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Sample records for academic alliances program

  1. ASC Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program Verification and Validation Whitepaper

    Klein, R; Graziani, F; Trucano, T

    2006-03-31

    The purpose of this whitepaper is to provide a framework for understanding the role that verification and validation (V&V) are expected to play in successful ASC Predictive Science Academic Alliance (PSAA) Centers and projects. V&V have been emphasized in the recent specification of the PSAA (NNSA, 2006): (1) The resulting simulation models lend themselves to practical verification and validation methodologies and strategies that should include the integrated use of experimental and/or observational data as a key part of model and sub-model validation, as well as demonstrations of numerical convergence and accuracy for code verification. (2) Verification, validation and prediction methodologies and results must be much more strongly emphasized as research topics and demonstrated via the proposed simulations. (3) It is mandatory that proposals address the following two topics: (a) Predictability in science & engineering; and (b) Verification & validation strategies for large-scale simulations, including quantification of uncertainty and numerical convergence. We especially call attention to the explicit coupling of computational predictability and V&V in the third bullet above. In this whitepaper we emphasize this coupling, and provide concentrated guidance for addressing item 2. The whitepaper has two main components. First, we provide a brief and high-level tutorial on V&V that emphasizes critical elements of the program. Second, we state a set of V&V-related requirements that successful PSAA proposals must address.

  2. Forging Industry-Academic Alliances

    Joseph M. Woodside

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With ever increasing amounts of data, organizations are identifying the importance of Business Intelligence (BI and Analytics for decision making. However in order to realize the full potential of these technologies, organizations require well-trained and educated management and analytic subject matter experts to transform the data and results into actionable information for decisions. In order to meet this demand for analytical talent, a Center for Business Intelligence and Analytics (CBIA housed within the university seeks to develop knowledge and skills vital in the fast changing field of business, through developing the next generation of managers and analysts with skills in decision-making through use of analytical techniques. This presentation provides the strategic framework for the definition and development of a CBIA and framework for joint academic and industry collaboration to develop the next generation of industry experts. The core components including industry demand, alliance objectives including objectives, curriculum and talent requirements, and opportunities.

  3. The advising alliance for international and domestic graduate students: Measurement invariance and implications for academic stress.

    Rice, Kenneth G; Suh, Hanna; Yang, Xiaohui; Choe, Elise; Davis, Don E

    2016-04-01

    We expanded the focus of a prior study of international graduate student advising relationships (Rice et al., 2009) to examine advising experiences of both international and domestic students. International (n = 434) and domestic (n = 387) students completed the Advisory Working Alliance Inventory (AWAI-S; Schlosser & Gelso, 2001) and measures of advising experiences, perceived academic stress, and desire to change advisor. Measurement invariance analyses suggested that a 23-item AWAI-S showed support for scalar invariance. A bifactor structure showed superior fit to the 3-factor model or a second-order factor model for the AWAI-S. International and domestic graduate students did not differ in ratings of general alliance, academic stress, or desire to change advisors. General alliance was strongly related to less academic stress and less desire to change advisors. International students who felt disrespected by their advisors were more likely to be academically stressed than domestic students. Structured mentoring experiences were associated with lower stress and less desire to change, and this effect was similar in both international and domestic students. Overall, results suggested that the current level of measurement, and possibly theory development, regarding the advisory alliance is good at identifying generic satisfaction but weaker at differentiating components of the alliance. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27045448

  4. Evaluation of an academic service partnership using a strategic alliance framework.

    Murray, Teri A; James, Dorothy C

    2012-01-01

    Strategic alliances involve the sharing of resources to achieve mutually relevant benefits and they are flexible ways to access resources outside of one's own institution. The recent landmark report from the Institute of Medicine, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, called for academic and health care organizations to strategically align around the future registered nurse workforce to improve the quality and safety of patient care. The dedicated education unit (DEU) is one practical way for 2 entities to align so that students can learn to administer safe, quality care. Because DEUs have great potential, it is critical to evaluate the alignment between the academic and service partner for appropriate fit, mutual benefit, and long-term success. In this article, we analyze the effectiveness of the Saint Louis University School of Nursing (SLUSON) and Mercy Hospital, St. Louis (MHSL) DEU project, an alliance between a medical center and school of nursing, using the Single Alliance Key Success Model. PMID:22177471

  5. 75 FR 78799 - Noise Compatibility Program Notice, Fort Worth Alliance Airport, Fort Worth, TX

    2010-12-16

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Compatibility Program Notice, Fort Worth Alliance Airport, Fort... 5, 2009. On December 1, 2010, the FAA approved the Fort Worth Alliance Airport noise compatibility... Date: The effective date of the FAA's approval of the Fort Worth Alliance Airport noise...

  6. Ontological Representation of Academic Programs

    Richard Hackelbusch

    2006-01-01

    Using legal terminology, academic institutions release teaching and examination regulations to form the statutory framework of academic programs. This terminology is one reason why students often do not know how to satisfy the program requirements laid down by the corresponding institutions. This can result in needlessly long study times. Frequent changes of those regulations and parallel valid different regulations forming the statutory framework of programs leading to the same degrees may a...

  7. Stereo-vision-based perception capabilities developed during the Robotics Collaborative Technology Alliances program

    Rankin, Arturo; Bajracharya, Max; Huertas, Andres; Howard, Andrew; Moghaddam, Baback; Brennan, Shane; Ansar, Adnan; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael; Matthies, Larry

    2010-04-01

    The Robotics Collaborative Technology Alliances (RCTA) program, which ran from 2001 to 2009, was funded by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and managed by General Dynamics Robotic Systems. The alliance brought together a team of government, industrial, and academic institutions to address research and development required to enable the deployment of future military unmanned ground vehicle systems ranging in size from man-portables to ground combat vehicles. Under RCTA, three technology areas critical to the development of future autonomous unmanned systems were addressed: advanced perception, intelligent control architectures and tactical behaviors, and human-robot interaction. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) participated as a member for the entire program, working four tasks in the advanced perception technology area: stereo improvements, terrain classification, pedestrian detection in dynamic environments, and long range terrain classification. Under the stereo task, significant improvements were made to the quality of stereo range data used as a front end to the other three tasks. Under the terrain classification task, a multi-cue water detector was developed that fuses cues from color, texture, and stereo range data, and three standalone water detectors were developed based on sky reflections, object reflections (such as trees), and color variation. In addition, a multi-sensor mud detector was developed that fuses cues from color stereo and polarization sensors. Under the long range terrain classification task, a classifier was implemented that uses unsupervised and self-supervised learning of traversability to extend the classification of terrain over which the vehicle drives to the far-field. Under the pedestrian detection task, stereo vision was used to identify regions-of-interest in an image, classify those regions based on shape, and track detected pedestrians in three-dimensional world coordinates. To improve the detectability of partially occluded

  8. Ontological Representation of Academic Programs

    Richard Hackelbusch

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Using legal terminology, academic institutions release teaching and examination regulations to form the statutory framework of academic programs. This terminology is one reason why students often do not know how to satisfy the program requirements laid down by the corresponding institutions. This can result in needlessly long study times. Frequent changes of those regulations and parallel valid different regulations forming the statutory framework of programs leading to the same degrees may aggravate those problems. Furthermore, academic boards have to supply an amount of courses which fits the students’ actual demand. This is a difficult task because there is only little information available for forecasting. In this paper, we present an ontology to handle these problems. It allows semantic representations of examination regulations and academic programs. Based upon this ontology, decision support systems can be implemented which can help students to decide how to satisfy the corresponding program regulations or which can help academic boards to forecast the students’ demand on certain courses.

  9. 3rd year final contractor report for: U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Project Title: Detailed Measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing at Large and Small Atwood Numbers

    This project had two major tasks: Task 1. The construction of a new air/helium facility to collect detailed measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing at high Atwood number, and the distribution of these data to LLNL, LANL, and Alliance members for code validation and design purposes. Task 2. The collection of initial condition data from the new Air/Helium facility, for use with validation of RT simulation codes at LLNL and LANL. This report describes work done in the last twelve (12) months of the project, and also contains a summary of the complete work done over the three (3) life of the project. As of April 1, 2006, the air/helium facility (Task 1) is now complete and extensive testing and validation of diagnostics has been performed. Initial condition studies (Task 2) is also complete. Detailed experiments with air/helium with Atwood numbers up to 0.1 have been completed, and Atwood numbers of 0.25. Within the last three (3) months we have been able to successfully run the facility at Atwood numbers of 0.5. The progress matches the project plan, as does the budget. We have finished the initial condition studies using the water channel, and this work has been accepted for publication on the Journal of Fluid Mechanics (the top fluid mechanics journal). Mr. Nick Mueschke and Mr. Wayne Kraft are continuing with their studies to obtain PhDs in the same field, and will also continue their collaboration visits to LANL and LLNL. Over its three (3) year life the project has supported two(2) Ph.D.'s and three (3) MS's, and produced nine (9) international journal publications, twenty four (24) conference publications, and numerous other reports. The highlight of the project has been our close collaboration with LLNL (Dr. Oleg Schilling) and LANL (Drs. Dimonte, Ristorcelli, Gore, and Harlow)

  10. Community cancer programs as strategic alliances: challenges and guidelines for action.

    Kaluzny, A D

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses the utility of strategic alliances as a way of expanding and improving the quality of cancer care provided in communities with limited access to major treatment centres. Alliances provide an organizational model for future community-based cancer programs by accommodating a growing need for interdependence among organizations and providers while permitting substantial independence and autonomy. Five managerial challenges to ensuring effective and efficient delivery of cance...

  11. Academic Medical Product Development: An Emerging Alliance of Technology Transfer Organizations and the CTSA

    Rose, Lynn M; Everts, Maaike; Heller, Caren; Burke, Christine; Hafer, Nathaniel; Steele, Scott

    2014-01-01

    To bring the benefits of science more quickly to patient care, the NIH National Center Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) supports programs that enhance the development, testing, and implementation of new medical products and procedures. The NCATS Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program is central to that mission; creating an academic home for clinical and translational science and supporting those involved in the discovery and development of new health-related invention...

  12. Preparing Academic Medical Centers for the Clinical Learning Environment Review: Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers National Initiative IV Outcomes and Evaluation

    Wehbe-Janek, Hania; Markova, Tsveti; Polis, Rachael L.; Peters, Marguerite; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Driven by changes to improve quality in patient care and population health while reducing costs, evolvement of the health system calls for restructuring health professionals' education and aligning it with the healthcare delivery system. In response to these changes, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER) encourages the integration of health system leadership, faculty, and residents in restructuring graduate medical education (GME). Innovative approaches to achieving this restructuring and the CLER objectives are essential. Methods: The Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers National Initiative (NI) IV provided a multiinstitutional learning collaborative focused on supporting GME redesign. From October 2013 through March 2015, participants conducted relevant projects, attended onsite meetings, and participated in teleconferences and webinars addressing the CLER areas. Participants shared best practices, resources, and experiences. We designed a pre/post descriptive study to examine outcomes. Results: Thirty-three institutions completed NI IV, and at its conclusion, the majority reported greater CLER readiness compared with baseline. Twenty-two (88.0%) institutions reported that NI IV had a great impact on advancing their efforts in the CLER area of their project focus, and 15 (62.5%) reported a great impact in other CLER focus areas. Opportunities to share progress with other teams and the national group meetings were reported to contribute to teams' success. Conclusion: The NI IV learning collaborative prepared institutions for CLER, suggesting successful integration of the clinical and educational enterprises. We propose that national learning collaboratives of GME-sponsoring health systems enable advancement of their education mission, leading ultimately to better healthcare outcomes. This learning model may be generalizable to newfound programs for academic medical centers

  13. 75 FR 48411 - Noise Compatibility Program Notice; Fort Worth Alliance Airport, Fort Worth, TX

    2010-08-10

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Compatibility Program Notice; Fort Worth Alliance Airport, Fort... Administration (FAA) announces that it is reviewing a proposed noise compatibility program that was submitted for... Noise Abatement Act, hereinafter referred to as ``the Act'') and 14 CFR Part 150 by the city of...

  14. The Stewardship Science Academic Alliance: A Model of Education for Fundamental and Applied Low-energy Nuclear Science

    The Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) were inaugurated in 2002 by the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U. S. Department of Energy. The purpose is to enhance connections between NNSA laboratories and the activities of university scientists and their students in research areas important to NNSA, including low-energy nuclear science. This paper highlights some of the ways that the SSAA fosters education and training of graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in low-energy nuclear science, preparing them for careers in fundamental and applied research and development

  15. The Stewardship Science Academic Alliance: A Model of Education for Fundamental and Applied Low-energy Nuclear Science

    Cizewski, J.A., E-mail: cizewski@rutgers.edu

    2014-06-15

    The Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) were inaugurated in 2002 by the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U. S. Department of Energy. The purpose is to enhance connections between NNSA laboratories and the activities of university scientists and their students in research areas important to NNSA, including low-energy nuclear science. This paper highlights some of the ways that the SSAA fosters education and training of graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in low-energy nuclear science, preparing them for careers in fundamental and applied research and development.

  16. Predictive Academic Alliances Program (PSAAP) Technical White Paper

    Schilling, O; Steinkamp, M J; Baer, M

    2006-03-01

    The design of efficient, high-gain capsules for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), the modeling of supernova implosions and explosions, and the modeling of shock-induced mixing of multi-phase reactive energetic materials requires a detailed understanding of the consequences of material interpenetration, hydrodynamic instabilities and mixing at molecular (or atomic) scales arising from initial perturbations at material interfaces, i.e., the Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities (buoyancy-, shock- and shear-induced instabilities, respectively). From a computational point of view, this requires the development of models for hydrodynamic instability growth from initial perturbations through the weakly- and strongly-nonlinear phases, and finally, to the late-time turbulent regime. In particular, modeling these processes completely and accurately is critical for demonstrating the feasibility and potential success of contemporary ICF capsule designs. In applications to energetic materials, turbulent mixing of multi-phase mixtures is a key process in anaerobic and aerobic combustion that can support shock formation and propagation. A predictive computational capability for the effects of turbulent mass, momentum, energy and species transport, as well as material mixing, on the thermonuclear fusion process in ICF entails the development of turbulent transport and mixing or subgrid-scale models based on statistically-averaged or filtered evolution equations, respectively. The former models are typically referred to as Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) (and related) models and the latter are referred to as large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The strong nonlinearity of the equations describing the hydrodynamics, thermodynamics, material properties and other multi-scale phenomena, together with the formal ensemble averaging or filtering procedure, introduce correlations of strongly-fluctuating fields and other a priori unclosed quantities that must be explicitly modeled to close the set of equations describing the implosion dynamics and burning of an ICF capsule or the combustion of reactive materials.

  17. Academic medical product development: an emerging alliance of technology transfer organizations and the CTSA.

    Rose, Lynn M; Everts, Maaike; Heller, Caren; Burke, Christine; Hafer, Nathaniel; Steele, Scott

    2014-12-01

    To bring the benefits of science more quickly to patient care, the NIH National Center Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) supports programs that enhance the development, testing, and implementation of new medical products and procedures. The NCATS clinical and translational science award (CTSA) program is central to that mission; creating an academic home for clinical and translational science and supporting those involved in the discovery and development of new health-related inventions. The technology transfer Offices (TTO) of CTSA-funded universities can be important partners in the development process; facilitating the transfer of medical research to the commercial sector for further development and ultimately, distribution to patients. The Aggregating Intellectual Property (IP) Working Group (AWG) of the CTSA public private partnerships key function committee (PPP-KFC) developed a survey to explore how CTSA-funded institutions currently interface with their respective TTOs to support medical product development. The results suggest a range of relationships across institutions; approximately half have formal collaborative programs, but only a few have well-connected programs. Models of collaborations are described and provided as examples of successful CTSA/TTO partnerships that have increased the value of health-related inventions as measured by follow-on funding and industry involvement; either as a consulting partner or licensee. PMID:24945893

  18. Building capabilities to manage strategic alliances

    SLUYTS, Kim; Matthyssens, Paul; Martens, Rudy; Streukens, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Recently, academics have attributed a large part of alliance success to a firm's ability to successfully manage its alliances, also called its level of alliance management capability. We contribute to this growing body of literature by (1) verifying the impact of alliance management capability on alliance performance and (2) analyzing the drivers of alliance management capability. We measure this capability through four types of alliance learning processes and study how each of these processe...

  19. Peer-Mentoring Program and Academic Atmosphere

    Sri Endah Kusmartini; Tiur Simanjuntak

    2014-01-01

    Management of Sriwijaya State Polytechnic believes that peer-mentoring program has positive effects on students’ academic success. Moreover, it is also believed that good academic atmosphere should be developed. In line with these, researchers tried to investigate whether peer-mentoring program and academic atmosphere correlated significantly to students’ writing achievement partially and simultaneously. The research was conducted in English Department, Sriwijaya State Polytechnic with 60 sam...

  20. Gay-Straight Alliances: Understanding Their Impact on the Academic and Social Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning High School Students

    McCormick, Adam; Schmidt, Kathryn; Clifton, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effectiveness of gay-straight alliances (GSAs) on the social and academic experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youths. The limited research on GSAs suggests that they are associated with positive youth development and increased safety; however, little qualitative information…

  1. Developing Academic Strategic Alliances: Reconciling Multiple Institutional Cultures, Policies, and Practices

    Eckel, Peter D.; Hartley, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Interorganizational relationships (IORs), according to these authors, represent a promising means for developing new capacities in the creation of strategic partnerships between colleges and universities. In this study, the authors focus on academic IORs that are strategic in nature (i.e., they extend beyond the mere sharing of library books or…

  2. Academic Medical Centers Forming Accountable Care Organizations and Partnering With Community Providers: The Experience of the Johns Hopkins Medicine Alliance for Patients.

    Berkowitz, Scott A; Ishii, Lisa; Schulz, John; Poffenroth, Matt

    2016-03-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs)--which include teaching hospital(s) and additional care delivery entities--that form accountable care organizations (ACOs) must decide whether to partner with other provider entities, such as community practices. Indeed, 67% (33/49) of AMC ACOs through the Medicare Shared Savings Program through 2014 are believed to include an outside community practice. There are opportunities for both the AMC and the community partners in pursuing such relationships, including possible alignment around shared goals and adding ACO beneficiaries. To create the Johns Hopkins Medicine Alliance for Patients (JMAP), in January 2014, Johns Hopkins Medicine chose to partner with two community primary care groups and one cardiology practice to support clinical integration while adding approximately 60 providers and 5,000 Medicare beneficiaries. The principal initial interventions within JMAP included care coordination for high-risk beneficiaries and later, in 2014, generating dashboards of ACO quality measures to facilitate quality improvement and early efforts at incorporating clinical pathways and Choosing Wisely recommendations. Additional interventions began in 2015.The principal initial challenges JMAP faced were data integration, generation of quality measure reports among disparate electronic medical records, receiving and then analyzing claims data, and seeking to achieve provider engagement; all these affected timely deployment of the early interventions. JMAP also created three regional advisory councils as a forum promoting engagement of local leadership. Network strategies among AMCs, including adding community practices in a nonemployment model, will continue to require thoughtful strategic planning and a keen understanding of local context. PMID:26535867

  3. Nuclear Engineering Academic Programs Survey, 2003

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2002 and August 31, 2003. Thirty-three academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during the survey time period and all responded (100% response rate). Three of the programs included in last year's report were discontinued or out-of-scope in 2003. One new program has been added to the list. This year the survey data include U.S. citizenship, gender, and race/ethnicity by degree level

  4. Demand Estimation for Collegiate Aviation Academic Programs.

    Goodell, Phillips W.

    This paper addresses the issue of how one might go about providing a reasonable answer to the question of how many students will enroll in a new academic program at a university and applies the principles to the process of estimating demand for a new collegiate aviation program. A combination of approaches is suggested, including the following:…

  5. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE (SECA) SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    Unknown

    2003-06-01

    This report summarizes the progress made during the September 2001-March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program''. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate a modular SOFC system that can be configured to create highly efficient, cost-competitive, and environmentally benign power plants tailored to specific markets. When fully developed, the system will meet the efficiency, performance, life, and cost goals for future commercial power plants.

  6. 2015 Stewardship Science Academic Programs Annual

    Stone, Terri [NNSA Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Washington, DC (United States); Mischo, Millicent [NNSA Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The Stockpile Stewardship Academic Programs (SSAP) are essential to maintaining a pipeline of professionals to support the technical capabilities that reside at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) national laboratories, sites, and plants. Since 1992, the United States has observed the moratorium on nuclear testing while significantly decreasing the nuclear arsenal. To accomplish this without nuclear testing, NNSA and its laboratories developed a science-based Stockpile Stewardship Program to maintain and enhance the experimental and computational tools required to ensure the continued safety, security, and reliability of the stockpile. NNSA launched its academic program portfolio more than a decade ago to engage students skilled in specific technical areas of relevance to stockpile stewardship. The success of this program is reflected by the large number of SSAP students choosing to begin their careers at NNSA national laboratories.

  7. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program

    Nguyen Minh

    2006-07-31

    This report summarizes the work performed for Phase I (October 2001 - August 2006) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled 'Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program'. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. During Phase I of the program significant progress has been made in the area of SOFC technology. A high-efficiency low-cost system was designed and supporting technology developed such as fuel processing, controls, thermal management, and power electronics. Phase I culminated in the successful demonstration of a prototype system that achieved a peak efficiency of 41%, a high-volume cost of $724/kW, a peak power of 5.4 kW, and a degradation rate of 1.8% per 500 hours. . An improved prototype system was designed, assembled, and delivered to DOE/NETL at the end of the program. This prototype achieved an extraordinary peak efficiency of 49.6%.

  8. Academic training: Advanced lectures on multiprocessor programming

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme 31 October 1, 2 November 2011 from 11:00 to 12:00 -  IT Auditorium, Bldg. 31   Three classes (60 mins) on Multiprocessor Programming Prof. Dr. Christoph von Praun Georg-Simon-Ohm University of Applied Sciences Nuremberg, Germany This is an advanced class on multiprocessor programming. The class gives an introduction to principles of concurrent objects and the notion of different progress guarantees that concurrent computations can have. The focus of this class is on non-blocking computations, i.e. concurrent programs that do not make use of locks. We discuss the implementation of practical non-blocking data structures in detail. 1st class: Introduction to concurrent objects 2nd class: Principles of non-blocking synchronization 3rd class: Concurrent queues Brief Bio of Christoph von Praun Christoph worked on a variety of analysis techniques and runtime platforms for parallel programs. Hist most recent research studies programming models an...

  9. Therapeutic alliance, expressed emotion, and treatment outcome for anorexia nervosa in a family-based partial hospitalization program.

    Rienecke, Renee D; Richmond, Rebekah; Lebow, Jocelyn

    2016-08-01

    Adolescent therapeutic alliance has been found to be associated with improvements in eating disorder cognitions and with early weight gain. The current study assessed patient and parent therapeutic alliance, correlates of parent alliance, and relationship between alliance and treatment outcome. Fifty-six patients with anorexia nervosa completed measures of therapeutic alliance and eating disorder symptoms. Patients' parents completed measures of therapeutic alliance, expressed emotion, and psychopathology. Patients' alliance predicted cognitive and behavioral symptomatology at end of treatment (β=-0.39, p=0.001), though it was not related to changes in weight (β=0.12, p=0.377). Maternal hostility was associated with lower maternal alliance (r=-0.34, p=0.05). Findings suggest that maternal hostility should be addressed in treatment, and that patient alliance may be important in achieving psychological recovery from disordered eating. PMID:27289048

  10. "When You Fail, You Feel Like a Failure": One Student's Experience of Academic Probation and an Academic Support Program

    Arcand, Isabelle; LeBlanc, Raymond N.

    2012-01-01

    This in-depth, qualitative study explored the experience of academic probation. It recounts the story of Mark, an undergraduate student on academic probation who participated in an academic support program to attain good academic standing. His story is contrasted to the current literature on academic probation and is considered in light of Dewey's…

  11. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) - Better Buildings Neighborhood Program at Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance: Home Performance with Energy Star® and Better Buildings Performance

    Holzhauser, Andy; Jones, Chris; Faust, Jeremy; Meyer, Chris; Van Divender, Lisa

    2013-12-30

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (Energy Alliance) is a nonprofit economic development agency dedicated to helping Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky communities reduce energy consumption. The Energy Alliance has launched programs to educate homeowners, commercial property owners, and nonprofit organizations about energy efficiency opportunities they can use to drive energy use reductions and financial savings, while extending significant focus to creating/retaining jobs through these programs. The mission of the Energy Alliance is based on the premise that investment in energy efficiency can lead to transformative economic development in a region. With support from seven municipalities, the Energy Alliance began operation in early 2010 and has been among the fastest growing nonprofit organizations in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area. The Energy Alliance offers two programs endorsed by the Department of Energy: the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® Program for homeowners and the Better Buildings Performance Program for commercial entities. Both programs couple expert guidance, project management, and education in energy efficiency best practices with incentives and innovative energy efficiency financing to help building owners effectively invest in the energy efficiency, comfort, health, longevity, and environmental impact of their residential or commercial buildings. The Energy Alliance has raised over $23 million of public and private capital to build a robust market for energy efficiency investment. Of the $23 million, $17 million was a direct grant from the Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The organization’s investments in energy efficiency projects in the residential and commercial sector have led to well over $50 million in direct economic activity and created over 375,000 hours of labor created or retained. In addition, over 250 workers have been trained through the Building Performance Training

  12. Mars Museum Visualization Alliance

    Sohus, A. M.; Viotti, M. A.; de Jong, E. M.

    2004-11-01

    The Mars Museum Visualization Alliance is a collaborative effort funded by the Mars Public Engagement Office and supported by JPL's Informal Education staff and the Solar System Visualization Project to share the adventure of exploration and make Mars a real place. The effort started in 2002 with a small working group of museum professionals to learn how best to serve museum audiences through informal science educators. By the time the Mars Exploration Rovers landed on Mars in January 2004, over 100 organizations were partners in the Alliance, which has become a focused community of Mars educators. The Alliance provides guaranteed access to images, information, news, and resources for use by the informal science educators with their students, educators, and public audiences. Thousands of people have shared the adventure of exploring Mars and now see it as a real place through the efforts of the Mars Museum Visualization Alliance partners. The Alliance has been lauded for "providing just the right inside track for museums to do what they do best," be that webcasts, live presentations with the latest images and information, high-definition productions, planetarium shows, or hands-on educational activities. The Alliance is extending its mission component with Cassini, Genesis, Deep Impact, and Stardust. The Mars Exploration and Cassini Programs, as well as the Genesis, Deep Impact, and Stardust Projects, are managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California.

  13. Understanding the Organizational Context of Academic Program Development

    Dee, Jay R.; Heineman, William A.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a conceptual model that academic leaders can use to navigate the complex, and often contentious, organizational terrain of academic program development. The model includes concepts related to the institution's external environment, as well as internal organizational structures, cultures, and politics. Drawing from the…

  14. Academic Staff's Views About International Scholarships and Support Programs

    M. Ertaç ATİLA; Ö. Faruk ÖZEKEN; Mustafa SÖZBİLİR

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine views of academic staff who have been to the United States in order to do a research study by means of scholarships and support programs provided by the Higher Education Council or Scientific or Technological Research Council of Turkey about the scholarship programs. The qualitative study is carried out as a holistic multiple case study research design. The data were gathered through semi-structured interviews from 10 academic staff who participated the s...

  15. Evaluating Academic Technical Communication Programs: New Stakeholders, Diverse Goals.

    Anderson, Paul V.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses three challenges (dealing with program diversity, accommodating conflicting emphases, and precipitating positive change) in evaluating academic technical communication programs. Outlines an approach to program evaluation that redefines the stakeholders to include a wide range of partners in both workplace and academy, and that uses a…

  16. Alianza Efectiva Familia-Escuela: Un Programa Audiovisual Para Padres Effective Family-School Alliance: An Audiovisual Program for Parents

    Lidia Alcalay

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente artículo es identificar y describir algunas de las variables consideradas como fundamentales para promover una alianza efectiva entre la familia y la escuela. Estas variables se consideraron al desarrollar un material educativo consistente en un video y un manual de actividades, para ser usado con los padres y apoderados en el contexto escolar. El tratamiento de las temáticas estuvo orientado a ampliar la perspectiva de los padres en relación a su rol en la educación de sus hijos y a cuestionar y enriquecer su integración al sistema escolar. En este marco se plantea que el material puede aumentar las competencias parentales de manera de generar una alianza más efectiva con el sistema escolar en pro de un mejor desarrollo del niño en el ámbito social, emocional y cognitivo.The purpose of this article is to identify and describe some of the variables that are considered as essential in order to promote an effective alliance between family and school. These variables were considered in the development of an educational program that includes a video and a set of activities designed to be used with parents in the school context. The different contents of the program were elaborated in such a way so as to expand parents' perspective with respect to their rol in their children's education, as well as to question and enrich their integration to the school system. Within this context, the educational program is oriented to increase parental competences so as to establish a more effective alliance with the school system which in turn, will have a positive effect in social, emotional and cognitive development of the child.

  17. Transfer of Training in an Academic Leadership Development Program for Program Coordinators

    Ladyshewsky, Richard K.; Flavell, Helen

    2012-01-01

    The higher education sector has increasingly begun to pay more attention to academic leadership. This qualitative study explores how such an investment in a 20-week leadership development program influenced the behaviour of 10 academic staff in the role of program coordinator 6 to 12 months following participation in the program. Otherwise known…

  18. Assessment of preclinical students’ academic motivation before and after a three-day academic affair program

    Aung MN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Myo Nyein Aung,1 Juraiporn Somboonwong,2 Vorapol Jaroonvanichkul,1 Pongsak Wannakrairot3 1Medical Education Unit, 2Quality Management Division and Department of Physiology, 3Academic Affairs Division, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, ThailandBackground: Medical students’ motivation is an important driving factor for academic performance, and therefore medical teachers and educators are often highly interested in this topic. This study evaluated the impact of an academic affair program upon preclinical year medical students’ motivation to study.Design and methods: An intervention study was conducted using a pretest-posttest study design. A total of 296 preclinical year medical students who had just passed their first year and were about to attend their second year at the Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, participated in the study. The intervention comprised of dialogues for personality development, pictorial expression in groups, as well as small group lectures delivered by senior students giving information on how to prepare for the forthcoming classes. Students’ academic motivation was measured before and after the intervention program, applying the transculturally translated Academic Motivation Scale (AMS. Cronbach’s alpha of Thai version AMS was 0.8992. The average scores in seven scales of AMS were compared between the pre- and posttest results, using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The differences were confirmed by using the multivariate analysis of variance.Results: Students’ academic motivation increased after participation in the three-day academic program. There was also a significant increase in introjected extrinsic motivation, which can enhance the students’ self-esteem and feeling of self-worth (P<0.001. Moreover, intrinsic motivation toward accomplishment increased significantly (P<0.001. This is related to the enjoyment of passing academic milestones, and a step

  19. The Effect of Freshmen Year Programs on Academic Success

    Post, Jennifer B.

    1998-01-01

    Academic Success and Freshmen Year Programs by Jennifer B. Post Committee Chair: Steven M. Janosik College Student Personnel (ABSTRACT) Student affairs practitioners attempt to combine in-class and out-of-class learning. One example of this is first year residential programs. In these programs freshmen live together in one residence hall. Each program is different, but common characteristics include increased student staff, freshmen seminar, and increa...

  20. A Structured Career Intervention Program for Academically Challenged Students

    Salleh, Amla; Abdullah, Syed Mohamad; Mahmud, Zuria; Ghavifekr, Simin; Ishak, Noriah

    2013-01-01

    A study was carried out to test the effects of a 2-week structured intervention program on academically challenged students' career development. A quasi-experimental study was designed using pre-tests, post-tests, and a control group approach to examine the effects of the intervention program. Data were collected from both the experimental…

  1. Exercise Science Academic Programs and Research in the Philippines

    MADRIGAL, NORBERTO; REYES, JOSEPHINE JOY; PAGADUAN, JEFFREY; ESPINO, REIL VINARD

    2010-01-01

    In this invited editorial, professors from leading institutions in the Philippines, share information regarding their programs relating to Exercise Science. They have provided information on academic components such as entrance requirements, progression through programs, and professional opportunities available to students following completion; as well as details regarding funding available to students to participate in research, collaboration, and specific research interests.

  2. Directory of Academic Programs in Occupational Safety and Health.

    Weis, William J., III; And Others

    This booklet describes academic program offerings in American colleges and universities in the area of occupational safety and health. Programs are divided into five major categories, corresponding to each of the core disciplines: (1) occupational safety and health/industrial hygiene, (2) occupational safety, (3) industrial hygiene, (4)…

  3. Southern Impact Testing Alliance (SITA)

    Hubbs, Whitney; Roebuck, Brian; Zwiener, Mark; Wells, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to form this Alliance began in 2008 to showcase the impact testing capabilities within the southern United States. Impact testing customers can utilize SITA partner capabilities to provide supporting data during all program phases-materials/component/ flight hardware design, development, and qualification. This approach would allow programs to reduce risk by providing low cost testing during early development to flush out possible problems before moving on to larger scale1 higher cost testing. Various SITA partners would participate in impact testing depending on program phase-materials characterization, component/subsystem characterization, full-scale system testing for qualification. SITA partners would collaborate with the customer to develop an integrated test approach during early program phases. Modeling and analysis validation can start with small-scale testing to ensure a level of confidence for the next step large or full-scale conclusive test shots. Impact Testing Facility (ITF) was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960's and played a malor role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As a result of return to flight testing after the loss of STS-107 (Columbia) MSFC ITF realized the need to expand their capabilities beyond meteoroid and space debris impact testing. MSFC partnered with the Department of Defense and academic institutions as collaborative efforts to gain and share knowledge that would benefit the Space Agency as well as the DoD. MSFC ITF current capabilities include: Hypervelocity impact testing, ballistic impact testing, and environmental impact testing.

  4. Therapeutic alliance.

    Fox, Valerie

    2002-01-01

    I have been very fortunate in my journey of mental illness. I respond well to medication, but I don't think that is the complete answer to living successfully with serious, persistent mental illness. I believe a person's environment is also of utmost importance, enabling the person suffering with mental illness to continually grow in life. I found early in my struggle with mental illness a psychiatrist with whom I have always had a very good rapport. Until recently I didn't know that what I have with this psychiatrist is professionally known as a therapeutic alliance. Over the years, when I need someone to talk over anything that is troubling to me, I seek my psychiatrist. A therapeutic alliance is non-judgmental; it is nourishing; and finally it is a relationship of complete trust. Perhaps persons reading this article who have never experienced this alliance will seek it. I believe it can make an insecure person secure; a frightened person less frightened; and allow a person to continue the journey of mental health with a sense of belief in oneself. PMID:12433224

  5. The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance Program: lessons learned and future directions.

    Shiboski, C H; Webster-Cyriaque, J Y; Ghannoum, M; Dittmer, D P; Greenspan, J S

    2016-04-01

    The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance (OHARA) was established in 2006 to provide the capacity to investigate the oral complications associated with HIV/AIDS within the ACTG infrastructure. Its goals were to explore the effects of potent antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the development of opportunistic infections, and variation and resistance of opportunistic pathogens in the context of immune suppression and long-term ART. The objectives of this talk, presented as part of a plenary session at the 7th World Workshop on Oral Health and Disease in AIDS, were to (i) provide an overview of OHARA's most recent research agenda, and how it evolved since OHARA's inception; (ii) describe OHARA's main accomplishments, including examples of research protocols completed and their key findings; and (iii) describe spin-off projects derived from OHARA, lessons learned, and future directions. OHARA has met its central goal and made key contributions to the field in several ways: (i) by developing/updating diagnostic criteria for oral disease endpoints commonly measured in OHARA protocols and in HIV/AIDS research in general and has creating standardized training modules, both for measuring these oral disease endpoints across clinical specialties, and for collecting oral fluid specimens; (ii) by implementing a total of nine protocols, six of which are completed. Three protocols involved domestic research sites, while three involved international research sites (in Africa, India, and South America); (iii) and by developing and validating a number of laboratory assays used in its protocols and in the field of oral HIV/AIDS research. PMID:27109281

  6. Timetabling an Academic Department with Linear Programming.

    Bezeau, Lawrence M.

    This paper describes an approach to faculty timetabling and course scheduling that uses computerized linear programming. After reviewing the literature on linear programming, the paper discusses the process whereby a timetable was created for a department at the University of New Brunswick. Faculty were surveyed with respect to course offerings…

  7. Meeting the Academic Needs of Minority Students through a Non-academic Mentoring Program

    Luz Mary Rincón; Caren Smith Fielder

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the preliminary results of a mentoring program developed by the Mount Pleasant Independent School District (MPISD) in the State of Texas with the goal of improving low-achieving students’ results on the math and reading state mandated tests, Texas Academic Knowledge and Skills (TAKS). The article describes the level of development of the program at the end of the first year of implementation and shows what may be the positive impact of youth participation in mentoring re...

  8. Genesis of an Academic Research Program

    Gautam Bhattacharyya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available As students progress towards their PhD degrees, they will become more independent and practitioner-like; for those moving into academia, it is often assumed the programs of their PhD mentors will serve as prototypes for their own successful research programs. However, the author’s research program as an Assistant Professor led him in directions never considered as a graduate student. The author had to make significant decisions in choosing a primary audience, finding an overarching theme, defining the individual problems, and developing these problems into researchable projects. Infrastructure-related issues associated with the author’s research program were also considered. The details of his journey from the end of his doctoral degree to his current position as an Assistant Professor are described in this article.

  9. Academic Program Approval and Review Practices

    Don G. Creamer

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available This report outlines general and specific processes for both program approval and program review practices found in 50 states and eight foreign countries and regions.  Models that depict these procedures are defined and the strengths and weakness of each are discussed.  Alternatives to current practice by state agencies in the U.S. are described that might provide for greater decentralization of these practices while maintaining institutional accountability.

  10. Supplement to the Handbook for Institutional Academic and Program Planning.

    Cherin, Ellen; Armijo, Frank

    Sample procedures, data formats; questionnaires, and explanations are presented that institutions can use to adapt and implement the planning process described in "A Handbook for Institutional and Academic Program Planning: From Idea to Implementation" (Kieft, Armijo, and Bucklew, 1978). Materials are designed for use by two-year and four-year…

  11. Balancing Fundraising in Academic Programs and Intercollegiate Athletics

    King, Elizabeth H.; Sexton, Eric L.; Rhatigan, James J.

    2010-01-01

    There is an uneasy relationship between fundraising for academic programs and intercollegiate athletics. This has little to do with individuals and almost everything to do with circumstances in higher education in the United States that have come into play in recent decades. This chapter identifies issues presidents will confront as they seek…

  12. Meeting the Academic Needs of Minority Students through a Non-academic Mentoring Program

    Luz Mary Rincón

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the preliminary results of a mentoring program developed by the Mount Pleasant Independent School District (MPISD in the State of Texas with the goal of improving low-achieving students’ results on the math and reading state mandated tests, Texas Academic Knowledge and Skills (TAKS. The article describes the level of development of the program at the end of the first year of implementation and shows what may be the positive impact of youth participation in mentoring relationships. The apparent impact of the mentoring program is shown through improved scores of TAKS tests of fifth grade and is illustrated in the experience of a mentor teacher and her group of students. Although it does not specifically target ethnic and language minorities, their improved academic performance may have been the result of the mentoring experience.

  13. Postsecondary Education as Triage: Returns to Academic and Technical Programs

    Kevin Hollenbeck

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the labor market outcomes of individuals with various types of postsecondary educational experiences. In particular, it examines differences between students who have pursued technical education programs from those who have pursued academic programs and from those individuals who have not pursued any type of postsecondary education. Empirical evidence is presented concerning the relationship between economic outcomes and grades earned and the degree to which the labor mark...

  14. Academic and Research Programs in Exercise Science, South Korea

    Park, Kyung-Shin; Song, Wook

    2009-01-01

    We appreciate the opportunity to review academic curriculum and current research focus of Exercise Science programs in South Korea. The information of this paper was collected by several different methods, including e-mail and phone interviews, and a discussion with Korean professors who attended the 2009 ACSM annual conference. It was agreed that exercise science programming in South Korea has improved over the last 60 years since being implemented. One of distinguishable achievement is that...

  15. Assessment of preclinical students’ academic motivation before and after a three-day academic affair program

    Aung, Myo Nyein; Somboonwong, Juraiporn; Jaroonvanichkul, Vorapol; Wannakrairot, Pongsak

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical students’ motivation is an important driving factor for academic performance, and therefore medical teachers and educators are often highly interested in this topic. This study evaluated the impact of an academic affair program upon preclinical year medical students’ motivation to study. Design and methods An intervention study was conducted using a pretest-posttest study design. A total of 296 preclinical year medical students who had just passed their first year and were about to attend their second year at the Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, participated in the study. The intervention comprised of dialogues for personality development, pictorial expression in groups, as well as small group lectures delivered by senior students giving information on how to prepare for the forthcoming classes. Students’ academic motivation was measured before and after the intervention program, applying the transculturally translated Academic Motivation Scale (AMS). Cronbach’s alpha of Thai version AMS was 0.8992. The average scores in seven scales of AMS were compared between the pre- and posttest results, using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The differences were confirmed by using the multivariate analysis of variance. Results Students’ academic motivation increased after participation in the three-day academic program. There was also a significant increase in introjected extrinsic motivation, which can enhance the students’ self-esteem and feeling of self-worth (Pmotivation toward accomplishment increased significantly (Pacademic milestones, and a step ahead of autonomous motivation. Amotivation level declined significantly (Pacademic motivational constructs before and after the intervention was altogether significant (P=0.036, multivariate analysis of variance). Conclusion After experiencing a three-day intervention, the new students’ motivation advanced along the continuum of self-determination toward

  16. A Growth Model for Academic Program Life Cycle (APLC): A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis

    Acquah, Edward H. K.

