracellular enveloped virus activity. One monoclonal antibody directed against VACV A33, MAb-1G10, has been shown to target a conformation-dependent epitope. Interestingly, while it recognizes VACV A33 as well as the corresponding variola homolog, it does not bind to the monkeypox homolog. In this study, we utilized a random phage display library to investigate the epitope recognized by MAb-1G10 that is critical for facilitating cell-to-cell spread of the vaccinia virus. Results By screening with linear or conformational random phage libraries, we found that phages binding to MAb-1G10 display the consensus motif CEPLC, with a disulfide bond formed between two cysteine residues required for MAb-1G10 binding. Although the phage motif contained no linear sequences homologous to VACV A33, structure modeling and analysis suggested that residue D115 is important to form the minimal epitope core. A panel of point mutants expressing the ectodomain of A33 protein was generated and analyzed by either binding assays such as ELISA and immunoprecipitation or a functional assessment by blocking MAb-1G10 mediated comet inhibition in cell culture. Conclusions These results confirm L118 as a component of the MAb-1G10 binding epitope, and further identify D115 as an essential residue. By defining the minimum conformational structure, as well as the conformational arrangement of a short peptide sequence recognized by MAb-1G10, these results introduce the possibility of designing small molecule mimetics that may

  18. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    Schlehofer, J.R.; Ehrbar, M.; zur Hausen, H.

    1986-07-15

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells.

  19. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells

  20. Structural analysis of point mutations at the Vaccinia virus A20/D4 interface.

    Contesto-Richefeu, Céline; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Brazzolotto, Xavier; Burmeister, Wim P; Peyrefitte, Christophe N; Iseni, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    The Vaccinia virus polymerase holoenzyme is composed of three subunits: E9, the catalytic DNA polymerase subunit; D4, a uracil-DNA glycosylase; and A20, a protein with no known enzymatic activity. The D4/A20 heterodimer is the DNA polymerase cofactor, the function of which is essential for processive DNA synthesis. The recent crystal structure of D4 bound to the first 50 amino acids of A20 (D4/A201-50) revealed the importance of three residues, forming a cation-π interaction at the dimerization interface, for complex formation. These are Arg167 and Pro173 of D4 and Trp43 of A20. Here, the crystal structures of the three mutants D4-R167A/A201-50, D4-P173G/A201-50 and D4/A201-50-W43A are presented. The D4/A20 interface of the three structures has been analysed for atomic solvation parameters and cation-π interactions. This study confirms previous biochemical data and also points out the importance for stability of the restrained conformational space of Pro173. Moreover, these new structures will be useful for the design and rational improvement of known molecules targeting the D4/A20 interface. PMID:27599859

  1. Vaccinia virus complement control protein significantly improves sensorimotor function recovery after severe head trauma.

    Pillay, Nirvana S; Kellaway, Laurie A; Kotwal, Girish J

    2007-06-11

    Vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP) is an immunomodulator that inhibits both the classical and alternate pathways of the complement system, therefore preventing cell death and inflammation. VCP has previously been shown to be therapeutically effective in mild and moderate traumatic brain injury models. In this study the efficacy of VCP in a severe head injury model is investigated in Wistar rats. Training in a Morris Water Maze (MWM) commenced 2 days prior stereotaxic surgery. Rats were anesthetized before being subjected to a severe (2.7-3.0 atm) lateral fluid percussion injury (FPI) 3.0 mm lateral to the sagittal suture and 4.5 mm posterior to bregma. Ten microliters of VCP (1.7 microg/microl) was injected into the injury site immediately after FPI. Fourteen days post-FPI, rats were tested for spatial learning and memory using the Morris Water Maze, followed by a battery of sensorimotor tests. The latter tests showed statistically significant differences between saline-treated and VCP-treated rats in lateral left pulsion (p=0.001) and tactile placing (p=0.002) on the first 5 days of testing. In addition, significant differences in right lateral pulsion in the first 4 days (p=0.007) of testing was evident. The results suggest that in a severe head injury model, VCP at this dosage favorably influences sensorimotor outcome. PMID:17467672

  2. Increased ATP generation in the host cell is required for efficient vaccinia virus production

    Hsu Che-Fang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To search for cellular genes up-regulated by vaccinia virus (VV infection, differential display-reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (ddRT-PCR assays were used to examine the expression of mRNAs from mock-infected and VV-infected HeLa cells. Two mitochondrial genes for proteins that are part of the electron transport chain that generates ATP, ND4 and CO II, were up-regulated after VV infection. Up-regulation of ND4 level by VV infection was confirmed by Western blotting analysis. Up-regulation of ND4 was reduced by the MAPK inhibitor, apigenin, which has been demonstrated elsewhere to inhibit VV replication. The induction of ND4 expression occurred after viral DNA replication since ara C, an inhibitor of poxviral DNA replication, could block this induction. ATP production was increased in the host cells after VV infection. Moreover, 4.5 μM oligomycin, an inhibitor of ATP production, reduced the ATP level 13 hr after virus infection to that of mock-infected cells and inhibited viral protein expression and virus production, suggesting that increased ATP production is required for efficient VV production. Our results further suggest that induction of ND4 expression is through a Bcl-2 independent pathway.

