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Sample records for acacia dealbata nas

  1. Le genre Acacia comme envahisseur : caractéristiques du cas Acacia dealbata Link en Europe

    Lorenzo, Paula; González, Luís; Reigosa, Manuel J.

    2010-01-01

    International audience * We review current knowledge about the biology of the genus Acacia, and Acacia dealbata Link (silver wattle) in particular, as an invader in Europe, focusing on (i) the biology of the genus Acacia; (ii) biological attributes that are important for the invasiveness of the genus and A. dealbata; (iii) possible hypotheses for the invasion success; and (iv) control methods.* Several Australian wattles have been recorded as naturalized in Europe. Acacia has attained pest...

  2. Natural and induced polyploidy in Acacia dealbata Link. and Acacia mangium Willd.

    Blakesley, David; Allen, Annabel; Pellny, Till K; Roberts, Andy V

    2002-09-01

    Seeds were obtained from seven natural populations of Acacia dealbata, three natural populations of A. mangium and a seed orchard of A. mangium, representing the natural range of the two species. Polyploids were discovered in two of the seven populations of A. dealbata. The 2C DNA amount for diploid A. dealbata (2n = 2x = 26) was 1.74 pg, and for diploid A. mangium (2n = 2x = 26) was 1.30 pg. A naturally occurring tetraploid of A. dealbata (2n = 4x = 52) had a 2C DNA amount of 3.41 pg and a naturally occurring triploid genotype had a 2C DNA amount of 2.53 pg. The use of colchicine and oryzalin was investigated as a means of producing higher frequencies of tetraploids of both A. mangium and A. dealbata for incorporation into breeding programmes. Colchicine treatment gave tetraploid frequencies up to 29% for A. dealbata seedlings, and up to 18% for A. mangium seedlings. In contrast, no tetraploid A. mangium was detected following oryzalin treatment, and the low frequencies of tetraploids observed in A. dealbata could be attributed to their natural occurrence. PMID:12234151

  3. Final report of the safety assessment of Acacia catechu gum, Acacia concinna fruit extract, Acacia dealbata leaf extract, Acacia dealbata leaf wax, Acacia decurrens extract, Acacia farnesiana extract, Acacia farnesiana flower wax, Acacia farnesiana gum, Acacia senegal extract, Acacia senegal gum, and Acacia senegal gum extract.

    2005-01-01

    These ingredients are derived from various species of the acacia plant. Only material derived from Acacia senegal are in current use according to industry data. The concentration at which these ingredients are reported to be used ranges from 9% in mascara to 0.0001% in tonics, dressings, and other hair-grooming aids. Gum arabic is a technical name for Acacia Senegal Gum. Gum arabic is comprised of various sugars and glucuronic acid residues in a long chain of galactosyl units with branched oligosaccharides. Gum arabic is generally recognized as safe as a direct food additive. Little information is available to characterize the extracts of other Acacia plant parts or material from other species. Acacia Concinna Fruit Extract was generally described as containing saponins, alkaloids, and malic acid with parabens and potassium sorbate added as preservatives. Cosmetic ingredient functions have been reported for Acacia Decurrens Extract (astringent; skin-conditioning agent--occlusive) and Acacia Farnesiana Extract (astringent), but not for the other Acacias included in this review. Toxicity data on gum arabic indicates little or no acute, short-term, or subchronic toxicity. Gum arabic is negative in several genotoxicity assays, is not a reproductive or developmental toxin, and is not carcinogenic when given intraperitoneally or orally. Clinical testing indicated some evidence of skin sensitization with gum arabic. The extensive safety test data on gum arabic supports the safety of Acacia Senegal Gum and Acacia Senegal Gum Extract, and it was concluded that these two ingredients are safe as used in cosmetic formulations. It was not possible, however, to relate the data on gum arabic to the crude Acacias and their extracts from species other than Acacia senegal. Therefore, the available data were considered insufficient to support the safety of Acacia Catechu Gum, Acacia Concinna Fruit Extract, Acacia Dealbata Leaf Extract, Acacia Dealbata Leaf Wax, Acacia Decurrens

  4. Soil and plant changing after invasion: the case of Acacia dealbata in a Mediterranean ecosystem.

    Lazzaro, Lorenzo; Giuliani, Claudia; Fabiani, Arturo; Agnelli, Alessandro Elio; Pastorelli, Roberta; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Benesperi, Renato; Calamassi, Roberto; Foggi, Bruno

    2014-11-01

    Acacia dealbata Link (Fabaceae) is one of the most invasive species in the Mediterranean ecosystems of Europe, Africa and America, where it has been proved to exert strong effects on soil and plant communities. In Italy A. dealbata has been largely used for ornamental and forestry purpose and is nowadays spreading in several areas. The present study was addressed to evaluate the impacts on soil chemical properties, soil microbial communities and understory plant communities and to assess the relationships among these compartments after the invasion of A. dealbata in a typical Mediterranean shrubland. Towards these aims, a soil and vegetation sampling was performed in Elba Island where A. dealbata is invading the sclerophyllous native vegetation. Three levels of invasion status were differentiated according to the gradient from invaded, to transitional and non-invaded vegetation. Quantitative and qualitative alterations of soil chemical properties and microbial communities (i.e. bacterial and fungal communities) and above-ground understory plant communities were found. In particular, the invaded soils had lower pH values than both the non-invaded and transitional ones. High differences were detected for both the total N and the inorganic fraction (NH4(+) and NO3(-)) contents, which showed the ranking: invaded>transitional>non-invaded soils. TOC and C/N ratio showed respectively higher and lower values in invaded than in non-invaded soils. Total plant covers, species richness and diversity in both the non-invaded and transitional subplots were higher than those in the invaded ones. The contribution of the nitrophilous species was significantly different among the three invasion statuses, with a strong increase going from native to transitional and invaded subplots. All these data confirm that A. dealbata modifies several compartments of the invaded ecosystems, from soil chemical properties to soil and plant microbial communities determining strong changes in the

  5. Case studies of the expansion of Acacia dealbata in the valley of the river Miño (Galicia, Spain

    Antonio Vazquez de la Cueva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Acacia dealbata is a naturalized tree of invasive behaviour that has expanded from small plots associated with vineyards into forest ecosystems. Our main objective is to find evidence to support the notion that disturbances, particularly forest fires, are important driving factors in the current expansion of A. dealbata.Area of study: We mapped it current distribution using three study areas and assesses the temporal changes registered in forest cover in these areas of the valley of the river Miño. Material and Methods: The analyses were based on visual interpretation of aerial photographs taken in 1985 and 2003 of three 1x1 km study areas and field works.Main result: A 62.4%, 48.6% and 22.2% of the surface area was covered by A. dealbata in 2003 in pure or mixed stands. Furthermore, areas composed exclusively of A. dealbata make up 33.8%, 15.2% and 5.7% of the stands. The transition matrix analyses between the two dates support our hypothesis that the areas currently covered by A. dealbata make up a greater proportion of the forest area previously classified as unwooded or open forest than those without A. dealbata cover. Both of these surface types are the result of an important impact of fire in the region. Within each area, A. dealbata is mainly located on steeper terrain, which is more affected by fires. Research highlights: A. dealbata is becoming the dominant tree species over large areas and the invasion of this species gives rise to monospecific stands, which may have important implications for future fire regimes.Keywords: Fire regime; Mimosa; plant invasion; silver wattle.

  6. Structural changes in soil communities after triclopyr application in soils invaded by Acacia dealbata Link.

    Souza-Alonso, Pablo; Guisande, Alejandra; González, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Triclopyr is a commonly used herbicide in the control of woody plants and can exhibit toxic effects to soil microorganisms. However, the impact on soils invaded by plant exotics has not yet been addressed. Here, we present the results of an 18-month field study conducted to evaluate the impact of triclopyr on the structure of fungal and bacterial communities in soils invaded by Acacia dealbata Link, through the use of denature gradient gel electrophoresis. After triclopyr application, analyses of bacterial fingerprints suggested a change in the structure of the soil bacterial community, whereas the structure of the soil fungal community remained unaltered. Bacterial density and F:B ratio values changed across the year but were not altered due to herbicide spraying. On the contrary, fungal diversity was increased in plots sprayed with triclopyr 5 months after the first application. Richness and diversity (H') of both bacteria and fungi were not modified after triclopyr application. PMID:25602151

  7. Factores facilitadores da invasibilidade de Acacia dealbata em função do uso do solo

    Coelho, Sara Isabel Duarte Belo Freixo, 1991-

    2014-01-01

    Os ecossistemas mediterrânicos compreendem comunidades especializadas particularmente susceptíveis a invasões biológicas. Acacia dealbata Link, também conhecida como mimosa, constitui uma das acácias invasoras no Sul da Europa mais agressivas. Tem uma grande afinidade com habitats ripários e perturbação antropogénica. A sua capacidade de regeneração após o corte, fogo ou gelo permite-lhe uma grande resistência à maioria dos tipos de controlo mecânico, facilitando a rápida invasão de novos amb...

  8. Gestão de eucaliptais invadidos e não invadidos por Acacia dealbata e os seus impactos na herpetofauna

    Albuquerque, Ana Filipa Matos

    2009-01-01

    Os impactos da gestão florestal sobre a biodiversidade podem ser muito variáveis, mesmo em casos de plantações de espécies exóticas. O eucalipto tornou-se deste há algumas décadas para cá uma espécie incontornável no panorama da floresta portuguesa. No presente estudo procede-se à avaliação dos impactos sobre a herpetofauna decorrentes da plantação de Eucalyptus globulus, na presença e na ausência da invasora Acacia dealbata e após aplicação de tratamento químico com herbicida num dos talhões...

  9. Anatomia das madeiras do genero Acacia, nativas e cultivadas no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul

    Marchiori, Jose Newton Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    O presente trabalho tem por objetivo o estudo anatômico da madeira de 15 espécies de Acacia, e contribuir para o conhecimento taxonômico, filogenético e ecofisiológico do xilema secundário no Gênero. As espécies estudadas foram as seguintes: Acacia bonariensis Gill. ex Hook. et Arn., Acacia caven (Mol.) Mol., Acacia dealbata Link, Acacia decurrens (Wendl.) Willd., Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd., Acacia ibirocayensis Marchiori, Acacia longifolia (Andr.) Willd., Acacia mearnsii De Willd., Acacia...

  10. Two invasive acacia species secure generalist pollinators in invaded communities

    Montesinos, Daniel; Castro, Sílvia; Rodríguez-Echeverría, Susana

    2016-07-01

    Exotic entomophilous plants need to establish effective pollinator interactions in order to succeed after being introduced into a new community, particularly if they are obligatory outbreeders. By establishing these novel interactions in the new non-native range, invasive plants are hypothesised to drive changes in the composition and functioning of the native pollinator community, with potential impacts on the pollination biology of native co-flowering plants. We used two different sites in Portugal, each invaded by a different acacia species, to assess whether two native Australian trees, Acacia dealbata and Acacia longifolia, were able to recruit pollinators in Portugal, and whether the pollinator community visiting acacia trees differed from the pollinator communities interacting with native co-flowering plants. Our results indicate that in the invaded range of Portugal both acacia species were able to establish novel mutualistic interactions, predominantly with generalist pollinators. For each of the two studied sites, only two other co-occurring native plant species presented partially overlapping phenologies. We observed significant differences in pollinator richness and visitation rates among native and non-native plant species, although the study of β diversity indicated that only the native plant Lithodora fruticosa presented a differentiated set of pollinator species. Acacias experienced a large number of visits by numerous pollinator species, but massive acacia flowering resulted in flower visitation rates frequently lower than those of the native co-flowering species. We conclude that the establishment of mutualisms in Portugal likely contributes to the effective and profuse production of acacia seeds in Portugal. Despite the massive flowering of A. dealbata and A. longifolia, native plant species attained similar or higher visitation rates than acacias.

  11. Invasive acacias experience higher ant seed removal rates at the invasion edges

    D. Montesinos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Seed dispersal is a key process for the invasion of new areas by exotic species. Introduced plants often take advantage of native generalist dispersers. Australian acacias are primarily dispersed by ants in their native range and produce seeds bearing a protein and lipid rich reward for ant mutualists (elaiosome. Nevertheless, the role of myrmecochory in the expansion of Australian acacias in European invaded areas is still not clear. We selected one European population of Acacia dealbata and another of A. longifolia and offered elaiosome-bearing and elaiosome-removed seeds to local ant communities. For each species, seeds were offered both in high-density acacia stands and in low-density invasion edges. For both acacia species, seed removal was significantly higher at the low-density edges. For A. longifolia, manual elimination of elaiosomes reduced the chance of seed removal by 80% in the low-density edges, whereas it made no difference on the high-density stands. For A. dealbata, the absence of elaiosome reduced seed removal rate by 52%, independently of the acacia density. Our data suggests that invasive acacias have found effective ant seed dispersers in Europe and that the importance of such dispersers is higher at the invasion edges.

  12. Bioactividad de los extractos y aislamiento de los lignanos de las semillas de Centaurea dealbata

    Shoeb, M.; Jaspars, M.; Macmanus, S.M.; Thoo-Lin, P.K.; Celik, S; Sarker, S. D.

    2006-01-01

    La Centaurea dealbata Willd. (familia: Asteraceae) pertenece al g??nero Centaurea, que comprende unas 500 especies. Para evaluar la actividad antioxidante y la toxicidad general de los extractos de n-hexano, diclorometano (DCM) y metanol (MeOH) de las semillas de C. dealbata se han utilizado, respectivamente, el ensayo DPPH y el ensayo de letalidad de gambas en salmuera. Tanto el extracto de DCM como el de MeOH presentaron niveles signifi cativos de actividad antioxidante, con val...

  13. Magnolia dealbata en Nuevo León, México Magnolia dealbata in Nuevo Leon, México

    Carlos Gerardo Velazco-Macías

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza y describe la distribución de Magnolia dealbata Zucc. en el estado de Nuevo León, México, aportando información acerca de la ecología, estado de conservación, situación del hábitat y fenología de las poblaciones estudiadas. Por medio de una revisión bibliográfica y trabajo de campo realizado en la sierra Madre Oriental, se obtuvieron datos que permiten distinguir 2 núcleos poblacionales ubicados en el municipio de Montemorelos, en el centro del estado, con extensión total de 17.66 hectáreas, y densidad de hasta 30 individuos por 100 m2. Se presenta en asociación con Pinus teocote, Quercus spp., Cornus florida, Carya sp. y Sambucus nigra. La observación fenológica durante el periodo de estudio mostró que la aparición de nuevos brotes foliares comienza a principios de marzo y la floración a principios de mayo. El hábitat se observa con pocas alteraciones y no se identificaron amenazas a corto plazo para estas poblaciones.The distribution of Magnolia dealbata Zucc. in the state of Nuevo León in northeastern Mexico is analyzed and described; information regarding its conservation status, habitat health, and phenology of studied populations is provided. Through bibliographical information and field work in the Sierra Madre Oriental, 2 core populations of M. dealbata Zucc. can be distinguished, both located in the municipality of Montemorelos in the center of the state, covering a total of 17.66 hectares. Density reaches 30 individuals per 100 square meters. The species grows in association with Pinus teocote, Quercus spp, Cornus florida, Carya sp. and Sambucus nigra. New leaves sprout in early March, and flower production starts in early May. Habitat shows little disturbance and no short-term threats were identified for these populations.

  14. Species diversity, structure and dynamics of two populations of an endangered species, Magnolia dealbata (Magnoliaceae).

    Sánchez-Velásquez, Lázaro R; Pineda-López, María del Rosario

    2006-09-01

    Little is known about the ecology and demography of the genus Magnolia. Magnolia dealbata Zucc. is an endangered species endemic to Mexico. Two contrasting populations of M. dealbata (one from the grasslands and other from a secondary cloud forest) were studied. We asked the following questions: (a) Are size structure (diameter at breast height, DBH) and infrutescence production significantly different between the two populations? (b) What are the populations' growth rates (lambda) based on an initial 1987 study? (c) Are the associated species diversity indices of these M. dealbata populations significantly different? The results show no significant differences between the population size structure (p=.094); the growth rates of the populations were 0.992 in grassland and 1.053 in secondary cloud forest. The number of infrutescences produced in year 2001 and DBH relationship were significantly linear (p.01) between their slopes. The diversity indices were not significantly different (p>.05), and only 54% of the species were common to both sites. Our study suggests that both populations are relatively stable and that the management history could impact more on the species composition than on the diversity indices. PMID:18494171

  15. Analysis of commercial proanthocyanidins. Part 4: solid state (13)C NMR as a tool for in situ analysis of proanthocyanidin tannins, in heartwood and bark of quebracho and acacia, and related species.

    Reid, David G; Bonnet, Susan L; Kemp, Gabre; van der Westhuizen, Jan H

    2013-10-01

    (13)C NMR is an effective method of characterizing proanthocyanidin (PAC) tannins in quebracho (Schinopsis lorentzii) heartwood and black wattle (Acacia mearnsii) bark, before and after commercial extraction. The B-rings of the constituent flavan-3-ols, catechols (quebracho) or pyrogallols (wattle), are recognized in unprocessed source materials by "marker" signals at ca. 118 or 105ppm, respectively. NMR allows the minimum extraction efficiency to be calculated; ca. 30%, and ca. 80%, for quebracho heartwood and black wattle bark, respectively. NMR can also identify PAC tannin (predominantly robinetinidin), and compare tannin content, in bark from other acacia species; tannin content decreases in the order A. mearnsii, Acacia pycnantha (87% of A. mearnsii), Acacia dealbata and Acacia decurrens (each 74%) and Acacia karroo (30%). Heartwood from an underexploited PAC tannin source, Searsia lancea, taxonomically close to quebracho, shows abundant profisetinidin and catechin PACs. NMR offers the advantage of being applicable to source materials in their native state, and has potential applications in optimizing extraction processes, identification of tannin sources, and characterization of tannin content in cultivar yield improvement programmes. PMID:23838626

  16. The world according to ACACIA

    The Dutch electric power research institute KEMA was a member of the international consortium ACACIA (A Consortium for the Application of Climate Impact Assessment) from 1997 - 2000. A brief overview is given of four years of participation in climate research

  17. The future according to ACACIA

    ACACIA stands for A Consortium for the Application of Climate Impact Assessments. Within the consortium a number of ocean/atmosphere climate simulations has been carried out. KEMA is involved in the analysis of one of the simulations (the Climate System Model, developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research in the USA) and assists in setting up an Internet site to present and distribute the results for researchers. An overview of recent developments within ACACIA is given

  18. Interactions Acacia/milieu

    Grego, S.; Moscatelu, M. C.; Mattia, E. Di; Marinari, S.; Cacciari, I.

    2013-01-01

    Afin de caractériser l'effet rhizosphérique d'Acacia tortilis subsp. raddiana, la biomasse microbienne, sa diversité et son activité métabolique ainsi que l'activité de quelques enzymes impliquées dans le cycle de l'azote et du phosphore ont été comparées dans des sites soumis à l'influence du système racinaire et dans des sites témoins de deux biotopes situés au nord et au sud du Sahara.Les résultats montrent que presque tous les paramètres suivis sont modifiés par le système racinaire d'Aca...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1330 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acacia (gum arabic). 184.1330 Section 184.1330 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1330 Acacia (gum arabic). (a) Acacia (gum arabic) is the dried gummy exudate from stems and branches of trees of various species of the genus Acacia,...

  20. Determination of Tannins of Three Common Acacia Species of Sudan

    Isam Eldin Hussein Elgailani; Christina Yacoub Ishak

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze and compare tannins of three common Acacia species of Sudan, since vegetable tannins are important in leather industry. Acacia nilotica and Acacia seyal samples were collected from Sunt Forest in Khartoum State, while Acacia senegal samples were collected from the Debabat Forest in South Kordofan State. Bark samples from bulk collections of the three Acacia species were extracted with boiled deionized water. The amount of tannins present in these bulk...

  1. Breeding Strategy of Acacia Hybrid (Acacia mangium × A. auriculiformis) to Increase Forest Plantation Productivity in Indonesia

    Sri Sunarti; Mohamad Na'iem; Eko Bhakti Hardiyanto; Sapto Indrioko

    2013-01-01

    Acacia hybrid (Acacia mangium× A.auriculiformis) shows better growth and wood properties, and tolerance to pest and disease. Currently, acacia hybrid breeding strategy was developed through naturally hybrid selected from trees grown in plantation. However, mass propagation of acacia hybrid using such kind of strategy was not satisfied due to ageing effect. This study was aimed to develop a new acacia hybrid breeding strategy using controlled pollination hybridization technique. The strategy w...

  2. Breeding Strategy of Acacia Hybrid (Acacia mangium × A. auriculiformis to Increase Forest Plantation Productivity in Indonesia

    Sri Sunarti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Acacia hybrid (Acacia mangium× A.auriculiformis shows better growth and wood properties, and tolerance to pest and disease. Currently, acacia hybrid breeding strategy was developed through naturally hybrid selected from trees grown in plantation. However, mass propagation of acacia hybrid using such kind of strategy was not satisfied due to ageing effect. This study was aimed to develop a new acacia hybrid breeding strategy using controlled pollination hybridization technique. The strategy was developed through a series of research: flowering, crossing, hybrid identification, clone multiplication, and clonal test. The results of study showed that the series of research for developing acacia hybrid breeding strategy was achieved. Flowering time synchronization provided a high probability for the success of controlled pollination hybridization. Leaves taxonomy at seedling stage revealed to be an efective way to identify acacia hybrid with acuracy of 92.2%. The acacia hybrid was succesfully propagated using shoot cutting at rate of 78.1%. The best selected clones of acacia hybrid outperformed in height growth at rates of 17.28% over to superior pure parents, which is equivalent to the estimated stand productivity at around 48 m3 ha-1 y-1. The series of research provided a new effective and efficient breeding strategy for acacia hybrid.Keywords: Acacia auriculiformis,  Acacia mangium, acacia hybrid, controlled pollination, breeding strategyDOI: 10.7226/jtfm.19.2.128

  3. Use of acacia leaf (Acacia mangium as a protein source in beef rations

    Saengkaew, B.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of dry acacia (Acacia mangium leaf as protein source in beef ration was investigated using twelve nine month to two year old Brahman steers. Randomized complete block design with three blocks and four treatments was used for this study. Body weight of the Brahman steers was used as blocks while the percentage of dry acacia leaf in concentrate feed at 0, 10, 20 and 30 was used as treatment groups. The Brahman steers were fed for ninety days. The results revealed that average body weight gain, growth rate, and feed conversion ratio of Brahman steers receiving the concentrate feed with different levels of dry acacia leaf were not significantly different (P>0.05. The Brahman steers that received the percentage of dry acacia leaf in concentrate feed at 0, 10, 20 and 30 had average body weight gains of 95.28, 100.00, 82.89 and 93.32 kg/head while average growth rates were 1.06, 1.11, 0.92 and 1.04 kg/head/day, feed conversion ratios were 10.79, 10.01, 10.98 and 9.95, and the total feed cost/kg weight gain were 33.18, 32.11, 30.31 and 28.25 Baht, respectively. Thus, it is possible to use dry acacia leaf up to 30 percent in concentrate feed.

  4. Potential biological activity of acacia honey.

    Muhammad, Aliyu; Odunola, Oyeronke A; Ibrahim, Mohammed A; Sallau, Abdullahi B; Erukainure, Ochuko L; Aimola, Idown A; Malami, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in functional foods-based research have increasingly become an area of major interest because it affects human health and activities. Functional foods are classes of foods with health promoting and disease preventing properties in addition to multiple nutritional values and of such type is honey. Acacia honey is a type of honey produced by bees (Apis mellifera) fed on Acacia flowers, hence the name. This review focuses on the potential biological activities of Acacia honey which includes quality, antioxidant, immuno-modulatory, antiproliferative and neurological properties at in vitro and in vivo levels. Based on our review, Acacia honey used from various researches is of high purity, contains some bioactive compounds ranging from vitamins, phenolics, flavonoids and fatty acids. It's highly nutritional with strong antioxidant and immuno-modulatory potentials which may therefore be considered a potential candidate for both cancer prevention and treatment. Neurologically, it may be considered as a viable therapeutic agent in the management of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26709666

  5. Maximizing seed germination in two Acacia species

    Akram Kiani Abari; Mohammad Hoseini Nasr; Mohammad Hodjati; Dariush Bayat; Morteza Radmehr

    2012-01-01

    Revegetation of disturbed land,particularly in arid environment,is often hindered by low seedling establishment.Information on seed biology and germination cues of valuable species is lacking.We investigated seed germination of two Acacia species (Acacia tortilis (Forsk.) Hayne and Acacia oerfota (Forssk) schweinf),required for nitrogen fixation and rehabilitation of arid and semi-arid areas.(four pre-germination seed treatments were applied in order to find the best treatment in germinating acacia species.The medium was L2 and three replicates were used.Seeds pre-treated with sand paper and also with H2SO4 and then H2O2 had the highest germination percentage in both species.The lowest germination percentage resulted from soaking seeds in water for 48 h followed by soaking in H2SO4 for A.oerfota and from soaking in water for 24 h for A.tortilis.Because the use of sand paper is difficult and time consuming,we recommend pre-treatment of A.tortilis and A.oerfota seeds with H2SO4 and H2O2 before planting.Our study results are significant for conservation agencies with an interest in optimizing germination in arid zones for rehabilitation and reforestation.

  6. Chemicals profiling and antioxidants activities of Acacia seeds

    Ennajeh, Imen; Laajel, Mejda; Khouja, Mohamed-Larbi; Ferchichi, Ali; Nasri, Nizar

    2011-01-01

    This study reported investigations on phytochemical screening and antioxidants activities of seeds from seven Acacia species. Storage proteins and mineral contents were determined. The seed extracts of Acacia species were evaluated for their total phenols, flavonoids, carotenoids contents and total antioxidant capacity assessed by 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assays. Total protein content ranged from 99.49 (Acacia cyclops...

  7. Towards a Classification of the African Acacias

    J. H. Ross

    1973-09-01

    Full Text Available Some of the first attempts to subdivide the genus Acacia Mill, as a whole are discussed briefly. Bentham’s work, in which the subdivisions of the genus were for the first time given names, is considered and his two series into which the African species fall are reproduced. The characters employed by various workers to divide the African species into two main groups are mentioned and the advantages of using each of these characters for the first dichotomy in a key are discussed. Recent work on pollen morphology and seedling morphology is correlated with general morphology. A proposal put forward by Guinet to divide Acacia into three large genera on the basis of pollen morphology is briefly discussed. Certain modifications to Bentham's series Vulgares and Gummiferae are suggested.

  8. Cross-amplification and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers from Acacia (Senegalia) mellifera and Acacia brevispica to Acacia senegal (L.) Willd.

    Omondi, S.F.; Dangasuk, O. G.; Odee, D W; Cavers, S.; Khasa, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    Seven polymorphic microsatellite markers isolated from Acacia brevispica and Acacia mellifera were successfully cross-amplified in Acacia senegal. The loci were surveyed for polymorphism using 30 samples. Allelic diversity ranged from 4 (Ame02, Ab06 and Ab18) to 13 (Ab26) per locus. The expected heterozygosity (HE) ranged from 0.543 (Ame02) to 0.868 (Ab26) while observed heterozygosity (HO) ranged from 0.516 (Ame05) to 0.800 (Ame03). Cross amplification of these loci represents a potential so...

  9. Radiosensitivity of Acacia catechu Willd. to gamma rays

    In the present study various traits of Acacia catechu were studied to assess their radiosensitivity. Analysis of variance for germination value, survival and height of plants of Acacia catechu following gamma irradiation of seeds were also carried out. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  10. Early growth performance of full-sib Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium F1 hybrid progenies at three different sites

    Shah Aimin, Atirah Abdullah; Abdullah, Mohd Zaki; Muhammad, Norwati; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2014-09-01

    Field trials of 14 full sib Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium F1 hybrid progenies were evaluated for growth performance at three sites (Bintulu, Mentakab and Segamat). Results indicated that there were significant differences (p> 0.05) for diameter breast height (Dbh) and total height (Ht) among the progenies and different sites. Superior progenies have been identified for future tree selection and improvement.

  11. Controle de Acacia farnesiana e de Mimosa pteridofita em pastagem

    Carmona Ricardo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Conduziu-se um experimento com o objetivo de estudar a eficácia agronômica e econômica de herbicidas para o controle de duas sérias plantas daninhas de pastagens: Acacia farnesiana e Mimosa pteridofita. Os produtos utilizados, por meio de pincelamento no toco, foram o óleo diesel, óleo lubrificante usado de trator, solução aquosa de 2,4-D + picloram e solução oleosa de 2,4-D + picloram. À exceção do óleo lubrificante, os herbicidas foram testados em dois tamanhos de planta daninha e duas alturas de corte. Avaliaram-se a porcentagem de controle e o vigor de brotação das plantas não-controladas. Concluiu-se que o corte das plantas só é eficiente no controle das duas espécies, quando realizado no nível do solo e seguido da aplicação de herbicida específico, como o 2,4-D + picloram. O óleo diesel também controla totalmente ambas as espécies, e com menores custos que o 2,4-D + picloram, porém apenas quando aplicado nas plantas mais jovens. Há incompatibilidade entre o óleo diesel e o 2,4-D + picloram no controle das duas espécies. O óleo lubrificante usado não apresenta nenhum efeito herbicida em plantas adultas destas espécies.

  12. Acacia: the case against moving the type to Australia

    Luckow, M.; Colin, H.; Chriri, B.; Winter, P.; Fagg, C.; Fortunato, R.; J. Hurter; Rico, L.; Breteler, F.J.; Bruneau, A.; Caccavari, M.; Graven, L.; Crisp, M; Wieringa, J. J.; Maesen, van der, L.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Acacia is polyphyletic and must be split into five genera. Proposal 1584 would retypify Acacia : the type of the Australian taxon A. penninervis would be conserved over the current lectotype ( A. scorpioides ) of an African taxon. We disagree with the recommendation of the Spermatophyte Committee to endorse this proposal. Contrary to Article 14.12 of the ICBN, no detailed case against conservation was presented in Proposal 1584. We maintain that there are strong...

  13. ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITIES OF NATURAL PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS FROM ACACIA CONCURRENS BARK

    Nimbekar, Tulsidas; Wanjari, Bhumesh; Patil, A. T.

    2010-01-01

    The present study showed that the ethanolic extracts from the bark of Acacia concurrens exhibited a strong antioxidant activity. Among all the fractions from ethanolic extracts of bark, the EtOAc soluble fraction exhibited the best antioxidant performance. Furthermore, the amounts of total phenolic compound were determined from the ethanolic extracts. Therefore, Acacia concurrens could be considered as a potential source of natural antioxidant.

  14. Spontaneous formation of small sized albumin/acacia coacervate particles.

    Burgess, D J; Singh, O N

    1993-07-01

    Microgel coacervate particles form spontaneously on mixing aqueous solutions of oppositely charged albumin and acacia, under specific conditions of pH, ionic strength, and polyion concentration, close to but not at the optimum conditions for maximum coacervate yield. The mean particle diameter of these coacervate particles is approximately 6 microns when suspended in aqueous media, as determined by HIAC/Royco particle analysis. The geometric standard deviation of the particles falls in the range 1.2-1.9 microns. The particle size was not dependent on the method of emulsification of the coacervate in the equilibrium phase, or on the stirring speed applied during the manufacturing process. The microgel particles were stable on storage, for periods up to forty-six days, without the addition of a chemical cross-linking agent, or the application of heat. Stability was measured with respect to the change in particle size of samples stored at different temperatures. The non-cross-linked microcapsules were also shown to be stable on pH change, to pH values outside the coacervation pH range. At the optimum conditions for maximum coacervate yield the albumin/acacia system formed a very viscous coacervate phase, which was unsuitable for microcapsule preparation. The rheological properties of albumin/acacia and gelatin/acacia complex coacervates optimized for maximum coacervate yield were compared. The albumin/acacia coacervate was shown to be three orders of magnitude more viscous than the gelatin/acacia system. PMID:8105049

  15. New NAS journal

    In April 1984 the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) will begin publishing a new quarterly focusing on science policy. Written primarily for legislators, diplomats, corporate managers, security analysts, and other public policy analysts, the new journal will deal with such diverse topics as arms control, economic competition, social change, and health care.Original articles are expected to create a 120-page periodical that will discuss policy issues on a sophisticated but nonspecialist level, in a manner similar to that which Foreign Affairs uses to discuss U.S. foreign policy topics, according to NAS.