    2010-01-01

    Academic program life cycle concept states each program's life flows through several stages: introduction, growth, maturity, and decline. A mixed-influence diffusion growth model is fitted to enrolment data on academic programs to analyze the factors determining progress of academic programs through their life cycles. The regression analysis yield…

  17. Student supports: developmental education and other academic programs.

    Bettinger, Eric P; Boatman, Angela; Long, Bridget Terry

    2013-01-01

    Low rates of college completion are a major problem in the United States. Less than 60 percent of students at four-year colleges graduate within six years, and at some colleges, the graduation rate is less than 10 percent. Additionally, many students enter higher education ill-prepared to comprehend college-level course material. Some estimates suggest that only one-third of high school graduates finish ready for college work; the proportion is even lower among older students. Colleges have responded to the poor preparation of incoming students by placing approximately 35 to 40 percent of entering freshmen into remedial or developmental courses, along with providing academic supports such as summer bridge programs, learning communities, academic counseling, and tutoring, as well as student supports such as financial aid and child care. Eric Bettinger, Angela Boatman, and Bridget Terry Long describe the role, costs, and impact of these college remediation and academic support programs. According to a growing body of research, the effects of remedial courses are considerably nuanced. The courses appear to help or hinder students differently by state, institution, background, and academic preparedness. The mixed findings from earlier research have raised questions ranging from whether remedial programs, on average, improve student academic outcomes to which types of programs are most effective. Administrators, practitioners, and policy makers are responding by redesigning developmental courses and searching for ways to implement effective remediation programs more broadly. In addition, recent research suggests that colleges may be placing too many students into remedial courses unnecessarily, suggesting the need for further examining the placement processes used to assign students to remedial courses. The authors expand the scope of remediation research by discussing other promising areas of academic support commonly offered by colleges, including advising, tutoring

  18. [International academic mobility program in nursing experience report].

    de Oliveira, Mariana Gonçalves; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag

    2012-03-01

    An experience of studying abroad or of academic exchange, really adds value to the professional and personal development of exchange students. This report aims to describe a student's experience in an international academic mobility program. It was developed from 2008 to 2009 in Brazil and Spain. The experiences, observations and activities of the student were emphasized believing that the training of students and researchers is not only restricted to the university and the students' home country, and that it is important to have possibilities of new experiences and differentiated knowledge. The conclusion is that this opportunity promoted a profound effect on psychological, cultural social and scientific development of the exchange student. PMID:22737814

  19. Forging Industry-Academic Alliances

    Joseph M. Woodside

    2014-01-01

    With ever increasing amounts of data, organizations are identifying the importance of Business Intelligence (BI) and Analytics for decision making. However in order to realize the full potential of these technologies, organizations require well-trained and educated management and analytic subject matter experts to transform the data and results into actionable information for decisions. In order to meet this demand for analytical talent, a Center for Business Intelligence and Analytics (CBIA)...

  20. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Academic Research Program

    Loomer, S. A.

    2004-12-01

    "Know the Earth.Show the Way." In fulfillment of its vision, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) provides geospatial intelligence in all its forms and from whatever source-imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial data and information-to ensure the knowledge foundation for planning, decision, and action. To achieve this, NGA conducts a multi-disciplinary program of basic research in geospatial intelligence topics through grants and fellowships to the leading investigators, research universities, and colleges of the nation. This research provides the fundamental science support to NGA's applied and advanced research programs. The major components of the NGA Academic Research Program (NARP) are: - NGA University Research Initiatives (NURI): Three-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators across the US academic community. Topics are selected to provide the scientific basis for advanced and applied research in NGA core disciplines. - Historically Black College and University - Minority Institution Research Initiatives (HBCU-MI): Two-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Minority Institutions across the US academic community. - Director of Central Intelligence Post-Doctoral Research Fellowships: Fellowships providing access to advanced research in science and technology applicable to the intelligence community's mission. The program provides a pool of researchers to support future intelligence community needs and develops long-term relationships with researchers as they move into career positions. This paper provides information about the NGA Academic Research Program, the projects it supports and how other researchers and institutions can apply for grants under the program.

  1. Academic Staff's Views About International Scholarships and Support Programs

    M. Ertaç ATİLA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine views of academic staff who have been to the United States in order to do a research study by means of scholarships and support programs provided by the Higher Education Council or Scientific or Technological Research Council of Turkey about the scholarship programs. The qualitative study is carried out as a holistic multiple case study research design. The data were gathered through semi-structured interviews from 10 academic staff who participated the scholarship program. Data were analyzed with content analysis technique. The results indicated that application process, time and financial resources were important for the preferences of academic staff in scholarship and support programs. The main reasons for applying the scholar program to undertake an international research study are grouped under three headings as academic, socio-cultural and foreign language improvements. The main influencing factors behind the researchers' preferences to go the United States are its' level of advancements in scientific research and peer influence. Concerning the duration of a research study in abroad the participants thought that 6 months to one year is adequate time and this time depends on the foreign language skills of the researchers, the field of study, subject and project. The main drawbacks of an international research study visit are the long waiting times for having the United States visa with no adequate support, the cost of health insurance and visa, lack of speaking foreign language skills, and adaptation time in the first arrival. As a result, the experienced participants suggested that the future scholarships have to cover health insurance; the researchers have to be supported for developing their foreign language skills and develop a clear research agenda and project prior to going abroad.

  2. Hmong Students in Higher Education and Academic Support Programs

    Soua Xiong; Song E. Lee PhD

    2011-01-01

    Student awareness, usage, and perception of academic support programs were examined among 55 Hmong college students at a large, public western university. Twenty-eight students had participated in one or more ASPs while 27 students had not participated in any ASPs. Those who had participated found the programs to be supportive with an average rating of 7.39 out of 10 (10 being most supportive). The majority of students who did not participate in ASPs reported that they were not aware of ASPs ...

  3. Academic Self-Concept, Academic Achievement, and Leadership in University Students Studying in a Physical Therapy Program.

    Gottlieb, Rosemary J.; Rogers, Janet L.

    2002-01-01

    Assessment of the academic self-concept of 32 physical therapy assistant students in a selective admission program revealed a positive correlation between grade point average in the core curriculum and their leadership and initiative scores. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

  4. Multicultural Environments of Academic versus Internship Training Programs: Lessons to Be Learned

    Peters, Heather J.; Krumm, Angela J.; Gonzales, Rufus R.; Gunter, Kensa K.; Paez, Karen N.; Zygowicz, Sharon D.; Haggins, Kristee L.

    2011-01-01

    Psychology training programs have a responsibility to train multiculturally competent psychologists. Predoctoral interns were surveyed to compare the multicultural environment of academic and internship programs. Internship programs were perceived as more multicultural than were academic programs. Factors contributing to differences are examined,…

  5. Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance

    ... Your Journey with TSC: You Are Not Alone Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance Overview La Esclerosis Tuberosa (Spanish Intro to ... History Database Research Resources International Scientific Advisory Board Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance Support Community Four Star Charity Rating by ...

  6. Alliance in Youth Care

    Rothman, Linda; Rijsingen, Rinie van; Pijnenburg, Huub

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of alliance in youth care. The concept of (therapeutic) alliance originates in adult psychotherapy and related research. Alliance refers to the working relationship between youth care workers and their clients. Within this concept, personal (emotional) and task re

  7. Hmong Students in Higher Education and Academic Support Programs

    Soua Xiong

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Student awareness, usage, and perception of academic support programs were examined among 55 Hmong college students at a large, public western university. Twenty-eight students had participated in one or more ASPs while 27 students had not participated in any ASPs. Those who had participated found the programs to be supportive with an average rating of 7.39 out of 10 (10 being most supportive. The majority of students who did not participate in ASPs reported that they were not aware of ASPs and their services. Results also show that the majority of Hmong college students perceived a lack of time to study, poor study habits, lack of money, lack of motivation, lack of direction on career goals, and poor time management to be obstacles for them in higher education. Based on the findings, it seems ASPs were not able to reach some Hmong students with their outreach efforts. However, those that they were able to reach found academic support services helpful, especially with financial concerns and direction on career goals.

  8. Western Nuclear Science Alliance

    The Western Nuclear Science Alliance (WNSA) was formed at Oregon State University (OSU) under the DOE Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program in 2002. The primary objective of the INIE program is to strengthen nuclear science and engineering programs at the member institutions and to address the long term goal of the University Reactor Infrastructure and Education Assistance Program. WNSA has been very effective in meeting these goals. The infrastructure at several of the WNSA university nuclear reactors has been upgraded significantly, as have classroom and laboratory facilities for Nuclear Engineering, Health Physics, and Radiochemistry students and faculty. Major nuclear-related education programs have been inaugurated, including considerable assistance by WNSA universities to other university nuclear programs. Research has also been enhanced under WNSA, as has outreach to pre-college and college students and faculty. The INIE program under WNSA has been an exceptional boost to the nuclear programs at the eight funded WNSA universities. In subsequent years under INIE these programs have expanded even further in terms of new research facilities, research reactor renovations, expanded educational opportunities, and extended cooperation and collaboration between universities, national laboratories, and nuclear utilities.

  9. Discovering epistemological axes for academic programs in computer science through network analysis

    Luis Casillas Santillán; Alonso Castillo Pérez

    2012-01-01

    Academic programs in higher education institutions (HEI) are constantly under construction. They are never finished at all. As reader could agree, the current merging of knowledge in present societies is inexorable. The available cyber-infrastructure is able to support new approaches in science development. Hence, academic programs in HEI are clearly under the pressure to be constantly modernized in order to provide valid and up to date knowledge. Every academic program has this challenge in ...

  10. Alliance brands: Building corporate brands through strategic alliances?

    He, HW; Balmer, JMT

    2006-01-01

    The emergence of airline alliance brands represents an unexplored area in the context of the nascent field of corporate brand management. This study reports a case study of an alliance brand within the airline industry: oneworld. The research into the oneworld alliance was driven by two fundamental questions relating to alliance brands: what are alliance brands and what are the implications of alliance brands for corporate branding and brand alliances? This study suggests that, with careful n...

  11. Leadership Behaviour and Effectiveness of Academic Program Directors in Australian Universities

    Vilkinas, Tricia; Ladyshewsky, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on leadership behaviour and effectiveness of university academic program directors who have responsibility for managing a program or course of study. The leadership capabilities were assessed using the Integrated Competing Values Framework as its theoretical foundation. Data from 90 academic program directors and 710…

  12. Burnout in United States Academic Chairs of Radiation Oncology Programs

    Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Thomas, Charles R., E-mail: thomasch@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute/Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Bonner, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); DeWeese, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Formenti, Silvia C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Mittal, Bharat B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ilinois (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the self-reported prevalence of burnout in chairs of academic radiation oncology departments, to identify factors contributing to burnout, and to compare the prevalence of burnout with that seen in other academic chair groups. Methods and Materials: An anonymous online survey was administered to the membership of the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP). Burnout was measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). Results: Questionnaires were returned from 66 of 87 chairs (76% response rate). Seventy-nine percent of respondents reported satisfaction with their current positions. Common major stressors were budget deficits and human resource issues. One-quarter of chairs reported that it was at least moderately likely that they would step down in the next 1 to 2 years; these individuals demonstrated significantly higher emotional exhaustion. Twenty-five percent of respondents met the MBI-HSS criteria for low burnout, 75% for moderate burnout, and none for high burnout. Group MBI-HSS subscale scores demonstrated a pattern of moderate emotional exhaustion, low depersonalization, and moderate personal accomplishment, comparing favorably with other specialties. Conclusions: This is the first study of burnout in radiation oncology chairs with a high response rate and using a validated psychometric tool. Radiation oncology chairs share similar major stressors to other chair groups, but they demonstrate relatively high job satisfaction and lower burnout. Emotional exhaustion may contribute to the anticipated turnover in coming years. Further efforts addressing individual and institutional factors associated with burnout may improve the relationship with work of chairs and other department members.

  13. Burnout in United States Academic Chairs of Radiation Oncology Programs

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the self-reported prevalence of burnout in chairs of academic radiation oncology departments, to identify factors contributing to burnout, and to compare the prevalence of burnout with that seen in other academic chair groups. Methods and Materials: An anonymous online survey was administered to the membership of the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP). Burnout was measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). Results: Questionnaires were returned from 66 of 87 chairs (76% response rate). Seventy-nine percent of respondents reported satisfaction with their current positions. Common major stressors were budget deficits and human resource issues. One-quarter of chairs reported that it was at least moderately likely that they would step down in the next 1 to 2 years; these individuals demonstrated significantly higher emotional exhaustion. Twenty-five percent of respondents met the MBI-HSS criteria for low burnout, 75% for moderate burnout, and none for high burnout. Group MBI-HSS subscale scores demonstrated a pattern of moderate emotional exhaustion, low depersonalization, and moderate personal accomplishment, comparing favorably with other specialties. Conclusions: This is the first study of burnout in radiation oncology chairs with a high response rate and using a validated psychometric tool. Radiation oncology chairs share similar major stressors to other chair groups, but they demonstrate relatively high job satisfaction and lower burnout. Emotional exhaustion may contribute to the anticipated turnover in coming years. Further efforts addressing individual and institutional factors associated with burnout may improve the relationship with work of chairs and other department members

  14. Brand alliance. Building block for scientific organisations´ marketing strategy

    Joern Redler

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses management issues of brand alliances as part of a scientific organisation´s marketing strategy. Though brand alliances have become quite popular with consumer products they seem to be exceptions in the marketing context of academic or scientific organisations. Against this background, the paper develops a brand alliance approach considering requirements of strategically marketing scientific organisations. As a starting point, brand alliances are discussed as a sub-categor...

  15. An academic program for experience-based seismic evaluation

    The authors have been involved in a project, sponsored by the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, to develop knowledge-based expert systems to aid in the implementation of the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG) approach for the seismic qualification of equipment in operating nuclear power plants. This approach, being founded on the use of engineering judgment in the application of prior earthquake experience data, requires comprehensive training. There seems to be general consensus that the experience-based approach is a more cost-effective means of qualifying nuclear power plant equipment when compared to the more traditional analytical methods. The experience-based approach has a number of potential applications in civil engineering, including bridge evaluation and design, seismic adequacy of general structures, foundation design, and water and wastewater treatment plant design and operation. The objective of this paper is to outline an academic curriculum, at the master's level, to educate structural engineers to use and further develop the experience-based approach for seismic evaluation. In the long term, this could lead to the development of academic programs in experience-based assessment and design for a wide range of applications in maintaining the nation's infrastructure

  16. A research agenda for academic petroleum engineering programs. [Final report

    Calhoun, J.C. Jr.

    1990-03-31

    The development of a research agenda should be a direct way of portraying the scope of petroleum engineering, of identifying the critical technological issues faced by the profession,of elucidating the gaps between the existing research resources and the needs. and of outlining a program of research through which the petroleum engineering departments can be collectively of maximum service. Such an agenda would be of value to the profession of petroleum engineering, to industry and to government agencies, as well as to the faculty and students of the petroleum engineering departments. The purposes of the activity that led to this report, therefore, were to develop a statement to serve as a beginning research agenda for the petroleum engineering academic community; to bring together representatives of the petroleum engineering academic community to recognize the importance of developing a consensus posture with respect to research; and to provide a document that will assist in portraying to industry, government agencies and others the problems and needs of the petroleum engineering departments for conducting research. Contents of this report include; introduction; the background; the scope of petroleum engineering research; priority research topics and technological issues; non-technological research issues; and conclusions and recommendations.

  17. A research agenda for academic petroleum engineering programs

    Calhoun, J.C. Jr.

    1990-03-31

    The development of a research agenda should be a direct way of portraying the scope of petroleum engineering, of identifying the critical technological issues faced by the profession,of elucidating the gaps between the existing research resources and the needs. and of outlining a program of research through which the petroleum engineering departments can be collectively of maximum service. Such an agenda would be of value to the profession of petroleum engineering, to industry and to government agencies, as well as to the faculty and students of the petroleum engineering departments. The purposes of the activity that led to this report, therefore, were to develop a statement to serve as a beginning research agenda for the petroleum engineering academic community; to bring together representatives of the petroleum engineering academic community to recognize the importance of developing a consensus posture with respect to research; and to provide a document that will assist in portraying to industry, government agencies and others the problems and needs of the petroleum engineering departments for conducting research. Contents of this report include; introduction; the background; the scope of petroleum engineering research; priority research topics and technological issues; non-technological research issues; and conclusions and recommendations.

  18. Developing Alliance Capabilities

    Heimeriks, Koen H.; Duysters, Geert; Vanhaverbeke, Wim

    This paper assesses the differential performance effects of learning mechanisms on the development of alliance capabilities. Prior research has suggested that different capability levels could be identified in which specific intra-firm learning mechanisms are used to enhance a firm's alliance...... capability. However, empirical testing in this field is scarce and little is known as to what extent different learning mechanisms are indeed useful in advancing a firm's alliance capability. This paper analyzes to what extent intra-firm learning mechanisms help firms develop their alliance capability....... Differential learning may explain in what way firms yield superior returns from their alliances in comparison to competitors. The empirical results show that different learning mechanisms have different performance effects at different stages of the alliance capability development process. The main lesson from...

  19. THE ALLIANCE FORMATION PROCESS

    Whipple, Judith M.; Frankel, Robert

    1998-01-01

    While interest in developing strategic alliances within the food system continues to increase, there remains considerable risk when firms adopt such a cooperative strategy. The risk is due in part to the lack of concrete guidelines that illustrate the steps or stages of alliance development and the important strategic and operational decisions required at each stage. The existence of such guidelines would facilitate alliance formation and enable managers and researchers to better understand a...

  20. Addressing the Academic Gap Between 4- and 6-Year Pharmacy Programs in South Korea

    Sujin YOO; Song, Seungyeon; Lee, Sangmi; Kwon, Kwangil; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To address the academic gap (or lack of adequate training and programs) between 4- and 6-year pharmacy programs and suggest methods for reducing this gap and to evaluate pharmacists’ perceptions of preceptorship.

  1. Assessing the Role of RCM in Decision-Making about Discontinuing Academic Programs and Restructuring Academic Units

    Mayer, Louis J.

    2011-01-01

    The path of growth and development for many American colleges and universities is to add new programs, majors, minors, departments, institutes, and centers to their academic portfolios in order to meet new demands and pursue new knowledge. Their source of funding is primarily through raising tuition rates and increasing non-tuition financial…

  2. Alliance capability as a mediator between experience and alliance performance

    Heimeriks, Koen; Duysters, Geert

    This study centers around the way in which firms can enhance alliance performance through the development of alliance capabilities. Whereas most research has focused on inter-firm antecedents of alliance performance, research on intra-firm antecedents pointing to prior experience and internal mec...... blocks underlying the process of alliance capability development.Key words: alliances, learning, knowledge transfer, alliance experience.JEL classification: L14......This study centers around the way in which firms can enhance alliance performance through the development of alliance capabilities. Whereas most research has focused on inter-firm antecedents of alliance performance, research on intra-firm antecedents pointing to prior experience and internal...... mechanisms to foster knowledge transfer has only recently emerged. As little is known about how firms develop alliance capabilities, this study aims to uncover how differences in sources of alliance capability development explain performance heterogeneity. The data come from a detailed survey held among...

  3. Trust in Strategic Alliances

    Nielsen, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of trust in strategic alliances. Adopting a co-evolutionary approach, I developed a framework to show how trust, conceptualised in different forms, plays distinct roles at various evolutionary stages of the alliance relationship...

  4. Paper Partners: A Peer-Led Talk-Aloud Academic Writing Program for Students Whose First Language of Academic Study Is Not English

    Vechter, Andrea; Brierley, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the Paper Partners program at Ryerson University, Toronto. This peer-mentoring program was developed to support the academic writing skills of students whose first language of academic study was not English. The program integrated a team of student-facilitators, a talk-aloud co-editing process, and a reflective feedback…

  5. Facilitating Economic Development through Strategic Alliances.

    Noftsinger, John B., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how colleges and universities are becoming increasingly involved in economic development, with the formation of strategic alliances that have led to programs that benefit business and higher education. Discusses example programs from the Valley of Virginia Partnership for Education, and the outreach program of James Madison University.…

  6. Assessment of preclinical students’ academic motivation before and after a three-day academic affair program

    Aung MN; Somboonwong J; Jaroonvanichkul V; Wannakrairot P

    2015-01-01

    Myo Nyein Aung,1 Juraiporn Somboonwong,2 Vorapol Jaroonvanichkul,1 Pongsak Wannakrairot3 1Medical Education Unit, 2Quality Management Division and Department of Physiology, 3Academic Affairs Division, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, ThailandBackground: Medical students’ motivation is an important driving factor for academic performance, and therefore medical teachers and educators are often highly interested in this topic. This study evaluated the impact of an ac...

  7. The early impact of therapeutic alliance in brief psychodynamic psychotherapy

    Marcolino José Alvaro Marques; Iacoponi Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    INTRODCTION: Therapeutic alliance is a key component of the psychotherapeutic process. This study estimated the impact of the therapeutic alliance as measured by CALPAS-P in an individual brief psychodynamic psychotherapy program. METHODS: To study the impact of the therapeutic alliance patients in psychotherapy answered to the CALPAS-P at the first and third session and to the Self-report Questionnaire (SRQ-20), to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and to the Hamilton Anxiety Scale at the ...

  8. Perceptions of Collegiate Student-Athletes' Programming Needs Based on Gender, Ethnicity, and Academic Class

    Arvan, April Anita

    2010-01-01

    Student-athletes are often disengaged in campus programming due to their academic and athletic commitments. Previous research explored various facets of student-athlete development, particularly academic development in relation to NCAA Division I student-athletes. The purpose of this quantitative, causal-comparative study was to determine…

  9. Academics in CTE Programs: Fully Preparing Students for Their Next Step

    MacQuarrie, David L.

    2008-01-01

    An echo can often be heard in career and technical education (CTE) hallways, "How am I going to fit academic skills into this program." They have a choice! They could pick up a math or English book and start selecting something to separately add in. Perhaps an academic consultant could be tapped to separately add to the task list. Another option…

  10. Limitations on Change: Current Conditions Influencing Academic Intransigence in Educational Administration Programs.

    Logan, Connie Stokes; Pounder, Diana G.

    An analysis of academic intransigence (resistance to change) in educational administrative preparation programs is presented in this paper. Drawing upon two conceptual frameworks, the stakeholder perspective and Porter's (1980) five-force model of industry structure and competitive influence, two factors contributing to academic intransigence are…

  11. Cultivating the Academic Integrity of Urban Adolescents with Ethical Philosophy Programming

    Seider, Scott; Novick, Sarah; Gomez, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    This mixed-methods study considered the effects of ethical philosophy programming at a high-performing, high-poverty urban high school upon the academic integrity of participating adolescents ("n" = 279). Analyses of pre-post survey data revealed that participating adolescents reported significantly higher levels of academic integrity…

  12. Academic Incentives for Students Can Increase Participation in and Effectiveness of a Physical Activity Program

    DeVahl, Julie; King, Richard; Williamson, Jon W.

    2005-01-01

    The authors sought to determine whether a greater academic incentive would improve the effectiveness and student adherence to a 12-week voluntary exercise program designed to decrease students' percentage of body fat. They randomly assigned 210 students to 1 of 2 groups with different academic reward structures. The group with the greater reward…

  13. Assessment for Effective Intervention: Enrichment Science Academic Program

    Sasson, Irit; Cohen, Donita

    2012-11-01

    Israel suffers from a growing problem of socio-economic gaps between those who live in the center of the country and residents of outlying areas. As a result, there is a low level of accessibility to higher education among the peripheral population. The goal of the Sidney Warren Science Education Center for Youth at Tel-Hai College is to strengthen the potential of middle and high school students and encourage them to pursue higher education, with an emphasis on majoring in science and technology. This study investigated the implementation and evaluation of the enrichment science academic program, as an example of informal learning environment, with an emphasis on physics studies. About 500 students conducted feedback survey after participating in science activities in four domains: biology, chemistry, physics, and computer science. Results indicated high level of satisfaction among the students. No differences were found with respect to gender excluding in physics with a positive attitudes advantage among boys. In order to get a deeper understanding of this finding, about 70 additional students conducted special questionnaires, both 1 week before the physics enrichment day and at the end of that day. Questionnaires were intended to assess both their attitudes toward physics and their knowledge and conceptions of the physical concept "pressure." We found that the activity moderately improved boys' attitudes toward physics, but that girls displayed decreased interest in and lower self-efficacy toward physics. Research results were used to the improvement of the instructional design of the physics activity demonstrating internal evaluation process for effective intervention.

  14. Comparative Effectiveness on Cognitive Asthma Outcomes of the SHARP Academic Asthma Health Education and Counseling Program and a Non-Academic Program.

    Kintner, Eileen; Cook, Gwendolyn; Marti, C Nathan; Stoddard, Debbie; Gomes, Melissa; Harmon, Phyllis; Van Egeren, Laurie A

    2015-12-01

    Asthma morbidity and mortality is higher among older school-age children and early adolescents than other age groups across the lifespan. NIH recommended expanding asthma education to schools and community settings to meet cognitive outcomes that have an impact on morbidity and mortality. Guided by the acceptance of asthma model, an evidence-guided, comprehensive school-based academic health education and counseling program, Staying Healthy-Asthma Responsible & Prepared™ (SHARP), was developed. The program complements existing school curricula by integrating biology, psychology, and sociology content with related spelling, math, and reading and writing assignments. Feasibility, benefits, and efficacy have been established. We compared the effectiveness of SHARP to a non-academic program, Open Airways for Schools, in improving asthma knowledge and reasoning about symptom management. A two-group, cluster-randomized, single-blinded design was used with a sample of 205 students in grades 4-5 with asthma and their caregivers. Schools were matched prior to randomization. The unit of analysis was the student. Certified elementary school teachers delivered the programs during instructional time. Data were collected from student/caregiver dyads at baseline and at 1, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. In multilevel modeling, students enrolled in the academic SHARP program demonstrated significant (padvantages were retained at 24 months. Findings support delivery in schools of the SHARP academic health education program for students with asthma. PMID:26296595

  15. Evaluating an academic writing program for nursing students who have English as a second language.

    Weaver, Roslyn; Jackson, Debra

    2011-01-01

    Academic writing skills are essential to the successful completion of preregistration nursing programs, yet the development of such skills is a challenge for many nursing students, particularly those who speak English as a second language (ESL). It is vital to develop and evaluate strategies that can support academic writing skills for ESL nursing students. This qualitative study evaluated a four-day academic writing intervention strategy designed to support ESL first-year nursing students. Data from the program showed two major areas of difficulty for participants relating to academic writing: problems understanding course content in English, and problems expressing their understanding of that content in English. The participants noted a key benefit of this program was the provision of individual feedback. Programs such as this intervention successfully meet the demands of ESL nursing students, although ongoing support is also needed. PMID:21854244

  16. Organisational and methodological aspects of experimental training programs for athletes lightweights in academic rowing

    Omelchenko E.S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: develop an experimental training program for lightweight rowers in academic rowing. Material: the study involved 27 qualified athletes who are engaged in academic rowing over 6 years, age 19-22 years, with sports qualifications KMS and MS. To better design the training program was conducted to study this physical condition of athletes also took into account the opinion of the leading coaches in academic rowing that are engaged with lightweight rowers. Results: as a result of an experimental study was designed training program in academic rowing. Conclusions: Experimental training program rowing provided its use for a year and was designed in the form of blocks and aims to developing and improving endurance (speed and power, strength and maximum strength. The experimental technique that was used in the training process, was designed with the preparation phase and plan on mesocycles and microcycle.

  17. The Role of Mentoring Program in Enhancing Mentees’ Academic Performance

    2014-01-01

    According to institutions of higher learning literature, mentoring program has two important features: communication and support. The ability of mentors to appropriately implement comfortable communication and provide adequate support may ehance positive mentee outcomes, especially academic performance. Although the nature of this relationship is crucial, little is known about the role of mentoring program as an important predictor of mentees’ academic performance in the higher education me...

  18. International Strategic Alliance

    Arif, Mohd.

    2008-01-01

    International Strategic Alliance is the combination of two or more firm future objective, which achieved by together practices of the MNCs. The term "strategic alliance" can means many things. In its broadest sense, it can apply to virtually any of collaboration between two or more firms, including one or more of the following activities: design contracts; technology transfer agreements; joint product development; distribution agreement; marketing and promotional collaboration; intellectual a...

  19. 34 CFR 425.1 - What is the Demonstration Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic Learning Program?

    2010-07-01

    ... of Vocational and Academic Learning Program? 425.1 Section 425.1 Education Regulations of the Offices... EDUCATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS FOR THE INTEGRATION OF VOCATIONAL AND ACADEMIC LEARNING PROGRAM General § 425.1 What is the Demonstration Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic...

  20. Training Programs That Facilitate Lasting Change in Student Academic Behaviour

    Hodge, Brad

    2014-01-01

    A range of evidence suggests that changing a person's pattern of behaviour is extremely difficult, with past behaviour being one of the strongest predictors of future behaviour. This is particularly evident in the university setting where students tend to use the same academic processes they have used throughout their schooling despite any…

  1. The Role of Mentoring Program in Enhancing Mentees’ Academic Performance

    Azman Ismail

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available According to institutions of higher learning literature, mentoring program has two important features: communication and support. The ability of mentors to appropriately implement comfortable communication and provide adequate support may ehance positive mentee outcomes, especially academic performance. Although the nature of this relationship is crucial, little is known about the role of mentoring program as an important predictor of mentees’ academic performance in the higher education mentoring research literature. Therefore, this study was conducted to measure the relationship between mentoring program and mentees’ academic performance using self-administered questionnaires gathered from undergraduate students in Malaysian institutions of higher learning in Sarawak. The results of SmartPLS path model showed two important outcomes: firstly, communication positively and significantly correlated with academic performance. Secondly, support positively and significantly correlated with academic performance. The result demonstrates that mentoring program does act as an important predictor of mentees’ academic performance in the organizational sample. Thus, discussion, implications and conclusion are elaborated.

  2. Beyond a curricular design of convenience: replacing the noon conference with an academic half day in three internal medicine residency programs.

    Batalden, Maren K; Warm, Eric J; Logio, Lia S

    2013-05-01

    Several residency programs have created an academic half day (AHD) for the delivery of core curriculum, and some program Web sites provide narrative descriptions of individual AHD curricula; nonetheless, little published literature on the AHD format exists. This article details three distinctive internal medicine residency programs (Cambridge Health Alliance, University of Cincinnati, and New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical College) whose leaders replaced the traditional noon conference curriculum with an AHD. Although each program's AHD developed independently of the other two, retrospective comparative review reveals instructive similarities and differences that may be useful to other residency directors. In this article, the authors describe the distinct approaches to the AHD at the three institutions through a framework of six core principles: (1) protect time and space to facilitate learning, (2) nurture active learning in residents, (3) choose and sequence curricular content deliberately, (4) develop faculty, (5) encourage resident preparation and accountability for learning, and (6) employ a continuous improvement approach to curriculum development and evaluation. The authors chronicle curricular adaptations at each institution over the first three years of experience. Preliminary outcome data, presented in the article, suggests that the transition from the traditional noon conference to an AHD may increase conference attendance, improve resident and faculty satisfaction with the curriculum, and improve resident performance on the In Training Examination. PMID:23524926

  3. Students' Persistence and Academic Success in a First-Year Professional Bachelor Program: The Influence of Students' Learning Strategies and Academic Motivation

    Gert Vanthournout; David Gijbels; Liesje Coertjens; Vincent Donche; Peter Van Petegem

    2012-01-01

    The present study explores whether students' learning strategies and academic motivation predict persistence and academic success in the first year of higher education. Freshmen students in a professional bachelor program in teacher education were questioned on their learning strategy use and motivation at the start and at the end of the academic year. Students' learning strategies were assessed using the inventory of learning styles-SV. Motivation was measured using scales from the self-regu...

  4. The Relationship between Institutional, Departmental and Program-Specific Variables and the Academic Performance of Division I FBS Football Programs

    Eigenbrot, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the connection between the academic evaluation of Division I FBS football programs and the various social settings that influenced these student-athletes. These social settings were classified as: institutional, departmental and program-specific. The experience of the student-athlete is thought to be impacted by all three…

  5. Strategic alliance development: a study on alliances between competing firms

    Wahyuni, S.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to reveal the development of lSAs (International Strategic Alliances) and the important factors for every phase of an alliance relationship. Since there are a great number of variables that can be assessed throughout the whole process of an alliance life, we decided to focus this research on the operational phase of alliances. This choice was based on the assumption that during the operational phase, firms normally face difficulties in their relationship. In th...

  6. Naval Academy athletic programs as predictors of midshipmen academic and military performance

    Zettler, Gregory M.

    2002-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This research analyzes the impact of the United States Naval Academy's club sport and varsity athletic programs on midshipman academic and military performance. Linear regression models are developed for the Naval Academy classes of 1998 and 1999 to analyze the effect of explanatory variables on midshipmen Academic Quality Point Rating (AQPR) and Military Quality Point Rating (MQPR). It is important to understand the relationship betw...

  7. Deaf Studies Alumni Perceptions of the Academic Program and Off-Campus Internship

    Cooper, Sheryl B.; Emanuel, Diana C.; Cripps, Jody H.

    2012-01-01

    Alumni of an undergraduate Deaf studies program completed an online survey about their education and employment after graduation and their perceptions of their internship and undergraduate academic program. Demographically, this population of Deaf studies alumni represented a higher percentage of women and dual-major graduates than was present in…

  8. Do In-School Feeding Programs Have an Impact on Academic Performance?

    Adrogue, Cecilia; Orlicki, Maria Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    As Argentina presents problems of malnutrition, the federal in-school feeding program has become a key policy because it provides an important nutritional intervention during a relevant growth period. This paper estimates the effect of the program on academic performance--measured by standardized test scores--with a difference in difference model,…

  9. Developing an Organizational Understanding of Faculty Mentoring Programs in Academic Medicine in Major American Research Universities

    Fischer Zellers, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and contextual factors associated with faculty mentoring programs in academic medicine within major research institutions in the United States, and explores the usefulness of organizational behavior theory in understanding these relationships. To date, many formal faculty mentoring programs are in operation…

  10. Predictive Modeling of Student Performances for Retention and Academic Support in a Diagnostic Medical Sonography Program

    Borghese, Peter; Lacey, Sandi

    2014-01-01

    As part of a retention and academic support program, data was collected to develop a predictive model of student performances in core classes in a Diagnostic Medical Sonography (DMS) program. The research goal was to identify students likely to have difficulty with coursework and provide supplemental tutorial support. The focus was on the…

  11. Homeland Security Education: Managerial versus Nonmanagerial Market Perspectives of an Academic Program

    Doss, Daniel; Henley, Russ; McElreath, David; Lackey, Hilliard; Jones, Don; Gokaraju, Balakrishna; Sumrall, William

    2016-01-01

    The authors discuss the findings of a market study that preceded the offering of an academic program in homeland security. The university disseminated a mail survey to gain data for analysis of variance testing of several hypotheses regarding market perceptions of the intended homeland security program offering. Stratification involved segregating…

  12. The Effects of Participation in School Instrumental Music Programs on Student Academic Achievement and School Attendance

    Davenport, Kevin O.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether or not students that participated in a school sponsored instrumental music program had higher academic achievement and attendance than students that did not participate in a school sponsor instrumental music program. Units of measurement included standardized test scores and attendance, without taking into consideration…

  13. Examining Nontraditional Graduate Students' Academic Writing Experiences in an Accelerated Adult Program

    Crite, Charles E., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The academic writing competencies of nontraditional graduate students enrolled in accelerated graduate programs have become a growing concern for many higher learning educators in those programs. The purpose of this nonexperimental quantitative study was to examine the writing experiences that impacted nontraditional graduate students enrolled in…

  14. A Study of Academic Programs in Pennsylvania. Executive Summary and PACU Policy Statement.

    Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Universities, Harrisburg.

    In response to the Pennsylvania State Board of Education's request that the Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Universities (PACU) and the Pennsylvania Association of Private School Administrators recommend solutions to the problem of unnecessary duplication of academic programs, a one year inventory of postsecondary degree programs in the…

  15. Creating community-based access to primary healthcare for the uninsured through strategic alliances and restructuring local health department programs.

    Scotten, E Shirin L; Absher, Ann C

    2006-01-01

    In 2003, the Wilkes County Health Department joined with county healthcare providers to develop the HealthCare Connection, a coordinated and continuous system of low-cost quality care for uninsured and low-income working poor. Through this program, local providers of primary and specialty care donate specialty care or ancillary services not provided by the Health Department, which provides case management for the program. Basing their methods on business models learned through the UNC Management Academy for Public Health, planners investigated the best practices for extending healthcare coverage to the underinsured and uninsured, analyzed operational costs, discovered underutilized local resources, and built capacity within the organization. The HealthCare Connection is an example of how a rural community can join together in a common business practice to improve healthcare access for uninsured and/or low-income adults. PMID:16912606

  16. NIMBY localism and national inequitable exclusion alliances: The case of syringe exchange programs in the United States

    Tempalski, Barbara; Friedman, Risa; Keem, Marie; Cooper, Hannah; Friedman, Samuel R.

    2007-01-01

    Syringe exchange programs (SEPs) aim to reduce the harm associated with injection drug use (IDU). Although they have been accepted as critical components of HIV prevention in many parts of the world, they are often unwelcome and difficult to set up and maintain, even in communities hardest hit by IDU-related HIV transmission. This research examines socio-cultural and political processes that shape community and institutional resistance toward establishing and maintaining SEPs. These processes...

  17. Anglo-Japanese Alliance

    Nish, Ian; Steeds, David; Hotta-Lister, Ayako

    2002-01-01

    Nish dealt with the diplomacy of Britain and Japan in the five months before the conclusion of the Anglo-Japanese Alliance, arguing that it was not a 'natural alliance' but that there were pockets of opposition to it which had to be overcome. In the case of Japan, this was associated with the activities of Marquis Ito in Europe on which much new material was presented. In the case of Britain, the naval and military arguments in favour of closer relations with Japan eventually overcame those a...

  18. How we enhanced medical academics skills and reduced social inequities using an academic teaching program.

    Martins, Antonio Camargo; Oliveira, Felipe Renê Alves; Delfino, Breno Matos; Pereira, Thasciany Moraes; de Moraes, Fabio Henrique Pinto; Barbosa, Guilherme Viana; de Macedo, Lucas Felipe; Domingos, Tayna Da Silva; Da Silva, Dyemisson Pinheiro; Menezes, Charlene Cristine Rodrigues; Oliveira Filho, Edmar Santana; Pereira, Thales Augusto Da Silva; Piccirilli, Elizabeth Souza; Pinto, Wagner De Jesus

    2015-01-01

    The training of future physicians should be concurrent with the development of different skills and attitudes. This warrants the need to regularly provide students with opportunities for self-development throughout their academic career. This approach was exemplified in a medical school in the Brazilian Amazon, where students were allowed to play the role of high school teachers. As part of this exercise, they conducted reinforcement classes for high school students to increase the number of university admissions. The medical students were solely responsible for organizing and implementing this project, giving them the opportunity to develop teaching and leadership skills, enhance their understanding of communication and administration and contribute toward the society. PMID:25301145

  19. Alliance Formation and War Behavior

    Jack S. Levy

    1981-01-01

    The question of whether alliance formation contributes to peace or to war is analyzed for the modern Great Power system over the last 500 years. It is found that for none of the last five centuries has alliance formation been correlated (tau-b) with war involving the Great Powers, and has often been correlated with peace. Furthermore, disproportionately few wars have been preceded by alliance formation (compared to random probability models), suggesting that alliances are not among the more i...

  20. Implementing Postsecondary Academic Programs in State Prisons: Challenges and Opportunities

    Meyer, Stephen J.; Fredericks, Linda; Borden, Cindy M.; Richardson, Penny L.

    2010-01-01

    Participation in postsecondary programs in correctional settings is low, despite evidence of positive outcomes and national emphasis on postsecondary education to meet labor market demands. Research related to implementation of correctional education programs has focused on adult basic and secondary education programs while less is known about…

  1. Bilingual Two-Way Immersion Programs Benefit Academic Achievement

    Marian, Viorica; Shook, Anthony; Schroeder, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of bilingual education on reading and math achievement were examined by comparing test scores across different elementary school programs. Results revealed that bilingual Two-Way Immersion (TWI) programs benefited both minority-language and majority-language students. Minority-language students in TWI programs outperformed their peers…

  2. The positive impact of a facilitated peer mentoring program on academic skills of women faculty

    Varkey Prathibha

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In academic medicine, women physicians lag behind their male counterparts in advancement and promotion to leadership positions. Lack of mentoring, among other factors, has been reported to contribute to this disparity. Peer mentoring has been reported as a successful alternative to the dyadic mentoring model for women interested in improving their academic productivity. We describe a facilitated peer mentoring program in our institution's department of medicine. Methods Nineteen women enrolled in the program were divided into 5 groups. Each group had an assigned facilitator. Members of the respective groups met together with their facilitators at regular intervals during the 12 months of the project. A pre- and post-program evaluation consisting of a 25-item self-assessment of academic skills, self-efficacy, and academic career satisfaction was administered to each participant. Results At the end of 12 months, a total of 9 manuscripts were submitted to peer-reviewed journals, 6 of which are in press or have been published, and another 2 of which have been invited to be revised and resubmitted. At the end of the program, participants reported an increase in their satisfaction with academic achievement (mean score increase, 2.32 to 3.63; P = 0.0001, improvement in skills necessary to effectively search the medical literature (mean score increase, 3.32 to 4.05; P = 0.0009, an improvement in their ability to write a comprehensive review article (mean score increase, 2.89 to 3.63; P = 0.0017, and an improvement in their ability to critically evaluate the medical literature (mean score increased from 3.11 to 3.89; P = 0.0008. Conclusions This facilitated peer mentoring program demonstrated a positive impact on the academic skills and manuscript writing for junior women faculty. This 1-year program required minimal institutional resources, and suggests a need for further study of this and other mentoring programs for women faculty.

  3. Faculty Members' Lived Experiences with Academic Quality in For-Profit On-Ground Gainful Employment Programs

    Booton, Carol M.

    2013-01-01

    Academic quality in for-profit vocational (Gainful Employment) programs is a concern for all stakeholders. However, academic quality is not easily defined. The Department of Education's Gainful Employment Rule defines academic quality With a few easily measured metrics such as student retention and job placement rate, despite the fact that…

  4. What Makes a Good Program? A Case Study of a School Admitting High Academic Achievers

    Ching Man Lam

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a qualitative study that explored the administration and implementation of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum) of the Project P.A.T.H.S. The case study method was used to explore perceptions of the teachers and the project coordinator of program effectiveness, and to identify various factors for program success. A school admitting high academic achievers was selected, and site visits, as well as individual and focus group interviews, were conducted wi...