  3. RAB1A promotes Vaccinia virus replication by facilitating the production of intracellular enveloped virions

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus with a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle that exploits numerous cellular proteins. This work characterises the role of a proviral cellular protein, the small GTPase RAB1A, in VACV replication. Using siRNA, we identified RAB1A as required for the production of extracellular enveloped virions (EEVs), but not intracellular mature virions (IMVs). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy further refined the role of RAB1A as facilitating the wrapping of IMVs to become intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). This is consistent with the known function of RAB1A in maintenance of ER to Golgi transport. VACV can therefore be added to the growing list of viruses which require RAB1A for optimal replication, highlighting this protein as a broadly proviral host factor. - Highlights: • Characterisation of the role of the small GTPase RAB1A in VACV replication. • RAB1A is not required for production of the primary virion form (IMV). • RAB1A is required for production of processed virion forms (IEVs, CEVs and EEVs). • Consistent with known role of RAB1A in ER to Golgi transport

  4. Structure and development of viruses observed in the electron microscope. II. Vaccinia and fowl pox viruses.

    MORGAN, C; ELLISON, S A; ROSE, H M; MOORE, D H

    1954-09-01

    Vaccinia and fowl pox viruses were visualized by the electron microscope in sections of infected chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryos. The viruses were of similar structure and size, averaging 200 x 300 mmicro with considerable individual variation. Intracytoplasmic viral particles contained a dense, nucleus-like body (nucleoid) separated from granular material (viroplasm) by a zone of lesser density. They were enclosed by a single membrane. Near the surface of the host cell and in the extracellular space the particles consisted of a central body of variable shape and density enclosed by a double membrane. The initial sites of development were confined to the cytoplasm of the host cell. Before release from the host cell the viral nucleoids appeared to enlarge and to occupy a central position within the particle, which became enclosed by a double limiting membrane. The brick-shaped forms found after removal of the embedding plastic from thick sections indicated that drying caused characteristic distortion of certain viral particles. PMID:13192254

  5. Brazilian vaccinia virus strains show a classical orthopoxvirus in-fection course and cross-protection

    Betania Paiva Drumond; Jonatas Santos Abraho; Zlia Ins Portela Lobato; Cludio Antonio Bonjardim; Paulo Csar Peregrino Ferreira; Erna Geessien Kroon

    2009-01-01

    Objectives:The purpose of this work was to study the infection course and cross-protection in mice after intra-dermal injection of Vaccinia virus (VACV ) strain Western Reserve and three Brazilian VACV strains:Araatuba,Muriaéand BeAn58058 isolated from cow,human and rodent,respectively.Methods:Balb /c mice were inoculated by footpad and back scarification and daily monitored regarding lesion development and weight loss.To check cross protection after intradermal VACV inoculation,mice were subsequently infected with different VACV strains and monitored to check lesion development.Serum neutralization assays were per-formed to check for the presence of antibodies against Orthopoxvirus.Results:After VACV intradermal inocu-lation the lesion development pattern was similar in mice infected with the different virus strains.By using the footpad scarification model,cross-protection among VACV strains was observed.Moreover,neutralizing anti-bodies against Orthopoxvirus were detected in sera from mice infected with all VACV strains.Conclusion:Al-though it was not possible to observe virulence differences among VACV strains isolated from cow,rodent and human using the murine model,this inoculation route showed to be an appropriated model to study lesions de-velopment since it mimics natural infections by VACV in nature.

  6. RAB1A promotes Vaccinia virus replication by facilitating the production of intracellular enveloped virions

    Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Featherstone, Rebecca J.; Reynolds, Danielle K.; Brown, Helen K. [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland (United Kingdom); James, John; Prescott, Alan [Division of Cell Signalling and Immunology, College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Haga, Ismar R. [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Beard, Philippa M., E-mail: pip.beard@roslin.ed.ac.uk [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus with a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle that exploits numerous cellular proteins. This work characterises the role of a proviral cellular protein, the small GTPase RAB1A, in VACV replication. Using siRNA, we identified RAB1A as required for the production of extracellular enveloped virions (EEVs), but not intracellular mature virions (IMVs). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy further refined the role of RAB1A as facilitating the wrapping of IMVs to become intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). This is consistent with the known function of RAB1A in maintenance of ER to Golgi transport. VACV can therefore be added to the growing list of viruses which require RAB1A for optimal replication, highlighting this protein as a broadly proviral host factor. - Highlights: • Characterisation of the role of the small GTPase RAB1A in VACV replication. • RAB1A is not required for production of the primary virion form (IMV). • RAB1A is required for production of processed virion forms (IEVs, CEVs and EEVs). • Consistent with known role of RAB1A in ER to Golgi transport.