  16. Host plant use by competing acacia-ants: mutualists monopolize while parasites share hosts.

    Stefanie Kautz

    Full Text Available Protective ant-plant mutualisms that are exploited by non-defending parasitic ants represent prominent model systems for ecology and evolutionary biology. The mutualist Pseudomyrmex ferrugineus is an obligate plant-ant and fully depends on acacias for nesting space and food. The parasite Pseudomyrmex gracilis facultatively nests on acacias and uses host-derived food rewards but also external food sources. Integrative analyses of genetic microsatellite data, cuticular hydrocarbons and behavioral assays showed that an individual acacia might be inhabited by the workers of several P. gracilis queens, whereas one P. ferrugineus colony monopolizes one or more host trees. Despite these differences in social organization, neither of the species exhibited aggressive behavior among conspecific workers sharing a tree regardless of their relatedness. This lack of aggression corresponds to the high similarity of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles among ants living on the same tree. Host sharing by unrelated colonies, or the presence of several queens in a single colony are discussed as strategies by which parasite colonies could achieve the observed social organization. We argue that in ecological terms, the non-aggressive behavior of non-sibling P. gracilis workers--regardless of the route to achieve this social structure--enables this species to efficiently occupy and exploit a host plant. By contrast, single large and long-lived colonies of the mutualist P. ferrugineus monopolize individual host plants and defend them aggressively against invaders from other trees. Our findings highlight the necessity for using several methods in combination to fully understand how differing life history strategies affect social organization in ants.

  17. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers from the acacia-ant Crematogaster mimosae.

    Rubin, B E; Makarewich, C A; Talaba, A L; Stenzler, L; Bogdanowicz, S M; Lovette, I J

    2009-07-01

    We describe 10 microsatellite loci developed from Crematogaster mimosae, an ant species that nests mutualistically in Acacia drepanolobium trees in east Africa. Polymorphism ranged from 4 to 16 alleles per locus (mean = 7.3). Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.485 to 0.813 (mean 0.626), and from 0.502 to 0.894 (mean 0.674), respectively. These markers will foster studies of the population structure, colony structure, and reproductive strategies of these ants. PMID:21564879

  18. PRODUCTIVE BEHAVIOR OF EUCALYPTUS AND ACACIA, IN DIFFERENT ARRANGEMENTS OF CROP-LIVESTOCK-FOREST INTEGRATION

    Fabiana Lopes Ramos de Oliveira; Christian Dias Cabacinha; Leonardo David Tuffi Santos; Dalvânia Gomes Barroso; Antônio dos Santos Júnior; Matheus Caldeira Brant; Regynaldo Arruda Sampaio

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate initial growth of clonal Eucalyptus, hybrid Eucalyptus grandis x E. urophylla and Acacia (Acacia mangium) trees in alternate and not alternate rows of trees, intercropped with forage (crop-livestock-forest integration - CLFI) and monoculture. The design was a randomized complete block design with four replications, three arboreal arrangements consisting of eucalyptus, acacia + eucalyptus, acacia, all planted in crop-livestock-forest integration and...

  19. Tree invasion in a semi-arid savanna in Zimbabwe : seedling recruitment of Acacia karroo

    Chirara, C. (Chipangura)

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis Chirara reports on his study on the competitive interaction between savanna grasses and young tree seedlings of Acacia karroo, from hereon indicated as ' Acacia seedlings' . Acacia is one of the tree species that dominates savanna grassland in situations of overgrazing (bush encroachment). The discussion is whether this invasion is predominantly caused by the decreasing light competition or water competition of grasses in overgrazed situations. So, Chirara studied: -Acacia seed...

  20. The roles of soil macrofauna on litter decomposition of Acacia mangium Willd

    MUSYAFA

    2005-01-01

    Acacia mangium has been widely planted in industrial forest plantation (HTI). High litter accumulation in floor of A. mangium (Acacia) plantation due to slow process of decomposition, may disturb nutrient cycling process. It is also vulnerable to forest fire especially in dry season. The research was aimed to clarify the density of soil macrofauna in Acacia plantation and the roles of macrofauna in the decomposition of Acacia litter. The density of macrofauna was estimated by using pitfall tr...

  1. Inhibitory Effects of Sodium Arsenite and Acacia Honey on Acetylcholinesterase in Rats

    Aliyu Muhammad; Oyeronke A Odunola; Michael A. Gbadegesin; Sallau, Abdullahi B.; Ndidi, Uche S.; Ibrahim, Mohammed A.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of sodium arsenite and Acacia honey on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and electrolytes in the brain and serum of Wistar rats. Male Wistar albino rats in four groups of five rats each were treated with distilled water, sodium arsenite (5 mg/kg body weight), Acacia honey (20% v/v), and sodium arsenite and Acacia honey, daily for one week. The sodium arsenite and Acacia honey significantly P

  2. Characterisation and molecular association of Nigerian and Sudanese Acacia gum exudates

    The chemical and physicochemical characteristics of gum exudate samples harvested from mature trees of Acacia senegal at two specific locations in Nigeria have been investigated together with gum samples harvested from Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal originating from Sudan. The monosaccharide sugar ...

  3. 75 FR 27334 - Acacia Natural Gas Corporation; Notice of Baseline Filing

    2010-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Acacia Natural Gas Corporation; Notice of Baseline Filing May 7, 2010. Take notice that on May 5, 2010, Acacia Natural Gas Corporation (Acacia) submitted a correction to its...

  4. 75 FR 28599 - Acacia Natural Gas Corporation; Notice of Baseline Filing

    2010-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Acacia Natural Gas Corporation; Notice of Baseline Filing May 13, 2010. Take notice that on May 11, 2010, Acacia Natural Gas Corporation (Acacia) submitted a corrected...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3400 - Karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia... and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive is a device composed of karaya and sodium borate with...

  6. 77 FR 63311 - Acacia Natural Gas Corporation; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    2012-10-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Acacia Natural Gas Corporation; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on October 9, 2012, Acacia Natural Gas Corporation (Acacia) filed a Petition for...

  7. 75 FR 24940 - Acacia Natural Gas Corporation; Notice of Baseline Filing

    2010-05-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Acacia Natural Gas Corporation; Notice of Baseline Filing April 29, 2010. Take notice that on April 27, 2010, Acacia Natural Gas Corporation (Acacia) submitted its...

  8. Induction of leafy galls in Acacia mearnsii De Wild seedlings infected by Rhodococcus fascians

    Marguerite Quoirin

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Plantlets of blackwattle (Acacia mearnsii De Wild were inoculated with the bacterium Rhodococcus fascians and cultured in vitro. Leafy galls appeared at the cotyledonary nodes in 75% of the infected plants. The galls were separated from the plants and cultured on a medium containing three-quarters-strength MS salts (Murashige and Skoog, 1962, MS vitamins, 2% sucrose and an antibiotic (cephalothin, supplemented with or without 0.2% activated charcoal. Histological studies conducted from the sixth to the twenty-second day after plant infection revealed the presence of newly formed meristematic centers, first in the axillary region, then on the petioles and lamina of the leaflets around the apical meristem. Approximately 37% of the galls developed one shoot with both concentrations of cephalothin.Plantas recém germinadas de acácia negra (Acacia mearnsii De Wild. foram inoculadas com a bactéria Rhodococcus fascians e cultivadas in vitro. Galhas cobertas por folhas apareceram na altura do nó cotiledonar em 75% das plantas infectadas. As galhas foram separadas das plantas e cultivadas num meio de cultura contendo os sais do meio MS (Murashige e Skoog, 1962 reduzidos a 3/4, as vitaminas do mesmo meio, 2% de sacarose e um antibiótico (cefalotina, adicionado ou não de 0,2% de carvão ativo. Estudos histológicos realizados entre o sexto e o vigésimo segundo dia depois da inoculação, revelaram a presença de centros meristemáticos novos, primeiro nas regiões axilares, em seguida nos pecíolos e limbos dos folíolos ao redor do meristema apical. Aproximadamente 37% das galhas desenvolveram um broto na presença de cefalotina.

  9. PRELIMINARY STUDY ON ENHANCED PROPERTIES AND BIOLOGICAL RESISTANCE OF CHEMICALLY MODIFIED ACACIA SPP.

    H. P. S. Abdul Khalil

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary experimental study was carried out to examine the ability of a chemically modified Acacia spp. to resist biodegradation. The modifications of Acacia mangium and Acacia hybrid were carried out by propionic anhydride and succinic anhydride in the presence of sodium formate as a catalyst. The treated samples were found resistant to microbial attack, while the untreated ones were damaged on 12 months exposure to a soil burial. The appearance grading, mass loss, mechanical properties, and scanning electron microscopy results revealed that chemical modification enhances the resistance of Acacia mangium and Acacia hybrid wood species to biodegradation.

  10. Palaeoclimatic potential of Acacia tortilis in the Eastern Sahara.

    Gagen, Mary; Young, Giles; Andersen, Gidske; Krzywinski, Knut; Goslar, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    The challenge of deriving useful dendroclimatic information from non-annual ring forming trees cannot be overstated. Here we consider the contribution to be made by combining radioacarbon dating with stable isotope dendroclimatology in the analysis of Sudanese Acacia. Stable carbon isotopic analyses are presented from 14C-dated living Sudanese Acacia tortilis in xeric northern Africa. Stable carbon isotopic ratios were assigned calendar dates based on high-density 14C results. Intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) changes are calculated over the industrial period.

  11. The NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    Bailey, David H.

    2009-11-15

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) are a suite of parallel computer performance benchmarks. They were originally developed at the NASA Ames Research Center in 1991 to assess high-end parallel supercomputers. Although they are no longer used as widely as they once were for comparing high-end system performance, they continue to be studied and analyzed a great deal in the high-performance computing community. The acronym 'NAS' originally stood for the Numerical Aeronautical Simulation Program at NASA Ames. The name of this organization was subsequently changed to the Numerical Aerospace Simulation Program, and more recently to the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Center, although the acronym remains 'NAS.' The developers of the original NPB suite were David H. Bailey, Eric Barszcz, John Barton, David Browning, Russell Carter, LeoDagum, Rod Fatoohi, Samuel Fineberg, Paul Frederickson, Thomas Lasinski, Rob Schreiber, Horst Simon, V. Venkatakrishnan and Sisira Weeratunga. The original NAS Parallel Benchmarks consisted of eight individual benchmark problems, each of which focused on some aspect of scientific computing. The principal focus was in computational aerophysics, although most of these benchmarks have much broader relevance, since in a much larger sense they are typical of many real-world scientific computing applications. The NPB suite grew out of the need for a more rational procedure to select new supercomputers for acquisition by NASA. The emergence of commercially available highly parallel computer systems in the late 1980s offered an attractive alternative to parallel vector supercomputers that had been the mainstay of high-end scientific computing. However, the introduction of highly parallel systems was accompanied by a regrettable level of hype, not only on the part of the commercial vendors but even, in some cases, by scientists using the systems. As a result, it was difficult to discern whether the new systems offered any fundamental

  12. Pichia acaciae Killer System: Genetic Analysis of Toxin Immunity▿

    Paluszynski, John P.; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2007-01-01

    The gene responsible for self-protection in the Pichia acaciae killer plasmid system was identified by heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Resistance profiling and conditional toxin/immunity coexpression analysis revealed dose-independent protection by pPac1-2 ORF4 and intracellular interference with toxin function, suggesting toxin reinternalization in immune killer cells.

  13. An isoflavone from the pods of Acacia nilotica

    A flavonoid was isolated from the alcoholic extract of the pods of acacia nilotica. The behavior of the flavonoid under UV light as well as its colour reactions indicated that it is an isoflavone. The structure was elucidated on the basis of spectral data.(Author)

  14. NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results

    Subhash, Saini; Bailey, David H.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) were developed in 1991 at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a pencil and paper fashion i.e. the complete details of the problem to be solved are given in a technical document, and except for a few restrictions, benchmarkers are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. In this paper, we present new NPB performance results for the following systems: (a) Parallel-Vector Processors: Cray C90, Cray T'90 and Fujitsu VPP500; (b) Highly Parallel Processors: Cray T3D, IBM SP2 and IBM SP-TN2 (Thin Nodes 2); (c) Symmetric Multiprocessing Processors: Convex Exemplar SPP1000, Cray J90, DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/300, and SGI Power Challenge XL. We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks. We also mention NAS future plans of NPB.

  15. The roles of soil macrofauna on litter decomposition of Acacia mangium Willd

    MUSYAFA

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Acacia mangium has been widely planted in industrial forest plantation (HTI. High litter accumulation in floor of A. mangium (Acacia plantation due to slow process of decomposition, may disturb nutrient cycling process. It is also vulnerable to forest fire especially in dry season. The research was aimed to clarify the density of soil macrofauna in Acacia plantation and the roles of macrofauna in the decomposition of Acacia litter. The density of macrofauna was estimated by using pitfall traps and hand-sorting method in Acacia stand, at Wanagama Reaserch Center, Gadjah Mada University (GMU. In the laboratory, Spirobolus sp. (Diplopoda were fed with the litter of Acacia and the ingestion rate, defecation rate, and assimilatioan rate were determined. C and N content of the litter and feces were analyzed at Laboratory of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture GMU. The results showed that the density of soil macrofauna was low (74.6 individual/m2. The study in laboratory showed that Spirobolus did not est newly fallen leaves of Acacia. Ingestion rate, defecation rate, assimilation efficiency of millipede fed with partly decomposed Acacia leaves were 76.8 mg/g/day, 7.0 mg/g/day, 6.1 mg/g/day respectively. C/N ratio of feces was lower than that of partly decomposed Acacia leaves. It indicated significant change during gut passage of Spirobolus sp. This millipede should be introduced in Acacia plantation as a potential decomposer.

  16. Carbon isotopes confirm the competitive advantages of Prosopis over Acacia erioloba

    The landscape of the Kalahari Desert is changing as the indigenous Acacia erioloba E.Mey. is being replaced by the invasive Prosopis spp. Although both species are phreatophytic, the disproportionately large taproot of Prosopis enables it to survive extreme moisture stress. δ13C values were determined on annually resolved Prosopis and Acacia erioloba samples to investigate adaptation to changing edaphic conditions. The results confirm that the Acacia erioloba sample died during a period of water stress

  17. PRELIMINARY STUDY ON ENHANCED PROPERTIES AND BIOLOGICAL RESISTANCE OF CHEMICALLY MODIFIED ACACIA SPP.

    H. P. S. Abdul Khalil; Irshad ul Haq Bhat,; Khairul B. Awang

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary experimental study was carried out to examine the ability of a chemically modified Acacia spp. to resist biodegradation. The modifications of Acacia mangium and Acacia hybrid were carried out by propionic anhydride and succinic anhydride in the presence of sodium formate as a catalyst. The treated samples were found resistant to microbial attack, while the untreated ones were damaged on 12 months exposure to a soil burial. The appearance grading, mass loss, mechanical properties...

  18. Biological nitrogen fixation and transfer by Acacia mollissima in the field

    Pot experiments were conducted to model the behaviour of nitrogen in Acacia mollissima and to improve the methodology of sampling this tree in the field. Different levels of soil nitrogen were used and their effects on nitrogen fixation studied. Acacia was grown in a pure stand and in a mixture with wheat to investigate the effect of nitrogen fixation on nitrogen nutrition of wheat and to examine competition between acacia and wheat for mineral nitrogen. 3 refs, 3 tabs

  19. Methods for Extraction and Charaterization of Tannins from Some Acacia Species of Sudan

    Isam Eldin Hussein Elgailani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study is aimed to analyze and compare extraction methods of tannins from three common Acacia species of Sudan. The Acacia species selected were Acacia nilotica, Acacia seyal and Acacia senegal. Bark samples from bulk collections of the three Acacia species were extracted with water, 80% methanol and 70% acetone. Two sets of extraction were made, one by boiling and a second by shaking the samples in the respective solvents for eight hours at room temperature. Although the amount of material extracted by these two procedures did not differ greatly (P > 0.05, 70% acetone was a more efficient solvent than either water or 80% methanol. The tannins of mature fruits extract of Acacia nilotica were identified by using Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC, Ultraviolet and Infrared spectroscopy. Comparisons of absorption spectra and TLC of the reference tannins and some phenolics with that of Acacia nilotica extracts revealed the presence of both condensed and hydrolyzable tannins, since it consists of catechin, tannic and gallic acids. Catechin considered to be the phenolic precursor of condensed tannins. Hydrolysis of Acacia nilotica extract, tannic and gallic acids by butanolic-hydrochloric acid yielded gallic acid which is considered to be a chemical precursor of hydrolyzable tannins

  20. A Preliminary Qualitative Study of Two Common Acacia Species in Sudan

    Jacknoon, Ayman Ahmed; Elhefian, Esam. A.; Mohammed, Adam Musa; Hamdi, Omer Abdalla Ahmed; Yahaya, Abdul Hamid

    2012-01-01

    This research is dealing with the analysis of tannins of two common Acacia species of Sudan i.e. Acacia nilotica and Acacia seyal. Bark samples from collections of the two acacia species were extracted with distilled water, 80% methanol and 70% acetone. Two sets of extraction were made, one by boiling, and the other by shaking the samples in the respective solvent for eight hours at room temperature. It was found that the 70% acetone was a more efficient solvent than either water or 80% metha...

  1. A leaf phosphorus assay for seedlings of Acacia mangium.

    Sun, J S; Simpson, R J; Sands, R

    1992-10-01

    Concentrations of extractable and total phosphorus in leaves, stem, root and nodules of 12-week-old seedlings of two provenances of Acacia mangium Willd. were analyzed to identify the fraction of phosphorus and the plant part most suitable for predicting the phosphorus nutritional status of the seedlings.For both provenances, concentrations of extractable phosphorus were more sensitive to changes in soil phosphorus status and varied less among different plant parts than concentrations of total phosphorus. Concentrations of extractable phosphorus in the youngest fully expanded leaf (Leaf 3 from the apex) and the next two older leaves correlated closely with seedling dry mass and may be used to assess the phosphorus nutritional status of Acacia mangium seedlings. PMID:14969954

  2. Fractionation of acacia honey affects its antioxidant potential in vitro

    Muhammad Aliyu; Oyeronke A Odunola; Ahsana D Farooq; Ahmed M Mesaik; Muhammad I Choudhary; Ochuko L Erukainure; Shahida Perveen; Almas Jabeen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of fractionation of acacia honey on its antioxidant potential in contrast with the pure honey from whole blood, brain and liver in vitro. Methods: Honey was partitioned into three fractions (dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and aqueous). Their immuno-modulatory effect on whole blood was assayed using Luminol-amplified chemiluminescence technique. Their antioxidant activities on rat brain and hepatic tissues which covers for catalase, SOD activities and lipid peroxidation. Results: Fractions of the honey enhanced the production of radicals with no significant (P>0.05) antioxidant activity on whole blood where as pure honey does. Pure honey significantly (P0.05) effects on lipid peroxidation. Conclusions: Fractionation of acacia honey negatively affects its antioxidant potential thereby making it a radical generating agent in contrast with the unfractionated.

  3. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    2010-04-01

    ...) The ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 5th Ed. (2004), pp. 210 and 211... incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acacia (gum arabic). 172.780 Section 172.780...

  4. Revegetação de cava de extração de argila com Acacia mangium: I - atributos químicos do solo, ácidos fúlvicos e húmicos Revegetation of clay extraction sites with Acacia mangium: I - soil chemical attributes and fulvic and humic acids

    Jolimar Antonio Schiavo; Luciano Pasqualoto Canellas; Marco Antonio Martins

    2007-01-01

    O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar alterações nos atributos químicos do solo e dos ácidos húmicos e fúlvicos extraídos de cava de extração de argila com vegetação espontânea de gramínea [Brachiaria mutica (Forsk.) Stapf] e revegetada de Acacia mangium Willd. Foram coletadas amostras de solo nas profundidades de 0-10, 10-20 e 20-30 cm. Na cobertura com A. mangium em relação a B. mutica, observaram-se acréscimos no estoque de carbono de 33 e 80 %, respectivamente nas profundidades d...

  5. Antioxidant and sensorial properties of acacia honey supplemented with prunes

    Tumbas Vesna T.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The changes in total phenol and flavonoid content, as well as antioxidant activity was monitored in acacia honey supplemented with prunes in 20, 30 and 40% mass concentrations. The total phenolic content increased by 2.5 times (from 16.18 to 41.64 mg GAE/100 g with increasing concentration of prunes in honey, while the increase in flavonoid content was even higher, approximately 11.5-fold (from 2.65 to 30.86 mg RE/100 g. The addition of prunes also improved the antioxidant activity of acacia honey. The honey samples with highest content of prunes, 40%, exhibited the best antioxidant activity measured by hydroxyl radical sacvenging assay (EC50 •OH=4.56 mg/ml, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical scavenging assay (EC50 DPPH=16.48 mg/ml, and reducing power (EC50 RP=81.17 mg/ml. Judging from the high correlation coefficients, ranging from 0.771 to 0.947 for total phenolics, and from 0.862 to 0.993 for total flavonoids, it is obvious that these compounds were associated with the antioxidant mechanisms. On the other hand, sensorial properties of supplemented honeys were lower than that of pure acacia honey, where flavor of supplemented honey was the least affected. Our results indicate that the supplementation of honey with prunes improves antioxidant activity of honey by enriching the phenolic composition, with slight modifications in sensorial characteristics.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of monodisperse copper nanoparticles using gum acacia

    Dong, Chunfa; Cai, Hao; Zhang, Xianglin; Cao, Chuanliang

    2014-03-01

    A simple method was put forward in this paper for preparing colloidal copper nanoparticles in aqueous solutions using copper sulfate, gum acacia and hydrazine hydrate as copper precursor, capping agents and reducing agents, respectively, without any inert gas. The formation of nanosized copper was confirmed by its characteristic surface plasmon absorption peak at 604 nm in UV-vis spectra. The transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that the as-synthesized copper fine spherical particles are distributed uniformly with a narrow distribution from 3 nm to 9 nm. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) demonstrated that the obtained metallic nanoparticles are single crystalline copper nanoparticles. Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopic data suggested that the copper nanoparticles are coated with gum acacia. The effects of the quantity of gum acacia on the particle size were investigated by the UV-vis spectra and TEM images. The growth process of the nanoparticles was monitored by the UV-vis spectra. The mechanism of the formation copper nanoparticles was discussed. The process raised in this study can be served as an excellent candidate for the preparation of copper nanoparticles in a large scale production.

  7. ANATOMIA DA MADEIRA DE Acacia nitidifolia Speg. (Leguminosae Mimosoideae. Wood anatomy of Acacia mitidifolia Spreg. (Leguminosae Mimosoideae.

    José Newton Cardoso Marchiori

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho visa o estudo anatômico da madeira de Acacia nitidifolia Speg. A estrutura anatômica apresenta porosidade difusa, elementos vasculares curtos, placas de perfurações simples, pontuações intervasculares ornamentadas e em arranjo alterno, parênquima axial paratraqueal vasicêntrico e marginal cristalífero, raios homogêneos comumente 2-3 seriados e fibras libriformes septadas. A presença de canais intercelulares axiais e de canais celulares na estrutura radial, tem grande importância taxonômica. Este último caráter era desconhecido para o gênero Acacia. A estrutura anatômica da madeira indica que a espécie em estudo pode ser classificada na série Vulgares Benth., que corresponde, em linhas gerais, ao sub-gênero Aculeiferum Vassal.

  8. Inhibition of the Corrosion of Mild Steel in Acid Media by Naturally Occurring Acacia Senegal

    Urvija Garg; Tak, R. K.

    2010-01-01

    The inhibition of corrosion of mild steel in HCl solution by naturally occurring Acacia Senegal has been studied in relation to the concentration of inhibitor and concentration of corrosive medium. It has been observed that the Acacia Senegal alcoholic extract acts as a good corrosion inhibitor in hydrochloric acid solution and the adsorption of the extract provides a good protection against mild steel corrosion.

  9. Características físicas, químicas e conteúdo de água em solos convertidos de savana para plantio de Acacia mangium. = Physical and chemical characteristics and soil humidity by converting savanna to Acacia mangium crop, Roraima State, Brazil.

    Maria Ivonilde Leitão de Souza

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Os quarenta mil quilômetros quadrados de savana (cerrado em Roraima vêm sendo substituídos por agricultura, pecuária e florestamento, portanto, objetivou-se avaliar o efeito da conversão da savana nativa para plantios de Acacia mangium, com diferentes idades, em diferentes classes de solos e profundidades dos solos nas características químicas, físicas e no teor de água do solo. O trabalho foi conduzido em duas fazendas do Empreendimento Ouro Verde Agrosilvopastoril Ltda, no município do Cantá, RR, em plantios de Acacia mangium com até quatro anos de implantação comparado a condição natural (savana. As áreas situam-se em solos da classe Latossolo Amarelo distrófico (Fazenda Tuquinha e Argissolo Amarelo distrófico (Fazenda Garimpeira e as variáveis foram avaliadas nas profundidades de 0 - 30; 30 - 60 e 60 - 90 cm. As variáveis analisadas foram: pH, bases trocáveis, alumínio trocável, H+ + Al3+, fósforo, sódio, Matéria Orgânica do Solo (MOS, granulometria, densidade do solo e teor de água no solo. Em geral, os solos são de baixa fertilidade natural, verificando-se que a implantação de Acaciamangium não apresentou alterações químicas positivas no solo, revelando uma tendência de aumento da umidade do solo coma idade de plantio de Acacia mangium. = The forty thousand square kilometers of savannah (cerrado in Roraima State, Brazil, are being replaced by agriculture and forestry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of native savanna conversion to plantationsof Acacia mangium at different ages, classes and soil depths on chemical and physical attribute and water content of soil. Thisresearch was done in two farms of Ouro Verde Agrossilvopastoril Ltda., in the city of Cantá – RR, with up to four year oldAcacia mangium crops at Tuquinha`s farm and at Garimpeira`s farm, and in natural savanna conditions. The collected samples were of dystrophic yellow Latosol (Tuquinha farm and dystrophic yellow

  10. Effect of Rhizobium and Mycorhiza inoculation on the nursery growth of Acacia and Teline monspessulana

    In an experiment accomplished in the tree nursery Tisquesusa located in Madrid (Cundinamarca) was evaluated the effect of the inoculation with strains selected of foreign and Indigenous rhizobium and Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi am (Glomus folescutolum) on the growth, nitrogen fixation, and micorrization of Acacia (Acacia decurrens) and Retamo (Teline monspessulana) that they are used In soils recovery by the Corporacion Autonoma Regional de Cundinamarca CAR. The studied species presented positive response to the inoculation with rhizobium; the indigenous strain DQ6-09, isolated in Guatavita (Cundinamarca), presented the better results in Retamo and also in Acacia alone and in mixture with the foreign strain T1881. The inoculation with fungi AM increased the heights, dry weights, phosphorus content and percentage of micorrization in Acacia and Retamo. The double inoculation with fungi ma and rhizobium it did not increase the nitrogen fixing of Acacia while in Retamo was presented a positive effect with the strain DQ6-09

  11. Antioxidant activity and protection against oxidative-induced damage of Acacia shaffneri and Acacia farnesiana pods extracts: in vitro and in vivo assays

    Delgadillo Puga, Claudia; Cuchillo Hilario, Mario; Espinosa Mendoza, José Guillermo; Medina Campos, Omar; Molina Jijón, Eduardo; Díaz Martínez, Margarita; Álvarez Izazaga, Marsela Alejandra; Ledesma Solano, José Ángel; Pedraza Chaverri, José

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is a worldwide public health issue, reaching epidemic condition in developing countries associated to chronic diseases. Oxidative damage is another side effect of obesity. Antioxidant activity from plant components regulates at some extent this imbalance. Main goal of the present study was to determine the antioxidant activity and protection against oxidative-induced damage of Acacia shaffneri (AS) and Acacia farnesiana (AF) pods extracts. Methods To evaluated antioxidant a...

  12. Antioxidant and sensorial properties of acacia honey supplemented with prunes

    Tumbas Vesna T.; Vulić Jelena J.; Čanadanović-Brunet Jasna M.; Đilas Sonja M.; Ćetković Gordana S.; Stajčić Slađana S.; Štajner Dubravka I.; Popović Boris M.

    2012-01-01

    The changes in total phenol and flavonoid content, as well as antioxidant activity was monitored in acacia honey supplemented with prunes in 20, 30 and 40% mass concentrations. The total phenolic content increased by 2.5 times (from 16.18 to 41.64 mg GAE/100 g) with increasing concentration of prunes in honey, while the increase in flavonoid content was even higher, approximately 11.5-fold (from 2.65 to 30.86 mg RE/100 g). The addition of prunes also improved the antioxidant activity of...

  13. Actividad antimicrobiana de Waltheria indica y Acacia farnesiana

    Nidia M. Rojas Hernández; Senovio Avellaneda Saucedo; Armando Cuéllar Cuéllar; Beatriz Romeu Álvarez; Daysi Lugo Moya

    2009-01-01

    Entre las plantas medicinales empleadas en Tierra Caliente, estado de Guerrero, México, se encuentran el Güinar (Waltheria indica L., Esterculiaceae) y el Huizache (Acacia farnesiana L. Willd, Mimosaceae). En ambas, la infusión de la raíz se usa popularmente para las diarreas. Con la finalidad de validar las propiedades que se les atribuyen a estas especies vegetales, el presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo evaluar la actividad antimicrobiana in vitro de los extractos acuosos y etanólicos prep...

  14. Uso de equações para estimar carbono orgânico em plantações de Acacia mearnsii De Wild. no Rio Grande do Sul - Brasil Use of equations to estimate organic carbon in Acacia mearnsii De Wild plantations in Rio Grande do Sul - Brazil

    Fabio Luiz Fleig Saidelles

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Para entender a importância das florestas e plantações florestais como sumidouros de carbono, é necessário desenvolver e aprimorar as metodologias de estimativa de biomassa e carbono. Assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi estimar o estoque de carbono orgânico (CO em plantações de Acacia mearnsii com 4 anos de idade. A área de trabalho localiza-se na cidade de Arroio dos Ratos, RS, nas coordenadas 30º07'12"de latitude sul e 51º57'45" de longitude oeste, com altitude média de 90 m. Após a realização de inventário florestal, foram abatidas 21 árvores, distribuídas em sete classes diamétricas, para cobrir a heterogeneidade do povoamento. Em seguida, determinaram-se a biomassa e o teor de CO dos componentes: folha, galho vivo, galho morto, madeira, casca e raiz. A estimativa do estoque de CO em povoamentos de Acacia mearnssi e nos seus compartimentos das árvores pode ser realizada por meio de equações matemáticas. O total de CO estocado na biomassa é de 29,79 Mg ha-1, distribuídos da seguinte forma: 64% na madeira, 11% na raiz, 9% na casca, 7% nos galhos vivos e 4% nos galhos mortos e nas folhas.To understand the importance of the forests and forest plantations as carbon sink, it is necessary to develop and improve the methodologies to estimate biomass and carbon. The aim of this study was to estimate the organic carbon (OC stock in 4-year-old plantations of Acacia mearnsii . The work area is located in Arroio dos Ratos-RS, in a farm of the Agroseta S.A. corporation, with coordinates 30º07'12" latitude south and 51º57'45" longitude west, and average altitude of 90 m. After the performance of the forest inventory, 21 trees were felled, distributed in 7-diameter classes to cover stand heterogeneity. The biomass and organic carbon were determined for: leaves, live branch, dead branch, wood, bark and roots. The estimate of the OC stock in Acacia mearnssi plantations and in its tree compartments can be carried out using

  15. Pharmacognostic screening and phytochemical evaluation of Acacia leucophloea root

    Sachin Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acacia leucophloea (Mimosoideae is native to Southeastern Asia. This tree species has been of interest to researchers because it is a medicinal plant employed in the Indian indigenous system of medicine. Pharmacognostic standardization, physico-chemical evaluation of the roots of Acacia leucophloea was carried out to determine its macro-and micro-scopical characters and also some of its quantitative standards. Microscopical studies were done by using trinocular microscope. Total ash, water-soluble ash, acid-insoluble ash and sulphated ash values, alcohol- and water-soluble extractive values were determined for phytochemical evaluations. Preliminary phytochemical screening was also done to detect different phytoconstituents. Microscopically, root showed cork, cortex, stellar region and calcium oxalate crystals. Powder microscopy showed crystal fibres, xylem fibres in bundle, phloem fibres, medullary ray, and cork cells, parenchyma cells with red cell content, tissues with abundant xylem vessels with pitted thickenings, parenchyma, and Stone cells. Total ash was approximately two times and four times more than acid insoluble and water soluble ash, respectively. Ethanol soluble extractive was approximately two times higher than water soluble extractive. TLC of petroleum ether and chloroform extract showed nine spots using benzene:methanol (19:1 and chloroform:methanol (19:1 respectively while ethanol extract showed four spots using ethyl acetate. Phytochemically, root exhibited alkaloids, terpenes, flavanoids and tannins.