  5. Bilingual Two-Way Immersion Programs Benefit Academic Achievement

    Marian, Viorica; Shook, Anthony; Schroeder, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of bilingual education on reading and math achievement were examined by comparing test scores across different elementary-school programs. Results revealed that bilingual Two-Way Immersion programs benefited both minority-language and majority-language students. Minority-language students in Two-Way Immersion outperformed their peers in Transitional Programs of Instruction, while majority-language students in Two-Way Immersion outperformed their peers in Mainstream monolingual cla...

  6. Effects of Enrichment Programs on the Academic Achievement of Gifted and Talented Students

    Suhail Mahmoud AL-ZOUBI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore the effect of enrichment programs on the academic achievement of gifted and talented students. The sample of the study consisted of (30 gifted and talented students studying at Al-Kourah Pioneer Center for gifted and talented students (APCGTS, Jordan. An achievement test was developed and applied on the sample of the study as a pretest and posttest. The results showed the effects of enrichment programs at APCGTS on improving the academic achievement of gifted and talented students.

  7. Academic Mergers in Social Work Programs: Autonomy or Disharmony?

    Halter, Anthony; Gullerud, Ernest

    1995-01-01

    Using data from a 1991 survey of social work program deans and directors, the experiences of recently merged, long-term merged, and independent social work programs with salaries, financial resources, promotion and tenure, staff morale, enrollment, curriculum, class size, and access to central administration are compared. Respondents' views are…

  8. Study Abroad Programs: A Golden Opportunity for Academic Library Engagement

    Denda, Kayo

    2013-01-01

    Study abroad programs in higher education increasingly play a major role in training students for global citizenship. This case study, conducted in a large research university in the United States, identifies the information needs of students and faculty in study abroad programs. Of particular interest is how awareness of library resources and…

  9. Profiling first-year students in STEM programs based on autonomous motivation and academic self-concept and relationship with academic achievement.

    Van Soom, Carolien; Donche, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The low success rate of first-year college students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) programs has spurred many academic achievement studies in which explanatory factors are studied. In this study, we investigated from a person-oriented perspective whether different motivational and academic self-concept profiles could be discerned between male and female first-year college students in STEM and whether differences in early academic achievement were associated with these student groups. Data on autonomous motivation, academic self-concept, and early academic achievement of 1,400 first-year STEM college students were collected. Cluster analyses were used to distinguish motivational profiles based on the relative levels of autonomous motivation and academic self-concept for male and female students. Differences in early academic achievement of the various profiles were studied by means of ANCOVA. Four different motivational profiles were discerned based on the dimensions of autonomous motivation (A) and academic self-concept (S): students scoring high and respectively low on both dimensions (HA-HS or LA-LS), and students scoring high on one dimension and low on the other (HA-LS or LA-HS). Also gender differences were found in this study: male students with high levels of academic self-concept and autonomous motivation had higher academic achievement compared to male students with low levels on both motivational dimensions. For female students, motivational profiles were not associated with academic achievement. The findings partially confirm the internal and external validity of the motivational theories underpinning this study and extend the present insights on identifying subgroup(s) of at risk students in contemporary STEM programs at university level. PMID:25390942

  10. Impacting Children’s Health and Academic Performance through Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programming

    Timothy A. BRUSSEAU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is associated with numerous academic and health benefits. Furthermore, schools have been identified as an ideal location to promote physical activity as most youth attend school regularly from ages 5-18. Unfortunately, in an effort to increase academic learning time, schools have been eliminating traditional activity opportunities including physical education and recess. To combat physical inactivity in you, numerous organizations are promoting a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program to encourage academic achievement and overall health. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs include five components and should be centered around 1 quality physical education, 2 physical activity before and after school, 3 physical activity during school (both recess and classroom activity, 4 staff involvement, and 5 family and community engagement.

  11. STRATEGIC ALLIANCES – THEIR DEFINITION AND FORMATION

    Kinderis, Remigijus; Jucevičius, Giedrius

    2013-01-01

    The article presents analysis of the definition of strategic alliances, the analysis of alliance and the research of a strategic alliance concept; furthermore, it focuses on the contingent hierarchy of alliances. The motives of strategic alliances formation, their categories, groups and benefit for business have been revealed in this article. Special attention is paid to the process of strategic alliance formation and the analysis of factors that influence the formation of strategic alliances...

  12. From Guide to Practice: Improving Your After School Science Program to Increase Student Academic Achievement

    Taylor, J.

    2013-12-01

    Numerous science organizations, such as NASA, offer educational outreach activities geared towards after school. For some programs, the primary goal is to grow students' love of science. For others, the programs are also intended to increase academic achievement. For those programs looking to support student learning in out-of-school time environments, aligning the program with learning during the classroom day can be a challenge. The Institute for Education Sciences, What Works Clearinghouse, put together a 'Practice Guide' for maximizing learning time beyond the regular school day. These practice guides provide concrete recommendations for educators supported by research. While this guide is not specific to any content or subject-area, the recommendations provided align very well with science education. After school science is often viewed as a fun, dynamic environment for students. Indeed, one of the recommendations to ensure time is structured according to students' needs is to provide relevant and interesting experiences. Given that our after school programs provide such creative environments for students, what other components are needed to promote increased academic achievement? The recommendations provided to academic achievement, include: 1. Align Instruction, 2. Maximize Attendance and Participation, 3. Adapt Instruction, 4. Provide Engaging Experiences, and 5. Evaluate Program. In this session we will examine these five recommendations presented in the Practice Guide, discuss how these strategies align with science programs, and examine what questions each program should address in order to provide experiences that lend themselves to maximizing instruction. Roadblocks and solutions for overcoming challenges in each of the five areas will be presented. Jessica Taylor will present this research based on her role as an author on the Practice Guide, 'Improving Academic Achievement in Out-of-School Time' and her experience working in various informal science

  13. Comparative study of an externship program versus a corporate-academic cooperation program for enhancing nursing competence of graduating students

    Tseng, Chien-Ning; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Chen, Kee-Hsin; Lou, Meei-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Background New graduates report intense stress during the transition from school to their first work settings. Managing this transition is important to reduce turnover rates. This study compared the effects of an externship program and a corporate-academic cooperation program on enhancing junior college students’ nursing competence and retention rates in the first 3 months and 1 year of initial employment. Methods This two-phase study adopted a pretest and posttest quasi-experimental design. ...

  14. Predicting Stereotype Endorsement and Academic Motivation in Women in Science Programs: A Longitudinal Model

    Delisle, Marie-Noelle; Guay, Frederic; Senecal, Caroline; Larose, Simon

    2009-01-01

    This study proposed and tested a model based on stereotype threat theory. The hypothesis is that women who are exposed to a low percentage of women in a science program are more likely to endorse the gender stereotype that science is a male domain, which will in turn undermine their autonomous academic motivation. A total of 167 women university…

  15. Planning and Implementing Institutional Image and Promoting Academic Programs in Higher Education

    Cetin, Rubeena

    2003-01-01

    Universities face a multitude of issues and challenges in the current era of higher educational endeavors. Universities are being urged to provide high quality education, exist as a well-reputed university, achieve enrollment success, improve competitive positioning, provide contemporary and well-designed academic programs, and maintain financial…

  16. Best Practices When Using Student Survey Results in Academic Program Review. SERU Project Technical Report

    Chatman, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Using the example of responses from civil engineering students at a very highly ranked participating university, this guide demonstrates the importance of comparative data when using student questionnaire data for undergraduate academic program review. It also emphasizes the advantage of using factor structures for better questionnaire-based…

  17. Efectos academicos de programas extracurriculares (Academic Effects of After-School Programs). ERIC Digest.

    Shumow, Lee

    The current emphasis on performance standards and testing has led schools to look to the after-school hours as time that can be spent developing children's academic skills. This Spanish-language digest describes types of after-school programs and discusses recent research on who participates and the effects of participation on children's school…

  18. Empirical Reflections on Academic Training Programs in Counseling Psychology: Contexts and Commitments

    Neimeyer, Greg J.; Goodyear, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    The three main articles in the Major Contribution of the September issue of "The Counseling Psychologist" address academic training programs in counseling psychology, focusing on their institutional contexts and commitments. Each article examines one key issue, provides empirical data concerning this issue, and traces the practical implications of…

  19. NSF's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR): Subsidizing Academic Research or State Budgets?

    Wu, Yonghong

    2009-01-01

    This cross-state empirical study focuses on the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) and examines its impact on the academic research and development (R&D) expenditures financed by state governments. Based on a panel of 50 states during 1979-2006, the empirical results indicate that…

  20. The Intersections of Living-Learning Programs and Social Identity as Factors of Academic Achievement and Intellectual Engagement

    Pasque, Penny A.; Murphy, Rena

    2005-01-01

    Findings from this study show that living-learning (LL) programs at a research institution in the Midwest have a series of positive outcomes for both academic achievement and intellectual engagement. Controlling for past academic achievement, socioeconomic status, and demographic characteristics, LL programs are predictors, albeit small…

  1. Transactional, Transformational, or Laissez-Faire Leadership: An Assessment of College of Agriculture Academic Program Leaders' (Deans) Leadership Styles

    Jones, David; Rudd, Rick

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if academic program leaders in colleges of agriculture at land-grant institutions use transactional, transformational, and/or laissez-faire leadership styles in performing their duties. Academic program leaders were defined as individuals listed by the National Association of State University and…

  2. Brand alliance. Building block for scientific organisations´ marketing strategy

    Joern Redler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses management issues of brand alliances as part of a scientific organisation´s marketing strategy. Though brand alliances have become quite popular with consumer products they seem to be exceptions in the marketing context of academic or scientific organisations. Against this background, the paper develops a brand alliance approach considering requirements of strategically marketing scientific organisations. As a starting point, brand alliances are discussed as a sub-category to brand combinations. Furthermore, opportunities for scientific organisations associated with the alliance approach are elucidated as well as, from a more general perspective, major threats. In the following course, the paper focuses on modelling a framework of customer-based brand alliance effects, referring to the behavioural science-based view of brands which conceptualises brands as the psychological reaction to the exposure of brand elements like a name, logo or symbols. In that context, prerequisites for success are examined as well. Further, essential components of a brand alliance management process are discussed and its application to scientific organisations is expounded. Aspects like, e.g., choosing and evaluating a partner brand, positioning a brand alliance or monitoring brand alliance performance are illuminated. In regard to practical application also factors and requirements for organisation´s brand alliance success are outlined.

  3. Collaborative academic-practice transition program for new graduate RNs in community settings: lessons learned.

    Jones-Bell, Jessie; Karshmer, Judith; Berman, Audrey; Prion, Susan; Van, Paulina; Wallace, Jonalyn; West, Nikki

    2014-06-01

    In 2010-2011, leaders from California academic and practice settings and additional community partners collaboratively developed four 12- to 16-week transition programs for 345 new registered nurse (RN) graduates who had not yet found employment as nurses. Program goals were to increase participants' confidence, competence, and employability and expand the employment landscape to nontraditional new graduate settings. One program focused exclusively on community-based settings and was completed by 40 participants at clinics and school sites; all participants secured RN jobs. Key lessons learned go beyond the impact for participants and relate to changing the nursing culture about career path models for new graduates, troubleshooting regulatory issues, the potential for new graduates to help transform nursing, and advancing academic-practice partnerships and supporting practice sites. The community-based transition program continues to provide opportunities for new RN graduates and model an approach for transforming nursing practice. PMID:24693972

  4. Scuba Diving and Kinesiology: Development of an Academic Program

    Kovacs, Christopher R.; Walter, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The use of scuba diving as a recreational activity within traditional university instructional programs has been well established. Departments focusing on kinesiology, physical education, or exercise science have often provided scuba diving lessons as part of their activity-based course offerings. However, few departments have developed an…

  5. NASA Museum Alliance

    Sohus, Anita

    2006-12-01

    NASA’s Museum Alliance is a nationwide network of informal educators at museums, science centers, and planetariums that present NASA information to their local audiences. Begun in 2002 as the Mars Museum Visualization Alliance with advisors from a dozen museums, the network has grown to over 300 people from 200 organizations, including a dozen or so international partners. The network has become a community of practice among these informal educators who work with students, educators, and the general public on a daily basis, presenting information and fielding questions about space exploration. Communications are primarily through an active listserve, regular telecons, and a password-protected website. Professional development is delivered via telecons and downloadable presentations. Current content offerings include Mars exploration, Cassini, Stardust, Genesis, Deep Impact, Earth observations, STEREO, and missions to explore beyond our solar system.

  6. Leadership's Role in Support of Online Academic Programs: Implementing an Administrative Support Matrix

    Barefield, Amanda C.; Meyer, John D

    2013-01-01

    The proliferation of online education programs creates a myriad of challenges for those charged with implementation and delivery of these programs. Although creating and sustaining quality education is a shared responsibility of faculty, staff, and academic leaders, this article focuses on the pivotal role of leadership in securing the necessary resources, developing the organizational structures, and influencing organizational culture. The vital foundation for a successful outcome when imple...

  7. The Effects of Texas's Targeted Pre-Kindergarten Program on Academic Performance

    Rodney J. Andrews; Paul Jargowsky; Kristin Kuhne

    2012-01-01

    There has been a resurgence in research that investigates the efficacy of early investments as a means of reducing gaps in academic performance. However, the strongest evidence for these effects comes from experimental evaluations of small, highly enriched programs. We add to this literature by assessing the extent to which a large-scale public program, Texas's targeted pre-Kindergarten (pre-K), affects scores on math and reading achievement tests, the likelihood of being retained in grade, a...

  8. Velvet Creative Alliance

    2007-01-01

    Tallinnas Niine t. 11 asuva disainibüroo Velvet Creative Alliance sisekujundus, mille eest sisearhitekt Taavi Aunre (Boom) pälvis Eesti Sisearhitektide Liidu 2006. a. büroointerjööri preemia. Osa mööblist on valmistatud T. Aunre jooniste järgi. Graafilise disaini osa kavandas disainibüroo ise. T. Aunrest, tema tähtsamad tööd. Plaan, 9 värv. vaadet, foto T. Aunrest

  9. Strategic alliances : fit or failure

    Douma, Marc Ulco

    1997-01-01

    Strategic alliances have come to form a structural element within present day economic systems. In spite of a considerable increase in the number of alliances, in practice these are quite often less successful than initially anticipated by the partners involved. These two observations formed the immediate motivation for our research into strategic alliances. The objective of this research was the development of a practical framework for companies, that structures and objectifies the decision ...

  10. Embedding academic socialisation within a language support program: An Australian case study

    Shelley Beatty

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes discipline-specific transition support utilised to follow-up the Post-Entry Language Assessment (PELA recently introduced at Edith Cowan University as one strategy to address declining rates of English language proficiency.  Transition support was embedded within a first year core unit and emphasis was placed on assisting students to develop spoken and written communicative competencies by scaffolding assessment tasks and providing other academic supports that used contextualised examples. While general satisfaction with the academic support offered during the course was high, the program achieved limited success in encouraging at-risk students to seek support. Further investigation into methods of encouraging student participation is required, along with research into strategies for extending effective academic socialisation support into the online learning environment.

  11. Rethinking schools of public health: a strategic alliance model.

    Moloughney, Brent W; Skinner, Harvey A

    2006-01-01

    Canada is in the midst of rejuvenation of public health organizations, mandates and infrastructure. Major planning exercises are underway regarding public health human resources, where academic institutions have a key role to play. To what extent could schools of public health be part of the solution? Many universities across Canada are considering or in the process of implementing MPH programs (some 17 programs planned and/or underway) and possible schools of public health. However, concerns are raised about critical mass, quality and standards. We encourage innovation and debate about ways to enhance collaborative and structural arrangements for education programs. A school of public health model might emerge from this, but so too might other models. Also, novel types of organizational structure need consideration. One example is a "strategic alliance" model that is broad-based, integrative and adaptive--building on the interdisciplinary focus needed for addressing public health concerns in the 21st century. From our perspective, the central question is: what (new) types of organizational structures and, equally important, collaborative networks will enable Canada to strengthen its public health workforce so that it may better address local and global challenges to public health? PMID:16827419

  12. Students' Persistence and Academic Success in a First-Year Professional Bachelor Program: The Influence of Students' Learning Strategies and Academic Motivation

    Gert Vanthournout

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study explores whether students' learning strategies and academic motivation predict persistence and academic success in the first year of higher education. Freshmen students in a professional bachelor program in teacher education were questioned on their learning strategy use and motivation at the start and at the end of the academic year. Students' learning strategies were assessed using the inventory of learning styles-SV. Motivation was measured using scales from the self-regulation questionnaire and the academic motivation scale. Gender and students' prior education were incorporated as control variables. Logistic regression analyses and general linear modelling were applied to predict persistence and academic success, respectively. In each case a stepwise approach in data analysis was used. Results on persistence indicate that lack of regulation and amotivation at the start of the year are significant predictors. For academic success, results showed that relating and structuring, lack of regulation, and lack of motivation at the end of the year are meaningful predictors. Overall, our study demonstrates that learning strategies and motivation have a moderate explanatory value regarding academic success and persistence, and that these effects remain even after controlling for the influence of background variables.

  13. Clinicians’ Attitudes Toward Therapeutic Alliance in ETherapy

    Madalina, Sucala; Julie B., Schnur; Emily H., Brackman; Michael J., Constantino; Guy H., Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    Although therapeutic alliance is a crucial factor in face-to-face therapies, no data exist on clinicians’ attitudes towards alliance in E-therapy. The study explored clinicians’ perceived importance of alliance in E-therapy, clinicians’ confidence in their skills to develop alliance in E-therapy, and whether attitudes towards alliance in E-therapy are associated with intended E-therapy practice. Clinicians (n=106) responded to an online survey. The majority of clinicians considered alliance t...

  14. Academic stress in Chinese schools and a proposed preventive intervention program

    Xu Zhao; Selman, Robert L.; Helen Haste

    2015-01-01

    While American educators fret about the mediocre educational performance of American students in international contests (e.g. the Program for International Student Assessment) and wonder why the Chinese education system produces such high-achieving students, educators, journalists, and public officials in China want to know what causes and how to prevent the high levels of academic stress that Chinese students, their families, and their school systems experience. So far, much of the blame for...

  15. THE IMPACT OF PEDAGOGICAL SUPPORT PROGRAM ON COPING STRATEGIES, ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AND STRESS LEVEL IN ADOLESCENCE

    Maslova, Jūlija

    2016-01-01

    The article analyses development of coping strategies and coping resources using in adolescence. Adolescents are often not able to cope with stressful situations because their coping strategies still forming, that leads to academic performance reduction. Therefore, a pedagogical support program for developing coping strategies in adolescents is crucial, and it was elaborated and approved as a formative experiment method. Results revealed that after the implementation of pedagogical support pr...

  16. Influence of Physical Education Academic Program on Personality Charities among Physical Education Students

    Chaya.Kothe; Dr. Rajendra Tuppekar

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to Influence of physical education academic program on personality characteristics among physical education students. Total 40 physical education students treated as a experimental group were selected as a subject for the presented studies & their age ranged from 22 to 30 years. No control group had been taken. Questionnaires were given to the 40 physical education Students. The instructions were given to the students before filling these questionnaires ...

  17. Graduates' emotional competency: aligning academic programs, firms' requirements and students' profiles

    Fabrizio Gerli; Sara Bonesso; Claudio Pizzi; Mariachiara Barzotto

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the still under-investigated phenomenon of the development of behavioral competencies in higher education settings. We carried out a study on a sample of graduate students enrolled in different disciplinary academic programs in a public University located in northern Italy. We analyzed their emotional, social and cognitive competencies (by adopting a research method that includes a multi-rater approach), comparing them with those expected by a sample of recruiting companie...

  18. Self-Efficacy, Intrinsic Motivation, and Academic Outcomes among Latino Middle School Students Participating in an After-School Program

    Niehaus, Kate; Rudasill, Kathleen Moritz; Adelson, Jill L.

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined how academic self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation, and participation in an after-school program contributed to the academic achievement of Latino middle school students over the course of one school year. Participants were 47 Latino students in sixth through eighth grades who attended two public middle schools in…

  19. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program

    Hrastinski, Iva; Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a scarcity of studies exploring the influence of students' American Sign Language (ASL) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing…

  20. The Impact of a Physical Activity Intervention Program on Academic Achievement in a Swedish Elementary School Setting

    Käll, Lina B.; Nilsson, Michael; Lindén, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite the emerging body of research on the potential of physical activity to improve learning and academic achievement, conclusive evidence regarding the effects of physical activity on academic achievement is lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of a physical activity intervention program on academic…

  1. Improving Academic Performance of School-Age Children by Physical Activity in the Classroom: 1-Year Program Evaluation

    Mullender-Wijnsma, Marijke J.; Hartman, Esther; de Greeff, Johannes W.; Bosker, Roel J.; Doolaard, Simone; Visscher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Background: An intervention was designed that combined physical activity with learning activities. It was based upon evidence for positive effects of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) on academic achievement. The aim of this study was to describe the program implementation and effects on academic achievement after 1?year. Methods:…

  2. Generation Psy: Student Characteristics and Academic Achievement in a Three-Year Problem-Based Learning Bachelor Program

    de Koning, Bjorn B.; Loyens, Sofie M. M.; Rikers, Remy M. J. P.; Smeets, Guus; van der Molen, Henk T.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the simultaneous impact of demographic, personality, intelligence, and (prior) study performance factors on students' academic achievement in a three-year academic problem-based psychology program. Information regarding students' gender, age, nationality, pre-university education, high school grades, Big Five personality…

  3. Library Instruction and Academic Success: A Mixed-Methods Assessment of a Library Instruction Program

    Melissa Bowles-Terry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – This study examines the connection between student academic success and information literacy instruction. Locally, it allowed librarians to ascertain the institution’s saturation rate for information literacy instruction and identify academic programs not utilizing library instruction services. In a broader application, it provides an argument for a tiered program of information literacy instruction and offers student perspectives on improving a library instruction program.Methods – Focus groups with 15 graduating seniors, all of whom had attended at least one library instruction session, discussed student experiences and preferences regarding library instruction. An analysis of 4,489 academic transcripts of graduating seniors identified differences in grade point average (GPA between students with different levels of library instruction.Results – Students value library instruction for orientation purposes as beginning students, and specialized, discipline-specific library instruction in upper-level courses. There is a statistically significant difference in GPA between graduating seniors who had library instruction in upper-level courses (defined in this study as post-freshman-level and those who did not.Conclusions – Library instruction seems to make the most difference to student success when it is repeated at different levels in the university curriculum, especially when it is offered in upper-level courses. Instruction librarians should differentiate between lower-division and upper-division learning objectives for students in order to create a more cohesive and non-repetitive information literacy curriculum.

  4. Alliances: Their advantages and pitfalls

    Contract alliances between operators and service companies, contractors, and suppliers in the drilling and production industry have helped cut costs and improve operational efficiency, but there are pitfalls to be aware of. Operators and service companies tend to form alliances for long-term pricing or efficiency gains rather than for continuous quality improvement or as a technology sharing agreements. A survey was sent to a total of 200 operators, contractors, and service companies to help identify the advantages nd pitfalls with current alliance strategies in the US petroleum industry. This article is the first of a two-part series on petroleum industry alliances. the second part, which will appear in an upcoming issue, covers the results of the alliance survey in detail

  5. Strategic alliances and market risk.

    Havenaar, Matthias; Hiscocks, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Strategic alliances in product development and marketing are crucial to the biotechnology industry. Many alliances, however, are terminated before the drug reaches the market. In this article we make the case that strategic alliances can fail because of how they are negotiated. Alliance contracts are often inflexible and do not allow for changes in market conditions. We propose a model for contract valuation that can assist biotech and/or pharma deal makers in negotiating alliances that have a higher chance of survival in uncertain market conditions. The model makes use of variable royalties and milestone payments. Because licensing is key to the biotech and/or pharma business model this article will be of interest not only to professionals in licensing, but to all professionals active in the industry. PMID:22484547

  6. The Academic Differences between Students Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs and Students Not Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs

    Koumoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This research study aimed to identify any correlation between participation in afterschool robotics at the high school level and academic performance. Through a sample of N = 121 students, the researcher examined the grades and attendance of students who participated in a robotics program in the 2011-2012 school year. The academic record of these…

  7. Ready for College: Assessing the Influence of Student Engagement on Student Academic Motivation in a First-Year Experience Program

    Ellis, Keyana Chamere

    2013-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Summer Academy (VTSA) Program, developed by through a collaborative partnership between faculty, administrators and staff concerned by attrition among-first year students, was introduced in summer 2012 as a campus initiative to assist first-year college students transition and acclimate to the academic and social systems of the campus environment. VTSA is a six-week intensive residential summer-bridge program that provides academic preparation, highly-individualized advising...

  8. Comparison of Emotional Intelligence Scores among Engineering Students at Different Stages of an Academic Program

    Nizaroyani Saibani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intelligence quotient (IQ has been widely used as a measure of an individual’s intellectual abilities. Emotional intelligence or emotional quotient (EQ is equally important in defining excellent work performance. An increasing number of employers have started considering fresh graduates with high EQ because the job market is already full of academically competent candidates. With this motivation considered, this study aims to compare the EQ levels of four groups of undergraduate students in their first year of enrollment in their academic program and at the start of each succeeding academic year in the Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM. The EQ scores of these students were also monitored until their graduation. The EQ levels were determined using the Malaysian EQ Inventory (MEQI test developed by UKM researchers. A comparative study of EQ levels among five batches of students was conducted, starting from their first enrollment in their respective programs. One batch of students has completed the study, and their MEQI results indicated a slight reduction in the total EQ scores. However, two domains recorded improvement: social skills and maturity. Thus, tertiary education is not expected to change student EQ levels, completely because EQ level comprises cognitive and emotional qualities developed during primary and secondary years of education. Innovative strategies on effective teaching and learning activities should be identified to determine their positive influence on the development of EQ domains.

  9. The Research Data Alliance

    Fontaine, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Research Data Alliance (RDA) is an international organization created in 2012 to provide researchers with a forum for identifying and removing barriers to data sharing. Since then, RDA has gained over 3000 individual members, over three dozen organizational members, 47 Interest Groups, and 17 Working Groups, all focused on research data sharing. Interoperability is one instantiation of data sharing, but is not the only barrier to overcome. Technology limitations, discipline-specific cultures that do not support sharing, lack of best-practices, or lack of good definitions, are only three of a long list of situations preventing researchers from sharing their data. This presentation will cover how RDA has grown, some details on how the first eight solutions contribute to interoperability and sharing, and a sneak peek at what's in the pipeline.

  10. From Near Extinction to Academic Excellence: The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Physics Program

    Sudhakaran, Gubbi

    2013-03-01

    A physics department that was on the brink of extinction has been successfully resuscitated into a nationally recognized program at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse (UW-L). The revitalization efforts included sweeping curricular reforms, aggressive recruitment, and retention of students and faculty. The reforms included the introduction of new academic programs for the majors, new courses for non-majors, a dual-degree program in Physics and Engineering, and opportunities for undergraduate research. The department uses several recruitment techniques which include contacting high school seniors in the region and conducting outreach activities to attract students to the program. In order to sustain and enhance the quality of the program, the department carries out comprehensive assessment of its programmatic goals on a regular basis. The department is also very successful in placing students with bachelor's degrees in physics in STEM careers at an exceptional rate. The success of the program in recruiting, retention, and career placement can be attributed to a combination of aggressive advising and flexible options designed to meet the needs and career goals of each student. The retention rate in the program is high due to one-on-one advising, involving students in undergraduate research at an early stage, and a very vibrant student society. Due to these initiatives, the department has maintained its growth over the years with 160 majors currently, and 29 majors graduating during the 2011- 2012 academic year. Recently, the UW-L Physics Program was selected to receive the 2013 American Physical Society (APS) ``Improving Undergraduate Physics Education Award''.

  11. Three-Year Longitudinal Study of School Behavior and Academic Outcomes: Results from a Comprehensive Expanded School Mental Health Program

    Daly, Brian P.; Sander, Mark A.; Nicholls, Elizabeth G.; Medhanie, Amanuel; Vanden Berk, Eric; Johnson, James

    2014-01-01

    While there has been encouraging growth in the number of expanded school mental health programs (ESMH) across the country, few programs rigorously evaluate long-term academic outcomes associated with receipt of these services. This study examined the effects of services from an ESMH program on school behavior (number of out-of-school suspensions…

  12. Academic stress in Chinese schools and a proposed preventive intervention program

    Xu Zhao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available While American educators fret about the mediocre educational performance of American students in international contests (e.g. the Program for International Student Assessment and wonder why the Chinese education system produces such high-achieving students, educators, journalists, and public officials in China want to know what causes and how to prevent the high levels of academic stress that Chinese students, their families, and their school systems experience. So far, much of the blame for these toxic levels of stress has been directed to the Gaokao, the Chinese national college entrance exam that takes place in June each year. But to date, top-down Chinese educational reforms have been ineffective in reducing the problem. In this article, we build a case for strengthening bottom-up efforts at the school level in China and propose an evidence-based approach for addressing the challenge of academic stress experienced by Chinese students.

  13. Improving the academic programming process in a school of nursing using computational modeling and simulation.

    Clancy, Thomas R; White-Delaney, Connie; Mako, Margo

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, academic institutions have been challenged to search for new methods to provide high quality education and research at an affordable cost. This study used a unique methodology, computational modeling and simulation, to investigate faculty productivity at a school of nursing from 2004 till 2007. A model of the academic programming process was built in Arena, a discrete event simulation software package. The model predicted significant improvements in baseline faculty percent effort (PE) after reducing variation in class distribution throughout the week, combining classes with enrollment of 10 or less, adding additional faculty and standardizing PE policies. Performance metrics for faculty productivity showed significant improvement post implementation of recommendations in 2007. PMID:19592910

  14. The Use of the LASSI (The Learning and Study Strategies Inventory) to Predict and Evaluate the Study Habits and Academic Performance of Students in a Learning Assistance Program

    Dill, Anna L.; Justice, Cheryl A.; Minchew, Sue S.; Moran, Laura M.; Wang, Chih-hsuan; Weed, Candace B.

    2014-01-01

    The Learning Center (TLC) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is an academic support unit designed to help students improve their academic performance. One of the programs offered by TLC is the Learning Skills Support Program (LSSP), which is designed for academically suspended students. The Center has traditionally used the Learning and Study…

  15. Interpartner Legitimacy in the Alliance Development Process

    Kumar, Rajesh; Das, T.K.

    cooperation to achieve alliance objectives. We propose three types of interpartner legitimacy - pragmatic, moral, and cognitive legitimacy - and discuss the dynamics of these three types in the formation, operation, and outcome stages of alliance development. Further, we discuss the salience of interpartner......We propose a framework to understand interpartner legitimacy in strategic alliances. Interpartner legitimacy is the mutual acknowledgment by the alliance partners that their actions are proper in the developmental processes of the alliance. We argue that interpartner legitimacy is needed for...... legitimacy in different alliance types. Finally, we derive propositions for further research, and discuss strategies that alliance managers can adopt to develop interpartner legitimacy....

  16. Assessment of preclinical students’ academic motivation before and after a three-day academic affair program

    Aung, Myo Nyein

    2015-01-01

    Myo Nyein Aung,1 Juraiporn Somboonwong,2 Vorapol Jaroonvanichkul,1 Pongsak Wannakrairot3 1Medical Education Unit, 2Quality Management Division and Department of Physiology, 3Academic Affairs Division, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, ThailandBackground: Medical students’ motivation is an important driving factor for academic performance, and therefore medical teachers and educators are often highly interested in this topic. This study evaluated the impact of a...

  17. Academic training: From Evolution Theory to Parallel and Distributed Genetic Programming

    2007-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 15, 16 March From 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 From Evolution Theory to Parallel and Distributed Genetic Programming F. FERNANDEZ DE VEGA / Univ. of Extremadura, SP Lecture No. 1: From Evolution Theory to Evolutionary Computation Evolutionary computation is a subfield of artificial intelligence (more particularly computational intelligence) involving combinatorial optimization problems, which are based to some degree on the evolution of biological life in the natural world. In this tutorial we will review the source of inspiration for this metaheuristic and its capability for solving problems. We will show the main flavours within the field, and different problems that have been successfully solved employing this kind of techniques. Lecture No. 2: Parallel and Distributed Genetic Programming The successful application of Genetic Programming (GP, one of the available Evolutionary Algorithms) to optimization problems has encouraged an ...

  18. Organizational Identity and Interorganizational Alliances

    Choi, Emily Wu

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the relationship between organizational identity and the formation and performance implications of interorganizational alliances. The first study investigates the effect of an organization's identity on its initial alliance portfolio formation, addressing how becoming comprehensible through organizational identity is a fundamental step in order for a new organization to be accepted by the market. Through different categorizations, some new organizations will be more...

  19. BUILDING STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP OF TRANSNATIONAL EDUCATION USING ONLINE PROGRAM TO INCREASE ACADEMIC QUALITY OF GRADUATES

    Gerardus Polla

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available International employment standard requires higher quality of graduates, which can be achieved through high-quality academic standards. As we know there are still a large number of graduates of Indonesian higher education rejected to work in global industry. Besides having low GPA, lots of graduates are considered lacking technical skills, interpersonal skills, and international experience. Indeed, the main weakness factor is the low English proficiency of graduates. We need a breakthrough that develops our academic standards of higher education to obtain international quality. Yet, there are challenges to face by the government, such as rebuilding the national system (establishing elite institutions, internationalizing higher education (globalizing the institutions or cross-border trades of education services, as well as enhancing private participation by repositioning the private sector. To overcome these challenges we need to build a strategic partnership of transnational education using online programs, which can obtain mutual benefit for the collaborating institutions. This article discusses about how to increase academic quality of graduates in Indonesia or in other Asian countries.

  20. The academic differences between students involved in school-based robotics programs and students not involved in school-based robotics programs

    Koumoullos, Michael

    This research study aimed to identify any correlation between participation in afterschool robotics at the high school level and academic performance. Through a sample of N=121 students, the researcher examined the grades and attendance of students who participated in a robotics program in the 2011-2012 school year. The academic record of these students was compared to a group of students who were members of school based sports teams and to a group of students who were not part of either of the first two groups. Academic record was defined as overall GPA, English grade, mathematics grade, mathematics-based standardized state exam scores, and attendance rates. All of the participants of this study were students in a large, urban career and technical education high school. As STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) has come to the forefront of educational focus, robotics programs have grown in quantity. Starting robotics programs requires a serious commitment of time, money, and other resources. The benefits of such programs have not been well analyzed. This research study had three major goals: to identify the academic characteristics of students who are drawn to robotics programs, to identify the academic impact of the robotics program during the robotics season, and to identify the academic impact of the robotics program at the end of the school year. The study was a non-experiment. The researchers ran MANOVS, repeated measures analyses, an ANOVA, and descriptive statistics to analyze the data. The data showed that students drawn to robotics were academically stronger than students who did not participate in robotics. The data also showed that grades and attendance did not significantly improve or degrade either during the robotics season or at year-end. These findings are significant because they show that robotics programs attract students who are academically strong. This information can be very useful in high school articulation programs

  1. The winning alliance

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    The ICTR-PHE 2012 conference, which closed its doors today after five busy days, sealed the alliance between the physics and medical communities. We have come a long way since 1977, when physicist David Townsend took the first PET images of a small mouse. Today, physicists are developing new detector techniques that medical doctors can transfer to the clinic in fields that are no longer confined to cancer treatment. Several powerful and innovative solutions for better healthcare are on their way.   An overwhelming number of proposals for improving virtually all aspects of cancer treatment was presented at the ICTR-PHE 2012: from new detectors and read-out solutions for implementation in the next generation of imaging instrumentation to accelerator-based facilities for the production of new isotopes for use both as radio-tracers and as drugs. And this is not all, because the issues that were discussed at the joint conference also included new uses of enhanced PET-CT imaging for cardiovascular...

  2. Reflective Peer Mentoring: Evolution of a Professional Development Program for Academic Librarians

    Janet L. Goosney

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For librarians engaged in teaching and learning, reflection has the potential to create opportunities to examine one’s instructional practice, identify and address challenges, and find new instructional pathways. It can also lead to a deeper understanding of one’s teaching. As valuable as it is, it can be challenging for librarians to find time to deeply contemplate instruction experiences. In the fast-paced environment of academic libraries, reflection is too often passed over as we rush from one teaching experience to the next. Recognizing the value of reflective practice, a team of academic librarians at Memorial University created a peer mentoring program for librarians involved in information literacy and other forms of teaching. The goal was to create an inviting and collaborative environment for exploring and developing instructional self-awareness by working with librarian colleagues. The resulting Reflective Peer Mentoring (RPM program requires minimal librarian time yet offers satisfying opportunities for brainstorming, problem solving, and reflection by bringing colleagues together into small co-mentored learning communities. This paper explores the successful evolution of this peer-based, collegial approach to reflection. It describes the inspiration and experimentation that led to the eventual creation of the RPM model, including Reflective Teaching & Observation (RTO, an earlier program founded on peer observation and collaborative exploration. It also describes the foundational principles that form the basis for the RPM program as well as the three-step framework on which it is structured. Finally, the article examines the information gathered and lessons learned from assessment of the program during the first year of implementation.

  3. Western Nuclear Science Alliance

    Steve Reese; George Miller; Stephen Frantz; Denis Beller; Denis Beller; Ed Morse; Melinda Krahenbuhl; Bob Flocchini; Jim Elliston

    2010-12-07

    The primary objective of the INIE program is to strengthen nuclear science and engineering programs at the member institutions and to address the long term goal of the University Reactor Infrastructure and Education Assistance Program.

  4. Exploring the relationship between scientist human capital and firm performance: The case of biomedical academic entrepreneurs in the SBIR Program.

    Toole, A; Czarnitzki, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    Do academic scientists bring valuable human capital to the companies they found or join? If so, what are the particular skills that compose their human capital and how are these skills related to firm performance? This paper examines these questions using a particular group of academic entrepreneurs - biomedical research scientists who choose to commercialize their knowledge through the U.S. Small Business Innovation Research Program. Our conceptual framework assumes the nature of an acade...

  5. Predicting the Admission into Medical School of African American College Students Who Have Participated in Summer Academic Enrichment Programs.

    Hesser, Al; Cregler, Louis L.; Lewis, Lloyd

    1998-01-01

    A study of 309 African American college students in summer academic enrichment programs at the Medical College of Georgia from 1980-89 found the most significant predictors of medical school admission were the Scholastic Assessment Test math score, summer program grade point average, college grade point average, career aspirations, college type,…

  6. Effectiveness of Selected Advanced Placement Programs on the Academic Performance and College Readiness of High School Students

    Lewis, Traschell S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of selected Advanced Placement (AP) programs on the academic performance and college readiness of high school students. Specifically, the researcher was concerned with ascertaining the effectiveness of social science, math, science, English, music/art and language AP programs on the…

  7. Implementing a robotics curriculum at an academic general surgery training program: our initial experience.

    Winder, Joshua S; Juza, Ryan M; Sasaki, Jennifer; Rogers, Ann M; Pauli, Eric M; Haluck, Randy S; Estes, Stephanie J; Lyn-Sue, Jerome R

    2016-09-01

    The robotic surgical platform is being utilized by a growing number of hospitals across the country, including academic medical centers. Training programs are tasked with teaching their residents how to utilize this technology. To this end, we have developed and implemented a robotic surgical curriculum, and share our initial experience here. Our curriculum was implemented for all General Surgical residents for the academic year 2014-2015. The curriculum consisted of online training, readings, bedside training, console simulation, participating in ten cases as bedside first assistant, and operating at the console. 20 surgical residents were included. Residents were provided the curriculum and notified the department upon completion. Bedside assistance and operative console training were completed in the operating room through a mix of biliary, foregut, and colorectal cases. During the fiscal years of 2014 and 2015, there were 164 and 263 robot-assisted surgeries performed within the General Surgery Department, respectively. All 20 residents completed the online and bedside instruction portions of the curriculum. Of the 20 residents trained, 13/20 (65 %) sat at the Surgeon console during at least one case. Utilizing this curriculum, we have trained and incorporated residents into robot-assisted cases in an efficient manner. A successful curriculum must be based on didactic learning, reading, bedside training, simulation, and training in the operating room. Each program must examine their caseload and resident class to ensure proper exposure to this platform. PMID:26994774

  8. Earth System Science Education Alliance

    Myers, R.; Schwerin, T.

