WorldWideScience

Sample records for academic hospital perspective

  1. Academic Hospitality

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  2. What is an appropriate radiotherapy technology? A Pretoria Academic Hospital perspective

    Full text: The opportunity to design a new radiation oncology facility only presents itself once in a professional lifetime (if you're lucky). The new Pretoria Academic Hospital evolved over a period of more than ten years of planning. Since there were no clear guidelines or budget presented during the acquisition of equipment we posed the question: what is appropriate? The factors determining appropriateness will be discussed and the various options tested against these. The recent experience of our facility with new equipment will be used as the basis for the arguments. Although there were national and regional plans available for oncology services, we were left in limbo with regard to budgets, expected service levels and time frames. Our department drew up a plan loosely based on the replacement of current technology with the equivalent new technology and rough estimates of expected patient numbers. We opted for a high tech approach. The next hurdle was to work within the tender system to draw up appropriate specifications and to manage the acquisition process. A sophisticated evaluation was done based on cost of ownership over a seven year period. The lessons learned from this experience will be shared. Commissioning of equipment and new techniques presented a huge challenge since it had to be performed with available resources while normal patient treatment had to be maintained. The whole philosophy of the department changed and we dragged a number of personnel kicking and screaming into the 21st century. As of today IMRT and SRS have become a routine part of life and IGRT capabilities are being developed. The experience in our department has shown how a high tech approach can be implemented successfully in a developing world setting to improve productivity and personnel morale. However, the needs and expectations vary between centres and our findings will be extrapolated to different scenarios. The answer to this question is neither clear cut nor static and

  3. Challenges and Opportunities in Academic Hospital Medicine: Report from the Academic Hospital Medicine Summit

    Flanders, Scott A.; Centor, Bob; Weber, Valerie; McGinn, Thomas; DeSalvo, Karen; Auerbach, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND The field of hospital medicine is growing rapidly in academic medical centers. However, few organizations have explicitly considered the opportunities and barriers posed to hospital medicine’s development as an academic field in internal medicine. OBJECTIVE To develop consensus around key areas limiting or facilitating hospital medicine’s development as an academic discipline. DESIGN Consensus format conference of key stakeholders in academic hospital medicine. RESULTS The...

  4. Roles and methods of performance evaluation of hospital academic leadership.

    Zhou, Ying; Yuan, Huikang; Li, Yang; Zhao, Xia; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly advancing implementation of public hospital reform urgently requires the identification and classification of a pool of exceptional medical specialists, corresponding with incentives to attract and retain them, providing a nucleus of distinguished expertise to ensure public hospital preeminence. This paper examines the significance of academic leadership, from a strategic management perspective, including various tools, methods and mechanisms used in the theory and practice of performance evaluation, and employed in the selection, training and appointment of academic leaders. Objective methods of assessing leadership performance are also provided for reference. PMID:27061556

  5. ASD Academic Transitions: Trends in Parental Perspective

    Lee, Cindy; McCoy, Kathleen M.; Zucker, Stanley H.; Mathur, Sarup R.

    2014-01-01

    Academic transitions are a necessary and important part of an ASD student's life. Parental involvement and perspective is a vital part of each transition planning process. The primary goal of this research was to identify trends in parent perspectives regarding ASD academic transitions through meta-synthesis of current research. The research…

  6. The unbooked maternity patient in an academic hospital in Durban

    R. Gcaba

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the unbooked maternity patient in an academic hospital in Durban, Natal; This hospital is the biggest hospital serving the underprivileged population of this area. Of the 16000 annual deliveries in this hospital, about 12% are unbooked patients. The health belief model of Rosenstock, as interpreted by Mikhail and Cox’s interaction model of client health behaviour were used as a theoretical framework for this research. A qualitative case study methodology was undertaken and semi-structured interviews were conducted with unbooked mothers who had utilized appropriate health services in a previous pregnancy. The aim of such interviews was to explore reasons given by mothers for non-use of facilities in the current pregnancy. The basic trends reflected in the findings regarding non-utilization of health services were client instability, health service failure and socio-cultural constraints, The study is innovative and addresses the problem from a social-cultural and midwifery perspective.

  7. Cultural Diversity in the Curriculum: Perceptions and Attitudes of Irish Hospitality and Tourism Academics

    Devine, Frances; Hearns, Niamh; Baum, Tom; Murray, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Academics are facing significant challenges in preparing indigenous students for employment in the multicultural working environment of hospitality and tourism organisations. In dealing with the impact of the new skills and flexibilities demanded by increasing globalisation, the indigenous workforce needs to possess a multicultural perspective and…

  8. Academic literacy : a Portuguese perspective

    Fischer, Adriana

    2008-01-01

    Current analysis deals with modes of literate constituency of undergraduate students in an academic environment. Study has been undertaken in Portugal in 2006. Data for analysis hailed from half-structured interviews with students in a Language and Literature graduation course at the University of Minho, Portugal. Samples of responses by four students were selected for specific discussions and with the proposed objective of this study, or rather, to analyze the way students con...

  9. Academic knowing in/through double perspectives

    Margareta Melin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the cultures and learning practices of four academic schools with an expressed wish to bridge the gap between traditional academic and arts or journalistic practices. Pierre Bourdieu, the French sociologist, termed them allodoxic, in that they challenge the traditional academic way of thinking and doing. Results from two research projects, spanning over 5 years, employing a multitude of methods, have been used in this article. The results show that these challenging bridging attempts create conflictual cultures. First, faculties with different backgrounds are employed and they bring with them their respective habitus and doxa (Bourdieu, which is manifested in their different epistemologies, doxas. Despite a strong will to work interdisciplinarily, conflicts (destructive arise particularly around epistemological and pedagogic issues. Second, I show that students at these schools have had double-perspective learning, through theoretical and practice-based methods, despite little help from their lecturers who have high ideals but little actual knowledge themselves of working in/through a double perspective. In many cases, through trial-and-error processes, students have appropriated embodied knowledge of a double perspective, which has given them surplus value when compared with learning through only traditional academic learning practices. It gives reflexive insights and understandings as well as transferrable skills highly useful in professional life. I finally argue that allodoxic conflictual cultures actually construct new ways of knowing through continuous discussions and meetings between faculties with different competences.

  10. Stakeholder perspectives on hospitality in the UK

    McClelland, C. R., and Holman, D

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of stakeholders‘ perspectives of work quality in the UK hospitality sector. Employing an estimated 2.4 million across a diverse range of occupations within hotels, restaurants, event management and catering, and with a turnover of around £90 billion a year, the hospitality sector makes a substantial contribution towards the UK economy (Oxford Economics, 2010). Catering, the selected subsector for the WALQING project, involves the provision of f...

  11. The academic environment: the students' perspective.

    Divaris, K; Barlow, P J; Chendea, S A; Cheong, W S; Dounis, A; Dragan, I F; Hamlin, J; Hosseinzadeh, L; Kuin, D; Mitrirattanakul, S; Mo'nes, M; Molnar, N; Perryer, G; Pickup, J; Raval, N; Shanahan, D; Songpaisan, Y; Taneva, E; Yaghoub-Zadeh, S; West, K; Vrazic, D

    2008-02-01

    Dental education is regarded as a complex, demanding and often stressful pedagogical procedure. Undergraduates, while enrolled in programmes of 4-6 years duration, are required to attain a unique and diverse collection of competences. Despite the major differences in educational systems, philosophies, methods and resources available worldwide, dental students' views regarding their education appear to be relatively convergent. This paper summarizes dental students' standpoint of their studies, showcases their experiences in different educational settings and discusses the characteristics of a positive academic environment. It is a consensus opinion that the 'students' perspective' should be taken into consideration in all discussions and decisions regarding dental education. Moreover, it is suggested that the set of recommendations proposed can improve students' quality of life and well-being, enhance their total educational experience and positively influence their future careers as oral health physicians. The 'ideal' academic environment may be defined as one that best prepares students for their future professional life and contributes towards their personal development, psychosomatic and social well-being. A number of diverse factors significantly influence the way students perceive and experience their education. These range from 'class size', 'leisure time' and 'assessment procedures' to 'relations with peers and faculty', 'ethical climate' and 'extra-curricular opportunities'. Research has revealed that stress symptoms, including psychological and psychosomatic manifestations, are prevalent among dental students. Apparently some stressors are inherent in dental studies. Nevertheless, suggested strategies and preventive interventions can reduce or eliminate many sources of stress and appropriate support services should be readily available. A key point for the Working Group has been the discrimination between 'teaching' and 'learning'. It is suggested that

  12. Academically Resilient, Low-Income Students' Perspectives of How School Counselors Can Meet Their Academic Needs

    Williams, Joseph; Steen, Sam; Albert, Tracy; Dely, Betty; Jacobs, Brian; Nagel, Chelsea; Irick, Anese

    2016-01-01

    This phenomenological, qualitative study examined a national sample of academically resilient, low-income middle school students' (N = 24) perspectives of what school counselors can do to promote their academic achievement. Three main themes and nine subthemes were identified: build meaningful relationships, build on the cultural wealth of…

  13. Managing money and retirement planning: Academics' perspectives

    Ming-Ming Lai; Ming-Ling Lai; Siok-Hwa Lau

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines money attitudes and associated retirement issues of academics in higher education in Malaysia. Systematic random sampling was used in selecting the target respondents. A questionnaire was personally administered on 458 academics in 16 universities in Malaysia. The survey found that academics exhibited positive attitudes toward money, and income appears to be the prime motivator. Consistent with the findings of prior studies, position, age and educational levels were strong...

  14. Trends in Clinically Significant Pain Prevalence Among Hospitalized Cancer Patients at an Academic Hospital in Taiwan

    Wang, Wei-Yun; Ho, Shung-Tai; Wu, Shang-Liang; Chu, Chi-Ming; Sung, Chun-Sung; Wang, Kwua-Yun; Liang, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinically significant pain (CSP) is one of the most common complaints among cancer patients during repeated hospitalizations, and the prevalence ranges from 24% to 86%. This study aimed to characterize the trends in CSP among cancer patients and examine the differences in the prevalence of CSP across repeated hospitalizations. A hospital-based, retrospective cohort study was conducted at an academic hospital. Patient-reported pain intensity was assessed and recorded in a nursing information system. We examined the differences in the prevalence of worst pain intensity (WPI) and last evaluated pain intensity (LPI) of ≥4 or ≥7 points among cancer inpatients from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. Linear mixed models were used to determine the significant difference in the WPI and LPI (≥4 or ≥7 points) at each hospitalization. We examined 88,133 pain scores from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization among cancer patients. The prevalence of the 4 CSP types showed a trend toward a reduction from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. There was a robust reduction in the CSP prevalence from the 1st to the 5th hospitalization, except in the case of LPI ≥ 7 points. The prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points was significantly higher (0.240-fold increase) during the 1st hospitalization than during the 5th hospitalization. For the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th hospitalizations, there was a significantly higher prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points compared with the 5th hospitalization. We also observed significant reductions in the prevalence of a WPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 4th hospitalizations, an LPI ≥ 4 points during the 1st to the 3rd hospitalizations, and an LPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 2nd hospitalization. Although the prevalence of the 4 CSP types decreased gradually, it is impossible to state the causative factors on the basis of this observational and descriptive study. The next step will examine the factors that determine the CSP prevalence among

  15. Challenges and perspectives of academic evaluation

    Francisco Inacio P M Bastos

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Academic evaluation has been an essential component of modern science since its inception, as science has moved away from personalized patronage toward its contemporary role as an essential enterprise of contemporary, democratic societies. In recent years, Brazil has experienced sustained growth in its scientific output, which is nowadays fully compatible with its status as a high middle-income country striving to become a fully developed, more equitable country in the years to come. Growth usually takes place amidst challenges and dilemmas and, in Brazil as elsewhere, academic evaluation is not exempt from such difficulties. In a large, profoundly heterogeneous country with a national evaluation system and nationwide on-line platforms disseminating information on the most disparate fields of knowledge, the main challenges refer to how to pay attention to detail without losing sight of comprehensiveness and how to handle social and regional diversity while preserving academic excellence as the fundamental benchmark.

  16. Academic Integrity and Plagiarism: Australasian Perspectives

    Joyce, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews nearly 80 published items concerned with promoting academic integrity and reducing plagiarism. Nearly all of them were published in the last seven years and have authors based in Australasia. Most of them have authors from computing departments and many were published in computing journals or presented at computing conferences.…

  17. Academic Procrastination: The Perspective of University Counsellors

    Patrzek, Justine; Grunschel, Carola; Fries, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the antecedents and consequences of academic procrastination in students who frequent university counselling in regard to this issue. To undertake this, semi-structured interviews with 12 experienced university counsellors in German universities were conducted. A qualitative content analysis resulted in…

  18. Drug repurposing from an academic perspective

    Oprea, Tudor; Bauman, Julie E.; Bologa, Cristian G.;

    2011-01-01

    Academia and small business research units are poised to play an increasing role in drug discovery, with drug repurposing as one of the major areas of activity. Here we summarize project status for several drugs or classes of drugs: raltegravir, cyclobenzaprine, benzbromarone, mometasone furoate......, astemizole, R-naproxen, ketorolac, tolfenamic acid, phenothiazines, methylergonovine maleate and beta-adrenergic receptor drugs, respectively. On the basis of this multi-year, multi-project experience we discuss strengths and weaknesses of academic-based drug repurposing research. Translational, target...

  19. Hospital management contracts: institutional and community perspectives.

    Wheeler, J. R.; Zuckerman, H S

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that external management by contract can improve the performance of managed hospitals. This article presents a conceptual framework which develops specific hypotheses concerning improved hospital operating efficiency, increased ability to meet hospital objectives, and increased ability to meet community objectives. Next, changes in the process and structure of management under contractual arrangements, based on observations from two not-for-profit hospital systems,...

  20. Drug Repurposing from an Academic Perspective.

    Oprea, Tudor I; Bauman, Julie E; Bologa, Cristian G; Buranda, Tione; Chigaev, Alexandre; Edwards, Bruce S; Jarvik, Jonathan W; Gresham, Hattie D; Haynes, Mark K; Hjelle, Brian; Hromas, Robert; Hudson, Laurie; Mackenzie, Debra A; Muller, Carolyn Y; Reed, John C; Simons, Peter C; Smagley, Yelena; Strouse, Juan; Surviladze, Zurab; Thompson, Todd; Ursu, Oleg; Waller, Anna; Wandinger-Ness, Angela; Winter, Stuart S; Wu, Yang; Young, Susan M; Larson, Richard S; Willman, Cheryl; Sklar, Larry A

    2011-01-01

    Academia and small business research units are poised to play an increasing role in drug discovery, with drug repurposing as one of the major areas of activity. Here we summarize project status for a number of drugs or classes of drugs: raltegravir, cyclobenzaprine, benzbromarone, mometasone furoate, astemizole, R-naproxen, ketorolac, tolfenamic acid, phenothiazines, methylergonovine maleate and beta-adrenergic receptor drugs, respectively. Based on this multi-year, multi-project experience we discuss strengths and weaknesses of academic-based drug repurposing research. Translational, target and disease foci are strategic advantages fostered by close proximity and frequent interactions between basic and clinical scientists, which often result in discovering new modes of action for approved drugs. On the other hand, lack of integration with pharmaceutical sciences and toxicology, lack of appropriate intellectual coverage and issues related to dosing and safety may lead to significant drawbacks. The development of a more streamlined regulatory process world-wide, and the development of pre-competitive knowledge transfer systems such as a global healthcare database focused on regulatory and scientific information for drugs world-wide, are among the ideas proposed to improve the process of academic drug discovery and repurposing, and to overcome the "valley of death" by bridging basic to clinical sciences. PMID:22368688

  1. Information Technology Diffusion in Academic Teaching: An Institutional Perspective

    Naveh, Gali; Tubin, Dorit; Pliskin, Nava

    Even though diffusion of information and communication technology (ICT) in academic teaching has been fast, the expected benefits in pedagogy and structure have yet to materialize. Rogers' diffusion theory, which focuses on adoption and rejection of innovation, can explain the proliferation of ICT usage in academia, but the lack of ICT-based pedagogical and structural changes are beyond the scope of diffusion theory. The objective of this paper is to broaden the theoretical base for explaining the state of ICT in academia via the alternative conceptual lens of institutional theory, which focuses on the relationship between the organization and its environment. With the institutional theory perspective in mind, we suggest that further pedagogical and structural changes in academic courses should not be expected as a result of ICT implementation in academic teaching.

  2. Redefining loyalism: a political perspective, an academic perspective

    Ervine, David; McAuley, James W.

    2001-01-01

    Redefining loyalism: a political perspective. Although loyalism in its modern sense has been around since the 1920s, it ac-quired its present shape only at the beginning of the 1970s. Then it was reborn in paramilitary form, and was used by other, more privileged, unionists to serve their own interests. Yet the sectarianism within which loyalism developed disguised the fact that less privileged members of the two communities had much in common. Separation bred hatred, and led to an unfounded ...

  3. Redefining Unionism : a political perspective ; an academic perspective

    Nesbitt, Dermot; English, Richard

    2001-01-01

    REDEFINING UNIONISM : A POLITICAL PERSPECTIVE The main unionist political demand in the years immediately after 1972 was for the return of the Northern Ireland parliament based on the principle of majority rule. Government-sponsored efforts to provide alternative solutions collapsed. More re-cently, attempts to resolve the problem on the basis of human rights and equality have been made, and the new unionist case is grounded largely on the belief that non-unionists should be persuaded that...

  4. Redefining southern nationalism : a political perspective ; an academic perspective

    O'Malley, Des; Garvin, Tom

    2001-01-01

    A political perspective: Southern Irish nationalism was traditionally aggressive and negative, and tended to view Northern Ireland as a colonial remnant; but economic protectionism and isolationism did little to stem the flow of emigrants out of the country. Evolution under the leadership of Sean Lemass from 1959 onwards led to a more outward-looking Ireland, but the more negative aspects of Irish nationalism began to appear again in the 1970s. The tension between two forms of republicani...

  5. Social contract of academic medical centres to the community: Dr Howard Atwood Kelly (1858-1943), a historical perspective.

    Allen, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Academic medical centres have traditionally been bastions of teaching and research. Outreach to the community at large and involvement in community affairs have sometimes been lacking in the overall mission and activities of academic medical centres. This paper provides an historical perspective first on the numerous achievements of a physician and surgeon and then on the topic of involvement in community affairs by reviewing the many contributions of America's pioneer gynaecological surgeon and one of the four physician founders of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine in 1889 - Dr Howard Atwood Kelly. PMID:24906403

  6. Time Perspective and School Membership as Correlates to Academic Achievement among African American Adolescents

    Adelabu, Detris Honora

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of academic achievement to time perspective (future, present) and school membership (belonging, acceptance, rejection) among 232 low-income, urban African American adolescents. Findings indicated positive, significant relationships among academic achievement, future time perspective, school belonging, and…

  7. Circumcision: Perspective in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    L O Abdur-Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The practice and pattern of male infants circumcised is influenced by culture, religion and socio-economic classification. The debate about the benefits and risks of circumcision has made a hospital-based practice the most acceptable. Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the ages, indications, co-morbidity, types and methods of circumcision, usage and mode of anaesthesia and outcome of male circumcision at a tertiary health centre in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of male circumcision in a paediatric surgery unit was done from January 2002 to December 2007. The data was analysed using SPSS software version 15. Results: There were 438 boys with age ranged between 6 days and 10 years (median 28 days, mean 53.6 days standard deviation 74.2. Neonatal circumcision (<29 days was 201 (46% and 318 (72.6% of the children were circumcised by the 3 rd month of live. Religion or tradition were the major indicators in 384 (87.7% patients while phimosis 38 (8.7%, paraphimosis 4 (1%, redundant post circumcision skin 10 (2.3% and defective prepuce in 2 (0.5% were other indications. Plastibel™ (PD was used in 214 (48.9%, classical circumcision 194 (44.2%, guillotine technique (GT and Gomco™ 10 (2.3% cases each while 10 (2.3% had a refashioning/re-excision post previous circumcision. There was an increase in use of PD, drop in the use of GT; and increase in the number of circumcision done over the years. Only 39.7% had anaesthesia administered and complication rate was 6.7%. Conclusion: Neonatal circumcision was highest in the hospital-based circumcision practice, which allowed the expected ideals in the use of devices in a tertiary health centre. However, the low rate of anaesthetic use is unacceptable.

  8. Citizens of the Academic Community? A Societal Perspective on Leadership in UK Higher Education

    Bolden, Richard; Gosling, Jonathan; O'Brien, Anne

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a societal perspective on academic leadership by exploring the preoccupations of academics as citizens rather than as employees, managers or individuals. It uses a listening post methodology to ask "what is it like to be a citizen of an academic institution in contemporary Britain?" Three listening posts, comprising…

  9. Social Network Perspectives Reveal Strength of Academic Developers as Weak Ties

    Matthews, Kelly E.; Crampton, Andrea; Hill, Matthew; Johnson, Elizabeth D.; Sharma, Manjula D.; Varsavsky, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Social network perspectives acknowledge the influence of disciplinary cultures on academics' teaching beliefs and practices with implications for academic developers. The contribution of academic developers in 18 scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) projects situated in the sciences are explored by drawing on data from a two-year national…

  10. The Battle over Professorship: Reform of Human Resource Management and Academic Careers in a Comparative Perspective

    Majcher, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Changing conditions of academic and scientific labour markets challenge the current conceptual thinking about the mechanisms of academic promotion, selection and recruitment. This paper explores the models of academic promotion and recruitment of professors in a comparative perspective using the examples of Poland and Germany, and addresses the…

  11. Adoption of Library 2.0 Functionalities by Academic Libraries and Users: A Knowledge Management Perspective

    Kim, Yong-Mi; Abbas, June

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the adoption of Library 2.0 functionalities by academic libraries and users through a knowledge management perspective. Based on randomly selected 230 academic library Web sites and 184 users, the authors found RSS and blogs are widely adopted by academic libraries while users widely utilized the bookmark function.…

  12. Job Stress and Burnout among Academic Career Anaesthesiologists at an Egyptian University Hospital

    Tarek Shams; Ragaa El-Masry

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: There is compelling evidence that anaesthesiology is a stressful occupation and, when this stressful occupation is associated with an academic career, the burnout level is high. This study aimed to assess the predictors and prevalence of stress and burnout, associated sociodemographic characteristics, and job-related features. Methods: A cross-sectional survey study was carried out at Mansoura University Hospital in Egypt among 98 anaesthesiologists who had academic careers. The E...

  13. Trends in Clinically Significant Pain Prevalence Among Hospitalized Cancer Patients at an Academic Hospital in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Wang, Wei-Yun; Ho, Shung-Tai; Wu, Shang-Liang; Chu, Chi-Ming; Sung, Chun-Sung; Wang, Kwua-Yun; Liang, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Clinically significant pain (CSP) is one of the most common complaints among cancer patients during repeated hospitalizations, and the prevalence ranges from 24% to 86%. This study aimed to characterize the trends in CSP among cancer patients and examine the differences in the prevalence of CSP across repeated hospitalizations. A hospital-based, retrospective cohort study was conducted at an academic hospital. Patient-reported pain intensity was assessed and recorded in a nursing information system. We examined the differences in the prevalence of worst pain intensity (WPI) and last evaluated pain intensity (LPI) of ≥ 4 or ≥ 7 points among cancer inpatients from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. Linear mixed models were used to determine the significant difference in the WPI and LPI (≥ 4 or ≥ 7 points) at each hospitalization. We examined 88,133 pain scores from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization among cancer patients. The prevalence of the 4 CSP types showed a trend toward a reduction from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. There was a robust reduction in the CSP prevalence from the 1st to the 5th hospitalization, except in the case of LPI ≥ 7 points. The prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points was significantly higher (0.240-fold increase) during the 1st hospitalization than during the 5th hospitalization. For the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th hospitalizations, there was a significantly higher prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points compared with the 5th hospitalization. We also observed significant reductions in the prevalence of a WPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 4th hospitalizations, an LPI ≥ 4 points during the 1st to the 3rd hospitalizations, and an LPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 2nd hospitalization. Although the prevalence of the 4 CSP types decreased gradually, it is impossible to state the causative factors on the basis of this observational and descriptive study. The next step will examine the factors that determine the CSP prevalence among cancer

  14. Designing and Publishing Indoor Maps for Patients and Visitors in an Academic Teaching Hospital

    Ryder, Kerry J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This project aims to improve the service user experience by designing and publishing an accessible indoor map in an academic teaching hospital. On a daily basis approximately 600 service users will be disoriented in the hospital resulting in 18 hours/day staff time spent helping patients find their way. 84% (n=109) of staff categorised indoor maps as a service improvement. Patients who get lost can feel anxiety, shame and even panic. Maps can improve patient autonomy¹. Internati...