  7. Stunned silence: gene expression programs in human cells infected with monkeypox or vaccinia virus.

    Kathleen H Rubins

    Full Text Available Poxviruses use an arsenal of molecular weapons to evade detection and disarm host immune responses. We used DNA microarrays to investigate the gene expression responses to infection by monkeypox virus (MPV, an emerging human pathogen, and Vaccinia virus (VAC, a widely used model and vaccine organism, in primary human macrophages, primary human fibroblasts and HeLa cells. Even as the overwhelmingly infected cells approached their demise, with extensive cytopathic changes, their gene expression programs appeared almost oblivious to poxvirus infection. Although killed (gamma-irradiated MPV potently induced a transcriptional program characteristic of the interferon response, no such response was observed during infection with either live MPV or VAC. Moreover, while the gene expression response of infected cells to stimulation with ionomycin plus phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, or poly (I-C was largely unimpaired by infection with MPV, a cluster of pro-inflammatory genes were a notable exception. Poly(I-C induction of genes involved in alerting the innate immune system to the infectious threat, including TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha and beta, CCL5 and IL-6, were suppressed by infection with live MPV. Thus, MPV selectively inhibits expression of genes with critical roles in cell-signaling pathways that activate innate immune responses, as part of its strategy for stealthy infection.

  8. Potential effect of prior raccoonpox virus infection in raccoons on vaccinia-based rabies immunization

    MacCarthy Kathleen A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The USDA, Wildlife Services cooperative oral rabies vaccination (ORV program uses a live vaccinia virus-vectored (genus Orthopoxvirus vaccine, Raboral V-RG® (V-RG, to vaccinate specific wildlife species against rabies virus in several regions of the U.S. Several naturally occurring orthopoxviruses have been found in North America, including one isolated from asymptomatic raccoons (Procyon lotor. The effect of naturally occurring antibodies to orthopoxviruses on successful V-RG vaccination in raccoons is the focus of this study. Results Overall, raccoons pre-immunized (n = 10 with a recombinant raccoonpox virus vaccine (RCN-F1 responded to vaccination with V-RG with lower rabies virus neutralizing antibody (VNA titers than those which were not pre-immunized (n = 10 and some failed to seroconvert for rabies VNA to detectable levels. Conclusion These results suggest that the success of some ORV campaigns may be hindered where raccoonpox virus or possibly other orthopoxvirus antibodies are common in wildlife species targeted for ORV. If these areas are identified, different vaccination strategies may be warranted.

  9. Enfrentando el bioterrorismo: aspectos epidemiológicos, clínicos y preventivos de la viruela Confronting bioterrorism: epidemiologic, clinical, and preventive aspects of smallpox

    Carlos Franco-Paredes

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Uno de los grandes logros de la salud pública mundial, la erradicación de la viruela, puede verse mermado por el posible riesgo de bioterrorismo. El debate acerca de la destrucción de los restos del virus en los dos laboratorios de referencia de la Organización Mundial de la Salud ha cambiado diametralmente debido a los eventos terroristas y a la dispersión intencional de Bacillus anthracis ocurridos en poblaciones civiles en Estados Unidos de América en el año 2001. La liberación del virus Variola con fines terroristas constituye un riesgo mínimo no cuantificable, pero desafortunadamente real. El impacto podría ser devastador debido a la elevada morbimortalidad de la enfermedad aunada al pánico y a la desestabilización social que podría ocasionar. Es por ello que el establecimiento de un plan de respuesta, sumado a disponibilidad de vacuna para ser utilizada pos-exposición, es importante dentro de los planes de contingencia contra el bioterrorismo. El reiniciar un programa limitado de vacunación contra la viruela, como parte de dicho plan, ha sido recientemente recomendado por el Comité Asesor de Vacunación, del Centro para el Control de las Enfermedades, pero la vacuna disponible puede causar complicaciones graves e incluso la muerte, por lo que dicha recomendación no ha sido universalmente aceptada. No obstante, el personal médico y de salud pública requiere de información actualizada sobre la viruela y su prevención, ya que ellos son la primera línea de defensa en caso de un posible brote a consecuencia de un ataque bioterrorista. El presente artículo presenta una revisión dirigida a proporcionar al personal de salud un enfoque clínico, epidemiológico y preventivo sobre la viruela.The worldwide eradication of smallpox, a major achievement in public health, is currently threatened by the risk of bioterrorism. The debate on the destruction of the Variola virus in the two reference laboratories of the World Health

  10. Introduction of the Six Major Genomic Deletions of Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) into the Parental Vaccinia Virus Is Not Sufficient To Reproduce an MVA-Like Phenotype in Cell Culture and in Mice▿