    2007-12-01

    The Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) professional development program is providing in-depth geoscience content and teaching methods to pre- and in-service teachers. The program is building and expanding on NASA's successful ESSEA program that was funded from 2000-2005. Now sponsored by NSF, the network has expanded to nearly 40 institutions of higher learning committed to teacher Earth system science education. The program supports participating institutions with funding, training, and standards-aligned courses and resources for pre- and in-service teachers. As a result, teachers are prepared to teach Earth system science using inquiry-based classroom methods, geoscience data and tools. From 1999-2005, the NASA funded ESSEA Program delivered online Earth system science professional development for K-12 teachers through a network of 20 colleges and universities. The program was led by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) and based on a trio of 16-week online courses (for elementary, middle, and high school teachers) that had been developed and piloted by NASA's Classroom of the Future at Wheeling Jesuit University. The ESSEA program's mission was to: 1) support universities, colleges, and science education organizations delivering the K-12 online graduate courses; 2) strengthen teachers' understanding of Earth system science; 3) demonstrate the ability to deliver exceptional professional development to a national audience; and 4) create a solid infrastructure to sustain the program. As of spring 2006, the courses had been used by 40 faculty at 20 institutions educating over 1,700 K-12 teachers in Earth system science. Through NSF funding beginning in late 2006, IGES is enhancing and building on the ESSEA foundation by: 1. Introducing extensive use of data, models and existing Earth system educational materials to support the courses; 2. Implementing a rigorous evaluation program designed to demonstrate growth in teachers' Earth

  9. Comparison of patient outcomes in academic medical centers with and without value analysis programs

    Murray AS

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Adrienne S Murray, Michael Griswold, Imran Sunesara, Ed SmithUniversity of Mississippi Health Care, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USABackground: Value analysis is the science of balancing the mandate to deliver high-quality clinical outcomes with the necessity to drive down costs in order to thrive in the challenging economics of health care. This study compared average length of stay, direct cost, morbidity, and mortality across the cardiology, cardiovascular, neuroscience, and orthopedic service lines, in academic medical centers with and without value analysis programs (VAPs. The basic question was, “Do academic medical centers with VAPs have lower average length of stay, better morbidity and mortality rates, and lower overall supply costs?”Methods and results: The clinical data base/resource manager (CDB/RM of the University HealthSystem Consortium was utilized as secondary data for this study. Reports from the CDB/RM were generated from 2006 to 2011. Continuous variable differences across VAP status were examined using Wilcoxon two-sample tests. Primary analyses used multilevel linear mixed model methods to estimate the effects of VAPs on primary outcomes (average length of stay, cost, morbidity, mortality. Association components of the linear mixed models incorporated random effects at the hospital level and robust, Huber-White, standard errors were calculated. There was no significant difference for average length of stay, direct cost, morbidity, and mortality between academic medical centers with and without VAPs. However, outcomes were not noted to be substantially worse.Conclusion: Numerous case studies reveal that aggressively active VAPs do decrease hospital cost. Also, this study did not find a negative impact on patient care. Further studies are needed to explore the benefits of value analysis and its effect on patient outcomes.Keywords: value analysis, average length of stay, morbidity, mortality

  10. Your alliances are too stable.

    Ernst, David; Bamford, James

    2005-06-01

    A 2004 McKinsey survey of more than 30 companies reveals that at least 70% of them have major alliances that are underperforming and in need of restructuring. Moreover, JVs that broaden or otherwise adjust their scope have a 79% success rate, versus 33% for ventures that remain essentially unchanged. Yet most firms don't routinely evaluate the need to overhaul their alliances or intervene to correct performance problems. That means corporations are missing huge opportunities: By revamping just one large alliance, a company can generate 100 million dololars to 300 million dollars in extra income a year. Here's how to unlock more value from alliances: (1) Launch the process. Don't wait until your venture is in the middle of a crisis; regularly scan your major alliances to determine which need restructuring. Once you've targeted one, designate a restructuring team and find a senior sponsor to push the process along. Then delineate the scope of the team's work. (2) Diagnose performance. Evaluate the venture on the following performance dimensions: ownership and financials, strategy, operations, governance, and organization and talent. Identify the root causes of the venture's problems, not just the symptoms, and estimate how much each problem is costing the company. (3) Generate restructuring options. Based on the diagnosis, decide whether to fix, grow, or exit the alliance. Assuming the answer is fix or grow, determine whether fundamental or incremental changes are needed, using the five performance dimensions above as a framework. Then assemble three or four packages of restructuring options, test them with shareholders, and gain parents' approval. (4) Execute the changes. Embark on a widespread and consistent communication effort, building support among executives in the JV and the parent companies. So the process stays on track, assign accountability to certain groups or individuals. PMID:15938444

  11. ASC Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program (PSAAP) II Review of the Carbon Capture Multidisciplinary Science Center (CCMSC) at the University of Utah

    Still, C. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ferencz, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hoekstra, R. J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hungerford, A. L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kuhl, A. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Montoya, D. R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wagner, J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-08

    The review was conducted on March 31 – April 1, 2015 at the University of Utah. Overall the review team was impressed with the work presented and found that the CCMSC had met or exceeded all of their Year 1 milestones. Specific details, comments and recommendations are included in this document.

  12. Alliance portfolios and innovation performance: Connecting structural and managerial perspectives.

    Faems, Dries; Janssens, Maddy; Neyens, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Whereas existing alliance portfolio studies mainly focus on the structure or management of alliance portfolios, we conceptually explore the connections between them. In particular, we formulate propositions, arguing that the formalization, centralization, and customization of alliance portfolio management moderate the relationship between the structural characteristics of alliance portfolios (i.e., alliance portfolio size and alliance portfolio heterogeneity) and innovation performance. Based...

  13. Strategic alliances : Alliance contracting and trust in an evolutionary perspective

    Alders, Ben; Berendsen, Gerard; Pieters, Ineke

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we will identify the contract dimensions of alliance contracts directed at joint development of new products or services. We will determine to what extent these contract dimensions are adaptable to future needs and insights. We will also provide insight into the contingency of these ad

  14. The Role of Leaders’ Working Alliance in Premarital Education

    Owen, Jesse J.; Rhoades, Galena K.; Stanley, Scott M.; Markman, Howard J.

    2011-01-01

    Premarital (and general relationship) education programs, as a prevention method, have been shown to have a positive effect on marital quality and can prevent divorce. However, it is unclear whether these positive effects are consistent across leaders who conduct premarital education programs. Examining the variability in relationship outcomes attributed to the leaders of premarital education programs, and the role of general therapeutic factors such as working alliance in explaining relation...

  15. The value of an open, early academic development program to students’ transition and first year experience: The UTAS UniStart program

    Andrea Adam

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The University of Tasmania’s (UTAS UniStart program is a pre- and early-semester academic transition support program available to all HECs-eligible incoming students. The aim of the program is to nurture critical thinking and independent study skills in commencing students. UniStart has been offered to commencing UTAS students for over 10 years, with a significant increase both in enrolments and in the flexibility of delivery over recent years. Evaluation of the program indicates that students feel more confident and prepared for their academic studies after undertaking the program and that the majority of students affirm, later in the year, that they have utilised and applied the skills developed in UniStart during their core studies. The program represents an important component of the university’s approach to supporting the first-year experience and student transition.

  16. A Profile of Academic Training Program Directors and Chairs in Radiation Oncology

    Purpose: To identify objective characteristics and benchmarks for program leadership in academic radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: A study of the 87 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education radiation oncology training program directors (PD) and their chairs was performed. Variables included age, gender, original training department, highest degree, rank, endowed chair assignment, National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding, and Hirsch index (H-index). Data were gathered from online sources such as departmental websites, NIH RePORTER, and Scopus. Results: There were a total of 87 PD. The median age was 48, and 14 (16%) were MD/PhD. A total of 21 (24%) were female, and rank was relatively equally distributed above instructor. Of the 26 professors, at least 7 (27%) were female. At least 24 (28%) were working at the institution from which they had received their training. A total of 6 individuals held endowed chairs. Only 2 PD had active NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 12 (range, 0-51) but the index dropped to 9 (range, 0-38) when those who served as both PD and chair were removed from the group. A total of 76 chairs were identified at the time of the study. The median age was 55, and 9 (12%) were MD/PhD. A total of 7 (9%) of the chairs were female, and rank was professor for all with the exception of 1 who was listed as “Head” and was an associate professor. Of the 76 chairs, at least 10 (13%) were working at the institution from which they received their training. There were a total of 21 individuals with endowed chairs. A total of 13 (17%) had NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 29 (range, 3-60). Conclusions: These data provide benchmarks for individuals and departments evaluating leadership positions in the field of academic radiation oncology. Such data are useful for evaluating leadership trends over time and comparing academic radiation oncology with other specialties

  17. A Profile of Academic Training Program Directors and Chairs in Radiation Oncology

    Wilson, Lynn D., E-mail: Lynn.wilson@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-RWJMS, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To identify objective characteristics and benchmarks for program leadership in academic radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: A study of the 87 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education radiation oncology training program directors (PD) and their chairs was performed. Variables included age, gender, original training department, highest degree, rank, endowed chair assignment, National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding, and Hirsch index (H-index). Data were gathered from online sources such as departmental websites, NIH RePORTER, and Scopus. Results: There were a total of 87 PD. The median age was 48, and 14 (16%) were MD/PhD. A total of 21 (24%) were female, and rank was relatively equally distributed above instructor. Of the 26 professors, at least 7 (27%) were female. At least 24 (28%) were working at the institution from which they had received their training. A total of 6 individuals held endowed chairs. Only 2 PD had active NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 12 (range, 0-51) but the index dropped to 9 (range, 0-38) when those who served as both PD and chair were removed from the group. A total of 76 chairs were identified at the time of the study. The median age was 55, and 9 (12%) were MD/PhD. A total of 7 (9%) of the chairs were female, and rank was professor for all with the exception of 1 who was listed as “Head” and was an associate professor. Of the 76 chairs, at least 10 (13%) were working at the institution from which they received their training. There were a total of 21 individuals with endowed chairs. A total of 13 (17%) had NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 29 (range, 3-60). Conclusions: These data provide benchmarks for individuals and departments evaluating leadership positions in the field of academic radiation oncology. Such data are useful for evaluating leadership trends over time and comparing academic radiation oncology with other specialties.

  18. Strategic Alliance Development - A Process Model A Case Study Integrating Elements of Strategic Alliances

    Mohd Yunos, Mohd Bulkiah

    2007-01-01

    There has been enormous increase in the formation of strategic alliance and the research efforts devoted to understanding alliance development process over the last few decades. However, the critical elements that influence the each stage of alliance development are yet unexplored. This dissertation aims to fill this gap and to supplement it by introducing an integrated process model of strategic alliance development and its critical elements. The process model for strategic alliance developm...

  19. Association of academic performance of premedical students to satisfaction and engagement in a short training program: a cross sectional study presenting gender differences

    Bigna, Jean Joel R.; Fonkoue, Loic; Tchatcho, Manuela Francette F; Dongmo, Christelle N; Soh, Dorothée M; Um, Joseph Lin Lewis N; Sime, Paule Sandra D.; Affana, Landry A; Woum, Albert Ruben N; Noumegni, Steve Raoul N; Tabekou, Alphonce; Wanke, Arlette M; Taffe, Herman Rhais K; Tchoukouan, Miriette Linda N; Anyope, Kevin O

    2014-01-01

    Background It is important that students have a high academic engagement and satisfaction in order to have good academic achievement. No study measures association of these elements in a short training program. This study aimed to measure the correlation between academic achievement, satisfaction and engagement dimensions in a short training program among premedical students. Methods We carried out a cross sectional study, in August 2013, at Cercle d’Etudiants, Ingénieurs, Médecins et Profess...

  20. An exploratory study of the relationship between learning styles and academic performance among students in different nursing programs.

    Li, Yuh-Shiow; Yu, Wen-Pin; Liu, Chin-Fang; Shieh, Sue-Heui; Yang, Bao-Huan

    2014-10-27

    Abstract Background: Learning style is a major consideration in planning for effective and efficient instruction and learning. Learning style has been shown to influence academic performance in the previous research. Little is known about Taiwanese students' learning styles, particularly in the field of nursing education. Aim: This purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between learning styles and academic performance among nursing students in a five-year associate degree of nursing (ADN) program and a two-year bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) program in Taiwan. Methods/Design: This study employed a descriptive and exploratory design. The Chinese version of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Form M was an instrument. Data such as grade point average (GPA) were obtained from the Office of Academic Affairs and the Registrar computerized records. Descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance ANOVA) and chi-square statistical analysis were used to explore the relationship between academic performance and learning style in Taiwanese nursing students. Results/Findings: The study sample included 285 nursing students: 96 students in a two-year BSN program, and 189 students in a five-year ADN program. Two common learning styles were found: introversion, sensing, thinking, and judging (ISTJ); and introversion, sensing, feeling, and judging (ISFJ). A sensing-judging pair was identified in 43.3% of the participants. Academic performance was significantly related to learning style (p student success. A large sample is recommended for further research. Understanding the learning style preferences of students can enhance learning for those who are under performing in their academic studies, thereby enhancing nursing education. PMID:25345890

  1. Building alliances for improving newborn health in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Miller-Petrie, Molly K; Mazia, Goldy; Serpa, Magdalena; Pooley, Bertha; Marshall, Margaret; Meléndez, Carlos; Vicuña, Marisol

    2014-07-01

    The regional Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) Neonatal Alliance and national neonatal alliances in Bolivia, El Salvador, and Peru were studied through in-depth interviews and a review of publications. Findings were analyzed to distill successful strategies, structures, and tools for improving neonatal health by working through alliances that can be replicated at the regional or national level. The studies found the following factors were the most critical for successful outcomes from alliance work: inclusion of the Ministry of Health as a leader or primary stakeholder; a committed, diverse, technically expert, and horizontal membership; the presence of champions for neonatal health at the national level; development of a shared work plan based on feasible objectives; the use of shared financing mechanisms; the use of informal and dynamic organizational structures; and a commitment to scientific evidence-based programming. The relationship between the regional and national alliances was found to be mutually beneficial. PMID:25211677

  2. Managing R&D Alliance Portfolios

    Engel Nielsen, Lars; Mahnke, Volker

    2003-01-01

    Many companies in high technology fields engage with alliance partners to reduce risks, create synergies and learn. While the challenges of managing individual alliances are well documented, little is known on how to manage several R&D alliances simultaneously. Multiple alliance strategies can be...... observed in several companies engaged in the cross section of telecommunication and mobile technology where increased complexity magnifies managerial challenges. Drawing on modern portfolio theory, this paper offers a model for managing portfolios of R&D alliances. In particular, an analysis of a...

  3. DETERMINING INTERNATIONAL STRATEGIC ALLIANCE PER-FORMANCE

    Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2002-01-01

    This paper considers the relationship between subjective measures of international al-liance performance and a set of variables, which may act as predictors of success before the alliance is formed (pre-alliance formation factors), and a set of variables which emerge during the operation of the alliance (post-alliance formation factors). The empiri-cal study, based on a web-survey, investigates a sample of Danish partner firms engaged in 48 equity joint ventures and 70 non-equity joint ventur...

  4. The National Digital Stewardship Alliance Charter: Enabling Collaboration to Achieve National Digital Preservation

    Anderson, Martha; Gallinger, Michelle; Potter, Abigail

    2009-01-01

    The Library of Congress proposes extending the success of the NDIIPP (National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program) network by forming a national stewardship alliance of committed digital preservation partners.

  5. National Blood Clot Alliance

    ... Navigation Home About Us Mission & Vision Board of Directors and Officers Medical & Scientific Advisory Board (MASAB) NBCA Operations Programs & Services About Clots Know Your Risk for Blood Clots Signs and Symptoms of Blood ...

  6. Discipline Policies in Early Childhood Care and Education Programs: Building an Infrastructure for Social and Academic Success

    Longstreth, Sascha; Brady, Sharon; Kay, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Preventing challenging behavior in young children is a national priority. The number of young children with behavioral problems is on the rise. Discipline policies can help early childhood programs build an infrastructure that promotes social and academic success. This study sought to document the extent to which existing early…

  7. A Report on Using General-Case Programming to Teach Collateral Academic Skills to a Student in a Postsecondary Setting

    Chezan, Laura C.; Drasgow, Erik; Marshall, Kathleen J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors' purpose in this report is to examine the application of general-case programming to teach collateral academic skills to a student with pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) and with a mild intellectual disability who was attending college. The authors use data drawn from their work with Tom to explain and…

  8. Emotional Intelligence and Academic Achievement among Senior Black Students Enrolled in Baccalaureate Nursing Programs: Implications for Nursing Education

    Nwabuebo, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative correlational study investigated the relationship between trait emotional intelligence (EI) and academic achievement as evident by Grade Point Average (GPA) among senior Black students enrolled in Baccalaureate Science nursing (BSN) programs within the United States. Participants were invited via the Internet to volunteer for the…

  9. A Comparative Case Study of Developing Leaders through a Doctoral Program: A Study of One Academic Institution

    Scanlon, Sheryl Lynne

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this comparative case study was to determine how one academic institution could address the leadership gap facing organizations today, through a traditional, classroom doctoral program in Organizational Leadership. Data was gathered utilizing mixed methods methodology that included a survey questionnaire, focus group information,…

  10. Effects of Family Functioning and Parenting Style on Early Entrants' Academic Performance and Program Completion

    Huey, Erron L.; Sayler, Michael F.; Rinn, Anne N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the predictive nature of parenting style and overall family environment on the academic performance and program completion of early college entrants. Furthermore, gender and family form were examined as possible moderators to these relationships. A total of 88 early college entrants participated in…

  11. Improving Academic Performance of School-Age Children by Physical Activity in the Classroom : 1-Year Program Evaluation

    Mullender-Wijnsma, Marijke J.; Hartman, Esther; de Greeff, Johannes W.; Bosker, Roel J.; Doolaard, Simone; Visscher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUNDAn intervention was designed that combined physical activity with learning activities. It was based upon evidence for positive effects of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) on academic achievement. The aim of this study was to describe the program implementation and effects on a

  12. "There Is a World out There": Spatial Imagination, Agency, and Academic Culture in a Mexican University Program

    Torres-Olave, Blanca Minerva

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the ways that students and professors imagine the space of higher education and thus shape their relationship to the larger academic community. Data come from a "Lengua Inglesa" program in northern Mexico. The findings reveal that personal and community histories, family networks, media, and migration converge to shape what…

  13. The Impact of the Academic Progress Rating on the Retention and Recruiting Strategies of NCAA Division I Football Programs

    Castle, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    In 2004, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) adopted legislation that it hoped would help increase the graduation rates of student athletes. The Academic Progress Rating (APR), was designed to hold each individual athletic program accountable for keeping student athletes eligible and at the institution until the student athlete…

  14. The Effect of a Zoo-Based Experiential Academic Science Program on High School Students' Math and Science Achievement and Perceptions of School Climate

    Mulkerrin, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an 11th-grade and 12th-grade zoo-based academic high school experiential science program compared to a same school-district school-based academic high school experiential science program on students' pretest and posttest science, math, and reading achievement, and student perceptions of…

  15. Performance of Project Alliancing in Australasia: a Digest of Infrastructure Development from 2008 to 2013

    Derek Henry Thomas Walker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Project and program alliances have been an accepted form of project procurement for public infrastructure engineering projects in Australia and New Zealand (Australasia. Alliancing often provides best value and superior value for money when compared to traditional approaches such as Design and Construct, however considerable debate continues about its success and applicability. This paper reports on three studies of completed construction project alliance performance in 2008, 2010 and 2012. Consolidated findings are presented on 61 project alliances, data is analysed and emerging trends discussed. Recent government policy changes in Australia at Federal and State level have led to a decline in the number of project alliances, however, while the volume of alliance activity is declining it still represents billions of dollars of infrastructure construction work being undertaken. Results also revealed that communication and trust between the executive leadership and operational management teams was a major factor contributing to the functioning of the alliance. Furthermore, the research identifies several key factors that were necessary preconditions for successful alliances. Paper Type: Research article

  16. The validity of ACT-PEP test scores for predicting academic performance of registered nurses in BSN programs.

    Yang, J C; Noble, J

    1990-01-01

    This study investigated the validity of three American College Testing-Proficiency Examination Program (ACT-PEP) tests (Maternal and Child Nursing, Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing, Adult Nursing) for predicting the academic performance of registered nurses (RNs) enrolled in bachelor's degree BSN programs nationwide. This study also examined RN students' performance on the ACT-PEP tests by their demographic characteristics: student's age, sex, race, student status (full- or part-time), and employment status (full- or part-time). The total sample for the three tests comprised 2,600 students from eight institutions nationwide. The median correlation coefficients between the three ACT-PEP tests and the semester grade point averages ranged from .36 to .56. Median correlation coefficients increased over time, supporting the stability of ACT-PEP test scores for predicting academic performance over time. The relative importance of selected independent variables for predicting academic performance was also examined; the most important variable for predicting academic performance was typically the ACT-PEP test score. Across the institutions, student demographic characteristics did not contribute significantly to explaining academic performance, over and above ACT-PEP scores. PMID:2254527

  17. The relationship between alliance and client involvement in CBT for child anxiety disorders.

    McLeod, Bryce D; Islam, Nadia Y; Chiu, Angela W; Smith, Meghan M; Chu, Brian C; Wood, Jeffrey J

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the nature of the relationship between the alliance and client involvement in child psychotherapy. To address this gap, we examined the relationship between these therapy processes over the course of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for child anxiety disorders. The sample was 31 child participants (M age = 9.58 years, SD = 2.17, range = 6-13 years, 67.7% boys; 67.7% Caucasian, 6.5% Latino, 3.2% Asian/Pacific Islander, and 22.6% mixed/other) diagnosed with a primary anxiety disorder. The participants received a manual-based individual CBT program for child anxiety or a manual-based family CBT program for child anxiety. Ratings of alliance and client involvement were collected on early (Session 2) and late (Session 8) treatment phases. Two independent coding teams rated alliance and client involvement. Change in alliance positively predicted late client involvement after controlling for initial levels of client involvement. In addition, change in client involvement positively predicted late alliance after controlling for initial levels of the alliance. The findings were robust after controlling for potentially confounding variables. In CBT for child anxiety disorders, change in the alliance appears to predict client involvement; however, client involvement also appears to predict the quality of the alliance. Our findings suggest that the nature of the relationship between alliance and client involvement may be more complex than previously hypothesized. In clinical practice, tracking alliance and level of client involvement could help optimize the impact and delivery of CBT for child anxiety. PMID:24245994

  18. Strategic alliances in engineering, technology and development

    The role of strategic alliances in the development of heavy oil resources, both mineable and in-situ, is discussed. A strategic alliance is defined as a custom designed, long term collaborative working arrangement between two parties to pool, exchange, and integrate their resources to maximize mutual gain. A combination of one or more of the following success factors is seen as contributing to the unlocking of static heavy oil resources: sufficiently high and sustained crude oil prices; strategic intent to pursue heavy oil development regardless of short-term setbacks or economic downturns; technology breakthroughs that can reduce bitumen supply and upgrading costs; and strategic alliances. An idealized model for strategic alliances designed to help develop heavy oil resources is illustrated. The advantages and pitfalls involved in strategic alliances are listed along with the characteristics of viable contract agreements for such alliances. Some examples of strategic alliances in engineering and technology development are presented from Alberta experience. 2 figs., 1 tab

  19. Governance processes and change within organizational participants of multi-sectoral community health care alliances: the mediating role of vision, mission, strategy agreement and perceived alliance value.

    Hearld, Larry R; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2014-03-01

    Multi-sectoral community health care alliances are organizations that bring together individuals and organizations from different industry sectors to work collaboratively on improving the health and health care in local communities. Long-term success and sustainability of alliances are dependent on their ability to galvanize participants to take action within their 'home' organizations and institutionalize the vision, goals, and programs within participating organizations and the broader community. The purpose of this study was to investigate two mechanisms by which alliance leadership and management processes may promote such changes within organizations participating in alliances. The findings of the study suggest that, despite modest levels of change undertaken by participating organizations, more positive perceptions of alliance leadership, decision making, and conflict management were associated with a greater likelihood of participating organizations making changes as a result of their participation in the alliance, in part by promoting greater vision, mission, and strategy agreement and higher levels of perceived value. Leadership processes had a stronger relationship with change within participating organizations than decision-making style and conflict management processes. Open-ended responses by participants indicated that participating organizations most often incorporated new measures or goals into their existing portfolio of strategic plans and activities in response to alliance participation. PMID:24415003

  20. Alliance for Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research & Education

    Olson, Hilary

    2013-09-01

    The Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research and Education (STORE) Alliance at The University of Texas at Austin completed its activity under Department of Energy Funding (DE- FE0002254) on September 1, 2013. The program began as a partnership between the Institute for Geophysics, the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering Department at UT. The initial vision of the program was to promote better understanding of CO2 utilization and storage science and engineering technology through programs and opportunities centered on training, outreach, research and technology transfer, and education. With over 8,000 hrs of formal training and education (and almost 4,500 of those hours awarded as continuing education credits) to almost 1,100 people, STORE programs and activities have provided benefits to the Carbon Storage Program of the Department of Energy by helping to build a skilled workforce for the future CCS and larger energy industry, and fostering scientific public literacy needed to continue the U.S. leadership position in climate change mitigation and energy technologies and application. Now in sustaining mode, the program is housed at the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and benefits from partnerships with the Gulf Coast Carbon Center, TOPCORP and other programs at the university receiving industry funding.

  1. Alliance for NanoHealth (ANH) Training Program for the development of future generations of interdisciplinary scientists and collaborative research focused upon the advancement of nanomedicine

    Gorenstein, David [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-12-23

    The objectives of this program are to promote the mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) Program by recruiting students to science and engineering disciplines with the intent of mentoring and supporting the next generation of scientists; to foster interdisciplinary and collaborative research under the sponsorship of ANH for the discovery and design of nano-based materials and devices with novel structures, functions, and properties; and to prepare a diverse work force of scientists, engineers, and clinicians by utilizing the unique intellectual and physical resources to develop novel nanotechnology paradigms for clinical application.

  2. Defining the TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ALLIANCE

    Ahlbom, Gabriella; Åman, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this project was to define the Technology Transfer Alliance (TTA), a nonprofit organization for Higher Education Institutions supporting capacity building in ICT and renewable energy through a project-driven learning. TTA is today still only an idea, waiting to be launched, which is why the goals for this bachelor thesis are to establish partnerships with institutions that will support the reaching of the goals of TTA, as well as providing a more solid definition of the functions o...

  3. Impacting Children's Health and Academic Performance through Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programming

    Brusseau, Timothy A.; Hannon, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with numerous academic and health benefits. Furthermore, schools have been identified as an ideal location to promote physical activity as most youth attend school regularly from ages 5-18. Unfortunately, in an effort to increase academic learning time, schools have been eliminating traditional activity…

  4. The Psychosocial Functioning of High School Students in Academically Rigorous Programs

    Suldo, Shannon M.; Shaunessy-Dedrick, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study determined whether students who take part in academically challenging high school curricula experience elevated levels of stress and whether this stress co-occurs with psychological and/or academic problems. Data from self-report questionnaires and school records were collected from 480 students from four high schools.…

  5. Physician equity alliances: attractive alternatives to PHOs.

    Goldstein, D

    1997-04-01

    Physician equity alliances are becoming attractive alternatives to PHOs as integrative models for partnering with physicians, securing managed care contracts and increasing revenue. Unlike many PHOs, these alliances provide mechanisms for asset integration and long-term relationships along with utilization management, sophisticated information systems, access to capital and opportunities for physicians to integrate clinically. There are six major types of physician equity alliances: majority physician-owned, clinic without walls, health system joint venture, publicly held physician practice management company, specialty network, and venture capital. The type of alliance that a physician group practice ultimately develops depends on vision, values, method of capitalization, initial organizer of the alliance, level of involvement of physicians in business issues, corporate structure desired, and characteristics of the managed care market in which the alliance will operate. PMID:10166285

  6. Strategie Aspects of Fighting in Alliances

    Konrad, Kai A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys some of the strategic aspects that emerge if players fight in an alliance against an enemy. The survey includes the free-rider problem and the hold-up problem that emerges in the baseline model, the role of super-modularity in alliance members' effort contributions, the role of budget constraints, the role of information transfer inside the alliance, and the role of in-group favoritism.

  7. A Theory of Inernational Strategic Alliance

    Z. Chen

    1999-01-01

    As an alternative to exporting, a firm can enter a foreign market by forging a strategic alliance with its foreign counterparts. The alliance, in the form of a bilateral supply and distribution agreement, eliminates trasportation costs and duplications in product distribution networks. Furthermore, even though it does not involve equity sharing and firms continue to compete against each other, strategic alliance tends to lessen competition in the sens that it leads to smaller outputs and high...

  8. Testing Assumptions about Evaluating Strategic Alliance Performance

    Olk, Paul; Ariño, Africa

    2003-01-01

    Researchers have used a variety of measures to evaluate strategic alliance performance. In this paper we use data collected on performance of R&D consortia in the U.S. and of Spain-based equity and non-equity dyadic alliances to investigate empirically five basic assumptions made by strategic alliance researchers. We find that while several assumptions are supported, others are not. Results are consistent across samples. We conclude with recommendations for how to evaluate performance in futu...

  9. Strategic aspects of fighting in alliances

    Konrad, Kai A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys some of the strategic aspects that emerge if players fight in an alliance against an enemy. The survey includes the free-rider problem and the hold-up problem that emerges in the baseline model, the role of supermodularity in alliance members' effort contributions, the role of budget constraints, the role of information transfer inside the alliance, and the role of in-group favoritism. (author's abstract)

  10. An Optimal Remanufacturing Centre Selection Algorithm for Reverse Logistics Alliance

    Uzma Hameed

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Reverse logistics has been an emerging field both in academic as well as in applied research since last two decades because of increasing consumer awareness, legislative initiatives and profits associated with reuse of products or components. The costs associated with reverse logistics are usually high and these need to be minimized. The current study focuses on the formulation of alliance for cost reductions in reverse logistics. Remanufacturing, refurbishing, repair, cannibalization and reuse are the processes which add value to the reverse logistics system and are capable of converting it into a profitable venture. Used products contribute a cheaper source of components and spares required to remanufacture a product because of the less costs associated with the labor and material resources when compared with the manufacturing of new parts or products. When a defective part is removed from a product or assembly, it can be restored to its original state of functionality. Instead of purchasing a new, the same can be restored from repair/remanufacture centre just replacing defective part with a new part or spare. Furthermore, for manufacturers to reduce investments in reverse logistics, the formations of alliance and sharing of facilities for remanufacturing can lead to more profitability. In this study a focus has been made for the formation of remanufacturing alliance and an algorithm has been formulated for the selection of optimal remanufacturing center for the reverse logistics alliance. A case company has been selected from emerging Chinese electronic manufacturing industry. The case has been solved by using data set of the selected company with the help of formulated algorithm.

  11. Terra Nova breaks new ground for alliances

    This paper reviews the development of alliances to help develop the Terra Nova oil and gas field in the offshore Atlantic areas of Canada. Largely attributed to BP, the strategic alliance concept got its start in the North Sea and on the North Slope of Alaska. BP saw it as the best way to take advantage of economy-of-scale, mitigate risk, and achieve outsourcing goals while retaining their core competencies. This paper reviews the methods of developing the alliances, the developing of a development plan for the Terra Nova field, and how the alliance plans to maximize the profittability of the operation for all involved

  12. Development of a resource model for infection prevention and control programs in acute, long term, and home care settings: conference proceedings of the Infection Prevention and Control Alliance.

    Morrison, Judith

    2004-02-01

    There is mounting concern about the impact of health care restructuring on the provision of infection prevention services across the health care continuum. In response to this, Health Canada hosted two meetings of Canadian infection control experts to develop a model upon which the resources required to support an effective, integrated infection prevention and control program across the health care continuum could be based. The final models project the IPCP needs as three full time equivalent infection control professionals/500 beds in acute care hospitals and one full time equivalent infection control professional/150-250 beds in long term care facilities. Non human resource requirements are also described for acute, long term, community, and home care settings. PMID:14755227

  13. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients

    Castañeda, Sheila F.; Rebeca E. Giacinto; Medeiros, Elizabeth A.; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targ...

  14. The Analysis of Learning Styles and Their Relationship to Academic Achievement in Medical Students of Basic Sciences Program

    Reza Ghaffari; Fariba Salek Ranjbarzadeh; Eskandar Fathi Azar; Susan Hassanzadeh; Naser Safaei; Parisa Golanbar; Hossein Mazouchian; Elham Abbasi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Learning style is an individual’s preferred method of encountering information in specific situations in order to acquire knowledge, skills and attitudes through study or experience. Students and Planers’ awareness of learning styles facilitate the teaching process, increases satisfaction and makes the future choices easier. This study aimed to examine different learning styles and their relation to academic achievement in medical students of basic sciences program at Tabriz Uni...

  15. A Promotion Program of Academic-Industrial Collaboration with Active and Joint Participation by Technical College Students Utilizing the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs

    Furusaki, Tsuyoshi; Ueda, Shigeta; Kojima, Yoichiro; Ikeda, Shin-Ichi; Abe, Tsukasa; Yoshizawa, Kousuke; Tada, Mitsuhiro

    Since 2005, Tomakomai National College of Technology has been conducting “A Promotion Program of Academic-Industrial Collaboration with Active and Joint Participation by Technical College Students” , in which the students actively challenged to resolve technical problems of local companies through internships and graduation researches. This project was adopted as part of the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. It has been revealed that the program is practical and effective engineering education for the students, i.e. “Future Engineers” . In addition, it leads to the revitalization of local companies which carried out collaborative researches with the participating students.

  16. Perceptions of Academic Staff towards Accommodating Students with Disabilities in a Civil Engineering Undergraduate Program in a University in South Africa

    Mayat, Nafisa; Amosun, Seyi Ladele

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of academic staff towards admission of students with disabilities, and their accommodation once accepted into an undergraduate Civil Engineering program in a South African university. Qualitative responses relating to the perceptions of five academic staff were obtained through semi-structured interviews. The…

  17. What are the pathology education requirements for all nonpathology ACGME-accredited programs in an academic center?

    Bean, Sarah M; Nagler, Alisa; Buckley, Patrick J

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to determine institution-wide graduate medical education (GME) requirements in pathology (exclusive of pathology residency and fellowships) at an academic center. All documents related to residency review committee (RRC) program requirements were searched for the key words "pathology," "laboratory," "autopsy," and "morbidity." For each occurrence, it was determined whether a pathology education requirement had been identified. Requirements were categorized and tabulated. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) lists 135 nonpathology programs; 66 programs exist at Duke University Medical Center, of which 54 (82%) had pathology education requirement(s). Twelve education categories were identified. Teaching/conferences were the most common (52%). Thirty-nine percent required consultation/support. Sixteen programs were required to perform gross/microscopic examination. Trainees in medical genetics are required to have a pathology rotation. Elective rotations should be available for trainees in 6 programs. Pathology departments at academic centers face significant institution-wide pathology education requirements for clinical ACGME programs. Didactic teaching/conferences and consultation/support are common requirements. Opportunities exist for innovative teaching strategies. PMID:22912348

  18. STRATEGIC ALLIANCES IN THE CONSTRUCTION SECTOR FROM ROMANIA

    CEZAR SIMION-MELINTE

    2012-01-01

    Strategic alliances in the construction sector in Romania have taken so far following forms: strategic alliances between foreign companies on the Romanian market; strategic alliances between Romanian and foreign companies, strategic alliances between Romanian companies, strategic alliances between public authorities and foreign or Romanian companies. Formation and performance of strategic alliances in the construction sector in Romania is influenced by the following factors: extent to which t...

  19. Impacting Children’s Health and Academic Performance through Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programming

    Timothy A. Brusseau; James C. Hannon

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with numerous academic and health benefits. Furthermore, schools have been identified as an ideal location to promote physical activity as most youth attend school regularly from ages 5-18. Unfortunately, in an effort to increase academic learning time, schools have been eliminating traditional activity opportunities including physical education and recess. To combat physical inactivity in you, numerous organizations are promoting a Comprehensive School Physica...

  20. Buyers' alliances for bargaining power

    Chae, Suchan; Heidhues, Paul

    2003-01-01

    We provide a novel explanation as to why forming an alliance of buyers (or sellers) across separate markets can be advantageous when input prices are determined by bargaining. Our explanation helps to understand the prevalence of buyer cooperatives among small and medium sized firms. ZUSAMMENFASSUNG - (Verhandlungsmacht durch Käuferkooperationen) Dieses Papier entwickelt eine neue Erklärung dafür, warum Zusammenschlüsse zwischen Käufern (oder Verkäufern), die in unterschiedlichen Märkten akti...

  1. Student Assistance General Provisions; Federal Pell Grant Program; Academic Competitiveness Grant Program; and National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent Grant Program. Final Rule. Federal Register, Part IV, Department of Education, 34 CFR Parts 668, 690, and 691

    National Archives and Records Administration, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Secretary is adopting as final, with changes, interim final regulations in: 34 CFR part 691 for the Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) and National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent Grant (National SMART Grant) programs; 34 CFR part 668 (Student Assistance General Provisions); and 34 CFR part 690 (Federal Pell Grant Program).…

  2. Ubuntunet Alliance: A Collaborative Research Platform for Sharing of Technological Tools for Eradication of Brain Drain

    Jameson Mbale

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The UbuntuNet Alliance Alliance is well-placed to facilitate interaction between education and research institutions and the African academic and researcher in the Diaspora so that together they can strengthen research that will exploit new technological tools and increase the industrial base. It is envisaged that the Alliance will become an important vehicle for linkages that will facilitate repatriation of scientific knowledge and skills to Africa and even help reduce and eventually eradicate the brain drain which has taken so many excellent intellectuals to the developed world. As organisational vehicles for inter-institutional collaboration both established and emerging NRENs can play a critical role in reversing these trends and in mitigating what appears to be the negative impact of the brain drain.

  3. Northeast Waste Management Alliance (NEWMA)

    Funding was provided to Brookhaven National Laboratory in the fourth quarter of FY93 to establish a regional alliance as defined by Dr. Clyde Frank during his visit to BNL on March 7, 1993. In collaboration with the Long Island Research Institute (LIRI), BNL developed a business plan for the Northeast Waste Management Alliance (NEWMA). Concurrently, informal discussions were initiated with representatives of the waste management industry, and meetings were held with local and state regulatory and governmental personnel to obtain their enthusiasm and involvement. A subcontract to LIRI was written to enable it to formalize interactions with companies offering new waste management technologies selected for their dual value to the DOE and local governments in the Northeast. LIRI was founded to develop and coordinate economic growth via introduction of new technologies. As a not-for-profit institution it is in an ideal position to manage the development of NEWMA through ready access to venture capital and strong interactions with the business community, universities, and BNL. Another subcontract was written with a professor at SUNY/Stony Brook to perform an evaluation of new pyrolitic processes, some of which may be appropriate for development by NEWMA. Independent endorsement of the business plan recently by another organization, GETF, with broad knowledge of DOE/EM-50 objectives, provides a further incentive for moving rapidly to implement the NEWMA strategy. This report describes progress made during the last quarter of FY93

  4. Assessment of Dermatoglyphics Multiple Intelligence Test (DMIT Reports: Implication to Career Guidance Program Enhancement of Academic Institutions

    Dr. Maria Luisa A. Valdez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to assess the reports generated from the Dermatoglyphics Multiple Intelligence Test (DMIT administered by selected DMIT resource companies and consultancy firms in India with the end view of identifying its implication to career guidance program enhancement of academic institutions. This paper employed the descriptive research method which involved the use of documentary analysis, questionnaires and interviews with purposively selected respondents supported by the researchers’ analysis and insights with reference to the content of the data. Findings of this research revealed that the dermatoglyphics, as a scientific discipline, began with the publication of Purkinje’s thesis (1823 and Galton’s classic book, Fingerprints (1892; DMIT is a remarkable offshoot of Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences which has the following salient features: Overview of the Dermatoglyphics and the Dermatoglyphics Multiple Intelligence Test/Analysis; Personality Assessment; Profile based on Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences and Dunn’s Brain Lateralization Theories; Learning Styles; Competency and Compatibility Profiles; Working Style; Leadership Style; Management Style; Report Interpretation; and Customized Academic and Relationship Advises; the respondents of this study gave their perceptions with reference to the beneficial results of the DMIT; and the foregoing findings have some implications that may be used by academic institutions to enhance their career guidance program.

  5. Project alliancing in the offshore industry

    In this paper the shift towards new types of project organisation within the offshore industry is explained and discussed. Special focus is given to the organisational concept of project alliancing. The principles, structure and culture of a project alliance as applied within the offshore industry are described. In the paper the organisational concept of project alliancing is discussed on its potential to reduce project costs and enhance profits, both for the operator (oil and gas company) as well as for participating contractors. A risk and reward mechanism developed to share project risks and rewards between allied parties is explained for an alliance case. Based upon an in-depth study carried out within a contractor company in the offshore industry the organisational and financial implications of project alliancing are presented. (author)

  6. American Geriatrics Society/Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs curricular milestones for graduating geriatric fellows.

    Parks, Susan M; Harper, G Michael; Fernandez, Helen; Sauvigne, Karen; Leipzig, Rosanne M

    2014-05-01

    This article describes the curricular milestones for geriatric fellows and the process used to develop them. The curricular milestones were developed to determine what every graduating geriatric fellow should be able to demonstrate to ensure that they will be able to practice effectively and safely in all care settings and with different older adult populations. Three major domains were identified: Caring for the Elderly Patient, Systems-Based Care for Elder Patients, and Geriatric Syndromes. Six hundred thirty-five geriatricians each reviewed and commented on one domain. These geriatricians represented important stakeholder groups: geriatric fellowship program directors; Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs (ADGAP) members, who are primarily geriatric program and fellowship directors; the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and ADGAP Education Committee; the AGS Teacher's Section; Geriatric Academic Career Award awardees; and through the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Family Medicine, board-certified geriatricians who spend more than 50% of their time in clinical practice. The AGS and ADGAP boards approved the final set of 76 Geriatric Curricular Milestones, which were posted on the Portal of Geriatric Online Education in December 2012. These curricular milestones are intended to assist geriatric fellowship directors as they develop curricula and assessments to inform program director reporting to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the Next Accreditation System, which begins in July 2014. PMID:24749808

  7. Strategic partnerships, alliances used to find ways to cut costs

    In a commoditized industry like oil and gas, building a sustainable source of competitive advantage is difficult at best. By and large, oil and gas companies are packed in a footrace to cut costs, increase efficiency, and gain market share. It is such a tight race that virtually every contender has reorganized, right-sized, and rationalized to the point that their cost-cutting programs have themselves become a commodity. Facing this problem, many firms are turning to strategic partnership and alliances to find new, more-permanent ways to cut costs. Partnerships and alliances offer many new avenues for cutting costs and significant advantages over more traditional approaches. Those firms that take advantage of these opportunities by bundling operations in new ways to create new organizations will be the industry leaders in years to come

  8. Research on the Customer Loyalty Program Partnership and Its Influence on Alliance Partners Based on the Case Study of China Southern Airlines Joining the Sky Team Alliance%航空积分联盟及其对联盟合作伙伴的影响研究——基于南航加入天合联盟的案例研究

    李纯青; 郝艳磊; 张军

    2011-01-01

    Loyalty program partnership as an important relationship marketing instrument has become one of the hotspots in marketing research. However, the key as to whether a firm will join the loyalty program partnership and how to choose the core enterprise lies in how to reinforce the expected effects and to achieve the multi-win. In view of the fact that domestic airlines have joined the international airline alliances one after another, this paper chooses China Southern airlines as an example, and uses single case study, including interviews and secondary data collection. It is concluded that: (1)The motive of China airlines joining the airline alliances is the fierce competition in the aviation market. Their management and service level must be improved. (2)China airlines' selection of alliances is mainly based on the complementarity among routes and the mutual cooperation before joining. (3)China airlines rapidly expand international and domestic markets, reduce costs and increase revenues and in the meanwhile, the management level and service level rise substantially.%积分联盟作为重要的关系营销手段逐渐成为营销领域的热点,但如何在多赢的基础上强化其预期作用是企业决定是否加入积分联盟和如何选择盟主企业的关键问题。针对国内航空公司相继加入国际航空联盟的事实,本文选择南航加入天合联盟为例,采用单案例研究方法,包括实地访谈和二手资料的收集,最后得出:(1)中国航空公司加入航空联盟的动因是航空市场的激烈竞争与国内航空公司自身管理和服务水平的亟待提高。(2)中国航空公司选择航空联盟的依据主要是航线之间的互补性和加盟前与已有联盟企业的良好合作关系。(3)中国航空公司加入航空联盟能迅速扩大其国际、国内市场,降低成本,增加收入并伴随着管理水平和服务水平的大幅度提高。

  9. Army ground robotics research program

    Bornstein, Jonathan A.