  15. Re-framing student academic freedom: a capability perspective

    MacFarlane, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The scholarly debate about academic freedom focuses almost exclusively on the rights of academic faculty. Student academic freedom is rarely discussed and is normally confined to debates connected with the politicisation of the curriculum. Concerns about (student) freedom of speech reflect the dominant role of negative rights in the analysis of academic freedom representing 'threats' to academic freedom in terms of rights which may be taken away from a person rather than conferred on them. Th...

  16. Portuguese Academics' Perceptions of Higher Education Institutions' Governance and Management: A Generational Perspective

    Santiago, Rui; Carvalho, Teresa; Cardoso, Sónia

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to analyse academics' perceptions on changes in the governance and management of higher education institutions (HEIs) under a generational perspective. It is empirically based on the analysis of national data resulting from the "Changing Academic Profession" international survey. Findings reveal a general tendency for…

  17. Challenging Perspectives on Learning and Teaching in the Disciplines: The Academic Voice

    Krause, Kerri-Lee D.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study of academic staff perspectives on disciplinary communities and skill development in disciplinary contexts. Fifty-five academic staff were interviewed across eight disciplines in four Australian universities. Responses of historians and mathematicians are the focus of this article. A socio-constructivist framework…

  18. Three Academics' Perspective on Medical Tourism: Reflections on a Trip to Southern India

    Johnston, Rory; Crooks, Valorie; Snyder, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    To date, medical tourism has gone relatively unnoticed by academic researchers when compared to other global health services practices such as health worker migration. Amongst the flurry of business briefings, industry reports and news media coverage that have accompanied the rapid growth of the industry over the past decade, only a handful of accounts from an academic perspective exist. Moreover, very few of these academic accounts are from researchers who have personally visited medical tou...

  19. Moving Toward Shibboleth Authentication: A Canadian Academic Library’s Perspective

    Cai, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Moving towards Shibboleth authentication has been a slow process for Canadian academic libraries. This article is intended to provide an overview of the current status of Shibboleth implementation from a Canadian academic library’s perspective. The author will begin with needs analysis for Shibboleth authentication for a Canadian academic library, then proceed to explore the issues and challenges surrounding Shibboleth implementation, and finally discuss the key roles of the stakeholders as w...

  20. Academic Librarians and Research: A Study of Canadian Library Administrator Perspectives

    Berg, Selinda Adelle; Jacobs, Heidi L. M.; Cornwall, Dayna

    2013-01-01

    Within the literature exploring the role of research in academic librarianship, very little attention has been paid to the perspectives of upper library administrators. This perspective is critical because library administrators play a key role in hiring, evaluating, supporting, promoting, and tenuring professional librarians. As a way of bringing…

  1. Re-Framing Student Academic Freedom: A Capability Perspective

    Macfarlane, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The scholarly debate about academic freedom focuses almost exclusively on the rights of academic faculty. Student academic freedom is rarely discussed and is normally confined to debates connected with the politicisation of the curriculum. Concerns about (student) freedom of speech reflect the dominant role of negative rights in the analysis of…

  2. Digital Storytelling in Australia: Academic Perspectives and Reflections

    Clarke, Robert; Adam, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This project explored the experiences of a small sample (N = 6) of Australian academics with the use of digital storytelling as a pedagogical tool in higher education contexts. This article describes two case studies of academic uses of digital storytelling, along with interpretive analysis of six semi-structured interviews of academics working…

  3. How one teaching hospital system and one medical school are jointly affirming their academic mission.

    Rosenblatt, M; Rabkin, M T; Tosteson, D C

    1997-06-01

    The economic forces that are reshaping the practice of medicine and the funding of medical research will have great impact on clinical education and research in teaching hospitals and their associated medical schools. Changes in the setting of and approach to medical education will need to be made in order to continue to train physicians at the same high level as in the past and to maintain the productivity of our national biomedical research enterprise and its contributions to health. Academic leaders, such as department chiefs who have clinical service responsibilities, are finding it more and more difficult to manage simultaneously the demands of the clinical business, education, and research. In an effort to organize a teaching hospital and a medical school in a manner that would position them to maintain more effectively their common academic mission front and center with the clinical business, Harvard Medical School and the Beth Israel Hospital created a joint venture in 1996. The new nonprofit Institute for Education and Research has education and research as its top (and only) mission. It is designed to provide additional and specific academic leadership and to enable the joint venture to undertake strategic planning for the academic mission. In addition to the challenges it faces from changes in the external environment, the Institute for Education and Research will need to establish a new pattern of interactions internally within the parent institutions. Collaborations with department chairs and faculty are an essential ingredient for its success. It is hoped that this structure will prove to be a useful template for organizing other medical school-hospital collaborations on behalf of the academic mission. PMID:9200578

  4. The Evolution of the Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario Statement of Principles--A Successful Harmonization Initiative

    Porter, Katie; Lampson, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    To improve efficiency, consistency and transparency in clinical trial contract negotiations with industry sponsors, a Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) committee facilitated the development of standard principles for member hospitals to follow during contract negotiation. Hospitals were encouraged to provide a link to the CAHO…

  5. Spiritual care in a hospital setting: nurses’ and patients’ perspectives

    Jan P. Vlasblom

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Many patients wish to discuss spiritual issues with nurses. Previous work has shown that nurses do so infrequently. A mixed methods research approach was used to investigate the perceptions of spiritual care of nurses and patients. Fifty-one nurses and 75 patients of five hospital departments of a non-academic hospital in the Netherlands were surveyed in 2007. We recorded the nurses’ perception of patient wishes, perceived relevance of spiritual care for patients, spiritual care provided in practice, and their evaluation of the spiritual care provided for the patients. With regard to the patients the nurses cared for, we recorded their satisfaction with the information and experiences of spiritual care provided by the nurses. Furthermore, semi-structured qualitative interviews with eight nurses examined the nurses’ perceptions of spiritual care including perceived barriers and facilitators of spiritual care giving. The nurses generally perceived spiritual care as important. The quantitative and qualitative research indicated that time to listen, availability, empathic skills, openness to other opinions, and a good relationship of trust were important facilitators. Fortyone per cent of the nurses said that few patients received sufficient attention to their spiritual needs. Patients also experienced limitations in the support for and registration of their spiritual needs. Both nurses and patients acknowledged shortcomings in the provision of spiritual care. Even though some issues may be improved relatively easily, such as registering needs, in practice giving spiritual care is complex, as it requires being available and building a relationship with the patient.

  6. Opening Online Academic Development Programmes to International Perspectives and Dialogue

    Donnelly, Roisin; Manathunga, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Professional development for academic staff in higher education is receiving increasing attention. The focus has been on providing an opportunity for academic staff to enhance their effectiveness in meeting changing needs and roles in higher education. Inherent in this changing role has been meeting the challenges of technology-infused learning environments available for use today. This chapter explores the potential of online academic development programmes to increase collaboration and dial...

  7. Positioning academic medical centers and teaching hospitals to thrive in the next decade.

    Morris, D E

    1985-06-01

    Market share for academic medical centers and teaching hospitals will decline over the next five years necessitating new strategies to ensure growth and profitability. These types of institutions are, however, in a strong position to compete and gain market share locally by building a defensible competitive advantage. This article offers three avenues for increasing market share: networking, brand name product differentiation, and business diversification. PMID:10271804

  8. An Academic Medical Center Experience with a Computerized Hospital Information System: The First Four Years

    Reynolds, Robert E.; Heller, Edward E.

    1980-01-01

    Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center (RPSLMC) obtained and implemented an on-line, real time medical information system (MIS), SPECTRA 2000, in 1976 in its branch hospital, the Sheridan Road Pavilion. After several years of successful operation and minor modifications, the system was evaluated with regard to installing it throughout the rest of the RPSLMC. A group of specified enhancements were outlined to make the system suitable to the needs of the large academic medical center. Impl...

  9. Preparing an Academic Medical Center to Manage Patients Infected with Ebola: Experiences of a University Hospital

    Schultz, Ch.; Koenig, KL; Alassaf, W

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc. As Ebola has spread beyond West Africa, the challenges confronting health care systems with no experience in managing such patients are enormous. Not only is Ebola a significant threat to a population's health, it can infect the medical personnel trying to treat it. As such, it represents a major challenge to those in public health, emergency medical services (EMS), and acute care hospitals. Our academic medical center volunteered t...

  10. Factors related to complications among adult patients with intellectual disabilities hospitalized at an academic medical center.

    Ailey, Sarah H; Johnson, Tricia J; Fogg, Louis; Friese, Tanya R

    2015-04-01

    People with intellectual disabilities (ID) represent a small but important group of hospitalized patients who have higher rates of complications than do patients without ID hospitalized for the same reasons. Complications are potentially avoidable conditions, such as healthcare-acquired infections, healthcare-acquired skin breakdown, falls, and medication errors and reactions. Addressing factors related to complications can focus efforts to improve hospital care. The purpose of this exploratory study was to analyze data from reviews of academic medical center charts (N  =  70) about complications and to examine patient and hospitalization characteristics in relation to complications among adult patients (age ≥ 18 years) with ID hospitalized for nonpsychiatric reasons. Adults with ID tended to be twice as likely to have complications (χ2  =  2.893, df  =  1, p  =  .09) if they had a surgical procedure and were nearly four times as likely to have complications (χ2  =  6.836, df  =  1, p  =  .009) if they had multiple chronic health conditions (three of the following: history of cerebral palsy, autism spectrum symptoms, aggressive behavior, respiratory disorder, and admission through the emergency department). Findings suggest preliminary criteria for assessing risk for complications among hospitalized people with ID and the need for attention to their specific needs when hospitalized. PMID:25860449

  11. Academic Freedom and University Autonomy: A Higher Education Policy Perspective

    Ren, Kai; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    This article reflects upon three seminal articles published in "Higher Education Policy" ("HEP") on academic freedom and university autonomy. The reflections indicate that "HEP" research contributes to a sophisticated and systematic understanding of the complexity of academic freedom, addressing both the original…

  12. Participating in International Academic Publishing: A Taiwan Perspective

    Min, Hui-Tzu

    2014-01-01

    There has been growing concern among researchers and scholars about how nonnative-English-speaking academics in the "expanding circle" (Kachru, 2001, p. 520) cope with challenges while publishing in English in international refereed journals in the center. Most found that academics from peripheral countries where English is a foreign…

  13. Geographical collections in Greek academic libraries: Current situation and perspectives

    Καπιδάκης, Σαράντος; Βαρδακώστα, Ιφιγένεια

    2011-01-01

    The paper aims at exploring the existence of geospatial collections and the GIS services in Greek academic libraries through a research in their websites. The initial hypothesis is that Greek academic libraries are not familiar with geographical information and services and therefore they have not developed efficient collections and services for their patrons regarding geospatial data. Thus, a research was conducted in various Greek Higher Education Institutions for departments affiliated wit...

  14. Mortality among inpatients of a psychiatric hospital: Indian perspective

    Shireesh Shatwaji Shinde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to assess mortality and its correlates among psychiatric inpatients of a tertiary care neuropsychiatric hospital. Given the background that such a study has never been undertaken in India, the findings would have a large bearing on policy making from a mental health-care perspective. Materials and Methods: The medical records of those psychiatric inpatients (n = 333 who died during their stay at the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences in past 26 years (January 1983 to December 2008 constituted the study population. Results: During the 26 years, there were a total of 103,252 psychiatric in-patient admissions, out of which 333 people died during their inpatient stay. Majority (n = 135, 44.6% of the mortality was seen in the age group of 21-40 years. Most of the subjects were males (n = 202, 67%, married (n = 172, 56.8% and from urban areas (n = 191, 63%. About, 54% of the subjects had short inpatient stay (<5 days, median for the sample. In 118 (39% of the subjects, there was a history of physical illness. Leading cause of death were cardiovascular system disorders (n = 132, 43.6%, followed by respiratory system disorders (n = 45, 14.9%, nervous system disorders (n = 30, 9.9% and infections (n = 31, 10.1%. In 21 (7%, cause of death was suicide. Conclusions: Identifying the factors associated with the death of inpatients is of utmost importance in assessing the care in a neuropsychiatric hospital and in formulating better treatment plan and policy in mental health. The discussion focuses on the analysis of different factors associated with inpatient mortality.

  15. Implementing an Interoperable Personal Health Record in Pediatrics: Lessons Learned at an Academic Children's Hospital.

    Anoshiravani, Arash; Gaskin, Gregory; Kopetsky, Ed; Sandborg, Christy; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2011-07-10

    This paper describes the development of an innovative health information technology creating a bidirectional link between the electronic medical record (EMR) of an academic children's hospital and a commercially available, interoperable personal health record (PHR). The goal of the PHR project has been to empower pediatric patients and their families to play a more active role in understanding, accessing, maintaining, and sharing their personal health information to ultimately improve health outcomes. The most notable challenges proved more operational and cultural than technological. Our experience demonstrates that an interoperable PHR is technically and culturally achievable at a pediatric academic medical center. Recognizing the complex social, cultural, and organizational contexts of these systems is important for overcoming barriers to a successful implementation. PMID:21853160

  16. Physician clinical alignment and integration: a community-academic hospital approach.

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Weiss, Sandra Jarva; Nester, Brian; Whalen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    An overwhelming need for change in the U.S. healthcare delivery system, coupled with the need to improve clinical and financial outcomes, has prompted hospitals to direct renewed efforts toward achieving high quality and cost-effectiveness. Additionally, with the dawn of accountable care organizations and increasing focus on patient expectations, hospitals have begun to seek physician partners through clinical alignment. Contrary to the unsuccessful alignment strategies of the 1990s, today's efforts are more mutually beneficial, driven by the need to achieve better care coordination, increased access to infrastructure, improved quality, and lower costs. In this article, we describe a large, academic, tertiary care hospital's approach to developing and implementing alignment and integration models with its collaboration-ready physicians and physician groups. We developed four models--short of physicians' employment with the organization--tailored to meet the needs of both the physician group and the hospital: (1) medical directorship (group physicians are appointed to serve as medical directors of a clinical area), (2) professional services agreement (specific clinical services, such as overnight admissions help, are contracted), (3) co-management services agreement (one specialty group co-manages all services within the specialty service lines), and (4) lease arrangement (closest in scope to employment, in which the hospital pays all expenses and receives all revenue). Successful hospital-physician alignment requires careful planning and the early engagement of legal counsel to ensure compliance with federal statutes. Establishing an integrated system with mutually identified goals better positions hospitals to deliver cost-effective and high-quality care under the new paradigm of healthcare reform. PMID:24988674

  17. Academic Staff's Perspectives upon Student Plagiarism: A Case Study at a University in Hong Kong

    Li, Yongyan

    2015-01-01

    Much of the previous research concerning student plagiarism has been conducted in Anglo-American settings. The present paper reports a case study of academic staff's perspectives upon student plagiarism at a university in Hong Kong. Based on interviews with 16 instructors, the study focused on the teachers' views and pedagogical practices,…

  18. "Serving Two Masters"--Academics' Perspectives on Working at an Offshore Campus in Malaysia

    Dobos, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of the internationalisation of higher education on the working lives of academics at an offshore campus in eastern Malaysia. Using the interpretivist paradigm and grounded theory methods it investigates their perspectives on various themes as those emerge during a series of interviews. These emerging themes are:…

  19. Radiology reporting in an academic children's hospital: what referring physicians think

    Transcribed reports are the radiologist's most conspicuous and enduring product, yet relatively little investigation of report quality has been undertaken by radiologists. This paper reports the results of a survey of 266 referring physicians in an academic children's hospital regarding their needs and assessments of the quality of radiology reporting. The results outline the range and relative importance of report features from referring physicians' points of view, provide specific suggestions for how to improve reporting performance, and generally indicate that reporting should receive more attention in training and practice than it currently does. (orig.)

  20. Measurement of Quality of Educational Hospital Services by the SERVQUAL Model: The Iranian Patients’ Perspective

    Rezaei, Satar; Matin, Behzad Karami; Moradi, Khalil; Bijan, Behroz; Fallahi, Masoud; Shokati, Behnam; Saeidi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The main mission of hospitals in any health system is to deliver high quality healthcare for patients and meet their needs and expectations. The aim of the current study was to assess the quality of the service of educational hospitals affiliated with Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2015, from the perspective of patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study, the perspectives of 400 patients were assessed about the quality of the services provided by educational hos...

  1. Perspectives on Integrated Academic Information Management Systems (IAIMS).

    Lunin, Lois F. (Ed.); Ball, Marion J. (Ed.)

    1988-01-01

    Various aspects of the Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) initiative sponsored by the National Library of Medicine are explored in 10 articles. An overview of the program, the technologies involved, examples of implementation, approaches to integrated information systems, and the future of the program are discussed. (CLB)

  2. An auto-ethnographic perspective on academic entrepreneurship

    Pilegaard, Morten; Moroz, Peter; Neergaard, Helle

    2010-01-01

    ) why academic entrepreneurship in the social sciences and humanities may differ from the hard sciences.  Our findings illustrate the importance of bridging innovation using twin skills to balance research and commercial goals, the need for codifying knowledge capacities and creating new or changing...

  3. The Work of Management Academics: An English Language Perspective

    Tietze, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the English language on the work of management academics. They are seen as knowledge workers in the context of business and management, who have to be able to use the English language in such ways to pursue successfully and competently the main purpose of their work--the generation, dissemination and…

  4. Perspectives on academic misconduct: implications for education and practice.

    Klainberg, Marilyn B; McCrink, Andrea; Eckardt, Patricia; Schecter, Rose; Bongiorno, Anne; Sedhom, Laila

    2014-01-01

    From Harvard to high school, concern related to academic misconduct, specifically cheating and its impact on societal issues, has become a great concern for educational communities. While a significant number of studies on ethical behaviors in practice in other professions such as business have been published, little research exists on registered nurses in practice. Even fewer studies have, for registered nurses, addressed if there is an association between perceived academic misconduct as students and perceived unethical behaviors in the workplace. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between perceptions of registered professional nurses' (RNs) current workplace behaviors and the RNs' retrospective perceptions of their academic misconduct as students. A convenience sample of 1 66 RNs enrolled in master's degree programs at four university schools of nursing completed questionnaires regarding their beliefs and behaviors. The outcome of this study was significant. Results revealed a strong relationship between unethical behaviors of the RN in practice and their prior academic misconduct when they were students. PMID:26021131

  5. Strategic Planning for Academic Research: A Canadian Perspective

    Sa, Creso M.; Tamtik, Merli

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on an empirical study of research planning in Canadian universities. Drawing on data compiled during interviews with senior administrators from 27 academic units in 10 universities, the paper analyses how strategic planning has been applied to the research mission over the past decade. Findings reveal variability in processes…

  6. IELTS and Academic Success in Higher Education: A UAE Perspective

    Kevin Schoepp

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the relationship between International English Language Testing System (IELTS entrance scores and academic success as defined by general education program GPA for students at a federal university in the United Arab Emirates in order to reflect upon regional English language proficiency entrance requirements. It focuses on one group of students, direct entry students who have bypassed the English language foundation program with an overall IELTS 6.0 or greater and were admitted straight into the baccalaureate program. Students were grouped according to their IELTS proficiency levels: 6.0, 6.5 or ≥7.0. Measures of central tendency for overall GPA and academic-stream-specific GPA, along with the overall IELTS and the corresponding sub-scores were calculated. To test the statistical significance of any mean score GPA differences that existed between the 3 IELTS groups, a One-Way ANOVA was calculated. Based on the statistical analyses, the IELTS ≥7.0 group appears to have achieved a meaningful threshold for academic success in that they have consistently outperformed the other direct entry students. This finding corresponds to international entrance-requirement standards for non-native speakers of English.Keywords: IELTS, Academic success, Higher Education, United Arab Emirates, English proficiency

  7. Academic probation and companioning: Three perspectives on experience and support

    Isabelle Arcand *

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study explored the process of academic companioning as experienced by five undergraduate probationary students and as supported by two professional resource persons. Data was collected through multiple in-depth interviews and analyzed using a threedimensional narrative inquiry space, which provided a fitting framework for a thematic narrative analysis. A document analysis was also used to determine how the conceptual foundation of the academic companioning program aligned with the students’ experience. Our analysis suggests congruence between the multiple sources of data examined. Key findings shed light on the nature of the companion’s role defined by a specific form of guidance and attendance to students’ self-confidence. Findings also illustrate how the program’s structure caters to students experience by facilitating an acknowledgement their own needs, helping them better understand the university context, and offering personal support.

  8. The current limitations on tissue banking from an academic perspective.

    Pierscionek, Barbara K

    2011-02-01

    For research on human physiology and pathologies the most relevant results come from human tissue, necessitating the creation of more tissue banks. This need is acknowledged by academics, clinical researchers and the pharmaceutical industry. For academics, the major obstacles to establishing tissue banks are the somewhat cumbersome ethical procedures, a perceived lack of demand for human tissue and insufficient knowledge about supply and its demographic differences. The causes are inter-related: confusing and time-consuming ethics applications cause some researchers to avoid human tissue work and expend research efforts on animal studies, leading to a false presumption of a lower level of demand for human tissue. Lack of knowledge about why rates of donation are low, and why there are differences in donation for different organs, leads to an uncertainty about supply. This too poses a problem for tissue bank establishment, and further research into this area is required. PMID:20824352

  9. IELTS and Academic Success in Higher Education: A UAE Perspective

    Kevin Schoepp; Dawn Garinger

    2016-01-01

    This study compares the relationship between International English Language Testing System (IELTS) entrance scores and academic success as defined by general education program GPA for students at a federal university in the United Arab Emirates in order to reflect upon regional English language proficiency entrance requirements. It focuses on one group of students, direct entry students who have bypassed the English language foundation program with an overall IELTS 6.0 or greater and were adm...

  10. Translational science and the hidden research system in universities and academic hospitals: a case study.

    Lander, Bryn; Atkinson-Grosjean, Janet

    2011-02-01

    Innovation systems (IS) and science policy scholarship predominantly focus on linkages between universities and industry, and the commercial translation of academic discoveries. Overlooked in such analyses are important connections between universities and academic hospitals, and the non-commercial aspects of translational science. The two types of institutions tend to be collapsed into a single entity-'the university'-and relational flows are lost. Yet the distinctions and flows between the two are crucial elements of translational science and the biomedical innovation system. This paper explores what has been called the 'hidden research system' that connects hospitals, universities, and their resources, with the clinical and scientific actors who make the linkages possible. Then, using a novel conceptual model of translational science, we examine the individual interactions and dynamics involved in a particular example of the biomedical innovation system at work: the diagnosis of IRAK-4 deficiency, a rare immunological disorder, and the translational flows that result. Contra to conventional IS analyses, we are able to point to the strong role of public-sector institutions, and the weak role of the private-sector, in the translational processes described here. Our research was conducted within a Canadian network of scientists and clinician-scientists studying the pathogenomics of immunological disorders and innate immunity. PMID:21168250

  11. Community orientation in hospitals: an institutional and resource dependence perspective.

    Proenca, E J; Rosko, M D; Zinn, J S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conceptualize community orientation-defined as the generation, dissemination, and use of community health-need intelligence-as a strategic response to environmental pressures, and to test a theoretically justified model of the predictors of community orientation in hospitals. DATA SOURCES: The analysis used data for 4,578 hospitals obtained from the 1994 and 1995 American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey and the 1994 Medicare Hospital Cost Report data sets. Market-level ...