    Meisinger-Henschel, Christine; Späth, Michaela; Lukassen, Susanne; Wolferstätter, Michael; Kachelriess, Heike; Baur, Karen; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Wagner, Markus; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; Hausmann, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has a highly restricted host range in cell culture and is apathogenic in vivo. MVA was derived from the parental chorioallantois vaccinia virus Ankara (CVA) by more than 570 passages in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells. During CEF cell passaging, six major deletions comprising 24,668 nucleotides occurred in the CVA genome. We have cloned both the MVA and the parental CVA genome as bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and have sequentially introduced the six major MVA deletions into the cloned CVA genome. Reconstituted mutant CVA viruses containing up to six major MVA deletions showed no detectable replication restriction in 12 of 14 mammalian cell lines tested; the exceptions were rabbit cell lines RK13 and SIRC. In mice, CVA mutants with up to three deletions showed slightly enhanced virulence, suggesting that gene deletion in replicating vaccinia virus (VACV) can result in gain of fitness in vivo. CVA mutants containing five or all six deletions were still pathogenic, with a moderate degree of attenuation. Deletion V was mainly responsible for the attenuated phenotype of these mutants. In conclusion, loss or truncation of all 31 open reading frames in the six major deletions is not sufficient to reproduce the specific MVA phenotype of strong attenuation and highly restricted host range. Mutations in viral genes outside or in association with the six major deletions appear to contribute significantly to this phenotype. Host range restriction and avirulence of MVA are most likely a cooperative effect of gene deletions and mutations involving the major deletions. PMID:20668072

  11. Introduction of the six major genomic deletions of modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) into the parental vaccinia virus is not sufficient to reproduce an MVA-like phenotype in cell culture and in mice.

    Meisinger-Henschel, Christine; Späth, Michaela; Lukassen, Susanne; Wolferstätter, Michael; Kachelriess, Heike; Baur, Karen; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Wagner, Markus; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; Hausmann, Jürgen

    2010-10-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has a highly restricted host range in cell culture and is apathogenic in vivo. MVA was derived from the parental chorioallantois vaccinia virus Ankara (CVA) by more than 570 passages in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells. During CEF cell passaging, six major deletions comprising 24,668 nucleotides occurred in the CVA genome. We have cloned both the MVA and the parental CVA genome as bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and have sequentially introduced the six major MVA deletions into the cloned CVA genome. Reconstituted mutant CVA viruses containing up to six major MVA deletions showed no detectable replication restriction in 12 of 14 mammalian cell lines tested; the exceptions were rabbit cell lines RK13 and SIRC. In mice, CVA mutants with up to three deletions showed slightly enhanced virulence, suggesting that gene deletion in replicating vaccinia virus (VACV) can result in gain of fitness in vivo. CVA mutants containing five or all six deletions were still pathogenic, with a moderate degree of attenuation. Deletion V was mainly responsible for the attenuated phenotype of these mutants. In conclusion, loss or truncation of all 31 open reading frames in the six major deletions is not sufficient to reproduce the specific MVA phenotype of strong attenuation and highly restricted host range. Mutations in viral genes outside or in association with the six major deletions appear to contribute significantly to this phenotype. Host range restriction and avirulence of MVA are most likely a cooperative effect of gene deletions and mutations involving the major deletions. PMID:20668072

  12. Comparison on Virulence and Immunogenicity of Two Recombinant Vaccinia Vaccines, Tian Tan and Guang9 Strains, Expressing the HIV-1 Envelope Gene

    Zhu, Rong; Huang, Weijin; Wang, Wenbo; Liu, Qiang; Nie, Jianhui; Meng, Shufang; Yu, Yongxin; Wang, Youchun

    2012-01-01

    Background The vaccinia virus Guang9 strain (VG9), derived from the vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain (VTT) has been found to be less virulent than VTT. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate whether VG9 could be a potential replicating virus vector, the TK genes in VG9 and VTT were replaced with the HIV-1 envelope gene via homologous recombination, resulting in the recombinant viruses, VG9-E and VTT-E. The biology, virulence, humoral and cellular immunological responses of VG9-E and VTT-...

  13. Comparison on Virulence and Immunogenicity of Two Recombinant Vaccinia Vaccines, Tian Tan and Guang9 Strains, Expressing the HIV-1 Envelope Gene

    Rong Zhu; Weijin Huang; Wenbo Wang; Qiang Liu; Jianhui Nie; Shufang Meng; Yongxin Yu; Youchun Wang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The vaccinia virus Guang9 strain (VG9), derived from the vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain (VTT) has been found to be less virulent than VTT. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate whether VG9 could be a potential replicating virus vector, the TK genes in VG9 and VTT were replaced with the HIV-1 envelope gene via homologous recombination, resulting in the recombinant viruses, VG9-E and VTT-E. The biology, virulence, humoral and cellular immunological responses of VG9-E and VT...