  16. A novel strain D5 isolated from Acacia confusa.

    Huang, Baoling; Lv, Chengqun; Zhao, Yili; Huang, Rong

    2012-01-01

    We isolated a novel strain D5 from nodules of Acacia confusa. Under strict sterile conditions the strain could successfully nodulate Acacia confusa, A. crassicarpa and A. mangium, with nitrogenase activity ranging from 18.90 to 19.86 nmol·g(-1)·min(-1). In the phylogenetic tree based on a complete 16S rRNA gene sequence, the sequence of strain D5 shared 99% homology with that of four species of genus Pseudomonas. The 685 bp nodA fragment amplified from strain D5 shared 95% homology with the nodA sequence of 9 species of genus Bradyrhizobium, with a genetic distance of 0.01682. The 740 bp nifH gene fragment was amplified from strain D5. This strain D5 nifH gene and Bradyrhizobium spp. formed a branch, showing 98% homology and a genetic distance of 0. The homology between this branch and the Bradyrhizobium spp. DG in another branch was 99%, with a genetic distance of 0.007906. These results indicate that this strain D5 is a new type of nitrogen-fixing bacterium. PMID:23166618

  17. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Acacia aroma Leaf Extracts

    C. M. Mattana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acacia aroma, native plant from San Luis, Argentina, is commonly used as antiseptic and for healing of wounds. The present study was conducted to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of hot aqueous extract (HAE and ethanolic extract (EE of A. aroma. The cytotoxic activity was assayed by neutral red uptake assay on Vero cell. Cell treatment with a range from 100 to 5000 μg/mL of HAE and EE showed that 500 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL were the maximum noncytotoxic concentrations, respectively. The CC50 was 658 μg/mL for EE and 1020 μg/mL for HAE. The genotoxicity was tested by the single-cell gel electrophoresis comet assay. The results obtained in the evaluation of DNA cellular damage exposed to varied concentrations of the HAE showed no significant genotoxic effect at range of 1–20 mg/mL. The EE at 20 mg/mL showed moderate genotoxic effect related to the increase of the DNA percentage contained in tail of the comet; DNA was classified in category 2. At concentrations below 5 mg/mL, the results of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Acacia aroma guarantee the safety at cell and genomic level. However further studies are needed for longer periods including animal models to confirm the findings.

  18. Equações Hipsométricas e Volumétricas para Acacia mangium Willd em Roraima / Hypsometric And Volumetric Equations for Acacia mangium Willd In Roraima

    Helio Tonini

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A Acacia mangium é a espécie florestal mais plantada no Estado de Roraima, sendo necessários estudos que visem ao desenvolvimento de sistemas silviculturais adaptados às condições locais. Este trabalho foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de selecionar equações de relação hipsométrica e de volume para A. mangium em área de savana no estado de Roraima. Foram utilizadas 701 árvores amostras localizadas em três fazendas e duas regiões. Foram testadas 8 equações hipsométricas e 5 volumétricas. Nas condições estudadas, a equação hipsométrica selecionada apresentou um R2aj = 0,62 e a equação logaritmizada de Spurr se mostrou a mais adequada para estimar a o volume total (R2aj =0,98 e comercial com casca (R2aj =0,58.

  19. A preliminary report on decay and canker of Acacia richii caused by Inonotus rickii in China

    Cui, B.K.; Zhao, C.L.; Vlasák, Josef; Dai, Y.C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2014), s. 82-84. ISSN 1437-4781 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : wood-decaying fungus * Inonotus rickii * Acacia richii Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 1.373, year: 2014

  20. The Importance of Acacia Trees for Insectivorous Bats and Arthropods in the Arava Desert

    Hackett, Talya D.; Korine, Carmi; Holderied, Marc W.

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic habitat modification often has a profound negative impact on the flora and fauna of an ecosystem. In parts of the Middle East, ephemeral rivers (wadis) are characterised by stands of acacia trees. Green, flourishing assemblages of these trees are in decline in several countries, most likely due to human-induced water stress and habitat changes. We examined the importance of healthy acacia stands for bats and their arthropod prey in comparison to other natural and artificial habi...

  1. Enhancing Colour Appearances of Cultivated 15 year-old Acacia hybrid Through Oil Heat Treatment Process

    Izyan Khalid; Razak Wahab; Othman Sulaiman; Aminuddin Mohamed; Tamer A. Tabet; Roziela Hanim Alamjuri

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of oil heat treatment process on colour appearance of cultivated Acacia hybrid. Parameters such as temperatures and treatment time are taken in account due to their influences in enhancing the colour chandes of the natural untreated and oil heat treated of the wood from sapwood right trough the heartwood. Young, natural and untreated Acacia hybrid would normally have the sapwood having lighter colour than the dark colour heartwood. Turning these timbers into...

  2. DETERMINATION OF LIGNIN CONTENT IN ACACIA SPP. USING NEAR-INFRARED REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY

    Sheng Yao; Guofen Wu; Mian Xing; Shuke Zhou; Junwen Pu

    2010-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy method was introduced to measure the lignin content in Acacia species. Acid-soluble lignin, Klason lignin, and total lignin contents from 78 wood meal samples of Acacia spp. trees grown in Guangxi province with different ages, height, and families were measured by wet chemistry. NIR spectra were also collected using a Bruker MPA spectrometer within 4000-12500cm-1 of wavenumbers using a standard sample cup and split into calibration and prediction sets. Equatio...

  3. Molecular Cloning and Expression of a New Allergen of Acacia farnesiana (Aca f 2

    Najmeh Sepahi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of pollens from different species of Acacia is a common cause of respiratory allergy in tropical areas of the world. Acacia farnesiana is commonly used as street trees in towns and ornamental shade trees in parks and gardens throughout arid and semi-arid regions of Asia. This study aimed to produce and purify the A. farnesiana pollen profilin (Aca f 2 and evaluate its nucleotide sequence homology with profilins of common allergenic plants to predict allergenic cross-reactivity.Thirty-nine patients who were allergic to Acacia pollens were included in the study. Cloning of Acacia profilin-coding sequence was performed by polymerase chain reaction using primers from Acacia pollen RNA. The cDNA of Acacia pollen profilin was then expressed in Escherichia coli using pET-21b(+ vector and purified by metal affinity chromatography. Immunoreactivity of the recombinant Acacia profilin (rAca f 2 was evaluated by specific ELISA, immunoblotting, and inhibition assays.The coding sequence of the Acacia profilin cDNA was recognized as a 399-bp open reading frame encoding 133 amino acid residues. Eighteen patients (18/39, 46.15% had significant specific IgE levels against Aca f 2. Immunodetection and inhibition assays indicated that purified Aca f 2 might be the same as that in the crude extract.Aca f2, the first allergen from A. farnesiana pollen, was identified as belonging to the family ofprofilins. The amino acid sequence homology analysis showed high cross-reactivity betweenAca f 2 and other profilins from botanically unrelated common allergenic plants.

  4. Molecular Cloning and Expression of a New Allergen of Acacia farnesiana (Aca f 2).

    Sepahi, Najmeh; Khodadadi, Ali; Assarehzadegan, Mohammad-Ali; Amini, Akram; Zarinhadideh, Farnoosh; Ali-Sadeghi, Hosein

    2015-08-01

    Inhalation of pollens from different species of Acacia is a common cause of respiratory allergy in tropical areas of the world. Acacia farnesiana is commonly used as street trees in towns and ornamental shade trees in parks and gardens throughout arid and semi-arid regions of Asia. This study aimed to produce and purify the A. farnesiana pollen profilin (Aca f 2) and evaluate its nucleotide sequence homology with profilins of common allergenic plants to predict allergenic cross-reactivity. Thirty-nine patients who were allergic to Acacia pollens were included in the study. Cloning of Acacia profilin-coding sequence was performed by polymerase chain reaction using primers from Acacia pollen RNA. The cDNA of Acacia pollen profilin was then expressed in Escherichia coli using pET-21b(+) vector and purified by metal affinity chromatography. Immunoreactivity of the recombinant Acacia profilin (rAca f 2) was evaluated by specific ELISA, immunoblotting, and inhibition assays. The coding sequence of the Acacia profilin cDNA was recognized as a 399-bp open reading frame encoding 133 amino acid residues. Eighteen patients (18/39, 46.15%) had significant specific IgE levels against Aca f 2. Immunodetection and inhibition assays indicated that purified Aca f 2 might be the same as that in the crude extract. Aca f2, the first allergen from A. farnesiana pollen, was identified as belonging to the family of profilins. The amino acid sequence homology analysis showed high cross-reactivity between Aca f 2 and other profilins from botanically unrelated common allergenic plants. PMID:26547704

  5. Molecular Cloning and Expression of a New Allergen of Acacia farnesiana (Aca f 2)

    Najmeh Sepahi; Ali Khodadadi; MohammadAli Assarehzadegan; Akram Amini; Farnoosh Zarinhadideh; Hosein Ali-Sadeghi

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation of pollens from different species of Acacia is a common cause of respiratory allergy in tropical areas of the world. Acacia farnesiana is commonly used as street trees in towns and ornamental shade trees in parks and gardens throughout arid and semi-arid regions of Asia. This study aimed to produce and purify the A. farnesiana pollen profilin (Aca f 2) and evaluate its nucleotide sequence homology with profilins of common allergenic plants to predict allergenic cross-reactivity.Thi...

  6. Nodulation of Acacia Species by Fast- and Slow-Growing Tropical Strains of Rhizobium

    Dreyfus, B.L.; Dommergues, Y. R.

    1981-01-01

    Thirteen Acacia species were classified into three groups according to effective nodulation response patterns with fast- and slow-growing tropical strains of Rhizobium. The first group nodulated effectively with slow-growing, cowpea-type Rhizobium strains; the second, with fast-growing Rhizobium strains; and the third, with both fast- and slow-growing Rhizobium strains. The Rhizobium requirements of the Acacia species of the second group were similar to those of Leucaena leucocephala.

  7. Effect of Acacia Gum, NaCl, and Sucrose on Physical Properties of Lotus Stem Starch

    Ritika Puri; Balmeet Singh Gill; Yogesh Khetra

    2014-01-01

    Consumer preferences in east Asian part of the world pave the way for consumption of lotus stem starch (LSS) in preparations such as breakfast meals, fast foods, and traditional confectioneries. The present study envisaged the investigation and optimization of additives, that is, acacia gum, sodium chloride (NaCl), and sucrose, on water absorption (WA), water absorption index (WAI), and water solubility index (WSI) of LSS employing response surface methodology (RSM). Acacia gum resulted in in...

  8. The importance of Acacia trees for insectivorous bats and arthropods in the Arava desert.

    Talya D Hackett

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic habitat modification often has a profound negative impact on the flora and fauna of an ecosystem. In parts of the Middle East, ephemeral rivers (wadis are characterised by stands of acacia trees. Green, flourishing assemblages of these trees are in decline in several countries, most likely due to human-induced water stress and habitat changes. We examined the importance of healthy acacia stands for bats and their arthropod prey in comparison to other natural and artificial habitats available in the Arava desert of Israel. We assessed bat activity and species richness through acoustic monitoring for entire nights and concurrently collected arthropods using light and pit traps. Dense green stands of acacia trees were the most important natural desert habitat for insectivorous bats. Irrigated gardens and parks in villages and fields of date palms had high arthropod levels but only village sites rivalled acacia trees in bat activity level. We confirmed up to 13 bat species around a single patch of acacia trees; one of the richest sites in any natural desert habitat in Israel. Some bat species utilised artificial sites; others were found almost exclusively in natural habitats. Two rare species (Barbastella leucomelas and Nycteris thebaica were identified solely around acacia trees. We provide strong evidence that acacia trees are of unique importance to the community of insectivorous desert-dwelling bats, and that the health of the trees is crucial to their value as a foraging resource. Consequently, conservation efforts for acacia habitats, and in particular for the green more densely packed stands of trees, need to increase to protect this vital habitat for an entire community of protected bats.

  9. Acacia mangium: Growing and utilization. MPTS monograph series No. 3

    Awang, K.; Taylor, D.

    1993-01-01

    With deforestation in the Asia-Pacific region progressing at the rate of 4.4 million ha per year, many countries have adopted plantation forestry using fast-growing species as a way to sustain the commercial supply of tree products and reduce pressure on natural forests. Acacia mangium (A. mangium) is playing a large role in this development, especially in Indonesia and Malaysia, due to its versatility and its ability to recapture grasslands dominated by the noxious weed, Imperata cylindrica. This monograph consolidates information on A. mangium from published literature, unpublished reports and studies, and observations from those familiar with the species. Priorities for future research are included in each chapter and in the final summary.

  10. Tannins quantification in barks of Mimosa tenuiflora and Acacia mearnsii

    Leandro Calegari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to its chemical complexity, there are several methodologies for vegetable tannins quantification. Thus, this work aims at quantifying both tannin and non-tannin substances present in the barks of Mimosa tenuiflora and Acacia mearnsii by two different methods. From bark particles of both species, analytical solutions were produced by using a steam-jacketed extractor. The solution was analyzed by Stiasny and hide-powder (no chromed methods. For both species, tannin levels were superior when analyzed by hide-powder method, reaching 47.8% and 24.1% for A. mearnsii and M. tenuiflora, respectively. By Stiasny method, the tannins levels considered were 39.0% for A. mearnsii, and 15.5% for M. tenuiflora. Despite the best results presented by A. mearnsii, the bark of M. tenuiflora also showed great potential due to its considerable amount of tannin and the availability of the species at Caatinga biome.

  11. A Trimeric Proanthocyanidin from the Bark of Acacia leucophloea Willd.

    Sarfaraz Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available (–-Fisetinidol-(4α,8-[(–-fisetinidol-(4α,6 ]-(+-catechin ( 1 , a proanthocyanidin, was isolated from the bark of Acacia leucophloea . Its structure including absolute configuration was elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and chemical correlation . The 1H NMR spectrum of this compound, exhibiting exceptional complex signals attributable to rotational isomerism, and the reported data were obtained at elevated temperature in methyl ether acetate form. This work provided the 1H and 13C NMR assignments for 1 and its rotational isomer as the free phenolic form at ambient temperature for the first time. Compound 1 showed inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase type IV from Bacillus stearothermophilus with the IC 50 value of 102.3 μM.

  12. Controle de Acacia farnesiana e de Mimosa pteridofita em pastagem

    Carmona Ricardo; Araujo Neto Bernardo Sayão Carvalho; Pereira Roberto Carvalho

    2001-01-01

    Conduziu-se um experimento com o objetivo de estudar a eficácia agronômica e econômica de herbicidas para o controle de duas sérias plantas daninhas de pastagens: Acacia farnesiana e Mimosa pteridofita. Os produtos utilizados, por meio de pincelamento no toco, foram o óleo diesel, óleo lubrificante usado de trator, solução aquosa de 2,4-D + picloram e solução oleosa de 2,4-D + picloram. À exceção do óleo lubrificante, os herbicidas foram testados em dois tamanhos de planta daninha e duas altu...

  13. Penentuan Persentase Kulit Kayu Acacia Mangium Di Pt Sumatera Sylva Lestari, Kecamatan Rambah Hilir, Kabupaten Rokan Hulu, Riau (Estimating Bark Wood Percentage Of Acacia Mangium In Pt Sumatera Sylva Lestari, Rambah Hilir Regency, Rokan Hulu, Riau)

    Latifah, Siti; Sasmuko, Sentot Adi; Simanungkalit, Sherly Chairani

    2009-01-01

    Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui persentase kulit kayu Acacia mangium. Penelitian ini dilakukan di PT Sumatera Sylva Lestari, Riau. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk menentukan besarnya nilai persentase kulit kayu Acacia mangium di PT Sumatera Sylva Lestari. Metode yang digunakan adalah metode berat dan metode volumetris. Di mana pada metode berat dilakukan penimbangan berat kayu Acacia mangium dengan dan tanpa kulit, sedangkan pada metode volumetris dilakukan pengukuran diameter ka...

  14. Anatomia da madeira de Acacia bonariensis Gill. ex Hook. et Arn. Wood anatomy of Acacia bonariensis Gill. ex Hook. et Arn.

    José Newton Cardoso Marchiori

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho é a descrição anatômica da madeira de Acacia bonariensis Gill. Hook. et Arn. A estrutura anatômica é comparada com outras espécies sul-brasileiras do mesmo gênero. A presença de raios multisseriados estreitos e fibras septadas permitem classificar a espécie na série Vulgares Bentham ou sub-gênero Aculeiferum Vassal.The wood anatomy of Acacia bonariensis Gill. ex Hook. et Arn. is described and compared with other south-american Acacias. The presence of narrow multisseriate rays and libriform fibres, observed in the wood, are commonly found among species of the series Vulgares Benth. or sub-genus Aculeiferum Vassal.

  15. Antigenotoxic activities of crude extracts from Acacia salicina leaves.

    Mansour, Hédi B; Boubaker, Jihed; Bouhlel, Inès; Mahmoud, Amor; Bernillon, Stéphane; Chibani, Jemni B; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2007-01-01

    For centuries, plants have been used in traditional medicines and there has been recent interest in the chemopreventive properties of compounds derived from plants. In the present study, we investigated the effects of extracts of Acacia salicina leaves on the genotoxicity of benzo[a]pyrene (B(a)P) and nifuroxazide in the SOS Chromotest. Aqueous, total oligomers flavonoids (TOF)-enriched, petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts were prepared from powdered Acacia leaves, and characterized qualitatively for the presence of tannins, flavonoids, and sterols. All the extracts significantly decreased the genotoxicity induced by 1 microg B(a)P (+S9) and 10 microg nifuroxazide (-S9). The TOF-enriched and methanol extracts decreased the SOS response induced by B(a)P to a greater extent, whereas the TOF-enriched and the ethyl acetate extracts exhibited increased activity against the SOS response produced by nifuroxazide. In addition, the aqueous, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts showed increased activity in scavenging the 1,1-diphenyl- 2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical, while 100-300 microg/ml of all the test extracts were active in inhibiting O2-production in a xanthine/xanthine oxidase system. In contrast, only the petroleum ether extract was effective at inhibiting nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by the superoxide radical in a nonenzymatic O2- -generating system. The present study indicates that extracts of A. salicina leaves are a significant source of compounds with antigenotoxic and antioxidant activity (most likely phenolic compounds and sterols), and thus may be useful for chemoprevention. PMID:17177209

  16. Etude de la germination des graines d'Acacia tortilis sous différentes contraintes abiotiques

    Jaouadi, W; Hamrouni, L.; Souayeh, N.; Khouja, ML.

    2010-01-01

    Study of Acacia tortilis seed germination under different abiotic constraints. Since Tunisian acacia populations are threatened by regression, we analyzed as a preliminary study the germination behavior of the species in order to plan subsequently for a preservation and rehabilitation program. In this context and to optimize acacia seed germination and to overcome and remove the obstacle of tegumentary inhibition, we have in a first attempt tested several physical (scarification, boiled water...

  17. Biological activities of some Acacia spp. (Fabaceae) against new clinical isolates identified by ribosomal RNA gene-based phylogenetic analysis.

    Mahmoud, Mahmoud Fawzy; Alrumman, Sulaiman Abdullah; Hesham, Abd El-Latif

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays,most of the pathogenic bacteria become resistant to antibiotics. Therefore,the pharmaceutical properties of the natural plant extracts have become of interest to researchers as alternative antimicrobial agents. In this study,antibacterial activities of extract gained from Acacia etbaica, Acacia laeta, Acacia origena and Acacia pycnantha have been evaluated against isolated pathogenic bacteria (Strains MFM-01, MFM-10 and AH-09) using agar well diffusion methods.The bacterial strains were isolated from infected individuals,and their exact identification was detected on the basis of 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequence determination. Alignment results and the comparison of 16 SrRN A gene sequences of the isolates to 16 SrRN A gene sequences available in Gen Bank data base as well as the phylogenetic analysis confirmed the accurate position of the isolates as Klebsiella oxytoca strain MFM-01, Staphylococcus aureus strain MFM-10 and Klebsiella pneumoniae strain AH-09. Except for cold water, all tested solvents (Chloroform, petroleum ether, methanol, diethyl ether, and acetone) showed variation in their activity against studied bacteria. GC-MS analysis of ethanol extracts showed that four investigated Acacia species have different phyto components. Eight important pharmaceutical components were found in the legume of Acacia etbaica, seven in the legume of Acacia laeta, fifteen in the legume of Acacia origena and nine in the leaves of Acacia pycnantha. A dendrogram was constructed based on chemical composition, revealed that Acacia laeta is more closely related to Acacia etbaica forming on eclade, whereas Acacia origena less similar to other species. Our results demonstrated that, investigated plants and chemical compounds present could be used as promising antibacterial agents. PMID:26826814

  18. Controle de Acacia farnesiana e de Mimosa pteridofita em pastagem Control of Acacia farnesiana and of Mimosa pteridofita in pastures

    Ricardo Carmona; Bernardo Sayão Carvalho Araujo Neto; Roberto Carvalho Pereira

    2001-01-01

    Conduziu-se um experimento com o objetivo de estudar a eficácia agronômica e econômica de herbicidas para o controle de duas sérias plantas daninhas de pastagens: Acacia farnesiana e Mimosa pteridofita. Os produtos utilizados, por meio de pincelamento no toco, foram o óleo diesel, óleo lubrificante usado de trator, solução aquosa de 2,4-D + picloram e solução oleosa de 2,4-D + picloram. À exceção do óleo lubrificante, os herbicidas foram testados em dois tamanhos de planta daninha e duas altu...

  19. Penentuan Prosentase Kulit Kayu Acacia mangium Di PT Sumatera Sylva Lestari Kecamatan Rambah Hilir Kabupaten Rokan Hulu, Riau

    Simanungkalit, Sherly Chairani

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research were to known bark wood percentage of Acacia manghim. The research was conducted at PT Sumatera Syiva Lestari, Riau in June 2005. The objective was to get bark percentage of Acacia mangium. The data collected were log diametre, and log weight. The result showed that bark percentage of Acacia mangium used bark weight is 8.71%, and bark percentage oi Acacia mangium used bark volume is 7.75 %. There was no difference, between bark percentage used weight method and bar...

  20. Rebrota de cepas de Acacia mearnsii em diferentes idades, épocas do ano e alturas de corte Resprouting of Acacia mearnsii stumps under different ages, seasons and cut heights

    Edison Rogério Perrando

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito da idade, da época do ano e da altura de corte sobre a capacidade de rebrota de cepas de Acacia mearnsii De Wild. O trabalho foi conduzido em delineamento de blocos ao acaso e parcelas subdivididas no tempo. Em árvores de quatro e sete anos, foram avaliadas as alturas de corte de 0,15; 0,30; 0,45; 0,60; 1,2 e 2 m aos 15, 30, 45, 60, 75 e 90 dias depois do corte, nas quatro estações do ano. Obteve-se interação significativa entre a altura de corte e a época de avaliação, em ambas as idades avaliadas. As maiores médias, quanto ao número de brotações por cepa, foram constatadas a 1,2 e 2 m de altura, na idade de quatro anos. Elevados porcentuais de mortalidade foram registrados em cepas com sete anos, independentemente da altura de corte. A capacidade de rebrota em cepas de acácia-negra é estimulada, quando o corte é realizado no período entre o outono e a primavera. O verão é a estação menos adequada à rebrota de cepas dessa espécie.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of age, time of the year and cut height on the resprouting capacity of Acacia mearnsii De Wild. stumps. The work was conducted in stands of four and seven years of age, in randomized blocks design and time subdivided plots. Different cut heights (0.15; 0.30; 0.45; 0.60; 1.2 and 2 m, and evaluation times (15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 days after cutting, in the four seasons of the year were evaluated. A significant interaction between cut height and evaluation time was found in both ages. The higher averages due to stumps in each strain were verified in 1.2 and 2 m height, in the age of four years. High death percentages were registered in seven years-old stumps, independently of cut height. The resprouting capacity of black wattle stumps is stimulated when cut is conducted between autumn and spring; summer is the least suitable season to stumps resprouting of this specie.

  1. Impact of an invasive nitrogen-fixing tree on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and the development of native species

    Guisande-Collazo, Alejandra; González, Luís; Souza-Alonso, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    This study contributes to knowledge on the effect of the invasive N2-fixing tree, Acacia dealbata, on soil microbial communities and consequences on plant species that are dependent on symbiotic relationships as in the case of Plantago lanceolata. The main results of this work indicate that Acacia dealbata modifies the structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the invaded shrublands and consequently the growth and development of plants that depend on AMF. Plantago lanceolata showed a subst...

  2. Produção de mudas de acácia colonizadas com micorrizas e rizóbio em diferentes recipientes Production of acacia plants colonized with mycorrhizas and rhizobium in different recipients

    Jolimar Antonio Schiavo

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se um experimento em casa de vegetação, com o objetivo de avaliar diferentes métodos na produção de mudas de Acacia mangium Willd, colonizadas com fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs e rizóbio. O delineamento experimental foi o inteiramente casualizado num esquema fatorial 4x2 (controle, FMAs, rizóbio e FMAs + rizóbio x blocos prensados e tubetes de plástico, com seis repetições. Os blocos prensados foram confeccionados com substratos orgânicos (bagaço de cana + torta de filtro de usina açucareira e vermiculita, colocados em fôrma metálica de 60x40x20 cm e prensados a 10 kgf cm-2, a fim de proporcionar agregação do material. A inoculação do rizóbio foi realizada com estirpe selecionada para a espécie (Br 3609, Br 6009. A inoculação de FMAs foi feita no momento da confecção dos blocos. Mudas de Acacia mangium que receberam inóculo de FMAs + rizóbio e produzidas em blocos prensados apresentaram maior produção de matéria seca e conteúdo de N na parte aérea. O conteúdo de P na parte aérea é significativamente maior somente nas mudas infectadas com os FMAs, independentemente do tipo de recipiente.A greenhouse experiment was carried out in order to evaluate different methods to produce Acacia mangium Willd plant seedlings, inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and rhizobium. A completely randomized design in a factorial scheme 4x2 (control, AMF, rhizobium and AMF + rhizobium x pressed blocks and plastic tubes, with six repetitions was used. The pressed blocks used to produce Acacia mangium plants were made with organic residue from sugarcane (sugarcane bagasse + filter cake and vermiculite. The inoculation with rhizobium was done with selected strain (Br 3609, Br 6009. The inoculation with AMF was done at the time when pressed blocks were made. Acacia mangium plants inoculated with both AMF + rhizobium led to a significant increase in dry matter yield and N content of shoot plants, only in

  3. Termites, vertebrate herbivores, and the fruiting success of Acacia drepanolobium.

    Brody, Alison K; Palmer, Todd M; Fox-Dobbs, Kena; Doak, Dan F

    2010-02-01

    In African savannas, vertebrate herbivores are often identified as key determinants of plant growth, survivorship, and reproduction. However, plant reproduction is likely to be the product of responses to a suite of abiotic and biotic factors, including nutrient availability and interactions with antagonists and mutualists. In a relatively simple system, we examined the role of termites (which act as ecosystem engineers--modifying physical habitat and creating islands of high soil fertility), vertebrate herbivores, and symbiotic ants, on the fruiting success of a dominant plant, Acacia drepanolobium, in East African savannas. Using observational data, large-scale experimental manipulations, and analysis of foliar N, we found that Acacia drepanolobium trees growing at the edge of termite mounds were more likely to reproduce than those growing farther away, in off-mound soils. Although vertebrate herbivores preferentially used termite mounds as demonstrated by dung deposits, long-term exclusion of mammalian grazers did not significantly reduce A. drepanolobium fruit production. Leaf N was significantly greater in trees growing next to mounds than in those growing farther away, and this pattern was unaffected by exclusion of vertebrates. Thus, soil enrichment by termites, rather than through dung and urine deposition by large herbivores, is of primary importance to fruit production near mounds. Across all mound-herbivore treatment combinations, trees that harbored Crematogaster sjostedti were more likely to fruit than those that harbored one of the other three ant species. Although C. sjostedti is less aggressive than the other ants, it tends to inhabit large, old trees near termite mounds which are more likely to fruit than smaller ones. Termites play a key role in generating patches of nutrient-rich habitat important to the reproductive success of A. drepanolobium in East African savannas. Enhanced nutrient acquisition from termite mounds appears to allow plants to

  4. Fungos micorrízicos arbusculares em estéril revegetado com Acacia mangium, após mineração de bauxita Colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi in substrate, after bauxite mining, vegetated with Acacia mangium

    Ana Lucy Caproni

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a composição das comunidades de FMAs em áreas revegetadas com Acacia mangium após a mineração de bauxita na região de Porto Trombetas, PA. Foram coletadas amostras de solo compostas nos períodos seco e chuvoso, em áreas revegetadas com Acacia mangium, que receberam inóculos de Glomus clarum e Gigaspora margarita, com 1 e 5 anos de idade. Os solos foram revegetados sem a reposição do horizonte superficial orgânico. Os esporos dos fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs foram extraídos e identificados através de suas características morfológicas. Analisou-se a densidade de esporos e de espécies em cada amostra, a densidade relativa e a freqüência de ocorrência de cada espécie por período de amostragem, além do índice de abundância e freqüência (IAF. Sob o plantio de mudas de A. mangium, a densidade de esporos de FMAs foi elevada e aumentou com a idade, enquanto o número de espécies não variou. Glomus clarum produz alta densidade de esporos na fase inicial do plantio e declina com o tempo, e Gigaspora margarita não esporula nas condições edafoclimáticas locais. A maioria das espécies de FMA não apresenta o mesmo padrão de esporulação nos períodos seco e chuvoso.The objective of this work was to monitor the establishment of Gigaspora margarita and Glomus clarum in reclaimed areas after the bauxite mining in Porto Trombetas, PA, Brazil. Soil samples were collected during the dry and rainy periods under one and five-year-old Acacia mangium trees grown from seedlings that had been inoculated with Glomus clarum and Gigaspora margarita. The exposed subsoil was managed without replacing the organic soil layer. FMA spores were extracted and identified through their morphologic characteristics. Spore density and frequency of each species were determined in each sampling The index of abundance and frequency (IAF were estimated for all samples. Under A. mangium the arbuscular

  5. Carbono orgânico e biomassa microbiana do solo em plantios de Acacia mangium no Cerrado de Roraima Soil organic carbon and soil microbial biomass in Acacia mangium plantation in the Savanna of Roraima

    Sara Magda Oliveira Simões

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar os efeitos de plantios de Acacia mangium, localizados no cerrado em Roraima, sobre o carbono orgânico e biomassa microbiana do solo. Foram realizadas amostragens de solo nas profundidades de 0-20 cm e 20-40 cm em dois plantios de A. mangium com cerca de cinco anos de idade, e em duas áreas de Cerrado nativo consideradas referência. Um dos plantios de A. mangium (localizado na Fazenda Cigolina correspondeu a um plantio homogêneo (espa��amento de 3,6 m entre linhas e 2,0 m entre plantas enquanto que o outro (localizado no Campo Experimental Água Boa - CEAB correspondeu a um plantio em faixas com duas linhas de plantio (espaçamento de 6 m entre linhas, 2,5 m entre plantas e cerca de 30 m entre faixas. As amostras de solo foram analisadas quanto ao carbono orgânico, carbono da biomassa microbiana, respiração basal do solo e quociente metabólico, além de atributos químicos de fertilidade. Foi verificado que os plantios de A. mangium não proporcionaram aumentos significativos do carbono orgânico do solo em comparação às áreas de referência. Entretanto, na média geral, esses plantios proporcionaram aumento do carbono da biomassa microbiana do solo e redução do quociente metabólico, indicando a possibilidade de acúmulo de carbono orgânico no solo em longo prazo. Também foi observado que, em comparação ao plantio da fazenda Cigolina e às áreas de referência, o carbono microbiano do solo foi maior e acompanhado de menor quociente metabólico no plantio de A. mangium no CEAB, mostrando que a estrutura de plantio exerceu influência sobre a biomassa microbiana do solo.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Acacia mangium plantation in the Roraima's Savanna, on soil organic carbon and soil microbial biomass. Soil samplings were collected on the depths of 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm in two Acacia mangium plantation sites, about five years old, and in two sites of native savanna as

  6. Sintomas de deficiência nutricional em mudas de Acacia holosericea em resposta à omissão de macronutrientes Symptoms of nutritional deficiency in seedlings of Acacia holosericea submitted to absence of macronutrients

    Tathiane Santi Sarcinelli

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A Acacia holosericea é uma espécie leguminosa arbórea bastante utilizada na recuperação de áreas degradadas. O conhecimento dos sintomas de deficiência nutricional apresentados por esta espécie possibilita a identificação e a correção de deficiências em exemplares plantados em substratos degradados. Os objetivos deste trabalho foram caracterizar a sintomatologia visual de carências de macronutrientes e avaliar a produção de biomassa e o acúmulo de nutrientes nas raízes e na parte aérea de mudas de Acacia holosericea, submetidas a diferentes soluções nutritivas com exclusão de macronutrientes. Os tratamentos constituíram-se de sete soluções nutritivas: 1 solução completa (SC; 2 SC -N; 3 SC -P; 4 SC -K; 5 SC -Ca; 6 SC -Mg; e 7 SC -S. Os tratamentos -N e Mg foram os que mais afetaram a produção total de biomassa. O decréscimo de produção manifestou-se na seguinte ordem: -N = -Mg > -K > -S > -Ca > SC > -P. As plantas do tratamento -N formaram nódulos no sistema radicular, exibindo teores foliares de N maiores que as plantas do tratamento SC. Com exceção dos tratamentos SC e -P, todos os outros apresentaram sintomas de deficiência. A ausência de S alterou a disposição natural dos filódios novos da A. holosericea.Acacia holosericea is a leguminous species that has been extensively used in land reclamation programs. The knowledge of its nutritional symptoms allows the identification and correction of deficiencies in individuals planted in degraded substrates. The aim of this work was to characterize the behavior of seedlings of A. holosericea submitted to different nutritional solutions with absence of macronutrients. The treatments consisted of seven nutritional solutions: 1 Complete solution (SC; 2 SC - N; 3 SC -P; 4 SC -K; 5 SC -Ca; 6 SC -Mg; 7 SC -S. Treatments -N and -Mg were the ones that most affected biomass production. Decrease in biomass production occurred in the following order: -N = -Mg > -K > -S

  7. Molecular characterization of a cellulose synthase gene (AaxmCesA1) isolated from an Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium hybrid.