  12. Academic Vocabulary, Writing and English for Academic Purposes: Perspectives from Second Language Learners

    Coxhead, Averil

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on vocabulary and writing at university level from the perspectives of 14 English as an additional language students studying at a New Zealand university. The students individually carried out an integrated reading and writing task and then participated in an interview which focused on their language learning background and…

  13. Value of Imaging Part I: Perspectives for the Academic Radiologist.

    Duong, Phuong-Anh T; Bresnahan, Brian; Pastel, David A; Sadigh, Gelareh; Ballard, David; Sullivan, Joseph C; Buch, Karen; Duszak, Richard

    2016-01-01

    With payers and policymakers increasingly scrutinizing the value of medical imaging, opportunities abound for radiologists and radiology health services researchers to meaningfully and rigorously demonstrate value. Part one of this two-part series on the value of imaging explores the concept of value in health care from the perspective of multiple stakeholders and discusses the opportunities and challenges for radiologists and health service researchers to demonstrate value. The current absence of meaningful national value metrics also presents an opportunity for radiologists to take the lead on the discussions of these metrics that may serve as the basis for future value-based payments. As both practitioners and investigators, radiologists should consider the perspectives of multiple stakeholders in all they do-interdisciplinary support and cooperation are essential to the success of value-focused imaging research and initiatives that improve patient outcomes. Radiology departments that align their cultures, infrastructures, and incentives to support these initiatives will greatly increase their chances of being successful in these endeavors. PMID:26683508

  14. Adherence to Informed Consent Standards in Shiraz Hospitals: Matrons Perspective

    Alireza Mohsenian Sisakht

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Informed consent is an important part of the patients’ rights and hospitals are assigned to obtain informed consent before any diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Obtaining an informed consent enables patients to accept or reject their care or treatments and prevent future contentions among patients and medical staff. Methods This survey was carried out during 2011-2. We assessed adherence of 33 Shiraz hospitals (governmental and non-governmental to informed consent standards defined by Joint Commission International (JCI Accreditation, USA. The questionnaire was designed using the Delphi method and then filled out by hospital matrons. We calculated valid percent frequency for each part of the questionnaire and compared these frequencies in governmental and nongovernmental hospitals using analytical statistics. Results Considering 63% of the hospitals that filled out the questionnaire, no statistically significant difference was observed between the governmental and non-governmental hospitals in adherence to informed consent standards. Conclusion This study shows a relatively acceptable adherence to standards about informed consent in Shiraz hospitals but the implementation seems not to be as satisfactory.

  15. A new perspective on hospital financial ratio analysis.

    Zeller, T L; Stanko, B B; Cleverley, W O

    1997-11-01

    Using audit financial data in a study of 2,189 not-for-profit hospitals for the period 1989-1992, six financial characteristics of performance were defined. These characteristics are profitability factor, fixed-asset efficiency, capital structure, fixed-asset age, working capital efficiency, and liquidity. The statistical output also shows the specific sets of financial ratios that can be used to measure the six characteristics of hospital performance. The results of this study can be beneficial to healthcare financial managers, hospital boards, policy groups, and other relevant entities because it affords them a clear understanding of an institution's financial performance. PMID:10184820

  16. Software engineering in medical informatics: the academic hospital as learning environment.

    Prins, H; Cornet, R; van den Berg, F M; van der Togt, R; Abu-Hanna, A

    2002-01-01

    In 2001, the revised course Software Engineering has been implemented in the Medical Informatics curriculum at the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam. This 13 weeks, full-time course consists of three parts: internship, theory and project. All parts are provided in problem-oriented manner with special attention for relevant skills such as project management, documentation and presentation. During the internship, students observe how health care professionals at several hospital wards work and how information supply is organized. In the theory part, students study concepts and methods of software engineering by means of case descriptions and self-directed learning. During the project, they apply their acquired knowledge to an observed, clinical information problem and complete several stages of the software engineering process. Evaluation by inquiry showed that, compared to other courses, students spent more time, and distributed their time more evenly, during the whole period of the course. In conjunction with theory, a combination of internship and project in a hospital seems to provide a surplus value compared to a practical in a computer laboratory. The integration of software theory, clinical practice and problem-based approach, contributed to the enthusiastic, intensive and realistic way students learned in this important topic that might be chosen as a future profession. PMID:15460769

  17. Succession planning: perspectives of chief executive officers in US hospitals.

    Collins, Sandra K

    2009-01-01

    A study was conducted to explore the perceptions of chief executive officers in US hospitals regarding the origins of leadership and how they felt about internally developed successors versus externally recruited successors. Furthermore, the study examined how this group of executives utilizes the succession planning process, what factors impact successor identification, what positions are applicable for succession planning activities, and who is ultimately held responsible for leadership continuity within the hospital industry. PMID:19668068

  18. Going fully digital: Perspective of a Dutch academic pathology lab

    Nikolas Stathonikos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, whole slide imaging has become more affordable and widely accepted in pathology labs. Digital slides are increasingly being used for digital archiving of routinely produced clinical slides, remote consultation and tumor boards, and quantitative image analysis for research purposes and in education. However, the implementation of a fully digital Pathology Department requires an in depth look into the suitability of digital slides for routine clinical use (the image quality of the produced digital slides and the factors that affect it and the required infrastructure to support such use (the storage requirements and integration with lab management and hospital information systems. Optimization of digital pathology workflow requires communication between several systems, which can be facilitated by the use of open standards for digital slide storage and scanner management. Consideration of these aspects along with appropriate validation of the use of digital slides for routine pathology can pave the way for pathology departments to go "fully digital." In this paper, we summarize our experiences so far in the process of implementing a fully digital workflow at our Pathology Department and the steps that are needed to complete this process.

  19. Comparison of Services of Public, Private and Foreign Hospitals from the Perspective of Bangladeshi Patients

    Siddiqui, Nazlee; Khandaker, Shahjahan Ali

    2007-01-01

    Despite recent developments in the Bangladesh healthcare sector, there is still great concern about the quality of healthcare services in the country. This study compared the quality of healthcare services by different types of institutions, i.e. public and private hospitals, from the perspective of Bangladeshi patients to identify the relevant areas for development. A survey was conducted among Bangladeshi citizens who were in-patients in public or private hospitals in Dhaka city or in hospi...

  20. Perceived Barriers and Facilitators for Academic Career in Geriatrics: Medical Students’ Perspectives

    Curran, Maureen A.; Black, Michelle; Depp, Colin A.; Iglewicz, Alana; Reichstadt, Jennifer; Palinkas, Lawrence; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is a growing concern about a shortage of physician scientists. This problem is particularly severe in certain subspecialties such as geriatrics in general and geriatric psychiatry in particular. This study sought to obtain medical students’ perspectives on barriers and facilitators toward pursuing a career in academics and/or in geriatric psychiatry or medicine. Methods The study surveyed 27 first-year medical students from six US medical schools, who had demonstrated a clear interest in academic geriatrics by completing a mentored summer research training program in geriatric medicine or geriatric psychiatry, funded by the National Institute on Aging. The survey included open-ended and close-ended questions about likely career choice and factors affecting it. Results Sixty percent of students reported they were likely to pursue an academic career, 44% a career in geriatric psychiatry or medicine, and only 36% a career in academic geriatrics. The most frequently perceived barriers were a lack of knowledge about academic careers and lack of exposure to geriatrics, financial concerns due to loan debts and low compensation, and negative impressions of research and of working with older adults. Facilitators included positive experiences with or positive impressions of research and research mentors and of older adults, and the growing demand for geriatric care. Conclusions Attracting capable and motivated medical students to academic careers in fields such as geriatric psychiatry or medicine should be a priority in seeking to expand the numbers of physician scientists and to add to the healthcare workforce in underserved subspecialty areas. Necessary approaches should include opportunities to work in academic settings, availability of sustained and dedicated mentorship, early, consistent, and positive exposure to older adults, and financial incentives. PMID:25080223

  1. Academic, Industry and Student Perspectives on the Inclusion of "Vocational Knowledge" in a "Learning and Teaching Academic Standards Statement" for Agriculture

    Acuña, Tina Botwright; Kelder, Jo-Anne; Able, Amanda J.; Guisard, Yann; Bellotti, William D.; McDonald, Glenn; Doyle, Richard; Wormell, Paul; Meinke, Holger

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the perspective of industry stakeholders in a national project to develop a Learning and Teaching Academic Standards (LTAS) Statement for the Agriculture discipline. The AgLTAS Statement will be aligned with the Science LTAS Statement published in 2011 and comprise a discourse on the nature and extent of the Agriculture…

  2. Hospital decentralisation in Romania: stakeholders' perspectives in the newsprint media.

    Popa, Adela Elena

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2010, Romania undertook a process of hospital decentralisation as part of the reform in the healthcare sector. The national newsprint media covered the process thoroughly. This paper is a study of how key stakeholders' views, attitudes, beliefs and attitudes towards decentralisation are represented in print media. 106 articles, published between June and September 2010, retrieved from the online databases of six leading national dailies were analysed. A mixed methodology was used in the data analysis stage. The qualitative data exploration identified five voices belonging to stakeholders involved directly or indirectly in the process: the representatives of central government, the local authorities (district and local councils, municipal mayors), health professionals (managers and physicians in hospitals), the media (journalists, analysts) and finally voices from civil society, professional associations and advocacy groups. These were the main actors negotiating the subjective meanings of the decentralisation process. An imbalance between these key actors were observed in the frequency, content and tone of the messages delivered in media during the four months. Central government and the local authorities were the most active voices, but the respective discourses differed significantly. An analysis of the accounts identified three main themes: the financial problem (hospitals liabilities and future spending), human resource in hospitals (the impact of decentralisation upon it) and the political character of the decentralisation. PMID:23558922

  3. The Social Construction of Skills: A Hospitality Sector Perspective

    Baum, Tom

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses the nature of skills in service work with specific reference to international tourism and its hospitality subsector. It explores the role of experiential factors (cultural, emotional and aesthetic) in equipping those entering work in the sector. The specific context of work in less developed countries and within migrant labour…

  4. Understanding Personal Learning Environment Perspectives of Thai International Tourism and Hospitality Higher Education Students

    Tanyong, Siriwan; Sharafuddin, Mohamed Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper is part of a periodic research conducted in developing a personal learning environment for Thailand's higher education students with English as medium of instruction. The objective of the first phase in this research was to understand the personal learning environment perspectives of Thai International tourism and hospitality higher…

  5. Quality Improvement Practices in Academic Emergency Medicine: Perspectives from the Chairs

    DelliFraine, Jami L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess academic emergency medicine (EM chairs’ perceptions of quality improvement (QI training programs.Methods: A voluntary anonymous 20 item survey was distributed to a sample of academic chairs of EM through the Association of Academic Chairs of Emergency Medicine. Data was collected to assess the percentage of academic emergency physicians who had received QI training, the type of training they received, their perception of the impact of this training on behavior, practice and outcomes, and any perceived barriers to implementing QI programs in the emergency department.Results: The response rate to the survey was 69% (N = 59. 59.3% of respondents report that their hospital has a formal QI program for physicians. Chairs received training in a variety of QI programs. The type of QI program used by respondents was perceived as having no impact on goals achieved by QI (χ2 = 12.382; p = 0.260, but there was a statistically significant (χ2 = 14.383; p = 0.006 relationship between whether or not goals were achieved and academic EM chairs’ perceptions about return on investment for QI training. Only 22% of chairs responded that they have already made changes as a result of the QI training. 78.8% of EM chairs responded that quality programs could have a significant positive impact on their practice and the healthcare industry. Chairs perceived that QI programs had the most potential value in the areas of understanding and reducing medical errors and improving patient flow and throughput. Other areas of potential value of QI include improving specific clinical indicators and standardizing physician care.Conclusion: Academic EM chairs perceived that QI programs were an effective way to drive needed improvements. The results suggest that there is a high level of interest in QI but a low level of adoption of training and implementation.[West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(5:479-485.

  6. [Gestational diabetes from the perspective of hospitalized pregnant women].

    Araújo, Márcio Flávio Moura; Pessoa, Sarah Maria Fraxe; Damasceno, Marta Maria Coelho; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia

    2013-01-01

    This phenomenological qualitative study aimed to understand the meaning of the experiences lived by women with gestational diabetes mellitus. The sample consisted of 12 patients hospitalized at a maternity hospital in the city of Fortaleza, state of Ceará, Brazil, which expressed their feelings and perceptions through open interviews and drawings. The empirical material was fully transcribed and then organized and analyzed by the phenomenological method. The results revealed two themes: (1) Living experiences that bring happiness and well-being, and (2) Living experiences that cause suffering. This phenomenological study showed the experience of women with gestational diabetes mellitus, thus enabling to plan and to implement intervention programs based on a participatory model of health in order to prioritize the subjective aspects involved in high-risk pregnancy. PMID:23743842

  7. Building new hospitals: a UK infection control perspective.

    Stockley, J M; Constantine, C E; Orr, K E

    2006-03-01

    Infection control input is vital throughout the planning, design and building stages of a new hospital project, and must continue through the commissioning (and decommissioning) process, evaluation and putting the facility into full clinical service. Many hospitals continue to experience problems months or years after occupying the new premises; some of these could have been avoided by infection control involvement earlier in the project. The importance of infection control must be recognized by the chief executive of the hospital trust and project teams overseeing the development. Clinical user groups and contractors must also be made aware of infection control issues. It is vital that good working relationships are built up between the infection control team (ICT) and all these parties. ICTs need the authority to influence the process. This may require their specific recognition by the Private Finance Initiative National Unit, the Department of Health or other relevant authorities. ICTs need training in how to read design plans, how to write effective specifications, and in other areas with which they may be unfamiliar. The importance of documentation and record keeping is paramount. External or independent validation of processes should be available, particularly in commissioning processes. Building design in relation to infection control needs stricter national regulations, allowing ICTs to focus on more local usage issues. Further research is needed to provide evidence regarding the relationship between building design and the prevalence of infection. PMID:16337712

  8. Transforming the Academic Faculty Perspective in Graduate Medical Education to Better Align Educational and Clinical Outcomes.

    Wong, Brian M; Holmboe, Eric S

    2016-04-01

    The current health care delivery model continues to fall short in achieving the desired patient safety and quality-of-care outcomes for patients. And, until recently, an explicit acknowledgment of the role and influence of the clinical learning environment on professional development had been missing from physician-based competency frameworks. In this Perspective, the authors explore the implications of the insufficient integration of education about patient safety and quality improvement by academic faculty into the clinical learning environment in many graduate medical education (GME) programs, and the important role that academic faculty need to play to better align the educational and clinical contexts to improve both learner and patient outcomes. The authors propose a framework that closely aligns the educational and clinical contexts, such that both educational and clinical outcomes are centered around the patient. This will require a reorganization of academic faculty perspective and educational design of GME training programs that recognizes that (1) the dynamic interplay between the faculty, learner, training program, and clinical microsystem ultimately influences the quality of physician that emerges from the training program and environment, and (2) patient outcomes relate to the quality of education and the success of clinical microsystems. To enable this evolution, there is a need to revisit the core competencies expected of academic faculty, implement innovative faculty development strategies, examine closely faculty's current clinical super vision practices, and establish a training environment that supports bridging from clinician to educator, training program to clinical microsystem, and educational outcomes to clinical outcomes that benefit patients. PMID:26703412

  9. The prevalence and effects of urinary incontinence in women working in the Universitas Academic Hospital, Bloemfontein

    Veronique C. Bailey

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Urinary incontinence affects 30% of women by the time they reach 50 years of age and continues to increase thereafter. Symptoms vary in severity and adversely impact on the physical and psychosocial wellbeing of affected individuals. By means of a self-administered questionnaire, the study investigated the prevalence of urinary incontinence and its effects on the quality of life in women working at the Universitas Academic Hospital in Bloemfontein in 2007. Pregnant women were not included in the study. One hundred and nine questionnaires were analysed. Participants were 24–62 years of age (mean age 44.4 years. Of these, 27.5% reported symptoms of urinary incontinence. Only one affected individual was younger than 30 years. Three-quarters of affected women rated their symptoms as light to moderate. In 34.6% of the affected women, the condition did not interfere with everyday activities at all, but 11.5% reported severe interference. Information regarding urinary incontinence, precautionary measures, such as Kegel exercises, and its associated psychosocial consequences, should be disseminated to women of all ages.

  10. Older people's perspectives on an elderly-friendly hospital environment: an exploratory study

    Karki S

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sushmita Karki,1 Dharma Nand Bhatta,1,2 Umesh Raj Aryal3 1Department of Public Health, Nobel College, Pokhara University, Kathmandu, Nepal; 2Faculty of Medicine, Epidemiology Unit, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand; 3Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal Background: Many older people are vulnerable with multiple health problems and need of extensive care and support for quality of life. The main objective of this study was to explore the older people's perspectives on an "elderly-friendly" hospital. Methods: Hospital was stratified by four domains including government, semi-government, community, and private. We interviewed 33 hospitalized older patients and four hospital managers between June and December 2014 in Kathmandu, Nepal, using purposive sampling technique. We executed a qualitative content analysis step with extensive review of the interviews. Final name of the theme was given after the agreement between the research team and experts to improve trustworthiness. Elderly-friendly services, expectation from government and hospital, and health policy related to senior citizen were developed as main themes. Results: Most of the participants were satisfied with the behavior of health personnel. However, none of the health personnel were trained with geriatric health care. Elderly-friendly hospital guidelines and policy were not developed by any hospitals. Older people health card, advocacy for older people's health and benefit, and hospital environment were the common expectations of older patients. Government policy and budget constraint were the main obstacles to promote elderly-friendly health care services. Conclusion: Elderly-related health policies, physical environments of hospital, elderly-friendly health manpower, advocacy, and other facilities and benefits should be improved and developed. There are urgent needs to develop elderly-friendly hospital policies and guidelines that

  11. [A paradigm change in German academic medicine. Merger and privatization as exemplified with the university hospitals in Marburg and Giessen].

    Maisch, Bernhard

    2005-03-01

    1. The intended fusion of the university hospitals Marburg and Giessen in the state of Hessia is "a marriage under pressure with uncalculated risk" (Spiegel 2005). In the present political and financial situation it hardly appears to be avoidable. From the point of the view of the faculty of medicine in Marburg it is difficult to understand, that the profits of this well guided university hospital with a positive yearly budget should go to the neighboring university hospital which still had a fair amount of deficit spending in the last years.2. Both medical faculties suffer from a very low budget from the state of Hessia for research and teaching. Giessen much more than Marburg, have a substantial need for investments in buildings and infrastructure. Both institutions have a similar need for investments in costly medical apparatuses. This is a problem, which many university hospitals face nowadays.3. The intended privatisation of one or both university hospitals will need sound answers to several fundamental questions and problems:a) A privatisation potentially endangers the freedom of research and teaching garanteed by the German constitution. A private company will undoubtedly influence by active or missing additional support the direction of research in the respective academic institution. An example is the priorisation of clinical in contrast to basic research.b) With the privatisation practical absurdities in the separation of research and teaching on one side and hospital care on the other will become obvious with respect to the status of the academic employees, the obligatory taxation (16%) when a transfer of labor from one institution to the other is taken into account. The use of rooms for seminars, lectures and bedside with a double function for both teaching, research and hospital care has to be clarified with a convincing solution in everyday practice.c) The potential additional acquisition of patients, which has been advocated by the Hessian state

  12. An Exploration of Practice Surrounding Student Writing in the Disciplines in UK Higher Education from the Perspectives of Academic Teachers

    Tuck, Jackie

    2013-01-01

    This thesis aims to contribute to our understanding of academic literacies in the UK context by exploring the practices of subject-based academic teachers around student writing through the lens of teachers’ experiences. Empirical work has yielded a great deal of insight in recent years into students’ experience of writing in higher education; less attention has been paid to student writing from the perspective of discipline-based teachers. This thesis aims to explore the complex lived realit...

  13. Challenges in Hospital-Associated Infection Management: A Unit Perspective.

    Stacy, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining a successful unit-based continuous quality improvement program for managing hospital-associated infections is a huge challenge and an overwhelming task. It requires strong organizational support and unit leadership, human and fiscal resources, time, and a dedicated and motivated nursing staff. A great deal of effort goes into implementing, monitoring, reporting, and evaluating quality improvement initiatives and can lead to significant frustration on the part of the leadership team and nursing staff when quality improvement efforts fail to produce the desired results. Each initiative presents its own unique set of challenges; however, common issues influence all initiatives. These common issues include organization and unit culture, current clinical practice guidelines being used to drive the initiatives, performance discrepancies on the part of nursing staff, availability of resources including equipment and supplies, monitoring of the data, and conflicting quality improvement priorities. PMID:26200734

  14. Medical information system in hospital emergency departments' organizational perspectives.

    Dumont, V; Rousseau, A

    2002-01-01

    The study reported in this article examines the implementation of the same software in 3 emergency departments from different Belgian hospitals. It was experienced and perceived very differently as a failure or a success by the units' staff. The software integrates different functionalities, which can be chosen and customized by some members of the units themselves. We will look at the three processes of implementation to find out different plausible explanation for their 'failure or success'. Our approach is developed through the qualitative methodology of case studies. The translation theory is presented as a renewal way of thinking the perceived 'successful or failed' implementation of a new information system and a guide for new project in emergency department. PMID:15058415

  15. Care provider perspectives on medical travel: A three-country study of destination hospitals.

    Garman, Andrew N; Johnson, Tricia J; Lynch, Elizabeth B; Satjapot, Siriporn

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing interest in the current and potential role of medical travel in U.S. patient care, very little research has been conducted on clinician and other provider organizations' perspectives on providing international patient care. The present study sought to gain formative insights about medical travel from the providers' perspectives, by conducting structured interviews and focus groups in six hospitals from three countries catering to patients traveling from the United States. Findings highlighted the surprising role of international events and policies in the evolution of medical travel, as well as both the desire and need for more transparent quality standards. PMID:26950538

  16. Using quality measures for quality improvement: the perspective of hospital staff.

    Asgar Aghaei Hashjin

    Full Text Available RESEARCH OBJECTIVE: This study examines the perspectives of a range of key hospital staff on the use, importance, scientific background, availability of data, feasibility of data collection, cost benefit aspects and availability of professional personnel for measurement of quality indicators among Iranian hospitals. The study aims to facilitate the use of quality indicators to improve quality of care in hospitals. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was conducted over the period 2009 to 2010. Staff at Iranian hospitals completed a self-administered questionnaire eliciting their views on organizational, clinical process, and outcome (clinical effectiveness, patient safety and patient centeredness indicators. POPULATION STUDIED: 93 hospital frontline staff including hospital/nursing managers, medical doctors, nurses, and quality improvement/medical records officers in 48 general and specialized hospitals in Iran. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: On average, only 69% of respondents reported using quality indicators in practice at their affiliated hospitals. Respondents varied significantly in their reported use of organizational, clinical process and outcome quality indicators. Overall, clinical process and effectiveness indicators were reported to be least used. The reported use of indicators corresponded with their perceived level of importance. Quality indicators were reported to be used among clinical staff significantly more than among managerial staff. In total, 74% of the respondents reported to use obligatory indicators, while this was 68% for voluntary indicators (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: There is a general awareness of the importance and usability of quality indicators among hospital staff in Iran, but their use is currently mostly directed towards external accountability purposes. To increase the formative use of quality indicators, creation of a common culture and feeling of shared ownership, alongside an increased uptake of clinical process and

  17. Older people’s perspectives on an elderly-friendly hospital environment: an exploratory study

    Karki, Sushmita; Bhatta, Dharma Nand; Aryal, Umesh Raj

    2015-01-01

    Background Many older people are vulnerable with multiple health problems and need of extensive care and support for quality of life. The main objective of this study was to explore the older people’s perspectives on an “elderly-friendly” hospital. Methods Hospital was stratified by four domains including government, semi-government, community, and private. We interviewed 33 hospitalized older patients and four hospital managers between June and December 2014 in Kathmandu, Nepal, using purposive sampling technique. We executed a qualitative content analysis step with extensive review of the interviews. Final name of the theme was given after the agreement between the research team and experts to improve trustworthiness. Elderly-friendly services, expectation from government and hospital, and health policy related to senior citizen were developed as main themes. Results Most of the participants were satisfied with the behavior of health personnel. However, none of the health personnel were trained with geriatric health care. Elderly-friendly hospital guidelines and policy were not developed by any hospitals. Older people health card, advocacy for older people’s health and benefit, and hospital environment were the common expectations of older patients. Government policy and budget constraint were the main obstacles to promote elderly-friendly health care services. Conclusion Elderly-related health policies, physical environments of hospital, elderly-friendly health manpower, advocacy, and other facilities and benefits should be improved and developed. There are urgent needs to develop elderly-friendly hospital policies and guidelines that focus on older people’s health benefits and friendly services. PMID:26028980

  18. Comparing Academic Library Spending with Public Libraries, Public K-12 Schools, Higher Education Public Institutions, and Public Hospitals between 1998-2008

    Regazzi, John J.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the overall spending trends and patterns of growth of Academic Libraries with Public Libraries, K-12 schools, higher education institutions, and hospitals in the period of 1998 to 2008. Academic Libraries, while showing a growth of 13% over inflation for the period, far underperformed the growth of the other public institutions…

  19. Comparing the Perspectives of Managers and Employees of Teaching Hospitals About Job Motivation

    Mohebbifar, Rafat; Kiaei, Mohammad Zakaria; Khosravizadeh, Omid; Mohseni, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of career motivators and understanding of managers and employees in prioritizing them, in order to plan incentives for this understanding, can play an important role in increasing productivity and creating harmony between the goals of the organization and staff. This study was done to survey the importance of career motivating factors from perspective of employees and managers in educational hospitals of Iran. In this study 269 from a total of 1843 employees of educational hospita...