  14. Deletion of C7L and K1L Genes Leads to Significantly Decreased Virulence of Recombinant Vaccinia Virus TianTan

    Zheng Liu; Shuhui Wang; Qicheng Zhang; Meijuan Tian; Jue Hou; Rongmin Wang; Chang Liu; Xu Ji; Ying Liu; Yiming Shao

    2013-01-01

    The vaccinia virus TianTan (VTT) has been modified as an HIV vaccine vector in China and has shown excellent performance in immunogenicity and safety. However, its adverse effects in immunosuppressed individuals warrant the search for a safer vector in the following clinic trails. In this study, we deleted the C7L and K1L genes of VTT and constructed six recombinant vaccinia strains VTT△C7L, VTT△K1L, VTT△C7LK1L, VTKgpe△C7L, VTKgpe△K1L and VTT△C7LK1L-gag. The pathogenicity and immunogenicity o...

  15. The development and use of a vaccinia-rabies recombinant oral vaccine for the control of wildlife rabies; a link between Jenner and Pasteur.

    PASTORET, P.P.; Brochier, B

    1996-01-01

    To improve both safety and stability of the oral vaccines used in the field to vaccinate foxes against rabies, a recombinant vaccinia virus, which expresses the immunizing G protein of rabies virus has been developed by inserting the cDNA which codes for the immunogenic glycoprotein of rabies virus into the thymidine kinase (TK) gene of the Copenhagen strain of vaccinia virus. The efficacy of this vaccine was tested by the oral route, primarily in foxes. The immunity conferred, a minimum of 1...

  16. De novo fatty acid biosynthesis contributes significantly to establishment of a bioenergetically favorable environment for vaccinia virus infection.

    Matthew D Greseth

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The poxvirus life cycle, although physically autonomous from the host nucleus, is nevertheless dependent upon cellular functions. A requirement for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis was implied by our previous demonstration that cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase inhibitor, impaired vaccinia virus production. Here we show that additional inhibitors of this pathway, TOFA and C75, reduce viral yield significantly, with partial rescue provided by exogenous palmitate, the pathway's end-product. Palmitate's major role during infection is not for phospholipid synthesis or protein palmitoylation. Instead, the mitochondrial import and β-oxidation of palmitate are essential, as shown by the impact of etomoxir and trimetazidine, which target these two processes respectively. Moreover, the impact of these inhibitors is exacerbated in the absence of exogenous glucose, which is otherwise dispensable for infection. In contrast to glucose, glutamine is essential for productive viral infection, providing intermediates that sustain the TCA cycle (anaplerosis. Cumulatively, these data suggest that productive infection requires the mitochondrial β-oxidation of palmitate which drives the TCA cycle and energy production. Additionally, infection causes a significant rise in the cellular oxygen consumption rate (ATP synthesis that is ablated by etomoxir. The biochemical progression of the vaccinia life cycle is not impaired in the presence of TOFA, C75, or etomoxir, although the levels of viral DNA and proteins synthesized are somewhat diminished. However, by reversibly arresting infections at the onset of morphogenesis, and then monitoring virus production after release of the block, we determined that virion assembly is highly sensitive to TOFA and C75. Electron microscopic analysis of cells released into C75 revealed fragmented aggregates of viroplasm which failed to be enclosed by developing virion membranes. Taken together, these data indicate that vaccinia

  17. De novo fatty acid biosynthesis contributes significantly to establishment of a bioenergetically favorable environment for vaccinia virus infection.

    Greseth, Matthew D; Traktman, Paula

    2014-03-01

    The poxvirus life cycle, although physically autonomous from the host nucleus, is nevertheless dependent upon cellular functions. A requirement for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis was implied by our previous demonstration that cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase inhibitor, impaired vaccinia virus production. Here we show that additional inhibitors of this pathway, TOFA and C75, reduce viral yield significantly, with partial rescue provided by exogenous palmitate, the pathway's end-product. Palmitate's major role during infection is not for phospholipid synthesis or protein palmitoylation. Instead, the mitochondrial import and β-oxidation of palmitate are essential, as shown by the impact of etomoxir and trimetazidine, which target these two processes respectively. Moreover, the impact of these inhibitors is exacerbated in the absence of exogenous glucose, which is otherwise dispensable for infection. In contrast to glucose, glutamine is essential for productive viral infection, providing intermediates that sustain the TCA cycle (anaplerosis). Cumulatively, these data suggest that productive infection requires the mitochondrial β-oxidation of palmitate which drives the TCA cycle and energy production. Additionally, infection causes a significant rise in the cellular oxygen consumption rate (ATP synthesis) that is ablated by etomoxir. The biochemical progression of the vaccinia life cycle is not impaired in the presence of TOFA, C75, or etomoxir, although the levels of viral DNA and proteins synthesized are somewhat diminished. However, by reversibly arresting infections at the onset of morphogenesis, and then monitoring virus production after release of the block, we determined that virion assembly is highly sensitive to TOFA and C75. Electron microscopic analysis of cells released into C75 revealed fragmented aggregates of viroplasm which failed to be enclosed by developing virion membranes. Taken together, these data indicate that vaccinia infection, and in

  18. A Chimeric HIV-1 gp120 Fused with Vaccinia Virus 14K (A27) Protein as an HIV Immunogen

    Vijayan, Aneesh; García-Arriaza, Juan; C. Raman, Suresh; Conesa, José Javier; Chichón, Francisco Javier; Santiago, César; Sorzano, Carlos Óscar S.; Carrascosa, José L.; Esteban, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    In the HIV vaccine field, there is a need to produce highly immunogenic forms of the Env protein with the capacity to trigger broad B and T-cell responses. Here, we report the generation and characterization of a chimeric HIV-1 gp120 protein (termed gp120-14K) by fusing gp120 from clade B with the vaccinia virus (VACV) 14K oligomeric protein (derived from A27L gene). Stable CHO cell lines expressing HIV-1 gp120-14K protein were generated and the protein purified was characterized by size excl...