    2002-07-01

    The U.S. Army has committed to a paradigm shift in the way future ground military operations will be conducted. It envisions highly mobile, lethal, and survivable forces that seamlessly combine manned and unmanned elements. To support this vision, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, together with an alliance of government, industrial and academic organizations, has embarked upon a concerted research program focusing upon development of the technologies required for autonomous ground mobility by unmanned systems. This paper will discuss technical activities of the past year and research directions for the future.

  10. Academic Learning Teams in Accelerated Adult Programs: Online and On-Campus Students' Perceptions

    Favor, Judy K.; Kulp, Amanda M.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports adult students' (N = 632) perceptions of long-functioning academic learning teams in accelerated online and on-campus business cohort groups in six constructs: attraction to team, performance expectation alignment, workload distribution, intra-team conflict, preference for teamwork, and impact on learning. Comparisons between…

  11. Strategies for Improving Academic Performance by Non-Native English Speakers in Graduate Programs

    Todd, Tracye A.; Stinson, Terrye A.; Sivakumaran, Thillainatarajan

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, the number of non-native English speaking students in higher education has increased dramatically. Educators at all levels have experienced challenges in meeting the academic needs of these students and continue to seek strategies for addressing these challenges. This paper describes some of this research related to K-12 and…

  12. Academic Experiences in a Cross-National Tertiary Program: Language Immersion Amid the Sciences

    Sakurai, Yusuke

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores Malaysian students' problems within their science and engineering tertiary courses in Japanese through their diary entries and semi-structured interviews. The study analyses how students implement management strategies to overcome their problems. Although many studies are available regarding students' academic activities in a…

  13. Programming Students for Academic Success: The PLS--An Alternative to Traditional Tracking

    Ansalone, George; Ming, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    In the past, attempts to explain the disparity in academic achievement between advantaged and disadvantaged students have generally focused on the ability, aptitude and motivation of the youth themselves. Some theorists have even suggested that heritable differences in intelligence among students from different social origins may account for this…

  14. Four Language Skills Performance, Academic Achievement, and Learning Strategy Use in Preservice Teacher Training Programs

    Shawer, Saad Fathy

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the differences in language learning strategies (LLS) use between preservice teachers of English as a foreign language (EFL) and Arabic as a second language (ASL). It also examines the relationship between LLS use and language performance (academic achievement and four language skills) among ASL students. The study made use…

  15. Organizational Change in Academic Programs: A Case Study of Doctoral Students' Experiences

    Frazier, Christina Coffee

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the experiences of doctoral students at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities as they transitioned from a fairly stable academic department experiencing significant changes. To achieve the purpose of the study, I investigated the experiences of doctoral students through an organizational development…

  16. Alliance free sets in Cartesian product graphs

    Yero, Ismael G; Bermudo, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Let $G=(V,E)$ be a graph. For a non-empty subset of vertices $S\\subseteq V$, and vertex $v\\in V$, let $\\delta_S(v)=|\\{u\\in S:uv\\in E\\}|$ denote the cardinality of the set of neighbors of $v$ in $S$, and let $\\bar{S}=V-S$. Consider the following condition: {equation}\\label{alliancecondition} \\delta_S(v)\\ge \\delta_{\\bar{S}}(v)+k, \\{equation} which states that a vertex $v$ has at least $k$ more neighbors in $S$ than it has in $\\bar{S}$. A set $S\\subseteq V$ that satisfies Condition (\\ref{alliancecondition}) for every vertex $v \\in S$ is called a \\emph{defensive} $k$-\\emph{alliance}; for every vertex $v$ in the neighborhood of $S$ is called an \\emph{offensive} $k$-\\emph{alliance}. A subset of vertices $S\\subseteq V$, is a \\emph{powerful} $k$-\\emph{alliance} if it is both a defensive $k$-alliance and an offensive $(k +2)$-alliance. Moreover, a subset $X\\subset V$ is a defensive (an offensive or a powerful) $k$-alliance free set if $X$ does not contain any defensive (offensive or powerful, respectively) $k$-allianc...

  17. Home-School Alliances: Approaches to Increasing Parent Involvement in Children's Learning in Upper Elementary and Junior High Schools (Grades 4-9). Proceedings of the NIE Conference on Home-School Alliances (Washington, DC, October 5-7, 1980).

    Safran, Daniel, Ed.

    This report is a transcript of presentations from the 1980 Conference on Home-School Alliances, defined as specific coordination strategies between home and school, and developed to further the social and academic development of children and youths. Following the preface, brief overview of the purpose and nature of the conference, and the…

  18. The Analysis of Learning Styles and Their Relationship to Academic Achievement in Medical Students of Basic Sciences Program

    Reza Ghaffari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Learning style is an individual’s preferred method of encountering information in specific situations in order to acquire knowledge, skills and attitudes through study or experience. Students and Planers’ awareness of learning styles facilitate the teaching process, increases satisfaction and makes the future choices easier. This study aimed to examine different learning styles and their relation to academic achievement in medical students of basic sciences program at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive – analytical study, the sample consisted of all medical students of basic sciences program at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in 2011-2012. The data was collected through a questionnaire which included respondents’ demographic information and overall grade point average (GPA as well as Kolb standard questions on learning styles. Results: 4.3%, 47.8%, 44.9% and 2.9% of students preferred diverger, assimilator, converger and accommodator learning styles, respectively. Mean overall GPA of students who preferred diverger learning styles was 14.990.39±. Students who prefer assimilator, converger and accommodator learning styles had mean overall GPAs of 14.940.56±, 15.080.58± and 14.830.29± respectively. The findings showed no significant relationship between students’ learning academic achievement and their learning styles (p = 0.689. Conclusion: There was no significant relationship between Students’ academic achievement and their learning styles. Furthermore, the majorit of the students preferred accommodator and converger learning styles. Consequently, adopting interactive teaching methods, using tutorials, running simulation programs, launching laboratory activities and encouraging students to think and analyze problems and issues can be greatly effective in prolonging their learning lifecycle.

  19. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program.

    Hrastinski, Iva; Wilbur, Ronnie B

    2016-04-01

    There has been a scarcity of studies exploring the influence of students' American Sign Language (ASL) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing students. Two subgroups, differing in ASL proficiency, were compared on the Northwest Evaluation Association Measures of Academic Progress and the reading comprehension subtest of the Stanford Achievement Test, 10th edition. Findings suggested that students highly proficient in ASL outperformed their less proficient peers in nationally standardized measures of reading comprehension, English language use, and mathematics. Moreover, a regression model consisting of 5 predictors including variables regarding education, hearing devices, and secondary disabilities as well as ASL proficiency and home language showed that ASL proficiency was the single variable significantly predicting results on all outcome measures. This study calls for a paradigm shift in thinking about deaf education by focusing on characteristics shared among successful deaf signing readers, specifically ASL fluency. PMID:26864688

  20. Admissions Criteria as Predictors of Academic Performance in a Three-Year Pharmacy Program at a Historically Black Institution.

    Tejada, Frederick R; Parmar, Jayesh R; Purnell, Miriam; Lang, Lynn A

    2016-02-25

    Objective. To determine the ability of University of Maryland Eastern Shore School of Pharmacy's admissions criteria to predict students' academic performance in a 3-year pharmacy program and to analyze transferability to African-American students. Methods. Statistical analyses were conducted on retrospective data for 174 students. Didactic and experiential scores were used as measures of academic performance. Results. Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT), grade point average (GPA), interview, and observational scores combined with previous pharmacy experience and biochemistry coursework predicted the students' academic performance except second-year (P2) experiential performance. For African-American students, didactic performance positively correlated with PCAT writing subtests, while the experiential performance positively correlated with previous pharmacy experience and observational score. For nonAfrican-American students, didactic performance positively correlated with PCAT multiple-choice subtests, and experiential performance with interview score. The prerequisite GPA positively correlated with both of the student subgroups' didactic performance. Conclusion. Both PCAT and GPA were predictors of didactic performance, especially in nonAfrican-Americans. Pharmacy experience and observational scores were predictors of experiential performance, especially in African-Americans. PMID:26941432

  1. Managing strategic alliances in the power generation industry

    Kumar, Rajesh

    2003-01-01

    Highlights the challenges for power development developers in initiating alliances in the power generation industry. Importance of strategic alliances in the industry; Nature of the alliances in the independent power industry; Strategies for creating and sustaining value in global power development......; Management of tensions inherent in internal and external alliances....

  2. Evaluation of an Intervention Program to Foster Self-Regulated Learning and Academic Achievement in Latin Instruction

    Daniela Wagner; Franziska Perels

    2012-01-01

    The study's aim was to develop two different intervention programs and to evaluate their contribution to students' self-regulated learning and academic achievement in Latin classes. The concept of our study referred to a process-focused model of self-regulated learning that divides the phases of the self-regulated learning process into different areas, which we applied to domain-specific translation strategies. Within a pre-, post-, and follow-up-test design with 109 tenth graders, self-regul...

  3. Who are the Students of the UNAM’s Master in Education?: Influence of Cultural Capital and Habitus in the Academic Development on a Graduate Program

    Rosalba Angélica Sánchez Dromundo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes cultural capital and habitus that students have when entering to the National Autonomous University of Mexico’s Master in Education. The analysis was done in terms of three groups: capital heirs, those groups whose family contributes or inherits cultural and class capital; those coming from a “declining” class, whose family have not achieved academic degrees but inherit some cultural capital; and those who are the first in their family group having studied higher education. Such classification allows to know the students academic background, and to envision from such data, several possibilities of their academic integration to the program. This paper identifies certain groups with small academic cultural capital and habitus, who would have serious incorporation and academic development difficulties from the beginning. The data was obtained from their life experience, their institutional documents and curriculum vitae.

  4. International Strategic Alliances for Local Market Entry: Direct Launches versus Marketing Alliances in Pharmaceuticals

    Takechi, Kazutaka

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of international strategic alliances by pharmaceutical firms. When launching drugs onto the market, there are two choices: launching the drugs directly or forming marketing alliances including licensing agreements. Because these choices affect firm revenue structure and the international supply pattern of pharmaceuticals, the impact on world welfare is significant. We examine the determinants of supply mode choice (direct launch versus alliance) by Jap...

  5. Strategic motivations for Sino-Western alliances: a comparativeanalysis of Chinese and Western alliance formation drivers.

    Saebi, Tina; Dong, Qinqin

    2008-01-01

    This paper compares the key drivers of Sino-foreign alliance formation from the perspective of both Chinese and Western alliance partners. Our results indicate that Chinese companies enter into alliances with Western companies mainly to get accesses to international markets and to develop their technological and managerial competences further, while Western partners aim to gain access to the local customer and supplier bases of their Chinese counterpart as well as to the complex distribution ...

  6. The Transition from Alliance Networks to Multilateral Alliances in the Global Airline Industry

    Sergio G. Lazzarini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines conditions in which alliance networks (informal webs of bilateral entanglements between firms may or may not evolve into multilateral alliances (broad, formal multiple-firm arrangements. I offer a theory to explain the formation of multilateral alliances based on both the resource profile and the structure of existing interfirm networks, and provide an initial test of that theory in the context of the global airline industry. Using data from 75 global airlines and their alliances, I propose a methodology to retrieve samples of alliance networks and then use regression analysis to assess how the resource profile and the structure of these networks influence their formalization into multilateral alliances. I find that multilateral alliances are more likely to emerge when alliance networks exhibit high resource diversity and network structure characterized by moderate density and high centralization. Apparently, while highly sparse networks reduce actors’ awareness of their potential joint collaboration, highly dense or embedded networks substitute for the need for formal controls accompanying multilateral agreements. The effect of centralization suggests that the formation of multilateral alliances tends to be triggered by leading actors directly connected to other network members.

  7. BUILDING STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP OF TRANSNATIONAL EDUCATION USING ONLINE PROGRAM TO INCREASE ACADEMIC QUALITY OF GRADUATES

    Gerardus Polla

    2011-01-01

    International employment standard requires higher quality of graduates, which can be achieved through high-quality academic standards. As we know there are still a large number of graduates of Indonesian higher education rejected to work in global industry. Besides having low GPA, lots of graduates are considered lacking technical skills, interpersonal skills, and international experience. Indeed, the main weakness factor is the low English proficiency of graduates. We need a breakthrough tha...

  8. The Alliance for Equity in Higher Education

    Merisotis, Jamie P.; Goulian, Katherine A.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter describes the organization, operations, and goals of the Alliance for Equity in Higher Education, a national coalition of associations and institutions founded to serve the emerging majority of racially diverse college students.

  9. Creation of a European alliance in radioecology

    Eight European organizations, including the CIEMAT, have created an Alliance Radioecology, pledging to integrate part of their R and D on a new Strategic Research Agenda, in order to integrate and sustain long-term research in this discipline.

  10. Global Alliance for Tuberculosis Drug Development

    ... Inadequate Treatment Maternal and Child Health Cycle of Poverty R&D Scientific Vision Our Pipeline Developing New ... 107 Haymeadow Street, Faerie Glen, Pretoria 0043, South Africa • +27 87 700 3900 © 2016 The TB Alliance. ...

  11. Building Bridges: A Practical Guide to Developing and Implementing a Subject-specific Peer-to-peer Academic Mentoring Program for First-year Higher Education Students

    Ronika K. Power

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Telemachus Ancient History Mentor Program (informally known as Tele’s Angels has been offering peer-led transition services to first-year students at Macquarie University since 2002. Tele’s Angels volunteer Mentors create a ‘learning community’ by providing their first-year colleagues with transition assistance, academic support and resources, and networking for and amongst students and staff. Individual mentoring is offered, as well as free peer-support services which focus on developing academic skills and building social networks. The program also focuses on student leadership – a key objective is that Mentors themselves are beneficiaries of all activities, embodying the program motto: “to give is to receive”. It is timely to report Tele’s Angels’ experiences to a wider audience and offer practical guidelines to those wishing to develop and implement subject-specific academic mentoring programs for first-year students in their own institutions.

  12. An Examination of the Effectiveness of the 30/30 Program on High School Students' Academic Performance, Attendance, Behavior and On-Time Graduation

    King, Nardos Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, many at-risk high school students are showing minimal academic achievement. At-risk students in the United States have been described as a population that needs proper guidance and attention (Ladson-Billings, 2006). The purpose of this mixed methods study was to assess the effectiveness of the 30/30 Program in increasing students academic achievement, school attendance, behavior, and on-time graduation rate (4 years). The 30/30 Program is a mentoring program that was d...

  13. Academic Expatriates Adjustment to Foreign Assignments

    Dewan, Sabira

    2010-01-01

    As globalisation has led to increasing international mobility, the contemporary expatriate management literature has focused on managers and corporate executives. The higher education literature focuses on the internationalisation of education systems, particularly growth in international strategic alliances between universities. By comparison, the academic expatriate even though not a new phenomenon remain an under-research group. Specifically, at a time when inter...

  14. The Effect of Scratch- and Lego Mindstorms Ev3-Based Programming Activities on Academic Achievement, Problem-Solving Skills and Logical-Mathematical Thinking Skills of Students

    Korkmaz, Özgen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the Scratch and Lego Mindstorms Ev3 programming activities on academic achievement with respect to computer programming, and on the problem-solving and logical-mathematical thinking skills of students. This study was a semi-experimental, pretest-posttest study with two experimental groups and…

  15. DATABASES in the RESEARCH of INTERNATIONAL ALLIANCES

    Susana Costa e Silva; Ferreira, Mário Pedro

    2007-01-01

    The low level of formality and the diversity of international alliances create an important challenge for researchers. Unlike mergers and acquisitions, alliances include various types of cooperation agreements between organizations and do not require formal registration. Therefore, in this field, secondary data is scarce and the few available international databases present several disadvantages. This manuscript attempts to discuss and assess options available to circumvent dif...

  16. Fairness theory applied to strategic alliance negotiations

    2012-01-01

    This thesis investigates negotiation processes during strategic alliance formations between venture capital firms and start-up companies by empirically assessing previous literature on negotiation theory and further developing the understanding of fairness theory. The lack of empirical evidence surrounding alliances between venture capital firms and start-up companies is the basis for this research. Cross-sectional data have been obtained from seven different successful cases of short-term in...

  17. Strategic Alliances in The Robotics Industry

    Nielsen, Ulrik Bjørn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the master-thesis was to examine how Blue Ocean Robotics can structure its strategic alliances to gain a competitive advantage in the market development of robotics in international markets.......The purpose of the master-thesis was to examine how Blue Ocean Robotics can structure its strategic alliances to gain a competitive advantage in the market development of robotics in international markets....

  18. Strategic alliances in the corporate environment

    Sambhi, Devinder S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper concentrates on research regarding the various types of strategic alliances that are employed within the corporate environment. A strategic alliance defined is the sharing of resources between two or more companies in order to provide shared benefits that otherwise individually would be more difficult to realise. This paper applies the findings to the Engineering Line of Business (ELoB) of BC Hydro, a Crown corporation in British Columbia. ELoB is entering a transition phase where ...

  19. LSU Geoscience Alliance to Enhance Minority Participation: Building Partnerships with Minority-Serving Institutions

    Anderson, L. C.; Ferrell, R. E.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Tomkin, J. H.; Bart, P. J.

    2004-12-01

    The LSU GAEMP (Geoscience Alliance to Enhance Minority Participation) program seeks to increase the number of under-represented minorities in the geosciences by targeting students at minority-serving institutions (MSIs) who have an undergraduate STEM (science, technology, engineering, or math) major that is not geology. The program, sponsored by a 5-year NSF award through the OEDG program, is administered by Geology and Geophysics faculty at LSU in collaboration with key science faculty at nine regional minority serving institutions (MSIs; seven Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) and two Hispanic Serving Institutions). These MSIs, especially several physics programs, provide well-trained, highly motivated graduates who compile excellent records in highly ranked graduate programs. These students also have strong potential because they have knowledge and skills relevant to graduate work in interdisciplinary areas. Forging collaborations with MSIs is crucial to exposing these talented students to geoscience education and career opportunities because most of these institutions do not have geoscience degree programs. The point of entry into GAEMP is a summer course that focuses on research to introduce basic geoscience concepts. Targeted recruits into GAEMP are MSI juniors that show high academic achievement and have non-geoscience STEM majors. Summer course participants are encouraged to, and supported in, cooperative research projects that are completed during the following academic year at the home institution. On receiving their baccalaureate degree, GAEMP participants are encouraged to apply to graduate school, especially at LSU where GAEMP graduate fellowships are available at both the M.S. and Ph.D. level. We use a variety of recruiting efforts to attract students into GAEMP including print media, a webpage, visits by LSU faculty and students to MSIs, and workshops at LSU for MSI faculty and students. With all these efforts, the enthusiastic

  20. Arriving at Success: Academic Management by Hispanic Nursing Students During the First Semester of a Baccalaureate Program.

    Dolan, Diana Martinez; Young, Elizabeth Anne; Cesario, Sandra; Symes, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Although an ethnically diverse workforce is believed to enhance patient care quality, Hispanics are under-represented in the nursing workforce. Recruiting and retaining Hispanic students in nursing programs is essential for greater workforce participation. This grounded theory study explored practices used by Hispanic nursing students to promote their academic success during the first semester of a baccalaureate program. Fifteen Hispanic nursing students participated in focus groups and individual interviews. Students engaged in an adaption process composed of phases related to arrival, managing, and responding to evaluations. For entering Hispanic nursing students, recognizing the weight of different assignments and adjusting time and energy accordingly were essential in the process of arriving at success. Finances, family dynamics, dealing with potential failure, and time management were significant concerns. PMID:26400392

  1. When and how to create strategic alliances

    As oil prices remain flat and discoveries become more costly, the relationships between suppliers and operators are changing. Arms-length, unit pricing buying practices remain the norm for many buyers, but others have identified advantages of forming alliances that make greater use of the suppliers' capabilities. Recently, operators and the service industry have started to evolve a new culture that provides value-added solutions in an incentive environment. coupled with long-term risk-sharing or partnering arrangements, the potential advantages to both the operator and supplier are clear. An alliance is a long-term commitment between the operator and one or more supplier organizations, formed to achieve well-defined project objectives in a way that is beneficial to all alliance partners. Alliances take many forms and are adapted to meet the needs of the project. Successful alliances are characterized by trust, common goals and open communication. They build on the efficiencies, capabilities and strengths each partner brings to the relationship. The nine steps to creating a successful alliance are described

  2. AllianceTM, the fuel assembly on the threshold of the third millennium

    Nuclear energy competitiveness has become a major challenge of the end of this century. In order to respond, Framatome has developed a new nuclear fuel assembly for an enhanced utilisation of existing PWRs, and also for the future European Pressurized Reactor (EPR). This development is the result of a joint Framatome and Framatome Cogema Fuels (FCF) strategy to propose today a fuel product meeting their customer's future needs. ALLIANCE is a fuel assembly designed for assembly burnup of at least 70 GWd/t. This allows the utilities to consider modes of operation of their reactors which were not technically accessible until now. ALLIANCE is based on an in depth analysis of the market needs of Framatome and Fragema, and also of FCF. ALLIANCE benefits from Framatome long term commitment in a large R and D program, which has provided significant outcomes such as new alloys, new components and new fuel assembly concepts. This R and D program allows direct access to all the CEA expertise and facilities. As a result, ALLIANCE is a fuel assembly with unmatched and totally demonstrated performance. ALLIANCE takes also advantage of the extended operational experience available through all the reactors supplied with Framatome fuel: number of irradiated assemblies reactor types operational conditions - sometimes very demanding. Framatome major customers have been directly involved in the development of this assembly. All the available operational feedback has been taken into account at the early stages of the ALLIANCE design. The main features of the ALLIANCE assembly are: cladding tubes and an assembly structure in M5 alloy, a mono-metallic mixing grid with enhanced thermo-hydraulic performance, the possibility to add mid span mixing grids, the Monobloc guide tube, the Trapper bottom nozzle and a new structure designed for assembly burnups of at least 70 GW d/t. The first ALLIANCE assemblies will be loaded in 1999 in an EdF reactor. In 2000, ALLIANCE assemblies will be loaded

  3. A Mandarin/English Two-Way Immersion Program: Language Proficiency and Academic Achievement

    Padilla, Amado M.; Fan, Lorraine; Xu, Xiaoqiu; Silva, Duarte

    2013-01-01

    A Mandarin/English two-way immersion elementary program is described from its inception and implementation through the fifth grade, the culminating year of the program. All students in all grades were assessed on their oral/listening, reading, and writing performance in Mandarin using program-created assessment measures. Fifth-grade students also…

  4. Willing and Enabled: The Academic Outcomes of a Tertiary Enabling Program in Regional Australia

    Andrewartha, Lisa; Harvey, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the achievement levels of students undertaking the Tertiary Enabling Program (TEP) at La Trobe University. The TEP is an alternative pathway program that traverses multiple institutions, campuses, and disciplinary areas, and is designed to prepare a diverse student cohort for tertiary study. The Program integrates several…

  5. Outdoor Education Opportunities for Middle School Students: Academic and Social Impacts of Adventure Programs

    Gordon, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This study examines components of outdoor adventure programs for middle school students, using a school with a successful program as a model. Outdoor education is often left out of these years for financial and safety reasons, however the benefits of adventure programs are both measurable and profound to self-concept, confidence, identity growth,…

  6. Academic Support Program in the Faculty of Agricultural and Forestry Engineering of the University of Cordoba (Spain)

    Castro, Sergio; Navarro, Rafael M.; Camacho, Emilio; Gallardo, Rosa; García-Ferrer, Alfonso; Pérez-Marín, M. Dolores; Peña, Adolfo; Taguas, Encarnación V.

    2014-05-01

    The incorporation of new students to undergraduate degrees is performed in different stages through a long, sequential enrollment process. The student integration to the new context of higher education including group work and new teaching methodologies lead to notable adaptation difficulties to this new educational environment. In fact, the highest rate of student failure in the Bachelor degree usually happens during the first courses. The Unit of Quality Evaluation/Monitoring of School of Agricultural and Forest Engineering (ETSIAM) has detected that these failure rates at first and second degree course may be reduced through the involvement of students in a support learning process, by increasing their skills and motivation as well as the contact with the University environment in the context of their future professional horizon. In order to establish a program of this type, it has been launched an Academic Support Program (ASP) at the ETSIAM. This program aims to achieve and reinforce the basic academic and personal skills/competences require by the Bologna's process (BC) and specific competences of the engineers on the area of Agriculture and Forestry in the European context. The ASP includes diferent bloks of seminars, lectures, collaborative work and discussion groups among students, professionals, professors and researchers and it has been designed based on these competences and tranversal contents in both degrees. These activities are planned in a common time for both degrees, out of teaching classes. In addition, a virtual space in Moodle has been created for discussion forums and preparation activities. Additional information about schedules, speakers and companies, presentations and other material are also provided. In the preliminary implementation of the ASP, we will present the results corresponding to the first year of this academic support program. We have conducted a survey among the students in order to have a first feedback about the impact of

  7. Integrating an academic radiation safety program into an environmental management system.

    Zurosky, Daniel M

    2003-08-01

    The Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) Program at the University of South Carolina recently developed an environmental management system (EMS) based on the ISO 14001 International Standard. Since our radiation safety program must already meet strict state licensing requirements, the process of conforming to this standard was relatively easy to accomplish. The EH&S program achieved certification to the ISO 14001 standard in August of 2002. The benefits of the EMS include: better interaction between radiation safety and other EH&S program entities, holds all employees accountable by closely tracking program activities, presents a clear picture of program accomplishments to the university administration, allows for better use of limited resources and provides for continuous program improvement. PMID:12865748

  8. Management of a comprehensive radiation safety program in a major American University and affiliated academic medical center

    Duke University, which operates under eight radiation licenses issued by the State of North Carolina, consists of a leading medical center including extensive inpatient and outpatient facilities, a medical school, biomedical research labs, and an academic campus including two major accelerator facilities. The Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Oncology departments handle over 40,000 diagnostic and therapeutic procedures annually, including approximately 160 radioiodine therapeutic cases. In biomedical research labs, about 300 professors are authorized to use radioactive materials. Over 2,000 radiation workers are identified on campus. Over the past two years, we have transformed the existing radiation safety program into a more responsive and more accountable one. Simultaneously, the institutional 'culture' changed, and the Radiation Safety Division came to be viewed as a helpful ally by investigators. The purpose of this paper is to present our experiences that have made this transformation possible. Our initiatives included; (a) defining short-term and long-term goals; (b) establishing a definitive chain of authority; (c) obtaining an external review by a consultant Health Physicist; (d) improving existing radiation safety programs; (e) reorganizing the Radiation Safety Division, with creation of multidisciplinary professional staff positions; (f) implementing campus-wide radiation safety training, (g) increasing technician positions; (h) establishing monthly medical center radiation safety executive meeting. As a result progress made at the Divisional level includes; (a) culture change by recruiting professionals with academic credentials and recent college graduates; (b) implementing weekly staff meetings and monthly quality assurance meetings; (c) achieving academic prominence by publishing and presenting papers in national meetings; (d) senior staff achieving faculty appointments with academic departments; (e) senior staff participating in graduate student

  9. Entrepreneurial Alliances: A Study of Entrepreneurship and Strategic Alliances in the Charter School Industry

    Washington, Cheryl A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the practices, processes, and success rates of 15 entrepreneurial alliances in the Texas charter school industry. The research involved interdisciplinary industries (business and education) and focused on how a specific type of alliance structure utilized social innovation to exploit opportunity and impact change in the…

  10. Strategic Alliance Poker: Demonstrating the Importance of Complementary Resources and Trust in Strategic Alliance Management

    Reutzel, Christopher R.; Worthington, William J.; Collins, Jamie D.

    2012-01-01

    Strategic Alliance Poker (SAP) provides instructors with an opportunity to integrate the resource based view with their discussion of strategic alliances in undergraduate Strategic Management courses. Specifically, SAP provides Strategic Management instructors with an experiential exercise that can be used to illustrate the value creation…

  11. Alliances: simulation platform for nuclear waste storage and disposal

    In order to analyse the feasibility of nuclear waste storages and disposals it is necessary to carry an important modelling and simulation program from the fine understanding of the process involved at each level (package, near field, geological site) of the safety assessment of a global situation. That is the reason why the CEA and the Andra have jointly developed since 2001 the software platform ALLIANCES. EDF has joined the project in 2003. The objective of the project is to obtain a numerical platform allowing: The simulation of the characteristic phenomena of all disposal and storage situations; The choice and coupling of different numerical codes; The simulation of multi-physical and multi-scale phenomena; The uncertainties analysis related to data and models; The studies management and traceability. ALLIANCES aim is not to develop a new scientific calculation code but to accumulate within the same simulation environment the already acquired knowledge and to gradually integrate new knowledge. Therefore, the project is based on the following three fundamental choices: integration of several scientific calculation codes for a same physical problem in order to take advantage of the complementarities of each code (discretization method, processing of complex geometry, processing of great property contrast,...). All these codes share the same User Interface (UI) and Application Programming Interface (API). This enables results comparison and then ensures a best confidence for the prediction; coupling algorithms of different numerical components implementation with a high level programming language (Python ); use of the Open Source Salome platform environment in order to ensure modularity and versatility of ALLIANCES. Salome platform gives access to the following generic tools: graphic user interface, geometry and meshing generator, visualization, calculation supervision (definition and distribution of calculation sequences). (authors)

  12. Succession planning for the future through an academic-practice partnership: a nursing administration master's program for emerging nurse leaders.

    Sherman, Rose; Dyess, Susan; Hannah, Ed; Prestia, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A global nursing leadership shortage is projected by the end of this decade. There is an urgent need to begin developing emerging nurse leaders now. This article describes the work of an academic-practice partnership collaborative of nurse leaders. The goal of the partnership is to develop and promote an innovative enhanced nursing administration master's program targeted to young emerging nurse leaders, who have not yet moved into formal leadership roles. An action research design is being used in program development and evaluation. Qualities needed by emerging leaders identified through research included a need to be politically astute, competency with business skills required of nurse leaders today, comfort with ambiguity, use of a caring approach, and leadership from a posture of innovation. The current curriculum was revised to include clinical immersion with a nurse leader from the first semester in the program, a change from all online to online/hybrid courses, innovative assignments, and a strong mentorship component. Eighteen young emerging nurse leaders began the program in January 2012. Early outcomes are positive. The emerging nurse leaders may be uniquely positioned, given the right skills sets, to be nurse leaders in the new age. PMID:23222750

  13. The incidence of academic administration of student professional training in the Master´s Family Systemic Therapy program at the Salesian Polytechnic University

    Dorys Ortiz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the results of research on the incidence of Academic Management in Vocational Training for students of the Master in Systemic Family Therapy in Salesian Polytechnic University. It contextualizes this training program in the entire university and raises various problems in academic management regarding the functions of teaching, research, resource management and links with society and its relation to certain aspects weakened vocational training, essentially, the admission of students and teachers, developing lines of research, monitoring graduates and the dissemination of results. Then, it defined and analyzed theoretically both academic management and vocational training. Third, it develops the methodological aspects of the research that is correlational. The collected data are presented in tables that allow quick visualization of results and help to check the influence of management on vocational training to test the hypothesis by Chi square test. The information obtained, finally, allows characterizing academic management and describing vocational training of the master.

  14. 25 CFR 36.20 - Standard V-Minimum academic programs/school calendar.

    2010-04-01

    ... society. (1) The school's language arts program shall assess the English and native language abilities of... native language of the school population. Programs shall meet local tribal approval. (2) The school..., physical education, music, etc.) which are directly related to or affect student instruction shall...

  15. A Handbook for Institutional Academic and Program Planning: From Idea to Implementation.

    Kieft, Raymond N.; And Others

    Planning activities at higher education institutions should be comprehensive, program based, and long-range. The daily process of planning and the necessity of integrating planning and resource allocation into a single system are emphasized in this handbook, which deals only with centralized planning activities. The focus is on program merit, not…

  16. SWRL Communication Skills Programs: Quality Assurance Information for the 1973-74 Academic Year.

    Hanson, Ralph A.; And Others

    This document reports on the quality assurance aspects of the tryout of three SWRL (Southwest Regional Laboratory) Communication Skills Programs: Reading, Composition, and Expressive Language. The sample population was both large and diverse, and a pattern of high proficiency was achieved both within program blocks or levels and across program…

  17. How Academics in Undergraduate Business Programs at an Australian University View Sustainability

    von der Heidt, Tania; Lamberton, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    This article explores conceptualisations of sustainability and perceptions of its importance in curriculum held by business subject and program leaders. Results are reported from an empirical study of the first-year Bachelor of Business program at an Australian university. Research data was collected in 16 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with…

  18. Designing an Academic Project Management Program: A Collaboration between a University and a PMI Chapter

    Poston, Robin S.; Richardson, Sandra M.

    2011-01-01

    The demand for project management skills in industry is increasing resulting in a higher demand for project management educational programs. Universities are addressing industry demand by developing project management courses, degree offerings and certificate programs that focus on both technical and general project management skills. While…

  19. Structured Opportunities: Exploring the Social and Academic Benefits for Peer Mentors in Retention Programs

    Kiyama, Judy Marquez; Luca, Sandra Guillen

    2014-01-01

    Informed by the experiences of former peer mentors, this qualitative study examines the structure of opportunity of a university retention program. Extending the concept of social capital, the study investigates the experiences of students who served as peer mentors, and how their involvement in the retention program has influenced their social…

  20. Predictors of academic performance for applicants to an international dental studies program in the United States.

    Pitigoi-Aron, Gabriela; King, Patricia A; Chambers, David W

    2011-12-01

    The number of U.S. and Canadian dental schools offering programs for dentists with degrees from other countries leading to the D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree has increased recently. This fact, along with the diversity of educational systems represented by candidates for these programs, increases the importance of identifying valid admissions predictors of success in international dental student programs. Data from 148 students accepted into the international dental studies program at the University of the Pacific from 1994 through 2004 were analyzed. Dependent variables were comprehensive cumulative GPA at the end of both the first and second years of the two-year program. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and both Parts I and II of the National Board Dental Examination (NBDE) were significant positive predictors of success. Performance on laboratory tests of clinical skill in operative dentistry and in fixed prosthodontics and ratings from interviewers were not predictive of overall success in the program. Although this study confirms the predictive value of written tests such as the TOEFL and NBDE, it also contributes to the literature documenting inconsistent results regarding other types of predictors. It may be the case that characteristics of individual programs or features of the applicant pools for each may require use of admissions predictors that are unique to schools. PMID:22184596

  1. Sourcing homegrown talent : partnering with educational institutions to develop unique academic and apprenticeship programs for the energy industry

    Anderson, D. [Southern Alberta Inst. of Technology, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT) is a world leader in providing skilled workers to industry and has a graduate employment rate of 97 per cent. This paper reviews employment opportunities and factors contributing to skills shortages in the energy sector which include: new technologies; new processes; baby-boomers leaving the market in great numbers; new drilling records; changing regulations; the Canada/Alaska pipelines; and growth in developing countries. It was also noted that more than 8,000 full-time positions will be created in the oil sands region of Alberta, with 25,000-30,000 jobs available during construction. However, government sets academic capacity, and there is competition for government funds. There are also increasing workforce qualifications. Examples of academic capacity in SAIT were provided. A comparison of oil patch demand versus SAIT supply was provided. Continuing education in Alberta was outlined, with details of re-training and apprenticeship programs. Issues concerning career pathways and pre-employment training were discussed, with reference to partnerships with high schools and module-based distance learning systems. Issues concerning Aboriginal programs were also examined. In addition, SAIT is moving towards the standardization of an electronic learning model using WebCT. Issues concerning granting status were also addressed and relationships with industry were discussed. Details of the Wellsite Production Education Technology Centre were presented and various advisory committees were outlined. Details of the ExxonMobil Calgary Campus were presented. Curriculum licensing with the University of Trinidad and Tobago was reviewed and the SAIT campus in Kazakhstan was described. It was concluded that future demand for training will be unprecedented and that innovation and commitment to excellence will be key. An energy training summit will be held in early 2005, to examine issues surrounding the provision of skilled labour

  2. Evaluation of gemtuzumab ozogamycin associated sinusoidal obstructive syndrome: Findings from an academic pharmacovigilance program review and a pharmaceutical sponsored registry

    Magwood-Golston, Jametta S.; Kessler, Samuel; Bennett, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2000, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved gemtuzumab ozogamycin for monotherapy for older patients with relapsed AML. A 0.9% rate of hepatic sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) was noted in licensing trials. In 2001, FDA received reports of 14 GO-associated SOS cases from MD Anderson Cancer Center. A State of South Carolina/National Cancer Institute funded pharmacovigilance program and a manufacturer sponsored registry independently evaluated this concern. Methods The manufacturer’s registry and the academic program focused on risk factors and incidence of GO-associated SOS in routine clinical practice and clinical trial settings, respectively. Comparisons were made of findings and dissemination efforts from the two studies. Results Retrospective analysis of clinical trials by the academic initiative identified 99 cases of SOS among 221 GO-treated stem cell patients and 649 patients who did not undergo HSCTs. SOS rates were 3% when GO was administered at doses ≤6 mg/m2 as monotherapy or with non-hepatotoxic agents; 28% when administered with 6-thioguanine, a hepatotoxic agent; 15% when administered as monotherapy at doses at a dose of 9 mg/m2, and between 15% and 40% if a stem cell transplant (SCT) was performed within 3 months of GO administration. Death from SOS occurred in 33% of the cases. The manufacturer’s registry prospectively evaluated 482 GO-treated patients who received a mean dose of 7.8 mg/m2. Overall, 41% received concomitant chemotherapy, 18% had undergone prior SCT, 9.1% developed SOS, and death from SOS occurred in 60% of the SOS cases. Findings from each initiative were disseminated at national conferences and in peer-reviewed manuscripts beginning in 2003. Conclusion Retrospective review of clinical trials, case series, and FDA reports and prospective registries can provide important information on safety signals initially identified in licensing trials. PMID:27030962

  3. First Candle/SIDS Alliance

    ... Blog Buy Form Our Store Blog About FIRST CANDLE PROGRAMS Pregnant and Empowered SPONSORED BY THE BOPPY ... that raise money for research and education. First Candle's Legacy Program can help you set up a ...

  4. Coping Power Adapted as Universal Prevention Program: Mid Term Effects on Children's Behavioral Difficulties and Academic Grades.

    Muratori, Pietro; Bertacchi, Iacopo; Giuli, Consuelo; Nocentini, Annalaura; Ruglioni, Laura; Lochman, John E

    2016-08-01

    Aggressive behaviors in schools have the potential to cause serious harm to students' emotional and social well-being and to limit their ability to achieve their full academic potential. Prevention programs developed to reduce children's aggressive behaviors in school settings can provide interventions at a universal or targeted level. The main aim of our randomized control study was to examine the efficacy of Coping Power, adapted as a universal prevention program, in reducing children's behavioral problems and improving school grades. Nine classes participated (184 students, mean age 91 months) from two elementary state schools in Tuscany, Italy. Study findings showed a significant reduction in behavioral problems and an improvement in school grades for the intervention classes relative to the control classes. This study suggests the Coping Power program can be delivered in school settings at both universal and targeted prevention levels, and that in this multi-tiered prevention model, teachers, educators and school psychologists can learn a set of intervention skills which can be delivered with flexibility, thus reducing some of the complexity and costs of schools using multiple interventions. PMID:27129573

  5. Identification of at-risk students and strategies to improve academic success in first year health programs. A Practice Report

    Andrew Gerard Pearson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition to university is a difficult process for many students, having a negative impact on their academic performance, ultimately resulting in failure or withdrawal from one or more courses in their first semester. This practice report describes a profile analysis and readiness assessment designed to identify students at high academic risk. Students so identified were offered additional workshops to address assumed knowledge and academic skills. Attendance at the workshops correlated with improved academic outcomes.

  6. Academic careers : the effect of participation to post-doctoral program

    Hanchane, Saïd; Recotillet, Isabelle

    2003-01-01

    This paper is devoted to assessment of post-doctoral programs for young PhD awarded in French Universities. Using longitudinal from the French Ministry of Education, our question lead to the econometric evaluation of post-doctoral participation on the probability to obtain a job as researcher in the public sector of research. Based on the estimation of a conditional bivariate Probit model and computation of marginal effects, we demonstrate that going through a post-doctoral program increases ...

  7. Trusting Relationships in the NATO Alliance

    Keating, Vincent Charles

    – particularly given the historical (and even current) animosities between some of the member states. How is it that so many states can work together given the structural bias towards distrust in the international system? Given the goal of the papers on this panel to investigate how NATO might in fact facilitate...... trust-building among its members, this paper represents an initial attempt to consider how the question of trust can be considered with respect to the existing literature on both alliances and NATO. In doing so, it brings together three literatures: trust theory, alliance theory, and NATO studies, in...... order to reveal the points of intersection that might help us to understand how and why trusting relationships can be formed within the NATO alliance....

  8. Multinational Corporation and International Strategic Alliance

    陆兮

    2015-01-01

    The world is now deeply into the second great wave of globalization, in which product, capital, and markets are becoming more and more integrated across countries. Multinational corporations are gaining their rapid growth around the globe and playing a significant role in the world economy. Meanwhile, the accelerated rate of globalization has also imposed pressures on MNCs, left them desperately seeking overseas alliances in order to remain competitive. International strategic alliances, which bring together large and commonly competitive firms for specific purposes, have gradual y shown its importance in the world market. And the form of international joint venture is now widely adopted. Then after the formation of alliances, selecting the right partner, formulating right strategies, establishing harmonious and effective partnership are generally the key to success.