  20. Relations between the Development of Future Time Perspective in Three Life Domains, Investment in Learning, and Academic Achievement

    Peetsma, Thea; van der Veen, Ineke

    2011-01-01

    Relations between the development of future time perspectives in three life domains (i.e., school and professional career, social relations, and leisure time) and changes in students' investment in learning and academic achievement were examined in this study. Participants were 584 students in the first and 584 in the second year of the lower…

  1. Extent of Implementing the Total Quality Management Principles by Academic Departments Heads at Najran University from Faculty Members' Perspectives

    Al-Din, Hesham Moustafa Kamal; Abouzid, Mohamed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the implementing degree of Total Quality Management (TQM) principals by Academic Departmental Heads (ADH) at the Najran University from faculty members' perspectives. It also aimed to determine significant differences between the average estimate of sample section of faculty members about the implementing degree of TQM…

  2. Implementing an Interoperable Personal Health Record in Pediatrics: Lessons Learned at an Academic Children’s Hospital

    Anoshiravani, Arash; Gaskin, Gregory; Kopetsky, Ed; Sandborg, Christy; Longhurst, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary This paper describes the development of an innovative health information technology creating a bidirectional link between the electronic medical record (EMR) of an academic children’s hospital and a commercially available, interoperable personal health record (PHR). The goal of the PHR project has been to empower pediatric patients and their families to play a more active role in understanding, accessing, maintaining, and sharing their personal health information to ultimately improve health outcomes. The most notable challenges proved more operational and cultural than technological. Our experience demonstrates that an interoperable PHR is technically and culturally achievable at a pediatric academic medical center. Recognizing the complex social, cultural, and organizational contexts of these systems is important for overcoming barriers to a successful implementation. PMID:21853160

  3. Teaching undergraduate academic writing in Sweden: Notes on a new book with developmental and sociolinguistic perspectives

    Angela Falk

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Thinking and Writing in Academic Contexts: A University Companion (Falk, 2011, is designed to help students, especially those with L2 (or incipient L2 English, increase their proficiency levels in composing essays and short research papers in English. The book also aims to raise students’ awareness of the typical expectations academic readers have when they consider the quality level of a text. This research note first provides a brief description of the language proficiency levels of incoming undergraduate students who study English in Sweden. Spoken proficiency in English usually ranges from satisfactory to excellent among incoming Swedish students, but these undergraduates typically need support and feedback on their texts so that their writing gains sophistication in language, structure, and content. The theoretical portion of this research note highlights some sociolinguistic perspectives concerning the linguistic development of young adults relating to the “developmental imperative” (Eckert, 2000, the “linguistic market” or “marketplace dialect” (Chambers, 2009, and the dynamic continuum of standard English (Wolfram & Schilling-Estes, 2006; see also Karstadt, 2002; Falk, 2005. The second half of the research note provides a brief synopsis of the chapters in the book; it also mentions some of the approaches that are taken to share advice with readers.

  4. Measurement of Quality of Educational Hospital Services by the SERVQUAL Model: The Iranian Patients’ Perspective

    Rezaei, Satar; Matin, Behzad Karami; Moradi, Khalil; Bijan, Behroz; Fallahi, Masoud; Shokati, Behnam; Saeidi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The main mission of hospitals in any health system is to deliver high quality healthcare for patients and meet their needs and expectations. The aim of the current study was to assess the quality of the service of educational hospitals affiliated with Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2015, from the perspective of patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study, the perspectives of 400 patients were assessed about the quality of the services provided by educational hospitals in Kermanshah (western Iran) in 2015. The quality was assessed by the SERVQUAL questionnaire with five dimensions, i.e., tangibility, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy. In addition, the Wilcoxon test and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used to explore any association between the dependent variable and explanatory variables. The data were analyzed using Stata V.12 software. Results There were negative gaps in all five dimensions. The highest and lowest gaps in the mean score were found in the assurance (−0.88) and responsiveness (−0.56) dimensions. The patients ranked responsiveness as the most important dimension of the quality of healthcare. Conclusion There were gaps between the patients’ perceptions and their expectation about the five dimensions that were studied based on the SERVQUAL model. Also, it is recommended that improving the quality of healthcare is possible by various policies, such as good responsiveness, access to health workers, and delivering healthcare in less time. PMID:27123218

  5. Changing Environment and the Academic Medical Center: The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    Heyssel, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Johns Hopkins Hospital expanded its health care delivery capabilities and strengthened its position in the marketplace by acquisitions of and mergers with other hospitals and a health maintenance organization. The resulting conglomerate has achieved its goals of expanding patient care, broadening the patient base, and enlarging the asset base and…

  6. [Participation of the family in hospital-based palliative cancer care: perspective of nurses].

    da Silva, Marcelle Miranda; Lima, Lorhanna da Silva

    2014-12-01

    The objective was to understand the perspective of nurses about the participation of the family in palliative cancer care and to analyze the nursing care strategies to meet their needs. Descriptive and qualitative research, conducted at the National Cancer Institute between January and March 2013, with 17 nurses. Elements of the Roy Adaptation Model were used for the interpretation of the data. Two categoriesemergedfrom the thematic analysis: perspective of nurses about the presence and valuation of family in the hospital; and appointing strategies to encourage family participation in care and meet their needs. This participation is essentialand represents a training opportunity for the purpose of homecare. Nurses create strategies to encourage it and seek to meet the needs. The results contribute to promote the family adaptation and integrity, in order to balance the dependent and independent behaviors, aimingfor quality of life and comfort. Further studies are neededdue to the challenges of the specialty. PMID:25842775

  7. Preparedness of Hospitals in the Republic of Ireland for an Influenza Pandemic, an Infection Control Perspective

    Reidy, Mary; Ryan, Fiona; Hogan, Dervla; Lacey, Sean; Buckley, Claire M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When an influenza pandemic occurs most of the population is susceptible and attack rates can range as high as 40–50 %. The most important failure in pandemic planning is the lack of standards or guidelines regarding what it means to be ‘prepared’. The aim of this study was to assess the preparedness of acute hospitals in the Republic of Ireland for an influenza pandemic from an infection control perspective. METHODS: This was a cross sectional study involving a questionnaire compl...

  8. Rapid Implementation of Inpatient Electronic Physician Documentation at an Academic Hospital

    Hahn, J S; Bernstein, J.A.; McKenzie, R.B.; King, B. J.; Longhurst, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Electronic physician documentation is an essential element of a complete electronic medical record (EMR). At Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, a teaching hospital affiliated with Stanford University, we implemented an inpatient electronic documentation system for physicians over a 12-month period. Using an EMR-based free-text editor coupled with automated import of system data elements, we were able to achieve voluntary, widespread adoption of the electronic documentation process. When give...

  9. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substanti...

  10. Hospitals

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  11. International student academic success: looking at the importance of underpinning knowledge from an educational supply chain perspective

    Bell, David

    2015-01-01

    Higher Education in the UK appears to be in a state of flux with ever changing policy for the recruitment and funding of home and EU students. As the market becomes more competitive the recruitment of international students studying specialist Master’s programmes is expanding, introducing greater variability into the educational supply chain. This study has investigated the factors affecting academic success, and reviewed recruitment from a supply chain perspective. The study has then focused...

  12. Academic Training Lectures | Theories of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking: A Post LHC Run-I Perspective | 26, 27 and 29 May

    2015-01-01

    Please note that our next series of Academic Training Lectures will take place on the 26, 27 and 29 May 2015.   Theories of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking: A Post LHC Run-I Perspective, by James Daniel Wells (University of Michigan (US)) from 11.00 a.m. to 12.00 p.m. in the Council Chamber (503-1-001) https://indico.cern.ch/event/383514/

  13. STUDY REGARDING THE CORRELATION BETWEEN THE ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL ENVIRONMENT FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF FUTURE GRADUATES. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING CASE

    Gabriela Lidia Tanase; Aurelia Stefanescu

    2014-01-01

    In a turbulent economic environment, characterized by a downward trend of financialresources and jobs offer, professional environment requirements are increasing, and thus, theacademic environment‘s role is becoming major. These were the coordinates that have directed ourempirical research on analyzing the perspective of future graduates regarding the correlationbetween the academic and professional environment in the field of managerial accounting. Theresearch approach considers on one hand,...

  14. Quality Improvement Practices in Academic Emergency Medicine: Perspectives from the Chairs

    DelliFraine, Jami L.; Langabeer, James; King, Brent

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess academic emergency medicine (EM) chairs’ perceptions of quality improvement (QI) training programs. Methods: A voluntary anonymous 20 item survey was distributed to a sample of academic chairs of EM through the Association of Academic Chairs of Emergency Medicine. Data was collected to assess the percentage of academic emergency physicians who had received QI training, the type of training they received, their perception of the impact of this training on behavior...

  15. Prophylactic Antibiotic Management of Surgical Patients Noted as "Allergic" to Penicillin at Two Academic Hospitals.

    Epstein, Richard H; Jacques, Paul St; Wanderer, Jonathan P; Bombulie, Mark R; Agarwalla, Niraj

    2016-05-01

    We studied prophylactic antibiotics administered at 2 academic medical centers during a 6-year period where a cephalosporin was indicated but an "allergy" to penicillin was noted. Another drug (typically vancomycin or clindamycin) was substituted approximately 80% of the time; this occurred frequently even when symptoms unrelated to acute hypersensitivity were listed. In >50% of cases, the reaction was either omitted or vague (e.g., simply "rash"). Given the estimated 1% cross-reactivity between penicillins and cephalosporins with similar R1 side chains, many of these patients could have received either the prescribed cephalosporin or another cephalosporin with a different R1 side chain. PMID:26556109

  16. Effect of Academic Education on Patient Satisfaction

    Narges Ebrahimi; M. D. Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    The study of patient satisfaction is becoming increasingly important. From the business perspective, patients represent the major customers of the hospital who receive and feel the healthcare services directly and realistically. However, despite their many efforts and successes with satisfaction measurement, evidence shows that more work in this area is still needed. This research investigates the effects and the relative importance of academic education on patient satisfaction. Eleven hospit...

  17. Academic Development and Educational Developers: Perspectives from Different European Higher Education Contexts

    Di Napoli, Roberto; Fry, Heather; Frenay, Mariane; Verhesschen, Piet; Verburgh, An

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports research in five European universities, in four countries between 2004 and 2008. The research explored and compared institutional contexts for academic development and the interpretations and reflections of a number of academic developers on the organizational position and role of academic development, and of "developers". A…

  18. Can Academic Autonomy Survive in the Knowledge Society? A Perspective from Britain

    Henkel, Mary

    2007-01-01

    The paper analyses the challenges posed to the principle of academic autonomy by the knowledge society and new conceptions of the state. It argues that these signify the breaking down of boundaries that have been critical for the justification of academic rights to self-government and freedom of inquiry. The ideal of academe as a sovereign,…

  19. "The Older Women Are Men:" Navigating the Academic Terrain, Perspectives from Ghana

    Mabokela, Reitumetse Obakeng; Mlambo, Yeukai Angela

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study investigates how the intersection of gender, socio-cultural factors, and organizational culture impact professional experiences of women academics at a selected public university in Ghana. Given the glaring absence of women in academic positions across many African universities, particularly at academic ranks beyond the…

  20. Should the "in situ" simulation become the new way in Belgium? Experience of an academic hospital.

    Pospiech, Audrey; Lois, Fernande; Van Dyck, Michel; Kahn, David; Kock, Marc De

    2013-01-01

    The place of simulation in medical education, particularly in anesthesia, appears to be more and more evident. However, the history of simulation in Belgium showed that the associated costs remain a barrier. The use of 'in situ' simulation, defined as the practice of simulation in the usual workplace, could solve the problem of providing access to this educational tool. Indeed, it allows reducing equipment and manpower costs: the needed equipment comes from the hospital, and supervision and o...

  1. Perceptions of Yoga Therapy Embedded in Two Inpatient Rehabilitation Hospitals: Agency Perspectives

    Marieke Van Puymbroeck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inpatient medical rehabilitation has maintained a typical medical-model focus and structure for many years. However, as integrative therapies, such as yoga therapy, emerge as treatments which can enhance the physical and mental health of its participants, it is important to determine if they can be easily implemented into the traditional rehabilitation structure and milieu. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of key agency personnel on the feasibility and utility of yoga therapy implemented in inpatient rehabilitation. This study reports the results of focus groups and an individual interview with key stakeholders (administrators and rehabilitation therapists from two rehabilitation hospitals following the implementation of yoga therapy. Results focused on several key themes: feasibility from the therapist and administrator perspectives, challenges to implementation, and utility and benefit. Overall, the implementation and integration of yoga therapy were positive; however, some programmatic and policy and organizational considerations remain. Implications for practice and future research are provided.

  2. Comparing the perspectives of managers and employees of teaching hospitals about job motivation.

    Mohebbifar, Rafat; Zakaria Kiaei, Mohammad; Khosravizadeh, Omid; Mohseni, Mohammad

    2014-11-01

    Recognition of career motivators and understanding of managers and employees in prioritizing them, in order to plan incentives for this understanding, can play an important role in increasing productivity and creating harmony between the goals of the organization and staff. This study was done to survey the importance of career motivating factors from perspective of employees and managers in educational hospitals of Iran. In this study 269 from a total of 1843 employees of educational hospitals in Qazvin province of Iran were selected through Quota-Random sampling and studied along with all 49 Managers. Lawrence Lindale questionnaire with 10 factors where used in order to determine motivational priorities. The results indicated that among the 10 studied motivational factors, from employees' viewpoint; "Good wages", "Good Working Conditions" and "Job Security" have the greatest roles in motivating employees. In the context of perspective agreement amongst employees and managers, the results showed 20 percent agreement. In this study, results of "Independent T" test showed a significant difference in comparison, between prioritizing employees' view and prediction of managers in the factors of "Job Security" (p = 0/031) and "Interesting Work" (p = 0/001). With respect to increase disagreement in the views of managers and employees as compared to previous studies, Managers need to pay more attention to cognition of motivational factors and make their viewpoints closer to actual motivational need of their employees. Attention to this fact can be a great help to the growth and productivity of the organization, making the organizational and individual goals closer and also keeping managers safe from execution of constant and undue motivational patterns. PMID:25363113

  3. Improving identification and documentation of pressure ulcers at an urban academic hospital

    Dahlstrom, Marcus; Best, Thomas; Baker, Christine; Doeing, Diane; Davis, Andrew; Doty, Judith; Arora, Vineet M.

    2012-01-01

    Background A two-year quality improvement campaign at a single teaching hospital was launched to improve the identification, documentation, and treatment of pressure ulcers (PUs) after Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) declared severe hospital-acquired PUs are “never-events.” Method The campaign included (1) reference materials, (2) new documentation templates, (3) staff education, and (4) hospital-wide mattress replacement. An ongoing retrospective chart review of frail older patients determined the presence of PU documentation, which provider (nurse or physician) documented the PU, and which descriptors (stage, size, or location) were used. Results The campaign significantly increased the proportion of PUs completely documented by nurses from 27% to 55% following mattress replacement and resident education (OR 3.68, p = 0.001, 95% CI: 1.68–8.08). A similar improvement was observed for physician documentation increasing from 12% to 36% following the same interventions however this change was not statistically significant (OR 2.11, p = 0.12, 95% CI: 0.82–5.39). These improvements were short-lived due to the implementation of electronic medical records (EMR) for nursing notes. Although the percentage of PUs completely documented by nurses decreased following EMR implementation, it increased in the following months, above the pre-campaign baseline as nurses adapted to the new documentation system. However, after EMR implementation, complete PU documentation by physicians fell to a nadir of 0% and did not recover. Discussion A multi-component campaign to improve the quality of PU documentation by both physicians and nurses can yield positive gains. However, these improvements were short-lived due to EMR implementation, which acutely worsened documentation of PUs. This emphasizes the importance of frequent and repeated interventions to sustain quality improvement successes. PMID:21500755

  4. Becoming a leader in patient satisfaction: changing the culture of care in an academic community hospital.

    Deitrick, Lynn M; Capuano, Terry A; Paxton, Stuart S; Stern, Glenn; Dunleavy, Jack; Miller, William L

    2006-01-01

    In the context of the current health care payer system, quality of care standards, financial incentives and consumer choice are not well aligned, yet competition for increased admissions has become a matter of survival. Satisfaction and loyalty are two constructs that are the most meaningful measures in the context of sustaining and increasing admissions. Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network (LVHHN) launched an ambitious patient satisfaction improvement initiative in 2001. LVHHN augmented existing patient service excellence programs with an ethnographic study of a representative unit. Interview and observational data were analyzed using NVivo software. These results (four distilled domains of patient experience) can then be used to identify key components of the care environment that made meaningful differences in the perceptions of patients and their satisfaction. A designated interdepartmental task force can then develop interventions from those learnings, track outcomes through the Press Ganey scores, and ultimately yield increased admissions through unit-specific process change across the hospital. Admissions for fiscal year 2001 to fiscal year 2003 increased from 5,817 to 7,795 patients. The clear value and return on this initiative for our organization included a 34% increase in patient admissions over a four-year period. Improvements in both patient satisfaction and loyalty were demonstrated by a 24% increase for the question, "Likelihood of your recommending this hospital to others" as measured by the Press Ganey Inpatient survey. This initiative demonstrates the successful application of qualitative methods in a clinical microsystem to better understand patient perceptions that determine their satisfaction with medical care. PMID:18681198

  5. Collection and removal of radioactive waste, coming from universities, high schools and academic hospitals

    In radionuclide laboratories of universities, radionuclides are employed for biomedical, chemical and physical research. In university hospitals, radionuclides are employed in vivo for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and in vitro in tracer methods in chemical analysis. In general it concerns radioactive materials in dispersive form such as gases, fluids or powders (open sources). During operation with open sources radioactive waste originates with low specific activity. Regulations and recommendations concerning the collection and separation, transport, processing and eventual storage of this low-level radioactive waste are dealt with. 17 refs.; figs.; tabs

  6. A positive deviance perspective on hospital knowledge management: analysis of Baldrige Award recipients 2002-2008.

    Griffith, John R; Fear, Kathleen M; Lammers, Eric; Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Lemak, Christy Harris; Zheng, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge management (KM) is emerging as an important aspect of achieving excellent organizational performance, but its use has not been widely explored for hospitals. Taking a positive deviance perspective, we analyzed the applications of nine healthcare organizations (HCOs) that received the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award from 2002 to 2008. Baldrige Award applications constitute a uniquely comprehensive, standardized, and audited record of HCOs achieving near-benchmark performance. Applications are organized around leadership, strategy, customers, information, workforce, and operations. We find that KM is frequently referenced in all sections, and about two thirds of each application addresses KM-related issues. Many specific KM activities, such as strategic and action plans, communications, and processes to capture internal and external knowledge, are addressed by all nine applications. We present examples illustrating these frequently appearing KM concepts. Baldrige Award-recipient HCOs apply continuous improvement to KM processes, as they do to their organizations as a whole. We conclude that these HCOs have developed sophisticated, comprehensive KM processes to align both culture and specific procedures throughout the organization. KM in these organizations is a deliberate effort to keep all relevant knowledge at the fingertips of every worker, characterized by frequent communication, careful maintenance of content accuracy, and redundant distribution. We also conclude that the extent and rigor of their KM practice distinguish them from other U.S. hospitals. PMID:23821898

  7. Protecting and promoting mental health of nurses in the hospital setting: Is it cost-effective from an employer’s perspective?

    Cindy Noben

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Nurses are at elevated risk of burnout, anxiety and depressive disorders, and may then become less productive. This begs the question if a preventive intervention in the work setting might be cost-saving from a business perspective. Material and Methods: A cost-benefit analysis was conducted to evaluate the balance between the costs of a preventive intervention among nurses at elevated risk of mental health complaints and the cost offsets stemming from improved productivity. This evaluation was conducted alongside a cluster-randomized trial in a Dutch academic hospital. The control condition consisted of screening without feedback and unrestricted access to usual care (N = 206. In the experimental condition screen-positive nurses received personalized feedback and referral to the occupational physician (N = 207. Results: Subtracting intervention costs from the cost offsets due to reduced absenteeism and presenteeism resulted in net-savings of 244 euros per nurse when only absenteeism is regarded, and 651 euros when presenteeism is also taken into account. This corresponds to a return-on-investment of 5 euros up to 11 euros for every euro invested. Conclusions: Within half a year, the cost of offering the preventive intervention was more than recouped. Offering the preventive intervention represents a favorable business case as seen from the employer’s perspective.