  19. Expression of the A56 and K2 Proteins Is Sufficient To Inhibit Vaccinia Virus Entry and Cell Fusion▿ †

    Wagenaar, Timothy R.; Moss, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Many animal viruses induce cells to fuse and form syncytia. For vaccinia virus, this phenomenon is associated with mutations affecting the A56 and K2 proteins, which form a multimer (A56/K2) on the surface of infected cells. Recent evidence that A56/K2 interacts with the entry/fusion complex (EFC) and that the EFC is necessary for syncytium formation furnishes a strong connection between virus entry and cell fusion. Among the important remaining questions are whether A56/K2 can prevent virus ...

  20. Recombination-mediated genetic engineering of a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)

    Cottingham, Matthew G; Andersen, Rikke F; Spencer, Alexandra J;

    2008-01-01

    infectious virus using a Fowlpox virus helper to supply transcriptional machinery. We apply here a similar approach to the attenuated strain Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA), now widely used as a safe non-replicating recombinant vaccine vector in mammals, including humans. Four apparently full...... using GalK counterselection to insert an antigen expression cassette lacking a tandem marker gene into the traditional thymidine kinase locus of MVA-BAC. MVA continues to feature prominently in clinical trials of recombinant vaccines against diseases such as HIV-AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. Here we...

  1. Tc17 cells are capable of mediating immunity to vaccinia virus by acquisition of a cytotoxic phenotype

    Yeh, Norman; Glosson, Nicole L.; Wang, Nan; Guindon, Lynette; McKinley, Carl; Hamada, Hiromasa; Li, Qingsheng; Dutton, Richard W.; Shrikant, Protul; Zhou, Baohua; Brutkiewicz, Randy R.; Blum, Janice S.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    CD8 T cells can acquire cytokine-secreting phenotypes paralleling cytokine production from Th cells. IL-17-secreting CD8 T cells, termed Tc17 cells, have been shown to promote inflammation and mediate immunity to influenza. However, most reports have observed a lack of cytotoxic activity by Tc17 cells. In this report, we explored the anti-viral activity of Tc17 cells using a vaccinia virus infection (VV) model. Tc17 cells expanded during VV infection, and TCR transgenic Tc17 cells were capabl...

  2. Interferon gamma is involved in the recovery of athymic nude mice from recombinant vaccinia virus/interleukin 2 infection

    1990-01-01

    Athymic nude mice recover from an infection with recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) encoding murine interleukin 2 (IL-2), but treatment with a mAb to IL-2 accentuated infection. Administration of a mAb against interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) to mice infected with the IL-2-encoding virus completely prevented the IL-2-induced mechanisms of recovery. Both asialo-GM1+ (NK) and asialo-GM1- (non-NK) cells were participants in the IFN-gamma-mediated recovery of nude mice from infection with the IL-2-encod...

  3. Characterization of hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein complexes expressed by recombinant vaccinia viruses.

    Ralston, R; Thudium, K; Berger, K; Kuo, C; Gervase, B; Hall, J; Selby, M; Kuo, G; Houghton, M; Choo, Q L

    1993-11-01

    We constructed recombinant vaccinia virus vectors for expression of the structural region of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Infection of mammalian cells with a vector (vv/HCV1-906) encoding C-E1-E2-NS2 generated major protein species of 22 kDa (C), 33 to 35 kDa (E1), and 70 to 72 kDa (E2), as observed previously with other mammalian expression systems. The bulk of the E1 and E2 expressed by vv/HCV1-906 was found integrated into endoplasmic reticulum membranes as core-glycosylated species, suggesting that these E1 and E2 species represent intracellular forms of the HCV envelope proteins. HCV E1 and E2 formed E1-E2 complexes which were precipitated by either anti-E1 or anti-E2 serum and which sedimented at approximately 15 S on glycerol density gradients. No evidence of intermolecular disulfide bonding between E1 and E2 was detected. E1 and E2 were copurified to approximately 90% purity by mild detergent extraction followed by chromatography on Galanthus nivalus lectin-agarose and DEAE-Fractogel. Immunization of chimpanzees with purified E1-E2 generated high titers of anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibodies. Further studies, to be reported separately, demonstrated that purified E1-E2 complexes were recognized at high frequency by HCV+ human sera (D. Y. Chien, Q.-L. Choo, R. Ralston, R. Spaete, M. Tong, M. Houghton, and G. Kuo, Lancet, in press) and generated protective immunity in chimpanzees (Q.-L. Choo, G. Kuo, R. Ralston, A. Weiner, D. Chien, G. Van Nest, J. Han, K. Berger, K. Thudium, J. Kansopon, J. McFarland, A. Tabrizi, K. Ching, B. Mass, L. B. Cummins, E. Muchmore, and M. Houghton, submitted for publication), suggesting that these purified HCV envelope proteins display native HCV epitopes. PMID:8411378