  9. Does Academic Apprenticeship Increase Networking Ties among Participants? A Case Study of an Energy Efficiency Training Program

    Hytönen, Kaisa; Palonen, Tuire; Lehtinen, Erno; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the requirements of future education in different fields of academic professional activity, a model called Academic Apprenticeship Education was initiated in Finland in 2009. The aim of this article is to analyse the development of expert networks in the context of a 1-year Academic Apprenticeship Education model in the field…

  10. The development of an Education Grand Rounds program at an academic health center

    Melissa S. Medina

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Faculty in the health professions need to demonstrate teaching effectiveness and faculty development of teaching can help them achieve this expectation. While there are several development options, the utility of an Education Grand Rounds was explored. The objectives were to coordinate eight yearly sessions focused on six topic priorities, involve our main and distant campus and national presenters, deliver live sessions to the main and distant campus and videocapture sessions, and dedicate session time to active learning. Methods: Education Grand Rounds was developed by faculty and administrative representatives from all six colleges on our two campuses and made available to all faculty at our academic health sciences center. Six sessions topics were prioritized: didactic and clinical teaching, education research, assessment/evaluation, education administration, and instructional technology. Results: Over five years, eight active learning sessions a year were delivered to the main and distant campuses emphasizing six prioritized teaching areas, included local and national presenters, with sixteen sessions videocaptured. On average monthly attendance was nineteen from the main and three from the distant campuses, representing five of six disciplines. The majority of attendees reported above/significantly above average satisfaction with the sessions. Conclusions: Education Grand Rounds is a sustainable form of faculty development for health sciences center faculty located on two campuses. Future directions should assess the impact of topic sequencing presented in multiple modalities, synchronous versus asynchronous participation, and the types of active learning used on participants' teaching improvement and change as a result of the sessions.

  11. The Mentor-Youth Alliance: The Role of Mentoring Relationships in Promoting Youth Competence

    Zand, Debra H.; Thomson, Nicole; Cervantes, Richard; Espiritu, Rachele; Klagholz, Donna; LaBlanc, Laura; Taylor, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Mentoring programs hold great promise for fostering competency in disadvantaged youth. Although considerable theoretical work has been conducted to explain the role of mentoring relationships in promoting positive youth outcomes, very little empirical research has directly investigated this alliance. The present study developed and validated a…

  12. The Relationship of Perfectionism, Depression, and Therapeutic Alliance during Treatment for Depression: Latent Difference Score Analysis

    Hawley, Lance L.; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Zuroff, David C.; Blatt, Sidney J.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined the longitudinal relationship of patient-rated perfectionism, clinician-rated depression, and observer-rated therapeutic alliance using the latent difference score (LDS) analytic framework. Outpatients involved in the Treatment for Depression Collaborative Research Program completed measures of perfectionism and depression at…

  13. Coupling methodology within the software platform alliances

    CEA, ANDRA and EDF are jointly developing the software platform ALLIANCES which aim is to produce a tool for the simulation of nuclear waste storage and disposal repository. This type of simulations deals with highly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical and chemical (T-H-M-C) processes. A key objective of Alliances is to give the capability for coupling algorithms development between existing codes. The aim of this paper is to present coupling methodology use in the context of this software platform. (author)

  14. Strategic alliances fit pattern of industry innovation

    The strategic alliance, vitally important as an isolated practice in the oil and gas business, also fits a broad pattern of innovation by which the industry is redefining itself for prosperity in a new energy age. The industry is experiencing a renaissance in almost every aspect, from technological breakthroughs to innovative business practices to new products and markets. An inevitable outgrowth of such rapid and fundamental change is an evolution in business relationships. The strategic alliance is at the forefront of this trend. Development of new relationships capitalizes on, and partly results from, enormous advances in technology and finance. The paper discusses new relationships, the outsourcing rage, integrating work flows, and technological advances

  15. Stakeholder relations a way of viewing your alliances

    Pierce, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Using stakeholder relationships in order to understand alliances could possibly be one way of getting a new take on alliances and why they so often fail. During the LUSAX research a number of factors have emerged that can be said to influence alliances. Having dedicated functions to run and monitor the alliances, as well as having good relationships with partners that materializes into trust are two such functions. How then do you understand complex relationships, the different ne...

  16. Digital Records Forensics: A New Science and Academic Program for Forensic Readiness

    Luciana Duranti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the Digital Records Forensics project, a research endeavour located at the University of British Columbia in Canada and aimed at the development of a new science resulting from the integration of digital forensics with diplomatics, archival science, information science and the law of evidence, and of an interdisciplinary graduate degree program, called Digital Records Forensics Studies, directed to professionals working for law enforcement agencies, legal firms, courts, and all kind of institutions and business that require their services. The program anticipates the need for organizations to become “forensically ready,” defined by John Tan as “maximizing the ability of an environment to collect credible digital evidence while minimizing the cost of an incident response (Tan, 2001.” The paper argues the need for such a program, describes its nature and content, and proposes ways of delivering it.

  17. A Study of At-Risk Students' Perceptions of an Online Academic Credit Recovery Program in an Urban North Texas Independent School District

    Buckley, Mychl K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to describe and analyze at-risk high school students' perceptions of their experiences with online academic credit recovery classes offered to them through an urban school district's dropout prevention department. The review of literature concerning curricula for online programs revealed that the…

  18. A Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Classroom Management Strategies and Classroom Management Programs on Students' Academic, Behavioral, Emotional, and Motivational Outcomes

    Korpershoek, Hanke; Harms, Truus; de Boer, Hester; van Kuijk, Mechteld; Doolaard, Simone

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis examined which classroom management strategies and programs enhanced students' academic, behavioral, social-emotional, and motivational outcomes in primary education. The analysis included 54 random and nonrandom controlled intervention studies published in the past decade (2003-2013). Results showed small but significant…

  19. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand In-Service Kindergarten Teachers' Behavior to Enroll in a Graduate Level Academic Program

    Chen, I. Ju

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate and predict the behavioral intention of in-service Taiwanese kindergarten teachers regarding whether they would join a graduate level academic program. The research framework was based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) in order to identify the most influential component that affected their…

  20. The Effects of the First Step to Success Program on Academic Engagement Behaviors of Turkish Students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Ozdemir, Selda

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of the First Step to Success (FSS) early intervention program with Turkish children identified with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Intervention effectiveness on target children's academic engagement behaviors was studied. Participants were four 7-year-old first-grade students in…

  1. A decade of offering a Healing Enhancement Program at an academic medical center.

    Cutshall, Susanne M; Rodgers, Nancy J; Dion, Liza J; Dreyer, Nikol E; Thomley, Barbara S; Do, Alexander; Wood, Christina; Pronk, Susan C; Bauer, Brent A

    2015-11-01

    An increased focus has been given to improving the patient experience in health care. This focus has included placing value in a patient-centric, holistic approach to patient care. In the past decade, the Healing Enhancement Program was developed at 1 large medical center to address this focus through implementation of such integrative medicine services as massage, acupuncture, and music therapy to holistically address the pain, anxiety, and tension that hospitalized patients often experience. We describe the development and growth of this program over the past decade. PMID:26573445

  2. Transfer Paths and Academic Performance: The Primary School Merger Program in China

    Mo, Di; Yi, Hongmei; Zhang, Linxiu; Shi, Yaojiang; Rozelle, Scott; Medina, Alexis

    2011-01-01

    In the late 1990s and early 2000s, China's Ministry of Education embarked on an ambitious program of elementary school mergers by shutting down small village schools and opening up larger centralized schools in towns and county seats. The goal of the program was to improve the teacher and building resources in an attempt to raise the human capital of students in poor rural areas, although it was recognized that students would lose the opportunity to learn in the settings of their own familiar...

  3. An Overview of Strategic Alliances between Universities and Corporations

    Elmuti, Dean; Abebe, Michael; Nicolosi, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Strategic alliances generally represent inter-firm cooperative agreements aimed at achieving competitive advantage for the partners. In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in strategic alliances by multinational firms. This paper aims to explore the essence of these alliances and why they have become such a growing area of…

  4. A Study of Learning Strategic Alliances from an Evolutionary Perspective

    CAO Yong-hui

    2008-01-01

    We present an exploratory framework based on an amalgamation of organizational learning and strategic alliance literatures. It highlights the importance of understanding learning in alliance partnerships from an evolutionary perspective. The research proposes that as alliances progress from awareness through commitment phases, learning priorities change.

  5. Academics as Part-Time Marketers in University Offshore Programs: An Exploratory Study

    Poole, David; Ewan, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Australian universities maintain almost 900 offshore programs delivered to more than 100 000 students, primarily in the nations of Singapore, Malaysia, China, and Hong Kong (Universities Australia, 2009; IDP, 2009a). Although offshore students comprise an estimated 30 per cent of international student enrolments at Australian universities (IDP,…

  6. Pressure Point On Campus: Academic Program Planning and Resource Allocation in Conflict with the Bargaining Table.

    Kieft, Raymond

    Considered are the nature and extent of some of the basic conflicts that arise when two, future-oriented, decision-making processes--institutional program planning/resource allocation and collective bargaining--are both present on the same campus. The identified conflicts come from the experiences of a university that was one of the first in the…

  7. 78 FR 79221 - Title I-Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged; Migrant Education Program

    2013-12-27

    ... public schools, but also those who are home- schooled or enrolled in non-public schools because, as they migrate, these home-schooled or non-public school children may move into and out of public schools, where... ] would be required of their individual program applications. See 67 FR 35967, 35970-71 (May 22, 2002)....

  8. Academic Stress in Chinese Schools and a Proposed Preventive Intervention Program

    Zhao, Xu; Selman, Robert L.; Haste, Helen

    2015-01-01

    While American educators fret about the mediocre educational performance of American students in international contests (e.g. the Program for International Student Assessment) and wonder why the Chinese education system produces such high-achieving students, educators, journalists, and public officials in China want to know what causes and how to…

  9. Svetovid--Interactive Development and Submission System with Prevention of Academic Collusion in Computer Programming

    Pribela, Ivan; Ivanovic, Mirjana; Budimac, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses Svetovid, cross-platform software that helps instructors to assess the amount of effort put into practical exercises and exams in courses related to computer programming. The software was developed as an attempt at solving problems associated with practical exercises and exams. This paper discusses the design and use of…

  10. Project Tradition and Technology (Project TNT): The Hualapai Bilingual Academic Excellence Program.

    Reed, Michael D.; And Others

    Project Tradition and Technology (TNT) at Peach Springs Elementary School (Peach Springs, Arizona) is 1 of 12 programs recognized nationally as an outstanding model of bilingual education by the U.S. Department of Education. Project TNT is a process-oriented curriculum development model that identifies the community's needs and expectations for…

  11. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) Adopting Research to Improve Care (ARTIC) Program: Reach, Sustainability, Spread and Lessons Learned from an Implementation Funding Model

    Julia E Moore; Grouchy, Michelle; Graham, Ian D; Shandling, Maureen; Doyle, Winnie; Straus, Sharon E.

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence on what works in healthcare, there is a significant gap in the time it takes to bring research into practice. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario's Adopting Research to Improve Care program addresses this research-to-practice gap by incorporating the following components into its funding program: strategic selection of evidence for implementation, education and training for implementation, implementation supports, executive champions and governance, and evaluation. F...

  12. Facing the fear of failure: An explorative qualitative study of client experiences in a mindfulness-based stress reduction program for university students with academic evaluation anxiety

    Hjeltnes, Aslak; Binder, Per-Einar; Moltu, Christian; Dundas, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate the subjective experiences of 29 university students who participated in an 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program for academic evaluation anxiety. Participants who self-referred to the Student Counseling Service underwent individual semi-structured interviews about how they experienced the personal relevance and practical usefulness of taking the MBSR program. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed through a team-based ...

  13. Development of Modes of Cooperation: An Opportunity for Open Innovation Alliances in Polish Biopharmaceutical Industry

    Lukasz Puslecki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents development of modes of cooperation in biopharmaceutical industry, referring to the latest data from the asap (the Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals. Examples of different modes of cooperation in contemporary economy as well as potential cooperation between academia, institutions and business in the field of biopharmaceutical industry in Poland are discussed. Biopharmaceutical companies try to implement new strategies to transfer their research processes to a higher level, often using open innovation model as an additional tool for developing new products and services. Thanks to the cooperation with universities in the framework of open innovation alliances, through joint work with academic researchers, biopharmaceutical companies are more successful in identifying disease mechanisms, implementation of better medical therapy for patients as well as in development of new drugs.

  14. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients.

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Medeiros, Elizabeth A; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women's health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program's acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p < 0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients. PMID:27271058

  15. Creating State-based Alliances to Support Earth and Space Science Education Reform

    Geary, E. E.; Manduca, C. A.; Barstow, D.

    2002-05-01

    Seven years after the publication of the National Science Education Standards and adoption of new state science education standards, Earth and space science remains outside the mainstream K-12 curriculum. Currently, less than ten percent of high school students in the United States of America take an Earth or space science course before graduation. This state of affairs is simply unacceptable. "All of us who live on this planet have the right and the obligation to understand Earth's unique history, its dynamic processes, its abundant resources, and its intriguing mysteries. As citizens of Earth, with the power to modify our climate and ecosystems, we also have a personal and collective responsibility to understand Earth so that we can make wise decisions about its and our future". As one step toward addressing this situation, we support the establishment of state-based alliances to promote Earth and space science education reform. "In many ways, states are the most vital locus of change in our nation's schools. State departments of education define curriculum frameworks, establish testing policies, support professional development and, in some cases, approve textbooks and materials for adoption". State alliance partners should include a broad spectrum of K-16 educators, scientists, policy makers, parents, and community leaders from academic institutions, businesses, museums, technology centers, and not-for profit organizations. The focus of these alliances should be on systemic and sustainable reform of K-16 Earth and space science education. Each state-based alliance should focus on specific educational needs within their state, but work together to share ideas, resources, and models for success. As we build these alliances we need to take a truly collaborative approach working with the other sciences, geography, and mathematics so that collectively we can improve the caliber and scope of science and mathematics education for all students.

  16. Promoting academic and social-emotional school readiness: the head start REDI program.

    Bierman, Karen L; Domitrovich, Celene E; Nix, Robert L; Gest, Scott D; Welsh, Janet A; Greenberg, Mark T; Blair, Clancy; Nelson, Keith E; Gill, Sukhdeep

    2008-01-01

    Forty-four Head Start classrooms were randomly assigned to enriched intervention (Head Start REDI-Research-based, Developmentally Informed) or "usual practice" conditions. The intervention involved brief lessons, "hands-on" extension activities, and specific teaching strategies linked empirically with the promotion of: (a) social-emotional competencies and (b) language development and emergent literacy skills. Take-home materials were provided to parents to enhance skill development at home. Multimethod assessments of three hundred and fifty-six 4-year-old children tracked their progress over the course of the 1-year program. Results revealed significant differences favoring children in the enriched intervention classrooms on measures of vocabulary, emergent literacy, emotional understanding, social problem solving, social behavior, and learning engagement. Implications are discussed for developmental models of school readiness and for early educational programs and policies. PMID:19037951

  17. Alliances - Another Way to Access the Market

    Komarov, Yuri A.

    1999-07-01

    The late 1990s were a difficult period for the world economy: decreased economic growth rate, dropping prices for energy and other raw materials, dropping import prices of natural gas. Companies involved in the energy business are currently at the stage of survival. High-priced projects with increased risks are postponed until better times. Consequently, Gazprom had to cut investments by two thirds. For Gazprom, the problems have been aggravated by the transition from authoritatively planned economy to market economy. Alliances are one of the most effective current methods of operation in the natural gas market. Alliances between Gazprom and leading Western oil and gas companies are beneficial both to the participants and the consumers because such alliances will provide for creation of a service package of the 21th century. The importance for Gazprom of cooperation with its alliance partners is that it makes it possible to implement cost-cutting measures that benefit both producers and consumers. It also makes it possible to ensure reliable distribution of the gas.

  18. Black-Brown Relations: Are Alliances Possible?

    Klor de Alva, J. Jorge; West, Cornel

    1997-01-01

    Dialogue between Cornel West and Jorge Klor de Alva explores the question of black-brown alliances, those between African Americans and Hispanic Americans. If minority groups can put aside the difference of skin color and join to combat economic and social racism, they can have far-reaching and meaningful impacts on society. (SLD)

  19. Management of innovation in networks and alliances

    Garbade, P.J.P.

    2014-01-01

    To remain competitive in a world of global competition a company has to adapt to changing situations at an increasing speed. This book discusses the important topic of the management of innovation in inter-organizational networks by focusing on the management of innovation both at the network level and at the strategic alliance level of the individual company.

  20. Alliances - Another Way to Access the Market

    The late 1990s were a difficult period for the world economy: decreased economic growth rate, dropping prices for energy and other raw materials, dropping import prices of natural gas. Companies involved in the energy business are currently at the stage of survival. High-priced projects with increased risks are postponed until better times. Consequently, Gazprom had to cut investments by two thirds. For Gazprom, the problems have been aggravated by the transition from authoritatively planned economy to market economy. Alliances are one of the most effective current methods of operation in the natural gas market. Alliances between Gazprom and leading Western oil and gas companies are beneficial both to the participants and the consumers because such alliances will provide for creation of a service package of the 21th century. The importance for Gazprom of cooperation with its alliance partners is that it makes it possible to implement cost-cutting measures that benefit both producers and consumers. It also makes it possible to ensure reliable distribution of the gas

  1. STRATEGIC ALLIANCES: FROM SUCCES TO FAILURE

    Petrica Dana; Bugnar Nicoleta; Mester Liana

    2009-01-01

    Over the past few years, the strategic alliances had been increasingly common. The term “strategic alliance” can mean many different things, but the commonly used meaning entails a joint corporative effort by two or more companies working towards agreed u

  2. Robustness of airline alliance route networks

    Lordan, Oriol; Sallan, Jose M.; Simo, Pep; Gonzalez-Prieto, David

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the robustness of the three major airline alliances' (i.e., Star Alliance, oneworld and SkyTeam) route networks. Firstly, the normalization of a multi-scale measure of vulnerability is proposed in order to perform the analysis in networks with different sizes, i.e., number of nodes. An alternative node selection criterion is also proposed in order to study robustness and vulnerability of such complex networks, based on network efficiency. And lastly, a new procedure - the inverted adaptive strategy - is presented to sort the nodes in order to anticipate network breakdown. Finally, the robustness of the three alliance networks are analyzed with (1) a normalized multi-scale measure of vulnerability, (2) an adaptive strategy based on four different criteria and (3) an inverted adaptive strategy based on the efficiency criterion. The results show that Star Alliance has the most resilient route network, followed by SkyTeam and then oneworld. It was also shown that the inverted adaptive strategy based on the efficiency criterion - inverted efficiency - shows a great success in quickly breaking networks similar to that found with betweenness criterion but with even better results.

  3. Developing Strategic Alliances in Management Learning

    Thorne, E. Ann; Wright, Gill

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The notion of effective strategic alliances provides the basis on which this paper proposes a framework to manage the application and outcomes of management learning. The management of key partner collaboration emerges in this paper as a major success factor in determining effective management learning. A proactive structured approach to…

  4. Strategic alliances in oil and gas industry

    A competitor today is an ally tomorrow. A strategic partner in one market is an adversary in another. In this radically new way of doing business, the oil and gas industry seems quite at home. The trend to mergers is not unique to the oil industry, what is unique is the knack of petroleum companies to form strategic alliances

  5. Trust, alliance management capability and the alliance management function: A comparative analysis of Portuguese SMEs

    Veloso, João Miguel Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Strategic alliances represent a key driver for internationalization and growth, being the purpose of this work project to better understand the intertwined relationship between trust and the existence of an alliance management position. Previous research supports the positive impact of such position in stock market returns. However, little attention has been given to the impact of such position on the level of trust in the collaborative arrangement, which is deemed to be a key driver for alli...

  6. The development of the therapeutic alliance and the emergence of alliance ruptures

    Joana Coutinho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study evaluated the development of the therapeutic alliance and the emergence of alliance ruptures, in a sample of patients with different diagnosis and different therapeutic outcome. Design: We examined the longitudinal data of 38 therapeutic dyads receiving cognitive-behavioural therapy, including dropouts as well as successful and unsuccessful cases. The sample included cases with Axis I and Axis II disorders. Method: At the end of each session, patients evaluated the alliance using the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI. Six judges trained in the observation of alliance rupture markers with an observational system of ruptures, rated 201 videotaped sessions. Longitudinal statistical models were applied to the data. Results: We found that the pattern of alliance development of successful cases was different from the unsuccessful and dropouts cases. In addition on average, patients with personality disorders began therapy with a lower WAI score that decreased over time, whereas patients with Axis-I disorders began therapy with a higher WAI score that increased over time.

  7. Identification of at-risk students and strategies to improve academic success in first year health programs. A Practice Report

    Andrew Gerard Pearson; Helen Naug

    2013-01-01

    The transition to university is a difficult process for many students, having a negative impact on their academic performance, ultimately resulting in failure or withdrawal from one or more courses in their first semester. This practice report describes a profile analysis and readiness assessment designed to identify students at high academic risk. Students so identified were offered additional workshops to address assumed knowledge and academic skills. Attendance at the workshops correlated ...

  8. Academic emotions in students' self-regulated learning and achievement : a program of qualitative and quantitative research

    Pekrun, Reinhard; Götz, Thomas; Titz, Wolfram; Perry, Raymond P.

    2002-01-01

    Academic emotions have largely been neglected by educational psychology. In 5 qualitative studies, it was found that students experience a rich diversity of emotions in academic settings. Anxiety was reported most often, but positive emotions were described no less frequently than negative emotions. Based on the studies reviewed in this article, taxonomies of different academic emotions and a self-report instrument measuring students' enjoyment, hope, pride, relief, anger, anxiety, shame, hop...

  9. Safety in Numbers: Progressive Implementation of a Robotics Program in an Academic Surgical Oncology Practice.

    King, Jonathan C; Zeh, Herbert J; Zureikat, Amer H; Celebrezze, James; Holtzman, Matthew P; Stang, Michael L; Tsung, Allan; Bartlett, David L; Hogg, Melissa E

    2016-08-01

    Background Robotic-assisted surgery has potential benefits over laparoscopy yet little has been published on the integration of this platform into complex surgical oncology. We describe the outcomes associated with integration of robotics into a large surgical oncology program, focusing on metrics of safety and efficiency. Methods A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database of robotic procedures from July 2009 to October 2014 identifying trends in volume, operative time, complications, conversion to open, and 90-day mortality. Results Fourteen surgeons performed 1236 cases during the study period: thyroid (246), pancreas/duodenum (458), liver (157), stomach (56), colorectal (129), adrenal (38), cholecystectomy (102), and other (48). There were 38 conversions to open (3.1%), 230 complications (18.6%), and 13 mortalities (1.1%). From 2009 to 2014, operative volume increased (7 cases/month vs 24 cases/month; P robotic surgical oncology program utilizing multiple surgeons is safe and feasible. As operative volume increased, operative time, complications, and conversions to open decreased and plateaued at approximately 3 years. No unanticipated adverse events attributable to the introduction of this platform were observed. PMID:27130645

  10. A FRAMEWORK FOR SUBCONTRACTOR INTEGRATION IN ALLIANCE CONTRACTS

    Vilasini, Nimesha

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Project alliancing involves the active collaboration of construction project owners and non-owner participants (designer, contractors, and suppliers to deliver projects in an atmosphere of shared responsibilities and liabilities. Alliancing connotes integration but in real practice, it fails to create a true alliance environment since only part of the value chain (owner, designer, main contractor is considered for integration. Consequently subcontractors are very often left out of the key alliance. Therefore this study identifies improvement areas to current alliance practice and suggests changes that will permit critical sub-contracting processes to be integrated into a project’s main alliance. To achieve this objective the research follows a comparative study approach. Information obtained from relevant literature is used to identify current subcontractor management practices and best practices for subcontractor integration in alliances. A case study of an alliance project is used to identify improvement areas in subcontractor management practices in an alliance environment. From these findings, the study proposes a revised alliance framework that integrates subcontractors from the early stages in alliance contracts, thus enabling the realisation of benefits accruable to projects through early contractor involvement.

  11. Creation of a healing enhancement program at an academic medical center.

    Cutshall, Susanne M; Fenske, Laura L; Kelly, Ryan F; Phillips, Brent R; Sundt, Thoralf M; Bauer, Brent A

    2007-11-01

    There has been a growing emphasis on evaluating and improving the experience of the hospitalized patient. In 2004, the Cardiovascular Surgery team at Mayo Clinic Rochester, though achieving a high level of technical expertise and clinical outcomes, recognized that patients were not rating their overall hospital experience as highly as was expected. After a systematic evaluation of the hospital experience, tension, stress, pain, and anxiety were identified as key challenges for patients. A multidisciplinary team was created to evaluate pain management practices and explore methods for reducing pain, anxiety, and tension. An extensive review of the literature and site visits to other institutions provided the foundation for the program. The term "Healing Enhancement" was coined to identify the goals of this emerging paradigm that focused on all aspects of the patient's experience-mind, body, and spirit. Integrated therapies such as music, massage, guided imagery, and relaxation training were explored to measure their role in patient care. PMID:17950176

  12. Unprecedented alliance in preparation for electric vehicle battery recycling

    Miller, D.G. [Toxco Inc., Anaheim, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    As electric and hybrid vehicles gain a larger part of the automobile market, it is expected that large volumes of electric and hybrid vehicles lead, nickel, and lithium batteries will be required. To meet the demand, the largest recycler of lithium batteries in the world, Toxco Inc. formed an alliance with Kinsbursky Brothers Inc. (KBI). KBI is considered to be one of the most reputable and largest non-lithium battery management companies in the United States. The objective of the alliance is to offer a one-stop battery recycling service with direct recycling facilities, a single point for battery management and recycling. The elimination of the middle-man in the recycling process and the elimination of the redundant logistics are expected to yield cost savings, both for the companies and the customers. This recycling service is offered for all common and other battery types. A major benefit of the recycling program is found in the reduction of volumes of hazardous and/or reactive waste in incineration facilities or landfills. tabs., figs.

  13. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Full Text Available ... Regulatory Issues How to Avoid Medicare Penalties EHR Incentive Program Medicare Inpatient & Outpatient Rules Physician Quality Reporting ... and Resource Use Reports Electronic Health Records (EHR) Incentive Program Physician Compare Website Surgical Quality Alliance S-CAHPS ...

  14. Lower back pain in physically demanding college academic programs: a questionnaire based study

    Donncha Ciarán

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lower back pain (LBP is ranked first as a cause of disability and inability to work, and is expected to affect up to 90% of the worlds population at some point in their lifetime. The annual first time incidence of LBP is 5%, and the annual prevalence (i.e. those suffering at time of questioning is between 15 and 63%. Prospective studies demonstrate that low back problems do not display a six-week spontaneous recovery pattern, as was once believed. The condition is regularly seen to worsen over time, becoming a chronic disorder, influenced by both physical and psychosocial factors. Methods The current study assessed the level of LBP amongst students engaged in educational programs that were physically demanding, and its influence on lower back problems. A 1-year retrospective questionnaire consisting of 37 closed, open and multi-choice questions was designed to ascertain self-reported information on the occurrence, cause and type of LBP. Treatment, care seeking and general knowledge regarding LBP were also recorded. Students were enrolled in BSc Equine Science, BSc Physical Education and BSc Sports & Exercise Science degree programs and a total number of 188 valid questionnaires were collected. Results The self reported, anthropometrical data for participants in this study are: age 20.9 ± 2.7 yrs; height 171.8 ± 9.3 cm; weight 66.7 ± 10.4 kg; female 64% (n = 120, male 36% (n = 68. The overall self reported prevalence of LBP was 32% (n = 61. Within the LBP population, 77% reported their problem as recurring. Two factors showed significance as having an influence on LBP. They were age (21.6 ± 3.5 yrs, p = 0.005 and hours of personal training physical activity (14.0 ± 8.2 hrs per week, p = 0.02. LBP sufferers also displayed poor management of their condition and an interest in education and treatment of their problem. Conclusion The current study revealed high prevalence of LBP consistent with that of the literature, and

  15. Review of Behavior on a Disk from CMS Academic Software: instructional programs for teaching teachers.

    Mulick, J A

    1992-01-01

    The programs on BOAD represent a set of useful simulations and demonstrations of learning phenomena that successfully convey important practical and theoretical information to students. The most successful modules deal with shaping and the selective effect of positive reinforcement on behavior. The range of examples is sufficiently broad to convey the generality of these learning phenomena, but the graphics and particular examples are better suited to the college classroom (for which they were developed and in which they have received extensive field testing) than to the general public, where some users might be distracted by working with simulated animal "subjects" or bored by the simple graphics. There is a separate application on the disk that drills students on behavioral vocabulary, a useful resource for helping to assure that behavioral issues are discussed using consistent terminology. Although a single disk is initialized for a single user so that individual progress can be tracked accurately in printed reports, the cost of a disk is so low that no student who needs to learn about teaching would be discouraged from purchasing it. In truth, this is the best deal in instructional software I have seen yet. PMID:1626085

  16. Understanding him in STEM: Sharing the stories of African American male scholars in engineering academic programs at a predominantly White university

    Hayes, Robert E., III

    Globalization of the world economy has confirmed the need for citizens to exemplify competitive capacities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. Since the 1970s, American higher education has seen increasing numbers of students entering college but has witnessed a decline in the number of students enrolling in STEM programs. African American men fall behind other students in regards to academic performance, persistence, and success throughout primary, secondary, and tertiary schooling. Accordingly, participation of African American men in STEM disciplines is low in comparison to White males and other race groups. Various factors have been identified as contributing to the academic failures of Black men. Poor academic and social preparedness, racial identity issues, institutional climates, negative stereotypes, and fear of success have been cited as potential contributors to the relative invisibility of African American men in STEM disciplines. This study explores the life stories of five African American male scholars in the college of engineering at a predominantly white university. The goal of the qualitative investigation is to help university faculty and administrators understand the institutional, interpersonal, and collective mechanisms influencing the success identities of African American male undergraduates in STEM academic programs. Understanding the lived experiences of this population may help universities innovate stronger supports for men of color in college and broaden the borders for all students interested in STEM careers.

  17. Helping Students and the Bottom Line: Creating a Module-Based Academic Program to Drive SEM Goals

    Levine, Jeffrey P.

    2012-01-01

    The chief academic officer to whom the author once reported gave him the freedom to be creative in implementing their institution's then-new, three-year strategic enrollment management (SEM) plan. For the fall 2010 semester, they had already exceeded projected net-tuition dollar amounts for the entire academic year. Just five months prior to…

  18. FAST-Future Academic Scholars in Teaching: A High-Engagement Development Program for Future STEM Faculty

    Vergara, Claudia E.; Urban-Lurain, Mark; Campa, Henry, III; Cheruvelil, Kendra S.; Ebert-May, Diane; Fata-Hartley, Cori; Johnston, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Doctoral granting institutions prepare future faculty members for academic positions at institutions of higher education across the nation. Growing concerns about whether these institutions are adequately preparing students to meet the demands of a changing academic environment have prompted several reform efforts. We describe a professional…

  19. The effect of an unstructured, moderate to vigorous, before-school physical activity program in elementary school children on academics, behavior, and health

    Tompkins Connie L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical inactivity has been deemed a significant, contributing factor to childhood overweight and obesity. In recent years, many school systems removed recess and/or physical education from their curriculum due to growing pressure to increase academic scores. With the vast majority of children’s time spent in school, alternative strategies to re-introduce physical activity back into schools are necessary. A creative yet underutilized solution to engage children in physical activity may be in before-school programs. The objective of the proposed study is to examine the effect of an unstructured, moderate to vigorous, before-school physical activity program on academic performance, classroom behavior, emotions, and other health related measures. Methods/Design Children in 3rd–5th grade will participate in a before-school (7:30–8:15 a.m., physical activity program for 12 weeks, 3 days a week. Children will be able to choose their preferred activity and asked to sustain physical activity of moderate to vigorous intensity with individual heart rate monitored during each session. Discussion The proposed study explores an innovative method of engaging and increasing physical activity in children. The results of this study will provide evidence to support the feasibility of an unstructured, moderate to vigorous, before-school physical activity program in children and provide insight regarding the ideal physical activity intensity and duration necessary to achieve a positive increase in academic performance. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01505244

  20. Intersectoral debate on social research strengthens alliances, advocacy and action for maternal survival in Zambia.

    Manandhar, Mary; Maimbolwa, Margaret; Muulu, Elson; Mulenga, Mary Mwange; O'Donovan, Diarmuid

    2009-03-01

    The Health Promotion Research Centre of the National University of Ireland, Galway and the University of Zambia's School of Medicine conducted operational research to understand and address the socio-cultural and gender contexts of maternal survival. Together with an analytical policy and programming review and qualitative research, the project process also involved the convening of 'Interest Group' meetings involving intersectoral stakeholders at Central (Lusaka) and Provincial (Kasama) levels. These meetings aimed to catalyse debate and stimulate advocacy on the project theme by using discussion of qualitative research as entry point. Participants came from government departments, civil society groups, the indigenous health system, academia, technical provider associations, and media, advocacy and human rights organisations. We found that engagement in Interest Groups was successful at Provincial level with lively participation from civil society, media and advocacy stakeholders and strong engagement by the health system. The process was welcomed as an opportunity to fill gaps in understanding about underlying social determinants of health and jointly explore intervention approaches. Overburdened government staff at central level faced with disease-focused interventions rather than underlying contextual determinants, and a weak culture of health sector engagement with civil society, academics and activists, contributed to less successful functioning in Lusaka. Final Dissemination and Discussion Events incorporated material from Interest Group Meetings to stimulate wider discussion and make recommendations. This project highlights the potential value of intersectoral stakeholder discussions from the inception stage of research to stimulate intersectoral exchange and alliance building, inform advocacy, and catalyse the process of research into action. PMID:19008243

  1. New Actors and Alliances in Development

    Richey, Lisa Ann; Ponte, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    ‘New actors and alliances in development’ brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars exploring how development financing and interventions are being shaped by a wider and more complex platform of actors than usually considered in the existing literature. The contributors also trace...... governments. Despite the diversity of these actors and alliances, several commonalities arise: they are often based on hybrid transnationalism and diffuse notions of development responsibility; rather than being new per se, they are newly being studied as practices that are now coming to be understood...... as ‘development’; and they are limited in their ability to act as agents of development by their lack of accountability or pro-poor commitment. The articles in this collection point to images and representations as increasingly important in development ‘branding’ and suggest fruitful new ground for critical...

  2. Alliance - a paradigm shift in energy transportation

    Key components of the Alliance Pipeline Project were outlined. This joint Canada - U.S. venture consists of a $Can 3.7 billion, producer-driven, high-pressure, rich-gas pipeline from producing fields in western Canada to an interconnection with the North American pipeline grid near Chicago. The initial volume for the system is 1.3 Bcfd, with provision for expansion to 2 Bcfd at minimal cost. The project also includes a $Can 200 million, non-regulated, natural gas liquids extraction plant and delivery system originating near Chicago. Alberta ethane supply and demand for 1995 and supply projections for 2010, (for delivery through the Alliance pipeline?), were also highlighted. 11 figs

  3. Facing the fear of failure: An explorative qualitative study of client experiences in a mindfulness-based stress reduction program for university students with academic evaluation anxiety

    Hjeltnes, Aslak; Binder, Per-Einar; Moltu, Christian; Dundas, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate the subjective experiences of 29 university students who participated in an 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program for academic evaluation anxiety. Participants who self-referred to the Student Counseling Service underwent individual semi-structured interviews about how they experienced the personal relevance and practical usefulness of taking the MBSR program. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed through a team-based explorative–reflective thematic approach based on a hermeneutic-phenomenological epistemology. Five salient patterns of meaning (themes) were found: (1) finding an inner source of calm, (2) sharing a human struggle, (3) staying focused in learning situations, (4) moving from fear to curiosity in academic learning, and (5) feeling more self-acceptance when facing difficult situations. We contextualize these findings in relation to existing research, discuss our own process of reflexivity, highlight important limitations of this study, and suggest possible implications for future research. PMID:26297629

  4. Facing the fear of failure: An explorative qualitative study of client experiences in a mindfulness-based stress reduction program for university students with academic evaluation anxiety.

    Hjeltnes, Aslak; Binder, Per-Einar; Moltu, Christian; Dundas, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate the subjective experiences of 29 university students who participated in an 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program for academic evaluation anxiety. Participants who self-referred to the Student Counseling Service underwent individual semi-structured interviews about how they experienced the personal relevance and practical usefulness of taking the MBSR program. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed through a team-based explorative-reflective thematic approach based on a hermeneutic-phenomenological epistemology. Five salient patterns of meaning (themes) were found: (1) finding an inner source of calm, (2) sharing a human struggle, (3) staying focused in learning situations, (4) moving from fear to curiosity in academic learning, and (5) feeling more self-acceptance when facing difficult situations. We contextualize these findings in relation to existing research, discuss our own process of reflexivity, highlight important limitations of this study, and suggest possible implications for future research. PMID:26297629

  5. Facing the fear of failure: An explorative qualitative study of client experiences in a mindfulness-based stress reduction program for university students with academic evaluation anxiety

    Aslak Hjeltnes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate the subjective experiences of 29 university students who participated in an 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR program for academic evaluation anxiety. Participants who self-referred to the Student Counseling Service underwent individual semi-structured interviews about how they experienced the personal relevance and practical usefulness of taking the MBSR program. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed through a team-based explorative–reflective thematic approach based on a hermeneutic-phenomenological epistemology. Five salient patterns of meaning (themes were found: (1 finding an inner source of calm, (2 sharing a human struggle, (3 staying focused in learning situations, (4 moving from fear to curiosity in academic learning, and (5 feeling more self-acceptance when facing difficult situations. We contextualize these findings in relation to existing research, discuss our own process of reflexivity, highlight important limitations of this study, and suggest possible implications for future research.

  6. Security Debates and Alliance against Terrorism

    ERDAĞ, Ramazan

    2010-01-01

    This article searches the answer that how security could be defined, what the new security studies are and what can be done against global terrorism and how can be assured peace and stability condition In this context, with new security disputes and perspectives it can be said that security is not an alone issue, it's a collective study and mostly claimed as dilemma. It also can be said that in the new era more international collaboration and alliance are need to supply internationa...

  7. Do International Roaming Alliances Harm Consumers?

    Bühler, Benno

    2009-01-01

    We develop a model of international roaming in which mobile network operators (MNOs) compete both on the wholesale market to sell roaming services to foreign operators and on the retail market for subscribers. The operators own a network infrastructure only in their home country. To allow their subscribers to place or receive calls abroad, they have to buy roaming services provided by foreign MNOs. We show that in absence of international alliances and capacity restrictions, competition betwe...

  8. Cluster as a Form of Strategic Alliance

    Marzena Godlewska; Elżbieta Weiss

    2007-01-01

    The article presents the theory of clusters that are treated as natural elements of European model of economic development. There are highlighted Polish Forum of Lisbon Strategy point of view that indicated clusters as one of fundamental ideas recommended for Polish economy. In based on literature and observation of articleís authors the concept, examples of Polish clusters and their role in strategic alliance are presented.  

  9. Cluster as a Form of Strategic Alliance

    Marzena Godlewska

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the theory of clusters that are treated as natural elements of European model of economic development. There are highlighted Polish Forum of Lisbon Strategy point of view that indicated clusters as one of fundamental ideas recommended for Polish economy. In based on literature and observation of articles authors the concept, examples of Polish clusters and their role in strategic alliance are presented.

  10. 2. An Alliance in the Making

    Ilias, Fouad

    2011-01-01

    2.1 Lebanon after Syria Just before Syria’s withdrawal, parties and politicians in Lebanon began reviewing their alliances according to the changing political conditions. The numerous opponents to the Syrian role in Lebanon became emboldened by the new Western stance toward Syria and its growing isolation. In addition, former Syrian clients and allies shifted their positions and joined the ranks of those demanding an end to Syrian occupation. This trend grew increasingly stronger after the as...

  11. STRATEGIC ALLIANCES: CREATING LONG TERM SUCCESS

    Whipple, Judith M.; Frankel, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Given today's increasingly competitive environment, firms in every industry are searching for new ways to increase their competitive advantage. Many firms have realized that, due to a variety of different reasons (e.g., fast-paced technological advances), significant performance improvements cannot be achieved alone. As such, the traditional response of performance enhancement through acquisition is no longer the only option. Strategic alliances are a new alternative that enable partnering fi...

  12. Pacific Alliance as Counterpart to MERCOSUR

    Skřička, Vojtěch

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on two integration blocks in Latin America -- the Pacific Alliance and MERCOSUR. The analysis should confirm the hypothesis that the integrated countries converge faster than non-integrated. With use of beta-convergence and sigma-convergence approaches, this hypothesis was rejected for the two Latin American integration groups. It is also supposed that market-led policies should diverge from the protectionist countries in terms of per capita income. However, this hypothesi...