  8. Should the "in situ" simulation become the new way in Belgium? Experience of an academic hospital.

    Pospiech, A; Lois, F; Van Dyck, M; Kahn, D; De Kock, M

    2013-01-01

    The place of simulation in medical education, particularly in anesthesia, appears to be more and more evident. However, the history of simulation in Belgium showed that the associated costs remain a barrier. The use of 'in situ' simulation, defined as the practice of simulation in the usual workplace, could solve the problem of providing access to this educational tool. Indeed, it allows reducing equipment and manpower costs: the needed equipment comes from the hospital, and supervision and organization are provided by staff members. It also provides access to simulation for a larger number of individuals on site. The environment is more realistic because the participants operate in their usual workplace, with their customary equipment and team. Furthermore, 'in situ' simulation allows participation of the paramedical staff. This allows developing skills related to teamwork and communication. Despite those numerous advantages, several difficulties persist. The associated logistic and organizational constraints can be cumbersome. PMID:24605415

  9. Hospital Collaboration with Emergency Medical Services in the Care of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Perspectives from Key Hospital Staff

    Landman, Adam B.; Spatz, Erica S.; Cherlin, Emily J.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that active collaboration between hospitals and emergency medical services (EMS) is significantly associated with lower acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality rates; however, the nature of such collaborations is not well understood. We sought to characterize views of key hospital staff regarding collaboration with EMS in the care of patients hospitalized with AMI. Methods We performed an exploratory analysis of qualitative data previously collected from site visits and in-depth interviews with 11 US hospitals that ranked in the top or bottom 5% of performance on 30-day risk-standardized AMI mortality rates (RSMRs) using Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data from 2005–2007. We selected all codes from the first analysis in which EMS was most likely to have been discussed. A multidisciplinary team analyzed the data using the constant comparative method to generate recurrent themes. Results Both higher and lower performing hospitals reported that EMS is critical to the provision of timely care for patients with AMI. However, close, collaborative relationships with EMS were more apparent in the higher performing hospitals. Higher performing hospitals demonstrated specific investment in and attention to EMS through: 1) respect for EMS as valued professionals and colleagues; 2) strong communication and coordination with EMS; and 3) active engagement of EMS in hospital AMI quality improvement efforts. Conclusion Hospital staff from higher performing hospitals described broad, multifaceted strategies to support collaboration with EMS in providing AMI care. The association of these strategies with hospital performance should be tested quantitatively in a larger, representative study. PMID:23146627

  10. Expectations and Influencing Factors of IS Graduates and Education in Thailand: A Perspective of the Students, Academics and Business Community

    Teay Shawyun Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As academic we have always been entrusted with developing the knowledge, skills, and capability of our IS students. In the strive for excellence in education, there is always the question of what has been implemented is appropriate and finally achieves its ultimate goals of delivering quality, capable and intellectual students as workforce for the business. To this end, this exploratory research tries to discover what knowledge, skills and capability are expected of an IS graduate, the facilities expected to develop these qualities and what influencing factors make the students go for an IS education. The research will be based on the perspectives of the student, academic and business community. The major findings highlight the overall tendency of higher mean expectation of the business community in most of the fundamental expectations of the type of knowledge, skills and capability and the facilities essential to the development of these attributes. The academics are normally supportive of the business community’s perspectives except in the dimensions of skill expectation and attitudinal factors. Overall, it also appears that the students show a lower average means on most attributes as compared to the academics and business community. Based on this research, there appears to be distinctive expectations of an IS graduate. Based on the balanced technology approach of looking at the development of the IS graduate from degree of sophistication of the Technoware (T, Humaware (H, Inforware (I and Orgaware (O, it is hoped that the following can be achieved: 1. A newly revised and revamped IS curriculum, 2. A linkage of the THIO to develop the IS graduate and 3. A linkage of the academia-industry THIO linkage to develop the IS graduate.

  11. The Relationship among Parental Involvement, Learning, and Academic Achievement: A Cultural Perspective

    Conant, Alison

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this QUAN-qual mixed methods study was to investigate how parents from various ethnicities and socioeconomic status construct their expectations of academic achievement and the impact these expectations have on academic success for the student. Data was gathered by using The Parent Survey of Family and Community Involvement in the…

  12. Implications of Socioeconomic Status on Academic Competence: A Perspective for Teachers

    Cedeño, Luis F.; Martínez-Arias, Rosario; Bueno, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Studies suggest that socioeconomic status is a strong predictor of academic achievement. This theoretical paper proposes that despite the fact that low-socioeconomic status represents a risk factor that seems to undermine attentional skills and thus academic achievement, emerging evidence suggests the potential of new approaches, interventions and…

  13. How Important Is Personal/Social Development to Academic Achievement? The Elementary School Counselor's Perspective

    Barna, Jennifer S.; Brott, Pamelia E.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored elementary school counselors' perceptions of importance and implementation for state standards in support of academic achievement. Results indicate that Academic and Personal/Social standards are important to achievement with no statistical difference between the standards. Further, counselors implement Personal/Social…

  14. Academic Libraries and High-Impact Practices for Student Retention: Library Deans' Perspectives

    Murray, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies on retention have highlighted the role of student engagement in influencing students' withdrawal decisions. This study seeks to address how academic libraries affect student retention by examining the perception of academic library deans or directors on the alignment between library services and resources with ten nationally…

  15. Exploring the contribution of formal and informal learning to academic staff member employability: A Dutch perspective

    Klink, Marcel; Heijden, van der Beatrice I.J.M.; Boon, Jo; Rooij, van Shahron Williams

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – Little attention has been paid to the employability of academic staff and the extent to which continuous learning contributes to academic career success. The purpose of this paper is to explore the contribution of formal and informal learning to employability. Design/methodology/approac

  16. Academic Literacy Socialization of First Year Doctoral Students in US: A Micro-Ethnographic Perspective

    Seloni, Lisya

    2012-01-01

    This study reports findings from a micro-ethnographic analysis of the academic literacy socialization of six multilingual students in the field of education as they progressed through their first-year of doctoral education. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the academic socialization processes that these multilingual students…

  17. Strategic Planning Effectiveness in Jordanian Universities: Faculty Members' and Academic Administrators' Perspectives

    Al-Omari, Aieman Ahmad; Salameh, Kayed M.

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to explore the faculty and academic administrators' perception of strategic planning effectiveness (SPE) in a reform environment, measuring the impact of university type, gender, and job role. A total of 338 faculty members and 183 academic administrators who enrolled during the first semester of the 2007-08 term at a public and a…

  18. Understanding Relationships between Academic Staff and Administrators: An Organisational Culture Perspective

    Kuo, Hui-Min

    2009-01-01

    This study attempts to advance the understanding of relationships between university academic staff and administrators through information in interviews with 18 academic staff members and 18 administrators at a large public research university in the United States. Through exploring the first-hand insights and perceptions of interviewees from an…

  19. Difficulties in Academic Writing: From the Perspective of King Saud University Postgraduate Students

    Al Fadda, Hind

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what difficulties King Saud University students encounter when learning to write academic English and to differentiate between students' learning needs and objectives. The sample consisted of 50 postgraduate students enrolled in King Saud University during the academic year 2009-2010. Analysis of the data…

  20. The characteristics of HIV and AIDS patients with deep vein thrombosis at Dr. George Mukhari Academic Hospital

    Indiran Govender

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT is 10 times more prevalent in HIV and AIDS patients than in the general population and is more common in patients with severe immune suppression (CD4 < 200 cells/mL. Opportunistic infections render HIV and AIDS patients susceptible to a hypercoaguable state, including lower protein S levels. Aim and setting: To present the profile of HIV and AIDS patients who developed DVT in the primary care wards of Dr. George Mukhari Academic Hospital (DGMAH, Garankuwa. Methods: Cross-sectional study of clinical records of admitted HIV and AIDS patients without DVT to the primary care wards, DGMAH, from 01 February 2010 to 31 January 2011. Results: Two hundred and twenty-nine patients were admitted and 17 (7.4% developed DVT. Of those that developed DVT, eight (47% had infection with tuberculosis (TB, four (24% had pneumonia and four (24% had gastroenteritis. The risk of developing DVT was 8/94 (8.5% in those with TB, 4/53 (7.5% in those with gastroenteritis and 4/75 (5.3% in those with pneumonia. The mean duration of stay was 14.1 days in those with DVT versus 4.0 days in those without. Conclusion: HIV (and AIDS is a hypercoaguable state and the risk of DVT is relatively high in patients with opportunistic infections. HIV and AIDS patients who are admitted to hospital with opportunistic infections may benefit from anti-thrombotic prophylaxis and further studies are needed to evaluate this.

  1. The incidence of gastroenteritis diagnosis among sick dogs presented to the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital correlated with meteorological data : research communication

    A.S. Shakespeare

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The number of sick dogs diagnosed with and without gastroenteritis presented to the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital situated north of Pretoria is reported from counts extracted from the records of the Outpatients clinic for 6 years, 1988 to 1993. The average percentage of sick dogs diagnosed with gastroenteritis was 11.51 % and the average percentage of sick dogs that were admitted to the parvovirus isolation hospital ward was 2.8 %. A strong correlation exists between the number of dogs admitted to the parvovirus ward and average monthly wind speed and inverse humidity values.

  2. The Shifting Boundaries of the Academic Profession: The Malaysian Professoriate in Comparative Perspective

    WILLIAM G. TIERNEY

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author looks at the changing nature of academic work by analysing a survey of Malaysian faculty in public universities. The Changing Academic Professions project is a first attempt to delineate the opinions and backgrounds of the Malaysian professoriate. The study is part of a larger cross-national project that involves 22 nations. The article first provides literature pertaining to academic work, and then discusses the methodology for the study. The author outlines five topics yielded from the data: (1 faculty mobility, (2 faculty satisfaction, (3 teaching satisfaction, (4 faculty power, and (5 academic freedom. The article then explores the methodological problems of the data and considers how these problems might be overcome in order to provide robust information about the changing professoriate in Malaysia.

  3. Hospitals

    Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    is to minimize the negative effects of stress inducing environments based on research results. Which stress inducing factors? We can look around at some old hospitals and see they are noisy, confusing, ugly, monotonous, hard, cold, artificial, and dark; qualitative terms which can indicate what we shouldn...... in the navigation experience and wasted time of medical staff in providing directions. Space in hospitals: space can be divided into personal, social and outdoor space. Personal space: single rooms have been well documented in: admission length, mortality rates, comfort levels, sense of privacy, all users......’ satisfaction. Social space: attention to spatial qualities, volume and interior design in terms of encouraging physical contact between users in wards, waiting areas and semi-private rooms. Outdoor space: Landscape and gardens are not enough in themselves; they should be visible, centrally or strategically...

  4. The role of selective attention on academic foundations: A cognitive neuroscience perspective

    Stevens, Courtney; Bavelier, Daphne

    2011-01-01

    To the extent that selective attention skills are relevant for academic foundations and amenable to training, they represent an important focus for the field of education. Here, drawing on research on the neurobiology of attention, we review hypothesized links between selective attention and processing across three domains important to early academic skills. First, we provide a brief review of the neural bases of selective attention, emphasizing the effects of selective attention on neural pr...

  5. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) Adopting Research to Improve Care (ARTIC) Program: Reach, Sustainability, Spread and Lessons Learned from an Implementation Funding Model

    Julia E Moore; Grouchy, Michelle; Graham, Ian D; Shandling, Maureen; Doyle, Winnie; Straus, Sharon E.

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence on what works in healthcare, there is a significant gap in the time it takes to bring research into practice. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario's Adopting Research to Improve Care program addresses this research-to-practice gap by incorporating the following components into its funding program: strategic selection of evidence for implementation, education and training for implementation, implementation supports, executive champions and governance, and evaluation. F...

  6. Faculty and Academic Responsiveness in a Period of Decline: An Organizational Perspective.

    Peterson, Marvin W.

    1980-01-01

    The importance of maintaining the moral and institutional loyalty of remaining faculty during a period of retrenchment is discussed. Areas discussed are institutional perspective, decline strategy, slack resources and priorities, program reviews and planning, and professional development. (Author/LC)

  7. An ecological perspective of science and math academic achievement among African American students

    Stewart, Endya Bentley

    Using data from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88), path analytic procedures were performed to test an ecological model of the effects of family, individual and school characteristics on the academic African American students. A distinctive study is the inclusion of school computer use in the model. The study results show that several of the variables directly or indirectly affected 12th grade academic achievement. Furthermore, most of the individual influence variables were directly related to 12 th grade achievement. Two surprising findings from this study were the insignificant effects of family income and school computer use on 12 th grade achievement. Overall, the findings support the notion that family, individual, and school characteristics are important predictors of academic success among African American students.

  8. Predictors of Academic Performance and School Engagement--Integrating Persistence, Motivation and Study Skills Perspectives Using Person-Centered and Variable-Centered Approaches

    Moreira, Paulo A. S.; Dias, Paulo; Vaz, Filipa Machado; Vaz, Joao Machado

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need for the integration of various theoretical perspectives on academic performance, especially the theories on educational persistence, and motivational theories. Recent models of students' engagement with school incorporate different dimensions of students, family and school. However, some authors are arguing that academic…

  9. A Conceptual Study on Hospital Information System in Public Hospital of Bangladesh: Electronic Medical Record and Clinical Information System Perspective

    Md. Mahmudul Haque; Saim Kayadibi; Khondakar S. Rafsanjani; Mabruk Billah

    2013-01-01

    The empirical data is used in organizations all over the world which require the integration of some informational systems like Electronic Medical Record (EMR) and Clinical Information System (CIS); these concepts will discover with new form of Bangladeshi public hospital’s improvement in Information Technology (IT) sector. The objective of this conceptual paper is to review critically and identify the gaps in current literature aligning with Hospital Information System (HIS) and Electronic M...

  10. Cost-effectiveness analysis of health care waste treatment facilities in iran hospitals; a provider perspective.

    Arash Rashidian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to make right and informative decision about choosing the most cost-effectiveness heterogeneous infectious waste treatment methods and devices.In this descriptive study, decision tree analysis, with 10-yr time horizon in bottom-up approach was used to estimate the costs and effectiveness criteria of the employed devices at provider perspective in Iranian hospitals. We used the one-way and scenario sensitivity analysis to measure the effects of variables with uncertainty. The resources of data were national Environmental and Occupational Health Center Survey (EOHCS in 2012, field observation and completing questionnaire by relevant authorities in mentioned centers.Devices called Saray 2, Autoclave based, and Newster 10, Hydroclave based, with 92032.4 (±12005 and 6786322.9 (±826453 Dollars had the lowest and highest costs respectively in studied time period and given the 5-10% discount rate. Depending on effectiveness factor type, Newster 10 with Ecodas products and Saray products respectively had the highest and lowest effectiveness. In most considered scenarios, Caspian-Alborz device was the most cost-effectiveness alternative, so for the treatment of each adjusted unit of volume and weight of infectious waste in a 10 year period and in different conditions, between 39.4 (±5.1 to 915 (±111.4 dollars must be spent.The findings indicate the inefficiency and waste of resources, so in order to efficient resource allocation and to encourage further cost containment in infectious waste management we introduce policy recommendation that be taken in three levels.

  11. Homeland Security Education: Managerial versus Nonmanagerial Market Perspectives of an Academic Program

    Doss, Daniel; Henley, Russ; McElreath, David; Lackey, Hilliard; Jones, Don; Gokaraju, Balakrishna; Sumrall, William

    2016-01-01

    The authors discuss the findings of a market study that preceded the offering of an academic program in homeland security. The university disseminated a mail survey to gain data for analysis of variance testing of several hypotheses regarding market perceptions of the intended homeland security program offering. Stratification involved segregating…

  12. Understanding the Changing Role of Academic Librarians from a Psychological Perspective: A Literature Review

    Shupe, Ellen I.; Pung, Stephanie K.

    2011-01-01

    Although issues related to the role of librarians have long been discussed in the literature on academic librarianship, there has been little attempt to incorporate the extensive psychological theory and research on role-related issues. In the current article we review the empirical literature on the role of librarians, with a particular focus on…

  13. Networking and the Role of the Academic Systems Librarian: An Evolutionary Perspective.

    Lavagnino, Merri Beth

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the role of academic systems librarians, focusing on the effect of networking technologies. Outlines stages in the evolution of the field derived from the literature and surveys, discusses new administrative and professional tasks and trends resulting from technological change, and speculates about the future of academic…

  14. Physical Activity--Academic Achievement: Student and Teacher Perspectives on the "New" Nexus

    Macdonald, Doune; Abbott, Rebecca; lisahunter; Hay, Peter; McCuaig, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between physical activity/fitness with cognitive and academic functioning has become a topic of considerable research interest. Increasingly, schooling systems are being expected to respond to these relationships through curricular and extra-curricular interventions. Purpose: This paper reports on the qualitative…

  15. Critical research needs for managing coral reef marine protected areas: perspectives of academics and managers.

    Cvitanovic, C; Wilson, S K; Fulton, C J; Almany, G R; Anderson, P; Babcock, R C; Ban, N C; Beeden, R J; Beger, M; Cinner, J; Dobbs, K; Evans, L S; Farnham, A; Friedman, K J; Gale, K; Gladstone, W; Grafton, Q; Graham, N A J; Gudge, S; Harrison, P L; Holmes, T H; Johnstone, N; Jones, G P; Jordan, A; Kendrick, A J; Klein, C J; Little, L R; Malcolm, H A; Morris, D; Possingham, H P; Prescott, J; Pressey, R L; Skilleter, G A; Simpson, C; Waples, K; Wilson, D; Williamson, D H

    2013-01-15

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are a primary policy instrument for managing and protecting coral reefs. Successful MPAs ultimately depend on knowledge-based decision making, where scientific research is integrated into management actions. Fourteen coral reef MPA managers and sixteen academics from eleven research, state and federal government institutions each outlined at least five pertinent research needs for improving the management of MPAs situated in Australian coral reefs. From this list of 173 key questions, we asked members of each group to rank questions in order of urgency, redundancy and importance, which allowed us to explore the extent of perceptional mismatch and overlap among the two groups. Our results suggest the mismatch among MPA managers and academics is small, with no significant difference among the groups in terms of their respective research interests, or the type of questions they pose. However, managers prioritised spatial management and monitoring as research themes, whilst academics identified climate change, resilience, spatial management, fishing and connectivity as the most important topics. Ranking of the posed questions by the two groups was also similar, although managers were less confident about the achievability of the posed research questions and whether questions represented a knowledge gap. We conclude that improved collaboration and knowledge transfer among management and academic groups can be used to achieve similar objectives and enhance the knowledge-based management of MPAs. PMID:23220604

  16. The Impact of Part Time Employment on Students' Health and Academic Performance: A Scottish Perspective

    Carney, Claire; McNeish, Sharon; McColl, John

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between part time working, mental and physical health and academic performance. Fifty per cent of the undergraduate full time respondents had part time jobs. Mean pay per hour was ?4.25 and mean number of hours worked was 14 hours. When the current state of students' health was compared to…

  17. Capacity Levels of Academic Staff in a Malaysian Public University: Students' Perspective

    Tajuddin, Muhammad Jawad; Ghani, Muhammad Faizal A.; Siraj, Saedah; Saifuldin, Mohd Helmi Firdaus; Kenayatulla, Husaina Banu; Elham, Faisol

    2013-01-01

    This research aims to develop a competency model for staff of higher education institutions in Malaysia. The model involves the listing of the main features and implementation strategy for the development of academic competence. Specifically, this research aims to achieve the following research objectives: a) to identify if there is any…

  18. Validating Student Satisfaction Related to Persistence, Academic Performance, Retention and Career Advancement within ODL Perspectives

    Sembiring, Maximus Gorky

    2015-01-01

    Student satisfaction associated with persistence, academic performance, retention, and its relations to career advancement were examined. It was aimed at measuring service quality (Servqual) dimensions as a foundation of satisfaction and how, in what comportments, they were interrelated. The study was conducted under explanatory-design. Data was…

  19. Students' Personality Traits and Academic Performance: A Five-Factor Model Perspective

    Chowdhury, Mohammed

    2006-01-01

    This study has investigated the impact of personality traits on students' academic achievement in an undergraduate marketing course taught by the same professor. All personality traits except extraversion positively and significantly predicted students' overall grade. Extraversion was positively related (r =0.140) but not statistically…

  20. Exploring Barriers and Solutions to Academic Writing: Perspectives from Students, Higher Education and Further Education Tutors

    Itua, Imose; Coffey, Margaret; Merryweather, David; Norton, Lin; Foxcroft, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Staff and student perceptions of what constitutes good academic writing in both further and higher education often differ. This is reflected in written assignments which frequently fall below the expected standard. In seeking to develop the writing skills of students and propose potential solutions to writing difficulties, a study was conducted in…

  1. Difficulties of Academic Achievement in Principles of Accounting Courses from the Student Perspective: Evidence from Libya

    Tailab, Mohamed M.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies by researchers and accounting educators explore various factors associated with the success or failure of accounting majors in college level accounting courses. This paper identifies and summarizes the main obstacles associated with low student academic achievement in introductory courses in the College of Accounting at Al-Jabal…

  2. Poor academic performance: A perspective of final year diagnostic radiography students

    Introduction: A study was conducted on final year diagnostic radiography students at a University of Technology in Durban. The aim of the study was to investigate the final year diagnostic radiography students' opinions and views on academic performance in order to inform teaching and learning methods. The objectives were: •To explore the students' opinions regarding poor performance. •To identify strategies to improve academic performance. Method: A qualitative, interpretive approach was used to explain and understand the students' lived experiences of their academic performances. A short open ended questionnaire was administered to a cohort of final diagnostic radiography students following feedback on a written assessment. Questionnaire responses were then manually captured and analyzed. Results: Five (5) themes were identified that could possibly be associated with poor academic performance. These themes were, poor preparation, lack of independent study, difficulty in understanding learning content and misinterpretation of assessment questions, inefficient studying techniques as well as perceived improvement strategies. Conclusion: Students identified their inadequate preparation and the lack of dedicated independent studying as the main reasons for poor performance. Students preferred to be taught in an assessment oriented manner. However their identified improvement strategies were aligned with the learner centred approach.

  3. Examining First-Year Non-Dominant Students' Experiences as Academic Writers: An Identity Perspective

    Panayotova, Dora Marinova

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation reports on a study investigating the identity of first-year university students as writers. The longitudinal project explored how students from educationally disadvantaged backgrounds construct their identities as undergraduates and as academic writers in their first year. The research was qualitative and interpretative, and used…

  4. Saudi English-Major Undergraduates' Academic Writing Problems: A Taif University Perspective

    Al-Khairy, Mohamed Ali

    2013-01-01

    This study attempted to investigate Saudi English-major undergraduates studying at Taif University to identify a) the types of academic writing Saudi English-major undergraduates carry out at English departments, b) Saudi English-major undergraduates' writing problems, c) the reasons behind Saudi English-major undergraduates' writing problems and…

  5. Perspectives on Academic Staff Involvement in the Acquisition and Implementation of Educational Technologies

    Habib, Laurence; Johannesen, Monica

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study using both quantitative and qualitative data to uncover the extent and nature of the involvement of academic staff in the processes of acquisition and implementation of educational technologies. Actor-network theory (ANT) is used to inform the design of the study and the analysis of the data. Three main…

  6. Toward an Effective Quality Assurance Model of Web-Based Learning: The Perspective of Academic Staff.

    Yeung, Davey

    2002-01-01

    Discusses quality assurance benchmarks for distance education and describes results of a survey of academic staff at higher education institutions in Hong Kong that measured their perception of quality assurance in Web-based learning. Examines institutional support; course development; teaching/learning process; course structure; student support;…

  7. Academic Drift in Dutch Non-University Higher Education Evaluated: A Staff Perspective

    Griffioen, Didi M. E.; de Jong, Uulkje

    2013-01-01

    In the context of a European knowledge economy, the Dutch non-university institutions systematically develop research activities at a higher frequency than before. With this development, they have been accused of academic drift, of striving to receive a status comparable to traditional universities. This study considers the perceptions of both…

  8. Identifying and priority setting indicators of integration and integrable units in hospitals of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences from the perspective of health experts

    yalda mousazadeh; hossein jabari beirami; ali janati; mohammad asghari jafarabadi; ali ebadi

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospitals face major challenges such as lack of resources, increase in costs, and particularly severelimitations by sanctions that lead to integration in hospitals. This study was conducted to identify and prioritize theindicators of integration and integrable hospital units based on the experts' perspective. METHODS: The present study was a three phase qualitative, applied survey. The first phase included a review of thefundamental concepts. The second phase included three focus ...