  4. Seven major genomic deletions of vaccinia virus Tiantan strain are sufficient to decrease pathogenicity.

    Li, Yiquan; Sheng, Yuan; Chu, Yunjie; Ji, Huifan; Jiang, Shuang; Lan, Tian; Li, Min; Chen, Shuang; Fan, Yuanyuan; Li, Wenjie; Li, Xiao; Sun, Lili; Jin, Ningyi

    2016-05-01

    Attenuated strain TTVAC7, as a multi-gene-deleted vaccinia virus Tiantan strain (VTT), was constructed by knocking out parts of non-essential genes related to virulence, host range and immunomodulation of VTT, and by combining double marker screening with exogenous selectable marker knockout techniques. In this study, shuttle vector plasmids pTC-EGFP, pTA35-EGFP, pTA66-EGFP, pTE-EGFP, pTB-EGFP, pTI-EGFP and pTJ-EGFP were constructed, which contained seven pairs of recombinant arms linked to the early and late strong promoter pE/L, as well as to enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as an exogenous selectable marker. BHK cells were co-transfected/infected successively with the above plasmids and VTT or gene-deleted VTT, and homologous recombination and fluorescence plaque screening methods were used to knock out the gene fragments (TC: TC7L ∼ TK2L; TA35: TA35L; TA66: TA66R; TE: TE3L ∼ TE4L; TB: TB13R; TI: TI4L; TJ: TJ2R). The Cre/LoxP system was then applied to knock out the exogenous selectable marker, and ultimately the gene-deleted attenuated strain TTVAC7 was obtained. A series of in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrated that not only the host range of TTVAC7 could be narrowed and its toxicity weakened significantly, but its high immunogenicity was maintained at the same time. These results support the potential of TTVAC7 to be developed as a safe viral vector or vaccine. PMID:26821204

  5. A cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus shows enhanced suppression of stem-cell like colon cancer

    Yoo, So Young; Bang, Seo Young; Jeong, Su-Nam; Kang, Dae Hwan; Heo, Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-like colon cancer cells (SCCs) pose a major challenge in colon cancer treatment because of their resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Oncolytic virus-based therapy has shown promising results in uncured cancer patients; however, its effects on SCCs are not well studied yet. Here, we engineered a cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus (CVV) as a potent biotherapeutic and investigated its therapeutic efficacy in terms of killing SCCs. CVV is an evolved Wyeth strain vaccinia virus (EVV) lacking the viral thymidine kinase. SCC models were established using human or mouse colon cancer spheres, which continuously expressed stemness markers. The cancer-favoring characteristics and different cytotoxic pathways for killing cancer cells successfully overrode general drug resistance, thereby killing colon cancer cells regardless of the presence of SCCs. Subcutaneously injected HT29 spheres showed lower growth in CVV-treated models than in 5-Fu-treated models. Intraperitoneally injected CT26 spheres induced tumor masses in the abdominal region. CVV-treated groups showed higher survival rates and smaller tumor mass formation, compared to 5-Fu-treated groups. Interestingly, the combined treatment of CVV with 5-Fu showed improved survival rates and complete suppression of tumor mass. The CVV developed in this study, thus, effectively suppresses SCCs, which can be synergistically enhanced by simultaneous treatment with the anticancer drug 5-Fu. Our novel CVV is highly advantageous as a next-generation therapeutic for treating colon cancer. PMID:26918725

  6. Vaccinia virus entry/fusion complex subunit A28 is a target of neutralizing and protective antibodies

    The vaccinia virus entry/fusion complex (EFC) is comprised of at least eight transmembrane proteins that are conserved in all poxviruses. However, neither the physical structure of the EFC nor the immunogenicity of the individual components has been determined. We prepared soluble forms of two EFC components, A28 and H2, by replacing the transmembrane domain with a signal peptide and adding a polyhistidine tail. The proteins were expressed by baculoviruses, secreted from insect cells, purified by affinity chromatography and used to raise antibodies in rabbits. The antibodies recognized the viral proteins but only the antibody to recombinant A28 bound intact virions and neutralized infectivity. Analyses with a set of overlapping peptides revealed a neutralizing epitope between residues 73 and 92 of A28. Passive immunization of mice with IgG purified from the anti-A28 serum provided partial protection against a vaccinia virus intranasal challenge, whereas IgG from the anti-H2 serum did not

  7. Safety and biodistribution of a double-deleted oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in laboratory Beagles