    Yong, Seok Yien Christina; Wickneswari, Ratnam

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose is the major component of plant cell walls, providing mechanical strength to the structural framework of plants. In association with lignin, hemicellulose, protein and pectin, cellulose forms the strong yet flexible bio-composite tissue of wood. Wood formation is an essential biological process and is of significant importance to the cellulosic private sector industry. Cellulose synthase genes encode the catalytic subunits of a large protein complex responsible for the biogenesis of cellulose in higher plants. The hybrid Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium represents an important source of tree cellulose for forest-based product manufacturing, with enormous economic potential. In this work, we isolate the first cellulose synthase gene, designated AaxmCesA1, from this species. The isolated full-length AaxmCesA1 cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 1,064 amino acids. Sequence analyses revealed that AaxmCesA1 cDNA possesses the key motif characteristics of a CesA protein. AaxmCesA1 shares more than 75 % amino acid sequence identity with CesA proteins from other plant species. Subsequently, the full-length AaxmCesA1 gene of 7,389 bp with partial regulatory and 13 intron regions was also isolated. Relative gene expression analysis by quantitative PCR in different tissues of the Acacia hybrid, suggests the involvement of the AaxmCesA1 gene in primary cell wall synthesis of rapidly dividing young root cells. Similarity analyses using Blast algorithms also suggests a role in primary cell wall deposition in the Acacia hybrid. Southern analysis predicts that AaxmCesA1 is a member of a multigene family with at least two isoforms in the genome of the Acacia hybrid. PMID:24415841

  8. Isolation and characterization of CCoAOMT in interspecific hybrid of Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium--a key gene in lignin biosynthesis.

    Pang, S L; Ong, S S; Lee, H H; Zamri, Z; Kandasamy, K I; Choong, C Y; Wickneswari, R

    2014-01-01

    This study was directed at the understanding of the function of CCoAOMT isolated from Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium. Full length cDNA of the Acacia hybrid CCoAOMT (AhCCoAOMT) was 1024-bp long, containing 750-bp coding regions, with one major open reading frame of 249 amino acids. On the other hand, full length genomic sequence of the CCoAOMT (AhgflCCoAOMT) was 2548 bp long, containing three introns and four exons with a 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of 391 bp in length. The 5'UTR of the characterized CCoAOMT gene contains various regulatory elements. Southern analysis revealed that the Acacia hybrid has more than three copies of the CCoAOMT gene. Real-time PCR showed that this gene was expressed in root, inner bark, leaf, flower and seed pod of the Acacia hybrid. Downregulation of the homologous CCoAOMT gene in tobacco by antisense (AS) and intron-containing hairpin (IHP) constructs containing partial AhCCoAOMT led to reduction in lignin content. Expression of the CCoAOMT in AS line (pART-HAS78-03) and IHP line (pART-HIHP78-06) was reduced respectively by 37 and 75% compared to the control, resulting in a decrease in the estimated lignin content by 24 and 56%, respectively. AhCCoAOMT was found to have altered not only S and G units but also total lignin content, which is of economic value to the pulp industry. Subsequent polymorphism analysis of this gene across eight different genetic backgrounds each of A. mangium and A. auriculiformis revealed 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in A. auriculiformis CCoAOMT and 30 SNPs in A. mangium CCoAOMT. PMID:25222227

  9. A mycorrhiza helper bacterium enhances ectomycorrhizal and endomycorrhizal symbiosis of Australian Acacia species.

    Duponnois, R; Plenchette, C

    2003-04-01

    The aims of this study were to test the effects of a mycorrhiza helper bacterium (MHB), Pseudomonas monteilii strain HR13 on the mycorrhization of (1) an Australian Acacia, A. holosericea, by several ectomycorrhizal fungi or one endomycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices, and (2) several Australian Acacia species by Pisolithus alba strain IR100 under glasshouse conditions. Bacterial inoculant HR13 significantly promoted ectomycorrhizal colonization for all the Acacia species, from 45.8% ( A. mangium) to 70.3% ( A. auriculiformis). A stimulating effect of HR13 on the ectomycorrhizal establishment was recorded with all the fungal isolates (strains of Pisolithus and Scleroderma). The same effect of bacteria on the frequency of endomycorrhizal colonization of A. holosericea seedlings by G. intraradices with vesicles and hyphae frequencies was recorded. The stimulation of saprophytic fungal growth by MHB is usually the main mechanism that could explain this bacterial effect on mycorrhizal establishment. MHB could stimulate the production of phenolic compounds such as hypaphorine and increase the aggressiveness of the fungal symbiont. However, no significant effect of MHB on fungal growth was recorded with Scleroderma isolates under axenic conditions but positive bacterial effects were observed with Pisolithus strains. From a practical viewpoint, it appears that MHB could stimulate the mycorrhizal colonization of Australian Acacia species with ectomycorrhizal or endomycorrhizal fungi, and could also facilitate controlled mycorrhization in nursery practices where Acacia species are grown for forestation purposes. PMID:12682830

  10. Salinity tolerance potential of two acacia species at early seedling stage

    Soil salinity is a major environmental issue in arid and semiarid regions of the world. Acacia has very important role for salt affected barren lands due to its high salinity tolerance potential. The aim of the present study was to explore the genetic differences among Acacia ampliceps and Acacia nilotica regarding their response to salinity. Three-weeks old seedlings of both species were transplanted in half strength Hoagland nutrient solution having five salt levels (control,100, 200, 300 and 400 mM NaCl) with four replications in completely randomized design with factorial arrangement. After eight weeks of transplantation, the plants were harvested and data for shoot and root length and their fresh and dry weights were recorded. Na/sup +/, K/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/concentration of both root and shoot was determined. All the growth parameters of both species declined significantly in response to salinity. Acacia ampliceps was more salt tolerant than Acacia nilotica with better growth owing to higher K/sup +/: Na/sup +/ ratio in plant tissues. (author)

  11. Antiatherosclerotic and Cardioprotective Potential of Acacia senegal Seeds in Diet-Induced Atherosclerosis in Rabbits

    Heera Ram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acacia senegal L. (Fabaceae seeds are essential ingredient of “Pachkutta,” a specific Rajasthani traditional food. The present study explored antiatherosclerotic and cardioprotective potential of Acacia senegal seed extract, if any, in hypercholesterolemic diet-induced atherosclerosis in rabbits. Atherosclerosis in rabbits was induced by feeding normal diet supplemented with oral administration of cholesterol (500 mg/kg body weight/day mixed with coconut oil for 15 days. Circulating total cholesterol (TC, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C, LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C, triglycerides, and VLDL-cholesterol (VLDL-C levels; atherogenic index (AI; cardiac lipid peroxidation (LPO; planimetric studies of aortal wall; and histopathological studies of heart, aorta, kidney, and liver were performed. Apart from reduced atherosclerotic plaques in aorta (6.34±0.72 and increased lumen volume (51.65±3.66, administration with ethanolic extract of Acacia senegal seeds (500 mg/kg/day, p.o. for 45 days to atherosclerotic rabbits significantly lowered serum TC, LDL-C, triglyceride, and VLDL-C levels and atherogenic index as compared to control. Atherogenic diet-induced cardiac LPO and histopathological abnormalities in aorta wall, heart, kidney, and liver were reverted to normalcy by Acacia senegal seed extract administration. The findings of the present study reveal that Acacia senegal seed extract ameliorated diet-induced atherosclerosis and could be considered as lead in the development of novel therapeutics.

  12. Acacia-gelatin microencapsulated liposomes: preparation, stability, and release of acetylsalicylic acid.

    Dong, C; Rogers, J A

    1993-01-01

    Liposomes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) containing acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) have been microencapsulated by acacia-gelatin using the complex coacervation technique as a potential oral drug delivery system. The encapsulation efficiency of ASA was unaltered by the microencapsulation process. The stability of the microencapsulated liposomes in sodium cholate solutions at pH 5.6 was much greater than the corresponding liposomes. The optimum composition and conditions for stability and ASA release were 3.0% acacia-gelatin and a 1- to 2-hr formaldehyde hardening time. Approximately 25% ASA was released in the first 6 hr from microencapsulated liposomes at 23 degrees C and the kinetics followed matrix-controlled release (Q varies; is directly proportional to t1/2). At 37 degrees C, this increased to 75% released in 30 min followed by a slow constant release, likely due to lowering of the phase transition temperature of DPPC by the acacia-gelatin to near 37 degrees C. At both temperatures, the release from control liposomes was even more rapid. Hardening times of 4 hr and an acacia-gelatin concentration of 5% resulted in a lower stability of liposomes and a faster release of ASA. It is concluded that under appropriate conditions the microencapsulation of liposomes by acacia-gelatin may increase their potential as an oral drug delivery system. PMID:8430052

  13. Future NAS Flight Demand Generation Tool Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aviation and Air Traffic Management researchers are increasingly utilizing complex regional or NAS-wide simulations to evaluate future concepts. These analyses...

  14. Phenolic extracts from Acacia mangium bark and their antioxidant activities.

    Zhang, Liangliang; Chen, Jiahong; Wang, Yongmei; Wu, Dongmei; Xu, Man

    2010-05-01

    Phenolic compounds are present at very high concentrations in the bark of Acacia mangium. These compounds are known to have strong antioxidant activity and thus different beneficial effects on human health. Phenolic compounds in bark of A. mangium were extracted and their antioxidant activities were investigated using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. A central composite design has been employed to optimize the experimental conditions for a high total phenolic content and antioxidant activity. The desirability function approach has been employed to simultaneously optimize the three responses: total phenols, antiradical activity and FRAP. An extraction time of 90 min, liquid-solid ratio of 5, and temperature of 50 degrees C was predicted for the optimum experimental conditions using the desirability function. A significant linear relationship between antioxidant potency, antiradical activity and the content of phenolic compounds of bark extracts was observed. The structures of condensed tannins isolated from A. mangium were characterized by MALDI-TOF MS analyses. Condensed tannin oligomers from A. mangium were shown to be heterogeneous mixtures consisting of procyanidin and prodelphinidin structural units with polymerization degrees up to 9. PMID:20657499

  15. Photosynthesis and antioxidant enzymes of phyllodes of Acacia mangium.

    Yu; Ong

    2000-10-16

    Physiological processes are influenced by environmental factors and plant characteristics. The distribution of photosynthetic capacity of phyllodes of Acacia mangium Willd. seedlings was studied in relation to the in vivo photosystem II (PSII) function, photosynthetic gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX)) of phyllodes at different positions on seedlings. There was a vertical gradient in photosynthetic capacity of phyllodes along the shoot. Phyllode 1 (at the apex) showed negative carbon uptake at PPFD lower than 400 µmol m(-2) s(-1). High photosynthetic capacities, chlorophyll concentrations, DeltaF/F'(m), and q(P) were observed in phyllodes 4, 6 and 8. The high photosynthetic capacities of mature phyllodes could be attributed to the enhanced availability of CO(2) and the high efficiency of PSII in energy absorption and utilization. Total SOD and APX activities (on a dry weight basis) were highest at phyllode 1 and decreased as the phyllodes matured. The high photosynthetic capacity and low respiration loss in mature phyllodes could be important factors, responsible for the rapid establishment and fast growth of A. mangium in reforestation programs. PMID:11011098

  16. Field grown Acacia Mangium: how intensive is root growth?

    Under rainfed conditions, root development of trees can be very unpredictable and variable, depending on the amount and distribution of rainfall received. This becomes more critical when the rainfall is seasonal and the soil has a high clay content. Our investigation dealt with the root development of Acacia mangium established as plantation forest on a soil with heavy clay texture in Kemasul Forest Reserve, Malaysia. The distribution of active roots was measured at 9- and 21- month-old plantations using the radioactive P injection method. Growth at different distances from the tree base and at different soil depths was studied. After nine months of field planting, we found that roots were mostly concentrated at the surface within 1000 mm distance from the tree base. At one year after the first measurement, roots were traced as far as 6400 mm away. A large part of these roots, however, were detected within 3700 mm distance in the upper 300 mm soil. At this stage, roots can still did not go deeper than 450 mm depth, probably due to the high clay content at lower depth and low pH. This rapid root growth indicates that below-ground competition can be very intense if this species is established as a mixed-species plantation

  17. Phenolic Extracts from Acacia mangium Bark and Their Antioxidant Activities

    Liangliang Zhang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds are present at very high concentrations in the bark of Acacia mangium. These compounds are known to have strong antioxidant activity and thus different beneficial effects on human health. Phenolic compounds in bark of A. mangium were extracted and their antioxidant activities were investigated using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical-scavenging and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays. A central composite design has been employed to optimize the experimental conditions for a high total phenolic content and antioxidant activity. The desirability function approach has been employed to simultaneously optimize the three responses: total phenols, antiradical activity and FRAP. An extraction time of 90 min, liquid-solid ratio of 5, and temperature of 50 °C was predicted for the optimum experimental conditions using the desirability function. A significant linear relationship between antioxidant potency, antiradical activity and the content of phenolic compounds of bark extracts was observed. The structures of condensed tannins isolated from A. mangium were characterized by MALDI-TOF MS analyses. Condensed tannin oligomers from A. mangium were shown to be heterogeneous mixtures consisting of procyanidin and prodelphinidin structural units with polymerization degrees up to 9.

  18. Characterization and Physicochemical Properties of Condensed Tannins from Acacia catechu.

    Duval, Antoine; Avérous, Luc

    2016-03-01

    Condensed tannins from Acacia catechu were carefully studied to determine their chemical structure and physicochemical properties. The combined use of MALDI-TOF-MS and (13)C NMR revealed that catechin and epicatechin are the predominant monomers. Most of the compounds were dimers, as confirmed by size exclusion chromatography measurements. To evaluate their potential as aromatic building block in polymer synthesis, special care was given to the characterization and quantification of the different OH groups. A detailed (31)P NMR analysis showed the predominance of catechin, with a catechin/epicatechin ratio of 4.2:1. Two distinct (1)H NMR measurements confirmed the quantification. The thermal properties were also determined: the tannins showed a high temperature of degradation (ca. 190 °C) and a high glass transition temperature (ca. 140 °C), allowing for thermal processing or chemical reactions at relatively high temperature. A. catechu tannins thus present interesting features to be used as aromatic building blocks in polymer materials. PMID:26853705

  19. Transient behaviour and control of the ACACIA plant

    This article deals with dynamic modelling and control of the ACACIA plant. A one-dimensional flow model describing the helium flow and the two-phase water flow is used through the whole plant, with different source terms in different pieces of equipment. A stage-by-stage model is produced for the radial compressor and axial turbine. Other models include the recuperator, water/helium heat exchangers, a natural convection evaporator, valves, etc. The models have been checked by comparison of the transient behavior with several other models, e.g. produced in RELAP. The dynamic behavior of this plant is analysed and a control structure is designed. First the requirements and options for a control system design are investigated. A number of possible control valve positions in the flowsheet are tested with transients in order to make an argued choice. The model is subsequently used to determine the optimal working conditions for different heat and power demands, these are used as set-points for the control system. Then the interaction between manipulated and controlled variables is mapped and based on this information a choice for coupling them in decentralised feedback control loops is made. This control structure is then tuned and tested. It can be concluded that both heat and power demand can be followed with acceptable performance over a wide range. (author)

  20. Low chitinase activity in Acacia myrmecophytes: a potential trade-off between biotic and chemical defences?

    Heil, M.; Staehelin, Christian; McKey, D.

    We determined chitinase activity in leaves of four myrmecophytic and four non-myrmecophytic leguminous species at the plants' natural growing sites in Mexico. Myrmecophytic plants (or 'ant plants') have obligate mutualisms with ants protecting them against herbivores and pathogenic fungi. Plant chitinases can be considered a reliable measure of plant resistance to pathogenic fungi. The myrmecophytic Acacia species, which were colonised by mutualistic ants, exhibited at least six-fold lower levels of chitinase activity compared with the non-myrmecophytic Acacia farnesiana and three other non-myrmecophytes. Though belonging to different phylogenetic groups, the myrmecophytic Acacia species formed one distinct group in the data set, which was clearly separated from the non-myrmecophytic species. These findings allowed for comparison between two recent hypotheses that attempt to explain low chitinase activity in ant plants. Most probably, chitinases are reduced in myrmecophytic plant species because these are effectively defended indirectly due to their symbiosis with mutualistic ants.

  1. An unusual clinical presentation of plasma cell gingivitis related to "Acacia" containing herbal toothpaste

    Anjali Makkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old female patient presented with unusual enlargement of the gingiva with generalized alveolar bone loss. In spite of periodontal therapy, including plaque control, scaling, root planning and surgical treatment, recurrence with the same degree of the gingival enlargement and further loss of attachment level occurred. Biopsy revealed dense infiltration of normal plasma cells separated by collagenous stroma. Discontinuation of herbal toothpaste resulted in remarkable remission of the gingival enlargement within 2 weeks. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of toothpaste components disclosed " Acacia" as an etiologic antigenic agent and confirmed the diagnosis of plasma cell gingivitis (PCG. Usually, PCG is not associated with the loss of attachment. This case report appears to be the first publication to document an atypical presentation of PCG with generalized aggressive periodontitis related to the use of herbal toothpaste containing " Acacia" extract from the tree "Acacia Arabica."

  2. An unusual clinical presentation of plasma cell gingivitis related to "Acacia" containing herbal toothpaste.

    Makkar, Anjali; Tewari, Shikha; Kishor, Kamal; Kataria, Santprakash

    2013-07-01

    A 17-year-old female patient presented with unusual enlargement of the gingiva with generalized alveolar bone loss. In spite of periodontal therapy, including plaque control, scaling, root planning and surgical treatment, recurrence with the same degree of the gingival enlargement and further loss of attachment level occurred. Biopsy revealed dense infiltration of normal plasma cells separated by collagenous stroma. Discontinuation of herbal toothpaste resulted in remarkable remission of the gingival enlargement within 2 weeks. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of toothpaste components disclosed "Acacia" as an etiologic antigenic agent and confirmed the diagnosis of plasma cell gingivitis (PCG). Usually, PCG is not associated with the loss of attachment. This case report appears to be the first publication to document an atypical presentation of PCG with generalized aggressive periodontitis related to the use of herbal toothpaste containing "Acacia" extract from the tree "Acacia Arabica." PMID:24174738

  3. Cambios provocados en el suelo por la invasión de acacias australianas

    P. Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available La invasión por acacias australianas altera profundamente tanto las características abióticas del suelo como la estructura de las comunidades microbianas edáficas, modificando los procesos y servicios de los ecosistemas invadidos. En general, las acacias invasoras conllevan un gran aumento del contenido de hojarasca, carbono y nitrógeno, así como modificaciones en los ciclos biogeoquímicos de estos elementos y una disminución de la disponibilidad hídrica en los ecosistemas invadidos. Producen también modificaciones en la diversidad funcional y genética de las comunidades de bacterias y hongos del suelo. Durante la invasión por algunas especies de acacias australianas se ha comprobado además que se produce una co-invasión de bacterias fijadoras de nitrógeno exóticas asociadas a las acacias. Estas bacterias exóticas pueden asociarse a leguminosas nativas que existen en el ecosistema invadido lo que conlleva una disrupción de la simbiosis entre leguminosas y rizobios nativos. Todos estos cambios en las propiedades abióticas y bióticas del suelo pueden tener consecuencias negativas para las especies vegetales nativas, reduciendo su crecimiento o impidiendo su establecimiento. Además, los cambios introducidos por las acacias refuerzan la invasión ya que favorecen la germinación, crecimiento y capacidad competidora de estas especies. Los estudios realizados sugieren que estos procesos de retroalimentación positivos entre las acacias y los suelos que invaden aumentan con el tiempo de invasión y dificultan la recuperación natural de los ecosistemas.

  4. Effet des contraintes hydrique et saline sur la germination de quelques acacias africains

    Ndour, P.; Danthu, P.

    1998-01-01

    Notre étude a porté sur la germination de neuf espèces ouest africaines du genre #Acacia$ originaires de zones bioclimatiques contrastées (#Acacia albida$, #A. dudgeoni$, #A. ehrenbergiana$, #A. nilotica adansonii$, #A. nilotica tomentosa$, #A. raddiana$, #A. senegal$, #A. seyal$ et #A. sieberiana$) soumises à une contrainte saline ou hydrique simulée par apport, dans l'eau d'imbibition des graines, de chlorure de sodium (de 0 à 40 g/l, correspondant à une pression osmotique de 0 à -2,4 MPa),...

  5. Condensed tannins from acacia mangium bark: Characterization by spot tests and FTIR

    Bharudin, Muhammad Azizi; Zakaria, Sarani; Chia, Chin Hua

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the adaptation and evaluation of one chemical tests for tannins characterization in acacia mangium bark. Acid butanol test developed to identify respectively condensed tannins is described. The two traditional tests used for tannin characterization namely ferric test and vanillin test were also performed and their functional also discussed. Condensed tannins were extracted from acacia mangium bark using water medium in presence of three different concentration basic reagent of NaOH(5%,10% and 15%) and were characterized by FT-IR spectrometry.

  6. Actividad antimicrobiana de Waltheria indica y Acacia farnesiana

    Nidia M. Rojas Hernández

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Entre las plantas medicinales empleadas en Tierra Caliente, estado de Guerrero, México, se encuentran el Güinar (Waltheria indica L., Esterculiaceae y el Huizache (Acacia farnesiana L. Willd, Mimosaceae. En ambas, la infusión de la raíz se usa popularmente para las diarreas. Con la finalidad de validar las propiedades que se les atribuyen a estas especies vegetales, el presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo evaluar la actividad antimicrobiana in vitro de los extractos acuosos y etanólicos preparados con las raíces de ambas plantas. A estos extractos, se les determinó el rendimiento de sólidos solubles totales y se les realizó el análisis fitoquímico general. La actividad antimicrobiana se evaluó frente a 25 cultivos bacterianos, dos cepas de hongos filamentosos y 13 cepas de siete especies de levaduras del género Candida. En ambas plantas, los extractos etanólicos tuvieron mayor actividad que los acuosos. Los extractos etanólicos de estas especies vegetales afectaron el crecimiento de siete cepas bacterianas, lo cual correspondió al 28 % de los cultivos evaluados. Esta actividad fue bacteriostática y bactericida para los dos extractos, a los que se les determinaron las Concentraciones Mínimas Inhibitoria (CMI y Bactericida (CMB frente a los cultivos sensibles. Solo se detectó actividad antifúngica por el extracto de W. indica sobre la cepa de C. utilis. La acción sobre bacterias enteropatógenas in vitro valida el uso de estas plantas en medicina tradicional y reafirma la necesidad de estudios toxicológicos para asegurar la inocuidad de su uso.

  7. Toxicological studies of aqueous extract of Acacia nilotica root

    Alli Lukman Adewale

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acacia nilotica is a widely used plant in traditional medical practice in Northern Nigeria and many African countries. The aim of this study was to determine the toxicological effects of a single dose (acute and of repeated doses (sub-acute administration of aqueous extract of A. nilotica root in rodents, following our earlier study on antiplasmodial activity. In the acute toxicity test, three groups of Swiss albino mice were orally administered aqueous extract of A. nilotica (50, 300 and 2000 mg/kg body weight and signs of toxicity were observed daily for 14 days. In the sub-acute toxicity study, four groups of 12 rats (6 male and 6 female were used. Group 1 received 10 ml/kg b.w distilled water (control, while groups 2, 3 and 4 received 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg b.w of the extract, respectively, for 28 consecutive days by oral gavage. Signs of toxicity/mortality, food and water intake and body weight changes were observed. Biochemical parameters were analysed in both plasma and liver homogenate. In the acute and sub-acute toxicity studies, the extract did not cause mortality. A significant reduction in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase was observed at 250 and 500 mg/kg b.w, while alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities were significantly higher than control values at 500 mg/kg b.w. The aqueous extract of A. nilotica was found to be safe in single dose administration in mice but repeated administration of doses higher than 250 mg/kg b.w of the extract for 28 days in rats may cause hepatotoxicity.

  8. Biologia reprodutiva de Acacia mearnsii De Wild.: receptividade de estigmas Reproductive biology of Acacia mearnsii De Wild.: stigma receptivity

    Eudes Maria Stiehl-Alves

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar a receptividade de estigmas de Acacia mearnsii De Wild. em 20 árvores da Área de Produção de Sementes (APS da Fazenda Locatelli, da empresa SETA S.A., no município de Butiá (RS e comparar os períodos de receptividade de estigmas e de viabilidade polínica em diversas fases da abertura floral. Foi utilizado como método de colorimetria o reagente de Baker para indicar a receptividade e a viabilidade. As análises foram conduzidas em delineamento inteiramente casualizado e a estatística χ2 foi utilizada para verificar a significância dos eventos estudados. Foi observada receptividade no início da abertura floral (71%, alcançando a total receptividade (100% em plena antese. A viabilidade polínica foi detectada no início da antese (77% e em total abertura floral (88%. Na fase de senescência foram observados estigmas receptivos (50% e políades viáveis (23%. Há sobreposição da fase de viabilidade masculina e de receptividade feminina, aumentando as chances de autopolinização. Na maioria das árvores analisadas (85% foi observada a total receptividade (100% nos estigmas amostrados. Em três árvores (15% observou-se uma média inferior a 95% de estigmas receptivos. Não foi observada diferença significativa pelo teste do χ2 na receptividade dos estigmas no germoplasma analisado, sugerindo que o genótipo não interfere diretamente para a receptividade dos estigmas.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stigma receptivity of Acacia mearnsii De Wild. in 20 trees of the Seed Production Area on the Fazenda Locatelli of the company SETA S.A., in the county of Butiá, state of Rio Grande do Sul, and to compare the periods of stigma receptivity and pollen viability at different stages of flower opening. The colorimetry method of the Baker reagent was used to determine receptivity and viability. The analyses were evaluated in a completely randomized design and the χ2 statistics were used to

  9. Effect of efficient microorganisms on cation exchange capacity in acacia seedlings (Acacia melanoxylon) for soil recovery in Mondonedo, Cundinamarca

    We determined the effect of efficient microorganisms (EM) on the cation exchange capacity for soil recovery in the municipality of Mondonedo, Cundinamarca. A greenhouse unit was installed in order to maintain stable conditions. After harvesting, sifted and homogenization of the soil sample, initial physical and chemical analyses were made. For the experimental units we used Acacia melanoxylon seedlings from Zabrinsky. A completely randomized design was done with eight treatments and three repetitions. For the maintenance and monitoring of the seedlings behaviour, a frequency of irrigation of three times per week was found. The application of the EM was done during three months: in the first month, it was applied four times (once a week); during the second month, it was applied twice (biweekly), and during the third month there was only one application. Additionally, every 15 days morphological analyses were made (number of leaves, branches and stem diameter). In the end, soil samples were taken from each plant pot. In the laboratory we analysed the cation exchange capacity, alkali ion exchange, saturation alkali, relations between elements and plant tissue. These were done using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Statistical analyses consisted on multiple comparisons test and variance tests, in order to find whether or not treatments exhibited significant differences. In that way, the best alternative for improving environmental quality of eroded soils as the Zabrinsky desert is the efficient microorganisms in 5% doses in irrigation water. Additionally, the cation exchange capacity must be enhanced using organic fertilizers (compost, mulch and gallinaza) in one pound doses, and chemical fertilizers: electrolytic Mn (0.0002 g), Cu (0.0002 g), Zn (0.0001 g), URFOS 44 (166.66 g) and klip-boro (5 g).

  10. Efeito da quitosana na emergência, desenvolvimento inicial e caracterização bioquímica de plântulas de Acacia mearnsii

    Álvaro Rodrigo Freddo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A quitosana é um polímero que vem sendo testado na proteção e indução de resistência em frutos, contra patógenos causadores de podridões. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo principal testar o efeito do tratamento de sementes de Acacia mearnsii com esse produto, bem como seu efeito no desenvolvimento inicial e na caracterização bioquímica das plântulas. Para tanto realizou-se este trabalho na Unepe de Silvicultura e no Laboratório de Fitossanidade da Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná - Câmpus Dois Vizinhos. As sementes de Acacia mearnsii foram tratadas com diferentes concentrações de quitosana (0; 0,25; 0,5; 1 e 2% e plantadas em tubetes com o substrato contaminado com o fungo Rhizoctonia solani. Avaliou-se aos 22 dias após a semeadura, a porcentagem de emergência, o índice de velocidade de emergência, a altura das plântulas, o comprimento da radícula, a massa da matéria fresca, além das variáveis bioquímicas dos tecidos foliares, o teor de proteínas totais e de compostos fenólicos e a atividade da enzima fenilalanina amônia-liase (FAL. Os resultados obtidos demonstraram que o uso de concentrações de quitosana entre 0,6 e 0,9% foram mais favoráveis à emergência e ao desenvolvimento das plântulas. Bioquimicamente, a quitosana demonstrou capacidade de alteração do teor de proteínas e da atividade da FAL, enzima a qual, está no ponto de ramificação entre o metabolismo primário e o secundário, indicando a possibilidade de ter havido ativação do sistema de defesa vegetal das plântulas, pelo tratamento das sementes com quitosana.

  11. A ninety-day oral toxicity study of a new type of processed gum arabic, from Acacia tree (Acacia senegal) exudates, in F344 rats.