  9. Academic Training Lectures | Black Holes from a Particle Physics Perspective | 18-19 November

    2014-01-01

    Black Holes from a Particle Physics Perspective by Georgi Dvali   Tuesday 18 and Wednesday 19 November 2014 from 11 am to 12 noon at CERN ( 40-S2-A01 - Salle Anderson ) Description: We will review the physics of black holes, both large and small, from a particle physicist's perspective, using particle physics tools for describing concepts such as entropy, temperature and quantum information processing. We will also discuss microscopic pictures of black hole formation in high energy particle scattering, potentially relevant for high-energy accelerator experiments, and some differences and similarities with the signatures of other BSM physics. See the Indico page here.

  10. Validating Student Satisfaction Related to Persistence, Academic Performance, Retention and Career Advancement within ODL Perspectives

    Maximus Gorky Sembiring

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Student satisfaction associated with persistence, academic performance, retention, and its relations to career advancement were examined. It was aimed at measuring service quality (Servqual dimensions as a foundation of satisfaction and how, in what comportments, they were interrelated. The study was conducted under explanatory-design. Data was collected proportionally and purposively followed by congregating them through unified interviews. Population was 1,814 Universitas Terbuka students domiciled overseas; 350 questionnaires were dispersed, 169 completed. Satisfaction was assessed by examining Servqual dimensions. Importance-performance analysis (IPA and customer-satisfaction index (CSI were applied to measure satisfaction and the level of its importance. Structural equation model (SEM was then employed to examine influencing variables. Nine hypotheses developed were all validated by the analysis. Responsiveness, assurance, tangible, reliability, and empathy were in harmony to satisfaction. Career advancement, retention, academic performance, and persistence were influenced by satisfaction. Qualitative inquiry implemented afterwards was basically coherent with the quantitative findings.

  11. The employee-organisation relationship of university academics: social exchange, psychological contract & organsational support perspectives

    O'Driscoll, Finian

    2013-01-01

    While the Higher Education literature is replete with studies investigating the effects the work environment has on the employment relationship and job-related attitudes of academics, there is a paucity of empirical research which directly examines the underlying nature of the exchange mechanisms manifest within this environment. Therefore, in response to calls to expand our understanding of factors which influence employee attitudinal outcomes in the workplace, this study sought to investiga...

  12. Academic Librarians' Perceptions on Information Literacy: The Israeli Perspective

    Aharony, Noa; Bronstein, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Information literacy (IL) is a necessary skill crucial for effective functioning in today's knowledge society. This study seeks to explore Israeli librarians' perspectives toward major components of information literacy. Do librarians find there is a need to redefine the concept? Who do they think should teach it? How do they think Web…

  13. Students' Perspectives on Academic Writing in the Digital Age

    Sinclair, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This study brings together three student comments and three theoretical constructs taken from Bakhtin's (1981) collection of essays "The Dialogic Imagination", written in the 1930s. Bakhtin's concepts of the chronotope, interanimation and the monologic provide lenses on a shifting student perspective on authoritative writing in…

  14. Electronic Medical Record Systems in Critical Access Hospitals: Leadership Perspectives on Anticipated and Realized Benefits

    Mills, Troy R; Vavroch, Jared; Bahensky, James A; Ward, Marcia M

    2010-01-01

    The growth of electronic medical records (EMRs) is driven by the belief that EMRs will significantly improve healthcare providers' performance and reduce healthcare costs. Evidence supporting these beliefs is limited, especially for small rural hospitals. A survey that focused on health information technology (HIT) capacity was administered to all hospitals in Iowa. Structured interviews were conducted with the leadership at 15 critical access hospitals (CAHs) that had implemented EMRs in ord...

  15. Stakeholder perspectives and reactions to "academic" cognitive enhancement: Unsuspected meaning of ambivalence and analogies.

    Forlini, Cynthia; Racine, Eric

    2012-07-01

    The existence of diverging discourses in the media and academia on the use of prescription medications to improve cognition in healthy individuals, i.e. "cognitive enhancement" (CE) creates the need to better understand perspectives from stakeholders. This qualitative focus-group study examined perspectives from students, parents and healthcare providers on CE. Stakeholders expressed ambivalence regarding CE (i.e. reactions to, definitions of, risks, and benefits). They were reluctant to adopt analogies to performance-enhancing steroids and caffeine though these analogies were useful in discussing concepts common to the use of different performance-enhancing substances. Media coverage of CE was criticized for lack of scientific rigor, ethical clarity, and inadvertent promotion of CE. Ambivalence of stakeholders suggests fundamental discomfort with economic and social driving forces of CE. Forms of public dialogue that voice the unease and ambivalence of stakeholders should be pursued to avoid opting hastily for permissive or restrictive health policies for CE. PMID:23823168

  16. The key to health services in Turkey: new perspectives on leadership and hospital management.

    Sahin, Alper A

    2014-01-01

    Health services are one of the most important criteria for making a country function. Turkey has mobilized all of its resources to provide high-quality, easily accessible and patient-friendly services for its population. To achieve this aim, the Turkish health care system has been undergoing a significant transformation through its Health Transformation Programme begun in 2005. The reforms focus on the introduction of a general health insurance system, changing hospital health services, improvements in hospital management and transformational leadership skills. Firstly, all state-run hospitals in the country were merged under the same umbrella, giving millions of people covered by the national security agency access to all of these hospitals. Secondly, all drugs and medical equipment used by patients were made free of charge. Thanks to these developments, hospitals were modernized, and this modernization process in the health sector is still continuing swiftly. On the other hand, for Turkish hospitals to survive, they need to modernize further and become closer to European models, and produce new leaders with new paradigms. In this new and changing health system, hospital leaders and executive officers should be visionaries and strategists advising when to change direction. Following this doctrine, most Turkish hospitals are now run by two top executives: the hospital manager and the chief executive officer who is in charge of business functions. These executives should clearly be the leaders of high-quality, health care organizations. PMID:24938025

  17. Letramento acadêmico: uma perspectiva etramento portuguesa = Academic literacy: a Portuguese perspective

    Adriana Fischer

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Os modos de constituição letrada de alunos universitários, no meio acadêmico, é foco deste trabalho, realizado em Portugal, no ano de 2006. Os dados que integram as análises advêm de entrevistas orais semiestruturadas realizadas com alunos do curso de Letras da Universidade do Minho. São selecionadas as falas de quatro alunas, a fim de se proceder a discussões específicas e coerentes ao objetivo proposto: analisar como alunos constituem-se sujeitos letrados no meio acadêmico. A teoria do letramento como prática social direciona as discussões e análises dos resultados advindos das falas vivas das alunas. Em acréscimo, abordagens relativas ao letramento acadêmico são decisivas para a compreensão das práticas letradas nesse contexto social. Na perspectiva das quatro alunas/sujeitos da pesquisa, experiências anteriores ao ingresso no curso de Letras e,principalmente, as diversas formas de interação no meio acadêmico interferem no uso, no domínio da linguagem e na formação como professoras. Das falas das alunas emerge uma tensão constante entre ser aluno e ser professor, o que indica uma constituição letrada emconflito, no que tange ao ensino de língua em Letras.Current analysis deals with modes of literate constituency of undergraduate students in an academic environment. Study hasbeen undertaken in Portugal in 2006. Data for analysis hailed from half-structured interviews with students in a Language and Literature graduation course at the University of Minho, Portugal. Samples of responses by four students were selected for specific discussions and with the proposed objective of this study, or rather, to analyze the way students constitute themselves as literate subjects in the academic environment. Literacy theory as social practice guided thediscussions and analyses of results from the interviews. Approaches related to academic literacy are crucial for the understanding of the literate practices in this social

  18. Developing novel chemical entities for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders: an academic perspective.

    Shayman, James A

    2015-12-15

    Historically, most Federal Drug Administration-approved drugs were the result of "in-house" efforts within large pharmaceutical companies. Over the last two decades, this paradigm has steadily shifted as the drug industry turned to startups, small biotechnology companies, and academia for the identification of novel drug targets and early drug candidates. This strategic pivot has created new opportunities for groups less traditionally associated with the creation of novel therapeutics, including small academic laboratories, for engagement in the drug discovery process. A recent example of the successful development of a drug that had its origins in academia is eliglustat tartrate, an oral agent for Gaucher disease type 1. PMID:26447223

  19. Keeping Perspective in Academic Leadership Roles: Insights from the Rectors of Icelandic Universities

    Kolbrún Arnardóttir 1986 (lögfræðingur)

    2015-01-01

    Since the position of ‘rector’ is the highest in Icelandic universities, taking over such a role is a major challenge as well as a sensitive change process for the individual and for the organisation. This paper introduces a change leadership model, i.e., the Oroboros Leadership Model. The research questions are: (1) Is it possible to provide academic leaders with a tool or a method that helps them guarantee their success in socializing within their university and to be better able to im...

  20. Perceptions of pre-clerkship medical students and academic advisors about sleep deprivation and its relationship to academic performance: a cross-sectional perspective from Saudi Arabia

    AlFakhri, Lama; Sarraj, Jumana; Kherallah, Shouq; Kuhail, Khulood; Obeidat, Akef; Abu-Zaid, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background The medical student population is believed to be at an increased risk for sleep deprivation. Little is known about students’ perceptions towards sleep deprivation and its relationship to academic performance. The aim of study is to explore the perceptions of medical students and their academic advisors about sleep deprivation and its relationship to academic performance. Methods The study took place at Alfaisal University, College of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. An online, anony...

  1. Why New Hybrid Organizations are Formed: Historical Perspectives on Epistemic and Academic Drift.

    Kaiserfeld, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    By comparing three types of hybrid organizations-18th-century scientific academies, 19th-century institutions of higher vocational education, and 20th-century industrial research institutes-it is the purpose here to answer the question of why new hybrid organizations are continuously formed. Traditionally, and often implicitly, it is often assumed that emerging groups of potential knowledge users have their own organizational preferences and demands influencing the setup of new hybrid organizations. By applying the concepts epistemic and academic drift, it will be argued here, however, that internal organizational dynamics are just as important as changing historical conjunctures in the uses of science when understanding why new hybrid organizations are formed. Only seldom have older hybrid organizations sought to make themselves relevant to new categories of knowledge users as the original ones have been marginalized. Instead, they have tended to accede to ideals supported by traditional academic organizations with higher status in terms of knowledge management, primarily universities. Through this process, demand has been generated for the founding of new hybrid organizations rather than the transformation of existing ones. Although this study focuses on Swedish cases, it is argued that since Sweden strove consistently to implement existing international policy trends during the periods in question, the observations may be generalized to apply to other national and transnational contexts. PMID:23687389

  2. Status and perspectives of hospital mortality in a public urban Hellenic hospital, based on a five-year review

    Stefanidou Anna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of hospital mortality helps to assess the standards of health-care delivery. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study evaluating the causes of deaths which occurred during the years 1995–1999 in a single hospital. The causes of death were classified according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD-10. Results Of the 149,896 patients who were discharged the 5836 (3.4% died. Males constituted 55% and females 45%. The median age was 75.1 years (1 day – 100 years. The seven most common ICD-10 chapters IX, II, IV, XI, XX, X, XIV included 92% of the total 5836 deaths. The most common contributors of non-neoplasmatic causes of death were cerebrovascular diseases (I60–I69 at 15.8%, ischemic heart disease (I20–I25 at 10.3%, cardiac failure (I50.0–I50.9 at 7.9%, diseases of the digestive system (K00–K93 at 6.7%, diabetes mellitus (E10–E14 at 6.6%, external causes of morbidity and mortality (V01–Y98 at 6.2%, renal failure (N17–N19 at 4.5%, influenza and pneumonia (J10–J18 at 4.1% and certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99 at 3.2%, accounting for 65.3% of the total 5836 deaths. Neoplasms (C00–D48 caused 17.7% (n = 1027 of the total 5836 deaths, with leading forms being the malignant neoplasms of bronchus and lung (C34 at 3.5% and the malignant neoplasms of large intestine (C18–21.2 at 1.5%. The highest death rates occurred in the intensive care unit (23.3%, general medicine (10.7%, cardiology (6.5% and nephrology (5.5%. Key problems related to certification of death were identified. Nearly half of the deaths (49.3%: n = 2879 occurred by the completion of the third day, which indicates the time limits for investigation and treatment. On the other hand, 6% (n = 356 died between the 29th and 262nd days after admission. Inadequacies of the emergency care service, infection control, medical oncology, rehabilitation, chronic and terminal care facilities, as well as

  3. Comparison between students’ academic performance and their abilities in written English language skills: A Tanzanian perspective

    Sotco Claudius Komba

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the study which sought to compare between the students’ academic performance and their abilities in written English Language Skills. The study was conducted at the Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA, Tanzania. The respondents were 358 finalists from six degree programmes selected randomly out of the 20 degree programmes at the university. The findings indicated that there was a statistically significant positive relationship between the students’ abilities in the English Writing Skills Test (EWST and their University GPAs (r=314, p< 0.01. However, the content analysis of the EWST essays showed that the students had serious problems in spelling, using appropriate forms of adjectives, punctuation marks, simple present tense, recognizing passive voice and using relative pronouns and prepositions.

  4. Identifying and communicating the contributions of library and information services in hospitals and academic health sciences centers

    Abels, Eileen G.; Cogdill, Keith W; Zach, Lisl

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This article introduces a systematic approach to identifying and communicating the value of library and information services (LIS) from the perspective of their contributions to achieving organizational goals.

  5. A helping hand or a servant discipline? Interpreting non-academic perspectives on the roles of social science in participatory policy-making

    Burchell, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    In the UK, a diverse network of actors has emerged around the delivery of government-sponsored processes of public participation in science and technology. Although this network includes social scientists, the relationship between social science and participatory policy-making remains an ambiguous one. My objective in this paper is to reflect in an exploratory manner on non-academic perspectives of the roles of social science in public participation. In particular, I draw attention to the ...

  6. Governing board structure, business strategy, and performance of acute care hospitals: a contingency perspective.

    Young, G; Beekun, R I; Ginn, G O

    1992-01-01

    Contingency theory suggests that for a hospital governing board to be effective in taking on a more active role in strategic management, the board needs to be structured to complement the overall strategy of the organization. A survey study was conducted to examine the strategies of acute care hospitals as related to the structural characteristics of their governing boards. After controlling for organizational size and system membership, results indicated a significant relationship between th...

  7. Through doctors' eyes: A qualitative study of hospital doctor perspectives on their working conditions

    McGowan, Yvonne; Humphries, Niamh; Burke, Helen; Conry, Mary; Morgan, Karen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital doctors face significant challenges in the current health care environment, working with staff shortages and cutbacks to health care expenditure, alongside increased demand for health care and increased public expectations. OBJECTIVE: This article analyses challenges faced by junior hospital doctors, providing insight into the experiences of these frontline staff in delivering health services in recessionary times. DESIGN: A qualitative methodology was chosen. METHODS: Se...

  8. A Comparison of Three Major Academic Rankings for World Universities: From a Research Evaluation Perspective

    Mu-hsuan Huang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces three current major university ranking systems. The Performance Ranking of Scientific Papers for World Universities by Higher Education Evaluation and Accreditation Council of Taiwan (HEEACT Ranking emphasizes both the quality and quantity of research and current research performance. The Academic Ranking of World Universities by Shanghai Jiao Tung University (ARWU focuses on outstanding performance of universities with indicators such as Nobel Prize winners. The QS World University Ranking (2004-2009 by Times Higher Education (THE-QS emphasizes on peer review with high weighting in evaluation. This paper compares the 2009 ranking results from the three ranking systems. Differences exist in the top 20 universities in three ranking systems except the Harvard University, which scored top one in all of the three rankings. Comparisons also revealed that the THE-QS favored UK universities. Further, obvious differences can be observed between THE-QS and the other two rankings when ranking results of some European countries (Germany, UK, Netherlands, & Switzerland and Chinese speaking regions were compared.

  9. Motivations and perspectives of academic and social interests of the Spanish language in Ivory Coast

    Ama Kouassi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Language is, par excellence, the way of communication between persons and peoples. Spanish has always aroused a lot of interest in the academic world. In Côte d’Ivoire, the analysis of the school course and university corroborates that. In this article, first, we will briefly comment on the secondary school and the university organization. We secondly will try to analyze the presence of Spain in Côte d’Ivoire as at the social and economically level. If English has always been a language of priority worldwide in terms of knowledge, other languages like French, Spanish, German, Italian and Portuguese do not stop being another way of international communication, though in a minor scale. In case of the Spanish, staggering positions are reached and it is called to occupy a preponderant place in countries in which it is not the official language, as the USA, Brazil and, in Africa, the case of Côte d’Ivoire and Senegal. Our article is inspired by other studies on Spanish in different countries non Spanish speaking, articles about the commercial relations between Spain and Côte d’Ivoire and sometimes between Spain and Africa. In addition, we also make reference to some of the organizations, the students' services and the departments of Spanish at the universities of Abidjan and Bouaké.

  10. On patient flow in hospitals: A data-based queueing-science perspective

    Mor Armony

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hospitals are complex systems with essential societal benefits and huge mounting costs. These costs are exacerbated by inefficiencies in hospital processes, which are often manifested by congestion and long delays in patient care. Thus, a queueing-network view of patient flow in hospitals is natural, for studying and improving its performance. The goal of our research is to explore patient flow data through the lenses of a queueing scientist. The means is exploratory data analysis (EDA in a large Israeli hospital, which reveals important features that are not readily explainable by existing models. Questions raised by our EDA include: Can a simple (parsimonious queueing model usefully capture the complex operational reality of the Emergency Department (ED? What time scales and operational regimes are relevant for modeling patient length of stay in the Internal Wards (IWs? How do protocols of patient transfer between the ED and the IWs influence patient delay, workload division and fairness? EDA also underscores the importance of an integrative view of hospital units by, for example, relating ED bottlenecks to IW physician protocols. The significance of such questions and our related findings raises the need for novel queueing models and theory, which we present here as research opportunities. Hospital data, and specifically patient flow data at the level of the individual patient, is increasingly collected but is typically confidential and/or proprietary. We have been fortunate to partner with a hospital that allowed us to open up its data for everyone to access. This enables reproducibility of our findings, through a user-friendly platform that is accessible through the Technion SEELab.

  11. Hearing the patient’s voice: The patient’s perspective as outcome measure in monitoring the quality of hospital care

    Kleefstra, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    The overall theme of this thesis is to contribute to the knowledge of how to use the patient’s perspective for monitoring the quality of hospital care. The patient’s perspective is measured with patient satisfaction questionnaires and with a patient rating website. Our studies showed that valid and reliable patient satisfaction questionnaires can indeed be used to assess or monitor the quality and safety of care from the patient’s perspective. This is in spite of the critical comments concern...

  12. Patient Safety Culture Status From The Perspective Medical Staff Of Yasuj Hospitals In 2015

    M Rezaean

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: One of the most important problems in the health sector, particularly in clinical centers, is the quality of healthcare. Patient safety is one of the most important elements in creating health care quality due to the fact that it is a critical component to the quality of health care and many errors are present in patient care and treatment practices..                                                               Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the status of the patient safety culture and its relationship with events reported in Yasuj hospitals. Methods: The present descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 361 medical staff of Yasuj hospitals. The data were collected through a hospital survey on patient safety culture. The collected data were analyzed by using SPSS statistics soft ware version 21, using Descriptive methods, Pearson Coefficient, ANOVA, and T-Test. Results: The results of the present study revealed that the teamwork among hospital units (71/89percent, with expectations and management measures (66/38% in the case of safety obtained the most score and non-punitive response to errors (48/79% and manager support (55/88 percent obtained the least score. 73/7% of employees of three hospitals in the past 12 months did not report any event. In addition, there was a meaningful statistical relationship between the total score of safety culture and reporting the events. In this study, 15.5 % of respondents assess their safety culture in work as good, 44.3 % as acceptable and 30.5 percent reported poor. The overall safety culture among the three studied hospitals was 61.81 %. Results confirmed that the culture safety of patient in studied hospitals was average. Conclusions: The hospitals may rely on their strong points in terms of patient safety culture and try to remove their weak points to form a safe environment and appropriate

  13. Succession planning: trends regarding the perspectives of Chief Executive Officers in US hospitals.

    Collins, Sandra K; McKinnies, Richard C; Matthews, Eric; Collins, Kevin S

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to revisit the perceptions of chief executive officers in US hospitals regarding the origin of leadership and how they felt about internally developed successors versus externally recruited successors. Furthermore, the study sought to develop understanding of how this group of executives utilizes the succession planning process, what factors impact successor identification, what positions are applicable for succession planning activities, and who is ultimately held responsible for leadership continuity within the hospital industry. The results of this 2012 study were compared with a previous study conducted in 2007 to determine if the perceptions had changed over time. PMID:23903939

  14. A Structural Model of Self-Concept, Autonomous Motivation and Academic Performance in Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Ahmed, Wondimu; Bruinsma, Marjon

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose and test a motivational model of performance by integrating constructs from self-concept and self-determination theories and to explore cultural group differences in the model. To this end, self-report measures of global self-esteem, academic self-concept, academic motivation and academic performance were…

  15. Becoming and Being an Academic: The Perspectives of Chinese Staff in Two Research-Intensive UK Universities

    Jiang, Xiaoli; Di Napoli, Roberto; Borg, Michaela; Maunder, Rachel; Fry, Heather; Walsh, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an interview study investigating the experiences of academic acculturation (a process of mutual influence and enrichment with regard to academic practice) of a group of Chinese academic staff in two research-intensive UK universities. Following a systematic content-based analysis, three major themes emerged as salient,…

  16. Academic Motivation, Self-Concept, Engagement, and Performance in High School: Key Processes from a Longitudinal Perspective

    Green, Jasmine; Liem, Gregory Arief D.; Martin, Andrew J.; Colmar, Susan; Marsh, Herbert W.; McInerney, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The study tested three theoretically/conceptually hypothesized longitudinal models of academic processes leading to academic performance. Based on a longitudinal sample of 1866 high-school students across two consecutive years of high school (Time 1 and Time 2), the model with the most superior heuristic value demonstrated: (a) academic motivation…

  17. Effect of Academic Education on Patient Satisfaction

    Narges Ebrahimi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of patient satisfaction is becoming increasingly important. From the business perspective, patients represent the major customers of the hospital who receive and feel the healthcare services directly and realistically. However, despite their many efforts and successes with satisfaction measurement, evidence shows that more work in this area is still needed. This research investigates the effects and the relative importance of academic education on patient satisfaction. Eleven hospitals and 1100 patients are included in the study; the results show people with higher education have less satisfaction about quality of services in the hospitals. Based on the findings of this study, hospitals and developer in designing and maintaining CRM software must consider level of education of patients as an important factor in managing relationship with patients.