  13. Academic Bankruptcy by Design.

    Browne, Arthur D.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages and requirements for offering a second chance to students who have failed, by forgiving a poor academic record, are discussed and supported by findings from a survey of institutions and the results of several experimental programs. (MSE)

  14. The Alliance Negotiation Scale: A psychometric investigation.

    Doran, Jennifer M; Safran, Jeremy D; Muran, J Christopher

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the utility and psychometric properties of a new measure of psychotherapy process, the Alliance Negotiation Scale (ANS; Doran, Safran, Waizmann, Bolger, & Muran, 2012). The ANS was designed to operationalize the theoretical construct of negotiation (Safran & Muran, 2000), and to extend our current understanding of the working alliance concept (Bordin, 1979). The ANS was also intended to improve upon existing measures such as the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI; Horvath & Greenberg, 1986, 1989) and its short form (WAI-S; Tracey & Kokotovic, 1989) by expanding the emphasis on negative therapy process. The present study investigates the psychometric validity of the ANS test scores and interpretation-including confirming its original factor structure and evaluating its internal consistency and construct validity. Construct validity was examined through the ANS' convergence and divergence with several existing scales that measure theoretically related constructs. The results bolster and extend previous findings about the psychometric integrity of the ANS, and begin to illuminate the relationship between negotiation and other important variables in psychotherapy research. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26460895

  15. Predicting Ecosystem Alliances Using Landscape Theory

    Shruti Satsangi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous articles in the TIM Review have covered various aspects of the concept of business ecosystems, from the types of ecosystems to keystone strategy, to different member roles and value co-creation. While there is no dearth of suggested best practices that organizations should follow as ecosystem members, it can be difficult to apply these insights into actionable steps for them to take. This is especially true when the ecosystem members already have a prior history of cooperation or competition with each other, as opposed to where a new ecosystem is created. Landscape theory, a political science approach to predicting coalition formation and strategic alliances, can be a useful complement to ecosystems studies by providing a tool to evaluate the best possible alliance options for an organization, given information about itself and the other companies in the system. As shown in the case study of mobile device manufacturers choosing platform providers in the mobile ecosystem, this tool is highly flexible and customizable, with more data providing a more accurate view of the alliances in the ecosystem. At the same time, with even basic parameters, companies can glean significant information about which coalitions will best serve their interest and overall standing within the ecosystem. This article shows the synergies between landscape theory and an ecosystems approach and offers a practical, actionable way in which to analyze individual member benefits.

  16. The clinical partnership as strategic alliance.

    Novotny, Jeanne M; Donahue, Moreen; Bhalla, Bharat B

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a renewed partnership between a collegiate school of nursing and a community hospital. Universities and hospitals are searching for creative solutions to increase the number of registered nurses available to meet the demand for nursing care. An affiliation agreement had been in existence for many years, but health care system imperatives made it necessary to redesign the partnership between nursing education and nursing service. The model used to develop this new partnership is based on the work done in the field of management and is in the form of a strategic alliance. The success of a strategic alliance depends on two key factors: the relationship between partners and partnership performance. Identified outcomes show that this partnership is helping to meet the increasing demand for nursing care by building student capacity, satisfying mutual needs of faculty and clinical staff, and removing economic barriers. This article describes the development of the strategic alliance, its current status, and strategies for the future. PMID:15343495

  17. Impact of the Positive Action program on school-level indicators of academic achievement, absenteeism, and disciplinary outcomes: A matched-pair, cluster randomized, controlled trial

    Snyder, Frank; Vuchinich, Samuel; Acock, Alan; Washburn, Isaac; Beets, Michael; Li, Kin-Kit

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of a comprehensive elementary school-based social-emotional and character education program on school-level achievement, absenteeism, and disciplinary outcomes utilizing a matched-pair, cluster randomized, controlled design. The Positive Action Hawai‘i trial included 20 racially/ethnically diverse schools (mean enrollment = 544) and was conducted from the 2002-03 through the 2005-06 academic years. Using school-level archival data, analyses comparing change from...

  18. Reading in the English classroom : A comparative study of attitudes to literature in vocational and academic programs in the first year of upper secondary school in Sweden

    Ragnarsson, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Being able to read and write different kinds of texts in English is more important than ever, and previous research has shown that the latter of those two skills benefits from the former. The importance of reading is stressed in the curriculum for upper secondary education. The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of English literature at upper secondary school. Similarities and differences in attitudes towards literature among students in vocational and academic programs in the fi...

  19. Building Bridges: A Practical Guide to Developing and Implementing a Subject-specific Peer-to-peer Academic Mentoring Program for First-year Higher Education Students

    Ronika K. Power; Beverley B. Miles; Alyce Peruzzi; Angela Voerman

    2011-01-01

    The Telemachus Ancient History Mentor Program (informally known as Tele’s Angels) has been offering peer-led transition services to first-year students at Macquarie University since 2002. Tele’s Angels volunteer Mentors create a ‘learning community’ by providing their first-year colleagues with transition assistance, academic support and resources, and networking for and amongst students and staff. Individual mentoring is offered, as well as free peer-support services which focus on developin...

  20. 不同动机下联盟能力、治理机制与联盟绩效关系的比较%Comparative Analysis of the Correlation between the Alliance Capability, Governance Mechanisms and Alliance Performance under the Different Alliance Motivations

    郑景丽; 龙勇

    2012-01-01

    As a modern new organization form, strategic alliance has been recognized one of the most rapid and economical approaches for enterprise development. Enterprise alliance capability, governance mechanisms and alli- ance performance have always drawn more and more attention form researchers both within and abroad. Numerous valuable research fruits have yielded. However, previous research has neglected some important alliance elements such as alliance motivations, which might greatly influence enterprise alliance capability, governance mechanisms and alliance performance, especially their interrelation. Through a survey for over 300 senior executives in some firms of ShengZhen, this article uses structural equation model to study the correlation between the alliance capability, governance mechanisms and alliance performance under the different alliance motivation in strategic alliances from an empirical view. The results indicates that the stronger the allied enterprise's capability of constructing cooperation rules, it is more inclined to strengthen the effect of formal governance mechanism but weaken relation governance mechanism in those non - academic resource acquired motivation alliances ; the stronger those enterprise's capability of developing and maintaining their relation, it is more inclined to strengthen both formal governance mechanism and relation governance mechanism, both of them play a positive role in alliance performance. But formal governance mechanism is advantageous of individuality performance realization; relation governance mechanism plays a more important part in integral performance. In academic resource acquired motivation strategic alliances, the stronger the allied enterprise's capability of constructing cooperation rules, it is more inclined to strengthen both formal governance and relation governance; the stronger the allied enterprise's capability of developing and maintaining their relation, it is more inclined to strengthen

  1. The new reality: academic medical centers partner with the community.

    Scott, K

    1996-11-01

    As academic medical centers face a price-sensitive market dominated by managed care, their survival, says Association of American Medical Colleges' Robert Dickler, will depend on the combination of strategies they use in response. HSL looks at three centers' solution--building alliances to secure patient bases, focusing on expanding primary care capabilities, and downsizing and reorganizing for greater cost savings. PMID:10162189

  2. VLSI Design with Alliance Free CAD Tools: an Implementation Example

    Chávez-Bracamontes Ramón

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the methodology used for a digital integrated circuit design that implements the communication protocol known as Serial Peripheral Interface, using the Alliance CAD System. The aim of this paper is to show how the work of VLSI design can be done by graduate and undergraduate students with minimal resources and experience. The physical design was sent to be fabricated using the CMOS AMI C5 process that features 0.5 micrometer in transistor size, sponsored by the MOSIS Educational Program. Tests were made on a platform that transfers data from inertial sensor measurements to the designed SPI chip, which in turn sends the data back on a parallel bus to a common microcontroller. The results show the efficiency of the employed methodology in VLSI design, as well as the feasibility of ICs manufacturing from school projects that have insufficient or no source of funding

  3. Academic Hospitality

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  4. The Geoscience Alliance--A National Network for Broadening Participation of Native Americans in the Geosciences

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Berthelote, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Geoscience Alliance is a national alliance of individuals committed to broadening participation of Native Americans in the geosciences. Native Americans in this case include American Indians, Alaska Natives and people of Native Hawai'ian ancestry. Although they make up a large percentage of the resource managers in the country, they are underrepresented in degrees in the geosciences. The Geoscience Alliance (GA) members are faculty and staff from tribal colleges, universities, and research centers; native elders and community members; industry, agency, and corporate representatives; students (K12, undergraduate, and graduate); formal and informal educators; and other interested individuals. The goals of the Geoscience Alliance are to 1) create new collaborations in support of geoscience education for Native American students, 2) establish a new research agenda aimed at closing gaps in our knowledge on barriers and best practices related to Native American participation in the geosciences, 3) increase participation by Native Americans in setting the national research agenda on issues in the geosciences, and particularly those that impact Native lands, 4) provide a forum to communicate educational opportunities for Native American students in the geosciences, and 5) to understand and respect indigenous traditional knowledge. In this presentation, we look at the disparity between numbers of Native Americans involved in careers related to the geosciences and those who are receiving bachelors or graduate degrees in the geosciences. We address barriers towards degree completion in the geosciences, and look at innovative programs that are addressing those barriers.

  5. Strategic alliances for improved performance in underground mining

    As the competitive climate of the modern coal industry continues, it seems clear that only by the intervention of small, highly focused workgroups will new efficiency and economy result in the continuous improvement required to survive and prosper. Strategic Alliances, drawing from known and proven principles, can contribute to efficiency and economy. However, individual attitudes and corporate-cultures often must change to foster the growth of functional Strategic Alliances. Motivating personal change in individuals within prospective Strategic Alliance partners is perhaps the most difficult element about establishing a new Strategic Alliance or maintaining an existing Alliance. Ultimately, Strategic Alliances are not fundamentally about corporations, or executives as leaders, but about individuals throughout the endeavors of both partner-organizations and a shared-vision to achieve a common goal

  6. The effect of health education programs for parents about breakfast on students' breakfast and their academic achievement in the north of Jordan

    Mariam M. Kawafheh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breakfast is often said to be the most important meal of the day, there is a significant evidence of positive academic effects due to breakfast consumption. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to examine whether the health education intervention about breakfast for parents leads to improvement in students' breakfast intake and their academic achievements, it also aims at investigating the effect of students' gender and class on their performance. Methods: The sample of the study was selected by random sampling technique. It consisted of (234 students, (115 male and (119 female students at Fatima Bent Al Yaman school for girls and Khaled Ben Al Walid school for boys in Irbid the first Directorate of Education in the first semester 2013/2014 and was distributed into four sections, which were selected purposefully two female sections and two male sections. Results: findings of the study indicated that there were statistically significant differences in the post- tests between the control and the experimental groups in favor of the experimental group which their parents were exposed to health education intervention about breakfast, and there was no statistically significant difference in the students' achievement due to gender or to the interaction between gender and group. Conclusion: breakfast has a positive effect on students’ academic performance. Keywords: Academic Achievement, Health Education Programs, School Children.

  7. Revenue-sharing mechanisms in airline alliance revenue management problems

    Alahuhta, Jari

    2015-01-01

    The research in revenue management in airline industry is usually limited to problems that only involve a single airline. Due to the emergence and growth of airline alliances, it is becoming increasingly important to understand revenue management in alliance contexts. In this thesis, I discuss different revenue-sharing models in airline alliances and analyze and compare these models both theoretically and through numerical simulations. I also describe how economics commonly approaches this ty...

  8. Cyclical interactions with alliance-specific heterogeneous invasion rates

    Perc, Matjaz; Szolnoki, Attila; Szabo, Gyorgy

    2006-01-01

    We study a six-species Lotka-Volterra type system on different two-dimensional lattices when each species has two superior and two inferior partners. The invasion rates from predator sites to a randomly chosen neighboring prey's site depend on the predator-prey pair, whereby cyclic symmetries within the two three-species defensive alliances are conserved. Monte Carlo simulations reveal an unexpected non-monotonous dependence of alliance survival on the difference of alliance-specific invasion...

  9. ALLIANCE DECISION-MAKING OF SME: PHASES AND INFLUENCE FACTORS

    KARLA DIAZ

    2009-01-01

    Experience of some countries shows how alliances have helped SME (small and medium enterprises) to be successful; however, this strategy is still not very popular in many other countries. Managing alliances is no more difficult than deciding to enter into such a cooperative relationship. Many researchers, particularly in the advanced countries have studied strategic alliances with special emphasis on large enterprises and focused as a way of internationalization but there is still a gap of re...

  10. Brisa and the CCR Group : a strategic alliance

    Ribeiro, Francisco Maria Quintela de Saldanha Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, Brisa, a Portuguese road concession company, reviewed their presence in Brazil under a strategic alliance with local partners which had lasted for more than 9 years. The case is based on information gathered in interviews to agents from Brisa present in Brazil and from events that occurred during the course of this alliance. The information includes comments and considerations about the relationship and expectations from the alliance between Brisa and the CCR Group. The interna...

  11. A Novel framework for Strategic Alliance of Knowledge Management Systems

    Suzan Bandar Al mutairi; M. Rizwan Jameel Qureshi

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge is the primary strategic resource of many organizations. Knowledge management system (KMS) is a process of knowledge extraction, storage, transformation, analysis, distribution and deployment. Strategic alliance plays an increasing role to a global scale in technology business competition. Organizations are able to use alliances to respond to new technology and deliver new products more efficiently. The relationship between knowledge management and strategic alliance is identified. ...

  12. IMPORTANCE OF STRATEGIC ALLIANCES IN COMPANY’S ACTIVITY

    Elena BARANOV

    2013-01-01

    Strategic alliance is an agreement between two or more organizations to cooperate in a specific business activity, so that each benefits from the strengths of the other, and gains competitive advantage. The formation of strategic alliances has been seen as a response to globalization and increasing uncertainty and complexity in the business environment. Strategic alliances involve the sharing of knowledge and expertise between partners as well as the reduction of risk and costs in areas such ...

  13. Need and potential risks of strategic alliances for competing successfully

    Catalina RADU

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In today’s global economy, many companies’ managers consider strategic alliances as a key strategic alternative. Even if it is true that strategic alliances can be a really powerful competitive tool, managers should pay attention to all potential risks before involving in a partnership. This paper aims to address a series of issues that may arise when forming a strategic alliance.

  14. Persistence of and interrelation between horizontal and vertical technology alliances

    Belderbos, Rene; Gilsing, Victor; Lokshin, Boris

    2009-01-01

    We examine how and to what extent the propensity to be engaged in alliances with different partner types (suppliers, customers and competitors) depends on prior alliance engagement with partner firms of the same type (persistence) and prior engagement in alliances with the other partner types (interrelation). We derive hypotheses from a combined competence and governance view of collaboration, and test these on an extensive panel dataset of innovation-active Dutch firms during 1996-2004. We f...

  15. The dynamics of relational quality in co-development alliances

    Bidault, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Co-development alliances are formed to create new capabilities (technologies, products, services, processes, etc.) that partner organizations need in order to reach their goals. They involve the combination of competencies, and other intangible assets. These alliances typically face a high level of risks in terms of undesired leakages of confidential knowledge or failure to achieve the expected development. Relational quality, an important consideration in all alliances, is particularly key. ...

  16. Possibility of Strategic Alliance from Competition:A Game Analysis

    张树义; 陈彦茹

    2004-01-01

    The possibility for two competitive firms to form a strategic alliance was quantitatively analyzed with the game theory. The strategic alliance could be formed in an infinitely repeated game with complete information or a finitely repeated game with incomplete information. In the former situation, the discount ratio is important. If the discount ratio is large enough, alliance would be a possible solution. In the latter situation, the bigger the possibility of the rationality is, the more possible is for both firms to make strategic alliance.

  17. Networks of Military Alliances, Wars, and International Trade

    Jackson, Matthew O

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the role of networks of alliances in preventing (multilateral) interstate wars. We first show that, in the absence of international trade, no network of alliances is peaceful and stable. We then show that international trade induces peaceful and stable networks: trade increases the density of alliances so that countries are less vulnerable to attack and also reduces countries' incentives to attack an ally. We present historical data on wars and trade, noting that the dramatic drop in interstate wars since 1950, and accompanying densification and stabilization of alliances, are consistent with the model but not other prominent theories.

  18. IMPORTANCE OF STRATEGIC ALLIANCES IN COMPANY’S ACTIVITY

    Elena BARANOV

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Strategic alliance is an agreement between two or more organizations to cooperate in a specific business activity, so that each benefits from the strengths of the other, and gains competitive advantage. The formation of strategic alliances has been seen as a response to globalization and increasing uncertainty and complexity in the business environment. Strategic alliances involve the sharing of knowledge and expertise between partners as well as the reduction of risk and costs in areas such as relationships with suppliers and the development of new products and technologies. A strategic alliance is sometimes equated with a joint venture, but an alliance may involve competitors, and generally has a shorter life span. Strategic partnership is a closely related concept. This article analyzes definition of strategic alliance, its benefits, types, process of formation, and provides a few cases studies of strategic alliances. This paper tries to synthesize the scope and role of marketing functions in the determination of effectiveness of strategic alliances. Several propositions from a marketing viewpoint concerning the analysis of alliance process are formulated. On the basis of the propositions, a framework is developed for future research.

  19. Cooperation in International Strategic Alliances and Impact on Host Economies

    Christoffersen, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that linkages between multinational enterprises entering developing countries and local firms can promote knowledge upgrading in local firms. Alliances are a particularly intense type of linkage, and this study investigates how the construct of cooperation, which is the...... essence of alliance activity, relates to knowledge transfer from foreign to local alliance partners, and then to how large a proportion of that knowledge is subsequently diffused to other local firms. The results suggest that although alliance cooperation is positively associated with knowledge transfer...

  20. 78 FR 27974 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for...

    2013-05-13

    ... Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Platform Partnership Scientific Progress... Partnerships (CNPP) awarded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The CNPPs are part of the Alliance for... trans-Alliance collaboration, scientific milestones, progress towards clinical translation...

  1. Product market relationships and cost of bank loans: evidence from strategic alliances

    Fang, Yiwei; Francis, Bill; Hasan, Iftekhar; Wang, Haizhi

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of strategic alliances on non-financial firms’ bank loan financing. We construct several measures to capture firms’ alliance activities using the frequency of alliance activities, the prominence of the alliance partner and the relative networking position in the overall alliance network. We find that firms with active alliance involvement experience a lower cost of debt from banks. We also document that allying with a prestigious partner (ie S&P 500 firms) can ...

  2. The parental alliance following divorce: an overview.

    Whiteside, M F

    1998-01-01

    The empirical literature on the postdivorce parental alliance was reviewed with a focus on implications for clinical interventions by family therapists. Variables of cooperation and conflict between parents, individual parenting style, and personal adjustment were significantly interrelated and a range of co-parenting behaviors related to these variables was documented. A typology of divorcing families can be useful in predicting risks for child difficulties and in developing appropriate parenting plans. Clinical interventions need to be tailored to the unique characteristics and resources of a given family and can speak to multiple points of the family system. PMID:9474521

  3. 22 CFR 217.44 - Academic adjustments.

    2010-04-01

    ... PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Postsecondary Education § 217.44 Academic... recipient's education program or activity. (c) Course examinations. In its course examinations or...

  4. Representations of Parent-Child Alliances in Children's Family Drawings

    Leon, Kim; Wallace, Tamar; Rudy, Duane

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between children's representations of parent-child alliances (PCA) and their peer relationship quality, using a new scale that was developed to rate representations of PCA in children's family drawings. The parent-child alliance pattern is characterized by a relationship between parent and…

  5. Therapist effects, working alliance, and African American women substance users.

    Davis, Telsie A; Ancis, Julie R; Ashby, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    African American (AfA) women with substance use disorders experience low rates of treatment retention compared to other groups of substance abusers. This is problematic since substance abuse treatment is effective only to the extent clients are retained. A weak working alliance is a significant barrier to treatment retention for AfA women. Thus, identifying therapist characteristics that facilitate a strong working alliance among this population stands as a promising step toward reducing disparities in treatment retention for this group. Therapist characteristics were explored as predictors of working alliance with AfA women substance users (N = 102). Two hypotheses were tested: (1) Population Sensitive Therapist Characteristics (PSTCs: multicultural competence, egalitarianism, and empowerment) will explain a significant amount of variance in working alliance beyond that explained by general therapist characteristics (GTCs: empathy, regard, and genuineness) and (2) GTCs will partially mediate the effect of each individual PSTC on working alliance. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that PSTCs explained 12% of the variance in working alliance after controlling for GTCs. Bootstrapping analyses demonstrated that GTCs mediated the effect of each PSTC on working alliance. Findings suggest that therapists can facilitate a stronger working alliance with AfA women substance users through demonstration of PSTCs in addition to GTCs, and that PSTCs are facilitative because they increase the likelihood the therapist is perceived as empathic, having unconditional positive regard, and genuine. Clinical and therapist training implications are discussed. PMID:25111550

  6. Beyond contracts : Governing structures in non-equity alliances

    Reuer, Jeffrey; Devarakonda, S.V.

    2012-01-01

    Non-equity alliances are often portrayed in the literature as purely contractual collaborative agreements. This paper questions the notion that contractual safeguards and incentives alone provide the formal governance mechanisms that undergird non-equity alliances. We argue and show that partners cr

  7. The antecedents of response strategies in strategic alliances

    Tjemkes, Brian; Furrer, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : Strategic alliances involve uncertainty, interdependence, and vulnerability, which often create adverse situations. This paper seeks to understand how alliance managers respond to these adverse situations by examining the influence of four exchange variables on response strategies. Design/methodology/approach : A scenario-based experiment provides empirical support for a typology consisting of seven conceptually and empirically distinct response strategies: exit, opportunism, aggres...

  8. Exploration of a Contextual Management Framework for Strategic Learning Alliances

    Dealtry, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to take a further step forward in examining those important business factors that will shape the future of best practice in the quality management of internal and external strategic alliances. Design/methodology/approach: The article presents a speculative scenario on the future of strategic alliances in education,…

  9. Strategic Alliances in Education: The Knowledge Engineering Web

    Westera, Wim; van den Herik, Jaap; van de Vrie, Evert

    2004-01-01

    The field of higher education shows a jumble of alliances between fellow institutes. The alliances are strategic in kind and serve an economy-of-scales concept. A large scale is a prerequisite for allocating the budgets for new educational methods and technologies in order to keep the educational services up-to-date. All too often, however,…

  10. In Defense of a Collective Goods Theory of Alliances

    Todd Sandler; Jon Cauley; Forbes, John F.

    1980-01-01

    This article defends the collective goods theory of alliances by showing that club theory is an appropriate tool for analyzing allocative issues of alliances from a positive prospective. The article concludes with a demonstration that Oppenheimer made an analytical mistake when he questioned the normative importance of Pareto optimality.

  11. The Alliance Capability of Technology-Based Born Globals

    Oxtorp, Liliya Altshuler; Elg, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    organisational skills that enable the firms to successfully initiate, manage and finish their R&D alliances with MNEs. The in-depth longitudinal methodology adds insight and value to the study. It is discussed how the specific aspects of the alliance capability can help born globals to counteract the challenges...

  12. Academics respond

    Hazel, Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK......Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK...

  13. The Relation between Supervisor Self-Disclosure and the Working Alliance among Social Work Students in Field Placement

    Davidson, Clare

    2011-01-01

    The author examined supervisor self-disclosure and the supervisory working alliance with the hope of adding to research-supported techniques in field work supervision. Students enrolled in an MSW program at a large urban university were asked to complete a survey on the frequency and content of their supervisor's self-disclosures and on their…

  14. The World Alliance for Patient Safety

    Martin Fletcher

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite enormous strides in our knowledge about quality health services, and the continuously growing interest in the safety of patients among policy makers and clinical leaders, much remains to be done to avoid unintentionally harm occurring in health care. In May 2004, the Fifty-seventh World Health Assembly supported the creation of the World Alliance for Patient Safety which aims to coordinate, spread and accelerate improvements in patient safety worldwide. The Forward Programme 2005 of the World Alliance for Patient safety sets out an important and comprehensive programme of international work in areas such as reporting and learning, patient involvement and safety solutions. The experience of other high risk industries, suggests that patient safety problems are primarily a function of deficiencies in system design, organization and operation. Understanding and improving the design of processes, structures and culture of health care delivery is therefore central to making care safer. A number of core challenges emerge across many European countries including the need to continue to build strong political will and commitment to address patient safety problems, stronger engagement and leadership from health care professionals, and promoting positive cultural changes with health care.

  15. The alliance hypothesis for human friendship.

    Peter DeScioli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exploration of the cognitive systems underlying human friendship will be advanced by identifying the evolved functions these systems perform. Here we propose that human friendship is caused, in part, by cognitive mechanisms designed to assemble support groups for potential conflicts. We use game theory to identify computations about friends that can increase performance in multi-agent conflicts. This analysis suggests that people would benefit from: 1 ranking friends, 2 hiding friend-ranking, and 3 ranking friends according to their own position in partners' rankings. These possible tactics motivate the hypotheses that people possess egocentric and allocentric representations of the social world, that people are motivated to conceal this information, and that egocentric friend-ranking is determined by allocentric representations of partners' friend-rankings (more than others' traits. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report results from three studies that confirm predictions derived from the alliance hypothesis. Our main empirical finding, replicated in three studies, was that people's rankings of their ten closest friends were predicted by their own perceived rank among their partners' other friends. This relationship remained strong after controlling for a variety of factors such as perceived similarity, familiarity, and benefits. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that the alliance hypothesis merits further attention as a candidate explanation for human friendship.

  16. Comprehensive study report in the matter of Alliance Pipeline Ltd. on behalf of the Alliance Pipeline Limited Partnership

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Alliance Pipeline Ltd. applied to the National Energy Board on July 3, 1997 for authorization to construct and operate the Canadian portion of a proposed natural gas pipeline system from northeastern British Columbia and northwestern Alberta to the midwest U.S. The company also applied for authorization of related tolls and tariffs. A comprehensive study of the proposal was required since the Canadian portion of the pipeline to Chicago (the Alliance Pipeline Project) is subject to the requirements of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA). This report is intended to satisfy the requirements of the CEAA. The report describes the project, the environmental assessment process, including public participation, the potential environmental effects, the assessment methodology, mitigative measures and the criteria used in evaluating the significance of the environmental effects. Forty-one recommendations were made and conclusions regarding the significance of the project`s potential adverse environmental effects were presented. The project involves about 1,565 km of mainline and related facilities from Gordondale, Alberta to a point on the Canada/U.S. border near Elmore, Saskatchewan, and about 770 km of lateral pipelines and related facilities in B.C. and Alberta. The proposal includes 7 mainline compressor stations and 26 lateral compressor stations. The U.S. portion of the mainline would extend 1,430 km to the system`s terminus near Chicago where it would interconnect with the North American pipeline grid. The proposed project is scheduled to begin service in the second half of the year 2000 and would deliver 37.5 million cubic metres of natural gas per day. The cost of the pipeline has been estimated at $3.7 billion (Can), $2 billion of which would be for the Canadian portion. It was concluded that the proposed project is not likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects if the mitigative measures, recommendations, monitoring and follow-up programs

  17. Product development alliances: factors influencing formation and success

    Olsen, Johanne Rønnow; Harmsen, Hanne; Friis, Alan

    2008-01-01

    alliance, with four partners and an interview survey, with 19 key informants in the Danish food industry. Findings - The nature of the differences between the developed framework for product development alliances in the food industry and theory on alliances in general, indeed seem to rest in the chosen...... specific context. Companies in the food industry are not forced by external conditions to enter into product development alliances. Therefore, compared to other industries, motivations have to be stronger or risks smaller for them to form such interorganisational relationships. However, once formed......, results indicate that success factors are rather universal across industries and types of alliances. Research limitations/implications - Further research should explore the findings further, both within the food industry context, as well as more broadly in terms of geography and industry. Practical...

  18. Group Innovation Ability of Agricultural Technological Innovation Strategic Alliance

    Chishun; MA; Jintian; YU

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural technological innovation strategic alliance, as an important form of strategic alliance, has steadily strengthened the collaborative management among organizations and raised competitive power with the backing of improved group innovation ability. This article studies innovation ability from individual innovation ability to the group innovation ability. Firstly, basic connotation of group innovation ability is to be concluded through the comparison of individual and group innovation ability. Secondly, evaluation index system is to be established based on the influencing factors of the group innovation ability of agricultural technological innovation strategic alliance and evaluation is based on three dimensions, namely organization technological innovation ability, alliance collaborative innovation ability as well as innovation environment. Furthermore, basic methods for promoting the group innovation ability of alliance are to be proposed.

  19. The Impact of Obfuscation on Strategic Alliance Formation

    Sofka, Wolfgang; de Faria, Pedro; Blettner, Daniela;

    Strategic alliances have become a major instrument for companies to create competitive advantage. Hence, the choice of alliance partners becomes an important but little studied part of firm strategy. In this paper we highlight the role of obfuscation, i.e., the degree to which firms conceal...... alliances. Based on a sample of pharmaceutical and biotech firms, we create a dyad-level panel-dataset of all potential and realized linkages to study firm?s partner choices. We find that, on average, obfuscation decreases alliance formation probability for those firms that lack previous alliance experience...... as a primary signal. This effect is dyadic in nature, i.e., particularly pronounced when experienced firms evaluate un-experienced partners. Our findings have important implications for impression management and perception engineering of firms which are new to industries or markets....

  20. Competence in Mathematics and Academic Achievement: An Analysis of Enrollees in the Bachelor of Science in Actuarial Science Program

    Wamala, Robert; Maswere, Dyson W.; Mwanga, Yeko

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the role of prior grounding attained in mathematics in predicting the academic achievement of enrollees in Bachelor of Science in Actuarial Science (BSAS). The investigation is based on administrative records of 240 BSAS enrollees at Makerere University, School of Statistics and Planning in the 2007-2009 cohorts. Students'…

  1. Multimodality and video observation in “Collective Academic Supervision” in the Master Program in Guidance, Aarhus University, Denmark

    Nordentoft, Helle; Buhl, Mie

    2012-01-01

    tool to bridge the practical experience and analytical distance where collective academic supervision process is brought in to enhance the transformation processes. In our discussion we draw on findings from a recent developmental project and video observations of group supervision sessions at the...

  2. Multimodality and video observation in “Collective Academic Supervision” in the Master Program in Guidance, Aarhus University, Denmark

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Buhl, Mie

    . We propose an introduction of video observation as a tool to bridge the practical experience and analytical distance where collective academic supervision process is brought in to enhance the transformation processes. In our discussion we draw on findings from a recent developmental project and video...

  3. Three Year Cumulative Impacts of the 4Rs Program on Children's Social-Emotional, Behavioral, and Academic Outcomes

    Jones, Stephanie M.; Brown, Joshua L.; Aber, J. Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades, developmental science has made significant progress in understanding children's trajectories toward social-emotional and academic outcomes. At the same time, there has been dramatic growth in the design, implementation, and rigorous evaluation of school-based interventions to promote positive social-emotional development…

  4. Academic Capitalism in the College Union: The Relationship between Revenue Generation and Students' Perceptions of Program Effectiveness

    Willis, Thearon Gifford, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Students continue to incur a larger portion of the cost of a college education and in doing so, they increasingly become consumers. Expanding on a small base of literature linking revenues and students' experience, this study uses a conceptual framework of academic capitalism to explore the extent of revenue generation in the college union and…

  5. Infrastructure Development of the Science and Engineering Alliance (IDSEA) Annual Report 1995 - 1996

    None

    1998-10-14

    This document is intended to serve two purposes: (1) a program status report on the progress the Science and Engineering Alliance (SEA) made since receiving initial Department of Energy (DOE) support for infrastructure development; and (2) a summary report of the activities administered by the SEA compiled in a single document under the auspices of the SEA Program. In 1995, a universal resource locator (URL) on the World Wide Web (WWW) was established for easy access to pertinent information about the SEA Program. The information pointed to by the URL is updated periodically, and the interested reader is urged to access the WWW for more information.

  6. Academic writing

    Eremina, Svetlana V.

    2003-10-01

    The series of workshops on academic writing have been developed by academic writing instructors from Language Teaching Centre, Central European University and presented at the Samara Academic Writing Workshops in November 2001. This paper presents only the part dealing with strucutre of an argumentative essay.

  7. The HIV / AIDS Alliance budgets $23 million for its 3-year plan as "linkman".

    1994-01-01

    The International Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Alliance, a London based nongovernmental organization (NGO) with a 1994 income of $3.5 million, is funding small organizations in developing countries via locally governed linking organizations, which review applications and provide technical support. The Alliance is headed by Jeff O'Malley, the founding executive director of Harvard's Global AIDS Policy Coalition and executive director of its 1992 "AIDS in the World" report. The result of a Rockefeller Foundation initiative, the Alliance has been operational since the beginning of 1994. 2 years of research, which focused on Mexico, the Ivory Coast, Tanzania, and Egypt, indicated that the ideal funding arrangement was one where a northern NGO funded a southern NGO in a partnership. However, the southern NGOs soon outgrew this relationship. Critics suggest existing networks should be used instead of the new linking organizations. O'Malley cites 2 reasons for this new method of empowering the south: 1) smaller community groups are reached and 2) national debate on AIDS is catalyzed. Research shows that groups on the edge of being considered NGOs have little access to funds; however, they often are in a position to do important work on AIDS prevention and care. After piloting programs in Burkina Faso and the Philippines, the Alliance released a provisional 3-year plan for networks to be established in 14 countries (9 in 1994, 5 in 1995). Linking organizations are being formed in Bangladesh, Ecuador, and Senegal. Pakistan and Sri Lanka will be next. Work ranges from prevention and care to social science research and small scale drug supply. Staff have a variety of backgrounds: health, AIDS, development, the private sector, government, and NGOs. Linking organizations are bound by a Statement of Vision and Values. Whether a new linking organization is established (Philippines) or an existing network used (Bangladesh) varies

  8. Learning in the context of community: The academic experiences of first-year arts and science students in a learning community program

    Schmidt, Nancy

    2000-10-01

    This study explored the academic experiences of two groups of first-year students in university, one in the arts and one in the science, who participated in a residential-based learning community program. Using qualitative and critical analysis of in-depth student interviews conducted over a fall and winter semester, I constructed their world as implied from their stories and narratives. From this vantage point, I investigated how students as novice learners negotiated their role as learners; the belief systems they brought with them to minimize academic risk; their coping strategies in a 12 week semestered system; and the tacit theories they acquired within their day-to-day educational experiences. A number of themes emerged from the research: students intentionally minimizing faculty contact until they developed 'worthiness'; learning as 'teacher pleasing'; disciplinary learning differences between the arts and sciences students; and a grade orientation that influenced what and how students learned. Within the broader political, ideological, and cultural framework of the university, I identified student patterns of accommodation, resistance, silence and submission in negotiating their roles as learners. By critiquing the academic side of university life as students experienced it and lived it as a community of learners, I exposed the tensions, contradictions, and paradoxes that emerged. I revealed the points of disjuncture that came from competing discourses within the university for these students: the discourse of community, the discourse of collective harmony, and the discourse of the market place.

  9. The supplemental instruction program: Student perceptions of the learning environment and impact on student academic achievement in college science at California State University, San Marcos

    Hizer, Suzanne Elizabeth

    Higher education in science has been criticized and calls to increase student learning and persistence to degree has been recognized as a national problem by the Department of Education, the National Science Foundation, the National Research Council, and the National Academy of Sciences. One mode of academic assistance that may directly address this issue is the implementation of Supplemental Instruction (SI) in science courses. SI is a specific model of academic assistance designed to help students in historically difficult science classes master course content, thus increasing their academic achievement and retention. This study assessed the SI program at California State University, San Marcos, in supported science courses. Specifically, academic achievement based on final course grades were compared between SI participating and nonparticipating students, multiple affective factors were measured at the beginning and end of the semester, and students' perceptions of the classroom and SI session learning environments recorded. Overall, students who attended five or more SI sessions achieved higher final course grades. Students who chose to participate in SI had higher initial levels of responsibility and anxiety. Additionally, SI participants experienced a reduction in anxiety over the semester whereas nonparticipants experienced an increase in anxiety from beginning to the end of the semester. The learning environment of SI embodies higher levels of constructivist principles of active learning such as cooperation, cohesiveness, innovation, and personalization---with one exception for the physics course, which is a based on problem-based learning. Structural equation modeling of variables indicates that high self-efficacy at the end of the semester is directly related to high final course grades; this is mediated by cohesion in the classroom and the cooperation evidenced in SI sessions. These findings are elaborated by student descriptions of what happened in SI

  10. 校企深度合作构建职教联盟章程与制药专业顶岗实习方案的实施%Construction of the depth of cooperation between schools and enterprises to implement the Constitution and Vocational Education Alliance Pharmaceutical Professional internship program

    张多婷; 朱丽波; 国勇; 丁岚峰

    2015-01-01

    校企深度融合构建了“轮岗实训——顶岗实习——就业”专业实训课程教学模式,使得顶岗实习实训课程有效的与企业工作岗位对接、更有针对性地为“职教联盟企业”培养高素质技能型人才,提升了高职制药专业实训课程育人的针对性、实践性和专业性。校企共同遵守构建的“职教联盟章程”,严格执行制药专业顶岗实习方案,强化了制药专业实训课程教学的质量,丰富了实训课程的内涵,保障了制药专业顶岗实习方案的实施与实训课程模式的可持续发展。%The deep integration between schools and enterprises to build a “rotation training - internships - employment” Practical Teaching mode, making internship training courses and corporate jobs effectively docking, more targeted for the “post Education Alliance “cultivate high quality talents, enhance vocational education pharmaceutical Professional Training Course targeted, practical and professional. Construction of schools and enterprises to abide by “Vocational Education Union constitution”, the strict implementation of the pharmaceutical professional internship program, and strengthen the quality of pharmacy professional training course teaching, enrich the connotation of training courses to ensure the implementation of the pharmaceutical professional internship program and model of sustainable Development training Course.

  11. Geoscience Alliance--A National Alliance for Broadening Participation of Native Americans in the Geosciences

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Pellerin, H.; Greensky, L.; Burger, A.

    2009-12-01

    The continuing underrepresentation of Native Americans in the geosciences can only mean that native voices go unheard in setting research agendas and priorities. This is particularly significant where issues such as global climate change impact the land and livelihood of Native American communities. This talk will outline progress towards a Geoscience Alliance, with participation by faculty from tribal colleges, universities, and research centers; native elders and community members; students (K12, undergraduate, and graduate); formal and informal educators; and other interested individuals. Our focus will be on defining goals for this alliance, i.e., new research in Geoscience education, defining best practices, inclusion of Native voices in Geoscience research, the potential for new collaborations, and promotion of opportunities for Native students and communities.

  12. English language proficiency and academic performance: A study of a medical preparatory year program in Saudi Arabia

    Kaliyadan, Feroze; Thalamkandathil, Nazer; Parupalli, Srinivas Rao; Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Balaha, Magdy Hassan; Al Bu Ali, Waleed Hamad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: All medical schools in Saudi Arabia have English as the primary official medium of instruction. Most of the high school education, however, is delivered in Arabic and hence the transition to an English based learning environment tends to be difficult for some students. Our study aims to correlate English language proficiency with academic performance among medical students in their preparatory year. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used. Test scores of 103 preparatory...

  13. Alliance Coordination, Dysfunctions, and the Protection of Idiosyncratic Knowledge in Strategic Learning Alliances

    Müller, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    In high technology industries firms use strategic learning alliances to create value that can’t be created alone. While they open their interorganizational membrane to gain new skills and competences, generate new products and services, accelerate development speed, and enter into new markets their idiosyncratic knowledge base may be impaired when knowledge related dysfunctions like the unintended knowledge transfer, asymmetric learning speed or premature closing occur. Within a value approac...

  14. Pumping services alliance: A new strategy for the 90's

    Shell Canada has forged a pumping services alliance with Nowsco Well Service Ltd. for an initial two year period. The alliance will cover pumping related services such as well cementation, well stimulation, coiled tubing work and, in the future could include other services such as pressure testing, corrosion inhibition treatments, flowline pigging, and pumping pipeline inspection tools. The alliance represents a major challenge in operating philosophy away from a competitive bidding strategy to a new strategy of forging business alliances that afford both parties benefits in a more cooperative mode. The alliance incorporates the service company more into the business of Shell Canada and comprises engineering and operations capability. The perceived benefits such an alliance would bring to the business are identified and the key issues that guided selection are documented. Detailed submissions from four major service companies were received and reviwed in a prequalification stage; final selection was made by a multi-disciplinary team. A joint mission statement was prepared that represented Nowsco's and Shell's vision of the alliance and helped guide the negotiations leading to a contract being struck complete with key result areas and performance measurement criteria. 5 refs

  15. Building alliances to combat nuclear smuggling

    The Second Line of Defense (SLD) programme cooperates with host countries throughout the world to provide radiation detection systems, including associated communications packages, training and initial maintenance support for land, sea and air international crossing points. These systems have proven their effectiveness. Though there are numerous challenges in providing these systems for operation in a range of cultures and environments, a different set of challenges emerges after installation. These are challenges in ensuring the long term effective operation of the equipment, available trained personnel and the integration of these systems into broader threat reduction efforts. The key to meeting these challenges is building alliances at multiple levels and between multiple players: between SLD and the host government to develop strong sustainability programmes; among different agencies within a country which previously may not have had extensive interactions; regionally among host countries to meet smuggling challenges; between industry and government to improve technical capability; and globally to leverage resources effectively. (author)

  16. Major customer accounts - strategic alliances for the future

    As electric utilities look to the future, they are forecasting a need for increased power supply capacity to meet load requirements. But rather than focus solely on the construction of new generating capacity, many utilities facing supply shortages have sought to develop and apply peak shaving and load shifting techniques. They commonly evaluate both new generation and demand side management (DSM) as alternative options in an integrated, least-cost planning approach. Demand side management poses new challenges for utilities because for demand side management to be successful, the product needs to be sold to customers. Gone are the days when a utility simply had to market a single product - electricity. Today, supply planning and marketing organizations need to form an integrated approach to furthering a company's DSM objectives and to bring marketing concepts to this process. This paper does not attempt to argue the pros and cons of demand side management, nor to identify the right DSM alternatives. Rather, the authors focus on issues utilities must address in implementing DSM: (1) value and means of forming strategic alliances with major utility customers if a utility is going to be able to perform in an increasingly competitive environment in the future; (2) critical success factors for an effective DSM program targeted at major utility customers; and (3) necessity of applying key marketing principles to DSM program design and implementation

  17. Reactive transport models and simulation with ALLIANCES

    Many chemical processes influence the evolution of nuclear waste storage. As a result, simulations based only upon transport and hydraulic processes fail to describe adequately some industrial scenarios. We need to take into account complex chemical models (mass action laws, kinetics...) which are highly non-linear. In order to simulate the coupling of these chemical reactions with transport, we use a classical Sequential Iterative Approach (SIA), with a fixed point algorithm, within the mainframe of the ALLIANCES platform. This approach allows us to use the various transport and chemical modules available in ALLIANCES, via an operator-splitting method based upon the structure of the chemical system. We present five different applications of reactive transport simulations in the context of nuclear waste storage: 1. A 2D simulation of the lixiviation by rain water of an underground polluted zone high in uranium oxide; 2. The degradation of the steel envelope of a package in contact with clay. Corrosion of the steel creates corrosion products and the altered package becomes a porous medium. We follow the degradation front through kinetic reactions and the coupling with transport; 3. The degradation of a cement-based material by the injection of an aqueous solution of zinc and sulphate ions. In addition to the reactive transport coupling, we take into account in this case the hydraulic retroaction of the porosity variation on the Darcy velocity; 4. The decalcification of a concrete beam in an underground storage structure. In this case, in addition to the reactive transport simulation, we take into account the interaction between chemical degradation and the mechanical forces (cracks...), and the retroactive influence on the structure changes on transport; 5. The degradation of the steel envelope of a package in contact with a clay material under a temperature gradient. In this case the reactive transport simulation is entirely directed by the temperature changes and

  18. Project-level Governance, Monetary Incentives, and Performance in Strategic R&D Alliances

    M.N. Ozdemir (Mahmut)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractA growing number of firms rely on strategic R&D alliances to develop new products. In these alliances, firms use various kinds of governance mechanisms for incentive alignment. Project-level governance, i.e., the daily control of alliance activities by firms’ alliance representatives suc

  19. The Effects of Trust in Virtual Strategic-Alliance Performance Outcomes

    Preston-Ortiz, Dina

    2010-01-01

    Outsourcing increases supported by technology have led to the formation of virtual strategic partnerships. Historically, 70% to 75% of alliance partnerships fail because members are often competitors outside the alliance network. To address alliance failure, a Delphi Study was conducted to identify the role of trust and alliance performance…

  20. Science and Engineering Alliance: A new resource for the nation

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and four major Historically Black Colleges and Universities with strong research and development capabilities in science, engineering and computer technology have formed the Science and Engineering Alliance. Located in California, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, each brings to the Alliance a tradition of research and development and educational excellence. This unique consortium is now available to perform research development and training to meet the needs of the public and private sectors. The Alliance was formed to help assure an adequate supply of top-quality minority scientists in the next century, while simultaneously meeting the research and development needs of the public and private sectors.