    Doi, Y; Ichihara, T; Hagiwara, A; Imai, N; Tamano, S; Orikoshi, H; Ogasawara, K; Sasaki, Y; Nakamura, M; Shirai, T

    2006-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate and characterize any subchronic toxicity of a new type of gum arabic (SUPER GUM [Acacia(sen)SUPER GUM]), a naturally processed polysaccharide exudate from gum acacia trees (Acacia senegal), when administered to both sexes of F344 rats at dietary levels of 0 (control), 1.25%, 2.5%, and 5.0% (10 rats/sex/group). During the study, the treatment had no effects on clinical signs, survival, body weights, and food and water consumption, or on findings of urinalysis, ophthalmology, hematology, or blood biochemistry. Gross pathology and histopathology exhibited no differences of toxicological significance between control and treated rats. Increased relative cecum (filled) weights, evident in both sexes of 5.0% group and females of 1.25% and 2.5% groups, were considered to be a physiological adaptation. Thus, the results indicated the toxic level of SUPER GUM to be more than 5.0%, and the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) was concluded to be 5.0% (3,117 mg/kg body weights/day for males, and 3,296 mg/kg body weights/day for males) from the present study. PMID:16256256

  12. Efeito da quitosana na emergência, desenvolvimento inicial e caracterização bioquímica de plântulas de Acacia mearnsii Effect of chitosan in emergency, initial development and biochemical characterization of acacia mearnsii seedlings

    Álvaro Rodrigo Freddo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A quitosana é um polímero que vem sendo testado na proteção e indução de resistência em frutos, contra patógenos causadores de podridões. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo principal testar o efeito do tratamento de sementes de Acacia mearnsii com esse produto, bem como seu efeito no desenvolvimento inicial e na caracterização bioquímica das plântulas. Para tanto realizou-se este trabalho na Unepe de Silvicultura e no Laboratório de Fitossanidade da Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná - Câmpus Dois Vizinhos. As sementes de Acacia mearnsii foram tratadas com diferentes concentrações de quitosana (0; 0,25; 0,5; 1 e 2% e plantadas em tubetes com o substrato contaminado com o fungo Rhizoctonia solani. Avaliou-se aos 22 dias após a semeadura, a porcentagem de emergência, o índice de velocidade de emergência, a altura das plântulas, o comprimento da radícula, a massa da matéria fresca, além das variáveis bioquímicas dos tecidos foliares, o teor de proteínas totais e de compostos fenólicos e a atividade da enzima fenilalanina amônia-liase (FAL. Os resultados obtidos demonstraram que o uso de concentrações de quitosana entre 0,6 e 0,9% foram mais favoráveis à emergência e ao desenvolvimento das plântulas. Bioquimicamente, a quitosana demonstrou capacidade de alteração do teor de proteínas e da atividade da FAL, enzima a qual, está no ponto de ramificação entre o metabolismo primário e o secundário, indicando a possibilidade de ter havido ativação do sistema de defesa vegetal das plântulas, pelo tratamento das sementes com quitosana.Chitosan is a polymer that has been tested for production as well the induction of resistance from fruits against pathogens that cause rots. The objective of this work was to test the effect of chitosan treatments upon Acacia mearnsii seeds in relation to initial development and biochemical characterization of seedlings. The present research was carried out in

  13. Preparation and Evaluation of Pellets Using Acacia and Tragacanth by Extrusion-Spheronization

    S. Pirmoradi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Extrusion-spheronization is an established technique for the production of pellets for pharmaceutical applications. In this study, the feasibility and influence of the incorporation of acacia, by itself and in combination with tragacanth, on the ability of formulations containing 2 model of drugs (ibuprofen and theophylline to form spherical pellets by extrusion-spheronization was investigated.Material and Methods: Formulations containing different ratios of acacia and tragacanth (8:2, 9:1, and 10:0 and different drug concentrations (20%, 40%, and 60% were prepared, on the basis of a 32 full factorial design. Pellet properties, such as aspect ratio, sphericity (image analysis, crushing strength and elastic modulus (mechanical tests, mean dissolution time, and dissolution profiles were evaluated. The effect of particular factors on responses was determined by linear regression analysis.Results: The sphericity, drug release rate, and the mechanical properties of the pellets were affected by the amounts and types of the drugs, and the ratio of the gums. Acacia, relative to tragacanth, produced pellets with higher mechanical strength and a faster drug release rate. Addition of small amounts of tragacanth to ibuprofen formulations resulted in matrix pellets with slow drug release.Conclusion: The results showed that acacia and tragacanth can be used successfully as 2 natural binders in the pellet formulations.

  14. STRATEGI DIVERSIFIKASI PRODUK KAYU OLAHAN Acacia mangium (studi kasus : PT. Musi Hutan Persada

    Hamzah Hamzah

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The objective of this study is to suggest  the best wood  products of Acacia mangium  that have  high value-added as an alternative business and to formulate the fitting  strategy. This study  is descriptive case study applying  purposive sampling method which involved wood product Experts and Senior PT. Musi Hutan Persada Management.  Data have been analyzed through Exponential Compare Method (MPE to select the best product alternative based on eleven set criteria, using AHP method, Hayami value-added Analysis, and Cost Analysis.  The study shows that there are five superior Acacia mangium based products, namely 1 Sawnwood and woodworking (KGKO, 2 Furniture, 3 Medium Density Fibreboard (MDF, 4 Tannin-glue of Acacia mangium  bark and 5 Wood Charcoal.  And  Sawnwood and Woodworking (KGKO, Furniture, and   Tannin-glue  have the best chance.  Best business strategy to be adhered by MHP, “related-diversification”, then is  to continue utilizing  Acacia mangium wood  as renewable resources,  integrated and sustainable business.

  15. Modeling relaxation length and density of acacia mangium wood using gamma - ray attenuation technique

    Wood density measurement is related to the several factors that influence wood quality. In this paper, density, relaxation length and half-thickness value of eight ages, 3, 5, 7, 10, 11, 13 and 15 year-old of Acacia mangium wood were determined using gamma radiation from 137Cs source. Results show that Acacia mangium tree of age 3 year has the highest relaxation length of 83.33 cm and least density of 0.43 gcm-3, while the tree of age 15 year has the least Relaxation length of 28.56 cm and highest density of 0.76 gcm-3. Results also show that the 3 year-old Acacia mangium wood has the highest half thickness value of 57.75 cm and 15 year-old tree has the least half thickness value of 19.85 cm. Two mathematical models have been developed for the prediction of density, variation with relaxation length and half-thickness value of different age of tree. A good agreement (greater than 85% in most cases) was observed between the measured values and predicted ones. Very good linear correlation was found between measured density and the age of tree (R2 = 0.824), and between estimated density and Acacia mangium tree age (R2 = 0.952). (Author)

  16. Invasiveness in introduced Australian acacias: the role of species traits and geneome size

    Gallagher, R. V.; Leishmann, M. R.; Miller, J. T.; Hui, C.; Richardson, D. M.; Suda, Jan; Trávníček, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2011), s. 884-897. ISSN 1366-9516 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Acacia * biological invasions * flow cytometry Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.830, year: 2011

  17. Integration of complete chloroplast genome sequences with small amplicon datasets improves phylogenetic resolution in Acacia.

    Williams, Anna V; Miller, Joseph T; Small, Ian; Nevill, Paul G; Boykin, Laura M

    2016-03-01

    Combining whole genome data with previously obtained amplicon sequences has the potential to increase the resolution of phylogenetic analyses, particularly at low taxonomic levels or where recent divergence, rapid speciation or slow genome evolution has resulted in limited sequence variation. However, the integration of these types of data for large scale phylogenetic studies has rarely been investigated. Here we conduct a phylogenetic analysis of the whole chloroplast genome and two nuclear ribosomal loci for 65 Acacia species from across the most recent Acacia phylogeny. We then combine this data with previously generated amplicon sequences (four chloroplast loci and two nuclear ribosomal loci) for 508 Acacia species. We use several phylogenetic methods, including maximum likelihood bootstrapping (with and without constraint) and ExaBayes, in order to determine the success of combining a dataset of 4000bp with one of 189,000bp. The results of our study indicate that the inclusion of whole genome data gave a far better resolved and well supported representation of the phylogenetic relationships within Acacia than using only amplicon sequences, with the greatest support observed when using a whole genome phylogeny as a constraint on the amplicon sequences. Our study therefore provides methods for optimal integration of genomic and amplicon sequences. PMID:26702955

  18. Performance of Acacia tortilis, Prosopis juliflora and Casuarina equisetifolia provenances in soils low in phosphorus

    Acacia tortilis, Prosopis juliflora and Casuarina equisetifolia provenances were screened to determine their potential for adaptability under P limiting conditions as a strategy to exploit genotypic differences in terms of utilization and uptake efficiencies. The experiment was conducted in the greenhouse at the Kenya Forestry Research Institute using soils taken from the field which are critically low in available P. The experimental treatments comprised of P application at 0 and 60 Kg P2O5/ha for 11 provenances of Acacia, 6 Prosopis and 4 Casuarina spp. Trait for adaptability to P deficiency was determined by measuring the growth performance, P uptake and utilization efficiencies at zero and moderate application of P. The results indicated considerable differences in the growth performance and phosphorus use efficiency (PUE). Acacia provenances showed the highest PUE compared with Prosopis and Casuarina spp although this was not reflected in the total dry matter yield. However, it was observed that P application resulted in an increase in shoot dry matter, height, root collar diameter and root dry matter in the case of Casuarina. Similarly, the highest total P uptake was obtained in Casuarina and Prosopis spp. The results further indicated that P application probably contributed to the reduction in root dry matter and root: shoot ratios of Acacia and Prosopis but not Casuarina spp. (author). 15 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  19. Immunochemical Characterization of Acacia Pollen Allergens and Evaluation of Cross-Reactivity Pattern with the Common Allergenic Pollens

    Mohammad-Hosein Shamsbiranvand; Ali Khodadadi; Mohammad-Ali Assarehzadegan; Seyed Hamid Borsi; Akram Amini

    2014-01-01

    Pollen from the Acacia has been reported as an important source of pollinosis in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The aim of this study was to characterize the IgE binding protein of Acacia farnesiana pollen extract and evaluate cross-reactivity with the most allergenic pollens. In this study, pollen extract was fractionated by SDS-PAGE and the allergenic profile was determined by IgE-immunoblotting and specific ELISA using forty-two Acacia allergic patients. Potential cross-rea...

  20. Olifantinvloed op Acacia Nigrescens-bome in 'n gedeelte van die Punda Milia- Sandveld van die Nasionale Krugerwildtuin

    A. H Engelbrecht

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Olifantinvloed op groot Acacia nigrescens (knop- piesdoring borne in die Punda Milia-Sandveld van die Nasionale Krugerwildtuin, is in Desernber 1978 ondersoek. 'n Monster van 951 borne toon dat die voortbestaan van die boornpopulasie bedreig word. Elephant impact on Acacia nigrescens trees in a section of the Punda Milia-Sandveld of the Kruger National Park. An investigation of elephant impact on tall Acacia nigrescens trees in the Punda Milia- Sandveld of the Kruger National Park was conducted during December 1978. A sample of 951 trees showed that the tree population is endangered.

  1. Multitasking in a plant-ant interaction: how does Acacia myrtifolia manage both ants and pollinators?

    Martínez-Bauer, Angélica E; Martínez, Gerardo Cerón; Murphy, Daniel J; Burd, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Plant associations with protective ants are widespread among angiosperms, but carry the risk that ants will deter pollinators as well as herbivores. Such conflict, and adaptations to ameliorate or prevent the conflict, have been documented in African and neotropical acacias. Ant-acacia associations occur in Australia, but little is known of their ecology. Moreover, recent phylogenetic evidence indicates that Australian acacias are only distantly related to African and American acacias, providing an intercontinental natural experiment in the management of ant-pollinator conflict. We examined four populations of Acacia myrtifolia over a 400-km environmental gradient in southeastern Australia using ant and pollinator exclusion as well as direct observation of ants and pollinators to assess the potential for ant-pollinator conflict to affect seed set. Native bees were the only group of floral visitors whose visitation rates were a significant predictor of fruiting success, although beetles and wasps may play an important role as "insurance" pollinators. We found no increase in pollinator visitation or fruiting success following ant exclusion, even with large sample sizes and effective exclusion. Because ants are facultative visitors to A. myrtifolia plants, their presence may be insufficient to interfere greatly with floral visitors. It is also likely that the morphological location of extrafloral nectaries tends to draw ants away from reproductive parts, although we commonly observed ants on inflorescences, so the spatial separation is not strict. A. myrtifolia appears to maintain a generalized mutualism over a wide geographic range without the need for elaborate adaptations to resolve ant-pollinator conflict. PMID:25571873

  2. Antiamoebic and Cytotoxicity of Ethanolic leaves Extract of Acacia nilotica (L

    Ahmed Saeed Kabbashi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acacia nilotica (L related to family Fabaceae-Mimosoideae. The division of Acacia nilotica is Magnolophyta and class is Magnolipsida. The genus is Acacia and species is nilotica. The ailments treated by this plant include colds, congestion, fever, gallbladder, hemorrhage, hemorrhoids, leucorrhoea, ophthalmic, sclerosis and small pox. Acacia bark is drunk for intestinal pains and used for treating acute diarrhea. Other preparations are used for gargle, toothache, ophthalmic and syphilitic ulcers. The roots of Acacia are used to treat Tuberculosis. The World Health Organization (WHO estimates that the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica is a major cause of morbidity worldwide, causing approximately 50 million cases of dysentery and 100,000 deaths annually. Intestinal amoebiasis due to the infection of E. histolytica is ranked third on the list of parasitic protozoan infections leading to death behind malaria and schistosomiasis. Objectives: This study was carried out to evaluate antiamoebic activites (Entamoeba histolyica and cytotoxicity (MTT assay of ethanol extract of A. nilotica (leaves. Method: The extract of A. nilotica (leaves, with different concentration (500 ppm, 250 ppm and 125 ppm and metronidazole concentration (312.5 μg/ml to be investigated in vitro against Entamoeba histolyica trophozoites. And cytotoxicity (MTT assay with different concentration (500 ppm, 250 ppm and 125 ppm and compare triton-100 (the reference control. Result: The result was obtained from A. nilotica leaves ethanol extract which exhibited 100% mortality within 96 h, at a concentration 500 ppm; this was compared with Metronidazole which gave 96% inhibition at concentration 312.5 µg/ml at the same time. And MTT assay verified the safety of the examined extract. Conclusion: These studies conducted for both A. nilotica leaves was proved to have potent activities against Entamoeba histolyica trophozoites in vitro. And MTT assay verified the safety.

  3. Metabolismo do cobre nas epilepsias

    Luís Marques de Assis

    1966-12-01

    Full Text Available Partindo do fato de que o metabolismo do cobre está alterado nas epilepsias, o autor estudou sob que forma essa alteração se manifesta e, mediante o uso de curare em pacientes mentais submetidos ao eletrochoque, a influência da hiperatividade muscular própria da crise convulsiva sobre o metabolismo do cobre. Além disso, o autor estudou as correlações entre sexo e idade dos pacientes epilépticos, de um lado, e cupremia e cuprorraquia, do outro, e fez a correlação entre os níveis de cobre do soro e do LCR desses pacientes. Nos pacientes epilépticos (84 foram colhidas amostras de sangue (81 casos e de LCR (66 casos em período intercrítico para dosagem do cobre total. Nos pacientes mentais (32 foram colhidas amostras de sangue antes e imediatamente após crise convulsiva determinada pelo eletrochoque simples (22 casos para dosagem de ceruloplasmina, e imediatamente após eletrochoque sob ação de curare (10 casos para dosagem do cobre total. Os resultados foram submetidos a análise estatística, tendo o autor chegado às seguintes conclusões: 1 o nível de cobre do sangue e do LCR dos pacientes epilépticos não depende do sexo nem da idade; 2 o teor de cobre do LCR está correlacionado com o do sangue nos pacientes epilépticos; 3 a supressão, mediante o uso de substância curarizante, das manifestações musculares da crise produzida pelo eletrochoque acarreta queda não significativa do nível de cobre do sangue; 4 a queda do nível de cobre do sangue após convulsões determinadas pelo eletrochoque depende da hiperatividade muscular que caracteriza a crise convulsiva; 5 a queda do nível de cobre do sangue após convulsões determinadas pelo eletrochoque depende principalmente do cobre de reação direta; 6 a queda dos níveis de cobre do sangue após convulsões determinadas pelo eletrochoque é devida à pas* sagem desse elemento para os espaços intracelulares.

  4. Produção Arbórea e Animal em Sistema Silvipastoril com Acácia-negra (Acacia mearnsii Trees and Animal Production in a Silvipastoral System with Black Wattle (Acacia mearnsii

    Zelia Maria de Souza Castilhos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Com o objetivo de avaliar o desempenho dos componentes arbóreo e animal em um sistema silvipastoril (SSP com acácia-negra (Acacia mearnsii De Wild e gramíneas perenes de verão, foi conduzido um trabalho em convênio com a empresa Seta S.A., na unidade da Fepagro em Tupanciretã, RS, no período de outubro de 1995 a maio de 2003. O delineamento experimental foi um bifatorial (espécie forrageira e densidade arbórea inteiramente casualizado, com duas repetições. As espécies forrageiras (EF avaliadas foram capim annoni (Eragrostis plana, braquiária (Brachiaria brizantha e capim gatton (Panicum maximum cv. Gatton nos quatro primeiros anos, e capim gatton, capim aruana (P. maximum cv. Aruana e capim pangola (Digitaria diversinervis para os demais anos. As densidades arbóreas (DA testadas foram de 1.667, 1.000, 833 e 500 árvores.ha-1. Com 1.667 árvores.ha-1 houve maior rendimento de madeira em todas as avaliações, não diferindo de 1.000 árvores/ha-1 a partir do quinto ano. A produtividade animal foi mais elevada em DA de 833 e 500 árvores.ha-1, sendo respectivamente 229 e 223 kg.ha-1 de peso vivo. Aos sete anos de implantação da acácia negra, o volume de madeira foi de 166; 143; 86 e 51 m3.ha-1, respectivamente, nas densidades arbóreas de 1.667; 1.000; 833 e 500 árvores.ha-1. Para que haja um equilíbrio entre produção arbórea e animal, SSPs com densidades arbóreas entre 1.000 e 833 árvores.ha-1 apresentam-se como alternativas viáveis para os produtores rurais.

     

    doi: 10.4336/2009.pfb.60.39

    A silvopastoral study consisting of black wattle (Acacia mearnsii De Wild and tropical perennial grasses was developed at the Fepagro Research Unity in Tupanciretã, RS, in collaboration with Seta Group, from October 1995 until May 2003, with the objective of evaluating trees and animal (beef cattle performances. The experiment was a bifactorial completely randomized design (forage specie and arboreal density with two

  5. Avaliação da atividade antibacteriana e triagem fitoquímica das flores de Acacia podalyriifolia A. Cunn. ex G. Don Leguminosae-Mimosoideae

    C.A. Andrade

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A atividade antibacteriana das flores da Acacia podalyriifolia A. Cunn. (Leguminosae foi avaliada pelo método de difusão em disco. As bactérias testadas foram: Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538, Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 1228, Escherichia coli (ATCC 11229 e Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853. O meio de cultura utilizado foi ágar Müeller-Hinton. Foram utilizados discos de papel (6 mm de diâmetro impregnados com 1000, 500, 250 e 125 mg dos extratos: Etanol Bruto, fração Acetato de Etila e fração Diclorometano obtidas a partir do extrato etanólico bruto. Os resultados indicam que as amostras avaliadas exercem ação contra as cepas gram positivo testadas, em graus variáveis sendo que a fração Acetato de Etila apresentou maior atividade. A triagem fitoquímica indicou a presença de fenóis e flavonoides nas flores de A. podalyriifolia.

  6. Effects of biotic and abiotic constraints on the symbiosis between rhizobia and the tropical leguminous trees Acacia and Prosopis.

    Räsänen, Leena A; Lindström, Kristina

    2003-10-01

    N2-fixing, drought tolerant and multipurpose Acacia and Prosopis species are appropriate trees for reforestation of degraded areas in arid and semiarid regions of the tropics and subtropics. Acacia and Prosopis trees form N2-fixing nodules with a wide range of rhizobia, for example African acacias mainly with Sinorhizobium sp. and Mesorhizobium sp., and Australian acacias with Bradyrhizobium sp. Although dry and hot seasons restrict formation of N2-fixing nodules on Acacia and Prosopis spp., fully grown trees and their symbiotic partners are well adapted to survive in harsh growth conditions. This review on one hand deals with major constraints of arid and semiarid soils, i.e. drought, salinity and high soil temperature, which affect growth of trees and rhizobia, and on the other hand with adaptation mechanisms by which both organisms survive through unfavourable periods. In addition, defects in infection and nodulation processes due to various abiotic and biotic constraints are reviewed. This knowledge is important when Acacia and Prosopis seedlings are used for forestation of degraded areas in arid and semiarid tropics. PMID:15242281

  7. Immunochemical characterization of acacia pollen allergens and evaluation of cross-reactivity pattern with the common allergenic pollens.

    Shamsbiranvand, Mohammad-Hosein; Khodadadi, Ali; Assarehzadegan, Mohammad-Ali; Borsi, Seyed Hamid; Amini, Akram

    2014-01-01

    Pollen from the Acacia has been reported as an important source of pollinosis in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The aim of this study was to characterize the IgE binding protein of Acacia farnesiana pollen extract and evaluate cross-reactivity with the most allergenic pollens. In this study, pollen extract was fractionated by SDS-PAGE and the allergenic profile was determined by IgE-immunoblotting and specific ELISA using forty-two Acacia allergic patients. Potential cross-reactivity among Acacia and selected allergenic plants was evaluated with ELISA and immunoblotting inhibition experiments. There were several resolved protein fractions on SDS-PAGE which ranged from 12 to 85 kDa. Several allergenic protein bands with molecular weights approximately between 12 and 85 kDa were recognized by IgE-specific antibodies from Acacia allergic patients in the immunoblot assay. The inhibition by the Prosopis juliflora pollen extract was more than those by other pollen extracts. Moreover, the wheal diameters generated by the Acacia pollen extract were highly correlated with those of P. juliflora pollen extracts. The findings suggest that several proteins such as 15, 23, 45, and 50 kDa proteins could be used as diagnostic and therapeutic reagents for patients allergic to A. farnesiana and P. juliflora. PMID:24949020

  8. Immunochemical Characterization of Acacia Pollen Allergens and Evaluation of Cross-Reactivity Pattern with the Common Allergenic Pollens

    Mohammad-Hosein Shamsbiranvand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollen from the Acacia has been reported as an important source of pollinosis in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The aim of this study was to characterize the IgE binding protein of Acacia farnesiana pollen extract and evaluate cross-reactivity with the most allergenic pollens. In this study, pollen extract was fractionated by SDS-PAGE and the allergenic profile was determined by IgE-immunoblotting and specific ELISA using forty-two Acacia allergic patients. Potential cross-reactivity among Acacia and selected allergenic plants was evaluated with ELISA and immunoblotting inhibition experiments. There were several resolved protein fractions on SDS-PAGE which ranged from 12 to 85 kDa. Several allergenic protein bands with molecular weights approximately between 12 and 85 kDa were recognized by IgE-specific antibodies from Acacia allergic patients in the immunoblot assay. The inhibition by the Prosopis juliflora pollen extract was more than those by other pollen extracts. Moreover, the wheal diameters generated by the Acacia pollen extract were highly correlated with those of P. juliflora pollen extracts. The findings suggest that several proteins such as 15, 23, 45, and 50 kDa proteins could be used as diagnostic and therapeutic reagents for patients allergic to A. farnesiana and P. juliflora.

  9. NASSN: a NAS-based storage network

    HAN De-zhi

    2007-01-01

    With the digital information and application requirement on the Internet increasing fleetly nowadays,it is urgent to work out a network storage system with a large capacity, a high availability and scalability. To solve the above-mentioned issues, a NAS-based storage network ( for short NASSN) has been designed. Firstly,the NASSN integrates multi-NAS,iNAS (an iSCSI-based NAS) and enterprise SAN with the help of storage virtualization, which can provide a greater capacity and better scalability. Secondly, the NASSN can provide high availability with the help of server and storage subsystem redundancy technologies. Thirdly, the NASSN simultaneously serves for both the file I/O and the block L/O with the help of an iSCSI module, which has the advantages of NAS and SAN. Finally, the NASSN can provide higher I/O speed by a high network-attached channel which implements the direct data transfer between the storage device and client. In the experiments, the NASSN has ultra-high-throughput for both of the file I/O requests and the block I/O requests.

  10. Identification of lignin genes and regulatory sequences involved in secondary cell wall formation in Acacia auriculiformis and Acacia mangium via de novo transcriptome sequencing

    Cannon Charles H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acacia auriculiformis × Acacia mangium hybrids are commercially important trees for the timber and pulp industry in Southeast Asia. Increasing pulp yield while reducing pulping costs are major objectives of tree breeding programs. The general monolignol biosynthesis and secondary cell wall formation pathways are well-characterized but genes in these pathways are poorly characterized in Acacia hybrids. RNA-seq on short-read platforms is a rapid approach for obtaining comprehensive transcriptomic data and to discover informative sequence variants. Results We sequenced transcriptomes of A. auriculiformis and A. mangium from non-normalized cDNA libraries synthesized from pooled young stem and inner bark tissues using paired-end libraries and a single lane of an Illumina GAII machine. De novo assembly produced a total of 42,217 and 35,759 contigs with an average length of 496 bp and 498 bp for A. auriculiformis and A. mangium respectively. The assemblies of A. auriculiformis and A. mangium had a total length of 21,022,649 bp and 17,838,260 bp, respectively, with the largest contig 15,262 bp long. We detected all ten monolignol biosynthetic genes using Blastx and further analysis revealed 18 lignin isoforms for each species. We also identified five contigs homologous to R2R3-MYB proteins in other plant species that are involved in transcriptional regulation of secondary cell wall formation and lignin deposition. We searched the contigs against public microRNA database and predicted the stem-loop structures of six highly conserved microRNA families (miR319, miR396, miR160, miR172, miR162 and miR168 and one legume-specific family (miR2086. Three microRNA target genes were predicted to be involved in wood formation and flavonoid biosynthesis. By using the assemblies as a reference, we discovered 16,648 and 9,335 high quality putative Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in the transcriptomes of A. auriculiformis and A. mangium

  11. Effect of Linear Chain Carboxylic Acid Anhydrides on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis), Acacia, (Acacia spp.), and Oil Palm (Tinnera spp.) Woods

    Mohd Afiq Mohtar; Norul Hisham Hamid; Mohd Hamami Sahri

    2014-01-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of Rubber wood, Acacia wood, and Oil palm wood that reacted with acetic, propionic, and butyric anhydrides using a microwave heating for 4 minutes were investigated. A sample dimension of 300 mm × 100 mm × 25 mm (L×W×T) was used for modification and they were cut into smaller specimens for different testing method. This study found that the density increment and void volume changes were not significantly different from anhydrides. The modification of woo...

  12. ANTIDIABETIC EFFECTS OF ACACIA TORTILIS SEED EXTRACT IN NORMAL AND ALLOXAN-INDUCED DIABETIC RATS

    Neeraj K. Agrawal*, Uma Gupta , Piyush Misra , S.P. Singh , Rakesh C. Verma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The concerned study reveals the first time experimental investigation of Hypoglycemic and antihyperglycemic effect of seed extract of Acacia tortilis plant was in normoglycaemic and Alloxan-induced (135 mg/Kg body weight intraperitoneally diabetic rats. The seed extract at the dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight was administered orally once a day for 13 days and at the end of the experimentation Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT and blood glucose estimation was done in all groups. The extract significantly lowered the blood glucose levels to an extent comparable to that produced by standard Oral hypoglycemic drug (Gliclazide 22 mg/Kg body weight in both normal and diabetic rats. The results suggest that seed extract of Acacia tortilis possess significant antidiabetic activity. The extract seems promising for the development of a phytomedicine for diabetes mellitus in future prospectus.

  13. A co-evolutionary relationship exists between Endoraecium (Pucciniales) and its Acacia hosts in Australia.

    McTaggart, A R; Doungsa-Ard, C; Geering, A D W; Aime, M C; Shivas, R G

    2015-12-01

    Endoraecium is a genus of rust fungi that infects several species of Acacia in Australia, South-East Asia and Hawaii. This study investigated the systematics of Endoraecium from 55 specimens in Australia based on a combined morphological and molecular approach. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted on partitioned datasets of loci from ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA. The recovered molecular phylogeny supported a recently published taxonomy based on morphology and host range that divided Endoraecium digitatum into five species. Spore morphology is synapomorphic and there is evidence Endoraecium co-evolved with its Acacia hosts. The broad host ranges of E. digitatum, E. parvum, E. phyllodiorum and E. violae-faustiae are revised in light of this study, and nine new species of Endoraecium are described from Australia based on host taxonomy, morphology and phylogenetic concordance. PMID:26823628

  14. Nitrogen fixation in Acacia auriculiformis and Albizia lebbeck and their contributions to crop-productivity improvement

    Pot and field experiments assessed N2 fixation by Albizia lebbeck and Acacia auriculiformis and contributions from prunings to yields of corn and hibiscus. Nitrogen fixation in these tree legumes was poor, with less than 50% N derived from fixation (%Ndfa) when grown in pots, but higher (>70%) in field conditions, after inoculation with compatible Bradyrhizobium strains. Prunings from A. lebbeck, as green manure improved growth of maize and hibiscus, inducing greater corn-kernel yields than did urea. Acacia auriculiformis prunings were similarly beneficial when mixed with leaves of A. lebbeck or L. leucocephala. Application of slow- and fast-nutrient-releasing leaves is required to maximize their contributions to crop productivity. (author)

  15. Pretreatment of Acacia nilotica Sawdust by Catalytic Delignification and Its Fractal Kinetic Modeling

    Mallick, Abhyuday; Ash, Soumendra Nath; Mahapatra, Debashis Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Alkaline delignification of Acacia nilotica heartwood has been carried out using 10 % Sodium hydroxide and Sodium sulphide as the cooking liquor. Delignification was carried out at 373, 393, 403 and 413 K on Acacia nilotica sawdust of particle-sizes 70, 100 and 120 mesh, for durations ranging from 1 to 3 h. The reactions were carried out in presence and in absence of Ferrous sulphate to determine its catalytic properties in delignification. Maximum delignification achieved was 82.7 %, based on Klason lignin, in 3 h at 413 K for 120 mesh feed. The activation energies for delignification were 20.9275 and 35 kJ/mol, respectively, in presence and in absence of Ferrous sulphate, indicating its significant catalytic effect. A kinetic model for delignification was developed by modification of the Nuclei Growth model. Delignification extent could be predicted from the developed model quite accurately, with R2 values ranging from 0.947 to 0.99.

  16. Chemical composition, digestibility and antinutritional factors content of two wild legumes: Styphonolobium burseroides and Acacia bilimekii.

    Sotelo, A; Migliaro, P; Toledo, A; Contreras, J

    1999-01-01

    The chemical composition, digestibility and toxin contents of two wild legumes: Styphnolobium burseroides and Acacia bilimekii, collected in a semi-arid zone of Mexico, were determined. Both legumes had a high fiber content. The seeds of Styphnolobium burseroides had a low protein content (14%), and the pod a high content of reducing sugars. However the seeds of Acacia bilimekii had a high protein concentration (35%). The seed proteins were low in sulphur amino acids and tryptophan in both legumes but were rich in lysine. Trypsin inhibitors and lectins were present in low concentrations; alkaloids and cyanogenic glucosides were not detected. The in vitro digestibility for monogastric animals was low but the same test with ruminal juice showed a high digestibility for both legumes. Based on their chemical composition and digestibility, these legumes could be a good alternative source in the feeding of ruminants. PMID:10646630

  17. Effect of Acacia Gum, NaCl, and Sucrose on Physical Properties of Lotus Stem Starch.

    Puri, Ritika; Gill, Balmeet Singh; Khetra, Yogesh

    2014-01-01

    Consumer preferences in east Asian part of the world pave the way for consumption of lotus stem starch (LSS) in preparations such as breakfast meals, fast foods, and traditional confectioneries. The present study envisaged the investigation and optimization of additives, that is, acacia gum, sodium chloride (NaCl), and sucrose, on water absorption (WA), water absorption index (WAI), and water solubility index (WSI) of LSS employing response surface methodology (RSM). Acacia gum resulted in increased water uptake and swelling of starch; however, NaCl reduced the swelling power of starch by making water unavailable to starch and also due to starch-ion electrostatic interaction. Sucrose restricted the water absorption by binding free water and decreased amylose leaching by building bridges with starch chains and thus forming rigid structure. PMID:26904639

  18. STUDIES ON DIURETIC AND LAXATIVE ACTIVITY OF ACACIA SUMA (ROXB BARKS

    Mondal Sumanta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The diuretic and laxative activity of aqueous extract of Acacia suma (Roxb. barks (Family: Fabaceae were studied in Wistar albino rats. Furosemide (10 mg/kg, p.o. and agar-agar (300 mg/kg, p.o. were used as reference standards respectively for activity comparison. The aqueous extract (400 mg/kg has shown significant increase in the volume of urine, urinary concentration of Na+, K+ and Cl- ions. However 200mg/kg dose failed to do so. On the other hand the extract was found to produce significant laxative activity in dose dependant manner. Presence of different phytoconstituents in aqueous extract of Acacia suma may be responsible for the specific activities.