  18. Through doctors' eyes: A qualitative study of hospital doctor perspectives on their working conditions.

    McGowan, Yvonne

    2013-03-11

    BACKGROUND: Hospital doctors face significant challenges in the current health care environment, working with staff shortages and cutbacks to health care expenditure, alongside increased demand for health care and increased public expectations. OBJECTIVE: This article analyses challenges faced by junior hospital doctors, providing insight into the experiences of these frontline staff in delivering health services in recessionary times. DESIGN: A qualitative methodology was chosen. METHODS: Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 doctors from urban Irish hospitals. Interviews were recorded via note taking. Full transcripts were analysed thematically using NVivo software. RESULTS: Dominant themes included the following: (1) unrealistic workloads: characterised by staff shortages, extended working hours, irregular and frequently interrupted breaks; (2) fatigue and its impact: the quality of care provided to patients while doctors were sleep-deprived was questioned; however, little reflection was given to any impact this may have had on junior doctors own health; (3) undervalued and disillusioned: insufficient training, intensive workloads and a perceived lack of power to influence change resulted in a sense of detachment among junior doctors. They appeared immune to their surroundings. CONCLUSION: Respondents ascribed little importance to the impact of current working conditions on their own health. They felt their roles were underappreciated and undervalued by policy makers and hospital management. Respondents were concerned with the lack of time and opportunity for training. This study highlighted several \\'red flags\\

  19. Academic Capitalism and Academic Culture: A Case Study

    Mendoza, Pilar; Berger, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    This case study investigated the impact of academic capitalism on academic culture by examining the perspectives of faculty members in an American academic department with significant industrial funding. The results of this study indicate that faculty members believe that the broad integrity of the academic culture remains unaffected in this…

  20. Field Note-Developing Suicide Risk Assessment Training for Hospital Social Workers: An Academic-Community Partnership

    Wharff, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Abigail M.; Lambert, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This article describes 1 large urban pediatric hospital's partnership with a university to provide suicide assessment and management training within its social work department. Social work administrators conducted a department-wide needs assessment and implemented a 2-session suicide assessment training program and evaluation. Respondents…

  1. Restructuring within an academic health center to support quality and safety: the development of the Center for Quality and Safety at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Bohmer, Richard M J; Bloom, Jonathan D; Mort, Elizabeth A; Demehin, Akinluwa A; Meyer, Gregg S

    2009-12-01

    Recent focus on the need to improve the quality and safety of health care has created new challenges for academic health centers (AHCs). Whereas previously quality was largely assumed, today it is increasingly quantifiable and requires organized systems for improvement. Traditional structures and cultures within AHCs, although well suited to the tripartite missions of teaching, research, and clinical care, are not easily adaptable to the tasks of measuring, reporting, and improving quality. Here, the authors use a case study of Massachusetts General Hospital's efforts to restructure quality and safety to illustrate the value of beginning with a focus on organizational culture, using a systematic process of engaging clinical leadership, developing an organizational framework dependent on proven business principles, leveraging focus events, and maintaining executive dedication to execution of the initiative. The case provides a generalizable example for AHCs of how applying explicit management design can foster robust organizational change with relatively modest incremental financial resources. PMID:19940570

  2. Knowledge and Performance about Nursing Ethic Codes from Nurses' and Patients' Perspective in Tabriz Teaching Hospitals, Iran

    Sara Moghaddam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing profession requires knowledge of ethics to guide performance. The nature of this profession necessitates ethical care more than routine care. Today, worldwide definition of professional ethic code has been done based on human and ethical issues in the communication between nurse and patient. To improve all dimensions of nursing, we need to respect ethic codes. The aim of this study is to assess knowledge and performance about nursing ethic codes from nurses' and patients' perspective.Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study Conducted upon 345 nurses and 500 inpatients in six teaching hospitals of Tabriz, 2012. To investigate nurses' knowledge and performance, data were collected by using structured questionnaires. Statistical analysis was done using descriptive and analytic statistics, independent t-test and ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient, in SPSS13.Results: Most of the nurses were female, married, educated at BS degree and 86.4% of them were aware of Ethic codes also 91.9% of nurses and 41.8% of patients represented nurses respect ethic codes. Nurses' and patients' perspective about ethic codes differed significantly. Significant relationship was found between nurses' knowledge of ethic codes and job satisfaction and complaint of ethical performance. Conclusion: According to the results, consideration to teaching ethic codes in nursing curriculum for student and continuous education for staff is proposed, on the other hand recognizing failures of the health system, optimizing nursing care, attempt to inform patients about Nursing ethic codes, promote patient rights and achieve patient satisfaction can minimize the differences between the two perspectives.

  3. A macroergonomic perspective on fatigue and coping in the hospital nurse work system.

    Steege, Linsey M; Dykstra, Jessica G

    2016-05-01

    Occupational fatigue in hospital nurses is associated with increased nurse turnover, and decreased nurse health and patient safety. The goal of this study was to explore the factors contributing to or preventing fatigue, and barriers and facilitators to individual nurse coping in hospital work systems. Interviews were conducted and analyzed using a directed qualitative content analysis approach guided by the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) model. Themes related to sources of fatigue within each of the five primary components of the SEIPS work system were identified, along with barriers and facilitators to nurses' experiences and strategies for coping with fatigue. Findings from this study provide guidance on what nurses perceive as contributing to fatigue and factors that are helpful and harmful to coping with fatigue within their work system. Implications for fatigue risk management systems (FRMS) are also discussed, in particular the importance of maintaining nurse autonomy in decision-making when implementing fatigue interventions or countermeasures. PMID:26851460

  4. [Hospital perspectives on the end of life, the case of homeless people].

    Marin, Isabelle; Romejko, Idriss Farota

    2016-02-01

    The hospital is the last refuge for sick homeless people when their illness makes life on the street impossible. The teams often consider these patients as different, difficult and not easy to place in a specific type of care. In palliative care, fewer questions are raised as the patients are hospitalised for their terminal phase. The difficulties often lie in diagnosing the disease and recognising its seriousness and the patient's social situation. PMID:26861081

  5. CROATIAN TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY: CURRENT STATE AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTAL PERSPECTIVES

    Slobodan Ivanovic; Ace Milenkovski; Vedran Milojica

    2015-01-01

    The economic crisis had a significant influence on the world economy, as well as on tourism and hospitality industry. Despite minor oscillations, European and world tourism turnover is registering a significant growth. Contemporary European tourists possess high purchasing power, as well as the tendency of undertaking travels, which is witnessed by the fact that Europe continues to be the leader in world tourism flows. As an EU member, Croatia needs to use this as a stimulation in...

  6. Boundaryless Career Attitudes, Employability and Employee Turnover: Perspective from Malaysian Hospitality Industry

    Wai Sei Chan; Ong Lin Dar

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to develop a research framework for examining the relationship between boundary less career attitudes and employee turnover intentions and whether employability mediates these relationships. From the literature reviews, the authors found a notable gap in the boundary less career literature and established employability as a mediating variable between boundary less career attitudes and employee turnover intentions. High employee turnover within the hospitality industry has beco...

  7. A manager's perspective on Generation Y in the hospitality industry in Finland

    Minnaar, Lars

    2014-01-01

    With a personal interest in good service and hospitality the author was dissapointed in many cases during service experiences in Finland. From hereonforth he decided to develop a thesis based on service quality. Being from generation Y himself it seemed logical to investigate what the hotel’s restaurant managers really think of this generation and whether they are prepared. Generation Y, a highly technically advanced, independent and demanding age group born between 1978 and 2000 is slowly...

  8. Effectiveness of Palivizumab in Preventing RSV Hospitalization in High Risk Children: A Real-World Perspective

    Nusrat Homaira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is one of the major causes globally of childhood respiratory morbidity and hospitalization. Palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody, has been recommended for high risk infants to prevent severe RSV-associated respiratory illness. This recommendation is based on evidence of efficacy when used under clinical trial conditions. However the real-world effectiveness of palivizumab outside of clinical trials among different patient populations is not well established. We performed a systematic review focusing on postlicensure observational studies of the protective effect of palivizumab prophylaxis for reducing RSV-associated hospitalizations in infants and children at high risk of severe infection. We searched studies published in English between 1 January 1999 and August 2013 and identified 420 articles, of which 20 met the inclusion criteria. This review supports the recommended use of palivizumab for reducing RSV-associated hospitalization rates in premature infants born at gestational age < 33 weeks and in children with chronic lung and heart diseases. Data are limited to allow commenting on the protective effect of palivizumab among other high risk children, including those with Down syndrome, cystic fibrosis, and haematological malignancy, indicating further research is warranted in these groups.

  9. Moving away from a cultural deficit to a holistic perspective: Traditional gender role values, academic attitudes, and educational goals for Mexican descent adolescents.

    Piña-Watson, Brandy; Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I; Dornhecker, Marianela; Martinez, Ashley J; Nagoshi, Julie L

    2016-04-01

    Latina/o youth lag behind Asian American and non-Latina/o White youth in many academic areas. Previous research has taken a deficit approach to understand the factors that affect academic outcomes for Latina/o youth often neglecting to highlight both the potential positive and negative contributions of gender role values. The present study took a holistic perspective to understand the affect of traditional Latina/o gender role values (i.e., marianismo, machismo, and caballerismo) on the academic attitudes and educational goals of Mexican descent youth. Structural equation models were tested to examine the associations of "positive" and "negative" gender role values on educational goals using 524 Mexican descent adolescents from a mid-sized city in southern Texas. We hypothesized that positive aspects of traditional Latina/o gender role values (i.e., "positive marianismo" and caballerismo) would be associated with more positive attitudes toward academics and higher educational goals. We further expected negative gender role values (i.e., "negative marianismo" and machismo) to have the opposite effect. Additionally, based on the theory of planned behavior and gender schema theory, academic attitudes were hypothesized to mediate the relation between gender role values and educational goals. An alternative model was tested in which educational goals mediated the relation between gender roles and academic attitudes. Results indicated that both models fit the data well, and recommendations are made for future longitudinal research aimed at disentangling the directionality of the relations in the model. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:26651213

  10. Co-occurrences Between Adolescent Substance Use and Academic Performance: School Context Inuences a Multilevel-Longitudinal Perspective

    Andrade, Fernando H.

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of literature has linked substance use and academic performance exploring substance use as a predictor of academic performance or vice versa. This study uses a different approach conceptualizing substance use and academic performance as parallel outcomes and exploring two topics: its multilevel-longitudinal association and school contextual effects on both outcomes. Using multilevel Confirmatory Factor Analysis and multilevel-longitudinal analyses, the empirical estimates relie...

  11. Triumph of hope over experience: learning from interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admissions identified through an Academic Health and Social Care Network

    Woodhams Victoria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internationally health services are facing increasing demands due to new and more expensive health technologies and treatments, coupled with the needs of an ageing population. Reducing avoidable use of expensive secondary care services, especially high cost admissions where no procedure is carried out, has become a focus for the commissioners of healthcare. Method We set out to identify, evaluate and share learning about interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admission across a regional Academic Health and Social Care Network (AHSN. We conducted a service evaluation identifying initiatives that had taken place across the AHSN. This comprised a literature review, case studies, and two workshops. Results We identified three types of intervention: pre-hospital; within the emergency department (ED; and post-admission evaluation of appropriateness. Pre-hospital interventions included the use of predictive modelling tools (PARR – Patients at risk of readmission and ACG – Adjusted Clinical Groups sometimes supported by community matrons or virtual wards. GP-advisers and outreach nurses were employed within the ED. The principal post-hoc interventions were the audit of records in primary care or the application of the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP within the admission ward. Overall there was a shortage of independent evaluation and limited evidence that each intervention had an impact on rates of admission. Conclusions Despite the frequency and cost of emergency admission there has been little independent evaluation of interventions to reduce avoidable admission. Commissioners of healthcare should consider interventions at all stages of the admission pathway, including regular audit, to ensure admission thresholds don’t change.

  12. Safe medication management and use of narcotics in a Joint Commission International-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People's Republic of China.

    Fang, Xu; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Xia, Ping; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Safe medication management and use of high-alert narcotics should arouse concern. Risk management experiences in this respect in a large-scale Joint Commission International (JCI)-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People's Republic of China during 2011-2015, focusing on organizational, educational, motivational, and information technological measures in storage, prescribing, preparing, dispensing, administration, and monitoring of medication are summarized. The intensity of use of meperidine in hospitalized patients in 2015 was one-fourth that in 2011. A 100% implementation rate of standard storage of narcotics has been achieved in the hospital since December 2012. A "Plan, Do, Check, Act" cycle was efficient because the ratio of number of inappropriate narcotics prescriptions to total number of narcotics prescriptions for inpatients decreased from August 2014 to December 2014 (28.22% versus 2.96%, P=0.0000), and it was controlled below 6% from then on. During the journey to good pain management ward accreditation by the Ministry of Health, People's Republic of China, (April 2012-October 2012), the medical oncology ward successfully demonstrated an increase in the pain screening rate at admission from 43.5% to 100%, cancer pain control rate from 85% to 96%, and degree of satisfaction toward pain nursing from 95.4% to 100% (all P-values person to 20.36 mg/person. A 100% implementation rate of independent double-check prior to narcotics dosing has been achieved since January 2013. From 2014 to 2015, the ratio of number of narcotics-related medication errors to number of discharged patients significantly decreased (6.95% versus 0.99%, P=0.0000). Taken together, continuous quality improvements have been achieved in safe medication management and use of narcotics by an integrated multidisciplinary collaboration during the journey to JCI accreditation and in the post-JCI accreditation era. PMID:27103812

  13. [Suicidality at the general hospitalperspective of consultation and liaison psychiatry].

    Imboden, Christian; Hatzinger, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Suicidality is a common problem in the general hospital. Patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders or during a psychosocial crisis can develop suicidal ideation during their stay at the general hospital, especially if they suffer from chronic disease. Some somatic disorders, such as cancer, epilepsy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, stroke and chronic pain conditions are associated with an increased risk of suicide. The fact that (1) a major part of patients are treated in the emergency room (ER) after a suicide attempt and (2) a suicide attempt is the strongest predictor for later completed suicide emphasizes the importance of expertise in dealing with suicidal patients in the ER. In order to improve prevention of suicides and suicide attempts within the general hospital and after discharge it is important to educate staff concerning suicidality and enhance detection of suicidal patients. A consultation and liaison psychiatrist should always be involved when there are suicidal patients on wards and in the ER. Assessment of suicidal patients has always to include clear recommendations concerning patient safety and treatment of the underlying condition as well as specific approaches in dealing with suicidal thoughts. Safety measures can include close monitoring, constant observation, restriction to means of suicide, referral to a psychiatric clinic and treatment with sedatives, generally benzodiazepines. Psychiatric disorders are ideally treated according to guidelines and clear recommendations should be given concerning treatment after discharge. Specific psychotherapy for suicidal behaviour possibly reduces the risk of future suicides. A special situation is created by assisted suicides which attribute to suicides in the elderly with a recent increase in the Swiss population. In some cases, undiagnosed depression may contribute to the decision making process, hence, underlining the importance of improved detection and treatment of depression in

  14. Doctors' perspectives on the barriers to appropriate prescribing in older hospitalized patients: A qualitative study.

    Cullinan, S

    2014-11-18

    Older patients commonly suffer from multimorbidites and take multiple medications. As a result, these patients are more vulnerable to potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP). PIP in older patients may result in adverse drug events and hospitalisations. However, little has been done to identify why PIP occurs. The objectives of this study were; (1) to identify hospital doctors\\' perceptions as to why PIP occurs, (2) to identify the barriers to addressing the issues identified, and (3) to determine which intervention types would be best suited to improving prescribing.

  15. Strategies used by hospital nurses to cope with a national crisis: a manager's perspective.

    Hendel, T; Fish, M; Aboudi, S

    2000-12-01

    This article explores the anxiety level of, and coping strategies used by, hospital nurses, during a national state of emergency. The study was guided by a stress and coping framework, developed by Lazarus & Folkman, and was conducted at a large teaching hospital, located in the centre of Israel, during the Iraqi crisis in January and February, 1998. Data were collected from a sample of 100 female nurses, and a descriptive correlational design was used. The findings indicated that approximately 33% of the nurses expressed feelings of stress, tension and a sense of discomfort. The dominant coping strategy used by the nurses was direct-active, which was found to be the most effective strategy. As they were unable to remove or control the stressor, stress management intervention by nursing managers focused mainly on communicating with staff and providing social support - informational and emotional--to buffer the stressful experience. Providing support and help in finding practical solutions is important for maintaining emotional stability of staff, thereby helping them to improve their nursing interventions in assisting people to cope with stressful situations. PMID:11153519

  16. Perceptions of community-based participatory research in the delta nutrition intervention research initiative:an academic perspective

    Lower Mississippi Delta Nutrition Intervention Research Initiative (Delta NIRI) is an academic-community partnership between seven academic institutions and three communities in Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. A range of community-based participatory methods have been employed to develop susta...

  17. Boundaryless Career Attitudes, Employability and Employee Turnover: Perspective from Malaysian Hospitality Industry

    Wai Sei Chan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop a research framework for examining the relationship between boundary less career attitudes and employee turnover intentions and whether employability mediates these relationships. From the literature reviews, the authors found a notable gap in the boundary less career literature and established employability as a mediating variable between boundary less career attitudes and employee turnover intentions. High employee turnover within the hospitality industry has become one of the major concerns to researchers and practitioners. However, limited studies have been devoted to the understanding of the causes. Also, within the careers literature, there is a traditional sentiment that boundary less career attitudes indicate an increase in employee turnover. Little work, however, has examined how these career attitudes of employees may trigger their intention to turnover and eventually bring about the decisions toward turnover.

  18. The postgraduate hospital educational environment measure (PHEEM questionnaire identifies quality of instruction as a key factor predicting academic achievement

    Joaquim Edson Vieira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study analyzes the reliability of the PHEEM questionnaire translated into Portuguese. We present the results of PHEEM following distribution to doctors in three different medical residency programs at a university hospital in Brazil. INTRODUCTION: Efforts to understand environmental factors that foster effective learning resulted in the development of a questionnaire to measure medical residents' perceptions of the level of autonomy, teaching quality and social support in their programs. METHODS: The questionnaire was translated using the modified Brislin back-translation technique. Cronbach's alpha test was used to ensure good reliability and ANOVA was used to compare PHEEM results among residents from the Surgery, Anesthesiology and Internal Medicine departments. The Kappa coefficient was used as a measure of agreement, and factor analysis was employed to evaluate the construct strength of the three domains suggested by the original PHEEM questionnaire. RESULTS: The PHEEM survey was completed by 306 medical residents and the resulting Cronbach's alpha was 0.899. The weighted Kappa was showed excellent reliability. Autonomy was rated most highly by Internal Medicine residents (63.7% ± 13.6%. Teaching was rated highest in Anesthesiology (66.7% ± 15.4%. Residents across the three areas had similar perceptions of social support (59.0% ± 13.3% for Surgery; 60.5% ± 13.6% for Internal Medicine; 61.4% ± 14.4% for Anesthesiology. Factor analysis suggested that nine factors explained 58.9% of the variance. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that PHEEM is a reliable instrument for measuring the quality of medical residency programs at a Brazilian teaching hospital. The results suggest that quality of teaching was the best indicator of overall response to the questionnaire.

  19. What Does ePrescribing Mean for Patients? A Case Study of the Perspectives of Hospital Renal Patients

    Lisa Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hospital ePrescribing systems are expected to improve quality of care for patients, yet the perspectives of patients themselves have seldom been explored in the context of ePrescribing deployments.OBJECTIVE: We sought to understand the significance of ePrescribing for patients through a case study of renal in-patients on a hospital ward, before and after the introduction of an ePrescribing system.METHODS: Three data sources were drawn on as part of the case study: interviews with representatives from national patient groups (n = 10, in-patients on a renal ward (n = 11 pre-implementation; n = 12 post-implementation and fieldnotes (n = 25 of observations made on the case study ward. Data were analysed thematically focusing on: (1 perceived benefits of ePrescribing; (2 patient awareness and understanding of the medications prescribed and (3 patient views on medicines reconciliation at admission and discharge.RESULTS: While ePrescribing was viewed positively overall, its implementation in the case study site failed to address the lack of patient involvement in the prescribing process and poor medication counselling upon discharge. Importantly, the limited impact of the ePrescribing system in these particular areas appeared to be the result of institutional and cultural practices rather than solely technological factors.CONCLUSIONS: The introduction of ePrescribing systems offers new opportunities to improve sharing of knowledge and communication with all those involved in the patient’s care pathways, including patients, carers and healthcare professionals across diverse care settings. Achieving this will, first and foremost, require significant cultural and policy shifts in how the patient’s role is perceived by clinicians in relation to medicines management.

  20. Acute Stroke Through the Perspective of a County Hospital: Problems and Opportunities

    Atay Vural

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stroke is one of the most important public health issues worldwide, and ranks as the second highest cause of mortality in our country. Regular follow-up of stroke statistics and taking necessary precautions upon determining deficits by countries themselves constitute the most important way of improving prognosis and survival after stroke incidents. To achieve this goal, statistical studies should be performed at various levels of healthcare services. Tertiary care hospitals are the most suitable centers to perform these studies. However, the majority of the population receives service at secondary care centers where the actual statistics remain unknown. The objective of this study was to examine all patients with acute stroke who presented to a county hospital over a one-year period and obtain related data, discuss deficits, and provide solutionbased recommendations. Materials and Methods: All patients diagnosed as having acute stroke between July 2013-July 2014 were included in the study. Demographic, clinical, and radiologic data, in addition to the timing of presentation and baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores were recorded retrospectively, and patients were classified by the type of stroke. All patients were followed up for at least one year after the stroke incident and cumulative survival scores were calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: Hemorrhagic stroke was determined in four out of 49 patients with acute stroke; the 45 patients diagnosed as having ischemic stroke were included in the study. Among these, 44.4% (n=20 of the patients presented within the first three hours of onset of clinical symptoms, 4.4% (n=2 presented at 3.-4.5 hours. Baseline NIHSS was 1-4 (mild stroke in 50% (n=10 of patients who presented in the first three hours, and >5 (moderate or severe stroke in 50% (n=10 of the remaining patients. The etiologic cause was embolic in 37.1% (n=13, large artery atherosclerosis

  1. Strategies for effective goals of care discussions and decision-making: perspectives from a multi-centre survey of Canadian hospital-based healthcare providers

    Roze des Ordons, Amanda L; Sharma, Nishan; Heyland, Daren K; You, John J

    2015-01-01

    Background Communication gaps impact the quality of patient care. Previous research has focused on communication barriers rather than seeking solutions. Our aim was to identify strategies for effective communication and decision-making about goals of care for medical interventions in serious illness, from the perspectives of hospital-based healthcare providers. Methods A cross-sectional survey composed of closed- and open-ended questions about goals of care communication and decision-making w...

  2. Exploring an Exam-Practice Approach to Teaching Academic Reading and Writing in China: Teacher Perspectives and Materials Analysis

    Terrett, Matthew Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This study explores teacher perceptions of an approach to teaching academic reading and writing that focuses on local English for Academic Purposes (EAP) exams (the Exam-Practice Approach) and presents a textual analysis of the teaching materials. The research context is the EAP component of an international foundation year programme for undergraduate students embarking on Business or Engineering pathways at a British university operating in China. Semi-structured interviews were conducted...

  3. Language and academic achievement: Perspectives on the potential role of indigenous African languages as a lingua academica

    Mbulungeni Madiba

    2013-01-01

    Although research literature abounds with studies that show the importance of language for academic achievement, the potential role of indigenous African languages in the educational sector in South Africa has not been adequately appraised or appreciated. Accordingly, ambivalence is still rife among parents, teachers, learners and government about the use of these languages for academic purposes. This ambivalence is evident from the existing national language education policies, school langua...