    Autio, Karoliina; Knuuttila, Anna; Kipar, Anja; Pesonen, Sari; Guse, Kilian; Parviainen, Suvi; Rajamäki, Minna; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated adverse events, biodistribution and shedding of oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in two Beagles, in preparation for a phase 1 trial in canine cancer patients. Dog 1 received one dose of vaccinia virus and was euthanized 24 hours afterwards, while dog 2 received virus four times once weekly and was euthanized 7 days after that. Dogs were monitored for adverse events and underwent a detailed postmortem examination. Blood, saliva, urine, feces, and organs were collected for virus detection. Dog 1 had mild fever and lethargy while dog 2 experienced a possible seizure 5.5 hours after first virus administration. Viral DNA declined quickly in the blood after virus administration in both dogs but was still detectable 1 week later by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Only samples taken directly after virus infusion contained infectious virus. Small amounts of viral DNA, but no infectious virus, were detected in a few saliva and urine samples. Necropsies did not reveal any relevant pathological changes and virus DNA was detected mainly in the spleen. The dogs in the study did not have cancer, and thus adverse events could be more common and viral load higher in dogs with tumors which allow viral amplification. PMID:27119092

  8. Role of the vaccinia virus O3 protein in cell entry can be fulfilled by its Sequence flexible transmembrane domain

    The vaccinia virus O3 protein, a component of the entry–fusion complex, is encoded by all chordopoxviruses. We constructed truncation mutants and demonstrated that the transmembrane domain, which comprises two-thirds of this 35 amino acid protein, is necessary and sufficient for interaction with the entry–fusion complex and function in cell entry. Nevertheless, neither single amino acid substitutions nor alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed essential amino acids within the transmembrane domain. Moreover, replication-competent mutant viruses were generated by randomization of 10 amino acids of the transmembrane domain. Of eight unique viruses, two contained only two amino acids in common with wild type and the remainder contained one or none within the randomized sequence. Although these mutant viruses formed normal size plaques, the entry–fusion complex did not co-purify with the mutant O3 proteins suggesting a less stable interaction. Thus, despite low specific sequence requirements, the transmembrane domain is sufficient for function in entry. - Highlights: • The 35 amino acid O3 protein is required for efficient vaccinia virus entry. • The transmembrane domain of O3 is necessary and sufficient for entry. • Mutagenesis demonstrated extreme sequence flexibility compatible with function

  9. Local Production of Tumor Necrosis Factor Encoded by Recombinant Vaccinia Virus is Effective in Controlling Viral Replication in vivo

    Sambhi, Sharan K.; Kohonen-Corish, Maija R. J.; Ramshaw, Ian A.

    1991-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has pleiotropic effects on a wide variety of cell types. In vitro studies have demonstrated that TNF has antiviral properties and is induced in response to viral infections. However, a role for TNF in the antiviral immune response of the host has yet to be demonstrated. Here we describe the construction of and studies using a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes the gene for murine TNF-α. By comparing the replication of and immune responses elicited by the TNF-encoding virus to a similarly constructed control virus, we hoped to observe immunobiological effects of TNF in the host. The in vivo experiments with this recombinant virus demonstrate that the localized production of TNF-α during a viral infection leads to the rapid and efficient clearance of the virus in normal mice and attenuates the otherwise lethal pathogenicity of the virus in immunodeficient animals. This attenuation occurs early in the infection (by postinfection hour 24) and is not due to the enhancement of cellular or antibody responses by the vaccinia virus-encoded TNF. This evidence suggests that attenuation of the recombinant virus is due to a direct antiviral effect of TNF on cells at the site of infection. Therefore, these results support the suggestion that TNF produced by immune cells may be an important effector mechanism of viral clearance in vivo.

  10. Role of the vaccinia virus O3 protein in cell entry can be fulfilled by its Sequence flexible transmembrane domain

    Satheshkumar, P.S.; Chavre, James; Moss, Bernard, E-mail: bmoss@nih.gov

    2013-09-15

    The vaccinia virus O3 protein, a component of the entry–fusion complex, is encoded by all chordopoxviruses. We constructed truncation mutants and demonstrated that the transmembrane domain, which comprises two-thirds of this 35 amino acid protein, is necessary and sufficient for interaction with the entry–fusion complex and function in cell entry. Nevertheless, neither single amino acid substitutions nor alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed essential amino acids within the transmembrane domain. Moreover, replication-competent mutant viruses were generated by randomization of 10 amino acids of the transmembrane domain. Of eight unique viruses, two contained only two amino acids in common with wild type and the remainder contained one or none within the randomized sequence. Although these mutant viruses formed normal size plaques, the entry–fusion complex did not co-purify with the mutant O3 proteins suggesting a less stable interaction. Thus, despite low specific sequence requirements, the transmembrane domain is sufficient for function in entry. - Highlights: • The 35 amino acid O3 protein is required for efficient vaccinia virus entry. • The transmembrane domain of O3 is necessary and sufficient for entry. • Mutagenesis demonstrated extreme sequence flexibility compatible with function.