  19. In vitro evaluation of anti-microbial of the leaf extracts of acacia modesta

    Infectious diseases caused by micro-organisms are transmissible and infect a large group of population. Investigations were carried out for studying the phytochemistry and biological potential of the leaves of Acacia modesta. Dried and finely ground leaves were extracted with ethanol. Different fractions were obtained by extracting the crude extract with n-hexane, chloroform and ethyl acetate. Fractions of n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, crude extract and the aqueous layer left behind were evaluated for their anti-microbial potential by determining the zone of inhibition against different bacterial strains. All fractions showed positive anti-bacterial activity except ethyl acetate fraction. However the aqueous layer showed activity which is significantly higher than the standard antibiotics used in this study. In conclusion the more active the compounds found in leaves, the more polar they were in nature. Bioassay guided isolation of these active compounds from aqueous fraction may lead to potential anti-bacterial metabolites from Acacia modesta. (author)

  20. Effect of Acacia Gum, NaCl, and Sucrose on Physical Properties of Lotus Stem Starch

    Ritika Puri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumer preferences in east Asian part of the world pave the way for consumption of lotus stem starch (LSS in preparations such as breakfast meals, fast foods, and traditional confectioneries. The present study envisaged the investigation and optimization of additives, that is, acacia gum, sodium chloride (NaCl, and sucrose, on water absorption (WA, water absorption index (WAI, and water solubility index (WSI of LSS employing response surface methodology (RSM. Acacia gum resulted in increased water uptake and swelling of starch; however, NaCl reduced the swelling power of starch by making water unavailable to starch and also due to starch-ion electrostatic interaction. Sucrose restricted the water absorption by binding free water and decreased amylose leaching by building bridges with starch chains and thus forming rigid structure.

  1. A co-evolutionary relationship exists between Endoraecium (Pucciniales) and its Acacia hosts in Australia

    McTaggart, A.R.; Doungsa-ard, C.; Geering, A.D.W.; Aime, M.C.; Shivas, R.G.

    2015-01-01

    Endoraecium is a genus of rust fungi that infects several species of Acacia in Australia, South-East Asia and Hawaii. This study investigated the systematics of Endoraecium from 55 specimens in Australia based on a combined morphological and molecular approach. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted on partitioned datasets of loci from ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA. The recovered molecular phylogeny supported a recently published taxonomy based on morphology and host range that divided Endora...

  2. Foliar endophytic fungi as potential protectors from pathogens in myrmecophytic Acacia plants

    González-Teuber, M.; Jimenez-Aleman, G.; Boland, W

    2014-01-01

    In defensive ant-plant interactions myrmecophytic plants express reduced chemical defense in their leaves to protect themselves from pathogens, and it seems that mutualistic partners are required to make up for this lack of defensive function. Previously, we reported that mutualistic ants confer plants of Acacia hindsii protection from pathogens, and that the protection is given by the ant-associated bacteria. Here, we examined whether foliar endophytic fungi may potentially act as a new part...

  3. Pseudomyrmex ants and Acacia host plants join efforts to protect their mutualism from microbial threats

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Heil, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Plants express numerous ‘pathogenesis-related’ (PR) proteins to defend themselves against pathogen infection. We recently discovered that PR-proteins such as chitinases, glucanases, peroxidases and thaumatin-like proteins are also functioning in the protection of extra-floral nectar (EFN) of Mexican Acacia myrmecophytes. These plants produce EFN, cellular food bodies and nesting space to house defending ant species of the genus Pseudomyrmex. More than 50 PR-proteins were discovered in this EF...

  4. The Development of a Biochemical Profile of Acacia Honey by Identifying Biochemical Determinants of its Quality

    Liviu Alexandru MARGHITAS; Daniel Severus DEZMIREAN; Pocol, Cristina Bianca; Marioara ILEA; Otilia BOBIS; Gergen, Iosif

    2010-01-01

    Codex Alimentarius Standard, EU Legislation and National Standards state honey authenticity. Authenticity in respect of production (to prevent adulteration) and authenticity in respect of geographical and botanical origin are the two main aspects of general honey authenticity. Quality of honey depends on the plant source, the chemical composition of these plants as well, as on the climatic conditions and soil mineral composition. Romanian acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia) honey that came from the...

  5. Effect of country origin on physicochemical, sugar and volatile composition of acacia, sunflower and tilia honeys

    Juan Borras, María del Sol; Doménech Antich, Eva Mª; HELLEBRANDOVA, MAGDALENA; Escriche Roberto, Mª Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of country (Spain, Romania, and Czech Republic) and botanical origin, on the physicochemical (HMF, diastase activity, moisture content, electrical conductivity), color (Pfund scale and CIEL*a*b*), principal sugars (glucose, fructose and sucrose) and volatile composition of acacia, sunflower and tilia honeys. PCA analyses considering these variables showed that honey type had a far greater influence on the differentiation of samples (above al...

  6. Evaluation of Topical Preparations Containing Curcuma, Acacia and Lupinus Extracts as an Anti-inflammatory Drugs

    M M Hamzah

    2011-01-01

    Summary: This work was suggested on the basis of presence of curcuminoids in curcuma and the presence of flavonoidal constituent in acacia and lupinus. The aim of this study was to study their possible anti-inflammatory effect by separately formulation of the three extracts in a suitable gel formula for topical administration and comparison of the prepared gels with a standard gel in the market (diclosal Emulgel) by using the carrageenan induced paw edema model in albino rats. The extracts we...

  7. Delayed colonisation of Acacia by thrips and the timing of host-conservatism and behavioural specialisation

    McLeish, Michael J.; Miller, Joseph T.; Mound, Laurence A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Repeated colonisation of novel host-plants is believed to be an essential component of the evolutionary success of phytophagous insects. The relative timing between the origin of an insect lineage and the plant clade they eat or reproduce on is important for understanding how host-range expansion can lead to resource specialisation and speciation. Path and stepping-stone sampling are used in a Bayesian approach to test divergence timing between the origin of Acacia and colonisation...

  8. Preliminary phytochemical and elemental analysis of aqueous and fractionated pod extracts of Acacia nilotica (Thorn mimosa)

    Mohammed Shaibu Auwal; Sanni Saka; Ismail Alhaji Mairiga; Kyari Abba Sanda; Abdullahi Shuaibu; Amina Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Acacia nilotica (Thorn mimosa) is used locally for various medicinal purposes by traditionalists and herbalists in northeastern Nigeria. Plants products have been used since ancient times in the management of various conditions. The bark of A. nilotica has been reported to be used traditionally to manage diabetes, dysentery, leprosy, ulcers, cancers, tumor of the eye, ear and testicles, induration of liver and spleen and also in treatment of various condylomas. The objective of this study is ...

  9. The anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of proteins extracted from Acacia farnesiana seeds

    L.S.S. LEAL; Silva, R.O.; T.S.L. ARAUJO; V.G. SILVA; Barbosa, A.L.R.; Medeiros, J V R; J. S. Oliveira; C.A. VENTURA

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Seeds of Acacia farnesiana are commonly sold in the local markets of northeastern Brazil as a therapeutic agent. The present work aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of proteins obtained from A. farnesiana seeds. Five different protein fractions (albumin, globulin, prolamin, acidic and basic glutelins) were obtained and investigated for the protein pattern, the presence of hemagglutinating and proteolytic activities. The globulin fraction (GLB) was also e...

  10. Pharmacodynamic studies on the isolated active fraction of Acacia farnesiana (L.) willd

    Bino Kingsley; Saminathan Kayarohanam; Pemaiah Brindha; Appian Subramoniam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acacia farnesiana is a medicinal plant that grows throughout tropical parts of Indian subcontinent, particularly in sandy soils of river beds in Northern India. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the anti-hyperglycemic activity of the extracts using glucose tolerance test. Isolation of an active fraction (AF) from the active extract (water extract) using alcohol precipitation and to get insight to the mechanism of action of the AF of A. farnesiana. Materials and Me...

  11. Robinia pseudo-acacia L. as a Posssible Biomonitor of Heavy Metal Pollution in Kayseri

    Aksoy, Ahmet

    2000-01-01

    The leaves of Robinia pseudo-acacia L. (Fabaceae) were tested as a possible biomonitor of heavy metal pollution in Kayseri. Concentrations of Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn were determined in unwashed and washed leaves and soils collected from a wide range of sites with different degrees of metal pollution. Differences between the unwashed and washed samples varied according to the metal pollutant levels. Significant correlations were obtained between the heavy metal concentrations in surface soil and was...

  12. Respon Pertumbuhan Bibit Beberapa Jenis Akasia (Acacia Spp) Terhadap Fungi Mikoriza Arbuskula.

    Pardosi, Rommel

    2011-01-01

    Industrial Forest Plantation in Indonesia, one of them used type of acacia. Land for Industrial Forest Plantation in Indonesia generally critical land, which will be nutrient poor. To improve soil fertility to increase the input of nutrients, and nutrients are usually a factory made fertilizers are expensive. One attempt to minimize the cost of artificial fertilizer use is to use Mikoriza Arbuskula Fungal (MAF). These fungal help plants to absorb nutrients. This research aims ...

  13. Pharmacognostical evaluation of Acacia catechu willd. heartwood with special reference to tyloses

    Kinnari Dhruve; Harisha, C. R.; Prajapati, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    Acacia catechu (L.) willd, commonly known as Khadira, is widely used in Ayurveda for the treatment of diseases. A detailed investigation of fresh and powder of heartwood of A. catechu was carried out. The diagnostic characters of heartwood of this plant includes tylosis formation, fibers with prism, fibers with scleroids, fragment of border pitted vessels, starch grains with hylem along with yellowish dark brown colouring matter, lignified fibers and fibers passing through medullary rays. Phy...

  14. Effect of plant growth promoting rhizobia on seed germination and seedling traits in Acacia senegal

    Singh, S.K.; A. Pancholy; Jindal, S. K.; R.Pathak

    2013-01-01

    Among arid zone tree species, Acacia senegal and Prosopis cineraria are the most important dryland resources of Western Rajasthan desert ecosystem. Due to ecological, biological and molecular similarities, they are often studied together. The climatic conditions in this region restrict the build-up of soil organic matter and soils are generally deficient in nitrogen. Studies were carried out to isolate and molecularly characterize the diverse group of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria from...

  15. Chemical Composition profile of Wild Acacia oerfota (Forssk Schweinf Seed Growing in the South of Iran

    Maryam Zarei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acacia is a genus belonging to the Fabaceae family and comprises about 135 species of trees which are widely spread throughout the arid and semi-arid tropics. There was no phytochemical investigation on A. Oerfota (Forssk Schweinf seed growing wild in south of Iran. Hence the current study includes analyses of Chemical composition of A. Oerfota seed to evaluate its nutritive potential value as a new source of enriched seed for nutritional purposes. A.Oerfota seeds were collected in August 2014 from Sarkhun village, Bandar Abbas, Hormozgan Province, Iran. The samples were analyzed by standardized international protocols in Research Laboratory in Pharmaceutical Sciences Branch, Islamic Azad University. Obviously in A. Oerfota the order of amount of the some mineral element contents such as zinc copper, iron, and calcium are different in comparison by other Acacia seeds studied in Iran in recent studies. The crude protein content of Iranian Acacia oerfota examined in this study which reached 25.06 and this value is significantly higher and superior than other A. oerfota reported in other countries especially in Africa samples and even higher to A. Nilotica. . Therefore due to the seed protein, Tanin and minerals of A. Oerfota could be a new source of edible vegetable after the future toxicological studies.

  16. The Development of a Biochemical Profile of Acacia Honey by Identifying Biochemical Determinants of its Quality

    Liviu Alexandru MARGHITAS

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Codex Alimentarius Standard, EU Legislation and National Standards state honey authenticity. Authenticity in respect of production (to prevent adulteration and authenticity in respect of geographical and botanical origin are the two main aspects of general honey authenticity. Quality of honey depends on the plant source, the chemical composition of these plants as well, as on the climatic conditions and soil mineral composition. Romanian acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia honey that came from the most important Transylvanian massif (Valea lui Mihai, Bihor County, Romania was evaluated for authenticity by pollen-analysis, several physico-chemical analyses, including sugar profile and mineral content. As polyphenolic content could be also an important factor for botanical authentification, HPLC-DAD-MS analyses were performed to assess the fingerprint of this important secondary plant metabolite. Statistical data were processed in order to develop a biochemical profile of this type of honey and the main quality categories identification. The results of physico-chemical analysis demonstrated that the tested honey samples could be framed into monofloral type of acacia honeys. The analysis of acacia honeys originating from Valea lui Mihai, Romania, showed that polyphenolic profile (phenolic acids and flavonoids could be used as a complementary method for authenticity determination together with pollen analysis and other physico-chemical analysis.

  17. Structural characterization and emulsifying properties of polysaccharides of Acacia mearnsii de Wild gum.

    Grein, Aline; da Silva, Bruno C; Wendel, Cinthia F; Tischer, Cesar A; Sierakowski, Maria Rita; Moura, Angela B Dewes; Iacomini, Marcello; Gorin, Philip A J; Simas-Tosin, Fernanda F; Riegel-Vidotti, Izabel C

    2013-01-30

    Polysaccharides (GNF) from Acacia mearnsii de Wild gum exudates, collected from trees growing in the south of Brazil, were characterized ((13)C and HSQC NMR, GC-MS, colorimetric assays). A commercial gum arabic (GAC) was analyzed similarly and compared with GNF. There were differences, consistent with distinct behavior in tensiometry tests and as emulsion stabilizer. GNF had a higher protein content than GAC, with small differences in the monosaccharide composition, the greater one being the lower uronic acid content of GNF (4%), compared with GAC (17%). GNF had a much broader molecular mass distribution, M(w)/M(n), and a lower M(w). GNF was more efficient in lowering the surface tension of water and saline solutions and was more efficient in emulsifying castor oil droplets. Results were discussed taking into account structural and molecular differences between the studied gums. It was concluded that polysaccharides from A. mearnsii de Wild are candidates as substitutes of currently commercialized arabic gums (Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal) having, depending on their application, improved properties. PMID:23218300

  18. Low ionizing radiation influence on the nucleic acids in common Acacia

    Three months old common acacia saplings were selected from a forestry nursery with an uniform genetic background. A 60 Co ionizing radiation source, with a dose rate of 10 mCi was used to irradiate saplings for different time durations: 1h, 2h, 4h and 7 h. One day after the irradiation, small amounts of green tissue were took for nucleic acid extraction and assay. The quantitative extraction was performed in perchloric acid at a temperature of about 100 Celsius degrees. Centrifugation at 5,000 cycles/minute was performed and supernatant liquid was used for spectrophotometric assay. The light extinction at the wavelengths of 270 nm and 290 nm was measured, after Spirin's method using a Beckman spectrophotometer. The average between DNA and RNA content values was evaluated and represented graphically. The logarithmic representation of nucleic acids content, via exposure time, fitted with a mathematical polynomial function of second order, showed the decreasing of nucleic acids content in samples in comparison to the control. This could be the effect of radiation damage at the level of the nucleic acids primary structure, resulting in the reducing of nucleic acid amount in the vegetal cells of irradiated common acacia saplings. Direct radiation action on some chemical bonds as well as indirect effects mediated by water radiolysis could be implied in the diminution of DNA and RNA content from common acacia cell nuclei. (authors)

  19. Digestibility Nutrient Contents on Acacia Seyal, Balanities Aegyptiaca and Chloris Gayana Hay

    A study was carried to determine the nutrients and their digestibility in Acacia seyal and Balanities aegyptiaca legume browses and compared with Chloris gayana hay. Samples were taken from these two leguminous forages at Mogotio and Emining divisions of Koibatek district and fed to sheep in a change over design. The sheep were housed in individual pens and fitted with faecal collection bags. They were fed and faeces collected twice daily. An adaptation period of 14 days, Faecal collection of 7 days and changeover of 10 days were enforced. Nutrients analysed for during digestibility included DM, OM, CP, NDF, Hemicellulose and Cellulose. The nutrients compositions were 651, 916, 112, 370, 339, 59 and 84; 665, 920, 152, 443, 341, 89 and 80, 845, 924, 68, 730, 463, 57, and 76 for DM, OM, CP, NDF, ADF, and ash in Acacia seal, Balanities aegyptiaca and Chloris gayana hay. The in vivio digestibility results were different (p<0.05) for all nutrients. The digestibilities of DM, OM, CP NDF, Hemicellulose and Cellulose in Acacia seyal, Balanities aegyptiaca and Chloris gayana hay were 54.7, 66.5, 32.8, 40.3, 51.7, and 82.7; 48.5, 58.9, 67.4, 36.9, 36.3, and 40.6 and 48.1, 50.4, 41.7, 53.7, 63.0 and 62.3% respectively. The two legume forages had nutrients that had higher digestibility than hay except for fibre

  20. Minor lipid components of some Acacia species: potential dietary health benefits of the unexploited seeds

    Nasri Nizar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oilseed samples from four Acacia species ( A. cyclops, A. ligulata, A. salicina and A. cyanophylla were analyzed in order to evaluate the potential nutritional value of their unexploited seeds. Methods Samples were collected from different Tunisian geographic locations. Seed oils were extracted and carotenoids, tocopherols and sterols were analyzed using chromatographic methods. Results The studied Acacia seeds seem to be quite rich in lipids (from 6% to 12%. All Acacia species contain mainly the xanthophylls zeaxanthin and lutein compounds: from ca. 38 mg.kg-1 of total lipids (A. cyclops to ca. 113 mg.kg-1 of total lipids (A. cyanophylla. Total tocopherols varied from ca. 221 mg.kg-1 of total lipids (A. cyclops to ca. 808 mg.kg-1 of total lipids (A. ligulata. Sterols are highly present and their contents ranged between ca. 7 g. kg-1 of total lipids (A. salicina and 11 g. kg-1 of total lipids (A. cyclops. Conclusion This study highlights that these unexploited seeds might have a potential nutritional value and encourages researchers to more explore and find developments for these plants for healthy purposes.

  1. Podridão-do-lenho em plantios homogêneos de Acacia mangium Heartrot in homogeneous stands of Acacia mangium

    Bernardo de Almeida Halfeld-Vieira

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi relatar a ocorrência da podridão-do-lenho em plantios homogêneos de Acacia mangium no Estado de Roraima. A observação dos sintomas iniciais em ferimentos de poda indica que a desrama artificial é um fator de predisposição. Estimativas realizadas em dois talhões comerciais constataram cerca de 8 e 39% de incidência da doença em árvores de três anos. Isolamentos a partir de árvores sintomáticas e testes de patogenicidade demonstram que Lasiodiplodia theobromae pode contribuir no processo de podridão. Este é o primeiro relato da podridão-do-lenho em A. mangium no Brasil, o que pode limitar sua exploração comercial.The objective of this work was to report the occurrence of heartrot in homogeneous stands of Acacia mangium in the State of Roraima, Brazil. Observations of symptoms initiating from pruning wounds indicated that the artificial pruning is a predisposing factor. A survey carried out in two commercial stands showed 8 and 39% of disease incidence in three-year-old trees. Isolations performed from symptomatic trees and pathogenicity tests demonstrated that the fungus Lasiodiplodia theobromae can incite the rot development. This is the first record of A. mangium heartrot in Brazil. The disease can restrict its commercial exploration.

  2. Impact of the energy crop Jatropha curcas L. on the composition of rhizobial populations nodulating cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) and acacia (Acacia seyal L.).

    Dieng, Amadou; Duponnois, Robin; Floury, Antoine; Laguerre, Gisèle; Ndoye, Ibrahima; Baudoin, Ezékiel

    2015-03-01

    Jatropha curcas, a Euphorbiaceae species that produces many toxicants, is increasingly planted as an agrofuel plant in Senegal. The purpose of this study was to determine whether soil priming induced by J. curcas monoculture could alter the rhizobial populations that nodulate cowpea and acacia, two locally widespread legumes. Soil samples were transferred into a greenhouse from three fields previously cultivated with Jatropha for 1, 2, and 15 years, and the two trap legumes were grown in them. Control soil samples were also taken from adjacent Jatropha-fallow plots. Both legumes tended to develop fewer but larger nodules when grown in Jatropha soils. Nearly all the nifH sequences amplified from nodule DNA were affiliated to the Bradyrhizobium genus. Only sequences from Acacia seyal nodules grown in the most recent Jatropha plantation were related to the Mesorhizobium genus, which was much a more conventional finding on A. seyal than the unexpected Bradyrhizobium genus. Apart from this particular case, only minor differences were found in the respective compositions of Jatropha soil versus control soil rhizobial populations. Lastly, the structure of these rhizobial populations was systematically imbalanced owing to the overwhelming dominance of a very small number of nifH genotypes, some of which were identical across soil types or even sites. Despite these weak and sparse effects on rhizobial diversity, future investigations should focus on the characterization of the nitrogen-fixing abilities of the predominant rhizobial strains. PMID:25466917

  3. Os Processos nas Indústrias Alimentares

    Guiné, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    O livro cobre a maioria das operações unitárias clássicas e emergentes utilizadas nas indústrias alimentares. A obra está estruturada em cinco partes: processos por contacto em equilíbrio, processos mecânicos, transferência de calor, processos térmicos, convencionais e tecnologias emergentes

  4. Risk assessment, eradication, and biological control: global efforts to limit Australian acacia invasions

    Wilson, John R.U.; Gairifo, Carla; Gibson, Michelle R.; Arianoutsou, Margarita; Bakar, Baki B.; Baret, Stephane; Celesti-Grapow, Laura; DiTomaso, Joseph M.; Dufour-Dror, Jean-Marc; Kueffer, Christoph; Kull, Christian A.; Hoffman, John H.; Impson, Fiona A.C.; Loope, Lloyd L.; Marchante, Elizabete; Harchante, Helia; Moore, Joslin L.; Murphy, Daniel J.; Tassin, Jacques; Witt, Arne; Zenni, Rafael D.; Richardson, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Aim Many Australian Acacia species have been planted around the world, some are highly valued, some are invasive, and some are both highly valued and invasive. We review global efforts to minimize the risk and limit the impact of invasions in this widely used plant group. Location Global. Methods Using information from literature sources, knowledge and experience of the authors, and the responses from a questionnaire sent to experts around the world, we reviewed: (1) a generalized life cycle of Australian acacias and how to control each life stage, (2) different management approaches and (3) what is required to help limit or prevent invasions. Results Relatively few Australian acacias have been introduced in large numbers, but all species with a long and extensive history of planting have become invasive somewhere. Australian acacias, as a group, have a high risk of becoming invasive and causing significant impacts as determined by existing assessment schemes. Moreover, in most situations, long-lived seed banks mean it is very difficult to control established infestations. Control has focused almost exclusively on widespread invaders, and eradication has rarely been attempted. Classical biological control is being used in South Africa with increasing success. Main conclusions A greater emphasis on pro-active rather than reactive management is required given the difficulties managing established invasions of Australian acacias. Adverse effects of proposed new introductions can be minimized by conducting detailed risk assessments in advance, planning for on-going monitoring and management, and ensuring resources are in place for long-term mitigation. Benign alternatives (e.g. sterile hybrids) could be developed to replace existing utilized taxa. Eradication should be set as a management goal more often to reduce the invasion debt. Introducing classical biological control agents that have a successful track-record in South Africa to other regions and identifying new

  5. Ameliorative Effects of Acacia Honey against Sodium Arsenite-Induced Oxidative Stress in Some Viscera of Male Wistar Albino Rats

    Aliyu, Muhammad; Ibrahim, Sani; Inuwa, Hajiya M.; Sallau, Abdullahi B.; Abbas, Olagunju; Aimola, Idowu A.; Habila, Nathan; Uche, Ndidi S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and its development is frequently associated with oxidative stress-induced by carcinogens such as arsenicals. Most foods are basically health-promoting or disease-preventing and a typical example of such type is honey. This study was undertaken to investigate the ameliorative effects of Acacia honey on sodium arsenite-induced oxidative stress in the heart, lung and kidney tissues of male Wistar rats. Male Wistar albino rats divided into four groups of five rats each were administered distilled water, Acacia honey (20%), sodium arsenite (5 mg/kg body weight), Acacia honey, and sodium arsenite daily for one week. They were sacrificed anesthetically using 60 mg/kg sodium pentothal. The tissues were used for the assessment of glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase activities, protein content and lipid peroxidation. Sodium arsenite significantly (P < 0.05) suppressed the glutathione peroxidase, catalase, superoxide dismutase activities with simultaneous induction of lipid peroxidation. Administration of Acacia honey significantly increased (P < 0.05) glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase activities with concomitant suppression of lipid peroxidation as evident by the decrease in malondialdehyde level. From the results obtained, Acacia honey mitigates sodium arsenite induced-oxidative stress in male Wistar albino rats, which suggest that it may attenuate oxidative stress implicated in chemical carcinogenesis. PMID:24368942

  6. The Effect of Sonic Bloom Fertilizing Technology on The Seed Germination and Growth of Acacia mangium Willd Seedling

    Mulyadi A T

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Acacia mangium Willd is one of the promising wood species, it is a fast growing species and can be used as raw materials for pulp, furniture and wood working. Musi Hutan Persada Company has planted Acacia mangium Willd in large scale for pulp processing raw materials and for wood working industry. The faculty of forestry of the Nusa Bangsa University in collaboration with the Musi Hutan Persada have examined  the effect of “Sonic Bloom” to the Acacia mangium Willd germination and seedling growth. The results of the research are the following : (1 The seed germination with “Sonic Bloom” provided percented of germination of 82%, better than those without “Sonic Bloom”, i.e. only 34%; (2 With Sonic Bloom,  the height of 80-days old seedling is 129.6 cm higher than those without “Sonic Bloom”of only 90.7 cm  ; (3 the diameter of 80-days old seedling with “Sonic Bloom” is 0,24 cm higher than those without “Sonic Bloom” harving diameters of only 0.19 cm.The study concludes that sonic bloom treatment is very useful for the seed germination and the growth of Acacia mangium Willd seedling Key Words : Sonic Bloom, persemaian, Acacia mangium, perkecambahan, bibit   Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE

  7. Pengaruh Suplementasi Acacia mangium Willd pada Pennisetum purpureum terhadap Karakteristik Fermentasi dan Produksi Gas Metana in Vitro

    B. Santoso

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available An in vitro study was conducted to determine the effect of Acacia mangium Willd supplementation to Pennisetum purpureum on fermentation characteristics, protozoal numbers, nutrients degradability and in vitro methane production. Treatments consisted of four composite substrates with P. purpureum and A. mangium Willd ratios at 100:0 (0%, 85:15 (15%, 70:30 (30%, and 55:45 (45%. Crude saponin and total tannin contents of A. mangium were 1.67% and 4.51%, respectively. Methane and gas productions decreased linearly (P<0.01 in response to acacia levels. Addition of A. mangium at 15%, 30% and 45% decreased CH4 production by 16.2%, 26.8% and 61.1%, respectively as compared to the control. There were linear decreases in total VFA and acetate concentrations (P<0.01, and propionate production (P<0.05 in response to increase in acacia addition. Total protozoal populations increased linearly (P<0.05 with added acacia. In vitro dry matter and organic matter degradabilities of substrate decreased linearly (P<0.01 with acacia addition. It is concluded that methane production is not essentially associated with protozoal population. A. mangium has a potential use for mitigation of enteric methane production.

  8. Tree size as a factor influencing leaf emergence and leaf fall in Acacia nigrescens and Combretum apiculatum in the Kruger National Park

    P. Novellie

    1989-10-01

    Full Text Available In Acacia nigrescens and Combretum apiculatum saplings tended to retain leaves over the dry season, whereas the mature trees generally lost most of their leaves. In Acacia nigrescens the production of new leaves over the dry season was more commonly observed in saplings than in mature trees.

  9. The handling of the proposal to conserve the name Acacia at the 17th International Botanical Congress—an attempt at minority rule

    G. Moore

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The handling of controversial Proposal 1584 to conserve the name Acacia with a conserved type for the Australian acacias during the Nomenclature Section meeting at the 17th International Botanical Congress (Vienna in 2005 is reviewed. Through a simple majority vote, this Section adopted rules requiring a 60% majority of votes to approve any proposal to modify the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature and a simple majority to approve all other motions; motions not receiving the required majority were to be rejected. However, for the motion addressing Proposal 1584, 45.1% voted to conserve the type of the name Acacia for Australian acacias, and 54.9% voted to retain the current African type for the name Acacia. Even though this motion failed to get a 60% majority either way as required by the Section’s own rules, Section officials have concluded that the name Acacia is to be conserved for Australian acacias. Treating a motion as approved, even though it received only minority support, also violates the fundamental principle of standard parliamentary procedure—the right of the majority to approve proposals. For Acacia to be formally conserved, the Nomenclature Section needed to approve a motion addressing Proposal 1584 with a majority vote, and this never happened in Vienna. Recommendations are made on how this process might be improved.

  10. Distributed Command/Control Impacts on NAS Operations Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Command and Control (C2) activities abound in the NAS, and significantly influence daily operations and overall NAS efficiency. Since C2 effects are so prominent,...

  11. Wood ash treatment, a cost-effective way to deactivate tannins in Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. foliage and to improve digestion by Barbarine sheep

    Ben Salem, H. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie (INRAT), Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia)]. E-mail: bensalem.hichem@iresa.agrinet.tn; Abidi, S. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie (INRAT), Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia); Ecole Superieure d' Agriculture de Mateur, Mateur (Tunisia); Makkar, H.P.S. [Animal Production and Health Section, Joint FAO/IAEA Division, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Nefzaoui, A. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie (INRAT), Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia)

    2005-08-19

    Three in vitro experiments and one in vivo experiment were carried out to study the effect of wood ash sources (6 L wood ash solution/kg fresh plant leaves) and levels and treatment duration on the nutritive value of acacia leaves. In Experiment 1, samples of fresh (F), dried (D), or dried and ground (DG) acacia were soaked for 6 h in water or acacia wood ash solution (120 g of wood ash dry matter/L of water). Soaking acacia in water decreased total extractable phenols (TP), total extractable tannins (TT) and extractable condensed tannins (CT). Wood ash treatment led to a further decrease of these phenolic compounds and was highest with DG acacia. Experiment 2 investigated different levels of acacia wood ash (0, 120, 180 and 240 g wood ash dry matter/L of water) and treatment duration (1, 2 and 3 days). The higher the level of wood ash, the lower proportion of TP and CT in acacia was noted. In Experiment 3, two sources of wood ash (i.e., acacia and Aleppo pine) and the same solution of each source of wood ash were used eight times. The two sources of wood ash had similar deactivating effect on TP and CT. The rate of decrease of TP and CT was highest when the same wood ash solution was used four consecutive times and decreased progressively thereafter. In these three experiments, water and wood ash treatment reduced organic matter and crude protein content but substantially increased the neutral detergent fibre (NDFom) content of treated acacia. In the fourth experiment, we treated acacia with acacia wood ash (180 g/L of water for 2 days) and the same solution was used five times. Treated and untreated acacia were air-dried and fed ad libitum to two groups, each of four Barbarine rams together with 300 g of concentrate. Wood ash treatment did not affect intake and OM digestibility of the diet but increased crude protein and NDFom digestibility (P < 0.05). Feeding untreated acacia resulted in negative N balances but with wood ash treatment, N balance was positive

  12. Wood ash treatment, a cost-effective way to deactivate tannins in Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. foliage and to improve digestion by Barbarine sheep

    Three in vitro experiments and one in vivo experiment were carried out to study the effect of wood ash sources (6 L wood ash solution/kg fresh plant leaves) and levels and treatment duration on the nutritive value of acacia leaves. In Experiment 1, samples of fresh (F), dried (D), or dried and ground (DG) acacia were soaked for 6 h in water or acacia wood ash solution (120 g of wood ash dry matter/L of water). Soaking acacia in water decreased total extractable phenols (TP), total extractable tannins (TT) and extractable condensed tannins (CT). Wood ash treatment led to a further decrease of these phenolic compounds and was highest with DG acacia. Experiment 2 investigated different levels of acacia wood ash (0, 120, 180 and 240 g wood ash dry matter/L of water) and treatment duration (1, 2 and 3 days). The higher the level of wood ash, the lower proportion of TP and CT in acacia was noted. In Experiment 3, two sources of wood ash (i.e., acacia and Aleppo pine) and the same solution of each source of wood ash were used eight times. The two sources of wood ash had similar deactivating effect on TP and CT. The rate of decrease of TP and CT was highest when the same wood ash solution was used four consecutive times and decreased progressively thereafter. In these three experiments, water and wood ash treatment reduced organic matter and crude protein content but substantially increased the neutral detergent fibre (NDFom) content of treated acacia. In the fourth experiment, we treated acacia with acacia wood ash (180 g/L of water for 2 days) and the same solution was used five times. Treated and untreated acacia were air-dried and fed ad libitum to two groups, each of four Barbarine rams together with 300 g of concentrate. Wood ash treatment did not affect intake and OM digestibility of the diet but increased crude protein and NDFom digestibility (P < 0.05). Feeding untreated acacia resulted in negative N balances but with wood ash treatment, N balance was positive

  13. Acacia albida, une légumineuse arborescente a fort potentiel mycorhizien et fixateur d'azote

    Gueye, Mamadou; Diop, T.; Ndao, Babacar

    1992-01-01

    Dans les zones sahéliennes et soudano-guinéennes du Sénégal, #Acacia albida$ révèle une vie symbiotique très active. La symbiose se manifeste pendant les grandes phases de développement de l'arbre (jeunes et adultes) puis sur des drageons et indépendamment des saisons. Des échantillons de racines de #Acacia albida$ prélevés à différentes périodes et sur différents sites au Sénégal ont montré la présence simultanée d'endomycorhizes et de nodules. #Acacia albida$ présente donc une double infect...