  1. Dynamics in Inter-Firm Collaboration: The Impact of Alliance Capabilities on Performance

    Gerrit Willem Ziggers

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we question the direct relationship between a firm’s alliance capability and alliance performance. We contend that this relationship is mediated through post-information factors such as alliance management and relational quality.Drawing from the Resource Based View a model is presented that explicates these indirect relationships. Partial least squares analysis was used to test three hypotheses, using a sample of Dutch alliance managers responsible for non‐equity alliances in agribusiness and the food industry. Our empirical findings affirm the hypothesized indirect relationships between a firm’s alliance capability and alliance performance.

  2. A study of subject-focused liaison services to its academic constituents under an IC~2 conceptualized program at Shanghai Jiao Tong University Library

    GUO; Jing; CHEN; Jin

    2010-01-01

    This paper stipulates that the subject-based library liaison service to a university’s teaching and research programs with certain embedded distinctive features should become the mainstream modus operandi of its library service.It takes the innovative service program based on an IC2 conceptualized program at Shanghai Jiao Tong University Library(thereafter abbreviated as SJTUL)as a concrete example to elucidate the merit of such an endeavor.Specifically,this paper discusses the particular development background,overall objectives and service contents of the IC2 motivated program at SJTUL.By presenting a detailed account of some of the key measures,major achievements and also possible future directions of library service development under the guiding principles of SJTUL’s IC2 program,these authors hope that its innovative library practice may serve as a reference for other academic librarians to gain some inspirations for their own parallel service innovations or refinement focused on subject-oriented library liaison service to their constituents and parent institution’s curricula and research projects.

  3. Attracting Non-Traditional Students to Campus Activities and Leadership Programs: Providing Links to Academics, Persistence Are Key.

    Tucker, Marcie S.

    2003-01-01

    Explores some strategies to attract non-traditional students to campus activities, highlights a model program that integrates scholarship support and leadership programs, explores new ways of marketing to these students, and offers some suggestions for continued development. (EV)

  4. THE ACADEMIC PERSONAL INFORMATION SYSTEM

    ÇIBUK, Musa

    2009-01-01

    In this study, technical and functional features of Academic Personal Information System (PerWeb) which has been developed at Computing Center and used since then has been introduced. PerWeb is also usable at all universities or academic communities. With this program, all personal information can be stored in one database and therefore all information's can be standardized for any person. MS-SQL is used in this contribution for database. An academic personal can view and edit information abo...

  5. Synergies between Science and Policy and the Use of New Teaching Tools in the Academic and Professional Development Programs

    The James Martin Center for Non-proliferation Studies (CNS) at the Monterey Institute of International Studies has been providing academic coursework and professional development training in nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear safeguards and security issues to graduate students and professionals for over two decades. Since 2011, the CNS also managers the Vienna Center for Disarmament and Non-Proliferation (VCDNP) in Vienna, Austria, an international non-governmental organization established at the initiative of the Austria Foreign Ministry. The VCDNP offers professional development courses on nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament to diplomats and other practitioners, primarily from the developing countries, as well as conducts a variety of awareness and outreach programmes. International safeguards and non-proliferation verification feature prominently in the CNS and VCDNP educational and training programmes. The Centers offer cutting edge courses and programmes that prepare specialists with relevant competences and skills for a range of the safeguards-related jobs, particularly in the area of open source information analysis. These programmes utilize both traditional and new tools and methods, offer curricula that combine science and policy, encourage regular interaction with the IAEA experts, other practitioners, as well as academic and professional networks. The proposed paper will offer an overview of best practices and lessons learned from key programmes and tools used by CNS and VCDNP in education and training, with particular attention paid to the use of negotiation simulations, on-line courses and modules, and virtual reality simulations. The paper will examine the role of internships, on-the-job training, academic and professional exchanges and discuss the role of partnerships among different stakeholders, including in training specialists from developing and newcomer countries. (author)

  6. The Influence of Therapist Variance on the Dependability of Therapists' Alliance Scores: A Brief Comment on "The Dependability of Alliance Assessments: The Alliance-Outcome Correlation Is Larger than You Think" (Crits-Christoph et al., 2011)

    Baldwin, Scott A.; Imel, Zac E.; Atkins, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Crits-Christoph, Connolly Gibbons, Hamilton, Ring-Kurtz, and Gallop (2011) used generalizability theory to critique the measurement of the therapeutic alliance in psychotherapy research, showing that the dependability of alliance scores may be quite low, which in turn can lead to attenuated alliance-outcome correlation estimates. Method…

  7. Transfer of Marketing Know-How in International Strategic Alliances: An Empirical Investigation of the Role and Antecedents of Knowledge Ambiguity

    Bernard L Simonin

    1999-01-01

    The competitive nature of knowledge transfer and the process of organizational learning between partners constitute a fundamental challenge for both academics and practitioners alike. By focusing on one type of competency - marketing know-how - this research examines the role of knowledge ambiguity pertaining to the process of knowledge transfer in international strategic alliances. Based on a cross-sectional sample of 151 multinationals and a structural equation methodology, this study empir...

  8. Perspective Is Everything: The Predictive Validity of Six Working Alliance Instruments

    Fenton, Lisa R.; Cecero, John J.; Nich, Charla; Frankforter, Tami L.; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2001-01-01

    The predictive validity of instruments commonly used to measure the therapeutic alliance was evaluated, using 46 sessions drawn from a clinical trial comparing manual-guided therapies for substance use. The California Psychotherapy Alliance Scale, Penn Helping Alliance Rating Scale, Vanderbilt Therapeutic Alliance Scale, and Working Alliance Inventory (Observer, Therapist, and Client versions) were rated for participants receiving either cognitive-behavioral therapy or twelve-step facilitatio...

  9. Project-level Governance, Monetary Incentives, and Performance in Strategic R&D Alliances

    Ozdemir, Mahmut

    2011-01-01

    textabstractA growing number of firms rely on strategic R&D alliances to develop new products. In these alliances, firms use various kinds of governance mechanisms for incentive alignment. Project-level governance, i.e., the daily control of alliance activities by firms’ alliance representatives such as steering committee members, alliance managers, and project managers; and, performance-based monetary incentives, i.e., the potential milestone payments tied to the performance of partners, are...

  10. Guidance on setting up learning and action alliances for flood risk and water management

    Blanksby, J.R.; Ashley, R; Newman, R; Kennedy, S

    2013-01-01

    Alliances are formed by individuals and organisations which have common purpose. Membership of alliances is voluntary. Therefore, in order to sustain the membership of an alliance it will be necessary to ensure that the needs and expectations of each and every member are satisfied. In a time of limited financial resources and great demands on the time of those participating in an alliance it is essential that each member sees that the benefits arising from the membership of the alliance outwe...

  11. Green Non-dyed Textile Innovation Alliance officially launched

    2012-01-01

    June 29, the Green Non-dyed Textile Innovation Alliance was officially launched by the China Textile Information Center, Nationa Textile Product Development Center together with China Chemical Fiber Industry Association

  12. A survey on alliances and related parameters in graphs

    Henning Fernau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we show that several graph parameters are known in different areas under completely different names.More specifically, our observations connect signed domination, monopolies, $\\alpha$-domination, $\\alpha$-independence,positive influence domination,and a parameter associated to fast information propagationin networks to parameters related to various notions of global $r$-alliances in graphs.We also propose a new framework, called (global $(D,O$-alliances, not only in order to characterizevarious known variants of alliance and domination parameters, but also to suggest a unifying framework for the study of alliances and domination.Finally, we also give a survey on the mentioned graph parameters, indicating how results transfer due to our observations.

  13. Measures of Strategic Alliance Performance, Classified and Assessed

    Christoffersen, Jeppe; Plenborg, Thomas; Robson, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last three decades, strategic alliance performance has been an important research topic within the international business and management fields. Researchers have investigated a number of factors explaining performance but often find diverging results. Scholars have suggested that one...

  14. Relationship Management in International Strategic Alliances and networks

    Andersen, Poul

    This chapter discusses relationship management in international strategic alliances and networks, building on and synthesizing parts of the relationship management literature. The chapter provides a model linking three generic relationship management tasks with three levels of management...

  15. How Power is Lost: Illusions of Alliance Among the Powerful

    Brion, Sebastien

    2010-01-01

    Effective leadership in organizations is predicated not only on technical, but also social competence (Barry & Crant, 2000; Huselid, 1995; Pfeffer & Veiga, 1999; Weick, 1979). Leaders rely heavily on their social interactions and relationships with others to succeed in organizational contexts. As a result, leaders need to be able to establish relationships and alliances to effectively engender acceptance and compliance from others. However, leaders often fail to establish effective alliances...

  16. Is Familiarity a Moderator of Brand/Country Alliances?

    Kristensen, Tore; Gabrielsen, Gorm; Jaffe, Eugene D.

    2014-01-01

    intrinsic cues (product attributes) in evaluating products. The question of whether familiarity moderates the country-of-origin (COO) effect is a valid one. In this present paper, we attempt to provide additional evidence as to how familiarity with products, brands and countries moderates consumer...... evaluation of brand/country alliances. Specifically, we concentrate on the brand leveraging process identified by Keller (2003) applied to the effect of familiarity on country/brand alliances....

  17. Alliance: a common factor of psychotherapy modeled by structural theory

    Tschacher, Wolfgang; Haken, Hermann; Kyselo, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus that the therapeutic alliance constitutes a core common factor for all modalities of psychotherapy. Meta-analyses corroborated that alliance, as it emerges from therapeutic process, is a significant predictor of therapy outcome. Psychotherapy process is traditionally described and explored using two categorically different approaches, the experiential (first-person) perspective and the behavioral (third-person) perspective. We propose to add to this duality a third, s...

  18. Alliance: A common factor of psychotherapy modeled by structural theory

    Wolfgang eTschacher; Hermann eHaken; Miriam eKyselo

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus that the therapeutic alliance constitutes a core common factor for all modalities of psychotherapy. Meta-analyses corroborated that alliance, as it emerges from therapeutic process, is a significant predictor of therapy outcome. Psychotherapy process is traditionally described and explored using two categorially different approaches, the experiential (first-person) perspective and the behavioral (third-person) perspective. We propose to add to this duality a third, st...

  19. Required Steps of Managing International Equity Placement Strategic Alliance

    Harimukti Wandebori; Erik Joost de Bruijn; Harm-Jan Steenhuis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to unravel the steps of managing international equity placement strategic alliance (IEPSA). The steps of managing an IEPSA are obtained by conducting theoretical review. The theoretical reviews consist of theory of strategic alliance; definition, classification, and finding definition of an IEPSA, political and analytical considerations and the necessary steps. These steps of managing IEPSA can be classified into analyzing of macro consideration, micro considera...

  20. Rockerne bør takke Liberal Alliance

    Krogh, Andreas Hagedorn

    2014-01-01

    Liberal Alliances Simon Emil Ammitzbøll blæser til kamp mod banderne. Problemet er blot, at han hverken forstår, hvem han kæmper med, eller hvordan kampen kan vindes.......Liberal Alliances Simon Emil Ammitzbøll blæser til kamp mod banderne. Problemet er blot, at han hverken forstår, hvem han kæmper med, eller hvordan kampen kan vindes....

  1. Exploration and Exploitation Fit and Performance in International Strategic Alliances

    Nielsen, Bo Bernhard; Gudergan, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    Exploration and exploitation constitute two separate, potentially conflicting strategic choices for firms engaged in international strategic alliances. Our empirical study challenges the ambidexterity argument and demonstrates that exploration and exploitation are separate (though not necessarily...... significant roles. When the motive is efficiency and downstream market performance, prior experience with the partner instead is beneficial, as are high levels of trust and low levels of cultural distance. These findings have key implications for literature on strategic fit and alliance performance....

  2. A transaction cost approach to strategic alliances in telecommunications

    Camino Blasco, David; Trecu, Juan Ramón

    1996-01-01

    An emerging form of international business organization is the strategic alliance, a species of joint-venture in which an innovator of technology contracts with another firm for the joint exploitation of technology and other assets across a number of national territories. This work will examine international alliances, applying insights from both the transaction cost and foreign investment theories to the telecommunications service industry and asking whether these cooperation agreements are ...

  3. Group Innovation Ability of Agricultural Technological Innovation Strategic Alliance

    Ma, Chishun; Yu, Jintian

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural technological innovation strategic alliance, as an important form of strategic alliance, has steadily strengthened the collaborative management among organizations and raised competitive power with the backing of improved group innovation ability. This article studies innovation ability from individual innovation ability to the group innovation ability. Firstly, basic connotation of group innovation ability is to be concluded through the comparison of individual and group innovat...

  4. Therapeutic alliance and outcomes in usual care child psychotherapy

    Accurso, Erin Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic alliance may be an important predictor of mental health outcomes for children and their families, but the research literature in this area is limited. This study examined the extent to which child and caregiver alliance are associated with therapeutic outcomes in a sample of 209 children (ages 4-13) with disruptive behavior problems and their caregivers who received usual care services in community mental health clinics. Children, therapists, and observers rated child-therapist al...

  5. Product-bundling and Incentives for Merger and Strategic Alliance

    Sue Mialon

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes firms' choice between a merger and a strategic alliance in bundling their product with other complementary products. We consider a framework in which firms can improve profits only from product-bundling. While mixed bundling is not profitable, pure bundling is because pure bundling reduces consumers' choices, and thus softens competition among firms. Firms benefit the most from this reduced competition if they form an alliance. Firms do not gain as much from a merger becau...

  6. Strategic Alliance-Case Study of Lenovo and IBM

    Jiang, Lili

    2007-01-01

    Strategic alliance gains high popularity in recent decades and has become an increasingly favorable choice for the company that intends to attain a competitive edge over other rivals so as to make a stand in the global market. Facing with the rapid globalization trend and dramatic economic development, it is almost impossible for any companies to develop individually, just as Doz and Hamel (1998) argue that in this new world, networks, coalitions, alliances, and strategic partnerships are not...

  7. A Strategic Analysis of the Oneworld Airline Alliance

    Atkinson, Russell M.

    2011-01-01

    Global airline alliances enable member airlines to increase profits. They achieve this by increasing customer willingness to pay and reducing costs. Deep levels of partnerships are required to drive these benefits. The ability for partners to closely integrate is largely dependent on antitrust immunities being granted by regulators, which enable joint venture partnerships. The Oneworld alliance is poised to capitalize on a recent decision by the United States Department of Transportation and ...

  8. Airline strategic alliances in overlapping Markets: Should policymakers be concerned?

    Gayle, Philip; Brown, Dave

    2015-01-01

    When there is significant overlap in potential partner airlines' route networks, policymakers have expressed concern that an alliance between such airlines may facilitate collusion on price and/or service levels in the partners' overlapping markets. The contribution of our paper is to put together a structural econometric model that is able to explicitly disentangle the demand and supply effects associated with an alliance between such airlines. The estimates from our structural econometric...

  9. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Tutorials and Seminar Series

    View details about tutorials and seminars hosted by Alliance members and members of the cancer research community. These events provide a forum for sharing innovative perspectives on research and development efforts in the field of nanotechnology and their application to cancer diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Also visit the Event Listing section to find scientific meetings and events where NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer leaders and members are participating.

  10. Adoption of Pair Programming in the Academic Environment with Different Degree of Complexity in Students Perspective– An Empirical Study

    V.Venkatesan,

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Agile software development is a light weight process which is a solution for the heavy weight processes. EXtreme Programming is one of the Agile Methods. Pair Programming is one of best practice of eXtreme Programming. . It is a technique which concentrates not only on the software but also the developer who working on the software. Pair Programming is best suitable to produce efficient software. It accentuates the practice of two persons working together at a single computer terminal, to design, code and test computer programs. We studied the effects of pair programming in student context on knowledge transfer and enjoyment of work. We analyzed whether the taskcomplexity affects the effort differences between solo and pair programming. We conducted experiment to evaluate the efficiency of the knowledge transfer of the students when they adopt pair programming. The feedback from the student show the positive result that pair programming improves knowledge transfer and enjoyment of work. Through the experiment we also analyzed whether there is dependency between the task complexity and students capability. The result of this experiment shows that there is significant difference in the duration of task completion, the effort to perform the task correctly between solo and pair programming.

  11. Academic Words and Academic Capitalism

    Billig, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This paper suggests that it is the best and worst of times for academic work. It is the best of times because there are more academics publishing than ever before. It is the worst of times because there is much unnecessary publication. Working in the competitive conditions of academic capitalism, academics feel impelled to keep publishing, whether or not they have anything to say. The pressures to publish continually and to promote one’s own approach are reflected in the way that social scien...

  12. Expatriate academics

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The literature on business expatriates has been increasing rapidly, but research on expatriate academics has remained scant, despite the apparent increasing globalisation of the academic world. Therefore, more research is needed on the latter group of expatriates. This paper aims to fil...

  13. Annual report 1991 - Science and Engineering Alliance, Inc.

    NONE

    1992-02-21

    Nineteen ninety-one was a busy and productive year for the Science and Engineering Alliance (SEA). This report covers the major programs and activities of the SEA during the fiscal year 1991 (the year ending September 30, 1991), which was the first year of operation. Where warranted, the report highlights some of the events from the last quarter of the calendar year. The SEA is a non-profit consortium of four Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The SEA members are Alabama A&M University (Normal, Alabama); Jackson State University (Jackson, Mississippi); Prairie View A&M University (Prairie View, Texas); and Southern University and A&M College (Baton Rouge, Louisiana). The SEA`s mission is to help increase the number of well-qualified minority scientists for the next century and beyond, and to provide input into the research and development needs of the nation. The SEA collaborates on research projects with government agencies, national laboratories, private foundations, industry and other universities in a broad range of technical areas.

  14. Caracterization of the process of forming strategic alliances

    Luciano Mattana

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The union between companies has represented an increase in their competitive capabilities. The strategic alliances have been shown as alternatives for the adequacy of the conduct and organizational framework of the companies toward the market and the world economic juncture. Nevertheless, researches demonstrate that a good number of enterprises of this nature fail. In this sense, this study aimed at characterizing the formation and sustentation of a strategic alliance which has already been formed for 26 years and, thus, verifying the main foundations which are responsible for the maintenance of the union health. The unity of analysis was the alliance between companies as FEMSA and CVI Indústria de Refrigerantes Ltda. Through the method of case study, using the qualitative technique with the aim of describing the case in study, four managers and one collaborator, all of them linked to the alliance, were interviewed. The research allowed establishing that the main foundations of sustaining the alliance in study are in the individual abilities of the partnerships, in the synergy among individual strategies and in the feeling of mutual confidence which exists. Moreover, it was found out that, in the moments of crisis, the major factor responsible for the maintenance of the business is the determination of the upper management on keeping a climate of enthusiasm between the participants of the strategic alliance.

  15. Alliance: A common factor of psychotherapy modeled by structural theory

    Wolfgang eTschacher

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available There is broad consensus that the therapeutic alliance constitutes a core common factor for all modalities of psychotherapy. Meta-analyses corroborated that alliance, as it emerges from therapeutic process, is a significant predictor of therapy outcome. Psychotherapy process is traditionally described and explored using two categorially different approaches, the experiential (first-person perspective and the behavioral (third-person perspective. We propose to add to this duality a third, structural approach. Dynamical systems theory and synergetics on the one hand and enactivist theory on the other together can provide this structural approach, which contributes in specific ways to a clarification of the alliance factor. Systems theory offers concepts and tools for the modeling of the individual self and, building on this, of alliance processes. In the enactive perspective, the self is conceived as a socially enacted autonomous system that strives to maintain identity by observing a two-fold goal: to exist as an individual self in its own right (distinction while also being open to others (participation. Using this conceptualization, we formalized the therapeutic alliance as a phase space whose potential minima (attractors can be shifted by the therapist to approximate therapy goals. This mathematical formalization is derived from probability theory and synergetics. Our conclusions say that structural theory provides powerful tools for the modeling of how therapeutic change is staged by the formation, utilization, and dissolution of the therapeutic alliance. In addition, we point out novel testable hypotheses and future applications.

  16. History and structure of Japan-US nuclear alliance

    'Japan-US nuclear alliance' for civil use of nuclear energy was used here as technical term for the state Japanese commercial power plants were all water-cooled reactors under the US nuclear engineering umbrella and US admitted Japanese development of all 'SNT: sensitive nuclear technology' in the area of nuclear fuel cycle. 'Japan-US alliance' was used for various areas closely related with national security while 'Japan-US nuclear weapon alliance' was for military use of nuclear energy such as nuclear weapon (transport methods included) and counter weapon system. Military and civil use of nuclear energy relied fundamentally on common technical bases and especially nuclear fuel cycle related technologies were directly connected to both uses and called 'SNT'. Japanese nuclear policy sticking to SNT might come from the axiom: nuclear engineering for national security, that meant Japan refrained from nuclear arms but maintained technical and industrial potential of nuclear arms. This could be called 'nuclear arms standby strategy' and derived from compromise of both countries to play role of stabilizer of 'Japan-US alliance'. History of Japanese nuclear power development could be well understood as formation process of 'Japan-US nuclear alliance'. If Fukushima Daiichi accident forced nuclear power to phase out, nuclear fuel cycle would be obliged to terminate. This meant failure of the axiom and dissolution of 'Japan-US nuclear alliance'. (T. Tanaka)

  17. Physical Activity and Academic Achievement

    2014-12-09

    This podcast highlights the evidence that supports the link between physical activity and improved academic achievement. It also identifies a few actions to support a comprehensive school physical activity program to improve academic achievement.  Created: 12/9/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/9/2014.

  18. Radiation oncology training in the United States: report from the Radiation Oncology Resident Training Working Group organized by the Society of Chairman of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP)

    Purpose: In response to the major changes occurring in healthcare, medical education, and cancer research, SCAROP addressed issues related to post-graduate education that could enhance existing programs and complement the present system. Methods and Materials: SCAROP brought together a Working Group with a broad range of representatives organized in subcommittees to address: training, curriculum, and model building. Results: The Working Group emphasized the importance of training physicians with the necessary clinical, scientific, and analytical skills, and the need to provide expert radiation oncology services to patients throughout the United States. Opportunities currently exist for graduates in academic medicine, although there may be limited time and financial resources available to support academic pursuits. Conclusions: In the face of diminishing resources for training and education and the increased scope of knowledge required, a number of models for resident training are considered that can provide flexibility to complement the present system. This report is intended to initiate dialogue among the organizations responsible for radiation oncology resident education so that resident training can continually evolve to meet the needs of cancer patients and take advantage of opportunities for progress through innovative cancer care and research

  19. A renewed Medication Adherence Alliance call to action: harnessing momentum to address medication nonadherence in the United States

    Zullig, Leah L; Granger, Bradi B; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2016-01-01

    The problem Nonadherence to prescription medications is a common and costly problem with multiple contributing factors, spanning the dimensions of individual behavior change, psychology, medicine, and health policy, among others. Addressing the problem of medication nonadherence requires strategic input from key experts in a number of fields. Meeting of experts The Medication Adherence Alliance is a group of key experts, predominately from the US, in the field of medication nonadherence. Members include representatives from consumer advocacy groups, community health providers, nonprofit groups, the academic community, decision-making government officials, and industry. In 2015, the Medication Adherence Alliance convened to review the current landscape of medication adherence. The group then established three working groups that will develop recommendations for shifting toward solutions-oriented science. Commentary of expert opinion From the perspective of the Medication Adherence Alliance, the objective of this commentary is to describe changes in the US landscape of medication adherence, framing the evolving field in the context of a recent think tank meeting of experts in the field of medication adherence. PMID:27462145

  20. Academic Skills Rovers: A Just in Time Peer Support Initiative for Academic Skills and Literacy Development

    Copeman, Peter; Keightley, Polly

    2014-01-01

    In 2013 the University of Canberra (UC) initiated a program of peer-assisted academic skills help, the Academic Skills Rovers program, with the goal of providing drop-in peer learning support to students at campus locations where they congregate to study. The Academic Skills Rovers were initially recruited from the teacher education discipline,…

  1. What Do Chinese and Foreign Universities Value about Their Strategic Alliances? Exploring a Dimension of Higher Education Alliances in a Cross Cultural Context

    Willis, Mike

    2003-01-01

    There are now over 5,000 alliances between Chinese and foreign universities but there is little research on how managers from the two sides value the various aspects of their educational alliances. This research finds that both sides valued a range of alliance levels, types, activities, sizes and structures but there were significant differences.…

  2. Two-Year Impact of a Mindfulness-Based Program on Preschoolers' Self-Regulation and Academic Performance

    Thierry, Karen L.; Bryant, Heather L.; Nobles, Sandra Speegle; Norris, Karen S.

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: Students experienced a mindfulness program designed to enhance their self-regulation in prekindergarten and kindergarten. At the end of the 1st year of the program, these students showed improvements in teacher-reported executive function skills, specifically related to working memory and planning and organizing, whereas…

  3. The Florida State University's Learning District: A Case Study of an Academic Library-Run Peer Tutoring Program

    Demeter, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In March 2010, the first floor of the main library at The Florida State University was renovated as a learning commons. With this change in design, all tutoring that existed throughout the library was moved into the commons. The crown jewel of these programs is the library's in-house, late-night peer tutoring program that has seen incredible…

  4. The Use of the Internet in Geriatrics Education: Results of a National Survey of Medical Geriatrics Academic Programs

    Hajjar, Ihab M.; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Teasdale, Thomas A.; Mintzer, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to characterize use of the Internet in medical geriatrics education programs, 130 medical education programs in the U.S. that train medical students, interns, residents, fellows and practicing physicians were asked to complete a survey developed by the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI). Sixty-eight programs…

  5. Perceptions and Development of Political Leadership Skills of Women in Academic Medicine: A Study of Selected Women Alumnae of the Hedwig Van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program

    Evers, Cynthia D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite women having much to offer in the field of academic medicine, women may not be sufficiently attuned to developing their political leadership skills, which are crucial for successful leadership (Ferris, Frink, & Galang, 1993; Ferris & Perrewe, 2010). The study's purpose was to examine how 14 women in academic medicine perceived…

  6. Participating in a policy debate program and academic achievement among at-risk adolescents in an urban public school district: 1997-2007.

    Anderson, Susannah; Mezuk, Briana

    2012-10-01

    This study investigates the relationship between participating in a high school debate program on college-readiness in the Chicago Public School district over a 10-year period. At-risk school students were identified using an index including 8th grade achievement, poverty status, and enrollment in special education. Regression analyses were used to assess the association between debate participation and graduation and ACT performance. Overall, debaters were 3.1 times more likely to graduate from high school (95% confidence interval: 2.7-3.5) than non-debaters, and more likely to reach the college-readiness benchmarks on the English, Reading, and Science portions of the ACT. This association was similar for both low-risk and at-risk students. Debate intensity was positively related to higher scores on all sections of the ACT. Findings indicate that debate participation is associated with improved academic performance for at-risk adolescents. PMID:22633913

  7. The Geoscience Alliance--A National Network for Broadening Participation of Native American/span>s in the Geosciences

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Berthelote, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Geoscience Alliance is a national alliance of individuals committed to broadening participation of Native Americans in the geosciences. Native Americans in this case include American Indians, Alaska Natives and people of Native Hawai'ian ancestry. Although they make up a large percentage of the resource managers in the country, they are underrepresented in degrees in the geosciences. The Geoscience Alliance (GA) members are faculty and staff from tribal colleges, universities, and research centers; native elders and community members; industry, agency, and corporate representatives; students (K12, undergraduate, and graduate); formal and informal educators; and other interested individuals. The goals of the Geoscience Alliance are to 1) create new collaborations in support of geoscience education for Native American students, 2) establish a new research agenda aimed at closing gaps in our knowledge on barriers and best practices related to Native American participation in the geosciences, 3) increase participation by Native Americans in setting the national research agenda on issues in the geosciences, and particularly those that impact Native lands, 4) provide a forum to communicate educational opportunities for Native American students in the geosciences, and 5) to understand and respect indigenous traditional knowledge. In this presentation, we look at the disparity between numbers of Native Americans involved in careers related to the geosciences and those who are receiving bachelors or graduate degrees in the geosciences. We address barriers towards degree completion in the geosciences, and look at innovative programs that are addressing those barriers.

  8. Strategic Classification and Examination of the Development of Current Airline Alliance Activities

    Wang, Zhi H.; Evans, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Previous research argues that despite the fact that strategic alliances have become an important feature of the world airline industry, little rigorous analysis has been done on the effects of these alliances. This is partially because there is a lack of precise definitions to specify different types of airline alliances in the literature. This research identifies several categories of airline alliances through a strategic classification of the current alliance activities involving the major airlines for the period 1989 to 1999. The classification enables this research to examine how strategic alliance activities are evolving, particularly to compare how airlines in North America, the European Union and the Asia Pacific region have committed to different alliances. Findings show that there is a significant difference between the number and scope of alliances adopted in the three aviation markets. These findings facilitate research to further analyse the impact of market liberalization on various formations of strategic airline alliances.

  9. Child, caregiver, and therapist perspectives on therapeutic alliance in usual care child psychotherapy

    Accurso, Erin C.; Garland, Ann F.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the temporal stability and cross-informant agreement on multiple perspectives of child and caregiver alliance with therapists in usual care psychotherapy. Baseline predictors of alliance were also examined. Children with disruptive behavior problems (n=209) and their caregivers were followed for up to 16 months after initiating psychotherapy at a community-based clinic. Alliance was rated by children, caregivers, and therapists every four months for as long as families participated in treatment. Repeated-measures analyses using linear mixed models with random intercepts were conducted to determine whether child and caregiver alliance differed across time, as well to examine factors associated with each perspective on alliance. Intraclass correlations (ICCs) between child, caregiver, and therapist reports of alliance were also examined. Alliance was rated relatively high overall across perspectives. Clients (children and caregivers) tended to report the strongest and most stable alliance, while therapists reported the weakest alliance and perceived deteriorations in child alliance over time. Inter-informant agreement was variable for child and caregiver alliance; agreement was moderate between clients and therapists. Several predictors of alliance emerged, including child gender, anxiety diagnosis, caregiver race/ethnicity, and therapist experience. This study provides methodological information about reports of therapeutic alliance across time and informants that can inform current efforts to understand the alliance-outcome association. PMID:25314097

  10. Required Steps of Managing International Equity Placement Strategic Alliance

    Harimukti Wandebori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to unravel the steps of managing international equity placement strategic alliance (IEPSA. The steps of managing an IEPSA are obtained by conducting theoretical review. The theoretical reviews consist of theory of strategic alliance; definition, classification, and finding definition of an IEPSA, political and analytical considerations and the necessary steps. These steps of managing IEPSA can be classified into analyzing of macro consideration, micro consideration, domestic company’s stakeholder support, cultural understanding, strategic planning, internal support, human resource management, organizational arrangement, management control system, evolved cultural understanding, and evaluating results. In this research, the domestic partners who formed the IEPSAs are limited to State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs. The IEPSA was one of the means of privatization. The research will be beneficial for both foreign and domestic partners who form an IEPSA in the previous SOEs. By knowing the steps of managing the IEPSA both partners will be able to secure a successful implementation of IEPSA. By identifying the steps of managing the IEPSA, the stakeholder will not see IEPSA as threat rather as an opportunity to improve performance, to create synergy, and generate benefits for both partners and stakeholder. By knowing the necessary steps of managing the IEPSA, the stakeholder including society and politician will envisage the IEPSA as a means of effectively improving the SOEs’ performances.The research was espected to provide contributions for the research on strategic alliances. Apparently, there exist no literatures discussing about IEPSA in the domain of strategic alliances. Keywords: strategic alliance, equity placement, international equity placement strategic alliance, privatization, steps of international equity placement strategic alliance, state-owned enterprises

  11. The Effectiveness of Academic Supervision for Teachers

    Rahabav, Patris

    2016-01-01

    This research was conducted with the purpose of describing the general effectiveness of the academic supervision for teachers with three main focus, which is to analyze the competence of supervisors; academic supervision program implementation and the results and impact of academic supervision. The research location is SMU Maria Mediatrix Ambon,…

  12. 22 CFR 142.44 - Academic adjustments.

    2010-04-01

    ... OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Postsecondary Education § 142.44 Academic... recipient's education program or activity. (c) Course examinations. In its examinations or other...

  13. The International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA)

    Stein, Thomas; Gopala Krishna, Barla; Crichton, Daniel J.

    2016-07-01

    The International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) is a close association of partners with the aim of improving the quality of planetary science data and services to the end users of space based instrumentation. The specific mission of the IPDA is to facilitate global access to, and exchange of, high quality scientific data products managed across international boundaries. Ensuring proper capture, accessibility and availability of the data is the task of the individual member space agencies. The IPDA is focused on developing an international standard that allows discovery, query, access, and usage of such data across international planetary data archive systems. While trends in other areas of space science are concentrating on the sharing of science data from diverse standards and collection methods, the IPDA concentrates on promoting governing data standards that drive common methods for collecting and describing planetary science data across the international community. This approach better supports the long term goal of easing data sharing across system and agency boundaries. An initial starting point for developing such a standard will be internationalization of NASA's Planetary Data System's (PDS) PDS4 standard. The IPDA was formed in 2006 with the purpose of adopting standards and developing collaborations across agencies to ensure data is captured in common formats. It has grown to a dozen member agencies represented by a number of different groups through the IPDA Steering Committee. Member agencies include: Armenian Astronomical Society, China National Space Agency (CNSA), European Space Agency (ESA), German Aerospace Center (DLR), Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO), Italian Space Agency (ASI), Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), National Air and Space Administration (NASA), National Centre for Space Studies (CNES), Space Research Institute (IKI), UAE Space Agency, and UK Space Agency. The IPDA Steering Committee oversees the execution of

  14. HMO development in an academic medical center: the rise and fall of a prepaid health program in New York city.

    Bosch, S J; Deuschle, K W

    1993-08-01

    Through a documented case study the authors identify the critical factors that impede the introduction of prepaid medical care as part of education and practice within a prestigious and well established academic medical center. The inherent conflicts between individual fee-for-service practice and population-based prepaid practice and the resistance to innovations in medical care organization as they surfaced in that center, are presented. The need for a clear understanding of the complexities of HMO development and of an appreciation for the importance of a planning process in which all interested parties are involved, is emphasized. A clear commitment by policy makers, administrators and providers is highlighted as fundamental for the implementation of a system where practitioners are motivated to assume responsibility for the comprehensive care of a defined population that prepays for their services. The rewards as well as the difficulties for institutionalizing commitment to this form of health care delivery and impacting on medical education are discussed. PMID:8408749

  15. Final report : PATTON Alliance gazetteer evaluation project.

    Bleakly, Denise Rae

    2007-08-01

    In 2005 the National Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC) proposed that the PATTON Alliance provide assistance in evaluating and obtaining the Integrated Gazetteer Database (IGDB), developed for the Naval Space Warfare Command Research group (SPAWAR) under Advance Research and Development Activity (ARDA) funds by MITRE Inc., fielded to the text-based search tool GeoLocator, currently in use by NGIC. We met with the developers of GeoLocator and identified their requirements for a better gazetteer. We then validated those requirements by reviewing the technical literature, meeting with other members of the intelligence community (IC), and talking with both the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) and the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA), the authoritative sources for official geographic name information. We thus identified 12 high-level requirements from users and the broader intelligence community. The IGDB satisfies many of these requirements. We identified gaps and proposed ways of closing these gaps. Three important needs have not been addressed but are critical future needs for the broader intelligence community. These needs include standardization of gazetteer data, a web feature service for gazetteer information that is maintained by NGA and USGS but accessible to users, and a common forum that brings together IC stakeholders and federal agency representatives to provide input to these activities over the next several years. Establishing a robust gazetteer web feature service that is available to all IC users may go a long way toward resolving the gazetteer needs within the IC. Without a common forum to provide input and feedback, community adoption may take significantly longer than anticipated with resulting risks to the war fighter.

  16. Creating University-Community Alliances to Build Internship Programs

    Perfect, Michelle M.; Schmitt, Ara J.; Hughes, Tammy L.; Herndon-Sobalvarro, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    By bringing together a community of field-based practitioners, university faculty can help school districts develop accredited school psychology internships. This article describes the rationale for an increase in university involvement in the development of internships, offers considerations unique to schools when supporting the development of an…

  17. Computing global offensive alliances in Cartesian product graphs

    Yero, Ismael G

    2012-01-01

    A global offensive alliance in a graph $G$ is a set $S$ of vertices with the property that every vertex not belonging to $S$ has at least one more neighbor in $S$ than it has outside of $S$. The global offensive alliance number of $G$, $\\gamma_o(G)$, is the minimum cardinality of a global offensive alliance in $G$. A set $S$ of vertices of a graph $G$ is a dominating set for $G$ if every vertex not belonging to $S$ has at least one neighbor in $S$. The domination number of $G$, $\\gamma(G)$, is the minimum cardinality of a dominating set of $G$. In this work we obtain closed formulas for the global offensive alliance number of several families of Cartesian product graphs, we also prove that $\\gamma_o(G\\square H)\\ge \\frac{\\gamma(G)\\gamma_o(H)}{2}$ for any graphs $G$ and $H$ and we show that if $G$ has an efficient dominating set, then $\\gamma_o(G\\square H)\\ge \\gamma(G)\\gamma_o(H).$ Moreover, we present a Vizing-like conjecture for the global offensive alliance number and we prove it for several families of grap...

  18. Alliance for Computational Science Collaboration HBCU Partnership at Fisk University. Final Report 2001

    Collins, W. E.

    2004-08-16

    Computational Science plays a big role in research and development in mathematics, science, engineering and biomedical disciplines. The Alliance for Computational Science Collaboration (ACSC) has the goal of training African-American and other minority scientists in the computational science field for eventual employment with the Department of Energy (DOE). The involvements of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) in the Alliance provide avenues for producing future DOE African-American scientists. Fisk University has been participating in this program through grants from the DOE. The DOE grant supported computational science activities at Fisk University. The research areas included energy related projects, distributed computing, visualization of scientific systems and biomedical computing. Students' involvement in computational science research included undergraduate summer research at Oak Ridge National Lab, on-campus research involving the participation of undergraduates, participation of undergraduate and faculty members in workshops, and mentoring of students. These activities enhanced research and education in computational science, thereby adding to Fisk University's spectrum of research and educational capabilities. Among the successes of the computational science activities are the acceptance of three undergraduate students to graduate schools with full scholarships beginning fall 2002 (one for master degree program and two for Doctoral degree program).

  19. Therapeutic alliance and binge-eating outcomes in a group therapy context.

    Tasca, Giorgio A; Compare, Angelo; Zarbo, Cristina; Brugnera, Agostino

    2016-07-01

    The therapeutic alliance in individual and group psychotherapy is associated with treatment outcomes for a variety of disorders. However, debate persists about the centrality of the alliance in determining positive outcomes. We examined the alliance-outcome relationship across 20 sessions of emotionally focused group therapy (EFGT) for binge-eating disorder (BED). We hypothesized that (1) previous session alliance increase will predict lower subsequent session binge eating level while controlling for previous session binge eating level; and (2) previous session binge eating decline will predict higher subsequent session alliance level while controlling previous session alliance level. Participants were 118 individuals with BED who received 20 sessions of EFGT in 8 groups. Levels of binge eating and therapeutic alliance to the therapist were measured weekly. Linear growth in alliance during group therapy was associated with reduced binge eating at 6 months' posttreatment. We also found that the group's and the individual's alliance scores and binge-eating episodes were significantly associated across treatment, suggesting a mutual influence of the group's and individual's experience of the alliance with the therapist. Regarding the first hypothesis, previous session alliance increase was significantly associated with lower subsequent session binge eating. Regarding the second hypothesis, previous session binge-eating decline was not significantly related to higher subsequent session alliance. The findings provide evidence in a group therapy context for a model in which alliance change influences subsequent symptom levels, but not the other way around. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27182894

  20. The Pullout Program Day a Week School for Gifted Children: Effects on Social-Emotional and Academic Functioning

    van der Meulen, Rachel T.; van der Bruggen, Corine O.; Spilt, Jantine L.; Verouden, Jaap; Berkhout, Maria; Bögels, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gifted children learn differently compared to their peers in several ways. However, their educational needs are often not met in regular schools, which may result in underachievement and social-emotional and behavioral problems. A pullout program, the "Day a Week School" (DWS), was offered to gifted children in 25 elementary…