  4. Academics explore humidity's benefits.

    Mortimer, Dave

    2008-11-01

    The effects of humidification on hospital superbugs are being explored by some of the UK's top academics, in what Dave Mortimer, national sales manager for Vapac Humidity Control, explains are the UK's first such studies. PMID:19044148

  5. A comparative study of knowledge and attitudes regarding biomedical waste (BMW management with a preliminary intervention in an academic hospital

    Violet N Pinto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: 1 To assess and compare the knowledge and attitudes regarding biomedical waste (BMW management in specialists, resident doctors, new medical interns, and final year nursing students. 2 To assess the effectiveness of a training program in changing the knowledge and attitudes regarding BMW management. Study Design: Stage 1-descriptive, Stage 2-quasi-experimental. Participants: Specialists, resident doctors, new medical interns, and final year nursing students. Setting: Tertiary hospital with attached medical college in Navi Mumbai. Data Collection tool: Pretested, precoded self-administered questionnaire. Intervention: Educational training program on BMW management, Period of Study: December 2010-March 2011. Statistical Analysis: Using software Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 20, chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA, Tukey's post hoc, and Z tests applied. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the knowledge scores between the groups as determined by a one-way ANOVA test (F (3,226 = 11.098, P < 0.001. A Tukey's post hoc test revealed that the specialists (20.82 ± 5.121 knowledge scores were significantly higher as compared to resident doctors (16.96 ± 5.268, medical interns (18.44 ± 4.293, and nursing group (15.33 ± 5.144. The positive attitude towards safe management of BMW was not found to be significant. After the training program in the medical interns' a statistically significant increase in their knowledge on BMW management was seen. Conclusion: The knowledge and attitudes between the groups of healthcare personnel varied and was not found to be satisfactory. Training programs with periodical sensitization sessions on BMW management are recommended, especially focusing at the junior level.

  6. Certified quality management according to DIN ISO 9001 in a radiology department at a university hospital. Measurable changes in academic quality indicators?

    Purpose: to evaluate the changes in academic quality indicators after implementation of a quality management system according to DIN ISO 9001:2000. Materials and methods: after implementation and certification of a quality management system, the actual state based on quality indicators from the fields of student teaching, research, continuing education and the satisfaction of referring physician was determined. After implementation of an action plan for the individual areas, the temporal changes in the ratios were documented in the follow-up. Results: the evaluation of teaching performance obtained by questionnaire among the students of the radiology course showed a steady increase in satisfaction (mean value 2003: 2.7; 2007: 3.9). In the field of research an increase in scientific output was achieved based on the number of an internal publication score (2002: 99 points; 2006: 509). Repeated opinion surveys among our referring physicians found improvements in indicators for the appointment of investigations, consulting service and waiting times for the investigation, while the waiting times for internal transport service did not improve. Exemplary measurements of the success of the advanced training of the staff demonstrated the need for continuing education for quality improvement. Conclusion: the evaluation of quality indicators showed over time a measurable positive impact on processes of a radiological Univ. Hospital after implementation of a QM system according to DIN ISO 9001:2000. (orig.)

  7. Identifying and priority setting indicators of integration and integrable units in hospitals of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences from the perspective of health experts

    yalda mousazadeh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hospitals face major challenges such as lack of resources, increase in costs, and particularly severelimitations by sanctions that lead to integration in hospitals. This study was conducted to identify and prioritize theindicators of integration and integrable hospital units based on the experts' perspective. METHODS: The present study was a three phase qualitative, applied survey. The first phase included a review of thefundamental concepts. The second phase included three focus group discussions with presence of experts to identifynecessary indicators for the implementation of integration strategy and the hospital units that can be integrated based onindicators. In the third phase, Delphi's questionnaire was prepared based on Likert's scale for prioritizing and choosingthe indicators and hospital units. RESULTS: 9 indicators and 29 hospital units were identified during focus group discussions. Consensus was achievedon 9 indicators and 23 units out of 29 units based on the three stages of Delphi's questionnaire. The most importantindicators were cost and parallelism in tasks (consensus = 95.2%. Service availability and responsibility(consensus = 71.4% were the least important indicators. The supporting units had the greatest potential (45.45% oftotal units of merging. Emergency, inpatient wards, management, and chairmanship units were not candidates forintegration according to the viewpoint of experts. CONCLUSIONS: Integration will lead to efficiency in resources management, avoids parallelism in tasks, increasesservice availability, and reduces costs. Integration capability exists in many parts of the hospital; therefore, it can beused in the hospitals. Furthermore, it is necessary to define clear indicators for measuring the success of this strategy.

  8. Personal and Social-Contextual Factors in K-12 Academic Performance: An Integrative Perspective on Student Learning

    Lee, Jihyun; Shute, Valerie J.

    2010-01-01

    Our extensive literature review in the fields of educational, social, and cognitive psychology has led us to identify about a dozen variables that demonstrate direct empirical links to academic achievement at the K-12 level. Those variables are grouped into four major categories: student engagement, learning strategies, school climate, and…

  9. Leadership in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Perspectives of Academics in Non-Formal Leadership Roles

    Hofmeyer, Anne; Sheingold, Brenda Helen; Klopper, Hester C.; Warland, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Developing leaders and leadership are key factors to improve learning and teaching in higher education. Despite the abundance of literature concerning developing formal leadership, fewer studies have been conducted with academics in non-formal leadership roles that focus on how they develop their leadership in learning and teaching. Publication…

  10. Academic Expectations of Australian Students from Aboriginal, Asian and Anglo Backgrounds: Perspectives of Teachers, Trainee-Teachers and Students

    Dandy, Justine; Durkin, Kevin; Barber, Bonnie L.; Houghton, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    There are ethnic group differences in academic achievement among Australian students, with Aboriginal students performing substantially below and Asian students above their peers. One factor that may contribute to these effects is societal stereotypes of Australian Asian and Aboriginal students, which may bias teachers' evaluations and…

  11. Academic Rigour, Managerial Relevance and Triangulation of Research Methods: A Perspective of Expectations Fulfilment in Postgraduate Education

    Hui, Loi Teck; Fatt, Quek Kia

    2008-01-01

    Developing high-quality human capital and advancing existing knowledge stocks are crucial for the competitive advantage of a nation. The authors argue that offering postgraduate programmes that give great emphasis to academic rigour, managerial relevance and the triangulation of research methods is vital if these ends are to be achieved. They…

  12. Batting 300 is Good: Perspectives of Faculty Researchers and their Mentors on Rejection, Resilience, and Persistence in Academic Medical Careers

    DeCastro, Rochelle; Sambuco, Dana; Ubel, Peter A.; Stewart, Abigail; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Professional rejection is a frequent experience in an academic medical career. The authors sought to understand how rejection affects those pursuing such careers and why some individuals may be more resilient than others in a population of individuals with demonstrated ability and interest in research careers. Method Between February 2010 and August 2011, the authors conducted semi-structured, in-depth telephone interviews with 100 former recipients of National Institutes of Health mentored career development awards and 28 of their mentors. Purposive sampling ensured a diverse range of viewpoints. Multiple analysts thematically coded verbatim transcripts using qualitative data analysis software. Results Participants described a variety of experiences with criticism and rejection in their careers, as well as an acute need for persistence and resilience in the face of such challenges. Through their narratives, participants also vividly described a range of emotional and behavioral responses to their experiences of professional rejection. Their responses illuminated the important roles that various factors, including mentoring and gender, play in shaping the ultimate influence of rejection on their own careers and on the careers of those they have mentored. Conclusions Responses to rejection vary considerably, and negative responses can lead promising individuals to abandon careers in academic medicine. Resilience does not, however, appear to be immutable—it can be learned. Given the frequency of experiences with rejection in academic medicine, strategies such as training mentors to foster resilience may be particularly helpful in improving faculty retention in academic medicine. PMID:23425991

  13. Trust and Work Place Spirituality on Knowledge Sharing Behaviour: Perspective from Non-Academic Staff of Higher Learning Institutions

    Rahman, Muhammad Sabbir; Osmangani, Aahad M; Daud, Nuraihan Mat; Chowdhury, Abdul Hannan; Hassan, Hasliza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This empirical research aims to add value in the existing research on knowledge sharing, investigate the antecedents of knowledge-sharing behaviour by embedding trust and workplace spirituality variable on non-academic staff from higher learning institution in Malaysia. The role of trust, perceived risk and workplace spirituality towards…

  14. Multi-View Interaction Modelling of human collaboration processes: a business process study of head and neck cancer care in a Dutch academic hospital.

    Stuit, Marco; Wortmann, Hans; Szirbik, Nick; Roodenburg, Jan

    2011-12-01

    In the healthcare domain, human collaboration processes (HCPs), which consist of interactions between healthcare workers from different (para)medical disciplines and departments, are of growing importance as healthcare delivery becomes increasingly integrated. Existing workflow-based process modelling tools for healthcare process management, which are the most commonly applied, are not suited for healthcare HCPs mainly due to their focus on the definition of task sequences instead of the graphical description of human interactions. This paper uses a case study of a healthcare HCP at a Dutch academic hospital to evaluate a novel interaction-centric process modelling method. The HCP under study is the care pathway performed by the head and neck oncology team. The evaluation results show that the method brings innovative, effective, and useful features. First, it collects and formalizes the tacit domain knowledge of the interviewed healthcare workers in individual interaction diagrams. Second, the method automatically integrates these local diagrams into a single global interaction diagram that reflects the consolidated domain knowledge. Third, the case study illustrates how the method utilizes a graphical modelling language for effective tree-based description of interactions, their composition and routing relations, and their roles. A process analysis of the global interaction diagram is shown to identify HCP improvement opportunities. The proposed interaction-centric method has wider applicability since interactions are the core of most multidisciplinary patient-care processes. A discussion argues that, although (multidisciplinary) collaboration is in many cases not optimal in the healthcare domain, it is increasingly considered a necessity to improve integration, continuity, and quality of care. The proposed method is helpful to describe, analyze, and improve the functioning of healthcare collaboration. PMID:21867775

  15. Academic capitalism and academic culture: A case study.

    Pilar Mendoza.; Berger, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    This case study investigated the impact of academic capitalism on academic culture by examining the perspectives of faculty members in an American academic department with significant industrial funding. The results of this study indicate that faculty members believe that the broad integrity of the academic culture remains unaffected in this department and they consider industrial sponsorship as a highly effective vehicle for enhancing the quality of education of students and pursuing their s...

  16. Diffusion of innovation I: Formulary acceptance rates of new drugs in teaching and non-teaching British Columbia hospitals--a hospital pharmacy perspective.

    D'Sa, M M; Hill, D S; Stratton, T P

    1994-12-01

    Lag times in the diffusion of new drugs in the hospital setting have both patient care and pharmaceutical industry implications. This two-part series uses diffusion theory to examine differences in the adoption rates of new drugs in British Columbia teaching and non-teaching hospitals. Formulary addition of a new drug by a hospital's Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee was considered the adoption indicator. Time for adoption was defined as the difference between a drug's Canadian market approval date and the date of formulary addition. Surveys were mailed in September 1990 to 41 hospital pharmacies (response rate = 88%), asking respondents to provide formulary inclusion dates of 29 drugs marketed between July 1987 and March 1990. A significant difference (Mann-Whitney U Test, p < 0.0358) in median adoption time was observed between the six teaching and 25 non-teaching study hospitals, with the former adopting a new drug in 7.5 months versus the latter adopting a new drug in 12.1 months. PMID:10139270

  17. Social Responsibility Evaluation for Public Hospitals from Patients' Perspective%基于患者视角的公立医院公益性评价

    刘文彬; 邓伟; 梁斐; 胡献之; 谷茜; 赵列宾; 董斌; 施李正; 陈英耀

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate serial responsibility for public hospitals from patients' perspective, explore the influencing factors, and provide policy recommendations to improve the social responsibility for public hospitals. Methods Field survey was carried out in public hospitals to collect data. The patients' assessment on social responsibility of public hospitals was analyzed. Mixed linear regression model was applied to explore the influencing factors of public hospitals' social responsibility. Results The occupation, insurance and the experience of the patients, in the aspect of the physicians' rational prescription and so on, will affect their assessment on the social responsibility of public hospitals. Conclusion Improving the appropriateness of medical services, optimizing the hospital environment, undertaking more programs for public welfare and so on, will help to enhance the social responsibility.%目的 从患者角度对公立医院公益性进行评价,探究其中的影响因素,为提高公立医院公益性提出政策建议.方法 对公立医院就诊患者进行现场调查,分析患者对公立医院公益性的评价情况,通过构建混合线性回归模型探究公立医院公益性的影响因素.结果 患者职业、医保情况、对服务适宜性等方面的感受将影响其对公立医院公益性的总体评价.结论 改善就医环境、增强服务适宜性、承担一定社会慈善公益事业,将有助于提高公立医院公益性.

  18. Hypoglycemia in the hospital

    Shomali, Mansur

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common adverse event affecting hospitalized patients with diabetes. This paper reviews the data regarding optimization of glucose in hospitalized patients, discusses the scope and significance of hypoglycemia in the hospital, and makes recommendations on how to reduce the risk of this serious adverse event. Keywords: hypoglycemia; hospital; diabetes; insulin(Published: 18 July 2011)Citation: Journal of Community Hospital Internal Medicine Perspectives 2011, 1: 7217 - DOI: 10...

  19. Family Advocates' Perspectives on the Early Academic Success of Children Born to Low-Income Adolescent Mothers

    Luster, Tom; Bates, Laura; Vandenbelt, Marcia; Nievar, M. Angela

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative analyses were conducted to examine family factors related to individual differences in the early school success of children born to low-income adolescent mothers from the perspective of paraprofessional family advocates. These families were participants in a 5-year family support program. Achievement test scores and teacher ratings…

  20. THE ROLE OF THE UNIVERSITY IN THE KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY: ETHICAL PERSPECTIVES ON ACADEMIC RESEARCH IN THE AGE OF CORPORATE SCIENCE

    MARIA CERNAT

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge society lies on the ruins of national culture that thought people to function in a single universal form of science. This type of society is tightly related to a post-national multicultural world that nourishes the erosion of classical (Kantian and Humboldian cultural and scientific foundations of the university. We are now witnessing it’s transformation into a “multiversity” dominated by the competitive international academic market for students and scholars and “commodified” knowledge. The fiscal crisis of publicly financed universities forced them to constantly pursue other forms of income, the industry being the most obvious solution. In the place of universities of reason and culture the drastic decrease of public funding generated the commercialization of the universities. This is because there is an “asymmetric convergence”: while universities are adopting corporate values and principles the industry itself is not influenced by the academic values and norms. The pursuit of knowledge for mere intellectual curiosity and also the conception of the knowledge as a public good have been abandoned in favor of applied research serving corporate interests. The resulting academic capitalism is far from being the best solution to budget cuts and this study is trying to highlight some of advantages but also the most important shortcomings of this present trend in our universities.

  1. Contributions of Saudi Institutions in Applied Linguistics’ Journals Indexed in SSCI: Perspectives from Academics and Journals’ Editors

    Mohammed Ali Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a new tendency for institutions to augment their publications in journals indexed in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI. Non-native English researchers may find it hard to get their submissions published in applied linguistics journals that are solely indexed in SSCI, which are known for their high rate of rejection. This could minimize the opportunity for researchers to get their manuscripts accepted for publication. This paper aims to collect data for academics’ perceptions of Saudi institutions to see their attitudes towards submitting and publishing in these journals. The article also aims to check the perceptions of journals’ editors on the submissions affiliated to Saudi universities to check the rate of rejection and the main reasons that lie behind the rejection. Thirty seven academics responded to an online survey designed to gauge their perceptions about submitting and publishing in applied linguistics journals indexed in SSCI. Academics perceive that publishing in such journals is difficult due to the high rate of rejection, long time of turnaround review, and a stringent peer review. Editors—those who responded to another survey—reported that a combination of outdated issues being investigated, poor research design and the lack of generalizability of research findings are the main reasons for rejecting submissions from Saudi academic institutions. On the bases of the study findings, limitations and tips for future studies are highlighted.

  2. The Impact of Marketing Mix Strategy on Hospitals Performance Measured by Patient Satisfaction: An Empirical Investigation on Jeddah Private Sector Hospital Senior Managers Perspective

    Ala'Eddin Mohammad Khalaf Ahmad; Abdullah Ali Al-Qarni; Omar Zayyan Alsharqi; Dalia Abdullah Qalai; Najla Kadi

    2013-01-01

    This research aims to investigate the impact of marketing mix strategy on patient satisfaction in private sector hospitals in Jeddah city in Saudi Arabia (KSA). This research consists of the independent variables  represented by marketing mix strategy components (namely health service, pricing, distribution, promotion, physical evidence, process, and personal strategies) and dependent variable which represented by patient satisfaction. In order to explore the relationship between independent ...

  3. A Life Course Perspective on Child Health, Academic Experiences and Occupational Skill Qualifications in Adulthood: Evidence from a British Cohort*

    Jackson, Margot I.

    2010-01-01

    Existing research rarely examines the social consequences of poor childhood health from a longitudinal perspective. Using data from the British National Child Development Study, I follow a cohort from before birth through middle age to examine whether children's health limitations before and during the educational process predict occupational skill qualifications in mid-adulthood, and whether any negative consequences are strongest for children in persistently poor health. I also examine whet...

  4. Perspective of hospital archives safety risk assessment mechanism from risk management perspective%从风险管理视角透视医院档案安全风险评估机制

    韦群慧

    2015-01-01

    Hospital archives as a fixity information to response the hospital real activities,data and the hospital historical events have important reference value and query value.With the increasing popularity of office automation.The importance of information security protection is becoming more apparent.Doing a good job in the management of hospital archives,and we must attach great importance to security risks.Doing a good job in safety risk assessment,selecting reasonable control mode,and establishing risk management system can be maximize achieved the hospital archives security assurance.In this article the author has comprehensive analysis of hospital archives safety risk assessment mechanism from risk management perspective.%医院档案作为一种反应医院的真实活动、资料以及医院历史事件的固化信息,具有重要的参考价值和查询价值。随着办公自动化的日趋普及,信息安全防范的重要性日趋显现。搞好医院档案管理,必须高度重视安全风险,做好安全风险评估,选择合理控制方式,建立风险管理体系,才能实现医院档案安全保障的最大化。本文从风险管理视角对医院档案安全风险评估机制进行综合分析。

  5. Retention of Underrepresented Minority Faculty: Strategic Initiatives for Institutional Value Proposition Based on Perspectives from a Range of Academic Institutions.

    Whittaker, Joseph A; Montgomery, Beronda L; Martinez Acosta, Veronica G

    2015-01-01

    The student and faculty make-up of academic institutions does not represent national demographics. Racial and ethnic minorities are disproportionately underrepresented nationally, and particularly at predominantly white institutions (PWIs). Although significant efforts and funding have been committed to increasing points of access or recruitment of under-represented minority (URM) students and faculty at PWIs, these individuals have not been recruited and retained at rates that reflect their national proportions. Underrepresentation of URMs is particularly prevalent in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. This reality represents a national crisis given a predicted shortage of workers in STEM disciplines based on current rates of training of all individuals, majority and URM, and the intersection of this limitation with persistent challenges in the recruitment, training, retention and advancement of URMs who will soon represent the largest pool of future trainees. An additional compounding factor is the increasingly disproportionate underrepresentation of minorities at higher professorial and administrative ranks, thus limiting the pool of potential mentors who are correlated with successful shepherding of URM students through STEM training and development. We address issues related to improving recruitment and retention of URM faculty that are applicable across a range of academic institutions. We describe challenges with recruitment and retention of URM faculty and their advancement through promotion in the faculty ranks and into leadership positions. We offer specific recommendations, including identifying environmental barriers to diversity and implementing strategies for their amelioration, promoting effective and innovative mentoring, and addressing leadership issues related to constructive change for promoting diversity. PMID:26240521

  6. A Study of Employability between Higher Technical and Vocational Education and Employer in Tourism and Hospitality: A Stakeholder perspective

    Ching-Yi Tsai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between tourism and hospitality education and work in terms of employability development as well as to discuss how higher education can contribute to such a development. To begin with, as a background, the relation between higher education and work has been described based on the already mentioned discrepancy discussion. Later, the concept of employability will be explored and discussed in general terms as well as regarding the tourism and hospitality. Finally, different ways of integrating employability in higher education curricula are discussed. Based on this discussion, we have some suggestions regarding the employability development within the tourism and hospitality industry.

  7. Academic capitalism and academic culture: A case study.

    Pilar Mendoza

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This case study investigated the impact of academic capitalism on academic culture by examining the perspectives of faculty members in an American academic department with significant industrial funding. The results of this study indicate that faculty members believe that the broad integrity of the academic culture remains unaffected in this department and they consider industrial sponsorship as a highly effective vehicle for enhancing the quality of education of students and pursuing their scientific interests. This study provides valuable insights to federal and institutional policiescreated to foster industry-academia partnerships and commercialization of academic research.

  8. Cancer Imaging at the Crossroads of Precision Medicine: Perspective From an Academic Imaging Department in a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Van den Abbeele, Annick D; Krajewski, Katherine M; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Fennessy, Fiona M; DiPiro, Pamela J; Nguyen, Quang-Dé; Harris, Gordon J; Jacene, Heather A; Lefever, Greg; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2016-04-01

    The authors propose one possible vision for the transformative role that cancer imaging in an academic setting can play in the current era of personalized and precision medicine by sharing a conceptual model that is based on experience and lessons learned designing a multidisciplinary, integrated clinical and research practice at their institution. The authors' practice and focus are disease-centric rather than imaging-centric. A "wall-less" infrastructure has been developed, with bidirectional integration of preclinical and clinical cancer imaging research platforms, enabling rapid translation of novel cancer drugs from discovery to clinical trial evaluation. The talents and expertise of medical professionals, scientists, and staff members have been coordinated in a horizontal and vertical fashion through the creation of Cancer Imaging Consultation Services and the "Adopt-a-Radiologist" campaign. Subspecialized imaging consultation services at the hub of an outpatient cancer center facilitate patient decision support and management at the point of care. The Adopt-a-Radiologist campaign has led to the creation of a novel generation of imaging clinician-scientists, fostered new collaborations, increased clinical and academic productivity, and improved employee satisfaction. Translational cancer research is supported, with a focus on early in vivo testing of novel cancer drugs, co-clinical trials, and longitudinal tumor imaging metrics through the imaging research core laboratory. Finally, a dedicated cancer imaging fellowship has been developed, promoting the future generation of cancer imaging specialists as multidisciplinary, multitalented professionals who are trained to effectively communicate with clinical colleagues and positively influence patient care. PMID:26774886

  9. What is the role of the pharmacist?: physicians' and nurses' perspectives in community and hospital settings of Santiago de Cuba

    Niurka María Dupotey Varela; Djenane Ramalho de Oliveira; Caridad Sedeño Argilagos; Kisvel Oliveros Castro; Elisveidis Mosqueda Pérez; Yelina Hidalgo Clavel; Nelly Sánchez Bisset

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out to understand the perceptions and expectations of the other health care professionals about pharmacists' role in primary health care centers and hospitals in Santiago de Cuba (Cuba). A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted, applying a self-administered questionnaire to health care professionals. The sample included 763 professionals (40.9% physicians and 59.1 % nurses) from hospitals and primary health care clinics, chosen by random stratified sampling,. T...

  10. Hospitality and hostility in hospitals

    Jensen, Tina Blegind; Aanestad, Margunn

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the adoption of healthcare information systems (HIS) from a user perspective. Our case study concerns how a group of orthopaedic surgeons experienced and reacted to the adoption and mandatory use of an Electronic Patient Record system in a Danish hospital. We...... propose to use the concepts of hospitality and hostility to turn our attention to the interaction between the host (the surgeons) and the guest (the information system) and consider how the boundaries between them evolved in the everyday work practices. As an alternative to previous studies on technology...