  14. Reproductive performance and milk production of Damascus goats fed acacia shrubs or berseem clover hay in North Sinai, Egypt.

    Shetaewi, M M; Abdel-Samee, A M; Bakr, E A

    2001-02-01

    Thirty-three adult Damascus does (29 +/- 1.1 kg BW) were fed 0.6 kg per head per day of a concentrate diet plus ad libitum rice straw (Oryza sativa, control, R), or green acacia (Acacia saligna, A) or berseem clover hay (Trifolium alexandrinum, B). All treatment groups had free access to underground saline water containing 3600 ppm TDS. The DM intake was lower (p milk yield over 10 weeks and the milk composition (total solids, fat and protein percentages) were significantly different between the three groups; group B having the highest means and group R the lowest. These results suggest that supplemental feeding is required to enhance the productivity of goats in arid or semi-arid environments and Acacia saligna should not be used fresh in excessive quantities for extended periods. PMID:11234194

  15. Efeito de diferentes substratos sobre o desenvolvimento de mudas de Acacia sp. Effect of different substrates on the development of Acacia sp. seedlings

    Alexson de Mello Cunha

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Os biossólidos têm sido estudados como fonte de matéria orgânica na agricultura. Objetivou-se avaliar o desenvolvimento de mudas de Acacia mangium e Acacia auriculiformis em diferentes substratos: a horizonte Bw com areia lavada (1:1, v:v e adubação mineral de 160, 640 e 160 g m-3de N, P2O5 e K2O, respectivamente (HB; b horizonte Bw com areia lavada e esterco bovino (1:1:1, v:v (HBE; c horizonte Bw com areia lavada e lodo de esgoto (1:1:1, v:v (HBL; e d 100% de lodo de esgoto (LE. Aplicou-se 1 kg de CaCO3 p.a. por m³ de substrato. Foram utilizadas sementes inoculadas com rizóbio e não-inoculadas, determinando-se, aos 90 dias após a semeadura, a altura das plantas, o diâmetro do colo e o peso da matéria seca da raiz e da parte aérea, na qual se determinaram N, P, K, Ca e Mg. O delineamento estatístico foi inteiramente casualizado, no esquema fatorial 2 x 4 (com ou sem inoculação x 4 substratos. No LE com inoculação, obteve-se melhor crescimento das mudas. O HBE produziu efeito superior no desenvolvimento das mudas em relação àquele com a mesma proporção de material orgânico na forma de lodo (HBL. Na maioria dos parâmetros avaliados não houve diferença devido à inoculação dos substratos HBE, HBL e HB, provavelmente devido à existência de bactérias nativas nesses substratos. As mudas desenvolvidas no substrato LE foram as que acumularam mais N e Ca, principalmente quando inoculadas. Houve tendência de maior acúmulo de P, K e Mg na parte aérea das mudas desenvolvidas no substrato HBE.Sewage sludge has been studied as source of organic matter on seedling production. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the development of Acacia mangium and Acacia auriculiformis seedlings in the following substrates: a oxic horizon + sand (1:1, v:v + 160, 640 e 160 g m-3 of N, P2O5 and K2O respectively (HB; b oxic horizon + sand + cattle manure (1:1:1, v:v (HBE; c oxic horizon + sand + sewage sludge (1:1:1, v:v (HBL and; d 100% sewage

  16. Tratamentos para superar a dormência de sementes de Acacia mangium Willd = Treatments to overcome dormancy of Acacia mangium seeds

    Adriana Paula D’Agostini Contreiras Rodrigues

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se o estudo de diferentes tratamentos para superar a dormência de sementes da espécie arbórea Acacia mangium Willd. Os tratamentos avaliados foram: imersão das sementes em ácido sulfúrico (96% PA por 15, 30, 60 e 90 minutos; imersão das sementes em água fervente (100°C por 15, 30 e 60 segundos e testemunha sem tratamentoprévio das sementes. Foram utilizadas quatro repetições de 100 sementes por tratamento. Após tratadas, colocaram-se as sementes para germinar em caixas gerbox, com papel filtro umedecido, na temperatura média de 27,5ºC. As avaliações foram diárias, por 21 dias. Foram avaliadas as seguintes variáveis: porcentagem de germinação, primeira contagem do teste de germinação, velocidade de germinação e o índice de velocidade de germinação das sementes. Os resultados obtidos permitiram inferir que: a imersão de sementes, em ácido sulfúrico por 90 minutos e em água fervente por 60 segundos, foi mais eficiente nasuperação da dormência de sementes de Acacia manguim Willd.; sementes imersas em ácido sulfúrico, por 90 minutos, apresentaram melhor vigor, independente do teste utilizado; a imersão das sementes em água fervente, por 60 segundos, pode ser a técnica mais indicadapara a superação da dormência, devido ao menor custo, facilidade do manuseio e do menor tempo de execução.In this work aimed to evaluate different treatments to overcome seed dormancy of Acacia mangium Willd. There were evaluated seven treatments: immersion of seeds into sulfuric acid (96% PA for 15, 30, 60 and 90 minutes; immersion of seeds in boiling water (100ºC for 15, 30 and 60 seconds and one tester, without previous treatment on the seeds. It was used four repetitions of 100 seeds for each treatment. After the treatment, the seeds were placed to germinate in gerbox with paper filter humidified at the medium temperature of 27.5ºC. The evaluations were made daily, during 21 days. There were evaluated percentage

  17. The conversion of grassland to acacia forest as an effective option for net reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

    de Godoi, Stefânia Guedes; Neufeld, Ângela Denise Hubert; Ibarr, Mariana Alves; Ferreto, Décio Oscar Cardoso; Bayer, Cimélio; Lorentz, Leandro Homrich; Vieira, Frederico Costa Beber

    2016-03-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of forestation with leguminous Acacia mearnsii De Wild in native grasslands on the soil greenhouse (GHG) fluxes and their main driving factors. The experiment was conducted in the Brazilian Pampa over the period of one year in a six-year-old Acacia plantation, evaluating four treatments: Acacia (AM), Acacia with litter periodically removed (A-l), Acacia after harvest (AH) and native grassland (NG) (reference treatment). Air samples were obtained by the static chamber method, and gas concentrations were evaluated by gas chromatography. Soil and climate factors were monitored. The accumulated fluxes of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) were statistically similar between the soils in the AM and NG treatments, which tended to oxidize CH4 (-1445 and -1752 g C-CH4 ha(-1) yr(-1), respectively) and had low emission of N2O (242 and 316 g N-N2O ha(-1) yr(-1)), most likely influenced by the low water-filled pore space and the low content of mineral N in the soil. However, the soil in the AH treatment presented higher emissions of both gases, totaling 1889 g C-CH4 ha(-1) yr(-1) and 1250 g N-N2O ha(-1) yr(-1). Afforestation neither significantly affected the total organic C stocks nor their lability, keeping the C management index for the forested area similar to that in the NG treatment. The conversion from grassland to Acacia forest represents an effective option for mitigating the net reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, which is basically determined by C accumulation in biomass and wood products. PMID:26731308

  18. Effect of composite yogurt enriched with acacia fiber and Bifidobacterium lactis

    Yang Won Min; Sang Un Park; Yeon Sil Jang; Young-Ho Kim; Poong-Lyul Rhee; Seo Hyun Ko; Nami Joo

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate whether composite yogurt with acacia dietary fiber and Bifidobacterium lactis (B.lactis)has additive effects in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).METHODS:A total of 130 patients were randomly allocated to consume,twice daily for 8 wk,either the composite yogurt or the control product.The composite yogurt contained acacia dietary fiber and high-dose B.lactis together with two classic yogurt starter cultures.Patients were evaluated using the visual analog scale via a structured questionnaire administered at baseline and after treatment.RESULTS:Improvements in bowel habit satisfaction and overall IBS symptoms from baseline were significantly higher in the test group than in the control group (27.16 vs 15.51,P =0.010,64.2 ± 17.0 vs 50.4 ± 20.5,P < 0.001; respectively).In constipation-predominant IBS,improvement in overall IBS symptoms was significantly higher in the test group than in the control group (72.4 ± 18.4 vs 50.0 ± 21.8,P < 0.001).In patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS,improvement in bowel habit satisfaction from baseline was significantly higher in the test group than in the control group (32.90 vs 7.81,P =0.006).CONCLUSION:Our data suggest that composite yogurt enriched with acacia fiber and B.lactis has greater therapeutic effects in patients with IBS than standard yogurt.

  19. COMPARATIVE STUDY REGARDING THE QUANTITY OF ACACIA AND LIME HONEY HARVESTED IN 2008 IN VARIOUS TYPES OF BEEHIVES

    SILVIA PĂTRUICĂ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The paperwork present the results of a comparative study regarding the production of acacia (Robinia pseudacacia and lime honey harvested in 2008 in flat, vertical and multi-frame hives. A total of 45 bee families (Apis mellifica carpatica, Banatica ecotipe, divided in three experimental groups, with 15 families on each hive, were examined for every type of hive. During the experiment there were tracked the number of honeycombs with larvae starting from 7th to 10th of April and from 1st to 5th of May, the acacia and lime honey yield.

  20. RESEARCHES CONCERNING OF THE MINERAL CONTENT OF ACACIA HONEY DERIVED ON DIFFERENTS COUNTRY

    SILVIA PĂTRUICĂ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the research concerning chemical composition of acacia honey from the differents region. Analisys concerning the mineral content were made in 14-19 march 2008 in the molecular and atomical spectroscopy laboratoriy of the Faculty of Agro-Food Tehnology and Processing from USABMV Timisoara, through spectroscopy with atomic absorbability in flame with the spectrometer. Contr AA 300 with continous surce. There were anailzted 3 honey samples made in 2007 from Domasnea and Farliug (Caras-Severin and Bala (Mehedinti. The ash contain in Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Zn, Mn, Fe, Pb, Co, Cr was determined.

  1. PERBANDINGAN VIGORITAS BENIH Acacia mangium HASIL PEMULIAAN DAN YANG BELUM DIMULIAKAN

    Naning Yuniarti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Seeds with high vigour are seeds that can germinate normally in sub-optimum conditions and above normal in optimum condition. To predict the performance of seedlings after planting and the storability of seeds, it is necessary to test the seed vigour. This study aims to investigate the growth and storage vigour of Acacia mangium breeding and unbreeding seeds. The experiment design was arranged in completely randomized design with each treatment being replicated four times with 100 seeds. Results obtained showed that breeding seeds had better growth and storage vigour. 

  2. Incidences and severity of vascular wilt in Acacia mangium plantations in Sabah, Malaysia

    Maid, Mandy; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the incidences and severity of vascular wilt disease associated with dieback in stands of commercial Acacia mangium plantations. The study revealed that the prevalence of the symptoms is high between 50 to 60% in two plantations, where it is found scattered in the plots that were surveyed. The incidence of the disease in each plot is low between 0 to 6%. The disease symptoms were more often found where the symptom syndrome in a chronic (level 3) or critical state (level 4). This suggests that the causal pathogen has the ability to penetrate into the tissues of the plants and only display symptoms at the latest stage.

  3. Genetic Diversity of Acacia mangium Seed Orchard in Wonogiri Indonesia Using Microsatellite Markers

    VIVI YUSKIANTI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity is important in tree improvement programs. To evaluate levels of genetic diversity of first generation Acacia mangium seedling seed orchard in Wonogiri, Central Java, Indonesia, three populations from each region of Papua New Guinea (PNG and Queensland, Australia (QLD were selected and analyzed using 25 microsatellite markers. Statistical analysis showed that PNG populations have higher number of detected alleles and level of genetic diversity than QLD populations. This study provides a basic information about the genetic background of the populations used in the development of an A. mangium seed orchard in Indonesia.

  4. Chemical Composition profile of Acacia Nilotica Seed Growing Wild in South of Iran

    Karim Abbasian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Acacia Nilotica is a pioneer species, relatively high in bioactive secondary compound and are important for a variety of functions is economically used as a source of tannins, gums, timber, fuel and fodder. Babul plant is therapeutic used as Anti-cancer, anti tumours, Antiscorbutic, Astringent, anti-oxidant, Natriuretic, Antispasmodial, Diuretic, Intestinal pains and diarrhea, Nerve stimulant, Cold, Congestion, Coughs, Dysenter, Fever, Hemorrhages, Leucorrhea, Ophthalmia and Sclerosis. The aim of this study was determination of proximate composition, mineral elements (Calcium, Potassium, Iron, Zinc, Sodium, Selenium and Copper contents in this endemic Iranian seed.

  5. Influence of radiation on some physico-chemical properties of gum acacia

    Controlling of degradation in polysaccharide is also gaining impetus from commercial point of view. Comprehensive studies on the influence of ionizing radiation on the physico-chemical properties of polysaccharides are very important for their applications in different industries. The effect of gamma radiation on gum acacia has been studied and its effect on some physico-chemical properties, as measured by UV spectroscopy and viscometry has been discussed. The gum samples are irradiated in the range of 5 kGy to 25 kGy both in air and vacuum. Samples irradiated under vacuum shows colour stability while viscosity remain unaffected. (author)

  6. Conceptual design for the energy conversion system of the ACACIA nuclear cogeneration plant

    The design of the energy conversion system (ECS) for the ACACIA (AdvanCed Atomic Cogenerator for Industrial Applications) is discussed. The plant combines a closed cycle gas turbine system with a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). It produces 13.6 MWe and 17 tons/h of industrial steam using a 40 MWth reactor (electrical efficiency 34%, total efficiency 64%). Design objectives are presented. The choice for a cycle is then explained. A preliminary design, including a sensitivity analysis, is given for the major equipment. 13 refs

  7. Efek Seresah Mahoni Swietenia macrophylla King. Terhadap Perkecambahan Acacia mangium Willd.

    Elis Tambaru Sri Suhadiyah

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to know the efects of phenolic compounds released from decomposed mahogany leaf litters on acacia seed germination. The experiments were carried out using factorial completelyrandomized design, with four replicates. The first factor was the volume of mahogany litters, i.e; S0= 0 gram, S1= 5 gram, S2= 10 gram and S3= 15 gram. The second factor was time of decomposition i.e; D2= 2 weeks, D3= 3 weeks and D4= 4 weeks respectively. Data were analyzed using ANOVA followed ...

  8. Analysis of commercial proanthocyanidins. Part 3: the chemical composition of wattle (Acacia mearnsii) bark extract.

    Venter, Pieter B; Senekal, Nadine D; Kemp, Gabré; Amra-Jordaan, Maryam; Khan, Pir; Bonnet, Susan L; van der Westhuizen, Jan H

    2012-11-01

    Wattle (Acacia mearnsii) bark extract is an important renewable industrial source of natural polymers for leather tanning and adhesive manufacturing. The wattle bark proanthocyanidin oligomers have 5-deoxy extender units that render the interflavanyl bonds resistant to acid catalysed hydrolysis and their composition cannot be determined via conventional thiolysis. We combined established phyto- and synthetic chemistry perspectives with an electrospray mass spectrometry investigation to establish that the flavan-3-ol based oligomers consist of a starter unit which is either catechin or gallocatechin, angularly bonded to fisetinidol or predominantly robinetinidol extender units. PMID:22917955

  9. Conteúdo e exportação de micronutrientes em acácia-negra (Acacia Mearnsii De Wild. procedência batemans bay (Austrália Content and exportation of micronutrients in black wattle (Acacia Mearnsii de wild. of Australian batemans bay provenance

    Marcos Vinicius Winckler Caldeira

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho foi estimar o conteúdo e a exportação de micronutrientes (Mn, B, Cu, Zn e Fe e o Na nos diferentes componentes de árvores de um povoamento de acácia-negra (Acacia mearnsii De Wild., procedência australiana Batemans Bay, com 2,4 anos de idade, em Butiá-RS (Brasil. A biomassa total estimada foi de 36.155 kg/ha, apresentando distribuição de 46,0, 20,0, 19,5, 12,0 e 3,0%, na madeira do lenho, nas folhas, nos galhos vivos, na casca e nos galhos mortos, respectivamente. A proporção de micronutrientes acumulados na biomassa dos componentes da árvore foram 43,76% nas folhas, 26,94% na madeira do tronco, 19,56% nos galhos vivos, 7,21% na casca e 2,54% nos galhos mortos. A quantidade estimada de micronutrientes contidos na biomassa acima do solo foi 10,4 kg/ha, acumulados da seguinte forma: Na (58,84%, Fe (21,79%, Zn (9,16%, B (4,09%, Mn (4,59% e Cu (1,54%. A casca e a madeira do lenho acumulou Na (21,47%, Fe (6,71%, Mn (2,11%, Zn (1,66%, B (1,58% e Cu (0,63%. A copa (folhas e galhos vivos e mortos acumularam Na (37,36%, Fe (15,07%, Zn (7,49%, B (2,53%, Mn (2,48% e Cu (0,91%. A exploração intensiva de áreas com a procedência Batemans Bay gera suspeitas de possíveis ocorrências de deficiências nutricionais de Na nas rotações futuras, tornando necessário o emprego de fertilizantes para manter a produtividade do sítio.This study aimed to estimate the content and exportation of micronutrients (Mn, B, Cu, Zn e Fe and Na in different tree components of black wattle (Acacia mearnsii De Wild. forest of Batemans Bay Australian provenance, 2.4 years old in Butiá, RS, Brazil. The total biomass found was 36,155 kg/ha, thus distributed: 46.0%; 20.0%; 19.5%; 12.0% and 3.0%, spread in the wood of the stem, leaves, live branches, bark and dead branches, respectively. The proportion of the micronutrients accumulated in the biomass of the components were: leaves (43.76%, wood of the stem (26.94%, live branches (19

  10. nas ir lytis Platono filosofijoje

    Kulevičius, Ernestas

    2008-01-01

    Praktinės filosofijos magistro baigiamojo darbo tema yra aktuali, nes tradicinis Platono filosofijos supratimas kūno ir lyties temomis yra klaidingai įprasminamas viename pretenzingame sakinyje: „Platonas teigė, kad kūnas – sielos kalėjimas“. Abejojant šio teiginio išsamumu iškeliamas darbo tikslas - sukvestionuoti tradicinį Platono filosofijos supratimą ir papildyti jį naujais aspektais. Pirmoje darbo dalyje apžvelgiama estetinė graikų kultūros prigimtis ir lyginama su idealizmu paremta Plat...

  11. SUSTENTABILIDADE NAS CONSTRUÇÕES

    Gabriela Siqueira Manhães; Ronaldo de Sousa Araújo

    2014-01-01

    O processo da área da construção civil é bastante heterogêneo, contemplando diferentes âmbitos de organização produtiva e de formas de comercialização de seus produtos finais, as construções. Nas construções, a complexidade e a indispensabilidade de planejamento e gerenciamento são agravadas pela crescente busca do mercado por maior qualidade em seu desenvolvimento e melhor desempenho do produto final. Isso pode não direcionar a comunicação entre os agentes envolvidos e racionaliz...

  12. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties of Acacia suma stem bark

    Sumanta Mondal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Acacia suma (Fabaceae is a medium sized erect tree found in the greater part of India. Present study was carried out for evaluation of ethanolic extract of stem bark of Acacia suma (EEAS at 200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o. for analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activity. EEAS was screened for analgesic activity by writhing, tail flick, tail immersion and hot plate method in mice.  The anti-inflammatory activity by acute carrageenan induced paw oedema and chronic Freund’s adjuvant arthritis models in rats. The antipyretic activity was evaluated using Brewer’s yeast induced pyrexia in rabbits. Acute toxicity in mice was found to be higher than 2000 mg/kg., p.o.  Analgesic activity revealed that test dose of 400 mg/kg, p.o., had significant activity in various tested models. Anti-inflammatory studies at 200 and 400 mg/kg., p.o., of extract showed significant activity (P<0.01.  The extract showed significant (P<0.01 effect on yeast-induced fever in rabbits in dose dependant manner. Preliminary phytochemical tests revealed presence of carbohydrates, tannins, alkaloids, saponins and phenolic compounds in the ethanol extract of A. suma bark. The present study therefore provides scientific base for its use in the folklore remedies as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties of natural origin.

  13. Anatomical characters of the phyllode and stem of Acacia podalyriifolia A. Cunn. ex G. Don (Fabaceae

    M.R. Duarte

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The Acacia genus has presented various secondary metabolites, such as tannins, flavonoids, alkaloids and gums. Preparations from different species have been applied for diabetes, gastrointestinal disorders and inflammatory diseases in the traditional medicine and have demonstrated cytotoxic, antimicrobial and antiparasitic activities. Acacia podalyriifolia A. Cunn. ex G. Don (Fabaceae is a small wood, indigenous to Australia and cultivated worldwide for its ornamental feature. This work aimed to characterize the anatomy of the phyllode and stem, in order to contribute to the species identification. The botanical material was fixed, sectioned and prepared according to usual light and scanning microtechniques. The epidermal cells, in surface view, are polygonal and coated with striate and thick cuticle, and filaments of epicuticular wax. Paracytic stomata and unicellular non-glandular trichomes are seen. Palisade and ground parenchymas, and minor collateral bundles with xylem directed alternately to upper and lower sides occur in the blade. The midrib shows two collateral bundles facing each other. The stem, in incipient secondary growth, exhibits epidermis, annular collenchyma, sclerenchymatic sheath and collateral vascular organization. Cells containing phenolic compounds and prisms of calcium oxalate are observed.

  14. Host-driven diversification of gall-inducing Acacia thrips and the aridification of Australia

    Chapman Thomas W

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insects that feed on plants contribute greatly to the generation of biodiversity. Hypotheses explaining rate increases in phytophagous insect diversification and mechanisms driving speciation in such specialists remain vexing despite considerable attention. The proliferation of plant-feeding insects and their hosts are expected to broadly parallel one another where climate change over geological timescales imposes consequences for the diversification of flora and fauna via habitat modification. This work uses a phylogenetic approach to investigate the premise that the aridification of Australia, and subsequent expansion and modification of arid-adapted host flora, has implications for the diversification of insects that specialise on them. Results Likelihood ratio tests indicated the possibility of hard molecular polytomies within two co-radiating gall-inducing species complexes specialising on the same set of host species. Significant tree asymmetry is indicated at a branch adjacent to an inferred transition to a Plurinerves ancestral host species. Lineage by time diversification plots indicate gall-thrips that specialise on Plurinerves hosts differentially experienced an explosive period of speciation contemporaneous with climatic cycling during the Quaternary period. Chronological analyses indicated that the approximate age of origin of gall-inducing thrips on Acacia might be as recent as 10 million years ago during the Miocene, as truly arid landscapes first developed in Australia. Conclusion Host-plant diversification and spatial heterogeneity of hosts have increased the potential for specialisation, resource partitioning, and unoccupied ecological niche availability for gall-thrips on Australian Acacia.

  15. Diversity of nitrogen fixing bacteria associated to the new Caledonian ubiquitous tree Acacia spirorbis

    Grangeteau, C.; Ducousso, M.; Jourand, P.; Lebrun, M.; Klonowska, A.; Fritsch, E.; Juillot, F.; Acherar, S.

    2012-04-01

    The New Caledonian endemic tree species Acacia spirorbis is able to grow and to present invasive traits on a wide range of soils (e.g.: ultramafic, calcareous coral, siliceous, aluminium enriched) in a large range of pH. Acacia spirorbis is also adapted to poly-metallic toxicity, especially Ni, to an unbalanced Ca/Mg ratio in strong favour of Mg and to poor N, P and K availability. The goal of this study was to improve our knowledge concerning the influence of bacterial symbionts on A. spirorbis adaptation to different soil conditions. Firstly, bacterial symbiots were isolated from field collected nodules or nodules obtained by trapping method and characterized by phylogenetic analysis of housekeeping genes (recA, dnaK and glnII) and symbiotic genes (nodA and nifH). A strong preference of A. spirorbis for different species of Bradyrhizobium has been noted ; Rhizobium species has been isolated only from nodules collected from a plantation located out of its natural area of distribution. A selection of representative rhizobial strains isolated from diverse soils was tested to compare their symbiotic efficiency with A. spirorbis in nursery conditions. Results are presented in function of soils diversity and in perspective of A. spirorbis adaptation to extremely diverse and adverse soil conditions.

  16. Chemical composition and nutritional evaluation of the seeds of Acacia tortilis (Forssk.) Hayne ssp. raddiana.

    Embaby, Hassan E; Rayan, Ahmed M

    2016-06-01

    Chemical composition and nutritional evaluation as well as physicochemical and functional properties of seed flour of Acacia tortilis (Forssk.) Hayne ssp. raddiana were studied. The results indicated that seeds contained 5.30% moisture, 3.99% ash, 9.19% fat, 14.31% fiber, 27.21% protein and 45.30% carbohydrates. Potassium was the predominant element followed by calcium and then phosphorous. Phytic acid, tannins and trypsin inhibitor as antinutrients were detected. The amino acid profile compared well with FAO/WHO recommended pattern except for cystine/methionine, isoleucine, tyrosine/phenylalanine, lysine and threonine. Also, the first limiting amino acid was lysine. Fatty acid composition showed that linoleic acid was the major fatty acid, followed by palmitic, stearic, oleic and arachidic acids. The seed oil showed absorbance in the ultraviolet ranges, thus it can be used as a broad spectrum UV protectant. For physicochemical and functional properties, acacia seeds flour had excellent water holding index, swelling index, foaming capacity and foam stability. PMID:26830561

  17. Evaluation of Topical Preparations Containing Curcuma, Acacia and Lupinus Extracts as an Anti-inflammatory Drugs

    M M Hamzah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: This work was suggested on the basis of presence of curcuminoids in curcuma and the presence of flavonoidal constituent in acacia and lupinus. The aim of this study was to study their possible anti-inflammatory effect by separately formulation of the three extracts in a suitable gel formula for topical administration and comparison of the prepared gels with a standard gel in the market (diclosal Emulgel by using the carrageenan induced paw edema model in albino rats. The extracts were subjected to phytochemical screening tests using reported methods to determine the presence of various phytoconstituents. Gel formulation was prepared containing 8% of each extract separately in gel base, namely sodium carboxy methyl cellulose (NaCMC. The pharmacological screening revealed that percent reduction of edema produced by curcuma extract was 30.0%, by acacia extract was 4%, by ethanol fraction lupinus was 18% and by chloroform fraction lupinus was 11.3%, while diclofenac sodium topical gel produced 48% reduction of edema. Industrial relevance: Medicinal plants provide a host of chemical compounds, which have been optimized on the basis of their biological activities. Chemical compounds present in medicinal plants have shown great promise in the management of various inflammatory disorders and have continued to serve as alternative and complementary therapies. The present study will help the industry to produce herbal drug effective in the treatment of inflammation with less side effect and less costly when compared to the synthetic drugs.

  18. Litterfall and nutrient dynamics in Acacia mangium (Mimosaceae) forest plantations of Antioquia, Colombia

    Fine litter production, nutrient return, nutrient resorption, and nutrient use efficiency were studied during one year in Acacia mangium forest plantations in mining gold degraded soils at the Bajo Cauca region of Colombia. annual fine litter production was estimated at 10.4 mg ha-1 and it was dominated by the leaf fraction (54%), followed by the reproductive material (24%) and to a lesser proportion by other debris (6%) and other species leaves (1.5%). the highest organic matter and nutrients returns were found on sites classified as high quality. Soil plowing realized previous Acacia mangium planting, did not show any significant effect on organic matter and nutrients returns. A. mangium leaf litter had a high N concentration and consequently, given the high leaf litter production values, it was found a high N return. By the opposite, leaf litter P content and P returns via litter fall were very low. The high values found for p retranslocation and P use efficiency indexes showed that P was the most limiting nutrient for the species. the high values of fine litter production and nutrient return via leaf litter indicate that A. mangium has a great capacity for degraded areas reclamation, as of the restoration of the biogeochemical cycles.

  19. Economics of mixed plantation of Prosopis juliflora and Acacia nilotica for fuel in Agra ravines

    Babu, R.; Puri, D.N.; Singh, J.P.; Sharma, K.

    1984-09-01

    Economic analysis of the mixed plantation of Acacia nilotica (60%), Prosopis juliflora (20%) and miscellaneous species (20%) in severe ravine lands along the bank of river Yamuna at Agra, was carried out. The benefit-cost ratios of the first 15 years rotation at 10% and 15% discount rates were worked out to be 1.81 and 1.09, respectively with internal rate of return (IRR) of 16.2%. Twenty percent of the area covered with Prosopis juliflora in the first rotation coppiced profusely and was retained. The remaining area was resown with Prosopis juliflora. The benefit-cost ratios of the second rotation of seven years (Prosopis juliflora - 78% and miscellaneous species - 22%) worked out to be 1.61 and 1.40 at 10% and 15% discount rates having IRR of 27%. Both the rotations gave a favourable benefit-cost ratio which establishes the economic feasibility of raising mixed plantation of Prosopis juliflora and Acacia nilotica in ravine lands whose opportunity cost is very low.

  20. Evolutionary history shapes patterns of mutualistic benefit in Acacia-rhizobial interactions.

    Barrett, Luke G; Zee, Peter C; Bever, James D; Miller, Joseph T; Thrall, Peter H

    2016-07-01

    The ecological and evolutionary factors that drive the emergence and maintenance of variation in mutualistic benefit (i.e., the benefits provided by one partner to another) in mutualistic symbioses are not well understood. In this study, we evaluated the role that host and symbiont phylogeny might play in determining patterns of mutualistic benefit for interactions among nine species of Acacia and 31 strains of nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria. Using phylogenetic comparative methods we compared patterns of variation in mutualistic benefit (host response to inoculation) to rhizobial phylogenies constructed from housekeeping and symbiosis genes; and a multigene host phylogeny. We found widespread genotype-by-genotype variation in patterns of plant growth. A relatively large component of this variation (21-28%) was strongly influenced by the interacting evolutionary histories of both partners, such that phylogenetically similar host species had similar growth responses when inoculated with phylogenetically similar rhizobia. We also found a relatively large nonphylogenetic effect for the average mutualistic benefit provided by rhizobia to plants, such that phylogenetic relatedness did not predict the overall benefit provided by rhizobia across all hosts. We conclude that phylogenetic relatedness should frequently predict patterns of mutualistic benefit in acacia-rhizobial mutualistic interactions; but that some mutualistic traits also evolve independently of the phylogenies. PMID:27241367

  1. Foliar endophytic fungi as potential protectors from pathogens in myrmecophytic Acacia plants.

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Jiménez-Alemán, Guillermo H; Boland, Wilhelm

    2014-10-01

    In defensive ant-plant interactions myrmecophytic plants express reduced chemical defense in their leaves to protect themselves from pathogens, and it seems that mutualistic partners are required to make up for this lack of defensive function. Previously, we reported that mutualistic ants confer plants of Acacia hindsii protection from pathogens, and that the protection is given by the ant-associated bacteria. Here, we examined whether foliar endophytic fungi may potentially act as a new partner, in addition to mutualistic ants and their bacteria inhabitants, involved in the protection from pathogens in myrmecophytic Acacia plants. Fungal endophytes were isolated from the asymptomatic leaves of A. hindsii plants for further molecular identification of 18S rRNA gene. Inhibitory effects of fungal endophytes were tested against Pseudomonas plant pathogens. Our findings support a potential role of fungal endophytes in pathogen the protection mechanisms against pathogens in myrmecophytic plants and provide the evidence of novel fungal endophytes capable of biosynthesizing bioactive metabolites. PMID:26843901

  2. Economic assessment and comparison of acacia energy crop with annual traditional crops in Southern Europe

    In several policy documents bioenergy is recognized as an important renewable energy source in Italy. The increase in energy prices represents an opportunity for lignocellulosic energy crops such as acacia and poplar. However, for Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) and Short Rotation Forestry (SRF) to be adopted by farmers, these crops must be perceived to be at least as profitable as crops that normally compete with these plantations for land use. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the economic feasibility of acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia) as an energy crop in a low input production regime in Italy and, in particular, to consider its competitiveness with wheat. Our results show that neither SRC and SRF techniques using assumed production costs (EUR3820 and EUR5285 ha-1 yr-1) nor biomass productions are able to obtain a positive profit (-EUR184 and -EUR172 ha-1 yr-1) that can convince farmers to invest in biomass plantations on their land. The results demonstrate that wheat is a more economically secure option than SRC or SRF. The viability of local biomass production in Italy and Southern Europe depends on the active support of the governments; without them, biomass is not economically competitive for the farmers when compared to crops such as wheat. (author)

  3. Economic assessment and comparison of acacia energy crop with annual traditional crops in Southern Europe

    Gasol, Carles M.; Rieradevall, Joan; Gabarrell, Xavier [SosteniPrA UAB-IRTA, Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals ICTA, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Brun, Filippo; Mosso, Angela [Dipartimento di Economia e Ingegneria Agraria Forestale e Ambientale, University of Torino (Italy)

    2010-01-15

    In several policy documents bioenergy is recognized as an important renewable energy source in Italy. The increase in energy prices represents an opportunity for lignocellulosic energy crops such as acacia and poplar. However, for Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) and Short Rotation Forestry (SRF) to be adopted by farmers, these crops must be perceived to be at least as profitable as crops that normally compete with these plantations for land use. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the economic feasibility of acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia) as an energy crop in a low input production regime in Italy and, in particular, to consider its competitiveness with wheat. Our results show that neither SRC and SRF techniques using assumed production costs (EUR3820 and EUR5285 ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) nor biomass productions are able to obtain a positive profit (-EUR184 and -EUR172 ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) that can convince farmers to invest in biomass plantations on their land. The results demonstrate that wheat is a more economically secure option than SRC or SRF. The viability of local biomass production in Italy and Southern Europe depends on the active support of the governments; without them, biomass is not economically competitive for the farmers when compared to crops such as wheat. (author)

  4. Effects of cadmium and copper on the biologic fixation of nitrogen by acacia cyanophylla lindl

    The seedlings of acacia cyanophylla were treated with different doses of Cu and Cd. The study of the accumulation of these heavy metals by the plant indicates that for the same dose, the endogenous levels are more elevated with Cd than with Cu. This indicates the strong mobility of Cd and constitutes one of the important reasons of its toxicity. The obtained results reveal that at low doses, Cu involves a strong decrease of the number and the weight of the nodules but the viability is affected only with the strong doses. On the other hand, Cd at low dose, affects both the processes of the nodulation and that of the viability of nodules. The measurement of the symbiotic nitrogen fixation, using the method of isotopic N dilution showed that at low doses (10 and 20 ppm), the N2 fixation is more affected by Cd than by Cu. At strong doses (50 ppm), the two types of metals inhibit completely the N2 fixation on acacia cyanophylla (author)

  5. Arsenic toxicity in Acacia mangium willd. and mimosa Caesalpiniaefolia benth. seedlings

    Henrique Nery Cipriani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Acacia mangium and Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia are fast-growing woody fabaceous species that might be suitable for phytoremediation of arsenic (As-contaminated sites. To date, few studies on their tolerance to As toxicity have been published. Therefore, this study assessed As toxicity symptoms in A. mangium and M. caesalpiniaefolia seedlings under As stress in a greenhouse. Seedlings of Acacia mangium and M. caesalpiniaefolia were grown for 120 d in an Oxisol-sand mixture with 0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg kg-1 As, in four replications in four randomized blocks. The plants were assessed for visible toxicity symptoms, dry matter production, shoot/root ratio, root anatomy and As uptake. Analyses of variance and regression showed that the growth of A. mangium and M. caesalpiniaefolia was severely hindered by As, with a reduction in dry matter production of more than 80 % at the highest As rate. The root/shoot ratio increased with increasing As rates. At a rate of 400 mg kg-1 As, whitish chlorosis appeared on Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia seedlings. The root anatomy of both species was altered, resulting in cell collapse, death of root buds and accumulation of phenolic compounds. Arsenic concentration was several times greater in roots than in shoots, with more than 150 and 350 mg kg-1 in M. caesalpiniaefolia and A. mangium roots, respectively. These species could be suitable for phytostabilization of As-contaminated sites, but growth-stimulating measures should be used.

  6. Partitioning of 15N labelled mineral nitrogen in Acacia and coconut

    Many of the coconut plantations in Cote d'Ivoire have deteriorated owing to loss of legume ground cover and soil fertility. It has not been possible to restore the ground cover but tree legumes have been proposed as an alternative to rejuvenate the soil and at the same time provide a source of fuel wood. Experiments were undertaken to provide background information that will be needed in evaluating the ability of Acacia trees to increase soil N and contribute N to coconut. Partitioning of N in four-year-old coconut and Acacia trees was measured six months after application of 15N labelled ammonium sulphate to the soil. The results showed that the labelled N was distributed throughout both tree types. The highest concentration of label was located in tissues that were actively growing during the six months after N application but a considerable amount of N was also contained in tissues that were physiologically mature. Approximately half of the dry matter of legume trees was contained in the woody tissue but most of the N was contained in the green portion of the trees. It appears that the legume trees could potentially be used as a source of fuel wood and still be useful in increasing the N and organic matter content of the soil. (author). 9 refs, 5 figs

  7. Economic assessment and comparison of acacia energy crop with annual traditional crops in Southern Europe

    In several policy documents bioenergy is recognized as an important renewable energy source in Italy. The increase in energy prices represents an opportunity for lignocellulosic energy crops such as acacia and poplar. However, for Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) and Short Rotation Forestry (SRF) to be adopted by farmers, these crops must be perceived to be at least as profitable as crops that normally compete with these plantations for land use. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the economic feasibility of acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia) as an energy crop in a low input production regime in Italy and, in particular, to consider its competitiveness with wheat. Our results show that neither SRC and SRF techniques using assumed production costs ( Euro 3820 and Euro 5285 ha-1 yr-1) nor biomass productions are able to obtain a positive profit (- Euro 184 and - Euro 172 ha-1 yr-1) that can convince farmers to invest in biomass plantations on their land. The results demonstrate that wheat is a more economically secure option than SRC or SRF. The viability of local biomass production in Italy and Southern Europe depends on the active support of the governments; without them, biomass is not economically competitive for the farmers when compared to crops such as wheat.

  8. Polyploidy can Confer Superiority to West African Acacia senegal (L.) Willd. Trees

    Diallo, Adja M.; Nielsen, Lene R.; Kjær, Erik D.; Petersen, Karen K.; Ræbild, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidy is a common phenomenon in the evolution of angiosperms. It has been suggested that polyploids manage harsh environments better than their diploid relatives but empirical data supporting this hypothesis are scarce, especially for trees. Using microsatellite markers and flow cytometry, we examine the frequency of polyploids and diploids in a progeny trial testing four different populations of Acacia senegal, a species native to sub-Saharan regions of Africa. We compare growth between cytotypes and test whether polyploid seedlings grow better than diploids. Our results show that polyploids coexist with diploids in highly variable proportions among populations in Senegal. Acacia senegal genotypes were predominantly diploid and tetraploid, but triploid, pentaploid, hexaploid, and octaploid forms were also found. We find that polyploids show faster growth than diploids under our test conditions: in an 18 years old field trial, polyploid superiority was estimated to be 17% in trunk diameter and 9% in height while in a growth chamber experiment, polyploids grew 28% taller, but only after being exposed to drought stress. The results suggest that polyploid A. senegal can have an adaptive advantage in some regions of Africa. PMID:27379120

  9. Lignin biodegradation and ligninolytic enzyme studies during biopulping of Acacia mangium wood chips by tropical white rot fungi.

    Liew, C Y; Husaini, A; Hussain, H; Muid, S; Liew, K C; Roslan, H A

    2011-06-01

    White rot fungi are good lignin degraders and have the potential to be used in industry. In the present work, Phellinus sp., Daedalea sp., Trametes versicolor and Pycnoporus coccineus were selected due to their relatively high ligninolytic enzyme activity, and grown on Acacia mangium wood chips under solid state fermentation. Results obtained showed that manganese peroxidase produced is far more compared to lignin peroxidase, suggesting that MnP might be the predominating enzymes causing lignin degradation in Acacia mangium wood chips. Cellulase enzyme assays showed that no significant cellulase activity was detected in the enzyme preparation of T. versicolor and Phellinus sp. This low cellulolytic activity further suggests that these two white rot strains are of more interest in lignin degradation. The results on lignin losses showed 20-30% of lignin breakdown at 60 days of biodegradation. The highest lignin loss was found in Acacia mangium biotreated with T. versicolor after 60 days and recorded 26.9%, corresponding to the percentage of their wood weight loss recorded followed by P. coccineus. In general, lignin degradation was only significant from 20 days onwards. The overall percentage of lignin weight loss was within the range of 1.02-26.90% over the biodegradation periods. Microscopic observations conducted using scanning electron microscope showed that T. versicolor, P. coccineus, Daedalea sp. and Phellinus sp. had caused lignin degradation in Acacia mangium wood chips. PMID:25187145

  10. Impact of Acacia tortilis ssp. raddiana tree on wheat and barley yield in the south of Tunisia

    Noumi, Zouhaier; Abdallah, Fathia; Torre, Franck; Michalet, Richard; Touzard, Blaise; Chaieb, Mohamed

    2011-03-01

    In the past, Acacia tortilis ssp. raddiana (Savi) Brenan colonised thousands of hectares in central and southern Tunisia. Nowadays, the geographical distribution of A. tortilis ssp. raddiana is restricted to the National Park of Bou-Hedma (central Tunisia). The Acacia is of considerable interest for local populations and may be considered as a "foundation species" under arid climate. This study examines the effects of Acacia canopy on soil fertility and cereal productivity. The improvement in soil fertility and microclimate provided by A. tortilis ssp. raddiana is known to facilitate the establishment of new species, but little is known about the interaction between the tree species and the cereals cultivated by local farmers. We studied the effect of A. tortilis ssp. raddiana canopy on the yield of three cereals crops ( Hordeum vulgare L., Triticum sativum L. and Triticum aestivum L.). We seeded 168 plots (15 × 15 m) under the tree canopy and in open areas on four different landform types (glacis, plain, wadis, and jessours) and measured cereal yield over two contrasting years (wet and dry). We found that: (1) precipitation and geomorphology are more important in determining cereal yield than canopy cover, (2) these effects on water availability are species-specific with no effect on the stress-tolerant barley. We finally discuss the potential negative effects of Acacia trees which may have balanced the positive effects found for nutrient in our study.

  11. 77 FR 11531 - Electric Quarterly Reports, Acacia Energy, Inc., et al.; Notice of Revocation of Market-Based...

    2012-02-27

    .... 2001, 67 FR 31,043, FERC Stats. & Regs. ] 31,127, reh'g denied, Order No. 2001-A, 100 FERC ] 61,074... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Electric Quarterly Reports, Acacia Energy, Inc., et al.; Notice of Revocation of Market-Based Rate Tariff Electric Quarterly Reports....... Docket No. ER02-2001-017...

  12. Short- and longterm impacts of Acacia longifolia invasion on belowground processes of a Mediterranean coastal dune ecosystem

    Marchante, Elizabete; Kjøller, Annelise; Struwe, Sten; Freitas, Helena

    2008-01-01

    Many coastal dune ecosystems in Portugal are invaded by the leguminous tree Acacia longifolia (Andrews) Willd. This exotic species was first introduced over one hundred years ago in an effort to mitigate dune erosion and loss of coastal landscapes. However, since then A. longifolia has spread to...

  13. A flavanone: 6, 7-dihydroxy-3, 5-dimethy I-4, methoxyflavone from the pods of acacia nilotica var astringens (sunt)

    A flavanone 6,7-dihydroxy-3, 5-dimethyl-4-methoxyflavone was isolated from the alcoholic extractives of the pods of acacia nilotica var astringens and structure was deduced on the basis of its IR, UV, NMR and mass spectra.(Author)

  14. Lipoproteínas: metabolismo y lipoproteínas aterogénicas

    Carlos Carvajal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Los lípidos viajan en sangre en diferentes partículas conteniendo lípidos y proteínas llamadas lipoproteínas. Hay cuatro clases de lipoproteínas en sangre: quilomicrones, VLDL, LDL y HDL. Los quilomicrones transportan triglicéridos (TAG a tejidos vitales (corazón, musculo esquelético y tejido adiposo. El hígado secreta VLDL que redistribuye TAG al tejido adiposo, corazón y músculo esquelético. LDL transporta colesterol hacia las células y HDL remueve colesterol de las células de vuelta al hígado. Las lipoproteínas ricas en TAG y sus remanentes son aterogénicas y están asociadas con otros factores lipídicos de riesgo (partículas de LDL pequeñas y densas y bajo HDL. LDL y Lp(a son partículas aterogénicas. HDL es una lipoproteína anti-aterogénica.

  15. Effect of Sugar, Urea, and Molasses and the Influence of Radiation on the Plasticization of Acacia catechu Extract Incorporated Starch/Poly-(Vinyl Alcohol) Based Film

    Marufa Naznin; Md. Zainul Abedin

    2013-01-01

    Acacia catechu extract was incorporated in the starch/PVA (60% : 40%) based films (0% to 15%) to the total weight of starch/PVA based film. The tensile strength (TS) of the starch/PVA blend film was 24 MPa whereas the acacia incorporated film shows the highest tensile strength (TS) of 33.8 MPa at 0.5%. Again, 0.5% acacia based film was treated with 10% urea, sugar, and molasses separately both at nonirradiated and irradiated conditions. At the nonirradiated condition molasses incorporated fil...

  16. Desrama, crescimento e predisposição à podridão-do-lenho em Acacia mangium Pruning on growth and heartrot predisposing in Acacia mangium

    Helio Tonini

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A desrama é um procedimento que aumenta o valor e a qualidade da madeira. Entretanto, se realizada de forma inadequada pode reduzir o crescimento e constituir fator de predisposição à podridão-do-lenho. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar o efeito da intensidade e época da desrama sobre o crescimento inicial e incidência de árvores com ferimentos não cicatrizados de Acacia mangium. Foi instalado um experimento em delineamento de blocos ao acaso, com três repetições e cinco tratamentos: testemunha (sem desrama; desrama de troncos múltiplos e galhos a 50 e 70% da altura, em época de baixa e alta pluviosidade. As avaliações de crescimento e presença de ferimentos não cicatrizados foram feitas seis meses depois da aplicação dos tratamentos. A época e a intensidade de desrama, quando efetuadas aos 8 e 13 meses, não afetaram o crescimento em diâmetro e altura. Houve boa cicatrização de ferimentos em árvores desramadas oito meses depois do plantio, em época de baixa pluviosidade, independentemente da intensidade. Árvores desramadas aos 13 meses depois do plantio, em época de alta pluviosidade, demonstraram predisposição à podridão-do-lenho.Pruning increases quality and economic value of the wood. Inadequate pruning procedures, however, interfere negatively on growth and consist on a predisposing factor to heartrot. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of intensity and season of pruning on initial growth and on incidence of Acacia mangium trees with non-occluded wounds. The experimental design was in randomized blocks with three replicates and five treatments: control (without pruning; pruning and singling at 50 and 70% of total height, in low and high precipitation season. Growth evaluations and the presence of non-occluded wounds were performed six months after treatments application. The season and intensity of pruning operations did not influence height and diameter growth. Efficient wound

  17. The monopurpose operating system FreeNAS and its usage

    NAVRÁTIL, Václav

    2009-01-01

    This work has examined features of the commonly available NAS operating systems based on kernels of FreeBSD, Linux, and OpenSolaris. Described in the theoretical part of the work is a detailed explanation of today's' current situation, along with basic information regarding these NAS systems that are being tested. The practical part discusses varying methods and the processes of testing NAS systems, when installed on an experimental machine. Testing is divided into three areas. The first one ...

  18. A New Scheme of Integrating NAS with SAN

    王志恒; 白英彩

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviewed two types of network storage technique: NAS and SAN. After comparing and ana-lyzing, it concluded that the ultimate realization of network storage will be in the eventual convergence of NAS andSAN architectures. Currently, all the integration methods are based on the architecture level. This paper present-ed a device-level integration scheme based on IXP1200 network processor. The device can be used as an NAS fileserver or an SAN's storage node. Furthermore, it can be used as a bridge to connect NAS and SAN, and then beshared by their clients.

  19. Entomofauna Associada a Galhos de Acacia mangium Willd. Roletados por Oncideres saga (Dalman (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae

    Gláucia Cordeiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O estudo da entomofauna associada aos galhos e fustes roletados por Oncideres saga (Dalman é importante para conhecermos seus possíveis inimigos naturais. Portanto, este trabalho teve como objetivo registrar os insetos associados aos galhos e fustes de Acacia mangium Willd. roletados por O. saga, em Coimbra-MG. Galhos e fustes roletados de A. mangium foram coletados de janeiro a abril de 2007. Este material foi vistoriado, armazenados em sacolas, feitas com tela plástica, e mantidos em sala com condições controladas (25,4±0,3°C e 66,7±1,4%. Constatou-se a presença de uma espécie, não determinada, de Scolytidae e a emergência de quatro espécies de Cerambycidae: Engyum quadrinotatum Thomsom; Eburodacrys sexmaculata (Olivier; Achryson surinamum (Linnaeus e Neoclytus pusillus (Laporte & Gory. Isto posto, fica evidenciada a necessidade de estudos com o objetivo de verificar qual o comportamento destes insetos em relação ao serrador O. saga.Insects associated with branches of Acacia mangium Willd. girdled by Oncideres saga (Dalman (Coleoptera: CerambycidaeAbstract. The study of the insects associated with branches and stems girdled by Oncideres saga (Dalman is important to know its possible natural enemies. Therefore, these work had the objective of register the insects associated with branches and stems girdled of Acacia mangium Willd. by this twig girdler beetle, in Coimbra, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Stems and branches of A. mangium were collected in January/2007 to April/2007. This material has been inspected, stored in plastic bags, and kept in a room with controlled conditions (25.4 ± 0.3°C and 66.7 ± 1.4%. It was noted the presence of a non-determined species of Scolytidae and the emergence of four species of Cerambycidae: Engyum quadrinotatum Thomsom; Eburodacrys sexmaculata (Olivier; Achryson surinamum (Linnaeus and Neoclytus pusillus (Laporte & Gory. It can be concluded that studies are needed with the objective of

  20. Influence of Acacia trees on soil nutrient levels in arid lands

    De Boever, Maarten; Gabriels, Donald; Ouessar, Mohamed; Cornelis, Wim

    2014-05-01

    The potential of scattered trees as keystone structures in restoring degraded environments is gaining importance. Scattered trees have strong influence on their abiotic environment, mainly causing changes in microclimate, water budget and soil properties. They often function as 'nursing trees', facilitating the recruitment of other plants. Acacia raddiana is such a keystone species which persists on the edge of the Sahara desert. The study was conducted in a forest-steppe ecosystem in central Tunisia where several reforestation campaigns with Acacia took place. To indentify the impact of those trees on soil nutrients, changes in nutrient levels under scattered trees of three age stages were examined for the upper soil layer (0-10 cm) at five microsites with increasing distance from the trunk. In addition, changes in soil nutrient levels with depth underneath and outside the canopy were determined for the 0-30 cm soil layer. Higher concentrations of organic matter (OM) were found along the gradient from underneath to outside the canopy for large trees compared to medium and small trees, especially at microsites close to the trunk. Levels of soluble K, electrical conductivity (EC), available P, OM, total C and N decreased whereas pH and levels of soluble Mg increased with increasing distance from tree. Levels of soluble Ca and Na remained unchanged along the gradient. At the microsite closest to the trunk a significant decrease in levels of soluble K, EC, OM, available P, total C and N, while a significant increase in pH was found with increasing depth. The concentration of other nutrients remained unchanged or declined not differently underneath compared to outside the canopy with increasing depth. Differences in nutrient levels were largely driven by greater inputs of organic matter under trees. Hence, Acacia trees can affect the productivity and reproduction of understory species with the latter in term an important source of organic matter. This positive feedback

  1. Ritmas. Judesys. Kalba. Kūnas

    Bekerytė, Živilė

    2011-01-01

    Darbe aptariamas vienas iš universaliausių reiškinių – ritmas, pabrėžiant, jog jis pasirodo kūniškoje tikrovėje per judesį ir kitimą. Kūnas yra ne tik ritmo suvokimo tarpininkas, bet ir pats savyje turi tą pulsuojantį ir judantį ritmą, kuris jam įkvepia gyvybę. Per kūno gyvybę ritmas atsiskleidžia muzikos ir kalbos išraiškoje. Šiose išraiškose svarbiausia yra pasaulio reikšmių įtaigus ir emocionalus perdavimas garsu ir gestu arba dar tiksliau balsu ir kūno judesiu. Poezija, turėdama ritmingą ...

  2. Revegetação de cava de extração de argila com Acacia mangium: I - atributos químicos do solo, ácidos fúlvicos e húmicos Revegetation of clay extraction sites with Acacia mangium: I - soil chemical attributes and fulvic and humic acids

    Jolimar Antonio Schiavo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar alterações nos atributos químicos do solo e dos ácidos húmicos e fúlvicos extraídos de cava de extração de argila com vegetação espontânea de gramínea [Brachiaria mutica (Forsk. Stapf] e revegetada de Acacia mangium Willd. Foram coletadas amostras de solo nas profundidades de 0-10, 10-20 e 20-30 cm. Na cobertura com A. mangium em relação a B. mutica, observaram-se acréscimos no estoque de carbono de 33 e 80 %, respectivamente nas profundidades de 0-10 e 20-30 cm. O menor estoque de C ocorreu na fração ácidos fúlvicos livres (AFL. Na cobertura com A. mangium foi observado aumento no grau de humificação da matéria orgânica, que variou de 38 a 280 % na fração ácidos fúlvicos (AF e de 26 a 217 % nos ácidos húmicos (AH, dependendo da profundidade do solo. A acidez total, tanto da fração AF como dos AH, foi elevada, variando na faixa de 810 a 920 cmol c kg-1. No entanto, em torno de 67 % da capacidade de troca de H+ deveu-se a grupos OH- fenólicos, caracterizados como grupamentos ácidos mais fracos. Os valores observados para a relação E4/E6 ficaram dentro da faixa normalmente encontrada para AF (entre 8,2 e 10,5 e AH (entre 1,3 e 3,9. Os AH isolados da cava com cobertura de A. mangium apresentaram valores mais elevados da relação E4/E6, sugerindo a presença de fração humificada menos condensada e de menor massa molecular.The objective of this study was to evaluate alterations in the soil chemical attributes and in humic and fulvic acids at a clay extraction site with spontaneous grass vegetation [Brachiaria mutica (Forsk. Stapf] and aforested with Acacia mangium Willd. Soil samples were collected at 0-10, 20-20 and 20-30 cm depths. A 33 % and 80 % increase in carbon stocks was observed under A. mangium as compared to the B. mutica cover at the 0-10 cm and 20-30 cm soil depths, respectively. The lowest carbon stock was observed in the free fulvic acids (FFA

  3. Deposição e decomposição da serapilheira em povoamentos de Mimosa caesalpiniifolia, Acacia mangium e Acacia holosericea com quatro anos de idade em planossolo

    A. G. Andrade

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Algumas espécies de leguminosas arbóreas, associadas a bactérias fixadoras de nitrogênio e a fungos micorrízicos, têm apresentado bom desenvolvimento em solos degradados. Visando avaliar a influência dessas espécies na recuperação da fertilidade do solo, mediu-se a quantidade de matéria seca e nutrientes no material formador da serapilheira, durante o ano de 1995, e na serapilheira acumulada na superfície do solo, em 1995 e 1996, e estimou-se sua velocidade de decomposição. Estudaram-se povoamentos homogêneos de Mimosa caesalpiniifolia (sabiá, Acacia mangium e Acacia holosericea, em espaçamento de 4 m²/planta, em Planossolo, no campo experimental da Embrapa Agrobiologia, município de Seropédica (RJ (22°49' S e 43°38' W, com altitude variando entre 18 e 33 m. A deposição média anual de material formador da serapilheira foi de 10 Mg ha-1, para o sabiá, e de 9 Mg ha-1, para as Acacias Em média, as folhas corresponderam a 64% do material formador da serapilheira produzido pelo sabiá e pela Acacia holosericea e 70% para Acacia mangium A parte mais rica em nutrientes do material formador da serapilheira foram as estruturas reprodutivas. A Acacia Mangium foi a espécie de maior capacidade de retranslocação interna de nutrientes, produzindo a serapilheira mais pobre em nutrientes e de menor velocidade de decomposição. A serapilheira produzida pelo sabiá foi a mais rica em nutrientes, com menor tempo de residência. As diferentes velocidades de decomposição da serapilheira dessas espécies podem ser utilizadas como estratégia para complementar necessidades nutricionais de culturas econômicas em sistemas agroflorestais e, ou, para auxiliar na recuperação de solos degradados.

  4. Effects of chopping, and soaking in water, hydrochloric acidic and calcium hydroxide solutions on the nutritional value of Acacia villosa for goats

    Wina, E. [Research Institute for Animal Production, Bogor (Indonesia)]. E-mail: winabudi@yahoo.com; Tangendjaja, B.; Susana, I.W.R. [Research Institute for Animal Production, Bogor (Indonesia)

    2005-08-19

    Acacia villosa, a thornless shrub legume, has potential as a feed supplement for ruminants if anti-nutritional factors, especially tannins, can be overcome. The effects of chopping and soaking the leaves on the amounts of tannin in the extracting solution and that left in the recovered leaves were studied. The tannin and non-tannin phenolics were solubilized in the extracting solution and the amount was increased with the soaking time. Soaking in calcium hydroxide solution, hydrochloric acid or water removed 41-76% of tannin and total phenolics removed from the recovered leaves. Soaking of the leaves also removed fermentable materials and reduced the gas production. In the first of two digestibility experiments, three groups of goats received one of these diets, those were: (1) sugar cane tops: unsoaked Acacia leaves (7:3), (2) sugar cane tops: water soaked Acacia leaves (7:3) and (3) sugar cane tops: water soaked Acacia leaves (7:3) + 100 g/day of cassava flour. Live weight of goats was measured every 2 weeks and a large increase in average daily gain was obtained for goats fed diet containing water soaked leaves and cassava flour (71 g/day) compared to those fed diet containing unsoaked leaves and water soaked leaves (38.9 and 44.7 g/day, respectively) (P < 0.05). In the second digestibility experiment, the three diets were: (1) sugar cane tops: unsoaked Acacia (7:3), (2) sugar cane tops water soaked Acacia (7:3), (3) sugar cane tops: calcium hydroxide soaked Acacia (7:3). A supplement of 100 g/day of cassava flour was added to each of these three diets. In both digestibility experiments, soaking improved intake and digestibility of Acacia leaves, and cassava flour increased the intake, but when all the diets contained cassava flour, there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) found in intake or digestibility between unsoaked and soaked leaves. In conclusion, soaking reduced tannin in Acacia leaves, improved digestibility and intake of Acacia leaves. In the

  5. Alterações morfofisiológicas em folhas de Coffea arabica L. cv. "Oeiras" sob influência do sombreamento por Acacia mangium Willd Morphophysiological alterations in leaves of Coffea arabica L. cv. 'Oeiras' shaded by Acacia mangium Willd

    Inês Angélica Cordeiro Gomes

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Diferenças na disponibilidade de radiação podem causar modificações na estrutura e função das folhas do cafeeiro, que podem responder de maneira diferencial à radiação por alterações morfológicas, anatômicas, de crescimento e na taxa fotossintética. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar características morfofisiológicas de cafeeiros (Coffea arabica L. cv. "Oeiras" sombreados por acácia (Acacia mangium Willd. na época seca e chuvosa no sul de Minas Gerais. As maiores taxas fotossintéticas e maiores espessuras da epiderme adaxial foram observadas na estação chuvosa nas linhas de cafeeiros a pleno sol. O sombreamento influenciou em menor espessura das folhas e em espaços intercelulares maiores no tecido esponjoso. Foi também verificada mudança na forma dos cloroplastos, os quais apresentaram-se mais alongados em folhas de cafeeiros a pleno sol quando relacionados aos arborizados.Light availability is one of the most important environmental factors affecting leaf structure and functions in coffee plants that can respond differently to radiation by changes in leaf anatomy, morphology, growth and photosynthetic rate. The objective of this research was evaluate some morphophysiological aspects in leaves of coffee (Coffea arabica L. cv. 'Oeiras' cropped under shelter trees in the south of Minas Gerais during the rainy and dry season. The shade caused lower leaves thickness and higher intercellular spaces in spongious tissue. There was also verified a change in chloroplast shape, which showed more elongated in coffee tree kept at full sunlight in relation to that ones maintained on shading.

  6. The leaching of eucalyptus hybrids and Acacia auriculiformis leaf litter : laboratory experiments on early decomposition and ecological implications in Congolese tree plantations

    Bernhard Reversat, France

    1999-01-01

    The first stage of leaf litter decomposition of two eucalyptus hybrids and #Acacia auriculiformis$ was studied in laboratory experiments where the decaying leaves were leached with water. Although the litter of both the species were characterized by a high content of soluble compounds, little soluble organic matter of acacia litter was recovered in litter leachates. By contrast, soluble organic matter of eucalyptus litter was more resistant to degradation and was, therefore, recovered in leac...

  7. Isolasi dan Karakterisasi Fungi Endofit Pada Akar tanaman Akasia (Acacia sp) di PT Sumatera Riang Lestari Sei Kebaro Labuhan Batu Selatan Sumatera Utara

    Siadari, Menak Hotnauli

    2010-01-01

    Endophytic fungi are microorganisms associated with plant tissues that are profitable, this endophytic fungi can improve plant growth while the plants provide a food source for endophytic. The purpose of this study is to determine and characterize the types of endophytic fungi found on acacia roots both macroscopic and microscopic. Sample was taken from healthy roots of acacia plants 10 and 6 years old. Isolation and characterization conducted laboratory Forest Faculty of Agriculture Universi...

  8. Contraste en la eficiencia defensiva de dos especies de hormigas del género Pseudomyrmex sobre plantas de Acacia cornigera (Parte III)

    Sánchez Galván, Ingrid R.; López Acosta, Juan Carlos; Rico-Gray, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    One of the most emblematic mutualistic interactions in the Neotropics is that between Acacia plants and Pseudomyrmex ants. In his first studies, D. H. JANZEN (1969) related the functional defensive system by the ants to allelopathic chemical agents, thus this system can be associated to induced defensive systems. Our study system, the interaction between Acacia cornigera and two Pseudomyrmex species (P. gracilis and P. ferrugineus), includes ant colonization patterns and plant behavior after ...

  9. Litter-forager termite mounds enhance the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between Acacia holosericea A. Cunn. Ex G. Don and Scleroderma dictyosporum isolates

    Duponnois, Robin; Assigbetse, Komi; Ramanankierana, H.; Kisa, Marija; Thioulouse, J.; Lepage, Michel

    2006-01-01

    The hypothesis of the present study was that the termite mounds of Macrotermes subhyalinus (MS) (a litter-forager termite) were inhabited by a specific microflora that could enhance with the ectomycorrhizal fungal development. We tested the effect of this feeding group mound material on (i) the ectomycorrhization symbiosis between Acacia holosericea (an Australian Acacia introduced in the sahelian areas) and two ectomycorrhizal fungal isolates of Scleroderma dictyosporum (IR408 and IR412) in ...

  10. Effects of hydric stress on the biological nitrogen fixation in acacia cyanophylla lindl

    Water stress was applied to the plant after a convenient watering relatively long period. the following suspension imposed brutally severe conditions. After the second day following the installation of water stress, the apparent signs of disruption of the physiological processes (leaf water potential, plant growth and nitrogen uptake) begin to appear. It is necessary to note that the experimentation was carried out on seedlings, in conditions completely different from those in natural conditions. The obtained results show that water stress induced a considerable viable nodule rate decrease. the symbiotic nitrogen fixation, as estimated by isotopic N dilution showed that the symbiotic fixation of Nitrogen 2 by acacia cyanophylla is strongly reduced as of the third day of water stress installation. It has been showed that the symbiotically fixed nitrogen remains for the most part confined in the roots (author)